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Sample records for 3d cell migration

  1. Quantifying modes of 3D cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Meghan K.; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-01-01

    Although it is widely appreciated that cells migrate in a variety of diverse environments in vivo, we are only now beginning to use experimental workflows that yield images with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution to study the molecular processes governing cell migration in 3D environments. Since cell migration is a dynamic process, it is usually studied via microscopy, but 3D movies of 3D processes are difficult to interpret by visual inspection. In this review, we discuss the technologies required to study the diversity of 3D cell migration modes with a focus on the visualization and computational analysis tools needed to study cell migration quantitatively at a level comparable to the analyses performed today on cells crawling on flat substrates. PMID:26603943

  2. Quantifying Modes of 3D Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Meghan K; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-12-01

    Although it is widely appreciated that cells migrate in a variety of diverse environments in vivo, we are only now beginning to use experimental workflows that yield images with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution to study the molecular processes governing cell migration in 3D environments. Since cell migration is a dynamic process, it is usually studied via microscopy, but 3D movies of 3D processes are difficult to interpret by visual inspection. In this review, we discuss the technologies required to study the diversity of 3D cell migration modes with a focus on the visualization and computational analysis tools needed to study cell migration quantitatively at a level comparable to the analyses performed today on cells crawling on flat substrates.

  3. Myosin IIA dependent retrograde flow drives 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wenting; Yamada, Soichiro

    2010-04-21

    Epithelial cell migration is an essential part of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration, yet their migration is least understood. Using our three-dimensional (3D) motility analysis, migrating epithelial cells formed an atypical polarized cell shape with the nucleus leading the cell front and a contractile cell rear. Migrating epithelial cells exerted traction forces to deform both the anterior and posterior extracellular matrix toward the cell body. The cell leading edge exhibited a myosin II-dependent retrograde flow with the magnitude and direction consistent with surrounding network deformation. Interestingly, on a two-dimensional substrate, myosin IIA-deficient cells migrated faster than wild-type cells, but in a 3D gel, these myosin IIA-deficient cells were unpolarized and immobile. In contrast, the migration rates of myosin IIB-deficient cells were similar to wild-type cells. Therefore, myosin IIA, not myosin IIB, is required for 3D epithelial cell migration.

  4. Modeling cell migration in 3D: Status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, Rajagopal; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2008-01-01

    Cell migration is a multi-scale process that integrates signaling, mechanics and biochemical reaction kinetics. Various mathematical models accurately predict cell migration on 2D surfaces, but are unable to capture the complexities of 3D migration. Additionally, quantitative 3D cell migration models have been few and far between. In this review we look and characterize various mathematical models available in literature to predict cell migration in 3D matrices and analyze their strengths and possible changes to these models that could improve their predictive capabilities.

  5. 3D printing of biomimetic microstructures for cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tina Qing; Qu, Xin; Liu, Justin; Chen, Shaochen

    2014-02-01

    To understand the physical behavior and migration of cancer cells, a 3D in vitro micro-chip in hydrogel was created using 3D projection printing. The micro-chip has a honeycomb branched structure, aiming to mimic 3D vascular morphology to test, monitor, and analyze differences in the behavior of cancer cells (i.e. HeLa) vs. non-cancerous cell lines (i.e. 10 T1/2). The 3D Projection Printing system can fabricate complex structures in seconds from user-created designs. The fabricated microstructures have three different channel widths of 25, 45, and 120 microns wide to reflect a range of blood vessel diameters. HeLa and 10 T1/2 cells seeded within the micro-chip were then analyzed for morphology and cell migration speed. 10 T1/2 cells exhibited greater changes in morphology due to channel size width than HeLa cells; however, channel width had a limited effect on 10 T1/2 cell migration while HeLa cancer cell migration increased as channel width decreased. This physiologically relevant 3D cancer tissue model has the potential to be a powerful tool for future drug discoveries and cancer migration studies.

  6. 3D printing of biomimetic microstructures for cancer cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tina Qing; Qu, Xin; Liu, Justin; Chen, Shaochen

    2013-01-01

    To understand the physical behavior and migration of cancer cells, a 3D in vitro micro-chip in hydrogel was created using 3D projection printing. The micro-chip has a honeycomb branched structure, aiming to mimic 3D vascular morphology to test, monitor, and analyze differences in the behavior of cancer cells (i.e. HeLa) vs. non-cancerous cell lines (i.e. 10T1/2). The 3D Projection Printing system can fabricate complex structures in seconds from user-created designs. The fabricated microstructures have three different channel widths of 25, 45, and 120 microns wide to reflect a range of blood vessel diameters. HeLa and 10T1/2 cells seeded within the micro-chip were then analyzed for morphology and cell migration speed. 10T1/2 cells exhibited greater changes in morphology due to channel size width than HeLa cells; however, channel width had a limited effect on 10T1/2 cell migration while HeLa cancer cell migration increased as channel width decreased. This physiologically relevant 3D cancer tissue model has the potential to be a powerful tool for future drug discoveries and cancer migration studies PMID:24150602

  7. 3D cancer cell migration in a confined matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alobaidi, Amani; Sun, Bo

    Cancer cell migration is widely studied in 2D motion, which does not mimic the invasion processes in vivo. More recently, 3D cell migration studies have been performed. The ability of cancer cells to migrate within the extracellular matrix depends on the physical and biochemical features of the extracellular matrix. We present a model of cell motility in confined matrix geometry. The aim of the study is to study cancer migration in collagen matrix, as a soft tissue, to investigate their motility within the confined and surrounding collagen environment. Different collagen concentrations have been used to show the ability of these cancer cells to move through such a complex structure by measuring Cancer cell migration velocity as well as the displacement. Graduate student physics department.

  8. Cell proliferation and migration in silk fibroin 3D scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Biman B; Kundu, Subhas C

    2009-05-01

    Pore architecture in 3D polymeric scaffolds is known to play a critical role in tissue engineering as it provides the vital framework for the seeded cells to organize into a functioning tissue. In this report, we investigated the effects of different freezing temperature regimes on silk fibroin protein 3D scaffold pore microstructure. The fabricated scaffolds using freeze-dry technique were used as a 3D model to monitor cell proliferation and migration. Pores of 200-250microm diameter were formed by slow cooling at temperatures of -20 and -80 degrees C but were found to be limited in porosity and pore interconnectivity as observed through scanning electron microscopic images. In contrast, highly interconnected pores with 96% porosity were observed when silk solutions were rapidly frozen at -196 degrees C. A detailed study was conducted to assess the affect of pore size, porosity and interconnectivity on human dermal fibroblast cell proliferation and migration on these 3D scaffolds using confocal microscopy. The cells were observed to migrate within the scaffold interconnectivities and were found to reach scaffold periphery within 28 days of culture. Confocal images further confirmed normal cell attachment and alignment of actin filaments within the porous scaffold matrix with well-developed nuclei. This study indicates rapid freeze-drying technique as an alternative method to fabricate highly interconnected porous scaffolds for developing functional 3D silk fibroin matrices for potential tissue engineering, biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  9. Protrusive waves guide 3D cell migration along nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Guetta-Terrier, Charlotte; Monzo, Pascale; Zhu, Jie; Long, Hongyan; Venkatraman, Lakshmi; Zhou, Yue; Wang, PeiPei; Chew, Sing Yian; Mogilner, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In vivo, cells migrate on complex three-dimensional (3D) fibrous matrices, which has made investigation of the key molecular and physical mechanisms that drive cell migration difficult. Using reductionist approaches based on 3D electrospun fibers, we report for various cell types that single-cell migration along fibronectin-coated nanofibers is associated with lateral actin-based waves. These cyclical waves have a fin-like shape and propagate up to several hundred micrometers from the cell body, extending the leading edge and promoting highly persistent directional movement. Cells generate these waves through balanced activation of the Rac1/N-WASP/Arp2/3 and Rho/formins pathways. The waves originate from one major adhesion site at leading end of the cell body, which is linked through actomyosin contractility to another site at the back of the cell, allowing force generation, matrix deformation and cell translocation. By combining experimental and modeling data, we demonstrate that cell migration in a fibrous environment requires the formation and propagation of dynamic, actin based fin-like protrusions. PMID:26553933

  10. Protrusive waves guide 3D cell migration along nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Guetta-Terrier, Charlotte; Monzo, Pascale; Zhu, Jie; Long, Hongyan; Venkatraman, Lakshmi; Zhou, Yue; Wang, PeiPei; Chew, Sing Yian; Mogilner, Alexander; Ladoux, Benoit; Gauthier, Nils C

    2015-11-09

    In vivo, cells migrate on complex three-dimensional (3D) fibrous matrices, which has made investigation of the key molecular and physical mechanisms that drive cell migration difficult. Using reductionist approaches based on 3D electrospun fibers, we report for various cell types that single-cell migration along fibronectin-coated nanofibers is associated with lateral actin-based waves. These cyclical waves have a fin-like shape and propagate up to several hundred micrometers from the cell body, extending the leading edge and promoting highly persistent directional movement. Cells generate these waves through balanced activation of the Rac1/N-WASP/Arp2/3 and Rho/formins pathways. The waves originate from one major adhesion site at leading end of the cell body, which is linked through actomyosin contractility to another site at the back of the cell, allowing force generation, matrix deformation and cell translocation. By combining experimental and modeling data, we demonstrate that cell migration in a fibrous environment requires the formation and propagation of dynamic, actin based fin-like protrusions.

  11. Controlled architectural and chemotactic studies of 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Tayalia, Prakriti; Mazur, Eric; Mooney, David J

    2011-04-01

    Chemotaxis plays a critical role in tissue development and wound repair, and is widely studied using ex vivo model systems in applications such as immunotherapy. However, typical chemotactic models employ 2D systems that are less physiologically relevant or use end-point assays, that reveal little about the stepwise dynamics of the migration process. To overcome these limitations, we developed a new model system using microfabrication techniques, sustained drug delivery approaches, and theoretical modeling of chemotactic agent diffusion. This model system allows us to study the effects of 3D architecture and chemotactic agent gradient on immune cell migration in real time. We find that dendritic cell migration is characterized by a strong interplay between matrix architecture and chemotactic gradients, and migration is also influenced dramatically by the cell activation state. Our results indicate that Lipopolysaccharide-activated dendritic cells studied in a traditional transwell system actually exhibit anomalous migration behavior. Such a 3D ex vivo system lends itself for analyzing cell migratory behavior in response to single or multiple competitive cues and could prove useful in vaccine development.

  12. Vinculin Regulates Directionality and Cell Polarity in 2D, 3D Matrix and 3D Microtrack Migration.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Aniqua; Carey, Shawn P; Kraning-Rush, Casey M; Goldblatt, Zachary E; Bordeleau, Francois; Lampi, Marsha C; Lin, Deanna Y; García, Andrés J; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2016-03-09

    During metastasis, cells can use proteolytic activity to form tube-like "microtracks" within the extracellular matrix (ECM). Using these microtracks, cells can migrate unimpeded through the stroma. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of microtrack migration, we developed an in vitro 3D micromolded collagen platform. When in microtracks, cells tend to migrate unidirectionally. Since focal adhesions are the primary mechanism by which cells interact with the ECM, we examined the roles of several focal adhesion molecules in driving unidirectional motion. Vinculin knockdown results in the repeated reversal of migration direction compared with control cells. Tracking the position of the Golgi centroid relative to the position of the nucleus centroid reveals that vinculin knockdown disrupts cell polarity in microtracks. Vinculin also directs migration on 2D substrates and in 3D uniform collagen matrices, indicated by reduced speed, shorter net displacement and decreased directionality in vinculin-deficient cells. In addition, vinculin is necessary for Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) activation in 3D as vinculin knockdown results in reduced FAK activation in both 3D uniform collagen matrices and microtracks, but not on 2D substrates, and accordingly, FAK inhibition halts cell migration in 3D microtracks. Together, these data indicate that vinculin plays a key role in polarization during migration.

  13. Vinculin is required for cell polarization, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling in 3D collagen.

    PubMed

    Thievessen, Ingo; Fakhri, Nikta; Steinwachs, Julian; Kraus, Viola; McIsaac, R Scott; Gao, Liang; Chen, Bi-Chang; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Betzig, Eric; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Waterman, Clare M; Fabry, Ben

    2015-11-01

    Vinculin is filamentous (F)-actin-binding protein enriched in integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Whereas studies in 2-dimensional (2D) tissue culture models have suggested that vinculin negatively regulates cell migration by promoting cytoskeleton-ECM coupling to strengthen and stabilize adhesions, its role in regulating cell migration in more physiologic, 3-dimensional (3D) environments is unclear. To address the role of vinculin in 3D cell migration, we analyzed the morphodynamics, migration, and ECM remodeling of primary murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with cre/loxP-mediated vinculin gene disruption in 3D collagen I cultures. We found that vinculin promoted 3D cell migration by increasing directional persistence. Vinculin was necessary for persistent cell protrusion, cell elongation, and stable cell orientation in 3D collagen, but was dispensable for lamellipodia formation, suggesting that vinculin-mediated cell adhesion to the ECM is needed to convert actin-based cell protrusion into persistent cell shape change and migration. Consistent with this finding, vinculin was necessary for efficient traction force generation in 3D collagen without affecting myosin II activity and promoted 3D collagen fiber alignment and macroscopical gel contraction. Our results suggest that vinculin promotes directionally persistent cell migration and tension-dependent ECM remodeling in complex 3D environments by increasing cell-ECM adhesion and traction force generation.

  14. N-cadherin as a key regulator of collective cell migration in a 3D environment.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wenting; Yamada, Soichiro

    2012-01-01

    Cell migration is a critical step of normal developmental processes and disease progression. Often, migrating cells interact and maintain contact with neighboring cells. However, the precise roles of cell-cell adhesion in cell migration have thus far been poorly defined. Often in aggressive cancers, N-cadherin is prominently upregulated, yet, these highly motile cells have limited cell-cell adhesion when plated on a stiff 2D substrate. But, the same cells in a 3D matrix migrate as a multicellular cluster. This new observation suggests that N-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion supports cell interactions between migrating cells in a more physiologically relevant 3D matrix, but not on a 2D substrate. While N-cadherin is an integral part of neural synapses, the ectopic expression of N-cadherin in transformed epithelial cells plays an equally important part in initiating pro-migratory signaling, and providing strong yet flexible cell cohesion essential for persistent cell migration in a 3D matrix. The 3D cell migration analysis for studying cell-to-cell interactions exposes the roles of N-cadherin in multicellular migration, and reveals novel insights into cell migration-dependent normal and pathological processes.

  15. Nonpolarized signaling reveals two distinct modes of 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Ryan J; Gavara, Núria; Chadwick, Richard S; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2012-04-30

    We search in this paper for context-specific modes of three-dimensional (3D) cell migration using imaging for phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) and active Rac1 and Cdc42 in primary fibroblasts migrating within different 3D environments. In 3D collagen, PIP3 and active Rac1 and Cdc42 were targeted to the leading edge, consistent with lamellipodia-based migration. In contrast, elongated cells migrating inside dermal explants and the cell-derived matrix (CDM) formed blunt, cylindrical protrusions, termed lobopodia, and Rac1, Cdc42, and PIP3 signaling was nonpolarized. Reducing RhoA, Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), or myosin II activity switched the cells to lamellipodia-based 3D migration. These modes of 3D migration were regulated by matrix physical properties. Specifically, experimentally modifying the elasticity of the CDM or collagen gels established that nonlinear elasticity supported lamellipodia-based migration, whereas linear elasticity switched cells to lobopodia-based migration. Thus, the relative polarization of intracellular signaling identifies two distinct modes of 3D cell migration governed intrinsically by RhoA, ROCK, and myosin II and extrinsically by the elastic behavior of the 3D extracellular matrix.

  16. Quantitative 3D analysis of complex single border cell behaviors in coordinated collective cell migration.

    PubMed

    Cliffe, Adam; Doupé, David P; Sung, HsinHo; Lim, Isaac Kok Hwee; Ong, Kok Haur; Cheng, Li; Yu, Weimiao

    2017-04-04

    Understanding the mechanisms of collective cell migration is crucial for cancer metastasis, wound healing and many developmental processes. Imaging a migrating cluster in vivo is feasible, but the quantification of individual cell behaviours remains challenging. We have developed an image analysis toolkit, CCMToolKit, to quantify the Drosophila border cell system. In addition to chaotic motion, previous studies reported that the migrating cells are able to migrate in a highly coordinated pattern. We quantify the rotating and running migration modes in 3D while also observing a range of intermediate behaviours. Running mode is driven by cluster external protrusions. Rotating mode is associated with cluster internal cell extensions that could not be easily characterized. Although the cluster moves slower while rotating, individual cells retain their mobility and are in fact slightly more active than in running mode. We also show that individual cells may exchange positions during migration.

  17. Filopodia in cell adhesion, 3D migration and cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Jacquemet, Guillaume; Hamidi, Hellyeh; Ivaska, Johanna

    2015-10-01

    This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of the role filopodia and filopodia-like structures in cell adhesion and three dimensional (3D) cell migration both in vitro and in vivo. In particular, we focus on recent advances demonstrating that filopodia are involved in substrate tethering and environment sensing in vivo. We further discuss the emerging role of filopodia and filopodial proteins in tumor dissemination as mounting in vitro, in vivo and clinical evidence suggest that filopodia drive cancer cell invasion and highlight filopodia proteins as attractive therapeutic targets. Finally, we outline outstanding questions that remain to be addressed to elucidate the role of filopodia during 3D cell migration.

  18. A porous 3D cell culture micro device for cell migration study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liang; Zhou, Changchun; Lin, Biaoyang; Li, Wei

    2010-08-01

    Cell migration under chemoattractant is an important biological step in cancer metastasis that causes the spread of malignant tumor cells. Porous polymeric materials are widely used to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) environment for applications such as three dimensional (3D) cell culturing and tissue engineering. In this paper we report a novel 3D cell culture device based on porous polymeric material to study cancer migration. We fabricated a porous channel on a polymeric chip using a selective ultrasonic foaming method. We demonstrate that a chemical concentration gradient could be established through the porous channel due to the slow diffusion process. We show that significant cell migration could be observed through the porous channel within 1-2 weeks of cell culturing when metastatic M4A4-GFP breast cancer cells were induced by 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS).We also developed a mathematical model to evaluate the diffusivity and concentration gradient through the fabricated porous structure.

  19. Migration dynamics of breast cancer cells in a tunable 3D interstitial flow chamber.

    PubMed

    Haessler, Ulrike; Teo, Jeremy C M; Foretay, Didier; Renaud, Philippe; Swartz, Melody A

    2012-04-01

    The migration of cells such as leukocytes, tumor cells, and fibroblasts through 3D matrices is critical for regulating homeostasis and immunity and for driving pathogenesis. Interstitial flow through the extracellular matrix, which can substantially increase during inflammation and in the tumor microenvironment, can influence cell migration in multiple ways. Leukocytes and tumor cells are heterogeneous in their migration responses to flow, yet most 3D migration studies use endpoint measurements representing average characteristics. Here we present a robust new microfluidic device for 3D culture with live imaging under well-controlled flow conditions, along with a comparison of analytical methods for describing the migration behavior of heterogeneous cell populations. We then use the model to provide new insight on how interstitial flow affects MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell invasion, phenomena that are not seen from averaged or endpoint measurements. Specifically, we find that interstitial flow increases the percentage of cells that become migratory, and increases migrational speed in about 20% of the cells. It also increases the migrational persistence of a subpopulation (5-10% of cells) in the positive or negative flow direction. Cells that migrated upstream moved faster but with less directedness, whereas cells that migrated in the direction of flow moved at slower speeds but with higher directedness. These findings demonstrate how fluid flow in the tumor microenvironment can enhance tumor cell invasion by directing a subpopulation of tumor cells in the flow direction; i.e., towards the draining lymphatic vessels, a major route of metastasis.

  20. 3D inverted colloidal crystals in realistic cell migration assays for drug screening applications.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Joakim; Lautenschläger, Franziska; Kuo, Cheng-Hwa R; Guck, Jochen; Sivaniah, Easan

    2011-12-01

    Screening drugs for their specific impact on cell mechanics, in addition to targeting adhesion and proteolysis, will be important for successfully moderating migration in infiltrative disorders including cancer metastasis. We present 3D inverted colloidal crystals made of hydrogel as a realistic cell migration assay, where the geometry and stiffness can be set independently to mimic the tissue requirements in question. We show the utility of this 3D assay for drug screening purposes, specifically in contrast to conventional 2D migration studies, by surveying the effects of commonly used cytoskeletal toxins that impact cell mechanics. This assay allows studying large cell numbers for good statistics but at single-cell resolution.

  1. Role of dynamin in elongated cell migration in a 3D matrix.

    PubMed

    Lees, Justin G; Gorgani, Nick N; Ammit, Alaina J; McCluskey, Adam; Robinson, Phillip J; O'Neill, Geraldine M

    2015-03-01

    The use of 3-dimensional (3D) collagen gels has yielded new insights into the migratory behaviour of cancer cells. While the large GTPase dynamin has emerged as an important regulator of cancer cell migration and invasion under 2D conditions, its role in 3D migration is unclear. We have used a potent dynamin modulator, a bis-tyrphostin derivative, Ryngo® 1-23, to investigate the role of dynamin in 3D migration in 3 different cell lines. The compound specifically inhibits persistent, elongated 3D migration in U87MG and SMA-560 cells. Treated U87MG cells adopt a rounded morphology that is not due to apoptosis, loss of matrix metalloprotease activity or inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Given that Ryngo 1-23 is known to regulate dynamin oligomerisation and actin dynamics at the leading edge, we analysed actin filament distribution. Ryngo 1-23 induced a switch in actin filament organization in 3D cultures resulting in the generation of multiple short actin-rich microspikes. Correlated with the change in actin filament distribution, cells displayed reduced collagen gel contraction. Since acto-myosin force transmission to the extra-cellular matrix underpins persistent, elongated migration, our results suggest that Ryngo 1-23 modulates this process in 3D migration via dynamin-mediated regulation of acto-myosin force transmission to the extra-cellular matrix.

  2. Comparative mechanisms of cancer cell migration through 3D matrix and physiological microtracks.

    PubMed

    Carey, Shawn P; Rahman, Aniqua; Kraning-Rush, Casey M; Romero, Bethsabe; Somasegar, Sahana; Torre, Olivia M; Williams, Rebecca M; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2015-03-15

    Tumor cell invasion through the stromal extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key feature of cancer metastasis, and understanding the cellular mechanisms of invasive migration is critical to the development of effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Since cancer cell migration is highly adaptable to physiochemical properties of the ECM, it is critical to define these migration mechanisms in a context-specific manner. Although extensive work has characterized cancer cell migration in two- and three-dimensional (3D) matrix environments, the migration program employed by cells to move through native and cell-derived microtracks within the stromal ECM remains unclear. We previously reported the development of an in vitro model of patterned type I collagen microtracks that enable matrix metalloproteinase-independent microtrack migration. Here we show that collagen microtracks closely resemble channel-like gaps in native mammary stroma ECM and examine the extracellular and intracellular mechanisms underlying microtrack migration. Cell-matrix mechanocoupling, while critical for migration through 3D matrix, is not necessary for microtrack migration. Instead, cytoskeletal dynamics, including actin polymerization, cortical tension, and microtubule turnover, enable persistent, polarized migration through physiological microtracks. These results indicate that tumor cells employ context-specific mechanisms to migrate and suggest that selective targeting of cytoskeletal dynamics, but not adhesion, proteolysis, or cell traction forces, may effectively inhibit cancer cell migration through preformed matrix microtracks within the tumor stroma.

  3. A novel 3D integrated platform for the high-resolution study of cell migration plasticity.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Julian; Bachmann, Tobias; Franco, Davide; Richner, Patrizia; Galliker, Patrick; Tiwari, Manish K; Ferrari, Aldo; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2013-08-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of interstitial cancer migration is of great scientific and medical interest. Creating 3D platforms, conducive to optical microscopy and mimicking the physical parameters (in plane and out of plane) involved in interstitial migration, is a major step forward in this direction. Here, a novel approach is used to directly print free-form, 3D micropores on basal scaffolds containing microgratings optimized for contact guidance. The platforms so formed are validated by monitoring cancer cell migration and micropore penetration with high-resolution optical microscopy. The shapes, sizes and deformability of the micropores are controllable, paving the way to decipher their role in interstitial migration.

  4. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils. PMID:26548801

  5. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Andrew D; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2015-11-09

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  6. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-11-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  7. Statistical analysis of cell migration in 3D using the anisotropic persistent random walk model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei-Hsun; Giri, Anjil; Wirtz, Denis

    2015-03-01

    Cell migration through 3D extracellular matrices (ECMs) is crucial to the normal development of tissues and organs and in disease processes, yet adequate analytical tools to characterize 3D migration are lacking. The motility of eukaryotic cells on 2D substrates in the absence of gradients has long been described using persistent random walks (PRWs). Recent work shows that 3D migration is anisotropic and features an exponential mean cell velocity distribution, rendering the PRW model invalid. Here we present a protocol for the analysis of 3D cell motility using the anisotropic PRW model. The software, which is implemented in MATLAB, enables statistical profiling of experimentally observed 2D and 3D cell trajectories, and it extracts the persistence and speed of cells along primary and nonprimary directions and an anisotropic index of migration. Basic computer skills and experience with MATLAB software are recommended for successful use of the protocol. This protocol is highly automated and fast, taking <30 min to analyze trajectory data per biological condition.

  8. Activating the nuclear piston mechanism of 3D migration in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Ryan J; Harlin, Heather M; Korsak, Lulu I T; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2017-01-02

    Primary human fibroblasts have the remarkable ability to use their nucleus like a piston, switching from low- to high-pressure protrusions in response to the surrounding three-dimensional (3D) matrix. Although migrating tumor cells can also change how they migrate in response to the 3D matrix, it is not clear if they can switch between high- and low-pressure protrusions like primary fibroblasts. We report that unlike primary fibroblasts, the nuclear piston is not active in fibrosarcoma cells. Protease inhibition rescued the nuclear piston mechanism in polarized HT1080 and SW684 cells and generated compartmentalized pressure. Achieving compartmentalized pressure required the nucleoskeleton-cytoskeleton linker protein nesprin 3, actomyosin contractility, and integrin-mediated adhesion, consistent with lobopodia-based fibroblast migration. In addition, this activation of the nuclear piston mechanism slowed the 3D movement of HT1080 cells. Together, these data indicate that inhibiting protease activity during polarized tumor cell 3D migration is sufficient to restore the nuclear piston migration mechanism with compartmentalized pressure characteristic of nonmalignant cells.

  9. Fabrication of microfluidic system for the assessment of cell migration on 3D micropatterned substrates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Joong; Hwang, Chang-Mo; Baek, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2009-01-01

    Cell migration and proliferation are major process in wound healing, cancer metastasis and organogenesis during development. Many cells are related to recovery process of wound. Especially, fibroblasts act an important role in wound healing. Various cytokines such as platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) can induce fibroblast migration and widely studied to investigate the cell response under controlled cytokine microenvironments during wound healing. In real tissue healing process, cell microenvironments change with tissue types and anatomical characteristics of organs. With microfluidic system, we tried to mimic the natural microenvironment of wound healing, with gradient of PDGF, a fibroblast migration inducing cytokine, and patterned substrate with different orientation to PDGF gradient. Fibroblasts cultured in PDGF gradient micro fluidic chip showed cell migration under various micro environmental gradient conditions. Cells were cultured under PDGF gradient condition and different substrate pattern. Mouse fibroblast L929 cells were cultured in the microfluidic gradient. The results showed that most cells migrated along the substrate topological patterns under high concentration of PDGF. We developed long range sustaining micro fluidic channel and could analyze cell migration along the gradient of PDGF. Also, the cell migration on patterned extracellular environment shows that cells migrate along the extracellular 3D pattern rather than directly along the cytokine gradient when the pattern height is less than 1 microm. In this study, we could demonstrate that the extracellular pattern is more dominant to cell migration in combination with cytokine gradient in the wounded tissue when the environmental cues are 20 microm.

  10. Mechano-sensing and cell migration: a 3D model approach.

    PubMed

    Borau, C; Kamm, R D; García-Aznar, J M

    2011-12-01

    Cell migration is essential for tissue development in different physiological and pathological conditions. It is a complex process orchestrated by chemistry, biological factors, microstructure and surrounding mechanical properties. Focusing on the mechanical interactions, cells do not only exert forces on the matrix that surrounds them, but they also sense and react to mechanical cues in a process called mechano-sensing. Here, we hypothesize the involvement of mechano-sensing in the regulation of directional cell migration through a three-dimensional (3D) matrix. For this purpose, we develop a 3D numerical model of individual cell migration, which incorporates the mechano-sensing process of the cell as the main mechanism regulating its movement. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that factors, such as substrate stiffness, boundary conditions and external forces, regulate specific and distinct cell movements.

  11. Nucleus and nucleus-cytoskeleton connections in 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lingling; Luo, Qing; Sun, Jinghui; Song, Guanbin

    2016-10-15

    Cell migration plays an important role in many physiological and pathological settings, ranging from embryonic development to cancer metastasis. Currently, accumulating data suggest that cells migrating in three-dimensional (3D) environments show well-defined differences compared to their well-established two-dimensional (2D) counterparts. During 3D migration, the cell body and nucleus must deform to allow cellular passage through the available spaces, and the deformability of the relatively rigid nucleus may constitute a limiting step. Here, we highlight the key evidence regarding the role of the nuclear mechanics in 3D migration, including the molecular components that govern the stiffness of the nucleus and review how the nuclear dynamics are connected to and controlled by cytoskeleton-based migration machinery. Intriguingly, nuclear movement must be coordinated with the cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading and trailing edges, which in turn impact the cytoplasmic dynamics that affect the migration efficiency. Thus, we suggest that alterations in the nuclear structure may facilitate cellular reorganizations that are necessary for efficient migration.

  12. Concentric gel system to study the biophysical role of matrix microenvironment on 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kurniawan, Nicholas Agung; Chaudhuri, Parthiv Kant; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2015-04-03

    The ability of cells to migrate is crucial in a wide variety of cell functions throughout life from embryonic development and wound healing to tumor and cancer metastasis. Despite intense research efforts, the basic biochemical and biophysical principles of cell migration are still not fully understood, especially in the physiologically relevant three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments. Here, we describe an in vitro assay designed to allow quantitative examination of 3D cell migration behaviors. The method exploits the cell's mechanosensing ability and propensity to migrate into previously unoccupied extracellular matrix (ECM). We use the invasion of highly invasive breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231, in collagen gels as a model system. The spread of cell population and the migration dynamics of individual cells over weeks of culture can be monitored using live-cell imaging and analyzed to extract spatiotemporally-resolved data. Furthermore, the method is easily adaptable for diverse extracellular matrices, thus offering a simple yet powerful way to investigate the role of biophysical factors in the microenvironment on cell migration.

  13. Concentric Gel System to Study the Biophysical Role of Matrix Microenvironment on 3D Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Kurniawan, Nicholas Agung; Chaudhuri, Parthiv Kant; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2015-01-01

    The ability of cells to migrate is crucial in a wide variety of cell functions throughout life from embryonic development and wound healing to tumor and cancer metastasis. Despite intense research efforts, the basic biochemical and biophysical principles of cell migration are still not fully understood, especially in the physiologically relevant three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments. Here, we describe an in vitro assay designed to allow quantitative examination of 3D cell migration behaviors. The method exploits the cell’s mechanosensing ability and propensity to migrate into previously unoccupied extracellular matrix (ECM). We use the invasion of highly invasive breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231, in collagen gels as a model system. The spread of cell population and the migration dynamics of individual cells over weeks of culture can be monitored using live-cell imaging and analyzed to extract spatiotemporally-resolved data. Furthermore, the method is easily adaptable for diverse extracellular matrices, thus offering a simple yet powerful way to investigate the role of biophysical factors in the microenvironment on cell migration. PMID:25867104

  14. The Rho family GEF Asef2 regulates cell migration in three dimensional (3D) collagen matrices through myosin II.

    PubMed

    Jean, Léolène; Yang, Lijie; Majumdar, Devi; Gao, Yandong; Shi, Mingjian; Brewer, Bryson M; Li, Deyu; Webb, Donna J

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to a variety of physiological processes, including tissue development, homeostasis, and regeneration. Migration has been extensively studied with cells on 2-dimensional (2D) substrates, but much less is known about cell migration in 3D environments. Tissues and organs are 3D, which is the native environment of cells in vivo, pointing to a need to understand migration and the mechanisms that regulate it in 3D environments. To investigate cell migration in 3D environments, we developed microfluidic devices that afford a controlled, reproducible platform for generating 3D matrices. Using these devices, we show that the Rho family guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Asef2 inhibits cell migration in 3D type I collagen (collagen I) matrices. Treatment of cells with the myosin II (MyoII) inhibitor blebbistatin abolished the decrease in migration by Asef2. Moreover, Asef2 enhanced MyoII activity as shown by increased phosphorylation of serine 19 (S19). Furthermore, Asef2 increased activation of Rac, which is a Rho family small GTPase, in 3D collagen I matrices. Inhibition of Rac activity by treatment with the Rac-specific inhibitor NSC23766 abrogated the Asef2-promoted increase in S19 MyoII phosphorylation. Thus, our results indicate that Asef2 regulates cell migration in 3D collagen I matrices through a Rac-MyoII-dependent mechanism.

  15. Cancer Cell Migration within 3D Layer-By-Layer Microfabricated Photocrosslinked PEG Scaffolds with Tunable Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Soman, Pranav; Kelber, Jonathan A.; Lee, Jin Woo; Wright, Tracy; Vecchio, Kenneth S.; Klemke, Richard L.; Chen, Shaochen

    2012-01-01

    Our current understanding of 3-dimensional (3D) cell migration is primarily based on results from fibrous scaffolds with randomly organized internal architecture. Manipulations that change the stiffness of these 3D scaffolds often alter other matrix parameters that can modulate cell motility independently or synergistically, making observations less predictive of how cells behave when migrating in 3D. In order to decouple microstructural influences and stiffness effects, we have designed and fabricated 3D polyethylene glycol (PEG) scaffolds that permit orthogonal tuning of both elastic moduli and microstructure. Scaffolds with log-pile architectures were used to compare the 3D migration properties of normal breast epithelial cells (HMLE) and Twist-transformed cells (HMLET). Our results indicate that the nature of cell migration is significantly impacted by the ability of cells to migrate in the third dimension. 2D ECM-coated PEG substrates revealed no statistically significant difference in cell migration between HMLE and HMLET cells among substrates of different stiffness. However, when cells were allowed to move along the third dimension, substantial differences were observed for cell displacement, velocity and path straightness parameters. Furthermore, these differences were sensitive to both substrate stiffness and the presence of the Twist oncogene. Importantly, these 3D modes of migration provide insight into the potential for oncogene-transformed cells to migrate within and colonize tissues of varying stiffness. PMID:22809641

  16. Cancer cell migration within 3D layer-by-layer microfabricated photocrosslinked PEG scaffolds with tunable stiffness.

    PubMed

    Soman, Pranav; Kelber, Jonathan A; Lee, Jin Woo; Wright, Tracy N; Vecchio, Kenneth S; Klemke, Richard L; Chen, Shaochen

    2012-10-01

    Our current understanding of 3-dimensional (3D) cell migration is primarily based on results from fibrous scaffolds with randomly organized internal architecture. Manipulations that change the stiffness of these 3D scaffolds often alter other matrix parameters that can modulate cell motility independently or synergistically, making observations less predictive of how cells behave when migrating in 3D. In order to decouple microstructural influences and stiffness effects, we have designed and fabricated 3D polyethylene glycol (PEG) scaffolds that permit orthogonal tuning of both elastic moduli and microstructure. Scaffolds with log-pile architectures were used to compare the 3D migration properties of normal breast epithelial cells (HMLE) and Twist-transformed cells (HMLET). Our results indicate that the nature of cell migration is significantly impacted by the ability of cells to migrate in the third dimension. 2D ECM-coated PEG substrates revealed no statistically significant difference in cell migration between HMLE and HMLET cells among substrates of different stiffness. However, when cells were allowed to move along the third dimension, substantial differences were observed for cell displacement, velocity and path straightness parameters. Furthermore, these differences were sensitive to both substrate stiffness and the presence of the Twist oncogene. Importantly, these 3D modes of migration provide insight into the potential for oncogene-transformed cells to migrate within and colonize tissues of varying stiffness.

  17. In-chip fabrication of free-form 3D constructs for directed cell migration analysis.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Mark Holm; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Hansen, Morten; Met, Özcan; Svane, Inge Marie; Larsen, Niels B

    2013-12-21

    Free-form constructs with three-dimensional (3D) microporosity were fabricated by two-photon polymerization inside the closed microchannel of an injection-molded, commercially available polymer chip for analysis of directed cell migration. Acrylate constructs were produced as woodpile topologies with a range of pore sizes from 5 × 5 μm to 15 × 15 μm and prefilled with fibrillar collagen. Dendritic cells seeded into the polymer chip in a concentration gradient of the chemoattractant CCL21 efficiently negotiated the microporous maze structure for pore sizes of 8 × 8 μm or larger. The cells migrating through smaller pore sizes made significantly more turns than those through larger pores. The introduction of additional defined barriers in the microporous structure resulted in dendritic cells making more turns while still being able to follow the chemoattractant concentration gradient.

  18. 3D arrays for high throughput assay of cell migration and electrotaxis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sanjun; Gao, Runchi; Devreotes, Peter N; Mogilner, Alex; Zhao, Min

    2013-09-01

    Cell behaviour in 3D environments can be significantly different from those in 2D cultures. With many different 3D matrices being developed and many experimental modalities used to modulate cell behaviour in 3D, it is necessary to develop high throughput techniques to study behaviour in 3D. We report on a 3D array on slide and have adapted this to our electrotaxis chamber, thereby offering a novel approach to quantify cellular responses to electric fields (EFs) in 3D conditions, in different matrices, with different strains of cells, under various field strengths. These developments used Dictyostelium cells to illustrate possible applications and limitations.

  19. Migration of bone marrow stromal cells in 3D: 4 color methodology reveals spatially and temporally coordinated events.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Marc M; Buschmann, Michael D

    2006-12-01

    The cytoskeleton plays a central role in many cell processes including directed cell migration. Since most previous work has investigated cell migration in two dimensions (2D), new methods are required to study movement in three dimensions (3D) while preserving 3D structure of the cytoskeleton. Most previous studies have labeled two cytoskeletal networks simultaneously, impeding an appreciation of their complex and dynamic interconnections. Here we report the development of a 4 color method to simultaneously image vimentin, actin, tubulin and the nucleus for high-resolution confocal microscopy of bone-marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) migrating through a porous membrane. Several methods were tested for structural preservation and labeling intensity resulting in identification of an optimized simultaneous fixation and permeabilization method using glutaraldehyde, paraformaldehyde and Triton X-100 followed by a quadruple fluorescent labeling method. This procedure was then applied at a sequence of time points to migrating cells, allowing temporal progression of migration to be assessed by visualizing all three networks plus the nucleus, providing new insights into 3D directed cell migration including processes such as leading edge structure, cytoskeletal distribution and nucleokinesis. Colocalization of actin and microtubules with distinct spatial arrangements at the cellular leading edge during migration, together with microtubule axial polarization supports recent reports indicating the pivotal role of microtubules in directed cell migration. This study also provides a foundation for 3D migration studies versus 2D studies, providing precise and robust methods to attain new insights into the cellular mechanisms of motility.

  20. 1-integrin and MT1-MMP promote tumor cell migration in 2D but not in 3D fibronectin microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corall, Silke; Haraszti, Tamas; Bartoschik, Tanja; Spatz, Joachim Pius; Ludwig, Thomas; Cavalcanti-Adam, Elisabetta Ada

    2014-03-01

    Cell migration is a crucial event for physiological processes, such as embryonic development and wound healing, as well as for pathological processes, such as cancer dissemination and metastasis formation. Cancer cell migration is a result of the concerted action of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), expressed by cancer cells to degrade the surrounding matrix, and integrins, the transmembrane receptors responsible for cell binding to matrix proteins. While it is known that cell-microenvironment interactions are essential for migration, the role of the physical state of such interactions remains still unclear. In this study we investigated human fibrosarcoma cell migration in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) fibronectin (FN) microenvironments. By using antibody blocking approach and cell-binding site mutation, we determined that -integrin is the main mediator of fibrosarcoma cell migration in 2D FN, whereas in 3D fibrillar FN, the binding of - and -integrins is not necessary for cell movement in the fibrillar network. Furthermore, while the general inhibition of MMPs with GM6001 has no effect on cell migration in both 2D and 3D FN matrices, we observed opposing effect after targeted silencing of a membrane-bound MMP, namely MT1-MMP. In 2D fibronectin, silencing of MT1-MMP results in decreased migration speed and loss of directionality, whereas in 3D FN matrices, cell migration speed is increased and integrin-mediated signaling for actin dynamics is promoted. Our results suggest that the fibrillar nature of the matrix governs the migratory behavior of fibrosarcoma cells. Therefore, to hinder migration and dissemination of diseased cells, matrix molecules should be directly targeted, rather than specific subtypes of receptors at the cell membrane.

  1. Migration in Confined 3D Environments Is Determined by a Combination of Adhesiveness, Nuclear Volume, Contractility, and Cell Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Lautscham, Lena A; Kämmerer, Christoph; Lange, Janina R; Kolb, Thorsten; Mark, Christoph; Schilling, Achim; Strissel, Pamela L; Strick, Reiner; Gluth, Caroline; Rowat, Amy C; Metzner, Claus; Fabry, Ben

    2015-09-01

    In cancer metastasis and other physiological processes, cells migrate through the three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix of connective tissue and must overcome the steric hindrance posed by pores that are smaller than the cells. It is currently assumed that low cell stiffness promotes cell migration through confined spaces, but other factors such as adhesion and traction forces may be equally important. To study 3D migration under confinement in a stiff (1.77 MPa) environment, we use soft lithography to fabricate polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) devices consisting of linear channel segments with 20 μm length, 3.7 μm height, and a decreasing width from 11.2 to 1.7 μm. To study 3D migration in a soft (550 Pa) environment, we use self-assembled collagen networks with an average pore size of 3 μm. We then measure the ability of four different cancer cell lines to migrate through these 3D matrices, and correlate the results with cell physical properties including contractility, adhesiveness, cell stiffness, and nuclear volume. Furthermore, we alter cell adhesion by coating the channel walls with different amounts of adhesion proteins, and we increase cell stiffness by overexpression of the nuclear envelope protein lamin A. Although all cell lines are able to migrate through the smallest 1.7 μm channels, we find significant differences in the migration velocity. Cell migration is impeded in cell lines with larger nuclei, lower adhesiveness, and to a lesser degree also in cells with lower contractility and higher stiffness. Our data show that the ability to overcome the steric hindrance of the matrix cannot be attributed to a single cell property but instead arises from a combination of adhesiveness, nuclear volume, contractility, and cell stiffness.

  2. Microfluidic assay of endothelial cell migration in 3D interpenetrating polymer semi-network HA-Collagen hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Gi Seok; Kwon, Gu Han; Kang, Ah Ran; Jung, Bo Young; Park, Yongdoo; Chung, Seok; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2011-08-01

    Cell migration through the extracellular matrix (ECM) is one of the key features for physiological and pathological processes such as angiogenesis, cancer metastasis, and wound healing. In particular, the quantitative assay of endothelial cell migration under the well-defined three dimensional (3D) microenvironment is important to analyze the angiogenesis mechanism. In this study, we report a microfluidic assay of endothelial cell sprouting and migration into an interpenetrating polymer semi-network HA-Collagen (SIPNs CH) hydrogel as ECM providing an enhanced in vivo mimicking 3D microenvironment to cells. The microfluidic chip could provide a well-controlled gradient of growth factor to cells, whereas the hydrogel could mimic a well-defined 3D microenvironment in vivo. (In addition/Furthermore, the microfluidic chip gives a well-controlled gradient of growth factor to cells) For this reason, three types of hydrogel, composed of semi-interpenetrating networks of collagen and hyaluronic acid were prepared, and firstly we proved the role of the hydrogel in endothelial cell migration. The diffusion property and swelling ratio of the hydrogel were characterized. It modulated the migration of endothelial cells in quantified manner, also being influenced by additional synthesis of Matrix metalloproteinase(MMP)-sensitive remodeling peptides and Arginine-glycine-lycinee (RGD) cell adhesion peptides. We successfully established a novel cell migration platform by changing major determinants such as ECM material under biochemical synthesis and under growth factor gradients in a microfluidic manner.

  3. An MEK-cofilin signalling module controls migration of human T cells in 3D but not 2D environments.

    PubMed

    Klemke, Martin; Kramer, Elisabeth; Konstandin, Mathias H; Wabnitz, Guido H; Samstag, Yvonne

    2010-09-01

    T cells infiltrate peripheral tissues to execute immunosurveillance and effector functions. For this purpose, T cells first migrate on the two-dimensional (2D) surface of endothelial cells to undergo transendothelial migration. Then they change their mode of movement to undergo migration within the three-dimensional (3D)-extracellular matrix of the infiltrated tissue. As yet, no molecular mechanisms are known, which control migration exclusively in either 2D or 3D environments. Here, we describe a signalling module that controls T-cell chemotaxis specifically in 3D environments. In chemotaxing T cells, Ras activity is spatially restricted to the lamellipodium. There, Ras initiates activation of MEK, which in turn inhibits LIM-kinase 1 activity, thereby allowing dephosphorylation of the F-actin-remodelling protein cofilin. Interference with this MEK-cofilin module by either inhibition of MEK or by knockdown of cofilin reduces speed and directionality of chemotactic migration in 3D-extracellular matrices, but not on 2D substrates. This MEK-cofilin module may have an important function in the tissue positioning of T cells during an immune response.

  4. Combinative in vitro studies and computational model to predict 3D cell migration response to drug insult.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Joseph S; Srivastava, Jaya; Fallica, Brian; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2014-10-01

    The development of drugs to counter diseases related to cell migration has resulted in a multi-billion dollar endeavor. Unfortunately, few drugs have emerged from this effort highlighting the need for new methods to enhance assays to study, analyze and control cell migration. In response to this complex process, computational models have emerged as potent tools to describe migration providing a high throughput and low cost method. However, most models are unable to predict migration response to drug with direct application to in vitro experiments. In addition to this, no model to date has attempted to describe migration in response to drugs while incorporating simultaneously protein signaling, proteolytic activity, and 3D culture. In this paper, we describe an integrated computational approach, in conjunction with in vitro observations, to serve as a platform to accurately predict migration in 3D matrices incorporating the function of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their interaction with the Extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. Our results provide biological insight into how matrix density, MMP activity, integrin adhesions, and p-ERK expression all affect speed and persistence in 3D. Predictions from the model provide insight toward improving drug combinations to more effectively reduce both speed and persistence during migration and the role of integrin adhesions in motility. In this way our integrated platform provides future potential to streamline and improve throughput toward the testing and development of migration targeting drugs with tangible application to current in vitro assays.

  5. Lamellipodin promotes invasive 3D cancer cell migration via regulated interactions with Ena/VASP and SCAR/WAVE

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Guillaume; Perera, Upamali; Gillett, Cheryl; Naba, Alexandra; Law, Ah-Lai; Sharma, Ved P.; Wang, Jian; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Balsamo, Michele; Mosis, Fuad; De Piano, Mario; Monypenny, James; Woodman, Natalie; McConnell, Russell E.; Mouneimne, Ghassan; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke; Cao, Yihai; Condeelis, John; Hynes, Richard O.; Gertler, Frank B.; Krause, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Cancer invasion is a hallmark of metastasis. The mesenchymal mode of cancer cell invasion is mediated by elongated membrane protrusions driven by the assembly of branched F-actin networks. How deregulation of actin regulators promotes cancer cell invasion is still enigmatic. We report that increased expression and membrane localization of the actin regulator Lamellipodin correlates with reduced metastasis-free survival and poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. In agreement we find that Lamellipodin depletion reduced lung metastasis in an orthotopic mouse breast cancer model. Invasive 3D cancer cell migration as well as invadopodia formation, and matrix degradation were impaired upon Lamellipodin depletion. Mechanistically, we show that Lamellipodin promotes invasive 3D cancer cell migration via both actin-elongating Ena/VASP proteins and the Scar/WAVE complex, which stimulates actin branching. In contrast, Lamellipodin interaction with Scar/WAVE but not Ena/VASP is required for random 2D cell migration. We identify a phosphorylation-dependent mechanism that regulates selective recruitment of these effectors to Lamellipodin: Abl-mediated Lamellipodin phosphorylation promotes its association with both Scar/WAVE and Ena/VASP, while Src-dependent phosphorylation enhances binding to Scar/WAVE but not Ena/VASP. Through these selective, regulated interactions Lamellipodin mediates directional sensing of EGF gradients and invasive 3D migration of breast cancer cells. Our findings imply that increased Lamellipodin levels enhance Ena/VASP and Scar/WAVE activities at the plasma membrane to promote 3D invasion and metastasis. PMID:26996666

  6. Measuring dynamic cell-material interactions and remodeling during 3D human mesenchymal stem cell migration in hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Kelly M; Kyburz, Kyle A; Anseth, Kristi S

    2015-07-21

    Biomaterials that mimic aspects of the extracellular matrix by presenting a 3D microenvironment that cells can locally degrade and remodel are finding increased applications as wound-healing matrices, tissue engineering scaffolds, and even substrates for stem cell expansion. In vivo, cells do not simply reside in a static microenvironment, but instead, they dynamically reengineer their surroundings. For example, cells secrete proteases that degrade extracellular components, attach to the matrix through adhesive sites, and can exert traction forces on the local matrix, causing its spatial reorganization. Although biomaterials scaffolds provide initially well-defined microenvironments for 3D culture of cells, less is known about the changes that occur over time, especially local matrix remodeling that can play an integral role in directing cell behavior. Here, we use microrheology as a quantitative tool to characterize dynamic cellular remodeling of peptide-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels that degrade in response to cell-secreted matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). This technique allows measurement of spatial changes in material properties during migration of encapsulated cells and has a sensitivity that identifies regions where cells simply adhere to the matrix, as well as the extent of local cell remodeling of the material through MMP-mediated degradation. Collectively, these microrheological measurements provide insight into microscopic, cellular manipulation of the pericellular region that gives rise to macroscopic tracks created in scaffolds by migrating cells. This quantitative and predictable information should benefit the design of improved biomaterial scaffolds for medically relevant applications.

  7. Elucidating the role of matrix stiffness in 3D cell migration and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ehrbar, M; Sala, A; Lienemann, P; Ranga, A; Mosiewicz, K; Bittermann, A; Rizzi, S C; Weber, F E; Lutolf, M P

    2011-01-19

    Reductionist in vitro model systems which mimic specific extracellular matrix functions in a highly controlled manner, termed artificial extracellular matrices (aECM), have increasingly been used to elucidate the role of cell-ECM interactions in regulating cell fate. To better understand the interplay of biophysical and biochemical effectors in controlling three-dimensional cell migration, a poly(ethylene glycol)-based aECM platform was used in this study to explore the influence of matrix cross-linking density, represented here by stiffness, on cell migration in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, the migration behavior of single preosteoblastic cells within hydrogels of varying stiffness and susceptibilities to degradation by matrix metalloproteases was assessed by time-lapse microscopy. Migration behavior was seen to be strongly dependent on matrix stiffness, with two regimes identified: a nonproteolytic migration mode dominating at relatively low matrix stiffness and proteolytic migration at higher stiffness. Subsequent in vivo experiments revealed a similar stiffness dependence of matrix remodeling, albeit less sensitive to the matrix metalloprotease sensitivity. Therefore, our aECM model system is well suited to unveil the role of biophysical and biochemical determinants of physiologically relevant cell migration phenomena.

  8. 2D protrusion but not motility predicts growth factor-induced cancer cell migration in 3D collagen.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Aaron S; Hughes-Alford, Shannon K; Kay, Jennifer E; Castillo, Amalchi; Wells, Alan; Gertler, Frank B; Lauffenburger, Douglas A

    2012-06-11

    Growth factor-induced migration is a critical step in the dissemination and metastasis of solid tumors. Although differences in properties characterizing cell migration on two-dimensional (2D) substrata versus within three-dimensional (3D) matrices have been noted for particular growth factor stimuli, the 2D approach remains in more common use as an efficient surrogate, especially for high-throughput experiments. We therefore were motivated to investigate which migration properties measured in various 2D assays might be reflective of 3D migratory behavioral responses. We used human triple-negative breast cancer lines stimulated by a panel of receptor tyrosine kinase ligands relevant to mammary carcinoma progression. Whereas 2D migration properties did not correlate well with 3D behavior across multiple growth factors, we found that increased membrane protrusion elicited by growth factor stimulation did relate robustly to enhanced 3D migration properties of the MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-157 lines. Interestingly, we observed this to be a more reliable relationship than cognate receptor expression or activation levels across these and two additional mammary tumor lines.

  9. Osteoblasts and Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Control Hematopoietic Stem Cell Migration and Proliferation in 3D In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    de Barros, Ana Paula D. N.; Takiya, Christina M.; Garzoni, Luciana R.; Leal-Ferreira, Mona Lisa; Dutra, Hélio S.; Chiarini, Luciana B.; Meirelles, Maria Nazareth; Borojevic, Radovan; Rossi, Maria Isabel D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Migration, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are dependent upon a complex three-dimensional (3D) bone marrow microenvironment. Although osteoblasts control the HSC pool, the subendosteal niche is complex and its cellular composition and the role of each cell population in HSC fate have not been established. In vivo models are complex and involve subtle species-specific differences, while bidimensional cultures do not reflect the 3D tissue organization. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the role of human bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSC) and active osteoblasts in control of migration, lodgment, and proliferation of HSCs. Methodology/Principal Findings A complex mixed multicellular spheroid in vitro model was developed with human BMSC, undifferentiated or induced for one week into osteoblasts. A clear limit between the two stromal cells was established, and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin, collagens I and IV, laminin, and osteopontin was similar to the observed in vivo. Noninduced BMSC cultured as spheroid expressed higher levels of mRNA for the chemokine CXCL12, and the growth factors Wnt5a and Kit ligand. Cord blood and bone marrow CD34+ cells moved in and out the spheroids, and some lodged at the interface of the two stromal cells. Myeloid colony-forming cells were maintained after seven days of coculture with mixed spheroids, and the frequency of cycling CD34+ cells was decreased. Conclusions/Significance Undifferentiated and one-week osteo-induced BMSC self-assembled in a 3D spheroid and formed a microenvironment that is informative for hematopoietic progenitor cells, allowing their lodgment and controlling their proliferation. PMID:20161704

  10. 3D computational modelling of cell migration: a mechano-chemo-thermo-electrotaxis approach.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Seyed Jamaleddin; Doweidar, Mohamed Hamdy; Doblaré, Manuel

    2013-07-21

    Single cell migration constitutes a fundamental phenomenon involved in many biological events such as wound healing, cancer development and tissue regeneration. Several experiments have demonstrated that, besides the mechanical driving force (mechanotaxis), cell migration may be also influenced by chemical, thermal and/or electrical cues. In this paper, we present an extension of a previous model of the same authors adding the effects of chemotaxis, thermotaxis and electrotaxis to the initial mechanotaxis model of cell migration, allowing us to predict cell migration behaviour under different conditions and substrate properties. The present model is based on the balance of effective forces during cell motility in the presence of the several guiding cues. This model has been applied to several numerical experiments to demonstrate the effect of the different drivers onto the cell path and final location within a certain three-dimensional substrate with heterogeneous properties. Our findings indicate that the presence of the chemotaxis, thermotaxis and/or electrotaxis reduce, in general, the random component of cell movement, being this reduction more important in the case of electrotaxis that can be considered a dominating signal during cell migration (besides the underlying mechanical effects). These results are qualitatively in agreement with well-known experimental ones.

  11. Lamellipodin promotes invasive 3D cancer cell migration via regulated interactions with Ena/VASP and SCAR/WAVE.

    PubMed

    Carmona, G; Perera, U; Gillett, C; Naba, A; Law, A-L; Sharma, V P; Wang, J; Wyckoff, J; Balsamo, M; Mosis, F; De Piano, M; Monypenny, J; Woodman, N; McConnell, R E; Mouneimne, G; Van Hemelrijck, M; Cao, Y; Condeelis, J; Hynes, R O; Gertler, F B; Krause, M

    2016-09-29

    Cancer invasion is a hallmark of metastasis. The mesenchymal mode of cancer cell invasion is mediated by elongated membrane protrusions driven by the assembly of branched F-actin networks. How deregulation of actin regulators promotes cancer cell invasion is still enigmatic. We report that increased expression and membrane localization of the actin regulator Lamellipodin correlate with reduced metastasis-free survival and poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. In agreement, we find that Lamellipodin depletion reduced lung metastasis in an orthotopic mouse breast cancer model. Invasive 3D cancer cell migration as well as invadopodia formation and matrix degradation was impaired upon Lamellipodin depletion. Mechanistically, we show that Lamellipodin promotes invasive 3D cancer cell migration via both actin-elongating Ena/VASP proteins and the Scar/WAVE complex, which stimulates actin branching. In contrast, Lamellipodin interaction with Scar/WAVE but not with Ena/VASP is required for random 2D cell migration. We identified a phosphorylation-dependent mechanism that regulates selective recruitment of these effectors to Lamellipodin: Abl-mediated Lamellipodin phosphorylation promotes its association with both Scar/WAVE and Ena/VASP, whereas Src-dependent phosphorylation enhances binding to Scar/WAVE but not to Ena/VASP. Through these selective, regulated interactions Lamellipodin mediates directional sensing of epidermal growth factor (EGF) gradients and invasive 3D migration of breast cancer cells. Our findings imply that increased Lamellipodin levels enhance Ena/VASP and Scar/WAVE activities at the plasma membrane to promote 3D invasion and metastasis.

  12. Topographical guidance of 3D tumor cell migration at an interface of collagen densities.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Francois; Tang, Lauren N; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2013-12-01

    During cancer progression, metastatic cells leave the primary tumor and invade into the fibrous extracellular matrix (ECM) within the surrounding stroma. This ECM network is highly heterogeneous, and interest in understanding how this network can affect cell behavior has increased in the past several decades. However, replicating this heterogeneity has proven challenging. Here, we designed and utilized a method to create a well-defined interface between two distinct regions of high- and low-density collagen gels to mimic the heterogeneities in density found in the tumor stroma. We show that cells will invade preferentially from the high-density side into the low-density side. We also demonstrate that the net cell migration is a function of the density of the collagen in which the cells are embedded, and the difference in density between the two regions has minimal effect on cell net displacement and distance travelled. Our data further indicate that a low-to-high density interface promotes directional migration and induces formation of focal adhesion on the interface surface. Together, the current results demonstrate how ECM heterogeneities, in the form of interfacial boundaries, can affect cell migration.

  13. Reconstruction and Visualization of Coordinated 3D Cell Migration Based on Optical Flow.

    PubMed

    Kappe, Christopher P; Schütz, Lucas; Gunther, Stefan; Hufnagel, Lars; Lemke, Steffen; Leitte, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Animal development is marked by the repeated reorganization of cells and cell populations, which ultimately determine form and shape of the growing organism. One of the central questions in developmental biology is to understand precisely how cells reorganize, as well as how and to what extent this reorganization is coordinated. While modern microscopes can record video data for every cell during animal development in 3D+t, analyzing these videos remains a major challenge: reconstruction of comprehensive cell tracks turned out to be very demanding especially with decreasing data quality and increasing cell densities. In this paper, we present an analysis pipeline for coordinated cellular motions in developing embryos based on the optical flow of a series of 3D images. We use numerical integration to reconstruct cellular long-term motions in the optical flow of the video, we take care of data validation, and we derive a LIC-based, dense flow visualization for the resulting pathlines. This approach allows us to handle low video quality such as noisy data or poorly separated cells, and it allows the biologists to get a comprehensive understanding of their data by capturing dynamic growth processes in stills. We validate our methods using three videos of growing fruit fly embryos.

  14. Cancer cell migration in 3D tissue: negotiating space by proteolysis and nuclear deformability.

    PubMed

    Krause, Marina; Wolf, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Efficient tumor cell invasion into the surrounding desmoplastic stroma is a hallmark of cancer progression and involves the navigation through available small tissue spaces existent within the dense stromal network. Such navigation includes the reciprocal adaptation of the moving tumor cell, including the nucleus as largest and stiffest organelle, to pre-existent or de-novo generated extracellular matrix (ECM) gaps, pores and trails within stromal compartments. Within the context of migration, we briefly summarize physiological and tumor-related changes in ECM geometries as well as tissue proteolysis. We then focus on mechanisms that ensure the successful translocation of a nucleus through a confining pore by cytoskeleton-mediated coupling, as well as regulators of cell and nuclear deformability such as chromatin organization and nuclear lamina expression. In summary, understanding dynamic nuclear mechanics during migration in response to confined space will add to a better conceptual appreciation of cancer invasion and progression.

  15. Electric field-controlled directed migration of neural progenitor cells in 2D and 3D environments.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiaoting; Li, Wenfei; Young, Fraser; Gao, Runchi; Chalmers, Laura; Zhao, Min; Song, Bing

    2012-02-16

    Endogenous electric fields (EFs) occur naturally in vivo and play a critical role during tissue/organ development and regeneration, including that of the central nervous system(1,2). These endogenous EFs are generated by cellular regulation of ionic transport combined with the electrical resistance of cells and tissues. It has been reported that applied EF treatment can promote functional repair of spinal cord injuries in animals and humans(3,4). In particular, EF-directed cell migration has been demonstrated in a wide variety of cell types(5,6), including neural progenitor cells (NPCs)(7,8). Application of direct current (DC) EFs is not a commonly available technique in most laboratories. We have described detailed protocols for the application of DC EFs to cell and tissue cultures previously(5,11). Here we present a video demonstration of standard methods based on a calculated field strength to set up 2D and 3D environments for NPCs, and to investigate cellular responses to EF stimulation in both single cell growth conditions in 2D, and the organotypic spinal cord slice in 3D. The spinal cordslice is an ideal recipient tissue for studying NPC ex vivo behaviours, post-transplantation, because the cytoarchitectonic tissue organization is well preserved within these cultures(9,10). Additionally, this ex vivo model also allows procedures that are not technically feasible to track cells in vivo using time-lapse recording at the single cell level. It is critically essential to evaluate cell behaviours in not only a 2D environment, but also in a 3D organotypic condition which mimicks the in vivo environment. This system will allow high-resolution imaging using cover glass-based dishes in tissue or organ culture with 3D tracking of single cell migration in vitro and ex vivo and can be an intermediate step before moving onto in vivo paradigms.

  16. Fibroblast morphogenesis on 3D collagen matrices: the balance between cell clustering and cell migration.

    PubMed

    da Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno; Grinnell, Frederick

    2013-10-01

    Fibroblast clusters have been observed in tissues under a variety of circumstances: in fibrosis and scar, in the formation of hair follicle dermal papilla, and as part of the general process of mesenchymal condensation that takes place during development. Cell clustering has been shown to depend on features of the extracellular matrix, growth factor environment, and mechanisms to stabilize cell-cell interactions. In vitro studies have shown that increasing the potential for cell-cell adhesion relative to cell-substrate adhesion promotes cell clustering. Experimental models to study fibroblast clustering have utilized centrifugation, hanging drops, and substrata with poorly adhesive, soft and mechanically unstable properties. In this review, we summarize work on a new, highly tractable, cell clustering research model in which human fibroblasts are incubated on the surfaces of collagen matrices. Fibroblast clustering occurs under procontractile growth factor conditions (e.g., serum or the serum lipid agonist lysophosphatidic acid) but not under promigratory growth factor conditions (e.g., platelet-derived growth factor) and can be reversed by switching growth factor environments. Cell contraction plays a dual role in clustering to bring cells closer together and to stimulate cells to organize fibronectin into a fibrillar matrix. Binding of fibroblasts to a shared fibronectin fibrillar matrix stabilizes clusters, and fragmentation of the fibrillar matrix occurs when growth factor conditions are switched to promote cell dispersal.

  17. Migration of tumor cells in 3D matrices is governed by matrix stiffness along with cell-matrix adhesion and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Muhammad H.; Trapani, Linda M.; Sieminski, Alisha; MacKellar, Drew; Gong, Haiyan; Kamm, Roger D.; Wells, Alan; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Cell migration on 2D surfaces is governed by a balance between counteracting tractile and adhesion forces. Although biochemical factors such as adhesion receptor and ligand concentration and binding, signaling through cell adhesion complexes, and cytoskeletal structure assembly/disassembly have been studied in detail in a 2D context, the critical biochemical and biophysical parameters that affect cell migration in 3D matrices have not been quantitatively investigated. We demonstrate that, in addition to adhesion and tractile forces, matrix stiffness is a key factor that influences cell movement in 3D. Cell migration assays in which Matrigel density, fibronectin concentration, and β1 integrin binding are systematically varied show that at a specific Matrigel density the migration speed of DU-145 human prostate carcinoma cells is a balance between tractile and adhesion forces. However, when biochemical parameters such as matrix ligand and cell integrin receptor levels are held constant, maximal cell movement shifts to matrices exhibiting lesser stiffness. This behavior contradicts current 2D models but is predicted by a recent force-based computational model of cell movement in a 3D matrix. As expected, this 3D motility through an extracellular environment of pore size much smaller than cellular dimensions does depend on proteolytic activity as broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors limit the migration of DU-145 cells and also HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. Our experimental findings here represent, to our knowledge, discovery of a previously undescribed set of balances of cell and matrix properties that govern the ability of tumor cells to migration in 3D environments. PMID:16832052

  18. Migration of tumor cells in 3D matrices is governed by matrix stiffness along with cell-matrix adhesion and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Muhammad H; Trapani, Linda M; Sieminski, Alisha L; Siemeski, Alisha; Mackellar, Drew; Gong, Haiyan; Kamm, Roger D; Wells, Alan; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-07-18

    Cell migration on 2D surfaces is governed by a balance between counteracting tractile and adhesion forces. Although biochemical factors such as adhesion receptor and ligand concentration and binding, signaling through cell adhesion complexes, and cytoskeletal structure assembly/disassembly have been studied in detail in a 2D context, the critical biochemical and biophysical parameters that affect cell migration in 3D matrices have not been quantitatively investigated. We demonstrate that, in addition to adhesion and tractile forces, matrix stiffness is a key factor that influences cell movement in 3D. Cell migration assays in which Matrigel density, fibronectin concentration, and beta1 integrin binding are systematically varied show that at a specific Matrigel density the migration speed of DU-145 human prostate carcinoma cells is a balance between tractile and adhesion forces. However, when biochemical parameters such as matrix ligand and cell integrin receptor levels are held constant, maximal cell movement shifts to matrices exhibiting lesser stiffness. This behavior contradicts current 2D models but is predicted by a recent force-based computational model of cell movement in a 3D matrix. As expected, this 3D motility through an extracellular environment of pore size much smaller than cellular dimensions does depend on proteolytic activity as broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors limit the migration of DU-145 cells and also HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. Our experimental findings here represent, to our knowledge, discovery of a previously undescribed set of balances of cell and matrix properties that govern the ability of tumor cells to migration in 3D environments.

  19. Biomimetic 3D Clusters Using Human Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Breast Cancer Cells: A Study on Migration and Invasion of Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Hee; Song, Boa; Hong, Seungpyo; Kim, Sang Heon; Lee, Kangwon

    2016-07-05

    Invasion and metastasis of cancer directly related to human death have been associated with interactions among many different types of cells and three-dimensional (3D) tissue matrices. Precise mechanisms related to cancer invasion and metastasis still remain unknown due to their complexities. Development of tumor microenvironment (TME)-mimicking system could play a key role in understanding cancer environments and in elucidating the relating phenomena and their driving forces. Here we report a facile and novel platform of 3D cancer cell-clusters using human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs) and breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) within a collagen gel matrix to show cancer invasion in the cell and extracellular matrix (ECM). Both clusters A (hASC only) and AC (hASC and MDA-MB-231) exhibited different behaviors and expressions of migration and invasion, as observed by the relating markers such as fibronectin, α-SMA, and CXCR4. hASCs showed a protrusive migration from a cluster center, whereas MDA-MB-231 spread out radially followed by hASC migration. Finally, the effect of matrix was further discussed by varying collagen gel densities. The new biomimetic system of 3D cancer clusters developed here has the potential to be utilized for research on migration and invasion of cancer cells in extracellular matrices.

  20. Integrating focal adhesion dynamics, cytoskeleton remodeling, and actin motor activity for predicting cell migration on 3D curved surfaces of the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Cheol; Kim, Choong; Wood, Levi; Neal, Devin; Kamm, Roger D; Asada, H Harry

    2012-11-01

    An integrative cell migration model incorporating focal adhesion (FA) dynamics, cytoskeleton and nucleus remodeling and actin motor activity is developed for predicting cell migration behaviors on 3-dimensional curved surfaces, such as cylindrical lumens in the 3-D extracellular matrix (ECM). The work is motivated by 3-D microfluidic migration experiments suggesting that the migration speed and direction may vary depending on the cross sectional shape of the lumen along which the cell migrates. In this paper, the mechanical structure of the cell is modeled as double elastic membranes of cell and nucleus. The two elastic membranes are connected by stress fibers, which are extended from focal adhesions on the cell surface to the nuclear membrane. The cell deforms and gains traction as transmembrane integrins distributed over the outer cell membrane bind to ligands on the ECM, form focal adhesions, and activate stress fibers. Probabilities at which integrin ligand-receptor bonds are formed as well as ruptures are affected by the surface geometry, resulting in diverse migration behaviors that depend on the curvature of the surface. Monte Carlo simulations of the integrative model reveal that (a) the cell migration speed is dependent on the cross sectional area of the lumen with a maximum speed at a particular diameter or width, (b) as the lumen diameter increases, the cell tends to spread and migrate around the circumference of the lumen, while it moves in the longitudinal direction as the lumen diameter narrows, (c) once the cell moves in one direction, it tends to stay migrating in the same direction despite the stochastic nature of migration. The relationship between the cell migration speed and the lumen width agrees with microfluidic experimental data for cancer cell migration.

  1. Multifunctional bioscaffolds for 3D culture of melanoma cells reveal increased MMP activity and migration with BRAF kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Leight, Jennifer L; Tokuda, Emi Y; Jones, Caitlin E; Lin, Austin J; Anseth, Kristi S

    2015-04-28

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are important for many different types of cancer-related processes, including metastasis. Understanding the functional impact of changes in MMP activity during cancer treatment is an important facet not typically evaluated as part of preclinical research. With MMP activity being a critical component of the metastatic cascade, we designed a 3D hydrogel system to probe whether pharmacological inhibition affected human melanoma cell proteolytic activity; metastatic melanoma is a highly aggressive and drug-resistant form of skin cancer. The relationship between MMP activity and drug treatment is unknown, and therefore we used an in situ fluorogenic MMP sensor peptide to determine how drug treatment affects melanoma cell MMP activity in three dimensions. We encapsulated melanoma cells from varying stages of progression within PEG-based hydrogels to examine the relationship between drug treatment and MMP activity. From these results, a metastatic melanoma cell line (A375) and two inhibitors that inhibit RAF (PLX4032 and sorafenib) were studied further to determine whether changes in MMP activity led to a functional change in cell behavior. A375 cells exhibited increased MMP activity despite an overall decrease in metabolic activity with PLX4032 treatment. The changes in proteolytic activity correlated with increased cell elongation and increased single-cell migration. In contrast, sorafenib did not alter MMP activity or cell motility, showing that the changes induced by PLX4032 were not a universal response to small-molecule inhibition. Therefore, we argue the importance of studying MMP activity with drug treatment and its possible implications for unwanted side effects.

  2. Multiple mechanisms of 3D migration: the origins of plasticity.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Ryan J; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2016-10-01

    Cells migrate through 3D environments using a surprisingly wide variety of molecular mechanisms. These distinct modes of migration often rely on the same intracellular components, which are used in different ways to achieve cell motility. Recent work reveals that how a cell moves can be dictated by the relative amounts of cell-matrix adhesion and actomyosin contractility. A current concept is that the level of difficulty in squeezing the nucleus through a confining 3D environment determines the amounts of adhesion and contractility required for cell motility. Ultimately, determining how the nucleus controls the mode of cell migration will be essential for understanding both physiological and pathological processes dependent on cell migration in the body.

  3. Human pancreatic stellate cells modulate 3D collagen alignment to promote the migration of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Drifka, Cole R; Loeffler, Agnes G; Esquibel, Corinne R; Weber, Sharon M; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Kao, W John

    2016-12-01

    A hallmark of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the ability for cancer cells to aggressively infiltrate and navigate through a dense stroma during the metastatic process. Key features of the PDAC stroma include an abundant population of activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and highly aligned collagen fibers; however, important questions remain regarding how collagen becomes aligned and what the biological manifestations are. To better understand how PSCs, aligned collagen, and PDAC cells might cooperate during the transition to invasion, we utilized a microchannel-based in vitro tumor model and advanced imaging technologies to recreate and examine in vivo-like heterotypic interactions. We found that PSCs participate in a collaborative process with cancer cells by orchestrating the alignment of collagen fibers that, in turn, are permissive to enhanced cell migration. Additionally, direct contact between PSCs, collagen, and PDAC cells is critical to invasion and co-migration of both cell types. This suggests PSCs may accompany and assist in navigating PDAC cells through the stromal terrain. Together, our data provides a new role for PSCs in stimulating the metastatic process and underscores the importance of collagen alignment in cancer progression.

  4. NEDD9 stabilizes focal adhesions, increases binding to the extra-cellular matrix and differentially effects 2D versus 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jessie; Baquiran, Jaime B; Bonakdar, Navid; Lees, Justin; Ching, Yu Wooi; Pugacheva, Elena; Fabry, Ben; O'Neill, Geraldine M

    2012-01-01

    The speed of cell migration on 2-dimensional (2D) surfaces is determined by the rate of assembly and disassembly of clustered integrin receptors known as focal adhesions. Different modes of cell migration that have been described in 3D environments are distinguished by their dependence on integrin-mediated interactions with the extra-cellular matrix. In particular, the mesenchymal invasion mode is the most dependent on focal adhesion dynamics. The focal adhesion protein NEDD9 is a key signalling intermediary in mesenchymal cell migration, however whether NEDD9 plays a role in regulating focal adhesion dynamics has not previously been reported. As NEDD9 effects on 2D migration speed appear to depend on the cell type examined, in the present study we have used mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) from mice in which the NEDD9 gene has been depleted (NEDD9 -/- MEFs). This allows comparison with effects of other focal adhesion proteins that have previously been demonstrated using MEFs. We show that focal adhesion disassembly rates are increased in the absence of NEDD9 expression and this is correlated with increased paxillin phosphorylation at focal adhesions. NEDD9-/- MEFs have increased rates of migration on 2D surfaces, but conversely, migration of these cells is significantly reduced in 3D collagen gels. Importantly we show that myosin light chain kinase is activated in 3D in the absence of NEDD9 and is conversely inhibited in 2D cultures. Measurement of adhesion strength reveals that NEDD9-/- MEFs have decreased adhesion to fibronectin, despite upregulated α5β1 fibronectin receptor expression. We find that β1 integrin activation is significantly suppressed in the NEDD9-/-, suggesting that in the absence of NEDD9 there is decreased integrin receptor activation. Collectively our data suggest that NEDD9 may promote 3D cell migration by slowing focal adhesion disassembly, promoting integrin receptor activation and increasing adhesion force to the ECM.

  5. Differential effects of MAPK pathway inhibitors on migration and invasiveness of BRAF(V600E) mutant thyroid cancer cells in 2D and 3D culture.

    PubMed

    Ingeson-Carlsson, Camilla; Martinez-Monleon, Angela; Nilsson, Mikael

    2015-11-01

    Tumor microenvironment influences targeted drug therapy. In this study we compared drug responses to RAF and MEK inhibitors on tumor cell migration in 2D and 3D culture of BRAF(V600E) mutant cell lines derived from human papillary (BCPAP) and anaplastic (SW1736) thyroid carcinomas. Scratch wounding was compared to a double-layered collagen gel model developed for analysis of directed tumor cell invasion during prolonged culture. In BCPAP both PLX4720 and U0126 inhibited growth and migration in 2D and decreased tumor cell survival in 3D. In SW1736 drugs had no effect on migration in 2D but decreased invasion in 3D, however this related to reduced growth. Dual inhibition of BRAF(V600E) and MEK reduced but did not prevent SW1736 invasion although rebound phosphorylation of ERK in response to PLX4720 was blocked by U0126. These findings indicate that anti-tumor drug effects in vitro differ depending on culture conditions (2D vs. 3D) and that the invasive features of anaplastic thyroid cancer depend on non-MEK mechanism(s).

  6. The cavity-to-cavity migration of leukaemic cells through 3D honey-combed hydrogels with adjustable internal dimension and stiffness.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Joakim; Lautenschläger, Franziska; Sivaniah, Easan; Guck, Jochen R

    2010-03-01

    Whilst rigid, planar surfaces are often used to study cell migration, a physiological scenario requires three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds with tissue-like stiffness. This paper presents a method for fabricating periodic hydrogel scaffolds with a 3D honeycomb-like structure from colloidal crystal templates. The scaffolds, made of hydrogel-walled cavities interconnected by pores, have separately tuneable internal dimensions and adjustable gel stiffness down to that of soft tissues. In conjunction with confocal microscopy, these scaffolds were used to study the importance of cell compliance on invasive potential. Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) cells were differentiated with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and treated with paclitaxel. Their migration ability into the scaffolds' size-restricted pores, enabled by cell softening during ATRA differentiation, was significantly reduced by paclitaxel treatment, which interferes with cell shape recovery. These findings demonstrate the usability of the scaffolds for investigating factors that affect cell migration, and potentially other cell functions, in a realistic 3D tissue model.

  7. Macrophage-Secreted TNFα and TGFβ1 Influence Migration Speed and Persistence of Cancer Cells in 3D Tissue Culture via Independent Pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Hebert, Jess D; Lee, Tara A; Xing, Hao; Boussommier-Calleja, Alexandra; Hynes, Richard O; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Kamm, Roger D

    2017-01-15

    The ability of a cancer cell to migrate through the dense extracellular matrix within and surrounding the solid tumor is a critical determinant of metastasis. Macrophages enhance invasion and metastasis in the tumor microenvironment, but the basis for their effects is not fully understood. Using a microfluidic 3D cell migration assay, we found that the presence of macrophages enhanced the speed and persistence of cancer cell migration through a 3D extracellular matrix in a matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-dependent fashion. Mechanistic investigations revealed that macrophage-released TNFα and TGFβ1 mediated the observed behaviors by two distinct pathways. These factors synergistically enhanced migration persistence through a synergistic induction of NF-κB-dependent MMP1 expression in cancer cells. In contrast, macrophage-released TGFβ1 enhanced migration speed primarily by inducing MT1-MMP expression. Taken together, our results reveal new insights into how macrophages enhance cancer cell metastasis, and they identify TNFα and TGFβ1 dual blockade as an antimetastatic strategy in solid tumors. Cancer Res; 77(2); 279-90. ©2016 AACR.

  8. Computational model of mesenchymal migration in 3D under chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, F O; Gómez-Benito, M J; Folgado, J; Fernandes, P R; García-Aznar, J M

    2017-01-01

    Cell chemotaxis is an important characteristic of cellular migration, which takes part in crucial aspects of life and development. In this work, we propose a novel in silico model of mesenchymal 3D migration with competing protrusions under a chemotactic gradient. Based on recent experimental observations, we identify three main stages that can regulate mesenchymal chemotaxis: chemosensing, dendritic protrusion dynamics and cell-matrix interactions. Therefore, each of these features is considered as a different module of the main regulatory computational algorithm. The numerical model was particularized for the case of fibroblast chemotaxis under a PDGF-bb gradient. Fibroblasts migration was simulated embedded in two different 3D matrices - collagen and fibrin - and under several PDGF-bb concentrations. Validation of the model results was provided through qualitative and quantitative comparison with in vitro studies. Our numerical predictions of cell trajectories and speeds were within the measured in vitro ranges in both collagen and fibrin matrices. Although in fibrin, the migration speed of fibroblasts is very low, because fibrin is a stiffer and more entangling matrix. Testing PDGF-bb concentrations, we noticed that an increment of this factor produces a speed increment. At 1 ng mL(-1) a speed peak is reached after which the migration speed diminishes again. Moreover, we observed that fibrin exerts a dampening behavior on migration, significantly affecting the migration efficiency.

  9. Analysis of the effects of stromal cells on the migration of lymphocytes into and through inflamed tissue using 3-D culture models.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Hannah C; Buckley, Christopher D; Moss, Paul; Rainger, G Ed; Nash, Gerard B; McGettrick, Helen M

    2013-12-31

    Stromal cells may regulate the recruitment and behaviour of leukocytes during an inflammatory response, potentially through interaction with the endothelial cells (EC) and the leukocytes themselves. Here we describe new in vitro methodologies to characterise the effects of stromal cells on the migration of lymphocytes through endothelium and its underlying matrix. Three-dimensional tissue-like constructs were created in which EC were cultured above a stromal layer incorporating fibroblasts either as a monolayer on a porous filter or dispersed within a matrix of collagen type 1. A major advantage of these constructs is that they enable each step in leukocyte migration to be analysed in sequence (migration through EC and then stroma), as would occur in vivo. Migrated cells can also be retrieved from the constructs to identify which subsets traffic more effectively and how their functional responses evolve during migration. We found that culture of EC with dermal fibroblasts promoted lymphocyte transendothelial migration but not onward transit through matrix. A critical factor influencing the effect of fibroblasts on recruitment proved to be their proximity to the EC, with direct contact tending to disrupt migration. Comparison of the different approaches indicates that choice of an appropriate 3-D model enables the steps in lymphocyte entry into tissue to be studied in sequence, the regulatory mechanism to be dissected, and the effects of changes in stroma to be investigated.

  10. Integrin {beta}1-dependent invasive migration of irradiation-tolerant human lung adenocarcinoma cells in 3D collagen matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Seiichiro; Haga, Hisashi; Yasuda, Motoaki; Mizutani, Takeomi; Kawabata, Kazushige; Shirato, Hiroki; Nishioka, Takeshi

    2010-06-04

    Radiotherapy is one of the effective therapies used for treating various malignant tumors. However, the emergence of tolerant cells after irradiation remains problematic due to their high metastatic ability, sometimes indicative of poor prognosis. In this study, we showed that subcloned human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549P-3) that are irradiation-tolerant indicate high invasive activity in vitro, and exhibit an integrin {beta}1 activity-dependent migratory pattern. In collagen gel overlay assay, majority of the A549P-3 cells displayed round morphology and low migration activity, whereas a considerable number of A549P-3IR cells surviving irradiation displayed a spindle morphology and high migration rate. Blocking integrin {beta}1 activity reduced the migration rate of A549P-3IR cells and altered the cell morphology allowing them to assume a round shape. These results suggest that the A549P-3 cells surviving irradiation acquire a highly invasive integrin {beta}1-dependent phenotype, and integrin {beta}1 might be a potentially effective therapeutic target in combination with radiotherapy.

  11. Cooperative roles of SDF-1α and EGF gradients on tumor cell migration revealed by a robust 3D microfluidic model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beum Jun; Hannanta-anan, Pimkhuan; Chau, Michelle; Kim, Yoon Soo; Swartz, Melody A; Wu, Mingming

    2013-01-01

    Chemokine-mediated directed tumor cell migration within a three dimensional (3D) matrix, or chemoinvasion, is an important early step in cancer metastasis. Despite its clinical importance, it is largely unknown how cytokine and growth factor gradients within the tumor microenvironment regulate chemoinvasion. We studied tumor cell chemoinvasion in well-defined and stable chemical gradients using a robust 3D microfluidic model. We used CXCL12 (also known as SDF-1α) and epidermal growth factor (EGF), two well-known extracellular signaling molecules that co-exist in the tumor microenvironment (e.g. lymph nodes or intravasation sites), and a malignant breast tumor cell line, MDA-MB-231, embedded in type I collagen. When subjected to SDF-1α gradients alone, MDA-MB-231 cells migrated up the gradient, and the measured chemosensitivity (defined as the average cell velocity along the direction of the gradient) followed the ligand - receptor (SDF-1α - CXCR4) binding kinetics. On the other hand, when subjected to EGF gradients alone, tumor cells increased their overall motility, but without statistically significant chemotactic (directed) migration, in contrast to previous reports using 2D chemotaxis assays. Interestingly, we found that the chemoinvasive behavior to SDF-1α gradients was abrogated or even reversed in the presence of uniform concentrations of EGF; however, the presence of SDF-1α and EGF together modulated tumor cell motility cooperatively. These findings demonstrate the capabilities of our microfluidic model in re-creating complex microenvironments for cells, and the importance of cooperative roles of multiple cytokine and growth factor gradients in regulating cell migration in 3D environments.

  12. Cooperative Roles of SDF-1α and EGF Gradients on Tumor Cell Migration Revealed by a Robust 3D Microfluidic Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beum Jun; Hannanta-anan, Pimkhuan; Chau, Michelle; Kim, Yoon Soo; Swartz, Melody A.; Wu, Mingming

    2013-01-01

    Chemokine-mediated directed tumor cell migration within a three dimensional (3D) matrix, or chemoinvasion, is an important early step in cancer metastasis. Despite its clinical importance, it is largely unknown how cytokine and growth factor gradients within the tumor microenvironment regulate chemoinvasion. We studied tumor cell chemoinvasion in well-defined and stable chemical gradients using a robust 3D microfluidic model. We used CXCL12 (also known as SDF-1α) and epidermal growth factor (EGF), two well-known extracellular signaling molecules that co-exist in the tumor microenvironment (e.g. lymph nodes or intravasation sites), and a malignant breast tumor cell line, MDA-MB-231, embedded in type I collagen. When subjected to SDF-1α gradients alone, MDA-MB-231 cells migrated up the gradient, and the measured chemosensitivity (defined as the average cell velocity along the direction of the gradient) followed the ligand – receptor (SDF-1α – CXCR4) binding kinetics. On the other hand, when subjected to EGF gradients alone, tumor cells increased their overall motility, but without statistically significant chemotactic (directed) migration, in contrast to previous reports using 2D chemotaxis assays. Interestingly, we found that the chemoinvasive behavior to SDF-1α gradients was abrogated or even reversed in the presence of uniform concentrations of EGF; however, the presence of SDF-1α and EGF together modulated tumor cell motility cooperatively. These findings demonstrate the capabilities of our microfluidic model in re-creating complex microenvironments for cells, and the importance of cooperative roles of multiple cytokine and growth factor gradients in regulating cell migration in 3D environments. PMID:23869217

  13. Computational model of mesenchymal migration in 3D under chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, F. O.; Gómez-Benito, M. J.; Folgado, J.; Fernandes, P. R.; García-Aznar, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Cell chemotaxis is an important characteristic of cellular migration, which takes part in crucial aspects of life and development. In this work, we propose a novel in silico model of mesenchymal 3D migration with competing protrusions under a chemotactic gradient. Based on recent experimental observations, we identify three main stages that can regulate mesenchymal chemotaxis: chemosensing, dendritic protrusion dynamics and cell–matrix interactions. Therefore, each of these features is considered as a different module of the main regulatory computational algorithm. The numerical model was particularized for the case of fibroblast chemotaxis under a PDGF-bb gradient. Fibroblasts migration was simulated embedded in two different 3D matrices – collagen and fibrin – and under several PDGF-bb concentrations. Validation of the model results was provided through qualitative and quantitative comparison with in vitro studies. Our numerical predictions of cell trajectories and speeds were within the measured in vitro ranges in both collagen and fibrin matrices. Although in fibrin, the migration speed of fibroblasts is very low, because fibrin is a stiffer and more entangling matrix. Testing PDGF-bb concentrations, we noticed that an increment of this factor produces a speed increment. At 1 ng mL−1 a speed peak is reached after which the migration speed diminishes again. Moreover, we observed that fibrin exerts a dampening behavior on migration, significantly affecting the migration efficiency. PMID:27336322

  14. The use of nanoimprinted scaffolds as 3D culture models to facilitate spontaneous tumor cell migration and well-regulated spheroid formation.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Yukie; Waki, Atsuo; Yoshida, Kaori; Kakezuka, Anna; Kobayashi, Maki; Namiki, Hideo; Kuroda, Yusei; Kiyono, Yasushi; Yoshii, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Takako; Asai, Tatsuya; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Gelovani, Juri G; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa

    2011-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures are essential for drug development and tumor research. However, the limitations of 2D cultures are widely recognized, and a better technique is needed. Recent studies have indicated that a strong physical contact between cells and 2D substrates induces cellular characteristics that differ from those of tumors growing in vivo. 3D cell cultures using various substrates are then developing; nevertheless, conventional approaches have failed in maintenance of cellular proliferation and viability, uniformity, reproducibility, and/or simplicity of these assays. Here, we developed a 3D culture system with inorganic nanoscale scaffolding using nanoimprinting technology (nano-culture plates), which reproduced the characteristics of tumor cells growing in vivo. Diminished cell-to-substrate physical contact facilitated spontaneous tumor cell migration, intercellular adhesion, and multi-cellular 3D-spheroid formation while maintaining cellular proliferation and viability. The resulting multi-cellular spheroids formed hypoxic core regions similar to tumors growing in vivo. This technology allows creating uniform and highly-reproducible 3D cultures, which is easily applicable for microscopic and spectrophotometric assays, which can be used for high-throughput/high-content screening of anticancer drugs and should accelerate discovery of more effective anticancer therapies.

  15. A quantitative comparison of human HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells and primary human dermal fibroblasts identifies a 3D migration mechanism with properties unique to the transformed phenotype.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Michael P; Rogers, Robert E; Singh, Samir P; Lee, Justin Y; Loveland, Samuel G; Koepsel, Justin T; Witze, Eric S; Montanez-Sauri, Sara I; Sung, Kyung E; Tokuda, Emi Y; Sharma, Yasha; Everhart, Lydia M; Nguyen, Eric H; Zaman, Muhammad H; Beebe, David J; Ahn, Natalie G; Murphy, William L; Anseth, Kristi S

    2013-01-01

    Here, we describe an engineering approach to quantitatively compare migration, morphologies, and adhesion for tumorigenic human fibrosarcoma cells (HT-1080s) and primary human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs) with the aim of identifying distinguishing properties of the transformed phenotype. Relative adhesiveness was quantified using self-assembled monolayer (SAM) arrays and proteolytic 3-dimensional (3D) migration was investigated using matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-degradable poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels ("synthetic extracellular matrix" or "synthetic ECM"). In synthetic ECM, hDFs were characterized by vinculin-containing features on the tips of protrusions, multipolar morphologies, and organized actomyosin filaments. In contrast, HT-1080s were characterized by diffuse vinculin expression, pronounced β1-integrin on the tips of protrusions, a cortically-organized F-actin cytoskeleton, and quantitatively more rounded morphologies, decreased adhesiveness, and increased directional motility compared to hDFs. Further, HT-1080s were characterized by contractility-dependent motility, pronounced blebbing, and cortical contraction waves or constriction rings, while quantified 3D motility was similar in matrices with a wide range of biochemical and biophysical properties (including collagen) despite substantial morphological changes. While HT-1080s were distinct from hDFs for each of the 2D and 3D properties investigated, several features were similar to WM239a melanoma cells, including rounded, proteolytic migration modes, cortical F-actin organization, and prominent uropod-like structures enriched with β1-integrin, F-actin, and melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM/CD146/MUC18). Importantly, many of the features observed for HT-1080s were analogous to cellular changes induced by transformation, including cell rounding, a disorganized F-actin cytoskeleton, altered organization of focal adhesion proteins, and a weakly adherent phenotype. Based on our results, we

  16. Loss of p53 promotes RhoA-ROCK-dependent cell migration and invasion in 3D matrices.

    PubMed

    Gadea, Gilles; de Toledo, Marion; Anguille, Christelle; Roux, Pierre

    2007-07-02

    In addition to its role in controlling cell cycle progression, the tumor suppressor protein p53 can also affect other cellular functions such as cell migration. In this study, we show that p53 deficiency in mouse embryonic fibroblasts cultured in three-dimensional matrices induces a switch from an elongated spindle morphology to a markedly spherical and flexible one associated with highly dynamic membrane blebs. These rounded, motile cells exhibit amoeboid-like movement and have considerably increased invasive properties. The morphological transition requires the RhoA-ROCK (Rho-associated coil-containing protein kinase) pathway and is prevented by RhoE. A similar p53-mediated transition is observed in melanoma A375P cancer cells. Our data suggest that genetic alterations of p53 in tumors are sufficient to promote motility and invasion, thereby contributing to metastasis.

  17. Integration of microfluidic chip with biomimetic hydrogel for 3D controlling and monitoring of cell alignment and migration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Ho; Lee, Ki Hwa; Lee, Jeonghoon; Choi, Hyuk; Lee, Donghee; Park, Yongdoo; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2014-04-01

    A biomimetic hydrogel was integrated into microfluidic chips to monitor glioma cell alignment and migration. The extracellular matrix-based biomimetic hydrogel was remodeled by matrix metalloprotease (MMP) secreted by glioma cells and the hydrogel could thus be used to assess cellular behavior. Both static and dynamic cell growth conditions (flow rate of 0.1 mL/h) were used. Cell culture medium with and without vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insensitive VEGF and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) were employed to monitor cell behavior. A concentration gradient formed in the hydrogel resulted in differences in cell behavior. Glioma cell viability in the microchannel was 75-85%. Cells in the VEGF-loaded microchannels spread extensively, degrading the MMP-sensitive hydrogel, and achieved cell sizes almost fivefold larger than seen in the control medium. Our integrated system can be used as a model for the study of cellular behavior in a controlled microenvironment generated by fluidic conditions in a biomimetic matrix.

  18. In vitro analysis of chemotactic leukocyte migration in 3D environments.

    PubMed

    Sixt, Michael; Lämmermann, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Cell migration on two-dimensional (2D) substrates follows entirely different rules than cell migration in three-dimensional (3D) environments. This is especially relevant for leukocytes that are able to migrate in the absence of adhesion receptors within the confined geometry of artificial 3D extracellular matrix scaffolds and within the interstitial space in vivo. Here, we describe in detail a simple and economical protocol to visualize dendritic cell migration in 3D collagen scaffolds along chemotactic gradients. This method can be adapted to other cell types and may serve as a physiologically relevant paradigm for the directed locomotion of most amoeboid cells.

  19. Real-time monitoring of 3D cell culture using a 3D capacitance biosensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Han, Nalae; Lee, Rimi; Choi, In-Hong; Park, Yong-Beom; Shin, Jeon-Soo; Yoo, Kyung-Hwa

    2016-03-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures have recently received attention because they represent a more physiologically relevant environment compared to conventional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures. However, 2D-based imaging techniques or cell sensors are insufficient for real-time monitoring of cellular behavior in 3D cell culture. Here, we report investigations conducted with a 3D capacitance cell sensor consisting of vertically aligned pairs of electrodes. When GFP-expressing human breast cancer cells (GFP-MCF-7) encapsulated in alginate hydrogel were cultured in a 3D cell culture system, cellular activities, such as cell proliferation and apoptosis at different heights, could be monitored non-invasively and in real-time by measuring the change in capacitance with the 3D capacitance sensor. Moreover, we were able to monitor cell migration of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with our 3D capacitance sensor.

  20. A microfluidic device for 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D cell navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamloo, Amir; Amirifar, Leyla

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices have received wide attention and shown great potential in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Investigating cell response to various stimulations is much more accurate and comprehensive with the aid of microfluidic devices. In this study, we introduced a microfluidic device by which the matrix density as a mechanical property and the concentration profile of a biochemical factor as a chemical property could be altered. Our microfluidic device has a cell tank and a cell culture chamber to mimic both 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D migration of three types of cells. Fluid shear stress is negligible on the cells and a stable concentration gradient can be obtained by diffusion. The device was designed by a numerical simulation so that the uniformity of the concentration gradients throughout the cell culture chamber was obtained. Adult neural cells were cultured within this device and they showed different branching and axonal navigation phenotypes within varying nerve growth factor (NGF) concentration profiles. Neural stem cells were also cultured within varying collagen matrix densities while exposed to NGF concentrations and they experienced 3D to 3D collective migration. By generating vascular endothelial growth factor concentration gradients, adult human dermal microvascular endothelial cells also migrated in a 2D to 3D manner and formed a stable lumen within a specific collagen matrix density. It was observed that a minimum absolute concentration and concentration gradient were required to stimulate migration of all types of the cells. This device has the advantage of changing multiple parameters simultaneously and is expected to have wide applicability in cell studies.

  1. Analyzing the roles of Rho GTPases in cancer cell migration with a live cell imaging 3D-morphology-based assay.

    PubMed

    Colomba, Audrey; Ridley, Anne J

    2014-01-01

    Rho GTPases are master regulators of cytoskeleton dynamics and therefore regulate cell motility. Rho GTPases, as well as their regulators and effectors, are often deregulated in cancers and thus contribute to tumor progression to metastasis. Cancer progression involves multiple steps, including invasion of the surrounding tissues. Several methods to investigate the invasion of tumors cells in 3D matrices in vitro have been developed. In this chapter we describe a 3D-based morphology assay that can be used for medium-throughput microscopy-based screening to identify regulators of cancer cell invasion. We use this method coupled to RNAi to investigate how Rho GTPases affect prostate cancer cell morphology in 3D Matrigel.

  2. Integrin associated proteins differentially regulate neutrophil polarity and directed migration in 2D and 3D.

    PubMed

    Yamahashi, Yukie; Cavnar, Peter J; Hind, Laurel E; Berthier, Erwin; Bennin, David A; Beebe, David; Huttenlocher, Anna

    2015-10-01

    Directed neutrophil migration in blood vessels and tissues is critical for proper immune function; however, the mechanisms that regulate three-dimensional neutrophil chemotaxis remain unclear. It has been shown that integrins are dispensable for interstitial three-dimensional (3D) leukocyte migration; however, the role of integrin regulatory proteins during directed neutrophil migration is not known. Using a novel microfluidic gradient generator amenable to 2D and 3D analysis, we found that the integrin regulatory proteins Kindlin-3, RIAM, and talin-1 differentially regulate neutrophil polarization and directed migration to gradients of chemoattractant in 2D versus 3D. Both talin-1-deficient and RIAM-deficient neutrophil-like cells had impaired adhesion, polarization, and migration on 2D surfaces whereas in 3D the cells polarized but had impaired 3D chemotactic velocity. Kindlin-3 deficient cells were able to polarize and migrate on 2D surfaces but had impaired directionality. In a 3D environment, Kindlin-3 deficient cells displayed efficient chemotaxis. These findings demonstrate that the role of integrin regulatory proteins in cell polarity and directed migration can be different in 2D and 3D.

  3. Controlled surface topography regulates collective 3D migration by epithelial-mesenchymal composite embryonic tissues.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiho; Shawky, Joseph H; Kim, YongTae; Hazar, Melis; LeDuc, Philip R; Sitti, Metin; Davidson, Lance A

    2015-07-01

    Cells in tissues encounter a range of physical cues as they migrate. Probing single cell and collective migratory responses to physically defined three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments and the factors that modulate those responses are critical to understanding how tissue migration is regulated during development, regeneration, and cancer. One key physical factor that regulates cell migration is topography. Most studies on surface topography and cell mechanics have been carried out with single migratory cells, yet little is known about the spreading and motility response of 3D complex multi-cellular tissues to topographical cues. Here, we examine the response to complex topographical cues of microsurgically isolated tissue explants composed of epithelial and mesenchymal cell layers from naturally 3D organized embryos of the aquatic frog Xenopus laevis. We control topography using fabricated micropost arrays (MPAs) and investigate the collective 3D migration of these multi-cellular systems in these MPAs. We find that the topography regulates both collective and individual cell migration and that dense MPAs reduce but do not eliminate tissue spreading. By modulating cell size through the cell cycle inhibitor Mitomycin C or the spacing of the MPAs we uncover how 3D topographical cues disrupt collective cell migration. We find surface topography can direct both single cell motility and tissue spreading, altering tissue-scale processes that enable efficient conversion of single cell motility into collective movement.

  4. Migration and Proliferative Activity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in 3D Polylactide Scaffolds Depends on Cell Seeding Technique and Collagen Modification.

    PubMed

    Rodina, A V; Tenchurin, T Kh; Saprykin, V P; Shepelev, A D; Mamagulashvili, V G; Grigor'ev, T E; Lukanina, K I; Orekhov, A S; Moskaleva, E Yu; Chvalun, S N

    2016-11-01

    We analyzed viability of mesenchymal stem cells seeded by static and dynamic methods to highly porous fibrous 3D poly-L-lactide scaffolds with similar physical and chemical properties, but different spatial organization modified with collagen. Standard collagen coating promoted protein adsorption on the scaffold surface and improved adhesive properties of 100 μ-thick scaffolds. Modification of 600-μ scaffolds with collagen under pressure increased proliferative activity of mesenchymal stem cells seeded under static and dynamic (delivery of 100,000 cells in 10 ml medium in a perfusion system at a rate of 1 ml/min) conditions by 47 and 648%, respectively (measured after 120-h culturing by MTT test). Dynamic conditions provide more uniform distribution of collagen on scaffold fibers and promote cell penetration into 3D poly-L-lactide scaffolds with thickness >600 μ.

  5. Towards Single Cell Traction Microscopy within 3D Collagen Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Matthew S.; Long, Rong; Feng, Xinzeng; Huang, YuLing; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Wu, Mingming

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Cells require the three dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, current understanding of cell-ECM and cell-cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D cell traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. 3D cell traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single animal cells embedded in either synthetic or natively derived fibrous gels. We discuss here the development of 3D cell traction microscopy, its current limitations, and perspectives on the future of this technology. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying 3D cell traction microscopy to individual tumor cells migration within collagen gels. PMID:23806281

  6. Imaging Shallow Salt With 3D Refraction Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanschuyver, C. J.; Hilterman, F. J.

    2005-05-01

    In offshore West Africa, numerous salt walls are within 200 m of sea level. Because of the shallowness of these salt walls, reflections from the salt top can be difficult to map, making it impossible to build an accurate velocity model for subsequent pre-stack depth migration. An accurate definition of salt boundaries is critical to any depth model where salt is present. Unfortunately, when a salt body is very shallow, the reflection from the upper interface can be obscured due to large offsets between the source and near receivers and also due to the interference from multiples and other near-surface noise events. A new method is described using 3D migration of the refraction waveforms which is simplified because of several constraints in the model definition. The azimuth and dip of the refractor is found by imaging with Kirchhoff theory. A Kirchhoff migration is performed where the traveltime values are adjusted to use the CMP refraction traveltime equation. I assume the sediment and salt velocities to be known such that once the image time is specified, then the dip and azimuth of the refraction path can be found. The resulting 3D refraction migrations are in excellent depth agreement with available well control. In addition, the refraction migration time picks of deeper salt events are in agreement with time picks of the same events on the reflection migration.

  7. Nuclear lamin stiffness is a barrier to 3D migration, but softness can limit survival.

    PubMed

    Harada, Takamasa; Swift, Joe; Irianto, Jerome; Shin, Jae-Won; Spinler, Kyle R; Athirasala, Avathamsa; Diegmiller, Rocky; Dingal, P C Dave P; Ivanovska, Irena L; Discher, Dennis E

    2014-03-03

    Cell migration through solid tissue often involves large contortions of the nucleus, but biological significance is largely unclear. The nucleoskeletal protein lamin-A varies both within and between cell types and was shown here to contribute to cell sorting and survival in migration through constraining micropores. Lamin-A proved rate-limiting in 3D migration of diverse human cells that ranged from glioma and adenocarcinoma lines to primary mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Stoichiometry of A- to B-type lamins established an activation barrier, with high lamin-A:B producing extruded nuclear shapes after migration. Because the juxtaposed A and B polymer assemblies respectively conferred viscous and elastic stiffness to the nucleus, subpopulations with different A:B levels sorted in 3D migration. However, net migration was also biphasic in lamin-A, as wild-type lamin-A levels protected against stress-induced death, whereas deep knockdown caused broad defects in stress resistance. In vivo xenografts proved consistent with A:B-based cell sorting, and intermediate A:B-enhanced tumor growth. Lamins thus impede 3D migration but also promote survival against migration-induced stresses.

  8. 7-cyclopentyl-5-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d] pyrimidin-4-ylamine inhibits the proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells by suppressing ERK and Akt pathways.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyang-Hee; Kim, Sang Woo; Lee, Chang Youn; Lim, Kyu Hee; Lee, Jiyun; Lim, Soyeon; Lee, Seahyoung; Hwang, Ki-Chul

    2017-03-05

    Excessive vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and migration after vascular injury significantly contributes to the development of occlusive vascular disease. Therefore, inhibiting the proliferation and migration of VSMCs is a validated therapeutic modality for occlusive vascular disease such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. In the present study, we screened chemical compounds for their anti-proliferative effects on VSMCs using multiple approaches, such as MTT assays, wound healing assays, and trans-well migration assays. Our data indicate that 7-cyclopentyl-5-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d] pyrimidin-4-ylamine, a lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) inhibitor, significantly inhibited both VSMC proliferation and migration. 7-cyclopentyl-5-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-ylamine suppresses VSMC proliferation and migration via down-regulating the protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) pathways, and it significantly decreased the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cyclin D1 and, the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRb). Additionally, 7-cyclopentyl-5-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d] pyrimidin-4-ylamine suppressed the migration of VSMCs from endothelium-removed aortic rings, as well as neointima formation following rat carotid balloon injury. The present study identified 7-cyclopentyl-5-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-ylamine as a potent VSMC proliferation and migration inhibitor and warrants further studies to elucidate its more detailed molecular mechanisms, such as its primary target, and to further validate its in vivo efficacy as a therapeutic agent for pathologic vascular conditions, such as restenosis and atherosclerosis.

  9. Individual versus collective fibroblast spreading and migration: regulation by matrix composition in 3D culture.

    PubMed

    Miron-Mendoza, Miguel; Lin, Xihui; Ma, Lisha; Ririe, Peter; Petroll, W Matthew

    2012-06-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) supplies both physical and chemical signals to cells and provides a substrate through which fibroblasts migrate during wound repair. To directly assess how ECM composition regulates this process, we used a nested 3D matrix model in which cell-populated collagen buttons were embedded in cell-free collagen or fibrin matrices. Time-lapse microscopy was used to record the dynamic pattern of cell migration into the outer matrices, and 3D confocal imaging was used to assess cell connectivity and cytoskeletal organization. Corneal fibroblasts stimulated with PDGF migrated more rapidly into collagen as compared to fibrin. In addition, the pattern of fibroblast migration into fibrin and collagen ECMs was strikingly different. Corneal fibroblasts migrating into collagen matrices developed dendritic processes and moved independently, whereas cells migrating into fibrin matrices had a more fusiform morphology and formed an interconnected meshwork. A similar pattern was observed when using dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that this response is not unique to corneal cells. We next cultured corneal fibroblasts within and on top of standard collagen and fibrin matrices to assess the impact of ECM composition on the cell spreading response. Similar differences in cell morphology and connectivity were observed – cells remained separated on collagen but coalesced into clusters on fibrin. Cadherin was localized to junctions between interconnected cells, whereas fibronectin was present both between cells and at the tips of extending cell processes. Cells on fibrin matrices also developed more prominent stress fibers than those on collagen matrices. Importantly, these spreading and migration patterns were consistently observed on both rigid and compliant substrates, thus differences in ECM mechanical stiffness were not the underlying cause. Overall, these results demonstrate for the first time that ECM protein composition alone (collagen vs. fibrin) can induce

  10. Toward single cell traction microscopy within 3D collagen matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Matthew S.; Long, Rong; Feng, Xinzeng; Huang, YuLing; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Wu, Mingming

    2013-10-01

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Cells require the three-dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, current understanding of cell–ECM and cell–cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D cell traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. 3D cell traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single animal cells embedded in either synthetic or natively derived fibrous gels. We discuss here the development of 3D cell traction microscopy, its current limitations, and perspectives on the future of this technology. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying 3D cell traction microscopy to individual tumor cell migration within collagen gels. - Highlights: • Review of the current state of the art in 3D cell traction force microscopy. • Bulk and micro-characterization of remodelable fibrous collagen gels. • Strategies for performing 3D cell traction microscopy within collagen gels.

  11. Multizone Paper Platform for 3D Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Derda, Ratmir; Hong, Estrella; Mwangi, Martin; Mammoto, Akiko; Ingber, Donald E.; Whitesides, George M.

    2011-01-01

    In vitro 3D culture is an important model for tissues in vivo. Cells in different locations of 3D tissues are physiologically different, because they are exposed to different concentrations of oxygen, nutrients, and signaling molecules, and to other environmental factors (temperature, mechanical stress, etc). The majority of high-throughput assays based on 3D cultures, however, can only detect the average behavior of cells in the whole 3D construct. Isolation of cells from specific regions of 3D cultures is possible, but relies on low-throughput techniques such as tissue sectioning and micromanipulation. Based on a procedure reported previously (“cells-in-gels-in-paper” or CiGiP), this paper describes a simple method for culture of arrays of thin planar sections of tissues, either alone or stacked to create more complex 3D tissue structures. This procedure starts with sheets of paper patterned with hydrophobic regions that form 96 hydrophilic zones. Serial spotting of cells suspended in extracellular matrix (ECM) gel onto the patterned paper creates an array of 200 micron-thick slabs of ECM gel (supported mechanically by cellulose fibers) containing cells. Stacking the sheets with zones aligned on top of one another assembles 96 3D multilayer constructs. De-stacking the layers of the 3D culture, by peeling apart the sheets of paper, “sections” all 96 cultures at once. It is, thus, simple to isolate 200-micron-thick cell-containing slabs from each 3D culture in the 96-zone array. Because the 3D cultures are assembled from multiple layers, the number of cells plated initially in each layer determines the spatial distribution of cells in the stacked 3D cultures. This capability made it possible to compare the growth of 3D tumor models of different spatial composition, and to examine the migration of cells in these structures. PMID:21573103

  12. 3D mapping of neuronal migration in the embryonic mouse brain with magnetic resonance microimaging.

    PubMed

    Deans, Abby E; Wadghiri, Youssef Zaim; Aristizábal, Orlando; Turnbull, Daniel H

    2015-07-01

    A prominent feature of the developing mammalian brain is the widespread migration of neural progenitor (NP) cells during embryogenesis. A striking example is provided by NP cells born in the ventral forebrain of mid-gestation stage mice, which subsequently migrate long distances to their final positions in the cortex and olfactory bulb. Previous studies have used two-dimensional histological methods, making it difficult to analyze three-dimensional (3D) migration patterns. Unlike histology, magnetic resonance microimaging (micro-MRI) is a non-destructive, quantitative and inherently 3D imaging method for analyzing mouse embryos. To allow mapping of migrating NP cells with micro-MRI, cells were labeled in situ in the medial (MGE) and lateral (LGE) ganglionic eminences, using targeted in utero ultrasound-guided injection of micron-sized particles of iron-oxide (MPIO). Ex vivo micro-MRI and histology were then performed 5-6days after injection, demonstrating that the MPIO had magnetically labeled the migrating NP populations, which enabled 3D visualization and automated segmentation of the labeled cells. This approach was used to analyze the distinct patterns of migration from the MGE and LGE, and to construct rostral-caudal migration maps from each progenitor region. Furthermore, abnormal migratory phenotypes were observed in Nkx2.1(-/-) embryos, most notably a significant increase in cortical neurons derived from the Nkx2.1(-/-) LGE. Taken together, these results demonstrate that MPIO labeling and micro-MRI provide an efficient and powerful approach for analyzing 3D cell migration patterns in the normal and mutant mouse embryonic brain.

  13. Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Trepat, Xavier; Chen, Zaozao; Jacobson, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to establishing and maintaining the proper organization of multicellular organisms. Morphogenesis can be viewed as a consequence, in part, of cell locomotion, from large-scale migrations of epithelial sheets during gastrulation, to the movement of individual cells during development of the nervous system. In an adult organism, cell migration is essential for proper immune response, wound repair, and tissue homeostasis, while aberrant cell migration is found in various pathologies. Indeed, as our knowledge of migration increases, we can look forward to, for example, abating the spread of highly malignant cancer cells, retarding the invasion of white cells in the inflammatory process, or enhancing the healing of wounds. This article is organized in two main sections. The first section is devoted to the single-cell migrating in isolation such as occurs when leukocytes migrate during the immune response or when fibroblasts squeeze through connective tissue. The second section is devoted to cells collectively migrating as part of multicellular clusters or sheets. This second type of migration is prevalent in development, wound healing, and in some forms of cancer metastasis. PMID:23720251

  14. Podosomes in space: macrophage migration and matrix degradation in 2D and 3D settings.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Christiane; Le-Cabec, Véronique; El Azzouzi, Karim; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Linder, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Migration of macrophages is a key process for a variety of physiological functions, such as pathogen clearance or tissue homeostasis. However, it can also be part of pathological scenarios, as in the case of tumor-associated macrophages. This review presents an overview of the different migration modes macrophages can adopt, depending on the physical and chemical properties of specific environments, and the constraints they impose upon cells. We discuss the importance of these environmental and also of cellular parameters, as well as their relative impact on macrophage migration and on the formation of matrix-lytic podosomes in 2D and 3D. Moreover, we present an overview of routinely used and also newly developed assays for the study of macrophage migration in both 2D and 3D contexts, their respective advantages and limitations, and also their potential to reliably mimic in vivo situations.

  15. 3D finite-difference seismic migration with parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Ober, C.C.; Gjertsen, R.; Minkoff, S.; Womble, D.E.

    1998-11-01

    The ability to image complex geologies such as salt domes in the Gulf of Mexico and thrusts in mountainous regions is essential for reducing the risk associated with oil exploration. Imaging these structures, however, is computationally expensive as datasets can be terabytes in size. Traditional ray-tracing migration methods cannot handle complex velocity variations commonly found near such salt structures. Instead the authors use the full 3D acoustic wave equation, discretized via a finite difference algorithm. They reduce the cost of solving the apraxial wave equation by a number of numerical techniques including the method of fractional steps and pipelining the tridiagonal solves. The imaging code, Salvo, uses both frequency parallelism (generally 90% efficient) and spatial parallelism (65% efficient). Salvo has been tested on synthetic and real data and produces clear images of the subsurface even beneath complicated salt structures.

  16. Amoeboid migration mode adaption in quasi-3D spatial density gradients of varying lattice geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelashvili, Mari; Emmert, Martin; Hodeck, Kai F.; Heinrich, Doris

    2014-07-01

    Cell migration processes are controlled by sensitive interaction with external cues such as topographic structures of the cell’s environment. Here, we present systematically controlled assays to investigate the specific effects of spatial density and local geometry of topographic structure on amoeboid migration of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. This is realized by well-controlled fabrication of quasi-3D pillar fields exhibiting a systematic variation of inter-pillar distance and pillar lattice geometry. By time-resolved local mean-squared displacement analysis of amoeboid migration, we can extract motility parameters in order to elucidate the details of amoeboid migration mechanisms and consolidate them in a two-state contact-controlled motility model, distinguishing directed and random phases. Specifically, we find that directed pillar-to-pillar runs are found preferably in high pillar density regions, and cells in directed motion states sense pillars as attractive topographic stimuli. In contrast, cell motion in random probing states is inhibited by high pillar density, where pillars act as obstacles for cell motion. In a gradient spatial density, these mechanisms lead to topographic guidance of cells, with a general trend towards a regime of inter-pillar spacing close to the cell diameter. In locally anisotropic pillar environments, cell migration is often found to be damped due to competing attraction by different pillars in close proximity and due to lack of other potential stimuli in the vicinity of the cell. Further, we demonstrate topographic cell guidance reflecting the lattice geometry of the quasi-3D environment by distinct preferences in migration direction. Our findings allow to specifically control amoeboid cell migration by purely topographic effects and thus, to induce active cell guidance. These tools hold prospects for medical applications like improved wound treatment, or invasion assays for immune cells.

  17. Prestack depth migration for 3D offshore methane hydrates data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seonghyung; Kim, Tae-yeon

    2015-04-01

    One of the indicators for the existence of methane hydrates on seismic data is BSR (bottom simulated reflector), which shows the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. It shows a reversed phase polarity compared to that of the water bottom reflections and high amplitude reflections. It is well known acoustic velocity decrease at the contact between gas hydrates and free-gas-bearing sediments. Prestack reverse time migration (RTM) is a method for imaging the subsurface in depth domain using inner product of source wavefield extrapolation in forward and receiver wavefield extrapolation in backward. It is widely used for imaging the complex subsurface structures with keeping amplitude. We applied RTM to 3D offshore seismic data for methane hydrates exploration. The study area is 12 x 25 km with 120 survey lines offshore. The shot gathers were acquired with 2 streamers and each one has 240 channels. Shot and receiver spacing is 25 m and 12.5 m. The line spacing is 100 m. Near offset is 150 m and maximum far offset is 3137.5 m. The record length is 7 second with a sampling rate of 1 ms. Shot gathers after resampled with 4 ms were processed to enhance signal to noise ratio using conventional basic processing such as amplitude recovery, deconvolution, and band-pass filtering. Interval velocities which were calculated from conventional stack velocities were used for velocity model for RTM. The basic-processed shot gathers and a velocity model were used for input data to obtain 3D image using RTM. For RTM, 20 Hz Ricker wavelet were used and grid size of x, y and z direction is 20x20x20 m. The total number of shot gathers is 176,387 and every 10th shot gather was chosen for reducing computer times and storage. The result is 3D image with inline, cross-line and depth slice image. High amplitude events are shown around (6 km, 4 km, 2.3 km) of in-line image. Each depth slice shows amplitude variation according to different depth steps. Especially channel structure variation

  18. Control of macrophage 3D migration: a therapeutic challenge to limit tissue infiltration.

    PubMed

    Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle

    2014-11-01

    Macrophages are professional migrating cells found in all body tissues from the early embryonic stages till the end of the adult life. Tissue macrophages do not only play beneficial roles. In several diseases, macrophages recruited from blood monocytes have a deleterious action such as favoring cancer progression and destroying tissues in chronic inflammation. To migrate in 3D environments, all leukocytes use the amoeboid movement while macrophages use the amoeboid and the mesenchymal migration modes. Mesenchymal migration takes place in dense matrices and involves podosomes and proteolysis of the extracellular matrix to create paths. Podosome disruption has been correlated with reduced mesenchymal migration of macrophages and unaffected amoeboid migration. Therefore, podosomes are proposed as a therapeutic target. Inhibiting podosome regulators that are only expressed in macrophages and few cell types would avoid collateral effects often encountered when ubiquitous proteins are used as drug targets. With the current status of our knowledge on human macrophage podosomes and 3D migration, the tyrosine kinase Hck appears to be a good candidate.

  19. 3D Cell Culture in Alginate Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Therese; Auk-Emblem, Pia; Dornish, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This review compiles information regarding the use of alginate, and in particular alginate hydrogels, in culturing cells in 3D. Knowledge of alginate chemical structure and functionality are shown to be important parameters in design of alginate-based matrices for cell culture. Gel elasticity as well as hydrogel stability can be impacted by the type of alginate used, its concentration, the choice of gelation technique (ionic or covalent), and divalent cation chosen as the gel inducing ion. The use of peptide-coupled alginate can control cell–matrix interactions. Gelation of alginate with concomitant immobilization of cells can take various forms. Droplets or beads have been utilized since the 1980s for immobilizing cells. Newer matrices such as macroporous scaffolds are now entering the 3D cell culture product market. Finally, delayed gelling, injectable, alginate systems show utility in the translation of in vitro cell culture to in vivo tissue engineering applications. Alginate has a history and a future in 3D cell culture. Historically, cells were encapsulated in alginate droplets cross-linked with calcium for the development of artificial organs. Now, several commercial products based on alginate are being used as 3D cell culture systems that also demonstrate the possibility of replacing or regenerating tissue. PMID:27600217

  20. 3D culture for cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Zuppinger, Christian

    2016-07-01

    This review discusses historical milestones, recent developments and challenges in the area of 3D culture models with cardiovascular cell types. Expectations in this area have been raised in recent years, but more relevant in vitro research, more accurate drug testing results, reliable disease models and insights leading to bioartificial organs are expected from the transition to 3D cell culture. However, the construction of organ-like cardiac 3D models currently remains a difficult challenge. The heart consists of highly differentiated cells in an intricate arrangement.Furthermore, electrical “wiring”, a vascular system and multiple cell types act in concert to respond to the rapidly changing demands of the body. Although cardiovascular 3D culture models have been predominantly developed for regenerative medicine in the past, their use in drug screening and for disease models has become more popular recently. Many sophisticated 3D culture models are currently being developed in this dynamic area of life science. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  1. The role of phosphoinositide 3-kinases in neutrophil migration in 3D collagen gels.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kayleigh J S; Muessel, Michelle J; Pullar, Christine E; Willars, Gary B; Wardlaw, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    The entry of neutrophils into tissue has been well characterised; however the fate of these cells once inside the tissue microenvironment is not fully understood. A variety of signal transduction pathways including those involving class I PI3 Kinases have been suggested to be involved in neutrophil migration. This study aims to determine the involvement of PI3 Kinases in chemokinetic and chemotactic neutrophil migration in response to CXCL8 and GM-CSF in a three-dimensional collagen gel, as a model of tissue. Using a three-dimensional collagen assay chemokinetic and chemotactic migration induced by CXCL8 was inhibited with the pan PI3 Kinase inhibitor wortmannin. Analysis of the specific Class I PI3 Kinase catalytic isoforms alpha, delta and gamma using the inhibitors PIK-75, PIK-294 and AS-605240 respectively indicated differential roles in CXCL8-induced neutrophil migration. PIK-294 inhibited both chemokinetic and chemotactic CXCL8-induced migration. AS-605240 markedly reduced CXCL8 induced chemokinetic migration but had no effect on CXCL8 induced chemotactic migration. In contrast PIK-75 inhibited chemotactic migration but not chemokinetic migration. At optimal concentrations of GM-CSF the inhibitors had no effect on the percentage of neutrophil migration in comparison to the control however at suboptimal concentrations wortmannin, AS-605240 and PIK-294 inhibited chemokinesis. This study suggests that PI3 Kinase is necessary for CXCL8 induced migration in a 3D tissue environment but that chemokinetic and chemotactic migration may be controlled by different isoforms with gamma shown to be important in chemokinesis and alpha important in chemotaxis. Neutrophil migration in response to suboptimal concentrations of GM-CSF is dependent on PI3 Kinase, particularly the gamma and delta catalytic isoforms.

  2. Fibroblast Migration in 3D is Controlled by Haptotaxis in a Non-muscle Myosin II-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Arotzena, O; Borau, C; Movilla, N; Vicente-Manzanares, M; García-Aznar, J M

    2015-12-01

    Cell migration in 3D is a key process in many physiological and pathological processes. Although valuable knowledge has been accumulated through analysis of various 2D models, some of these insights are not directly applicable to migration in 3D. In this study, we have confined biomimetic hydrogels within microfluidic platforms in the presence of a chemoattractant (platelet-derived growth factor-BB). We have characterized the migratory responses of human fibroblasts within them, particularly focusing on the role of non-muscle myosin II. Our results indicate a prominent role for myosin II in the integration of chemotactic and haptotactic migratory responses of fibroblasts in 3D confined environments.

  3. An extracellular-matrix-specific GEF-GAP interaction regulates Rho GTPase crosstalk for 3D collagen migration.

    PubMed

    Kutys, Matthew L; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2014-09-01

    Rho-family GTPases govern distinct types of cell migration on different extracellular matrix proteins in tissue culture or three-dimensional (3D) matrices. We searched for mechanisms selectively regulating 3D cell migration in different matrix environments and discovered a form of Cdc42-RhoA crosstalk governing cell migration through a specific pair of GTPase activator and inhibitor molecules. We first identified βPix, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), as a specific regulator of migration in 3D collagen using an affinity-precipitation-based GEF screen. Knockdown of βPix specifically blocks cell migration in fibrillar collagen microenvironments, leading to hyperactive cellular protrusion accompanied by increased collagen matrix contraction. Live FRET imaging and RNAi knockdown linked this βPix knockdown phenotype to loss of polarized Cdc42 but not Rac1 activity, accompanied by enhanced, de-localized RhoA activity. Mechanistically, collagen phospho-regulates βPix, leading to its association with srGAP1, a GTPase-activating protein (GAP), needed to suppress RhoA activity. Our results reveal a matrix-specific pathway controlling migration involving a GEF-GAP interaction of βPix with srGAP1 that is critical for maintaining suppressive crosstalk between Cdc42 and RhoA during 3D collagen migration.

  4. Collective Motion of Mammalian Cell Cohorts in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Yasha; Vargas, Diego A.; Pegoraro, Adrian F.; Lepzelter, David; Weitz, David A.; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2016-01-01

    Collective cell migration is ubiquitous in biology, from development to cancer; it occurs in complex systems comprised of heterogeneous cell types, signals and matrices, and requires large scale regulation in space and time. Understanding how cells achieve organized collective motility is crucial to addressing cellular and tissue function and disease progression. While current two-dimensional model systems recapitulate the dynamic properties of collective cell migration, quantitative three-dimensional equivalent model systems have proved elusive. To establish such a model system, we study cell collectives by tracking individuals within cell cohorts embedded in three dimensional collagen scaffolding. We develop a custom algorithm to quantify the temporal and spatial heterogeneity of motion in cell cohorts during motility events. In the absence of external driving agents, we show that these cohorts rotate in short bursts, <2 hours, and translate for up to 6 hours. We observe, track, and analyze three dimensional motion of cell cohorts composed of 3–31 cells, and pave a path toward understanding cell collectives in 3D as a complex emergent system. PMID:26549557

  5. A novel mechanotactic 3D modeling of cell morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamaleddin Mousavi, Seyed; Hamdy Doweidar, Mohamed

    2014-08-01

    Cell morphology plays a critical role in many biological processes, such as cell migration, tissue development, wound healing and tumor growth. Recent investigations demonstrate that, among other stimuli, cells adapt their shapes according to their substrate stiffness. Until now, the development of this process has not been clear. Therefore, in this work, a new three-dimensional (3D) computational model for cell morphology has been developed. This model is based on a previous cell migration model presented by the same authors. The new model considers that during cell-substrate interaction, cell shape is governed by internal cell deformation, which leads to an accurate prediction of the cell shape according to the mechanical characteristic of its surrounding micro-environment. To study this phenomenon, the model has been applied to different numerical cases. The obtained results, which are qualitatively consistent with well-known related experimental works, indicate that cell morphology not only depends on substrate stiffness but also on the substrate boundary conditions. A cell located within an unconstrained soft substrate (several kPa) with uniform stiffness is unable to adhere to its substrate or to send out pseudopodia. When the substrate stiffness increases to tens of kPa (intermediate and rigid substrates), the cell can adequately adhere to its substrate. Subsequently, as the traction forces exerted by the cell increase, the cell elongates and its shape changes. Within very stiff (hard) substrates, the cell cannot penetrate into its substrate or send out pseudopodia. On the other hand, a cell is found to be more elongated within substrates with a constrained surface. However, this elongation decreases when the cell approaches it. It can be concluded that the higher the net traction force, the greater the cell elongation, the larger the cell membrane area, and the less random the cell alignment.

  6. 3-D prestack Kirchhoff depth migration: From prototype to production in a massively parallel processor environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, H.; Solano, M.; VanDyke, J.P.; McMechan, G.A.; Epili, D.

    1998-03-01

    Portable, production-scale 3-D prestack Kirchhoff depth migration software capable of full-volume imaging has been successfully implemented and applied to a six-million trace (46.9 Gbyte) marine data set from a salt/subsalt play in the Gulf of Mexico. Velocity model building and updates use an image-driven strategy and were performed in a Sun Sparc environment. Images obtained by 3-D prestack migration after three velocity iterations are substantially better focused and reveal drilling targets that were not visible in images obtained from conventional 3-D poststack time migration. Amplitudes are well preserved, so anomalies associated with known reservoirs conform to the petrophysical predictions. Prototype development was on an 8-node Intel iPSC860 computer; the production version was run on an 1824-node Intel Paragon computer. The code has been successfully ported to CRAY (T3D) and Unix workstation (PVM) environments.

  7. Prestack reverse time migration for 3D marine reflection seismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Seonghyung; Kim, Taeyoun

    2015-03-10

    Prestack reverse time migration (RTM) is a method for imaging the subsurface using the inner product of wavefield extrapolation in shot domain and in receiver domain. It is well known that RTM is better for preserving amplitudes and phases than other prestack migrations. Since 3D seismic data is huge data volume and it needs heavy computing works, it requires parallel computing in order to have a meaningful depth image of the 3D subsurface. We implemented a parallelized version of 3D RTM for prestack depth migration. The results of numerical example for 3D SEG/EAGE salt model showed good agreement with the original geological model. We applied RTM to offshore 3D seismic reflection data. The study area is 12 × 25 km with 120 survey lines. Shot and receiver spacing is 25 m and 12.5 m. The line spacing is 100 m. Shot gathers were preprocessed to enhance signal to noise ratio and velocity model was calculated from conventional stack velocity. Both of them were used to obtain 3D image using RTM. The results show reasonable subsurface image.

  8. Stem cell reprogramming: A 3D boost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abilez, Oscar J.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2016-03-01

    Biophysical factors in an optimized three-dimensional microenvironment enhance the reprogramming efficiency of human somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells when compared to traditional cell-culture substrates.

  9. Unit cell geometry of 3-D braided structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du, Guang-Wu; Ko, Frank K.

    1993-01-01

    The traditional approach used in modeling of composites reinforced by three-dimensional (3-D) braids is to assume a simple unit cell geometry of a 3-D braided structure with known fiber volume fraction and orientation. In this article, we first examine 3-D braiding methods in the light of braid structures, followed by the development of geometric models for 3-D braids using a unit cell approach. The unit cell geometry of 3-D braids is identified and the relationship of structural parameters such as yarn orientation angle and fiber volume fraction with the key processing parameters established. The limiting geometry has been computed by establishing the point at which yarns jam against each other. Using this factor makes it possible to identify the complete range of allowable geometric arrangements for 3-D braided preforms. This identified unit cell geometry can be translated to mechanical models which relate the geometrical properties of fabric preforms to the mechanical responses of composite systems.

  10. A Kosloff/Basal method, 3D migration program implemented on the CYBER 205 supercomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pyle, L. D.; Wheat, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    Conventional finite difference migration has relied on approximations to the acoustic wave equation which allow energy to propagate only downwards. Although generally reliable, such approaches usually do not yield an accurate migration for geological structures with strong lateral velocity variations or with steeply dipping reflectors. An earlier study by D. Kosloff and E. Baysal (Migration with the Full Acoustic Wave Equation) examined an alternative approach based on the full acoustic wave equation. The 2D, Fourier type algorithm which was developed was tested by Kosloff and Baysal against synthetic data and against physical model data. The results indicated that such a scheme gives accurate migration for complicated structures. This paper describes the development and testing of a vectorized, 3D migration program for the CYBER 205 using the Kosloff/Baysal method. The program can accept as many as 65,536 zero offset (stacked) traces.

  11. "Constructing" the Cell Cycle in 3D

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koc, Isil; Turan, Merve

    2012-01-01

    The cycle of duplication and division, known as the "cell cycle," is the essential mechanism by which all living organisms reproduce. This activity allows students to develop an understanding of the main events that occur during the typical eukaryotic cell cycle mostly in the process of mitotic phase that divides the duplicated genetic material…

  12. Fresnel Volume Migration of the ISO89-3D data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hloušek, F.; Buske, S.

    2016-11-01

    This paper demonstrates the capabilities of Fresnel Volume Migration (FVM) for 3-D single-component seismic data in a crystalline environment. We show its application to the ISO89-3D data set, which was acquired in 1989 at the German continental deep drilling site (KTB) near Windischeschenbach (Southeast Germany). A key point in FVM is the derivation of the emergent angle for the recorded wavefield. This angle is used as the initial condition of the ray-tracing-algorithm within FVM. In order to limit the migration operator to the physically relevant part of a reflector, it is restricted to the Fresnel-volume around the backpropagated ray. We discuss different possibilities for an adequate choice of the used aperture for a local slant-stack algorithm using the semblance as a measure of the coherency for different emergent angles. Furthermore, we reduce the number of used receivers for this procedure using the Voronoi diagram, thereby leading to a more equal distribution of the receivers within the selected aperture. We demonstrate the performance of these methods for a simple 3-D synthetic example and show the results for the ISO89-3D data set. For the latter, our approach yields images of significantly better quality compared to previous investigations and allows for a detailed characterization of the subsurface. Even in migrated single shot gathers, structures are clearly visible due to the focusing achieved by FVM.

  13. Epidermal growth factor improves the migration and contractility of aged fibroblasts cultured on 3D collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daehwan; Kim, So Young; Mun, Seog Kyun; Rhee, Sangmyung; Kim, Beom Joon

    2015-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) plays a critical role in fibroblasts by stimulating the production of collagen and supports cell renewal through the interaction between keratinocytes and fibroblasts. It is well known that the contractile activity of fibroblasts is required for the remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which contributes to skin elasticity. However, the role of EGF in the contraction of aged fibroblasts under 3-dimensional (3D) culture conditions is not yet fully understood. In the present study, we demonstrated that young fibroblasts spread and proliferated more rapidly than aged fibroblasts under 2-dimensional (2D) culture conditions. Cell migration assay using a nested collagen matrix revealed that the migration of young fibroblasts was also greater than that of aged fibroblasts under 3D culture conditions. However, the addition of recombinant human EGF (rhEGF) resulted in the enhanced migration of aged fibroblasts; the migration rate was similar to that of the young fibroblasts. The aged fibroblasts showed decreased cluster formation compared with the young fibroblasts on the collagen matrix, which was improved by the addition of rhEGF. Furthermore, cell contraction assay revealed that the basal contractility of the aged fibroblasts was lower than that of the young fibroblasts; however, following treatment with rhEGF, the contractility was restored to levels similar or even higher to those of the young fibroblasts. Taken together, our results suggest that rhEGF is a potential renewal agent that acts to improve the migration and contraction of aged fibroblasts more efficiently than young fibroblasts under 3D culture conditions; thus, EGF may have valuable regenerative effects on aged skin.

  14. Cyto-3D-print to attach mitotic cells.

    PubMed

    Castroagudin, Michelle R; Zhai, Yujia; Li, Zhi; Marnell, Michael G; Glavy, Joseph S

    2016-08-01

    The Cyto-3D-print is an adapter that adds cytospin capability to a standard centrifuge. Like standard cytospinning, Cyto-3D-print increases the surface attachment of mitotic cells while giving a higher degree of adaptability to other slide chambers than available commercial devices. The use of Cyto-3D-print is cost effective, safe, and applicable to many slide designs. It is durable enough for repeated use and made of biodegradable materials for environment-friendly disposal.

  15. Phenotypic changes in proliferation, differentiation, and migration of chondrocytes: 3D in vitro models for joint wound healing.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Hui; Chen, Chun-Wei; Lai, Wen-Fu T; Tang, Ja-Reng; Deng, Win-Ping; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Chung, Andrew; Zuo, Chun S; Bowley, John F

    2010-03-01

    We aim to establish a 3D model of cartilage wound healing, and explore the involvement of chondrocytes in its repair. To characterize chondrocyte involvement in wound healing, an in vitro 3D model composed of chondrocyte mixing with either type II/I collagen or type I collagen matrix was established. The "defects" measuring 5 mm in diameter were made on each collagen matrix-chondrocyte construct to mimic in vivo cartilage defects. The effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on chondrocytes migration and differentiation were studied. The migration and Glucosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis of chondrocytes in the defect areas were observed by microscopy after Alcian-blue staining. In the presence of bFGF, GAG expression increased significantly when chondrocytes were cultured in type II/I collagen matrix compared to type I collagen matrix. However, mild GAG accumulation was also found when cells were cultured in either type I or type II/I collagens without bFGF. In a 3D model of cartilage wound healing, bFGF promote chondrocyte proliferation, migration and differentiation in the presence of type II/I collagen matrix, and showed potential to regulate wound healing. These wound healing models may provide feasible methods to explore various drugs prior to human trials.

  16. Trichobilharzia regenti (Schistosomatidae): 3D imaging techniques in characterization of larval migration through the CNS of vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Bulantová, Jana; Macháček, Tomáš; Panská, Lucie; Krejčí, František; Karch, Jakub; Jährling, Nina; Saghafi, Saiedeh; Dodt, Hans-Ulrich; Horák, Petr

    2016-04-01

    Migration of parasitic worms through the host tissues, which may occasionally result in fatal damage to the internal organs, represents one of the major risks associated with helminthoses. In order to track the parasites, traditionally used 2D imaging techniques such as histology or squash preparation do not always provide sufficient data to describe worm location/behavior in the host. On the other hand, 3D imaging methods are widely used in cell biology, medical radiology, osteology or cancer research, but their use in parasitological research is currently occasional. Thus, we aimed at the evaluation of suitability of selected 3D methods to monitor migration of the neuropathogenic avian schistosome Trichobilharzia regenti in extracted spinal cord of experimental vertebrate hosts. All investigated methods, two of them based on tracking of fluorescently stained larvae with or without previous chemical clearing of tissue and one based on X-ray micro-CT, exhibit certain limits for in vivo observation. Nevertheless, our study shows that the tested methods as ultramicroscopy (used for the first time in parasitology) and micro-CT represent promising tool for precise analyzing of parasite larvae in the CNS. Synthesis of these 3D imaging techniques can provide more comprehensive look at the course of infection, host immune response and pathology caused by migrating parasites within entire tissue samples, which would not be possible with traditional approaches.

  17. Substrate Topography Induces a Crossover from 2D to 3D Behavior in Fibroblast Migration

    PubMed Central

    Ghibaudo, Marion; Trichet, Léa; Le Digabel, Jimmy; Richert, Alain; Hersen, Pascal; Ladoux, Benoît

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In a three-dimensional environment, cells migrate through complex topographical features. Using microstructured substrates, we investigate the role of substrate topography in cell adhesion and migration. To do so, fibroblasts are plated on chemically identical substrates composed of microfabricated pillars. When the dimensions of the pillars (i.e., the diameter, length, and spacing) are varied, migrating cells encounter alternating flat and rough surfaces that depend on the spacing between the pillars. Consequently, we show that substrate topography affects cell shape and migration by modifying cell-to-substrate interactions. Cells on micropillar substrates exhibit more elongated and branched shapes with fewer actin stress fibers compared with cells on flat surfaces. By analyzing the migration paths in various environments, we observe different mechanisms of cell migration, including a persistent type of migration, that depend on the organization of the topographical features. These responses can be attributed to a spatial reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton due to physical constraints and a preferential formation of focal adhesions on the micropillars, with an increased lifetime compared to that observed on flat surfaces. By changing myosin II activity, we show that actomyosin contractility is essential in the cellular response to micron-scale topographic signals. Finally, the analysis of cell movements at the frontier between flat and micropillar substrates shows that cell transmigration through the micropillar substrates depends on the spacing between the pillars. PMID:19580774

  18. Label free cell tracking in 3D tissue engineering constructs with high resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. A.; Lam, K.-P.; Dempsey, K. P.; Mazzocchi-Jones, D.; Richardson, J. B.; Yang, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Within the field of tissue engineering there is an emphasis on studying 3-D live tissue structures. Consequently, to investigate and identify cellular activities and phenotypes in a 3-D environment for all in vitro experiments, including shape, migration/proliferation and axon projection, it is necessary to adopt an optical imaging system that enables monitoring 3-D cellular activities and morphology through the thickness of the construct for an extended culture period without cell labeling. This paper describes a new 3-D tracking algorithm developed for Cell-IQ®, an automated cell imaging platform, which has been equipped with an environmental chamber optimized to enable capturing time-lapse sequences of live cell images over a long-term period without cell labeling. As an integral part of the algorithm, a novel auto-focusing procedure was developed for phase contrast microscopy equipped with 20x and 40x objectives, to provide a more accurate estimation of cell growth/trajectories by allowing 3-D voxels to be computed at high spatiotemporal resolution and cell density. A pilot study was carried out in a phantom system consisting of horizontally aligned nanofiber layers (with precise spacing between them), to mimic features well exemplified in cellular activities of neuronal growth in a 3-D environment. This was followed by detailed investigations concerning axonal projections and dendritic circuitry formation in a 3-D tissue engineering construct. Preliminary work on primary animal neuronal cells in response to chemoattractant and topographic cue within the scaffolds has produced encouraging results.

  19. Screening for Stromal and Matrix Effects in 3D Microenvironments of Breast Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanez-Sauri, Sara I.

    Breast cancer progression ensures through the acquisition of genetic mutations, the uncontrollable growth of cells, and their progression to invasion. Studies have shown that the surrounding three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment can also influence breast cancer cell progression by controlling the morphology, differentiation, proliferation, and migration of cells. However, most of the currently available in vitro screening platforms are based on the two-dimensional (2D) culture of cells, and do not provide cells with the complex 3D microenvironment that exists in vivo. Therefore, there is a need for more biologically relevant in vitro platforms to help decipher the complexity of the microenvironment and its influence in breast cancer. In this dissertation we present an automated microfluidic platform that allows to efficiently screen for the effect of multiple matrix and stromal microenvironment in 3D cultures of breast cancer cells. Several extracellular matrix (ECM) compositions and stromal cells are included in the 3D microenvironments to examine their influence on breast cancer cell behavior. The screening results suggest that collagen gels with fibronectin might be influencing paracrine signals between breast cancer cells and stromal cells. The ability of the platform to culture and treat cells in 3D microenvironments offers a powerful screening tool for the identification of compounds and interactions using more in vivo-like 3D microenvironments. The identification of these mechanisms will increase our current understanding of breast cancer, and will aid in the identification of potential therapeutics.

  20. Imaging the Juan de Fuca subduction plate using 3D Kirchoff Prestack Depth Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C.; Bodin, T.; Allen, R. M.; Tauzin, B.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a new Receiver Function migration method to image the subducting plate in the western US that utilizes the US array and regional network data. While the well-developed CCP (common conversion point) poststack migration is commonly used for such imaging; our method applies a 3D prestack depth migration approach. The traditional CCP and post-stack depth mapping approaches implement the ray tracing and moveout correction for the incoming teleseismic plane wave based on a 1D earth reference model and the assumption of horizontal discontinuities. Although this works well in mapping the reflection position of relatively flat discontinuities (such as the Moho or the LAB), CCP is known to give poor results in the presence of lateral volumetric velocity variations and dipping layers. Instead of making the flat layer assumption and 1D moveout correction, seismic rays are traced in a 3D tomographic model with the Fast Marching Method. With travel time information stored, our Kirchoff migration is done where the amplitude of the receiver function at a given time is distributed over all possible conversion points (i.e. along a semi-elipse) on the output migrated depth section. The migrated reflectors will appear where the semicircles constructively interfere, whereas destructive interference will cancel out noise. Synthetic tests show that in the case of a horizontal discontinuity, the prestack Kirchoff migration gives similar results to CCP, but without spurious multiples as this energy is stacked destructively and cancels out. For 45 degree and 60 degree dipping discontinuities, it also performs better in terms of imaging at the right boundary and dip angle. This is especially useful in the Western US case, beneath which the Juan de Fuca plate subducted to ~450km with a dipping angle that may exceed 50 degree. While the traditional CCP method will underestimate the dipping angle, our proposed imaging method will provide an accurate 3D subducting plate image without

  1. Optimization, pharmacophore modeling and 3D-QSAR studies of sipholanes as breast cancer migration and proliferation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Foudah, Ahmed I; Sallam, Asmaa A; Akl, Mohamed R; El Sayed, Khalid A

    2014-02-12

    Sipholenol A, a triterpene isolated from the Red Sea sponge Callyspongia siphonella, was previously shown to reverse multidrug resistance in P-glycoprotein-overexpressing cancer cells. Moreover, sipholanes showed promising in vitro inhibitory effects against the invasion and migration of the metastatic human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. The breast tumor kinase (Brk), a mediator of cancer cell phenotypes important for proliferation, survival, and migration, was proposed as a potential target. This study reports additional semisynthetic optimization of sipholenol A esters to improve the breast cancer antimigratory and antiproliferative activities as well as Brk phosphorylation inhibition. Fifteen new sipholenol A analogs (25-39) were semisynthesized. Sipholenol A 4β-4',5'-dichlorobenzoate ester (29) was the most potent, with an IC50 value of 1.3 μM in the migration assay. The level of Brk phosphorylation inhibition of 29 was assessed using the Z'-LYTE™ kinase assay and Western blot analysis. Active analogs showed no toxicity on the non-tumorigenic epithelial breast cell line MCF10A at doses equal to their IC50 values or higher in migration and proliferation assays, suggesting their selectivity towards malignant cells. Pharmacophore modeling and 3D-QSAR studies were conducted to identify important pharmacophoric features and correlate 3D-chemical structure with activity. These studies provided the evidence for future design of novel antimigratory compounds based on a simplified sipholane structure possessing rings A and B (perhydrobenzoxepine) connected to substituted aromatic esters, with the elimination of rings C and D ([5,3,0]bicyclodecane system). This will enable the future synthesis of the new active entities feasibly and cost-effectively. These results demonstrate the potential of marine natural products for the discovery of novel scaffolds for the control and management of metastatic breast cancer.

  2. Characteristics of tumor and host cells in 3-D simulated microgravity environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, V.; Dinh, T.; Wood, T.; Pellis, N.; Hannigan, E.

    Co-cultures of three-dimensional (3-D) constructs of one cell type with dispersed cells of a second cell type in low-shear rotating suspension cultures in simulated microgravity environment have been used to investigate invasive properties of normal and malignant cell types. We have shown that the epithelial and endothelial cells undergo a switch in characteristics when grown in an in vitro 3-D environment, that mimics the in vivo host environment as compared with conventional two-dimensional (2-D) monolayer cultures. Histological preparations and immunohistochemical staining procedures of cocultured harvests demonstrated various markers of interest: like collagen vimentin, mucin, elastin, fibrin, fibrinogen, cytokeratin, adhesion molecules and various angiogenic factors by tumor cells from gynecological cancer patients along with fibroblasts, endothelial cells and patient-derived mononuclear cells (n=8). The growth rate was enhanced 10-15 folds by 3-D cocultures of patient-derived cells as compared with 2-D monolayer cultures and 3-D monocultures. The production of interleukin-2, interleukin-6, interleukin -8, vascular endothelial cell growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and angiogenin was studied by using ELISA and RT- PCR. Human umbilical vein-derived endothelial cell (HUVEC) were used to study the mitogenic response of the conditioned medium collected from 3-D monocultures and cocultures during proliferation and migration assays. The conditioned medium collected from 3-D cocultures of cancer cells also 1) increased the expression of message levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor flt-1 and KDR was observed by HUVEC, and 2) increased the expression of intracellular and vascular cell adhesion molecules on the surface of HUVEC, when measured by using Live cell ELISA assays and immunofluorescent staining as compared with 3-D monocultures of normal epithelial cells. There was an increase in production of 1) enzymatic activity that

  3. A novel device to concurrently assess leukocyte extravasation and interstitial migration within a defined 3D environment.

    PubMed

    Molteni, Raffaella; Bianchi, Elena; Patete, Paolo; Fabbri, Monica; Baroni, Guido; Dubini, Gabriele; Pardi, Ruggero

    2015-01-07

    Leukocyte extravasation and interstitial migration are key events during inflammation. Traditional in vitro techniques address only specific steps of cell recruitment to tissues and fail to recapitulate the whole process in an appropriate three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment. Herein, we describe a device that enables us to qualitatively and quantitatively assess in 4D the interdependent steps underlying leukocyte trafficking in a close-to-physiology in vitro context. Real-time tracking of cells, from initial adhesion to the endothelium and subsequent diapedesis to interstitial migration towards the source of the chemoattractant within the 3D collagen matrix, is enabled by the use of optically transparent porous membranes laid over the matrix. Unique features of the device, such as the use of non-planar surfaces and the contribution of physiological flow to the establishment of a persistent chemoattractant gradient, were assessed by numerical simulations and validated by proof-of-concept, simultaneous testing of differentially treated primary mouse neutrophils. This microfluidic platform offers new and versatile tools to thoroughly investigate the stepwise process of circulating cell recruitment to target tissues in vitro and to test novel therapeutics targeting various steps of the process.

  4. 3D Protein Dynamics in the Cell Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anand P; Galland, Rémi; Finch-Edmondson, Megan L; Grenci, Gianluca; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Studer, Vincent; Viasnoff, Virgile; Saunders, Timothy E

    2017-01-10

    The three-dimensional (3D) architecture of the cell nucleus plays an important role in protein dynamics and in regulating gene expression. However, protein dynamics within the 3D nucleus are poorly understood. Here, we present, to our knowledge, a novel combination of 1) single-objective based light-sheet microscopy, 2) photoconvertible proteins, and 3) fluorescence correlation microscopy, to quantitatively measure 3D protein dynamics in the nucleus. We are able to acquire >3400 autocorrelation functions at multiple spatial positions within a nucleus, without significant photobleaching, allowing us to make reliable estimates of diffusion dynamics. Using this tool, we demonstrate spatial heterogeneity in Polymerase II dynamics in live U2OS cells. Further, we provide detailed measurements of human-Yes-associated protein diffusion dynamics in a human gastric cancer epithelial cell line.

  5. Molecular Predictors of 3D Morphogenesis by Breast Cancer Cell Lines in 3D Culture

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Ju; Chang, Hang; Giricz, Orsi; Lee, Genee; Baehner, Frederick; Gray, Joe; Bissell, Mina; Kenny, Paraic; Parvin, Bahram

    2010-02-01

    Correlative analysis of molecular markers with phenotypic signatures is the simplest model for hypothesis generation. In this paper, a panel of 24 breast cell lines was grown in 3D culture, their morphology was imaged through phase contrast microscopy, and computational methods were developed to segment and represent each colony at multiple dimensions. Subsequently, subpopulations from these morphological responses were identified through consensus clustering to reveal three clusters of round, grape-like, and stellate phenotypes. In some cases, cell lines with particular pathobiological phenotypes clustered together (e.g., ERBB2 amplified cell lines sharing the same morphometric properties as the grape-like phenotype). Next, associations with molecular features were realized through (i) differential analysis within each morphological cluster, and (ii) regression analysis across the entire panel of cell lines. In both cases, the dominant genes that are predictive of the morphological signatures were identified. Specifically, PPAR? has been associated with the invasive stellate morphological phenotype, which corresponds to triple-negative pathobiology. PPAR? has been validated through two supporting biological assays.

  6. 3D map of the human corneal endothelial cell

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhiguo; Forest, Fabien; Gain, Philippe; Rageade, Damien; Bernard, Aurélien; Acquart, Sophie; Peoc’h, Michel; Defoe, Dennis M.; Thuret, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Corneal endothelial cells (CECs) are terminally differentiated cells, specialized in regulating corneal hydration and transparency. They are highly polarized flat cells that separate the cornea from the aqueous humor. Their apical surface, in contact with aqueous humor is hexagonal, whereas their basal surface is irregular. We characterized the structure of human CECs in 3D using confocal microscopy of immunostained whole corneas in which cells and their interrelationships remain intact. Hexagonality of the apical surface was maintained by the interaction between tight junctions and a submembraneous network of actomyosin, braced like a drum. Lateral membranes, which support enzymatic pumps, presented complex expansions resembling interdigitated foot processes at the basal surface. Using computer-aided design and drafting software, we obtained a first simplified 3D model of CECs. By comparing their expression with those in epithelial, stromal and trabecular corneal cells, we selected 9 structural or functional proteins for which 3D patterns were specific to CECs. This first 3D map aids our understanding of the morphologic and functional specificity of CECs and could be used as a reference for characterizing future cell therapy products destined to treat endothelial dysfunctions. PMID:27381832

  7. Tissuelike 3D Assemblies of Human Broncho-Epithelial Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissuelike assemblies (TLAs) of human broncho-epithelial (HBE) cells have been developed for use in in vitro research on infection of humans by respiratory viruses. The 2D monolayer HBE cell cultures heretofore used in such research lack the complex cell structures and interactions characteristic of in vivo tissues and, consequently, do not adequately emulate the infection dynamics of in-vivo microbial adhesion and invasion. In contrast, the 3D HBE TLAs are characterized by more-realistic reproductions of the geometrical and functional complexity, differentiation of cells, cell-to-cell interactions, and cell-to-matrix interactions characteristic of human respiratory epithelia. Hence, the 3D HBE TLAs are expected to make it possible to perform at least some of the research in vitro under more-realistic conditions, without need to infect human subjects. The TLAs are grown on collagen-coated cyclodextran microbeads under controlled conditions in a nutrient liquid in the simulated microgravitational environment of a bioreactor of the rotating- wall-vessel type. Primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells are used as a foundation matrix, while adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cells are used as the overlying component. The beads become coated with cells, and cells on adjacent beads coalesce into 3D masses. The resulting TLAs have been found to share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelia including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The differentiation of the cells in these TLAs into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues is confirmed by the presence of compounds, including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium marker compounds, and by the production of tissue mucin. In a series of initial infection tests, TLA cultures were inoculated with human respiratory syncytial viruses and parainfluenza type 3 viruses. Infection was confirmed by photomicrographs that

  8. Influence of scaffold design on 3D printed cell constructs.

    PubMed

    Souness, Auryn; Zamboni, Fernanda; Walker, Gavin M; Collins, Maurice N

    2017-02-14

    Additive manufacturing is currently receiving significant attention in the field of tissue engineering and biomaterial science. The development of precise, affordable 3D printing technologies has provided a new platform for novel research to be undertaken in 3D scaffold design and fabrication. In the past, a number of 3D scaffold designs have been fabricated to investigate the potential of a 3D printed scaffold as a construct which could support cellular life. These studies have shown promising results; however, few studies have utilized a low-cost desktop 3D printing technology as a potential rapid manufacturing route for different scaffold designs. Here six scaffold designs were manufactured using a Fused deposition modeling, a "bottom-up" solid freeform fabrication approach, to determine optimal scaffold architecture for three-dimensional cell growth. The scaffolds, produced from PLA, are coated using pullulan and hyaluronic acid to assess the coating influence on cell proliferation and metabolic rate. Scaffolds are characterized both pre- and postprocessing using water uptake analysis, mechanical testing, and morphological evaluation to study the inter-relationships between the printing process, scaffold design, and scaffold properties. It was found that there were key differences between each scaffold design in terms of porosity, diffusivity, swellability, and compressive strength. An optimal design was chosen based on these physical measurements which were then weighted in accordance to design importance based on literature and utilizing a design matrix technique. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017.

  9. Tetraspanins in Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xupin; Zhang, Jiaping; Huang, Yuesheng

    2015-01-01

    Tetraspanins are a superfamily of small transmembrane proteins that are expressed in almost all eukaryotic cells. Through interacting with one another and with other membrane and intracellular proteins, tetraspanins regulate a wide range of proteins such as integrins, cell surface receptors, and signaling molecules, and thereby engage in diverse cellular processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to proliferation and differentiation. In particular, tetraspanins modulate the function of proteins involved in all determining factors of cell migration including cell–cell adhesion, cell–ECM adhesion, cytoskeletal protrusion/contraction, and proteolytic ECM remodeling. We herein provide a brief overview of collective in vitro and in vivo studies of tetraspanins to illustrate their regulatory functions in the migration and trafficking of cancer cells, vascular endothelial cells, skin cells (keratinocytes and fibroblasts), and leukocytes. We also discuss the involvement of tetraspanins in various pathologic and remedial processes that rely on cell migration and their potential value as targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26091149

  10. Cell migration, freshly squeezed.

    PubMed

    Welch, Matthew D

    2015-02-12

    Migrating cells exhibit distinct motility modes and can switch between modes based on chemical or physical cues. Liu et al. and Ruprecht et al. now describe how confinement and contractility influence motility mode plasticity and instigate a mode termed stable bleb migration in embryonic and tumor cells.

  11. 3D Reconstruction of Coronary Artery Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Tong; Chen, Huan; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The 3D geometry of individual vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), which are essential for understanding the mechanical function of blood vessels, are currently not available. This paper introduces a new 3D segmentation algorithm to determine VSMC morphology and orientation. Methods and Results A total of 112 VSMCs from six porcine coronary arteries were used in the analysis. A 3D semi-automatic segmentation method was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs from cell clumps as well as to extract the 3D geometry of VSMCs. A new edge blocking model was introduced to recognize cell boundary while an edge growing was developed for optimal interpolation and edge verification. The proposed methods were designed based on Region of Interest (ROI) selected by user and interactive responses of limited key edges. Enhanced cell boundary features were used to construct the cell’s initial boundary for further edge growing. A unified framework of morphological parameters (dimensions and orientations) was proposed for the 3D volume data. Virtual phantom was designed to validate the tilt angle measurements, while other parameters extracted from 3D segmentations were compared with manual measurements to assess the accuracy of the algorithm. The length, width and thickness of VSMCs were 62.9±14.9μm, 4.6±0.6μm and 6.2±1.8μm (mean±SD). In longitudinal-circumferential plane of blood vessel, VSMCs align off the circumferential direction with two mean angles of -19.4±9.3° and 10.9±4.7°, while an out-of-plane angle (i.e., radial tilt angle) was found to be 8±7.6° with median as 5.7°. Conclusions A 3D segmentation algorithm was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs of blood vessel walls based on optical image stacks. The results were validated by a virtual phantom and manual measurement. The obtained 3D geometries can be utilized in mathematical models and leads a better understanding of vascular mechanical properties and function. PMID:26882342

  12. Grid cells in 3-D: Reconciling data and models.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Timothy K; Moss, Cynthia F

    2015-12-01

    It is well documented that place cells and grid cells in echolocating bats show properties similar to those described in rodents, and yet, continuous theta-frequency oscillations, proposed to play a central role in grid/place cell formation, are not present in bat recordings. These comparative neurophysiological data have raised many questions about the role of theta-frequency oscillations in spatial memory and navigation. Additionally, spatial navigation in three-dimensions poses new challenges for the representation of space in neural models. Inspired by the literature on space representation in the echolocating bat, we have developed a nonoscillatory model of 3-D grid cell creation that shares many of the features of existing oscillatory-interference models. We discuss the model in the context of current knowledge of 3-D space representation and highlight directions for future research.

  13. Microfluidic titer plate for stratified 3D cell culture.

    PubMed

    Trietsch, Sebastiaan J; Israëls, Guido D; Joore, Jos; Hankemeier, Thomas; Vulto, Paul

    2013-09-21

    Human tissues and organs are inherently heterogeneous. Their functionality is determined by the interplay between different cell types, their secondary architecture, vascular system and gradients of signaling molecules and metabolites. Here we propose a stratified 3D cell culture platform, in which adjacent lanes of gels and liquids are patterned by phaseguides to capture this tissue heterogeneity. We demonstrate 3D cell culture of HepG2 hepatocytes under continuous perfusion, a rifampicin toxicity assay and co-culture with fibroblasts. 4T1 breast cancer cells are used to demonstrate invasion and aggregation models. The platform is incorporated in a microtiter plate format that renders it fully compatible with automation and high-content screening equipment. The extended functionality, ease of handling and full compatibility to standard equipment is an important step towards adoption of Organ-on-a-Chip technology for screening in an industrial setting.

  14. Fabricating gradient hydrogel scaffolds for 3D cell culture.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Kaushik; Young, Marian F; Simon, Carl G

    2011-05-01

    Optimizing cell-material interactions is critical for maximizing regeneration in tissue engineering. Combinatorial and high-throughput (CHT) methods can be used to systematically screen tissue scaffolds to identify optimal biomaterial properties. Previous CHT platforms in tissue engineering have involved a two-dimensional (2D) cell culture format where cells were cultured on material surfaces. However, these platforms are inadequate to predict cellular response in a three-dimensional (3D) tissue scaffold. We have developed a simple CHT platform to screen cell-material interactions in 3D culture format that can be applied to screen hydrogel scaffolds. Herein we provide detailed instructions on a method to prepare gradients in elastic modulus of photopolymerizable hydrogels.

  15. Single molecule microscopy in 3D cell cultures and tissues.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Florian M; Kaemmerer, Elke; Meckel, Tobias

    2014-12-15

    From the onset of the first microscopic visualization of single fluorescent molecules in living cells at the beginning of this century, to the present, almost routine application of single molecule microscopy, the method has well-proven its ability to contribute unmatched detailed insight into the heterogeneous and dynamic molecular world life is composed of. Except for investigations on bacteria and yeast, almost the entire story of success is based on studies on adherent mammalian 2D cell cultures. However, despite this continuous progress, the technique was not able to keep pace with the move of the cell biology community to adapt 3D cell culture models for basic research, regenerative medicine, or drug development and screening. In this review, we will summarize the progress, which only recently allowed for the application of single molecule microscopy to 3D cell systems and give an overview of the technical advances that led to it. While initially posing a challenge, we finally conclude that relevant 3D cell models will become an integral part of the on-going success of single molecule microscopy.

  16. 3D timelapse analysis of muscle satellite cell motility.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Ashley L; Atchison, Kevin; Fisher, Kevin E; Davis, George E; Cornelison, D D W

    2009-10-01

    Skeletal muscle repair and regeneration requires the activity of satellite cells, a population of myogenic stem cells scattered throughout the tissue and activated to proliferate and differentiate in response to myotrauma or disease. While it seems likely that satellite cells would need to navigate local muscle tissue to reach damaged areas, relatively little data on such motility exist, and most studies have been with immortalized cell lines. We find that primary satellite cells are significantly more motile than myoblast cell lines, and that adhesion to laminin promotes primary cell motility more than fourfold over other substrates. Using timelapse videomicroscopy to assess satellite cell motility on single living myofibers, we have identified a requirement for the laminin-binding integrin alpha 7 beta 1 in satellite cell motility, as well as a role for hepatocyte growth factor in promoting directional persistence. The extensive migratory behavior of satellite cells resident on muscle fibers suggests caution when determining, based on fixed specimens, whether adjacent cells are daughters from the same mother cell. We also observed more persistent long-term contact between individual satellite cells than has been previously supposed, potential cell-cell attractive and repulsive interactions, and migration between host myofibers. Based on such activity, we assayed for expression of "pathfinding" cues, and found that satellite cells express multiple guidance ligands and receptors. Together, these data suggest that satellite cell migration in vivo may be more extensive than currently thought, and could be regulated by combinations of signals, including adhesive haptotaxis, soluble factors, and guidance cues.

  17. Rho/ROCK pathway inhibition by the CDK inhibitor p27(kip1) participates in the onset of macrophage 3D-mesenchymal migration.

    PubMed

    Gui, Philippe; Labrousse, Arnaud; Van Goethem, Emeline; Besson, Arnaud; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Le Cabec, Véronique

    2014-09-15

    Infiltration of macrophages into tissue can promote tumour development. Depending on the extracellular matrix architecture, macrophages can adopt two migration modes: amoeboid migration--common to all leukocytes, and mesenchymal migration--restricted to macrophages and certain tumour cells. Here, we investigate the initiating mechanisms involved in macrophage mesenchymal migration. We show that a single macrophage is able to use both migration modes. Macrophage mesenchymal migration is correlated with decreased activity of Rho/Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) and is potentiated when ROCK is inhibited, suggesting that amoeboid inhibition participates in mechanisms that initiate mesenchymal migration. We identify the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p27(kip1) (also known as CDKN1B) as a new effector of macrophage 3D-migration. By using p27(kip1) mutant mice and small interfering RNA targeting p27(kip1), we show that p27(kip1) promotes mesenchymal migration and hinders amoeboid migration upstream of the Rho/ROCK pathway, a process associated with a relocation of the protein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Finally, we observe that cytoplasmic p27(kip1) is required for in vivo infiltration of macrophages within induced tumours in mice. This study provides the first evidence that silencing of amoeboid migration through inhibition of the Rho/ROCK pathway by p27(kip1) participates in the onset of macrophage mesenchymal migration.

  18. Mesoscopic in vivo 3-D tracking of sparse cell populations using angular multiplexed optical projection tomography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lingling; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Kumar, Sunil; Andrews, Natalie; Dallman, Margaret J; French, Paul M W; McGinty, James

    2015-04-01

    We describe an angular multiplexed imaging technique for 3-D in vivo cell tracking of sparse cell distributions and optical projection tomography (OPT) with superior time-lapse resolution and a significantly reduced light dose compared to volumetric time-lapse techniques. We demonstrate that using dual axis OPT, where two images are acquired simultaneously at different projection angles, can enable localization and tracking of features in 3-D with a time resolution equal to the camera frame rate. This is achieved with a 200x reduction in light dose compared to an equivalent volumetric time-lapse single camera OPT acquisition with 200 projection angles. We demonstrate the application of this technique to mapping the 3-D neutrophil migration pattern observed over ~25.5 minutes in a live 2 day post-fertilisation transgenic LysC:GFP zebrafish embryo following a tail wound.

  19. 3D Kirchhoff depth migration algorithm: A new scalable approach for parallelization on multicore CPU based cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Richa; Londhe, Ashutosh; Srivastava, Abhishek; Sirasala, Kirannmayi M.; Khonde, Kiran

    2017-03-01

    In this article, a new scalable 3D Kirchhoff depth migration algorithm is presented on state of the art multicore CPU based cluster. Parallelization of 3D Kirchhoff depth migration is challenging due to its high demand of compute time, memory, storage and I/O along with the need of their effective management. The most resource intensive modules of the algorithm are traveltime calculations and migration summation which exhibit an inherent trade off between compute time and other resources. The parallelization strategy of the algorithm largely depends on the storage of calculated traveltimes and its feeding mechanism to the migration process. The presented work is an extension of our previous work, wherein a 3D Kirchhoff depth migration application for multicore CPU based parallel system had been developed. Recently, we have worked on improving parallel performance of this application by re-designing the parallelization approach. The new algorithm is capable to efficiently migrate both prestack and poststack 3D data. It exhibits flexibility for migrating large number of traces within the available node memory and with minimal requirement of storage, I/O and inter-node communication. The resultant application is tested using 3D Overthrust data on PARAM Yuva II, which is a Xeon E5-2670 based multicore CPU cluster with 16 cores/node and 64 GB shared memory. Parallel performance of the algorithm is studied using different numerical experiments and the scalability results show striking improvement over its previous version. An impressive 49.05X speedup with 76.64% efficiency is achieved for 3D prestack data and 32.00X speedup with 50.00% efficiency for 3D poststack data, using 64 nodes. The results also demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the improved algorithm with high scalability and efficiency on a multicore CPU cluster.

  20. Microdroplet chain array for cell migration assays.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Pan, Jian-Zhang; Zhao, Shi-Ping; Lou, Qi; Zhu, Ying; Fang, Qun

    2016-11-29

    Establishing cell migration assays in multiple different microenvironments is important in the study of tissue repair and regeneration, cancer progression, atherosclerosis, and arthritis. In this work, we developed a miniaturized and massive parallel microfluidic platform for multiple cell migration assays combining the traditional membrane-based cell migration technique and the droplet-based microfluidic technique. Nanoliter-scale droplets are flexibly assembled as building blocks based on a porous membrane to form microdroplet chains with diverse configurations for different assay modes. Multiple operations including in-droplet 2D/3D cell culture, cell co-culture and cell migration induced by a chemoattractant concentration gradient in droplet chains could be flexibly performed with reagent consumption in the nanoliter range for each assay and an assay scale-up to 81 assays in parallel in one microchip. We have applied the present platform to multiple modes of cell migration assays including the accurate cell migration assay, competitive cell migration assay, biomimetic chemotaxis assay, and multifactor cell migration assay based on the organ-on-a-chip concept, for demonstrating its versatility, applicability, and potential in cell migration-related research.

  1. 3D visualization of membrane failures in fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Yadvinder; Orfino, Francesco P.; Dutta, Monica; Kjeang, Erik

    2017-03-01

    Durability issues in fuel cells, due to chemical and mechanical degradation, are potential impediments in their commercialization. Hydrogen leak development across degraded fuel cell membranes is deemed a lifetime-limiting failure mode and potential safety issue that requires thorough characterization for devising effective mitigation strategies. The scope and depth of failure analysis has, however, been limited by the 2D nature of conventional imaging. In the present work, X-ray computed tomography is introduced as a novel, non-destructive technique for 3D failure analysis. Its capability to acquire true 3D images of membrane damage is demonstrated for the very first time. This approach has enabled unique and in-depth analysis resulting in novel findings regarding the membrane degradation mechanism; these are: significant, exclusive membrane fracture development independent of catalyst layers, localized thinning at crack sites, and demonstration of the critical impact of cracks on fuel cell durability. Evidence of crack initiation within the membrane is demonstrated, and a possible new failure mode different from typical mechanical crack development is identified. X-ray computed tomography is hereby established as a breakthrough approach for comprehensive 3D characterization and reliable failure analysis of fuel cell membranes, and could readily be extended to electrolyzers and flow batteries having similar structure.

  2. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells display a proangiogenic phenotype on 3D scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Neofytou, Evgenios A; Chang, Edwin; Patlola, Bhagat; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Cheng, Zhen; Robbins, Robert C; Beygui, Ramin E

    2011-09-01

    Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Recent studies suggest that adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) can be used as a potential source for cardiovascular tissue engineering due to their ability to differentiate along the cardiovascular lineage and to adopt a proangiogenic phenotype. To understand better ASCs' biology, we used a novel 3D culture device. ASCs' and b.END-3 endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and vessel morphogenesis were significantly enhanced compared to 2D culturing techniques. ASCs were isolated from inguinal fat pads of 6-week-old GFP+/BLI+ mice. Early passage ASCs cells (P3-P4), PKH26-labeled murine b.END-3 cells or a co-culture of ASCs and b.END-3 cells were seeded at a density of 1 × 10(5) on three different surface configurations: (a) a 2D surface of tissue culture plastic, (b) Matrigel, and (c) a highly porous 3D scaffold fabricated from inert polystyrene. VEGF expression, cell proliferation, and tubulization, were assessed using optical microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, 3D confocal microscopy, and SEM imaging (n = 6). Increased VEGF levels were seen in conditioned media harvested from co-cultures of ASCs and b.END-3 on either Matrigel or a 3D matrix. Fluorescence, confocal, SEM, bioluminescence revealed improved cell, proliferation, and tubule formation for cells seeded on the 3D polystyrene matrix. Collectively, these data demonstrate that co-culturing ASCs with endothelial cells in a 3D matrix environment enable us to generate prevascularized tissue-engineered constructs. This can potentially help us to surpass the tissue thickness limitations faced by the tissue engineering community today.

  3. Quantitative Multiscale Cell Imaging in Controlled 3D Microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Welf, Erik S.; Driscoll, Meghan K.; Dean, Kevin M.; Schäfer, Claudia; Chu, Jun; Davidson, Michael W.; Lin, Michael Z.; Danuser, Gaudenz; Fiolka, Reto

    2016-01-01

    The microenvironment determines cell behavior, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood because quantitative studies of cell signaling and behavior have been challenging due to insufficient spatial and/or temporal resolution and limitations on microenvironmental control. Here we introduce microenvironmental selective plane illumination microscopy (meSPIM) for imaging and quantification of intracellular signaling and submicrometer cellular structures as well as large-scale cell morphological and environmental features. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by showing that the mechanical properties of the microenvironment regulate the transition of melanoma cells from actin-driven protrusion to blebbing, and we present tools to quantify how cells manipulate individual collagen fibers. We leverage the nearly isotropic resolution of meSPIM to quantify the local concentration of actin and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling on the surfaces of cells deep within 3D collagen matrices and track the many small membrane protrusions that appear in these more physiologically relevant environments. PMID:26906741

  4. 3D insight into fault geometries, deformation, and fluid-migration within the Hosgri Fault Zone offshore central California: Results from high-resolution 3D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluesner, J.; Brothers, D. S.; Johnson, S. Y.; Watt, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution 3D seismic P-Cable data and advanced seismic attribute analyses were used to detect and interpret complex strike-slip fault geometries, deformation patterns, and fluid-pathways across a portion of the Hosgri Fault Zone (HFZ) offshore central California. Combination of the fault attribute results with structural analysis provides 3D insight into the geometry and internal structure of restraining and releasing bends, step-over zones, fault convergence zones, and apparent paired fault bends. The 3D seismic volume covers a 13.7 km2 region along the HFZ offshore of Point Sal and was collected in 2012 as part of the PG&E Central California Seismic Imaging Project (PG&E, 2014). Application of the fault attribute workflow isolated and delineated fault strands within the 3D volume. These results revealed that the northern and southern edges of the survey region are characterized by single fault strands that exhibit an approximate 6° change in strike across the 3D volume. Between these single faults strands is a complex network of fault splays, bends, stepovers, and convergence zones. Structural analysis reveals that the southern portion of the HFZ in the region is characterized by transtensional deformation, whereas transpressional-related folding dominates the central and northern portions of the HFZ. In the central region, convergence of the Lions Head Fault from the southeast results in an apparent impinging block, leading to development of a "paired fault bend" to the west. Combination of the fault and "chimney" attribute results indicates a strong connection between faults and fluid-migration pathways. Fluid-pathways are concentrated along discrete faults in the transtensional zones, but appear to be more broadly distributed amongst fault bounded anticlines and structurally controlled traps in the transpressional zones.

  5. Analysing immune cell migration.

    PubMed

    Beltman, Joost B; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J

    2009-11-01

    The visualization of the dynamic behaviour of and interactions between immune cells using time-lapse video microscopy has an important role in modern immunology. To draw robust conclusions, quantification of such cell migration is required. However, imaging experiments are associated with various artefacts that can affect the estimated positions of the immune cells under analysis, which form the basis of any subsequent analysis. Here, we describe potential artefacts that could affect the interpretation of data sets on immune cell migration. We propose how these errors can be recognized and corrected, and suggest ways to prevent the data analysis itself leading to biased results.

  6. 3D Surface Topology Guides Stem Cell Adhesion and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Priyalakshmi; Ondeck, Matthew G.; Chirasatitsin, Somyot; Nghamkham, Kamolchanok; Reilly, Gwendolen C.; Engler, Adam J.; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Polymerized high internal phase emulsion (polyHIPE) foams are extremely versatile materials for investigating cell-substrate interactions in vitro. Foam morphologies can be controlled by polymerization conditions to result in either open or closed pore structures with different levels of connectivity, consequently enabling the comparison between 2D and 3D matrices using the same substrate with identical surface chemistry conditions. Additionally, here we achieve the control of pore surface topology (i.e. how different ligands are clustered together) using amphiphilic block copolymers as emulsion stabilisers. We demonstrate that adhesion of human mesenchymal progenitor (hES-MP) cells cultured on polyHIPE foams is dependent on foam surface topology and chemistry but is independent of porosity and interconnectivity. We also demonstrate that the interconnectivity, architecture and surface topology of the foams has an effect on the osteogenic differentiation potential of hES-MP cells. Together these data demonstrate that the adhesive heterogeneity of a 3D scaffold could regulate not only mesenchymal stem cell attachment but also cell behavior in the absence of soluble growth factors. PMID:25818420

  7. 3D airflow dynamics over transverse ridges Mpekweni, South Africa: implications for dune field migration behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Derek; Cooper, Andrew; Green, Andrew; Beyers, Meiring; Wiles, Errol; Benallack, Keegan

    2016-04-01

    Un-vegetated dune fields provide excellent opportunities to examine airflow dynamics over various types and scales of dune landforms. The three dimensional surface over which lower boundary layers travel, help adjust surface airflow and consequently the aeolian response of the dunes themselves. The use of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modelling in recent studies now enables investigation of the 3D behaviour of airflow over complex terrain, providing new insights into heterogeneous surface flow and aeolian response of dune surfaces on a large (dunefield) scale. Using a largely un-vegetated coastal dune field site at Mpekweni, Eastern Cape, South Africa, a detailed (0.1m gridded) terrestrial laser scanning survey was conducted to create a high resolution topographical surface. Using local wind flow measurements and local met station records as input, CFD modelling was performed for a number of scenarios involving variable direction and magnitude to examine surface flow patterns across multiple dune forms. Near surface acceleration, expansion and separation of airflow inducing convergence and divergence (steering) of flow velocity streamlines are investigated. Flow acceleration over dune crests/brink lines is a key parameter in driving dune migration and slip face dynamics. Dune aspect ratio (height to length) is also important in determining the degree of crestal flow acceleration, with an increase in flow associated with increasing aspect ratios. Variations in dune height appear to be the most important parameter in driving general flow acceleration. The results from the study provide new insights into dune migration behaviour at this site as well as surface flow behaviour across multiple dune configurations and length scales within un-vegetated dune fields.

  8. Combinatorial Extracellular Matrices for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Cho, Seung-Woo; Son, Sun Mi; Hudson, Sarah P.; Bogatyrev, Said; Keung, Lily; Kohane, Daniel S.; Langer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are promising cell sources for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Scaffolds for ESC-based tissue regeneration should provide not only structural support, but also signals capable of supporting appropriate cell differentiation and tissue development. Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key component of stem cell niche in vivo and can influence stem cell fate via mediating cell attachment and migration, presenting chemical and physical cues, as well as binding soluble factors. Here we investigated the effects of combinatorial extracellular matrix proteins on controlled human ESC (hESC) differentiation. Varying ECM compositions in 3D markedly affects cell behavior, and optimal compositions of ECM hydrogels are identified which facilitate specific-lineage differentiation of stem cells. To our knowledge, this is the first combinatorial analysis of ECM hydrogels for their effects on hESC differentiation in 3D. The 3D matrices described herein may provide a useful platform for studying the interactive ECM signaling in influencing stem cell differentiation. PMID:20614932

  9. 3D-printed external light trap for solar cells.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Lourens; Paetzold, Ulrich W; Blab, Gerhard A; Schropp, Ruud E I; di Vece, Marcel

    2016-05-01

    We present a universally applicable 3D-printed external light trap for enhanced absorption in solar cells. The macroscopic external light trap is placed at the sun-facing surface of the solar cell and retro-reflects the light that would otherwise escape. The light trap consists of a reflective parabolic concentrator placed on top of a reflective cage. Upon placement of the light trap, an improvement of 15% of both the photocurrent and the power conversion efficiency in a thin-film nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) solar cell is measured. The trapped light traverses the solar cell several times within the reflective cage thereby increasing the total absorption in the cell. Consequently, the trap reduces optical losses and enhances the absorption over the entire spectrum. The components of the light trap are 3D printed and made of smoothened, silver-coated thermoplastic. In contrast to conventional light trapping methods, external light trapping leaves the material quality and the electrical properties of the solar cell unaffected. To explain the theoretical operation of the external light trap, we introduce a model that predicts the absorption enhancement in the solar cell by the external light trap. The corresponding calculated path length enhancement shows good agreement with the empirically derived value from the opto-electrical data of the solar cell. Moreover, we analyze the influence of the angle of incidence on the parasitic absorptance to obtain full understanding of the trap performance. © 2015 The Authors. Progress in Photovoltaics: Research and Applications published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. 2D-3D MIGRATION AND CONFORMATIONAL MULTIPLICATION OF CHEMICALS IN LARGE CHEMICAL INVENTORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical interactions are three-dimensional (3D) in nature and require modeling chemicals as 3D entities. In turn, using 3D models of chemicals leads to the realization that a single 2D structure can have hundreds of different conformations, and the electronic properties of these...

  11. Mesenchymal stem cell interactions with 3D ECM modules fabricated via multiphoton excited photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Su, Ping-Jung; Tran, Quyen A; Fong, Jimmy J; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Ogle, Brenda M; Campagnola, Paul J

    2012-09-10

    To understand complex micro/nanoscale ECM stem cell interactions, reproducible in vitro models are needed that can strictly recapitulate the relative content and spatial arrangement of native tissue. Additionally, whole ECM proteins are required to most accurately reflect native binding dynamics. To address this need, we use multiphoton excited photochemistry to create 3D whole protein constructs or "modules" to study how the ECM governs stem cell migration. The constructs were created from mixtures of BSA/laminin (LN) and BSA alone, whose comparison afforded studying how the migration dynamics are governed from the combination of morphological and ECM cues. We found that mesenchymal stem cells interacted for significantly longer durations with the BSA/LN constructs than pure BSA, pointing to the importance of binding cues of the LN. Critical to this work was the development of an automated system with feedback based on fluorescence imaging to provide quality control when synthesizing multiple identical constructs.

  12. Surface modified alginate microcapsules for 3D cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Chiung Wen; Chueh, Di-Yen; Chen, Peilin

    2016-06-01

    Culture as three dimensional cell aggregates or spheroids can offer an ideal platform for tissue engineering applications and for pharmaceutical screening. Such 3D culture models, however, may suffer from the problems such as immune response and ineffective and cumbersome culture. This paper describes a simple method for producing microcapsules with alginate cores and a thin shell of poly(L-lysine)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-g-PEG) to encapsulate mouse induced pluripotent stem (miPS) cells, generating a non-fouling surface as an effective immunoisolation barrier. We demonstrated the trapping of the alginate microcapsules in a microwell array for the continuous observation and culture of a large number of encapsulated miPS cells in parallel. miPS cells cultured in the microcapsules survived well and proliferated to form a single cell aggregate. Droplet formation of monodisperse microcapsules with controlled size combined with flow cytometry provided an efficient way to quantitatively analyze the growth of encapsulated cells in a high-throughput manner. The simple and cost-effective coating technique employed to produce the core-shell microcapsules could be used in the emerging field of cell therapy. The microwell array would provide a convenient, user friendly and high-throughput platform for long-term cell culture and monitoring.

  13. Microfabricated polymeric vessel mimetics for 3-D cancer cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Ashley A.; Das, Chandan K.; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Pursley, Randall H.; McQueen, Philip G.; Hall, Matthew D.; Pohida, Thomas J.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2013-01-01

    Modeling tumor growth in vitro is essential for cost-effective testing of hypotheses in preclinical cancer research. 3-D cell culture offers an improvement over monolayer culture for studying cellular processes in cancer biology because of the preservation of cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions. Oxygen transport poses a major barrier to mimicking in vivo environments and is not replicated in conventional cell culture systems. We hypothesized that we can better mimic the tumor microenvironment using a bioreactor system for controlling gas exchange in cancer cell cultures with silicone hydrogel synthetic vessels. Soft-lithography techniques were used to fabricate oxygen-permeable silicone hydrogel membranes containing arrays of micropillars. These membranes were inserted into a bioreactor and surrounded by basement membrane extract (BME) within which fluorescent ovarian cancer (OVCAR8) cells were cultured. Cell clusters oxygenated by synthetic vessels showed a ∼100um drop-off to anoxia, consistent with in vivo studies of tumor nodules fed by the microvasculature. We showed oxygen tension gradients inside the clusters oxygenated by synthetic vessels had a ∼100 µm drop-off to anoxia, which is consistent with in vivo studies. Oxygen transport in the bioreactor system was characterized by experimental testing with a dissolved oxygen probe and finite element modeling of convective flow. Our study demonstrates differing growth patterns associated with controlling gas distributions to better mimic in vivo conditions. PMID:23911071

  14. 3D motion analysis of keratin filaments in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herberich, Gerlind; Windoffer, Reinhard; Leube, Rudolf; Aach, Til

    2010-03-01

    We present a novel and efficient approach for 3D motion estimation of keratin intermediate filaments in vitro. Keratin filaments are elastic cables forming a complex scaffolding within epithelial cells. To understand the mechanisms of filament formation and network organisation under physiological and pathological conditions, quantitative measurements of dynamic network alterations are essential. Therefore we acquired time-lapse series of 3D images using a confocal laser scanning microscope. Based on these image series, we show that a dense vector field can be computed such that the displacements from one frame to the next can be determined. Our method is based on a two-step registration process: First, a rigid pre-registration is applied in order to compensate for possible global cell movement. This step enables the subsequent nonrigid registration to capture only the sought local deformations of the filaments. As the transformation model of the deformable registration algorithm is based on Free Form Deformations, it is well suited for modeling filament network dynamics. The optimization is performed using efficient linear programming techniques such that the huge amount of image data of a time series can be efficiently processed. The evaluation of our results illustrates the potential of our approach.

  15. The interplay of fibronectin functionalization and TGF-β1 presence on fibroblast proliferation, differentiation and migration in 3D matrices.

    PubMed

    Sapudom, Jiranuwat; Rubner, Stefan; Martin, Steve; Thoenes, Stephan; Anderegg, Ulf; Pompe, Tilo

    2015-09-01

    Defined biomimetic three-dimensional (3D) matrices are needed to decipher the complex cellular signalling during wound healing at high resolution in vitro. Soluble factors like TGF-β1 and adhesion promoting structural components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are known to be key regulators of fibroblast behaviour. The ECM component fibronectin (FN) bears a complex function as adhesion promoter, fibrillar element and soluble factor binder. However, its implementation in biomimetic 3D matrices is frequently ill defined. To study the impact of FN on fibroblast cellular function under differentiating conditions (TGF-β1 stimulation), we functionalized 3D collagen I matrices with FN using two strategies: co-assembly and adsorptive immobilization. In comparison to co-assembly, adsorptive immobilization provided no alteration in collagen microstructure as well as mechanical properties. Moreover, this approach provided a controllable FN amount and a homogenous distribution of FN throughout collagen networks. A strong interplay of FN amount and TGF-β1 stimulation on fibroblast function was found in terms of proliferation, migration and myofibroblast differentiation. High levels of FN alone reduced proliferation and showed no effect on differentiation of fibroblasts, but increased migration. In contrast, fibroblast stimulation with high amounts of FN together with TGF-β1 increased proliferation. Independent of FN, the TGF-β1 stimulation enhanced mRNA expression of matrix components like collagen type I alpha 1 chain (Coll I(a1), FN with extra domain A (EDA-FN) and reduced cell migration. The latter cell behaviour indicated a FN independent differentiation into a myofibroblast phenotype. Overall, our 3D biomimetic matrices allow dissecting the overlapping action of the ECM protein FN and the soluble factor TGF-β1 on fibroblast proliferation, migration and differentiation in 3D microenvironments. Furthermore, this model enables the mimicking of important steps of the

  16. Centrosome Positioning in 1D Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adlerz, Katrina; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    During cell migration, the positioning of the centrosome and nucleus define a cell's polarity. For a cell migrating on a two-dimensional substrate the centrosome is positioned in front of the nucleus. Under one-dimensional confinement, however, the centrosome is positioned behind the nucleus in 60% of cells. It is known that the centrosome is positioned by CDC42 and dynein for cells moving on a 2D substrate in a wound-healing assay. It is currently unknown, however, if this is also true for cells moving under 1D confinement, where the centrosome position is often reversed. Therefore, centrosome positioning was studied in cells migrating under 1D confinement, which mimics cells migrating through 3D matrices. 3 to 5 μm fibronectin lines were stamped onto a glass substrate and cells with fluorescently labeled nuclei and centrosomes migrated on the lines. Our results show that when a cell changes directions the centrosome position is maintained. That is, when the centrosome is between the nucleus and the cell's trailing edge and the cell changes direction, the centrosome will be translocated across the nucleus to the back of the cell again. A dynein inhibitor did have an influence on centrosome positioning in 1D migration and change of directions.

  17. Involvement of 3D osteoblast migration and bone apatite during in vitro early osteocytogenesis.

    PubMed

    Robin, Marc; Almeida, Claudia; Azaïs, Thierry; Haye, Bernard; Illoul, Corinne; Lesieur, Julie; Giraud-Guille, Marie-Madeleine; Nassif, Nadine; Hélary, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    The transition from osteoblast to osteocyte is described to occur through passive entrapment mechanism (self-buried, or embedded by neighboring cells). Here, we provide evidence of a new pathway where osteoblasts are "more" active than generally assumed. We demonstrate that osteoblasts possess the ability to migrate and differentiate into early osteocytes inside dense collagen matrices. This step involves MMP-13 simultaneously with IBSP and DMP1 expression. We also show that osteoblast migration is enhanced by the presence of apatite bone mineral. To reach this conclusion, we used an in vitro hybrid model based on both the structural characteristics of the osteoid tissue (including its density, texture and three-dimensional order), and the use of bone-like apatite. This finding highlights the mutual dynamic influence of osteoblast cell and bone extra cellular matrix. Such interactivity extends the role of physicochemical effects in bone morphogenesis complementing the widely studied molecular signals. This result represents a conceptual advancement in the fundamental understanding of bone formation.

  18. Quasi-horizontal circulation cells in 3D seawater intrusion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abarca, E.; Carrera, J.; Sanchez-Vila, X.; Voss, C.I.

    2007-01-01

    The seawater intrusion process is characterized by the difference in freshwater and seawater density that causes freshwater to float on seawater. Many confined aquifers have a large horizontal extension with respect to thickness. In these cases, while buoyancy acts in the vertical direction, flow is confined between the upper and bottom boundaries and the effect of gravity is controlled by variations of aquifer elevation. Therefore, the effective gravity is controlled by the slope and the shape of the aquifer boundaries. Variability in the topography of the aquifer boundaries is one case where 3D analysis is necessary. In this work, density-dependent flow processes caused by 3D aquifer geometry are studied numerically and specifically, considering a lateral slope of the aquifer boundaries. Sub-horizontal circulation cells are formed in the saltwater entering the aquifer. The penetration of the saltwater can be quantified by a dimensionless buoyancy number that measures the lateral slope of the aquifer relative to freshwater flux. The penetration of the seawater intrusion wedge is controlled more by this slope than by the aquifer thickness and dispersivity. Thus, the slope must be taken into account in order to accurately evaluate seawater intrusion. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Rnd3 Regulation of the Actin Cytoskeleton Promotes Melanoma Migration and Invasive Outgrowth in 3-D

    PubMed Central

    Klein, R. Matthew; Aplin, Andrew E.

    2009-01-01

    Depth of cell invasion into the dermis is a clinical determinant for poor prognosis in cutaneous melanoma. The signaling events that promote the switch from a non-invasive to invasive tumor phenotype remain obscure. Activating mutations in the serine/threonine kinase B-RAF are prevalent in melanoma. Mutant B-RAF is required for melanoma cell invasion. The expression of Rnd3, a Rho family GTPase, is regulated by mutant B-RAF, although its role in melanoma progression is unknown. In this study, we determined the functional contribution of Rnd3 to invasive melanoma. Endogenous Rnd3 was targeted for knockdown using a doxycyclineinducible shRNA system in invasive human melanoma cells. Depletion of Rnd3 promoted prominent actin stress fibers and enlarged focal adhesions. Mechanistically, stress fiber formation induced by Rnd3 knockdown required the specific involvement of RhoA and ROCK1/2 activity but not RhoB or RhoC. Rnd3 expression in human melanoma cell lines was strongly associated with elevated ERK phosphorylation and invasive behavior in a 3-D dermal-like environment. A functional role for Rnd3 was demonstrated in the invasive outgrowth of melanoma tumor spheroids. Knockdown of Rnd3 reduced invasive outgrowth of spheroids embedded in collagen gels. Additionally, Rnd3 depletion inhibited collective and border cell movement out from spheroids in a ROCK1/2-dependent manner. Collectively, these findings implicate Rnd3 as a major suppressor of RhoA mediated actin cytoskeletal organization and in the acquisition of an invasive melanoma phenotype. PMID:19244113

  20. Enhanced 3D fluorescence live cell imaging on nanoplasmonic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan Gartia, Manas; Hsiao, Austin; Sivaguru, Mayandi; Chen, Yi; Logan Liu, G.

    2011-09-01

    We have created a randomly distributed nanocone substrate on silicon coated with silver for surface-plasmon-enhanced fluorescence detection and 3D cell imaging. Optical characterization of the nanocone substrate showed it can support several plasmonic modes (in the 300-800 nm wavelength range) that can be coupled to a fluorophore on the surface of the substrate, which gives rise to the enhanced fluorescence. Spectral analysis suggests that a nanocone substrate can create more excitons and shorter lifetime in the model fluorophore Rhodamine 6G (R6G) due to plasmon resonance energy transfer from the nanocone substrate to the nearby fluorophore. We observed three-dimensional fluorescence enhancement on our substrate shown from the confocal fluorescence imaging of chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells grown on the substrate. The fluorescence intensity from the fluorophores bound on the cell membrane was amplified more than 100-fold as compared to that on a glass substrate. We believe that strong scattering within the nanostructured area coupled with random scattering inside the cell resulted in the observed three-dimensional enhancement in fluorescence with higher photostability on the substrate surface.

  1. Focal adhesion kinase activity is required for actomyosin contractility-based invasion of cells into dense 3D matrices

    PubMed Central

    Mierke, Claudia T.; Fischer, Tony; Puder, Stefanie; Kunschmann, Tom; Soetje, Birga; Ziegler, Wolfgang H.

    2017-01-01

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) regulates the dynamics of integrin-based cell adhesions important for motility. FAK’s activity regulation is involved in stress-sensing and focal-adhesion turnover. The effect of FAK on 3D migration and cellular mechanics is unclear. We analyzed FAK knock-out mouse embryonic fibroblasts and cells expressing a kinase-dead FAK mutant, R454-FAK, in comparison to FAK wild-type cells. FAK knock-out and FAKR454/R454 cells invade dense 3D matrices less efficiently. These results are supported by FAK knock-down in wild-type fibroblasts and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells showing reduced invasiveness. Pharmacological interventions indicate that in 3D matrices, cells deficient in FAK or kinase-activity behave similarly to wild-type cells treated with inhibitors of Src-activity or actomyosin-contractility. Using magnetic tweezers experiments, FAKR454/R454 cells are shown to be softer and exhibit impaired adhesion to fibronectin and collagen, which is consistent with their reduced 3D invasiveness. In line with this, FAKR454/R454 cells cannot contract the matrix in contrast to FAK wild-type cells. Finally, our findings demonstrate that active FAK facilitates 3D matrix invasion through increased cellular stiffness and transmission of actomyosin-dependent contractile force in dense 3D extracellular matrices. PMID:28202937

  2. 2-D and 3-D Difraction Stake Migration Method Using GPR: A Case Study in Canakkale (Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çaǧlar Yalçiner, Cahit

    In this study, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) method was applied for Clandestine cemetery detection in Ηanakkale (Dardanelles), west Turkey. Investigated area was a historical area which was used as tent hospitals during the World War I. The study area was also used to bury soldiers who died during the treatment process in tent hospitals. Because of agricultural activity grave stones were used by local people, thus, most of the graves were lost in the field. 45 GPR profiles were applied with a GPR system (RAMAC) equipped with 250 MHz central frequency shielded antenna. After main processing steps on raw data, migration was applied to improve section resolution and develop the realism of the subsurface images. Although the GPR in results before migration the anomalous zones are visible, after migration the results became much more visible both in the profiles and 3D illustrations, thus, migrated GPR data were preferred to locate the buried martyrdoms.

  3. 3D Clumped Cell Segmentation Using Curvature Based Seeded Watershed

    PubMed Central

    Atta-Fosu, Thomas; Guo, Weihong; Jeter, Dana; Mizutani, Claudia M.; Stopczynski, Nathan; Sousa-Neves, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Image segmentation is an important process that separates objects from the background and also from each other. Applied to cells, the results can be used for cell counting which is very important in medical diagnosis and treatment, and biological research that is often used by scientists and medical practitioners. Segmenting 3D confocal microscopy images containing cells of different shapes and sizes is still challenging as the nuclei are closely packed. The watershed transform provides an efficient tool in segmenting such nuclei provided a reasonable set of markers can be found in the image. In the presence of low-contrast variation or excessive noise in the given image, the watershed transform leads to over-segmentation (a single object is overly split into multiple objects). The traditional watershed uses the local minima of the input image and will characteristically find multiple minima in one object unless they are specified (marker-controlled watershed). An alternative to using the local minima is by a supervised technique called seeded watershed, which supplies single seeds to replace the minima for the objects. Consequently, the accuracy of a seeded watershed algorithm relies on the accuracy of the predefined seeds. In this paper, we present a segmentation approach based on the geometric morphological properties of the ‘landscape’ using curvatures. The curvatures are computed as the eigenvalues of the Shape matrix, producing accurate seeds that also inherit the original shape of their respective cells. We compare with some popular approaches and show the advantage of the proposed method. PMID:28280723

  4. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: Characterization in a 3D-cell culture model

    PubMed Central

    Gagliano, Nicoletta; Celesti, Giuseppe; Tacchini, Lorenza; Pluchino, Stefano; Sforza, Chiarella; Rasile, Marco; Valerio, Vincenza; Laghi, Luigi; Conte, Vincenzo; Procacci, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the effect of three-dimensional (3D)-arrangement on the expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells. METHODS: HPAF-II, HPAC, and PL45 PDAC cells were cultured in either 2D-monolayers or 3D-spheroids. Ultrastructure was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The expression of E-cadherin, β-catenin, N-cadherin, collagen type I (COL-I), vimentin, α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), and podoplanin was assayed by confocal microscopy in cells cultured on 12-mm diameter round coverslips and in 3D-spheroids. Gene expression for E-cadherin, Snail, Slug, Twist, Zeb1, and Zeb2 was quantified by real-time PCR. E-cadherin protein level and its electrophoretic pattern were studied by Western blot in cell lysates obtained from cells grown in 2D-monolayers and 3D-spheroids. RESULTS: The E-cadherin/β-catenin complex was expressed in a similar way in plasma membrane cell boundaries in both 2D-monolayers and 3D-spheroids. E-cadherin increased in lysates obtained from 3D-spheroids, while cleavage fragments were more evident in 2D-monolayers. N-cadherin expression was observed in very few PDAC cells grown in 2D-monolayers, but was more evident in 3D-spheroids. Some cells expressing COL-I were observed in 3D-spheroids. Podoplanin, expressed in collectively migrating cells, and αSMA were similarly expressed in both experimental conditions. The concomitant maintenance of the E-cadherin/β-catenin complex at cell boundaries supports the hypothesis of a collective migration for these cells, which is consistent with podoplanin expression. CONCLUSION: We show that a 3D-cell culture model could provide deeper insight into understanding the biology of PDAC and allow for the detection of marked differences in the phenotype of PDAC cells grown in 3D-spheroids. PMID:27182158

  5. The self-organization of grid cells in 3D.

    PubMed

    Stella, Federico; Treves, Alessandro

    2015-03-30

    Do we expect periodic grid cells to emerge in bats, or perhaps dolphins, exploring a three-dimensional environment? How long will it take? Our self-organizing model, based on ring-rate adaptation, points at a complex answer. The mathematical analysis leads to asymptotic states resembling face centered cubic (FCC) and hexagonal close packed (HCP) crystal structures, which are calculated to be very close to each other in terms of cost function. The simulation of the full model, however, shows that the approach to such asymptotic states involves several sub-processes over distinct time scales. The smoothing of the initially irregular multiple fields of individual units and their arrangement into hexagonal grids over certain best planes are observed to occur relatively quickly, even in large 3D volumes. The correct mutual orientation of the planes, though, and the coordinated arrangement of different units, take a longer time, with the network showing no sign of convergence towards either a pure FCC or HCP ordering.

  6. The self-organization of grid cells in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Federico; Treves, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Do we expect periodic grid cells to emerge in bats, or perhaps dolphins, exploring a three-dimensional environment? How long will it take? Our self-organizing model, based on ring-rate adaptation, points at a complex answer. The mathematical analysis leads to asymptotic states resembling face centered cubic (FCC) and hexagonal close packed (HCP) crystal structures, which are calculated to be very close to each other in terms of cost function. The simulation of the full model, however, shows that the approach to such asymptotic states involves several sub-processes over distinct time scales. The smoothing of the initially irregular multiple fields of individual units and their arrangement into hexagonal grids over certain best planes are observed to occur relatively quickly, even in large 3D volumes. The correct mutual orientation of the planes, though, and the coordinated arrangement of different units, take a longer time, with the network showing no sign of convergence towards either a pure FCC or HCP ordering. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05913.001 PMID:25821989

  7. Engineering Cellular Microenvironments with Photo- and Enzymatically Responsive Hydrogels: Toward Biomimetic 3D Cell Culture Models.

    PubMed

    Tam, Roger Y; Smith, Laura J; Shoichet, Molly S

    2017-03-27

    Conventional cell culture techniques using 2D polystyrene or glass have provided great insight into key biochemical mechanisms responsible for cellular events such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and cell-cell interactions. However, the physical and chemical properties of 2D culture in vitro are dramatically different than those found in the native cellular microenvironment in vivo. Cells grown on 2D substrates differ significantly from those grown in vivo, and this explains, in part, why many promising drug candidates discovered through in vitro drug screening assays fail when they are translated to in vivo animal or human models. To overcome this obstacle, 3D cell culture using biomimetic hydrogels has emerged as an alternative strategy to recapitulate native cell growth in vitro. Hydrogels, which are water-swollen polymers, can be synthetic or naturally derived. Many methods have been developed to control the physical and chemical properties of the hydrogels to match those found in specific tissues. Compared to 2D culture, cells cultured in 3D gels with the appropriate physicochemical cues can behave more like they naturally do in vivo. While conventional hydrogels involve modifications to the bulk material to mimic the static aspects of the cellular microenvironment, recent progress has focused on using more dynamic hydrogels, the chemical and physical properties of which can be altered with external stimuli to better mimic the dynamics of the native cellular microenvironment found in vivo. In this Account, we describe our progress in designing stimuli-responsive, optically transparent hydrogels that can be used as biomimetic extracellular matrices (ECMs) to study cell differentiation and migration in the context of modeling the nervous system and cancer. Specifically, we developed photosensitive agarose and hyaluronic acid hydrogels that are activated by single or two-photon irradiation for biomolecule immobilization at specific volumes within the 3D

  8. Coculture system with an organotypic brain slice and 3D spheroid of carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Han-Ning; Lohaus, Raphaela; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Binder, Claudia; Dehghani, Faramarz; Pukrop, Tobias

    2013-10-09

    Patients with cerebral metastasis of carcinomas have a poor prognosis. However, the process at the metastatic site has barely been investigated, in particular the role of the resident (stromal) cells. Studies in primary carcinomas demonstrate the influence of the microenvironment on metastasis, even on prognosis(1,2). Especially the tumor associated macrophages (TAM) support migration, invasion and proliferation(3). Interestingly, the major target sites of metastasis possess tissue-specific macrophages, such as Kupffer cells in the liver or microglia in the CNS. Moreover, the metastatic sites also possess other tissue-specific cells, like astrocytes. Recently, astrocytes were demonstrated to foster proliferation and persistence of cancer cells(4,5). Therefore, functions of these tissue-specific cell types seem to be very important in the process of brain metastasis(6,7). Despite these observations, however, up to now there is no suitable in vivo/in vitro model available to directly visualize glial reactions during cerebral metastasis formation, in particular by bright field microscopy. Recent in vivo live imaging of carcinoma cells demonstrated their cerebral colonization behavior(8). However, this method is very laborious, costly and technically complex. In addition, these kinds of animal experiments are restricted to small series and come with a substantial stress for the animals (by implantation of the glass plate, injection of tumor cells, repetitive anaesthesia and long-term fixation). Furthermore, in vivo imaging is thus far limited to the visualization of the carcinoma cells, whereas interactions with resident cells have not yet been illustrated. Finally, investigations of human carcinoma cells within immunocompetent animals are impossible(8). For these reasons, we established a coculture system consisting of an organotypic mouse brain slice and epithelial cells embedded in matrigel (3D cell sphere). The 3D carcinoma cell spheres were placed directly next to

  9. Peptide hydrogelation and cell encapsulation for 3D culture of MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongzhou; Ding, Ying; Sun, Xiuzhi S; Nguyen, Thu A

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture plays an invaluable role in tumor biology by providing in vivo like microenviroment and responses to therapeutic agents. Among many established 3D scaffolds, hydrogels demonstrate a distinct property as matrics for 3D cell culture. Most of the existing pre-gel solutions are limited under physiological conditions such as undesirable pH or temperature. Here, we report a peptide hydrogel that shows superior physiological properties as an in vitro matrix for 3D cell culture. The 3D matrix can be accomplished by mixing a self-assembling peptide directly with a cell culture medium without any pH or temperature adjustment. Results of dynamic rheological studies showed that this hydrogel can be delivered multiple times via pipetting without permanently destroying the hydrogel architecture, indicating the deformability and remodeling ability of the hydrogel. Human epithelial cancer cells, MCF-7, are encapsulated homogeneously in the hydrogel matrix during hydrogelation. Compared with two-dimensional (2D) monolayer culture, cells residing in the hydrogel matrix grow as tumor-like clusters in 3D formation. Relevant parameters related to cell morphology, survival, proliferation, and apoptosis were analyzed using MCF-7 cells in 3D hydrogels. Interestingly, treatment of cisplatin, an anti-cancer drug, can cause a significant decrease of cell viability of MCF-7 clusters in hydrogels. The responses to cisplatin were dose- and time-dependent, indicating the potential usage of hydrogels for drug testing. Results of confocal microscopy and Western blotting showed that cells isolated from hydrogels are suitable for downstream proteomic analysis. The results provided evidence that this peptide hydrogel is a promising 3D cell culture material for drug testing.

  10. Iterative methods for 3D implicit finite-difference migration using the complex Padé approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Carlos A. N.; Campos, Itamara S.; Costa, Jessé C.; Neto, Francisco A.; Schleicher, Jörg; Novais, Amélia

    2013-08-01

    Conventional implementations of 3D finite-difference (FD) migration use splitting techniques to accelerate performance and save computational cost. However, such techniques are plagued with numerical anisotropy that jeopardises the correct positioning of dipping reflectors in the directions not used for the operator splitting. We implement 3D downward continuation FD migration without splitting using a complex Padé approximation. In this way, the numerical anisotropy is eliminated at the expense of a computationally more intensive solution of a large-band linear system. We compare the performance of the iterative stabilized biconjugate gradient (BICGSTAB) and that of the multifrontal massively parallel direct solver (MUMPS). It turns out that the use of the complex Padé approximation not only stabilizes the solution, but also acts as an effective preconditioner for the BICGSTAB algorithm, reducing the number of iterations as compared to the implementation using the real Padé expansion. As a consequence, the iterative BICGSTAB method is more efficient than the direct MUMPS method when solving a single term in the Padé expansion. The results of both algorithms, here evaluated by computing the migration impulse response in the SEG/EAGE salt model, are of comparable quality.

  11. 3-D Prestack-migration of Wide-angle Data from a Variscan Transition Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleibinhaus, F.; Bopp, M.; Simon, M.; Gebrande, H.

    1999-09-01

    In addition to the near normal-incidence observations within the German DEKORP 2 project in 1984, wide-angle observations have been carried out on a parallel profile across the boundary between the Saxothuringian and Moldanubian crust, approximately 50 km NE of the main transect to control three-dimensional variations. Explosion sources have been used for the entire survey, providing excellent conditions for wide-angle registrations. A velocity model has been derived on the basis of in- and off-line refraction measurements using a kinematic raytracer which was extended to three dimensions by interpolation of 2-D velocity fields between parallel sections. Although prestack-migration of the data led to aliasing effects due to large shot and geophone spacing, stable results were obtained by forming envelopes after single-shot migration. The migrated sections reveal a strongly reflective Moho at about 31 km depth and a steeply (50°) dipping intracrustal reflector, which seems to be related to the border between the two Variscan units.

  12. 3D-Printing Crystallographic Unit Cells for Learning Materials Science and Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodenbough, Philip P.; Vanti, William B.; Chan, Siu-Wai

    2015-01-01

    Introductory materials science and engineering courses universally include the study of crystal structure and unit cells, which are by their nature highly visual 3D concepts. Traditionally, such topics are explored with 2D drawings or perhaps a limited set of difficult-to-construct 3D models. The rise of 3D printing, coupled with the wealth of…

  13. Lensfree diffractive tomography for the imaging of 3D cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Momey, F.; Berdeu, A.; Bordy, T.; Dinten, J.-M.; Marcel, F. Kermarrec; Picollet-D’hahan, N.; Gidrol, X.; Allier, C.

    2016-01-01

    New microscopes are needed to help realize the full potential of 3D organoid culture studies. In order to image large volumes of 3D organoid cultures while preserving the ability to catch every single cell, we propose a new imaging platform based on lensfree microscopy. We have built a lensfree diffractive tomography setup performing multi-angle acquisitions of 3D organoid culture embedded in Matrigel and developed a dedicated 3D holographic reconstruction algorithm based on the Fourier diffraction theorem. With this new imaging platform, we have been able to reconstruct a 3D volume as large as 21.5 mm3 of a 3D organoid culture of prostatic RWPE1 cells showing the ability of these cells to assemble in 3D intricate cellular network at the mesoscopic scale. Importantly, comparisons with 2D images show that it is possible to resolve single cells isolated from the main cellular structure with our lensfree diffractive tomography setup. PMID:27231600

  14. Segmentation of densely populated cell nuclei from confocal image stacks using 3D non-parametric shape priors.

    PubMed

    Ong, Lee-Ling S; Wang, Mengmeng; Dauwels, Justin; Asada, H Harry

    2014-01-01

    An approach to jointly estimate 3D shapes and poses of stained nuclei from confocal microscopy images, using statistical prior information, is presented. Extracting nuclei boundaries from our experimental images of cell migration is challenging due to clustered nuclei and variations in their shapes. This issue is formulated as a maximum a posteriori estimation problem. By incorporating statistical prior models of 3D nuclei shapes into level set functions, the active contour evolutions applied on the images is constrained. A 3D alignment algorithm is developed to build the training databases and to match contours obtained from the images to them. To address the issue of aligning the model over multiple clustered nuclei, a watershed-like technique is used to detect and separate clustered regions prior to active contour evolution. Our method is tested on confocal images of endothelial cells in microfluidic devices, compared with existing approaches.

  15. In vitro cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Nina; Walzl, Angelika; Unger, Christine; Rosner, Margit; Krupitza, Georg; Hengstschläger, Markus; Dolznig, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Determining the migratory and invasive capacity of tumor and stromal cells and clarifying the underlying mechanisms is most relevant for novel strategies in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, drug development and treatment. Here we shortly summarize the different modes of cell travelling and review in vitro methods, which can be used to evaluate migration and invasion. We provide a concise summary of established migration/invasion assays described in the literature, list advantages, limitations and drawbacks, give a tabular overview for convenience and depict the basic principles of the assays graphically. In many cases particular research problems and specific cell types do not leave a choice for a broad variety of usable assays. However, for most standard applications using adherent cells, based on our experience we suggest to use exclusion zone assays to evaluate migration/invasion. We substantiate our choice by demonstrating that the advantages outbalance the drawbacks e.g. the simple setup, the easy readout, the kinetic analysis, the evaluation of cell morphology and the feasibility to perform the assay with standard laboratory equipment. Finally, innovative 3D migration and invasion models including heterotypic cell interactions are discussed. These methods recapitulate the in vivo situation most closely. Results obtained with these assays have already shed new light on cancer cell spreading and potentially will uncover unknown mechanisms.

  16. 3D-printed microfluidic chips with patterned, cell-laden hydrogel constructs.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Yu, Chu Hsiang; Ersoy, Fulya; Emadi, Sharareh; Khademhosseini, Ali; Tasoglu, Savas

    2016-06-20

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing offers potential to fabricate high-throughput and low-cost fabrication of microfluidic devices as a promising alternative to traditional techniques which enables efficient design iterations in the development stage. In this study, we demonstrate a single-step fabrication of a 3D transparent microfluidic chip using two alternative techniques: a stereolithography-based desktop 3D printer and a two-step fabrication using an industrial 3D printer based on polyjet technology. This method, compared to conventional fabrication using relatively expensive materials and labor-intensive processes, presents a low-cost, rapid prototyping technique to print functional 3D microfluidic chips. We enhance the capabilities of 3D-printed microfluidic devices by coupling 3D cell encapsulation and spatial patterning within photocrosslinkable gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA). The platform presented here serves as a 3D culture environment for long-term cell culture and growth. Furthermore, we have demonstrated the ability to print complex 3D microfluidic channels to create predictable and controllable fluid flow regimes. Here, we demonstrate the novel use of 3D-printed microfluidic chips as controllable 3D cell culture environments, advancing the applicability of 3D printing to engineering physiological systems for future applications in bioengineering.

  17. Melanoma cells undergo aggressive coalescence in a 3D Matrigel model that is repressed by anti-CD44.

    PubMed

    Wessels, Deborah; Lusche, Daniel F; Voss, Edward; Kuhl, Spencer; Buchele, Emma C; Klemme, Michael R; Russell, Kanoe B; Ambrose, Joseph; Soll, Benjamin A; Bossler, Aaron; Milhem, Mohammed; Goldman, Charles; Soll, David R

    2017-01-01

    Using unique computer-assisted 3D reconstruction software, it was previously demonstrated that tumorigenic cell lines derived from breast tumors, when seeded in a 3D Matrigel model, grew as clonal aggregates which, after approximately 100 hours, underwent coalescence mediated by specialized cells, eventually forming a highly structured large spheroid. Non-tumorigenic cells did not undergo coalescence. Because histological sections of melanomas forming in patients suggest that melanoma cells migrate and coalesce to form tumors, we tested whether they also underwent coalescence in a 3D Matrigel model. Melanoma cells exiting fragments of three independent melanomas or from secondary cultures derived from them, and cells from the melanoma line HTB-66, all underwent coalescence mediated by specialized cells in the 3D model. Normal melanocytes did not. However, coalescence of melanoma cells differed from that of breast-derived tumorigenic cell lines in that they 1) coalesced immediately, 2) underwent coalescence as individual cells as well as aggregates, 3) underwent coalescence far faster and 4) ultimately formed long, flat, fenestrated aggregates that were extremely dynamic. A screen of 51 purified monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting cell surface-associated molecules revealed that two mAbs, anti-beta 1 integrin/(CD29) and anti-CD44, blocked melanoma cell coalescence. They also blocked coalescence of tumorigenic cells derived from a breast tumor. These results add weight to the commonality of coalescence as a characteristic of tumorigenic cells, as well as the usefulness of the 3D Matrigel model and software for both investigating the mechanisms regulating tumorigenesis and screening for potential anti-tumorigenesis mAbs.

  18. Melanoma cells undergo aggressive coalescence in a 3D Matrigel model that is repressed by anti-CD44

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Edward; Kuhl, Spencer; Buchele, Emma C.; Klemme, Michael R.; Russell, Kanoe B.; Ambrose, Joseph; Soll, Benjamin A.; Bossler, Aaron; Milhem, Mohammed; Goldman, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Using unique computer-assisted 3D reconstruction software, it was previously demonstrated that tumorigenic cell lines derived from breast tumors, when seeded in a 3D Matrigel model, grew as clonal aggregates which, after approximately 100 hours, underwent coalescence mediated by specialized cells, eventually forming a highly structured large spheroid. Non-tumorigenic cells did not undergo coalescence. Because histological sections of melanomas forming in patients suggest that melanoma cells migrate and coalesce to form tumors, we tested whether they also underwent coalescence in a 3D Matrigel model. Melanoma cells exiting fragments of three independent melanomas or from secondary cultures derived from them, and cells from the melanoma line HTB-66, all underwent coalescence mediated by specialized cells in the 3D model. Normal melanocytes did not. However, coalescence of melanoma cells differed from that of breast-derived tumorigenic cell lines in that they 1) coalesced immediately, 2) underwent coalescence as individual cells as well as aggregates, 3) underwent coalescence far faster and 4) ultimately formed long, flat, fenestrated aggregates that were extremely dynamic. A screen of 51 purified monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting cell surface-associated molecules revealed that two mAbs, anti-beta 1 integrin/(CD29) and anti-CD44, blocked melanoma cell coalescence. They also blocked coalescence of tumorigenic cells derived from a breast tumor. These results add weight to the commonality of coalescence as a characteristic of tumorigenic cells, as well as the usefulness of the 3D Matrigel model and software for both investigating the mechanisms regulating tumorigenesis and screening for potential anti-tumorigenesis mAbs. PMID:28264026

  19. Three-dimensional cell migration does not follow a random walk.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei-Hsun; Giri, Anjil; Sun, Sean X; Wirtz, Denis

    2014-03-18

    Cell migration through 3D extracellular matrices is critical to the normal development of tissues and organs and in disease processes, yet adequate analytical tools to characterize 3D migration are lacking. Here, we quantified the migration patterns of individual fibrosarcoma cells on 2D substrates and in 3D collagen matrices and found that 3D migration does not follow a random walk. Both 2D and 3D migration features a non-Gaussian, exponential mean cell velocity distribution, which we show is primarily a result of cell-to-cell variations. Unlike in the 2D case, 3D cell migration is anisotropic: velocity profiles display different speed and self-correlation processes in different directions, rendering the classical persistent random walk (PRW) model of cell migration inadequate. By incorporating cell heterogeneity and local anisotropy to the PRW model, we predict 3D cell motility over a wide range of matrix densities, which identifies density-independent emerging migratory properties. This analysis also reveals the unexpected robust relation between cell speed and persistence of migration over a wide range of matrix densities.

  20. Guiding Cell Attachment in 3D Microscaffolds Selectively Functionalized with Two Distinct Adhesion Proteins.

    PubMed

    Richter, Benjamin; Hahn, Vincent; Bertels, Sarah; Claus, Tanja K; Wegener, Martin; Delaittre, Guillaume; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Bastmeyer, Martin

    2017-02-01

    The combination of three different photoresists into a single direct laser written 3D microscaffold permits functionalization with two bioactive full-length proteins. The cell-instructive microscaffolds consist of a passivating framework equipped with light activatable constituents featuring distinct protein-binding properties. This allows directed cell attachment of epithelial or fibroblast cells in 3D.

  1. Tumor cell migration is a superstatistical process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabry, Ben

    2014-03-01

    Over short time scales, cell migration can be well described as a homogeneous correlated random walk with a fixed average step length and a certain degree of directional persistence. On time scales of up to 24 h, however, the migration process is highly inhomogeneous. Superstatistical fluctuations of step length and directional persistence lead to ``anomalous'' features, such as an exponential step width distribution (SWD) and a superdiffusive mean squared displacement (MSD). These features are quantitatively reproduced by a correlated random walk with temporally varying persistence. By comparing cell migration on planar substrates and in a 3D collagen matrix, we demonstrate that the globally averaged MSD and SWD are not sensitive to the microscopic migration mechanism of the cells and can therefore yield identical results in these different environments. By contrast, the temporal fluctuations of step length and directional persistence, and their mutual correlations, provide a characteristic fingerprint of the migration process in different environments. In collaboration with Julian Steinwachs and Claus Metzner, Department of Physics, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg.

  2. Cell migration in the forebrain.

    PubMed

    Marín, Oscar; Rubenstein, John L R

    2003-01-01

    The forebrain comprises an intricate set of structures that are required for some of the most complex and evolved functions of the mammalian brain. As a reflection of its complexity, cell migration in the forebrain is extremely elaborated, with widespread dispersion of cells across multiple functionally distinct areas. Two general modes of migration are distinguished in the forebrain: radial migration, which establishes the general cytoarchitectonical framework of the different forebrain subdivisions; and tangential migration, which increases the cellular complexity of forebrain circuits by allowing the dispersion of multiple neuronal types. Here, we review the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying each of these types of migrations and discuss how emerging concepts in neuronal migration are reshaping our understanding of forebrain development in normal and pathological situations.

  3. Directed 3D Cell Alignment and Elongation in Microengineered Hydrogels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Immortalized human liver carcinoma cells (Hep-G2) were maintained in DMEM supplemented with 10% FBS, 1% P/S and were passaged twice per week. 2.4. Prepolymer ... prepolymer (20% (w/v) in DPBS) was used to coat TMSPMA treated glass slides as previously described [28]. 2.5. Cell encapsulation and micropatterning Cell... prepolymer was pipetted between a TMSPMA coated glass slide and an untreated coverslip (18 mm (w) 18 mm (l)), then exposed to 6.9 mW/cm2 UV light

  4. Preservation of the 3D Phenotype Upon Dispersal of Cultured Cell Spheroids Into Monolayer Cultures.

    PubMed

    Koshkin, Vasilij; Ailles, Laurie E; Liu, Geoffrey; Krylov, Sergey N

    2017-01-01

    In functional cytometric studies, cultured cells are exposed to effectors (e.g., drugs), and the heterogeneity of cell responses are studied using cytometry techniques (e.g., image cytometry). Such studies are difficult to perform on 3D cell cultures. A solution is to disperse 3D clusters and transfer the cells to the 2D state before applying effectors and using cytometry. This approach requires that the lifetime of the 3D phenotype be longer than the duration of the experiment. Here we studied the dynamics of phenotype transformation from 3D to 2D and searched for means of slowing this transformation down in dispersed spheroids of MCF7 cells. We found three functional biomarkers of the 3D phenotype in MCF7 cell spheroids that are absent in the 2D cell culture: (i) the presence of a subpopulation with an elevated drug-expelling capacity; (ii) the presence of a subpopulation with an elevated cytoprotective capacity; and (iii) the accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Monitoring these biomarkers in cells transferred from the 3D state to the 2D state revealed their gradual extinction. We found that the combined application of an elevated cell density and thiol-containing medium supplements increased the lifetime of the 3D phenotype by several fold to as long as 96 h. Our results suggest that extending the lifetime of the 3D phenotype in the cells transferred from the 3D state to the 2D state can facilitate detailed functional cytometric studies, such as measurements of population heterogeneity of cytotoxicity, chemosensitivity, and radiosensitivity. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 154-162, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. 3-D Microwell Array System for Culturing Virus Infected Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    El Assal, Rami; Gurkan, Umut A.; Chen, Pu; Juillard, Franceline; Tocchio, Alessandro; Chinnasamy, Thiruppathiraja; Beauchemin, Chantal; Unluisler, Sebnem; Canikyan, Serli; Holman, Alyssa; Srivatsa, Srikar; Kaye, Kenneth M.; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells have been increasingly grown in pharmaceutical research to understand tumorigenesis and develop new therapeutic drugs. Currently, cells are typically grown using two-dimensional (2-D) cell culture approaches, where the native tumor microenvironment is difficult to recapitulate. Thus, one of the main obstacles in oncology is the lack of proper infection models that recount main features present in tumors. In recent years, microtechnology-based platforms have been employed to generate three-dimensional (3-D) models that better mimic the native microenvironment in cell culture. Here, we present an innovative approach to culture Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infected human B cells in 3-D using a microwell array system. The results demonstrate that the KSHV-infected B cells can be grown up to 15 days in a 3-D culture. Compared with 2-D, cells grown in 3-D had increased numbers of KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) dots, as detected by immunofluorescence microscopy, indicating a higher viral genome copy number. Cells in 3-D also demonstrated a higher rate of lytic reactivation. The 3-D microwell array system has the potential to improve 3-D cell oncology models and allow for better-controlled studies for drug discovery. PMID:28004818

  6. 3-D Microwell Array System for Culturing Virus Infected Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    El Assal, Rami; Gurkan, Umut A; Chen, Pu; Juillard, Franceline; Tocchio, Alessandro; Chinnasamy, Thiruppathiraja; Beauchemin, Chantal; Unluisler, Sebnem; Canikyan, Serli; Holman, Alyssa; Srivatsa, Srikar; Kaye, Kenneth M; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-12-22

    Cancer cells have been increasingly grown in pharmaceutical research to understand tumorigenesis and develop new therapeutic drugs. Currently, cells are typically grown using two-dimensional (2-D) cell culture approaches, where the native tumor microenvironment is difficult to recapitulate. Thus, one of the main obstacles in oncology is the lack of proper infection models that recount main features present in tumors. In recent years, microtechnology-based platforms have been employed to generate three-dimensional (3-D) models that better mimic the native microenvironment in cell culture. Here, we present an innovative approach to culture Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infected human B cells in 3-D using a microwell array system. The results demonstrate that the KSHV-infected B cells can be grown up to 15 days in a 3-D culture. Compared with 2-D, cells grown in 3-D had increased numbers of KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) dots, as detected by immunofluorescence microscopy, indicating a higher viral genome copy number. Cells in 3-D also demonstrated a higher rate of lytic reactivation. The 3-D microwell array system has the potential to improve 3-D cell oncology models and allow for better-controlled studies for drug discovery.

  7. Investigation of cell viability and morphology in 3D bio-printed alginate constructs with tunable stiffness.

    PubMed

    Shi, Pujiang; Laude, Augustinus; Yeong, Wai Yee

    2017-04-01

    In this article, mouse fibroblast cells (L929) were seeded on 2%, 5%, and 10% alginate hydrogels, and they were also bio-printed with 2%, 5%, and 10% alginate solutions individually to form constructs. The elastic and viscous moduli of alginate solutions, their interior structure and stiffness, interactions of cells and alginate, cell viability, migration and morphology were investigated by rheometer, MTT assay, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and fluorescent microscopy. The three types of bio-printed scaffolds of distinctive stiffness were prepared, and the seeded cells showed robust viability either on the alginate hydrogel surfaces or in the 3D bio-printed constructs. Majority of the proliferated cells in the 3D bio-printed constructs weakly attached to the surrounding alginate matrix. The concentration of alginate solution and hydrogel stiffness influenced cell migration and morphology, moreover the cells formed spheroids in the bio-printed 10% alginate hydrogel construct. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1009-1018, 2017.

  8. Local 3D matrix confinement determines division axis through cell shape.

    PubMed

    He, Lijuan; Chen, Weitong; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Jimenez, Angela; Wong, Bin Sheng; San, Angela; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Wirtz, Denis

    2016-02-09

    How the division axis is determined in mammalian cells embedded in three-dimensional (3D) matrices remains elusive, despite that many types of cells divide in 3D environments. Cells on two-dimensional (2D) substrates typically round up completely to divide. Here, we show that in 3D collagen matrices, mammalian cells such as HT1080 human fibrosarcoma and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exhibit division modes distinct from their Counterparts on 2D substrates, with a markedly higher fraction of cells remaining highly elongated through mitosis in 3D matrices. The long axis of elongated mitotic cells accurately predicts the division axis, independently of matrix density and cell-matrix interactions. This 3D-specific elongated division mode is determined by the local confinement produced by the matrix and the ability of cells to protrude and locally remodel the matrix via β1 integrin. Elongated division is readily recapitulated using collagen-coated microfabricated channels. Cells depleted of β1 integrin still divide in the elongated mode in microchannels, suggesting that 3D confinement is sufficient to induce the elongated cell-division phenotype.

  9. Spontaneous Electroless Galvanic Cell Deposition of 3D Hierarchical and Interlaced S-M-S Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chuan Fu; Azmansah, Siti Aishah Bte; Zhu, Hai; Xu, Qing-Hua; Ho, Ghim Wei

    2017-01-01

    One-pot electroless galvanic cell deposition of a 3D hierarchical semiconductor-metal-semiconductor interlaced nanoarray is demonstrated. The fabricated 3D photoanode deviates from the typical planar geometry, and aims to optimize the effective surface area for light harvesting and long-range charge transfer-collection pathways.

  10. Fluid and cell behaviors along a 3D printed alginate/gelatin/fibrin channel.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yufan; Wang, Xiaohong

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell manipulation is available with the integration of microfluidic technology and rapid prototyping techniques. High-Fidelity (Hi-Fi) constructs hold enormous therapeutic potential for organ manufacturing and regenerative medicine. In the present paper we introduced a quasi-three-dimensional (Q3D) model with parallel biocompatible alginate/gelatin/fibrin hurdles. The behaviors of fluids and cells along the microfluidic channels with various widths were studied. Cells inside the newly designed microfluidic channels attached and grew well. Morphological changes of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in both two-dimensional (2D) and 3D milieu were found on the printed constructs. Endothelialization occurred with the co-cultures of ADSCs and hepatocytes. This study provides insights into the interactions among fluids, cells and biomaterials, the behaviors of fluids and cells along the microfluidic channels, and the applications of Q3D techniques.

  11. A 3D Hydrodynamic Model for Cytokinesis of Eukaryotic Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    remark that more features can be added to the model by augmenting the corresponding free energy . 2.2 Transport equations for biomass Given the...density for component i, i = 1, 2, 3. For incompress- ible materials, we enforce ϕ1 + ϕ2 + ϕ3 = 1. (2) 2.1 Thermodynamic free energy We denote the domain...in which the cell resides together with the buffer fluid as Ω. The free energy of this mixture system is proposed as follows, F = ∫ Ω fdx, (3) where f

  12. Design of 3D printed insert for hanging culture of Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chong; Meng, Qin; Zhang, Guoliang

    2014-12-17

    A Caco-2 cell culture on Transwell, an alternative testing to animal or human testing used in evaluating drug intestinal permeability, incorrectly estimated the absorption of actively transported drugs due to the low expression of membrane transporters. Similarly, three-dimensional (3D) cultures of Caco-2 cells, which have been recommended to be more physiological relevant, were not superior to the Transwell culture in either accuracy or convenience in drug permeability testing. Using rapid 3D printing prototyping techniques, this study proposed a hanging culture of Caco-2 cells that performed with high accuracy in predicting drug permeability in humans. As found, hanging cultured Caco-2 cells formed a confluent monolayer and maintained high cell viability on the 3D printed insert. Compared with the normal culture on Transwell, the Caco-2 cells on the 3D printed insert presented ∼30-100% higher brush border enzyme activity and ∼2-7 folds higher activity of P-glycoprotein/multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 during 21 days of incubation. For the eight membrane transporter substrates, the predictive curve of the 3D printing culture exhibited better linearity (R(2) = 0.92) to the human oral adsorption than that of the Transwell culture (R(2) = 0.84), indicating better prediction by the 3D printing culture. In this regard, the 3D printed insert for hanging culture could be potentially developed as a convenient and low-cost tool for testing drug oral absorption.

  13. Improving segmentation of 3D touching cell nuclei using flow tracking on surface meshes.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Guo, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Automatic segmentation of touching cell nuclei in 3D microscopy images is of great importance in bioimage informatics and computational biology. This paper presents a novel method for improving 3D touching cell nuclei segmentation. Given binary touching nuclei by the method in Li et al. (2007), our method herein consists of several steps: surface mesh reconstruction and curvature information estimation; direction field diffusion on surface meshes; flow tracking on surface meshes; and projection of surface mesh segmentation to volumetric images. The method is validated on both synthesised and real 3D touching cell nuclei images, demonstrating its validity and effectiveness.

  14. Micro-well arrays for 3D shape control and high resolution analysis of single cells.

    PubMed

    Ochsner, Mirjam; Dusseiller, Marc R; Grandin, H Michelle; Luna-Morris, Sheila; Textor, Marcus; Vogel, Viola; Smith, Michael L

    2007-08-01

    In addition to rigidity, matrix composition, and cell shape, dimensionality is now considered an important property of the cell microenvironment which directs cell behavior. However, available tools for cell culture in two-dimensional (2D) versus three-dimensional (3D) environments are difficult to compare, and no tools exist which provide 3D shape control of single cells. We developed polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates for the culture of single cells in 3D arrays which are compatible with high-resolution microscopy. Cell adhesion was limited to within microwells by passivation of the flat upper surface through 'wet-printing' of a non-fouling polymer and backfilling of the wells with specific adhesive proteins or lipid bilayers. Endothelial cells constrained within microwells were viable, and intracellular features could be imaged with high resolution objectives. Finally, phalloidin staining of actin stress fibers showed that the cytoskeleton of cells in microwells was 3D and not limited to the cell-substrate interface. Thus, microwells can be used to produce microenvironments for large numbers of single cells with 3D shape control and can be added to a repertoire of tools which are ever more sought after for both fundamental biological studies as well as high throughput cell screening assays.

  15. 3D cell-printing of large-volume tissues: Application to ear regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Seob; Kim, Byung Soo; Seo, Dong Hwan; Park, Jeong Hun; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2017-01-17

    The three-dimensional (3D) printing of large-volume cells, printed in a clinically relevant size, is one of the most important challenges in the field of tissue engineering. However, few studies have reported the fabrication of large-volume cell-printed constructs (LCCs). To create LCCs, appropriate fabrication conditions should be established: factors involved include fabrication time, residence time, and temperature control of the cell-laden hydrogel in the syringe to ensure high cell viability and functionality. The prolonged time required for 3D printing of LCCs can reduce cell viability and result in insufficient functionality of the construct, because the cells are exposed to a harsh environment during the printing process. In this regard, we present an advanced 3D cell-printing system composed of a clean air workstation, humidifier, and Peltier system, which provides a suitable printing environment for production of LCCs with high cell viability. We confirmed that the advanced 3D cell-printing system was capable of providing enhanced printability of hydrogels and fabricating an ear-shaped LCC with high cell viability. In vivo results for the ear-shaped LCC also showed that printed chondrocytes proliferated sufficiently and differentiated into cartilage tissue. Thus, we conclude that the advanced 3D cell-printing system is a versatile tool to create cell-printed constructs for the generation of large-volume tissues.

  16. Analysis of cell migration within a three-dimensional collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Rommerswinkel, Nadine; Niggemann, Bernd; Keil, Silvia; Zänker, Kurt S; Dittmar, Thomas

    2014-10-05

    The ability to migrate is a hallmark of various cell types and plays a crucial role in several physiological processes, including embryonic development, wound healing, and immune responses. However, cell migration is also a key mechanism in cancer enabling these cancer cells to detach from the primary tumor to start metastatic spreading. Within the past years various cell migration assays have been developed to analyze the migratory behavior of different cell types. Because the locomotory behavior of cells markedly differs between a two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) environment it can be assumed that the analysis of the migration of cells that are embedded within a 3D environment would yield in more significant cell migration data. The advantage of the described 3D collagen matrix migration assay is that cells are embedded within a physiological 3D network of collagen fibers representing the major component of the extracellular matrix. Due to time-lapse video microscopy real cell migration is measured allowing the determination of several migration parameters as well as their alterations in response to pro-migratory factors or inhibitors. Various cell types could be analyzed using this technique, including lymphocytes/leukocytes, stem cells, and tumor cells. Likewise, also cell clusters or spheroids could be embedded within the collagen matrix concomitant with analysis of the emigration of single cells from the cell cluster/ spheroid into the collagen lattice. We conclude that the 3D collagen matrix migration assay is a versatile method to analyze the migration of cells within a physiological-like 3D environment.

  17. Quantitative Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Comparison of 2D and 3D Colon Cancer Cell Culture Models.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiaoshan; Lukowski, Jessica K; Weaver, Eric M; Skube, Susan B; Hummon, Amanda B

    2016-12-02

    Cell cultures are widely used model systems. Some immortalized cell lines can be grown in either two-dimensional (2D) adherent monolayers or in three-dimensional (3D) multicellular aggregates, or spheroids. Here, the quantitative proteome and phosphoproteome of colon carcinoma HT29 cells cultures in 2D monolayers and 3D spheroids were compared with a stable isotope labeling of amino acids (SILAC) labeling strategy. Two biological replicates from each sample were examined, and notable differences in both the proteome and the phosphoproteome were determined by nanoliquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to assess how growth configuration affects molecular expression. A total of 5867 protein groups, including 2523 phosphoprotein groups and 8733 phosphopeptides were identified in the samples. The Gene Ontology analysis revealed enriched GO terms in the 3D samples for RNA binding, nucleic acid binding, enzyme binding, cytoskeletal protein binding, and histone binding for their molecular functions (MF) and in the process of cell cycle, cytoskeleton organization, and DNA metabolic process for the biological process (BP). The KEGG pathway analysis indicated that 3D cultures are enriched for oxidative phosphorylation pathways, metabolic pathways, peroxisome pathways, and biosynthesis of amino acids. In contrast, analysis of the phosphoproteomes indicated that 3D cultures have decreased phosphorylation correlating with slower growth rates and lower cell-to-extracellular matrix interactions. In sum, these results provide quantitative assessments of the effects on the proteome and phosphoproteome of culturing cells in 2D versus 3D cell culture configurations.

  18. BioSig3D: High Content Screening of Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Models

    PubMed Central

    Bilgin, Cemal Cagatay; Fontenay, Gerald; Cheng, Qingsu; Chang, Hang; Han, Ju; Parvin, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    BioSig3D is a computational platform for high-content screening of three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models that are imaged in full 3D volume. It provides an end-to-end solution for designing high content screening assays, based on colony organization that is derived from segmentation of nuclei in each colony. BioSig3D also enables visualization of raw and processed 3D volumetric data for quality control, and integrates advanced bioinformatics analysis. The system consists of multiple computational and annotation modules that are coupled together with a strong use of controlled vocabularies to reduce ambiguities between different users. It is a web-based system that allows users to: design an experiment by defining experimental variables, upload a large set of volumetric images into the system, analyze and visualize the dataset, and either display computed indices as a heatmap, or phenotypic subtypes for heterogeneity analysis, or download computed indices for statistical analysis or integrative biology. BioSig3D has been used to profile baseline colony formations with two experiments: (i) morphogenesis of a panel of human mammary epithelial cell lines (HMEC), and (ii) heterogeneity in colony formation using an immortalized non-transformed cell line. These experiments reveal intrinsic growth properties of well-characterized cell lines that are routinely used for biological studies. BioSig3D is being released with seed datasets and video-based documentation. PMID:26978075

  19. Cell migration in confined environments.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We describe a protocol for measuring the speed of human neutrophils migrating through small channels, in conditions of mechanical confinement comparable to those experienced by neutrophils migrating through tissues. In such conditions, we find that neutrophils move persistently, at constant speed for tens of minutes, enabling precise measurements at single cells resolution, for large number of cells. The protocol relies on microfluidic devices with small channels in which a solution of chemoattractant and a suspension of isolated neutrophils are loaded in sequence. The migration of neutrophils can be observed for several hours, starting within minutes after loading the neutrophils in the devices. The protocol is divided into four main steps: the fabrication of the microfluidic devices, the separation of neutrophils from whole blood, the preparation of the assay and cell loading, and the analysis of data. We discuss the practical steps for the implementation of the migration assays in biology labs, the adaptation of the protocols to various cell types, including cancer cells, and the supplementary device features required for precise measurements of directionality and persistence during migration.

  20. Examination of 1D Solar Cell Model Limitations Using 3D SPICE Modeling: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, W. E.; Olson, J. M.; Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.

    2012-06-01

    To examine the limitations of one-dimensional (1D) solar cell modeling, 3D SPICE-based modeling is used to examine in detail the validity of the 1D assumptions as a function of sheet resistance for a model cell. The internal voltages and current densities produced by this modeling give additional insight into the differences between the 1D and 3D models.

  1. Development of a 3D cell printed construct considering angiogenesis for liver tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Woo; Choi, Yeong-Jin; Yong, Woon-Jae; Pati, Falguni; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Kang, Kyung Shin; Kang, In-Hye; Park, Jaesung; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-01-12

    Several studies have focused on the regeneration of liver tissue in a two-dimensional (2D) planar environment, whereas actual liver tissue is three-dimensional (3D). Cell printing technology has been successfully utilized for building 3D structures; however, the poor mechanical properties of cell-laden hydrogels are a major concern. Here, we demonstrate the printing of a 3D cell-laden construct and its application to liver tissue engineering using 3D cell printing technology through a multi-head tissue/organ building system. Polycaprolactone (PCL) was used as a framework material because of its excellent mechanical properties. Collagen bioink containing three different types of cells-hepatocytes (HCs), human umbilical vein endothelial cells , and human lung fibroblasts--was infused into the canals of a PCL framework to induce the formation of capillary--like networks and liver cell growth. A co-cultured 3D microenvironment of the three types of cells was successfully established and maintained. The vascular formation and functional abilities of HCs (i.e., albumin secretion and urea synthesis) demonstrated that the heterotypic interaction among HCs and nonparenchymal cells increased the survivability and functionality of HCs within the collagen gel. Therefore, our results demonstrate the prospect of using cell printing technology for the creation of heterotypic cellular interaction within a structure for liver tissue engineering.

  2. Macrophage podosomes go 3D.

    PubMed

    Van Goethem, Emeline; Guiet, Romain; Balor, Stéphanie; Charrière, Guillaume M; Poincloux, Renaud; Labrousse, Arnaud; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Le Cabec, Véronique

    2011-01-01

    Macrophage tissue infiltration is a critical step in the immune response against microorganisms and is also associated with disease progression in chronic inflammation and cancer. Macrophages are constitutively equipped with specialized structures called podosomes dedicated to extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. We recently reported that these structures play a critical role in trans-matrix mesenchymal migration mode, a protease-dependent mechanism. Podosome molecular components and their ECM-degrading activity have been extensively studied in two dimensions (2D), but yet very little is known about their fate in three-dimensional (3D) environments. Therefore, localization of podosome markers and proteolytic activity were carefully examined in human macrophages performing mesenchymal migration. Using our gelled collagen I 3D matrix model to obligate human macrophages to perform mesenchymal migration, classical podosome markers including talin, paxillin, vinculin, gelsolin, cortactin were found to accumulate at the tip of F-actin-rich cell protrusions together with β1 integrin and CD44 but not β2 integrin. Macrophage proteolytic activity was observed at podosome-like protrusion sites using confocal fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. The formation of migration tunnels by macrophages inside the matrix was accomplished by degradation, engulfment and mechanic compaction of the matrix. In addition, videomicroscopy revealed that 3D F-actin-rich protrusions of migrating macrophages were as dynamic as their 2D counterparts. Overall, the specifications of 3D podosomes resembled those of 2D podosome rosettes rather than those of individual podosomes. This observation was further supported by the aspect of 3D podosomes in fibroblasts expressing Hck, a master regulator of podosome rosettes in macrophages. In conclusion, human macrophage podosomes go 3D and take the shape of spherical podosome rosettes when the cells perform mesenchymal migration. This work

  3. 3D visualization of HIV transfer at the virological synapse between dendritic cells and T cells

    PubMed Central

    Felts, Richard L.; Narayan, Kedar; Estes, Jacob D.; Shi, Dan; Trubey, Charles M.; Fu, Jing; Hartnell, Lisa M.; Ruthel, Gordon T.; Schneider, Douglas K.; Nagashima, Kunio; Bess, Julian W.; Bavari, Sina; Lowekamp, Bradley C.; Bliss, Donald; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2010-01-01

    The efficiency of HIV infection is greatly enhanced when the virus is delivered at conjugates between CD4+ T cells and virus-bearing antigen-presenting cells such as macrophages or dendritic cells via specialized structures known as virological synapses. Using ion abrasion SEM, electron tomography, and superresolution light microscopy, we have analyzed the spatial architecture of cell-cell contacts and distribution of HIV virions at virological synapses formed between mature dendritic cells and T cells. We demonstrate the striking envelopment of T cells by sheet-like membrane extensions derived from mature dendritic cells, resulting in a shielded region for formation of virological synapses. Within the synapse, filopodial extensions emanating from CD4+ T cells make contact with HIV virions sequestered deep within a 3D network of surface-accessible compartments in the dendritic cell. Viruses are detected at the membrane surfaces of both dendritic cells and T cells, but virions are not released passively at the synapse; instead, virus transfer requires the engagement of T-cell CD4 receptors. The relative seclusion of T cells from the extracellular milieu, the burial of the site of HIV transfer, and the receptor-dependent initiation of virion transfer by T cells highlight unique aspects of cell-cell HIV transmission. PMID:20624966

  4. Methods to improve the resolution of prestack migrated images, with application to a 3D dataset from a fractured reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Gabriel

    I present three different methods to achieve increased definition in images from conventional seismic data, as illustrated with 3D data from the Fort Worth Basin's Barnett Shale fractured reservoir play, currently one of the hottest exploration and production trends in continental U.S. First, I present a method to correct for wavelet stretch in common-angle prestack migrated data. Wavelet stretch adversely influences contributions to the image from large angle or long offset data. Increasing the fidelity of large angles improves the vertical and lateral resolution in images from seismic data and from derived attributes, and positively impact AVA/AVO analysis. Achieving the greatest potential of this technique demands that I address the increased sensitivity to velocity errors and anisotropy. The other two methods presented here benefit from the balance in spectral content of the imaged data across angles and the increased resolution that are achieved from correcting for wavelet stretch. Then I introduce a new way to define azimuth binning in Kirchhoff prestack migration. This approach avoids mixing the typically weaker side-scattered energy with the stronger reflections from the sagittal plane. With the modified binning, signal and noise events are preferentially imaged in azimuth orientations normal to their apparent strike orientation, in surface- or map-views. This modified azimuthal binning also results in improved detection of out-of-the-plane steeply dipping reflectors, fractures and faults and their orientation, especially when combined with attributes such as curvature and coherence. Finally, I present an approach to measure lateral misalignment in prestack migrated seismic images and then correct for it by applying a warping procedure to these images. Though velocity errors are the most likely source for misalignment between images, it can also result from other imperfections in the imaging procedure. Lateral misalignment is most easily recognized and

  5. A ring barrier-based migration assay to assess cell migration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Das, Asha M; Eggermont, Alexander M M; ten Hagen, Timo L M

    2015-06-01

    Cell migration is a key feature of virtually every biological process, and it can be studied in a variety of ways. Here we outline a protocol for the in vitro study of cell migration using a ring barrier-based assay. A 'barrier' is inserted in the culture chamber, which prevents cells from entering a defined area. Cells of interest are seeded around this barrier, and after the formation of a peripheral monolayer the barrier is removed and migration into the cell-free area is monitored. This assay is highly reproducible and convenient to perform, and it allows the deduction of several parameters of migration, including total and effective migration, velocity and cell polarization. An advantage of this assay over the conventional scratch assay is that the cells move over an unaltered and virgin surface, and thus the effect of matrix components on cell migration can be studied. In addition, the cells are not harmed at the onset of the assay. Through computer automation, four individual barrier assays can be monitored at the same time. The procedure can be used in a 12-well standard plate allowing higher throughput, or it can be modified to perform invasion assays. The basic procedure takes 2-3 d to complete.

  6. Rapid 3-D delineation of cell nuclei for high-content screening platforms.

    PubMed

    Gertych, Arkadiusz; Ma, Zhaoxuan; Tajbakhsh, Jian; Velásquez-Vacca, Adriana; Knudsen, Beatrice S

    2016-02-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) microscopy combined with multiplexing of fluorescent labels allows high-content analysis of large numbers of cell nuclei. The full automation of 3-D screening platforms necessitates image processing algorithms that can accurately and robustly delineate nuclei in images with little to no human intervention. Imaging-based high-content screening was originally developed as a powerful tool for drug discovery. However, cell confluency, complexity of nuclear staining as well as poor contrast between nuclei and background result in slow and unreliable 3-D image processing and therefore negatively affect the performance of studying a drug response. Here, we propose a new method, 3D-RSD, to delineate nuclei by means of 3-D radial symmetries and test it on high-resolution image data of human cancer cells treated by drugs. The nuclei detection performance was evaluated by means of manually generated ground truth from 2351 nuclei (27 confocal stacks). When compared to three other nuclei segmentation methods, 3D-RSD possessed a better true positive rate of 83.3% and F-score of 0.895±0.045 (p-value=0.047). Altogether, 3D-RSD is a method with a very good overall segmentation performance. Furthermore, implementation of radial symmetries offers good processing speed, and makes 3D-RSD less sensitive to staining patterns. In particular, the 3D-RSD method performs well in cell lines, which are often used in imaging-based HCS platforms and are afflicted by nuclear crowding and overlaps that hinder feature extraction.

  7. Rapid 3-D delineation of cell nuclei for high-content screening platforms

    PubMed Central

    Gertych, Arkadiusz; Ma, Zhaoxuan; Tajbakhsh, Jian; Velásquez-Vacca, Adriana; Knudsen, Beatrice S.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) microscopy combined with multiplexing of fluorescent labels allows high-content analysis of large numbers of cell nuclei. The full automation of 3-D screening platforms necessitates image processing algorithms that can accurately and robustly delineate nuclei in images with little to no human intervention. Imaging-based high-content screening was originally developed as a powerful tool for drug discovery. However, cell confluency, complexity of nuclear staining as well as poor contrast between nuclei and background result in slow and unreliable 3-D image processing and therefore negatively affect the performance of studying a drug response. Here, we propose a new method, 3D-RSD, to delineate nuclei by means of 3-D radial symmetries and test it on high-resolution image data of human cancer cells treated by drugs. The nuclei detection performance was evaluated by means of manually generated ground truth from 2351 nuclei (27 confocal stacks). When compared to three other nuclei segmentation methods, 3D-RSD possessed a better true positive rate of 83.3% and F-score of 0.895+/-0.045 (p- value=0.047). Altogether, 3D-RSD is a method with a very good overall segmentation performance. Furthermore, implementation of radial symmetries offers good processing speed, and makes 3D-RSD less sensitive to staining patterns. In particular the 3D-RSG method performs well in cell lines, which are often used in imaging-based HCS platforms and are afflicted by nuclear crowding and overlaps that hinder feature extraction. PMID:25982066

  8. 3D printed complex tissue construct using stem cell-laden decellularized extracellular matrix bioinks for cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jinah; Park, Hun-Jun; Kim, Seok-Won; Kim, Heejin; Park, Ju Young; Na, Soo Jin; Kim, Hyeon Ji; Park, Moon Nyeo; Choi, Seung Hyun; Park, Sun Hwa; Kim, Sung Won; Kwon, Sang-Mo; Kim, Pum-Joon; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising therapeutic method for the treatment of ischemic heart diseases; however, some challenges prohibit the efficacy after cell delivery due to hostile microenvironment of the injured myocardium. 3D printed pre-vascularized stem cell patch can enhance the therapeutic efficacy for cardiac repair through promotion of rapid vascularization after patch transplantation. In this study, stem cell-laden decellularized extracellular matrix bioinks are used in 3D printing of pre-vascularized and functional multi-material structures. The printed structure composed of spatial patterning of dual stem cells improves cell-to-cell interactions and differentiation capability and promotes functionality for tissue regeneration. The developed stem cell patch promoted strong vascularization and tissue matrix formation in vivo. The patterned patch exhibited enhanced cardiac functions, reduced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, increased migration from patch to the infarct area, neo-muscle and capillary formation along with improvements in cardiac functions. Therefore, pre-vascularized stem cell patch provides cardiac niche-like microenvironment, resulting in beneficial effects on cardiac repair.

  9. Segmentation of whole cells and cell nuclei from 3-D optical microscope images using dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    McCullough, D P; Gudla, P R; Harris, B S; Collins, J A; Meaburn, K J; Nakaya, M A; Yamaguchi, T P; Misteli, T; Lockett, S J

    2008-05-01

    Communications between cells in large part drive tissue development and function, as well as disease-related processes such as tumorigenesis. Understanding the mechanistic bases of these processes necessitates quantifying specific molecules in adjacent cells or cell nuclei of intact tissue. However, a major restriction on such analyses is the lack of an efficient method that correctly segments each object (cell or nucleus) from 3-D images of an intact tissue specimen. We report a highly reliable and accurate semi-automatic algorithmic method for segmenting fluorescence-labeled cells or nuclei from 3-D tissue images. Segmentation begins with semi-automatic, 2-D object delineation in a user-selected plane, using dynamic programming (DP) to locate the border with an accumulated intensity per unit length greater that any other possible border around the same object. Then the two surfaces of the object in planes above and below the selected plane are found using an algorithm that combines DP and combinatorial searching. Following segmentation, any perceived errors can be interactively corrected. Segmentation accuracy is not significantly affected by intermittent labeling of object surfaces, diffuse surfaces, or spurious signals away from surfaces. The unique strength of the segmentation method was demonstrated on a variety of biological tissue samples where all cells, including irregularly shaped cells, were accurately segmented based on visual inspection.

  10. A Discrete Cell Migration Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nutaro, James J; Kruse, Kara L; Ward, Richard C; O'Quinn, Elizabeth; Woerner, Matthew M; Beckerman, Barbara G

    2007-01-01

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells is a fundamental process in the development of intimal hyperplasia, a precursor to development of cardiovascular disease and a potential response to injury of an arterial wall. Boyden chamber experiments are used to quantify the motion of cell populations in response to a chemoattractant gradient (i.e., cell chemotaxis). We are developing a mathematical model of cell migration within the Boyden chamber, while simultaneously conducting experiments to obtain parameter values for the migration process. In the future, the model and parameters will be used as building blocks for a detailed model of the process that causes intimal hyperplasia. The cell migration model presented in this paper is based on the notion of a cell as a moving sensor that responds to an evolving chemoattractant gradient. We compare the results of our three-dimensional hybrid model with results from a one-dimensional continuum model. Some preliminary experimental data that is being used to refine the model is also presented.

  11. A modular segmented-flow platform for 3D cell cultivation.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Karen; Förster, Tobias; Römer, Robert; Quade, Mandy; Wiedemeier, Stefan; Grodrian, Andreas; Gastrock, Gunter

    2015-07-10

    In vitro 3D cell cultivation is promised to equate tissue in vivo more realistically than 2D cell cultivation corresponding to cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Therefore, a scalable 3D cultivation platform was developed. This platform, called pipe-based bioreactors (pbb), is based on the segmented-flow technology: aqueous droplets are embedded in a water-immiscible carrier fluid. The droplet volumes range from 60 nL to 20 μL and are used as bioreactors lined up in a tubing like pearls on a string. The modular automated platform basically consists of several modules like a fluid management for a high throughput droplet generation for self-assembly or scaffold-based 3D cell cultivation, a storage module for incubation and storage, and an analysis module for monitoring cell aggregation and proliferation basing on microscopy or photometry. In this report, the self-assembly of murine embryonic stem cells (mESCs) to uniformly sized embryoid bodies (EBs), the cell proliferation, the cell viability as well as the influence on the cell differentiation to cardiomyocytes are described. The integration of a dosage module for medium exchange or agent addition will enable pbb as long-term 3D cell cultivation system for studying stem cell differentiation, e.g. cardiac myogenesis or for diagnostic and therapeutic testing in personalized medicine.

  12. Vorinostat differentially alters 3D nuclear structure of cancer and non-cancerous esophageal cells.

    PubMed

    Nandakumar, Vivek; Hansen, Nanna; Glenn, Honor L; Han, Jessica H; Helland, Stephanie; Hernandez, Kathryn; Senechal, Patti; Johnson, Roger H; Bussey, Kimberly J; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2016-08-09

    The histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor vorinostat has received significant attention in recent years as an 'epigenetic' drug used to treat solid tumors. However, its mechanisms of action are not entirely understood, particularly with regard to its interaction with the aberrations in 3D nuclear structure that accompany neoplastic progression. We investigated the impact of vorinostat on human esophageal epithelial cell lines derived from normal, metaplastic (pre-cancerous), and malignant tissue. Using a combination of novel optical computed tomography (CT)-based quantitative 3D absorption microscopy and conventional confocal fluorescence microscopy, we show that subjecting malignant cells to vorinostat preferentially alters their 3D nuclear architecture relative to non-cancerous cells. Optical CT (cell CT) imaging of fixed single cells showed that drug-treated cancer cells exhibit significant alterations in nuclear morphometry. Confocal microscopy revealed that vorinostat caused changes in the distribution of H3K9ac-marked euchromatin and H3K9me3-marked constitutive heterochromatin. Additionally, 3D immuno-FISH showed that drug-induced expression of the DNA repair gene MGMT was accompanied by spatial relocation toward the center of the nucleus in the nuclei of metaplastic but not in non-neoplastic cells. Our data suggest that vorinostat's differential modulation of 3D nuclear architecture in normal and abnormal cells could play a functional role in its anti-cancer action.

  13. Vorinostat differentially alters 3D nuclear structure of cancer and non-cancerous esophageal cells

    PubMed Central

    Nandakumar, Vivek; Hansen, Nanna; Glenn, Honor L.; Han, Jessica H.; Helland, Stephanie; Hernandez, Kathryn; Senechal, Patti; Johnson, Roger H.; Bussey, Kimberly J.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2016-01-01

    The histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor vorinostat has received significant attention in recent years as an ‘epigenetic’ drug used to treat solid tumors. However, its mechanisms of action are not entirely understood, particularly with regard to its interaction with the aberrations in 3D nuclear structure that accompany neoplastic progression. We investigated the impact of vorinostat on human esophageal epithelial cell lines derived from normal, metaplastic (pre-cancerous), and malignant tissue. Using a combination of novel optical computed tomography (CT)-based quantitative 3D absorption microscopy and conventional confocal fluorescence microscopy, we show that subjecting malignant cells to vorinostat preferentially alters their 3D nuclear architecture relative to non-cancerous cells. Optical CT (cell CT) imaging of fixed single cells showed that drug-treated cancer cells exhibit significant alterations in nuclear morphometry. Confocal microscopy revealed that vorinostat caused changes in the distribution of H3K9ac-marked euchromatin and H3K9me3-marked constitutive heterochromatin. Additionally, 3D immuno-FISH showed that drug-induced expression of the DNA repair gene MGMT was accompanied by spatial relocation toward the center of the nucleus in the nuclei of metaplastic but not in non-neoplastic cells. Our data suggest that vorinostat’s differential modulation of 3D nuclear architecture in normal and abnormal cells could play a functional role in its anti-cancer action. PMID:27503568

  14. Quantitative 3D imaging of whole, unstained cells by using X-ray diffraction microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huaidong; Song, Changyong; Chen, Chien-Chun; Xu, Rui; Raines, Kevin S; Fahimian, Benjamin P; Lu, Chien-Hung; Lee, Ting-Kuo; Nakashima, Akio; Urano, Jun; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Miao, Jianwei

    2010-06-22

    Microscopy has greatly advanced our understanding of biology. Although significant progress has recently been made in optical microscopy to break the diffraction-limit barrier, reliance of such techniques on fluorescent labeling technologies prohibits quantitative 3D imaging of the entire contents of cells. Cryoelectron microscopy can image pleomorphic structures at a resolution of 3-5 nm, but is only applicable to thin or sectioned specimens. Here, we report quantitative 3D imaging of a whole, unstained cell at a resolution of 50-60 nm by X-ray diffraction microscopy. We identified the 3D morphology and structure of cellular organelles including cell wall, vacuole, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, granules, nucleus, and nucleolus inside a yeast spore cell. Furthermore, we observed a 3D structure protruding from the reconstructed yeast spore, suggesting the spore germination process. Using cryogenic technologies, a 3D resolution of 5-10 nm should be achievable by X-ray diffraction microscopy. This work hence paves a way for quantitative 3D imaging of a wide range of biological specimens at nanometer-scale resolutions that are too thick for electron microscopy.

  15. Label-free characterization of white blood cells by measuring 3D refractive index maps

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jonghee; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, HyunJoo; Choi, Chulhee; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of white blood cells (WBCs) is crucial for blood analyses and disease diagnoses. However, current standard techniques rely on cell labeling, a process which imposes significant limitations. Here we present three-dimensional (3D) optical measurements and the label-free characterization of mouse WBCs using optical diffraction tomography. 3D refractive index (RI) tomograms of individual WBCs are constructed from multiple two-dimensional quantitative phase images of samples illuminated at various angles of incidence. Measurements of the 3D RI tomogram of WBCs enable the separation of heterogeneous populations of WBCs using quantitative morphological and biochemical information. Time-lapse tomographic measurements also provide the 3D trajectory of micrometer-sized beads ingested by WBCs. These results demonstrate that optical diffraction tomography can be a useful and versatile tool for the study of WBCs. PMID:26504637

  16. Studying methane migration mechanisms at Walker Ridge, Gulf of Mexico, via 3D methane hydrate reservoir modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Nole, Michael; Daigle, Hugh; Mohanty, Kishore; Cook, Ann; Hillman, Jess

    2015-12-15

    . Therefore, it is likely that additional mechanisms are at play, notably bound water activity reduction in clays. Three-dimensionality allows for inclusion of lithologic heterogeneities, which focus fluid flow and subsequently allow for heterogeneity in the methane migration mechanisms that dominate in marine sediments at a local scale. Incorporating recently acquired 3D seismic data from Walker Ridge to inform the lithologic structure of our modeled reservoir, we show that even with deep adjective sourcing of methane along highly permeable pathways, local hydrate accumulations can be sourced either by diffusive or advective methane flux; advectively-sourced hydrates accumulate evenly in highly permeable strata, while diffusively-sourced hydrates are characterized by thin strata-bound intervals with high clay-sand pore size contrasts.

  17. Assessing Methane Migration Mechanisms at Walker Ridge, Gulf of Mexico, via 3D Methane Hydrate Reservoir Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nole, M.; Daigle, H.; Mohanty, K. K.; Hillman, J. I. T.; Cook, A.

    2015-12-01

    We employ a 3D methane hydrate reservoir simulator to model marine methane hydrate systems. Our simulator couples highly nonlinear heat and mass transport equations and includes heterogeneous sedimentation, in-situ organic methanogenesis, and the influences of both pore size contrast and salt exclusion from the hydrate phase on solubility gradients. Using environmental parameters of Walker Ridge, Gulf of Mexico, we first simulate hydrate formation in and around a thin, dipping, planar sand stratum surrounded by clay lithology as it is buried to 295mbsf. With sufficient methane supplied by methanogenesis in the clays, a 200x sand-clay pore size contrast allows for a strong enough concentration gradient to significantly drop the concentration of hydrate in clays immediately surrounding a thin sand, a phenomenon observed in corresponding well log data. Building upon previous work, our simulations account for a depth-wise increase in sand-clay solubility contrast from about 1.6% near the seafloor to 8.6% at depth, progressively strengthening the diffusive flux of methane with time. An exponentially decaying methanogenesis input to the clay lithology decreases the methane supplied to clays surrounding the sand layer with time, further enhancing the sand-clay hydrate saturation contrast. Significant diffusive methane transport occurs in a clay interval of about 11m above the sand and 4m below it, matching well log observations. Clay-sand pore size contrast alone is not enough to create hydrate-free zones seen in logs, because the corresponding diffusive methane flux is slower than the rate at which methanogenesis supplies methane. Therefore, it is likely that additional mechanisms are at play, notably bound water activity reduction in clays. Three-dimensionality allows for inclusion of lithologic heterogeneities, which focus flow and allow for heterogeneity in locally dominant methane migration mechanisms. Incorporating recent 3D seismic data to inform the model

  18. Microfluidic 3D cell culture: potential application for tissue-based bioassays

    PubMed Central

    Li, XiuJun (James); Valadez, Alejandra V.; Zuo, Peng; Nie, Zhihong

    2014-01-01

    Current fundamental investigations of human biology and the development of therapeutic drugs, commonly rely on two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell culture systems. However, 2D cell culture systems do not accurately recapitulate the structure, function, physiology of living tissues, as well as highly complex and dynamic three-dimensional (3D) environments in vivo. The microfluidic technology can provide micro-scale complex structures and well-controlled parameters to mimic the in vivo environment of cells. The combination of microfluidic technology with 3D cell culture offers great potential for in vivo-like tissue-based applications, such as the emerging organ-on-a-chip system. This article will review recent advances in microfluidic technology for 3D cell culture and their biological applications. PMID:22793034

  19. Stem cells catalyze cartilage formation by neonatal articular chondrocytes in 3D biomimetic hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Janice H.; Kajiyama, Glen; Smith, Robert Lane; Maloney, William; Yang, Fan

    2013-12-01

    Cartilage loss is a leading cause of disability among adults and effective therapy remains elusive. Neonatal chondrocytes (NChons) are an attractive allogeneic cell source for cartilage repair, but their clinical translation has been hindered by scarce donor availability. Here we examine the potential for catalyzing cartilage tissue formation using a minimal number of NChons by co-culturing them with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in 3D hydrogels. Using three different co-culture models, we demonstrated that the effects of co-culture on cartilage tissue formation are dependent on the intercellular distance and cell distribution in 3D. Unexpectedly, increasing ADSC ratio in mixed co-culture led to increased synergy between NChons and ADSCs, and resulted in the formation of large neocartilage nodules. This work raises the potential of utilizing stem cells to catalyze tissue formation by neonatal chondrocytes via paracrine signaling, and highlights the importance of controlling cell distribution in 3D matrices to achieve optimal synergy.

  20. High sensitivity plasmonic biosensor based on nanoimprinted quasi 3D nanosquares for cell detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shuyan; Li, Hualin; Yang, Mengsu; Pang, Stella W.

    2016-07-01

    Quasi three-dimensional (3D) plasmonic nanostructures consisting of Au nanosquares on top of SU-8 nanopillars and Au nanoholes on the bottom were developed and fabricated using nanoimprint lithography with simultaneous thermal and UV exposure. These 3D plasmonic nanostructures were used to detect cell concentration of lung cancer A549 cells, retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, and breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Nanoimprint technology has the advantage of producing high uniformity plasmonic nanostructures for such biosensors. Multiple resonance modes were observed in these quasi 3D plasmonic nanostructures. The hybrid coupling of localized surface plasmon resonances and Fabry-Perot cavity modes in the quasi 3D nanostructures resulted in high sensitivity of 496 nm/refractive index unit. The plasmonic resonance peak wavelength and sensitivity could be tuned by varying the Au thickness. Resonance peak shifts for different cells at the same concentration were distinct due to their different cell area and confluency. The cell concentration detection limit covered a large range of 5 × 102 to 1 × 107 cells ml-1 with these new plasmonic nanostructures. They also provide a large resonance peak shift of 51 nm for as little as 0.08 cells mm-2 of RPE cells for high sensitivity cell detection.

  1. Efficient light harvesting with micropatterned 3D pyramidal photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wooh, Sanghyuk; Yoon, Hyunsik; Jung, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Yong-Gun; Koh, Jai Hyun; Lee, Byoungho; Kang, Yong Soo; Char, Kookheon

    2013-06-11

    3D TiO2 photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) are fabricated by the soft lithographic technique for efficient light trapping. An extended strategy to the construction of randomized pyramid structure is developed by the conventional wet-etching of a silicon wafer for low-cost fabrication. Moreover, the futher enhancement of light absorption resulting in photocurrent increase is achieved by combining the 3D photoanode with a conventional scattering layer.

  2. Preliminary 3d depth migration of a network of 2d seismic lines for fault imaging at a Pyramid Lake, Nevada geothermal prospect

    SciTech Connect

    Frary, R.; Louie, J.; Pullammanappallil, S.; Eisses, A.

    2016-08-01

    Roxanna Frary, John N. Louie, Sathish Pullammanappallil, Amy Eisses, 2011, Preliminary 3d depth migration of a network of 2d seismic lines for fault imaging at a Pyramid Lake, Nevada geothermal prospect: presented at American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, Dec. 5-9, abstract T13G-07.

  3. Automatic 3D Cell Analysis in High-Throughput Microarray Using Micropillar and Microwell Chips.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Woo; Lee, Moo-Yeal; Ku, Bosung; Nam, Do-Hyun

    2015-10-01

    Area-based and intensity-based 3D cell viability measurement methods are compared in high-throughput screening in order to analyze their effects on the assay results (doubling time and IC50) and their repeatability. Many other 3D cell-based high-throughput screening platforms had been previously introduced, but these had not clearly addressed the effects of the two methods on the assay results and assay repeatability. In this study, the optimal way to analyze 3D cultured cells is achieved by comparing day-to-day data of doubling times and IC50 values obtained from the two methods. In experiments, the U251 cell line is grown in chips. The doubling time, based on the area of the 3D cells, was 27.8 ± 1.8 h (standard deviation: 6.6%) and 27.8 ± 3.8 h (standard deviation: 13.7%) based on the intensity of the 3D cells. The doubling time calculated by area shows a smaller standard deviation than one calculated by intensity. IC50 values calculated by both methods are very similar. The standard deviations of IC50 values for the two methods were within ± 3-fold. The IC50 variations of the 12 compounds were similar regardless of the viability measurement methods and were highly related to the shape of the dose-response curves.

  4. 3D cell culture to determine in vitro biocompatibility of bioactive glass in association with chitosan.

    PubMed

    Bédouin, Y; Pellen Mussi, P; Tricot-Doleux, S; Chauvel-Lebret, D; Auroy, P; Ravalec, X; Oudadesse, H; Perez, F

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the in vitro biocompatibility of a composite biomaterial composed of 46S6 bioactive glass in association with chitosan (CH) by using 3D osteoblast culture of SaOS2. The 46S6 and CH composite (46S6-CH) forms small hydroxyapatite crystals on its surface after only three days immersion in the simulated body fluid. For 2D osteoblast culture, a significant increase in cell proliferation was observed after three days of contact with 46S6 or 46S6-CH-immersed media. After six days, 46S6-CH led to a significant increase in cell proliferation (128%) compared with pure 46S6 (113%) and pure CH (122%). For 3D osteoblast culture, after six days of culture, there was an increase in gene expression of markers of the early osteoblastic differentiation (RUNX2, ALP, COL1A1). Geometric structures corresponding to small apatite clusters were observed by SEM on the surface of the spheroids cultivated with 46S6 or 46S6-CH-immersed media. We showed different cellular responses depending on the 2D and 3D cell culture model. The induction of osteoblast differentiation in the 3D cell culture explained the differences of cell proliferation in contact with 46S6, CH or 46S6-CH-immersed media. This study confirmed that the 3D cell culture model is a very promising tool for in vitro biological evaluation of bone substitutes' properties.

  5. Enhancement of neurite outgrowth in neuron cancer stem cells by growth on 3-D collagen scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Kuo, Shyh Ming; Liu, Guei-Sheung; Chen, Wan-Nan U.; Chuang, Chin-Wen; Liu, Li-Feng

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neuron cancer stem cells (NCSCs) behave high multiply of growth on collagen scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhancement of NCSCs neurite outgrowth on porous collagen scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3-D collagen culture of NCSCs shows an advance differentiation than 2-D culture. -- Abstract: Collagen is one component of the extracellular matrix that has been widely used for constructive remodeling to facilitate cell growth and differentiation. The 3-D distribution and growth of cells within the porous scaffold suggest a clinical significance for nerve tissue engineering. In the current study, we investigated proliferation and differentiation of neuron cancer stem cells (NCSCs) on a 3-D porous collagen scaffold that mimics the natural extracellular matrix. We first generated green fluorescence protein (GFP) expressing NCSCs using a lentiviral system to instantly monitor the transitions of morphological changes during growth on the 3-D scaffold. We found that proliferation of GFP-NCSCs increased, and a single cell mass rapidly grew with unrestricted expansion between days 3 and 9 in culture. Moreover, immunostaining with neuronal nuclei (NeuN) revealed that NCSCs grown on the 3-D collagen scaffold significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth. Our findings confirmed that the 80 {mu}m porous collagen scaffold could enhance attachment, viability and differentiation of the cancer neural stem cells. This result could provide a new application for nerve tissue engineering and nerve regeneration.

  6. 3D texture analysis in renal cell carcinoma tissue image grading.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Yun; Cho, Nam-Hoon; Jeong, Goo-Bo; Bengtsson, Ewert; Choi, Heung-Kook

    2014-01-01

    One of the most significant processes in cancer cell and tissue image analysis is the efficient extraction of features for grading purposes. This research applied two types of three-dimensional texture analysis methods to the extraction of feature values from renal cell carcinoma tissue images, and then evaluated the validity of the methods statistically through grade classification. First, we used a confocal laser scanning microscope to obtain image slices of four grades of renal cell carcinoma, which were then reconstructed into 3D volumes. Next, we extracted quantitative values using a 3D gray level cooccurrence matrix (GLCM) and a 3D wavelet based on two types of basis functions. To evaluate their validity, we predefined 6 different statistical classifiers and applied these to the extracted feature sets. In the grade classification results, 3D Haar wavelet texture features combined with principal component analysis showed the best discrimination results. Classification using 3D wavelet texture features was significantly better than 3D GLCM, suggesting that the former has potential for use in a computer-based grading system.

  7. Cell Shape Dynamics: From Waves to Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Meghan; McCann, Colin; Sun, Xiaoyu; Fourkas, John; Parent, Carole; Losert, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    We observe and quantify wave-like characteristics of amoeboid migration. Using the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, a model system for the study of chemotaxis, we demonstrate that cell shape changes in a wave-like manner. Cells have regions of high boundary curvature that propagate from the leading edge toward the back, usually along alternating sides of the cell. Curvature waves are easily seen in cells that do not adhere to a surface, such as cells that are electrostatically repelled from surfaces or cells that extend over the edge of micro-fabricated cliffs. Without surface contact, curvature waves travel from the leading edge to the back of a cell at ˜35 μm/min. Non-adherent myosin II null cells do not exhibit these curvature waves. At the leading edge of adherent cells, curvature waves are associated with protrusive activity. Like regions of high curvature, protrusive activity travels along the boundary in a wave-like manner. Upon contact with a surface, the waves stop moving relative to the surface, and the boundary shape thus reflects the history of protrusive motion. The wave-like character of protrusions provides a plausible mechanism for the ability of cells to both swim in viscous fluids and to navigate complex 3-D topography.

  8. Bridging the gap: from 2D cell culture to 3D microengineered extracellular matrices

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanfen

    2016-01-01

    Historically the culture of mammalian cells in the laboratory has been performed on planar substrates with media cocktails that are optimized to maintain phenotype. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that much of biology discerned from 2D studies does not translate well to the 3D microenvironment. Over the last several decades, 2D and 3D microengineering approaches have been developed that better recapitulate the complex architecture and properties of in vivo tissue. Inspired by the infrastructure of the microelectronics industry, lithographic patterning approaches have taken center stage because of the ease in which cell-sized features can be engineered on surfaces and within a broad range of biocompatible materials. Patterning and templating techniques enable precise control over extracellular matrix properties including: composition, mechanics, geometry, cell-cell contact, and diffusion. In this review article we will explore how the field of engineered extracellular matrices has evolved with the development of new hydrogel chemistry and the maturation of micro- and nano- fabrication. Guided by the spatiotemporal regulation of cell state in developing tissues, we will review the maturation of micropatterning in 2D, pseudo-3D systems, and patterning within 3D hydrogels in the context of translating the information gained from 2D systems to synthetic engineered 3D tissues. PMID:26592366

  9. 3D Cell Printing of Functional Skeletal Muscle Constructs Using Skeletal Muscle-Derived Bioink.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeong-Jin; Kim, Taek Gyoung; Jeong, Jonghyeon; Yi, Hee-Gyeong; Park, Ji Won; Hwang, Woonbong; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-10-01

    Engineered skeletal muscle tissues that mimic the structure and function of native muscle have been considered as an alternative strategy for the treatment of various muscular diseases and injuries. Here, it is demonstrated that 3D cell-printing of decellularized skeletal muscle extracellular matrix (mdECM)-based bioink facilitates the fabrication of functional skeletal muscle constructs. The cellular alignment and the shape of the tissue constructs are controlled by 3D cell-printing technology. mdECM bioink provides the 3D cell-printed muscle constructs with a myogenic environment that supports high viability and contractility as well as myotube formation, differentiation, and maturation. More interestingly, the preservation of agrin is confirmed in the mdECM, and significant increases in the formation of acetylcholine receptor clusters are exhibited in the 3D cell-printed muscle constructs. In conclusion, mdECM bioink and 3D cell-printing technology facilitate the mimicking of both the structural and functional properties of native muscle and hold great promise for producing clinically relevant engineered muscle for the treatment of muscular injuries.

  10. 3D Models of the NCI60 Cell Lines for Screening Oncology Compounds.

    PubMed

    Selby, Mike; Delosh, Rene; Laudeman, Julie; Ogle, Chad; Reinhart, Russell; Silvers, Thomas; Lawrence, Scott; Kinders, Robert; Parchment, Ralph; Teicher, Beverly A; Evans, David M

    2017-03-01

    The NCI60 cell line panel screen includes 60 human tumor cell lines derived from nine tumor types that has been used over the past 20+ years to screen small molecules, biologics, and natural products for activity. Cells in monolayer culture in 96-well plates are exposed to compounds for 48 h, and Sulforhodamine B is used to determine cell viability. Data analysis tools such as COMPARE allow classification of compounds based on the pattern of cell line response. However, many compounds highly active in monolayer cell culture fail to show efficacy in vivo. Therefore, we explored 3D culture of the NCI60 panel as a strategy to improve the predictive accuracy of the screen. 3D cultures more closely resemble tumors than monolayer cultures with tighter cell-cell contact and nutrient and oxygen gradients between the periphery and the center. We optimized the NCI60 cell line panel for generating 3D spheroids of a prespecified diameter (300-500 µm) in ultra-low attachment (ULA) plates. Spheroids were classified into four categories based on imaging, and concentration response of select agents in 2D and 3D models is presented.

  11. Paper/PMMA Hybrid 3D Cell Culture Microfluidic Platform for the Study of Cellular Crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kin Fong; Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Chen, Ming-Jie

    2017-04-06

    Studying cellular crosstalk is important for understanding tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, and therapeutic resistance. Moreover, a three-dimensional (3D) cell culture model can provide a more physiologically meaningful culture microenvironment. However, studying cellular crosstalk in a 3D cell culture model involves tedious processing. In this study, a paper/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) hybrid 3D cell culture microfluidic platform was successfully developed for the study of cellular crosstalk. The platform was a paper substrate with culture microreactors placed on a PMMA substrate with hydrogel-infused channels. Different types of cells were directly seeded and cultured in the microreactors. Aberrant cell proliferation of the affected cells was induced by secretions from transfected cells, and the proliferation ratios were investigated using a colorimetric method. The results showed that the responses of cellular crosstalk were different in different types of cells. Moreover, neutralizing and competitive assays were performed to show the functionality of the platform. Additionally, the triggered signaling pathways of the affected cells were directly analyzed by a subsequent immunoassay. The microfluidic platform provides a simple method for studying cellular crosstalk and the corresponding signaling pathways in a 3D culture model.

  12. Quantification by SIFT-MS of acetaldehyde released by lung cells in a 3D model.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Abigail V; Chippendale, Thomas W E; Yang, Ying; Španěl, Patrik; Smith, David; Sulé-Suso, Josep

    2013-01-07

    Our previous studies have shown that both lung cancer cells and non-malignant lung cells release acetaldehyde in vitro. However, data from other laboratories have produced conflicting results. Furthermore, all these studies have been carried out in 2D models which are less physiological cell growth systems when compared to 3D models. Therefore, we have carried out further work on the release of acetaldehyde by lung cells in 3D collagen hydrogels. Lung cancer cells CALU-1 and non-malignant lung cells NL20 were seeded in these hydrogels at different cell concentrations and the release of acetaldehyde was measured with the Selected Ion Flow Tube Mass Spectrometry (SIFT-MS) technique. The data obtained showed that the amount of acetaldehyde released by both cell types grown in a 3D model is higher when compared to that of the same cells grown in 2D models. More importantly, acetaldehyde from the headspace of lung cancer cells could be measured even at a low cell concentration (10(5) cells per hydrogel). The differential of acetaldehyde release could be, depending on the cell concentration, more than 3 fold higher for cancer cells when compared to non-malignant lung cells. This pilot study is the first to study acetaldehyde emission from albeit only two cell types cultured in 3D scaffolds. Clearly, from such limited data the behaviour of other cell types and of tumour cells in vivo cannot be predicted with confidence. Nevertheless, this work represents another step in the search for volatile biomarkers of tumour cells, the ultimate goal of which is to exploit volatile compounds in exhaled breath and other biological fluids as biomarkers of tumours in vivo.

  13. 3D Nanochannel Array Platform for High-throughput Cell Manipulation and Nano-electroporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Lingqian

    Electroporation is one of the most common non-viral methods for gene delivery. Recent progress in gene therapy has offered special opportunities to electroporation for in vitro and in vivo applications. However, conventional bulk electroporation (BEP) inevitably causes serious cell damage and stochastic transfection between cells. Microfluidic electroporation (MEP) has been claimed to provide benign single cell transfection for the last decade. Nevertheless, the intracellular transport in both MEP and BEP systems is highly diffusion-dominant, which prevents precise dose control and high uniformity. In this Ph.D. research, we developed a 3D nanochannel-electroporation (3D NEP) platform for mass cell transfection. A silicon-based nanochannel array (3D NEP) chip was designed and fabricated for cell manipulation and electroporation. The chip, designed as Z-directional microchannel - nanochannel array, was fabricated by clean room techniques including projection photolithography and deep reactive-ion etching (DRIE). The fabricated 3D NEP chip is capable of handling 40,000 cells per 1 cm2, up to 1 million per wafer (100 mm diameter). High-throughput cell manipulation technologies were investigated for precise alignment of individual cells to the nanochannel array, a key step for NEP to achieve dose control. We developed three techniques for cell trapping in this work. (1) Magnetic tweezers (MTs) were integrated on the chip to remotely control cells under a programmed magnetic field. (2) A positive dielectrophoresis (pDEP) power system was built as an alternative to trap cells onto the nanochannel array using DEP force. (3) A novel yet simple 'dipping-trap' method was used to rapidly trap cells onto a nanochannel array, aligned by a micro-cap array pattern on the 3D NEP chip, which eventually offered 70 - 90 % trapping efficiency and 90 % specificity. 3D NEP platforms were assembled for cell transfection based on the Si-based nanochannel array chip and cell manipulation

  14. Mean deformation metrics for quantifying 3D cell-matrix interactions without requiring information about matrix material properties.

    PubMed

    Stout, David A; Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Estrada, Jonathan B; Toyjanova, Jennet; Kesari, Haneesh; Reichner, Jonathan S; Franck, Christian

    2016-03-15

    Mechanobiology relates cellular processes to mechanical signals, such as determining the effect of variations in matrix stiffness with cell tractions. Cell traction recorded via traction force microscopy (TFM) commonly takes place on materials such as polyacrylamide- and polyethylene glycol-based gels. Such experiments remain limited in physiological relevance because cells natively migrate within complex tissue microenvironments that are spatially heterogeneous and hierarchical. Yet, TFM requires determination of the matrix constitutive law (stress-strain relationship), which is not always readily available. In addition, the currently achievable displacement resolution limits the accuracy of TFM for relatively small cells. To overcome these limitations, and increase the physiological relevance of in vitro experimental design, we present a new approach and a set of associated biomechanical signatures that are based purely on measurements of the matrix's displacements without requiring any knowledge of its constitutive laws. We show that our mean deformation metrics (MDM) approach can provide significant biophysical information without the need to explicitly determine cell tractions. In the process of demonstrating the use of our MDM approach, we succeeded in expanding the capability of our displacement measurement technique such that it can now measure the 3D deformations around relatively small cells (∼10 micrometers), such as neutrophils. Furthermore, we also report previously unseen deformation patterns generated by motile neutrophils in 3D collagen gels.

  15. Large-scale pharmacological profiling of 3D tumor models of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mathews Griner, Lesley A; Zhang, Xiaohu; Guha, Rajarshi; McKnight, Crystal; Goldlust, Ian S; Lal-Nag, Madhu; Wilson, Kelli; Michael, Sam; Titus, Steve; Shinn, Paul; Thomas, Craig J; Ferrer, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer commonly uses cell proliferation assays in which cells grow as two-dimensional (2D) monolayers. Compounds identified using 2D monolayer assays often fail to advance during clinical development, most likely because these assays do not reproduce the cellular complexity of tumors and their microenvironment in vivo. The use of three-dimensional (3D) cellular systems have been explored as enabling more predictive in vitro tumor models for drug discovery. To date, small-scale screens have demonstrated that pharmacological responses tend to differ between 2D and 3D cancer cell growth models. However, the limited scope of screens using 3D models has not provided a clear delineation of the cellular pathways and processes that differentially regulate cell survival and death in the different in vitro tumor models. Here we sought to further understand the differences in pharmacological responses between cancer tumor cells grown in different conditions by profiling a large collection of 1912 chemotherapeutic agents. We compared pharmacological responses obtained from cells cultured in traditional 2D monolayer conditions with those responses obtained from cells forming spheres versus cells already in 3D spheres. The target annotation of the compound library screened enabled the identification of those key cellular pathways and processes that when modulated by drugs induced cell death in all growth conditions or selectively in the different cell growth models. In addition, we also show that many of the compounds targeting these key cellular functions can be combined to produce synergistic cytotoxic effects, which in many cases differ in the magnitude of their synergism depending on the cellular model and cell type. The results from this work provide a high-throughput screening framework to profile the responses of drugs both as single agents and in pairwise combinations in 3D sphere models of cancer cells. PMID

  16. Mechanosensing of cells in 3D gel matrices based on natural and synthetic materials.

    PubMed

    Shan, Jieling; Chi, Qingjia; Wang, Hongbing; Huang, Qiping; Yang, Li; Yu, Guanglei; Zou, Xiaobing

    2014-11-01

    Cells in vivo typically are found in 3D matrices, the mechanical stiffness of which is important to the cell and tissue-scale biological processes. Although it is well characterized that as to how cells sense matrix stiffness in 2D substrates, the scenario in 3D matrices needs to be explored. Thus, materials that can mimic native 3D environments and possess wide, physiologically relevant elasticity are highly desirable. Natural polymer-based materials and synthetic hydrogels could provide an better 3D platforms to investigate the mechano-response of cells with stiffness comparable to their native environments. However, the limited stiffness range together with interdependence of matrix stiffness and adhesive ligand density are inherent in many kinds of materials, and hinder efforts to demonstrate the true effects contributed by matrix stiffness. These problems have been addressed by the recently emerging exquisitely designed materials based on native matrix components, designer matrices, and synthetic polymers. In this review, a variety of materials with a wide stiffness range that mimic the mechanical environment of native 3D matrices and the independent affection of stiffness for cellular behavior and tissue-level processes are discussed.

  17. Characterisation of the surface structure of 3D printed scaffolds for cell infiltration and surgical suturing.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Cantu, Laura; Gleadall, Andrew; Faris, Callum; Segal, Joel; Shakesheff, Kevin; Yang, Jing

    2016-03-01

    3D printing is of great interest for tissue engineering scaffolds due to the ability to form complex geometries and control internal structures, including porosity and pore size. The porous structure of scaffolds plays an important role in cell ingrowth and nutrition infusion. Although the internal porosity and pore size of 3D printed scaffolds have been frequently studied, the surface porosity and pore size, which are critical for cell infiltration and mass transport, have not been investigated. The surface geometry can differ considerably from the internal scaffold structure depending on the 3D printing process. It is vital to be able to control the surface geometry of scaffolds as well as the internal structure to fabricate optimal architectures. This work presents a method to control the surface porosity and pore size of 3D printed scaffolds. Six scaffold designs have been printed with surface porosities ranging from 3% to 21%. We have characterised the overall scaffold porosity and surface porosity using optical microscopy and microCT. It has been found that surface porosity has a significant impact on cell infiltration and proliferation. In addition, the porosity of the surface has been found to have an effect on mechanical properties and on the forces required to penetrate the scaffold with a surgical suturing needle. To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the surface geometry of extrusion-based 3D printed scaffolds and demonstrates the importance of surface geometry in cell infiltration and clinical manipulation.

  18. Direct cell writing of 3D microorgan for in vitro pharmacokinetic model.

    PubMed

    Chang, Robert; Nam, Jae; Sun, Wei

    2008-06-01

    A novel targeted application of tissue engineering is the development of an in vitro pharmacokinetic model for drug screening and toxicology. An in vitro pharmacokinetic model is needed to realistically and reliably predict in vivo human response to drug administrations and potential toxic exposures. This paper details the fabrication process development and adaptation of microfluidic devices for the creation of such a physiologically relevant pharmacokinetic model. First, an automated syringe-based, layered direct cell writing (DCW) bioprinting process creates a 3D microorgan that biomimics the cell's natural microenvironment with enhanced functionality. Next, soft lithographic micropatterning techniques are used to fabricate a microscale in vitro device to house the 3D microorgan. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of the DCW process for freeform biofabrication of 3D cell-encapsulated hydrogel-based tissue constructs with defined reproducible patterns, direct integration of 3D constructs onto a microfluidic device for continuous perfusion drug flow, and characterization of 3D tissue constructs with predictable cell viability/proliferation outcomes and enhanced functionality over traditional culture methods.

  19. Quantitative analysis of 3D extracellular matrix remodelling by pancreatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Benjamin K.; Cortes, Ernesto; Rice, Alistair J.; Sarper, Muge

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling is integral to numerous physiological and pathological processes in biology, such as embryogenesis, wound healing, fibrosis and cancer. Until recently, most cellular studies have been conducted on 2D environments where mechanical cues significantly differ from physiologically relevant 3D environments, impacting cellular behaviour and masking the interpretation of cellular function in health and disease. We present an integrated methodology where cell-ECM interactions can be investigated in 3D environments via ECM remodelling. Monitoring and quantification of collagen-I structure in remodelled matrices, through designated algorithms, show that 3D matrices can be used to correlate remodelling with increased ECM stiffness observed in fibrosis. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are the key effectors of the stromal fibrosis associated to pancreatic cancer. We use PSCs to implement our methodology and demonstrate that PSC matrix remodelling capabilities depend on their contractile machinery and β1 integrin-mediated cell-ECM attachment. PMID:27170254

  20. Nanoscale Analysis of a Hierarchical Hybrid Solar Cell in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Divitini, Giorgio; Stenzel, Ole; Ghadirzadeh, Ali; Guarnera, Simone; Russo, Valeria; Casari, Carlo S; Bassi, Andrea Li; Petrozza, Annamaria; Di Fonzo, Fabio; Schmidt, Volker; Ducati, Caterina

    2014-01-01

    A quantitative method for the characterization of nanoscale 3D morphology is applied to the investigation of a hybrid solar cell based on a novel hierarchical nanostructured photoanode. A cross section of the solar cell device is prepared by focused ion beam milling in a micropillar geometry, which allows a detailed 3D reconstruction of the titania photoanode by electron tomography. It is found that the hierarchical titania nanostructure facilitates polymer infiltration, thus favoring intermixing of the two semiconducting phases, essential for charge separation. The 3D nanoparticle network is analyzed with tools from stochastic geometry to extract information related to the charge transport in the hierarchical solar cell. In particular, the experimental dataset allows direct visualization of the percolation pathways that contribute to the photocurrent. PMID:25834481

  1. CellSegm - a MATLAB toolbox for high-throughput 3D cell segmentation.

    PubMed

    Hodneland, Erlend; Kögel, Tanja; Frei, Dominik Michael; Gerdes, Hans-Hermann; Lundervold, Arvid

    2013-08-09

    : The application of fluorescence microscopy in cell biology often generates a huge amount of imaging data. Automated whole cell segmentation of such data enables the detection and analysis of individual cells, where a manual delineation is often time consuming, or practically not feasible. Furthermore, compared to manual analysis, automation normally has a higher degree of reproducibility. CellSegm, the software presented in this work, is a Matlab based command line software toolbox providing an automated whole cell segmentation of images showing surface stained cells, acquired by fluorescence microscopy. It has options for both fully automated and semi-automated cell segmentation. Major algorithmic steps are: (i) smoothing, (ii) Hessian-based ridge enhancement, (iii) marker-controlled watershed segmentation, and (iv) feature-based classfication of cell candidates. Using a wide selection of image recordings and code snippets, we demonstrate that CellSegm has the ability to detect various types of surface stained cells in 3D. After detection and outlining of individual cells, the cell candidates can be subject to software based analysis, specified and programmed by the end-user, or they can be analyzed by other software tools. A segmentation of tissue samples with appropriate characteristics is also shown to be resolvable in CellSegm. The command-line interface of CellSegm facilitates scripting of the separate tools, all implemented in Matlab, offering a high degree of flexibility and tailored workflows for the end-user. The modularity and scripting capabilities of CellSegm enable automated workflows and quantitative analysis of microscopic data, suited for high-throughput image based screening.

  2. High Content Imaging (HCI) on Miniaturized Three-Dimensional (3D) Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Pranav; Lee, Moo-Yeal

    2015-01-01

    High content imaging (HCI) is a multiplexed cell staining assay developed for better understanding of complex biological functions and mechanisms of drug action, and it has become an important tool for toxicity and efficacy screening of drug candidates. Conventional HCI assays have been carried out on two-dimensional (2D) cell monolayer cultures, which in turn limit predictability of drug toxicity/efficacy in vivo; thus, there has been an urgent need to perform HCI assays on three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures. Although 3D cell cultures better mimic in vivo microenvironments of human tissues and provide an in-depth understanding of the morphological and functional features of tissues, they are also limited by having relatively low throughput and thus are not amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS). One attempt of making 3D cell culture amenable for HTS is to utilize miniaturized cell culture platforms. This review aims to highlight miniaturized 3D cell culture platforms compatible with current HCI technology. PMID:26694477

  3. On-chip clearing of arrays of 3-D cell cultures and micro-tissues.

    PubMed

    Grist, S M; Nasseri, S S; Poon, T; Roskelley, C; Cheung, K C

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) cell cultures are beneficial models for mimicking the complexities of in vivo tissues, especially in tumour studies where transport limitations can complicate response to cancer drugs. 3-D optical microscopy techniques are less involved than traditional embedding and sectioning, but are impeded by optical scattering properties of the tissues. Confocal and even two-photon microscopy limit sample imaging to approximately 100-200 μm depth, which is insufficient to image hypoxic spheroid cores. Optical clearing methods have permitted high-depth imaging of tissues without physical sectioning, but they are difficult to implement for smaller 3-D cultures due to sample loss in solution exchange. In this work, we demonstrate a microfluidic platform for high-throughput on-chip optical clearing of breast cancer spheroids using the SeeDB, Clear(T2), and ScaleSQ clearing methods. Although all three methods are able to effectively clear the spheroids, we find that SeeDB and ScaleSQ more effectively clear the sample than Clear(T2); however, SeeDB induces green autofluorescence while ScaleS causes sample expansion. Our unique on-chip implementation permits clearing arrays of 3-D cultures using perfusion while monitoring the 3-D cultures throughout the process, enabling visualization of the clearing endpoint as well as monitoring of transient changes that could induce image artefacts. Our microfluidic device is compatible with on-chip 3-D cell culture, permitting the use of on-chip clearing at the endpoint after monitoring the same spheroids during their culture. This on-chip method has the potential to improve readout from 3-D cultures, facilitating their use in cell-based assays for high-content drug screening and other applications.

  4. Ultrafine fibrous gelatin scaffolds with deep cell infiltration mimicking 3D ECMs for soft tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qiuran; Xu, Helan; Cai, Shaobo; Yang, Yiqi

    2014-07-01

    In this research, ultrafine fibrous scaffolds with deep cell infiltration and sufficient water stability have been developed from gelatin, aiming to mimic the extracellular matrices (ECMs) as three dimensional (3D) stromas for soft tissue repair. The ultrafine fibrous scaffolds produced from the current technologies of electrospinning and phase separation are either lack of 3D oriented fibrous structure or too compact to be penetrated by cells. Whilst electrospun scaffolds are able to emulate two dimensional (2D) ECMs, they cannot mimic the 3D ECM stroma. In this work, ultralow concentration phase separation (ULCPS) has been developed to fabricate gelatin scaffolds with 3D randomly oriented ultrafine fibers and loose structures. Besides, a non-toxic citric acid crosslinking system has been established for the ULCPS method. This system could endow the scaffolds with sufficient water stability, while maintain the fibrous structures of scaffolds. Comparing with electrospun scaffolds, the ULCPS scaffolds showed improved cytocompatibility and more importantly, cell infiltration. This research has proved the possibility of using gelatin ULCPS scaffolds as the substitutes of 3D ECMs.

  5. On human pluripotent stem cell control: The rise of 3D bioengineering and mechanobiology

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yue; Sang, Jianming; Fu, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide promising resources for regenerating tissues and organs and modeling development and diseases in vitro. To fulfill their promise, the fate, function, and organization of hPSCs need to be precisely regulated in a three-dimensional (3D) environment to mimic cellular structures and functions of native tissues and organs. In the past decade, innovations in 3D culture systems with functional biomaterials have enabled efficient and versatile control of hPSC fate at the cellular level. However, we are just at the beginning of bringing hPSC-based regeneration and development and disease modeling to the tissue and organ levels. In this review, we summarize existing bioengineered culture platforms for controlling hPSC fate and function by regulating inductive mechanical and biochemical cues coexisting in the synthetic cell microenvironment. We highlight recent excitements in developing 3D hPSC-based in vitro tissue and organ models with in vivo-like cellular structures, interactions, and functions. We further discuss an emerging multifaceted mechanotransductive signaling network – with transcriptional coactivators YAP and TAZ at the center stage – that regulate fates and behaviors of mammalian cells, including hPSCs. Future development of 3D biomaterial systems should incorporate dynamically modulated mechanical and chemical properties targeting specific intracellular signaling events leading to desirable hPSC fate patterning and functional tissue formation in 3D. PMID:25818411

  6. Single cell detection using 3D magnetic rolled-up structures.

    PubMed

    Ger, Tzong-Rong; Huang, Hao-Ting; Huang, Chen-Yu; Lai, Mei-Feng

    2013-11-07

    A 3D rolled-up structure made of a SiO2 layer and a fishbone-like magnetic thin film was proposed here as a biosensor. The magnetoresistance (MR) measurement results of the sensor suggest that the presence of the stray field, which is induced by the magnetic nanoparticles, significantly increased the switching field. Comparing the performance of the 2D sensor and 3D sensor designed in this study, the response in switching field variation was 12.14% in the 2D sensor and 62.55% in the 3D sensor. The response in MR ratio variation was 4.55% in the 2D sensor and 82.32% in the 3D sensor. In addition, the design of the 3D sensor structure also helped to attract and trap a single magnetic cell due to its stronger stray field compared with the 2D structure. The 3D magnetic biosensor designed here can provide important information for future biochip research and applications.

  7. Modeling spatial distribution of oxygen in 3d culture of islet beta-cells.

    PubMed

    McReynolds, John; Wen, Yu; Li, Xiaofei; Guan, Jianjun; Jin, Sha

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) scaffold culture of pancreatic β-cell has been proven to be able to better mimic physiological conditions in the body. However, one critical issue with culturing pancreatic β-cells is that β-cells consume large amounts of oxygen, and hence insufficient oxygen supply in the culture leads to loss of β-cell mass and functions. This becomes more significant when cells are cultured in a 3D scaffold. In this study, in order to understand the effect of oxygen tension inside a cell-laden collagen culture on β-cell proliferation, a culture model with encapsulation of an oxygen-generator was established. The oxygen-generator was made by embedding hydrogen peroxide into nontoxic polydimethylsiloxane to avoid the toxicity of a chemical reaction in the β-cell culture. To examine the effectiveness of the oxygenation enabled 3D culture, the spatial-temporal distribution of oxygen tension inside a scaffold was evaluated by a mathematical modeling approach. Our simulation results indicated that an oxygenation-aided 3D culture would augment the oxygen supply required for the β-cells. Furthermore, we identified that cell seeding density and the capacity of the oxygenator are two critical parameters in the optimization of the culture. Notably, cell-laden scaffold cultures with an in situ oxygen supply significantly improved the β-cells' biological function. These β-cells possess high insulin secretion capacity. The results obtained in this work would provide valuable information for optimizing and encouraging functional β-cell cultures. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:221-228, 2017.

  8. Bioengineered 3D Glial Cell Culture Systems and Applications for Neurodegeneration and Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Watson, P Marc D; Kavanagh, Edel; Allenby, Gary; Vassey, Matthew

    2017-02-01

    Neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation are key features in a range of chronic central nervous system (CNS) diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, as well as acute conditions like stroke and traumatic brain injury, for which there remains significant unmet clinical need. It is now well recognized that current cell culture methodologies are limited in their ability to recapitulate the cellular environment that is present in vivo, and there is a growing body of evidence to show that three-dimensional (3D) culture systems represent a more physiologically accurate model than traditional two-dimensional (2D) cultures. Given the complexity of the environment from which cells originate, and their various cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, it is important to develop models that can be controlled and reproducible for drug discovery. 3D cell models have now been developed for almost all CNS cell types, including neurons, astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocyte cells. This review will highlight a number of current and emerging techniques for the culture of astrocytes and microglia, glial cell types with a critical role in neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory conditions. We describe recent advances in glial cell culture using electrospun polymers and hydrogel macromolecules, and highlight how these novel culture environments influence astrocyte and microglial phenotypes in vitro, as compared to traditional 2D systems. These models will be explored to illuminate current trends in the techniques used to create 3D environments for application in research and drug discovery focused on astrocytes and microglial cells.

  9. Development of 3-D Hydrogel Culture Systems With On-Demand Cell Separation

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Sharon K.; Bloodworth, Nathaniel C.; Massad, Christopher S.; Hammoudi, Taymour M.; Suri, Shalu; Yang, Peter J.; Lu, Hang; Temenoff, Johnna S.

    2013-01-01

    Recently there has been an increased interest in the effects of paracrine signaling between groups of cells, particularly in the context of better understanding how stem cells contribute to tissue repair. Most current 3-D co-culture methods lack the ability to effectively separate 2 cell populations after the culture period, which is important for simultaneously analyzing the reciprocal effects of each cell type on the other. Here, we detail the development of a 3-D hydrogel co-culture system that allows us to culture different cell types for up to 7 days and subsequently separate and isolate the different cell populations using enzyme-sensitive glues. Separable 3-D co-culture laminates were prepared by laminating PEG-based hydrogels with enzyme-degradable hydrogel adhesives. Encapsulated cell populations exhibited good segregation with well-defined interfaces. Furthermore, constructs can be separated on-demand upon addition of the appropriate enzyme and cell viability remains high throughout the culture period, even after laminate separation. This platform offers great potential for a variety of basic cell signaling studies as the incorporation of an enzyme-sensitive adhesive interface allows the on-demand separation of individual cell populations for immediate analysis or further culture to examine persistence of co-culture effects and paracrine signaling on cell populations. PMID:23447378

  10. 3D Silicon Microstructures: A New Tool for Evaluating Biological Aggressiveness of Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Mazzini, Giuliano; Carpignano, Francesca; Surdo, Salvatore; Aredia, Francesca; Panini, Nicolò; Torchio, Martina; Erba, Eugenio; Danova, Marco; Scovassi, Anna Ivana; Barillaro, Giuseppe; Merlo, Sabina

    2015-10-01

    In this work, silicon micromachined structures (SMS), consisting of arrays of 3- μ m-thick silicon walls separated by 50- μm-deep, 5- μ m-wide gaps, were applied to investigate the behavior of eight tumor cell lines, with different origins and biological aggressiveness, in a three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment. Several cell culture experiments were performed on 3D-SMS and cells grown on silicon were stained for fluorescence microscopy analyses. Most of the tumor cell lines recognized in the literature as highly aggressive (OVCAR-5, A375, MDA-MB-231, and RPMI-7951) exhibited a great ability to enter and colonize the narrow deep gaps of the SMS, whereas less aggressive cell lines (OVCAR-3, Capan-1, MCF7, and NCI-H2126) demonstrated less penetration capability and tended to remain on top of the SMS. Quantitative image analyses of several fluorescence microscopy fields of silicon samples were performed for automatic cell recognition and count, in order to quantify the fraction of cells inside the gaps, with respect to the total number of cells in the examined field. Our results show that higher fractions of cells in the gaps are obtained with more aggressive cell lines, thus supporting in a quantitative way the observation that the behavior of tumor cells on the 3D-SMS depends on their aggressiveness level.

  11. Analysis of shallow gas and fluid migration within the Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary succession of the SW Barents Sea continental margin using 3D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreassen, Karin; Nilssen, Espen Glad; Ødegaard, Christian M.

    2007-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) seismic data acquired for hydrocarbon exploration reveal that gas accumulations are common within the 2 3 km thick Plio-Pleistocene stratigraphic column of the south-western Barents Sea continental margin. The 3D seismic data have relatively low-frequency content (<40 Hz) but, due to dense spatial sampling, long source-receiver offsets, 3D migration and advanced interpretation techniques, they provide surprisingly detailed images of inferred gas accumulations and the sedimentary environments in which they occur. The presence of gas is inferred from seismic reflection segments with anomalously high amplitude and reversed phase, compared with the seafloor reflection, so-called bright spots. Fluid migration is inferred from vertical zones of acoustic masking and acoustic pipes. The 3D seismic volume allows a spatial analysis of amplitude anomalies inferred to reflect the presence of gas and fluids. At several locations, seismic attribute maps reveal detailed images of flat spots, inferred to represent gas water interfaces. The data indicate a focused fluid migration system, where sub-vertical faults and zones of highly fractured sediments are conduits for the migration of gas-bearing fluids in Plio-Pleistocene sediments. Gas is interpreted to appear in high-porosity fan-shaped sediment lobes, channel and delta deposits, glacigenic debris flows and sediment blocks, probably sealed by low-permeability, clayey till and/or (glacio)marine sediments. Gas and fluid flow are here attributed mainly to rapid Plio-Pleistocene sedimentation that loaded large amounts of sedimentary material over lower-density, fine-grained Eocene oozes. This probably caused pore-fluid dewatering of the high-fluid content oozes through a network of polygonal faults. The study area is suggested to have experienced cycles of fluid expulsion and hydrocarbon migration associated with glacial interglacial cycles.

  12. In the beginning there were soft collagen-cell gels: towards better 3D connective tissue models?

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert A

    2013-10-01

    In the 40 years since Elsdale and Bard's analysis of fibroblast culture in collagen gels we have moved far beyond the concept that such 3D fibril network systems are better models than monolayer cultures. This review analyses key aspects of that progression of models, against a background of what exactly each model system tries to mimic. This story tracks our increasing understanding of fibroblast responses to soft collagen gels, in particularly their cytoskeletal contraction, migration and integrin attachment. The focus on fibroblast mechano-function has generated models designed to directly measure the overall force generated by fibroblast populations, their reaction to external loads and the role of the matrix structure. Key steps along this evolution of 3D collagen models have been designed to mimic normal skin, wound repair, tissue morphogenesis and remodelling, growth and contracture during scarring/fibrosis. As new models are developed to understand cell-mechanical function in connective tissues the collagen material has become progressively more important, now being engineered to mimic more complex aspects of native extracellular matrix structure. These have included collagen fibril density, alignment and hierarchical structure, controlling material stiffness and anisotropy. But of these, tissue-like collagen density is key in that it contributes to control of the others. It is concluded that across this 40 year window major progress has been made towards establishing a family of 3D experimental collagen tissue-models, suitable to investigate normal and pathological fibroblast mechano-functions.

  13. 3D Bioprinting a Cell-Laden Bone Matrix for Breast Cancer Metastasis Study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Zhu, Wei; Nowicki, Margaret; Miao, Shida; Cui, Haitao; Holmes, Benjamin; Glazer, Robert I; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-11-09

    Metastasis is one of the deadliest consequences of breast cancer, with bone being one of the primary sites of occurrence. Insufficient 3D biomimetic models currently exist to replicate this process in vitro. In this study, we developed a biomimetic bone matrix using 3D bioprinting technology to investigate the interaction between breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone stromal cells (fetal osteoblasts and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)). A tabletop stereolithography 3D bioprinter was employed to fabricate a series of bone matrices consisting of osteoblasts or MSCs encapsulated in gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogel with nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA). When BrCa cells were introduced into the stromal cell-laden bioprinted matrices, we found that the growth of BrCa cells was enhanced by the presence of osteoblasts or MSCs, whereas the proliferation of the osteoblasts or MSCs was inhibited by the BrCa cells. The BrCa cells co-cultured with MSCs or osteoblasts presented increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion in comparison to that of monocultured BrCa cells. Additionally, the alkaline phosphatase activity of MSCs or osteoblasts was reduced after BrCa cell co-culture. These results demonstrate that the 3D bioprinted matrix, with BrCa cells and bone stromal cells, provides a suitable model with which to study the interactive effects of cells in the context of an artificial bone microenvironment and thus may serve as a valuable tool for the investigation of postmetastatic breast cancer progression in bone.

  14. Quantification of Dynamic Morphological Drug Responses in 3D Organotypic Cell Cultures by Automated Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Härmä, Ville; Schukov, Hannu-Pekka; Happonen, Antti; Ahonen, Ilmari; Virtanen, Johannes; Siitari, Harri; Åkerfelt, Malin; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Nees, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Glandular epithelial cells differentiate into complex multicellular or acinar structures, when embedded in three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix. The spectrum of different multicellular morphologies formed in 3D is a sensitive indicator for the differentiation potential of normal, non-transformed cells compared to different stages of malignant progression. In addition, single cells or cell aggregates may actively invade the matrix, utilizing epithelial, mesenchymal or mixed modes of motility. Dynamic phenotypic changes involved in 3D tumor cell invasion are sensitive to specific small-molecule inhibitors that target the actin cytoskeleton. We have used a panel of inhibitors to demonstrate the power of automated image analysis as a phenotypic or morphometric readout in cell-based assays. We introduce a streamlined stand-alone software solution that supports large-scale high-content screens, based on complex and organotypic cultures. AMIDA (Automated Morphometric Image Data Analysis) allows quantitative measurements of large numbers of images and structures, with a multitude of different spheroid shapes, sizes, and textures. AMIDA supports an automated workflow, and can be combined with quality control and statistical tools for data interpretation and visualization. We have used a representative panel of 12 prostate and breast cancer lines that display a broad spectrum of different spheroid morphologies and modes of invasion, challenged by a library of 19 direct or indirect modulators of the actin cytoskeleton which induce systematic changes in spheroid morphology and differentiation versus invasion. These results were independently validated by 2D proliferation, apoptosis and cell motility assays. We identified three drugs that primarily attenuated the invasion and formation of invasive processes in 3D, without affecting proliferation or apoptosis. Two of these compounds block Rac signalling, one affects cellular cAMP/cGMP accumulation. Our approach supports

  15. Architectural proteins: regulators of 3D genome organization in cell fate.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Díaz, Elena; Corces, Victor G

    2014-11-01

    The relation between alterations in chromatin structure and changes in gene expression during cell differentiation has served as a paradigm to understand the link between genome organization and function. Yet, the factors involved and the mechanisms by which the 3D organization of the nucleus is established remain poorly understood. The use of Chromosome Conformation-Capture (3C)-based approaches has resulted in a new appreciation of the role of architectural proteins in the establishment of 3D genome organization. Architectural proteins orchestrate higher-order chromatin organization through the establishment of interactions between regulatory elements across multiple spatial scales. The regulation of these proteins, their interaction with DNA, and their co-occurrence in the genome, may be responsible for the plasticity of 3D chromatin architecture that dictates cell and time-specific blueprints of gene expression.

  16. Crossing barriers: the new dimension of 2D cell migration assays.

    PubMed

    Van Horssen, Remco; ten Hagen, Timo L M

    2011-01-01

    In our body cells move in three dimensions, embedded in an extracellular matrix that varies in composition, density and stiffness, and this movement is fundamental to life. Next to 3D cell migration assays, representing these physiological circumstances, still we need 2D migrations assays to perform detailed studies on the contribution of matrix-components and (extra)cellular proteins to cell movements. Next to the debate on differences between 3D and 2D migration, there also are many new perspectives on the use and development of novel or modified 2D cell migration assays. Of special significance is the introduction of so-called barrier migration assays, methods that avoid cell and matrix damage, as complementation or replacement of scratch/wound healing assays. Here, we discuss the possibilities and limitations of different 2D barrier migration assays.

  17. New data-driven method from 3D confocal microscopy for calculating phytoplankton cell biovolume.

    PubMed

    Roselli, L; Paparella, F; Stanca, E; Basset, A

    2015-06-01

    Confocal laser scanner microscopy coupled with an image analysis system was used to directly determine the shape and calculate the biovolume of phytoplankton organisms by constructing 3D models of cells. The study was performed on Biceratium furca (Ehrenberg) Vanhoeffen, which is one of the most complex-shaped phytoplankton. Traditionally, biovolume is obtained from a standardized set of geometric models based on linear dimensions measured by light microscopy. However, especially in the case of complex-shaped cells, biovolume is affected by very large errors associated with the numerous manual measurements that this entails. We evaluate the accuracy of these traditional methods by comparing the results obtained using geometric models with direct biovolume measurement by image analysis. Our results show cell biovolume measurement based on decomposition into simple geometrical shapes can be highly inaccurate. Although we assume that the most accurate cell shape is obtained by 3D direct biovolume measurement, which is based on voxel counting, the intrinsic uncertainty of this method is explored and assessed. Finally, we implement a data-driven formula-based approach to the calculation of biovolume of this complex-shaped organism. On one hand, the model is obtained from 3D direct calculation. On the other hand, it is based on just two linear dimensions which can easily be measured by hand. This approach has already been used for investigating the complexities of morphology and for determining the 3D structure of cells. It could also represent a novel way to generalize scaling laws for biovolume calculation.

  18. Ornamenting 3D printed scaffolds with cell-laid extracellular matrix for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pati, Falguni; Song, Tae-Ha; Rijal, Girdhari; Jang, Jinah; Kim, Sung Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    3D printing technique is the most sophisticated technique to produce scaffolds with tailorable physical properties. But, these scaffolds often suffer from limited biological functionality as they are typically made from synthetic materials. Cell-laid mineralized ECM was shown to be potential for improving the cellular responses and drive osteogenesis of stem cells. Here, we intend to improve the biological functionality of 3D-printed synthetic scaffolds by ornamenting them with cell-laid mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM) that mimics a bony microenvironment. We developed bone graft substitutes by using 3D printed scaffolds made from a composite of polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and mineralized ECM laid by human nasal inferior turbinate tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hTMSCs). A rotary flask bioreactor was used to culture hTMSCs on the scaffolds to foster formation of mineralized ECM. A freeze/thaw cycle in hypotonic buffer was used to efficiently decellularize (97% DNA reduction) the ECM-ornamented scaffolds while preserving its main organic and inorganic components. The ECM-ornamented 3D printed scaffolds supported osteoblastic differentiation of newly-seeded hTMSCs by upregulating four typical osteoblastic genes (4-fold higher RUNX2; 3-fold higher ALP; 4-fold higher osteocalcin; and 4-fold higher osteopontin) and increasing calcium deposition compared to bare 3D printed scaffolds. In vivo, in ectopic and orthotopic models in rats, ECM-ornamented scaffolds induced greater bone formation than that of bare scaffolds. These results suggest a valuable method to produce ECM-ornamented 3D printed scaffolds as off-the-shelf bone graft substitutes that combine tunable physical properties with physiological presentation of biological signals.

  19. Cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Moutasim, Karwan A; Nystrom, Maria L; Thomas, Gareth J

    2011-01-01

    A number of in vitro assays have been developed to study tumor cell motility. Historically, assays have been mainly monocellular, where carcinoma cells are studied in isolation. Scratch assays can be used to study the collective and directional movement of populations of cells, whereas two chamber assays lend themselves to the analysis of chemotactic/haptotactic migration and cell invasion. However, an inherent disadvantage of these assays is that they grossly oversimplify the complex process of invasion, lacking the tumor structural architecture and stromal components. Organotypic assays, where tumor cells are grown at an air/liquid interface on gels populated with stromal cells, are a more physiologically relevant method for studying 3-dimensional tumor invasion.

  20. Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Expansion in Contact with Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in a Hanging Drop Model Uncovers Disadvantages of 3D Culture

    PubMed Central

    Schmal, Olga; Seifert, Jan; Schäffer, Tilman E.; Walter, Christina B.; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Klein, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Efficient ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells with a concomitant preservation of stemness and self-renewal potential is still an unresolved ambition. Increased numbers of methods approaching this issue using three-dimensional (3D) cultures were reported. Here, we describe a simplified 3D hanging drop model for the coculture of cord blood-derived CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). When seeded as a mixed cell suspension, MSCs segregated into tight spheroids. Despite the high expression of niche-specific extracellular matrix components by spheroid-forming MSCs, HSPCs did not migrate into the spheroids in the initial phase of coculture, indicating strong homotypic interactions of MSCs. After one week, however, HSPC attachment increased considerably, leading to spheroid collapse as demonstrated by electron microscopy and immunofluorescence staining. In terms of HSPC proliferation, the conventional 2D coculture system was superior to the hanging drop model. Furthermore, expansion of primitive hematopoietic progenitors was more favored in 2D than in 3D, as analyzed in colony-forming assays. Conclusively, our data demonstrate that MSCs, when arranged with a spread (monolayer) shape, exhibit better HSPC supportive qualities than spheroid-forming MSCs. Therefore, 3D systems are not necessarily superior to traditional 2D culture in this regard. PMID:26839560

  1. Fabrication of 3D cell-laden hydrogel microstructures through photo-mold patterning.

    PubMed

    Occhetta, P; Sadr, N; Piraino, F; Redaelli, A; Moretti, M; Rasponi, M

    2013-09-01

    Native tissues are characterized by spatially organized three-dimensional (3D) microscaled units which functionally define cells-cells and cells-extracellular matrix interactions. The ability to engineer biomimetic constructs mimicking these 3D microarchitectures is subject to the control over cell distribution and organization. In the present study we introduce a novel protocol to generate 3D cell laden hydrogel micropatterns with defined size and shape. The method, named photo-mold patterning (PMP), combines hydrogel micromolding within polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps and photopolymerization through a recently introduced biocompatible ultraviolet (UVA) activated photoinitiator (VA-086). Exploiting PDMS micromolds as geometrical constraints for two methacrylated prepolymers (polyethylene glycol diacrylate and gelatin methacrylate), micrometrically resolved structures were obtained within a 3 min exposure to a low cost and commercially available UVA LED. The PMP was validated both on a continuous cell line (human umbilical vein endothelial cells expressing green fluorescent protein, HUVEC GFP) and on primary human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). HUVEC GFP and BMSCs were exposed to 1.5% w/v VA-086 and UVA light (1 W, 385 nm, distance from sample = 5 cm). Photocrosslinking conditions applied during the PMP did not negatively affect cells viability or specific metabolic activity. Quantitative analyses demonstrated the potentiality of PMP to uniformly embed viable cells within 3D microgels, creating biocompatible and favorable environments for cell proliferation and spreading during a seven days' culture. PMP can thus be considered as a promising and cost effective tool for designing spatially accurate in vitro models and, in perspective, functional constructs.

  2. Isolation, growth, and characterization of human renal epithelial cells using traditional and 3D methods.

    PubMed

    Gildea, John J; McGrath, Helen E; Van Sciver, Robert E; Wang, Dora Bigler; Felder, Robin A

    2013-01-01

    The kidney is a highly heterogeneous organ that is responsible for fluid and electrolyte balance. Much interest is focused on determining the function of specific renal epithelial cells in humans, which can only be accomplished through the isolation and growth of nephron segment-specific epithelial cells. However, human renal epithelial cells are notoriously difficult to maintain in culture. This chapter describes the isolation, growth, immortalization, and characterization of the human renal proximal tubule cell. In addition, we describe new paradigms in 3D cell culture which allow the cells to maintain more in vivo-like morphology and function.

  3. Dextran-based hydrogel formed by thiol-Michael addition reaction for 3D cell encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen Qi; Wei, Zhao; Zhu, Xv Long; Huang, Guo You; Xu, Feng; Yang, Jian Hai; Osada, Yoshihito; Zrínyi, Miklós; Li, Jian Hui; Chen, Yong Mei

    2015-04-01

    Cell encapsulation in three-dimensional (3D) hydrogels can mimic native cell microenvironment and plays a major role in cell-based transplantation therapies. In this contribution, a novel in situ-forming hydrogel, Dex-l-DTT hydrogel ("l" means "linked-by"), by cross-linking glycidyl methacrylate derivatized dextran (Dex-GMA) and dithiothreitol (DTT) under physiological conditions, has been developed using thiol-Michael addition reaction. The mechanical properties, gelation process and degree of swelling of the hydrogel can be easily adjusted by changing the pH of phosphate buffer saline. The 3D cell encapsulation ability is demonstrated by encapsulating rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and NIH/3T3 fibroblasts into the in situ-forming hydrogel with maintained high viability. The BMSCs also maintain their differentiation potential after encapsulation. These results demonstrate that the Dex-l-DTT hydrogel holds great potential for biomedical field.

  4. Primed 3D injectable microniches enabling low-dosage cell therapy for critical limb ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaqian; Liu, Wei; Liu, Fei; Zeng, Yang; Zuo, Simin; Feng, Siyu; Qi, Chunxiao; Wang, Bingjie; Yan, Xiaojun; Khademhosseini, Ali; Bai, Jing; Du, Yanan

    2014-01-01

    The promise of cell therapy for repair and restoration of damaged tissues or organs relies on administration of large dose of cells whose healing benefits are still limited and sometimes irreproducible due to uncontrollable cell loss and death at lesion sites. Using a large amount of therapeutic cells increases the costs for cell processing and the risks of side effects. Optimal cell delivery strategies are therefore in urgent need to enhance the specificity, efficacy, and reproducibility of cell therapy leading to minimized cell dosage and side effects. Here, we addressed this unmet need by developing injectable 3D microscale cellular niches (microniches) based on biodegradable gelatin microcryogels (GMs). The microniches are constituted by in vitro priming human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) seeded within GMs resulting in tissue-like ensembles with enriched extracellular matrices and enhanced cell–cell interactions. The primed 3D microniches facilitated cell protection from mechanical insults during injection and in vivo cell retention, survival, and ultimate therapeutic functions in treatment of critical limb ischemia (CLI) in mouse models compared with free cell-based therapy. In particular, 3D microniche-based therapy with 105 hMSCs realized better ischemic limb salvage than treatment with 106 free-injected hMSCs, the minimum dosage with therapeutic effects for treating CLI in literature. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first convincing demonstration of injectable and primed cell delivery strategy realizing superior therapeutic efficacy for treating CLI with the lowest cell dosage in mouse models. This study offers a widely applicable cell delivery platform technology to boost the healing power of cell regenerative therapy. PMID:25197069

  5. In Vivo Chondrogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Human Cell-laden Hydrogel Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Thomas; Hägg, Daniel; Brantsing, Camilla; Rotter, Nicole; Apelgren, Peter; Lindahl, Anders; Kölby, Lars; Gatenholm, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Background: The three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting technology allows creation of 3D constructs in a layer-by-layer fashion utilizing biologically relevant materials such as biopolymers and cells. The aim of this study is to investigate the use of 3D bioprinting in a clinically relevant setting to evaluate the potential of this technique for in vivo chondrogenesis. Methods: Thirty-six nude mice (Balb-C, female) received a 5- × 5- × 1-mm piece of bioprinted cell-laden nanofibrillated cellulose/alginate construct in a subcutaneous pocket. Four groups of printed constructs were used: (1) human (male) nasal chondrocytes (hNCs), (2) human (female) bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs), (3) coculture of hNCs and hBMSCs in a 20/80 ratio, and (4) Cell-free scaffolds (blank). After 14, 30, and 60 days, the scaffolds were harvested for histological, immunohistochemical, and mechanical analysis. Results: The constructs had good mechanical properties and keep their structural integrity after 60 days of implantation. For both the hNC constructs and the cocultured constructs, a gradual increase of glycosaminoglycan production and hNC proliferation was observed. However, the cocultured group showed a more pronounced cell proliferation and enhanced deposition of human collagen II demonstrated by immunohistochemical analysis. Conclusions: In vivo chondrogenesis in a 3D bioprinted human cell-laden hydrogel construct has been demonstrated. The trophic role of the hBMSCs in stimulating hNC proliferation and matrix deposition in the coculture group suggests the potential of 3D bioprinting of human cartilage for future application in reconstructive surgery. PMID:28280669

  6. 3D patterned stem cell differentiation using thermo-responsive methylcellulose hydrogel molds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonjae; Park, Jon

    2016-07-06

    Tissue-specific patterned stem cell differentiation serves as the basis for the development, remodeling, and regeneration of the multicellular structure of the native tissues. We herein proposed a cytocompatible 3D casting process to recapitulate this patterned stem cell differentiation for reconstructing multicellular tissues in vitro. We first reconstituted the 2D culture conditions for stem cell fate control within 3D hydrogel by incorporating the sets of the diffusible signal molecules delivered through drug-releasing microparticles. Then, utilizing thermo-responsivity of methylcellulose (MC), we developed a cytocompatible casting process to mold these hydrogels into specific 3D configurations, generating the targeted spatial gradients of diffusible signal molecules. The liquid phase of the MC solution was viscous enough to adopt the shapes of 3D impression patterns, while the gelated MC served as a reliable mold for patterning the hydrogel prepolymers. When these patterned hydrogels were integrated together, the stem cells in each hydrogel distinctly differentiated toward individually defined fates, resulting in the formation of the multicellular tissue structure bearing the very structural integrity and characteristics as seen in vascularized bones and osteochondral tissues.

  7. 3D patterned stem cell differentiation using thermo-responsive methylcellulose hydrogel molds

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonjae; Park, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-specific patterned stem cell differentiation serves as the basis for the development, remodeling, and regeneration of the multicellular structure of the native tissues. We herein proposed a cytocompatible 3D casting process to recapitulate this patterned stem cell differentiation for reconstructing multicellular tissues in vitro. We first reconstituted the 2D culture conditions for stem cell fate control within 3D hydrogel by incorporating the sets of the diffusible signal molecules delivered through drug-releasing microparticles. Then, utilizing thermo-responsivity of methylcellulose (MC), we developed a cytocompatible casting process to mold these hydrogels into specific 3D configurations, generating the targeted spatial gradients of diffusible signal molecules. The liquid phase of the MC solution was viscous enough to adopt the shapes of 3D impression patterns, while the gelated MC served as a reliable mold for patterning the hydrogel prepolymers. When these patterned hydrogels were integrated together, the stem cells in each hydrogel distinctly differentiated toward individually defined fates, resulting in the formation of the multicellular tissue structure bearing the very structural integrity and characteristics as seen in vascularized bones and osteochondral tissues. PMID:27381562

  8. 3D patterned stem cell differentiation using thermo-responsive methylcellulose hydrogel molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonjae; Park, Jon

    2016-07-01

    Tissue-specific patterned stem cell differentiation serves as the basis for the development, remodeling, and regeneration of the multicellular structure of the native tissues. We herein proposed a cytocompatible 3D casting process to recapitulate this patterned stem cell differentiation for reconstructing multicellular tissues in vitro. We first reconstituted the 2D culture conditions for stem cell fate control within 3D hydrogel by incorporating the sets of the diffusible signal molecules delivered through drug-releasing microparticles. Then, utilizing thermo-responsivity of methylcellulose (MC), we developed a cytocompatible casting process to mold these hydrogels into specific 3D configurations, generating the targeted spatial gradients of diffusible signal molecules. The liquid phase of the MC solution was viscous enough to adopt the shapes of 3D impression patterns, while the gelated MC served as a reliable mold for patterning the hydrogel prepolymers. When these patterned hydrogels were integrated together, the stem cells in each hydrogel distinctly differentiated toward individually defined fates, resulting in the formation of the multicellular tissue structure bearing the very structural integrity and characteristics as seen in vascularized bones and osteochondral tissues.

  9. Microscale technologies for imaging endogenous gene expression in individual cells within 3D tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Ting; Luo, Zhen; Ma, Yunzhe; Gill, Harvinder Singh; Nitin, N.

    2013-05-01

    The goal of this study was to develop an innovative approach to image gene expression in intact 3D tissues. Imaging gene expression of individual cells in 3D tissues is expected to have a significant impact on both clinical diagnostic applications and fundamental biological science and engineering applications in a laboratory setting. To achieve this goal, we have developed an integrated approach that combines: 1) microneedle-based minimally invasive intra-tissue delivery of oligonucleotide probes and Streptolysin O (SLO) or CPP; 2) SLO as a pore forming permeation enhancer to enable intracellular delivery of oligonucleotide probes and CPP peptides can also transport conjugated cargo in cells; and 3) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) pair of ON probes to improve specificity and sensitivity of RNA detection in tissue models. The results of this study demonstrate uniform coating and rapid release of ON probes from microneedles in a tissue environment. Microneedle assisted delivery of ON probes in 3D tissue does not result in cell damage and the ON probes are uniformly delivered in the tissue. The results also demonstrate the feasibility of FRET imaging of ON probes in 3D tissue and highlight the potential for imaging 28-s rRNA in individual living cells.

  10. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induce Directional Migration of Invasive Breast Cancer Cells through TGF-β

    PubMed Central

    McAndrews, Kathleen M.; McGrail, Daniel J.; Ravikumar, Nithin; Dawson, Michelle R.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are recruited to the tumor microenvironment and influence tumor progression; however, how MSCs induce the invasion of cancer cells is not completely understood. Here, we used a 3D coculture model to determine how MSCs affect the migration of invasive breast cancer cells. Coculture with MSCs increases the elongation, directional migration, and traction generation of breast cancer cells. MSC-induced directional migration directly correlates with traction generation and is mediated by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and the migratory proteins rho-associated kinase, focal adhesion kinase, and matrix metalloproteinases. Treatment with MSC conditioned media or recombinant TGF-β1 elicits a similar migration response to coculture. Taken together, this work suggests TGF-β is secreted by MSCs, leading to force-dependent directional migration of invasive breast cancer cells. These pathways may be potential targets for blocking cancer cell invasion and subsequent metastasis. PMID:26585689

  11. Rapid Fabrication of Cell-Laden Alginate Hydrogel 3D Structures by Micro Dip-Coating

    PubMed Central

    Ghanizadeh Tabriz, Atabak; Mills, Christopher G.; Mullins, John J.; Davies, Jamie A.; Shu, Wenmiao

    2017-01-01

    Development of a simple, straightforward 3D fabrication method to culture cells in 3D, without relying on any complex fabrication methods, remains a challenge. In this paper, we describe a new technique that allows fabrication of scalable 3D cell-laden hydrogel structures easily, without complex machinery: the technique can be done using only apparatus already available in a typical cell biology laboratory. The fabrication method involves micro dip-coating of cell-laden hydrogels covering the surface of a metal bar, into the cross-linking reagents calcium chloride or barium chloride to form hollow tubular structures. This method can be used to form single layers with thickness ranging from 126 to 220 µm or multilayered tubular structures. This fabrication method uses alginate hydrogel as the primary biomaterial and a secondary biomaterial can be added depending on the desired application. We demonstrate the feasibility of this method, with survival rate over 75% immediately after fabrication and normal responsiveness of cells within these tubular structures using mouse dermal embryonic fibroblast cells and human embryonic kidney 293 cells containing a tetracycline-responsive, red fluorescent protein (tHEK cells). PMID:28286747

  12. Optimizing Photo-Encapsulation Viability of Heart Valve Cell Types in 3D Printable Composite Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Kang, Laura Hockaday; Armstrong, Patrick A; Lee, Lauren Julia; Duan, Bin; Kang, Kevin Heeyong; Butcher, Jonathan Talbot

    2017-02-01

    Photocrosslinking hydrogel technologies are attractive for the biofabrication of cardiovascular soft tissues, but 3D printing success is dependent on multiple variables. In this study we systematically test variables associated with photocrosslinking hydrogels (photoinitiator type, photoinitiator concentration, and light intensity) for their effects on encapsulated cells in an extrusion 3D printable mixture of methacrylated gelatin/poly-ethylene glycol diacrylate/alginate (MEGEL/PEGDA3350/alginate). The fabrication conditions that produced desired hydrogel mechanical properties were compared against those that optimize aortic valve or mesenchymal stem cell viability. In the 3D hydrogel culture environment and fabrication setting studied, Irgacure can increase hydrogel stiffness with a lower proportional decrease in encapsulated cell viability compared to VA086. Human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (HADMSC) survived increasing photoinitiator concentrations in photo-encapsulation conditions better than aortic valve interstitial cells (HAVIC) and aortic valve sinus smooth muscle cells (HASSMC). Within the range of photo-encapsulation fabrication conditions tested with MEGEL/PEGDA/alginate (0.25-1.0% w/v VA086, 0.025-0.1% w/v Irgacure 2959, and 365 nm light intensity 2-136 mW/cm(2)), the highest viabilities achieved were 95, 93, and 93% live for HASSMC, HAVIC, and HADMSC respectively. These results identify parameter combinations that optimize cell viability during 3D printing for multiple cell types. These results also indicate that general oxidative stress is higher in photocrosslinking conditions that induce lower cell viability. However, suppressing this increase in intracellular oxidative stress did not improve cell viability, which suggests that other stress mechanisms also contribute.

  13. Localizing Protein in 3D Neural Stem Cell Culture: a Hybrid Visualization Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Fai, Stephen; Bennett, Steffany A.L.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of 3-dimensional (3D) topography in influencing neural stem and progenitor cell (NPC) phenotype is widely acknowledged yet challenging to study. When dissociated from embryonic or post-natal brain, single NPCs will proliferate in suspension to form neurospheres. Daughter cells within these cultures spontaneously adopt distinct developmental lineages (neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes) over the course of expansion despite being exposed to the same extracellular milieu. This progression recapitulates many of the stages observed over the course of neurogenesis and gliogenesis in post-natal brain and is often used to study basic NPC biology within a controlled environment. Assessing the full impact of 3D topography and cellular positioning within these cultures on NPC fate is, however, difficult. To localize target proteins and identify NPC lineages by immunocytochemistry, free-floating neurospheres must be plated on a substrate or serially sectioned. This processing is required to ensure equivalent cell permeabilization and antibody access throughout the sphere. As a result, 2D epifluorescent images of cryosections or confocal reconstructions of 3D Z-stacks can only provide spatial information about cell position within discrete physical or digital 3D slices and do not visualize cellular position in the intact sphere. Here, to reiterate the topography of the neurosphere culture and permit spatial analysis of protein expression throughout the entire culture, we present a protocol for isolation, expansion, and serial sectioning of post-natal hippocampal neurospheres suitable for epifluorescent or confocal immunodetection of target proteins. Connexin29 (Cx29) is analyzed as an example. Next, using a hybrid of graphic editing and 3D modelling softwares rigorously applied to maintain biological detail, we describe how to re-assemble the 3D structural positioning of these images and digitally map labelled cells within the complete neurosphere. This

  14. Force transmission in migrating cells

    PubMed Central

    Sauser, Roger; Ambrosi, Davide; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B.

    2010-01-01

    During cell migration, forces generated by the actin cytoskeleton are transmitted through adhesion complexes to the substrate. To investigate the mechanism of force generation and transmission, we analyzed the relationship between actin network velocity and traction forces at the substrate in a model system of persistently migrating fish epidermal keratocytes. Front and lateral sides of the cell exhibited much stronger coupling between actin motion and traction forces than the trailing cell body. Further analysis of the traction–velocity relationship suggested that the force transmission mechanisms were different in different cell regions: at the front, traction was generated by a gripping of the actin network to the substrate, whereas at the sides and back, it was produced by the network’s slipping over the substrate. Treatment with inhibitors of the actin–myosin system demonstrated that the cell body translocation could be powered by either of the two different processes, actomyosin contraction or actin assembly, with the former associated with significantly larger traction forces than the latter. PMID:20100912

  15. 3-D measurement of osmotic dehydration of isolated and adhered PC-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshimori, Takashi; Takamatsu, Hiroshi

    2009-02-01

    Cell dehydration during freezing results from an elevated concentration of electrolytes in the extracellular medium that is deeply involved in cellular injury. We undertook real-time threedimensional (3-D) observation of osmotic dehydration of cells, motivated by a comparison of cellular responses between isolated cells in suspension and cultured cells adhering to a surface since several studies have suggested a difference in freeze tolerance between cell suspensions and monolayers. A laser confocal scanner was used with a perfusion microscope to capture sectional images of chloromethylbenzamido (DiI)-stained PC-3 cells that were exposed to an increase in NaCl concentration from 0.15 to 0.5M at 23 degrees C. Change in cell volume was determined from reconstructed 3-D images taken every 2.5s. When cells were exposed to an elevated NaCl concentration, isolated cells contracted and markedly distorted from their original spherical shape. In contrast, adhered cells showed only a reduction in height and kept their basal area constant. Apparent membrane hydraulic conductivity did not vary considerably between isolated and adhered cells, suggesting a negligible effect of the cytoskeletal structure on the rate of water transport. The surface area that contributed to water transport in adhered PC-3 cells was nearly equal to or slightly smaller than that present in isolated cells. Therefore, the similarity in properties and dimensions between isolated and adhered cells indicate that there will be similar extents of dehydration, resulting in a similar degree of supercooling during freezing.

  16. Three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing for continuous sampling and analysis of adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunxiu; Wang, Min; Yin, Xuefeng

    2011-10-07

    A simple three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing microfluidic device integrated with continuous sampling, rapid dynamic lysis, capillary electrophoretic (CE) separation and detection of intracellular content is presented. One of the major difficulties in microfluidic cell analysis for adherent cells is that the cells are prone to attaching to the channel surface. To solve this problem, a cross microfluidic chip with three sheath-flow channels located on both sides of and below the sampling channel was developed. With the three sheath flows around the sample solution-containing cells, the formed soft fluid wall prevents the cells from adhering to the channel surface. Labeled cells were 3D hydrodynamically focused by the sheath-flow streams and smoothly introduced into the cross-section one by one. The introduction of sheath-flow streams not only ensured single-cell sampling but avoided blockage of the sampling channel by adherent cells as well. The maximum rate for introduction of individual cells into the separation channel was about 151 cells min(-1). With electric field applied on the separation channel, the aligned cells were driven into the separation channel and rapidly lysed within 400 ms at the entry of the channel by sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) added in the sheath-flow solution. The microfluidic system was evaluated by analysis of reduced glutathione (GSH) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in single HepG2 cells. The average analysis throughput of ROS and GSH in single cells was 16-18 cells min(-1).

  17. Visualization and 3D Reconstruction of Flame Cells of Taenia solium (Cestoda)

    PubMed Central

    Valverde-Islas, Laura E.; Arrangoiz, Esteban; Vega, Elio; Robert, Lilia; Villanueva, Rafael; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Willms, Kaethe; Zepeda-Rodríguez, Armando; Fortoul, Teresa I.; Ambrosio, Javier R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Flame cells are the terminal cells of protonephridial systems, which are part of the excretory systems of invertebrates. Although the knowledge of their biological role is incomplete, there is a consensus that these cells perform excretion/secretion activities. It has been suggested that the flame cells participate in the maintenance of the osmotic environment that the cestodes require to live inside their hosts. In live Platyhelminthes, by light microscopy, the cells appear beating their flames rapidly and, at the ultrastructural, the cells have a large body enclosing a tuft of cilia. Few studies have been performed to define the localization of the cytoskeletal proteins of these cells, and it is unclear how these proteins are involved in cell function. Methodology/Principal Findings Parasites of two different developmental stages of T. solium were used: cysticerci recovered from naturally infected pigs and intestinal adults obtained from immunosuppressed and experimentally infected golden hamsters. Hamsters were fed viable cysticerci to recover adult parasites after one month of infection. In the present studies focusing on flame cells of cysticerci tissues was performed. Using several methods such as video, confocal and electron microscopy, in addition to computational analysis for reconstruction and modeling, we have provided a 3D visual rendition of the cytoskeletal architecture of Taenia solium flame cells. Conclusions/Significance We consider that visual representations of cells open a new way for understanding the role of these cells in the excretory systems of Platyhelminths. After reconstruction, the observation of high resolution 3D images allowed for virtual observation of the interior composition of cells. A combination of microscopic images, computational reconstructions and 3D modeling of cells appears to be useful for inferring the cellular dynamics of the flame cell cytoskeleton. PMID:21412407

  18. Stochastic microstructure modeling and electrochemical simulation of lithium-ion cell anodes in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, Simon; Feinauer, Julian; Westhoff, Daniel; Manke, Ingo; Schmidt, Volker; Latz, Arnulf

    2016-12-01

    Thermodynamically consistent transport theory is used to compare 3D images of real anode microstructures from lithium-ion batteries to virtual ones created by a parametric stochastic 3D microstructure model. Half-cell simulations in 3D with spatially resolved microstructures at different applied currents show that for low currents the deviations between various electrochemical quantities like current density or overpotential are negligibly small. For larger currents small differences become more pronounced. Qualitative and quantitative differences of these features are discussed with respect to the microstructure and it is shown that the real and virtual structures behave similar during electrochemical simulations. Extensions of the stochastic microstructure model, which overcome small differences in electrochemical behavior, are proposed.

  19. Investigation on 3D morphological changes of in vitro cells through digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memmolo, Pasquale; Miccio, Lisa; Merola, Francesco; Netti, Paolo A.; Coppola, Giuseppe; Ferraro, Pietro

    2013-04-01

    We report the investigation of the identification and measurement of region of interest (ROI) in quantitative phase-contrast maps (QPMs) of biological cells by digital holographic microscopy (DHM), with the aim to analyze the 3D positions and 3D morphology together. We consider as test case for our tool the in vitro bull sperm head morphometry analysis. Extraction and measurement of various morphological parameters are performed by using two methods: the anisotropic diffusion filter, that is based on the Gaussian diffusivity function which allows more accuracy of the edge position, and the simple thresholding filter. In particular we consider the calculation of area, ellipticity, perimeter, major axis, minor axis and shape factor as a morphological parameter, instead, for the estimation of 3D position, we compute the centroid, the weighted centroid and the maximum phase values. A statistical analysis on a data set composed by N = 14 holograms relative to bovine spermatozoa and its reference holograms is reported.

  20. 3D niche microarrays for systems-level analyses of cell fate.

    PubMed

    Ranga, A; Gobaa, S; Okawa, Y; Mosiewicz, K; Negro, A; Lutolf, M P

    2014-07-14

    The behaviour of mammalian cells in a tissue is governed by the three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment and involves a dynamic interplay between biochemical and mechanical signals provided by the extracellular matrix (ECM), cell-cell interactions and soluble factors. The complexity of the microenvironment and the context-dependent cell responses that arise from these interactions have posed a major challenge to understanding the underlying regulatory mechanisms. Here we develop an experimental paradigm to dissect the role of various interacting factors by simultaneously synthesizing more than 1,000 unique microenvironments with robotic nanolitre liquid-dispensing technology and by probing their effects on cell fate. Using this novel 3D microarray platform, we assess the combined effects of matrix elasticity, proteolytic degradability and three distinct classes of signalling proteins on mouse embryonic stem cells, unveiling a comprehensive map of interactions involved in regulating self-renewal. This approach is broadly applicable to gain a systems-level understanding of multifactorial 3D cell-matrix interactions.

  1. Characterization of Collective Cell Migration Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Rachel; Yue, Haicen; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Losert, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    During cancer progression, tumor cells invade the surrounding tissue and migrate throughout the body, forming clinically dangerous secondary tumors. This metastatic process begins when cells leave the primary tumor, either as individual cells or collectively migrating groups. Here we present data on the migration dynamics of epithelial sheets composed of many cells. Using quantitative image analysis techniques, we are able to extract motion information from time-lapse images of cell lines with varying malignancy. Adapting metrics originally used to study fluid flows we are able to characterize the migration dynamics of these cell lines. By describing the migration dynamics in great detail, we are able to make a clear comparison of our results to a simulation of collective cell migration. Specifically, we explore whether leader cells are required to describe our expanding sheets of cells and whether the answer depends on individual cell activity.

  2. Modeling the formation of cell-matrix adhesions on a single 3D matrix fiber.

    PubMed

    Escribano, J; Sánchez, M T; García-Aznar, J M

    2015-11-07

    Cell-matrix adhesions are crucial in different biological processes like tissue morphogenesis, cell motility, and extracellular matrix remodeling. These interactions that link cell cytoskeleton and matrix fibers are built through protein clutches, generally known as adhesion complexes. The adhesion formation process has been deeply studied in two-dimensional (2D) cases; however, the knowledge is limited for three-dimensional (3D) cases. In this work, we simulate different local extracellular matrix properties in order to unravel the fundamental mechanisms that regulate the formation of cell-matrix adhesions in 3D. We aim to study the mechanical interaction of these biological structures through a three dimensional discrete approach, reproducing the transmission pattern force between the cytoskeleton and a single extracellular matrix fiber. This numerical model provides a discrete analysis of the proteins involved including spatial distribution, interaction between them, and study of the different phenomena, such as protein clutches unbinding or protein unfolding.

  3. Investigation of osteoblast cells behavior in polymeric 3D micropatterned scaffolds using digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mihailescu, M; Popescu, R C; Matei, A; Acasandrei, A; Paun, I A; Dinescu, M

    2014-08-01

    The effect of micropatterned polymeric scaffolds on the features of the cultured cells at different time intervals after seeding was investigated by digital holographic microscopy. Both parallel and perpendicular walls, with different heights, were fabricated using two-photon lithography on photopolymers. The walls were subsequently coated with polypyrrole-based thin films using the matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation technique. Osteoblast-like cells, MG-63 line, were cultured on these polymeric 3D micropatterned scaffolds. To analyze these scaffolds with/without cultured cells, an inverted digital holographic microscope, which provides 3D images, was used. Information about the samples' refractive indices and heights was obtained from the phase shift introduced in the optical path. Characteristics of cell adhesion, alignment, orientation, and morphology as a function of the wall heights and time from seeding were highlighted.

  4. 3D analysis of the performances degradation caused by series resistance in concentrator solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Daliento, Santolo; Lancellotti, Laura

    2010-01-15

    This paper deals with the modeling of series resistance components in silicon concentrator solar cells. The main components of the macroscopic series resistance are analyzed by means of one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations. It is shown that the contribution of the lateral current flux, flowing along the emitter region, and of the transverse current flux, flowing along the metal grid, cannot be neglected and, hence, the operation of solar cells subjected to high current densities cannot be described by simple one-dimensional models. The percentage weight of 2D and 3D components on the total value of the series resistance is evaluated and rules for the proper design of the cell geometries are given. An analysis of the effectiveness of the most popular methods for the extraction of the series resistance from the I-V curves of solar cells is also proposed. (author)

  5. An approach to quantifying 3D responses of cells to extreme strain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuhui; Huang, Guoyou; Li, Moxiao; Wang, Lin; Elson, Elliot L.; Jian Lu, Tian; Genin, Guy M.; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The tissues of hollow organs can routinely stretch up to 2.5 times their length. Although significant pathology can arise if relatively large stretches are sustained, the responses of cells are not known at these levels of sustained strain. A key challenge is presenting cells with a realistic and well-defined three-dimensional (3D) culture environment that can sustain such strains. Here, we describe an in vitro system called microscale, magnetically-actuated synthetic tissues (micro-MASTs) to quantify these responses for cells within a 3D hydrogel matrix. Cellular strain-threshold and saturation behaviors were observed in hydrogel matrix, including strain-dependent proliferation, spreading, polarization, and differentiation, and matrix adhesion retained at strains sufficient for apoptosis. More broadly, the system shows promise for defining and controlling the effects of mechanical environment upon a broad range of cells. PMID:26887698

  6. A 3D human neural cell culture system for modeling Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Hye; Choi, Se Hoon; D’Avanzo, Carla; Hebisch, Matthias; Sliwinski, Christopher; Bylykbashi, Enjana; Washicosky, Kevin J.; Klee, Justin B.; Brüstle, Oliver; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Kim, Doo Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell technologies have facilitated the development of human cellular disease models that can be used to study pathogenesis and test therapeutic candidates. These models hold promise for complex neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) because existing animal models have been unable to fully recapitulate all aspects of pathology. We recently reported the characterization of a novel three-dimensional (3D) culture system that exhibits key events in AD pathogenesis, including extracellular aggregation of β-amyloid and accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau. Here we provide instructions for the generation and analysis of 3D human neural cell cultures, including the production of genetically modified human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) with familial AD mutations, the differentiation of the hNPCs in a 3D matrix, and the analysis of AD pathogenesis. The 3D culture generation takes 1–2 days. The aggregation of β-amyloid is observed after 6-weeks of differentiation followed by robust tau pathology after 10–14 weeks. PMID:26068894

  7. A 3D human neural cell culture system for modeling Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Hye; Choi, Se Hoon; D'Avanzo, Carla; Hebisch, Matthias; Sliwinski, Christopher; Bylykbashi, Enjana; Washicosky, Kevin J; Klee, Justin B; Brüstle, Oliver; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Kim, Doo Yeon

    2015-07-01

    Stem cell technologies have facilitated the development of human cellular disease models that can be used to study pathogenesis and test therapeutic candidates. These models hold promise for complex neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), because existing animal models have been unable to fully recapitulate all aspects of pathology. We recently reported the characterization of a novel 3D culture system that exhibits key events in AD pathogenesis, including extracellular aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) and accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau. Here we provide instructions for the generation and analysis of 3D human neural cell cultures, including the production of genetically modified human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) with familial AD mutations, the differentiation of the hNPCs in a 3D matrix and the analysis of AD pathogenesis. The 3D culture generation takes 1-2 d. The aggregation of Aβ is observed after 6 weeks of differentiation, followed by robust tau pathology after 10-14 weeks.

  8. Polymer-based mesh as supports for multi-layered 3D cell culture and assays.

    PubMed

    Simon, Karen A; Park, Kyeng Min; Mosadegh, Bobak; Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Mazzeo, Aaron D; Ngo, Philip M; Whitesides, George M

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture systems can mimic certain aspects of the cellular microenvironment found in vivo, but generation, analysis and imaging of current model systems for 3D cellular constructs and tissues remain challenging. This work demonstrates a 3D culture system-Cells-in-Gels-in-Mesh (CiGiM)-that uses stacked sheets of polymer-based mesh to support cells embedded in gels to form tissue-like constructs; the stacked sheets can be disassembled by peeling the sheets apart to analyze cultured cells-layer-by-layer-within the construct. The mesh sheets leave openings large enough for light to pass through with minimal scattering, and thus allowing multiple options for analysis-(i) using straightforward analysis by optical light microscopy, (ii) by high-resolution analysis with fluorescence microscopy, or (iii) with a fluorescence gel scanner. The sheets can be patterned into separate zones with paraffin film-based decals, in order to conduct multiple experiments in parallel; the paraffin-based decal films also block lateral diffusion of oxygen effectively. CiGiM simplifies the generation and analysis of 3D culture without compromising throughput, and quality of the data collected: it is especially useful in experiments that require control of oxygen levels, and isolation of adjacent wells in a multi-zone format.

  9. Thermoforming techniques for manufacturing porous scaffolds for application in 3D cell cultivation.

    PubMed

    Borowiec, Justyna; Hampl, Jörg; Gebinoga, Michael; Elsarnagawy, Tarek; Elnakady, Yasser A; Fouad, Hassan; Almajhadi, Fahd; Fernekorn, Uta; Weise, Frank; Singh, Sukhdeep; Elsarnagawy, Dief; Schober, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Within the scientific community, there is an increasing demand to apply advanced cell cultivation substrates with increased physiological functionalities for studying spatially defined cellular interactions. Porous polymeric scaffolds are utilized for mimicking an organ-like structure or engineering complex tissues and have become a key element for three-dimensional (3D) cell cultivation in the meantime. As a consequence, efficient 3D scaffold fabrication methods play an important role in modern biotechnology. Here, we present a novel thermoforming procedure for manufacturing porous 3D scaffolds from permeable materials. We address the issue of precise thermoforming of porous polymer foils by using multilayer polymer thermoforming technology. This technology offers a new method for structuring porous polymer foils that are otherwise available for non-porous polymers only. We successfully manufactured 3D scaffolds from solvent casted and phase separated polylactic acid (PLA) foils and investigated their biocompatibility and basic cellular performance. The HepG2 cell culture in PLA scaffold has shown enhanced albumin secretion rate in comparison to a previously reported polycarbonate based scaffold with similar geometry.

  10. Bioengineered 3D brain tumor model to elucidate the effects of matrix stiffness on glioblastoma cell behavior using PEG-based hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Christine; Tong, Xinming; Yang, Fan

    2014-07-07

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive form of primary brain tumor with a median survival of 12-15 months, and the mechanisms underlying GBM tumor progression remain largely elusive. Given the importance of tumor niche signaling in driving GBM progression, there is a strong need to develop in vitro models to facilitate analysis of brain tumor cell-niche interactions in a physiologically relevant and controllable manner. Here we report the development of a bioengineered 3D brain tumor model to help elucidate the effects of matrix stiffness on GBM cell fate using poly(ethylene-glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels with brain-mimicking biochemical and mechanical properties. We have chosen PEG given its bioinert nature and tunable physical property, and the resulting hydrogels allow tunable matrix stiffness without changing the biochemical contents. To facilitate cell proliferation and migration, CRGDS and a MMP-cleavable peptide were chemically incorporated. Hyaluronic acid (HA) was also incorporated to mimic the concentration in the brain extracellular matrix. Using U87 cells as a model GBM cell line, we demonstrate that such biomimetic hydrogels support U87 cell growth, spreading, and migration in 3D over the course of 3 weeks in culture. Gene expression analyses showed U87 cells actively deposited extracellular matrix and continued to upregulate matrix remodeling genes. To examine the effects of matrix stiffness on GBM cell fate in 3D, we encapsulated U87 cells in soft (1 kPa) or stiff (26 kPa) hydrogels, which respectively mimics the matrix stiffness of normal brain or GBM tumor tissues. Our results suggest that changes in matrix stiffness induce differential GBM cell proliferation, morphology, and migration modes in 3D. Increasing matrix stiffness led to delayed U87 cell proliferation inside hydrogels, but cells formed denser spheroids with extended cell protrusions. Cells cultured in stiff hydrogels also showed upregulation of HA synthase 1 and matrix

  11. Uncovering cancer cell behavioral phenotype in 3-D in vitro metastatic landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Sun, Bo; Duclos, Guillaume; Kam, Yoonseok; Gatenby, Robert; Stone, Howard; Austin, Robert

    2012-02-01

    One well-known fact is that cancer cell genetics determines cell metastatic potentials. However, from a physics point of view, genetics as cell properties cannot directly act on metastasis. An agent is needed to unscramble the genetics first before generating dynamics for metastasis. Exactly this agent is cell behavioral phenotype, which is rarely studied due to the difficulties of real-time cell tracking in in vivo tissue. Here we have successfully constructed a micro in vitro environment with collagen based Extracellular Matrix (ECM) structures for cell 3-D metastasis. With stable nutrition (glucose) gradient inside, breast cancer cell MDA-MB-231 is able to invade inside the collagen from the nutrition poor site towards the nutrition rich site. Continuous confocal microscopy captures images of the cells every 12 hours and tracks their positions in 3-D space. The micro fluorescent beads pre-mixed inside the ECM demonstrate that invasive cells have altered the structures through mechanics. With the observation and the analysis of cell collective behaviors, we argue that game theory may exist between the pioneering cells and their followers in the metastatic cell group. The cell collaboration may explain the high efficiency of metastasis.

  12. Two-Photon Microscopy Analysis of Gold Nanoparticle Uptake in 3D Cell Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Rane, Tushar D.; Armani, Andrea M.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials can be synthesized from a wide range of material systems in numerous morphologies, creating an extremely diverse portfolio. As result of this tunability, these materials are emerging as a new class of nanotherapeutics and imaging agents. One particularly interesting nanomaterial is the gold nanoparticle. Due to its inherent biocompatibility and tunable photothermal behavior, it has made a rapid transition from the lab setting to in vivo testing. In most nanotherapeutic applications, the efficacy of the agent is directly related to the target of interest. However, the optimization of the AuNP size and shape for efficacy in vitro, prior to testing in in vivo models of a disease, has been largely limited to two dimensional monolayers of cells. Two dimensional cell cultures are unable to reproduce conditions experienced by AuNP in the body. In this article, we systematically investigate the effect of different properties of AuNP on the penetration depth into 3D cell spheroids using two-photon microscopy. The 3D spheroids are formed from the HCT116 cell line, a colorectal carcinoma cell line. In addition to studying different sizes and shapes of AuNPs, we also study the effect of an oligo surface chemistry. There is a significant difference between AuNP uptake profiles in the 2D monolayers of cells as compared to the 3D cell spheroids. Additionally, the range of sizes and shapes studied here also exhibit marked differences in uptake penetration depth and efficacy. Finally, our results demonstrate that two-photon microscopy enables quantitative AuNP localization and concentration data to be obtained at the single spheroid level without fluorescent labeling of the AuNP, thus, providing a viable technique for large scale screening of AuNP properties in 3D cell spheroids as compared to tedious and time consuming techniques like electron microscopy. PMID:27936027

  13. Using 3D Super-Resolution Microscopy to Probe Breast Cancer Stem Cells and Their Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    microenvironments on breast cancer by creating arrays of polydimethlysiloxane (PDMS) microposts of different stiffness and sizes and seeded them with MCF-7 cells...of MCF-7s. Finally, with QPI, we investigated the real-time response of breast- cancer cells to different microenvironmental cues . We thus have...controls this cellular phenotype. To realize this goal, we had proposed to use 3D super-resolution microscopy to visualize how individual breast CaSCs

  14. A Cost-Effective Method to Assemble Biomimetic 3D Cell Culture Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Sabreen; El-Badri, Nagwa; El-Mokhtaar, Mohamed; Al-Mofty, Saif; Farghaly, Mohamed; Ayman, Radwa; Habib, Dina; Mousa, Noha

    2016-01-01

    Developing effective stem cell based therapies requires the design of complex in vitro culture systems for more accurate representation of the stem cell niche. Attempts to improve conventional cell culture platforms include the use of biomaterial coated culture plates, sphere culture, microfluidic systems and bioreactors. Most of these platforms are not cost-effective, require industrial technical expertise to fabricate, and remain too simplistic compared to the physiological cell niche. The human amniotic membrane (hAM) has been used successfully in clinical grafting applications due to its unique biological composition and regenerative properties. In this study, we present a combinatorial platform that integrates the hAM with biomolecular, topographic and mechanical cues in one versatile model. Methods We utilized the hAM to provide the biological and the three dimensional (3D) topographic components of the prototype. The 3D nano-roughness of the hAM was characterized using surface electron microscopy and surface image analysis (ImageJ and SurfaceJ). We developed additional macro-scale and micro-scale versions of the platform which provided additional shear stress factors to simulate the fluid dynamics of the in vivo extracellular fluids. Results Three models of varying complexities of the prototype were assembled. A well-defined 3D surface modulation of the hAM in comparable to commercial 3D biomaterial culture substrates was achieved without complex fabrication and with significantly lower cost. Performance of the prototype was demonstrated through culture of primary human umbilical cord mononuclear blood cells (MNCs), human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell line (hBMSC), and human breast cancer tissue. Conclusion This study presents methods of assembling an integrated, flexible and low cost biomimetic cell culture platform for diverse cell culture applications. PMID:27935982

  15. 3D Image-Guided Automatic Pipette Positioning for Single Cell Experiments in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Long, Brian; Li, Lu; Knoblich, Ulf; Zeng, Hongkui; Peng, Hanchuan

    2015-01-01

    We report a method to facilitate single cell, image-guided experiments including in vivo electrophysiology and electroporation. Our method combines 3D image data acquisition, visualization and on-line image analysis with precise control of physical probes such as electrophysiology microelectrodes in brain tissue in vivo. Adaptive pipette positioning provides a platform for future advances in automated, single cell in vivo experiments. PMID:26689553

  16. Migration in action: profiling border cells.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Heinrich

    2006-04-01

    Acquiring the ability to migrate is essential for cells taking part in many developmental and disease processes. Two studies in this issue of Developmental Cell use gene expression profiling of purified border cells from the Drosophila ovary to characterize the molecular changes required in cells to initiate migration in vivo. Their results offer interesting new insights into a moving cell's physiology.

  17. Cell type-specific adaptation of cellular and nuclear volume in micro-engineered 3D environments.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Alexandra M; Klein, Franziska; Gudzenko, Tetyana; Richter, Benjamin; Striebel, Thomas; Wundari, Bayu G; Autenrieth, Tatjana J; Wegener, Martin; Franz, Clemens M; Bastmeyer, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Bio-functionalized three-dimensional (3D) structures fabricated by direct laser writing (DLW) are structurally and mechanically well-defined and ideal for systematically investigating the influence of three-dimensionality and substrate stiffness on cell behavior. Here, we show that different fibroblast-like and epithelial cell lines maintain normal proliferation rates and form functional cell-matrix contacts in DLW-fabricated 3D scaffolds of different mechanics and geometry. Furthermore, the molecular composition of cell-matrix contacts forming in these 3D micro-environments and under conventional 2D culture conditions is identical, based on the analysis of several marker proteins (paxillin, phospho-paxillin, phospho-focal adhesion kinase, vinculin, β1-integrin). However, fibroblast-like and epithelial cells differ markedly in the way they adapt their total cell and nuclear volumes in 3D environments. While fibroblast-like cell lines display significantly increased cell and nuclear volumes in 3D substrates compared to 2D substrates, epithelial cells retain similar cell and nuclear volumes in 2D and 3D environments. Despite differential cell volume regulation between fibroblasts and epithelial cells in 3D environments, the nucleus-to-cell (N/C) volume ratios remain constant for all cell types and culture conditions. Thus, changes in cell and nuclear volume during the transition from 2D to 3D environments are strongly cell type-dependent, but independent of scaffold stiffness, while cells maintain the N/C ratio regardless of culture conditions.

  18. Cell Counting in Human Endobronchial Biopsies - Disagreement of 2D versus 3D Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Bratu, Vlad A.; Erpenbeck, Veit J.; Fehrenbach, Antonia; Rausch, Tanja; Rittinghausen, Susanne; Krug, Norbert; Hohlfeld, Jens M.; Fehrenbach, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Question Inflammatory cell numbers are important endpoints in clinical studies relying on endobronchial biopsies. Assumption-based bidimensional (2D) counting methods are widely used, although theoretically design-based stereologic three-dimensional (3D) methods alone offer an unbiased quantitative tool. We assessed the method agreement between 2D and 3D counting designs in practice when applied to identical samples in parallel. Materials and Methods Biopsies from segmental bronchi were collected from healthy non-smokers (n = 7) and smokers (n = 7), embedded and sectioned exhaustively. Systematic uniform random samples were immunohistochemically stained for macrophages (CD68) and T-lymphocytes (CD3), respectively. In identical fields of view, cell numbers per volume unit (NV) were assessed using the physical disector (3D), and profiles per area unit (NA) were counted (2D). For CD68+ cells, profiles with and without nucleus were separately recorded. In order to enable a direct comparison of the two methods, the zero-dimensional CD68+/CD3+-ratio was calculated for each approach. Method agreement was tested by Bland-Altmann analysis. Results In both groups, mean CD68+/CD3+ ratios for NV and NA were significantly different (non-smokers: 0.39 and 0.68, p<0.05; smokers: 0.49 and 1.68, p<0.05). When counting only nucleated CD68+ profiles, mean ratios obtained by 2D and 3D counting were similar, but the regression-based Bland-Altmann analysis indicated a bias of the 2D ratios proportional to their magnitude. This magnitude dependent deviation differed between the two groups. Conclusions 2D counts of cell and nuclear profiles introduce a variable size-dependent bias throughout the measurement range. Because the deviation between the 3D and 2D data was different in the two groups, it precludes establishing a ‘universal conversion formula’. PMID:24663339

  19. A 3D printed nano bone matrix for characterization of breast cancer cell and osteoblast interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Castro, Nathan J.; Cui, Haitao; Zhou, Xuan; Boualam, Benchaa; McGrane, Robert; Glazer, Robert I.; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-08-01

    Bone metastasis is one of the most prevalent complications of late-stage breast cancer, in which the native bone matrix components, including osteoblasts, are intimately involved in tumor progression. The development of a successful in vitro model would greatly facilitate understanding the underlying mechanism of breast cancer bone invasion as well as provide a tool for effective discovery of novel therapeutic strategies. In the current study, we fabricated a series of in vitro bone matrices composed of a polyethylene glycol hydrogel and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite of varying concentrations to mimic the native bone microenvironment for the investigation of breast cancer bone metastasis. A stereolithography-based three-dimensional (3D) printer was used to fabricate the bone matrices with precisely controlled architecture. The interaction between breast cancer cells and osteoblasts was investigated in the optimized bone matrix. Using a Transwell® system to separate the two cell lines, breast cancer cells inhibited osteoblast proliferation, while osteoblasts stimulated breast cancer cell growth, whereas, both cell lines increased IL-8 secretion. Breast cancer cells co-cultured with osteoblasts within the 3D bone matrix formed multi-cellular spheroids in comparison to two-dimensional monolayers. These findings validate the use of our 3D printed bone matrices as an in vitro metastasis model, and highlights their potential for investigating breast cancer bone metastasis.

  20. Anticancer Drug Camptothecin Test in 3D Hydrogel Networks with HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jun; Susan Sun, Xiuzhi; Yang, Zhilong; Cao, Shuai

    2017-01-01

    Development of a biomimetic 3D culture system for drug screening is necessary to fully understand the in vivo environment. Previously, a self-assembling peptide hydrogel has been reported; the hydrogel exhibited physiological properties superior to a 3D cell culture matrix. In this work, further research using H9e hydrogel with HeLa cells was carried out considering H9e hydrogel’s interaction with camptothecin, a hydrophobic drug. According to AFM images, a PGworks solution triggered H9e hydrogel fiber aggregation and forms a 3D matrix suitable for cell culture. Dynamic rheological studies showed that camptothecin was encapsulated within the hydrogel network concurrently with peptide self-assembly without permanently destroying the hydrogel’s architecture and remodeling ability. Fluorescence measurement indicated negligible interaction between the fluorophore part of camptothecin and the hydrogel, especially at concentration 0.25 and 0.5 wt%. Using a dialysis method, we found that H9e hydrogel could not significantly inhibit the diffusion of camptothecin encapsulated inside the hydrogel matrix. In the cell culture experiment, HeLa cells were simultaneously embedded in the H9e hydrogel with the initialization of hydrogelation. Most importantly, cell viability data after camptothecin treatment showed responses that were drug-dose dependent but unaffected by the H9e hydrogel concentration, indicating that the hydrogel did not inhibit the drug. PMID:28145436

  1. 3D cell culture: a review of current approaches and techniques.

    PubMed

    Haycock, John W

    2011-01-01

    Cell culture in two dimensions has been routinely and diligently undertaken in thousands of laboratories worldwide for the past four decades. However, the culture of cells in two dimensions is arguably primitive and does not reproduce the anatomy or physiology of a tissue for informative or useful study. Creating a third dimension for cell culture is clearly more relevant, but requires a multidisciplinary approach and multidisciplinary expertise. When entering the third dimension, investigators need to consider the design of scaffolds for supporting the organisation of cells or the use of bioreactors for controlling nutrient and waste product exchange. As 3D culture systems become more mature and relevant to human and animal physiology, the ability to design and develop co-cultures becomes possible as does the ability to integrate stem cells. The primary objectives for developing 3D cell culture systems vary widely - and range from engineering tissues for clinical delivery through to the development of models for drug screening. The intention of this review is to provide a general overview of the common approaches and techniques for designing 3D culture models.

  2. Defining an optimal surface chemistry for pluripotent stem cell culture in 2D and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonca, Michael R., Jr.

    Surface chemistry is critical for growing pluripotent stem cells in an undifferentiated state. There is great potential to engineer the surface chemistry at the nanoscale level to regulate stem cell adhesion. However, the challenge is to identify the optimal surface chemistry of the substrata for ES cell attachment and maintenance. Using a high-throughput polymerization and screening platform, a chemically defined, synthetic polymer grafted coating that supports strong attachment and high expansion capacity of pluripotent stem cells has been discovered using mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells as a model system. This optimal substrate, N-[3-(Dimethylamino)propyl] methacrylamide (DMAPMA) that is grafted on 2D synthetic poly(ether sulfone) (PES) membrane, sustains the self-renewal of ES cells (up to 7 passages). DMAPMA supports cell attachment of ES cells through integrin beta1 in a RGD-independent manner and is similar to another recently reported polymer surface. Next, DMAPMA has been able to be transferred to 3D by grafting to synthetic, polymeric, PES fibrous matrices through both photo-induced and plasma-induced polymerization. These 3D modified fibers exhibited higher cell proliferation and greater expression of pluripotency markers of mouse ES cells than 2D PES membranes. Our results indicated that desirable surfaces in 2D can be scaled to 3D and that both surface chemistry and structural dimension strongly influence the growth and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. Lastly, the feasibility of incorporating DMAPMA into a widely used natural polymer, alginate, has been tested. Novel adhesive alginate hydrogels have been successfully synthesized by either direct polymerization of DMAPMA and methacrylic acid blended with alginate, or photo-induced DMAPMA polymerization on alginate nanofibrous hydrogels. In particular, DMAPMA-coated alginate hydrogels support strong ES cell attachment, exhibiting a concentration dependency of DMAPMA. This research provides a

  3. 3D nanochannel electroporation for high-throughput cell transfection with high uniformity and dosage control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Lingqian; Bertani, Paul; Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Yang, Zhaogang; Chen, Feng; Chiang, Chiling; Malkoc, Veysi; Kuang, Tairong; Gao, Keliang; Lee, L. James; Lu, Wu

    2015-12-01

    Of great interest to modern medicine and biomedical research is the ability to inject individual target cells with the desired genes or drug molecules. Some advances in cell electroporation allow for high throughput, high cell viability, or excellent dosage control, yet no platform is available for the combination of all three. In an effort to solve this problem, here we show a ``3D nano-channel electroporation (NEP) chip'' on a silicon platform designed to meet these three criteria. This NEP chip can simultaneously deliver the desired molecules into 40 000 cells per cm2 on the top surface of the device. Each 650 nm pore aligns to a cell and can be used to deliver extremely small biological elements to very large plasmids (>10 kbp). When compared to conventional bulk electroporation (BEP), the NEP chip shows a 20 fold improvement in dosage control and uniformity, while still maintaining high cell viability (>90%) even in cells such as cardiac cells which are characteristically difficult to transfect. This high-throughput 3D NEP system provides an innovative and medically valuable platform with uniform and reliable cellular transfection, allowing for a steady supply of healthy, engineered cells.Of great interest to modern medicine and biomedical research is the ability to inject individual target cells with the desired genes or drug molecules. Some advances in cell electroporation allow for high throughput, high cell viability, or excellent dosage control, yet no platform is available for the combination of all three. In an effort to solve this problem, here we show a ``3D nano-channel electroporation (NEP) chip'' on a silicon platform designed to meet these three criteria. This NEP chip can simultaneously deliver the desired molecules into 40 000 cells per cm2 on the top surface of the device. Each 650 nm pore aligns to a cell and can be used to deliver extremely small biological elements to very large plasmids (>10 kbp). When compared to conventional bulk

  4. Polymer-Based Mesh as Supports for Multi-layered 3D Cell Culture and Assays

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Karen A.; Park, Kyeng Min; Mosadegh, Bobak; Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Mazzeo, Aaron; Ngo, Phil M.; Whitesides, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture systems can mimic certain aspects of the cellular microenvironment found in vivo, but generation, analysis and imaging of current model systems for 3D cellular constructs and tissues remain challenging. This work demonstrates a 3D culture system – Cells-in-Gels-in-Mesh (CiGiM) – that uses stacked sheets of polymer-based mesh to support cells embedded in gels to form tissue-like constructs; the stacked sheets can be disassembled by peeling the sheets apart to analyze cultured cells—layer-by-layer—within the construct. The mesh sheets leave openings large enough for light to pass through with minimal scattering, and thus allowing multiple options for analysis—(i) using straightforward analysis by optical light microscopy, (ii) by high-resolution analysis with fluorescence microscopy, or (iii) with a fluorescence gel scanner. The sheets can be patterned into separate zones with paraffin film-based decals, in order to conduct multiple experiments in parallel; the paraffin-based decal films also block lateral diffusion of oxygen effectively. CiGiM simplifies the generation and analysis of 3D culture without compromising throughput, and quality of the data collected: it is especially useful in experiments that require control of oxygen levels, and isolation of adjacent wells in a multi-zone format. PMID:24095253

  5. Behaviour of gravisensitive cells on 2D and 3D clinostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauch, Sebastian M.; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Seibt, Dieter; Schuber, Marianne; Hader, Donat-P.

    2005-08-01

    2D and 3D clinostats are widely applied to study the influence of simulated microgravity on different kinds of organisms and cell cultures [1]. To critically evaluate the results achieved (functional weightlessness, omnilateral gravistimulation or other side effects such as strong mechanical disturbances) a comparison between the applied simulation methods and real microgravity is necessary. In a first approach, the swimming behavior of Euglena gracilis, a "professional gravi-sensing" unicellular freshwater flagellate, was observed under 2D and 3D clinostat conditions as well as under real microgravity during a TEXUS sounding rocket flight.According to current theory Euglena perceives the gravity vector by stimulation of mechanosensitive channels: the cell mass, which is denser than the surrounding medium, exerts pressure onto the lower membrane and the resulting gated calcium influx modulates the beating pattern of the flagella [4].A changed influence of gravity of the cells can be directly visualized by changes in their orientation with respect to gravity (gravitaxis).

  6. A Method for Sectioning and Immunohistochemical Analysis of Stem Cell-Derived 3-D Organoids.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Luke A; Beebe, David C; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A

    2016-05-12

    This unit describes a protocol for embedding, sectioning, and immunocytochemical analysis of pluripotent stem cell-derived 3-D organoids. Specifically, we describe a method to embed iPSC-derived retinal cups in low-melt agarose, acquire thick sections using a vibratome tissue slicer, and perform immunohistochemical analysis. This method includes an approach for antibody labeling that minimizes the amount of antibody needed for individual experiments and that utilizes large-volume washing to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, allowing for clean, high-resolution imaging of developing cell types. The universal methods described can be employed regardless of the type of pluripotent stem cell used and 3-D organoid generated. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. 3D Printed Trileaflet Valve Conduits Using Biological Hydrogels and Human Valve Interstitial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Bin; Kapetanovic, Edi; Hockaday, Laura A.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering has great potential to provide a functional de novo living valve replacement capable of integration with host tissue and growth. Among various valve conduit fabrication techniques, 3D bioprinting enables deposition of cells and hydrogels into 3D constructs with anatomical geometry and heterogeneous mechanical properties. Successful translation of this approach is however constrained by the dearth of printable and biocompatible hydrogel materials. Furthermore, it is not known how human valve cells respond to these printed environments. In this study, we develop 3D printable formulations of hybrid hydrogels based on methacrylated hyaluronic acid (Me-HA) and methacrylated gelatin (Me-Gel), and utilize them to bioprint heart valve conduits containing encapsulated human aortic valvular interstitial cells (HAVIC). Increasing Me-Gel concentration resulted in lower stiffness and higher viscosity, facilitated cell spreading, and better maintained HAVIC fibroblastic phenotype. Bioprinting accuracy was dependent upon the relative concentrations of Me-Gel and Me-HA, but when optimized enabled the fabrication of a trileaflet valve shape accurate to the original design. HAVIC encapsulated within bioprinted heart valves maintained high viability, and remodeled the initial matrix by depositing collagen and glyosaminoglycans. These findings represent the first rational design of bioprinted trileaflet valve hydrogels that regulate encapsulated human VIC behavior. The use of anatomically accurate living valve scaffolds through bioprinting may accelerate our understanding of physiological valve cell interactions and our progress towards de novo living valve replacements. PMID:24334142

  8. 3D cell culture systems modeling tumor growth determinants in cancer target discovery.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Claudio R; Zimmermann, Miriam; Agarkova, Irina; Kelm, Jens M; Krek, Wilhelm

    2014-04-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity of cancer cells, cell biological context, heterotypic crosstalk and the microenvironment are key determinants of the multistep process of tumor development. They sign responsible, to a significant extent, for the limited response and resistance of cancer cells to molecular-targeted therapies. Better functional knowledge of the complex intra- and intercellular signaling circuits underlying communication between the different cell types populating a tumor tissue and of the systemic and local factors that shape the tumor microenvironment is therefore imperative. Sophisticated 3D multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) systems provide an emerging tool to model the phenotypic and cellular heterogeneity as well as microenvironmental aspects of in vivo tumor growth. In this review we discuss the cellular, chemical and physical factors contributing to zonation and cellular crosstalk within tumor masses. On this basis, we further describe 3D cell culture technologies for growth of MCTS as advanced tools for exploring molecular tumor growth determinants and facilitating drug discovery efforts. We conclude with a synopsis on technological aspects for on-line analysis and post-processing of 3D MCTS models.

  9. Thermo-responsive non-woven scaffolds for "smart" 3D cell culture.

    PubMed

    Rossouw, Claire L; Chetty, Avashnee; Moolman, Francis Sean; Birkholtz, Lyn-Marie; Hoppe, Heinrich; Mancama, Dalu T

    2012-08-01

    The thermo-responsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) has received widespread attention for its in vitro application in the non-invasive, non-destructive release of adherent cells on two dimensional surfaces. In this study, 3D non-woven scaffolds fabricated from poly(propylene) (PP), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), and nylon that had been grafted with PNIPAAm were tested for their ability to support the proliferation and subsequent thermal release of HC04 and HepG2 hepatocytes. Hepatocyte viability and proliferation were estimated using the Alamar Blue assay and Hoechst 33258 total DNA quantification. The assays revealed that the pure and grafted non-woven scaffolds maintained the hepatocytes within the matrix and promoted 3D proliferation comparable to that of the commercially available Algimatrix™ alginate scaffold. Albumin production and selected cytochrome P450 genes expression was found to be superior in cells growing on pure and grafted non-woven PP scaffolds as compared to cells grown as a 2D monolayer. Two scaffolds, namely, PP-g-PNIPAAm-A and PP-g-PNIPAAm-B were identified as having far superior thermal release capabilities; releasing the majority of the cells from the matrices within 2 h. This is the first report for the development of 3D non-woven, thermo-responsive scaffolds able to release cells from the matrix without the use of any enzymatic assistance or scaffold degradation.

  10. Melanin Transfer in Human 3D Skin Equivalents Generated Exclusively from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gledhill, Karl; Guo, Zongyou; Umegaki-Arao, Noriko; Higgins, Claire A.; Itoh, Munenari; Christiano, Angela M.

    2015-01-01

    The current utility of 3D skin equivalents is limited by the fact that existing models fail to recapitulate the cellular complexity of human skin. They often contain few cell types and no appendages, in part because many cells found in the skin are difficult to isolate from intact tissue and cannot be expanded in culture. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) present an avenue by which we can overcome this issue due to their ability to be differentiated into multiple cell types in the body and their unlimited growth potential. We previously reported generation of the first human 3D skin equivalents from iPSC-derived fibroblasts and iPSC-derived keratinocytes, demonstrating that iPSCs can provide a foundation for modeling a complex human organ such as skin. Here, we have increased the complexity of this model by including additional iPSC-derived melanocytes. Epidermal melanocytes, which are largely responsible for skin pigmentation, represent the second most numerous cell type found in normal human epidermis and as such represent a logical next addition. We report efficient melanin production from iPSC-derived melanocytes and transfer within an entirely iPSC-derived epidermal-melanin unit and generation of the first functional human 3D skin equivalents made from iPSC-derived fibroblasts, keratinocytes and melanocytes. PMID:26308443

  11. Focal Adhesion-Independent Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Paluch, Ewa K; Aspalter, Irene M; Sixt, Michael

    2016-10-06

    Cell migration is central to a multitude of physiological processes, including embryonic development, immune surveillance, and wound healing, and deregulated migration is key to cancer dissemination. Decades of investigations have uncovered many of the molecular and physical mechanisms underlying cell migration. Together with protrusion extension and cell body retraction, adhesion to the substrate via specific focal adhesion points has long been considered an essential step in cell migration. Although this is true for cells moving on two-dimensional substrates, recent studies have demonstrated that focal adhesions are not required for cells moving in three dimensions, in which confinement is sufficient to maintain a cell in contact with its substrate. Here, we review the investigations that have led to challenging the requirement of specific adhesions for migration, discuss the physical mechanisms proposed for cell body translocation during focal adhesion-independent migration, and highlight the remaining open questions for the future.

  12. 3D microfilter device for viable circulating tumor cell (CTC) enrichment from blood.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Siyang; Lin, Henry K; Lu, Bo; Williams, Anthony; Datar, Ram; Cote, Richard J; Tai, Yu-Chong

    2011-02-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells has emerged as a promising minimally invasive diagnostic and prognostic tool for patients with metastatic cancers. We report a novel three dimensional microfilter device that can enrich viable circulating tumor cells from blood. This device consists of two layers of parylene membrane with pores and gap precisely defined with photolithography. The positions of the pores are shifted between the top and bottom membranes. The bottom membrane supports captured cells and minimize the stress concentration on cell membrane and sustain cell viability during filtration. Viable cell capture on device was investigated with scanning electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and immunofluorescent staining using model systems of cultured tumor cells spiked in blood or saline. The paper presents and validates this new 3D microfiltration concept for circulation tumor cell enrichment application. The device provides a highly valuable tool for assessing and characterizing viable enriched circulating tumor cells in both research and clinical settings.

  13. The application of low shear modeled microgravity to 3-D cell biology and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Navran, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    The practice of cell culture has been virtually unchanged for 100 years. Until recently, life scientists have had to content themselves with two-dimensional cell culture technology. Clearly, living creatures are not constructed in two dimensions and thus it has become widely recognized that in vitro culture systems must become three dimensional to correctly model in vivo biology. Attempts to modify conventional 2-D culture technology to accommodate 3-D cell growth such as embedding cells in extracellular matrix have demonstrated the superiority of concept. Nevertheless, there are serious drawbacks to this approach including limited mass transport and lack of scalability. Recently, a new cell culture technology developed at NASA to study the effects of microgravity on cells has emerged to solve many of the problems of 3-D cell culture. The technology, the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) is a single axis clinostat consisting of a fluid-filled, cylindrical, horizontally rotating culture vessel. Cells placed in this environment are suspended by the resolution of the gravitational, centrifugal and Coriolis forces with extremely low mechanical shear. These conditions, which have been called "low shear modeled microgravity", enable cells to assemble into tissue-like aggregates with high mass transport of nutrients, oxygen and wastes. Examples of the use of the RWV for basic cell biology research and tissue engineering applications are discussed.

  14. Effects of extracellular fiber architecture on cell membrane shear stress in a 3D fibrous matrix.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, John A; Boschetti, Federica; Swartz, Melody A

    2007-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow has been shown to affect the organization and behavior of cells in 3D environments in vivo and in vitro, yet the forces driving such responses are not clear. Due to the complex architecture of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the difficulty of measuring fluid flow near cells embedded in it, the levels of shear stress experienced by cells in this environment are typically estimated using bulk-averaged matrix parameters such as hydraulic permeability. While this is useful for estimating average stresses, it cannot yield insight into how local matrix fiber architecture-which is cell-controlled in the immediate pericellular environment-affects the local stresses imposed on the cell surface. To address this, we used computational fluid dynamics to study flow through an idealized mesh constructed of a cubic lattice of fibers simulating a typical in vitro collagen gel. We found that, in such high porosity matrices, the fibers strongly affect the flow fields near the cell, with peak shear stresses up to five times higher than those predicted by the Brinkman equation. We also found that minor remodeling of the fibers near the cell surface had major effects on the shear stress profile on the cell. These findings demonstrate the importance of fiber architecture to the fluid forces on a cell embedded in a 3D matrix, and also show how small modifications in the local ECM can lead to large changes in the mechanical environment of the cell.

  15. Transplantation stimulates interstitial cell migration in hydra

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, T.; David, C.N.; Bosch, T.C. )

    1990-04-01

    Migration of interstitial cells and nerve cell precursors was analyzed in Hydra magnipapillata and Hydra vulgaris (formerly Hydra attenuata). Axial grafts were made between ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled donor and unlabeled host tissue. Migration of labeled cells into the unlabeled half was followed for 4 days. The results indicate that the rate of migration was initially high and then slowed on Days 2-4. Regrafting fresh donor tissue on Days 2-4 maintained high levels of migration. Thus, migration appears to be stimulated by the grafting procedure itself.

  16. Random versus directionally persistent cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Ryan J.; Doyle, Andrew D.; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2009-01-01

    Directional migration is an important component of cell motility. Although the basic mechanisms of random cell movement are well characterized, no single model explains the complex regulation of directional migration. Multiple factors operate at each step of cell migration to stabilize lamellipodia and maintain directional migration. Factors such as topography of the extracellular matrix, the cellular polarity machinery, receptor signalling, integrin trafficking and co-receptors, and actin–myosin contraction converge on regulation of the Rho family of GTPases and control of lamellipodial protrusions to promote directional migration. PMID:19603038

  17. The influence of printing parameters on cell survival rate and printability in microextrusion-based 3D cell printing technology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Li, Yang; Mao, Shuangshuang; Sun, Wei; Yao, Rui

    2015-11-02

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell printing technology has provided a versatile methodology to fabricate cell-laden tissue-like constructs and in vitro tissue/pathological models for tissue engineering, drug testing and screening applications. However, it still remains a challenge to print bioinks with high viscoelasticity to achieve long-term stable structure and maintain high cell survival rate after printing at the same time. In this study, we systematically investigated the influence of 3D cell printing parameters, i.e. composition and concentration of bioink, holding temperature and holding time, on the printability and cell survival rate in microextrusion-based 3D cell printing technology. Rheological measurements were utilized to characterize the viscoelasticity of gelatin-based bioinks. Results demonstrated that the bioink viscoelasticity was increased when increasing the bioink concentration, increasing holding time and decreasing holding temperature below gelation temperature. The decline of cell survival rate after 3D cell printing process was observed when increasing the viscoelasticity of the gelatin-based bioinks. However, different process parameter combinations would result in the similar rheological characteristics and thus showed similar cell survival rate after 3D bioprinting process. On the other hand, bioink viscoelasticity should also reach a certain point to ensure good printability and shape fidelity. At last, we proposed a protocol for 3D bioprinting of temperature-sensitive gelatin-based hydrogel bioinks with both high cell survival rate and good printability. This research would be useful for biofabrication researchers to adjust the 3D bioprinting process parameters quickly and as a referable template for designing new bioinks.

  18. A 3-D cardiac muscle construct for exploring adult marrow stem cell based myocardial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Valarmathi, Mani T; Goodwin, Richard L; Fuseler, John W; Davis, Jeffrey M; Yost, Michael J; Potts, Jay D

    2010-04-01

    Adult bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are capable of differentiating into cardiomyocyte-like cells in vitro and contribute to myocardial regeneration in vivo. Consequently, BMSCs may potentially play a vital role in cardiac repair and regeneration. However, this concept has been limited by inadequate and inconsistent differentiation of BMSCs into cardiomyocytes along with poor survival and integration of neo-cardiomyocytes after implantation into ischemic myocardium. In order to overcome these barriers and to explore adult stem cell based myocardial regeneration, we have developed an in vitro model of three-dimensional (3-D) cardiac muscle using rat ventricular embryonic cardiomyocytes (ECMs) and BMSCs. When ECMs and BMSCs were seeded sequentially onto a 3-D tubular scaffold engineered from topographically aligned type I collagen-fibers and cultured in basal medium for 7, 14, 21, or 28 days, the maturation and co-differentiation into a cardiomyocyte lineage was observed. Phenotypic induction was characterized at morphological, immunological, biochemical and molecular levels. The observed expression of transcripts coding for cardiomyocyte phenotypic markers and the immunolocalization of cardiomyogenic lineage-associated proteins revealed typical expression patterns of neo-cardiomyogenesis. At the biochemical level differentiating cells exhibited appropriate metabolic activity and at the ultrastructural level myofibrillar and sarcomeric organization were indicative of an immature phenotype. Our 3-D co-culture system sustains the ECMs in vitro continuum of differentiation process and simultaneously induces the maturation and differentiation of BMSCs into cardiomyocyte-like cells. Thus, this novel 3-D co-culture system provides a useful in vitro model to investigate the functional role and interplay of developing ECMs and BMSCs during cardiomyogenic differentiation.

  19. Quantitative 3D Tracing of Gene-delivery Viral Vectors in Human Cells and Animal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ping-Jie; Li, Chengwen; Neumann, Aaron; Samulski, R Jude

    2012-01-01

    Trafficking through a variety of cellular structures and organelles is essential for the interaction between gene-delivery vectors (i.e., adeno-associated virus (AAV) and liposomes) and host cells/tissues. Here, we present a method of computer-assisted quantitative 3D biodistribution microscopy that samples the whole population of fluorescently-labeled vectors and document their trafficking routes. Using AAV as a working model, we first experimentally defined numerical parameters for the singularity of Cy5-labeled particles by combining confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We then developed a robust approach that integrates single-particle fluorescence imaging with 3D deconvolution and isosurface rendering to quantitate viral distribution and trafficking in human cells as well as animal tissues at the single-particle level. Using this quantitative method, we uncovered an as yet uncharacterized rate-limiting step during viral cell entry, while delineating nuclear accumulation of virions during the first 8 hours postinfection. Further, our studies revealed for the first time that following intramuscular injection, AAV spread progressively across muscle tissues through endomysium between myofibers instead of traversing through target cells. Such 3D resolution and quantitative dissection of vector–host interactions at the subcellular level should significantly improve our ability to resolve trafficking mechanisms of gene-delivery particles and facilitate the development of enhanced viral vectors. PMID:22108857

  20. n-ZnO/p-Si 3D heterojunction solar cells in Si holey arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio; Fukata, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    A wafer-scale, low-cost solar cell based on n-ZnO/p-Si 3D heterojunction arrays on holey Si substrates has been fabricated. This device shows a power-conversion efficiency of 1.2% and high photosensitivity. The present n-ZnO/p-Si heterojunction architectures are envisaged as potentially valuable candidates for next-generation photovoltaics.A wafer-scale, low-cost solar cell based on n-ZnO/p-Si 3D heterojunction arrays on holey Si substrates has been fabricated. This device shows a power-conversion efficiency of 1.2% and high photosensitivity. The present n-ZnO/p-Si heterojunction architectures are envisaged as potentially valuable candidates for next-generation photovoltaics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11752e

  1. A Tunable Scaffold of Microtubular Graphite for 3D Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Aerographite (AG) is a novel carbon-based material that exists as a self-supportive 3D network of interconnected hollow microtubules. It can be synthesized in a variety of architectures tailored by the growth conditions. This flexibility in creating structures presents interesting bioengineering possibilities such as the generation of an artificial extracellular matrix. Here we have explored the feasibility and potential of AG as a scaffold for 3D cell growth employing cyclic RGD (cRGD) peptides coupled to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) conjugated phospholipids for surface functionalization to promote specific adhesion of fibroblast cells. Successful growth and invasion of the bulk material was followed over a period of 4 days. PMID:27258400

  2. Laser irradiated fluorescent perfluorocarbon microparticles in 2-D and 3-D breast cancer cell models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Chengcheng; Wang, Long; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Yan; Hu, Yihe; Peng, Qinghai

    2017-03-01

    Perfluorocarbon (PFC) droplets were studied as new generation ultrasound contrast agents via acoustic or optical droplet vaporization (ADV or ODV). Little is known about the ODV irradiated vaporization mechanisms of PFC-microparticle complexs and the stability of the new bubbles produced. In this study, fluorescent perfluorohexane (PFH) poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles were used as a model to study the process of particle vaporization and bubble stability following excitation in two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) cell models. We observed localization of the fluorescent agent on the microparticle coating material initially and after vaporization under fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, the stability and growth dynamics of the newly created bubbles were observed for 11 min following vaporization. The particles were co-cultured with 2-D cells to form 3-D spheroids and could be vaporized even when encapsulated within the spheroids via laser irradiation, which provides an effective basis for further work.

  3. Architectural proteins: Regulators of 3D genome organization in cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Díaz, Elena; Corces, Victor G.

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between alterations in chromatin structure and changes in gene expression during cell differentiation has served as a paradigm to understand the link between genome organization and function. Yet the factors involved and the mechanisms by which the three-dimensional organization of the nucleus is established remain poorly understood. The use of Chromosome Conformation-Capture (3C) based approaches has resulted in a new appreciation of the role of architectural proteins in the establishment of 3D genome organization. Architectural proteins orchestrate higher-order chromatin organization through the establishment of interactions between regulatory elements across multiple spatial scales. The regulation of these proteins, their interaction with DNA, and their co occurrence in the genome, may be responsible for the plasticity of 3D-chromatin architecture that dictates cell and time-specific blueprints of gene expression. PMID:25218583

  4. Next-generation regenerative medicine: organogenesis from stem cells in 3D culture.

    PubMed

    Sasai, Yoshiki

    2013-05-02

    The behavior of stem cells, when they work collectively, can be much more sophisticated than one might expect from their individual programming. This Perspective covers recent discoveries about the dynamic patterning and structural self-formation of complex organ buds in 3D stem cell culture, including the generation of various neuroectodermal and endodermal tissues. For some tissues, epithelial-mesenchymal interactions can also be manipulated in coculture to guide organogenesis. This new area of stem cell research-the spatiotemporal control of dynamic cellular interactions-will open a new avenue for next-generation regenerative medicine.

  5. Determination of key parameters of SEU occurrence using 3-D full cell SRAM simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, P.; Palau, J.M.; Bruguier, G.; Tavernier, C.; Ecoffet, R.; Gasiot, J.

    1999-12-01

    A 3-D entire SRAM cell, based on a 0.35-{micro}m current CMOS technology, is simulated in this work with a DEVICE simulator. The transient current, resulting from a heavy ion strike in the most sensitive region of the cell, is studied as a function of the LET value, the cell layout and the ion penetration depth. A definition of the critical charge is proposed and two new methods are presented to compute this basic amount of charge only using SPICE simulations. Numerical applications are performed with two different generations of submicron CMOS technologies, including the determination of the sensitive thicknesses.

  6. Modulus-regulated 3D-cell proliferation in an injectable self-healing hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongsan; Zhang, Yingwei; Shi, Feng; Tao, Lei; Wei, Yen; Wang, Xing

    2017-01-01

    Cell therapy has attracted wide attention among researchers in biomaterial and medical areas. As a carrier, hydrogels that could keep high viability of the embedded cells have been developed. However, few researches were conducted on 3D cell proliferation, a key factor for cell therapy, especially after injection. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time the proliferation regulation of the 3D-embedded L929 cells in a modulus-tunable and injectable self-healing hydrogel before and after injection without adding specific growth factor. The cells showed a stiffness-dependent proliferation to grow faster in higher stiffness hydrogels. The proliferating rates of the encapsulated cells before and after injection were quantified, and the shearing force as a possible negative influence factor was discussed, suggesting the both internal property of the hydrogel and injection process are critical for further practical applications. Due to the high operability and good biocompatibility, this injectable self-healing hydrogel can be a promising carrier for cell therapy.

  7. Controlled Positioning of Cells in Biomaterials—Approaches Towards 3D Tissue Printing

    PubMed Central

    Wüst, Silke; Müller, Ralph; Hofmann, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Current tissue engineering techniques have various drawbacks: they often incorporate uncontrolled and imprecise scaffold geometries, whereas the current conventional cell seeding techniques result mostly in random cell placement rather than uniform cell distribution. For the successful reconstruction of deficient tissue, new material engineering approaches have to be considered to overcome current limitations. An emerging method to produce complex biological products including cells or extracellular matrices in a controlled manner is a process called bioprinting or biofabrication, which effectively uses principles of rapid prototyping combined with cell-loaded biomaterials, typically hydrogels. 3D tissue printing is an approach to manufacture functional tissue layer-by-layer that could be transplanted in vivo after production. This method is especially advantageous for stem cells since a controlled environment can be created to influence cell growth and differentiation. Using printed tissue for biotechnological and pharmacological needs like in vitro drug-testing may lead to a revolution in the pharmaceutical industry since animal models could be partially replaced by biofabricated tissues mimicking human physiology and pathology. This would not only be a major advancement concerning rising ethical issues but would also have a measureable impact on economical aspects in this industry of today, where animal studies are very labor-intensive and therefore costly. In this review, current controlled material and cell positioning techniques are introduced highlighting approaches towards 3D tissue printing. PMID:24956301

  8. Controlled Positioning of Cells in Biomaterials-Approaches Towards 3D Tissue Printing.

    PubMed

    Wüst, Silke; Müller, Ralph; Hofmann, Sandra

    2011-08-04

    Current tissue engineering techniques have various drawbacks: they often incorporate uncontrolled and imprecise scaffold geometries, whereas the current conventional cell seeding techniques result mostly in random cell placement rather than uniform cell distribution. For the successful reconstruction of deficient tissue, new material engineering approaches have to be considered to overcome current limitations. An emerging method to produce complex biological products including cells or extracellular matrices in a controlled manner is a process called bioprinting or biofabrication, which effectively uses principles of rapid prototyping combined with cell-loaded biomaterials, typically hydrogels. 3D tissue printing is an approach to manufacture functional tissue layer-by-layer that could be transplanted in vivo after production. This method is especially advantageous for stem cells since a controlled environment can be created to influence cell growth and differentiation. Using printed tissue for biotechnological and pharmacological needs like in vitro drug-testing may lead to a revolution in the pharmaceutical industry since animal models could be partially replaced by biofabricated tissues mimicking human physiology and pathology. This would not only be a major advancement concerning rising ethical issues but would also have a measureable impact on economical aspects in this industry of today, where animal studies are very labor-intensive and therefore costly. In this review, current controlled material and cell positioning techniques are introduced highlighting approaches towards 3D tissue printing.

  9. Monolithic cell counter based on 3D hydrodynamic focusing in microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiè, Petra; Bragheri, Francesca; Osellame, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Hydrodynamic focusing is a powerful technique frequently used in microfluidics that presents a wide range of applications since it allows focusing the sample flowing in the device to a narrow region in the center of the microchannel. In fact thanks to the laminarity of the fluxes in microchannels it is possible to confine the sample solution with a low flow rate by using a sheath flow with a higher flow rate. This in turn allows the flowing of one sample element at a time in the detection region, thus enabling analysis on single particles. Femtosecond laser micromachining is ideally suited to fabricate device integrating full hydrodynamic focusing functionalities thanks to the intrinsic 3D nature of this technique, especially if compared to expensive and complicated lithographic multi-step fabrication processes. Furthermore, because of the possibility to fabricate optical waveguides with the same technology, it is possible to obtain compact optofluidic devices to perform optical analysis of the sample even at the single cell level, as is the case for optical cell stretchers and sorters. In this work we show the fabrication and the fluidic characterization of extremely compact devices having only two inlets for 2D (both in vertical and horizontal planes) as well as full 3D symmetric hydrodynamic focusing. In addition we prove one of the possible application of the hydrodynamic focusing module, by fabricating and validating (both with polystyrene beads and erythrocytes) a monolithic cell counter obtained by integrating optical waveguides in the 3D hydrodynamic focusing device.

  10. Economic 3D-printing approach for transplantation of human stem cell-derived β-like cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiwon; Millman, Jeffrey R

    2016-12-01

    Transplantation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) differentiated into insulin-producing β cells is a regenerative medicine approach being investigated for diabetes cell replacement therapy. This report presents a multifaceted transplantation strategy that combines differentiation into stem cell-derived β (SC-β) cells with 3D printing. By modulating the parameters of a low-cost 3D printer, we created a macroporous device composed of polylactic acid (PLA) that houses SC-β cell clusters within a degradable fibrin gel. Using finite element modeling of cellular oxygen diffusion-consumption and an in vitro culture system that allows for culture of devices at physiological oxygen levels, we identified cluster sizes that avoid severe hypoxia within 3D-printed devices and developed a microwell-based technique for resizing clusters within this range. Upon transplantation into mice, SC-β cell-embedded 3D-printed devices function for 12 weeks, are retrievable, and maintain structural integrity. Here, we demonstrate a novel 3D-printing approach that advances the use of differentiated hPSC for regenerative medicine applications and serves as a platform for future transplantation strategies.

  11. 3D Cell Entrapment as a Function of the Weight Percent of Peptide-Amphiphile Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Carolyn M.; Forster, Colleen L.; Kokkoli, Efrosini

    2015-01-01

    The design of scaffolds which mimic the stiffness, nanofiber structure, and biochemistry of the native extra-cellular matrix (ECM) has been a major objective for the tissue engineering field. Furthermore, mimicking the innate three dimensional (3D) environment of the ECM has been shown to significantly alter cellular response compared to traditional two dimensional (2D) culture. We report the development of a self-assembling, fibronectin-mimetic, peptide-amphiphile nanofiber scaffold for 3D cell culture. To form such a scaffold, 5 mol% of a bioactive PR_g fibronectin-mimetic peptide-amphiphile was mixed with 95 mol% of a diluent peptide-amphiphile (E2) whose purpose was to neutralize electrostatic interactions, increase the gelation kinetics and promote cell survival. Atomic force microscopy verified the fibrilar structure of the gels and the mechanical properties were characterized for various weight percent (wt%) formulations of the 5 mol% PR_g - 95 mol% E2 peptide-amphiphile mixture. The 0.5 wt% formulations had an elastic modulus of 429.0 ± 21.3 Pa while the 1.0 wt% peptide-amphiphile hydrogels had an elastic modulus of 808.6 ± 38.1 Pa. The presence of entrapped cells in the gels decreased the elastic modulus and the decrease was a function of the cell loading. While both formulations supported cell proliferation, the 0.5 wt% gels supported significantly greater NIH3T3/GFP fibroblast cell proliferation throughout the gels than the 1.0 wt% gels. However, compared to the 0.5 wt% formulations, the 1.0 wt% hydrogels promoted greater increase in mRNA expression and production of fibronectin and type IV collagen ECM proteins. This study suggests that this fibronectin-mimetic scaffold holds great promise in the advance of 3D culture applications and cell therapies. PMID:25970351

  12. VA-086 methacrylate gelatine photopolymerizable hydrogels: A parametric study for highly biocompatible 3D cell embedding.

    PubMed

    Occhetta, Paola; Visone, Roberta; Russo, Laura; Cipolla, Laura; Moretti, Matteo; Rasponi, Marco

    2015-06-01

    The ability to replicate in vitro the native extracellular matrix (ECM) features and to control the three-dimensional (3D) cell organization plays a fundamental role in obtaining functional engineered bioconstructs. In tissue engineering (TE) applications, hydrogels have been successfully implied as biomatrices for 3D cell embedding, exhibiting high similarities to the natural ECM and holding easily tunable mechanical properties. In the present study, we characterized a promising photocrosslinking process to generate cell-laden methacrylate gelatin (GelMA) hydrogels in the presence of VA-086 photoinitiator using a ultraviolet LED source. We investigated the influence of prepolymer concentration and light irradiance on mechanical and biomimetic properties of resulting hydrogels. In details, the increasing of gelatin concentration resulted in enhanced rheological properties and shorter polymerization time. We then defined and validated a reliable photopolymerization protocol for cell embedding (1.5% VA-086, LED 2 mW/cm2) within GelMA hydrogels, which demonstrated to support bone marrow stromal cells viability when cultured up to 7 days. Moreover, we showed how different mechanical properties, derived from different crosslinking parameters, strongly influence cell behavior. In conclusion, this protocol can be considered a versatile tool to obtain biocompatible cell-laden hydrogels with properties easily adaptable for different TE applications.

  13. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, N. R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development.

  14. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, N.R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development. PMID:26887292

  15. Limbal melanocytes support limbal epithelial stem cells in 2D and 3D microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Dziasko, Marc A; Tuft, Stephen J; Daniels, Julie T

    2015-09-01

    Human limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs) are essential for the maintenance of the corneal epithelium of the ocular surface. LESCs are located within limbal crypts between the palisades of Vogt in the limbus; the interface between the peripheral cornea and conjunctiva. The limbal crypts have been proposed as a LESC niche owing to their support of epithelial cells, which can form holoclone colonies in vitro. Closely associated with the limbal crypts is a concentrated population of melanocytes. The anatomical location and close proximity to putative LESC suggests that melanocytes might play a role in maintenance of these stem cells in the niche. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of human limbal melanocytes (hLM) to support the expansion of human limbal epithelial cells (LECs) in vitro as an indicator of functional cell-cell interaction. After observing that hLM co-localize with clusters of compact epithelial cells in the native limbal crypts, hLM were isolated from crypt-rich cadaveric limbal biopsies and used as feeders for the culture of LECs. Interestingly, LECs grown on mitotically active hLM were able to generate large epithelial colonies that contained small and compact cells with morphological stem cell characteristics. Immunocytochemistry revealed that LECs expanded on hLM were positive for the expression of the putative stem cell markers CK15, Bmi-1 and p63α and negative for the marker of terminal cell differentiation CK3. LECs and hLM were finally co-cultured on RAFT (real architecture for 3D tissue) collagen tissue equivalents. In 3D co-cultures, hLM promoted multi-layering of the epithelial sheet in which basal cells were maintained in an undifferentiated state. Taken together, these observations suggest melanocytes could play an important role in the maintenance of LESCs in the native human limbal stem cell niche.

  16. Potential and limitations of microscopy and Raman spectroscopy for live-cell analysis of 3D cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Charwat, Verena; Schütze, Karin; Holnthoner, Wolfgang; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Gangnus, Rainer; Hofbauer, Pablo; Hoffmann, Claudia; Angres, Brigitte; Kasper, Cornelia

    2015-07-10

    Today highly complex 3D cell culture formats that closely mimic the in vivo situation are increasingly available. Despite their wide use, the development of analytical methods and tools that can work within the depth of 3D-tissue constructs lags behind. In order to get the most information from a 3D cell sample, adequate and reliable assays are required. However, the majority of tools and methods used today have been originally designed for 2D cell cultures and translation to a 3D environment is in general not trivial. Ideally, an analytical method should be non-invasive and allow for repeated observation of living cells in order to detect dynamic changes in individual cells within the 3D cell culture. Although well-established laser confocal microscopy can be used for these purposes, this technique has serious limitations including penetration depth and availability. Focusing on two relevant analytical methods for live-cell monitoring, we discuss the current challenges of analyzing living 3D samples: microscopy, which is the most widely used technology to observe and examine cell cultures, has been successfully adapted for 3D samples by recording of so-called "z-stacks". However the required equipment is generally very expensive and therefore access is often limited. Consequently alternative and less advanced approaches are often applied that cannot capture the full structural complexity of a 3D sample. Similarly, image analysis tools for quantification of microscopic images range from highly specialized and costly to simplified and inexpensive. Depending on the actual sample composition and scientific question the best approach needs to be assessed individually. Another more recently introduced technology for non-invasive cell analysis is Raman micro-spectroscopy. It enables label-free identification of cellular metabolic changes with high sensitivity and has already been successful applied to 2D and 3D cell cultures. However, its future significance for cell

  17. Collective cell migration during inflammatory response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Stroka, Kimberly; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Wound scratch healing assays of endothelial cell monolayers is a simple model to study collective cell migration as a function of biological signals. A signal of particular interest is the immune response, which after initial wounding in vivo causes the release of various inflammatory factors such as tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α). TNF-α is an innate inflammatory cytokine that can induce cell growth, cell necrosis, and change cell morphology. We studied the effects of TNF-α on collective cell migration using the wound healing assays and measured several migration metrics, such as rate of scratch closure, velocities of leading edge and bulk cells, closure index, and velocity correlation functions between migrating cells. We observed that TNF-α alters all migratory metrics as a function of the size of the scratch and TNF-α content. The changes observed in migration correlate with actin reorganization upon TNF-α exposure.

  18. Human 3D vascularized organotypic microfluidic assays to study breast cancer cell extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jessie S.; Bersini, Simone; Gilardi, Mara; Dubini, Gabriele; Charest, Joseph L.; Moretti, Matteo; Kamm, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    A key aspect of cancer metastases is the tendency for specific cancer cells to home to defined subsets of secondary organs. Despite these known tendencies, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we develop a microfluidic 3D in vitro model to analyze organ-specific human breast cancer cell extravasation into bone- and muscle-mimicking microenvironments through a microvascular network concentrically wrapped with mural cells. Extravasation rates and microvasculature permeabilities were significantly different in the bone-mimicking microenvironment compared with unconditioned or myoblast containing matrices. Blocking breast cancer cell A3 adenosine receptors resulted in higher extravasation rates of cancer cells into the myoblast-containing matrices compared with untreated cells, suggesting a role for adenosine in reducing extravasation. These results demonstrate the efficacy of our model as a drug screening platform and a promising tool to investigate specific molecular pathways involved in cancer biology, with potential applications to personalized medicine. PMID:25524628

  19. Differences in growth properties of endometrial cancer in three dimensional (3D) culture and 2D cell monolayer

    SciTech Connect

    Chitcholtan, Kenny; Asselin, Eric; Parent, Sophie; Sykes, Peter H.; Evans, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models have an invaluable role in understanding the behaviour of tumour cells in a well defined microenvironment. This is because some aspects of tumour characteristics cannot be fully recapitulated in a cell monolayer (2D). In the present study, we compared growth patterns, expression of signalling molecules, and metabolism-associated proteins of endometrial cancer cell lines in 3D and 2D cell cultures. Cancer cells formed spherical structures in 3D reconstituted basement membrane (3D rBM), and the morphological appearance was cell line dependent. Cell differentiation was observed after 8 days in the 3D rBM. There was reduced proliferation, detected by less expression of PCNA in 3D rBM than in 2D cell monolayers. The addition of exogenous epidermal growth factor (EGF) to cancer cells induced phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt in both cell culture conditions. The uptake of glucose was selectively altered in the 3D rBM, but there was a lack of association with Glut-1 expression. The secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) was selectively altered in 3D rBM, and it was cell line dependent. Our data demonstrated that 3D rBM as an in vitro model can influence proliferation and metabolism of endometrial cancer cell behaviour compared to 2D cell monolayer. Changes are specific to individual cell types. The use of 3D rBM is, therefore, important in the in vitro study of targeted anticancer therapies.

  20. 3D Bioprinting of complex channels-Effects of material, orientation, geometry, and cell embedding.

    PubMed

    Wüst, Silke; Müller, Ralph; Hofmann, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    Creating filled or hollow channels within 3D tissues has become increasingly important in tissue engineering. Channels can serve as vasculature enhancing medium perfusion or as conduits for nerve regeneration. The 3D biofabrication seems to be a promising method to generate these structures within 3D constructs layer-by-layer. In this study, geometry and interface of bioprinted channels were investigated with micro-computed tomography and fluorescent imaging. In filament printing, size and shape of printed channels are influenced by their orientation, which was analyzed by printing horizontally and vertically aligned channels, and by the ink, which was evaluated by comparing channels printed with an alginate-gelatin hydrogel or with an emulsion. The influence of geometry and cell-embedding in the hydrogel on feature size and shape was investigated by printing more complex channels. The generation of hollow channels, induced through leaching of a support phase, was monitored over time. Horizontally aligned channels provided 16× smaller cross-sectional areas than channels in vertical orientation. The smallest feature size of hydrogel filaments was twice as large compared to emulsion filaments. Feature size and shape depended on the geometry but did not alter when living cells were embedded. With that knowledge, channels can be consciously tailored to the particular needs.

  1. Boosting Power Density of Microbial Fuel Cells with 3D Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Aerogel Electrode.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Tianyu; Zhu, Xun; Zhang, Feng; Ye, Dingding; Liao, Qiang; Li, Yat

    2016-08-01

    A 3D nitrogen-doped graphene aerogel (N-GA) as an anode material for microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is reported. Electron microscopy images reveal that the N-GA possesses hierarchical porous structure that allows efficient diffusion of both bacterial cells and electron mediators in the interior space of 3D electrode, and thus, the colonization of bacterial communities. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic measurements further show that nitrogen doping considerably reduces the charge transfer resistance and internal resistance of GA, which helps to enhance the MFC power density. Importantly, the dual-chamber milliliter-scale MFC with N-GA anode yields an outstanding volumetric power density of 225 ± 12 W m(-3) normalized to the total volume of the anodic chamber (750 ± 40 W m(-3) normalized to the volume of the anode). These power densities are the highest values report for milliliter-scale MFCs with similar chamber size (25 mL) under the similar measurement conditions. The 3D N-GA electrode shows great promise for improving the power generation of MFC devices.

  2. Boosting Power Density of Microbial Fuel Cells with 3D Nitrogen‐Doped Graphene Aerogel Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Tianyu; Zhang, Feng; Ye, Dingding; Liao, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    A 3D nitrogen‐doped graphene aerogel (N‐GA) as an anode material for microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is reported. Electron microscopy images reveal that the N‐GA possesses hierarchical porous structure that allows efficient diffusion of both bacterial cells and electron mediators in the interior space of 3D electrode, and thus, the colonization of bacterial communities. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic measurements further show that nitrogen doping considerably reduces the charge transfer resistance and internal resistance of GA, which helps to enhance the MFC power density. Importantly, the dual‐chamber milliliter‐scale MFC with N‐GA anode yields an outstanding volumetric power density of 225 ± 12 W m−3 normalized to the total volume of the anodic chamber (750 ± 40 W m−3 normalized to the volume of the anode). These power densities are the highest values report for milliliter‐scale MFCs with similar chamber size (25 mL) under the similar measurement conditions. The 3D N‐GA electrode shows great promise for improving the power generation of MFC devices. PMID:27818911

  3. Accurate Automatic Detection of Densely Distributed Cell Nuclei in 3D Space

    PubMed Central

    Tokunaga, Terumasa; Kanamori, Manami; Teramoto, Takayuki; Jang, Moon Sun; Kuge, Sayuri; Ishihara, Takeshi; Yoshida, Ryo; Iino, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    To measure the activity of neurons using whole-brain activity imaging, precise detection of each neuron or its nucleus is required. In the head region of the nematode C. elegans, the neuronal cell bodies are distributed densely in three-dimensional (3D) space. However, no existing computational methods of image analysis can separate them with sufficient accuracy. Here we propose a highly accurate segmentation method based on the curvatures of the iso-intensity surfaces. To obtain accurate positions of nuclei, we also developed a new procedure for least squares fitting with a Gaussian mixture model. Combining these methods enables accurate detection of densely distributed cell nuclei in a 3D space. The proposed method was implemented as a graphical user interface program that allows visualization and correction of the results of automatic detection. Additionally, the proposed method was applied to time-lapse 3D calcium imaging data, and most of the nuclei in the images were successfully tracked and measured. PMID:27271939

  4. Image informatics for studying signal transduction in cells interacting with 3D matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeranis, Dimitrios S.; Guo, Jin; Chen, Chengpin; Yannas, Ioannis V.; Wei, Xunbin; So, Peter T. C.

    2014-03-01

    Cells sense and respond to chemical stimuli on their environment via signal transduction pathways, complex networks of proteins whose interactions transmit chemical information. This work describes an implementation of image informatics, imaging-based methodologies for studying signal transduction networks. The methodology developed focuses on studying signal transduction networks in cells that interact with 3D matrices. It utilizes shRNA-based knock down of network components, 3D high-content imaging of cells inside the matrix by spectral multi-photon microscopy, and single-cell quantification using features that describe both cell morphology and cell-matrix adhesion pattern. The methodology is applied in a pilot study of TGFβ signaling via the SMAD pathway in fibroblasts cultured inside porous collagen-GAG scaffolds, biomaterials similar to the ones used clinically to induce skin regeneration. Preliminary results suggest that knocking down all rSMAD components affects fibroblast response to TGFβ1 and TGFβ3 isoforms in different ways, and suggest a potential role for SMAD1 and SMAD5 in regulating TGFβ isoform response. These preliminary results need to be verified with proteomic results that can provide solid evidence about the particular role of individual components of the SMAD pathway.

  5. Video lensfree microscopy of 2D and 3D culture of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allier, C. P.; Vinjimore Kesavan, S.; Coutard, J.-G.; Cioni, O.; Momey, F.; Navarro, F.; Menneteau, M.; Chalmond, B.; Obeid, P.; Haguet, V.; David-Watine, B.; Dubrulle, N.; Shorte, S.; van der Sanden, B.; Di Natale, C.; Hamard, L.; Wion, D.; Dolega, M. E.; Picollet-D'hahan, N.; Gidrol, X.; Dinten, J.-M.

    2014-03-01

    Innovative imaging methods are continuously developed to investigate the function of biological systems at the microscopic scale. As an alternative to advanced cell microscopy techniques, we are developing lensfree video microscopy that opens new ranges of capabilities, in particular at the mesoscopic level. Lensfree video microscopy allows the observation of a cell culture in an incubator over a very large field of view (24 mm2) for extended periods of time. As a result, a large set of comprehensive data can be gathered with strong statistics, both in space and time. Video lensfree microscopy can capture images of cells cultured in various physical environments. We emphasize on two different case studies: the quantitative analysis of the spontaneous network formation of HUVEC endothelial cells, and by coupling lensfree microscopy with 3D cell culture in the study of epithelial tissue morphogenesis. In summary, we demonstrate that lensfree video microscopy is a powerful tool to conduct cell assays in 2D and 3D culture experiments. The applications are in the realms of fundamental biology, tissue regeneration, drug development and toxicology studies.

  6. 3D X-rays application for precision measurement of the cell structure of extruded polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, J. Y.; Kim, K. Y.; Shin, H. S.; Yeom, S.; Lee, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    While the thermal performance of existing insulation materials have been determined by blister gases, the thermal performance of future insulation materials will be dependent on the cell size and independent foam content as we use eco-friendly blister gases with a higher thermal conductivity. However, with the current technology we are only able to guess the whole cell size and independent foam content through SEM applied 2D fragmentary scanning but are still far from the level of accurate cell structure data extraction. Under this situation, we utilized X-ray CT scanned 3D images to identify and shape the cell structure and proposed a method of inferring the whole distribution and independent foam content as accurately as possible. According to X-ray CT scanning images and SEM images, the shape was similar but according to tracer applied CT scanning images, the cell size distribution was 380∼400 pm within the range of the general insulation diameter distribution which had the highest reliability. As for extrusion foaming polystyrene, we need additional image processing to identify the independent foam content as its density is too low. So, it is recommended to raise the 3D cell structure completeness of XPS by improving the scanning accuracy.

  7. Rapid 3D Refractive‐Index Imaging of Live Cells in Suspension without Labeling Using Dielectrophoretic Cell Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Habaza, Mor; Kirschbaum, Michael; Guernth‐Marschner, Christian; Dardikman, Gili; Barnea, Itay; Korenstein, Rafi; Duschl, Claus

    2016-01-01

    A major challenge in the field of optical imaging of live cells is achieving rapid, 3D, and noninvasive imaging of isolated cells without labeling. If successful, many clinical procedures involving analysis and sorting of cells drawn from body fluids, including blood, can be significantly improved. A new label‐free tomographic interferometry approach is presented. This approach provides rapid capturing of the 3D refractive‐index distribution of single cells in suspension. The cells flow in a microfluidic channel, are trapped, and then rapidly rotated by dielectrophoretic forces in a noninvasive and precise manner. Interferometric projections of the rotated cell are acquired and processed into the cellular 3D refractive‐index map. Uniquely, this approach provides full (360°) coverage of the rotation angular range around any axis, and knowledge on the viewing angle. The experimental demonstrations presented include 3D, label‐free imaging of cancer cells and three types of white blood cells. This approach is expected to be useful for label‐free cell sorting, as well as for detection and monitoring of pathological conditions resulting in cellular morphology changes or occurrence of specific cell types in blood or other body fluids. PMID:28251046

  8. Mechanical Properties of 3-D Printed Cellular Foams with triangular cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunga, Pratap Kumar

    In the present work, poly lactic acid (PLA) is used as a model system to investigate the mechanical behavior of 3-D printed foams with triangular cells. Solid PLA tension and compression specimens and foams made of PLA were fabricated using fused deposition 3-D printing technique. The solid PLA tension specimens were characterized for their densities and found to be about 10% lower in density as compared to their bulk counter parts. The triangular foams had a relative density of about 64%. The relationships between the structure of the foams and its deformation behavior under compression along two in-plane directions were characterized. Furthermore, simple finite element models were developed to understand the observed deformation behavior of triangular foams.

  9. Heritable Genetic Changes in Cells Recovered From Irradiated 3D Tissue Constructs

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Cornforth

    2012-03-26

    Combining contemporary cytogenetic methods with DNA CGH microarray technology and chromosome flow-sorting increases substantially the ability to resolve exchange breakpoints associated with interstitial deletions and translocations, allowing the consequences of radiation damage to be directly measured at low doses, while also providing valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of misrepair processes that, in turn, identify appropriate biophysical models of risk at low doses. Specific aims apply to cells recovered from 3D tissue constructs of human skin and, for the purpose of comparison, the same cells irradiated in traditional 2D cultures. The project includes research complementary to NASA/HRP space radiation project.

  10. Universal lab-on-a-chip platform for complex, perfused 3D cell cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonntag, F.; Schmieder, F.; Ströbel, J.; Grünzner, S.; Busek, M.; Günther, K.; Steege, T.; Polk, C.; Klotzbach, U.

    2016-03-01

    The miniaturization, rapid prototyping and automation of lab-on-a-chip technology play nowadays a very important role. Lab-on-a-chip technology is successfully implemented not only for environmental analysis and medical diagnostics, but also as replacement of animals used for the testing of substances in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries. For that purpose the Fraunhofer IWS and partners developed a lab-on-a-chip platform for perfused cell-based assays in the last years, which includes different micropumps, valves, channels, reservoirs and customized cell culture modules. This technology is already implemented for the characterization of different human cell cultures and organoids, like skin, liver, endothelium, hair follicle and nephron. The advanced universal lab-on-a-chip platform for complex, perfused 3D cell cultures is divided into a multilayer basic chip with integrated micropump and application-specific 3D printed cell culture modules. Moreover a technology for surface modification of the printed cell culture modules by laser micro structuring and a complex and flexibly programmable controlling device based on an embedded Linux system was developed. A universal lab-on-a-chip platform with an optional oxygenator and a cell culture module for cubic scaffolds as well as first cell culture experiments within the cell culture device will be presented. The module is designed for direct interaction with robotic dispenser systems. This offers the opportunity to combine direct organ printing of cells and scaffolds with the microfluidic cell culture module. The characterization of the developed system was done by means of Micro-Particle Image Velocimetry (μPIV) and an optical oxygen measuring system.

  11. Tracking immune-related cell responses to drug delivery microparticles in 3D dense collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Obarzanek-Fojt, Magdalena; Curdy, Catherine; Loggia, Nicoletta; Di Lena, Fabio; Grieder, Kathrin; Bitar, Malak; Wick, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Beyond the therapeutic purpose, the impact of drug delivery microparticles on the local tissue and inflammatory responses remains to be further elucidated specifically for reactions mediated by the host immune cells. Such immediate and prolonged reactions may adversely influence the release efficacy and intended therapeutic pathway. The lack of suitable in vitro platforms limits our ability to gain insight into the nature of immune responses at a single cell level. In order to establish an in vitro 3D system mimicking the connective host tissue counterpart, we utilized reproducible, compressed, rat-tail collagen polymerized matrices. THP1 cells (human acute monocytic leukaemia cells) differentiated into macrophage-like cells were chosen as cell model and their functionality was retained in the dense rat-tail collagen matrix. Placebo microparticles were later combined in the immune cell seeded system during collagen polymerization and secreted pro-inflammatory factors: TNFα and IL-8 were used as immune response readout (ELISA). Our data showed an elevated TNFα and IL-8 secretion by macrophage THP1 cells indicating that Placebo microparticles trigger certain immune cell responses under 3D in vivo like conditions. Furthermore, we have shown that the system is sensitive to measure the differences in THP1 macrophage pro-inflammatory responses to Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) microparticles with different API release kinetics. We have successfully developed a tissue-like, advanced, in vitro system enabling selective "readouts" of specific responses of immune-related cells. Such system may provide the basis of an advanced toolbox enabling systemic evaluation and prediction of in vivo microparticle reactions on human immune-related cells.

  12. Dynamic Assessment of Fibroblast Mechanical Activity during Rac-induced Cell Spreading in 3-D Culture

    PubMed Central

    Petroll, W. Matthew; Ma, Lisha; Kim, Areum; Ly, Linda; Vishwanath, Mridula

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the morphological and sub-cellular mechanical effects of Rac activation on fibroblasts within 3-D collagen matrices. Corneal fibroblasts were plated at low density inside 100 μm thick fibrillar collagen matrices and cultured for 1 to 2 days in serum-free media. Time-lapse imaging was then performed using Nomarski DIC. After an acclimation period, perfusion was switched to media containing PDGF. In some experiments, Y-27632 or blebbistatin were used to inhibit Rho-kinase (ROCK) or myosin II, respectively. PDGF activated Rac and induced cell spreading, which resulted in an increase in cell length, cell area, and the number of pseudopodial processes. Tractional forces were generated by extending pseudopodia, as indicated by centripetal displacement and realignment of collagen fibrils. Interestingly, the pattern of pseudopodial extension and local collagen fibril realignment was highly dependent upon the initial orientation of fibrils at the leading edge. Following ROCK or myosin II inhibition, significant ECM relaxation was observed, but small displacements of collagen fibrils continued to be detected at the tips of pseudopodia. Taken together, the data suggests that during Rac-induced cell spreading within 3-D matrices, there is a shift in the distribution of forces from the center to the periphery of corneal fibroblasts. ROCK mediates the generation of large myosin II-based tractional forces during cell spreading within 3-D collagen matrices, however residual forces can be generated at the tips of extending pseudopodia that are both ROCK and myosin II-independent. PMID:18452153

  13. Maturation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Hepatocytes by 3D-Culture

    PubMed Central

    Gieseck III, Richard L.; Hannan, Nicholas R. F.; Bort, Roque; Hanley, Neil A.; Drake, Rosemary A. L.; Cameron, Grant W. W.; Wynn, Thomas A.; Vallier, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell derived hepatocytes (IPSC-Heps) have the potential to reduce the demand for a dwindling number of primary cells used in applications ranging from therapeutic cell infusions to in vitro toxicology studies. However, current differentiation protocols and culture methods produce cells with reduced functionality and fetal-like properties compared to adult hepatocytes. We report a culture method for the maturation of IPSC-Heps using 3-Dimensional (3D) collagen matrices compatible with high throughput screening. This culture method significantly increases functional maturation of IPSC-Heps towards an adult phenotype when compared to conventional 2D systems. Additionally, this approach spontaneously results in the presence of polarized structures necessary for drug metabolism and improves functional longevity to over 75 days. Overall, this research reveals a method to shift the phenotype of existing IPSC-Heps towards primary adult hepatocytes allowing such cells to be a more relevant replacement for the current primary standard. PMID:24466060

  14. Estimation of single cell volume from 3D confocal images using automatic data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorvatova, A.; Cagalinec, M.; Mateasik, A.; Chorvat, D., Jr.

    2012-06-01

    Cardiac cells are highly structured with a non-uniform morphology. Although precise estimation of their volume is essential for correct evaluation of hypertrophic changes of the heart, simple and unified techniques that allow determination of the single cardiomyocyte volume with sufficient precision are still limited. Here, we describe a novel approach to assess the cell volume from confocal microscopy 3D images of living cardiac myocytes. We propose a fast procedure based on segementation using active deformable contours. This technique is independent on laser gain and/or pinhole settings and it is also applicable on images of cells stained with low fluorescence markers. Presented approach is a promising new tool to investigate changes in the cell volume during normal, as well as pathological growth, as we demonstrate in the case of cell enlargement during hypertension in rats.

  15. Fabrication of 3-D Reconstituted Organoid Arrays by DNA-Programmed Assembly of Cells (DPAC).

    PubMed

    Todhunter, Michael E; Weber, Robert J; Farlow, Justin; Jee, Noel Y; Cerchiari, Alec E; Gartner, Zev J

    2016-09-13

    Tissues are the organizational units of function in metazoan organisms. Tissues comprise an assortment of cellular building blocks, soluble factors, and extracellular matrix (ECM) composed into specific three-dimensional (3-D) structures. The capacity to reconstitute tissues in vitro with the structural complexity observed in vivo is key to understanding processes such as morphogenesis, homeostasis, and disease. In this article, we describe DNA-programmed assembly of cells (DPAC), a method to fabricate viable, functional arrays of organoid-like tissues within 3-D ECM gels. In DPAC, dissociated cells are chemically functionalized with degradable oligonucleotide "Velcro," allowing rapid, specific, and reversible cell adhesion to a two-dimensional (2-D) template patterned with complementary DNA. An iterative assembly process builds up organoids, layer-by-layer, from this initial 2-D template and into the third dimension. Cleavage of the DNA releases the completed array of tissues that are captured and fully embedded in ECM gels for culture and observation. DPAC controls the size, shape, composition, and spatial heterogeneity of organoids and permits positioning of constituent cells with single-cell resolution even within cultures several centimeters long. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. In Situ "Clickable" Zwitterionic Starch-Based Hydrogel for 3D Cell Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Dianyu; Li, Junjie; Cui, Man; Wang, Jinmei; Zhou, Yuhang; Luo, Liu; Wei, Yufei; Ye, Lei; Sun, Hong; Yao, Fanglian

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell encapsulation in hydrogel provides superb methods to investigate the biochemical cues in directing cellular fate and behaviors outside the organism, the primary step of which is to establish suitable "blank platform" to mimic and simplify native ECM microenvironment. In this study, zwitterionic starch-based "clickable" hydrogels were fabricated via a "copper- and light- free" Michael-type "thiol-ene" addition reaction between acylated-modified sulfobetaine-derived starch (SB-ST-A) and dithiol-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-SH). By incorporating antifouling SB-ST and PEG, the hydrogel system would be excellently protected from nontarget protein adsorption to act as a "blank platform". The hydrogels could rapidly gel under physiological conditions in less than 7 min. Dynamic rheology experiments suggested the stiffness of the hydrogel was close to the native tissues, and the mechanical properties as well as the gelation times and swelling behaviors could be easily tuned by varying the precursor proportions. The protein and cell adhesion assays demonstrated that the hydrogel surface could effectively resist nonspecific protein and cell adhesion. The degradation study in vitro confirmed that the hydrogel was biodegradable. A549 cells encapsulated in the hydrogel maintained high viability (up to 93%) and started to proliferate in number and extend in morphology after 2 days' culture. These results indicated the hydrogel presented here could be a potential candidate as "blank platform" for 3D cell encapsulation and biochemical cues induced cellular behavior investigation in vitro.

  17. Pluripotent stem cell expansion and neural differentiation in 3-D scaffolds of tunable Poisson's ratio.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yuanwei; Li, Yan; Song, Liqing; Zeng, Changchun; Li, Yan

    2017-02-01

    Biophysical properties of the scaffolds such as the elastic modulus, have been recently shown to impact stem cell lineage commitment. On the other hand, the contribution of the Poisson's ratio, another important biophysical property, to the stem cell fate decision, has not been studied. Scaffolds with tunable Poisson's ratio (ν) (termed as auxetic scaffolds when Poisson's ratio is zero or negative) are anticipated to provide a spectrum of unique biophysical 3-D microenvironments to influence stem cell fate. To test this hypothesis, in the present work we fabricated auxetic polyurethane scaffolds (ν=0 to -0.45) and evaluated their effects on neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Compared to the regular scaffolds (ν=+0.30) before auxetic conversion, the auxetic scaffolds supported smaller aggregate formation and higher expression of β-tubulin III upon neural differentiation. The influences of pore structure, Poisson's ratio, and elastic modulus on neural lineage commitment were further evaluated using a series of auxetic scaffolds. The results indicate that Poisson's ratio may confound the effects of elastic modulus, and auxetic scaffolds with proper pore structure and Poisson's ratio enhance neural differentiation. This study demonstrates that tuning the Poisson's ratio of the scaffolds together with elastic modulus and microstructure would enhance the capability to generate broader, more diversified ranges of biophysical 3-D microenvironments for the modulation of cellular differentiation.

  18. Diacylglycerol kinase α promotes 3D cancer cell growth and limits drug sensitivity through functional interaction with Src

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Ayuso, Pedro; Daza-Martín, Manuel; Martín-Pérez, Jorge; Ávila-Flores, Antonia; Mérida, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK)α converts diacylglycerol to phosphatidic acid. This lipid kinase sustains survival, migration and invasion of tumor cells, with no effect over untransformed cells, suggesting its potential as a cancer-specific target. Nonetheless the mechanisms that underlie DGKα specific contribution to cancer survival have not been elucidated. Using three-dimensional (3D) colon and breast cancer cell cultures, we demonstrate that DGKα upregulation is part of the transcriptional program that results in Src activation in these culture conditions. Pharmacological or genetic DGKα silencing impaired tumor growth in vivo confirming its function in malignant transformation. DGKα-mediated Src regulation contributed to limit the effect of Src inhibitors, and its transcriptional upregulation in response to PI3K/Akt inhibitors resulted in reduced toxicity. Src oncogenic properties and contribution to pharmacological resistance have been linked to its overactivation in cancer. DGKα participation in this central node helps to explain why its pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated targeting specifically alters tumor viability with no effect on untransformed cells. Our results identify DGKα-mediated stabilization of Src activation as an important mechanism in tumor growth, and suggest that targeting this enzyme, alone or in combination with other inhibitors in wide clinical use, could constitute a treatment strategy for aggressive forms of cancer. PMID:25339152

  19. Role of Mechanical Cues in Cell Differentiation and Proliferation: A 3D Numerical Model

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyed Jamaleddin; Hamdy Doweidar, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Cell differentiation, proliferation and migration are essential processes in tissue regeneration. Experimental evidence confirms that cell differentiation or proliferation can be regulated according to the extracellular matrix stiffness. For instance, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate to neuroblast, chondrocyte or osteoblast within matrices mimicking the stiffness of their native substrate. However, the precise mechanisms by which the substrate stiffness governs cell differentiation or proliferation are not well known. Therefore, a mechano-sensing computational model is here developed to elucidate how substrate stiffness regulates cell differentiation and/or proliferation during cell migration. In agreement with experimental observations, it is assumed that internal deformation of the cell (a mechanical signal) together with the cell maturation state directly coordinates cell differentiation and/or proliferation. Our findings indicate that MSC differentiation to neurogenic, chondrogenic or osteogenic lineage specifications occurs within soft (0.1-1 kPa), intermediate (20-25 kPa) or hard (30-45 kPa) substrates, respectively. These results are consistent with well-known experimental observations. Remarkably, when a MSC differentiate to a compatible phenotype, the average net traction force depends on the substrate stiffness in such a way that it might increase in intermediate and hard substrates but it would reduce in a soft matrix. However, in all cases the average net traction force considerably increases at the instant of cell proliferation because of cell-cell interaction. Moreover cell differentiation and proliferation accelerate with increasing substrate stiffness due to the decrease in the cell maturation time. Thus, the model provides insights to explain the hypothesis that substrate stiffness plays a key role in regulating cell fate during mechanotaxis. PMID:25933372

  20. Microfluidic chip with integrated electrical cell-impedance sensing for monitoring single cancer cell migration in three-dimensional matrixes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tien Anh; Yin, Tsung-I; Reyes, Diego; Urban, Gerald A

    2013-11-19

    Cell migration has been recognized as one hallmark of malignant tumor progression. By integrating the method of electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) with the Boyden chamber design, the state-of-the-art techniques provide kinetic information about cell migration and invasion processes in three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrixes. However, the information related to the initial stage of cell migration with single-cell resolution, which plays a unique role in the metastasis-invasion cascade of cancer, is not yet available. In this paper, we present a microfluidic device integrated with ECIS for investigating single cancer cell migration in 3D matrixes. Using microfluidics techniques without the requirement of physical connections to off-chip pneumatics, the proposed sensor chip can efficiently capture single cells on microelectrode arrays for sequential on-chip 2D or 3D cell culture and impedance measurement. An on-chip single-cell migration assay was successfully demonstrated within several minutes. Migration of single metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells in their initial stage can be monitored in real time; it shows a rapid change in impedance magnitude of approximately 10 Ω/s, whereas no prominent impedance change is observed for less-metastasis MCF-7 cells. The proposed sensor chip, allowing for a rapid and selective detection of the migratory properties of cancer cells at the single-cell level, could be applied as a new tool for cancer research.

  1. Human bronchial epithelial cells differentiate to 3D glandular acini on basement membrane matrix.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaofang; Peters-Hall, Jennifer R; Bose, Sumit; Peña, Maria T; Rose, Mary C

    2011-06-01

    To create a model system that investigates mechanisms resulting in hyperplasia and hypertrophy of respiratory tract submucosal glands, we developed an in vitro three-dimensional (3D) system wherein normal human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells differentiated into glandular acini when grown on a basement membrane matrix. The differentiation of primary HBE cells into glandular acini was monitored temporally by light microscopy. Apoptosis-induced lumen formation was observed by immunofluorescence analysis. The acinar cells expressed and secreted MUC5B mucin (marker for glandular mucous cells) and lysozyme, lactoferrin, and zinc-α2-glycoprotein (markers for glandular serous cells) at Day 22. β-Tubulin IV, a marker for ciliated cells, was not detected. Expression of mucous and serous cell markers in HBE glandular acini demonstrated that HBE cells grown on a basement membrane matrix differentiated into acini that exhibit molecular characteristics of respiratory tract glandular acinar cells. Inhibition studies with neutralizing antibodies resulted in a marked decrease in size of the spheroids at Day 7, demonstrating that laminin (a major component of the basement membrane matrix), the cell surface receptor integrin α6, and the cell junction marker E-cadherin have functional roles in HBE acinar morphogenesis. No significant variability was detected in the average size of glandular acini formed by HBE cells from two normal individuals. These results demonstrated that this in vitro model system is reproducible, stable, and potentially useful for studies of glandular differentiation and hyperplasia.

  2. Drug-releasing nano-engineered titanium implants: therapeutic efficacy in 3D cell culture model, controlled release and stability.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Karan; Kogawa, Masakazu; Prideaux, Matthew; Findlay, David M; Atkins, Gerald J; Losic, Dusan

    2016-12-01

    There is an ongoing demand for new approaches for treating localized bone pathologies. Here we propose a new strategy for treatment of such conditions, via local delivery of hormones/drugs to the trauma site using drug releasing nano-engineered implants. The proposed implants were prepared in the form of small Ti wires/needles with a nano-engineered oxide layer composed of array of titania nanotubes (TNTs). TNTs implants were inserted into a 3D collagen gel matrix containing human osteoblast-like, and the results confirmed cell migration onto the implants and their attachment and spread. To investigate therapeutic efficacy, TNTs/Ti wires loaded with parathyroid hormone (PTH), an approved anabolic therapeutic for the treatment of severe bone fractures, were inserted into 3D gels containing osteoblast-like cells. Gene expression studies revealed a suppression of SOST (sclerostin) and an increase in RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand) mRNA expression, confirming the release of PTH from TNTs at concentrations sufficient to alter cell function. The performance of the TNTs wire implants using an example of a drug needed at relatively higher concentrations, the anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin, is also demonstrated. Finally, the mechanical stability of the prepared implants was tested by their insertion into bovine trabecular bone cores ex vivo followed by retrieval, which confirmed the robustness of the TNT structures. This study provides proof of principle for the suitability of the TNT/Ti wire implants for localized bone therapy, which can be customized to cater for specific therapeutic requirements.

  3. 3D measurements of live cells via digital holographic microscopy and terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun Yong; Oser, Dorian; Iapozzuto, Peter; Norbury, Sean; Mahajan, Supriya; Khmaladze, Alexander; Sharikova, Anna

    2016-03-01

    This is a study of the central nervous system (CNS) cells, including brain micro vascular endothelial cells (BMV) that constitute the blood brain barrier, and C6 glial cells that are the predominant cell in the brain. The cells are exposed to various chemicals by non-invasive, label-free methods. Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is a technique that records an interference pattern between an object and reference waves, so that the computationally reconstructed holographic image contains both amplitude and phase information, and 3D images are obtained. The measurement of cell cultures by digital holographic microscopy yields information about cell death mechanisms, since these processes are correlated with individual cell volume. Our in-house DHM combines a visible (red) laser source with a conventional microscope base, and LabVIEW-run data processing. Terahertz spectral signatures are associated with structural changes in molecules and provide complementary information about cells. Both CNS cells BMV and C6 cells are treated with the drug "Methamphetamine" (METH), which induces apoptosis in neuronal cells and exhibits decrease in cell volume, a characteristic of cells undergoing apoptosis (induced cell death). METH can cause CNS cell death by cross-talk between mitochondria-, endoplasmic reticulum-, and receptor-mediated apoptotic events, all of which results in drug induced changes in neuroplasticity and significant neuropathology. Doxorubicin (DOX), a popular anticancer drug, is used as a control. We observe that METH treatment resulted in more pronounced cell volume shrinkage in both the BMV and C6 cells, as compared to DOX-induced cell apoptosis.

  4. Low-level laser therapy in 3D cell culture model using gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Basso, Fernanda G; Soares, Diana G; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto; Hebling, Josimeri

    2016-07-01

    Besides extensive data about the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on different cell types, so far, these results were obtained from monolayer cell culture models, which have limitations in terms of cell morphology and phenotype expression. Therefore, for better in vitro evaluation of the effects of LLLT, this study was performed with a 3D cell culture model, where gingival fibroblasts were seeded in collagen matrix. Cells isolated from a healthy patient were seeded in wells of 24-well plates with culture medium (DMEM) supplemented with 10 % fetal bovine serum and collagen type I solution. After 5 days, a serum-free DMEM was added to the matrices with cells that were subjected or not to three consecutive irradiations of LLLT by means of the LaserTABLE diode device (780 nm, 25 mW) at 0.5, 1.5, and 3 J/cm(2). Twenty-four hours after the last irradiation, cell viability and morphology as well as gene expression of growth factors were assessed. Histological evaluation of matrices demonstrated uniform distribution and morphology of gingival fibroblasts within the collagen matrix. LLLT at 3 J/cm(2) increased gingival fibroblast viability. Enhanced gene expression of hCOL-I and hEGF was observed for 0.5 J/cm(2), while no significant changes were detected for the other irradiation densities tested. In conclusion, LLLT promoted biostimulation of gingival fibroblasts seeded in a 3D cell culture model, demonstrating that this model can be applied for phototherapy studies and that LLLT could penetrate the collagen matrix to increase cell functions related to tissue repair.

  5. Spatially monitoring oxygen level in 3D microfabricated cell culture systems using optical oxygen sensing beads.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Acosta, Miguel A; Leach, Jennie B; Carrier, Rebecca L

    2013-04-21

    Capability of measuring and monitoring local oxygen concentration at the single cell level (tens of microns scale) is often desirable but difficult to achieve in cell culture. In this study, biocompatible oxygen sensing beads were prepared and tested for their potential for real-time monitoring and mapping of local oxygen concentration in 3D micro-patterned cell culture systems. Each oxygen sensing bead is composed of a silica core loaded with both an oxygen sensitive Ru(Ph2phen3)Cl2 dye and oxygen insensitive Nile blue reference dye, and a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) shell rendering biocompatibility. Human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells were cultivated on a series of PDMS and type I collagen based substrates patterned with micro-well arrays for 3 or 7 days, and then brought into contact with oxygen sensing beads. Using an image analysis algorithm to convert florescence intensity of beads to partial oxygen pressure in the culture system, tens of microns-size oxygen sensing beads enabled the spatial measurement of local oxygen concentration in the microfabricated system. Results generally indicated lower oxygen level inside wells than on top of wells, and local oxygen level dependence on structural features of cell culture surfaces. Interestingly, chemical composition of cell culture substrates also appeared to affect oxygen level, with type-I collagen based cell culture systems having lower oxygen concentration compared to PDMS based cell culture systems. In general, results suggest that oxygen sensing beads can be utilized to achieve real-time and local monitoring of micro-environment oxygen level in 3D microfabricated cell culture systems.

  6. Spacecraft charging analysis with the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D

    SciTech Connect

    Deca, J.; Lapenta, G.; Marchand, R.; Markidis, S.

    2013-10-15

    We present the first results on the analysis of spacecraft charging with the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, designed for running on massively parallel supercomputers. The numerical algorithm is presented, highlighting the implementation of the electrostatic solver and the immersed boundary algorithm; the latter which creates the possibility to handle complex spacecraft geometries. As a first step in the verification process, a comparison is made between the floating potential obtained with iPic3D and with Orbital Motion Limited theory for a spherical particle in a uniform stationary plasma. Second, the numerical model is verified for a CubeSat benchmark by comparing simulation results with those of PTetra for space environment conditions with increasing levels of complexity. In particular, we consider spacecraft charging from plasma particle collection, photoelectron and secondary electron emission. The influence of a background magnetic field on the floating potential profile near the spacecraft is also considered. Although the numerical approaches in iPic3D and PTetra are rather different, good agreement is found between the two models, raising the level of confidence in both codes to predict and evaluate the complex plasma environment around spacecraft.

  7. Direct 3D-printing of cell-laden constructs in microfluidic architectures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Justin; Hwang, Henry H; Wang, Pengrui; Whang, Grace; Chen, Shaochen

    2016-04-21

    Microfluidic platforms have greatly benefited the biological and medical fields, however standard practices require a high cost of entry in terms of time and energy. The utilization of three-dimensional (3D) printing technologies has greatly enhanced the ability to iterate and build functional devices with unique functions. However, their inability to fabricate within microfluidic devices greatly increases the cost of producing several different devices to examine different scientific questions. In this work, a variable height micromixer (VHM) is fabricated using projection 3D-printing combined with soft lithography. Theoretical and flow experiments demonstrate that altering the local z-heights of VHM improved mixing at lower flow rates than simple geometries. Mixing of two fluids occurs as low as 320 μL min(-1) in VHM whereas the planar zigzag region requires a flow rate of 2.4 mL min(-1) before full mixing occurred. Following device printing, to further demonstrate the ability of this projection-based method, complex, user-defined cell-laden scaffolds are directly printed inside the VHM. The utilization of this unique ability to produce 3D tissue models within a microfluidic system could offer a unique platform for medical diagnostics and disease modeling.

  8. Effects of electromagnetic field frequencies on chondrocytes in 3D cell-printed composite constructs.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hee-Gyeong; Kang, Kyung Shin; Hong, Jung Min; Jang, Jinah; Park, Moon Nyeo; Jeong, Young Hun; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-07-01

    In cartilage tissue engineering, electromagnetic field (EMF) therapy has been reported to have a modest effect on promoting cartilage regeneration. However, these studies were conducted using different frequencies of EMF to stimulate chondrocytes. Thus, it is necessary to investigate the effect of EMF frequency on cartilage formation. In addition to the stimulation, a scaffold is required to satisfy the characteristics of cartilage such as its hydrated and dense extracellular matrix, and a mechanical resilience to applied loads. Therefore, we 3D-printed a composite construct composed of a polymeric framework and a chondrocyte-laden hydrogel. Here, we observed frequency-dependent positive and negative effects on chondrogenesis using a 3D cell-printed cartilage tissue. We found that a frequency of 45 Hz promoted gene expression and secretion of extracellular matrix molecules of chondrocytes. In contrast, a frequency of 7.5 Hz suppressed chondrogenic differentiation in vitro. Additionally, the EMF-treated composite constructs prior to implantation showed consistent results with those of in vitro, suggesting that in vitro pre-treatment with different EMF frequencies provides different capabilities for the enhancement of cartilage formation in vivo. This correlation between EMF frequency and 3D-printed chondrocytes suggests the necessity for optimization of EMF parameters when this physical stimulus is applied to engineered cartilage. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1797-1804, 2016.

  9. Standardized 3D Bioprinting of Soft Tissue Models with Human Primary Cells.

    PubMed

    Rimann, Markus; Bono, Epifania; Annaheim, Helene; Bleisch, Matthias; Graf-Hausner, Ursula

    2016-08-01

    Cells grown in 3D are more physiologically relevant than cells cultured in 2D. To use 3D models in substance testing and regenerative medicine, reproducibility and standardization are important. Bioprinting offers not only automated standardizable processes but also the production of complex tissue-like structures in an additive manner. We developed an all-in-one bioprinting solution to produce soft tissue models. The holistic approach included (1) a bioprinter in a sterile environment, (2) a light-induced bioink polymerization unit, (3) a user-friendly software, (4) the capability to print in standard labware for high-throughput screening, (5) cell-compatible inkjet-based printheads, (6) a cell-compatible ready-to-use BioInk, and (7) standard operating procedures. In a proof-of-concept study, skin as a reference soft tissue model was printed. To produce dermal equivalents, primary human dermal fibroblasts were printed in alternating layers with BioInk and cultured for up to 7 weeks. During long-term cultures, the models were remodeled and fully populated with viable and spreaded fibroblasts. Primary human dermal keratinocytes were seeded on top of dermal equivalents, and epidermis-like structures were formed as verified with hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunostaining. However, a fully stratified epidermis was not achieved. Nevertheless, this is one of the first reports of an integrative bioprinting strategy for industrial routine application.

  10. Fabrication of solution processed 3D nanostructured CuInGaS₂ thin film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Van Ben; Cho, Jin Woo; Park, Se Jin; Hwang, Yun Jeong; Park, Hoo Keun; Do, Young Rag; Min, Byoung Koun

    2014-03-28

    In this study we demonstrate the fabrication of CuInGaS₂ (CIGS) thin film solar cells with a three-dimensional (3D) nanostructure based on indium tin oxide (ITO) nanorod films and precursor solutions (Cu, In and Ga nitrates in alcohol). To obtain solution processed 3D nanostructured CIGS thin film solar cells, two different precursor solutions were applied to complete gap filling in ITO nanorods and achieve the desirable absorber film thickness. Specifically, a coating of precursor solution without polymer binder material was first applied to fill the gap between ITO nanorods followed by deposition of the second precursor solution in the presence of a binder to generate an absorber film thickness of ∼1.3 μm. A solar cell device with a (Al, Ni)/AZO/i-ZnO/CdS/CIGS/ITO nanorod/glass structure was constructed using the CIGS film, and the highest power conversion efficiency was measured to be ∼6.3% at standard irradiation conditions, which was 22.5% higher than the planar type of CIGS solar cell on ITO substrate fabricated using the same precursor solutions.

  11. Silk scaffolds connected with different naturally occurring biomaterials for prostate cancer cell cultivation in 3D.

    PubMed

    Bäcker, Anne; Erhardt, Olga; Wietbrock, Lukas; Schel, Natalia; Göppert, Bettina; Dirschka, Marian; Abaffy, Paul; Sollich, Thomas; Cecilia, Angelica; Gruhl, Friederike J

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, different biopolymer blend scaffolds based on the silk protein fibroin from Bombyx mori (BM) were prepared via freeze-drying method. The chemical, structural, and mechanical properties of the three dimensional (3D) porous silk fibroin (SF) composite scaffolds of gelatin, collagen, and chitosan as well as SF from Antheraea pernyi (AP) and the recombinant spider silk protein spidroin (SSP1) have been systematically investigated, followed by cell culture experiments with epithelial prostate cancer cells (LNCaP) up to 14 days. Compared to the pure SF scaffold of BM, the blend scaffolds differ in porous morphology, elasticity, swelling behavior, and biochemical composition. The new composite scaffold with SSP1 showed an increased swelling degree and soft tissue like elastic properties. Whereas, in vitro cultivation of LNCaP cells demonstrated an increased growth behavior and spheroid formation within chitosan blended scaffolds based on its remarkable porosity, which supports nutrient supply matrix. Results of this study suggest that silk fibroin matrices are sufficient and certain SF composite scaffolds even improve 3D cell cultivation for prostate cancer research compared to matrices based on pure biomaterials or synthetic polymers.

  12. 3D bioprinting of biomimetic aortic vascular constructs with self-supporting cells.

    PubMed

    Kucukgul, Can; Ozler, S Burce; Inci, Ilyas; Karakas, Ezgi; Irmak, Ster; Gozuacik, Devrim; Taralp, Alpay; Koc, Bahattin

    2015-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of deaths throughout the world. Vascular diseases are mostly treated with autografts and blood vessel transplantations. However, traditional grafting methods have several problems including lack of suitable harvest sites, additional surgical costs for harvesting procedure, pain, infection, lack of donors, and even no substitutes at all. Recently, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine approaches are used to regenerate damaged or diseased tissues. Most of the tissue engineering investigations have been based on the cell seeding into scaffolds by providing a suitable environment for cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. Because of the challenges such as difficulties in seeding cells spatially, rejection, and inflammation of biomaterials used, the recent tissue engineering studies focus on scaffold-free techniques. In this paper, the development of novel computer aided algorithms and methods are developed for 3D bioprinting of scaffold-free biomimetic macrovascular structures. Computer model mimicking a real human aorta is generated using imaging techniques and the proposed computational algorithms. An optimized three-dimensional bioprinting path planning are developed with the proposed self-supported model. Mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cell aggregates and support structures (hydrogels) are 3D bioprinted layer-by-layer according to the proposed self-supported method to form an aortic tissue construct.

  13. Advances in automated 3-D image analyses of cell populations imaged by confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ancin, H; Roysam, B; Dufresne, T E; Chestnut, M M; Ridder, G M; Szarowski, D H; Turner, J N

    1996-11-01

    Automated three-dimensional (3-D) image analysis methods are presented for rapid and effective analysis of populations of fluorescently labeled cells or nuclei in thick tissue sections that have been imaged three dimensionally using a confocal microscope. The methods presented here greatly improve upon our earlier work (Roysam et al.:J Microsc 173: 115-126, 1994). The principal advances reported are: algorithms for efficient data pre-processing and adaptive segmentation, effective handling of image anisotrophy, and fast 3-D morphological algorithms for separating overlapping or connected clusters utilizing image gradient information whenever available. A particular feature of this method is its ability to separate densely packed and connected clusters of cell nuclei. Some of the challenges overcome in this work include the efficient and effective handling of imaging noise, anisotrophy, and large variations in image parameters such as intensity, object size, and shape. The method is able to handle significant inter-cell, intra-cell, inter-image, and intra-image variations. Studies indicate that this method is rapid, robust, and adaptable. Examples were presented to illustrate the applicability of this approach to analyzing images of nuclei from densely packed regions in thick sections of rat liver, and brain that were labeled with a fluorescent Schiff reagent.

  14. Regulation of mesenchymal stem cell 3D microenvironment: From macro to microfluidic bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Sart, Sébastien; Agathos, Spiros N; Li, Yan; Ma, Teng

    2016-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have emerged as an important cell type in cell therapy and tissue engineering. In these applications, maintaining the therapeutic properties of hMSCs requires tight control of the culture environments and the structural cell organizations. Bioreactor systems are essential tools to achieve these goals in the clinical-scale expansion and tissue engineering applications. This review summarizes how different bioreactors provide cues to regulate the structure and the chemico-mechanical microenvironment of hMSCs with a focus on 3D organization. In addition to conventional bioreactors, recent advances in microfluidic bioreactors as a novel approach to better control the hMSC microenvironment are also discussed. These advancements highlight the key role of bioreactor systems in preserving hMSC's functional properties by providing dynamic and temporal regulation of in vitro cellular microenvironment.

  15. An automated tool for 3D tracking of single molecules in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardini, L.; Capitanio, M.; Pavone, F. S.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, tremendous improvements have been achieved in the precision of localization of single fluorescent molecules, allowing localization and tracking of biomolecules at the nm level. Since the behaviour of proteins and biological molecules is tightly influenced by the cell's environment, a growing number of microscopy techniques are moving from in vitro to live cell experiments. Looking at both diffusion and active transportation processes inside a cell requires three-dimensional localization over a few microns range, high SNR images and high temporal resolution (ms order of magnitude). To satisfy these requirements we developed an automated routine that allow 3D tracking of single fluorescent molecules in living cells with nanometer accuracy, by exploiting the properties of the point-spread-function of out-of-focus Quantum Dots bound to the protein of interest.

  16. Construction of 3D micropatterned surfaces with wormlike and superhydrophilic PEG brushes to detect dysfunctional cells.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jianwen; Shi, Qiang; Ye, Wei; Fan, Qunfu; Shi, Hengchong; Wong, Shing-Chung; Xu, Xiaodong; Yin, Jinghua

    2014-12-10

    Detection of dysfunctional and apoptotic cells plays an important role in clinical diagnosis and therapy. To develop a portable and user-friendly platform for dysfunctional and aging cell detection, we present a facile method to construct 3D patterns on the surface of styrene-b-(ethylene-co-butylene)-b-styrene elastomer (SEBS) with poly(ethylene glycol) brushes. Normal red blood cells (RBCs) and lysed RBCs (dysfunctional cells) are used as model cells. The strategy is based on the fact that poly(ethylene glycol) brushes tend to interact with phosphatidylserine, which is in the inner leaflet of normal cell membranes but becomes exposed in abnormal or apoptotic cell membranes. We demonstrate that varied patterned surfaces can be obtained by selectively patterning atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiators on the SEBS surface via an aqueous-based method and growing PEG brushes through surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. The relatively high initiator density and polymerization temperature facilitate formation of PEG brushes in high density, which gives brushes worm-like morphology and superhydrophilic property; the tendency of dysfunctional cells adhered on the patterned surfaces is completely different from well-defined arrays of normal cells on the patterned surfaces, providing a facile method to detect dysfunctional cells effectively. The PEG-patterned surfaces are also applicable to detect apoptotic HeLa cells. The simplicity and easy handling of the described technique shows the potential application in microdiagnostic devices.

  17. A Novel Core-Shell Microcapsule for Encapsulation and 3D Culture of Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wujie; Zhao, Shuting; Rao, Wei; Snyder, Jedidiah; Choi, Jung K.; Wang, Jifu; Khan, Iftheker A.; Saleh, Navid B.; Mohler, Peter J.; Yu, Jianhua; Hund, Thomas J.; Tang, Chuanbing; He, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we report the preparation of a novel microcapsule of ~ 100 μm with a liquid (as compared to solid-like alginate hydrogel) core and an alginate-chitosan-alginate (ACA) shell for encapsulation and culture of embryonic stem (ES) cells in the miniaturized 3D space of the liquid core. Murine R1 ES cells cultured in the microcapsules were found to survive (> 90%) well and proliferate to form either a single aggregate of pluripotent cells or embryoid body (EB) of more differentiated cells in each microcapsule within 7 days, dependent on the culture medium used. This novel microcapsule technology allows massive production of the cell aggregates or EBs of uniform size and controllable pluripotency, which is important for the practical application of stem cell based therapy. Moreover, the semipermeable ACA shell was found to significantly reduce immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding to the encapsulated cells by up to 8.2 times, compared to non-encapsulated cardiac fibroblasts, mesenchymal stem cells, and ES cells. This reduction should minimize inflammatory and immune responses induced damage to the cells implanted in vivo becasue IgG binding is an important first step of the undesired host responses. Therefore, the ACA microcapsule with selective shell permeability should be of importance to advance the emerging cell-based medicine. PMID:23505611

  18. Wnt5a-mediating neurogenesis of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells in a 3D microfluidic cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeein; Kim, Sohyeun; Jung, Jinsun; Lim, Youngbin; Kang, Kyungsun; Park, Seungsu; Kang, Sookyung

    2011-10-01

    In stem cell biology, cell plasticity refers to the ability of stem cells to differentiate into a variety of cell lineages. Recently, cell plasticity has been used to refer to the ability of a given cell type to reversibly de-differentiate, re-differentiate, or transdifferentiate in response to specific stimuli. These processes are regulated by multiple intracellular and extracellular growth and differentiation factors, including low oxygen. Our recent study showed that 3D microfluidic cell culture induces activation of the Wnt5A/β-catenin signaling pathway in hATSCs (human Adipose Tissue-derived Stem Cells). This resulted in self renewal and transdifferentiation of hATSCs into neurons. To improve neurogenic potency of hATSCs in response to low oxygen and other unknown physical factors, we developed a gel-free 3D microfluidic cell culture system (3D-μFCCS). The functional structure was developed for the immobilization of 3D multi-cellular aggregates in a microfluidic channel without the use of a matrix on the chip. Growth of hATSCs neurosphere grown on a chip was higher than the growth of control cells grown in a culture dish. Induction of differentiation in the Chip system resulted in a significant increase in the induction of neuronal-like cell structures and the presentation of TuJ or NF160 positive long neuritis compared to control cells after active migration from the center of the microfluidic channel layer to the outside of the microfluidic channel layer. We also observed that the chip neurogenesis system induced a significantly higher level of GABA secreting neurons and, in addition, almost 60% of cells were GABA + cells. Finally, we observed that 1 month of after the transplantation of each cell type in a mouse SCI lesion, chip cultured and neuronal differentiated hATSCs exhibited the ability to effectively transdifferentiate into NF160 + motor neurons at a high ratio. Interestingly, our CHIP/PCR analysis revealed that HIF1α-induced hATSCs neurogenesis

  19. Assessing Drug Efficacy in a Miniaturized Pancreatic Cancer In Vitro 3D Cell Culture Model.

    PubMed

    Shelper, Todd B; Lovitt, Carrie J; Avery, Vicky M

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer continues to have one of the poorest prognoses among all cancers. The drug discovery efforts for this disease have largely failed, with no significant improvement in survival outcomes for advanced pancreatic cancer patients over the past 20 years. Traditional in vitro cell culture techniques have been used extensively in both basic and early drug discovery; however, these systems offer poor models to assess emerging therapeutics. More predictive cell-based models, which better capture the cellular heterogeneity and complexities of solid pancreatic tumors, are urgently needed not only to improve drug discovery success but also to provide insight into the tumor biology. Pancreatic tumors are characterized by a unique micro-environment that is surrounded by a dense stroma. A complex network of interactions between extracellular matrix (ECM) components and the effects of cell-to-cell contacts may enhance survival pathways within in vivo tumors. This biological and physical complexity is lost in traditional cell monolayer models. To explore the predictive potential of a more complex cellular system, a three-dimensional (3D) micro-tumor assay was evaluated. Efficacy of six current chemotherapeutics was determined against a panel of primary and metastatic pancreatic tumor cell lines in a miniaturized ECM-based 3D cell culture system. Suitability for potential use in high-throughput screening applications was assessed, including ascertaining the effects that miniaturization and automation had on assay robustness. Cellular health was determined by utilizing an indirect population-based metabolic activity assay and a direct imaging-based cell viability assay.

  20. Enzymatically triggered peptide hydrogels for 3D cell encapsulation and culture.

    PubMed

    Szkolar, Laura; Guilbaud, Jean-Baptiste; Miller, Aline F; Gough, Julie E; Saiani, Alberto

    2014-07-01

    We have investigated the possibility of using enzymatically triggered peptide hydrogels for the encapsulation and culture of cells. Based on recent work done on the enzymatically triggered gelation of FEFK (F, phenylalanine; E, glutamic acid; K, lysine) using thermolysin, a protease enzyme from Bacillus Thermoproteolyticus Rokko, we have investigated the possibility of using this gelation triggering mechanism to encapsulate cells within a 3D hydrogel matrix. First, the properties of enzymatically triggered hydrogels prepared in phosphate buffer solution were investigated and compared with the properties of hydrogels prepared in HPLC grade water from our previous work. We showed that the use of phosphate buffer solution allowed the production of hydrogels with very high shear moduli (>1 MPa). The gelation kinetics was also investigated, and the mechanical properties of the system were shown to closely follow the synthesis of the octapeptide by the enzyme through reverse hydrolysis. In a second phase, we developed, on the basis of information acquired, a facile protocol for the encapsulation of cells and plating of the hydrogel. Human dermal fibroblasts were then used to exemplify the use of these materials. FEFEFKFK octapeptide hydrogels prepared under the same conditions and with the same mechanical properties were used as a control. We showed that no significant differences were observed between the two systems and that after a decrease in cell number on day 1, cells start to proliferate. After 5 days of culture, the cells can be seen to start to adopt a stretched morphology typical of fibroblasts. The results clearly show that the protocol developed minimises the potential detrimental effect that thermolysin can have on the cells and that these enzymatically triggered hydrogels can be used for the 3D encapsulation and culture of cells.

  1. Multiscale Cues Drive Collective Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Peter; Wood, David K.; Kwon, Sunghoon; Provenzano, Paolo P.; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-01-01

    To investigate complex biophysical relationships driving directed cell migration, we developed a biomimetic platform that allows perturbation of microscale geometric constraints with concomitant nanoscale contact guidance architectures. This permits us to elucidate the influence, and parse out the relative contribution, of multiscale features, and define how these physical inputs are jointly processed with oncogenic signaling. We demonstrate that collective cell migration is profoundly enhanced by the addition of contract guidance cues when not otherwise constrained. However, while nanoscale cues promoted migration in all cases, microscale directed migration cues are dominant as the geometric constraint narrows, a behavior that is well explained by stochastic diffusion anisotropy modeling. Further, oncogene activation (i.e. mutant PIK3CA) resulted in profoundly increased migration where extracellular multiscale directed migration cues and intrinsic signaling synergistically conspire to greatly outperform normal cells or any extracellular guidance cues in isolation. PMID:27460294

  2. Multiscale Cues Drive Collective Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Peter; Wood, David K.; Kwon, Sunghoon; Provenzano, Paolo P.; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-07-01

    To investigate complex biophysical relationships driving directed cell migration, we developed a biomimetic platform that allows perturbation of microscale geometric constraints with concomitant nanoscale contact guidance architectures. This permits us to elucidate the influence, and parse out the relative contribution, of multiscale features, and define how these physical inputs are jointly processed with oncogenic signaling. We demonstrate that collective cell migration is profoundly enhanced by the addition of contract guidance cues when not otherwise constrained. However, while nanoscale cues promoted migration in all cases, microscale directed migration cues are dominant as the geometric constraint narrows, a behavior that is well explained by stochastic diffusion anisotropy modeling. Further, oncogene activation (i.e. mutant PIK3CA) resulted in profoundly increased migration where extracellular multiscale directed migration cues and intrinsic signaling synergistically conspire to greatly outperform normal cells or any extracellular guidance cues in isolation.

  3. The Arp2/3 complex mediates multigeneration dendritic protrusions for efficient 3-dimensional cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Giri, Anjil; Bajpai, Saumendra; Trenton, Nicholaus; Jayatilaka, Hasini; Longmore, Gregory D; Wirtz, Denis

    2013-10-01

    Arp2/3 is a protein complex that nucleates actin filament assembly in the lamellipodium in adherent cells crawling on planar 2-dimensional (2D) substrates. However, in physiopathological situations, cell migration typically occurs within a 3-dimensional (3D) environment, and little is known about the role of Arp2/3 and associated proteins in 3D cell migration. Using time resolved live-cell imaging and HT1080, a fibrosarcoma cell line commonly used to study cell migration, we find that the Arp2/3 complex and associated proteins N-WASP, WAVE1, cortactin, and Cdc42 regulate 3D cell migration. We report that this regulation is caused by formation of multigeneration dendritic protrusions, which mediate traction forces on the surrounding matrix and effective cell migration. The primary protrusions emanating directly from the cell body and prolonging the nucleus forms independent of Arp2/3 and dependent on focal adhesion proteins FAK, talin, and p130Cas. The Arp2/3 complex, N-WASP, WAVE1, cortactin, and Cdc42 regulate the secondary protrusions branching off from the primary protrusions. In 3D matrices, fibrosarcoma cells as well as migrating breast, pancreatic, and prostate cancer cells do not display lamellipodial structures. This study characterizes the unique topology of protrusions made by cells in a 3D matrix and show that these dendritic protrusions play a critical role in 3D cell motility and matrix deformation. The relative contribution of these proteins to 3D migration is significantly different from their role in 2D migration.

  4. Self-organization of neural patterns and structures in 3D culture of stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasai, Yoshiki

    2013-05-01

    Over the last several years, much progress has been made for in vitro culture of mouse and human ES cells. Our laboratory focuses on the molecular and cellular mechanisms of neural differentiation from pluripotent cells. Pluripotent cells first become committed to the ectodermal fate and subsequently differentiate into uncommitted neuroectodermal cells. Both previous mammalian and amphibian studies on pluripotent cells have indicated that the neural fate is a sort of the basal direction of the differentiation of these cells while mesoendodermal differentiation requires extrinsic inductive signals. ES cells differentiate into neuroectodermal cells with a rostral-most character (telencephalon and hypothalamus) when they are cultured in the absence of strong patterning signals. In this talk, I first discuss this issue by referring to our recent data on the mechanism of spontaneous neural differentiation in serum-free culture of mouse ES cells. Then, I will talk about self-organization phenomena observed in 3D culture of ES cells, which lead to tissue-autonomous formation of regional structures such as layered cortical tissues. I also discuss our new attempt to monitor these in vitro morphogenetic processes by live imaging, in particular, self-organizing morphogenesis of the optic cup in three-dimensional cultures.

  5. Quantification of substrate and cellular strains in stretchable 3D cell cultures: an experimental and computational framework.

    PubMed

    González-Avalos, P; Mürnseer, M; Deeg, J; Bachmann, A; Spatz, J; Dooley, S; Eils, R; Gladilin, E

    2017-03-07

    The mechanical cell environment is a key regulator of biological processes . In living tissues, cells are embedded into the 3D extracellular matrix and permanently exposed to mechanical forces. Quantification of the cellular strain state in a 3D matrix is therefore the first step towards understanding how physical cues determine single cell and multicellular behaviour. The majority of cell assays are, however, based on 2D cell cultures that lack many essential features of the in vivo cellular environment. Furthermore, nondestructive measurement of substrate and cellular mechanics requires appropriate computational tools for microscopic image analysis and interpretation. Here, we present an experimental and computational framework for generation and quantification of the cellular strain state in 3D cell cultures using a combination of 3D substrate stretcher, multichannel microscopic imaging and computational image analysis. The 3D substrate stretcher enables deformation of living cells embedded in bead-labelled 3D collagen hydrogels. Local substrate and cell deformations are determined by tracking displacement of fluorescent beads with subsequent finite element interpolation of cell strains over a tetrahedral tessellation. In this feasibility study, we debate diverse aspects of deformable 3D culture construction, quantification and evaluation, and present an example of its application for quantitative analysis of a cellular model system based on primary mouse hepatocytes undergoing transforming growth factor (TGF-β) induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

  6. A cut cell method for the 3D simulation of Crookes radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dechriste, Guillaume; Mieussens, Luc

    2014-12-09

    Devices involved in engineering applications, such as vacuum pumps or MEMS, may be made of several moving parts. This raise the issue of the simulation of rarefied gas flow around moving boundaries. We propose a simple process, known as cut cell method, to treat the motion of a solid body in the framework of the deterministic solving of a kinetic equation. Up to our knowledge, this is the first time that this approach has been used for this kind of simulations. The method is illustrated by the 2D and 3D simulations of a Crookes radiometer.

  7. A cut cell method for the 3D simulation of Crookes radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechriste, Guillaume; Mieussens, Luc

    2014-12-01

    Devices involved in engineering applications, such as vacuum pumps or MEMS, may be made of several moving parts. This raise the issue of the simulation of rarefied gas flow around moving boundaries. We propose a simple process, known as cut cell method, to treat the motion of a solid body in the framework of the deterministic solving of a kinetic equation. Up to our knowledge, this is the first time that this approach has been used for this kind of simulations. The method is illustrated by the 2D and 3D simulations of a Crookes radiometer.

  8. Microencapsulation of Neuroblastoma Cells and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Collagen Microspheres: A 3D Model for Cancer Cell Niche Study

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Pan; Sin, Hoi Shun; Chan, Shing; Chan, Godfrey Chi Fung; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing trend for researchers to use in vitro 3D models in cancer studies, as they can better recapitulate the complex in vivo situation. And the fact that the progression and development of tumor are closely associated to its stromal microenvironment has been increasingly recognized. The establishment of such tumor supportive niche is vital in understanding tumor progress and metastasis. The mesenchymal origin of many cells residing in the cancer niche provides the rationale to include MSCs in mimicking the niche in neuroblastoma. Here we co-encapsulate and co-culture NBCs and MSCs in a 3D in vitro model and investigate the morphology, growth kinetics and matrix remodeling in the reconstituted stromal environment. Results showed that the incorporation of MSCs in the model lead to accelerated growth of cancer cells as well as recapitulation of at least partially the tumor microenvironment in vivo. The current study therefore demonstrates the feasibility for the collagen microsphere to act as a 3D in vitro cancer model for various topics in cancer studies. PMID:26657086

  9. A harmonic polynomial cell (HPC) method for 3D Laplace equation with application in marine hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yan-Lin Faltinsen, Odd M.

    2014-10-01

    We propose a new efficient and accurate numerical method based on harmonic polynomials to solve boundary value problems governed by 3D Laplace equation. The computational domain is discretized by overlapping cells. Within each cell, the velocity potential is represented by the linear superposition of a complete set of harmonic polynomials, which are the elementary solutions of Laplace equation. By its definition, the method is named as Harmonic Polynomial Cell (HPC) method. The characteristics of the accuracy and efficiency of the HPC method are demonstrated by studying analytical cases. Comparisons will be made with some other existing boundary element based methods, e.g. Quadratic Boundary Element Method (QBEM) and the Fast Multipole Accelerated QBEM (FMA-QBEM) and a fourth order Finite Difference Method (FDM). To demonstrate the applications of the method, it is applied to some studies relevant for marine hydrodynamics. Sloshing in 3D rectangular tanks, a fully-nonlinear numerical wave tank, fully-nonlinear wave focusing on a semi-circular shoal, and the nonlinear wave diffraction of a bottom-mounted cylinder in regular waves are studied. The comparisons with the experimental results and other numerical results are all in satisfactory agreement, indicating that the present HPC method is a promising method in solving potential-flow problems. The underlying procedure of the HPC method could also be useful in other fields than marine hydrodynamics involved with solving Laplace equation.

  10. Brownian nanoimaging of interface dynamics and ligand-receptor binding at cell surfaces in 3-D.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Igor R; Evans, Evan A

    2013-04-01

    We describe a method for nanoimaging interfacial dynamics and ligand-receptor binding at surfaces of live cells in 3-D. The imaging probe is a 1-μm diameter glass bead confined by a soft laser trap to create a "cloud" of fluctuating states. Using a facile on-line method of video image analysis, the probe displacements are reported at ~10 ms intervals with bare precisions (±SD) of 4-6 nm along the optical axis (elevation) and 2 nm in the transverse directions. We demonstrate how the Brownian distributions are analyzed to characterize the free energy potential of each small probe in 3-D taking into account the blur effect of its motions during CCD image capture. Then, using the approach to image interactions of a labeled probe with lamellae of leukocytic cells spreading on cover-glass substrates, we show that deformations of the soft distribution in probe elevations provide both a sensitive long-range sensor for defining the steric topography of a cell lamella and a fast telemetry for reporting rare events of probe binding with its surface receptors. Invoking established principles of Brownian physics and statistical thermodynamics, we describe an off-line method of super resolution that improves precision of probe separations from a non-reactive steric boundary to ~1 nm.

  11. Fluorescence fluctuation microscopy to reveal 3D architecture and function in the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lenser, Thorsten; Weisshart, Klaus; Ulbricht, Tobias; Klement, Karolin; Hemmerich, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) architecture of the cell nucleus is determined not only by the presence of subnuclear domains, such as the nuclear envelope, chromosome territories, and nuclear bodies, but also by smaller domains which form in response to specific functions, such as RNA transcription, DNA replication, and DNA repair. Since both stable and dynamic structures contribute to nuclear morphology, it is important to study the biophysical principles of the formation of macromolecular assemblies within the nucleus. For this purpose, a variety of fluorescence fluctuation microscopy techniques can be applied. Here, we summarize our current knowledge on the 3D architecture of the mammalian cell nucleus and describe in detail how the assembly of functional nuclear protein complexes can be analyzed in living cells using fluorescence bleaching techniques, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, raster image correlation spectroscopy, and mathematical modeling. In conclusion, the application of all these techniques in combination is a powerful tool to assess the full spectrum of nuclear protein dynamics and to understand the biophysical principles underlying nuclear structure and function.

  12. Cartilage repair and subchondral bone migration using 3D printing osteochondral composites: a one-year-period study in rabbit trochlea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijie; Lian, Qin; Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; He, Jiankang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidences show that subchondral bone may play a significant role in the repair or progression of cartilage damage in situ. However, the exact change of subchondral bone during osteochondral repair is still poorly understood. In this paper, biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technology using PEG hydrogel and β-TCP ceramic and then implanted in rabbit trochlea within a critical size defect model. Animals were euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 52 weeks after implantation. Histological results showed that hyaline-like cartilage formed along with white smooth surface and invisible margin at 24 weeks postoperatively, typical tidemark formation at 52 weeks. The repaired subchondral bone formed from 16 to 52 weeks in a "flow like" manner from surrounding bone to the defect center gradually. Statistical analysis illustrated that both subchondral bone volume and migration area percentage were highly correlated with the gross appearance Wayne score of repaired cartilage. Therefore, subchondral bone migration is related to cartilage repair for critical size osteochondral defects. Furthermore, the subchondral bone remodeling proceeds in a "flow like" manner and repaired cartilage with tidemark implies that the biphasic PEG/β-TCP composites fabricated by 3D printing provides a feasible strategy for osteochondral tissue engineering application.

  13. Cartilage Repair and Subchondral Bone Migration Using 3D Printing Osteochondral Composites: A One-Year-Period Study in Rabbit Trochlea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; He, Jiankang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidences show that subchondral bone may play a significant role in the repair or progression of cartilage damage in situ. However, the exact change of subchondral bone during osteochondral repair is still poorly understood. In this paper, biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technology using PEG hydrogel and β-TCP ceramic and then implanted in rabbit trochlea within a critical size defect model. Animals were euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 52 weeks after implantation. Histological results showed that hyaline-like cartilage formed along with white smooth surface and invisible margin at 24 weeks postoperatively, typical tidemark formation at 52 weeks. The repaired subchondral bone formed from 16 to 52 weeks in a “flow like” manner from surrounding bone to the defect center gradually. Statistical analysis illustrated that both subchondral bone volume and migration area percentage were highly correlated with the gross appearance Wayne score of repaired cartilage. Therefore, subchondral bone migration is related to cartilage repair for critical size osteochondral defects. Furthermore, the subchondral bone remodeling proceeds in a “flow like” manner and repaired cartilage with tidemark implies that the biphasic PEG/β-TCP composites fabricated by 3D printing provides a feasible strategy for osteochondral tissue engineering application. PMID:25177697

  14. Quantitative characterization of 3D deformations of cell interactions with soft biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Christian

    In recent years, the importance of mechanical forces in directing cellular function has been recognized as a significant factor in biological and physiological processes. In fact, these physical forces are now viewed equally as important as biochemical stimuli in controlling cellular response. Not only do these cellular forces, or cell tractions, play an important role in cell migration, they are also significant to many other physiological and pathological processes, both at the tissue and organ level, including wound healing, inflammation, angiogenesis, and embryogenesis. A complete quantification of cell tractions during cell-material interactions can lead to a deeper understanding of the fundamental role these forces play in cell biology. Thus, understanding the function and role of a cell from a mechanical framework can have important implications towards the development of new implant materials and drug treatments. Previous research has contributed significant descriptions of cell-tissue interactions by quantifying cell tractions in two-dimensional environments; however, most physiological processes are three-dimensional in nature. Recent studies have shown morphological differences in cells cultured on two-dimensional substrates versus three-dimensional matrices, and that the intrinsic extracellular matrix interactions and migration behavior are different in three dimensions versus two dimensions. Hence, measurement techniques are needed to investigate cellular behavior in all three dimensions. This thesis presents a full-field imaging technique capable of quantitatively measuring cell traction forces in all three spatial dimensions, and hence addresses the need of a three-dimensional quantitative imaging technique to gain insight into the fundamental role of physical forces in biological processes. The technique combines laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) with digital volume correlation (DVC) to track the motion of fluorescent particles during cell

  15. Monitoring the effects of doxorubicin on 3D-spheroid tumor cells in real-time

    PubMed Central

    Baek, NamHuk; Seo, Ok Won; Kim, MinSung; Hulme, John; An, Seong Soo A

    2016-01-01

    Recently, increasing numbers of cell culture experiments with 3D spheroids presented better correlating results in vivo than traditional 2D cell culture systems. 3D spheroids could offer a simple and highly reproducible model that would exhibit many characteristics of natural tissue, such as the production of extracellular matrix. In this paper numerous cell lines were screened and selected depending on their ability to form and maintain a spherical shape. The effects of increasing concentrations of doxorubicin (DXR) on the integrity and viability of the selected spheroids were then measured at regular intervals and in real-time. In total 12 cell lines, adenocarcinomic alveolar basal epithelial (A549), muscle (C2C12), prostate (DU145), testis (F9), pituitary epithelial-like (GH3), cervical cancer (HeLa), HeLa contaminant (HEp2), embryo (NIH3T3), embryo (PA317), neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y), osteosarcoma U2OS, and embryonic kidney cells (293T), were screened. Out of the 12, 8 cell lines, NIH3T3, C2C12, 293T, SH-SY5Y, A549, HeLa, PA317, and U2OS formed regular spheroids and the effects of DXR on these structures were measured at regular intervals. Finally, 5 cell lines, A549, HeLa, SH-SY5Y, U2OS, and 293T, were selected for real-time monitoring and the effects of DXR treatment on their behavior were continuously recorded for 5 days. A potential correlation regarding the effects of DXR on spheroid viability and ATP production was measured on days 1, 3, and 5. Cytotoxicity of DXR seemed to occur after endocytosis, since the cellular activities and ATP productions were still viable after 1 day of the treatment in all spheroids, except SH-SY5Y. Both cellular activity and ATP production were halted 3 and 5 days from the start of the treatment in all spheroids. All cell lines maintained their spheroid shape, except SHSY-5, which behaved in an unpredictable manner when exposed to toxic concentrations of DXR. Cytotoxic effects of DXR towards SH-SY5Y seemed to cause degradation of

  16. Scaffolds fabricated by 3D two-photon photopolymerization for live cell studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplicky, T.; Cunderlikova, B.; Mateasik, A.; Vincze, A.; Chorvat, D.; Marcek Chorvatova, A.

    2016-12-01

    Design and fabrication of appropriate biocompatible microstructures that ensure fixation and control of experimental conditions for live cell and bacteria observations is an important prerequisite for number of real time experiments. Our approach is to design engineered microfabricated 3D structures for growth of cells in culture without significant modification of their metabolic state. Presented approach is aimed at evaluation of the potential applicability of biocompatible constructs in the biomedical field and thus live cell monitoring in controlled conditions. Design and evaluation of properties of materials and structures with mesoscopic arrangement and their interaction with biological objects is a prerequisite for establishment of physiologically relevant in vitro models of pathologies as well as for development of a new generation of nano / micro / bio-sensors.

  17. Disease Modeling in Stem Cell-Derived 3D Organoid Systems.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Devanjali; Heo, Inha; Clevers, Hans

    2017-03-21

    Organoids are 3D in vitro culture systems derived from self-organizing stem cells. They can recapitulate the in vivo architecture, functionality, and genetic signature of original tissues. Thus, organoid technology has been rapidly applied to understanding stem cell biology, organogenesis, and various human pathologies. The recent development of human patient-derived organoids has enabled disease modeling with precision, highlighting their great potential in biomedical applications, translational medicine, and personalized therapy. In light of recent breakthroughs using organoids, it is only apt that we appreciate the advantages and shortcomings of this technology to exploit its full potential. We discuss recent advances in the application of organoids in studying cancer and hereditary diseases, as well as in the examination of host cell-microorganism interactions.

  18. Epidermal growth factor promotes a mesenchymal over an amoeboid motility of MDA-MB-231 cells embedded within a 3D collagen matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geum, Dongil T.; Kim, Beum Jun; Chang, Audrey E.; Hall, Matthew S.; Wu, Mingming

    2016-01-01

    The receptor of epidermal growth factor (EGFR) critically regulates tumor cell invasion and is a potent therapeutic target for treatment of many types of cancers, including carcinomas and glioblastomas. It is known that EGF regulates cell motility when tumor cells are embedded within a 3D biomatrix. However, roles of EGF in modulating tumor cell motility phenotype are largely unknown. In this article, we report that EGF promotes a mesenchymal over an amoeboid motility phenotype using a malignant breast tumor cell line, MDA-MB-231, embedded within a 3D collagen matrix. Amoeboid cells are rounded in shape, while mesenchymal cells are elongated, and their migrations are governed by a distinctly different set of biomolecules. Using single cell tracking analysis, we also show that EGF promotes cell dissemination through a significant increase in cell persistence along with a moderate increase of speed. The increase of persistence is correlated with the increase of the percentage of the mesenchymal cells within the population. Our work reveals a novel role of microenvironmental cue, EGF, in modulating heterogeneity and plasticity of tumor cell motility phenotype. In addition, it suggests a potential visual cue for diagnosing invasive states of breast cancer cells. This work can be easily extended beyond breast cancer cells.

  19. 3D Chirp Sonar Images on Fluid Migration Pathways and Their Implications on Seafloor Stability East of the Fangliao Submarine Canyon Offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. W.; Liu, C. S.; Su, C. C.; Hsu, H. H.; Chen, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    This study utilizes both chirp sonar images and coring results to investigate the unstable seafloor strata east of the Fangliao Submarine Canyon offshore southwestern Taiwan. We have constructed 3D chirp sonar images from a densely surveyed block to trace the attitude of an acoustic transparent layer and features caused by fluid activities. Based on the distribution of this transparent layer and fluid-related features, we suggest that this transparent layer forms a pathway for fluid migration which induces fluid-related characters such as acoustic blanking and fluid chimneys in the 3D chirp sonar images. Cored seafloor samples are used in this study to investigate the sediment compositions. The 210Pb activity profiles of the cores show oscillating and unsteady values at about 20~25 cm from core top. The bulk densities of the core samples in the same section (about 20~25 cm from core top) give values lower than those at deeper parts of the cores. These results indicate that the water content is much higher in the shallow sediments than in the deeper strata. From core sample analyses, we deduce that the local sediments are disturbed by liquefaction. From the analyses of 3D chirp sonar images and core data, we suggest that the seafloor east of the Fangliao Submarine Canyon is in an unstable condition, if disturbed by earthquakes, submarine landslides and gravity flows could be easily triggered and cause some geohazards, like breaking submarine cables during the 2006 Pingtung earthquake event.

  20. AC electric field induced dipole-based on-chip 3D cell rotation.

    PubMed

    Benhal, Prateek; Chase, J Geoffrey; Gaynor, Paul; Oback, Björn; Wang, Wenhui

    2014-08-07

    The precise rotation of suspended cells is one of the many fundamental manipulations used in a wide range of biotechnological applications such as cell injection and enucleation in nuclear transfer (NT) cloning. Noticeably scarce among the existing rotation techniques is the three-dimensional (3D) rotation of cells on a single chip. Here we present an alternating current (ac) induced electric field-based biochip platform, which has an open-top sub-mm square chamber enclosed by four sidewall electrodes and two bottom electrodes, to achieve rotation about the two axes, thus 3D cell rotation. By applying an ac potential to the four sidewall electrodes, an in-plane (yaw) rotating electric field is generated and in-plane rotation is achieved. Similarly, by applying an ac potential to two opposite sidewall electrodes and the two bottom electrodes, an out-of-plane (pitch) rotating electric field is generated and rolling rotation is achieved. As a prompt proof-of-concept, bottom electrodes were constructed with transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) using the standard lift-off process and the sidewall electrodes were constructed using a low-cost micro-milling process and then assembled to form the chip. Through experiments, we demonstrate rotation of bovine oocytes of ~120 μm diameter about two axes, with the capability of controlling the rotation direction and the rate for each axis through control of the ac potential amplitude, frequency, and phase shift, and cell medium conductivity. The maximum observed rotation rate reached nearly 140° s⁻¹, while a consistent rotation rate reached up to 40° s⁻¹. Rotation rate spectra for zona pellucida-intact and zona pellucida-free oocytes were further compared and found to have no effective difference. This simple, transparent, cheap-to-manufacture, and open-top platform allows additional functional modules to be integrated to become a more powerful cell manipulation system.

  1. Fabrication and evaluation of electrohydrodynamic jet 3D printed polycaprolactone/chitosan cell carriers using human embryonic stem cell-derived fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Sriram, Gopu; Fawzy, Amr S; Fuh, Jerry Yh; Rosa, Vinicius; Cao, Tong; Wong, Yoke San

    2016-08-01

    Biological function of adherent cells depends on the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions in three-dimensional space. To understand the behavior of cells in 3D environment and their interactions with neighboring cells and matrix requires 3D culture systems. Here, we present a novel 3D cell carrier scaffold that provides an environment for routine 3D cell growth in vitro We have developed thin, mechanically stable electrohydrodynamic jet (E-jet) 3D printed polycaprolactone and polycaprolactone/Chitosan macroporous scaffolds with precise fiber orientation for basic 3D cell culture application. We have evaluated the application of this technology by growing human embryonic stem cell-derived fibroblasts within these 3D scaffolds. Assessment of cell viability and proliferation of cells seeded on polycaprolactone and polycaprolactone/Chitosan 3D-scaffolds show that the human embryonic stem cell-derived fibroblasts could adhere and proliferate on the scaffolds over time. Further, using confocal microscopy we demonstrate the ability to use fluorescence-labelled cells that could be microscopically monitored in real-time. Hence, these 3D printed polycaprolactone and polycaprolactone/Chitosan scaffolds could be used as a cell carrier for in vitro 3D cell culture-, bioreactor- and tissue engineering-related applications in the future.

  2. Accessible bioprinting: adaptation of a low-cost 3D-printer for precise cell placement and stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Reid, John A; Mollica, Peter A; Johnson, Garett D; Ogle, Roy C; Bruno, Robert D; Sachs, Patrick C

    2016-06-07

    The precision and repeatability offered by computer-aided design and computer-numerically controlled techniques in biofabrication processes is quickly becoming an industry standard. However, many hurdles still exist before these techniques can be used in research laboratories for cellular and molecular biology applications. Extrusion-based bioprinting systems have been characterized by high development costs, injector clogging, difficulty achieving small cell number deposits, decreased cell viability, and altered cell function post-printing. To circumvent the high-price barrier to entry of conventional bioprinters, we designed and 3D printed components for the adaptation of an inexpensive 'off-the-shelf' commercially available 3D printer. We also demonstrate via goal based computer simulations that the needle geometries of conventional commercially standardized, 'luer-lock' syringe-needle systems cause many of the issues plaguing conventional bioprinters. To address these performance limitations we optimized flow within several microneedle geometries, which revealed a short tapered injector design with minimal cylindrical needle length was ideal to minimize cell strain and accretion. We then experimentally quantified these geometries using pulled glass microcapillary pipettes and our modified, low-cost 3D printer. This systems performance validated our models exhibiting: reduced clogging, single cell print resolution, and maintenance of cell viability without the use of a sacrificial vehicle. Using this system we show the successful printing of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) into Geltrex and note their retention of a pluripotent state 7 d post printing. We also show embryoid body differentiation of hiPSC by injection into differentiation conducive environments, wherein we observed continuous growth, emergence of various evaginations, and post-printing gene expression indicative of the presence of all three germ layers. These data demonstrate an

  3. Gelatin-based 3D conduits for transdifferentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into Schwann cell-like phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Uz, Metin; Büyüköz, Melda; Sharma, Anup D; Sakaguchi, Donald S; Altinkaya, Sacide Alsoy; Mallapragada, Surya K

    2017-02-16

    In this study, gelatin-based 3D conduits with three different microstructures (nanofibrous, macroporous and ladder-like) were fabricated for the first time via combined molding and thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) technique for peripheral nerve regeneration. The effects of conduit microstructure and mechanical properties on the transdifferentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into Schwann cell (SC) like phenotypes were examined to help facilitate neuroregeneration and understand material-cell interfaces. Results indicated that 3D macroporous and ladder-like structures enhanced MSC attachment, proliferation and spreading, creating interconnected cellular networks with large numbers of viable cells compared to nanofibrous and 2D-tissue culture plate counterparts. 3D-ladder-like conduit structure with complex modulus of ∼0.4×10(6)Pa and pore size of ∼150μm provided the most favorable microenvironment for MSC transdifferentiation leading to ∼85% immunolabeling of all SC markers. On the other hand, the macroporous conduits with complex modulus of ∼4×10(6)Pa and pore size of ∼100μm showed slightly lower (∼65% for p75, ∼75% for S100 and ∼85% for S100β markers) immunolabeling. Transdifferentiated MSCs within 3D-ladder-like conduits secreted significant amounts (∼2.5pg/mL NGF and ∼0.7pg/mL GDNF per cell) of neurotrophic factors, while MSCs in macroporous conduits released slightly lower (∼1.5pg/mL NGF and 0.7pg/mL GDNF per cell) levels. PC12 cells displayed enhanced neurite outgrowth in media conditioned by conduits with transdifferentiated MSCs. Overall, conduits with macroporous and ladder-like 3D structures are promising platforms in transdifferentiation of MSCs for neuroregeneration and should be further tested in vivo.

  4. Laser irradiated fluorescent perfluorocarbon microparticles in 2-D and 3-D breast cancer cell models

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Chengcheng; Wang, Long; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Yan; Hu, Yihe; Peng, Qinghai

    2017-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon (PFC) droplets were studied as new generation ultrasound contrast agents via acoustic or optical droplet vaporization (ADV or ODV). Little is known about the ODV irradiated vaporization mechanisms of PFC-microparticle complexs and the stability of the new bubbles produced. In this study, fluorescent perfluorohexane (PFH) poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles were used as a model to study the process of particle vaporization and bubble stability following excitation in two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) cell models. We observed localization of the fluorescent agent on the microparticle coating material initially and after vaporization under fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, the stability and growth dynamics of the newly created bubbles were observed for 11 min following vaporization. The particles were co-cultured with 2-D cells to form 3-D spheroids and could be vaporized even when encapsulated within the spheroids via laser irradiation, which provides an effective basis for further work. PMID:28262671

  5. A novel 3D mesenchymal stem cell model of the multiple myeloma bone marrow niche: biologic and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Jakubikova, Jana; Cholujova, Danka; Hideshima, Teru; Gronesova, Paulina; Soltysova, Andrea; Harada, Takeshi; Joo, Jungnam; Kong, Sun-Young; Szalat, Raphael E; Richardson, Paul G; Munshi, Nikhil C; Dorfman, David M; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2016-11-22

    Specific niches within the tumor bone marrow (BM) microenvironment afford a sanctuary for multiple myeloma (MM) clones due to stromal cell-tumor cell interactions, which confer survival advantage and drug resistance. Defining the sequelae of tumor cell interactions within the MM niches on an individualized basis may provide the rationale for personalized therapies. To mimic the MM niche, we here describe a new 3D co-culture ex-vivo model in which primary MM patient BM cells are co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in a hydrogel 3D system. In the 3D model, MSC with conserved phenotype (CD73+CD90+CD105+) formed compact clusters with active fibrous connections, and retained lineage differentiation capacity. Extracellular matrix molecules, integrins, and niche related molecules including N-cadherin and CXCL12 are expressed in 3D MSC model. Furthermore, activation of osteogenesis (MMP13, SPP1, ADAMTS4, and MGP genes) and osteoblastogenic differentiation was confirmed in 3D MSC model. Co-culture of patient-derived BM mononuclear cells with either autologous or allogeneic MSC in 3D model increased proliferation of MM cells, CXCR4 expression, and SP cells. We carried out immune profiling to show that distribution of immune cell subsets was similar in 3D and 2D MSC model systems. Importantly, resistance to novel agents (IMiDs, bortezomib, carfilzomib) and conventional agents (doxorubicin, dexamethasone, melphalan) was observed in 3D MSC system, reflective of clinical resistance. This 3D MSC model may therefore allow for studies of MM pathogenesis and drug resistance within the BM niche. Importantly, ongoing prospective trials are evaluating its utility to inform personalized targeted and immune therapy in MM.

  6. A novel 3D mesenchymal stem cell model of the multiple myeloma bone marrow niche: biologic and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Jakubikova, Jana; Cholujova, Danka; Hideshima, Teru; Gronesova, Paulina; Soltysova, Andrea; Harada, Takeshi; Joo, Jungnam; Kong, Sun-Young; Szalat, Raphael E.; Richardson, Paul G.; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Dorfman, David M.; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    Specific niches within the tumor bone marrow (BM) microenvironment afford a sanctuary for multiple myeloma (MM) clones due to stromal cell-tumor cell interactions, which confer survival advantage and drug resistance. Defining the sequelae of tumor cell interactions within the MM niches on an individualized basis may provide the rationale for personalized therapies. To mimic the MM niche, we here describe a new 3D co-culture ex-vivo model in which primary MM patient BM cells are co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in a hydrogel 3D system. In the 3D model, MSC with conserved phenotype (CD73+CD90+CD105+) formed compact clusters with active fibrous connections, and retained lineage differentiation capacity. Extracellular matrix molecules, integrins, and niche related molecules including N-cadherin and CXCL12 are expressed in 3D MSC model. Furthermore, activation of osteogenesis (MMP13, SPP1, ADAMTS4, and MGP genes) and osteoblastogenic differentiation was confirmed in 3D MSC model. Co-culture of patient-derived BM mononuclear cells with either autologous or allogeneic MSC in 3D model increased proliferation of MM cells, CXCR4 expression, and SP cells. We carried out immune profiling to show that distribution of immune cell subsets was similar in 3D and 2D MSC model systems. Importantly, resistance to novel agents (IMiDs, bortezomib, carfilzomib) and conventional agents (doxorubicin, dexamethasone, melphalan) was observed in 3D MSC system, reflective of clinical resistance. This 3D MSC model may therefore allow for studies of MM pathogenesis and drug resistance within the BM niche. Importantly, ongoing prospective trials are evaluating its utility to inform personalized targeted and immune therapy in MM. PMID:27764795

  7. Scaffold-free and scaffold-assisted 3D culture enhances differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Vidyasekar, Prasanna; Shyamsunder, Pavithra; Sahoo, Sanjeeb Kumar; Verma, Rama Shanker

    2016-02-01

    3D cultures of stem cells can preserve differentiation potential or increase the efficiency of methods that induce differentiation. Mouse bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs) were cultured in 3D as scaffold-free spheroids or "mesoid bodies" (MBs) and as aggregates on poly(lactic) acid microspheres (MB/MS). 3D cultures demonstrated viable cells, interaction on multiple planes, altered cell morphology, and the formation of structures similar to epithelial cell bridges. Cell proliferation was limited in suspension cultures of MB and MB/MS; however, cells regained proliferative capacity when transferred to flat substrates of tissue culture plates (TCPs). Expanded as monolayer, cells retained expression of Sca-1 and CD44 stem cell markers. 3D cultures demonstrated enhanced potential for adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation showing higher triglyceride accumulation and robust mineralization in comparison with TCP cultures. Enhanced and efficient adipogenesis was also observed in 3D cultures generated in a rotating cell culture system. Preservation of multilineage potential of BMSC was demonstrated in 5-azacytidine treatment of 3D cultures and TCP by expression of cardiac markers GATA4 and ACTA1 although functioning cardiomyocytes were not derived.

  8. Segmentation of vascular structures and hematopoietic cells in 3D microscopy images and quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Jian; Yang, Lin; Kamocka, Malgorzata M.; Zollman, Amy L.; Carlesso, Nadia; Chen, Danny Z.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present image processing methods for quantitative study of how the bone marrow microenvironment changes (characterized by altered vascular structure and hematopoietic cell distribution) caused by diseases or various factors. We develop algorithms that automatically segment vascular structures and hematopoietic cells in 3-D microscopy images, perform quantitative analysis of the properties of the segmented vascular structures and cells, and examine how such properties change. In processing images, we apply local thresholding to segment vessels, and add post-processing steps to deal with imaging artifacts. We propose an improved watershed algorithm that relies on both intensity and shape information and can separate multiple overlapping cells better than common watershed methods. We then quantitatively compute various features of the vascular structures and hematopoietic cells, such as the branches and sizes of vessels and the distribution of cells. In analyzing vascular properties, we provide algorithms for pruning fake vessel segments and branches based on vessel skeletons. Our algorithms can segment vascular structures and hematopoietic cells with good quality. We use our methods to quantitatively examine the changes in the bone marrow microenvironment caused by the deletion of Notch pathway. Our quantitative analysis reveals property changes in samples with deleted Notch pathway. Our tool is useful for biologists to quantitatively measure changes in the bone marrow microenvironment, for developing possible therapeutic strategies to help the bone marrow microenvironment recovery.

  9. Segmentation of 3D cell membrane images by PDE methods and its applications.

    PubMed

    Mikula, K; Peyriéras, N; Remešíková, M; Stašová, O

    2011-06-01

    We present a set of techniques that enable us to segment objects from 3D cell membrane images. Particularly, we propose methods for detection of approximate cell nuclei centers, extraction of the inner cell boundaries, the surface of the organism and the intercellular borders--the so called intercellular skeleton. All methods are based on numerical solution of partial differential equations. The center detection problem is represented by a level set equation for advective motion in normal direction with curvature term. In case of the inner cell boundaries and the global surface, we use the generalized subjective surface model. The intercellular borders are segmented by the advective level set equation where the velocity field is given by the gradient of the signed distance function to the segmented inner cell boundaries. The distance function is computed by solving the time relaxed eikonal equation. We describe the mathematical models, explain their numerical approximation and finally we present various possible practical applications on the images of zebrafish embryogenesis--computation of important quantitative characteristics, evaluation of the cell shape, detection of cell divisions and others.

  10. Multi-cellular 3D human primary liver cell culture elevates metabolic activity under fluidic flow.

    PubMed

    Esch, Mandy B; Prot, Jean-Matthieu; Wang, Ying I; Miller, Paula; Llamas-Vidales, Jose Ricardo; Naughton, Brian A; Applegate, Dawn R; Shuler, Michael L

    2015-05-21

    We have developed a low-cost liver cell culture device that creates fluidic flow over a 3D primary liver cell culture that consists of multiple liver cell types, including hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells (fibroblasts, stellate cells, and Kupffer cells). We tested the performance of the cell culture under fluidic flow for 14 days, finding that hepatocytes produced albumin and urea at elevated levels compared to static cultures. Hepatocytes also responded with induction of P450 (CYP1A1 and CYP3A4) enzyme activity when challenged with P450 inducers, although we did not find significant differences between static and fluidic cultures. Non-parenchymal cells were similarly responsive, producing interleukin 8 (IL-8) when challenged with 10 μM bacterial lipoprotein (LPS). To create the fluidic flow in an inexpensive manner, we used a rocking platform that tilts the cell culture devices at angles between ±12°, resulting in a periodically changing hydrostatic pressure drop between reservoirs and the accompanying periodically changing fluidic flow (average flow rate of 650 μL min(-1), and a maximum shear stress of 0.64 dyne cm(-2)). The increase in metabolic activity is consistent with the hypothesis that, similar to unidirectional fluidic flow, primary liver cell cultures increase their metabolic activity in response to fluidic flow periodically changes direction. Since fluidic flow that changes direction periodically drastically changes the behavior of other cells types that are shear sensitive, our findings support the theory that the increase in hepatic metabolic activity associated with fluidic flow is either activated by mechanisms other than shear sensing (for example increased opportunities for gas and metabolite exchange), or that it follows a shear sensing mechanism that does not depend on the direction of shear. Our mode of device operation allows us to evaluate drugs under fluidic cell culture conditions and at low device manufacturing and operation

  11. Fabrication of three-dimensional multi-protein microstructures for cell migration and adhesion enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Da Sie, Yong; Li, Yi-Cheng; Chang, Nan-Shan; Campagnola, Paul J.; Chen, Shean-Jen