Science.gov

Sample records for 3d chemical transport

  1. Ozone Measurements and a 3D Chemical Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; Douglass, Anne R.; Frith, Stacey; Steenrod, Steven; Polansky, Brian

    2004-01-01

    We have used our three-dimensional chemical transport model (CTM) to calculate the expected reponse of stratospheric composition over the past 30 years to forcing by chlorine and bromine compounds, solar ultraviolet, and volcanic aerosols. The CTM uses off-line winds and temperatures fiom a 50-year run of the finite volume general circulation model (FVGCM). We compare the total column ozone and the ozone profile fiom the CTM output to a variety of data sources. These include a merged total ozone data set from TOMS and SBUV using the new version 8 algorithm. Total ozone fiom the CTM are compared to ground-station measurements of total ozone at specific locations. Ozone profiles are compared to satellite meausrements fiom SBUV, SAGE, and HALOE. Profiles are also compared to ozonesondes over several locations. The results of the comparisons are quantified by using a time-series statistical analysis to determine trends, solar cycle, and volcanic reponse in both the model and in the data. Initial results indicate that the model responds to forcings in a way that is similar to the observed atmospheric response. The model does seem to be more sensitive to the chlorine and bromine perturbation ihan is the data. Further details and comparisons wiii be discussed.

  2. Ozone formation during an episode over Europe: A 3-D chemical/transport model simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berntsen, Terje; Isaksen, Ivar S. A.

    1994-01-01

    A 3-D regional photochemical tracer/transport model for Europe and the Eastern Atlantic has been developed based on the NASA/GISS CTM. The model resolution is 4x5 degrees latitude and longitude with 9 layers in the vertical (7 in the troposphere). Advective winds, convection statistics and other meteorological data from the NASA/GISS GCM are used. An extensive gas-phase chemical scheme based on the scheme used in our global 2D model has been incorporated in the 3D model. In this work ozone formation in the troposphere is studied with the 3D model during a 5 day period starting June 30. Extensive local ozone production is found and the relationship between the source regions and the downwind areas are discussed. Variations in local ozone formation as a function of total emission rate, as well as the composition of the emissions (HC/NO(x)) ratio and isoprene emissions) are elucidated. An important vertical transport process in the troposphere is by convective clouds. The 3D model includes an explicit parameterization of this process. It is shown that this process has significant influence on the calculated surface ozone concentrations.

  3. Stratospheric Sulphur - 3D Chemical Transport Model Simulations and MIPAS/ENVISAT Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Annika; Höpfner, Michael; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin; Stiller, Gabriele; Clarmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In this study processes that regulate the atmospheric distribution, and the budget of carbonyl sulphide (OCS), sulphur dioxide (SO2) and stratospheric sulphate aerosols are investigated in the upper troposphere / lower stratosphere. Sulphate aerosols impact the Earth's climate by backscattering parts of the incoming solar radiation. This negative radiative forcing can lead to reduced surface temperatures and is thought of as one reason for the recent global warming "hiatus". Our study is based on the comparison of modeled and observed data. An isentropic chemical transport model is used, spanning the region from 330 to 3000 K potential temperature (~ 8 - 66 km), driven by ERA-Interim Reanalysis data. The simulations are compared to observations from MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding), a limb sounder on the satellite ENVISAT that was operational from July 2002 to April 2012. The focus of our study lies on volcanically emitted SO2 and its dispersion, as main precursor for sulphate aerosol during volcanically perturbed times, with its simulated distribution and lifetime, in comparison to MIPAS SO2 measurements. Moreover data for OCS, as the main source for stratospheric sulphur during volcanically quiescent periods. Furthermore, first results of sulphuric aerosol-mass retrievals from MIPAS are presented. These will be combined with the gaseous sulphur species to obtain a global budget of stratospheric sulphur.

  4. Analysis of long-range transport of aerosols for Portugal using 3D chemical transport model and satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchepel, O.; Ferreira, J.; Fernandes, A. P.; Basart, S.; Baldasano, J. M.; Borrego, C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the contribution of long-range transport of mineral dust from North Africa to the air pollution levels in Portugal based on a combination of a modelling approach and satellite observations. The Comprehensive Air Quality Model (CAMx) was applied together with the updated Dust REgional Atmospheric Model (BSC-DREAM8b) to characterise anthropogenic and natural sources of primary aerosols as well as secondary aerosols formation. The modelling results, after their validation and bias removing process, have been used in combination with aerosol measurements provided by Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), using OMAERUV Level-2 v003 product, aiming to better understand the advantages and shortcomings of both, satellite and modelling aerosol data. The data analysis is presented for Portugal for July 2006 focusing on aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm and aerosol type. Based on the modelling results, the importance of the long-range transport of mineral dust was demonstrated for the simulation days, achieving a 60% contribution to AOD levels. The mineral dust is affecting atmospheric layers up to 6 km but peak concentrations are presented at layers below 2 km. The model predicts a complex mixture of different types of aerosol for the pixels classified by OMI as "mineral dust" and "sulphates". Although a good agreement between the model outputs and OMI observations has been found in terms of the spatial pattern and AOD correlation is about 0.48 for mineral dust, several problems were identified. The model is systematically underestimating the aerosol concentration at near ground level in comparison with the air quality monitoring stations, while OMI is in general overestimating AOD for the analysed period based on the comparison with AERONET data. Additionally, misclassification of mineral dust for some geographical locations and discontinuity in AOD values along the coastal line at water/land interface in the OMI data are discussed.

  5. Atmospheric Nitrogen Trifluoride: Optimized emission estimates using 2-D and 3-D Chemical Transport Models from 1973-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivy, D. J.; Rigby, M. L.; Prinn, R. G.; Muhle, J.; Weiss, R. F.

    2009-12-01

    We present optimized annual global emissions from 1973-2008 of nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), a powerful greenhouse gas which is not currently regulated by the Kyoto Protocol. In the past few decades, NF3 production has dramatically increased due to its usage in the semiconductor industry. Emissions were estimated through the 'pulse-method' discrete Kalman filter using both a simple, flexible 2-D 12-box model used in the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) network and the Model for Ozone and Related Tracers (MOZART v4.5), a full 3-D atmospheric chemistry model. No official audited reports of industrial NF3 emissions are available, and with limited information on production, a priori emissions were estimated using both a bottom-up and top-down approach with two different spatial patterns based on semiconductor perfluorocarbon (PFC) emissions from the Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR v3.2) and Semiconductor Industry Association sales information. Both spatial patterns used in the models gave consistent results, showing the robustness of the estimated global emissions. Differences between estimates using the 2-D and 3-D models can be attributed to transport rates and resolution differences. Additionally, new NF3 industry production and market information is presented. Emission estimates from both the 2-D and 3-D models suggest that either the assumed industry release rate of NF3 or industry production information is still underestimated.

  6. Polar Ozone Loss Rates: Comparison Of Match Observations With Simulations Of 3-D Chemical Transport Model And Box Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, O. P.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Lefevre, F.; Marchand, M.; Pazmino, A.; Hauchecorne, A.

    2005-12-01

    Model simulations of ozone loss rates during recent arctic and Antarctic winters are compared with the observed ozone loss rates from the match technique. Arctic winters 1994/1995, 1999/2000, 2002/2003 and the Antarctic winter 2003 were considered for the analysis. We use a high resolution chemical transport model MIMOSA-CHIM and REPROBUS box model for the calculation of ozone loss rates. Trajectory model calculations show that the ozone loss rates are dependent on the initialization fields. On the one hand when chemical fields are initialized by UCAM (University of Cambridge SLIMCAT model simulated fields) the loss rates were underestimated by a factor of two whereas on the other hand when it is initialized by UL (University of Leeds) fields the model loss rates are in a very good agreement with match loss rates at lower levels. The study shows a very good agreement between MIMOSA-CHIM simulation and match observation in 1999/2000 winter at both levels, 450 and 500 K, except slight underestimation in March at 500 K. But in January we have a very good agreement. This is also true for 1994/1995 when we consider simulated ozone loss rate in view of the ECMWF wind deficiency assuming that match observations were not made on isolated trajectories. Sensitivity tests, by changing JCl2O2 value, particle number density and heating rates, performed for the arctic winter 1999/2000 shows that we need to improve our understanding of particle number density and heating rate calculation mechanism. Burkholder JCl2O2 has improved the comparison of MIMOSA-CHIM model results with observations (Tripathi et al., 2005). In the same study the comparison results were shown to improved by changing heating rates and number density through NAT particle sedimentation.

  7. Production of Lightning NO(x) and its Vertical Distribution Calculated from 3-D Cloud-scale Chemical Transport Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Lesley; Pickering, Kenneth; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Allen, Dale; DeCaria, Alex; Ridley, Brian; Lin, Ruei-Fong; Lang, Steve; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    A 3-D cloud scale chemical transport model that includes a parameterized source of lightning NO(x), based on observed flash rates has been used to simulate six midlatitude and subtropical thunderstorms observed during four field projects. Production per intracloud (P(sub IC) and cloud-to-ground (P(sub CG)) flash is estimated by assuming various values of P(sub IC) and P(sub CG) for each storm and determining which production scenario yields NO(x) mixing ratios that compare most favorably with in-cloud aircraft observations. We obtain a mean P(sub CG) value of 500 moles NO (7 kg N) per flash. The results of this analysis also suggest that on average, P(sub IC) may be nearly equal to P(sub CG), which is contrary to the common assumption that intracloud flashes are significantly less productive of NO than are cloud-to-ground flashes. This study also presents vertical profiles of the mass of lightning NO(x), after convection based on 3-D cloud-scale model simulations. The results suggest that following convection, a large percentage of lightning NO(x), remains in the middle and upper troposphere where it originated, while only a small percentage is found near the surface. The results of this work differ from profiles calculated from 2-D cloud-scale model simulations with a simpler lightning parameterization that were peaked near the surface and in the upper troposphere (referred to as a "C-shaped" profile). The new model results (a backward C-shaped profile) suggest that chemical transport models that assume a C-shaped vertical profile of lightning NO(x) mass may place too much mass neat the surface and too little in the middle troposphere.

  8. Quantum transport through 3D Dirac materials

    SciTech Connect

    Salehi, M.; Jafari, S.A.

    2015-08-15

    Bismuth and its alloys provide a paradigm to realize three dimensional materials whose low-energy effective theory is given by Dirac equation in 3+1 dimensions. We study the quantum transport properties of three dimensional Dirac materials within the framework of Landauer–Büttiker formalism. Charge carriers in normal metal satisfying the Schrödinger equation, can be split into four-component with appropriate matching conditions at the boundary with the three dimensional Dirac material (3DDM). We calculate the conductance and the Fano factor of an interface separating 3DDM from a normal metal, as well as the conductance through a slab of 3DDM. Under certain circumstances the 3DDM appears transparent to electrons hitting the 3DDM. We find that electrons hitting the metal-3DDM interface from metallic side can enter 3DDM in a reversed spin state as soon as their angle of incidence deviates from the direction perpendicular to interface. However the presence of a second interface completely cancels this effect.

  9. The Effects of Lightning NO(x) Production during the July 21 EULINOX Storm studied with a 3-D Cloud-scale Chemical Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Lesley E.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Stenchikov, Georgiy L.; Huntrieser, Heidi; Schumann, Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    The July 21,1998 thunderstonn observed during the European Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Project (EULINOX) project was simulated using the three-dimensional Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. The simulation successfully reproduced a number of observed storm features including the splitting of the original cell into a southern cell which developed supercell characteristics, and a northern cell which became multicellular. Output from the GCE simulation was used to drive an offline cloud-scale chemical transport model which calculates tracer transport and includes a parameterization of lightning NO(x) production which uses observed flash rates as input. Estimates of lightning NO(x) production were deduced by assuming various values of production per intracloud and production per cloud-to-ground flash and comparing the results with in-cloud aircraft observations. The assumption that both types of flashes produce 360 moles of NO per flash on average compared most favorably with column mass and probability distribution functions calculated from observations. This assumed production per flash corresponds to a global annual lightning NOx source of 7 Tg N per yr. Chemical reactions were included in the model to evaluate the impact of lightning NO(x), on ozone. During the storm, the inclusion of lightning NOx in the model results in a small loss of ozone (on average less than 4 ppbv) at all model levels. Simulations of the chemical environment in the 24 hours following the storm show on average a small increase in the net production of ozone at most levels resulting from lightning NO(x), maximizing at approximately 5 ppbv per day at 5.5 km. Between 8 and 10.5 km, lightning NO(x) causes decreased net ozone production.

  10. MPSalsa 3D Simulations of Chemically Reacting Flows

    DOE Data Explorer

    Many important scientific and engineering applications require a detailed analysis of complex systems with coupled fluid flow, thermal energy transfer, mass transfer and nonequilibrium chemical reactions. Currently, computer simulations of these complex reacting flow problems are limited to idealized systems in one or two spatial dimensions when coupled with a detailed, fundamental chemistry model. The goal of our research is to develop, analyze and implement advanced MP numerical algorithms that will allow high resolution 3D simulations with an equal emphasis on fluid flow and chemical kinetics modeling. In our research, we focus on the development of new, fully coupled, implicit solution strategies that are based on robust MP iterative solution methods (copied from http://www.cs.sandia.gov/CRF/MPSalsa/). These simulations are needed for scientific and technical areas such as: combustion research for transportation, atmospheric chemistry modeling for pollution studies, chemically reacting flow models for analysis and control of manufacturing processes, surface catalytic reactors for methane to methanol conversion and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process modeling for production of advanced semiconductor materials (http://www.cs.sandia.gov/CRF/MPSalsa/).

    This project website provides six QuickTime videos of these simulations, along with a small image gallery and slideshow animations. A list of related publications and conference presentations is also made available.

  11. 3D printing of versatile reactionware for chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kitson, Philip J; Glatzel, Stefan; Chen, Wei; Lin, Chang-Gen; Song, Yu-Fei; Cronin, Leroy

    2016-05-01

    In recent decades, 3D printing (also known as additive manufacturing) techniques have moved beyond their traditional applications in the fields of industrial manufacturing and prototyping to increasingly find roles in scientific research contexts, such as synthetic chemistry. We present a general approach for the production of bespoke chemical reactors, termed reactionware, using two different approaches to extrusion-based 3D printing. This protocol describes the printing of an inert polypropylene (PP) architecture with the concurrent printing of soft material catalyst composites, using two different 3D printer setups. The steps of the PROCEDURE describe the design and preparation of a 3D digital model of the desired reactionware device and the preparation of this model for use with fused deposition modeling (FDM) type 3D printers. The protocol then further describes the preparation of composite catalyst-silicone materials for incorporation into the 3D-printed device and the steps required to fabricate a reactionware device. This combined approach allows versatility in the design and use of reactionware based on the specific needs of the experimental user. To illustrate this, we present a detailed procedure for the production of one such reactionware device that will result in the production of a sealed reactor capable of effecting a multistep organic synthesis. Depending on the design time of the 3D model, and including time for curing and drying of materials, this procedure can be completed in ∼3 d.

  12. 2D-3D MIGRATION AND CONFORMATIONAL MULTIPLICATION OF CHEMICALS IN LARGE CHEMICAL INVENTORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical interactions are three-dimensional (3D) in nature and require modeling chemicals as 3D entities. In turn, using 3D models of chemicals leads to the realization that a single 2D structure can have hundreds of different conformations, and the electronic properties of these...

  13. A non-conforming 3D spherical harmonic transport solver

    SciTech Connect

    Van Criekingen, S.

    2006-07-01

    A new 3D transport solver for the time-independent Boltzmann transport equation has been developed. This solver is based on the second-order even-parity form of the transport equation. The angular discretization is performed through the expansion of the angular neutron flux in spherical harmonics (PN method). The novelty of this solver is the use of non-conforming finite elements for the spatial discretization. Such elements lead to a discontinuous flux approximation. This interface continuity requirement relaxation property is shared with mixed-dual formulations such as the ones based on Raviart-Thomas finite elements. Encouraging numerical results are presented. (authors)

  14. Modeling variably saturated multispecies reactive groundwater solute transport with MODFLOW-UZF and RT3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, Ryan T.; Morway, Eric D.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Gates, Timothy K.

    2013-01-01

    A numerical model was developed that is capable of simulating multispecies reactive solute transport in variably saturated porous media. This model consists of a modified version of the reactive transport model RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3 Dimensions) that is linked to the Unsaturated-Zone Flow (UZF1) package and MODFLOW. Referred to as UZF-RT3D, the model is tested against published analytical benchmarks as well as other published contaminant transport models, including HYDRUS-1D, VS2DT, and SUTRA, and the coupled flow and transport modeling system of CATHY and TRAN3D. Comparisons in one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional variably saturated systems are explored. While several test cases are included to verify the correct implementation of variably saturated transport in UZF-RT3D, other cases are included to demonstrate the usefulness of the code in terms of model run-time and handling the reaction kinetics of multiple interacting species in variably saturated subsurface systems. As UZF1 relies on a kinematic-wave approximation for unsaturated flow that neglects the diffusive terms in Richards equation, UZF-RT3D can be used for large-scale aquifer systems for which the UZF1 formulation is reasonable, that is, capillary-pressure gradients can be neglected and soil parameters can be treated as homogeneous. Decreased model run-time and the ability to include site-specific chemical species and chemical reactions make UZF-RT3D an attractive model for efficient simulation of multispecies reactive transport in variably saturated large-scale subsurface systems.

  15. Modeling variably saturated multispecies reactive groundwater solute transport with MODFLOW-UZF and RT3D.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Ryan T; Morway, Eric D; Niswonger, Richard G; Gates, Timothy K

    2013-01-01

    A numerical model was developed that is capable of simulating multispecies reactive solute transport in variably saturated porous media. This model consists of a modified version of the reactive transport model RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3 Dimensions) that is linked to the Unsaturated-Zone Flow (UZF1) package and MODFLOW. Referred to as UZF-RT3D, the model is tested against published analytical benchmarks as well as other published contaminant transport models, including HYDRUS-1D, VS2DT, and SUTRA, and the coupled flow and transport modeling system of CATHY and TRAN3D. Comparisons in one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional variably saturated systems are explored. While several test cases are included to verify the correct implementation of variably saturated transport in UZF-RT3D, other cases are included to demonstrate the usefulness of the code in terms of model run-time and handling the reaction kinetics of multiple interacting species in variably saturated subsurface systems. As UZF1 relies on a kinematic-wave approximation for unsaturated flow that neglects the diffusive terms in Richards equation, UZF-RT3D can be used for large-scale aquifer systems for which the UZF1 formulation is reasonable, that is, capillary-pressure gradients can be neglected and soil parameters can be treated as homogeneous. Decreased model run-time and the ability to include site-specific chemical species and chemical reactions make UZF-RT3D an attractive model for efficient simulation of multispecies reactive transport in variably saturated large-scale subsurface systems.

  16. Radiation Transport in 3D Heterogeneous Materials: DNS

    SciTech Connect

    Graziani, F

    2003-07-09

    In order to develop a phenomenological approach to transport in 3D heterogeneous media, we have performed direct numerical simulation studies. Using an algorithm based on the lattice random walk to generate random media, we have performed radiographic shots of the sample and digitized both the chord length and optical depth distributions. The optical depth distribution is then used to compute an effective mean free path. As theory predicts, the atomically averaged mean free path is always a minimum value. We have also demonstrated a dependency of mean free path on the distribution of random material.

  17. Transport of 3D space charge dominated beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Jian-Qin

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we present the theoretical analysis and the computer code design for the intense pulsed beam transport. Intense beam dynamics is a very important issue in low-energy high-current accelerators and beam transport systems. This problem affects beam transmission and beam qualities. Therefore, it attracts the attention of the accelerator physicists worldwide. The analysis and calculation for the intense beam dynamics are very complicated, because the state of particle motion is dominated not only by the applied electromagnetic fields, but also by the beam-induced electromagnetic fields (self-fields). Moreover, the self fields are related to the beam dimensions and particle distributions. So, it is very difficult to get the self-consistent solutions of particle motion analytically. For this reason, we combine the Lie algebraic method and the particle in cell (PIC) scheme together to simulate intense 3D beam transport. With the Lie algebraic method we analyze the particle nonlinear trajectories in the applied electromagnetic fields up to third order approximation, and with the PIC algorithm we calculate the space charge effects to the particle motion. Based on the theoretical analysis, we have developed a computer code, which calculates beam transport systems consisting of electrostatic lenses, electrostatic accelerating columns, solenoid lenses, magnetic and electric quadruples, magnetic sextupoles, octopuses and different kinds of electromagnetic analyzers. The optimization calculations and the graphic display for the calculated results are provided by the code.

  18. 3D Chemical and Elemental Imaging by STXM Spectrotomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Karunakaran, C.; Lu, Y.; Hormes, J.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Prange, A.; Franz, B.; Harkness, T.; Obst, M.

    2011-09-09

    Spectrotomography based on the scanning transmission x-ray microscope (STXM) at the 10ID-1 spectromicroscopy beamline of the Canadian Light Source was used to study two selected unicellular microorganisms. Spatial distributions of sulphur globules, calcium, protein, and polysaccharide in sulphur-metabolizing bacteria (Allochromatium vinosum) were determined at the S 2p, C 1s, and Ca 2p edges. 3D chemical mapping showed that the sulphur globules are located inside the bacteria with a strong spatial correlation with calcium ions (it is most probably calcium carbonate from the medium; however, with STXM the distribution and localization in the cell can be made visible, which is very interesting for a biologist) and polysaccharide-rich polymers, suggesting an influence of the organic components on the formation of the sulphur and calcium deposits. A second study investigated copper accumulating in yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) treated with copper sulphate. 3D elemental imaging at the Cu 2p edge showed that Cu(II) is reduced to Cu(I) on the yeast cell wall. A novel needle-like wet cell sample holder for STXM spectrotomography studies of fully hydrated samples is discussed.

  19. 3D Chemical and Elemental Imaging by STXM Spectrotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Karunakaran, C.; Prange, A.; Franz, B.; Harkness, T.; Lu, Y.; Obst, M.; Hormes, J.

    2011-09-01

    Spectrotomography based on the scanning transmission x-ray microscope (STXM) at the 10ID-1 spectromicroscopy beamline of the Canadian Light Source was used to study two selected unicellular microorganisms. Spatial distributions of sulphur globules, calcium, protein, and polysaccharide in sulphur-metabolizing bacteria (Allochromatium vinosum) were determined at the S 2p, C 1s, and Ca 2p edges. 3D chemical mapping showed that the sulphur globules are located inside the bacteria with a strong spatial correlation with calcium ions (it is most probably calcium carbonate from the medium; however, with STXM the distribution and localization in the cell can be made visible, which is very interesting for a biologist) and polysaccharide-rich polymers, suggesting an influence of the organic components on the formation of the sulphur and calcium deposits. A second study investigated copper accumulating in yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) treated with copper sulphate. 3D elemental imaging at the Cu 2p edge showed that Cu(II) is reduced to Cu(I) on the yeast cell wall. A novel needle-like wet cell sample holder for STXM spectrotomography studies of fully hydrated samples is discussed.

  20. 3-D numerical simulations of volcanic ash transport and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y. J.; Koyaguchi, T.

    2012-12-01

    During an explosive volcanic eruption, volcanic gas and pyroclasts are ejected from the volcanic vent. The pyroclasts are carried up within a convective plume, advected by the surrounding wind field, and sediment on the ground depending on their terminal velocity. The fine ash are expected to have atmospheric residence, whereas the coarser particles form fall deposits. Accurate modeling of particle transport and deposition is of critical importance from the viewpoint of disaster prevention. Previously, some particle-tracking models (e.g., PUFF) and advection-diffusion models (e.g., TEPHRA2 and FALL3D) tried to forecast particle concentration in the atmosphere and particle loading at ground level. However, these models assumed source conditions (the grain-size distribution, plume height, and mass release location) based on the simple 1-D model of convective plume. In this study, we aim to develop a new 3-D model which reproduces both of the dynamics of convective plume and the ash transport. The model is designed to describe the injection of eruption cloud and marker particles from a circular vent above a flat surface into the stratified atmosphere. Because the advection is the predominant mechanism of particle transport near the volcano, the diffusive process is not taken into account in this model. The distribution of wind velocity is given as an initial condition. The model of the eruption cloud dynamics is based on the 3-D time-dependent model of Suzuki et al. (2005). We apply a pseudo-gas model to calculate the eruption cloud dynamics: the effect of particle separation on the cloud dynamics is not considered. In order to reproduce the drastic change of eruption cloud density, we change the effective gas constant and heat capacity of the mixture in the equation of state for ideal gases with the mixing ratio between the ejected material and entrained air. In order to calculate the location and movement of ash particles, the present model employs Lagrangian marker

  1. PHT3D-UZF: A reactive transport model for variably-saturated porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, Ming Zhi; Post, Vincent E. A.; Salmon, S. Ursula; Morway, Eric; Prommer, H.

    2016-01-01

    A modified version of the MODFLOW/MT3DMS-based reactive transport model PHT3D was developed to extend current reactive transport capabilities to the variably-saturated component of the subsurface system and incorporate diffusive reactive transport of gaseous species. Referred to as PHT3D-UZF, this code incorporates flux terms calculated by MODFLOW's unsaturated-zone flow (UZF1) package. A volume-averaged approach similar to the method used in UZF-MT3DMS was adopted. The PHREEQC-based computation of chemical processes within PHT3D-UZF in combination with the analytical solution method of UZF1 allows for comprehensive reactive transport investigations (i.e., biogeochemical transformations) that jointly involve saturated and unsaturated zone processes. Intended for regional-scale applications, UZF1 simulates downward-only flux within the unsaturated zone. The model was tested by comparing simulation results with those of existing numerical models. The comparison was performed for several benchmark problems that cover a range of important hydrological and reactive transport processes. A 2D simulation scenario was defined to illustrate the geochemical evolution following dewatering in a sandy acid sulfate soil environment. Other potential applications include the simulation of biogeochemical processes in variably-saturated systems that track the transport and fate of agricultural pollutants, nutrients, natural and xenobiotic organic compounds and micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals, as well as the evolution of isotope patterns.

  2. PHT3D-UZF: A Reactive Transport Model for Variably-Saturated Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming Zhi; Post, Vincent E A; Salmon, S Ursula; Morway, Eric D; Prommer, Henning

    2016-01-01

    A modified version of the MODFLOW/MT3DMS-based reactive transport model PHT3D was developed to extend current reactive transport capabilities to the variably-saturated component of the subsurface system and incorporate diffusive reactive transport of gaseous species. Referred to as PHT3D-UZF, this code incorporates flux terms calculated by MODFLOW's unsaturated-zone flow (UZF1) package. A volume-averaged approach similar to the method used in UZF-MT3DMS was adopted. The PHREEQC-based computation of chemical processes within PHT3D-UZF in combination with the analytical solution method of UZF1 allows for comprehensive reactive transport investigations (i.e., biogeochemical transformations) that jointly involve saturated and unsaturated zone processes. Intended for regional-scale applications, UZF1 simulates downward-only flux within the unsaturated zone. The model was tested by comparing simulation results with those of existing numerical models. The comparison was performed for several benchmark problems that cover a range of important hydrological and reactive transport processes. A 2D simulation scenario was defined to illustrate the geochemical evolution following dewatering in a sandy acid sulfate soil environment. Other potential applications include the simulation of biogeochemical processes in variably-saturated systems that track the transport and fate of agricultural pollutants, nutrients, natural and xenobiotic organic compounds and micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals, as well as the evolution of isotope patterns.

  3. Rayleigh Quotient Iteration in 3D, Deterministic Neutron Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Slaybaugh, R; Evans, Thomas M; Davidson, Gregory G; Wilson, P.

    2012-01-01

    Today's "grand challenge" neutron transport problems require 3-D meshes with billions of cells, hundreds of energy groups, and accurate quadratures and scattering expansions. Leadership-class computers provide platforms on which high-fidelity fluxes can be calculated. However, appropriate methods are needed that can use these machines effectively. Such methods must be able to use hundreds of thousands of cores and have good convergence properties. Rayleigh quotient iteration (RQI) is an eigenvalue solver that has been added to the Sn code Denovo to address convergence. Rayleigh quotient iteration is an optimal shifted inverse iteration method that should converge in fewer iterations than the more common power method and other shifted inverse iteration methods for many problems of interest. Denovo's RQI uses a new multigroup Krylov solver for the fixed source solutions inside every iteration that allows parallelization in energy in addition to space and angle. This Krylov solver has been shown to scale successfully to 200,000 cores: for example one test problem scaled from 69,120 cores to 190,080 cores with 98% efficiency. This paper shows that RQI works for some small problems. However, the Krylov method upon which it relies does not always converge because RQI creates ill-conditioned systems. This result leads to the conclusion that preconditioning is needed to allow this method to be applicable to a wider variety of problems.

  4. 3-D PARTICLE TRANSPORT WITHIN THE HUMAN UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study trajectories of inhaled particulate matter (PM) were simulated within a three-dimensional (3-D) computer model of the human upper respiratory tract (URT). The airways were described by computer-reconstructed images of a silicone rubber cast of the human head, throat...

  5. SOLIDFELIX: a transportable 3D static volume display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhans, Knut; Kreft, Alexander; Wörden, Henrik Tom

    2009-02-01

    Flat 2D screens cannot display complex 3D structures without the usage of different slices of the 3D model. Volumetric displays like the "FELIX 3D-Displays" can solve the problem. They provide space-filling images and are characterized by "multi-viewer" and "all-round view" capabilities without requiring cumbersome goggles. In the past many scientists tried to develop similar 3D displays. Our paper includes an overview from 1912 up to today. During several years of investigations on swept volume displays within the "FELIX 3D-Projekt" we learned about some significant disadvantages of rotating screens, for example hidden zones. For this reason the FELIX-Team started investigations also in the area of static volume displays. Within three years of research on our 3D static volume display at a normal high school in Germany we were able to achieve considerable results despite minor funding resources within this non-commercial group. Core element of our setup is the display volume which consists of a cubic transparent material (crystal, glass, or polymers doped with special ions, mainly from the rare earth group or other fluorescent materials). We focused our investigations on one frequency, two step upconversion (OFTS-UC) and two frequency, two step upconversion (TFTSUC) with IR-Lasers as excitation source. Our main interest was both to find an appropriate material and an appropriate doping for the display volume. Early experiments were carried out with CaF2 and YLiF4 crystals doped with 0.5 mol% Er3+-ions which were excited in order to create a volumetric pixel (voxel). In addition to that the crystals are limited to a very small size which is the reason why we later investigated on heavy metal fluoride glasses which are easier to produce in large sizes. Currently we are using a ZBLAN glass belonging to the mentioned group and making it possible to increase both the display volume and the brightness of the images significantly. Although, our display is currently

  6. Towards a 3D Space Radiation Transport Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Tripathl, R. K.; Cicomptta, F. A.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Tweed, J.

    2002-01-01

    High-speed computational procedures for space radiation shielding have relied on asymptotic expansions in terms of the off-axis scatter and replacement of the general geometry problem by a collection of flat plates. This type of solution was derived for application to human rated systems in which the radius of the shielded volume is large compared to the off-axis diffusion limiting leakage at lateral boundaries. Over the decades these computational codes are relatively complete and lateral diffusion effects are now being added. The analysis for developing a practical full 3D space shielding code is presented.

  7. 3D unstructured-mesh radiation transport codes

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, J.

    1997-12-31

    Three unstructured-mesh radiation transport codes are currently being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The first code is ATTILA, which uses an unstructured tetrahedral mesh in conjunction with standard Sn (discrete-ordinates) angular discretization, standard multigroup energy discretization, and linear-discontinuous spatial differencing. ATTILA solves the standard first-order form of the transport equation using source iteration in conjunction with diffusion-synthetic acceleration of the within-group source iterations. DANTE is designed to run primarily on workstations. The second code is DANTE, which uses a hybrid finite-element mesh consisting of arbitrary combinations of hexahedra, wedges, pyramids, and tetrahedra. DANTE solves several second-order self-adjoint forms of the transport equation including the even-parity equation, the odd-parity equation, and a new equation called the self-adjoint angular flux equation. DANTE also offers three angular discretization options: $S{_}n$ (discrete-ordinates), $P{_}n$ (spherical harmonics), and $SP{_}n$ (simplified spherical harmonics). DANTE is designed to run primarily on massively parallel message-passing machines, such as the ASCI-Blue machines at LANL and LLNL. The third code is PERICLES, which uses the same hybrid finite-element mesh as DANTE, but solves the standard first-order form of the transport equation rather than a second-order self-adjoint form. DANTE uses a standard $S{_}n$ discretization in angle in conjunction with trilinear-discontinuous spatial differencing, and diffusion-synthetic acceleration of the within-group source iterations. PERICLES was initially designed to run on workstations, but a version for massively parallel message-passing machines will be built. The three codes will be described in detail and computational results will be presented.

  8. Atmospheric transport of persistent organic pollutants - development of a 3-d dynamical transport model covering the northern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, K. M.; Christensen, J. H.; Geels, C.; Frohn, L. M.; Brandt, J.

    2003-04-01

    The Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model (DEHM) is a 3-D dynamical atmospheric transport model originally developed to describe the atmospheric transport of sulphur, lead, and mercury to the Arctic. The model has been validated carefully for these compounds. A new version of DEHM is currently being developed to describe the atmospheric transport of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) which are toxic, lipophilic and bio-accumulating compounds showing great persistence in the environment. The model has a horizontal resolution of 150 km x 150 km and 18 vertical layers, and it is driven by meteorological data from the numerical weather prediction model MM5V2. During environmental cycling POPs can be deposited and re-emitted several times before reaching a final destination. A description of the exchange processes between the land/ocean surfaces and the atmosphere is included in the model to account for this multi-hop transport. The present model version describes the atmospheric transport of the pesticide alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane (alpha-HCH). Other POPs may be included when proper data on emissions and physical-chemical parameters becomes available. The model-processes and the first model results are presented. The atmospheric transport of alpha-HCH for the 1990s is well described by the model.

  9. 3-D QSARS FOR RANKING AND PRIORITIZATION OF LARGE CHEMICAL DATASETS: AN EDC CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The COmmon REactivity Pattern (COREPA) approach is a three-dimensional structure activity (3-D QSAR) technique that permits identification and quantification of specific global and local steroelectronic characteristics associated with a chemical's biological activity. It goes bey...

  10. NEW 3D TECHNIQUES FOR RANKING AND PRIORITIZATION OF CHEMICAL INVENTORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    New three-dimensional quantitative structure activity (3-D QSAR) techniques for prioritizing chemical inventories for endocrine activity will be presented. The Common Reactivity Pattern (COREPA) approach permits identification of common steric and/or electronic patterns associate...

  11. OS3D/GIMRT software for modeling multicomponent-multidimensional reactive transport

    SciTech Connect

    CI Steefel; SB Yabusaki

    2000-05-17

    OS3D/GIMRT is a numerical software package for simulating multicomponent reactive transport in porous media. The package consists of two principal components: (1) the code OS3D (Operator Splitting 3-Dimensional Reactive Transport) which simulates reactive transport by either splitting the reaction and transport steps in time, i.e., the classic time or operator splitting approach, or by iterating sequentially between reactions and transport, and (2) the code GIMRT (Global Implicit Multicomponent Reactive Transport) which treats up to two dimensional reactive transport with a one step or global implicit approach. Although the two codes do not yet have totally identical capabilities, they can be run from the same input file, allowing comparisons to be made between the two approaches in many cases. The advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches are discussed more fully below, but in general OS3D is designed for simulation of transient concentration fronts, particularly under high Peclet number transport conditions, because of its use of a total variation diminishing or TVD transport algorithm. GIMRT is suited for simulating water-rock alteration over long periods of time where the aqueous concentration field is at or close to a quasi-stationary state and the numerical transport errors are less important. Where water-rock interaction occurs over geological periods of time, GIMRT may be preferable to OS3D because of its ability to take larger time steps.

  12. XEDS STEM Tomography For 3D Chemical Characterization Of Nanoscale Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Genc, Arda; Kovarik, Libor; Gu, Meng; Cheng, Huikai; Plachinda, Pavel; Pullan, Lee; Freitag, Bert; Wang, Chong M.

    2013-08-01

    We present a tomography technique which couples scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (XEDS) to resolve 3D distribution of elements in nanoscale materials. STEM imaging when combined with a symmetrically arranged XEDS detector design around the specimen overcomes many of the obstacles in 3D spectroscopic tomography of nanoscale materials and successfully elucidate the 3D chemical information in a large field of view of the TEM sample. We employed this technique to investigate 3D distribution of Nickel (Ni), Manganese (Mn) and Oxygen (O) in Li(NiMn)O2 battery cathode material. For this purpose, 2D elemental maps were acquired for a range of tilt angles and reconstructed to obtain 3D elemental distribution in an isolated Li(NiMnO2) nanoparticle. The results highlight the strength of this technique in 3D chemical analysis of nanoscale materials by successfully resolving Ni, Mn and O elemental distributions in 3D and discovering the new phenomenon of Ni surface segregation in this material. Furthermore, the comparison of simultaneously acquired HAADF STEM and XEDS STEM tomography results show that XEDS STEM tomography provides additional 3D chemical information of the material especially when there is low atomic number (Z) contrast in the material of interest.

  13. 3D geometry and hydrodynamic modifications in fractured and porous rock samples through chemical alterations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noiriel, C. N.

    2011-12-01

    Fractured and porous rocks are the principal path for water flow and potential contamination. Modification of fracture topology and transmissivity by reactive fluids is an important and complex geological process. In carbonate rocks, fractures and porous media properties may change quickly and strongly due to natural processes (e.g. karstification, salt intrusion) or anthropogenic practice (e.g. CO2 geological sequestration). Recent application of X-ray micro-tomography to the Earth Sciences, which allows the visualization of 3D objects with a micrometre resolution, has considerably increased experimental capability by giving access to a 4D spatio-temporal vision (3D geometry + time) of the physical-chemical processes within the rocks. New information is now accessible, which provides a better understanding of the processes and allows the numerical models to be better constrained. I will present the application of X-ray micro-tomography to study changes of petrophysical properties (e.g. porosity, permeability, mineral surface area, etc.) of fractured and porous rocks in response to fluid-rock interactions (dissolution and precipitation). Experimental results will be discussed in regard to numerical modelling of flow and transport. Keywords: X-ray micro-tomography, fracture, porous media, dissolution, precipitation, carbon dioxide sequestration, limestone, reactive surface, geochemical modelling,

  14. Moving from Batch to Field Using the RT3D Reactive Transport Modeling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, T. P.; Gautam, T. R.

    2002-12-01

    The public domain reactive transport code RT3D (Clement, 1997) is a general-purpose numerical code for solving coupled, multi-species reactive transport in saturated groundwater systems. The code uses MODFLOW to simulate flow and several modules of MT3DMS to simulate the advection and dispersion processes. RT3D employs the operator-split strategy which allows the code solve the coupled reactive transport problem in a modular fashion. The coupling between reaction and transport is defined through a separate module where the reaction equations are specified. The code supports a versatile user-defined reaction option that allows users to define their own reaction system through a Fortran-90 subroutine, known as the RT3D-reaction package. Further a utility code, known as BATCHRXN, allows the users to independently test and debug their reaction package. To analyze a new reaction system at a batch scale, users should first run BATCHRXN to test the ability of their reaction package to model the batch data. After testing, the reaction package can simply be ported to the RT3D environment to study the model response under 1-, 2-, or 3-dimensional transport conditions. This paper presents example problems that demonstrate the methods for moving from batch to field-scale simulations using BATCHRXN and RT3D codes. The first example describes a simple first-order reaction system for simulating the sequential degradation of Tetrachloroethene (PCE) and its daughter products. The second example uses a relatively complex reaction system for describing the multiple degradation pathways of Tetrachloroethane (PCA) and its daughter products. References 1) Clement, T.P, RT3D - A modular computer code for simulating reactive multi-species transport in 3-Dimensional groundwater aquifers, Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Research Report, PNNL-SA-28967, September, 1997. Available at: http://bioprocess.pnl.gov/rt3d.htm.

  15. Gray and multigroup radiation transport through 3D binary stochastic media with different sphere radii distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Gordon L.

    2017-03-01

    Gray and multigroup radiation is transported through 3D media consisting of spheres randomly placed in a uniform background. Comparisons are made between using constant radii spheres and three different distributions of sphere radii. Because of the computational cost of 3D calculations, only the lowest angle order, n=1, is tested. If the mean chord length is held constant, using different radii distributions makes little difference. This is true for both gray and multigroup solutions. 3D transport solutions are compared to 2D and 1D solutions with the same mean chord lengths. 2D disk and 3D sphere media give solutions that are nearly identical while 1D slab solutions are fundamentally different.

  16. Gray and multigroup radiation transport through 3D binary stochastic media with different sphere radii distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Olson, Gordon Lee

    2016-12-06

    Here, gray and multigroup radiation is transported through 3D media consisting of spheres randomly placed in a uniform background. Comparisons are made between using constant radii spheres and three different distributions of sphere radii. Because of the computational cost of 3D calculations, only the lowest angle order, n=1, is tested. If the mean chord length is held constant, using different radii distributions makes little difference. This is true for both gray and multigroup solutions. 3D transport solutions are compared to 2D and 1D solutions with the same mean chord lengths. 2D disk and 3D sphere media give solutions that aremore » nearly identical while 1D slab solutions are fundamentally different.« less

  17. Gray and multigroup radiation transport through 3D binary stochastic media with different sphere radii distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Gordon Lee

    2016-12-06

    Here, gray and multigroup radiation is transported through 3D media consisting of spheres randomly placed in a uniform background. Comparisons are made between using constant radii spheres and three different distributions of sphere radii. Because of the computational cost of 3D calculations, only the lowest angle order, n=1, is tested. If the mean chord length is held constant, using different radii distributions makes little difference. This is true for both gray and multigroup solutions. 3D transport solutions are compared to 2D and 1D solutions with the same mean chord lengths. 2D disk and 3D sphere media give solutions that are nearly identical while 1D slab solutions are fundamentally different.

  18. An implicit dispersive transport algorithm for the US Geological Survey MOC3D solute-transport model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kipp, K.L.; Konikow, L.F.; Hornberger, G.Z.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents an extension to the U.S. Geological Survey MOC3D transport model that incorporates an implicit-in-time difference approximation for the dispersive transport equation, including source/sink terms. The original MOC3D transport model (Version 1) uses the method of characteristics to solve the transport equation on the basis of the velocity field. The original MOC3D solution algorithm incorporates particle tracking to represent advective processes and an explicit finite-difference formulation to calculate dispersive fluxes. The new implicit procedure eliminates several stability criteria required for the previous explicit formulation. This allows much larger transport time increments to be used in dispersion-dominated problems. The decoupling of advective and dispersive transport in MOC3D, however, is unchanged. With the implicit extension, the MOC3D model is upgraded to Version 2. A description of the numerical method of the implicit dispersion calculation, the data-input requirements and output options, and the results of simulator testing and evaluation are presented. Version 2 of MOC3D was evaluated for the same set of problems used for verification of Version 1. These test results indicate that the implicit calculation of Version 2 matches the accuracy of Version 1, yet is more efficient than the explicit calculation for transport problems that are characterized by a grid Peclet number less than about 1.0.

  19. Transport analysis in toroidal helical plasmas using the integrated code: TASK3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakasa, A.; Fukuyama, A.; Murakami, S.; Beidler, C. D.; Maassberg, H.; Yokoyama, M.; Sato, M.

    2009-11-01

    The integrated simulation code in helical plasmas, TASK3D, is being developed on the basis of an integrated modeling code for tokamak plasma, TASK. In helical systems, the neoclassical transport is one of the important issues in addition to the anomalous transport, because of strong temperature dependence of heat conductivity and an important role in determining the radial electric field. We have already constructed the neoclassical transport database in LHD, DGN/LHD. The mono-energetic diffusion coefficients are evaluated based on the Monte Carlo method by DCOM code and the mono-energetic diffusion coefficients database is constructed using a neural network technique. Also we apply GSRAKE code, which solves the ripple-averaged drift kinetic equation, to obtain transport coefficients in highly collisionless regime. We have newly incorporated the DGN/LHD module into TASK3D. We will present several results of transport simulation in typical LHD plasmas.

  20. The Transient 3-D Transport Coupled Code TORT-TD/ATTICA3D for High-Fidelity Pebble-Bed HTGR Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seubert, Armin; Sureda, Antonio; Lapins, Janis; Bader, Johannes; Laurien, Eckart

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the 3D discrete ordinates-based coupled code system TORT-TD/ATTICA3D that aims at steady state and transient analyses of pebble-bed high-temperature gas cooled reactors. In view of increasing computing power, the application of time-dependent neutron transport methods becomes feasible for best estimate evaluations of safety margins. The calculation capabilities of TORT-TD/ATTICA3D are presented along with the coupling approach, with focus on the time-dependent neutron transport features of TORT-TD. Results obtained for the OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR-400 benchmark demonstrate the transient capabilities of TORT-TD/ATTICA3D.

  1. LigandBox: A database for 3D structures of chemical compounds.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Takeshi; Sugihara, Yusuke; Fukunishi, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2013-01-01

    A database for the 3D structures of available compounds is essential for the virtual screening by molecular docking. We have developed the LigandBox database (http://ligandbox.protein.osaka-u.ac.jp/ligandbox/) containing four million available compounds, collected from the catalogues of 37 commercial suppliers, and approved drugs and biochemical compounds taken from KEGG_DRUG, KEGG_COMPOUND and PDB databases. Each chemical compound in the database has several 3D conformers with hydrogen atoms and atomic charges, which are ready to be docked into receptors using docking programs. The 3D conformations were generated using our molecular simulation program package, myPresto. Various physical properties, such as aqueous solubility (LogS) and carcinogenicity have also been calculated to characterize the ADME-Tox properties of the compounds. The Web database provides two services for compound searches: a property/chemical ID search and a chemical structure search. The chemical structure search is performed by a descriptor search and a maximum common substructure (MCS) search combination, using our program kcombu. By specifying a query chemical structure, users can find similar compounds among the millions of compounds in the database within a few minutes. Our database is expected to assist a wide range of researchers, in the fields of medical science, chemical biology, and biochemistry, who are seeking to discover active chemical compounds by the virtual screening.

  2. Anisotropic heat transport in integrable and chaotic 3-D magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Blazevski, D.; Chacon, Luis

    2012-01-01

    A study of anisotropic heat transport in 3-D chaotic magnetic fields is presented. The approach is based on the recently proposed Lagrangian-Green s function (LG) method in Ref. [1] that allows an efficient and accurate integration of the parallel transport equation applicable to general magnetic fields with local or non-local parallel flux closures. We focus on reversed shear magnetic field configurations known to exhibit separatrix reconnection and shearless transport barriers. The role of reconnection and magnetic field line chaos on temperature transport is studied. Numerical results are presented on the anomalous relaxation of radial temperature gradients in the presence of shearless Cantori partial barri- ers. Also, numerical evidence of non-local effective radial temperature transport in chaotic fields is presented. Going beyond purely parallel transport, the LG method is generalized to include finite perpendicular diffusivity, and the problem of temperature flattening inside a magnetic island is studied.

  3. Integrated 3D-printed reactionware for chemical synthesis and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symes, Mark D.; Kitson, Philip J.; Yan, Jun; Richmond, Craig J.; Cooper, Geoffrey J. T.; Bowman, Richard W.; Vilbrandt, Turlif; Cronin, Leroy

    2012-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing has the potential to transform science and technology by creating bespoke, low-cost appliances that previously required dedicated facilities to make. An attractive, but unexplored, application is to use a 3D printer to initiate chemical reactions by printing the reagents directly into a 3D reactionware matrix, and so put reactionware design, construction and operation under digital control. Here, using a low-cost 3D printer and open-source design software we produced reactionware for organic and inorganic synthesis, which included printed-in catalysts and other architectures with printed-in components for electrochemical and spectroscopic analysis. This enabled reactions to be monitored in situ so that different reactionware architectures could be screened for their efficacy for a given process, with a digital feedback mechanism for device optimization. Furthermore, solely by modifying reactionware architecture, reaction outcomes can be altered. Taken together, this approach constitutes a relatively cheap, automated and reconfigurable chemical discovery platform that makes techniques from chemical engineering accessible to typical synthetic laboratories.

  4. A 3D AgCl hierarchical superstructure synthesized by a wet chemical oxidation method.

    PubMed

    Lou, Zaizhu; Huang, Baibiao; Ma, Xiangchao; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Qin, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zeyan; Dai, Ying; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2012-12-07

    A novel 3D AgCl hierarchical superstructure, with fast growth along the 〈111〉 directions of cubic seeds, is synthesized by using a wet chemical oxidation method. The morphological structures and the growth process are investigated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The crystal structures are analyzed by their crystallographic orientations. The surface energy of AgCl facets {100}, {110}, and {111} with absorbance of Cl(-) ions is studied by density functional theory calculations. Based on the experimental and computational results, a plausible mechanism is proposed to illustrate the formation of the 3D AgCl hierarchical superstructures. With more active sites, the photocatalytic activity of the 3D AgCl hierarchical superstructures is better than those of concave and cubic ones in oxygen evolution under irradiation by visible light.

  5. Solar radiation transport in the cloudy atmosphere: a 3D perspective on observations and climate impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Anthony B.; Marshak, Alexander

    2010-02-01

    The interplay of sunlight with clouds is a ubiquitous and often pleasant visual experience, but it conjures up major challenges for weather, climate, environmental science and beyond. Those engaged in the characterization of clouds (and the clear air nearby) by remote sensing methods are even more confronted. The problem comes, on the one hand, from the spatial complexity of real clouds and, on the other hand, from the dominance of multiple scattering in the radiation transport. The former ingredient contrasts sharply with the still popular representation of clouds as homogeneous plane-parallel slabs for the purposes of radiative transfer computations. In typical cloud scenes the opposite asymptotic transport regimes of diffusion and ballistic propagation coexist. We survey the three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric radiative transfer literature over the past 50 years and identify three concurrent and intertwining thrusts: first, how to assess the damage (bias) caused by 3D effects in the operational 1D radiative transfer models? Second, how to mitigate this damage? Finally, can we exploit 3D radiative transfer phenomena to innovate observation methods and technologies? We quickly realize that the smallest scale resolved computationally or observationally may be artificial but is nonetheless a key quantity that separates the 3D radiative transfer solutions into two broad and complementary classes: stochastic and deterministic. Both approaches draw on classic and contemporary statistical, mathematical and computational physics.

  6. Solar Radiation Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere: A 3D Perspective on Observations and Climate Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Anthony B.; Marshak, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The interplay of sunlight with clouds is a ubiquitous and often pleasant visual experience, but it conjures up major challenges for weather, climate, environmental science and beyond. Those engaged in the characterization of clouds (and the clear air nearby) by remote sensing methods are even more confronted. The problem comes, on the one hand, from the spatial complexity of real clouds and, on the other hand, from the dominance of multiple scattering in the radiation transport. The former ingredient contrasts sharply with the still popular representation of clouds as homogeneous plane-parallel slabs for the purposes of radiative transfer computations. In typical cloud scenes the opposite asymptotic transport regimes of diffusion and ballistic propagation coexist. We survey the three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric radiative transfer literature over the past 50 years and identify three concurrent and intertwining thrusts: first, how to assess the damage (bias) caused by 3D effects in the operational 1D radiative transfer models? Second, how to mitigate this damage? Finally, can we exploit 3D radiative transfer phenomena to innovate observation methods and technologies? We quickly realize that the smallest scale resolved computationally or observationally may be artificial but is nonetheless a key quantity that separates the 3D radiative transfer solutions into two broad and complementary classes: stochastic and deterministic. Both approaches draw on classic and contemporary statistical, mathematical and computational physics.

  7. Identifying secondary structures in proteins using NMR chemical shift 3D correlation maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Amrita; Dorai, Kavita

    2013-06-01

    NMR chemical shifts are accurate indicators of molecular environment and have been extensively used as aids in protein structure determination. This work focuses on creating empirical 3D correlation maps of backbone chemical shift nuclei for use as identifiers of secondary structure elements in proteins. A correlated database of backbone nuclei chemical shifts was constructed from experimental structural data gathered from entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) as well as isotropic chemical shift values from the RefDB database. Rigorous statistical analysis of the maps led to the conclusion that specific correlations between triplets of backbone chemical shifts are best able to differentiate between different secondary structures such as α-helices, β-strands and turns. The method is compared with similar techniques that use NMR chemical shift information as aids in biomolecular structure determination and performs well in tests done on experimental data determined for different types of proteins, including large multi-domain proteins and membrane proteins.

  8. GPU accelerated simulations of 3D deterministic particle transport using discrete ordinates method

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Chunye; Liu Jie; Chi Lihua; Huang Haowei; Fang Jingyue; Gong Zhenghu

    2011-07-01

    Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), originally developed for real-time, high-definition 3D graphics in computer games, now provides great faculty in solving scientific applications. The basis of particle transport simulation is the time-dependent, multi-group, inhomogeneous Boltzmann transport equation. The numerical solution to the Boltzmann equation involves the discrete ordinates (S{sub n}) method and the procedure of source iteration. In this paper, we present a GPU accelerated simulation of one energy group time-independent deterministic discrete ordinates particle transport in 3D Cartesian geometry (Sweep3D). The performance of the GPU simulations are reported with the simulations of vacuum boundary condition. The discussion of the relative advantages and disadvantages of the GPU implementation, the simulation on multi GPUs, the programming effort and code portability are also reported. The results show that the overall performance speedup of one NVIDIA Tesla M2050 GPU ranges from 2.56 compared with one Intel Xeon X5670 chip to 8.14 compared with one Intel Core Q6600 chip for no flux fixup. The simulation with flux fixup on one M2050 is 1.23 times faster than on one X5670.

  9. Impact of 3D root uptake on solute transport: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, N.; Javaux, M.; Vanderborght, J.; Steffen, B.; Vereecken, H.

    2011-12-01

    Plant transpiration is an important component of the hydrological cycle. Through root water uptake, plants do not only affect the 3D soil water flow velocity distribution, but also solute movement in soil. This numerical study aims at investigating how solute fate is impacted by root uptake using the 3D biophysical model R-SWMS (Javaux et al., 2008). This model solves the Richards equation in 3D in the soil and the flow equation within the plant root xylem vessels. Furthermore, for solute transport simulations, the 3D particle tracker PARTRACE (Bechtold et al., 2011) was used. . We generated 3D virtual steady-state breakthrough curves (BTC) experiments in soils with transpiring plants. The averaged BTCs were then fitted with a 1D numerical flow model under steady-state conditions to obtain apparent CDE parameters. Two types of root architecture, a fibrous and a taprooted structure, were compared in virtual 3D experiments. The solute uptake type or the transpiration rate were also modified and we analyzed how these parameters affected apparent disperisivity and velocity profiles. Our simulation results show, that both, apparent velocity and dispersivity length are affected by water and solute root uptake. In addition, under high exclusion processes (slight or no active uptake), solute accumulates around roots and generates a long tailing to the breakthrough curves, which cannot be reproduced by 1D models that simulate root water uptake with solute exclusion. This observation may have an important impact on how to model pollutant mass transfer to groundwater at larger scales. Javaux, M., T. Schröder, J. Vanderborght, and H. Vereecken. 2008. Use of a three-dimensional detailed modeling approach for predicting root water uptake. Vadose Zone J. 7:1079-1088.doi: 10.2136/vzj2007.0115. Bechtold, M., S. Haber-Pohlmeier, J. Vanderborght, A. Pohlmeier, P.A. Ferre, and H. Vereecken. 2011. Near-surface solute redistribution during evaporation. Submitted to Geophys. Res. Lett

  10. 3-D Spherical Modelling of the Thermo-Chemical Evolution of Venus' Mantle and Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armann, Marina; Tackley, Paul J.

    2010-05-01

    Several first-order aspects of the dynamics of Venus' mantle remain poorly understood. These include (i) how it loses its radiogenic heat despite the presence of stagnant lid convection. Hypotheses that have been advanced (summarised in [Turcotte, JGR 1995]) are conduction through a thin lithosphere, episodic overturn of the lithosphere, magmatic heat transport, and concentration of almost all heat-producing elements into the crust, but there are problems with all of these taken individually. (ii) The relatively long-wavelength distribution of surface features, which is surprising because numerical models and analogue laboratory experiments of stagnant-lid convection produce relatively short-wavelength convective cells. (iii) The inferred (from crater distributions [Hauck et al., JGR 1998]) relatively uniform surface age of 500-700 Ma. (iv) Whether the highlands are above mantle downwellings as on Earth or above mantle upwellings [Bindschadler et al., 1992]. To study these questions, we are performing integrated thermo-chemical convection modelling of Venus' evolution over 4.5 billion years, in 3-D spherical and 2-D spherical annulus [Hernlund and Tackley, PEPI 2008] geometries. These models include "laboratory" rheological parameters based on [Karato and Wu, Science 1993; Yamazaki and Karato, Am. Min. 2001] and plastic yielding based on Byerlee's law, which might cause changes in tectonic regime (e.g., episodic plate tectonics). Crustal formation and the resulting crust-mantle differentiation are modelled using a self-consistent melting criterion. Phase transitions in both the olivine system and pyroxene-garnet system are included. The concentration of heat-producing elements is assumed to be the same as in bulk silicate Earth and decreases with time, and cooling of the core is tracked using a parameterised core heat balance. Geoid and surface topography are calculated using a self-gravitating formulation. Thus, the model constitutes an attempt to incorporate as

  11. Quantitative investigation of chemical shrinkage stress in flip chip using a 3D moire interferometry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Fei; Liu, Lie; Yi, Sung; Chian, Kerm S.

    2002-06-01

    Thermo-mechanical reliability is a key issue of IC packaging. In this paper, the chemical shrinkage stress caused by the underfill curing is quantitatively investigated: DSC test result provides the basis for the determination of temperature profile for the curing of underfill. The 3D deformation of the flip chip during the underfill curing process is measured with 3D Moire interferometry system. Also a simple theoretical model is set up for this problem, DMA test provide the necessary parameters for this model. The experimental and theoretical results agree well with each other, both results show that the chemical shrinkage stress is fairly small when compared with the thermal residual stress, so this part of residual stress can be neglected in the commonly used finite element analysis (FEA) model.

  12. 3D modeling of environments contaminated with chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasiobedzki, Piotr; Ng, Ho-Kong; Bondy, Michel; McDiarmid, Carl H.

    2008-04-01

    CBRN Crime Scene Modeler (C2SM) is a prototype 3D modeling system for first responders investigating environments contaminated with Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear agents. The prototype operates on board a small robotic platform or a hand-held device. The sensor suite includes stereo and high resolution cameras, a long wave infra red camera, chemical detector, and two gamma detectors (directional and non-directional). C2SM has been recently tested in field trials where it was teleoperated within an indoor environment with gamma radiation sources present. The system has successfully created multi-modal 3D models (geometry, colour, IR and gamma radiation), correctly identified location of radiation sources and provided high resolution images of these sources.

  13. Chemically tuned linear energy transfer dependent quenching in a deformable, radiochromic 3D dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høye, Ellen Marie; Skyt, Peter S.; Balling, Peter; Muren, Ludvig P.; Taasti, Vicki T.; Swakoń, Jan; Mierzwińska, Gabriela; Rydygier, Marzena; Bassler, Niels; Petersen, Jørgen B. B.

    2017-02-01

    Most solid-state detectors, including 3D dosimeters, show lower signal in the Bragg peak than expected, a process termed quenching. The purpose of this study was to investigate how variation in chemical composition of a recently developed radiochromic, silicone-based 3D dosimeter influences the observed quenching in proton beams. The dependency of dose response on linear energy transfer, as calculated through Monte Carlo simulations of the dosimeter, was investigated in 60 MeV proton beams. We found that the amount of quenching varied with the chemical composition: peak-to-plateau ratios (1 cm into the plateau) ranged from 2.2 to 3.4, compared to 4.3 using an ionization chamber. The dose response, and thereby the quenching, was predominantly influenced by the curing agent concentration, which determined the dosimeter’s deformation properties. The dose response was found to be linear at all depths. All chemical compositions of the dosimeter showed dose-rate dependency; however this was not dependent on the linear energy transfer. Track-structure theory was used to explain the observed quenching effects. In conclusion, this study shows that the silicone-based dosimeter has potential for use in measuring 3D-dose-distributions from proton beams.

  14. DANTSYS/MPI: a system for 3-D deterministic transport on parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.S.; Alcouffe, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    Since 1994, we have been using a data parallel form of our deterministic transport code DANTSYS to perform time-independent fixed source and eigenvalue calculations on the CM-200`s at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Parallelization of the transport sweep is obtained by using a 2-D spatial decomposition which retains the ability to invert the source iteration equation in a single iteration (i.e., the diagonal plane sweep). We have now implemented a message passing version of DANTSYS, referred to as DANTSYS/MPI, on the Cray T3D installed at Los Alamos in 1995. By taking advantage of the SPMD (Single Program, Multiple Data) architecture of the Cray T3D, as well as its low latency communications network, we have managed to achieve grind times (time to solve a single cell in phase space) of less than 10 nanoseconds on the 512 PE (Processing Element) T3D, as opposed to typical grind times of 150-200 nanoseconds on a 2048 PE CM-200, or 300-400 nanoseconds on a single PE of a Cray Y-MP. In addition, we have also parallelized the Diffusion Synthetic Accelerator (DSA) equations which are used to accelerate the convergence of the transport equation. DANTSYS/MPI currently runs on traditional Cray PVP`s and the Cray T3D, and it`s computational kernel (Sweep3D) has been ported to and tested on an array of SGI SMP`s (Symmetric Memory Processors), a network of IBM 590 workstations, an IBM SP2, and the Intel TFLOPs machine at Sandia National Laboratory. This paper describes the implementation of DANTSYS/MPI on the Cray T3D, and presents a simple performance model which accurately predicts the grind time as a function of the number of PE`s and problem size, or scalability. This paper also describes the parallel implementation and performance of the elliptic solver used in DANTSYS/MPI for solving the synthetic acceleration equations.

  15. 3D nonrigid registration via optimal mass transport on the GPU

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Tauseef ur; Haber, Eldad; Pryor, Gallagher; Melonakos, John; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new computationally efficient numerical scheme for the minimizing flow approach for optimal mass transport (OMT) with applications to non-rigid 3D image registration. The approach utilizes all of the gray-scale data in both images, and the optimal mapping from image A to image B is the inverse of the optimal mapping from B to A. Further, no landmarks need to be specified, and the minimizer of the distance functional involved is unique. Our implementation also employs multigrid, and parallel methodologies on a consumer graphics processing unit (GPU) for fast computation. Although computing the optimal map has been shown to be computationally expensive in the past, we show that our approach is orders of magnitude faster then previous work and is capable of finding transport maps with optimality measures (mean curl) previously unattainable by other works (which directly influences the accuracy of registration). We give results where the algorithm was used to compute non-rigid registrations of 3D synthetic data as well as intra-patient pre-operative and post-operative 3D brain MRI datasets. PMID:19135403

  16. CheS-Mapper - Chemical Space Mapping and Visualization in 3D

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Analyzing chemical datasets is a challenging task for scientific researchers in the field of chemoinformatics. It is important, yet difficult to understand the relationship between the structure of chemical compounds, their physico-chemical properties, and biological or toxic effects. To that respect, visualization tools can help to better comprehend the underlying correlations. Our recently developed 3D molecular viewer CheS-Mapper (Chemical Space Mapper) divides large datasets into clusters of similar compounds and consequently arranges them in 3D space, such that their spatial proximity reflects their similarity. The user can indirectly determine similarity, by selecting which features to employ in the process. The tool can use and calculate different kind of features, like structural fragments as well as quantitative chemical descriptors. These features can be highlighted within CheS-Mapper, which aids the chemist to better understand patterns and regularities and relate the observations to established scientific knowledge. As a final function, the tool can also be used to select and export specific subsets of a given dataset for further analysis. PMID:22424447

  17. Near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) of 3D printed pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Khorasani, Milad; Edinger, Magnus; Raijada, Dhara; Bøtker, Johan; Aho, Johanna; Rantanen, Jukka

    2016-12-30

    Hot-melt extrusion and 3D printing are enabling manufacturing approaches for patient-centred medicinal products. Hot-melt extrusion is a flexible and continuously operating technique which is a crucial part of a typical processing cycle of printed medicines. In this work we use hot-melt extrusion for manufacturing of medicinal films containing indomethacin (IND) and polycaprolactone (PCL), extruded strands with nitrofurantoin monohydrate (NFMH) and poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO), and feedstocks for 3D printed dosage forms with nitrofurantoin anhydrate (NFAH), hydroxyapatite (HA) and poly (lactic acid) (PLA). These feedstocks were printed into a prototype solid dosage form using a desktop 3D printer. These model formulations were characterized using near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) and, more specifically, the image analytical data were analysed using multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS). The MCR-ALS algorithm predicted the spatial distribution of IND and PCL in the films with reasonable accuracy. In the extruded strands both the chemical mapping of the components in the formulation as well as the solid form of the active compound could be visualized. Based on the image information the total nitrofurantoin and PEO contents could be estimated., The dehydration of NFMH to NFAH, a process-induced solid form change, could be visualized as well. It was observed that the level of dehydration increased with increasing processing time (recirculation during the mixing phase of molten PEO and nitrofurantoin). Similar results were achieved in the 3D printed solid dosage forms produced from the extruded feedstocks. The results presented in this work clearly demonstrate that NIR-CI in combination with MCR-ALS can be used for chemical mapping of both active compound and excipients, as well as for visualization of solid form variation in the final product. The suggested NIR-CI approach is a promising process control tool for characterization of

  18. 3-D Spherical modelling of the thermo-chemical evolution of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armann, M.; Tackley, P. J.

    2009-04-01

    Several first-order aspects of the dynamics of Venus' mantle remain poorly understood. These include (i) how Venus' mantle loses its radiogenic heat (presumably about the same as Earth's) despite the presence of stagnant lid convection. Hypotheses that have been advanced (summarised in [1]) are conduction through a thin lithosphere, episodic overturn of the lithosphere, magmatic heat transport, and concentration of almost all heat-producing elements into the crust, but there are problems with all of these taken individually. A thick lithosphere may not be consistent with admittance ratios, magmatic heat transport would require a too-large resurfacing rate, and a large concentration of heat-producing elements in the crust would cause weakness and possibly melting in the deep crust. (ii) The relatively long-wavelength distribution of surface features, which is surprising because numerical models and analogue laboratory experiments of stagnant-lid convection produce relatively short-wavelength convective cells. (iii) The inferred (from crater distributions [2]) relatively uniform surface age of 500-700 Ma. (iv) Whether the highlands are above mantle downwellings as on Earth or above mantle upwellings [3]. (v) How the mantle can have outgassing only 25% of 40Ar [4] but supposedly most of its water [5]. (vi) The cause of coronae and relationship to mantle processes [6]. To study some of these questions, we are performing integrated thermo-chemical convection modelling of Venus' evolution over 4.5 billion years, in 3-D spherical geometry as well as 2-D spherical annulus geometry [7]. These models include realistic ("laboratory") rheological parameters for diffusion creep and dislocation creep based on [8][9], which are also composition-dependent, and plastic yielding based on Byerlee's law, which might cause changes in tectonic regime (e.g., episodic plate tectonics). Crustal formation and the resulting differentiation of the crust and mantle are modelled using a self

  19. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110–120 kHz), {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow {sup 1}H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) {sup 1}H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic

  20. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110-120 kHz), (1)H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong (1)H-(1)H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow (1)H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) (1)H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about (1)H-(1)H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic-level structural and dynamical

  1. Optically directed molecular transport and 3D isoelectric positioning of amphoteric biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Hafeman, Dean G.; Harkins, James B.; Witkowski, Charles E.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Warmack, Robert J.; Brown, Gilbert M.; Thundat, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate the formation of charged molecular packets and their transport within optically created electrical force-field traps in a pH-buffered electrolyte. We call this process photoelectrophoretic localization and transport (PELT). The electrolyte is in contact with a photoconductive semiconductor electrode and a counterelectrode that are connected through an external circuit. A light beam directed to coordinates on the photoconductive electrode surface produces a photocurrent within the circuit and electrolyte. Within the electrolyte, the photocurrent creates localized force-field traps centered at the illuminated coordinates. Charged molecules, including polypeptides and proteins, electrophoretically accumulate into the traps and subsequently can be transported in the electrolyte by moving the traps over the photoconductive electrode in response to movement of the light beam. The molecules in a single trap can be divided into aliquots, and the aliquots can be directed along multiple routes simultaneously by using multiple light beams. This photoelectrophoretic transport of charged molecules by PELT resembles the electrostatic transport of electrons within force-field wells of solid-state charge-coupled devices. The molecules, however, travel in a liquid electrolyte rather than a solid. Furthermore, we have used PELT to position amphoteric biomolecules in three dimensions. A 3D pH gradient was created in an electrolyte medium by controlling the illumination position on a photoconductive anode where protons were generated electrolytically. Photoelectrophoretic transport of amphoteric molecules through the pH gradient resulted in accumulation of the molecules at their apparent 3D isoelectric coordinates in the medium. PMID:16618926

  2. 3D simulation of tungsten low-pressure chemical vapor deposition in contact holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bär, E.; Lorenz, J.

    1995-10-01

    We present a new method for three-dimensional (3D) simulation of low-pressure chemical vapor deposition in arbitrary geometries using a segment-based topography discretization with triangles combined with the calculation of particle fluxes to the wafer surface. The simulation program is applied to tungsten LPCVD using the reduction of tungsten hexafluoride (WF 6) by silane (SiH 4). We found that an approach in which the redistribution of the SiH 4 molecules is simulated and a constant reaction probability after collision of a SiH 4 molecule with the surface is assumed allows the simulation of this process with a reaction probability which is consistent with thermodynamic calculations. A comparison between a simulated 3D profile and experimental data from tungsten LPCVD in a contact hole shows very good agreement between experiment and simulation.

  3. Quasi 3D modeling of water flow and solute transport in vadose zone and groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakirevich, A.; Kuznetsov, M.; Weisbrod, N.; Pachepsky, Y. A.

    2013-12-01

    The complexity of subsurface flow systems calls for a variety of concepts leading to the multiplicity of simplified flow models. One commonly used simplification is based on the assumption that lateral flow and transport in unsaturated zone is insignificant unless the capillary fringe is involved. In such cases the flow and transport in the unsaturated zone above groundwater level can be simulated as a 1D phenomenon, whereas through groundwater they are viewed as 2D or 3D phenomena. A new approach for a numerical scheme for 3D variably saturated flow and transport is presented. A Quasi-3D approach allows representing flow in the 'vadose zone - aquifer' system by a series of 1D Richards' equations solved in variably-saturated zone and by 3D-saturated flow equation in groundwater (modified MODFLOW code). The 1D and 3D equations are coupled at the phreatic surface in a way that aquifer replenishment is calculated using the Richards' equation, and solving for the moving water table does not require definition of the specific yield parameter. The 3D advection-dispersion equation is solved in the entire domain by the MT3D code. Using implicit finite differences approximation to couple processes in the vadose zone and groundwater provides mass conservation and increase of computational efficiency. The above model was applied to simulate the impact of irrigation on groundwater salinity in the Alto Piura aquifer (Northern Peru). Studies on changing groundwater quality in arid and semi-arid lands show that irrigation return flow is one of the major factors contributing to aquifer salinization. Existing mathematical models do not account explicitly for the solute recycling during irrigation on a daily scale. Recycling occurs throughout the unsaturated and saturated zones, as function of the solute mass extracted from pumping wells. Salt concentration in irrigation water is calculated at each time step as a function of concentration of both surface water and groundwater

  4. 3D SERS imaging based on chemically-synthesized highly-symmetric nanoporous silver microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Yukihiro; Vantasin, Sanpon; Ji, Wei; Tanaka, Yoshito; Kitahama, Yasutaka; Wongrawee, Kanet; Ekgasit, Sanong

    2016-09-01

    This study presents the synthesis, SERS properties in three dimensions, and an application of 3D symmetric nanoporous silver microparticles. The particles are synthesized by purely chemical process: controlled precipitation of AgCl to acquire highly symmetric AgCl microparticle, followed by in-place to convert AgCl into nanoporous silver. The particles display highly predictable SERS enhancement pattern in three dimensions, which resembles particle shape and retains symmetry. The highly regular enhancement pattern allows an application in the study of inhomogeneity in two-layer polymer system, by improving spatial resolution in Z axis.

  5. Fast 3D Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) Imaging of the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, He; Jones, Craig K.; van Zijl, Peter C. M.; Barker, Peter B.; Zhou, Jinyuan

    2010-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI can detect low-concentration compounds with exchangeable protons through saturation transfer to water. CEST imaging is generally slow, as it requires acquisition of saturation images at multiple frequencies. In addition, multi-slice imaging is complicated by saturation effects differing from slice to slice because of relaxation losses. In this study, a fast three-dimensional (3D) CEST imaging sequence is presented that allows whole-brain coverage for a frequency-dependent saturation spectrum (z-spectrum, 26 frequencies) in less than 10 min. The approach employs a 3D gradient- and spin-echo (GRASE) readout using a prototype 32-channel phased-array coil, combined with two-dimensional SENSE accelerations. Results from a homogenous protein-containing phantom at 3T show that the sequence produced a uniform contrast across all slices. To show translational feasibility, scans were also performed on five healthy human subjects. Results for CEST images at 3.5ppm downfield of the water resonance, so-called amide proton transfer (APT) images, show that lipid signals are sufficiently suppressed and artifacts caused by B0 inhomogeneity can be removed in post-processing. The scan time and image quality of these in vivo results show that 3D CEST MRI using GRASE acquisition is feasible for whole-brain CEST studies at 3T in a clinical time frame. PMID:20632402

  6. A 3D Chemically Modified Graphene Hydrogel for Fast, Highly Sensitive, and Selective Gas Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jin; Tao, Kai; Guo, Yuanyuan; Li, Zhong; Wang, Xiaotian; Luo, Zhongzhen; Du, Chunlei; Chen, Di; Norford, Leslie K.

    2016-01-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) has proved to be a promising candidate in high‐performance gas sensing in ambient conditions. However, trace detection of different kinds of gases with simultaneously high sensitivity and selectivity is challenging. Here, a chemiresistor‐type sensor based on 3D sulfonated RGO hydrogel (S‐RGOH) is reported, which can detect a variety of important gases with high sensitivity, boosted selectivity, fast response, and good reversibility. The NaHSO3 functionalized RGOH displays remarkable 118.6 and 58.9 times higher responses to NO2 and NH3, respectively, compared with its unmodified RGOH counterpart. In addition, the S‐RGOH sensor is highly responsive to volatile organic compounds. More importantly, the characteristic patterns on the linearly fitted response–temperature curves are employed to distinguish various gases for the first time. The temperature of the sensor is elevated rapidly by an imbedded microheater with little power consumption. The 3D S‐RGOH is characterized and the sensing mechanisms are proposed. This work gains new insights into boosting the sensitivity of detecting various gases by combining chemical modification and 3D structural engineering of RGO, and improving the selectivity of gas sensing by employing temperature dependent response characteristics of RGO for different gases. PMID:28331786

  7. 3-D Spherical modelling of the thermo-chemical evolution of Venus' mantle and crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armann, M.; Tackley, P. J.

    2008-09-01

    Background Several first-order aspects of the dynamics of Venus' mantle remain poorly understood. These include (i) how Venus' mantle loses its radiogenic heat, which is expected to be about the same as Earth's, despite the presence of stagnant lid convection. Hypotheses that have been advanced (summarised in [1]) are conduction through a thin lithosphere, episodic overturn of the lithosphere, magmatic heat transport, and concentration of almost all heat-producing elements into the crust, but there are problems with all of these taken individually. A thick lithosphere may not be consistent with admittance ratios, magmatic heat transport would require a too-large resurfacing rate, and a large concentration of heat-producing elements in the crust would cause weakness and possibly melting in the deep crust. (ii) The relatively long-wavelength distribution of surface features, which is surprising because numerical models and analogue laboratory experiments of stagnant-lid convection produce relatively short-wavelength convective cells. (iii) The inferred (from crater distributions [2]) relatively uniform surface age of 500-700 Ma. (iv) Whether the highlands are above mantle downwellings as on Earth or above mantle upwellings [3]. (v) How the mantle can have outgassing only 25% of 40Ar [4] but supposedly most of its water [5]. (vi) The cause of coronae and relationship to mantle processes [6]. Model To study some of these questions, we take advantage of advances in computational capabilities to perform integrated thermo-chemical convection models of Venus' evolution over 4.5 billion years, in 3-D spherical geometry as well as 2-D spherical annulus geometry [7]. These models include realistic ("laboratory") rheological parameters for diffusion creep and dislocation creep based on [8][9], which are also composition-dependent, and plastic yielding based on Byerlee's law, which might cause changes in tectonic regime (e.g., episodic plate tectonics). Crustal formation and

  8. M3D-K simulations of sawteeth and energetic particle transport in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Wei; Sheng, Zheng-Mao; Fu, G. Y.; Breslau, J. A.; Wang, Feng

    2014-09-15

    Nonlinear simulations of sawteeth and related energetic particle transport are carried out using the kinetic/magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hybrid code M3D-K. MHD simulations show repeated sawtooth cycles for a model tokamak equilibrium. Furthermore, test particle simulations are carried out to study the energetic particle transport due to a sawtooth crash. The results show that energetic particles are redistributed radially in the plasma core, depending on pitch angle and energy. For trapped particles, the redistribution occurs for particle energy below a critical value in agreement with existing theories. For co-passing particles, the redistribution is strong with little dependence on particle energy. In contrast, the redistribution level of counter-passing particles decreases with increasing particle energy.

  9. Momentum Transport: 2D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2001-01-01

    The major objective of this study is to investigate the momentum budgets associated with several convective systems that developed during the TOGA COARE IOP (west Pacific warm pool region) and GATE (east Atlantic region). The tool for this study is the improved Goddard Cumulas Ensemble (GCE) model which includes a 3-class ice-phase microphysical scheme, explicit cloud radiative interactive processes and air-sea interactive surface processes. The model domain contains 256 x 256 grid points (with 2 km resolution) in the horizontal and 38 grid points (to a depth of 22 km) in the vertical. The 2D domain has 1024 grid points. The simulations were performed over a 7-day time period (December 19-26, 1992, for TOGA COARE and September 1-7, 1994 for GATE). Cyclic literal boundary conditions are required for this type of long-term integration. Two well organized squall systems (TOGA, COARE February 22, 1993, and GATE September 12, 1994) were also simulated using the 3D GCE model. Only 9 h simulations were required to cover the life time of the squall systems. the lateral boundary conditions were open for these two squall systems simulations. the following will be examined: (1) the momentum budgets in the convective and stratiform regions, (2) the relationship between momentum transport and cloud organization (i.e., well organized squall lines versus less organized convective), (3) the differences and similarities in momentum transport between 2D and 3D simulated convective systems, and (4) the differences and similarities in momentum budgets between cloud systems simulated with open and cyclic lateral boundary conditions. Preliminary results indicate that there are only small differences between 2D and 3D simulated momentum budgets. Major differences occur, however, between momentum budgets associated with squall systems simulated using different lateral boundary conditions.

  10. 3D Neutron Transport PWR Full-core Calculation with RMC code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yishu; She, Ding; Fan, Xiao; Wang, Kan; Li, Zeguang; Liang, Jingang; Leroyer, Hadrien

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, there are more and more interests in the use of Monte Carlo codes to calculate the detailed power density distributions in full-core reactors. With the Inspur TS1000 HPC Server of Tsinghua University, several calculations have been done based on the EDF 3D Neutron Transport PWR Full-core benchmark through large-scale parallelism. To investigate and compare the results of the deterministic method and Monte Carlo method, EDF R&D and Department of Engineering Physics of Tsinghua University are having a collaboration to make code to code verification. So in this paper, two codes are used. One is the code COCAGNE developed by the EDF R&D, a deterministic core code, and the other is the Monte Carlo code RMC developed by Department of Engineering Physics in Tsinghua University. First, the full-core model is described and a 26-group calculation was performed by these two codes using the same 26-group cross-section library provided by EDF R&D. Then the parallel and tally performance of RMC is discussed. RMC employs a novel algorithm which can cut down most of the communications. It can be seen clearly that the speedup ratio almost linearly increases with the nodes. Furthermore the cell-mapping method applied by RMC consumes little time to tally even millions of cells. The results of the codes COCAGNE and RMC are compared in three ways. The results of these two codes agree well with each other. It can be concluded that both COCAGNE and RMC are able to provide 3D-transport solutions associated with detailed power density distributions calculation in PWR full-core reactors. Finally, to investigate how many histories are needed to obtain a given standard deviation for a full 3D solution, the non-symmetrized condensed 2-group fluxes of RMC are discussed.

  11. Combining 3D Hydraulic Tomography with Tracer Tests for Improved Transport Characterization.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-León, E; Leven, C; Haslauer, C P; Cirpka, O A

    2016-07-01

    Hydraulic tomography (HT) is a method for resolving the spatial distribution of hydraulic parameters to some extent, but many details important for solute transport usually remain unresolved. We present a methodology to improve solute transport predictions by combining data from HT with the breakthrough curve (BTC) of a single forced-gradient tracer test. We estimated the three dimensional (3D) hydraulic-conductivity field in an alluvial aquifer by inverting tomographic pumping tests performed at the Hydrogeological Research Site Lauswiesen close to Tübingen, Germany, using a regularized pilot-point method. We compared the estimated parameter field to available profiles of hydraulic-conductivity variations from direct-push injection logging (DPIL), and validated the hydraulic-conductivity field with hydraulic-head measurements of tests not used in the inversion. After validation, spatially uniform parameters for dual-domain transport were estimated by fitting tracer data collected during a forced-gradient tracer test. The dual-domain assumption was used to parameterize effects of the unresolved heterogeneity of the aquifer and deemed necessary to fit the shape of the BTC using reasonable parameter values. The estimated hydraulic-conductivity field and transport parameters were subsequently used to successfully predict a second independent tracer test. Our work provides an efficient and practical approach to predict solute transport in heterogeneous aquifers without performing elaborate field tracer tests with a tomographic layout.

  12. Ash3d: A finite-volume, conservative numerical model for ash transport and tephra deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwaiger, Hans F.; Denlinger, Roger P.; Mastin, Larry G.

    2012-01-01

    We develop a transient, 3-D Eulerian model (Ash3d) to predict airborne volcanic ash concentration and tephra deposition during volcanic eruptions. This model simulates downwind advection, turbulent diffusion, and settling of ash injected into the atmosphere by a volcanic eruption column. Ash advection is calculated using time-varying pre-existing wind data and a robust, high-order, finite-volume method. Our routine is mass-conservative and uses the coordinate system of the wind data, either a Cartesian system local to the volcano or a global spherical system for the Earth. Volcanic ash is specified with an arbitrary number of grain sizes, which affects the fall velocity, distribution and duration of transport. Above the source volcano, the vertical mass distribution with elevation is calculated using a Suzuki distribution for a given plume height, eruptive volume, and eruption duration. Multiple eruptions separated in time may be included in a single simulation. We test the model using analytical solutions for transport. Comparisons of the predicted and observed ash distributions for the 18 August 1992 eruption of Mt. Spurr in Alaska demonstrate to the efficacy and efficiency of the routine.

  13. A multiscale 3D finite element analysis of fluid/solute transport in mechanically loaded bone.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lixia; Pei, Shaopeng; Lucas Lu, X; Wang, Liyun

    2016-01-01

    The transport of fluid, nutrients, and signaling molecules in the bone lacunar-canalicular system (LCS) is critical for osteocyte survival and function. We have applied the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) approach to quantify load-induced fluid and solute transport in the LCS in situ, but the measurements were limited to cortical regions 30-50 μm underneath the periosteum due to the constrains of laser penetration. With this work, we aimed to expand our understanding of load-induced fluid and solute transport in both trabecular and cortical bone using a multiscaled image-based finite element analysis (FEA) approach. An intact murine tibia was first re-constructed from microCT images into a three-dimensional (3D) linear elastic FEA model, and the matrix deformations at various locations were calculated under axial loading. A segment of the above 3D model was then imported to the biphasic poroelasticity analysis platform (FEBio) to predict load-induced fluid pressure fields, and interstitial solute/fluid flows through LCS in both cortical and trabecular regions. Further, secondary flow effects such as the shear stress and/or drag force acting on osteocytes, the presumed mechano-sensors in bone, were derived using the previously developed ultrastructural model of Brinkman flow in the canaliculi. The material properties assumed in the FEA models were validated against previously obtained strain and FRAP transport data measured on the cortical cortex. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of this computational approach in estimating the fluid flux in the LCS and the cellular stimulation forces (shear and drag forces) for osteocytes in any cortical and trabecular bone locations, allowing further studies of how the activation of osteocytes correlates with in vivo functional bone formation. The study provides a promising platform to reveal potential cellular mechanisms underlying the anabolic power of exercises and physical activities in treating

  14. A multiscale 3D finite element analysis of fluid/solute transport in mechanically loaded bone

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lixia; Pei, Shaopeng; Lucas Lu, X; Wang, Liyun

    2016-01-01

    The transport of fluid, nutrients, and signaling molecules in the bone lacunar–canalicular system (LCS) is critical for osteocyte survival and function. We have applied the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) approach to quantify load-induced fluid and solute transport in the LCS in situ, but the measurements were limited to cortical regions 30–50 μm underneath the periosteum due to the constrains of laser penetration. With this work, we aimed to expand our understanding of load-induced fluid and solute transport in both trabecular and cortical bone using a multiscaled image-based finite element analysis (FEA) approach. An intact murine tibia was first re-constructed from microCT images into a three-dimensional (3D) linear elastic FEA model, and the matrix deformations at various locations were calculated under axial loading. A segment of the above 3D model was then imported to the biphasic poroelasticity analysis platform (FEBio) to predict load-induced fluid pressure fields, and interstitial solute/fluid flows through LCS in both cortical and trabecular regions. Further, secondary flow effects such as the shear stress and/or drag force acting on osteocytes, the presumed mechano-sensors in bone, were derived using the previously developed ultrastructural model of Brinkman flow in the canaliculi. The material properties assumed in the FEA models were validated against previously obtained strain and FRAP transport data measured on the cortical cortex. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of this computational approach in estimating the fluid flux in the LCS and the cellular stimulation forces (shear and drag forces) for osteocytes in any cortical and trabecular bone locations, allowing further studies of how the activation of osteocytes correlates with in vivo functional bone formation. The study provides a promising platform to reveal potential cellular mechanisms underlying the anabolic power of exercises and physical activities in

  15. MODIS volcanic ash retrievals vs FALL3D transport model: a quantitative comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradini, S.; Merucci, L.; Folch, A.

    2010-12-01

    Satellite retrievals and transport models represents the key tools to monitor the volcanic clouds evolution. Because of the harming effects of fine ash particles on aircrafts, the real-time tracking and forecasting of volcanic clouds is key for aviation safety. Together with the security reasons also the economical consequences of a disruption of airports must be taken into account. The airport closures due to the recent Icelandic Eyjafjöll eruption caused millions of passengers to be stranded not only in Europe, but across the world. IATA (the International Air Transport Association) estimates that the worldwide airline industry has lost a total of about 2.5 billion of Euro during the disruption. Both security and economical issues require reliable and robust ash cloud retrievals and trajectory forecasting. The intercomparison between remote sensing and modeling is required to assure precise and reliable volcanic ash products. In this work we perform a quantitative comparison between Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) retrievals of volcanic ash cloud mass and Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) with the FALL3D ash dispersal model. MODIS, aboard the NASA-Terra and NASA-Aqua polar satellites, is a multispectral instrument with 36 spectral bands operating in the VIS-TIR spectral range and spatial resolution varying between 250 and 1000 m at nadir. The MODIS channels centered around 11 and 12 micron have been used for the ash retrievals through the Brightness Temperature Difference algorithm and MODTRAN simulations. FALL3D is a 3-D time-dependent Eulerian model for the transport and deposition of volcanic particles that outputs, among other variables, cloud column mass and AOD. Three MODIS images collected the October 28, 29 and 30 on Mt. Etna volcano during the 2002 eruption have been considered as test cases. The results show a general good agreement between the retrieved and the modeled volcanic clouds in the first 300 km from the vents. Even if the

  16. Chromium(VI) transport and fate in unsaturated zone and aquifer: 3D Sandbox results.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingmin; Sobecky, Patricia A; Zhao, Lanpo; Crawford, Patrice; Li, Mingtang

    2016-04-05

    The simulation of Cr(VI) behavior in an unsaturated zone and aquifer, using a 3D experimental set-up were performed to illustrate the distribution, transport and transformation of Cr(VI), and further to reveal the potential harm of Cr(VI) after entering the groundwater. The result indicated that chromium(VI) was transported in the vertical direction, meanwhile, was transported in the horizontal direction under the influence of groundwater flow. The direction and distance away from the pollution source zone had great effect on the chromium(VI) concentration. At the sampling sites near the pollution source zone, there was a sudden increase of chromium(VI) concentration. The concentration of chromium(III) concentration in some random effluent samples was not detected. Chromium had not only transported but also had fraction and specie transformation in the unsaturated zone and aquifer. The relative concentration of residue fraction chromium was decreased with time. The content of Fe-Mn oxide fraction chromium was increased with time. The relative content of exchangeable and carbonate-bound fraction chromium was lower and the content variations were not obvious. Chromium(VI) (91-98%) was first reduced to chromium(III) rapidly. The oxidation reaction occurred later and the relative content of chromium(VI) was increased again. The presence of manganese oxides under favorable soil conditions can promote the reoxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI).

  17. Exploring 3D structural influences of aliphatic and aromatic chemicals on α-cyclodextrin binding.

    PubMed

    Linden, Lukas; Goss, Kai-Uwe; Endo, Satoshi

    2016-04-15

    Binding of solutes to macromolecules is often influenced by steric effects caused by the 3D structures of both binding partners. In this study, the 1:1 α-cyclodextrin (αCD) binding constants (Ka1) for 70 organic chemicals were determined to explore the solute-structural effects on the αCD binding. Ka1 was measured using a three-part partitioning system with either a headspace or a passive sampler serving as the reference phase. The Ka1 values ranged from 1.08 to 4.97 log units. The results show that longer linear aliphatic chemicals form more stable complexes than shorter ones, and that the position of the functional group has a strong influence on Ka1, even stronger than the type of the functional group. Comparison of linear and variously branched aliphatic chemicals indicates that having a sterically unhindered alkyl chain is favorable for binding. These results suggest that only one alkyl chain can enter the binding cavity. Relatively small aromatic chemicals such as 1,3-dichlorobenzene bind to αCD well, while larger ones like tetrachlorobenzene and 3-ring aromatic chemicals show only a weak interaction with αCD, which can be explained by cavity exclusion. The findings of this study help interpret cyclodextrin binding data and facilitate the understanding of binding processes to macromolecules.

  18. Discovering More Chemical Concepts from 3D Chemical Information Searches of Crystal Structure Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    2016-01-01

    Three new examples are presented illustrating three-dimensional chemical information searches of the Cambridge structure database (CSD) from which basic core concepts in organic and inorganic chemistry emerge. These include connecting the regiochemistry of aromatic electrophilic substitution with the geometrical properties of hydrogen bonding…

  19. An optimal transport approach for seismic tomography: application to 3D full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métivier, L.; Brossier, R.; Mérigot, Q.; Oudet, E.; Virieux, J.

    2016-11-01

    the L 2 distance, in 2D and 3D contexts.

  20. BioFVM: an efficient, parallelized diffusive transport solver for 3-D biological simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffarizadeh, Ahmadreza; Friedman, Samuel H.; Macklin, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Computational models of multicellular systems require solving systems of PDEs for release, uptake, decay and diffusion of multiple substrates in 3D, particularly when incorporating the impact of drugs, growth substrates and signaling factors on cell receptors and subcellular systems biology. Results: We introduce BioFVM, a diffusive transport solver tailored to biological problems. BioFVM can simulate release and uptake of many substrates by cell and bulk sources, diffusion and decay in large 3D domains. It has been parallelized with OpenMP, allowing efficient simulations on desktop workstations or single supercomputer nodes. The code is stable even for large time steps, with linear computational cost scalings. Solutions are first-order accurate in time and second-order accurate in space. The code can be run by itself or as part of a larger simulator. Availability and implementation: BioFVM is written in C ++ with parallelization in OpenMP. It is maintained and available for download at http://BioFVM.MathCancer.org and http://BioFVM.sf.net under the Apache License (v2.0). Contact: paul.macklin@usc.edu. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26656933

  1. Facile synthesis 3D flexible core-shell graphene/glass fiber via chemical vapor deposition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Direct deposition of graphene layers on the flexible glass fiber surface to form the three-dimensional (3D) core-shell structures is offered using a two-heating reactor chemical vapor deposition system. The two-heating reactor is utilized to offer sufficient, well-proportioned floating C atoms and provide a facile way for low-temperature deposition. Graphene layers, which are controlled by changing the growth time, can be grown on the surface of wire-type glass fiber with the diameter from 30 nm to 120 um. The core-shell graphene/glass fiber deposition mechanism is proposed, suggesting that the 3D graphene films can be deposited on any proper wire-type substrates. These results open a facile way for direct and high-efficiency deposition of the transfer-free graphene layers on the low-temperature dielectric wire-type substrates. PACS 81.05.U-; 81.07.-b; 81.15.Gh PMID:25170331

  2. Dynamic 3-D chemical agent cloud mapping using a sensor constellation deployed on mobile platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosofret, Bogdan R.; Konno, Daisei; Rossi, David; Marinelli, William J.; Seem, Pete

    2014-05-01

    The need for standoff detection technology to provide early Chem-Bio (CB) threat warning is well documented. Much of the information obtained by a single passive sensor is limited to bearing and angular extent of the threat cloud. In order to obtain absolute geo-location, range to threat, 3-D extent and detailed composition of the chemical threat, fusion of information from multiple passive sensors is needed. A capability that provides on-the-move chemical cloud characterization is key to the development of real-time Battlespace Awareness. We have developed, implemented and tested algorithms and hardware to perform the fusion of information obtained from two mobile LWIR passive hyperspectral sensors. The implementation of the capability is driven by current Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Reconnaissance Vehicle operational tactics and represents a mission focused alternative of the already demonstrated 5-sensor static Range Test Validation System (RTVS).1 The new capability consists of hardware for sensor pointing and attitude information which is made available for streaming and aggregation as part of the data fusion process for threat characterization. Cloud information is generated using 2-sensor data ingested into a suite of triangulation and tomographic reconstruction algorithms. The approaches are amenable to using a limited number of viewing projections and unfavorable sensor geometries resulting from mobile operation. In this paper we describe the system architecture and present an analysis of results obtained during the initial testing of the system at Dugway Proving Ground during BioWeek 2013.

  3. Chemical Structure-Biological Activity Models for Pharmacophores’ 3D-Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.; Duda-Seiman, Corina; Duda-Seiman, Daniel; Putz, Ana-Maria; Alexandrescu, Iulia; Mernea, Maria; Avram, Speranta

    2016-01-01

    Within medicinal chemistry nowadays, the so-called pharmaco-dynamics seeks for qualitative (for understanding) and quantitative (for predicting) mechanisms/models by which given chemical structure or series of congeners actively act on biological sites either by focused interaction/therapy or by diffuse/hazardous influence. To this aim, the present review exposes three of the fertile directions in approaching the biological activity by chemical structural causes: the special computing trace of the algebraic structure-activity relationship (SPECTRAL-SAR) offering the full analytical counterpart for multi-variate computational regression, the minimal topological difference (MTD) as the revived precursor for comparative molecular field analyses (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA); all of these methods and algorithms were presented, discussed and exemplified on relevant chemical medicinal systems as proton pump inhibitors belonging to the 4-indolyl,2-guanidinothiazole class of derivatives blocking the acid secretion from parietal cells in the stomach, the 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)-methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine congeners’ (HEPT ligands) antiviral activity against Human Immunodeficiency Virus of first type (HIV-1) and new pharmacophores in treating severe genetic disorders (like depression and psychosis), respectively, all involving 3D pharmacophore interactions. PMID:27399692

  4. Chemical Structure-Biological Activity Models for Pharmacophores' 3D-Interactions.

    PubMed

    Putz, Mihai V; Duda-Seiman, Corina; Duda-Seiman, Daniel; Putz, Ana-Maria; Alexandrescu, Iulia; Mernea, Maria; Avram, Speranta

    2016-07-08

    Within medicinal chemistry nowadays, the so-called pharmaco-dynamics seeks for qualitative (for understanding) and quantitative (for predicting) mechanisms/models by which given chemical structure or series of congeners actively act on biological sites either by focused interaction/therapy or by diffuse/hazardous influence. To this aim, the present review exposes three of the fertile directions in approaching the biological activity by chemical structural causes: the special computing trace of the algebraic structure-activity relationship (SPECTRAL-SAR) offering the full analytical counterpart for multi-variate computational regression, the minimal topological difference (MTD) as the revived precursor for comparative molecular field analyses (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA); all of these methods and algorithms were presented, discussed and exemplified on relevant chemical medicinal systems as proton pump inhibitors belonging to the 4-indolyl,2-guanidinothiazole class of derivatives blocking the acid secretion from parietal cells in the stomach, the 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)-methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine congeners' (HEPT ligands) antiviral activity against Human Immunodeficiency Virus of first type (HIV-1) and new pharmacophores in treating severe genetic disorders (like depression and psychosis), respectively, all involving 3D pharmacophore interactions.

  5. Zig-Zag Thermal-Chemical 3-D Instabilities in the Mantle Wedge: Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, G.; Gerya, T. V.; Arcay, D.; Yuen, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    To understand the plume initiation and propagation it is important to understand whether small-scale convection is occurring under the back-arc in the Low Viscosity Wedge(LVW) and its implication on the island-arc volcanism. Honda et al. [Honda and Saito, 2003; Honda, et al., 2007]) already deployed small- scale convection in the Low Viscosity Wedge (LVW) above a subducting slab with kinematically imposed velocity boundary condition. They have suggested that a roll (finger)-like pattern of hot and cold anomalies emerges in the mantle wedge above the subducting slab. Here, we perform three-dimensional coupled petrological-thermomechanical numerical simulations of intraoceanic one-sided subduction with spontaneously bending retreating slab characterized by weak hydrated upper interface by using multigrid approach combined with characteristics-based marker-in-cell method with conservative finite difference schemes[Gerya and Yuen, 2003a], to investigate the 3D instabilities above the slab and lateral variation along the arc. Our results show that water released from subducting slab through dehydration reactions may lower the viscosity of the mantle. It allows the existence of wave-like small-scale convection in the LVW, which is shown as roll-like structure in 2D petrological-thermomechanical numerical experiments [Gorczyk et al., 2006] using in-situ rock properties computed on the basis of Gibbs free energy minimization. However, in our 3D cases, the rolls aligning with the arc mainly occur earlier , while zig-zag small-scale thermal-chemical instabilities may episodically form above the slab at later stages, which is different from the aligning finger-like pattern in purely thermal models (Honda et al,2003;2007). Also in contrast to thermal convection chemically buoyant hydrated plumes rising from the slab in our models are actually colder then the mantle wedge [Gerya and Yuen 2003b] which also strongly modify both the convection pattern and the seismic structure in

  6. Long-range atmospheric transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: a global 3-D model analysis including evaluation of Arctic sources.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Carey L; Selin, Noelle E

    2012-09-04

    We use the global 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem to simulate long-range atmospheric transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). To evaluate the model's ability to simulate PAHs with different volatilities, we conduct analyses for phenanthrene (PHE), pyrene (PYR), and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). GEOS-Chem captures observed seasonal trends with no statistically significant difference between simulated and measured mean annual concentrations. GEOS-Chem also captures variability in observed concentrations at nonurban sites (r = 0.64, 0.72, and 0.74, for PHE, PYR, and BaP). Sensitivity simulations suggest snow/ice scavenging is important for gas-phase PAHs, and on-particle oxidation and temperature-dependency of gas-particle partitioning have greater effects on transport than irreversible partitioning or increased particle concentrations. GEOS-Chem estimates mean atmospheric lifetimes of <1 day for all three PAHs. Though corresponding half-lives are lower than the 2-day screening criterion for international policy action, we simulate concentrations at the high-Arctic station of Spitsbergen within four times observed concentrations with strong correlation (r = 0.70, 0.68, and 0.70 for PHE, PYR, and BaP). European and Russian emissions combined account for ~80% of episodic high-concentration events at Spitsbergen.

  7. Evaluation of 3D printing and its potential impact on biotechnology and the chemical sciences.

    PubMed

    Gross, Bethany C; Erkal, Jayda L; Lockwood, Sarah Y; Chen, Chengpeng; Spence, Dana M

    2014-04-01

    Nearing 30 years since its introduction, 3D printing technology is set to revolutionize research and teaching laboratories. This feature encompasses the history of 3D printing, reviews various printing methods, and presents current applications. The authors offer an appraisal of the future direction and impact this technology will have on laboratory settings as 3D printers become more accessible.

  8. Simulation of bacteria transport processes in a river with Flow3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzwälder, Kordula; Bui, Minh Duc; Rutschmann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Water quality aspects are getting more and more important due to the European water Framework directive (WFD). One problem related to this topic is the inflow of untreated wastewater due to combined sewer overflows into a river. The wastewater mixture contains even bacteria like E. coli and Enterococci which are markers for water quality. In our work we investigated the transport of these bacteria in river Isar by using a large-scale flume in the outside area of our lab (Oskar von Miller Institute). Therefor we could collect basic data and knowledge about the processes which occur during bacteria sedimentation and remobilisation. In our flume we could use the real grain with the exact size distribution curve as in the river Isar which we want to simulate and we had the chance to nurture a biofilm which is realistic for the analysed situation. This biofilm plays an important role in the remobilisation processes, because the bacteria are hindered to be washed out back into the bulk phase as fast and in such an amount as this would happen without biofilm. The results of our experiments are now used for a module in the 3D software Flow3D to simulate the effects of a point source inlet of raw wastewater on the water quality. Therefor we have to implement the bacteria not as a problem of concentration with advection and diffusion but as single particles which can be inactivated during the process of settling and need to be hindered from remobilisation by the biofilm. This biofilm has special characteristic, it is slippery and has a special thickness which influences the chance of bacteria being removed. To achieve realistic results we have to include the biofilm with more than a probabilistic-tool to make sure that our module is transferable. The module should be as flexible as possible to be improved step by step with increasing quality of dataset.

  9. A global 3-D model to simulate long-range transport of PAHs: Effect of climate on transport to the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, C. L.; Selin, N. E.

    2011-12-01

    We simulate the long-range transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to the Arctic under present and future climate using a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). PAHs, toxic byproducts of combustion, reach the Arctic by long-range atmospheric transport. PAHs are semivolatile compounds that partition between the gas and particle phases. We implement temperature-dependent PAH partitioning into hydrophobic organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC) aerosols in the model to simulate this behavior. First, we test the validity of the model by comparing results to global measurements of the PAHs phenanthrene (PHE), pyrene (PYR), and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and find that for mean global and mean Arctic concentrations, measurements and model results are not statistically different and that the model captures 64 - 74% (r2s) of the concentration variability in non-urban locations. We then simulate daily transport of PHE, PYR, and BaP to the Arctic for the years 2005-2009. Preliminary results suggest the model captures up to 50% (r2s) of the variability in Arctic concentrations, and is able to capture episodic events. Source-receptor analyses indicate European and Russian sources account for approximately 80% of PAHs in the Arctic. The sensitivity of PAH transport to simulated future climate meteorology (GCAP) and to variable OC and BC concentrations is investigated, particularly with respect to transport to the Arctic and remote exposures. The implications for regional and global PAH regulatory policies are discussed.

  10. A Chemical Approach to 3-D Lithographic Patterning of Si and GeNanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, I.D.; Xu, Q.; Yi, D.O.; Liao, C.Y.; Ager III, J.W.; Beeman, J.W.; Yu, K.M.; Robinson, J.T.; Dubon, O.D.; Chrzan, D.C.; Haller, E.E.

    2005-12-12

    Ion implantation into silica followed by thermal annealingis an established growth method for Si and Ge nanocrystals. Wedemonstrate that growth of Group IV semiconductor nanocrystals can besuppressed by co-implantation of oxygen prior to annealing. For Sinanocrystals, at low Si/O dose ratios, oxygen co-implantation leads to areduction of the average nanocrystal size and a blue-shift of thephotoluminescence emission energy. For both Si and Ge nanocrystals, atlarger Si/O or Ge/O dose ratios, the implanted specie is oxidized andnanocrystals do not form. This chemical deactivation was utilized toachieve patterned growth of Si and Ge nanocrystals. Si was implanted intoa thin SiO2 film on a Si substrate followed by oxygen implantationthrough an electron beam lithographically defined stencil mask. Thermalannealing of the co-implanted structure yields two-dimensionallypatterned growth of Si nanocrystals under the masked regions. We applieda previously developed process to obtain exposed nanocrystals byselective HF etching of the silica matrix to these patterned structures.Atomic force microscopy (AFM) of etched structures revealed that exposednanocrystals are not laterally displaced from their original positionsduring the etching process. Therefore, this process provides a means ofachieving patterned structures of exposed nanocrystals. The possibilitiesfor scaling this chemical-based lithography process to smaller featuresand for extending it to 3-D patterning is discussed.

  11. Simulation of light transport in scintillators based on 3D characterization of crystal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Roncali, Emilie; Cherry, Simon R

    2013-04-07

    In the development of positron emission tomography (PET) detectors, understanding and optimizing scintillator light collection is critical for achieving high performance, particularly when the design incorporates depth-of-interaction (DOI) encoding or time-of-flight information. Monte-Carlo simulations play an important role in guiding research in detector designs and popular software such as GATE now include models of light transport in scintillators. Although current simulation toolkits are able to provide accurate models of perfectly polished surfaces, they do not successfully predict light output for other surface finishes, for example those often used in DOI-encoding detectors. The lack of accuracy of those models mainly originates from a simplified description of rough surfaces as an ensemble of micro-facets determined by the distribution of their normal, typically a gaussian distribution. The user can specify the standard deviation of this distribution, but this parameter does not provide a full description of the surface reflectance properties. We propose a different approach based on 3D measurements of the surface using atomic force microscopy. Polished and rough (unpolished) crystals were scanned to compute the surface reflectance properties. The angular distributions of reflectance and reflected rays were computed and stored in look-up tables (LUTs). The LUTs account for the effect of incidence angle and were integrated in a light transport model. Crystals of different sizes were simulated with and without reflector. The simulated maximum light output and the light output as a function of DOI showed very good agreement with experimental characterization of the crystals, indicating that our approach provides an accurate model of polished and rough surfaces and could be used to predict light collection in scintillators. This model is based on a true 3D representation of the surface, makes no assumption about the surface and provides insight on the optical

  12. Simulation of light transport in scintillators based on 3D characterization of crystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roncali, Emilie; Cherry, Simon R.

    2013-04-01

    In the development of positron emission tomography (PET) detectors, understanding and optimizing scintillator light collection is critical for achieving high performance, particularly when the design incorporates depth-of-interaction (DOI) encoding or time-of-flight information. Monte-Carlo simulations play an important role in guiding research in detector designs and popular software such as GATE now include models of light transport in scintillators. Although current simulation toolkits are able to provide accurate models of perfectly polished surfaces, they do not successfully predict light output for other surface finishes, for example those often used in DOI-encoding detectors. The lack of accuracy of those models mainly originates from a simplified description of rough surfaces as an ensemble of micro-facets determined by the distribution of their normal, typically a Gaussian distribution. The user can specify the standard deviation of this distribution, but this parameter does not provide a full description of the surface reflectance properties. We propose a different approach based on 3D measurements of the surface using atomic force microscopy. Polished and rough (unpolished) crystals were scanned to compute the surface reflectance properties. The angular distributions of reflectance and reflected rays were computed and stored in look-up tables (LUTs). The LUTs account for the effect of incidence angle and were integrated in a light transport model. Crystals of different sizes were simulated with and without reflector. The simulated maximum light output and the light output as a function of DOI showed very good agreement with experimental characterization of the crystals, indicating that our approach provides an accurate model of polished and rough surfaces and could be used to predict light collection in scintillators. This model is based on a true 3D representation of the surface, makes no assumption about the surface and provides insight on the optical

  13. 3-D simulation of gases transport under condition of inert gas injection into goaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mao-Xi; Shi, Guo-Qing; Guo, Zhixiong; Wang, Yan-Ming; Ma, Li-Yang

    2016-12-01

    To prevent coal spontaneous combustion in mines, it is paramount to understand O2 gas distribution under condition of inert gas injection into goaf. In this study, the goaf was modeled as a 3-D porous medium based on stress distribution. The variation of O2 distribution influenced by CO2 or N2 injection was simulated based on the multi-component gases transport and the Navier-Stokes equations using Fluent. The numerical results without inert gas injection were compared with field measurements to validate the simulation model. Simulations with inert gas injection show that CO2 gas mainly accumulates at the goaf floor level; however, a notable portion of N2 gas moves upward. The evolution of the spontaneous combustion risky zone with continuous inert gas injection can be classified into three phases: slow inerting phase, rapid accelerating inerting phase, and stable inerting phase. The asphyxia zone with CO2 injection is about 1.25-2.4 times larger than that with N2 injection. The efficacy of preventing and putting out mine fires is strongly related with the inert gas injecting position. Ideal injections are located in the oxidation zone or the transitional zone between oxidation zone and heat dissipation zone.

  14. A 3-D hydrologic transport model of a water recharge system using carbamazepine and chloride as tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, Michael; Gasser, Guy; Negev, Ido; Pankratov, Irena; Elhanany, Sara; Lev, Ovadia; Gvirtzman, Haim

    2014-05-01

    Wastewater recharge facilities are often used as a final water treatment before the discharge to the sea or before water reclamation. These facilities are often located in active aquifers that supply drinking water. Thus, leakage from the water recharge facility and gradual expansion of the underground wastewater plume are of considerable health concern. Hydrological modeling of water recharge systems are widely used as operational and predictive tools. These models rely on distributed water head monitoring and at least one chemical or physical tracer to model solutes' transport. Refractory micropollutants have proven useful in qualitative identification of pollution leakages and for quantification of pollution to a specific site near water recharge facilities. However, their usefulness as tracers for hydrological modeling is still questionable. In this article, we describe a long term, 3-D hydraulic model of a large-scale wastewater effluents recharge system in which a combination of chloride and a refractory micropollutant, carbamazepine is used to trace the solute transport. The combination of the two tracers provides the model with the benefits of the high specificity of the carbamazepine and the extensive historic data base that is available for chloride. The model predicts westward expansion of the pollution plume, whereas a standing front is formed at the east. These trends can be confirmed by the time trace of the carbamazepine concentrations at specific locations. We show that the combination of two tracers accounts better (at least at some locations) for the evolution of the pollution plume than a model based on chloride or carbamazepine alone.

  15. Application of the Finite Orbit Width Version of the CQL3D Code to Transport of Fast Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Yu. V.; Harvey, R. W.

    2016-10-01

    The CQL3D bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck (FP) code now includes the ``fully'' neoclassical version in which the diffusion and advection processes are averaged over actual drift orbits, rather than using a 1st-order expansion. Incorporation of Finite-Orbit-Width (FOW) effects results in neoclassical radial transport caused by collisions, RF wave heating and by toroidal electric field (radial pinch). We apply the CQL3D-full-FOW code to study the thermalization and radial transport of high-energy particles, such as alpha-particles produced by fusion in ITER or deuterons from NBI in NSTX, under effect of their interaction with auxiliary RF waves. A particular attention is given to visualization of transport in 3D space of velocity +major-radius coordinates. Supported by USDOE Grants FC02-01ER54649, FG02-04ER54744, and SC0006614.

  16. ChemEngine: harvesting 3D chemical structures of supplementary data from PDF files.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Muthukumarasamy; Vyas, Renu

    2016-01-01

    Digital access to chemical journals resulted in a vast array of molecular information that is now available in the supplementary material files in PDF format. However, extracting this molecular information, generally from a PDF document format is a daunting task. Here we present an approach to harvest 3D molecular data from the supporting information of scientific research articles that are normally available from publisher's resources. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of extracting truly computable molecules from PDF file formats in a fast and efficient manner, we have developed a Java based application, namely ChemEngine. This program recognizes textual patterns from the supplementary data and generates standard molecular structure data (bond matrix, atomic coordinates) that can be subjected to a multitude of computational processes automatically. The methodology has been demonstrated via several case studies on different formats of coordinates data stored in supplementary information files, wherein ChemEngine selectively harvested the atomic coordinates and interpreted them as molecules with high accuracy. The reusability of extracted molecular coordinate data was demonstrated by computing Single Point Energies that were in close agreement with the original computed data provided with the articles. It is envisaged that the methodology will enable large scale conversion of molecular information from supplementary files available in the PDF format into a collection of ready- to- compute molecular data to create an automated workflow for advanced computational processes. Software along with source codes and instructions available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/chemengine/files/?source=navbar.Graphical abstract.

  17. 3D Visualization of Monte-Carlo Simulation's of HZE Track Structure and Initial Chemical Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    Heavy ions biophysics is important for space radiation risk assessment [1] and hadron-therapy [2]. The characteristic of heavy ions tracks include a very high energy deposition region close to the track (<20 nm) denoted as the track core, and an outer penumbra region consisting of individual secondary electrons (6-rays). A still open question is the radiobiological effects of 6- rays relative to the track core. Of importance is the induction of double-strand breaks (DSB) [3] and oxidative damage to the biomolecules and the tissue matrix, considered the most important lesions for acute and long term effects of radiation. In this work, we have simulated a 56Fe26+ ion track of 1 GeV/amu with our Monte-Carlo code RITRACKS [4]. The simulation results have been used to calculate the energy depiction and initial chemical species in a "voxelized" space, which is then visualized in 3D. Several voxels with dose >1000 Gy are found in the penumbra, some located 0.1 mm from the track core. In computational models, the DSB induction probability is calculated with radial dose [6], which may not take into account the higher RBE of electron track ends for DSB induction. Therefore, these simulations should help improve models of DSB induction and our understanding of heavy ions biophysics.

  18. EDCs DataBank: 3D-Structure database of endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Montes-Grajales, Diana; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2015-01-02

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are a group of compounds that affect the endocrine system, frequently found in everyday products and epidemiologically associated with several diseases. The purpose of this work was to develop EDCs DataBank, the only database of EDCs with three-dimensional structures. This database was built on MySQL using the EU list of potential endocrine disruptors and TEDX list. It contains the three-dimensional structures available on PubChem, as well as a wide variety of information from different databases and text mining tools, useful for almost any kind of research regarding EDCs. The web platform was developed employing HTML, CSS and PHP languages, with dynamic contents in a graphic environment, facilitating information analysis. Currently EDCs DataBank has 615 molecules, including pesticides, natural and industrial products, cosmetics, drugs and food additives, among other low molecular weight xenobiotics. Therefore, this database can be used to study the toxicological effects of these molecules, or to develop pharmaceuticals targeting hormone receptors, through docking studies, high-throughput virtual screening and ligand-protein interaction analysis. EDCs DataBank is totally user-friendly and the 3D-structures of the molecules can be downloaded in several formats. This database is freely available at http://edcs.unicartagena.edu.co.

  19. (Bio)Chemical Tailoring of Biogenic 3-D Nanopatterned Templates with Energy-Relevant Functionalities

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhage, Kenneth H; Kroger, Nils

    2014-09-08

    The overall aim of this research has been to obtain fundamental understanding of (bio)chemical methodologies that will enable utilization of the unique 3-D nanopatterned architectures naturally produced by diatoms for the syntheses of advanced functional materials attractive for applications in energy harvesting/conversion and storage. This research has been conducted in three thrusts: Thrust 1 (In vivo immobilization of proteins in diatom biosilica) is directed towards elucidating the fundamental mechanism(s) underlying the cellular processes of in vivo immobilization of proteins in diatom silica. Thrust 2 (Shape-preserving reactive conversion of diatom biosilica into porous, high-surface area inorganic replicas) is aimed at understanding the fundamental mechanisms of shape preservation and nanostructural evolution associated with the reactive conversion and/or coating-based conversion of diatom biosilica templates into porous inorganic replicas. Thrust 3 (Immobilization of energy-relevant enzymes in diatom biosilica and onto diatom biosilica-derived inorganic replicas) involves use of the results from both Thrust 1 and 2 to develop strategies for in vivo and in vitro immobilization of enzymes in/on diatom biosilica and diatom biosilica-derived inorganic replicas, respectively. This Final Report describes progress achieved in all 3 of these thrusts.

  20. 3D electro-thermal Monte Carlo study of transport in confined silicon devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Mohamed Y.

    The simultaneous explosion of portable microelectronics devices and the rapid shrinking of microprocessor size have provided a tremendous motivation to scientists and engineers to continue the down-scaling of these devices. For several decades, innovations have allowed components such as transistors to be physically reduced in size, allowing the famous Moore's law to hold true. As these transistors approach the atomic scale, however, further reduction becomes less probable and practical. As new technologies overcome these limitations, they face new, unexpected problems, including the ability to accurately simulate and predict the behavior of these devices, and to manage the heat they generate. This work uses a 3D Monte Carlo (MC) simulator to investigate the electro-thermal behavior of quasi-one-dimensional electron gas (1DEG) multigate MOSFETs. In order to study these highly confined architectures, the inclusion of quantum correction becomes essential. To better capture the influence of carrier confinement, the electrostatically quantum-corrected full-band MC model has the added feature of being able to incorporate subband scattering. The scattering rate selection introduces quantum correction into carrier movement. In addition to the quantum effects, scaling introduces thermal management issues due to the surge in power dissipation. Solving these problems will continue to bring improvements in battery life, performance, and size constraints of future devices. We have coupled our electron transport Monte Carlo simulation to Aksamija's phonon transport so that we may accurately and efficiently study carrier transport, heat generation, and other effects at the transistor level. This coupling utilizes anharmonic phonon decay and temperature dependent scattering rates. One immediate advantage of our coupled electro-thermal Monte Carlo simulator is its ability to provide an accurate description of the spatial variation of self-heating and its effect on non

  1. Crossover from 3D to 2D quantum transport in Bi2Se3/In2Se3 superlattices.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanfei; Liu, Haiwen; Guo, Xin; Jiang, Ying; Sun, Yi; Wang, Huichao; Wang, Yong; Li, Han-Dong; Xie, Mao-Hai; Xie, Xin-Cheng; Wang, Jian

    2014-09-10

    The topological insulator/normal insulator (TI/NI) superlattices (SLs) with multiple Dirac channels are predicted to offer great opportunity to design novel materials and investigate new quantum phenomena. Here, we report first transport studies on the SLs composed of TI Bi2Se3 layers sandwiched by NI In2Se3 layers artificially grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The transport properties of two kinds of SL samples show convincing evidence that the transport dimensionality changes from three-dimensional (3D) to two-dimensional (2D) when decreasing the thickness of building block Bi2Se3 layers, corresponding to the crossover from coherent TI transport to separated TI channels. Our findings provide the possibility to realizing "3D surface states" in TI/NI SLs.

  2. Crossover from 3D to 2D Quantum Transport in Bi2Se3/In2Se3 Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanfei, Zhao; Haiwen, Liu; Xin, Guo; Ying, Jiang; Yi, Sun; Huichao, Wang; Yong, Wang; Handong, Li; Maohai, Xie; Xincheng, Xie; Jian, Wang

    2015-03-01

    The topological insulator/normal insulator (TI/NI) superlattices (SLs) with multiple Dirac channels are predicted to offer great opportunity to design novel materials and investigate new quantum phenomena. Here, we report first transport studies on the SLs composed of TI Bi2Se3 layers sandwiched by NI In2Se3 layers artificially grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The transport properties of two kinds of SL samples show convincing evidence that the transport dimensionality changes from three-dimensional (3D) to two-dimensional (2D) when decreasing the thickness of building block Bi2Se3 layers, corresponding to the crossover from coherent TI transport to separated TI channels. Our findings provide the possibility to realizing 3D surface states in TI/NI SLs.

  3. 3D modelling of the transport and fate of riverine fine sediment exported to a semi-enclosed system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delandmeter, Philippe; Lambrechts, Jonathan; Lewis, Stephen; Legat, Vincent; Deleersnijder, Eric; Wolanski, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the transport and fate of suspended sediment exported by rivers is crucial for the management of sensitive marine ecosystems. Sediment transport and fate can vary considerably depending on the geophysical characteristics of the offshore environment (i.e. open, semi-enclosed and enclosed systems and the nature of the continental shelf). In this presentation, we focus on a semi-enclosed setting in the Great Barrier Reef, NE Australia. In this system, the large tropical Burdekin River discharges to a long and narrow continental shelf containing numerous headlands and embayments. Using a new 3D sediment model we developed and SLIM 3D, a Finite Element 3D model for coastal flows, we highlight the key processes of sediment transport for such a system. We validate the model with available measured data from the region. Wind direction and speed during the high river flows are showed to largely control the dynamics and final fate of the sediments. Most (71%) of the sediment load delivered by the river is deposited and retained near the river mouth. The remaining sediment is transported further afield in riverine freshwater plumes. The suspended sediment transported longer distances in the freshwater plumes can reach sensitive marine ecosystems. These results are compared to previous studies on the Burdekin River sediment fate and differences are analysed. The model suggests that wind-driven resuspension events will redistribute sediments within an embayment but have little influence on transporting sediments from bay to bay.

  4. Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media: 3D Visualization Using Synchrotron X-Ray Microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueck, C. L.; Meisenheimer, D.; Wildenschild, D.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms controlling colloid transport and deposition in the vadose zone is an important step in protecting our water resources. Not only may these particles themselves be undesirable contaminants, but they can also aid in the transport of smaller, molecular-scale contaminants by chemical attachment. In this research, we examined the influence that air-water interfaces (AWI) and air-water-solid contact lines (AWS) have on colloid deposition and mobilization in three-dimensional systems. We used x-ray microtomography to visualize the transport of hydrophobic colloids as they move through a partially saturated glass bead pack. Drainage and imbibition experiments were conducted using syringe pumps to control the flow of a colloid suspension through the porous media at 0.6 mL/hr. The high ionic strength fluid was adjusted to a pH of 9.5 and a concentration of 1.0 mol/L KI. During the drainage and imbibition, the flow was periodically halted and allowed to equilibrate before collecting the microtomography scans. Dopants were used to enhance the contrast between the four phases (water, air, beads, and colloids), including potassium iodide dissolved in the fluid, and an outer layer of silver coating the colloids. We hypothesized that AWIs and AWSs will scour and mobilize a significant percentage of colloids, and therefore reduce the concentration of colloids along the vertical profile of the column. The concentration of potassium iodide, and thus the ionic strength, necessary for adequate image segmentation was also explored in separate experiments so that the influence of ionic strength on colloid deposition and mobilization can be studied.

  5. Massively parallel computation of 3D flow and reactions in chemical vapor deposition reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Salinger, A.G.; Shadid, J.N.; Hutchinson, S.A.; Hennigan, G.L.; Devine, K.D.; Moffat, H.K.

    1997-12-01

    Computer modeling of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) reactors can greatly aid in the understanding, design, and optimization of these complex systems. Modeling is particularly attractive in these systems since the costs of experimentally evaluating many design alternatives can be prohibitively expensive, time consuming, and even dangerous, when working with toxic chemicals like Arsine (AsH{sub 3}): until now, predictive modeling has not been possible for most systems since the behavior is three-dimensional and governed by complex reaction mechanisms. In addition, CVD reactors often exhibit large thermal gradients, large changes in physical properties over regions of the domain, and significant thermal diffusion for gas mixtures with widely varying molecular weights. As a result, significant simplifications in the models have been made which erode the accuracy of the models` predictions. In this paper, the authors will demonstrate how the vast computational resources of massively parallel computers can be exploited to make possible the analysis of models that include coupled fluid flow and detailed chemistry in three-dimensional domains. For the most part, models have either simplified the reaction mechanisms and concentrated on the fluid flow, or have simplified the fluid flow and concentrated on rigorous reactions. An important CVD research thrust has been in detailed modeling of fluid flow and heat transfer in the reactor vessel, treating transport and reaction of chemical species either very simply or as a totally decoupled problem. Using the analogy between heat transfer and mass transfer, and the fact that deposition is often diffusion limited, much can be learned from these calculations; however, the effects of thermal diffusion, the change in physical properties with composition, and the incorporation of surface reaction mechanisms are not included in this model, nor can transitions to three-dimensional flows be detected.

  6. A 3D Model of Double-Helical DNA Showing Variable Chemical Details

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cady, Susan G.

    2005-01-01

    Since the first DNA model was created approximately 50 years ago using molecular models, students and teachers have been building simplified DNA models from various practical materials. A 3D double-helical DNA model, made by placing beads on a wire and stringing beads through holes in plastic canvas, is described. Suggestions are given to enhance…

  7. Localization and visualization of excess chemical potential in statistical mechanical integral equation theory 3D-HNC-RISM.

    PubMed

    Du, Qi-Shi; Liu, Peng-Jun; Huang, Ri-Bo

    2008-02-01

    In this study the excess chemical potential of the integral equation theory, 3D-RISM-HNC [Q. Du, Q. Wei, J. Phys. Chem. B 107 (2003) 13463-13470], is visualized in three-dimensional form and localized at interaction sites of solute molecule. Taking the advantage of reference interaction site model (RISM), the calculation equations of chemical excess potential are reformulized according to the solute interaction sites s in molecular space. Consequently the solvation free energy is localized at every interaction site of solute molecule. For visualization of the 3D-RISM-HNC calculation results, the excess chemical potentials are described using radial and three-dimensional diagrams. It is found that the radial diagrams of the excess chemical potentials are more sensitive to the bridge functions than the radial diagrams of solvent site density distributions. The diagrams of average excess chemical potential provide useful information of solute-solvent electrostatic and van der Waals interactions. The local description of solvation free energy at active sites of solute in 3D-RISM-HNC may broaden the application scope of statistical mechanical integral equation theory in solution chemistry and life science.

  8. A 3-D variational assimilation scheme in coupled transport-biogeochemical models: Forecast of Mediterranean biogeochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Teruzzi, Anna; Dobricic, Srdjan; Solidoro, Cosimo; Cossarini, Gianpiero

    2014-01-01

    [1] Increasing attention is dedicated to the implementation of suitable marine forecast systems for the estimate of the state of the ocean. Within the framework of the European MyOcean infrastructure, the pre-existing short-term Mediterranean Sea biogeochemistry operational forecast system has been upgraded by assimilating remotely sensed ocean color data in the coupled transport-biogeochemical model OPATM-BFM using a 3-D variational data assimilation (3D-VAR) procedure. In the present work, the 3D-VAR scheme is used to correct the four phytoplankton functional groups included in the OPATM-BFM in the period July 2007 to September 2008. The 3D-VAR scheme decomposes the error covariance matrix using a sequence of different operators that account separately for vertical covariance, horizontal covariance, and covariance among biogeochemical variables. The assimilation solution is found in a reduced dimensional space, and the innovation for the biogeochemical variables is obtained by the sequential application of the covariance operators. Results show a general improvement in the forecast skill, providing a correction of the basin-scale bias of surface chlorophyll concentration and of the local-scale spatial and temporal dynamics of typical bloom events. Further, analysis of the assimilation skill provides insights into the functioning of the model. The computational costs of the assimilation scheme adopted are low compared to other assimilation techniques, and its modular structure facilitates further developments. The 3D-VAR scheme results especially suitable for implementation within a biogeochemistry operational forecast system.

  9. Thermal Investigation of Common 2d FETs and New Generation of 3d FETs Using Boltzmann Transport Equation in Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samian, R. S.; Abbassi, A.; Ghazanfarian, J.

    2013-09-01

    The thermal performance of two-dimensional (2D) field-effect transistors (FET) is investigated frequently by solving the Fourier heat diffusion law and the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE). With the introduction of the new generation of 3D FETs in which their thickness is less than the phonon mean-free-path it is necessary to carefully simulate the thermal performance of such devices. This paper numerically integrates the BTE in common 2D transistors including planar single layer and Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) transistor, and the new generation of 3D transistors including FinFET and Tri-Gate devices. In order to decrease the directional dependency of results in 3D simulations; the Legendre equal-weight (PN-EW) quadrature set has been employed. It is found that if similar switching time is assumed for 3D and 2D FETs while the new generation of 3D FETs has less net energy consumption, they have higher hot-spot temperature. The results show continuous heat flux distribution normal to the silicon/oxide interface while the temperature jump is seen at the interface in double layer transistors.

  10. 3D Space Radiation Transport in a Shielded ICRU Tissue Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2014-01-01

    A computationally efficient 3DHZETRN code capable of simulating High Charge (Z) and Energy (HZE) and light ions (including neutrons) under space-like boundary conditions with enhanced neutron and light ion propagation was recently developed for a simple homogeneous shield object. Monte Carlo benchmarks were used to verify the methodology in slab and spherical geometry, and the 3D corrections were shown to provide significant improvement over the straight-ahead approximation in some cases. In the present report, the new algorithms with well-defined convergence criteria are extended to inhomogeneous media within a shielded tissue slab and a shielded tissue sphere and tested against Monte Carlo simulation to verify the solution methods. The 3D corrections are again found to more accurately describe the neutron and light ion fluence spectra as compared to the straight-ahead approximation. These computationally efficient methods provide a basis for software capable of space shield analysis and optimization.

  11. Volatile transport on inhomogeneous surfaces: II. Numerical calculations (VT3D)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Leslie A.

    2017-03-01

    Several distant icy worlds have atmospheres that are in vapor-pressure equilibrium with their surface volatiles, including Pluto, Triton, and, probably, several large KBOs near perihelion. Studies of the volatile and thermal evolution of these have been limited by computational speed, especially for models that treat surfaces that vary with both latitude and longitude. In order to expedite such work, I present a new numerical model for the seasonal behavior of Pluto and Triton which (i) uses initial conditions that improve convergence, (ii) uses an expedient method for handling the transition between global and non-global atmospheres, (iii) includes local conservation of energy and global conservation of mass to partition energy between heating, conduction, and sublimation or condensation, (iv) uses time-stepping algorithms that ensure stability while allowing larger timesteps, and (v) can include longitudinal variability. This model, called VT3D, has been used in Young (2012a, 2012b), Young (2013), Olkin et al. (2015), Young and McKinnon (2013), and French et al. (2015). Many elements of VT3D can be used independently. For example, VT3D can also be used to speed up thermophysical models (Spencer et al., 1989) for bodies without volatiles. Code implementation is included in the supplemental materials and is available from the author.

  12. The history and principles of chemical dosimetry for 3-D radiation fields: gels, polymers and plastics.

    PubMed

    Doran, Simon J

    2009-03-01

    Over recent decades, modern protocols of external beam radiotherapy have been developed that involve very steep dose gradients and are thus extremely sensitive to errors in treatment delivery. A recent credentialling study by the Radiological Physics Center at the MD Anderson Cancer Center (Texas, USA) has noted potentially significant inaccuracies in test treatments at a variety of institutions. 3-D radiation dosimetry (often referred to as "gel dosimetry") may have an important role in commissioning new treatment protocols, to help prevent this type of error. This article discusses the various techniques of 3-D radiation dosimetry, with a focus on the types of radiosensitive samples used and on the optical computed tomography readout technique.

  13. Wet chemical method for synthesizing 3D graphene/gold nanocomposite: catalytic reduction of methylene blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jiliang; Yang, Xujie; Xu, Xingyou

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a simple and environmentally-friendly approach was reported to synthesize a novel 3D composite of graphene/gold nanoparticles (3DG/Au NPs) in one step. A 3D interlaced framework of graphene, which exhibited hierarchically porous structures, generated directly through the distinct driving force during the hydrothermal growth. Meanwhile, Au NPs with high dispersity, which displayed tunable morphologies, were immobilized on the framework, where the as-prepared graphene was employed as the endogenous reducing agent. Compared with AuNPs, the obtained 3DG/Au NPs exhibited remarkably convenient recyclability and high activity for the reduction of methylene blue which is a kind of organic dye.

  14. The chemical, mechanical, and physical properties of 3D printed materials composed of TiO2-ABS nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Skorski, Matthew R.; Esenther, Jake M.; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Miller, Abigail E.; Hartings, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To expand the chemical capabilities of 3D printed structures generated from commercial thermoplastic printers, we have produced and printed polymer filaments that contain inorganic nanoparticles. TiO2 was dispersed into acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and extruded into filaments with 1.75 mm diameters. We produced filaments with TiO2 compositions of 1, 5, and 10% (kg/kg) and printed structures using a commercial 3D printer. Our experiments suggest that ABS undergoes minor degradation in the presence of TiO2 during the different processing steps. The measured mechanical properties (strain and Young’s modulus) for all of the composites are similar to those of structures printed from the pure polymer. TiO2 incorporation at 1% negatively affects the stress at breaking point and the flexural stress. Structures produced from the 5 and 10% nanocomposites display a higher breaking point stress than those printed from the pure polymer. TiO2 within the printed matrix was able to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of the polymer. TiO2 was also able to photocatalyze the degradation of a rhodamine 6G in solution. These experiments display chemical reactivity in nanocomposites that are printed using commercial 3D printers, and we expect that our methodology will help to inform others who seek to incorporate catalytic nanoparticles in 3D printed structures. PMID:27375367

  15. The chemical, mechanical, and physical properties of 3D printed materials composed of TiO2-ABS nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Skorski, Matthew; Esenther, Jake; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Miller, Abigail E; Hartings, Matthew R

    To expand the chemical capabilities of 3D printed structures generated from commercial thermoplastic printers, we have produced and printed polymer filaments that contain inorganic nanoparticles. TiO2 was dispersed into acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and extruded into filaments with 1.75 mm diameters. We produced filaments with TiO2 compositions of 1%, 5%, and 10% (kg/kg) and printed structures using a commercial 3D printer. Our experiments suggest that ABS undergoes minor degradation in the presence of TiO2 during the different processing steps. The measured mechanical properties (strain and Young's modulus) for all of the composites are similar to those of structures printed from the pure polymer. TiO2 incorporation at 1% negatively affects the stress at breaking point and the flexural stress. Structures produced from the 5 and 10% nanocomposites display a higher breaking point stress than those printed from the pure polymer. TiO2 within the printed matrix was able to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of the polymer. TiO2 was also able to photocatalyze the degradation of a rhodamine 6G in solution. These experiments display chemical reactivity in nanocomposites that are printed using commercial 3D printers, and we expect that our methodology will help to inform others who seek to incorporate catalytic nanoparticles in 3D printed structures.

  16. Fast ion transport during applied 3D magnetic perturbations on DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Van Zeeland, Michael A.; Ferraro, N. M.; Grierson, Brian A.; ...

    2015-06-26

    In this paper, measurements show fast ion losses correlated with applied three-dimensional (3D) fields in a variety of plasmas ranging from L-mode to resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) edge localized mode (ELM) suppressed H-mode discharges. In DIII-D L-mode discharges with a slowly rotatingmore » $n=2$ magnetic perturbation, scintillator detector loss signals synchronized with the applied fields are observed to decay within one poloidal transit time after beam turn-off indicating they arise predominantly from prompt loss orbits. Full orbit following using M3D-C1 calculations of the perturbed fields and kinetic profiles reproduce many features of the measured losses and points to the importance of the applied 3D field phase with respect to the beam injection location in determining the overall impact on prompt beam ion loss. Modeling of these results includes a self-consistent calculation of the 3D perturbed beam ion birth profiles and scrape-off-layer ionization, a factor found to be essential to reproducing the experimental measurements. Extension of the simulations to full slowing down timescales, including fueling and the effects of drag and pitch angle scattering, show the applied $n=3$ RMPs in ELM suppressed H-mode plasmas can induce a significant loss of energetic particles from the core. With the applied $n=3$ fields, up to 8.4% of the injected beam power is predicted to be lost, compared to 2.7% with axisymmetric fields only. These fast ions, originating from minor radii $$\\rho >0.7$$ , are predicted to be primarily passing particles lost to the divertor region, consistent with wide field-of-view infrared periscope measurements of wall heating in $n=3$ RMP ELM suppressed plasmas. Edge fast ion $${{\\text{D}}_{\\alpha}}$$ (FIDA) measurements also confirm a large change in edge fast ion profile due to the $n=3$ fields, where the effect was isolated by using short 50 ms RMP-off periods during which ELM suppression was maintained yet the fast ion profile

  17. Fast ion transport during applied 3D magnetic perturbations on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Van Zeeland, Michael A.; Ferraro, N. M.; Grierson, Brian A.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Kramer, G. J.; Lasnier, C. J.; Pace, David C.; Allen, Steve L.; Chen, X.; Evans, T. E.; García-Muñoz, M.; Hanson, J. M.; Lanctot, M. J.; Lao, L. L.; Meyer, W. H.; Moyer, R. A.; Nazikian, R.; Orlov, D. M.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Wingen, A.

    2015-06-26

    In this paper, measurements show fast ion losses correlated with applied three-dimensional (3D) fields in a variety of plasmas ranging from L-mode to resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) edge localized mode (ELM) suppressed H-mode discharges. In DIII-D L-mode discharges with a slowly rotating $n=2$ magnetic perturbation, scintillator detector loss signals synchronized with the applied fields are observed to decay within one poloidal transit time after beam turn-off indicating they arise predominantly from prompt loss orbits. Full orbit following using M3D-C1 calculations of the perturbed fields and kinetic profiles reproduce many features of the measured losses and points to the importance of the applied 3D field phase with respect to the beam injection location in determining the overall impact on prompt beam ion loss. Modeling of these results includes a self-consistent calculation of the 3D perturbed beam ion birth profiles and scrape-off-layer ionization, a factor found to be essential to reproducing the experimental measurements. Extension of the simulations to full slowing down timescales, including fueling and the effects of drag and pitch angle scattering, show the applied $n=3$ RMPs in ELM suppressed H-mode plasmas can induce a significant loss of energetic particles from the core. With the applied $n=3$ fields, up to 8.4% of the injected beam power is predicted to be lost, compared to 2.7% with axisymmetric fields only. These fast ions, originating from minor radii $\\rho >0.7$ , are predicted to be primarily passing particles lost to the divertor region, consistent with wide field-of-view infrared periscope measurements of wall heating in $n=3$ RMP ELM suppressed plasmas. Edge fast ion ${{\\text{D}}_{\\alpha}}$ (FIDA) measurements also confirm a large change in edge fast ion profile due to the $n=3$ fields, where the effect was isolated by using short 50 ms RMP-off periods during which ELM suppression was maintained yet the fast ion profile was allowed

  18. Stability and accuracy of 3D neutron transport simulations using the 2D/1D method in MPACT

    DOE PAGES

    Collins, Benjamin; Stimpson, Shane; Kelley, Blake W.; ...

    2016-08-25

    We derived a consistent “2D/1D” neutron transport method from the 3D Boltzmann transport equation, to calculate fuel-pin-resolved neutron fluxes for realistic full-core Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) problems. The 2D/1D method employs the Method of Characteristics to discretize the radial variables and a lower order transport solution to discretize the axial variable. Our paper describes the theory of the 2D/1D method and its implementation in the MPACT code, which has become the whole-core deterministic neutron transport solver for the Consortium for Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL) core simulator VERA-CS. We also performed several applications on both leadership-class and industry-classmore » computing clusters. Results are presented for whole-core solutions of the Watts Bar Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 and compared to both continuous-energy Monte Carlo results and plant data.« less

  19. Stability and accuracy of 3D neutron transport simulations using the 2D/1D method in MPACT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Benjamin; Stimpson, Shane; Kelley, Blake W.; Young, Mitchell T. H.; Kochunas, Brendan; Graham, Aaron; Larsen, Edward W.; Downar, Thomas; Godfrey, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    A consistent "2D/1D" neutron transport method is derived from the 3D Boltzmann transport equation, to calculate fuel-pin-resolved neutron fluxes for realistic full-core Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) problems. The 2D/1D method employs the Method of Characteristics to discretize the radial variables and a lower order transport solution to discretize the axial variable. This paper describes the theory of the 2D/1D method and its implementation in the MPACT code, which has become the whole-core deterministic neutron transport solver for the Consortium for Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL) core simulator VERA-CS. Several applications have been performed on both leadership-class and industry-class computing clusters. Results are presented for whole-core solutions of the Watts Bar Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 and compared to both continuous-energy Monte Carlo results and plant data.

  20. Stability and accuracy of 3D neutron transport simulations using the 2D/1D method in MPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Benjamin; Stimpson, Shane; Kelley, Blake W.; Young, Mitchell T. H.; Kochunas, Brendan; Graham, Aaron; Larsen, Edward W.; Downar, Thomas; Godfrey, Andrew

    2016-08-25

    We derived a consistent “2D/1D” neutron transport method from the 3D Boltzmann transport equation, to calculate fuel-pin-resolved neutron fluxes for realistic full-core Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) problems. The 2D/1D method employs the Method of Characteristics to discretize the radial variables and a lower order transport solution to discretize the axial variable. Our paper describes the theory of the 2D/1D method and its implementation in the MPACT code, which has become the whole-core deterministic neutron transport solver for the Consortium for Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL) core simulator VERA-CS. We also performed several applications on both leadership-class and industry-class computing clusters. Results are presented for whole-core solutions of the Watts Bar Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 and compared to both continuous-energy Monte Carlo results and plant data.

  1. Simulation of Tritium Transport and Groundwater Age in a Variably Saturated 3D Model, Lake Rotorua Catchment, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daughney, C.; Toews, M. W.; Morgenstern, U.; Cornaton, F. J.; Jackson, B. M.

    2013-12-01

    Lake Rotorua is a focus of culture and tourism in New Zealand. The lake's water quality has declined since the 1970s, partly due to nutrient inputs that reach the lake via the groundwater system. Improved land use management within the catchment requires prediction of the spatial variations of groundwater transit time from land surface to the lake, and from this the prediction of current and future nutrient inflows to the lake. This study combines the two main methods currently available for determination of water age: numerical groundwater models and hydrological tracers. A steady-state 3D finite element model was constructed to simulate groundwater flow and transport of tritium and age at the catchment scale (555 km2). The model materials were defined using a 3D geologic model and included ignimbrites, rhyolites, alluvial and lake bottom sediments. The steady-state saturated groundwater flow model was calibrated using observed groundwater levels in boreholes (111 locations) and stream flow measurements from groundwater-fed streams and springs (61 locations). Hydraulic conductivities and Cauchy boundary conditions associated with the streams, springs and lake were parameterized. The transport parameters for the model were calibrated using 191 tritium samples from 105 locations (springs, streams and boreholes), with most locations having two sample dates. The transport model used steady-state flow, but simulated the transient transport and decay of tritium from rainfall recharge between 1945 and 2012. An additional 1D unsaturated sub-model was added to account for tritium decay from the ground surface to the water table. The sub-model is linked on top of the 3D model, and uses the water table depths and material properties from the 3D model. The adjustable calibration parameters for the transport model were porosity and van Genuchten parameters related to the unsaturated sub-models. Calibration of the flow model was achieved using a combination of automated least

  2. Chemical Transport--Coping with Disasters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca L.

    1980-01-01

    Describes operations of CHEMTREC, a chemical emergency information system supported by the Chemical Manufacturer's Association. Presents data on transportation incidents involving hazardous materials and the most frequently involved chemicals in transportation incidents. (CS)

  3. The influence of plasma technology coupled to chemical grafting on the cell growth compliance of 3D hydroxyapatite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Russo, Laura; Zanini, Stefano; Giannoni, Paolo; Landi, Elena; Villa, Anna; Sandri, Monica; Riccardi, Claudia; Quarto, Rodolfo; Doglia, Silvia M; Nicotra, Francesco; Cipolla, Laura

    2012-11-01

    The development of advanced materials with biomimetic features in order to elicit desired biological responses and to guarantee tissue biocompatibility is recently gaining attention for tissue engineering applications. Bioceramics, such as hydroxyapatite-based biomaterials are now used in a number of different applications throughout the body, covering all areas of the skeleton, due to their biological and chemical similarity to the inorganic phases of bones. When bioactive sintered hydroxyapatite (HA) is desired, biomolecular modification of these materials is needed. In the present work, we investigated the influence of plasma surface modification coupled to chemical grafting on the cell growth compliance of HA 3D scaffolds.

  4. 2D and 3D crystallization of a bacterial homologue of human vitamin C membrane transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Harder, Daniel; Ucurum, Zöhre; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2014-10-01

    Most organisms are able to synthesize vitamin C whereas humans are not. In order to contribute to the elucidation of the molecular working mechanism of vitamin C transport through biological membranes, we cloned, overexpressed, purified, functionally characterized, and 2D- and 3D-crystallized a bacterial protein (UraDp) with 29% of amino acid sequence identity to the human sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 1 (SVCT1). Ligand-binding experiments by scintillation proximity assay revealed that uracil is a substrate preferably bound to UraDp. For structural analysis, we report on the production of tubular 2D crystals and present a first projection structure of UraDp from negatively stained tubes. On the other hand the successful growth of UraDp 3D crystals and their crystallographic analysis is described. These 3D crystals, which diffract X-rays to 4.2Å resolution, pave the way towards the high-resolution crystal structure of a bacterial homologue with high amino acid sequence identity to human SVCT1.

  5. 3D effects of edge magnetic field configuration on divertor/scrape-off layer transport and optimization possibilities for a future reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Xu, Y.; Ida, K.; Corre, Y.; Feng, Y.; Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Tabares, F. L.; Evans, T. E.; Coenen, J. W.; Liang, Y.; Bader, A.; Itoh, K.; Yamada, H.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Ciraolo, G.; Tafalla, D.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Guo, H. Y.; Cui, Z. Y.; Reiter, D.; Asakura, N.; Wenzel, U.; Morita, S.; Ohno, N.; Peterson, B. J.; Masuzaki, S.

    2015-10-01

    This paper assesses the three-dimensional (3D) effects of the edge magnetic field structure on divertor/scrape-off layer transport, based on an inter-machine comparison of experimental data and on the recent progress of 3D edge transport simulation. The 3D effects are elucidated as a consequence of competition between transports parallel (\\parallel ) and perpendicular (\\bot ) to the magnetic field, in open field lines cut by divertor plates, or in magnetic islands. The competition has strong impacts on divertor functions, such as determination of the divertor density regime, impurity screening and detachment control. The effects of magnetic perturbation on the edge electric field and turbulent transport are also discussed. Parameterization to measure the 3D effects on the edge transport is attempted for the individual divertor functions. Based on the suggested key parameters, an operation domain of the 3D divertor configuration is discussed for future devices.

  6. A 3-D variational assimilation scheme in coupled transport-biogeochemical models: Forecast of Mediterranean biogeochemical properties

    PubMed Central

    Teruzzi, Anna; Dobricic, Srdjan; Solidoro, Cosimo; Cossarini, Gianpiero

    2014-01-01

    [1] Increasing attention is dedicated to the implementation of suitable marine forecast systems for the estimate of the state of the ocean. Within the framework of the European MyOcean infrastructure, the pre-existing short-term Mediterranean Sea biogeochemistry operational forecast system has been upgraded by assimilating remotely sensed ocean color data in the coupled transport-biogeochemical model OPATM-BFM using a 3-D variational data assimilation (3D-VAR) procedure. In the present work, the 3D-VAR scheme is used to correct the four phytoplankton functional groups included in the OPATM-BFM in the period July 2007 to September 2008. The 3D-VAR scheme decomposes the error covariance matrix using a sequence of different operators that account separately for vertical covariance, horizontal covariance, and covariance among biogeochemical variables. The assimilation solution is found in a reduced dimensional space, and the innovation for the biogeochemical variables is obtained by the sequential application of the covariance operators. Results show a general improvement in the forecast skill, providing a correction of the basin-scale bias of surface chlorophyll concentration and of the local-scale spatial and temporal dynamics of typical bloom events. Further, analysis of the assimilation skill provides insights into the functioning of the model. The computational costs of the assimilation scheme adopted are low compared to other assimilation techniques, and its modular structure facilitates further developments. The 3D-VAR scheme results especially suitable for implementation within a biogeochemistry operational forecast system. PMID:26213670

  7. A 3-D Model of Signaling and Transport Pathways in Epithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Quong, A A; Westbrook, C K

    2005-04-01

    A 3-dimensional computer model was developed to simulate the spatial and chemical evolution of calcium ions inside an array of human epithelial kidney cells. This is a prototype model, intended to develop a methodology to incorporate much more complex interactions of metabolic and other processes within many types of cells and lead to increased ability to predict cellular responses to disease as well as to chemical and biological warfare situations. Preliminary tests of the model are described.

  8. Direct fabrication of 3D graphene on nanoporous anodic alumina by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Hualin; Garrett, David J.; Apollo, Nicholas V.; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Lau, Desmond; Prawer, Steven; Cervenka, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    High surface area electrode materials are of interest for a wide range of potential applications such as super-capacitors and electrochemical cells. This paper describes a fabrication method of three-dimensional (3D) graphene conformally coated on nanoporous insulating substrate with uniform nanopore size. 3D graphene films were formed by controlled graphitization of diamond-like amorphous carbon precursor films, deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). Plasma-assisted graphitization was found to produce better quality graphene than a simple thermal graphitization process. The resulting 3D graphene/amorphous carbon/alumina structure has a very high surface area, good electrical conductivity and exhibits excellent chemically stability, providing a good material platform for electrochemical applications. Consequently very large electrochemical capacitance values, as high as 2.1 mF for a sample of 10 mm3, were achieved. The electrochemical capacitance of the material exhibits a dependence on bias voltage, a phenomenon observed by other groups when studying graphene quantum capacitance. The plasma-assisted graphitization, which dominates the graphitization process, is analyzed and discussed in detail.

  9. Direct fabrication of 3D graphene on nanoporous anodic alumina by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Hualin; Garrett, David J.; Apollo, Nicholas V.; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Lau, Desmond; Prawer, Steven; Cervenka, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    High surface area electrode materials are of interest for a wide range of potential applications such as super-capacitors and electrochemical cells. This paper describes a fabrication method of three-dimensional (3D) graphene conformally coated on nanoporous insulating substrate with uniform nanopore size. 3D graphene films were formed by controlled graphitization of diamond-like amorphous carbon precursor films, deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). Plasma-assisted graphitization was found to produce better quality graphene than a simple thermal graphitization process. The resulting 3D graphene/amorphous carbon/alumina structure has a very high surface area, good electrical conductivity and exhibits excellent chemically stability, providing a good material platform for electrochemical applications. Consequently very large electrochemical capacitance values, as high as 2.1 mF for a sample of 10 mm3, were achieved. The electrochemical capacitance of the material exhibits a dependence on bias voltage, a phenomenon observed by other groups when studying graphene quantum capacitance. The plasma-assisted graphitization, which dominates the graphitization process, is analyzed and discussed in detail. PMID:26805546

  10. Photons, Electrons and Positrons Transport in 3D by Monte Carlo Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-01

    Version 04 FOTELP-2014 is a new compact general purpose version of the previous FOTELP-2K6 code designed to simulate the transport of photons, electrons and positrons through three-dimensional material and sources geometry by Monte Carlo techniques, using subroutine package PENGEOM from the PENELOPE code under Linux-based and Windows OS. This new version includes routine ELMAG for electron and positron transport simulation in electric and magnetic fields, RESUME option and routine TIMER for obtaining starting random number and for measuring the time of simulation.

  11. Age, double porosity, and simple reaction modifications for the MOC3D ground-water transport model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goode, Daniel J.

    1999-01-01

    This report documents modifications for the MOC3D ground-water transport model to simulate (a) ground-water age transport; (b) double-porosity exchange; and (c) simple but flexible retardation, decay, and zero-order growth reactions. These modifications are incorporated in MOC3D version 3.0. MOC3D simulates the transport of a single solute using the method-ofcharacteristics numerical procedure. The age of ground water, that is the time since recharge to the saturated zone, can be simulated using the transport model with an additional source term of unit strength, corresponding to the rate of aging. The output concentrations of the model are in this case the ages at all locations in the model. Double porosity generally refers to a separate immobilewater phase within the aquifer that does not contribute to ground-water flow but can affect solute transport through diffusive exchange. The solute mass exchange rate between the flowing water in the aquifer and the immobile-water phase is the product of the concentration difference between the two phases and a linear exchange coefficient. Conceptually, double porosity can approximate the effects of dead-end pores in a granular porous media, or matrix diffusion in a fractured-rock aquifer. Options are provided for decay and zero-order growth reactions within the immobilewater phase. The simple reaction terms here extend the original model, which included decay and retardation. With these extensions, (a) the retardation factor can vary spatially within each model layer, (b) the decay rate coefficient can vary spatially within each model layer and can be different for the dissolved and sorbed phases, and (c) a zero-order growth reaction is added that can vary spatially and can be different in the dissolved and sorbed phases. The decay and growth reaction terms also can change in time to account for changing geochemical conditions during transport. The report includes a description of the theoretical basis of the model, a

  12. Evaluation of Stratospheric Transport in New 3D Models Using the Global Modeling Initiative Grading Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahan, Susan E.; Douglass, Anne R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) Team developed objective criteria for model evaluation in order to identify the best representation of the stratosphere. This work created a method to quantitatively and objectively discriminate between different models. In the original GMI study, 3 different meteorological data sets were used to run an offline chemistry and transport model (CTM). Observationally-based grading criteria were derived and applied to these simulations and various aspects of stratospheric transport were evaluated; grades were assigned. Here we report on the application of the GMI evaluation criteria to CTM simulations integrated with a new assimilated wind data set and a new general circulation model (GCM) wind data set. The Finite Volume Community Climate Model (FV-CCM) is a new GCM developed at Goddard which uses the NCAR CCM physics and the Lin and Rood advection scheme. The FV-Data Assimilation System (FV-DAS) is a new data assimilation system which uses the FV-CCM as its core model. One year CTM simulations of 2.5 degrees longitude by 2 degrees latitude resolution were run for each wind data set. We present the evaluation of temperature and annual transport cycles in the lower and middle stratosphere in the two new CTM simulations. We include an evaluation of high latitude transport which was not part of the original GMI criteria. Grades for the new simulations will be compared with those assigned during the original GMT evaluations and areas of improvement will be identified.

  13. 3D Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Buoyant Flow and Heat Transport in a Curved Open Channel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-dimensional buoyancy-extended version of kappa-epsilon turbulence model was developed for simulating the turbulent flow and heat transport in a curved open channel. The density- induced buoyant force was included in the model, and the influence of temperature stratification on flow field was...

  14. 3D modelling of transport, deposition and resuspension of highway deposited sediments in wet detention ponds.

    PubMed

    Bentzen, T R

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents results from an experimental and numerical study of flows and transport of primarily particle bound pollutants in highway wet detention ponds. The study presented here is part of a general investigation on road runoff and pollution in respect to wet detention ponds. The objective is to evaluate the quality of long term simulation based on historical rains series of the pollutant discharges from roads and highways. A three-dimensional hydrodynamic and mud transport model is used for the investigation. The transport model has been calibrated and validated on e.g. experiments in a 30 m long concrete channel with width of 0.8 m and a water depth of approximately 0.8 m and in circular flume experiments in order to reproduce near-bed specific processes such as resuspension and consolidation. With a fairly good agreement with measurements, modelling of hydrodynamics, transport of dissolved pollutants and particles in wet detention ponds is possible with application of a three dimensional RANS model and the advection/dispersion equation taken physical phenomena like wind, waves, deposition, erosion and consolidation of the bottom sediment into account.

  15. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofan; Mehmani, Yashar; Perkins, William A.; Pasquali, Andrea; Schonherr, Martin; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Parks, Michael L.; Trask, Nathaniel; Balhoff, Matthew T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Geier, Martin; Krafczyk, Manfred; Luo, Li -Shi; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2015-09-28

    In this study, multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include (1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and (2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing a standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of the first type based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (FVM-based CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and (for capable codes) nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The intercomparison work was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support

  16. Electrostatic dust transport on Eros: 3-D simulations of pond formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Anna L. H.; Colwell, Joshua E.; DeWolfe, Alexandria Ware

    2008-06-01

    NEAR-Shoemaker spacecraft images of the surface of the near-Earth Asteroid 433 Eros reveal that more than 200 craters on Eros are partially filled with smooth deposits, termed ponds [Veverka, J., and 32 colleagues, 2001a. Science 292, 484-488]. These ponds appear smooth even at a high resolution of 1.2 cm/pixel and spectral analysis suggests that they may be made up of particles ≪50 μm in size [Robinson, M.S., Thomas, P.C., Veverka, J., Murchie, S., Carcish, B., 2001. Nature 413, 396-400; Riner, M.A., Eckart, J.M., Gigilio, J.G., Robinson, M.S., 2006. Lunar Planet. Sci. XXXVII. Abstract 2291]. Coupled with the concentration of ponds at low latitudes, the possible small particle size suggests that these deposits might be related to electrostatic transport of dust near the local terminator [Robinson, M.S., Thomas, P.C., Veverka, J., Murchie, S., Carcish, B., 2001. Nature 413, 396-400]. The work presented here incorporates the precise lighting geometry within a crater at a specified latitude into two models for electrostatic transport of dust grains in order to explore dust deposition and pond formation via this mechanism, particularly as a function of latitude. We find that micrometer-sized dust particles are preferentially transported into craters at latitudes where solar illumination angles are often low. In addition we find that if particles are electrostatically lifted off the surface they are preferentially transported into topographic depressions independent of whether the particles undergo stable levitation. The primary limiting factor for our model is uncertainty concerning the dust launching mechanism. Despite that, and though it does not match the observed north-south asymmetry in pond distribution, our model demonstrates potential for good general agreement between future predictions of pond formation via electrostatic transport of dust and observations of pond locations on the surface of Eros.

  17. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Mehmani, Yashar; Perkins, William A.; Pasquali, Andrea; Schönherr, Martin; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Parks, Michael L.; Trask, Nathaniel; Balhoff, Matthew T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Geier, Martin; Krafczyk, Manfred; Luo, Li-Shi; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2016-09-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing a standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of the first type based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (FVM-based CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and (for capable codes) nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The intercomparison work was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support for confidence

  18. Quantification of anthropogenic impact on groundwater dependent terrestrial ecosystem using geochemical and isotope tools combined with 3-D flow and transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, A. J.; Witczak, S.; Dulinski, M.; Wachniew, P.; Rozanski, K.; Kania, J.; Postawa, A.; Karczewski, J.; Moscicki, W. J.

    2014-08-01

    A dedicated study was launched in 2010 with the main aim to better understand the functioning of groundwater dependent terrestrial ecosystem (GDTE) located in southern Poland. The GDTE consists of a valuable forest stand (Niepolomice Forest) and associated wetland (Wielkie Bloto fen). A wide range of tools (environmental tracers, geochemistry, geophysics, 3-D flow and transport modeling) was used. The research was conducted along three major directions: (i) quantification of the dynamics of groundwater flow in various parts of the aquifer associated with GDTE, (ii) quantification of the degree of interaction between the GDTE and the aquifer, and (iii) 3-D modeling of groundwater flow in the vicinity of the studied GDTE and quantification of possible impact of enhanced exploitation of the aquifer on the status of GDTE. Environmental tracer data (tritium, stable isotopes of water) strongly suggest that upward leakage of the aquifer contributes significantly to the present water balance of the studied wetland and associated forest. Physico-chemical parameters of water (pH, conductivity, Na / Cl ratio) confirm this notion. Model runs indicate that prolonged groundwater abstraction through the newly-established network of water supply wells, conducted at maximum permitted capacity (ca. 10 000 m3 d-1), may trigger drastic changes in the ecosystem functioning, eventually leading to its degradation.

  19. Materials ``alchemy'': Shape-preserving chemical transformation of micro-to-macroscopic 3-D structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhage, Kenneth H.

    2010-06-01

    The scalable fabrication of nano-structured materials with complex morphologies and tailorable chemistries remains a significant challenge. One strategy for such synthesis consists of the generation of a solid structure with a desired morphology (a “preform”), followed by reactive conversion of the preform into a new chemistry. Several gas/solid and liquid/solid reaction processes that are capable of such chemical conversion into new micro-to-nano-structured materials, while preserving the macroscopic-to-microscopic preform morphologies, are described in this overview. Such shape-preserving chemical transformation of one material into another could be considered a modern type of materials “alchemy.”

  20. Mechanical approach to chemical transport

    PubMed Central

    Kocherginsky, Nikolai; Gruebele, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Nonequilibrium thermodynamics describes the rates of transport phenomena with the aid of various thermodynamic forces, but often the phenomenological transport coefficients are not known, and the description is not easily connected with equilibrium relations. We present a simple and intuitive model to address these issues. Our model is based on Lagrangian dynamics for chemical systems with dissipation, so one may think of the model as physicochemical mechanics. Using one main equation, the model allows a systematic derivation of all transport and equilibrium equations, subject to the limitation that heat generated or absorbed in the system must be small for the model to be valid. A table with all major examples of transport and equilibrium processes described using physicochemical mechanics is given. In equilibrium, physicochemical mechanics reduces to standard thermodynamics and the Gibbs–Duhem relation, and we show that the First and Second Laws of thermodynamics are satisfied for our system plus bath model. Out of equilibrium, our model provides relationships between transport coefficients and describes system evolution in the presence of several simultaneous external fields. The model also leads to an extension of the Onsager–Casimir reciprocal relations for properties simultaneously transported by many components. PMID:27647899

  1. Identification of groundwater parameters at Columbus, Mississippi, using a 3D inverse flow and transport model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlebo, H.C.; Rosbjerg, D.; Hill, M.C.

    1996-01-01

    An extensive amount of data including hydraulic heads, hydraulic conductivities and concentrations of several solutes from controlled injections have been collected during the MADE 1 and MADE 2 experiments at a heterogeneous site near Columbus, Mississippi. In this paper the use of three-dimensional inverse groundwater models including simultaneous estimation of flow and transport parameters is proposed to help identify the dominant characteristics at the site. Simulations show that using a hydraulic conductivity distribution obtained from 2187 borehole flowmeter tests directly in the model produces poor matches to the measured hydraulic heads and tritium concentrations. Alternatively, time averaged hydraulic head maps are used to define zones of constant hydraulic conductivity to be estimated. Preliminary simulations suggest that in the case of conservative transport many, but not all, of the major plume characteristics can be explained by large-scale heterogeneity in recharge and hydraulic conductivity.

  2. Full 3D visualization tool-kit for Monte Carlo and deterministic transport codes

    SciTech Connect

    Frambati, S.; Frignani, M.

    2012-07-01

    We propose a package of tools capable of translating the geometric inputs and outputs of many Monte Carlo and deterministic radiation transport codes into open source file formats. These tools are aimed at bridging the gap between trusted, widely-used radiation analysis codes and very powerful, more recent and commonly used visualization software, thus supporting the design process and helping with shielding optimization. Three main lines of development were followed: mesh-based analysis of Monte Carlo codes, mesh-based analysis of deterministic codes and Monte Carlo surface meshing. The developed kit is considered a powerful and cost-effective tool in the computer-aided design for radiation transport code users of the nuclear world, and in particular in the fields of core design and radiation analysis. (authors)

  3. A 3D Model for Ion Beam Formation and Transport Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Todd, D.; Leitner, D.

    2006-02-07

    In this paper, we present a three-dimensional model forself-consistently modeling ion beam formation from plasma ion sources andtransporting in low energy beam transport systems. A multi-sectionoverlapped computational domain has been used to break the originaltransport system into a number of weakly coupled subsystems. Within eachsubsystem, macro-particle tracking is used to obtain the charge densitydistribution in this subdomain. The three-dimensional Poisson equation issolved within the subdomain after each particle tracking to obtain theself-consistent space-charge forces and the particle tracking is repeateduntil the solution converges. Two new Poisson solvers based on acombination of the spectral method and the finite difference multigridmethod have been developed to solve the Poisson equation in cylindricalcoordinates for the straight beam transport section and in Frenet-Serretcoordinates for the bending magnet section. This model can have importantapplication in design and optimization of the low energy beam line opticsof the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) front end.

  4. Applications of the 3-D Deterministic Transport Attila{reg_sign} for Core Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, D.S.; Gougar, D.; Roth, P.A.; Wareing, T.; Failla, G.; McGhee, J.; Barnett, A.

    2004-10-06

    An LDRD (Laboratory Directed Research and Development) project is ongoing at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for applying the three-dimensional multi-group deterministic neutron transport code (Attila{reg_sign}) to criticality, flux and depletion calculations of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This paper discusses the model development, capabilities of Attila, generation of the cross-section libraries, and comparisons to an ATR MCNP model and future.

  5. Applications of the 3-D Deterministic Transport Code Attlla for Core Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Lucas

    2004-10-01

    An LDRD (Laboratory Directed Research and Development) project is ongoing at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for applying the three-dimensional multi-group deterministic neutron transport code (Attila®) to criticality, flux and depletion calculations of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This paper discusses the model development, capabilities of Attila, generation of the cross-section libraries, and comparisons to an ATR MCNP model and future.

  6. Importance of 3D Processes Near the Ocean's Surface for Material Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgokmen, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    There are a number of practical problems that demand an accurate knowledge of ocean currents near the surface of the ocean. It is known that oceanic coherent features transport heat and carry out vertical exchange of biogeochemical tracers. Ocean currents can affect biological primary production, air-sea gas exchanges and global tracer budgets. Ocean currents are also important for the dispersion of substances that pose a danger to society, economy and human health. Examples of such events include algal blooms, the Fukushima nuclear plant incident in the Pacific Ocean in 2011, and repeated large oil spills in the Gulf of Mexico, namely the IXTOC in 1978 and the Deepwater Horizon event in 2010. Such incidents demand accurate answers to questions such as ``where will the pollutant go?", ``how fast will it get there?" and ``how much pollutant will arrive there?", and in some instances ``where did the pollutant come from?". The answers to these questions are critical to the allocation of limited response resources, and in determining the overall impact of the events. We will summarize the efforts by the Consortium for Advanced Research on Transport of Hydrocarbon in the Environment (CARTHE). One of the primary objectives of CARTHE is to improve predictive modeling capability for flows near the air-sea interface. In particular, two large experiments, Grand Lagrangian Deployment (GLAD) and Surf-zone and Coastal Oil Pathways Experiment (SCOPE), coordinated with real-time modeling were instructive on processes influencing near-surface material transport. Findings on submesoscale flows as well as model deficiencies to capture processes relevant to transport will be discussed. Insight into future modeling and observational plans will be provided.

  7. Mountain watershed as a 3d-crack net transportation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonova, Tatiana; Arakelian, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    1. New model for simulating of formation of a mountain watershed and a river-bed as an unified 3D-crack net is discussed for the first time The following questions are under study: watershed pattern, morphological structure of mountain watershed (drainage system, water-parting system), mountain watershed formation mechanism, brittle destruction as a genetically attributed property of rock, mountain litho-watershed formation stages (i.e. drainage cones and slope surfaces formation stage, branched drainage system formation stage, water-parting arc formation). 2. We focused our study on the features of establishment of the geosystems for a river basin being localized on the mountain slopes of ridges in relatively similar geological conditions. A system of river channels (drainage network) is also closely connected with the processes of crack formation and destruction. Litho-watershed basis plays a dominant role in formation and functioning of the river basin, and also in mountain relief in general. 3. Conditions that need to be taken into account in the analysis of formation of litho-watershed, are the following: physico-geographical and climatic features of the mountain country; geological-mineralogical and orographic features; age; character of the fractures formation in the rocks. Various combinations of these conditions will determine the formation of mountain watersheds, namely, their size, structure, figure of a run river system, water cut, etc. 4. In progress, the problem of universality of presented approach for the different mountain river basin with own peculiarities should be studied in details for each case on the basis of necessary data both in geographical and geological aspects.

  8. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Xiaofan; Mehmani, Yashar; Perkins, William A.; ...

    2015-09-28

    In this study, multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include (1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and (2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing a standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of the firstmore » type based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (FVM-based CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and (for capable codes) nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The intercomparison work was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides

  9. Coupling ANIMO and MT3DMS for 3D regional-scale modeling of nutrient transport in soil and groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, G.; Del Val Alonso, L.; Groenendijk, P.; Griffioen, J.

    2012-12-01

    We developed an on-line coupling between the 1D/quasi-2D nutrient transport model ANIMO and the 3D groundwater transport model code MT3DMS. ANIMO is a detailed, process-oriented model code for the simulation of nitrate leaching to groundwater, N- and P-loads on surface waters and emissions of greenhouse gasses. It is the leading nutrient fate and transport code in the Netherlands where it is used primarily for the evaluation of fertilization related legislation. In addition, the code is applied frequently in international research projects. MT3DMS is probably the most commonly used groundwater solute transport package worldwide. The on-line model coupling ANIMO-MT3DMS combines the state-of-the-art descriptions of the biogeochemical cycles in ANIMO with the advantages of using a 3D approach for the transport through the saturated domain. These advantages include accounting for regional lateral transport, considering groundwater-surface water interactions more explicitly, and the possibility of using MODFLOW to obtain the flow fields. An additional merit of the on-line coupling concept is that it preserves feedbacks between the saturated and unsaturated zone. We tested ANIMO-MT3DMS by simulating nutrient transport for the period 1970-2007 in a Dutch agricultural polder catchment covering an area of 118 km2. The transient groundwater flow field had a temporal resolution of one day and was calculated with MODFLOW-MetaSWAP. The horizontal resolution of the model grid was 100x100m and consisted of 25 layers of varying thickness. To keep computation times manageable, we prepared MT3DMS for parallel computing, which in itself is a relevant development for a large community of groundwater transport modelers. For the parameterization of the soil, we applied a standard classification approach, representing the area by 60 units with unique combinations of soil type, land use and geohydrological setting. For the geochemical parameterization of the deeper subsurface, however, we

  10. Benchmark Study of 3D Pore-scale Flow and Solute Transport Simulation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibe, T. D.; Yang, X.; Mehmani, Y.; Perkins, W. A.; Pasquali, A.; Schoenherr, M.; Kim, K.; Perego, M.; Parks, M. L.; Trask, N.; Balhoff, M.; Richmond, M. C.; Geier, M.; Krafczyk, M.; Luo, L. S.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that benchmark study to include additional models of the first type based on the immersed-boundary method (IMB), lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all five approaches (FVM-based CFD, IMB, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The benchmark study was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support for confidence in a variety of pore-scale modeling methods, and motivates further development and application of pore-scale simulation methods.

  11. Investigating the Use of 3-D Deterministic Transport for Core Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    H. D. Gougar; D. Scott

    2004-04-01

    An LDRD (Laboratory Directed Research and Development) project is underway at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to demonstrate the feasibility of using a three-dimensional multi-group deterministic neutron transport code (Attila®) to perform global (core-wide) criticality, flux and depletion calculations for safety analysis of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This paper discusses the ATR, model development, capabilities of Attila, generation of the cross-section libraries, comparisons to experimental results for Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC) concepts, and future work planned with Attila.

  12. Three-fluid, 3D MHD solar wind modeling with turbulence transport and eddy viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usmanov, A. V.; Goldstein, M. L.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from a three-fluid, fully three-dimensional MHD solar wind model that includes turbulence transport, eddy viscosity, turbulent resistivity, and turbulent heating. The solar wind plasma is described as a co-moving system of three species: the solar wind protons, electrons, and interstellar pickup protons. Separate energy equations are employed for each species. We obtain numerical solutions of Reynolds-averaged solar wind equations coupled with turbulence transport equations in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU. The integrated system of equations includes the effects of electron heat conduction, Coulomb collisions, photoionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms and their charge exchange with the solar wind protons, turbulence energy generation by pickup protons, and turbulent heating of solar wind protons and electrons. Using either a dipole approximation for the solar magnetic field or synoptic solar magnetograms from the Wilcox Solar Observatory for assigning boundary conditions at the coronal base, we apply the model to study the global structure of the solar wind and its three-dimensional properties, including turbulence parameters, throughout the heliosphere. The model results are compared with observations on WIND, Ulysses and Voyager 2 spacecraft. This work is partially supported by LWS and Heliophysics Grand Challenges programs.

  13. Development of a 3D to 1D Particle Transport Model to Predict Deposition in the Lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakes, Jessica M.; Grandmont, Celine; Shadden, Shawn C.; Vignon-Clementel, Irene E.

    2014-11-01

    Aerosolized particles are commonly used for therapeutic drug delivery as they can be delivered to the body systemically or be used to treat lung diseases. Recent advances in computational resources have allowed for sophisticated pulmonary simulations, however it is currently impossible to solve for airflow and particle transport for all length and time scales of the lung. Instead, multi-scale methods must be used. In our recent work, where computational methods were employed to solve for airflow and particle transport in the rat airways (Oakes et al. (2014), Annals of Biomedical Engineering 42, 899), the number of particles to exit downstream of the 3D domain was determined. In this current work, the time-dependent Lagrangian description of particles was used to numerically solve a 1D convection-diffusion model (trumpet model, Taulbee and Yu (1975), Journal of Applied Physiology, 38, 77) parameterized specifically for the lung. The expansion of the airway dimensions was determined based on data collected from our aerosol exposure experiments (Oakes et al. (2014), Journal of Applied Physiology, 116, 1561). This 3D-1D framework enables us to predict the fate of particles in the whole lung. This work was supported by the Whitaker Foundation at the IIE, a INRIA Associated Team Postdoc Grant, and a UC Presidential Fellowship.

  14. Development of a 3-D upwind PNS code for chemically reacting hypersonic flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannehill, J. C.; Wadawadigi, G.

    1992-01-01

    Two new parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) codes were developed to compute the three-dimensional, viscous, chemically reacting flow of air around hypersonic vehicles such as the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP). The first code (TONIC) solves the gas dynamic and species conservation equations in a fully coupled manner using an implicit, approximately-factored, central-difference algorithm. This code was upgraded to include shock fitting and the capability of computing the flow around complex body shapes. The revised TONIC code was validated by computing the chemically-reacting (M(sub infinity) = 25.3) flow around a 10 deg half-angle cone at various angles of attack and the Ames All-Body model at 0 deg angle of attack. The results of these calculations were in good agreement with the results from the UPS code. One of the major drawbacks of the TONIC code is that the central-differencing of fluxes across interior flowfield discontinuities tends to introduce errors into the solution in the form of local flow property oscillations. The second code (UPS), originally developed for a perfect gas, has been extended to permit either perfect gas, equilibrium air, or nonequilibrium air computations. The code solves the PNS equations using a finite-volume, upwind TVD method based on Roe's approximate Riemann solver that was modified to account for real gas effects. The dissipation term associated with this algorithm is sufficiently adaptive to flow conditions that, even when attempting to capture very strong shock waves, no additional smoothing is required. For nonequilibrium calculations, the code solves the fluid dynamic and species continuity equations in a loosely-coupled manner. This code was used to calculate the hypersonic, laminar flow of chemically reacting air over cones at various angles of attack. In addition, the flow around the McDonnel Douglas generic option blended-wing-body was computed and comparisons were made between the perfect gas, equilibrium air, and the

  15. The effect of anisotropic heat transport on magnetic islands in 3-D configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Schlutt, M. G.; Hegna, C. C.

    2012-08-15

    An analytic theory of nonlinear pressure-induced magnetic island formation using a boundary layer analysis is presented. This theory extends previous work by including the effects of finite parallel heat transport and is applicable to general three dimensional magnetic configurations. In this work, particular attention is paid to the role of finite parallel heat conduction in the context of pressure-induced island physics. It is found that localized currents that require self-consistent deformation of the pressure profile, such as resistive interchange and bootstrap currents, are attenuated by finite parallel heat conduction when the magnetic islands are sufficiently small. However, these anisotropic effects do not change saturated island widths caused by Pfirsch-Schlueter current effects. Implications for finite pressure-induced island healing are discussed.

  16. Quantum transport in 3D Weyl semimetals: Is there a metal-insulator transition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Klaus

    2016-12-01

    We calculate the transport properties of three-dimensional Weyl fermions in a disordered environment. The resulting conductivity depends only on the Fermi energy and the scattering rate. First we study the conductivity at the spectral node for a fixed scattering rate and obtain a continuous transition from an insulator at weak disorder to a metal at stronger disorder. Within the self-consistent Born approximation the scattering rate depends on the Fermi energy. Then it is crucial that the limits of the conductivity for a vanishing Fermi energy and a vanishing scattering rate do not commute. As a result, there is also metallic behavior in the phase with vanishing scattering rate and only a quantum critical point remains as an insulating phase. The latter turns out to be a critical fixed point in terms of a renormalization-group flow.

  17. TART97 a coupled neutron-photon 3-D, combinatorial geometry Monte Carlo transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E.

    1997-11-22

    TART97 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo transport code. This code can on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART97 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART97 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on- line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART97 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART97 and its data riles.

  18. Characterization of reactive transport by 3-D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) under unsaturated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrer, Markus; Binley, Andrew; Slater, Lee D.

    2016-10-01

    The leaching of nitrate from intensively used arable soil is of major concern in many countries. In this study, we show how time lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can be used to characterize spatially heterogeneous processes of ion production, consumption, and transport in soils. A controlled release fertilizer was introduced into an undisturbed soil core in a laboratory lysimeter and subjected to infiltration events. The production of ions resulting from processes associated with nitrification and their transport through the soil core was observed by time lapse ERT and analysis of seepage water samples from a multicompartment sampler. ERT images show development and propagation of a high-conductivity plume from the fertilizer source zone. Molar amounts of nitrate produced in and exported from the soil core could be well reproduced by time lapse ERT using a spatial moment analysis. Furthermore, we observed that several shape measures of local breakthrough-curves (BTCs) of seepage water conductivity and nitrate derived by effluent analyses and BTCs of bulk conductivity derived by ERT are highly correlated, indicating the preservation of spatial differences of the plume breakthrough in the ERT data. Also differences between nitrate breakthrough and a conservative tracer breakthrough can be observed by ERT. However, the estimation of target ion concentrations by ERT is error bound and the smoothing algorithm of the inversion masks spatial conductivity differences. This results in difficulties reproducing spatial differences of ion source functions and variances of travel times. Despite the observed limitations, we conclude that time lapse ERT can be qualitatively and quantitatively informative with respect to processes affecting the fate of nitrate in arable soils.

  19. 78 FR 55278 - Chemical Transportation Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Chemical Transportation Advisory Committee AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Committee... that the re- establishment of the Chemical Transportation Advisory Committee (CTAC) is necessary and in... Committee: Chemical Transportation Advisory Committee. ADDRESSES: If you desire to submit comments on...

  20. 76 FR 34240 - Chemical Transportation Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Chemical Transportation Advisory Committee AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Committee... that the establishment of the Chemical Transportation Advisory Committee (CTAC) is necessary and in the...: Chemical Transportation Advisory Committee. ADDRESSES: If you desire to submit comments on this...

  1. 3D chemical imaging in the laboratory by hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Egan, C. K.; Jacques, S. D. M.; Wilson, M. D.; Veale, M. C.; Seller, P.; Beale, A. M.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Withers, P. J.; Cernik, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of laboratory based hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography which allows the internal elemental chemistry of an object to be reconstructed and visualised in three dimensions. The method employs a spectroscopic X-ray imaging detector with sufficient energy resolution to distinguish individual elemental absorption edges. Elemental distributions can then be made by K-edge subtraction, or alternatively by voxel-wise spectral fitting to give relative atomic concentrations. We demonstrate its application to two material systems: studying the distribution of catalyst material on porous substrates for industrial scale chemical processing; and mapping of minerals and inclusion phases inside a mineralised ore sample. The method makes use of a standard laboratory X-ray source with measurement times similar to that required for conventional computed tomography. PMID:26514938

  2. 3D chemical imaging in the laboratory by hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, C. K.; Jacques, S. D. M.; Wilson, M. D.; Veale, M. C.; Seller, P.; Beale, A. M.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Withers, P. J.; Cernik, R. J.

    2015-10-01

    We report the development of laboratory based hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography which allows the internal elemental chemistry of an object to be reconstructed and visualised in three dimensions. The method employs a spectroscopic X-ray imaging detector with sufficient energy resolution to distinguish individual elemental absorption edges. Elemental distributions can then be made by K-edge subtraction, or alternatively by voxel-wise spectral fitting to give relative atomic concentrations. We demonstrate its application to two material systems: studying the distribution of catalyst material on porous substrates for industrial scale chemical processing; and mapping of minerals and inclusion phases inside a mineralised ore sample. The method makes use of a standard laboratory X-ray source with measurement times similar to that required for conventional computed tomography.

  3. C2SM: a mobile system for detecting and 3D mapping of chemical, radiological, and nuclear contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasiobedzki, Piotr; Ng, Ho-Kong; Bondy, Michel; McDiarmid, C. H.

    2009-05-01

    CBRN Crime Scene Modeler (C2SM) is a prototype mobile CBRN mapping system for First Responders in events where Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear agents where used. The prototype operates on board a small robotic platform, increases situational awareness of the robot operator by providing geo-located images and data, and current robot location. The sensor suite includes stereo and high resolution cameras, a long wave infra red (thermal) camera and gamma and chemical detectors. The system collects and sends geo-located data to a remote command post in near real-time and automatically creates 3D photorealistic model augmented with CBRN measurements. Two prototypes have been successfully tested in field trials and a fully ruggedised commercial version is expected in 2010.

  4. Versatile Method for Producing 2D and 3D Conductive Biomaterial Composites Using Sequential Chemical and Electrochemical Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Severt, Sean Y; Ostrovsky-Snider, Nicholas A; Leger, Janelle M; Murphy, Amanda R

    2015-11-18

    Flexible and conductive biocompatible materials are attractive candidates for a wide range of biomedical applications including implantable electrodes, tissue engineering, and controlled drug delivery. Here, we demonstrate that chemical and electrochemical polymerization techniques can be combined to create highly versatile silk-conducting polymer (silk-CP) composites with enhanced conductivity and electrochemical stability. Interpenetrating silk-CP composites were first generated via in situ deposition of polypyrrole during chemical polymerization of pyrrole. These composites were sufficiently conductive to serve as working electrodes for electropolymerization, which allowed an additional layer of CP to be deposited on the surface. This sequential method was applied to both 2D films and 3D sponge-like silk scaffolds, producing conductive materials with biomimetic architectures. Overall, this two-step technique expanded the range of available polymers and dopants suitable for the synthesis of mechanically robust, biocompatible, and highly conductive silk-based materials.

  5. 3D Monte Carlo model of optical transport in laser-irradiated cutaneous vascular malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majaron, Boris; Milanič, Matija; Jia, Wangcun; Nelson, J. S.

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional Monte Carlo (MC) model of optical transport in skin and applied it to analysis of port wine stain treatment with sequential laser irradiation and intermittent cryogen spray cooling. Our MC model extends the approaches of the popular multi-layer model by Wang et al.1 to three dimensions, thus allowing treatment of skin inclusions with more complex geometries and arbitrary irradiation patterns. To overcome the obvious drawbacks of either "escape" or "mirror" boundary conditions at the lateral boundaries of the finely discretized volume of interest (VOI), photons exiting the VOI are propagated in laterally infinite tissue layers with appropriate optical properties, until they loose all their energy, escape into the air, or return to the VOI, but the energy deposition outside of the VOI is not computed and recorded. After discussing the selection of tissue parameters, we apply the model to analysis of blood photocoagulation and collateral thermal damage in treatment of port wine stain (PWS) lesions with sequential laser irradiation and intermittent cryogen spray cooling.

  6. Doppler effects on 3-D non-LTE radiation transport and emission spectra.

    SciTech Connect

    Giuliani, J. L.; Davis, J.; DasGupta, A.; Apruzese, John P.; Jennings, Christopher A.; Clark, R. W.; Ampleford, David J.; Bailey, James E.; Thornhill, Joseph W.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Rochau, Gregory Alan; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Jones, Brent Manley; Hansen, Stephanie B.

    2010-10-01

    Spatially and temporally resolved X-ray emission lines contain information about temperatures, densities, velocities, and the gradients in a plasma. Extracting this information from optically thick lines emitted from complex ions in dynamic, three-dimensional, non-LTE plasmas requires self-consistent accounting for both non-LTE atomic physics and non-local radiative transfer. We present a brief description of a hybrid-structure spectroscopic atomic model coupled to an iterative tabular on-the-spot treatment of radiative transfer that can be applied to plasmas of arbitrary material composition, conditions, and geometries. The effects of Doppler line shifts on the self-consistent radiative transfer within the plasma and the emergent emission and absorption spectra are included in the model. Sample calculations for a two-level atom in a uniform cylindrical plasma are given, showing reasonable agreement with more sophisticated transport models and illustrating the potential complexity - or richness - of radially resolved emission lines from an imploding cylindrical plasma. Also presented is a comparison of modeled L- and K-shell spectra to temporally and radially resolved emission data from a Cu:Ni plasma. Finally, some shortcomings of the model and possible paths for improvement are discussed.

  7. Searching for Thermal Anomalies on Icy Satellites: Step 1- Validation of the Three Dimensional Volatile-Transport (VT3D)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Gary G.; Howett, Carly J. A.; Young, Leslie A.; Spencer, John R.

    2015-11-01

    In the last few decades, thermal data from the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft have detected various anomalies on Jovian and Saturnian satellites, including the thermally anomalous “PacMan” regions on Mimas and Tethys and the Pwyll anomaly on Europa (Howett et al. 2011, Howett et al. 2012, Spencer et al. 1999). Yet, the peculiarities of some of these anomalies, like the weak detection of the “PacMan” anomalies on Rhea and Dione and the low thermal inertia values of the widespread anomalies on equatorial Europa, are subjects for on-going research (Howett et al. 2014, Rathbun et al. 2010). Further, analysis and review of all the data both Galileo and Cassini took of these worlds will provide information of the thermal inertia and albedos of their surfaces, perhaps highlighting potential targets of interest for future Jovian and Saturnian system missions. Many previous works have used a thermophysical model for airless planets developed by Spencer (1990). However, the Three Dimensional Volatile-Transport (VT3D) model proposed by Young (2012) is able to predict surface temperatures in significantly faster computation time, incorporating seasonal and diurnal insolation variations. This work is the first step in an ongoing investigation, which will use VT3D’s capabilities to reanalyze Galileo and Cassini data. VT3D, which has already been used to analyze volatile transport on Pluto, is validated by comparing its results to that of the Spencer thermal model. We will also present our initial results using VT3D to reanalyze the thermophysical properties of the PacMan anomaly previous discovered on Mimas by Howett et al. (2011), using temperature constraints of diurnal data from Cassini/CIRS. VT3D is expected to be an efficient tool in identifying new thermal anomalies in future Saturnian and Jovian missions.Bibliography:C.J.A. Howett et al. (2011), Icarus 216, 221.C.J.A. Howett et al. (2012), Icarus 221, 1084.C.J.A. Howett et al. (2014), Icarus 241, 239.J

  8. 3-D Deep Penetration Neutron Imaging of Thick Absorgin and Diffusive Objects Using Transport Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ragusa, Jean; Bangerth, Wolfgang

    2011-08-01

    here explores the inverse problem of optical tomography applied to heterogeneous domains. The neutral particle transport equation was used as the forward model for how neutral particles stream through and interact within these heterogeneous domains. A constrained optimization technique that uses Newtons method served as the basis of the inverse problem. Optical tomography aims at reconstructing the material properties using (a) illuminating sources and (b) detector readings. However, accurate simulations for radiation transport require that the particle (gamma and/or neutron) energy be appropriate discretize in the multigroup approximation. This, in turns, yields optical tomography problems where the number of unknowns grows (1) about quadratically with respect to the number of energy groups, G, (notably to reconstruct the scattering matrix) and (2) linearly with respect to the number of unknown material regions. As pointed out, a promising approach could rely on algorithms to appropriately select a material type per material zone rather than G2 values. This approach, though promising, still requires further investigation: (a) when switching from cross-section values unknowns to material type indices (discrete integer unknowns), integer programming techniques are needed since derivative information is no longer available; and (b) the issue of selecting the initial material zoning remains. The work reported here proposes an approach to solve the latter item, whereby a material zoning is proposed using one-group or few-groups transport approximations. The capabilities and limitations of the presented method were explored; they are briefly summarized next and later described in fuller details in the Appendices. The major factors that influenced the ability of the optimization method to reconstruct the cross sections of these domains included the locations of the sources used to illuminate the domains, the number of separate experiments used in the reconstruction, the

  9. 1D and 3D anthropometric data application on public transport vehicle layout and on oil and gas laboratories work environment design.

    PubMed

    Pastura, F C H; Guimarães, C P; Zamberlan, M C P; Cid, G L; Santos, V S; Streit, P; Paranhos, A G; Cobbe, R T; Cobbe, K T; Batista, D S

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to present 1D and 3D anthropometric data applied to two distinct design situations: one related to the interior layout of a public transport vehicle and another one related to oil and gas laboratories work environment design. On this study, the 1D anthropometric data were extracted from the Brazilian anthropometric database developed by INT and the 3D anthropometric data were obtained using a Cyberware 3D whole body scanner. A second purpose of this paper is to present the 3D human scanning data as a tool that can help designers on decision making.

  10. SUTRA: A model for 2D or 3D saturated-unsaturated, variable-density ground-water flow with solute or energy transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voss, Clifford I.; Provost, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    SUTRA (Saturated-Unsaturated Transport) is a computer program that simulates fluid movement and the transport of either energy or dissolved substances in a subsurface environment. This upgraded version of SUTRA adds the capability for three-dimensional simulation to the former code (Voss, 1984), which allowed only two-dimensional simulation. The code employs a two- or three-dimensional finite-element and finite-difference method to approximate the governing equations that describe the two interdependent processes that are simulated: 1) fluid density-dependent saturated or unsaturated ground-water flow; and 2) either (a) transport of a solute in the ground water, in which the solute may be subject to: equilibrium adsorption on the porous matrix, and both first-order and zero-order production or decay; or (b) transport of thermal energy in the ground water and solid matrix of the aquifer. SUTRA may also be used to simulate simpler subsets of the above processes. A flow-direction-dependent dispersion process for anisotropic media is also provided by the code and is introduced in this report. As the primary calculated result, SUTRA provides fluid pressures and either solute concentrations or temperatures, as they vary with time, everywhere in the simulated subsurface system. SUTRA flow simulation may be employed for two-dimensional (2D) areal, cross sectional and three-dimensional (3D) modeling of saturated ground-water flow systems, and for cross sectional and 3D modeling of unsaturated zone flow. Solute-transport simulation using SUTRA may be employed to model natural or man-induced chemical-species transport including processes of solute sorption, production, and decay. For example, it may be applied to analyze ground-water contaminant transport problems and aquifer restoration designs. In addition, solute-transport simulation with SUTRA may be used for modeling of variable-density leachate movement, and for cross sectional modeling of saltwater intrusion in

  11. Simplified behaviors from increased heterogeneity: II. 3-D Uranium transport at the decimeter scale and intertank comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Andrew W.; Rodriguez, Derrick R.; Honeyman, Bruce D.

    2013-05-01

    Upscaling from bench scale systems to field scale systems incorporates physical and chemical heterogeneities from atomistic up to field scales. Heterogeneities of intermediate scale (~ 10- 1 m) are impossible to incorporate in a bench scale experiment. To transcend these scale discrepancies, this second in a pair of papers presents results from an intermediate scale, 3-D tank experiment completed using five different particle sizes of uranium contaminated sediment from a former uranium mill field site. The external dimensions of the tank were 2.44 m × 0.61 m × 0.61 m (L × H × W). The five particle sizes were packed in a heterogeneous manner using roughly 11 cm cubes. Small groundwater wells were installed for spatial characterization of chemical gradients and flow parameters. An approximately six month long bromide tracer test was used for flow field characterization. Within the flow domain, local uranium breakthrough curves exhibited a wide range of behaviors. However, the global effluent breakthrough curve was smooth, and not unlike breakthrough curves observed in column scale experiments. This paper concludes with an inter-tank comparison of all three experimental systems presented in this pair of papers. Although there is a wide range of chemical and physical variability between the three tanks, major chemical constituent behaviors are often quite similar or even identical.

  12. Simplified behaviors from increased heterogeneity: II. 3-D uranium transport at the decimeter scale and intertank comparisons.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew W; Rodriguez, Derrick R; Honeyman, Bruce D

    2013-05-01

    Upscaling from bench scale systems to field scale systems incorporates physical and chemical heterogeneities from atomistic up to field scales. Heterogeneities of intermediate scale (~10(-1) m) are impossible to incorporate in a bench scale experiment. To transcend these scale discrepancies, this second in a pair of papers presents results from an intermediate scale, 3-D tank experiment completed using five different particle sizes of uranium contaminated sediment from a former uranium mill field site. The external dimensions of the tank were 2.44 m×0.61 m×0.61 m (L×H×W). The five particle sizes were packed in a heterogeneous manner using roughly 11 cm cubes. Small groundwater wells were installed for spatial characterization of chemical gradients and flow parameters. An approximately six month long bromide tracer test was used for flow field characterization. Within the flow domain, local uranium breakthrough curves exhibited a wide range of behaviors. However, the global effluent breakthrough curve was smooth, and not unlike breakthrough curves observed in column scale experiments. This paper concludes with an inter-tank comparison of all three experimental systems presented in this pair of papers. Although there is a wide range of chemical and physical variability between the three tanks, major chemical constituent behaviors are often quite similar or even identical.

  13. A 3D, cross-scale, baroclinic model with implicit vertical transport for the Upper Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Fei; Zhang, Yinglong J.; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Wang, Harry V.; Irby, Isaac D.; Shen, Jian; Wang, Zhengui

    2016-11-01

    We develop a new vertically implicit transport solver, based on two total variation diminishing (TVD) limiters in space and time, inside a 3D unstructured-grid model (SCHISM), and apply it to the Upper Chesapeake Bay (UCB), which has complex geometry and sharp pycnocline. We show that the model is able to accurately and efficiently capture the elevation, velocity, salinity and temperature in both the deep and shallow regions of UCB. Compared with all available CTD casts, the overall model skills have the mean absolute error of 1.08 PSU and 0.85 °C, and correlation coefficient of 0.97 and 0.99 for salinity and temperature respectively. More importantly, the new implicit solver better captures the density stratification, which has great implications on biogeochemistry in this estuarine system. The cross-scale capability of the model is demonstrated by extending the high-resolution grids into a tributary (Chester River) and its sub-tributary (Corsica River), with minimal impact on the model efficiency. The model is also able to capture complex 3D structures at the transition zone between the main bay and the tributary, including the three-layered circulation in Baltimore Harbor. As more and more attention is being paid to the productive shallows in the Chesapeake Bay and other estuaries, the model can serve as a very powerful management tool to understand the impact of both local and remote forcing functions.

  14. Development of Bottom-Up Chemical Approaches to 3-D Negative Index Meta-Materials: Two Photon Lithographic Approach-Chiral Chemical Synthesis Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-30

    Approaches to 3-D Negative Index Meta-Materials Two Photon Lithographic Approach- Chiral Chemical Synthesis Approach 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-09-1...materials with large optical activity. A series of chiral polymers, based on thiophene, fluorene, and fluorene-quinoxaline motif with chiral side...chains were synthesized, post-processed and characterized in both solution and film phases. A new concept of chirality enhancement via coupling with

  15. Modeling alongshore propagating tides and currents around West Maui, Hawaii and implications for transport using Delft3D.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitousek, S.; Fletcher, C. H.; Storlazzi, C. D.

    2006-12-01

    Nearshore currents are driven by a number of components including tides, waves winds and even internal tides. To adequately simulate transport of sand and other constituents, the realistic behavior of the dominant current-generating phenomena should be resolved. This often requires sufficient observations and calibration/validation efforts to achieve realistic modeling results. The work explores the capabilities of modeling the currents along West Maui. The West Maui coast has a propagating tide where the observed peak tidal currents, which are directed parallel to the coast, occur very closely to the peak tidal water levels. In 2003, the USGS collected an extensive set of current observations along West Maui, Hawaii, with the goal of better understanding transport mechanisms of sediment, larvae, pollutants and other particles in coral reef settings. The observations included vessel mounted ADCP surveys and an array seafloor instruments at the 10m isobath along the coast. A simple 2DH model of West Maui using Delft3D shows good comparison of the modeled and observed currents. Nearshore currents driven by waves and winds are also considered. During the data collection period a significant erosion event occurred within the study domain at Kaanapali Beach. This event undermined several trees on the shoreline and threatened resort infrastructure. In modeling the nearshore currents of this region we hope to determine the potential for sand transport and shoreline change to hindcast this event.

  16. 78 FR 67379 - Chemical Transportation Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Chemical Transportation Advisory Committee AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Committee Management; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Chemical Transportation Advisory... hazardous materials c. Update on Bulk Chemical Data Guide (Blue Book) d. Vessel to vessel transfer...

  17. A 3-dimensional micro- and nanoparticle transport and filtration model (MNM3D) applied to the migration of carbon-based nanomaterials in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Carlo; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2016-10-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) in the environment can act both as contaminants, when they are unintentionally released, and as remediation agents when injected on purpose at contaminated sites. In this work two carbon-based NPs are considered, namely CARBO-IRON®, a new material developed for contaminated site remediation, and single layer graphene oxide (SLGO), a potential contaminant of the next future. Understanding and modeling the transport and deposition of such NPs in aquifer systems is a key aspect in both cases, and numerical models capable to simulate NP transport in groundwater in complex 3D scenarios are necessary. To this aim, this work proposes a modeling approach based on modified advection-dispersion-deposition equations accounting for the coupled influence of flow velocity and ionic strength on particle transport. A new modeling tool (MNM3D - Micro and Nanoparticle transport Model in 3D geometries) is presented for the simulation of NPs injection and transport in 3D scenarios. MNM3D is the result of the integration of the numerical code MNMs (Micro and Nanoparticle transport, filtration and clogging Model - Suite) in the well-known transport model RT3D (Clement et al., 1998). The injection in field-like conditions of CARBO-IRON® (20 g/l) amended by CMC (4 g/l) in a 2D vertical tank (0.7 × 1.0 × 0.12 m) was simulated using MNM3D, and compared to experimental results under the same conditions. Column transport tests of SLGO at a concentration (10 mg/l) representative of a possible spill of SLGO-containing waste water were performed at different values of ionic strength (0.1 to 35 mM), evidencing a strong dependence of SLGO transport on IS, and a reversible blocking deposition. The experimental data were fitted using the numerical code MNMs and the ionic strength-dependent transport was up-scaled for a full scale 3D simulation of SLGO release and long-term transport in a heterogeneous aquifer. MNM3D showed to potentially represent a valid tool for

  18. The effect of tumour size on drug transport and uptake in 3-D tumour models reconstructed from magnetic resonance images

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Wenbo; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw

    2017-01-01

    Drug transport and its uptake by tumour cells are strongly dependent on tumour properties, which vary in different types of solid tumours. By simulating the key physical and biochemical processes, a numerical study has been carried out to investigate the transport of anti-cancer drugs in 3-D tumour models of different sizes. The therapeutic efficacy for each tumour is evaluated by using a pharmacodynamics model based on the predicted intracellular drug concentration. Simulation results demonstrate that interstitial fluid pressure and interstitial fluid loss vary non-linearly with tumour size. Transvascular drug exchange, driven by the concentration gradient of unbound drug between blood and interstitial fluid, is more efficient in small tumours, owing to the low spatial-mean interstitial fluid pressure and dense microvasculature. However, this has a detrimental effect on therapeutic efficacy over longer periods as a result of enhanced reverse diffusion of drug to the blood circulation after the cessation of drug infusion, causing more rapid loss of drug in small tumours. PMID:28212385

  19. 77 FR 70453 - Chemical Transportation Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard Chemical Transportation Advisory Committee AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ] ACTION: Committee Management; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Chemical...

  20. Issues involved in the quantitative 3D imaging of proton doses using optical CT and chemical dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Simon; Gorjiara, Tina; Kacperek, Andrzej; Adamovics, John; Kuncic, Zdenka; Baldock, Clive

    2015-01-01

    Dosimetry of proton beams using 3D imaging of chemical dosimeters is complicated by a variation with proton linear energy transfer (LET) of the dose-response (the so-called ‘quenching effect’). Simple theoretical arguments lead to the conclusion that the total absorbed dose from multiple irradiations with different LETs cannot be uniquely determined from post-irradiation imaging measurements on the dosimeter. Thus, a direct inversion of the imaging data is not possible and the proposition is made to use a forward model based on appropriate output from a planning system to predict the 3D response of the dosimeter. In addition to the quenching effect, it is well known that chemical dosimeters have a non-linear response at high doses. To the best of our knowledge it has not yet been determined how this phenomenon is affected by LET. The implications for dosimetry of a number of potential scenarios are examined. Dosimeter response as a function of depth (and hence LET) was measured for four samples of the radiochromic plastic PRESAGE®, using an optical computed tomography readout and entrance doses of 2.0 Gy, 4.0 Gy, 7.8 Gy and 14.7 Gy, respectively. The dosimeter response was separated into two components, a single-exponential low-LET response and a LET-dependent quenching. For the particular formulation of PRESAGE® used, deviations from linearity of the dosimeter response became significant for doses above approximately 16 Gy. In a second experiment, three samples were each irradiated with two separate beams of 4 Gy in various different configurations. On the basis of the previous characterizations, two different models were tested for the calculation of the combined quenching effect from two contributions with different LETs. It was concluded that a linear superposition model with separate calculation of the quenching for each irradiation did not match the measured result where two beams overlapped. A second model, which used the concept of an

  1. Chemical Equilibrium And Transport (CET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, B. J.

    1991-01-01

    Powerful, machine-independent program calculates theoretical thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Aids in design of compressors, turbines, engines, heat exchangers, and chemical processing equipment.

  2. Computation of Flow Over a Drag Prediction Workshop Wing/Body Transport Configuration Using CFL3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2001-01-01

    A Drag Prediction Workshop was held in conjunction with the 19th AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference in June 2001. The purpose of the workshop was to assess the prediction of drag by computational methods for a wing/body configuration (DLR-F4) representative of subsonic transport aircraft. This report details computed results submitted to this workshop using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code CFL3D. Two supplied grids were used: a point-matched 1-to-1 multi-block grid, and an overset multi-block grid. The 1-to-1 grid, generally of much poorer quality and with less streamwise resolution than the overset grid, is found to be too coarse to adequately resolve the surface pressures. However, the global forces and moments are nonetheless similar to those computed using the overset grid. The effect of three different turbulence models is assessed using the 1-to-1 grid. Surface pressures are very similar overall, and the drag variation due to turbulence model is 18 drag counts. Most of this drag variation is in the friction component, and is attributed in part to insufficient grid resolution of the 1-to-1 grid. The misnomer of 'fully turbulent' computations is discussed; comparisons are made using different transition locations and their effects on the global forces and moments are quantified. Finally, the effect of two different versions of a widely used one-equation turbulence model is explored.

  3. Evaluating the Credibility of Transport Processes in the Global Modeling Initiative 3D Model Simulations of Ozone Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahan, Susan E.; Douglass, Anne R.

    2003-01-01

    The Global Modeling Initiative has integrated two 35-year simulations of an ozone recovery scenario with an offline chemistry and transport model using two different meteorological inputs. Physically based diagnostics, derived from satellite and aircraft data sets, are described and then used to evaluate the realism of temperature and transport processes in the simulations. Processes evaluated include barrier formation in the subtropics and polar regions, and extratropical wave-driven transport. Some diagnostics are especially relevant to simulation of lower stratospheric ozone, but most are applicable to any stratospheric simulation. The temperature evaluation, which is relevant to gas phase chemical reactions, showed that both sets of meteorological fields have near climatological values at all latitudes and seasons at 30 hPa and below. Both simulations showed weakness in upper stratospheric wave driving. The simulation using input from a general circulation model (GMI(sub GCM)) showed a very good residual circulation in the tropics and northern hemisphere. The simulation with input from a data assimilation system (GMI(sub DAS)) performed better in the midlatitudes than at high latitudes. Neither simulation forms a realistic barrier at the vortex edge, leading to uncertainty in the fate of ozone-depleted vortex air. Overall, tracer transport in the offline GMI(sub GCM) has greater fidelity throughout the stratosphere than the GMI(sub DAS).

  4. The Development of WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Ryan

    Graphics processing units, or GPUs, have gradually increased in computational power from the small, job-specific boards of the early 1990s to the programmable powerhouses of today. Compared to more common central processing units, or CPUs, GPUs have a higher aggregate memory bandwidth, much higher floating-point operations per second (FLOPS), and lower energy consumption per FLOP. Because one of the main obstacles in exascale computing is power consumption, many new supercomputing platforms are gaining much of their computational capacity by incorporating GPUs into their compute nodes. Since CPU-optimized parallel algorithms are not directly portable to GPU architectures (or at least not without losing substantial performance), transport codes need to be rewritten to execute efficiently on GPUs. Unless this is done, reactor simulations cannot take full advantage of these new supercomputers. WARP, which can stand for ``Weaving All the Random Particles,'' is a three-dimensional (3D) continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code developed in this work as to efficiently implement a continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport algorithm on a GPU. WARP accelerates Monte Carlo simulations while preserving the benefits of using the Monte Carlo Method, namely, very few physical and geometrical simplifications. WARP is able to calculate multiplication factors, flux tallies, and fission source distributions for time-independent problems, and can run in both criticality or fixed source modes. WARP can transport neutrons in unrestricted arrangements of parallelepipeds, hexagonal prisms, cylinders, and spheres. WARP uses an event-based algorithm, but with some important differences. Moving data is expensive, so WARP uses a remapping vector of pointer/index pairs to direct GPU threads to the data they need to access. The remapping vector is sorted by reaction type after every transport iteration using a high-efficiency parallel radix sort, which serves to keep the

  5. Measurement of gas transport properties for chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Hablutzel, N.

    1996-12-01

    In the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process for fabricating ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), transport of gas phase reactant into the fiber preform is a critical step. The transport can be driven by pressure or by concentration. This report describes methods for measuring this for CVI preforms and partially infiltrated composites. Results are presented for Nicalon fiber cloth layup preforms and composites, Nextel fiber braid preforms and composites, and a Nicalon fiber 3-D weave composite. The results are consistent with a percolating network model for gas transport in CVI preforms and composites. This model predicts inherent variability in local pore characteristics and transport properties, and therefore, in local densification during processing; this may lead to production of gastight composites.

  6. Numerical Solution of 3D Poisson-Nernst-Planck Equations Coupled with Classical Density Functional Theory for Modeling Ion and Electron Transport in a Confined Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Da; Zheng, Bin; Lin, Guang; Sushko, Maria L.

    2014-08-29

    We have developed efficient numerical algorithms for the solution of 3D steady-state Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations (PNP) with excess chemical potentials described by the classical density functional theory (cDFT). The coupled PNP equations are discretized by finite difference scheme and solved iteratively by Gummel method with relaxation. The Nernst-Planck equations are transformed into Laplace equations through the Slotboom transformation. Algebraic multigrid method is then applied to efficiently solve the Poisson equation and the transformed Nernst-Planck equations. A novel strategy for calculating excess chemical potentials through fast Fourier transforms is proposed which reduces computational complexity from O(N2) to O(NlogN) where N is the number of grid points. Integrals involving Dirac delta function are evaluated directly by coordinate transformation which yields more accurate result compared to applying numerical quadrature to an approximated delta function. Numerical results for ion and electron transport in solid electrolyte for Li ion batteries are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental data and the results from previous studies.

  7. ACE-Asia Chemical Transport Modeling Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    UNO, I.; Chin, M.; Collins, W.; Ginoux, P.; Rasch, P.; Carmichael, G. R.; Yienger, J. J.

    2001-12-01

    ACE-Asia (Asia Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment) was designed to increase our understanding of how atmospheric aerosol particles affect the Earth?s climate system. The intensive observation period was carried out during March to May, 2001, and more than 100 researchers from several countries (United States, Japan, Korea, China, and many other Asian countries) participated using aircraft, a research vessel, surface stations and numerical models. Aerosol transport forecast activities played an important role during the ACE-Asia intensive observation period. Three independent modeling groups operated chemical transport models in forecast mode and participated in flight planning activities at the operations center. These models were: MATCH (Model of Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry; Rasch and Collins); GOCART (Georgia Tech/Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model; Chin and Ginour) and CFORS (Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University + University of Iowa - Chemical weather FORecast System; Uno, Carmichael and Yienger). The MATCH model used in ACE-Asia was a transport model applied for the Asia region, driven by NCEP forecast meteorology. A unique feature of this model was that it assimilated satellite derived optical depths into its forecast algorithm. The GOCART model provided global aerosol forecast using forecast meteorological fields provided by the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS). The CFORS model provided regional forecasts using a limited area transport model coupled with Regional Meteorological Modeling System (RAMS), initialized by NCEP and JMA forecasts. All models produced 3-d aerosol forecast products consisting of aerosol mass distributions and optical depths for sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, sea salt, and dust. In the field these model products were made available to all participating scientists via the Web, and were also presented during the

  8. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Soil Chemical Characteristics at Micrometric Scale by Combining 2D SEM-EDX Data and 3D X-Ray CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Hapca, Simona; Baveye, Philippe C.; Wilson, Clare; Lark, Richard Murray; Otten, Wilfred

    2015-01-01

    There is currently a significant need to improve our understanding of the factors that control a number of critical soil processes by integrating physical, chemical and biological measurements on soils at microscopic scales to help produce 3D maps of the related properties. Because of technological limitations, most chemical and biological measurements can be carried out only on exposed soil surfaces or 2-dimensional cuts through soil samples. Methods need to be developed to produce 3D maps of soil properties based on spatial sequences of 2D maps. In this general context, the objective of the research described here was to develop a method to generate 3D maps of soil chemical properties at the microscale by combining 2D SEM-EDX data with 3D X-ray computed tomography images. A statistical approach using the regression tree method and ordinary kriging applied to the residuals was developed and applied to predict the 3D spatial distribution of carbon, silicon, iron, and oxygen at the microscale. The spatial correlation between the X-ray grayscale intensities and the chemical maps made it possible to use a regression-tree model as an initial step to predict the 3D chemical composition. For chemical elements, e.g., iron, that are sparsely distributed in a soil sample, the regression-tree model provides a good prediction, explaining as much as 90% of the variability in some of the data. However, for chemical elements that are more homogenously distributed, such as carbon, silicon, or oxygen, the additional kriging of the regression tree residuals improved significantly the prediction with an increase in the R2 value from 0.221 to 0.324 for carbon, 0.312 to 0.423 for silicon, and 0.218 to 0.374 for oxygen, respectively. The present research develops for the first time an integrated experimental and theoretical framework, which combines geostatistical methods with imaging techniques to unveil the 3-D chemical structure of soil at very fine scales. The methodology presented

  9. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Soil Chemical Characteristics at Micrometric Scale by Combining 2D SEM-EDX Data and 3D X-Ray CT Images.

    PubMed

    Hapca, Simona; Baveye, Philippe C; Wilson, Clare; Lark, Richard Murray; Otten, Wilfred

    2015-01-01

    There is currently a significant need to improve our understanding of the factors that control a number of critical soil processes by integrating physical, chemical and biological measurements on soils at microscopic scales to help produce 3D maps of the related properties. Because of technological limitations, most chemical and biological measurements can be carried out only on exposed soil surfaces or 2-dimensional cuts through soil samples. Methods need to be developed to produce 3D maps of soil properties based on spatial sequences of 2D maps. In this general context, the objective of the research described here was to develop a method to generate 3D maps of soil chemical properties at the microscale by combining 2D SEM-EDX data with 3D X-ray computed tomography images. A statistical approach using the regression tree method and ordinary kriging applied to the residuals was developed and applied to predict the 3D spatial distribution of carbon, silicon, iron, and oxygen at the microscale. The spatial correlation between the X-ray grayscale intensities and the chemical maps made it possible to use a regression-tree model as an initial step to predict the 3D chemical composition. For chemical elements, e.g., iron, that are sparsely distributed in a soil sample, the regression-tree model provides a good prediction, explaining as much as 90% of the variability in some of the data. However, for chemical elements that are more homogenously distributed, such as carbon, silicon, or oxygen, the additional kriging of the regression tree residuals improved significantly the prediction with an increase in the R2 value from 0.221 to 0.324 for carbon, 0.312 to 0.423 for silicon, and 0.218 to 0.374 for oxygen, respectively. The present research develops for the first time an integrated experimental and theoretical framework, which combines geostatistical methods with imaging techniques to unveil the 3-D chemical structure of soil at very fine scales. The methodology presented

  10. Radionuclide Incorporation in Secondary Crystalline Minerals Resulting from Chemical Weathering of Selected Waste Glasses: Progress Report for Subtask 3d

    SciTech Connect

    SV Mattigod; DI Kaplan; VL LeGore; RD Orr; HT Schaef; JS Young

    1998-10-23

    Experiments were conducted in fiscal year 1998 by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate potential incorporation of radionuclides in secondary mineral phases that form from weathering vitrified nuclear waste glasses. These experiments were conducted as part of the Immobilized Low- Activity Waste-Petiormance Assessment (ILAW-PA) to generate data on radionuclide mobilization and transport in a near-field enviromnent of disposed vitrified wastes. An initial experiment was conducted to identify the types of secondary minerals that form from two glass samples of differing compositions, LD6 and SRL202. Chemical weathering of LD6 glass at 90oC in contact with an aliquot of uncontaminated Hanford Site groundwater resulted in the formation of a Crystalline zeolitic mineral, phillipsite. In contrast similar chemical weathering of SRL202 glass at 90"C resulted in the formation of a microcrystalline smectitic mineral, nontronite. A second experiment was conducted at 90"C to assess the degree to which key radionuclides would be sequestered in the structure of secondary crystalline minerals; namely, phillipsite and nontronite. Chemical weathering of LD6 in contact with radionuclide-spiked Hanford Site groundwater indicated that substantial ilactions of the total activities were retained in the phillipsite structure. Similar chemical weathering of SRL202 at 90"C, also in contact with radionuclide-spiked Hanford Site groundwater, showed that significant fractions of the total activities were retained in the nontronite structure. These results have important implications regarding the radionuclide mobilization aspects of the ILAW-PA. Additional studies are required to confkm the results and to develop an improved under- standing of mechanisms of sequestration and attenuated release of radionuclides to help refine certain aspects of their mobilization.

  11. Bile canaliculi formation and biliary transport in 3D sandwich-cultured hepatocytes in dependence of the extracellular matrix composition.

    PubMed

    Deharde, Daniela; Schneider, Christin; Hiller, Thomas; Fischer, Nicolas; Kegel, Victoria; Lübberstedt, Marc; Freyer, Nora; Hengstler, Jan G; Andersson, Tommy B; Seehofer, Daniel; Pratschke, Johann; Zeilinger, Katrin; Damm, Georg

    2016-10-01

    Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are still considered as gold standard for investigation of in vitro metabolism and hepatotoxicity in pharmaceutical research. It has been shown that the three-dimensional (3D) cultivation of PHH in a sandwich configuration between two layers of extracellular matrix (ECM) enables the hepatocytes to adhere three dimensionally leading to formation of in vivo like cell-cell contacts and cell-matrix interactions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of different ECM compositions on morphology, cellular arrangement and bile canaliculi formation as well as bile excretion processes in PHH sandwich cultures systematically. Freshly isolated PHH were cultured for 6 days between two ECM layers made of collagen and/or Matrigel in four different combinations. The cultures were investigated by phase contrast microscopy and immunofluorescence analysis with respect to cell-cell connections, repolarization as well as bile canaliculi formation. The influence of the ECM composition on cell activity and viability was measured using the XTT assay and a fluorescent dead or alive assay. Finally, the bile canalicular transport was analyzed by live cell imaging to monitor the secretion and accumulation of the fluorescent substance CDF in bile canaliculi. Using collagen and Matrigel in different compositions in sandwich cultures of hepatocytes, we observed differences in morphology, cellular arrangement and cell activity of PHH in dependence of the ECM composition. Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes with an underlay of collagen seem to represent the best in vivo tissue architecture in terms of formation of trabecular cell arrangement. Cultures overlaid with collagen were characterized by the formation of abundant bile canaliculi, while the bile canaliculi network in hepatocytes cultured on a layer of Matrigel and overlaid with collagen showed the most branched and stable canalicular network. All cultures showed a time-dependent leakage of

  12. Effects of Type of Exploratory Strategy and Prior Knowledge on Middle School Students' Learning of Chemical Formulas from a 3D Role-Playing Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ming-Puu; Wong, Yu-Ting; Wang, Li-Chun

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of the type of exploratory strategy and level of prior knowledge on middle school students' performance and motivation in learning chemical formulas via a 3D role-playing game (RPG). Two types of exploratory strategies-RPG exploratory with worked-example and RPG exploratory without…

  13. Three Dimensional (3D) Printing: A Straightforward, User-Friendly Protocol to Convert Virtual Chemical Models to Real-Life Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossi, Sergio; Benaglia, Maurizio; Brenna, Davide; Porta, Riccardo; Orlandi, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    A simple procedure to convert protein data bank files (.pdb) into a stereolithography file (.stl) using VMD software (Virtual Molecular Dynamic) is reported. This tutorial allows generating, with a very simple protocol, three-dimensional customized structures that can be printed by a low-cost 3D-printer, and used for teaching chemical education…

  14. INFLUENCE OF MACROMOLECULES ON CHEMICAL TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Macromolecules in the pore fluid influence the mobility of hydrophobic compounds through soils. his study evaluated the significance of macromolecules in facilitating chemical transport under laboratory conditions. Partition coefficients between 14C-labeled hexachlorobenzene and ...

  15. MT3D-USGS version 1: A U.S. Geological Survey release of MT3DMS updated with new and expanded transport capabilities for use with MODFLOW

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedekar, Vivek; Morway, Eric D.; Langevin, Christian D.; Tonkin, Matthew J.

    2016-09-30

    MT3D-USGS, a U.S. Geological Survey updated release of the groundwater solute transport code MT3DMS, includes new transport modeling capabilities to accommodate flow terms calculated by MODFLOW packages that were previously unsupported by MT3DMS and to provide greater flexibility in the simulation of solute transport and reactive solute transport. Unsaturated-zone transport and transport within streams and lakes, including solute exchange with connected groundwater, are among the new capabilities included in the MT3D-USGS code. MT3D-USGS also includes the capability to route a solute through dry cells that may occur in the Newton-Raphson formulation of MODFLOW (that is, MODFLOW-NWT). New chemical reaction Package options include the ability to simulate inter-species reactions and parent-daughter chain reactions. A new pump-and-treat recirculation package enables the simulation of dynamic recirculation with or without treatment for combinations of wells that are represented in the flow model, mimicking the above-ground treatment of extracted water. A reformulation of the treatment of transient mass storage improves conservation of mass and yields solutions for better agreement with analytical benchmarks. Several additional features of MT3D-USGS are (1) the separate specification of the partitioning coefficient (Kd) within mobile and immobile domains; (2) the capability to assign prescribed concentrations to the top-most active layer; (3) the change in mass storage owing to the change in water volume now appears as its own budget item in the global mass balance summary; (4) the ability to ignore cross-dispersion terms; (5) the definition of Hydrocarbon Spill-Source Package (HSS) mass loading zones using regular and irregular polygons, in addition to the currently supported circular zones; and (6) the ability to specify an absolute minimum thickness rather than the default percent minimum thickness in dry-cell circumstances.Benchmark problems that implement the new

  16. Alkynes as a versatile platform for construction of chemical molecular complexity and realization of molecular 3D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, K. I.; Ananikov, V. P.

    2016-03-01

    The current level of scientific and technological development requires the formation of general tools and techniques. One of the most versatile technologies is 3D printing, which allows fast and efficient creation of materials and biological objects of desired shape and composition. Today, methods have been developed for 3D printing of macro- and nano-sized objects and for production of films and deposited materials with molecular precision but the most promising technology is printing at the molecular level (molecular 3D printing) for the purpose of direct construction of molecular complexity. This process is currently at the initial stage concerning selection of simple molecules to be used as building blocks possessing flexibility, availability and ease of modification. In this review, we examine the possible versatile synthons suitable for preparation of the main types of organic compounds using molecular 3D printing. The surveyed data strongly indicate that alkyne molecules may be used as a building material in a molecular 3D printer working on hydrocarbons. The bibliography includes 428 references.

  17. Structurally Defined 3D Nanographene Assemblies via Bottom-Up Chemical Synthesis for Highly Efficient Lithium Storage

    DOE PAGES

    Yen, Hung-Ju; Tsai, Hsinhan; Zhou, Ming; ...

    2016-10-10

    In this paper, functionalized 3D nanographenes with controlled electronic properties have been synthesized through a multistep organic synthesis method and are further used as promising anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, exhibiting a much increased capacity (up to 950 mAh g-1), three times higher than that of the graphite anode (372 mAh g-1).

  18. Interfacing 3D micro/nanochannels with a branch-shaped reservoir enhances fluid and mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prasoon; Gandhi, Prasanna S.; Majumder, Mainak

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) micro/nanofluidic devices can accelerate progress in numerous fields such as tissue engineering, drug delivery, self-healing and cooling devices. However, efficient connections between networks of micro/nanochannels and external fluidic ports are key to successful applications of 3D micro/nanofluidic devices. Therefore, in this work, the extent of the role of reservoir geometry in interfacing with vascular (micro/nanochannel) networks, and in the enabling of connections with external fluidic ports while maintaining the compactness of devices, has been experimentally and theoretically investigated. A statistical modelling suggested that a branch-shaped reservoir demonstrates enhanced interfacing with vascular networks when compared to other regular geometries of reservoirs. Time-lapse dye flow experiments by capillary action through fabricated 3D micro/nanofluidic devices confirmed the connectivity of branch-shaped reservoirs with micro/nanochannel networks in fluidic devices. This demonstrated a ~2.2-fold enhancement of the volumetric flow rate in micro/nanofluidic networks when interfaced to branch-shaped reservoirs over rectangular reservoirs. The enhancement is due to a ~2.8-fold increase in the perimeter of the reservoirs. In addition, the mass transfer experiments exhibited a ~1.7-fold enhancement in solute flux across 3D micro/nanofluidic devices that interfaced with branch-shaped reservoirs when compared to rectangular reservoirs. The fabrication of 3D micro/nanofluidic devices and their efficient interfacing through branch-shaped reservoirs to an external fluidic port can potentially enable their use in complex applications, in which enhanced surface-to-volume interactions are desirable.

  19. Characterization of chemical agent transport in paints.

    PubMed

    Willis, Matthew P; Gordon, Wesley; Lalain, Teri; Mantooth, Brent

    2013-09-15

    A combination of vacuum-based vapor emission measurements with a mass transport model was employed to determine the interaction of chemical warfare agents with various materials, including transport parameters of agents in paints. Accurate determination of mass transport parameters enables the simulation of the chemical agent distribution in a material for decontaminant performance modeling. The evaluation was performed with the chemical warfare agents bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide (distilled mustard, known as the chemical warfare blister agent HD) and O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX), an organophosphate nerve agent, deposited on to two different types of polyurethane paint coatings. The results demonstrated alignment between the experimentally measured vapor emission flux and the predicted vapor flux. Mass transport modeling demonstrated rapid transport of VX into the coatings; VX penetrated through the aliphatic polyurethane-based coating (100 μm) within approximately 107 min. By comparison, while HD was more soluble in the coatings, the penetration depth in the coatings was approximately 2× lower than VX. Applications of mass transport parameters include the ability to predict agent uptake, and subsequent long-term vapor emission or contact transfer where the agent could present exposure risks. Additionally, these parameters and model enable the ability to perform decontamination modeling to predict how decontaminants remove agent from these materials.

  20. User’s guide and reference to Ash3d: a three-dimensional model for Eulerian atmospheric tephra transport and deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, Larry G.; Randall, Michael J.; Schwaiger, Hans F.; Denlinger, Roger P.

    2013-01-01

    Ash3d is a three-dimensional Eulerian atmospheric model for tephra transport, dispersal, and deposition, written by the authors to study and forecast hazards of volcanic ash clouds and tephra fall. In this report, we explain how to set up simulations using both a web interface and an ASCII input file, and how to view and interpret model output. We also summarize the architecture of the model and some of its properties.

  1. Structurally Defined 3D Nanographene Assemblies via Bottom-Up Chemical Synthesis for Highly Efficient Lithium Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Hung-Ju; Tsai, Hsinhan; Zhou, Ming; Holby, Edward F.; Choudhury, Samrat; Chen, Aiping; Adamska, Lyudmyla; Tretiak, Sergei; Sanchez, Timothy; Iyer, Srinivas; Zhang, Hanguang; Zhu, Lingxiang; Lin, Haiqing; Dai, Liming; Wu, Gang; Wang, Hsing-Lin

    2016-10-10

    In this paper, functionalized 3D nanographenes with controlled electronic properties have been synthesized through a multistep organic synthesis method and are further used as promising anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, exhibiting a much increased capacity (up to 950 mAh g-1), three times higher than that of the graphite anode (372 mAh g-1).

  2. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  3. Mapping of the C3d ligand binding site on complement receptor 2 (CR2/CD21) using nuclear magnetic resonance and chemical shift analysis.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, James M; Hannan, Jonathan P; Eisenmesser, Elan Z; Holers, V Michael

    2009-04-03

    Complement receptor 2 (CR2, CD21) is a cell membrane protein, with 15 or 16 extracellular short consensus repeats (SCRs), that promotes B lymphocyte responses and bridges innate and acquired immunity. The most distally located SCRs (SCR1-2) mediate the interaction of CR2 with its four known ligands (C3d, Epstein-Barr virus gp350, interferon-alpha, and CD23). Inhibitory monoclonal antibodies against SCR1-2 block binding of all ligands. To develop ligand-specific inhibitors that would also assist in identifying residues unique to each receptor-ligand interaction, phage were selected from randomly generated libraries by panning with recombinant SCR1-2, followed by specific ligand-driven elution. Derived peptides were tested by competition ELISA. One peptide, C3dp1 (APQHLSSQYSRT) exhibited ligand-specific inhibition at midmicromolar IC(50). C3d was titrated into (15)N-labeled SCR1-2, which revealed chemical shift changes indicative of specific intermolecular interactions. With backbone assignments made, the chemical shift changes were mapped onto the crystal structure of SCR1-2. With regard to C3d, the binding surface includes regions of SCR1, SCR2, and the inter-SCR linker, specifically residues Arg(13), Tyr(16), Arg(28), Tyr(29), Ser(32), Thr(34), Lys(48), Asp(56), Lys(57), Tyr(68), Arg(83), Gly(84), Asn(101), Asn(105), and Ser(109). SCR1 and SCR2 demonstrated distinct binding modes. The CR2 binding surface incorporating SCR1 is inconsistent with a previous x-ray CR2-C3d co-crystal analysis but consistent with mutagenesis, x-ray neutron scattering, and inhibitory monoclonal antibody epitope mapping. Titration with C3dp1 yielded chemical shift changes (Arg(13), Tyr(16), Thr(34), Lys(48), Asp(56), Lys(57), Tyr(68), Arg(83), Gly(84), Asn(105), and Ser(109)) overlapping with C3d, indicating that C3dp1 interacts at the same CR2 site as C3d.

  4. Drug Transport and Pharmacokinetics for Chemical Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Laurent; Kanneganti, Kumud; Kim, Kwang Seok

    2010-01-01

    Experiments in continuous-stirred vessels were proposed to introduce methods in pharmacokinetics and drug transport to chemical engineering students. The activities can be incorporated into the curriculum to illustrate fundamentals learned in the classroom. An appreciation for the role of pharmacokinetics in drug discovery will also be gained…

  5. Mapping tropical biodiversity using spectroscopic imagery : characterization of structural and chemical diversity with 3-D radiative transfer modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feret, J. B.; Gastellu-Etchegorry, J. P.; Lefèvre-Fonollosa, M. J.; Proisy, C.; Asner, G. P.

    2014-12-01

    The accelerating loss of biodiversity is a major environmental trend. Tropical ecosystems are particularly threatened due to climate change, invasive species, farming and natural resources exploitation. Recent advances in remote sensing of biodiversity confirmed the potential of high spatial resolution spectroscopic imagery for species identification and biodiversity mapping. Such information bridges the scale-gap between small-scale, highly detailed field studies and large-scale, low-resolution satellite observations. In order to produce fine-scale resolution maps of canopy alpha-diversity and beta-diversity of the Peruvian Amazonian forest, we designed, applied and validated a method based on spectral variation hypothesis to CAO AToMS (Carnegie Airborne Observatory Airborne Taxonomic Mapping System) images, acquired from 2011 to 2013. There is a need to understand on a quantitative basis the physical processes leading to this spectral variability. This spectral variability mainly depends on canopy chemistry, structure, and sensor's characteristics. 3D radiative transfer modeling provides a powerful framework for the study of the relative influence of each of these factors in dense and complex canopies. We simulated series of spectroscopic images with the 3D radiative model DART, with variability gradients in terms of leaf chemistry, individual tree structure, spatial and spectral resolution, and applied methods for biodiversity mapping. This sensitivity study allowed us to determine the relative influence of these factors on the radiometric signal acquired by different types of sensors. Such study is particularly important to define the domain of validity of our approach, to refine requirements for the instrumental specifications, and to help preparing hyperspectral spatial missions to be launched at the horizon 2015-2025 (EnMAP, PRISMA, HISUI, SHALOM, HYSPIRI, HYPXIM). Simulations in preparation include topographic variations in order to estimate the robustness

  6. Biosensor discovery of thyroxine transport disrupting chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Marchesini, Gerardo R. Meimaridou, Anastasia; Haasnoot, Willem; Meulenberg, Eline; Albertus, Faywell; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Takeuchi, Makoto; Irth, Hubertus; Murk, Albertinka J.

    2008-10-01

    Ubiquitous chemicals may interfere with the thyroid system that is essential in the development and physiology of vertebrates. We applied a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor-based screening method for the fast screening of chemicals with thyroxine (T4) transport disrupting activity. Two inhibition assays using the main thyroid hormone transport proteins, T4 binding globulin (TBG) and transthyretin (TTR), in combination with a T4-coated biosensor chip were optimized and automated for screening chemical libraries. The transport protein-based biosensor assays were rapid, high throughput and bioeffect-related. A library of 62 chemicals including the natural hormones, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) and metabolites, halogenated bisphenol A (BPA), halogenated phenols, pharmaceuticals, pesticides and other potential environmentally relevant chemicals was tested with the two assays. We discovered ten new active compounds with moderate to high affinity for TBG with the TBG assay. Strikingly, the most potent binding was observed with hydroxylated metabolites of the brominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs) BDE 47, BDE 49 and BDE 99, that are commonly found in human plasma. The TTR assay confirmed the activity of previously identified hydroxylated metabolites of PCBs and PBDEs, halogenated BPA and genistein. These results show that the hydroxylated metabolites of the ubiquitous PBDEs not only target the T4 transport at the TTR level, but also, and to a great extent, at the TBG level where most of the T4 in humans is circulating. The optimized SPR biosensor-based transport protein assay is a suitable method for high throughput screening of large libraries for potential thyroid hormone disrupting compounds.

  7. Comparison of accelerated 3-D spiral chemical shift imaging and single-voxel spectroscopy at 3T in the pediatric age group.

    PubMed

    Yazbek, Sandrine; Prabhu, Sanjay P; Connaughton, Pauline; Grant, Patricia E; Gagoski, Borjan

    2015-08-01

    Single-voxel spectroscopy (SVS) is usually used in the pediatric population when a short acquisition time is crucial. To overcome the long acquisition time of 3-D phase-encoded chemical shift imaging (CSI) and lack of spatial coverage of single-voxel spectroscopy, efficient encoding schemes using spiral k-space trajectories have been successfully deployed, enabling acquisition of volumetric CSI in <5 min. We assessed feasibility of using 3-D spiral CSI sequence routinely in pediatric clinical settings by comparing its reconstructed spectra against SVS spectra. Volumetric spiral CSI obtained spectra from 2-cc isotropic voxels over a 16×16×10-cm region. SVS acquisition encoded a 3.4-cc (1.5-mm) isotropic voxel. Acquisition time was 3 min for every technique. Data were gathered prospectively from 11 random pediatric patients. Spectra from left basal ganglia were obtained using both techniques and were processed with post-processing software. The following metabolite ratios were calculated: N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr), choline/creatine (Cho/Cr), lactate/creatine (Lac/Cr) and N-acetylapartate/choline (NAA/Cho). We collected data on 11 children ages 4 days to 10 years. In 10/11 cases, spectral quality of both methods was acceptable. Considering 10/11 cases, we found a statistically significant difference between SVS and 3-D spiral CSI for all three ratios. However, this difference was fixed and was probably caused by a fixed bias. This means that 3-D spiral CSI can be used instead of SVS by removing the mean difference between the methods for each ratio. Accelerated 3-D CSI is feasible in pediatric patients and can potentially substitute for SVS.

  8. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    SciTech Connect

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; Gable, Carl W.; Karra, Satish

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates mass balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.

  9. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    DOE PAGES

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; ...

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates massmore » balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.« less

  10. Radionuclide transport and uptake in coastal aquatic ecosystems: a comparison of a 3D dynamic model and a compartment model.

    PubMed

    Erichsen, Anders Christian; Konovalenko, Lena; Møhlenberg, Flemming; Closter, Rikke Margrethe; Bradshaw, Clare; Aquilonius, Karin; Kautsky, Ulrik

    2013-05-01

    In safety assessments of underground radioactive waste repositories, understanding radionuclide fate in ecosystems is necessary to determine the impacts of potential releases. Here, the reliability of two mechanistic models (the compartmental K-model and the 3D dynamic D-model) in describing the fate of radionuclides released into a Baltic Sea bay is tested. Both are based on ecosystem models that simulate the cycling of organic matter (carbon). Radionuclide transfer is linked to adsorption and flows of carbon in food chains. Accumulation of Th-230, Cs-135, and Ni-59 in biological compartments was comparable between the models and site measurements despite differences in temporal resolution, biological state variables, and partition coefficients. Both models provided confidence limits for their modeled concentration ratios, an improvement over models that only estimate means. The D-model enables estimates at high spatio-temporal resolution. The K-model, being coarser but faster, allows estimates centuries ahead. Future developments could integrate the two models to take advantage of their respective strengths.

  11. 3D structure of AcrB: the archetypal multidrug efflux transporter of Escherichia coli likely captures substrates from periplasm.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Christopher A; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2003-02-01

    Recent advances in structural biology have extended our understanding of the multiple drug efflux complex, AcrAB-TolC, of Escherichia coli. This tripartite complex and its homologs are the major mechanisms that give most Gram-negative bacteria their characteristic intrinsic resistance to a variety of lipophilic drugs, dyes, and detergents. Most recently, the structure of the transporter AcrB was elucidated at high resolution [Nature 419(2002)587]. It is a particularly significant achievement since integral membrane proteins are notoriously elusive structures for crystallography. The striking features of this trimeric pump, such as the presence of potential substrate-binding sites in the periplasmic domain and the possibility of direct interaction with the end of TolC tunnel, refine our understanding of the mode of action of this tripartite efflux transport complex.

  12. A 3D Hybrid Model for Tissue Growth: The Interplay between Cell Population and Mass Transport Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Gang; Markenscoff, Pauline; Zygourakis, Kyriacos

    2009-01-01

    Abstract To provide theoretical guidance for the design and in vitro cultivation of bioartificial tissues, we have developed a multiscale computational model that can describe the complex interplay between cell population and mass transport dynamics that governs the growth of tissues in three-dimensional scaffolds. The model has three components: a transient partial differential equation for the simultaneous diffusion and consumption of a limiting nutrient; a cellular automaton describing cell migration, proliferation, and collision; and equations that quantify how the varying nutrient concentration modulates cell division and migration. The hybrid discrete-continuous model was parallelized and solved on a distributed-memory multicomputer to study how transport limitations affect tissue regeneration rates under conditions encountered in typical bioreactors. Simulation results show that the severity of transport limitations can be estimated by the magnitude of two dimensionless groups: the Thiele modulus and the Biot number. Key parameters including the initial seeding mode, cell migration speed, and the hydrodynamic conditions in the bioreactor are shown to affect not only the overall rate, but also the pattern of tissue growth. This study lays the groundwork for more comprehensive models that can handle mixed cell cultures, multiple nutrients and growth factors, and other cellular processes, such as cell death. PMID:19619455

  13. Chemically driven fluid transport in long microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Mingren; Ye, Fangfu; Liu, Rui; Chen, Ke; Yang, Mingcheng; Ripoll, Marisol

    2016-09-01

    Chemical gradients maintained along surfaces can drive fluid flows by diffusio-osmosis, which become significant at micro- and nano-scales. Here, by means of mesoscopic simulations, we show that a concentration drop across microchannels with periodically inhomogeneous boundary walls can laterally transport fluids over arbitrarily long distances along the microchannel. The driving field is the secondary local chemical gradient parallel to the channel induced by the periodic inhomogeneity of the channel wall. The flow velocity depends on the concentration drop across the channel and the structure and composition of the channel walls, but it is independent of the overall channel length. Our work thus presents new insight into the fluid transport in long microchannels commonly found in nature and is useful for designing novel micro- or nano-fluidic pumps.

  14. Silicon refinement by chemical vapor transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, J.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon refinement by chemical vapor transport is discussed. The operating characteristics of the purification process, including factors affecting the rate, purification efficiency and photovoltaic quality of the refined silicon were studied. The casting of large alloy plates was accomplished. A larger research scale reactor is characterized, and it is shown that a refined silicon product yields solar cells with near state of the art conversion efficiencies.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Porosity and Transport Properties by FIB-SEM 3D Imaging of a Solder Based Sintered Silver for a New Microelectronic Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rmili, W.; Vivet, N.; Chupin, S.; Le Bihan, T.; Le Quilliec, G.; Richard, C.

    2016-04-01

    As part of development of a new assembly technology to achieve bonding for an innovative silicon carbide (SiC) power device used in harsh environments, the aim of this study is to compare two silver sintering profiles and then to define the best candidate for die attach material for this new component. To achieve this goal, the solder joints have been characterized in terms of porosity by determination of the morphological characteristics of the material heterogeneities and estimating their thermal and electrical transport properties. The three dimensional (3D) microstructure of sintered silver samples has been reconstructed using a focused ion beam scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) tomography technique. The sample preparation and the experimental milling and imaging parameters have been optimized in order to obtain a high quality of 3D reconstruction. Volume fractions and volumetric connectivity of the individual phases (silver and voids) have been determined. Effective thermal and electrical conductivities of the samples and the tortuosity of the silver phase have been also evaluated by solving the diffusive transport equation.

  16. Revisiting the TORT Solutions to the NEA Suite of Benchmarks for 3D Transport Methods and Codes Over a Range in Parameter Space

    SciTech Connect

    Bekar, Kursat B; Azmy, Yousry

    2009-01-01

    Improved TORT solutions to the 3D transport codes' suite of benchmarks exercise are presented in this study. Preliminary TORT solutions to this benchmark indicate that the majority of benchmark quantities for most benchmark cases are computed with good accuracy, and that accuracy improves with model refinement. However, TORT fails to compute accurate results for some benchmark cases with aspect ratios drastically different from 1, possibly due to ray effects. In this work, we employ the standard approach of splitting the solution to the transport equation into an uncollided flux and a fully collided flux via the code sequence GRTUNCL3D and TORT to mitigate ray effects. The results of this code sequence presented in this paper show that the accuracy of most benchmark cases improved substantially. Furthermore, the iterative convergence problems reported for the preliminary TORT solutions have been resolved by bringing the computational cells' aspect ratio closer to unity and, more importantly, by using 64-bit arithmetic precision in the calculation sequence. Results of this study are also reported.

  17. TART 2000: A Coupled Neutron-Photon, 3-D, Combinatorial Geometry, Time Dependent, Monte Carlo Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E

    2000-11-22

    TART2000 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo radiation transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input Preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART2000 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART2000 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART2000 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART2000 and its data files.

  18. TART98 a coupled neutron-photon 3-D, combinatorial geometry time dependent Monte Carlo Transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D E

    1998-11-22

    TART98 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo radiation transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART98 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART98 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART98 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART98 and its data files.

  19. Pressure evolution of electrical transport in the 3D topological insulator (Bi,Sb)2(Te,Se)3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffries, Jason; Butch, N. P.; Vohra, Y. K.; Weir, S. T.

    2014-03-01

    The group V-VI compounds--like Bi2Se3, Sb2Te3, or Bi2Te3--have been widely studied in recent years for their bulk topological properties. The high-Z members of this series form with the same crystal structure, and are therefore amenable to isostructural substitution studies. It is possible to tune the Bi-Sb and Te-Se ratios such that the material exhibits insulating behavior, thus providing an excellent platform for understanding how a topological insulator evolves with applied pressure. We report our observations of the pressure-dependent electrical transport and compare that behavior with other binary V-VI compounds under pressure. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Dynamics of leaf gas exchange, xylem and phloem transport, water potential and carbohydrate concentration in a realistic 3-D model tree crown

    PubMed Central

    Nikinmaa, Eero; Sievänen, Risto; Hölttä, Teemu

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Tree models simulate productivity using general gas exchange responses and structural relationships, but they rarely check whether leaf gas exchange and resulting water and assimilate transport and driving pressure gradients remain within acceptable physical boundaries. This study presents an implementation of the cohesion–tension theory of xylem transport and the Münch hypothesis of phloem transport in a realistic 3-D tree structure and assesses the gas exchange and transport dynamics. Methods A mechanistic model of xylem and phloem transport was used, together with a tested leaf assimilation and transpiration model in a realistic tree architecture to simulate leaf gas exchange and water and carbohydrate transport within an 8-year-old Scots pine tree. The model solved the dynamics of the amounts of water and sucrose solute in the xylem, cambium and phloem using a fine-grained mesh with a system of coupled ordinary differential equations. Key Results The simulations predicted the observed patterns of pressure gradients and sugar concentration. Diurnal variation of environmental conditions influenced tree-level gradients in turgor pressure and sugar concentration, which are important drivers of carbon allocation. The results and between-shoot variation were sensitive to structural and functional parameters such as tree-level scaling of conduit size and phloem unloading. Conclusions Linking whole-tree-level water and assimilate transport, gas exchange and sink activity opens a new avenue for plant studies, as features that are difficult to measure can be studied dynamically with the model. Tree-level responses to local and external conditions can be tested, thus making the approach described here a good test-bench for studies of whole-tree physiology. PMID:24854169

  1. Evolution of chemical bonding and electron density rearrangements during D(3h) → D(3d) reaction in monolayered TiS2: a QTAIM and ELF study.

    PubMed

    Ryzhikov, Maxim R; Slepkov, Vladimir A; Kozlova, Svetlana G; Gabuda, Svyatoslav P

    2014-08-15

    Monolayered titanium disulfide TiS2, a prospective nanoelectronic material, was previously shown to be subject to an exothermic solid-state D3h -D3d reaction that proceeds via a newly discovered transition state. Here, we study the reaction in detail using topological methods of quantum chemistry (quantum theory of atoms in molecules and electron localization function analysis) and show how electron density and chemical bonding between the atoms change in the course of the reaction. The reaction is shown to undergo a series of topological catastrophes, associated with elementary chemical events such as break and formation of bonds (including the unexpected formation of S-S bonding between sulfur layers), and rearrangement of electron density of outer valence and core shells.

  2. Pressure evolution of electrical transport in the 3D topological insulator (Bi,Sb) 2 (Se,Te) 3

    DOE PAGES

    Jeffries, J. R.; Butch, N. P.; Vohra, Y. K.; ...

    2015-03-18

    The group V-VI compounds|like Bi2Se3, Sb2Te3, or Bi2Te3|have been widely studied in recent years for their bulk topological properties. The high-Z members of this series form with the same crystal structure, and are therefore amenable to isostructural substitution studies. It is possible to tune the Bi-Sb and Te-Se ratios such that the material exhibits insulating behavior, thus providing an excellent platform for understanding how a topological insulator evolves with applied pressure. We report our observations of the pressure-dependent electrical transport and crystal structure of a pseudobinary (Bi,Sb)2(Te,Se)3 compound. Similar to some of its sister compounds, the (Bi,Sb)2(Te,Se)3 pseudobinary compound undergoesmore » multiple, pressure-induced phase transformations that result in metallization, the onset of a close-packed crystal structure, and the development of distinct superconducting phases.« less

  3. Development of the 3D Parallel Particle-In-Cell Code IMPACT to Simulate the Ion Beam Transport System of VENUS (Abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D.S.; Ryne, R.D.

    2005-03-15

    The superconducting ECR ion source VENUS serves as the prototype injector ion source for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The RIA driver linac requires a great variety of high charge state ion beams with up to an order of magnitude higher intensity than currently achievable with conventional ECR ion sources. In order to design the beam line optics of the low energy beam line for the RIA front end for the wide parameter range required for the RIA driver accelerator, reliable simulations of the ion beam extraction from the ECR ion source through the ion mass analyzing system are essential. The RIA low energy beam transport line must be able to transport intense beams (up to 10 mA) of light and heavy ions at 30 keV.For this purpose, LBNL is developing the parallel 3D particle-in-cell code IMPACT to simulate the ion beam transport from the ECR extraction aperture through the analyzing section of the low energy transport system. IMPACT, a parallel, particle-in-cell code, is currently used to model the superconducting RF linac section of RIA and is being modified in order to simulate DC beams from the ECR ion source extraction. By using the high performance of parallel supercomputing we will be able to account consistently for the changing space charge in the extraction region and the analyzing section. A progress report and early results in the modeling of the VENUS source will be presented.

  4. Development of the 3D Parallel Particle-In-Cell Code IMPACT to Simulate the Ion Beam Transport System of VENUS (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D. S.; Ryne, R. D.

    2005-03-01

    The superconducting ECR ion source VENUS serves as the prototype injector ion source for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The RIA driver linac requires a great variety of high charge state ion beams with up to an order of magnitude higher intensity than currently achievable with conventional ECR ion sources. In order to design the beam line optics of the low energy beam line for the RIA front end for the wide parameter range required for the RIA driver accelerator, reliable simulations of the ion beam extraction from the ECR ion source through the ion mass analyzing system are essential. The RIA low energy beam transport line must be able to transport intense beams (up to 10 mA) of light and heavy ions at 30 keV. For this purpose, LBNL is developing the parallel 3D particle-in-cell code IMPACT to simulate the ion beam transport from the ECR extraction aperture through the analyzing section of the low energy transport system. IMPACT, a parallel, particle-in-cell code, is currently used to model the superconducting RF linac section of RIA and is being modified in order to simulate DC beams from the ECR ion source extraction. By using the high performance of parallel supercomputing we will be able to account consistently for the changing space charge in the extraction region and the analyzing section. A progress report and early results in the modeling of the VENUS source will be presented.

  5. Alginate based 3D hydrogels as an in vitro co-culture model platform for the toxicity screening of new chemical entities

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Shih-Feng; Starly, Binil

    2011-10-01

    Prediction of human response to potential therapeutic drugs is through conventional methods of in vitro cell culture assays and expensive in vivo animal testing. Alternatives to animal testing require sophisticated in vitro model systems that must replicate in vivo like function for reliable testing applications. Advancements in biomaterials have enabled the development of three-dimensional (3D) cell encapsulated hydrogels as in vitro drug screening tissue model systems. In this study, we have developed an in vitro platform to enable high density 3D culture of liver cells combined with a monolayer growth of target breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) in a static environment as a representative example of screening drug compounds for hepatotoxicity and drug efficacy. Alginate hydrogels encapsulated with serial cell densities of HepG2 cells (10{sup 5}-10{sup 8} cells/ml) are supported by a porous poly-carbonate disc platform and co-cultured with MCF-7 cells within standard cell culture plates during a 3 day study period. The clearance rates of drug transformation by HepG2 cells are measured using a coumarin based pro-drug. The platform was used to test for HepG2 cytotoxicity 50% (CT{sub 50}) using commercially available drugs which further correlated well with published in vivo LD{sub 50} values. The developed test platform allowed us to evaluate drug dose concentrations to predict hepatotoxicity and its effect on the target cells. The in vitro 3D co-culture platform provides a scalable and flexible approach to test multiple-cell types in a hybrid setting within standard cell culture plates which may open up novel 3D in vitro culture techniques to screen new chemical entity compounds. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > A porous support disc design to support the culture of desired cells in 3D hydrogels. > Demonstrated the co-culture of two cell types within standard cell-culture plates. > A scalable, low cost approach to toxicity screening involving

  6. The chemical composition of animal cells reconstructed from 2D and 3D ToF-SIMS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitenstein, D.; Rommel, C. E.; Stolwijk, J.; Wegener, J.; Hagenhoff, B.

    2008-12-01

    This paper gives an overview on the progress achieved in our lab within the last two years in the analysis of single cells and tissue-like cell layers by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Basically two types of investigations were performed: on the one hand a two-dimensional imaging and on the other hand a three-dimensional microarea analysis. In both cases chemical fixation in combination with slow air-drying were used as easy sample preparation method. It was the goal of both approaches to identify the distribution of natural components as well as the localisation of xenobiotic fluorophors. In our experimental set-ups the distribution of phophatidylcholine and amino-acid signals were in line with the expectation. In contrast, the distribution of the fluorophor ethidiumhomodimer could only be detected within the two-dimensional imaging, whereas it was not detected in the three-dimensional analysis. Also four other fluorophors failed in the latter approach. Thus, in our hands the three-dimensional detection is to date limited to certain molecules with a comparably low mass and/or an intrinsical charge.

  7. Controlled 3D Assembly of Graphene Sheets to Build Conductive, Chemically Selective and Shape-Responsive Materials.

    PubMed

    Woltornist, Steven J; Varghese, Deepthi; Massucci, Daniel; Cao, Zhen; Dobrynin, Andrey V; Adamson, Douglas H

    2017-03-06

    Driven by the surface activity of graphene, electrically conductive elastomeric foams have been synthesized by the controlled reassembly of graphene sheets; from their initial stacked morphology, as found in graphite, to a percolating network of exfoliated sheets, defining hollow spheres. This network creates a template for the formation of composite foams, whose swelling behavior is sensitive to the composition of the solvent, and whose electrical resistance is sensitive to physical deformation. The self-assembly of graphene sheets is driven thermodynamically, as graphite is found to act as a 2D surfactant and is spread at high-energy interfaces. This spreading, or exfoliation, of graphite at an oil/water interface stabilizes water-in-oil emulsions, without the need for added surfactants or chemical modification of the graphene. Using a monomer such as butyl acrylate for the emulsion's oil phase, elastomeric foams are created by polymerizing the continuous oil phase. Removal of the aqueous phase then results in robust, conductive, porous, and inexpensive composites, with potential applications in energy storage, filtration, and sensing.

  8. Controlled synthesis, asymmetrical transport behavior and luminescence properties of lanthanide doped ZnO mushroom-like 3D hierarchical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Dan; Lu, Wei; Jin, Lin; Li, Chunyang; Luo, Wen; Wang, Mengnan; Wang, Zhenling; Hao, Jianhua

    2014-10-01

    Lanthanide doped ZnO mushroom-like 3D hierarchical structures have been fabricated by polyol-mediated method and characterized by various microstructural and optical techniques. The results indicate that the as-prepared ZnO:Ln3+ (Ln = Tb, Eu) samples have a hexagonal phase structure and possess a mushroom-like 3D hierarchical morphology. The length of the whole mushroom from stipe bottom to pileus top is about 1.0 μm, and the diameters of pileus and stipe are about 0.8 μm and 0.4 μm, respectively. It is found that the flow of N2 is the key parameter for the formation of the novel ZnO structure and the addition of (NH4)2HPO4 has a prominent effect on the phase structure and the growth of mushroom-like morphology. The potential mechanism of forming this morphology is proposed. The pileus of the formed mushroom is assembled by several radial ZnO:Ln3+ nanorods, whereas the stipe is composed of over layered ZnO:Ln3+ nanosheets. Moreover, asymmetrical I-V characteristic curves of ZnO:Ln3+ mushrooms indicate that the texture composition of the 3D hierarchical morphology might lead to the asymmetrical transport behavior of electrical conductivity. Lanthanide doped ZnO samples can exhibit red or green emission under the excitation of UV light.Lanthanide doped ZnO mushroom-like 3D hierarchical structures have been fabricated by polyol-mediated method and characterized by various microstructural and optical techniques. The results indicate that the as-prepared ZnO:Ln3+ (Ln = Tb, Eu) samples have a hexagonal phase structure and possess a mushroom-like 3D hierarchical morphology. The length of the whole mushroom from stipe bottom to pileus top is about 1.0 μm, and the diameters of pileus and stipe are about 0.8 μm and 0.4 μm, respectively. It is found that the flow of N2 is the key parameter for the formation of the novel ZnO structure and the addition of (NH4)2HPO4 has a prominent effect on the phase structure and the growth of mushroom-like morphology. The potential

  9. Lagrangian Sampling of 3-D Air Quality Model Results for Regional Transport Contributions to Sulfate Aerosol Concentrations at Baltimore, MD in Summer of 2004

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lagrangian method provides estimates of the chemical and physical evolution of air arriving in the daytime boundary layer at Baltimore. Study results indicate a dominant role for regional transport contributions of those days when sulfate air pollution is highest in Baltimor...

  10. Analysis of riverine suspended particulate matter fluxes (Gulf of Lion, Mediterranean Sea) using a synergy of ocean color observations with a 3-D hydrodynamic sediment transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Fouest, Vincent; Chami, Malik; Verney, Romaric

    2015-02-01

    The export of riverine suspended particulate matter (SPM) in the coastal ocean has major implications for the biogeochemical cycles. In the Mediterranean Sea (France), the Rhone River inputs of SPM into the Gulf of Lion (GoL) are highly variable in time, which severely impedes the assessment of SPM fluxes. The objectives of this study are (i) to investigate the prediction of the land-to-ocean flux of SPM using the complementarity (i.e., synergy) between a hydrodynamic sediment transport model and satellite observations, and (ii) to analyze the spatial distribution of the SPM export. An original approach that combines the MARS-3D model with satellite ocean color data is proposed. Satellite-derived SPM and light penetration depth are used to initialize MARS-3D and to validate its predictions. A sensitivity analysis is performed to quantify the impact of riverine SPM size composition and settling rate on the horizontal export of SPM. The best agreement between the model and the satellite in terms of SPM spatial distribution and export is obtained for two conditions: (i) when the relative proportion of "heavy and fast" settling particles significantly increases relative to the "light and slow" ones, and (ii) when the settling rate of heavy and light SPM increases by fivefold. The synergy between MARS-3D and the satellite data improved the SPM flux predictions by 48% near the Rhone River mouth. Our results corroborate the importance of implementing satellite observations within initialization procedures of ocean models since data assimilation techniques may fail for river floods showing strong seasonal variability.

  11. Pdf - Transport equations for chemically reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kollmann, W.

    1989-01-01

    The closure problem for the transport equations for pdf and the characteristic functions of turbulent, chemically reacting flows is addressed. The properties of the linear and closed equations for the characteristic functional for Eulerian and Lagrangian variables are established, and the closure problem for the finite-dimensional case is discussed for pdf and characteristic functions. It is shown that the closure for the scalar dissipation term in the pdf equation developed by Dopazo (1979) and Kollmann et al. (1982) results in a single integral, in contrast to the pdf, where double integration is required. Some recent results using pdf methods obtained for turbulent flows with combustion, including effects of chemical nonequilibrium, are discussed.

  12. 3-D Quantum Transport Solver Based on the Perfectly Matched Layer and Spectral Element Methods for the Simulation of Semiconductor Nanodevices

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Candong; Lee, Joon-Ho; Lim, Kim Hwa; Massoud, Hisham Z.; Liu, Qing Huo

    2007-01-01

    A 3-D quantum transport solver based on the spectral element method (SEM) and perfectly matched layer (PML) is introduced to solve the 3-D Schrödinger equation with a tensor effective mass. In this solver, the influence of the environment is replaced with the artificial PML open boundary extended beyond the contact regions of the device. These contact regions are treated as waveguides with known incident waves from waveguide mode solutions. As the transmitted wave function is treated as a total wave, there is no need to decompose it into waveguide modes, thus significantly simplifying the problem in comparison with conventional open boundary conditions. The spectral element method leads to an exponentially improving accuracy with the increase in the polynomial order and sampling points. The PML region can be designed such that less than −100 dB outgoing waves are reflected by this artificial material. The computational efficiency of the SEM solver is demonstrated by comparing the numerical and analytical results from waveguide and plane-wave examples, and its utility is illustrated by multiple-terminal devices and semiconductor nanotube devices. PMID:18037971

  13. 6-Substituted Pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine Thienoyl Regioisomers as Targeted Antifolates for Folate Receptor α and the Proton-Coupled Folate Transporter in Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Wallace, Adrianne; Raghavan, Sudhir; Deis, Siobhan M.; Wilson, Mike R.; Yang, Si; Polin, Lisa; White, Kathryn; Kushner, Juiwanna; Orr, Steven; George, Christina; O’Connor, Carrie; Hou, Zhanjun; Mitchell-Ryan, Shermaine; Dann, Charles E.; Matherly, Larry H.; Gangjee, Aleem

    2016-01-01

    2-Amino-4-oxo-6-substituted-pyrrolo[2,3-d]-pyrimidine antifolate thiophene regioisomers of AGF94 (4) with a thienoyl side chain and three-carbon bridge lengths [AGF150 (5) and AGF154 (7)] were synthesized as potential antitumor agents. These analogues inhibited proliferation of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) sublines expressing folate receptors (FRs) α or β (IC50s < 1 nM) or the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) (IC50 < 7 nM). Compounds 5 and 7 inhibited KB, IGROV1, and SKOV3 human tumor cells at subnanomolar concentrations, reflecting both FRα and PCFT uptake. AGF152 (6) and AGF163 (8), 2,4-diamino-5-substituted-furo[2,3-d]pyrimidine thiophene regioisomers, also inhibited growth of FR-expressing CHO and KB cells. All four analogues inhibited glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase (GARFTase). Crystal structures of human GARFTase complexed with 5 and 7 were reported. In severe combined immunodeficient mice bearing SKOV3 tumors, 7 was efficacious. The selectivity of these compounds for PCFT and for FRα and β over the ubiquitously expressed reduced folate carrier is a paradigm for selective tumor targeting. PMID:26317331

  14. Crystal structure and carrier transport properties of a new 3D mixed-valence Cu(I)-Cu(II) coordination polymer including pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate ligand.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Takashi; Tanaka, Naoya; Kim, Kyung Ho; Anma, Haruho; Seki, Shu; Saeki, Akinori; Maekawa, Masahiko; Kuroda-Sowa, Takayoshi

    2011-03-14

    A novel mixed-valence Cu(i)-Cu(ii) coordination polymer having an infinite three-dimensional (3D) structure, {[Cu(I)(4)Cu(II)(2)Br(4)(Pyr-dtc)(4)]·CHCl(3)}(n) (1) (Pyr-dtc(-) = pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate), has been prepared and structurally characterized via X-ray diffraction. This complex consists of 1D Cu(i)-Br chains and bridging mononuclear copper(ii) units of Cu(II)(Pyr-dtc)(2), which form an infinite 3D network. A magnetic study indicates that this complex includes copper(ii) ions exhibiting a weak antiferromagnetic interaction (θ = -0.086 K) between the unpaired electrons of the copper(ii) ions present in the diamagnetic Cu(i)-Br chains. The carrier transport properties of 1 are investigated using an impedance spectroscopy technique and flash-photolysis time-resolved microwave conductivity measurement (FP-TRMC). The impedance spectroscopy reveals that this complex exhibits intriguing semiconducting properties at a small activation energy (E(a) = 0.29 eV (bulk)). The sum of the mobilities of the negative and positive carriers estimated via FP-TRMC is Σμ∼ 0.4 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1).

  15. Proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H isotropic/anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation solid-state NMR at 70kHz MAS.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Yarava, Jayasubba Reddy; Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors offer a wealth of information for structural and dynamics studies of a variety of chemical and biological systems. In particular, CSA of amide protons can provide piercing insights into hydrogen-bonding interactions that vary with the backbone conformation of a protein and dynamics. However, the narrow span of amide proton resonances makes it very difficult to measure (1)H CSAs of proteins even by using the recently proposed 2D (1)H/(1)H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift (CSA/CS) correlation technique. Such difficulties due to overlapping proton resonances can in general be overcome by utilizing the broad span of isotropic chemical shifts of low-gamma nuclei like (15)N. In this context, we demonstrate a proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H CS/CSA/CS correlation experiment at fast MAS frequency (70kHz) to measure (1)H CSA values of unresolved amide protons of N-acetyl-(15)N-l-valyl-(15)N-l-leucine (NAVL).

  16. 3D Anhydrous proton-transporting nanochannels formed by self-assembly of liquid crystals composed of a sulfobetaine and a sulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Soberats, Bartolome; Yoshio, Masafumi; Ichikawa, Takahiro; Taguchi, Satomi; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Kato, Takashi

    2013-10-16

    Herein we describe anhydrous proton transportation through 3D interconnected pathways formed by self-assembled molecular complexes. A thermotropic bicontinuous cubic (Cub(bi)) phase has been successfully obtained by mixing a wedge-shaped sulfobetaine with benzenesulfonic acid in different ratios. These ionic complexes exhibit the Cub(bi) phase in a wide range of temperatures, while the single zwitterionic compound shows only a columnar hexagonal phase, and benzenesulfonic acid is nonmesomorphic. Anhydrous proton conduction on the order of 10(-4) S cm(-1) has been achieved for the mixture in the Cub(bi) phase over 100 °C, which can be useful for the development of new electrolytes for the next generation of fuel cells.

  17. Modeling of mass and charge transport in a solid oxide fuel cell anode structure by a 3D lattice Boltzmann approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, Hedvig; Andersson, Martin; Sundén, Bengt

    2016-08-01

    A 3D model at microscale by the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is proposed for part of an anode of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to analyze the interaction between the transport and reaction processes and structural parameters. The equations of charge, momentum, heat and mass transport are simulated in the model. The modeling geometry is created with randomly placed spheres to resemble the part of the anode structure close to the electrolyte. The electrochemical reaction processes are captured at specific sites where spheres representing Ni and YSZ materials are present with void space. This work focuses on analyzing the effect of structural parameters such as porosity, and percentage of active reaction sites on the ionic current density and concentration of H2 using LBM. It is shown that LBM can be used to simulate an SOFC anode at microscale and evaluate the effect of structural parameters on the transport processes to improve the performance of the SOFC anode. It was found that increasing the porosity from 30 to 50 % decreased the ionic current density due to a reduction in the number of reaction sites. Also the consumption of H2 decreased with increasing porosity. When the percentage of active reaction sites was increased while the porosity was kept constant, the ionic current density increased. However, the H2 concentration was slightly reduced when the percentage of active reaction sites was increased. The gas flow tortuosity decreased with increasing porosity.

  18. Performance and accuracy of criticality calculations performed using WARP – A framework for continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport in general 3D geometries on GPUs

    DOE PAGES

    Bergmann, Ryan M.; Rowland, Kelly L.; Radnović, Nikola; ...

    2017-05-01

    In this companion paper to "Algorithmic Choices in WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs" (doi:10.1016/j.anucene.2014.10.039), the WARP Monte Carlo neutron transport framework for graphics processing units (GPUs) is benchmarked against production-level central processing unit (CPU) Monte Carlo neutron transport codes for both performance and accuracy. We compare neutron flux spectra, multiplication factors, runtimes, speedup factors, and costs of various GPU and CPU platforms running either WARP, Serpent 2.1.24, or MCNP 6.1. WARP compares well with the results of the production-level codes, and it is shown that on the newestmore » hardware considered, GPU platforms running WARP are between 0.8 to 7.6 times as fast as CPU platforms running production codes. Also, the GPU platforms running WARP were between 15% and 50% as expensive to purchase and between 80% to 90% as expensive to operate as equivalent CPU platforms performing at an equal simulation rate.« less

  19. Quantification of anthropogenic impact on groundwater-dependent terrestrial ecosystem using geochemical and isotope tools combined with 3-D flow and transport modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, A. J.; Witczak, S.; Dulinski, M.; Wachniew, P.; Rozanski, K.; Kania, J.; Postawa, A.; Karczewski, J.; Moscicki, W. J.

    2015-02-01

    Groundwater-dependent ecosystems (GDEs) have important functions in all climatic zones as they contribute to biological and landscape diversity and provide important economic and social services. Steadily growing anthropogenic pressure on groundwater resources creates a conflict situation between nature and man which are competing for clean and safe sources of water. Such conflicts are particularly noticeable in GDEs located in densely populated regions. A dedicated study was launched in 2010 with the main aim to better understand the functioning of a groundwater-dependent terrestrial ecosystem (GDTE) located in southern Poland. The GDTE consists of a valuable forest stand (Niepolomice Forest) and associated wetland (Wielkie Błoto fen). It relies mostly on groundwater from the shallow Quaternary aquifer and possibly from the deeper Neogene (Bogucice Sands) aquifer. In July 2009 a cluster of new pumping wells abstracting water from the Neogene aquifer was set up 1 km to the northern border of the fen. A conceptual model of the Wielkie Błoto fen area for the natural, pre-exploitation state and for the envisaged future status resulting from intense abstraction of groundwater through the new well field was developed. The main aim of the reported study was to probe the validity of the conceptual model and to quantify the expected anthropogenic impact on the studied GDTE. A wide range of research tools was used. The results obtained through combined geologic, geophysical, geochemical, hydrometric and isotope investigations provide strong evidence for the existence of upward seepage of groundwater from the deeper Neogene aquifer to the shallow Quaternary aquifer supporting the studied GDTE. Simulations of the groundwater flow field in the study area with the aid of a 3-D flow and transport model developed for Bogucice Sands (Neogene) aquifer and calibrated using environmental tracer data and observations of hydraulic head in three different locations on the study area

  20. Comparison of a 3-D multi-group SN particle transport code with Monte Carlo for intracavitary brachytherapy of the cervix uteri.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Kent A; Wareing, Todd A; Failla, Gregory; Horton, John L; Eifel, Patricia J; Mourtada, Firas

    2009-12-03

    A patient dose distribution was calculated by a 3D multi-group S N particle transport code for intracavitary brachytherapy of the cervix uteri and compared to previously published Monte Carlo results. A Cs-137 LDR intracavitary brachytherapy CT data set was chosen from our clinical database. MCNPX version 2.5.c, was used to calculate the dose distribution. A 3D multi-group S N particle transport code, Attila version 6.1.1 was used to simulate the same patient. Each patient applicator was built in SolidWorks, a mechanical design package, and then assembled with a coordinate transformation and rotation for the patient. The SolidWorks exported applicator geometry was imported into Attila for calculation. Dose matrices were overlaid on the patient CT data set. Dose volume histograms and point doses were compared. The MCNPX calculation required 14.8 hours, whereas the Attila calculation required 22.2 minutes on a 1.8 GHz AMD Opteron CPU. Agreement between Attila and MCNPX dose calculations at the ICRU 38 points was within +/- 3%. Calculated doses to the 2 cc and 5 cc volumes of highest dose differed by not more than +/- 1.1% between the two codes. Dose and DVH overlays agreed well qualitatively. Attila can calculate dose accurately and efficiently for this Cs-137 CT-based patient geometry. Our data showed that a three-group cross-section set is adequate for Cs-137 computations. Future work is aimed at implementing an optimized version of Attila for radiotherapy calculations.

  1. Pathology in a tube: Step 1. Fixing, staining, and transporting pancreatic core biopsies in a microfluidic device for 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ronnie; Burfeind, Chris W.; Kramer, Greg M.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2014-03-01

    A minimally-invasive diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is accomplished by obtaining a fine needle aspirate and observing the cell preparations under conventional optical microscopy. As an unavoidable artifact, native tissue architecture is lost, making definite diagnosis of malignancy, or invasive neoplasm, impossible. One solution is the preparation of core biopsies (CBs) within a microfluidic device that are subsequently imaged in 3D. In this paper, porcine pancreas CBs (L = 1-2 cm, D = 0.4-2.0 mm) were formalin-fixed, stained and optically cleared (FocusClear®). In brightfield at 40x, light transmission through the ordinarily opaque CBs was increased 5-15x, and internal islet structures were easily identified 250-300 μm beneath the tissue surface. Typically, specimen preparation is time intensive and requires precise handling since CBs are delicate; thus, fixative, absorptive stain and FocusClear® diffusion were done slowly and manually. To significantly speed up tissue processing, we developed a microfluidic device consisting of both a main channel (L = 12.5 cm, D = 1.415 mm) with a circular cross section used for fixing and transporting the CB and an intersecting U-channel employed for staining. Space between the CB and channel wall provided a key feature not traditionally employed in microfluidic devices, such that at low flow rates (5-10 mL/min) CBs were fixed and stained while the specimen remained stationary. By switching quickly to higher flow rates (15-20 mL/min), we could precisely overcome adhesion and transport the specimen within the channel towards the imaging platform for 3D pathology.

  2. HST3D; a computer code for simulation of heat and solute transport in three-dimensional ground-water flow systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kipp, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    The Heat- and Soil-Transport Program (HST3D) simulates groundwater flow and associated heat and solute transport in three dimensions. The three governing equations are coupled through the interstitial pore velocity, the dependence of the fluid density on pressure, temperature, the solute-mass fraction , and the dependence of the fluid viscosity on temperature and solute-mass fraction. The solute transport equation is for only a single, solute species with possible linear equilibrium sorption and linear decay. Finite difference techniques are used to discretize the governing equations using a point-distributed grid. The flow-, heat- and solute-transport equations are solved , in turn, after a particle Gauss-reduction scheme is used to modify them. The modified equations are more tightly coupled and have better stability for the numerical solutions. The basic source-sink term represents wells. A complex well flow model may be used to simulate specified flow rate and pressure conditions at the land surface or within the aquifer, with or without pressure and flow rate constraints. Boundary condition types offered include specified value, specified flux, leakage, heat conduction, and approximate free surface, and two types of aquifer influence functions. All boundary conditions can be functions of time. Two techniques are available for solution of the finite difference matrix equations. One technique is a direct-elimination solver, using equations reordered by alternating diagonal planes. The other technique is an iterative solver, using two-line successive over-relaxation. A restart option is available for storing intermediate results and restarting the simulation at an intermediate time with modified boundary conditions. This feature also can be used as protection against computer system failure. Data input and output may be in metric (SI) units or inch-pound units. Output may include tables of dependent variables and parameters, zoned-contour maps, and plots of the

  3. A 3D individual-based aquatic transport model for the assessment of the potential dispersal of planktonic larvae of an invasive bivalve.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Andrea B; Wittmann, Marion E; Chandra, Sudeep; Schladow, S Geoffrey; Rueda, Francisco J

    2014-12-01

    The unwanted impacts of non-indigenous species have become one of the major ecological and economic threats to aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Assessing the potential dispersal and colonization of non-indigenous species is necessary to prevent or reduce deleterious effects that may lead to ecosystem degradation and a range of economic impacts. A three dimensional (3D) numerical model has been developed to evaluate the local dispersal of the planktonic larvae of an invasive bivalve, Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea), by passive hydraulic transport in Lake Tahoe, USA. The probability of dispersal of Asian clam larvae from the existing high density populations to novel habitats is determined by the magnitude and timing of strong wind events. The probability of colonization of new near-shore areas outside the existing beds is low, but sensitive to the larvae settling velocity ws. High larvae mortality was observed due to settling in unsuitable deep habitats. The impact of UV-radiation during the pelagic stages, on the Asian clam mortality was low. This work provides a quantification of the number of propagules that may be successfully transported as a result of natural processes and in function of population size. The knowledge and understanding of the relative contribution of different dispersal pathways, may directly inform decision-making and resource allocation associated with invasive species management.

  4. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  5. Ice Particle Transport Analysis With Phase Change for the E(sup 3) Turbofan Engine Using LEWICE3D Version 3.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin, S.

    2012-01-01

    Ice Particle trajectory calculations with phase change were made for the Energy Efficient Engine (E(sup 3)) using the LEWICE3D Version 3.2 software. The particle trajectory computations were performed using the new Glenn Ice Particle Phase Change Model which has been incorporated into the LEWICE3D Version 3.2 software. The E(sup 3) was developed by NASA and GE in the early 1980 s as a technology demonstrator and is representative of a modern high bypass turbofan engine. The E(sup 3) flow field was calculated using the NASA Glenn ADPAC turbomachinery flow solver. Computations were performed for the low pressure compressor of the E(sup 3) for a Mach 0.8 cruise condition at 11,887 m assuming a standard warm day for ice particle sizes of 5, 20, and 100 microns and a free stream particle concentration of 0.3 g/cu m. The impingement efficiency results showed that as particle size increased average impingement efficiencies and scoop factors increased for the various components. The particle analysis also showed that the amount of mass entering the inner core decreased with increased particle size because the larger particles were less able to negotiate the turn into the inner core due to particle inertia. The particle phase change analysis results showed that the larger particles warmed less as they were transported through the low pressure compressor. Only the smallest 5 micron particles were warmed enough to produce melting and the amount of melting was relatively small with a maximum average melting fraction of 0.836. The results also showed an appreciable amount of particle sublimation and evaporation for the 5 micron particles entering the engine core (22 percent).

  6. When good statistical models of aquifer heterogeneity go right: The impact of aquifer permeability structures on 3D flow and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovic, I.; Maghrebi, M.; Fiori, A.; Dagan, G.

    2017-02-01

    Natural gradient steady flow of mean velocity U takes place in heterogeneous aquifers of random logconductivity Y = lnK , characterized by the univariate PDF f(Y) and autocorrelation ρY. Solute transport is analyzed through the Breakthrough Curve (BTC) at planes at distance x from the injection plane. The study examines the impact of permeability structures sharing same f(Y) and ρY, but differing in higher order statistics (integral scales of variograms of Y classes) upon the numerical solution of flow and transport. Flow and transport are solved for 3D structures, rather than the 2D models adopted in most of previous works. We considered a few permeability structures, including the widely employed multi-Gaussian, the connected and disconnected fields introduced by Zinn and Harvey [2003] and a model characterized by equipartition of the correlation scale among Y values. We also consider the impact of statistical anisotropy of Y, the shape of ρY and local diffusion. The main finding is that unlike 2D, the prediction of the BTC of ergodic plumes by numerical and analytical models for different structures is quite robust, displaying a seemingly universal behavior, and can be used with confidence in applications. However, as a prerequisite the basic parameters KG (the geometric mean), σY2 (the logconductivity variance) and I (the horizontal integral scale of ρY) have to be identified from field data. The results suggest that narrowing down the gap between the BTCs in applications can be achieved by obtaining Kef (the effective conductivity) or U independently (e.g. by pumping tests), rather than attempting to characterize the permeability structure beyond f(Y) and ρY.

  7. The impact of fault zones on the 3D coupled fluid and heat transport for the area of Brandenburg (NE German Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yvonne, Cherubini; Mauro, Cacace; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2013-04-01

    Faults can provide permeable pathways for fluids at a variety of scales, from great depth in the crust to flow through fractured aquifers, geothermal fields, and hydrocarbon reservoirs (Barton et al. 1995). In terms of geothermal energy exploration, it is essential to understand the role of faults and their impact on the thermal field and fluid system. 3D numerical simulations provide a useful tool for investigating the active physical processes in the subsurface. To assess the influence of major fault zones on the thermal field and fluid system, 3D coupled fluid and heat transport simulations are carried out. The study is based on a recently published structural model of the Brandenburg area, which is located in the south-eastern part of the Northeast German Basin (NEGB) (Noack et al. 2010). Two major fault zones of the Elbe Fault System (Gardelegen and Lausitz Escarpments) vertically offset the pre-Permian basement against the Permian to Cenozoic basin fill at the southern margin by several km (Scheck et al. 2002). Within the numerical models, these two major fault zones are represented as equivalent porous media and vertical discrete elements. The coupled system of equations describing fluid flow and heat transport in saturated porous media are numerically solved by the Finite Element software FEFLOW® (Diersch, 2002). Different possible geological scenarios are modelled and compared to a simulation in which no faults are considered. In one scenario the fault zones are set as impermeable. In this case, the thermal field is similar to the no fault model. Fluid flow is redirected because the fault zones act as hydraulic barriers that prevent a lateral fluid advection into the fault zones. By contrast, modelled permeable fault zones induce a pronounced thermal signature with distinctly cooler temperatures than in the no fault model. Fluid motion within the fault is initially triggered by advection due to hydraulic head gradients, but may be even enhanced by

  8. An automated system for collection of time-lapse 3D radar data to investigate vadose zone flow and transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangel, A. R.; Moysey, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Capturing three-dimensional ground-penetrating radar (GPR) images can significantly enhance our understanding of subsurface variability during vadose zone flow and transport processes. The high spatial sampling (i.e., small step sizes between profiles) required to collect full resolution 3D data can be a major challenge - particularly for high frequency imaging of detailed structures such as those related to preferential flow patterns in soils. We have developed an automated system for collecting GPR data to address these challenges. The system is based on the Sensors and Software SPIDAR (OEM NIC) platform running a 1000MHz source and receiver antenna that can be independently positioned using a 2-axis motion control system, with both the radar and positioning components integrated through LabView. The antennas can be positioned independently along a rail parallel with the x-axis, which can itself be moved along a second set of rails along the y-axis. The positioning accuracy along each axis has been estimated to be 3um and 0.2mm along each direction, respectively, thus indicating that high resolution positioning for accurate 3D imaging is readily attained. The integrated radar and positioning system is currently capable of collecting up to 100 traces per second over a 25ns time window with 4 stacks, or an equivalent lateral velocity of approximately 50cm/s with traces collected every 0.5cm along the profile. This high speed data collection means that a full 3D section of data (>75,000 traces) over a 0.75m x 1.5m area can be collected in under 20 minutes at sub-centimeter resolution, implying that near real-time imaging of infiltration over reasonably large areas can be achieved. In our case, the radar system has been implemented for a lab environment where it is able to perform imaging experiments over a 4m x 4m x 2m (LxWxH) sand-filled tank. In this presentation we will provide examples of three dimensional data collected over the tank. Experiments imaging rocks

  9. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; ...

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  10. Quantification of chemical transport processes from soil to surface runoff

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although there is a conceptual understanding on processes governing chemical transport from soil to surface runoff, there are little literature and research results actually quantifying these individual processes. We developed a laboratory flow cell and experimental procedures to quantify chemical ...

  11. Documentation of a computer program to simulate lake-aquifer interaction using the MODFLOW ground water flow model and the MOC3D solute-transport model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, Michael L.; Konikow, Leonard F.

    2000-01-01

    Heads and flow patterns in surficial aquifers can be strongly influenced by the presence of stationary surface-water bodies (lakes) that are in direct contact, vertically and laterally, with the aquifer. Conversely, lake stages can be significantly affected by the volume of water that seeps through the lakebed that separates the lake from the aquifer. For these reasons, a set of computer subroutines called the Lake Package (LAK3) was developed to represent lake/aquifer interaction in numerical simulations using the U.S. Geological Survey three-dimensional, finite-difference, modular ground-water flow model MODFLOW and the U.S. Geological Survey three-dimensional method-of-characteristics solute-transport model MOC3D. In the Lake Package described in this report, a lake is represented as a volume of space within the model grid which consists of inactive cells extending downward from the upper surface of the grid. Active model grid cells bordering this space, representing the adjacent aquifer, exchange water with the lake at a rate determined by the relative heads and by conductances that are based on grid cell dimensions, hydraulic conductivities of the aquifer material, and user-specified leakance distributions that represent the resistance to flow through the material of the lakebed. Parts of the lake may become ?dry? as upper layers of the model are dewatered, with a concomitant reduction in lake surface area, and may subsequently rewet when aquifer heads rise. An empirical approximation has been encoded to simulate the rewetting of a lake that becomes completely dry. The variations of lake stages are determined by independent water budgets computed for each lake in the model grid. This lake budget process makes the package a simulator of the response of lake stage to hydraulic stresses applied to the aquifer. Implementation of a lake water budget requires input of parameters including those representing the rate of lake atmospheric recharge and evaporation

  12. Studies of Trace Gas Chemical Cycles Using Inverse Methods and Global Chemical Transport Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    2003-01-01

    We report progress in the first year, and summarize proposed work for the second year of the three-year dynamical-chemical modeling project devoted to: (a) development, testing, and refining of inverse methods for determining regional and global transient source and sink strengths for long lived gases important in ozone depletion and climate forcing, (b) utilization of inverse methods to determine these source/sink strengths using either MATCH (Model for Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry) which is based on analyzed observed wind fields or back-trajectories computed from these wind fields, (c) determination of global (and perhaps regional) average hydroxyl radical concentrations using inverse methods with multiple titrating gases, and (d) computation of the lifetimes and spatially resolved destruction rates of trace gases using 3D models. Important goals include determination of regional source strengths of methane, nitrous oxide, methyl bromide, and other climatically and chemically important biogenic/anthropogenic trace gases and also of halocarbons restricted by the Montreal protocol and its follow-on agreements and hydrohalocarbons now used as alternatives to the restricted halocarbons.

  13. A multi-scale Lattice Boltzmann model for simulating solute transport in 3D X-ray micro-tomography images of aggregated porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxian; Crawford, John W.; Flavel, Richard J.; Young, Iain M.

    2016-10-01

    The Lattice Boltzmann (LB) model and X-ray computed tomography (CT) have been increasingly used in combination over the past decade to simulate water flow and chemical transport at pore scale in porous materials. Because of its limitation in resolution and the hierarchical structure of most natural soils, the X-ray CT tomography can only identify pores that are greater than its resolution and treats other pores as solid. As a result, the so-called solid phase in X-ray images may in reality be a grey phase, containing substantial connected pores capable of conducing fluids and solute. Although modified LB models have been developed to simulate fluid flow in such media, models for solute transport are relatively limited. In this paper, we propose a LB model for simulating solute transport in binary soil images containing permeable solid phase. The model is based on the single-relaxation time approach and uses a modified partial bounce-back method to describe the resistance caused by the permeable solid phase to chemical transport. We derive the relationship between the diffusion coefficient and the parameter introduced in the partial bounce-back method, and test the model against analytical solution for movement of a pulse of tracer. We also validate it against classical finite volume method for solute diffusion in a simple 2D image, and then apply the model to a soil image acquired using X-ray tomography at resolution of 30 μm in attempts to analyse how the ability of the solid phase to diffuse solute at micron-scale affects the behaviour of the solute at macro-scale after a volumetric average. Based on the simulated results, we discuss briefly the danger in interpreting experimental results using the continuum model without fully understanding the pore-scale processes, as well as the potential of using pore-scale modelling and tomography to help improve the continuum models.

  14. Accurate electronic and chemical properties of 3d transition metal oxides using a calculated linear response U and a DFT + U(V) method.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhongnan; Joshi, Yogesh V; Raman, Sumathy; Kitchin, John R

    2015-04-14

    We validate the usage of the calculated, linear response Hubbard U for evaluating accurate electronic and chemical properties of bulk 3d transition metal oxides. We find calculated values of U lead to improved band gaps. For the evaluation of accurate reaction energies, we first identify and eliminate contributions to the reaction energies of bulk systems due only to changes in U and construct a thermodynamic cycle that references the total energies of unique U systems to a common point using a DFT + U(V) method, which we recast from a recently introduced DFT + U(R) method for molecular systems. We then introduce a semi-empirical method based on weighted DFT/DFT + U cohesive energies to calculate bulk oxidation energies of transition metal oxides using density functional theory and linear response calculated U values. We validate this method by calculating 14 reactions energies involving V, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co oxides. We find up to an 85% reduction of the mean average error (MAE) compared to energies calculated with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional. When our method is compared with DFT + U with empirically derived U values and the HSE06 hybrid functional, we find up to 65% and 39% reductions in the MAE, respectively.

  15. Accurate electronic and chemical properties of 3d transition metal oxides using a calculated linear response U and a DFT + U(V) method

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhongnan; Kitchin, John R.; Joshi, Yogesh V.; Raman, Sumathy

    2015-04-14

    We validate the usage of the calculated, linear response Hubbard U for evaluating accurate electronic and chemical properties of bulk 3d transition metal oxides. We find calculated values of U lead to improved band gaps. For the evaluation of accurate reaction energies, we first identify and eliminate contributions to the reaction energies of bulk systems due only to changes in U and construct a thermodynamic cycle that references the total energies of unique U systems to a common point using a DFT + U(V ) method, which we recast from a recently introduced DFT + U(R) method for molecular systems. We then introduce a semi-empirical method based on weighted DFT/DFT + U cohesive energies to calculate bulk oxidation energies of transition metal oxides using density functional theory and linear response calculated U values. We validate this method by calculating 14 reactions energies involving V, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co oxides. We find up to an 85% reduction of the mean average error (MAE) compared to energies calculated with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional. When our method is compared with DFT + U with empirically derived U values and the HSE06 hybrid functional, we find up to 65% and 39% reductions in the MAE, respectively.

  16. Implementation of agronomical and geochemical modules into a 3D groundwater code for assessing nitrate storage and transport through unconfined Chalk aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picot-Colbeaux, Géraldine; Devau, Nicolas; Thiéry, Dominique; Pettenati, Marie; Surdyk, Nicolas; Parmentier, Marc; Amraoui, Nadia; Crastes de Paulet, François; André, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    Chalk aquifer is the main water resource for domestic water supply in many parts in northern France. In same basin, groundwater is frequently affected by quality problems concerning nitrates. Often close to or above the drinking water standards, nitrate concentration in groundwater is mainly due to historical agriculture practices, combined with leakage and aquifer recharge through the vadose zone. The complexity of processes occurring into such an environment leads to take into account a lot of knowledge on agronomy, geochemistry and hydrogeology in order to understand, model and predict the spatiotemporal evolution of nitrate content and provide a decision support tool for the water producers and stakeholders. To succeed in this challenge, conceptual and numerical models representing accurately the Chalk aquifer specificity need to be developed. A multidisciplinary approach is developed to simulate storage and transport from the ground surface until groundwater. This involves a new agronomic module "NITRATE" (NItrogen TRansfer for Arable soil to groundwaTEr), a soil-crop model allowing to calculate nitrogen mass balance in arable soil, and the "PHREEQC" numerical code for geochemical calculations, both coupled with the 3D transient groundwater numerical code "MARTHE". Otherwise, new development achieved on MARTHE code allows the use of dual porosity and permeability calculations needed in the fissured Chalk aquifer context. This method concerning the integration of existing multi-disciplinary tools is a real challenge to reduce the number of parameters by selecting the relevant equations and simplifying the equations without altering the signal. The robustness and the validity of these numerical developments are tested step by step with several simulations constrained by climate forcing, land use and nitrogen inputs over several decades. In the first time, simulations are performed in a 1D vertical unsaturated soil column for representing experimental nitrates

  17. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  18. Making Intercontinental Burning Influences Quantitative: Lessons on Transport and Geochemistry From the 3-D Simulation of CO in PEM-T A and TRACE-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, Robert; Houben, Howard; Sachse, Glenn; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    We report on two aspects of the simulation of global transport of plumes originating from subtropical biomass fires. We use of meteorological assimilation (MM5) at 2-degree resolution with a Grail cloud parameterization and a Blackadar-based planetary boundary layer parameterization. Ames's GRACES model provides emissions, transport, and an appropriate level of simulated chemical transformation. We have worked with passive-tracer CO or linear chemistry. This is appropriate since we find major work to be done in evaluating CO source strengths and transport mechanisms before chemical integrations could be meaningful. First, we present mechanisms by which CO and other pollutants are introduced into the free troposphere, and are then transported with hate dilution from approx. 0 to approx. 180 degrees longitude. One principal conduit for these plumes is the vernal subtropical jet; however the plumes appear at various altitudes and latitudes as they influenced by frontal motions and (most likely) radiative processes. A common, repeated pattern of transport has pollutant plumes arriving in the distant Pacific Ocean from Africa and South America at 25 degrees south and 14 km altitude. Following this, there is then a general appearance of pollution at extending down to 5 kin at more equatorial (10 S) and polar latitudes (to 45 S). Second, we evaluate the quantitative success of our simulation. (Such success requires efforts considerably beyond trajectory analyses, and is necessary for our community to claim an understanding of the effects of biomass burning on global atmospheric chemistry and the planet's trend in oxidizing capacity.) We find that we simulate most pollution episodes sampled by Glenn Sachse's CO instrument and the Blake hydrocarbon analyses during PENT A. We will present our current ideas on why our general levels appear satisfactory when the observations are within 20 ppb of background levels, but substantially miss the variability associated with the most

  19. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D QSAR) and pharmacophore elucidation of tetrahydropyran derivatives as serotonin and norepinephrine transporter inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharkar, Prashant S.; Reith, Maarten E. A.; Dutta, Aloke K.

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D QSAR) using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) was performed on a series of substituted tetrahydropyran (THP) derivatives possessing serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporter inhibitory activities. The study aimed to rationalize the potency of these inhibitors for SERT and NET as well as the observed selectivity differences for NET over SERT. The dataset consisted of 29 molecules, of which 23 molecules were used as the training set for deriving CoMFA models for SERT and NET uptake inhibitory activities. Superimpositions were performed using atom-based fitting and 3-point pharmacophore-based alignment. Two charge calculation methods, Gasteiger-Hückel and semiempirical PM3, were tried. Both alignment methods were analyzed in terms of their predictive abilities and produced comparable results with high internal and external predictivities. The models obtained using the 3-point pharmacophore-based alignment outperformed the models with atom-based fitting in terms of relevant statistics and interpretability of the generated contour maps. Steric fields dominated electrostatic fields in terms of contribution. The selectivity analysis (NET over SERT), though yielded models with good internal predictivity, showed very poor external test set predictions. The analysis was repeated with 24 molecules after systematically excluding so-called outliers (5 out of 29) from the model derivation process. The resulting CoMFA model using the atom-based fitting exhibited good statistics and was able to explain most of the selectivity (NET over SERT)-discriminating factors. The presence of -OH substituent on the THP ring was found to be one of the most important factors governing the NET selectivity over SERT. Thus, a 4-point NET-selective pharmacophore, after introducing this newly found H-bond donor/acceptor feature in addition to the initial 3-point pharmacophore, was proposed.

  20. Three-dimensional mapping of soil chemical characteristics at micrometric scale: Statistical prediction by combining 2D SEM-EDX data and 3D X-ray computed micro-tomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapca, Simona

    2015-04-01

    Many soil properties and functions emerge from interactions of physical, chemical and biological processes at microscopic scales, which can be understood only by integrating techniques that traditionally are developed within separate disciplines. While recent advances in imaging techniques, such as X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT), offer the possibility to reconstruct the 3D physical structure at fine resolutions, for the distribution of chemicals in soil, existing methods, based on scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray detection (EDX), allow for characterization of the chemical composition only on 2D surfaces. At present, direct 3D measurement techniques are still lacking, sequential sectioning of soils, followed by 2D mapping of chemical elements and interpolation to 3D, being an alternative which is explored in this study. Specifically, we develop an integrated experimental and theoretical framework which combines 3D X-ray CT imaging technique with 2D SEM-EDX and use spatial statistics methods to map the chemical composition of soil in 3D. The procedure involves three stages 1) scanning a resin impregnated soil cube by X-ray CT, followed by precision cutting to produce parallel thin slices, the surfaces of which are scanned by SEM-EDX, 2) alignment of the 2D chemical maps within the internal 3D structure of the soil cube, and 3) development, of spatial statistics methods to predict the chemical composition of 3D soil based on the observed 2D chemical and 3D physical data. Specifically, three statistical models consisting of a regression tree, a regression tree kriging and cokriging model were used to predict the 3D spatial distribution of carbon, silicon, iron and oxygen in soil, these chemical elements showing a good spatial agreement between the X-ray grayscale intensities and the corresponding 2D SEM-EDX data. Due to the spatial correlation between the physical and chemical data, the regression-tree model showed a great potential

  1. Thermodynamic and transport properties of gaseous tetrafluoromethane in chemical equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. L.; Boney, L. R.

    1973-01-01

    Equations and in computer code are presented for the thermodynamic and transport properties of gaseous, undissociated tetrafluoromethane (CF4) in chemical equilibrium. The computer code calculates the thermodynamic and transport properties of CF4 when given any two of five thermodynamic variables (entropy, temperature, volume, pressure, and enthalpy). Equilibrium thermodynamic and transport property data are tabulated and pressure-enthalpy diagrams are presented.

  2. Tracing man's impact on groundwater dependent ecosystem using geochemical an isotope tools combined with 3D flow and transport modeling: case study from southern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Anna; Witczak, Stanislaw; Kania, Jaroslaw; Wachniew, Przemyslaw; Rozanski, Kazimierz; Dulinski, Marek; Jench, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Niepolomice Forest. There is a growing concern that continued exploitation of those wells may lead to lowering water table in the Niepolomice Forest area and, as a consequence, may trigger drastic changes in this unique ecosystem. A dedicated study was launched with the main aim to quantify the interaction between Niepolomice Forest, with the focus the Wielkie Bloto fen, and the underlying Bogucice Sands aquifer. The work was pursued along three major lines: (i) vertical profiling of the Wielkie Bloto fen aimed at characterizing chemical and isotope contrast in the shallow groundwater occupying the Quaternary cover in order to identify upward leakage of deeper groundwater in the investigated area, (ii) regular monitoring of flow rate, chemistry and environmental isotopes of the Dluga Woda stream draining the Wielkie Bloto fen, and (iii) 3D modeling of groundwater flow in the vicinity of the Wielkie Bloto fen focusing on quantifying the impact of the Wola Batorska well field on the regional groundwater flow patterns. The results of isotope and chemical analyses confirmed existence of upward seepage of groundwater from the Bogucice Sands aquifer in the area of Wielkie Bloto fen. Preliminary assessment of the water balance of Dluga Woda catchment indicates that the baseflow originating from groundwater seepage is equal approximately 16% of the annual precipitation. Results of 3D flow model applied to the study area indicate that prolonged operation of the well-field Wola Batorska at maximum capacity may lead to substantial lowering of water table in the Niepolomice Forest area and, as a consequence, endanger further existence of this unique GDTE. Acknowledgements. Partial financial support of this work through GENESIS project (http:/www.thegenesisproject.eu) funded by the European Commission 7FP contract 226536, and through statutory funds of the AGH University of Science and Technology (projects No.11.11.140.026 and 11.11.220.01) is kindly acknowledged.

  3. Characterization of Transport Errors in Chemical Forecasts from a Global Tropospheric Chemical Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bey, I.; Jacob, D. J.; Liu, H.; Yantosca, R. M.; Sachse, G. W.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a new methodology to characterize errors in the representation of transport processes in chemical transport models. We constrain the evaluation of a global three-dimensional chemical transport model (GEOS-CHEM) with an extended dataset of carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations obtained during the Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) aircraft campaign. The TRACEP mission took place over the western Pacific, a region frequently impacted by continental outflow associated with different synoptic-scale weather systems (such as cold fronts) and deep convection, and thus provides a valuable dataset. for our analysis. Model simulations using both forecast and assimilated meteorology are examined. Background CO concentrations are computed as a function of latitude and altitude and subsequently subtracted from both the observed and the model datasets to focus on the ability of the model to simulate variability on a synoptic scale. Different sampling strategies (i.e., spatial displacement and smoothing) are applied along the flight tracks to search for systematic model biases. Statistical quantities such as correlation coefficient and centered root-mean-square difference are computed between the simulated and the observed fields and are further inter-compared using Taylor diagrams. We find no systematic bias in the model for the TRACE-P region when we consider the entire dataset (i.e., from the surface to 12 km ). This result indicates that the transport error in our model is globally unbiased, which has important implications for using the model to conduct inverse modeling studies. Using the First-Look assimilated meteorology only provides little improvement of the correlation, in comparison with the forecast meteorology. These general statements can be refined when the entire dataset is divided into different vertical domains, i.e., the lower troposphere (less than 2 km), the middle troposphere (2-6 km), and the upper troposphere (greater than

  4. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  5. Drift Transport in Al2O3-Sheathed 3-D Transparent Conducting Oxide Photoanodes Observed in Liquid Electrolyte-Based Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fa-Qian; Zhu, Kai; Li, Tao; Xu, Tao

    2014-04-25

    It has long been taken for granted that electron transport in liquid-electrolyte-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) undergoes an ambipolar diffusive transport due to the strong coupling between electrons in the photoanode and the nearby mobile cations in liquid electrolyte, which, therefore, screens off any electric field in the photoanodes and consequently eliminates the possibility for drift transport. In this work, we demonstrate the existence of drift transport in liquid electrolyte-based DSSCs using a thin Al2O3-sheathed 3-dimentional (3-D) fluorinated tin oxide (FTO), as photoanodes. The electron diffusion rate in such 3-D TCO based DSSC exhibits a striking enhancement to the value of ~10–2 cm2/s, about 104 times faster than that of the TiO2 nanoparticle-based DSSCs. The electron diffusion coefficient is independent of the photoelectron density, while intensity modulated photocurrent spectroscopy (IMPS) suggests that the time constants of electron transport exhibit a linear dependence on the bias voltage, a strong indication of drift transport behavior in this 3-D FTO hollow nanobeads-based DSSC, despite the use of liquid I/I3 electrolyte.

  6. 78 FR 23773 - Chemical Transportation Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ..., VA, to discuss marine transportation of hazardous materials. The meetings will be open to the public... matters relating to marine transportation of hazardous materials. The Committee advises, consults with... of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) Annex II b. Requirements for Third-Party Surveyors of MARPOL...

  7. RT3D tutorials for GMS users

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, T.P.; Jones, N.L.

    1998-02-01

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a computer code that solves coupled partial differential equations that describe reactive-flow and transport of multiple mobile and/or immobile species in a three dimensional saturated porous media. RT3D was developed from the single-species transport code, MT3D (DoD-1.5, 1997 version). As with MT3D, RT3D also uses the USGS groundwater flow model MODFLOW for computing spatial and temporal variations in groundwater head distribution. This report presents a set of tutorial problems that are designed to illustrate how RT3D simulations can be performed within the Department of Defense Groundwater Modeling System (GMS). GMS serves as a pre- and post-processing interface for RT3D. GMS can be used to define all the input files needed by RT3D code, and later the code can be launched from within GMS and run as a separate application. Once the RT3D simulation is completed, the solution can be imported to GMS for graphical post-processing. RT3D v1.0 supports several reaction packages that can be used for simulating different types of reactive contaminants. Each of the tutorials, described below, provides training on a different RT3D reaction package. Each reaction package has different input requirements, and the tutorials are designed to describe these differences. Furthermore, the tutorials illustrate the various options available in GMS for graphical post-processing of RT3D results. Users are strongly encouraged to complete the tutorials before attempting to use RT3D and GMS on a routine basis.

  8. AE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, Donald A

    2016-06-20

    AE3D solves for the shear Alfven eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies in a torodal magnetic fusion confinement device. The configuration can be either 2D (e.g. tokamak, reversed field pinch) or 3D (e.g. stellarator, helical reversed field pinch, tokamak with ripple). The equations solved are based on a reduced MHD model and sound wave coupling effects are not currently included.

  9. A Parameter-Free Dynamic Alternative to Hyper-Viscosity for Coupled Transport Equations: Application to the Simulation of 3D Squall Lines Using Spectral Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-04

    that involve physics coupling with phase change in the simulation of 3D deep convection . We show that the VMS+DC approach is a robust technique that can...of 3D deep convection . We show that the VMS+DC approach is a robust technique that can damp the high order modes characterizing the spectral element...of Spectral Elements, Deep Convection , Kessler Microphysics Preprint J. Comput. Phys. 283 (2015) 360-373 June 4, 2015 1. Introduction In the field of

  10. Estimation of the maximum allowable loading amount of COD in Luoyuan Bay by a 3-D COD transport and transformation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jialin; Li, Keqiang; Shi, Xiaoyong; Liang, Shengkang; Han, Xiurong; Ma, Qimin; Wang, Xiulin

    2014-08-01

    The rapid economic and social developments in the Luoyuan and Lianjiang counties of Fujian Province, China, raise certain environment and ecosystem issues. The unusual phytoplankton bloom and eutrophication, for example, have increased in severity in Luoyuan Bay (LB). The constant increase of nutrient loads has largely caused the environmental degradation in LB. Several countermeasures have been implemented to solve these environmental problems. The most effective of these strategies is the reduction of pollutant loadings into the sea in accordance with total pollutant load control (TPLC) plans. A combined three-dimensional hydrodynamic transport-transformation model was constructed to estimate the marine environmental capacity of chemical oxygen demand (COD). The allowed maximum loadings for each discharge unit in LB were calculated with applicable simulation results. The simulation results indicated that the environmental capacity of COD is approximately 11×104 t year-1 when the water quality complies with the marine functional zoning standards for LB. A pollutant reduction scheme to diminish the present levels of mariculture- and domestic-based COD loadings is based on the estimated marine COD environmental capacity. The obtained values imply that the LB waters could comply with the targeted water quality criteria. To meet the revised marine functional zoning standards, discharge loadings from discharge units 1 and 11 should be reduced to 996 and 3236 t year-1, respectively.

  11. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

    2009-01-20

    Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

  12. 18. VIEW OF THE CEILING, THE PIPING TRANSPORTED CHEMICALS FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. VIEW OF THE CEILING, THE PIPING TRANSPORTED CHEMICALS FROM A CHEMICAL PREPARATION ROOM ON THE SECOND FLOOR TO THE FIRST FLOOR PROCESS AREAS. (6/12/73) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery & Fabrication Facility, North-central section of plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  13. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  14. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; ...

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  15. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  16. CET89 - CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM WITH TRANSPORT PROPERTIES, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, B.

    1994-01-01

    Scientists and engineers need chemical equilibrium composition data to calculate the theoretical thermodynamic properties of a chemical system. This information is essential in the design and analysis of equipment such as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical processing equipment. The substantial amount of numerical computation required to obtain equilibrium compositions and transport properties for complex chemical systems led scientists at NASA's Lewis Research Center to develop CET89, a program designed to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of these systems. CET89 is a general program which will calculate chemical equilibrium compositions and mixture properties for any chemical system with available thermodynamic data. Generally, mixtures may include condensed and gaseous products. CET89 performs the following operations: it 1) obtains chemical equilibrium compositions for assigned thermodynamic states, 2) calculates dilute-gas transport properties of complex chemical mixtures, 3) obtains Chapman-Jouguet detonation properties for gaseous species, 4) calculates incident and reflected shock properties in terms of assigned velocities, and 5) calculates theoretical rocket performance for both equilibrium and frozen compositions during expansion. The rocket performance function allows the option of assuming either a finite area or an infinite area combustor. CET89 accommodates problems involving up to 24 reactants, 20 elements, and 600 products (400 of which may be condensed). The program includes a library of thermodynamic and transport properties in the form of least squares coefficients for possible reaction products. It includes thermodynamic data for over 1300 gaseous and condensed species and transport data for 151 gases. The subroutines UTHERM and UTRAN convert thermodynamic and transport data to unformatted form for faster processing. The program conforms to the FORTRAN 77 standard, except for

  17. Deep etching of single- and polycrystalline silicon with high speed, high aspect ratio, high uniformity, and 3D complexity by electric bias-attenuated metal-assisted chemical etching (EMaCE).

    PubMed

    Li, Liyi; Zhao, Xueying; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2014-10-08

    In this work, a novel wet silicon (Si) etching method, electric bias-attenuated metal-assisted chemical etching (EMaCE), is demonstrated to be readily available for three-dimensional (3D) electronic integration, microelectromechinal systems, and a broad range of 3D electronic components with low cost. On the basis of the traditional metal-assisted chemical etching process, an electric bias was applied to the Si substrate in EMaCE. The 3D geometry of the etching profile was effectively controlled by the bias in a real-time manner. The reported method successfully fabricated an array of over 10 000 vertical holes with diameters of 28 μm on 1 cm(2) silicon chips at a rate of up to 11 μm/min. The sidewall roughness was kept below 50 nm, and a high aspect ratio of over 10:1 was achieved. The 3D geometry could be attenuated by the variable applied bias in real time. Vertical deep etching was realized on (100)-, (111)-Si, and polycrystalline Si substrates. Complex features with lateral dimensions of 0.8-500 μm were also fabricated with submicron accuracy.

  18. Venus in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, Jeffrey J.

    1993-01-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  19. 3D photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Jeffrey J. L.; Roumeliotis, Michael; Chaudhary, Govind; Stodilka, Robert Z.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-06-01

    Our group has concentrated on development of a 3D photoacoustic imaging system for biomedical imaging research. The technology employs a sparse parallel detection scheme and specialized reconstruction software to obtain 3D optical images using a single laser pulse. With the technology we have been able to capture 3D movies of translating point targets and rotating line targets. The current limitation of our 3D photoacoustic imaging approach is its inability ability to reconstruct complex objects in the field of view. This is primarily due to the relatively small number of projections used to reconstruct objects. However, in many photoacoustic imaging situations, only a few objects may be present in the field of view and these objects may have very high contrast compared to background. That is, the objects have sparse properties. Therefore, our work had two objectives: (i) to utilize mathematical tools to evaluate 3D photoacoustic imaging performance, and (ii) to test image reconstruction algorithms that prefer sparseness in the reconstructed images. Our approach was to utilize singular value decomposition techniques to study the imaging operator of the system and evaluate the complexity of objects that could potentially be reconstructed. We also compared the performance of two image reconstruction algorithms (algebraic reconstruction and l1-norm techniques) at reconstructing objects of increasing sparseness. We observed that for a 15-element detection scheme, the number of measureable singular vectors representative of the imaging operator was consistent with the demonstrated ability to reconstruct point and line targets in the field of view. We also observed that the l1-norm reconstruction technique, which is known to prefer sparseness in reconstructed images, was superior to the algebraic reconstruction technique. Based on these findings, we concluded (i) that singular value decomposition of the imaging operator provides valuable insight into the capabilities of

  20. New Multi-group Transport Neutronics (PHISICS) Capabilities for RELAP5-3D and its Application to Phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard Strydom; Cristian Rabiti; Andrea Alfonsi

    2012-10-01

    PHISICS is a neutronics code system currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Its goal is to provide state of the art simulation capability to reactor designers. The different modules for PHISICS currently under development are a nodal and semi-structured transport core solver (INSTANT), a depletion module (MRTAU) and a cross section interpolation (MIXER) module. The INSTANT module is the most developed of the mentioned above. Basic functionalities are ready to use, but the code is still in continuous development to extend its capabilities. This paper reports on the effort of coupling the nodal kinetics code package PHISICS (INSTANT/MRTAU/MIXER) to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D, to enable full core and system modeling. This will enable the possibility to model coupled (thermal-hydraulics and neutronics) problems with more options for 3D neutron kinetics, compared to the existing diffusion theory neutron kinetics module in RELAP5-3D (NESTLE). In the second part of the paper, an overview of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW benchmark is given. This benchmark has been approved by the OECD, and is based on the General Atomics 350 MW Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR) design. The benchmark includes coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics exercises that require more capabilities than RELAP5-3D with NESTLE offers. Therefore, the MHTGR benchmark makes extensive use of the new PHISICS/RELAP5-3D coupling capabilities. The paper presents the preliminary results of the three steady state exercises specified in Phase I of the benchmark using PHISICS/RELAP5-3D.

  1. Chemical method to enhance transungual transport and iontophoresis efficiency.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jinsong; Smith, Kelly A; Li, S Kevin

    2008-06-05

    Transungual transport is hindered by the inherent small effective pore size of the nail even when it is fully hydrated. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of chemical enhancers thioglycolic acid (TGA), glycolic acid (GA), and urea (UR) on transungual transport and iontophoresis efficiency. In vitro passive and iontophoretic transport experiments of model permeants mannitol (MA), UR, and tetraethylammonium (TEA) ion across the fully hydrated, enhancer-treated and untreated human nail plates were performed in phosphate-buffered saline. The transport experiments consisted of several stages, alternating between passive and anodal iontophoretic transport at 0.1mA. Nail water uptake experiments were conducted to determine the water content of the enhancer-treated nails. The effects of the enhancers on transungual electroosmosis were also evaluated. Nails treated with GA and UR did not show any transport enhancement. Treatment with TGA at 0.5M enhanced passive and iontophoretic transungual transport of MA, UR, and TEA. Increasing the TGA concentration to 1.8M did not further increase TEA iontophoresis efficiency. The effect of TGA on the nail plates was irreversible. The present study shows the possibility of using a chemical enhancer to reduce transport hindrance in the nail plate and thus enhance passive and iontophoretic transungual transport.

  2. Interpretation of Trace Gas Data Using Inverse Methods and Global Chemical Transport Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    1997-01-01

    This is a theoretical research project aimed at: (1) development, testing, and refining of inverse methods for determining regional and global transient source and sink strengths for long lived gases important in ozone depletion and climate forcing, (2) utilization of inverse methods to determine these source/sink strengths which use the NCAR/Boulder CCM2-T42 3-D model and a global 3-D Model for Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry (MATCH) which is based on analyzed observed wind fields (developed in collaboration by MIT and NCAR/Boulder), (3) determination of global (and perhaps regional) average hydroxyl radical concentrations using inverse methods with multiple titrating gases, and, (4) computation of the lifetimes and spatially resolved destruction rates of trace gases using 3-D models. Important goals include determination of regional source strengths of methane, nitrous oxide, and other climatically and chemically important biogenic trace gases and also of halocarbons restricted by the Montreal Protocol and its follow-on agreements and hydrohalocarbons used as alternatives to the restricted halocarbons.

  3. Measurement of gas transport through fiber preforms and densified composites for chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Hablutzel, N.

    1998-05-01

    Gas transport via pressure-driven permeation or via concentration-driven diffusion is a key step in the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process. This paper describes methods for the measurement of these properties for CVI preforms and partially infiltrated composites. Results are presented for Nicalon-fiber cloth layup preforms and composites, Nextel-fiber braid preforms and composites, and a Nicalon-fiber three-dimensional (3-D) weave composite. The permeability of Nicalon cloth layup preforms is strongly dependent on the packing density over the range of 29--40 vol% but is only weakly dependent on the orientation of the alternating cloth layers. The permeability of Nextel braid preforms is dependent on the thread count and the weight for cloths with similar construction and packing density. The gas permeability of the finer wave (6.3 tows/cm (16 tows/in.)) is approximately one-half that of the coarser weave (3.5 tows/cm (9 tows/in.)). Results are reported for a small number of infiltrated composites with Nextel fiber reinforcement. Attempts to mount a Nicalon-fiber 3-D weave preform specimen have been unsuccessful. Results for a small number of composite specimens with 3-D weave reinforcement are reported.

  4. 3D Nanostructuring of Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blick, Robert

    2000-03-01

    Modern semiconductor technology allows to machine devices on the nanometer scale. I will discuss the current limits of the fabrication processes, which enable the definition of single electron transistors with dimensions down to 8 nm. In addition to the conventional 2D patterning and structuring of semiconductors, I will demonstrate how to apply 3D nanostructuring techniques to build freely suspended single-crystal beams with lateral dimension down to 20 nm. In transport measurements in the temperature range from 30 mK up to 100 K these nano-crystals are characterized regarding their electronic as well as their mechanical properties. Moreover, I will present possible applications of these devices.

  5. Mathematical modelling of physical and chemical processes of coal combustion in chamber furnaces of boiler aggregates based on the package of applied programs FIRE 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, A. V.; Starchenko, A. V.

    2012-09-01

    The furnace processes of the combustion of poly-fraction high-ashes Ekibastuz coal in the furnace chamber of the boiler aggregate PK-39 and of the combustion of highly humid brown Berezov's coal in the furnace of the BKZ-210-140 boiler are investigated by mathematical modeling using the package of applied programs FIRE 3D [1-3]. Results of the numerical modeling of the processes of aerodynamics, heat exchange, and combustion in the furnace volume and their comparison with the results of nature tests are presented.

  6. Dynamical microstructure formation in 3D directional solidification of transparent model alloys: in situ characterization in DECLIC Directional Solidification Insert under diffusion transport in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeon, N.; Mota, F. L.; Chen, L.; Tourret, D.; Debierre, J. M.; Guérin, R.; Karma, A.; Billia, B.; Trivedi, R.

    2015-06-01

    To clarify and characterize the fundamental physical mechanisms active in the dynamical formation of three-dimensional (3D) arrays of cells and dendrites under diffusive growth conditions, in situ monitoring of series of experiments on transparent model alloy succinonitrile - 0.24 wt% camphor was carried out under low gravity in the DECLIC Directional Solidification Insert on-board the International Space Station. These experiments offered the very unique opportunity to in situ observe and characterize the whole development of the microstructure in extended 3D patterns. The experimental methods will be first briefly described, including in particular the observation modes and the image analysis procedures developed to quantitatively characterize the patterns. Microgravity environment provided the conditions to get quantitative benchmark data: homogeneous patterns corresponding to homogeneous values of control parameters along the whole interface were obtained. The sequence of microstructure formation will be presented as well as the evolution of the primary spacing which is one of the most important pattern characteristic. Time evolution of this primary spacing during the microstructure development will be analysed to identify the mechanisms of spacing selection and adjustment; the importance of the macroscopic interfacial curvature will be pointed out.

  7. Transition from non-Fickian to Fickian longitudinal transport through 3-D rough fractures: Scale-(in)sensitivity and roughness dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lichun; Bayani Cardenas, M.

    2017-03-01

    Understanding transport in rough fractures from non-Fickian to Fickian regimes and the prediction of non-Fickian transport is critical for the development of new transport theories and many practical applications. Through computational experiments that fall within the macrodispersion regime, we first simulated and analyzed solute transport through synthetic rough fractures with stationary geometrical properties (i.e., fracture roughness σb/ and correlation length λ, where b refers to aperture with its standard deviation σb and arithmetic mean ) across increasing fracture longitudinal transport domain length L, with L/λ ranging from 2.5 to 50. The results were used to determine how solute transport behavior evolves with increasing scale in the longitudinal direction. Moreover, a set of correlated fractures with aperture fields following normal and log-normal distributions was created to further identify and quantify the dependence of non-Fickian transport on roughness. We found that although persistent intermittent velocity structures were present, the breakthrough curves (BTCs) and residence time distributions showed diminishing early arrival and tailing, features of non-Fickian transport, with increasing longitudinal L/λ, ultimately converging to a Fickian transport regime given σb/ remained constant. Inverse analysis of the experimental BTCs with the advection-dispersion equation (ADE) model showed that the dispersion coefficient (D) was non-trivially scale-dependent. Simulation results for rough fractures with varying σb/ and L/λ indicated that the ratio of fluid velocity to transport velocity fitted to the ADE model depends on σb/ and L/λ. The continuous time random walk (CTRW) performed much better across all transport scales, and resulted in scale-independent fitted parameters, i.e., β in the memory function. The fitted β is proportional to σb/but is insensitive to L/λ. Therefore, bulk longitudinal solute transport across the pre-asymptotic and

  8. 3-D transient analysis of pebble-bed HTGR by TORT-TD/ATTICA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Seubert, A.; Sureda, A.; Lapins, J.; Buck, M.; Bader, J.; Laurien, E.

    2012-07-01

    As most of the acceptance criteria are local core parameters, application of transient 3-D fine mesh neutron transport and thermal hydraulics coupled codes is mandatory for best estimate evaluations of safety margins. This also applies to high-temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR). Application of 3-D fine-mesh transient transport codes using few energy groups coupled with 3-D thermal hydraulics codes becomes feasible in view of increasing computing power. This paper describes the discrete ordinates based coupled code system TORT-TD/ATTICA3D that has recently been extended by a fine-mesh diffusion solver. Based on transient analyses for the PBMR-400 design, the transport/diffusion capabilities are demonstrated and 3-D local flux and power redistribution effects during a partial control rod withdrawal are shown. (authors)

  9. 3D Tomography of Accretionary Lapilli From The Island of Stromboli (Aeolian Archipelago, Italy): Spatial Arrangement, Internal Structure, Grain Size Distribution and Chemical Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgavi, D.; Ielpo, M.; Valentini, L.; Laeger, K.; Paredes, J.; Petrelli, M.; Costa, A.; Perugini, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Secche di Lazzaro formation (7 Ka) is a phreatomagmatic deposit in the south-western part of the island of Stromboli (Aeolian Archipelago, Italy). The volcanic sequence is constituted by three main sub-units. In two of them abundant accretionary lapilli are present. We performed granulometric analysis to describe the spatial arrangement and the grain-size distribution of the lapilli inside the deposit. Lapilli were characterized by SEM investigations (BSE images). EMPA and LA-ICP-MS analyses of major and trace elements on glasses and minerals were performed. Although BSE images provide accurate morphological information, they do not allow the real 3D microstructure to be accessed. Therefore, non-invasive 3D imaging of the lapilli was performed by X-ray micro-tomography (X-mCT). The results of the X-mCT measurements provided a set of 2D cross-sectional slices stacked along the vertical axis, with a voxel size varying between 2.7 and 4.1 mm, depending on the size of the sample. The X-mCT images represent a mapping of X-ray attenuation, which in turn depends on the density of the phases distributed within the sample. This technique helped us to better constrain the particle and crystal distribution inside the accretionary lapilli. The recognized phases are: glass, clinopyroxene, plagioclase and Ti-Fe minerals. We discover also a high concentration of Na, Cl and SO3 in the ash matrix. This evidence is ubiquitous in all the accretionary lapilli. The work presented here could define a new route for future studies in the field of physical volcanology as X-ray micro-tomography could be a useful, non destructive technique to better characterize the internal structure of accretionary lapilli helping us to describe grain-size distribution of component particles and their spatial distribution within aggregates.

  10. Twin Peaks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The two hills in the distance, approximately one to two kilometers away, have been dubbed the 'Twin Peaks' and are of great interest to Pathfinder scientists as objects of future study. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The white areas on the left hill, called the 'Ski Run' by scientists, may have been formed by hydrologic processes.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  11. 3D and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Y. C.

    1995-05-01

    This conference on physiology and function covers a wide range of subjects, including the vasculature and blood flow, the flow of gas, water, and blood in the lung, the neurological structure and function, the modeling, and the motion and mechanics of organs. Many technologies are discussed. I believe that the list would include a robotic photographer, to hold the optical equipment in a precisely controlled way to obtain the images for the user. Why are 3D images needed? They are to achieve certain objectives through measurements of some objects. For example, in order to improve performance in sports or beauty of a person, we measure the form, dimensions, appearance, and movements.

  12. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  13. EFFECT OF NON-TARGET ORGANICS ON ORGANIC CHEMICAL TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To improve our standard of living, man has synthesized organic compounds for use in products considered essential for life. These compounds are having and will continue to have a significant impact on the terrestrial environment. Understanding organic chemical transport through s...

  14. How We 3D-Print Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    2015-04-23

    A new type of graphene aerogel will make for better energy storage, sensors, nanoelectronics, catalysis and separations. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have made graphene aerogel microlattices with an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The research appears in the April 22 edition of the journal, Nature Communications. The 3D printed graphene aerogels have high surface area, excellent electrical conductivity, are lightweight, have mechanical stiffness and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90 percent compressive strain). In addition, the 3D printed graphene aerogel microlattices show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials and much better mass transport.

  15. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  16. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    An area of rocky terrain near the landing site of the Sagan Memorial Station can be seen in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  17. Methods for modeling non-equilibrium degenerate statistics and quantum-confined scattering in 3D ensemble Monte Carlo transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Dax M.; Valsaraj, Amithraj; David, John K.; Register, Leonard F.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2016-12-01

    Particle-based ensemble semi-classical Monte Carlo (MC) methods employ quantum corrections (QCs) to address quantum confinement and degenerate carrier populations to model tomorrow's ultra-scaled metal-oxide-semiconductor-field-effect-transistors. Here, we present the most complete treatment of quantum confinement and carrier degeneracy effects in a three-dimensional (3D) MC device simulator to date, and illustrate their significance through simulation of n-channel Si and III-V FinFETs. Original contributions include our treatment of far-from-equilibrium degenerate statistics and QC-based modeling of surface-roughness scattering, as well as considering quantum-confined phonon and ionized-impurity scattering in 3D. Typical MC simulations approximate degenerate carrier populations as Fermi distributions to model the Pauli-blocking (PB) of scattering to occupied final states. To allow for increasingly far-from-equilibrium non-Fermi carrier distributions in ultra-scaled and III-V devices, we instead generate the final-state occupation probabilities used for PB by sampling the local carrier populations as function of energy and energy valley. This process is aided by the use of fractional carriers or sub-carriers, which minimizes classical carrier-carrier scattering intrinsically incompatible with degenerate statistics. Quantum-confinement effects are addressed through quantum-correction potentials (QCPs) generated from coupled Schrödinger-Poisson solvers, as commonly done. However, we use these valley- and orientation-dependent QCPs not just to redistribute carriers in real space, or even among energy valleys, but also to calculate confinement-dependent phonon, ionized-impurity, and surface-roughness scattering rates. FinFET simulations are used to illustrate the contributions of each of these QCs. Collectively, these quantum effects can substantially reduce and even eliminate otherwise expected benefits of considered In0.53Ga0.47 As FinFETs over otherwise identical

  18. Representing the effects of stratosphere–troposphere exchange on 3-D O3 distributions in chemistry transport models using a potential vorticity-based parameterization

    EPA Science Inventory

    Downward transport of ozone (O3) from the stratosphere can be a significant contributor to tropospheric O3 background levels. However, this process often is not well represented in current regional models. In this study, we develop a seasonally and spatially varying potential vor...

  19. Transport and transportation pathways of hazardous chemicals from solid waste disposal.

    PubMed

    Van Hook, R I

    1978-12-01

    To evaluate the impact of hazardous chemicals in solid wastes on man and other organisms, it is necessary to have information about amounts of chemical present, extent of exposure, and chemical toxicity. This paper addresses the question of organism exposure by considering the major physical and biological transport pathways and the physicochemical and biochemical transformations that may occur in sediments, soils, and water. Disposal of solid wastes in both terrestrial and oceanic environments is considered. Atmospheric transport is considered for emissions from incineration of solid wastes and for wind resuspension of particulates from surface waste deposits. Solid wastes deposited in terrestrial environments are subject to leaching by surface and ground waters. Leachates may then be transported to other surface waters and drinking water aquifers through hydrologic transport. Leachates also interact with natural organic matter, clays, and microorganisms in soils and sediments. These interactions may render chemical constituents in leachates more or less mobile, possibly change chemical and physical forms, and alter their biological activity. Oceanic waste disposal practices result in migration through diffusion and ocean currents. Surface area-to-volume ratios play a major role in the initial distributions of chemicals in the aquatic environment. Sediments serve as major sources and sinks of chemical contaminants. Food chain transport in both aquatic and terrestrial environments results in the movement of hazardous chemicals from lower to higher positions in the food web. Bioconcentration is observed in both terrestrial and aquatic food chains with certain elements and synthetic organics. Bioconcentration factors tend to be higher for synthetic organics, and higher in aquatic than in terrestrial systems. Biodilution is not atypical in terrestrial environments. Synergistic and antagonistic actions are common occurrences among chemical contaminants and can be

  20. Transport and transportation pathways of hazardous chemicals from solid waste disposal.

    PubMed Central

    Van Hook, R I

    1978-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of hazardous chemicals in solid wastes on man and other organisms, it is necessary to have information about amounts of chemical present, extent of exposure, and chemical toxicity. This paper addresses the question of organism exposure by considering the major physical and biological transport pathways and the physicochemical and biochemical transformations that may occur in sediments, soils, and water. Disposal of solid wastes in both terrestrial and oceanic environments is considered. Atmospheric transport is considered for emissions from incineration of solid wastes and for wind resuspension of particulates from surface waste deposits. Solid wastes deposited in terrestrial environments are subject to leaching by surface and ground waters. Leachates may then be transported to other surface waters and drinking water aquifers through hydrologic transport. Leachates also interact with natural organic matter, clays, and microorganisms in soils and sediments. These interactions may render chemical constituents in leachates more or less mobile, possibly change chemical and physical forms, and alter their biological activity. Oceanic waste disposal practices result in migration through diffusion and ocean currents. Surface area-to-volume ratios play a major role in the initial distributions of chemicals in the aquatic environment. Sediments serve as major sources and sinks of chemical contaminants. Food chain transport in both aquatic and terrestrial environments results in the movement of hazardous chemicals from lower to higher positions in the food web. Bioconcentration is observed in both terrestrial and aquatic food chains with certain elements and synthetic organics. Bioconcentration factors tend to be higher for synthetic organics, and higher in aquatic than in terrestrial systems. Biodilution is not atypical in terrestrial environments. Synergistic and antagonistic actions are common occurrences among chemical contaminants and can be

  1. 3D Bi2S3/TiO2 cross-linked heterostructure: An efficient strategy to improve charge transport and separation for high photoelectrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Minmin; Jia, Junhong

    2016-10-01

    A novel 3D cross-linked heterostructure of TiO2 nanorods connecting with each other via ultrathin Bi2S3 nanosheets is constructed by a facile and effective strategy. The growth mechanism has been investigated and proposed based on the evolution of microstructure by changing the reaction parameters. Benefiting from the unique cross-linked heterostructure, the as-prepared Bi2S3 nanosheets modified TiO2 nanorods arrays could achieve a high energy conversion efficiency of 3.29% which is the highest value to date for Bi2S3-only sensitized solar cells as the reported highest value is 2.23% and other reported values are less than 1%. Furthermore, the photoelectrochemical studies clearly reveal that the novel cross-linked heterostructure exhibits much better activity than 0D nanoparticles decorated TiO2 nanorods under visible light irradiation, which may be primarily ascribed to the efficient electron transfer from 2D ultrathin Bi2S3 nanosheets to 1D TiO2 nanorod arrays. The promising results in this work confirm the advantages of cross-linked heterostructure and also undoubtedly offer an attractive synthesis strategy to fabricate other nanorod-based hierarchical architecture as well as nano-devices for solar energy conversion.

  2. 3-D simulation of soot formation in a direct-injection diesel engine based on a comprehensive chemical mechanism and method of moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Bei-Jing; Dang, Shuai; Song, Ya-Na; Gong, Jing-Song

    2012-02-01

    Here, we propose both a comprehensive chemical mechanism and a reduced mechanism for a three-dimensional combustion simulation, describing the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), in a direct-injection diesel engine. A soot model based on the reduced mechanism and a method of moments is also presented. The turbulent diffusion flame and PAH formation in the diesel engine were modelled using the reduced mechanism based on the detailed mechanism using a fixed wall temperature as a boundary condition. The spatial distribution of PAH concentrations and the characteristic parameters for soot formation in the engine cylinder were obtained by coupling a detailed chemical kinetic model with the three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model. Comparison of the simulated results with limited experimental data shows that the chemical mechanisms and soot model are realistic and correctly describe the basic physics of diesel combustion but require further development to improve their accuracy.

  3. Low cost lab-on-a-chip prototyping with a consumer grade 3D printer.

    PubMed

    Comina, Germán; Suska, Anke; Filippini, Daniel

    2014-08-21

    Versatile prototyping of 3D printed lab-on-a-chip devices, supporting different forms of sample delivery, transport, functionalization and readout, is demonstrated with a consumer grade printer, which centralizes all critical fabrication tasks. Devices cost 0.57US$ and are demonstrated in chemical sensing and micromixing examples, which exploit established principles from reference technologies.

  4. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  5. Comparison of the 3-D Deterministic Neutron Transport Code Attila® To Measure Data, MCNP And MCNPX For The Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    D. Scott Lucas; D. S. Lucas

    2005-09-01

    An LDRD (Laboratory Directed Research and Development) project is underway at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to apply the three-dimensional multi-group deterministic neutron transport code (Attila®) to criticality, flux and depletion calculations of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This paper discusses the development of Attila models for ATR, capabilities of Attila, the generation and use of different cross-section libraries, and comparisons to ATR data, MCNP, MCNPX and future applications.

  6. Combined physical and chemical nonequilibrium transport model for solution conduits.

    PubMed

    Field, Malcolm S; Leij, Feike J

    2014-02-01

    Solute transport in karst aquifers is primarily constrained to relatively complex and inaccessible solution conduits where transport is often rapid, turbulent, and at times constrictive. Breakthrough curves generated from tracer tests in solution conduits are typically positively-skewed with long tails evident. Physical nonequilibrium models to fit breakthrough curves for tracer tests in solution conduits are now routinely employed. Chemical nonequilibrium processes are likely important interactions, however. In addition to partitioning between different flow domains, there may also be equilibrium and nonequilibrium partitioning between the aqueous and solid phases. A combined physical and chemical nonequilibrium (PCNE) model was developed for an instantaneous release similar to that developed by Leij and Bradford (2009) for a pulse release. The PCNE model allows for partitioning open space in solution conduits into mobile and immobile flow regions with first-order mass transfer between the two regions to represent physical nonequilibrium in the conduit. Partitioning between the aqueous and solid phases proceeds either as an equilibrium process or as a first-order process and represents chemical nonequilibrium for both the mobile and immobile regions. Application of the model to three example breakthrough curves demonstrates the applicability of the combined physical and chemical nonequilibrium model to tracer tests conducted in karst aquifers, with exceptionally good model fits to the data. The three models, each from a different state in the United States, exhibit very different velocities, dispersions, and other transport properties with most of the transport occurring via the fraction of mobile water. Fitting the model suggests the potentially important interaction of physical and chemical nonequilibrium processes.

  7. Forest Canopy Processes in a Regional Chemical Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makar, Paul; Staebler, Ralf; Akingunola, Ayodeji; Zhang, Junhua; McLinden, Chris; Kharol, Shailesh; Moran, Michael; Robichaud, Alain; Zhang, Leiming; Stroud, Craig; Pabla, Balbir; Cheung, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Forest canopies have typically been absent or highly parameterized in regional chemical transport models. Some forest-related processes are often considered - for example, biogenic emissions from the forests are included as a flux lower boundary condition on vertical diffusion, as is deposition to vegetation. However, real forest canopies comprise a much more complicated set of processes, at scales below the "transport model-resolved scale" of vertical levels usually employed in regional transport models. Advective and diffusive transport within the forest canopy typically scale with the height of the canopy, and the former process tends to dominate over the latter. Emissions of biogenic hydrocarbons arise from the foliage, which may be located tens of metres above the surface, while emissions of biogenic nitric oxide from decaying plant matter are located at the surface - in contrast to the surface flux boundary condition usually employed in chemical transport models. Deposition, similarly, is usually parameterized as a flux boundary condition, but may be differentiated between fluxes to vegetation and fluxes to the surface when the canopy scale is considered. The chemical environment also changes within forest canopies: shading, temperature, and relativity humidity changes with height within the canopy may influence chemical reaction rates. These processes have been observed in a host of measurement studies, and have been simulated using site-specific one-dimensional forest canopy models. Their influence on regional scale chemistry has been unknown, until now. In this work, we describe the results of the first attempt to include complex canopy processes within a regional chemical transport model (GEM-MACH). The original model core was subdivided into "canopy" and "non-canopy" subdomains. In the former, three additional near-surface layers based on spatially and seasonally varying satellite-derived canopy height and leaf area index were added to the original model

  8. Xenobiotic metabolism capacities of human skin in comparison with a 3D epidermis model and keratinocyte-based cell culture as in vitro alternatives for chemical testing: activating enzymes (Phase I).

    PubMed

    Götz, Christine; Pfeiffer, Roland; Tigges, Julia; Blatz, Veronika; Jäckh, Christine; Freytag, Eva-Maria; Fabian, Eric; Landsiedel, Robert; Merk, Hans F; Krutmann, Jean; Edwards, Robert J; Pease, Camilla; Goebel, Carsten; Hewitt, Nicola; Fritsche, Ellen

    2012-05-01

    Skin is important for the absorption and metabolism of exposed chemicals such as cosmetics or pharmaceuticals. The Seventh Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive prohibits the use of animals for cosmetic testing for certain endpoints, such as genotoxicity; therefore, there is an urgent need to understand the xenobiotic metabolizing capacities of human skin and to compare these activities with reconstructed 3D skin models developed to replace animal testing. We have measured Phase I enzyme activities of cytochrome P450 (CYP) and cyclooxygenase (COX) in ex vivo human skin, the 3D skin model EpiDerm™ (EPI-200), immortalized keratinocyte-based cell lines and primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes. Our data demonstrate that basal CYP enzyme activities are very low in whole human skin and EPI-200 as well as keratinocytes. In addition, activities in monolayer cells differed from organotypic tissues after induction. COX activity was similar in skin, EPI-200 and NHEK cells, but was significantly lower in immortalized keratinocytes. Hence, the 3D model EPI-200 might represent a more suitable model for dermatotoxicological studies. Altogether, these data help to better understand skin metabolism and expand the knowledge of in vitro alternatives used for dermatotoxicity testing.

  9. Representing the effects of stratosphere-troposphere exchange on 3-D O3 distributions in chemistry transport models using a potential vorticity-based parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Jia; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Hogrefe, Christian; Wang, Jiandong; Gan, Chuen-Meei; Sarwar, Golam; Wong, David C.; McKeen, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    Downward transport of ozone (O3) from the stratosphere can be a significant contributor to tropospheric O3 background levels. However, this process often is not well represented in current regional models. In this study, we develop a seasonally and spatially varying potential vorticity (PV)-based function to parameterize upper tropospheric and/or lower stratospheric (UTLS) O3 in a chemistry transport model. This dynamic O3-PV function is developed based on 21-year ozonesonde records from World Ozone and Ultraviolet Radiation Data Centre (WOUDC) with corresponding PV values from a 21-year Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) simulation across the Northern Hemisphere from 1990 to 2010. The result suggests strong spatial and seasonal variations of O3 / PV ratios which exhibits large values in the upper layers and in high-latitude regions, with highest values in spring and the lowest values in autumn over an annual cycle. The newly developed O3 / PV function was then applied in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model for an annual simulation of the year 2006. The simulated UTLS O3 agrees much better with observations in both magnitude and seasonality after the implementation of the new parameterization. Considerable impacts on surface O3 model performance were found in the comparison with observations from three observational networks, i.e., EMEP, CASTNET and WDCGG. With the new parameterization, the negative bias in spring is reduced from -20 to -15 % in the reference case to -9 to -1 %, while the positive bias in autumn is increased from 1 to 15 % in the reference case to 5 to 22 %. Therefore, the downward transport of O3 from upper layers has large impacts on surface concentration and needs to be properly represented in regional models.

  10. 3D Geological Model for "LUSI" - a Deep Geothermal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, Reza; Jansen, Gunnar; Mazzini, Adriano; Galvan, Boris; Miller, Stephen A.

    2016-04-01

    Geothermal applications require the correct simulation of flow and heat transport processes in porous media, and many of these media, like deep volcanic hydrothermal systems, host a certain degree of fracturing. This work aims to understand the heat and fluid transport within a new-born sedimentary hosted geothermal system, termed Lusi, that began erupting in 2006 in East Java, Indonesia. Our goal is to develop conceptual and numerical models capable of simulating multiphase flow within large-scale fractured reservoirs such as the Lusi region, with fractures of arbitrary size, orientation and shape. Additionally, these models can also address a number of other applications, including Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), CO2 sequestration (Carbon Capture and Storage CCS), and nuclear waste isolation. Fractured systems are ubiquitous, with a wide-range of lengths and scales, making difficult the development of a general model that can easily handle this complexity. We are developing a flexible continuum approach with an efficient, accurate numerical simulator based on an appropriate 3D geological model representing the structure of the deep geothermal reservoir. Using previous studies, borehole information and seismic data obtained in the framework of the Lusi Lab project (ERC grant n°308126), we present here the first 3D geological model of Lusi. This model is calculated using implicit 3D potential field or multi-potential fields, depending on the geological context and complexity. This method is based on geological pile containing the geological history of the area and relationship between geological bodies allowing automatic computation of intersections and volume reconstruction. Based on the 3D geological model, we developed a new mesh algorithm to create hexahedral octree meshes to transfer the structural geological information for 3D numerical simulations to quantify Thermal-Hydraulic-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) physical processes.

  11. A Parallel 3d Model for The Multi-Species Low Energy BeamTransport System of the RIA Prototype ECR Ion Source Venus

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D.

    2005-05-16

    The driver linac of the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) requires a great variety of high intensity, high charge state ion beams. In order to design and to optimize the low energy beamline optics of the RIA front end,we have developed a new parallel three-dimensional model to simulate the low energy, multi-species ion beam formation and transport from the ECR ion source extraction region to the focal plane of the analyzing magnet. A multisection overlapped computational domain has been used to break the original transport system into a number of each subsystem, macro-particle tracking is used to obtain the charge density distribution in this subdomain. The three-dimensional Poisson equation is solved within the subdomain and particle tracking is repeated until the solution converges. Two new Poisson solvers based on a combination of the spectral method and the multigrid method have been developed to solve the Poisson equation in cylindrical coordinates for the beam extraction region and in the Frenet-Serret coordinates for the bending magnet region. Some test examples and initial applications will also be presented.

  12. Generation of a 3D model for human GABA transporter hGAT-1 using molecular modeling and investigation of the binding of GABA.

    PubMed

    Wein, Thomas; Wanner, Klaus T

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional model of the human Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter hGAT-1 was developed by homology modeling and refined by subsequent molecular modeling using the crystal structure of a bacterial homologue leucine transporter from Aquifex aeolicus (LeuT(Aa)) as the template. Protein structure quality checks show that the resulting structure is particularly suited for the analysis of the substrate binding pocket and virtual screening experiments. Interactions of GABA and the substrate binding pocket were investigated using docking studies. The difference of 6 out of 13 substrate interacting side chains between hGAT-1 and LeuT(Aa) lead to the different substrate preference which can be explained using our three-dimensional model of hGAT-1. In particular the replacement of serine 256 and isoleucine 359 in LeuT(Aa) with glycine and threonine in hGAT-1 seems to facilitate the selection of GABA as the main substrate by changing the hydrogen bonding pattern in the active site to the amino group of the substrate. For a set of 12 compounds flexible docking experiments were performed using LigandFit in combination with the Jain scoring function. With few exceptions the obtained rank order of potency was in line with experimental data. Thus, the method can be assumed to give at least a rough estimate of the potency of the potential of GABA uptake inhibitors.

  13. MOZART, a global chemical transport model for ozone and related chemical tracers: 1. Model description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasseur, G. P.; Hauglustaine, D. A.; Walters, S.; Rasch, P. J.; Müller, J.-F.; Granier, C.; Tie, X. X.

    1998-11-01

    We present a new global three-dimensional chemical-transport model (called MOZART) developed in the framework of the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM) and aimed at studying the distribution and budget of tropospheric ozone and its precursors. The model, developed with a horizontal resolution of 2.8° in longitude and latitude, includes 25 levels in the vertical between the Earth's surface and an upper boundary located at approximately 35 km altitude. In its present configuration the model calculates the global distribution of 56 chemical constituents with a timestep of 20 min, and accounts for surface emission and deposition, large-scale advective transport, subscale convective and boundary layer exchanges, chemical and photochemical transformations, as well as wet scavenging. Transport is simulated "off line" from CCM with dynamical variables provided every 3 hours from preestablished history tapes. Advection is calculated using the semi-Lagrangian transport scheme [Rasch and Williamson, 1990] developed for the MATCH model of Rasch et al. [1997]. Convective and boundary layer transports are expressed according to Hack [1994] and Holtslag and Boville [1993], respectively. A detailed evaluation of the model results is provided in a companion paper [Hauglustaine et al., this issue]. An analysis of the spatial and temporal variability in the chemical fields predicted by the model suggests that regional events such as summertime ozone episodes in polluted areas can be simulated by MOZART.

  14. Intraoral 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühmstedt, Peter; Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Munkelt, Christoph; Heinze, Matthias; Palme, Martin; Schmidt, Ingo; Hintersehr, Josef; Notni, Gunther

    2007-09-01

    Here a new set-up of a 3D-scanning system for CAD/CAM in dental industry is proposed. The system is designed for direct scanning of the dental preparations within the mouth. The measuring process is based on phase correlation technique in combination with fast fringe projection in a stereo arrangement. The novelty in the approach is characterized by the following features: A phase correlation between the phase values of the images of two cameras is used for the co-ordinate calculation. This works contrary to the usage of only phase values (phasogrammetry) or classical triangulation (phase values and camera image co-ordinate values) for the determination of the co-ordinates. The main advantage of the method is that the absolute value of the phase at each point does not directly determine the coordinate. Thus errors in the determination of the co-ordinates are prevented. Furthermore, using the epipolar geometry of the stereo-like arrangement the phase unwrapping problem of fringe analysis can be solved. The endoscope like measurement system contains one projection and two camera channels for illumination and observation of the object, respectively. The new system has a measurement field of nearly 25mm × 15mm. The user can measure two or three teeth at one time. So the system can by used for scanning of single tooth up to bridges preparations. In the paper the first realization of the intraoral scanner is described.

  15. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  16. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  17. Dynamics of 3D representation of interfaces in UV-induced chemical vapor deposition: experiments, modeling, and simulation for silicon nitride thin layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flicstein, Jean; Guillonneau, E.; Marquez, Jose; How Kee Chun, L. S.; Maisonneuve, D.; David, C.; Wang, Zh. Z.; Palmier, Jean F.; Courant, J. L.

    2001-06-01

    We study the surface dynamics of silicon nitride films deposited by UV-induced low pressure chemical vapor pressure. Atomic force microscopy measurements show that the surface reaches a scale invariant stationary state coherent wit the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) equation. Discrete geometry techniques are oriented to extra morphological characteristics of surface and bulk which corresponds to computer simulated photodeposit. This allows to determine the physical origin of KPZ scaling to be al ow value of the surface sticking probability, and connected to the surface concentration of activate charged centers, which permits to start the evaluation of the Monte Carlo-molecular dynamics simulator.

  18. [EVALUATION OF CHANGES OF GEOMETRICAL PARAMETERS OF ALGINATE DENTAL IMPRESSIONS DUE TO THE INFLUENCE OF CHEMICAL AND MICROWAVE DISINFECTION METHOD USING 3D TECHNOLOGIES].

    PubMed

    Nespraydko, V P; Shevchuk, V A; Michaylov, A A; Lyseyko, N V

    2015-01-01

    This clinical and laboratory study evaluated the effect of two methods of disinfection in different modes at the volume changes of alginate dental impressions and plaster models poured from them, as compared to the same parameters of plastic master models (PMM), using three-dimensional non-contact laser scanner and software. Immersion chemical disinfection for 15 min, microwave disinfection at 354 W for 10 minutes and combined disinfection with the power of 319 W for 4 minutes did not significantly affect the volumetric dimensional accuracy of the alginate impressions (P > 0.05).

  19. Highly-Sensitive Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)-based Chemical Sensor using 3D Graphene Foam Decorated with Silver Nanoparticles as SERS substrate

    PubMed Central

    Srichan, Chavis; Ekpanyapong, Mongkol; Horprathum, Mati; Eiamchai, Pitak; Nuntawong, Noppadon; Phokharatkul, Ditsayut; Danvirutai, Pobporn; Bohez, Erik; Wisitsoraat, Anurat; Tuantranont, Adisorn

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a novel platform for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS)-based chemical sensors utilizing three-dimensional microporous graphene foam (GF) decorated with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is developed and applied for methylene blue (MB) detection. The results demonstrate that silver nanoparticles significantly enhance cascaded amplification of SERS effect on multilayer graphene foam (GF). The enhancement factor of AgNPs/GF sensor is found to be four orders of magnitude larger than that of AgNPs/Si substrate. In addition, the sensitivity of the sensor could be tuned by controlling the size of silver nanoparticles. The highest SERS enhancement factor of ∼5 × 104 is achieved at the optimal nanoparticle size of 50 nm. Moreover, the sensor is capable of detecting MB over broad concentration ranges from 1 nM to 100 μM. Therefore, AgNPs/GF is a highly promising SERS substrate for detection of chemical substances with ultra-low concentrations. PMID:27020705

  20. Chemically generated convective transport of micron sized particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyaev, Oleg; Das, Sambeeta; Altemose, Alicia; Shum, Henry; Balazs, Anna; Sen, Ayusman

    2015-11-01

    A variety of chemical and biological applications require manipulation of micron sized objects like cells, viruses, and large molecules. Increasing the size of particles up to a micron reduces performance of techniques based on diffusive transport. Directional transport of cargo toward detecting elements reduces the delivery time and improves performance of sensing devices. We demonstrate how chemical reactions can be used to organize fluid flows carrying particles toward the assigned destinations. Convection is driven by density variations caused by a chemical reaction occurring at a catalyst or enzyme-covered target site. If the reaction causes a reduction in fluid density, as in the case of catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, then fluid and suspended cargo is drawn toward the target along the bottom surface. The intensity of the fluid flow and the time of cargo delivery are controlled by the amount of reagent in the system. After the reagent has been consumed, the fluid pump stops and particles are found aggregated on and around the enzyme-coated patch. The pumps are reusable, being reactivated upon injection of additional reagent. The developed technique can be implemented in lab-on-a-chip devices for transportation of micro-scale object immersed in solution.

  1. Transport Coefficients for the NASA Lewis Chemical Equilibrium Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svehla, Roger A.

    1995-01-01

    The new transport property data that will be used in the NASA Lewis Research Center's Chemical Equilibrium and Applications Program (CEA) is presented. It complements a previous publication that documented the thermodynamic and transport property data then in use. Sources of the data and a brief description of the method by which the data were obtained are given. Coefficients to calculate the viscosity, thermal conductivity, and binary interactions are given for either one, or usually, two temperature intervals, typically 300 to 1000 K and 1000 to 5000 K. The form of the transport equation is the same as used previously. The number of species was reduced from the previous database. Many species for which the data were estimated were eliminated from the database. Some ionneutral interactions were added.

  2. Effect of Chemical and Physical Properties on the In Vitro Degradation of 3D Printed High Resolution Poly(propylene fumarate) Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jason M; Bodamer, Emily; Krebs, Olivia; Luo, Yuanyuan; Kleinfehn, Alex; Becker, Matthew L; Dean, David

    2017-04-10

    Two distinct molecular masses of poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) are combined with an additive manufacturing process to fabricate highly complex scaffolds possessing controlled chemical properties and porous architecture. Scaffolds were manufactured with two polymer molecular masses and two architecture styles. Degradation was assessed in an accelerated in vitro environment. The purpose of the degradation study is not to model or mimic in vivo degradation, but to efficiently compare the effect of modulating scaffold properties. This is the first study addressing degradation of chain-growth synthesized PPF, a process that allows for considerably more control over molecular mass distribution. It demonstrates that, with greater process control, not only is scaffold fabrication reproducible, but the mechanical properties and degradation kinetics can be tailored by altering the physical properties of the scaffold. This is a clear step forward in using PPF to address unmet medical needs while meeting regulatory demands and ultimately obtaining clinical relevancy.

  3. Xenobiotic metabolism capacities of human skin in comparison with a 3D-epidermis model and keratinocyte-based cell culture as in vitro alternatives for chemical testing: phase II enzymes.

    PubMed

    Götz, Christine; Pfeiffer, Roland; Tigges, Julia; Ruwiedel, Karsten; Hübenthal, Ulrike; Merk, Hans F; Krutmann, Jean; Edwards, Robert J; Abel, Josef; Pease, Camilla; Goebel, Carsten; Hewitt, Nicola; Fritsche, Ellen

    2012-05-01

    The 7th Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive prohibits the use of animals in cosmetic testing for certain endpoints, such as genotoxicity. Therefore, skin in vitro models have to replace chemical testing in vivo. However, the metabolic competence neither of human skin nor of alternative in vitro models has so far been fully characterized, although skin is the first-pass organ for accidentally or purposely (cosmetics and pharmaceuticals) applied chemicals. Thus, there is an urgent need to understand the xenobiotic-metabolizing capacities of human skin and to compare these activities to models developed to replace animal testing. We have measured the activity of the phase II enzymes glutathione S-transferase, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase and N-acetyltransferase in ex vivo human skin, the 3D epidermal model EpiDerm 200 (EPI-200), immortalized keratinocyte-based cell lines (HaCaT and NCTC 2544) and primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes. We show that all three phase II enzymes are present and highly active in skin as compared to phase I. Human skin, therefore, represents a more detoxifying than activating organ. This work systematically compares the activities of three important phase II enzymes in four different in vitro models directly to human skin. We conclude from our studies that 3D epidermal models, like the EPI-200 employed here, are superior over monolayer cultures in mimicking human skin xenobiotic metabolism and thus better suited for dermatotoxicity testing.

  4. Pressure evolution of electrical transport in the 3D topological insulator (Bi,Sb) 2 (Se,Te) 3

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, J. R.; Butch, N. P.; Vohra, Y. K.; Weir, S. T.

    2015-03-18

    The group V-VI compounds|like Bi2Se3, Sb2Te3, or Bi2Te3|have been widely studied in recent years for their bulk topological properties. The high-Z members of this series form with the same crystal structure, and are therefore amenable to isostructural substitution studies. It is possible to tune the Bi-Sb and Te-Se ratios such that the material exhibits insulating behavior, thus providing an excellent platform for understanding how a topological insulator evolves with applied pressure. We report our observations of the pressure-dependent electrical transport and crystal structure of a pseudobinary (Bi,Sb)2(Te,Se)3 compound. Similar to some of its sister compounds, the (Bi,Sb)2(Te,Se)3 pseudobinary compound undergoes multiple, pressure-induced phase transformations that result in metallization, the onset of a close-packed crystal structure, and the development of distinct superconducting phases.

  5. Three-Dimensional (3D) Distribution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-11

    witnessed by ongoing efforts in both Afghanistan and Iraq , must turn distribution challenges into opportunities by mastering Three-Dimensional (3D...sustainment. 5 Joint Logistics Functions •Supply •Services •Maintenance •Transportation • Health Service Support •General Engineering Joint Personnel...Maintenance •Transportation • Health Service Support •Explosive Ordinance Disposal •Human Resource Support •Legal Support •Religious Support •Financial

  6. Nonlocal reactive transport with physical and chemical heterogeneity: Localization errors

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, J.H.; Hu, B.X.; Deng, F.W.

    1995-09-01

    The origin of nonlocality in {open_quotes}macroscale{close_quotes} models for subsurface chemical transport is illustrated. It is argued that media that are either nonperiodic (e.g., media with evolving heterogeneity) or periodic viewed on a scale wherein a unit cell is discernible must display some nonlocality in the mean. A metaphysical argument suggests that owing to the scarcity of information on natural scales of heterogeneity and on scales of observation associated with an instrument window, constitutive theories for the mean concentration should at the outset of any modeling effort always be considered nonlocal. The intuitive appeal to nonlocality is reinforced with an analytical derivation of the constitutive theory for a conservative tracer without appeal to any mathematical approximations. Comparisons are made between the fully nonlocal (FNL), nonlocal in time (NLT), and fully localized (FL) theories. For conservative transport, there is little difference between the first-order FL and FNL models for spatial moments up to and including the third. However, for conservative transport the first-order NLT model differs significantly from the FNL model in the third spatial moments. For reactive transport, all spatial moments differ between the FNL and FL models. The second transverse-horizontal and third longitudinal-horizontal moments for the NLT model differ from the FNL model. These results suggest that localized first-order transport models for conservative tracers are reasonable if only lower-order moments are desired. However, when the chemical reacts with its environment, the localization approximation can lead to significant error in all moments, and a FNL model will in general be required for accurate simulation. 18 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Project LOCOST: Laser or Chemical Hybrid Orbital Space Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, Alan; Kost, Alicia; Lampshire, Gregory; Larsen, Rob; Monahan, Bob; Wright, Geoff

    1990-01-01

    A potential mission in the late 1990s is the servicing of spacecraft assets located in GEO. The Geosynchronous Operations Support Center (GeoShack) will be supported by a space transfer vehicle based at the Space Station (SS). The vehicle will transport cargo between the SS and the GeoShack. A proposed unmanned, laser or chemical hybrid orbital space transfer vehicle (LOCOST) can be used to efficiently transfer cargo between the two orbits. A preliminary design shows that an unmanned, laser/chemical hybrid vehicle results in the fuel savings needed while still providing fast trip times. The LOCOST vehicle receives a 12 MW laser beam from one Earth orbiting, solar pumped, iodide Laser Power Station (LPS). Two Energy Relay Units (ERU) provide laser beam support during periods of line-of-sight blockage by the Earth. The baseline mission specifies a 13 day round trip transfer time. The ship's configuration consist of an optical train, one hydrogen laser engine, two chemical engines, a 18 m by 29 m box truss, a mission-flexible payload module, and propellant tanks. Overall vehicle dry mass is 8,000 kg. Outbound cargo mass is 20,000 kg, and inbound cargo mass is 6,000 kg. The baseline mission needs 93,000 kg of propellants to complete the scenario. Fully fueled, outbound mission mass is 121,000 kg. A regeneratively cooled, single plasma, laser engine design producing a maximum of 768 N of thrust is utilized along with two traditional chemical engines. The payload module is designed to hold 40,000 kg of cargo, though the baseline mission specifies less. A proposed design of a laser/chemical hybrid vehicle provides a trip time and propellant efficient means to transport cargo from the SS to a GeoShack. Its unique, hybrid propulsion system provides safety through redundancy, allows baseline missions to be efficiently executed, while still allowing for the possibility of larger cargo transfers.

  8. JOVIAN STRATOSPHERE AS A CHEMICAL TRANSPORT SYSTEM: BENCHMARK ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xi; Shia Runlie; Yung, Yuk L.

    2013-04-20

    We systematically investigated the solvable analytical benchmark cases in both one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) chemical-advective-diffusive systems. We use the stratosphere of Jupiter as an example but the results can be applied to other planetary atmospheres and exoplanetary atmospheres. In the 1D system, we show that CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6} are mainly in diffusive equilibrium, and the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} profile can be approximated by modified Bessel functions. In the 2D system in the meridional plane, analytical solutions for two typical circulation patterns are derived. Simple tracer transport modeling demonstrates that the distribution of a short-lived species (such as C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) is dominated by the local chemical sources and sinks, while that of a long-lived species (such as C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) is significantly influenced by the circulation pattern. We find that an equator-to-pole circulation could qualitatively explain the Cassini observations, but a pure diffusive transport process could not. For slowly rotating planets like the close-in extrasolar planets, the interaction between the advection by the zonal wind and chemistry might cause a phase lag between the final tracer distribution and the original source distribution. The numerical simulation results from the 2D Caltech/JPL chemistry-transport model agree well with the analytical solutions for various cases.

  9. Mitigation of chemical attacks in enclosed public transportation facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swansiger, William A.; Brockmann, John E.

    1998-12-01

    Public transportation facilities in the United States are vulnerable to attack by terrorists using chemical agents. This paper focuses on the problem of protecting the people in underground subway stations, which are among the most difficult facilities to protect. A nerve agent can produce symptoms in seconds to minutes, so immediate triggering of evacuation alarms and initiation of mitigation measures is necessary to minimize casualties in the station. The question of whether currently available chemical detectors are sufficiently capable and reliable to enable an automated response is addressed and augmentation possibilities are discussed. A number of concepts for mitigating chemical attacks are explored and their applicability to other transportation facilities is discussed. A possible near-term mitigation measure that is reviewed in some detail is the use of water sprays to scrub gasses and aerosols from the air. This technique may have applicability in the station at the point of agent release, as well as for detoxification of the air stream if selective venting is employed. Calculations show that with proper spray nozzle selection, the water pressure and flow rate available at some subway stations for fire suppression is sufficient for effective removal of Sarin from an air stream.

  10. Targeting the Proton-Coupled Folate Transporter for Selective Delivery of 6-Substituted Pyrrolo[2,3-d]Pyrimidine Antifolate Inhibitors of De Novo Purine Biosynthesis in the Chemotherapy of Solid TumorsS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Desmoulin, Sita Kugel; Wang, Yiqiang; Wu, Jianmei; Stout, Mark; Hou, Zhanjun; Fulterer, Andreas; Chang, Min-Hwang; Romero, Michael F.; Cherian, Christina; Gangjee, Aleem

    2010-01-01

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) is a folate-proton symporter with an acidic pH optimum, approximating the microenvironments of solid tumors. We tested 6-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine antifolates with one to six carbons in the bridge region for inhibition of proliferation in isogenic Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and HeLa cells expressing PCFT or reduced folate carrier (RFC). Only analogs with three and four bridge carbons (N-{4-[3-2-amino-4-oxo-4,7-dihydro-3H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]-pyrimidin-6-yl)propyl]benzoyl}-l-glutamic acid (compound 2) and N-{4-[4-2-amino-4-oxo-4,7-dihydro-3H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]-pyrimidin-6-yl)butyl]benzoyl}*-l-glutamic acid (compound 3), respectively) were inhibitory, with 2 ≫ 3. Activity toward RFC-expressing cells was negligible. Compound 2 and pemetrexed (Pmx) competed with [3H]methotrexate for PCFT transport in PCFT-expressing CHO (R2/hPCFT4) cells from pH 5.5 to 7.2; inhibition increased with decreasing pH. In Xenopus laevis oocytes microinjected with PCFT cRNA, uptake of 2, like that of Pmx, was electrogenic. Cytotoxicity of 2 toward R2/hPCFT4 cells was abolished in the presence of adenosine or 5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxamide, suggesting that glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase (GARFTase) in de novo purine biosynthesis was the primary target. Compound 2 decreased GTP and ATP pools by ∼50 and 75%, respectively. By an in situ GARFTase assay, 2 was ∼20-fold more inhibitory toward intracellular GARFTase than toward cell growth or colony formation. Compound 2 irreversibly inhibited clonogenicity, although this required at least 4 h of exposure. Our results document the potent antiproliferative activity of compound 2, attributable to its efficient cellular uptake by PCFT, resulting in inhibition of GARFTase and de novo purine biosynthesis. Furthermore, they establish the feasibility of selective chemotherapy drug delivery via PCFT over RFC, a process that takes advantage of a unique biological feature of solid tumors. PMID

  11. Transport of chemical tracers from the boundary layer to stratosphere associated with the dynamics of the Asian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Laura L.; Honomichl, Shawn B.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Abalos, Marta; Randel, William J.; Bergman, John W.; Bian, Jianchun

    2016-12-01

    Chemical transport associated with the dynamics of the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) system is investigated using model output from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model run in specified dynamics mode. The 3-D day-to-day behavior of modeled carbon monoxide is analyzed together with dynamical fields and transport boundaries to identify preferred locations of uplifting from the boundary layer, the role of subseasonal-scale dynamics in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS), and the relationship of ASM transport and the stratospheric residual circulation. The model simulation of CO shows the intraseasonal east-west oscillation of the anticyclone may play an essential role in transporting convectively pumped boundary layer pollutants in the UTLS. A statistical analysis of 11 year CO also shows that the southern flank of the Tibetan plateau is a preferred location for boundary layer tracers to be lofted to the tropopause region. The vertical structure of a model tracer (E90) further shows that the rapid ASM vertical transport is only effective up to the tropopause level (around 400 K). The efficiency of continued vertical transport into the deep stratosphere is limited by the slow ascent associated with the zonal-mean residual circulation in the lower stratosphere during northern summer. Quasi-isentropic transport near the 400 K potential temperature level is likely the most effective process for ASM anticyclone air to enter the stratosphere.

  12. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  13. Spherical 3D isotropic wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.

    2012-04-01

    Context. Future cosmological surveys will provide 3D large scale structure maps with large sky coverage, for which a 3D spherical Fourier-Bessel (SFB) analysis in spherical coordinates is natural. Wavelets are particularly well-suited to the analysis and denoising of cosmological data, but a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform does not currently exist to analyse spherical 3D data. Aims: The aim of this paper is to present a new formalism for a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet, i.e. one based on the SFB decomposition of a 3D field and accompany the formalism with a public code to perform wavelet transforms. Methods: We describe a new 3D isotropic spherical wavelet decomposition based on the undecimated wavelet transform (UWT) described in Starck et al. (2006). We also present a new fast discrete spherical Fourier-Bessel transform (DSFBT) based on both a discrete Bessel transform and the HEALPIX angular pixelisation scheme. We test the 3D wavelet transform and as a toy-application, apply a denoising algorithm in wavelet space to the Virgo large box cosmological simulations and find we can successfully remove noise without much loss to the large scale structure. Results: We have described a new spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform, ideally suited to analyse and denoise future 3D spherical cosmological surveys, which uses a novel DSFBT. We illustrate its potential use for denoising using a toy model. All the algorithms presented in this paper are available for download as a public code called MRS3D at http://jstarck.free.fr/mrs3d.html

  14. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  15. DYNAMIC 3D QSAR TECHNIQUES: APPLICATIONS IN TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two dynamic techniques recently developed to account for conformational flexibility of chemicals in 3D QSARs are presented. In addition to the impact of conformational flexibility of chemicals in 3D QSAR models, the applicability of various molecular descriptors is discussed. The...

  16. A 3D Global Climate Model of the Pluto atmosphere coupled to a volatile transport model to interpret New Horizons observations, including the N2, CH4 and CO cycles and the formation of organic hazes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Tanguy; Forget, Francois

    2016-04-01

    To interpret New Horizons observations and simulate the Pluto climate system, we have developed a Global Climate Model (GCM) of Pluto's atmosphere. In addition to a 3D "dynamical core" which solves the equation of meteorology, the model takes into account the N2 condensation and sublimation and its thermal and dynamical effects, the vertical turbulent mixing, the radiative transfer through methane and carbon monoxide, molecular thermal conduction, and a detailed surface thermal model with different thermal inertia for various timescales (diurnal, seasonal). The GCM also includes a detailed model of the CH4 and CO cycles, taking into account their transport by the atmospheric circulation and turbulence, as well as their condensation and sublimation on the surface and in the atmosphere, possibly forming methane ice clouds. The GCM consistently predicts the 3D methane abundance in the atmosphere, which is used as an input for our radiative transfer calculation. In a second phase, we also developed a volatile transport model, derived from the GCM, which can be run over thousands of years in order to reach consistent initial states for the GCM runs and better explore the seasonal processes on Pluto. Results obtained with the volatile transport model show that the distribution of N2, CH4 and CO ices primarily depends on the seasonal thermal inertia used for the different ices, and is affected by the assumed topography as well. As observed, it is possible to form a large and permanent nitrogen glacier with CO and CH4 ice deposits in an equatorial basin corresponding to Sputnik Planum, while having a surface pressure evolution consistent with stellar occultations and New Horizons data. In addition, most of the methane ice is sequestered with N2 ice in the basin but seasonal polar caps of CH4 frosts also form explaining the bright polar caps observed with Hubble in the 1980s and in line with New Horizons observations. Using such balanced combination of surface and

  17. Electrochemical fields within 3D reconstructed microstructures of mixed ionic and electronic conducting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanxiang; Chen, Yu; Lin, Ye; Yan, Mufu; Harris, William M.; Chiu, Wilson K. S.; Ni, Meng; Chen, Fanglin

    2016-11-01

    The performance and stability of the mixed ionic and electronic conducting (MIEC) membrane devices, such as solid oxide cells (SOCs) and oxygen separation membranes (OSMs) interplay tightly with the transport properties and the three-dimensional (3D) microstructure of the membrane. However, development of the MIEC devices is hindered by the limited knowledge about the distribution of electrochemical fields within the 3D local microstructures, especially at surface and interface. In this work, a generic model conforming to local thermodynamic equilibrium is developed to calculate the electrochemical fields, such as electric potential and oxygen chemical potential, within the 3D microstructure of the MIEC membrane. Stability of the MIEC membrane is evaluated by the distribution of oxygen partial pressure. The cell-level performance such as polarization resistance and voltage vs. current curve can be further calculated. Case studies are performed to demonstrate the capability of the framework by using X-ray computed tomography reconstructed 3D microstructures of a SOC and an OSM. The calculation method demonstrates high computational efficiency for large size 3D tomographic microstructures, and permits parallel calculation. The framework can serve as a powerful tool for correlating the transport properties and the 3D microstructure to the performance and the stability of MIEC devices.

  18. Recent EFIT Developments and 3D Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, L. L.; Chu, M. S.; St. John, H. E.; Strait, E. J.; Montgomery, A. L.; Perkins, F. W.

    2006-10-01

    Recent developments of the equilibrium reconstruction code EFIT and its 3D extension to model toroidally asymmetric effects due to error and externally applied perturbation magnetic fields are presented. These include a new more complete uncertainty matrix for magnetic diagnostics based on detailed knowledge about their fabrication, installation, calibration, and operation. A new algorithm to efficiently compute high bootstrap-fraction equilibria that explicitly separates out the Pfirsch-Schluter and bootstrap contributions to the poloidal current stream function is also being developed. Other on-going and planned developments include a new computational structure based on Fortran 90/95 with a unified interface that can conveniently accommodate different tokamak devices and grid sizes, as well as a computational link that allows easy integration with transport and stability physics modules for integrated modeling. EFIT reconstruction capability is also being extended to 3D based on perturbation solutions to the 3D Grad-Shafranov equilibrium equation.

  19. Chemical transport from paired agricultural and restored prairie watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, K.E.

    2002-01-01

    A five-year record of streamflow and chemical sampling data was evaluated to assess the effects of large-scale prairie restoration on transport of NO3-N, Cl, and SO4 loads from paired 5000-ha watersheds located in Jasper County, Iowa. Water quality conditions monitored during land use conversion from row crop agriculture to native prairie in the Walnut Creek watershed were compared with a highly agricultural control watershed (Squaw Creek). Combining hydrograph separation with a load estimation program, baseflow and stormflow loads of NO3-N, Cl, and SO4 were estimated at upstream and downstream sites on Walnut Creek and a downstream site on Squaw Creek. Chemical export in both watersheds was found to occur primarily with baseflow, with baseflow transport greatest during the late summer and fall. Lower Walnut Creek watershed, which contained the restored prairie areas, exported less NO3-N and Cl compared with upper Walnut Creek and Squaw Creek watersheds. Average flow-weighted concentrations of NO3-N exceeded 10 mg/L in upper Walnut Creek and Squaw Creek, but were estimated to be 6.6 mg/L in lower Walnut Creek. Study results demonstrate the utility of partitioning loads into baseflow and stormflow components to identify sources of pollutant loading to streams.

  20. 3 Lectures: "Lagrangian Models", "Numerical Transport Schemes", and "Chemical and Transport Models"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, A.

    2005-01-01

    The topics for the three lectures for the Canadian Summer School are Lagrangian Models, numerical transport schemes, and chemical and transport models. In the first lecture I will explain the basic components of the Lagrangian model (a trajectory code and a photochemical code), the difficulties in using such a model (initialization) and show some applications in interpretation of aircraft and satellite data. If time permits I will show some results concerning inverse modeling which is being used to evaluate sources of tropospheric pollutants. In the second lecture I will discuss one of the core components of any grid point model, the numerical transport scheme. I will explain the basics of shock capturing schemes, and performance criteria. I will include an example of the importance of horizontal resolution to polar processes. We have learned from NASA's global modeling initiative that horizontal resolution matters for predictions of the future evolution of the ozone hole. The numerical scheme will be evaluated using performance metrics based on satellite observations of long-lived tracers. The final lecture will discuss the evolution of chemical transport models over the last decade. Some of the problems with assimilated winds will be demonstrated, using satellite data to evaluate the simulations.

  1. Controlling transport and chemical functionality of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Latham, Andrew H; Williams, Mary Elizabeth

    2008-03-01

    A wide range of metal, magnetic, semiconductor, and polymer nanoparticles with tunable sizes and properties can be synthesized by wet-chemical techniques. Magnetic nanoparticles are particularly attractive because their inherent superparamagnetic properties make them desirable for medical imaging, magnetic field assisted transport, and separations and analyses. With such applications on the horizon, synthetic routes for quickly and reliably rendering magnetic nanoparticle surfaces chemically functional have become an increasingly important focus. This Account describes common synthetic routes for making and functionalizing magnetic nanoparticles and discusses initial applications in magnetic field induced separations. The most widely studied magnetic nanoparticles are iron oxide (Fe2O3 and Fe3O4), cobalt ferrite (CoFe 2O4), iron platinum (FePt), and manganese ferrite (MnFe 2O4), although others have been investigated. Magnetic nanoparticles are typically prepared under either high-temperature organic phase or aqueous conditions, producing particles with surfaces that are stabilized by attached surfactants or associated ions. Although it requires more specialized glassware, high-temperature routes are generally preferred when a high degree of stability and low particle size dispersity is desired. Particles can be further modified with a secondary metal or polymer to create core-shell structures. The outer shells function as protective layers for the inner metal cores and alter the surface chemistry to enable postsynthetic modification of the surfactant chemistry. Efforts by our group as well as others have centered on pathways to yield nanoparticles with surfaces that are both easily functionalized and tunable in terms of the number and variety of attached species. Ligand place-exchange reactions have been shown quite successful for exchanging silanes, acids, thiols, and dopamine ligands onto the surfaces of some magnetic particles. Poly(ethylene oxide

  2. Chemical vapour transport of III-V semiconductor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Mervyn Howard

    Over the temperature range 770 to 1310 K, however, two bromides compete for prominence, dependent upon temperature. In both instances, it is shown that vapour transport becomes rate limited at low temperature. Further to the chemical vapour transport of indium phosphide, the dissociative sublimation of the compound has also been investigated. Raman spectroscopy has been used to identify high temperature molecular species involved in vapour transport of III-V semiconductor materials. Supplementary work has been performed on the thermochemistry of indium monobromide. The heat of formation of indium bromide crystals has been determined using a solution calormetric technique. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to measure the heat capacity and heat of fusion, of the salt. An entrainment study of the evaporation of liquid indium monobromide was undertaken to yield a value for its heat of vaporisation. Using a statistical thermodynamic approach, the heat capacity of the vapour was calculated. Collating the information, a value for the heat of formation of indium monobromide gas at 1000 K has been calculated for use in other thermodynamic calculations.

  3. Simple buffers for 3D STORM microscopy.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Nicolas; Keller, Debora; Rajan, Vinoth Sundar; Gönczy, Pierre; Manley, Suliana

    2013-06-01

    3D STORM is one of the leading methods for super-resolution imaging, with resolution down to 10 nm in the lateral direction, and 30-50 nm in the axial direction. However, there is one important requirement to perform this type of imaging: making dye molecules blink. This usually relies on the utilization of complex buffers, containing different chemicals and sensitive enzymatic systems, limiting the reproducibility of the method. We report here that the commercial mounting medium Vectashield can be used for STORM of Alexa-647, and yields images comparable or superior to those obtained with more complex buffers, especially for 3D imaging. We expect that this advance will promote the versatile utilization of 3D STORM by removing one of its entry barriers, as well as provide a more reproducible way to compare optical setups and data processing algorithms.

  4. 2D- and 3D-QSAR studies of a series of benzopyranes and benzopyrano[3,4b][1,4]-oxazines as inhibitors of the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabeen, Ishrat; Wetwitayaklung, Penpun; Chiba, Peter; Pastor, Manuel; Ecker, Gerhard F.

    2013-02-01

    The ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is notorious for contributing to multidrug resistance in antitumor therapy. Due to its expression in many blood-organ barriers, it also influences the pharmacokinetics of drugs and drug candidates and is involved in drug/drug- and drug/nutrient interactions. However, due to lack of structural information the molecular basis of ligand/transporter interaction still needs to be elucidated. Towards this goal, a series of Benzopyranes and Benzopyrano[3,4b][1,4]oxazines have been synthesized and pharmacologically tested for their ability to inhibit P-gp mediated daunomycin efflux. Both quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models using simple physicochemical and novel GRID-independent molecular descriptors (GRIND) were established to shed light on the structural requirements for high P-gp inhibitory activity. The results from 2D-QSAR showed a linear correlation of vdW surface area (Å2) of hydrophobic atoms with the pharmacological activity. GRIND (3D-QSAR) studies allowed to identify important mutual distances between pharmacophoric features, which include one H-bond donor, two H-bond acceptors and two hydrophobic groups as well as their distances from different steric hot spots of the molecules. Activity of the compounds particularly increases with increase of the distance of an H-bond donor or a hydrophobic feature from a particular steric hot spot of the benzopyrane analogs.

  5. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  6. 3D Buckligami: Digital Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hecke, Martin; de Reus, Koen; Florijn, Bastiaan; Coulais, Corentin

    2014-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit collective buckling in 3D, and create these by a 3D printing/moulding technique. Our structures consist of cubic lattice of anisotropic unit cells, and we show that their mechanical properties are programmable via the orientation of these unit cells.

  7. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  8. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  9. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  10. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  11. 3D vision system assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzaniti, J. Larry; Edmondson, Richard; Vaden, Justin; Hyatt, Bryan; Chenault, David B.; Kingston, David; Geulen, Vanilynmae; Newell, Scott; Pettijohn, Brad

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we report on the development of a 3D vision system consisting of a flat panel stereoscopic display and auto-converging stereo camera and an assessment of the system's use for robotic driving, manipulation, and surveillance operations. The 3D vision system was integrated onto a Talon Robot and Operator Control Unit (OCU) such that direct comparisons of the performance of a number of test subjects using 2D and 3D vision systems were possible. A number of representative scenarios were developed to determine which tasks benefited most from the added depth perception and to understand when the 3D vision system hindered understanding of the scene. Two tests were conducted at Fort Leonard Wood, MO with noncommissioned officers ranked Staff Sergeant and Sergeant First Class. The scenarios; the test planning, approach and protocols; the data analysis; and the resulting performance assessment of the 3D vision system are reported.

  12. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  13. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  14. TH-E-BRE-01: A 3D Solver of Linear Boltzmann Transport Equation Based On a New Angular Discretization Method with Positivity for Photon Dose Calculation Benchmarked with Geant4

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, X; Gao, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The Linear Boltzmann Transport Equation (LBTE) solved through statistical Monte Carlo (MC) method provides the accurate dose calculation in radiotherapy. This work is to investigate the alternative way for accurately solving LBTE using deterministic numerical method due to its possible advantage in computational speed from MC. Methods: Instead of using traditional spherical harmonics to approximate angular scattering kernel, our deterministic numerical method directly computes angular scattering weights, based on a new angular discretization method that utilizes linear finite element method on the local triangulation of unit angular sphere. As a Result, our angular discretization method has the unique advantage in positivity, i.e., to maintain all scattering weights nonnegative all the time, which is physically correct. Moreover, our method is local in angular space, and therefore handles the anisotropic scattering well, such as the forward-peaking scattering. To be compatible with image-guided radiotherapy, the spatial variables are discretized on the structured grid with the standard diamond scheme. After discretization, the improved sourceiteration method is utilized for solving the linear system without saving the linear system to memory. The accuracy of our 3D solver is validated using analytic solutions and benchmarked with Geant4, a popular MC solver. Results: The differences between Geant4 solutions and our solutions were less than 1.5% for various testing cases that mimic the practical cases. More details are available in the supporting document. Conclusion: We have developed a 3D LBTE solver based on a new angular discretization method that guarantees the positivity of scattering weights for physical correctness, and it has been benchmarked with Geant4 for photon dose calculation.

  15. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  16. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  17. Limits on the ability of global Eulerian models to resolve intercontinental transport of chemical plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastham, Sebastian D.; Jacob, Daniel J.

    2017-02-01

    Quasi-horizontal chemical plumes in the free troposphere can preserve their concentrated structure for over a week, enabling transport on intercontinental scales with important environmental impacts. Global Eulerian chemical transport models (CTMs) fail to preserve these plumes due to fast numerical dissipation. We examine the causes of this dissipation and how it can be cured. Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) meteorological data at 0.25° × 0.3125° horizontal resolution and ˜ 0.5 km vertical resolution in the free troposphere are used to drive a worldwide ensemble of GEOS-Chem CTM plumes at resolutions from 0.25° × 0.3125° to 4° × 5°, in both 2-D (horizontal) and 3-D. Two-dimensional simulations enable examination of the sensitivity of numerical dissipation to grid resolution. We show that plume decay is driven by flow divergence and shear, filamenting the plumes until GEOS-Chem's high-order advection scheme cannot resolve gradients and fast numerical diffusion ensues. This divergence can be measured by the Lyapunov exponent (λ) of the flow. Dissipation of plumes is much faster at extratropical latitudes than in the tropics and this can be explained by stronger divergence. The plume decay constant (α) is linearly related to λ, and increasing grid resolution provides only modest benefits toward plume preservation. Three-dimensional simulations show near-complete dissipation of plumes within a few days, independent of horizontal grid resolution and even in the tropics. This is because vertical grid resolution is inadequate in all cases to properly resolve plume gradients. We suggest that finer vertical grid resolution in the free troposphere is essential for models to resolve intercontinental plumes, while current horizontal resolution in these models (˜ 1°) is sufficient.

  18. Chemical synthesis and 1H-NMR 3D structure determination of AgTx2-MTX chimera, a new potential blocker for Kv1.2 channel, derived from MTX and AgTx2 scorpion toxins

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Cyril; M'Barek, Sarrah; Visan, Violetta; Grissmer, Stephan; Sampieri, François; Sabatier, Jean-Marc; Darbon, Hervé; Fajloun, Ziad

    2008-01-01

    Agitoxin 2 (AgTx2) is a 38-residue scorpion toxin, cross-linked by three disulfide bridges, which acts on voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels. Maurotoxin (MTX) is a 34-residue scorpion toxin with an uncommon four-disulfide bridge reticulation, acting on both Ca2+-activated and Kv channels. A 39-mer chimeric peptide, named AgTx2-MTX, was designed from the sequence of the two toxins and chemically synthesized. It encompasses residues 1–5 of AgTx2, followed by the complete sequence of MTX. As established by enzyme cleavage, the new AgTx2-MTX molecule displays half-cystine pairings of the type C1–C5, C2–C6, C3–C7, and C4–C8, which is different from that of MTX. The 3D structure of AgTx2-MTX solved by 1H-NMR, revealed both α-helical and β-sheet structures, consistent with a common α/β scaffold of scorpion toxins. Pharmacological assays of AgTx2-MTX revealed that this new molecule is more potent than both original toxins in blocking rat Kv1.2 channel. Docking simulations, performed with the 3D structure of AgTx2-MTX, confirmed this result and demonstrated the participation of the N-terminal domain of AgTx2 in its increased affinity for Kv1.2 through additional molecular contacts. Altogether, the data indicated that replacement of the N-terminal domain of MTX by the one of AgTx2 in the AgTx2-MTX chimera results in a reorganization of the disulfide bridge arrangement and an increase of affinity to the Kv1.2 channel. PMID:18042681

  19. Chemical synthesis and 1H-NMR 3D structure determination of AgTx2-MTX chimera, a new potential blocker for Kv1.2 channel, derived from MTX and AgTx2 scorpion toxins.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Cyril; M'Barek, Sarrah; Visan, Violetta; Grissmer, Stephan; Sampieri, François; Sabatier, Jean-Marc; Darbon, Hervé; Fajloun, Ziad

    2008-01-01

    Agitoxin 2 (AgTx2) is a 38-residue scorpion toxin, cross-linked by three disulfide bridges, which acts on voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels. Maurotoxin (MTX) is a 34-residue scorpion toxin with an uncommon four-disulfide bridge reticulation, acting on both Ca(2+)-activated and Kv channels. A 39-mer chimeric peptide, named AgTx2-MTX, was designed from the sequence of the two toxins and chemically synthesized. It encompasses residues 1-5 of AgTx2, followed by the complete sequence of MTX. As established by enzyme cleavage, the new AgTx2-MTX molecule displays half-cystine pairings of the type C1-C5, C2-C6, C3-C7, and C4-C8, which is different from that of MTX. The 3D structure of AgTx2-MTX solved by (1)H-NMR, revealed both alpha-helical and beta-sheet structures, consistent with a common alpha/beta scaffold of scorpion toxins. Pharmacological assays of AgTx2-MTX revealed that this new molecule is more potent than both original toxins in blocking rat Kv1.2 channel. Docking simulations, performed with the 3D structure of AgTx2-MTX, confirmed this result and demonstrated the participation of the N-terminal domain of AgTx2 in its increased affinity for Kv1.2 through additional molecular contacts. Altogether, the data indicated that replacement of the N-terminal domain of MTX by the one of AgTx2 in the AgTx2-MTX chimera results in a reorganization of the disulfide bridge arrangement and an increase of affinity to the Kv1.2 channel.

  20. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  1. A microfluidic device for 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D cell navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamloo, Amir; Amirifar, Leyla

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices have received wide attention and shown great potential in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Investigating cell response to various stimulations is much more accurate and comprehensive with the aid of microfluidic devices. In this study, we introduced a microfluidic device by which the matrix density as a mechanical property and the concentration profile of a biochemical factor as a chemical property could be altered. Our microfluidic device has a cell tank and a cell culture chamber to mimic both 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D migration of three types of cells. Fluid shear stress is negligible on the cells and a stable concentration gradient can be obtained by diffusion. The device was designed by a numerical simulation so that the uniformity of the concentration gradients throughout the cell culture chamber was obtained. Adult neural cells were cultured within this device and they showed different branching and axonal navigation phenotypes within varying nerve growth factor (NGF) concentration profiles. Neural stem cells were also cultured within varying collagen matrix densities while exposed to NGF concentrations and they experienced 3D to 3D collective migration. By generating vascular endothelial growth factor concentration gradients, adult human dermal microvascular endothelial cells also migrated in a 2D to 3D manner and formed a stable lumen within a specific collagen matrix density. It was observed that a minimum absolute concentration and concentration gradient were required to stimulate migration of all types of the cells. This device has the advantage of changing multiple parameters simultaneously and is expected to have wide applicability in cell studies.

  2. Mass transport measurements and modeling for chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Chiang, D.Y.; Fiadzo, O.G.; Hablutzel, N.

    1997-12-01

    This project involves experimental and modeling investigation of densification behavior and mass transport in fiber preforms and partially densified composites, and application of these results to chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process modeling. This supports work on-going at ORNL in process development for fabrication of ceramic matrix composite (CMC) tubes. Tube-shaped composite preforms are fabricated at ORNL with Nextel{trademark} 312 fiber (3M Corporation, St. Paul, MN) by placing and compressing several layers of braided sleeve on a tubular mandrel. In terms of fiber architecture these preforms are significantly different than those made previously with Nicalon{trademark} fiber (Nippon Carbon Corp., Tokyo, Japan) square weave cloth. The authors have made microstructure and permeability measurements on several of these preforms and a few partially densified composites so as to better understand their densification behavior during CVI.

  3. Parameterization of Aerosol Sinks in Chemical Transport Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The modelers point of view is that the aerosol problem is one of sources, evolution, and sinks. Relative to evolution and sink processes, enormous attention is given to the problem of aerosols sources, whether inventory based (e.g., fossil fuel emissions) or dynamic (e.g., dust, sea salt, biomass burning). On the other hand, aerosol losses in models are a major factor in controlling the aerosol distribution and lifetime. Here we shine some light on how aerosol sinks are treated in modern chemical transport models. We discuss the mechanisms of dry and wet loss processes and the parameterizations for those processes in a single model (GEOS-5). We survey the literature of other modeling studies. We additionally compare the budgets of aerosol losses in several of the ICAP models.

  4. 3D Scan Systems Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave Blank) 2. REPORT DATE 5 Feb 98 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 3D Scan Systems Integration REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED...2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-1 298-102 [ EDO QUALITY W3PECTEDI DLA-ARN Final Report for US Defense Logistics Agency on DDFG-T2/P3: 3D...SCAN SYSTEMS INTEGRATION Contract Number SPO100-95-D-1014 Contractor Ohio University Delivery Order # 0001 Delivery Order Title 3D Scan Systems

  5. Interplay between chemical reactions and transport in structured spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konkoli, Zoran

    2005-07-01

    The main motivation behind this study is to understand the interplay between the reactions and transport in a geometries that are not compact. Typical examples of compact geometries are a box or a sphere. A network made of containers C1,C2,…,CN and tubes is an example of the space that is structured and noncompact. In containers, particles react with the rate λ . Tubes connecting containers allow for the exchange of chemicals with the transport rate D . A situation is considered where a number of reactants is small and kinetics is noise dominated. A method is presented that can be used to calculate the average and higher moments of the reaction time. A number of different chemical reactions are studied and their performance compared in various ways. Two schemes are discussed in general, the reaction on a fixed geometry ensemble (ROGE) and the geometry on a fixed reaction ensemble, examples are given in the ROGE case. The most important findings are as follows. (i) There is a large number of reactions that run faster in a networklike geometry. Such reactions contain antagonistic catalytic influences in the intermediate stages of a reaction scheme that are best dealt with in a networklike structure. (ii) Antagonistic catalytic influences are hard to identify since they are strongly connected to the pattern of injected molecules (inject pattern) and depend on the choice of molecules that have to be synthesized at the end (task pattern). (iii) The reaction time depends strongly on the details of the inject and task patterns.

  6. Transport and Reactivity of Decontaminants to Provide Hazard Mitigation of Chemical Warfare Agents from Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    A combined approach was developed that integrated two types of testing—dilute liquid-phase reactor results to determine 18 chemical reactivity...TRANSPORT AND REACTIVITY OF DECONTAMINANTS TO PROVIDE HAZARD MITIGATION OF CHEMICAL ...2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Transport and Reactivity of Decontaminants to Provide Hazard Mitigation of Chemical Warfare Agents from Materials 5a

  7. Investigation of diamond deposition by chemical vapor transport with hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piekarczyk, Wladyslaw; Messier, Russell F.; Roy, Rustum; Engdahl, Chris

    1990-12-01

    The carbon-hydrogen chemical vapor transport system was examined in accordance with a four-stage transport model. A result of this examination is that graphite co-deposition could be avoided when diamond is deposited from gas solutions under-saturated with respect to diamond. Actual deposition experiments showed that this unusual requirement can be fulfilled but only for the condition that the transport distance between the carbon source and the substrate surface is short. In such a case diamond can be deposited equally from super-saturated as well as from under-saturated gas solutions. On the basis of thermodynamic considerations a possible explanation of this unusual phenomenon is given. It is shown that there is a possibility of deposition of diamond from both super-saturated as well as under-saturated gas solutions but only on the condition that they are in a non-equilibrium state generally called the activated state. A model of the diamond deposition process consisting of two steps is proposed. In the first step diamond and graphite are deposited simultaneously. The most important carbon deposition reaction is C2H2(g) + 2 H(g) C(diamond graphite) + CH(g). The amount of co-deposited graphite is not a direct function of the saturation state of the gas phase. In the second step graphite is etched according to the most probable reaction C(graphite) + 4 H(g) CH4(g). Atomic hydrogen in a super-equilibrium concentration is necessary not only to etch graphite but also to precipitate and graphite. 1.

  8. Chemical Processing and Transport in the Stratospheric Vortex and Subvortex from Satellite Measurements and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santee, Michelle; Manney, Gloria; MacKenzie, Ian; Chipperfield, Martyn; Feng, Wuhu; Sander, Stanley; Froidevaux, Lucien; Livesey, Nathaniel; Bernath, Peter; Walker, Kaley; Boone, Chris

    A suite of atmospheric composition measurements from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on NASA's Aura satellite and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) on Canada's SCISAT-1 mission is used to study chemical processing in and dispersal of chemically-processed air from the lower stratospheric polar vortices. In particular, interannual and interhemispheric variability in chlorine activation and deactivation are investigated using measurements of ClO, HCl, and ClONO2. Theoretical understanding is assessed by comparing measurements to customized runs of the SLIMCAT 3D chemical transport model. Results are shown from a newly-updated version of the model that incorporates a sophisticated microphysical scheme as a fully-coupled module, allowing polar stratospheric cloud formation and sedimentation to be calculated interactively in full-chemistry simulations. The impact of recently-published ClOOCl absorption cross sections, which yield a stratospheric ClOOCl photolysis rate substantially lower than previous estimates, on the agreement between modelled and measured chlorine species is evaluated. In addition, measurements of HNO3 and O3 and SLIMCAT results are related to mixing diagnostics to track the springtime export of denitrified, ozone-depleted air from the "subvortex", the transition zone (potential temperatures of 350-450 K) between the region above of strong confinement inside the polar vortex and the region below of less restricted exchange with lower-latitude air. Particularly over Antarctica, such mixing of processed air out of the subvortex may significantly affect the composition of the midlatitude lowermost stratosphere and upper troposphere.

  9. Chemical transport through continental crust: (Annual) progress report, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-20

    The main objective of these studies is to understand the extent and mechanisms of chemical migration over a range of temperatures and in diverse geologic media. During 1988--1989 we continued to attack these problems through studies in the granite-pegmatite systems of the Black Hills, South Dakota. Mineral chemistry, major element chemistry and trace element modeling of the Harney Peak Granite (Black Hills, South Dakota) suggest that 75% to 80% fractional crystallization was the dominant mechanism in producing evolved tourmaline-bearing granite (high B, Li, Rb, Cs, Be, Nb) from a biotite-muscovite granite. To evaluate the petrogenetic-evolutionary relations between the granite and the surrounding rare-element pegmatite field, over 500 K-feldspars (Kf) were analyzed from 60 unzoned to complexly zoned pegmatites. Pegmatites with Kf relatively high in Ba (>140 ppM) and relatively low in Rb (<1000 ppM) and Cs (<30 ppM) are distributed in regions of high pegmatite density (>200 pegmatites/sq. mile), whereas highly evolved pegmatites with Kf enriched in Rb (>4000 ppM) and Cs (>500 ppM) are distributed in regions of low pegmatite density (<100 pegmatites/sq. mile). The extent of pegmatite evolution as reflected in the Kf documents the relation between the degree of fractionation and internal zoning characteristics. Modeling of these data is a major task for the next grant year to provide new insights into chemical and thermal transport in the midcrust.

  10. 3D polymer scaffold arrays.

    PubMed

    Simon, Carl G; Yang, Yanyin; Dorsey, Shauna M; Ramalingam, Murugan; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a combinatorial platform for fabricating tissue scaffold arrays that can be used for screening cell-material interactions. Traditional research involves preparing samples one at a time for characterization and testing. Combinatorial and high-throughput (CHT) methods lower the cost of research by reducing the amount of time and material required for experiments by combining many samples into miniaturized specimens. In order to help accelerate biomaterials research, many new CHT methods have been developed for screening cell-material interactions where materials are presented to cells as a 2D film or surface. However, biomaterials are frequently used to fabricate 3D scaffolds, cells exist in vivo in a 3D environment and cells cultured in a 3D environment in vitro typically behave more physiologically than those cultured on a 2D surface. Thus, we have developed a platform for fabricating tissue scaffold libraries where biomaterials can be presented to cells in a 3D format.

  11. Autofocus for 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Elkin, Forest

    2008-04-01

    Three dimensional (3D) autofocus remains a significant challenge for the development of practical 3D multipass radar imaging. The current 2D radar autofocus methods are not readily extendable across sensor passes. We propose a general framework that allows a class of data adaptive solutions for 3D auto-focus across passes with minimal constraints on the scene contents. The key enabling assumption is that portions of the scene are sparse in elevation which reduces the number of free variables and results in a system that is simultaneously solved for scatterer heights and autofocus parameters. The proposed method extends 2-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) methods to an arbitrary number of passes allowing the consideration of scattering from multiple height locations. A specific case from the proposed autofocus framework is solved and demonstrates autofocus and coherent multipass 3D estimation across the 8 passes of the "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set" X-Band radar data.

  12. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  13. TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation outline: transport principles, effective solubility; gasoline composition; and field examples (plume diving).
    Presentation conclusions: MTBE transport follows from - phyiscal and chemical properties and hydrology. Field examples show: MTBE plumes > benzene plu...

  14. Tumor Targeting with Novel 6-Substituted Pyrrolo [2,3-d] Pyrimidine Antifolates with Heteroatom Bridge Substitutions via Cellular Uptake by Folate Receptor α and the Proton-Coupled Folate Transporter and Inhibition of de Novo Purine Nucleotide Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Golani, Lalit K; Wallace-Povirk, Adrianne; Deis, Siobhan M; Wong, Jennifer; Ke, Jiyuan; Gu, Xin; Raghavan, Sudhir; Wilson, Mike R; Li, Xinxin; Polin, Lisa; de Waal, Parker W; White, Kathryn; Kushner, Juiwanna; O'Connor, Carrie; Hou, Zhanjun; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten; Dann, Charles E; Matherly, Larry H; Gangjee, Aleem

    2016-09-08

    Targeted antifolates with heteroatom replacements of the carbon vicinal to the phenyl ring in 1 by N (4), O (8), or S (9), or with N-substituted formyl (5), acetyl (6), or trifluoroacetyl (7) moieties, were synthesized and tested for selective cellular uptake by folate receptor (FR) α and β or the proton-coupled folate transporter. Results show increased in vitro antiproliferative activity toward engineered Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing FRs by 4-9 over the CH2 analogue 1. Compounds 4-9 inhibited de novo purine biosynthesis and glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase (GARFTase). X-ray crystal structures for 4 with FRα and GARFTase showed that the bound conformations of 4 required flexibility for attachment to both FRα and GARFTase. In mice bearing IGROV1 ovarian tumor xenografts, 4 was highly efficacious. Our results establish that heteroatom substitutions in the 3-atom bridge region of 6-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidines related to 1 provide targeted antifolates that warrant further evaluation as anticancer agents.

  15. Influence of nonlinear chemical reactions on the transport coefficients in oscillatory Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, Swarup; Dalal, D. C.

    2016-10-01

    A multiple-scale method of averaging is applied to the study of transport of a chemical species in oscillatory Couette flow where the species may undergoes a reversible phase exchange with the boundary wall and nonlinear chemical reactions both within the fluid and at the boundary wall. Analytical expressions are obtained for transport coefficients. The results shows how the transport coefficients are influenced by the reversible phase exchange reaction kinetics and the rate and degree of the nonlinear decay chemical reaction.

  16. Transport, chemical and electrochemical processes in a planar solid oxide fuel cell: Detailed three-dimensional modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Thinh X.; Kosinski, Pawel; Hoffmann, Alex C.; Vik, Arild

    A detailed numerical three-dimensional (3D) model for a planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is developed in this paper. The 3D model takes into account detailed processes including transport, chemical and electrochemical processes taking place in the cell. Moreover, effects of the composite electrodes are taken into account by considering an electrochemically active layer of finite thickness in each of the electrodes. The developed model is applied to a repeating unit of an anode-supported SOFC working under direct internal reforming conditions. Detailed results for chemical species, temperature, current density and electric potential distribution are presented and discussed. It was found that the temperature distribution across the cell is more uniform in the interconnects than in the inner part of the cell. However, only small differences in the electric potential between the electrode and the corresponding interconnect are found. The current density in the electrodes is found to be high near the electrolyte and low deep into the electrochemically active layer. The current density is also low under the ribs of the interconnects.

  17. Thermal-chemical-mechanical feedback during fluid-rock interactions: Implications for chemical transport and scales of equilibria in the crust

    SciTech Connect

    Dutrow, Barbara

    2008-08-13

    Our research evaluates the hypothesis that feedback amongst thermal-chemical-mechanical processes operative in fluid-rock systems alters the fluid flow dynamics of the system which, in turn, affects chemical transport and temporal and spatial scales of equilibria, thus impacting the resultant mineral textural development of rocks. Our methods include computational experimentation and detailed analyses of fluid-infiltrated rocks from well-characterized terranes. This work focuses on metamorphic rocks and hydrothermal systems where minerals and their textures are utilized to evaluate pressure (P), temperature (T), and time (t) paths in the evolution of mountain belts and ore deposits, and to interpret tectonic events and the timing of these events. Our work on coupled processes also extends to other areas where subsurface flow and transport in porous media have consequences such as oil and gas movement, geothermal system development, transport of contaminants, nuclear waste disposal, and other systems rich in fluid-rock reactions. Fluid-rock systems are widespread in the geologic record. Correctly deciphering the products resulting from such systems is important to interpreting a number of geologic phenomena. These systems are characterized by complex interactions involving time-dependent, non-linear processes in heterogeneous materials. While many of these interactions have been studied in isolation, they are more appropriately analyzed in the context of a system with feedback. When one process impacts another process, time and space scales as well as the overall outcome of the interaction can be dramatically altered. Our goals to test this hypothesis are: to develop and incorporate algorithms into our 3D heat and mass transport code to allow the effects of feedback to be investigated numerically, to analyze fluid infiltrated rocks from a variety of terranes at differing P-T conditions, to identify subtle features of the infiltration of fluids and/or feedback, and

  18. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  19. Analysis of stereoelectronic properties, mechanism of action and pharmacophore of synthetic indolo[2,1-b]quinazoline-6,12-dione derivatives in relation to antileishmanial activity using quantum chemical, cyclic voltammetry and 3-D-QSAR CATALYST procedures.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Apurba K; Skanchy, David J; Jennings, Barton; Hudson, Thomas H; Brendle, James J; Werbovetz, Karl A

    2002-06-01

    Several indolo[2,1-b]quinazoline-6,12-dione (tryptanthrin) derivatives exhibited remarkable activity at concentrations below 100 ng/mL when tested against in vitro Leishmania donovani amastigotes. The in vitro toxicity studies indicate that the compounds are fairly well tolerated in both macrophage and neuronal lines. An analysis based on qualitative and quantitative structure-activity relationship studies between in vitro antileishmanial activity and molecular electronic structure of 27 analogues of indolo[2,1-b]quinazoline-6,12-dione is presented here by using a combination of semi-empirical AM1 quantum chemical, cyclic voltammetry and a pharmacophore generation (CATALYST) methods. A modest to good correlation is observed between activity and a few calculated molecular properties such as molecular density, octanol-water partition coefficient, molecular orbital energies, and redox potentials. Electron transfer seems to be a plausible path in the mechanism of action of the compounds. A pharmacophore generated by using the 3-D QSAR of CATALYST produced a fairly accurate predictive model of antileishmanial activity of the tryptanthrins. The validity of the pharmacophore model extends to structurally different class of compounds that could open new frontiers for study. The carbonyl group of the five- and six-membered rings in the indolo[2,1-b]quinazoline-6,12-dione skeleton and the electron transfer ability to the carbonyl atom appear to be crucial for activity.

  20. 3D Cell Culture in Alginate Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Therese; Auk-Emblem, Pia; Dornish, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This review compiles information regarding the use of alginate, and in particular alginate hydrogels, in culturing cells in 3D. Knowledge of alginate chemical structure and functionality are shown to be important parameters in design of alginate-based matrices for cell culture. Gel elasticity as well as hydrogel stability can be impacted by the type of alginate used, its concentration, the choice of gelation technique (ionic or covalent), and divalent cation chosen as the gel inducing ion. The use of peptide-coupled alginate can control cell–matrix interactions. Gelation of alginate with concomitant immobilization of cells can take various forms. Droplets or beads have been utilized since the 1980s for immobilizing cells. Newer matrices such as macroporous scaffolds are now entering the 3D cell culture product market. Finally, delayed gelling, injectable, alginate systems show utility in the translation of in vitro cell culture to in vivo tissue engineering applications. Alginate has a history and a future in 3D cell culture. Historically, cells were encapsulated in alginate droplets cross-linked with calcium for the development of artificial organs. Now, several commercial products based on alginate are being used as 3D cell culture systems that also demonstrate the possibility of replacing or regenerating tissue. PMID:27600217

  1. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  2. Atmospheric Transport During the Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific TRACE-P Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, Henry E.; Kiley, C. M.; Hannan, J. R.; Westberg, D. J.; Avery, M. A.; Newell, R. E.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric transport over the Pacific Basin is described during NASA's Transport and Chemical Evolution Over the Pacific Experiment (TRACE-P) that was conducted between February - April 2001. The mission included extensive chemical sampling from two aircraft based primarily in Hong Kong and Yokota Air Base, Japan. Meteorological conditions during TRACE-P changed rapidly due to the seasonal winter/spring transition and the decay of prolonged ENSO cold phase (La Nina) conditions. To document these changes, TRACE-P was divided into two halves, and mean flow patterns during each half are presented and discussed. Important circulation features are the semi-permanent Siberian anticyclone and transient middle latitude cyclones that form near eastern Asia and then move eastward over the northern Pacific. Five-day backward trajectories from the various flight tracks show that air sampled by the aircraft had been transported from a variety of locations. Some parcels remained over the tropical western North Pacific during the entire period, while other important origins were Southeast Asia, Africa, and central Asia. Patterns of satellite-derived precipitation and lightning are described. TRACE-P occurs during a neutral to weak La Nina period of relatively cold sea surface temperatures in the tropical Pacific. Compared to climatology, the TRACE-P period exhibits deep convection located west of its typical position; however, tropospheric flow patterns do not exhibit a strong La Nina signal. Circulation patterns during TRACE-P are found to be generally similar to those during NASA's PEM WEST-B mission that occurred in the same region during February - March 1994.

  3. 3D visualization of polymer nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, James H

    2009-01-01

    Soft materials and structured polymers are extremely useful nanotechnology building blocks. Block copolymers, in particular, have served as 2D masks for nanolithography and 3D scaffolds for photonic crystals, nanoparticle fabrication, and solar cells. F or many of these applications, the precise 3 dimensional structure and the number and type of defects in the polymer is important for ultimate function. However, directly visualizing the 3D structure of a soft material from the nanometer to millimeter length scales is a significant technical challenge. Here, we propose to develop the instrumentation needed for direct 3D structure determination at near nanometer resolution throughout a nearly millimeter-cubed volume of a soft, potentially heterogeneous, material. This new capability will be a valuable research tool for LANL missions in chemistry, materials science, and nanoscience. Our approach to soft materials visualization builds upon exciting developments in super-resolution optical microscopy that have occurred over the past two years. To date, these new, truly revolutionary, imaging methods have been developed and almost exclusively used for biological applications. However, in addition to biological cells, these super-resolution imaging techniques hold extreme promise for direct visualization of many important nanostructured polymers and other heterogeneous chemical systems. Los Alamos has a unique opportunity to lead the development of these super-resolution imaging methods for problems of chemical rather than biological significance. While these optical methods are limited to systems transparent to visible wavelengths, we stress that many important functional chemicals such as polymers, glasses, sol-gels, aerogels, or colloidal assemblies meet this requirement, with specific examples including materials designed for optical communication, manipulation, or light-harvesting Our Research Goals are: (1) Develop the instrumentation necessary for imaging materials

  4. INTEX-NA: Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment - North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Hanwant B.; Jacob, D.; Pfister, L.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    INTEX-NA is an integrated atmospheric chemistry field experiment to be performed over North America using the NASA DC-8 and P-3B aircraft as its primary platforms. It seeks to understand the exchange of chemicals and aerosols between continents and the global troposphere. The constituents of interest are ozone and its precursors (hydrocarbons, NOX and HOX), aerosols, and the major greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N2O). INTEX-NA will provide the observational database needed to quantify inflow, outflow, and transformations of chemicals over North America. INTEX-NA is to be performed in two phases. Phase A will take place during the period of May-August 2004 and Phase B during March-June 2006. Phase A is in summer when photochemistry is most intense and climatic issues involving aerosols and carbon cycle are most pressing, and Phase B is in spring when Asian transport to North America is at its peak. INTEX-NA will coordinate its activities with concurrent measurement programs including satellites (e. g. Terra, Aura, Envisat), field activities undertaken by the North American Carbon Program (NACP), and other U.S. and international partners. However, it is being designed as a 'stand alone' mission such that its successful execution is not contingent on other programs. Synthesis of the ensemble of observation from surface, airborne, and space platforms, with the help of global/regional models is an important It is anticipated that approximately 175 flight hours for each of the aircraft (DC-8 and P-3B) will be required for each Phase. Principal operational sites are tentatively selected to be Bangor, ME; Wallops Island, VA; Seattle, WA; Rhinelander, WI; Lancaster, CA; and New Orleans, LA. These coastal and continental sites can support large missions and are suitable for INTEX-NA objectives. The experiment will be supported by forecasts from meteorological and chemical models, satellite observations, surface networks, and enhanced O3,-sonde releases. In addition to

  5. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  6. EFIT 3D Reconstruction and Recent Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, L. L.; Chu, M. S.; St. John, H. E.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A. D.; Ren, Q.; Jeon, Y. M.; Flannagan, D.

    2007-11-01

    Recent 3D extension of the EFIT equilibrium reconstruction code to model toroidally asymmetric effects due to error and externally applied perturbation magnetic fields and other developments are presented. The 3D extension is based on an expansion of the MHD equations. Other developments include a new computational structure based on Fortran 90/95 with a unified interface that can conveniently accommodate different tokamak devices and grid sizes, as well as a Python-based GUI. New computational links that allow easy integration with transport and stability physics modules to facilitate kinetic reconstruction and stability analysis are also being developed. A new more complete uncertainty matrix for magnetic diagnostics based on knowledge about their fabrication, installation, calibration, and operation has also been implemented into EFIT and tested. Reconstructions with the new magnetic uncertainty matrix yield results similar to those using the existing one but with more realistic fitting merit figures.

  7. Improving Lightning NO(x) Parameterizations for Global Chemical Transport Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickering, Kenneth E.; Ott, Lesley E.; DeCaria, Alex J.; Stenchikov, Georgiy L.; Allen, Dale J.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2006-01-01

    Parameterization of lightning NO(x) in global chemical transport models requires a method to specify the temporal and geographic distribution of flash rates, an estimate of NO production per flash, and a method to specify the effective vertical distribution of NO production. Flash rate parameterizations using the upward convective cloud mass flux have been developed and tested for several GCM and assimilated meteorological data sets. This parameterization and others involving the cloud-top height and convective precipitation provide a generally acceptable climatological distribution of flashes after normalization with satellite data. However, considerable improvement in terms of geographic and temporal variability may be achieved in the future using cloud microphysics data available from next-generation GCMs. Cloud-resolving case-study simulations of convective transport and lightning NO production have yielded results which are directly applicable to the NO production per flash and the vertical NO distribution portions of the global model lightning parameterizations. In this work we have used cloud-resolving models (the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model (GCE) and MM5) to drive an off-line cloud-scale chemical transport model (CSCTM). The CSCTM, in conjunction with aircraft measurements of NO(x) in thunderstorms and ground-based lightning observations, has been used to constrain the amount of NO produced per flash. Observed lightning flash rates have been incorporated into the CSCTM, and several scenarios of NO production per intracloud (IC) and per cloud-to-ground (CG) flash have been tested in each of several case study storms. The resulting NO(x) mixing ratios are compared with aircraft measurements taken within the storm (typically the anvil region) to determine the most likely NO production scenario. The range of values of NO production per flash (or per meter of lightning channel length) that have been deduced from the model will be shown and compared with

  8. Significant enhancement of power conversion efficiency for dye sensitized solar cell using 1D/3D network nanostructures as photoanodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Baoyuan; Yu, Jichao; Hu, Yunxia; Xia, Chen; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    The single–crystalline TiO2 nanorod arrays with rutile phase have attracted much attention in the dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) applications because of their superior chemical stability, better electron transport properties, higher refractive index and low production cost. However, it suffers from a low surface area as compared with TiO2 nanoparticle films. In order to enlarge the surface area of TiO2 nanorod arrays, the 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes sample was synthesized using a facile two-step hydrothermal process involving hydrothermal growth 1D/3D nanorods and followed by post-etching treatment. In such bi-layer structure, the oriented TiO2 nanorods layer could provide direct pathway for fast electron transportation, and the 3D nanotubes layer offers a higher surface area for dye loading, therefore, the 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes photoanode exhibited faster electron transport and higher surface area than either 1D or 3D nanostructures alone, and an highest efficiency of 7.68% was achieved for the DSSCs based on 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes photoanode with further TiCl4 treatment. PMID:25800933

  9. Macrophage podosomes go 3D.

    PubMed

    Van Goethem, Emeline; Guiet, Romain; Balor, Stéphanie; Charrière, Guillaume M; Poincloux, Renaud; Labrousse, Arnaud; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Le Cabec, Véronique

    2011-01-01

    Macrophage tissue infiltration is a critical step in the immune response against microorganisms and is also associated with disease progression in chronic inflammation and cancer. Macrophages are constitutively equipped with specialized structures called podosomes dedicated to extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. We recently reported that these structures play a critical role in trans-matrix mesenchymal migration mode, a protease-dependent mechanism. Podosome molecular components and their ECM-degrading activity have been extensively studied in two dimensions (2D), but yet very little is known about their fate in three-dimensional (3D) environments. Therefore, localization of podosome markers and proteolytic activity were carefully examined in human macrophages performing mesenchymal migration. Using our gelled collagen I 3D matrix model to obligate human macrophages to perform mesenchymal migration, classical podosome markers including talin, paxillin, vinculin, gelsolin, cortactin were found to accumulate at the tip of F-actin-rich cell protrusions together with β1 integrin and CD44 but not β2 integrin. Macrophage proteolytic activity was observed at podosome-like protrusion sites using confocal fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. The formation of migration tunnels by macrophages inside the matrix was accomplished by degradation, engulfment and mechanic compaction of the matrix. In addition, videomicroscopy revealed that 3D F-actin-rich protrusions of migrating macrophages were as dynamic as their 2D counterparts. Overall, the specifications of 3D podosomes resembled those of 2D podosome rosettes rather than those of individual podosomes. This observation was further supported by the aspect of 3D podosomes in fibroblasts expressing Hck, a master regulator of podosome rosettes in macrophages. In conclusion, human macrophage podosomes go 3D and take the shape of spherical podosome rosettes when the cells perform mesenchymal migration. This work

  10. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K; Johnson, Blake N; McAlpine, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and 'living' platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with the

  11. DNA Charge Transport: From Chemical Principles to the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Anna R.; Grodick, Michael A.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2016-01-01

    The DNA double helix has captured the imagination of many, bringing it to the forefront of biological research. DNA has unique features that extend our interest into areas of chemistry, physics, material science and engineering. Our laboratory has focused on studies of DNA charge transport (CT), wherein charges can efficiently travel long molecular distances through the DNA helix while maintaining an exquisite sensitivity to base pair π-stacking. Because DNA CT chemistry reports on the integrity of the DNA duplex, this property may be exploited to develop electrochemical devices to detect DNA lesions and DNA-binding proteins. Furthermore, studies now indicate that DNA CT may also be used in the cell by, for example, DNA repair proteins, as a cellular diagnostic, in order to scan the genome to localize efficiently to damage sites. In this review, we describe this evolution of DNA CT chemistry from the discovery of fundamental chemical principles to applications in diagnostic strategies and possible roles in biology. PMID:26933744

  12. Petal, terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at the lower area of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The metallic object at lower right is part of the lander's low-gain antenna. This image is part of a 3D 'monster

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  13. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  14. 3D Structures of Responsive Nanocompartmentalized Microgels.

    PubMed

    Gelissen, Arjan P H; Oppermann, Alex; Caumanns, Tobias; Hebbeker, Pascal; Turnhoff, Sarah K; Tiwari, Rahul; Eisold, Sabine; Simon, Ulrich; Lu, Yan; Mayer, Joachim; Richtering, Walter; Walther, Andreas; Wöll, Dominik

    2016-11-09

    Compartmentalization in soft matter is important for segregating and coordinating chemical reactions, sequestering (re)active components, and integrating multifunctionality. Advances depend crucially on quantitative 3D visualization in situ with high spatiotemporal resolution. Here, we show the direct visualization of different compartments within adaptive microgels using a combination of in situ electron and super-resolved fluorescence microscopy. We unravel new levels of structural details and address the challenge of reconstructing 3D information from 2D projections for nonuniform soft matter as opposed to monodisperse proteins. Moreover, we visualize the thermally induced shrinkage of responsive core-shell microgels live in water. This strategy opens doors for systematic in situ studies of soft matter systems and their application as smart materials.

  15. Effects of occupation-numbers in (3d-5d) and U energy on transport and magnetic properties of complex perovskites Pb2MReO6 (M = Cr, Mn and Fe) by LSDA and LSDA + U methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa Saad H.-E., M.

    2017-02-01

    Three compounds of lead-based complex perovskites Pb2MReO6 (M = Cr, Mn and Fe) have been investigated in detail based on density functional theory (DFT) using local spin density approximation (LSDA) and (LSDA + U) methods. By introducing a series of 3d-ions in M-site, the number of valence electrons that occupied the 3d-orbitals can be increased from Cr3+(3d3) to Mn2+(3d5) and Fe3+(3d5), and this beside the effect of energy U are the main factors that influenced the physical properties of Pb2MReO6. Magnetic and electronic calculations showed that all Pb2MReO6 compounds have ferrimagnetic half-metallic (FI-HM) properties. FI-HM are attributed to the M (3d)-Re (5d) hybridization through the strong 180° super-exchange (SE) interaction via the long-range pathway M (3d)↑-O (2p)-Re (5d)↓, in conformity with both Pauli Exclusion principles and Goodenough-Kanamori rules. This result is interpreted within a scenario where the Re (5d) states play a crucial role in the FI-HM ground state.

  16. The World of 3-D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayshark, Robin K.

    1991-01-01

    Students explore three-dimensional properties by creating red and green wall decorations related to Christmas. Students examine why images seem to vibrate when red and green pieces are small and close together. Instructions to conduct the activity and construct 3-D glasses are given. (MDH)

  17. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  18. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  19. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  20. 3D printing in chemistry: past, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatford, Ryan; Karanassios, Vassili

    2016-05-01

    During the last years, 3d printing for rapid prototyping using additive manufacturing has been receiving increased attention in the technical and scientific literature including some Chemistry-related journals. Furthermore, 3D printing technology (defining size and resolution of 3D objects) and properties of printed materials (e.g., strength, resistance to chemical attack, electrical insulation) proved to be important for chemistry-related applications. In this paper these are discussed in detail. In addition, application of 3D printing for development of Micro Plasma Devices (MPDs) is discussed and 2d-profilometry data of a 3D printed surfaces is reported. And, past and present chemistry and bio-related applications of 3D printing are reviewed and possible future directions are postulated.

  1. Combined physical and chemical nonequilibrium transport model: Analytical solution, moments, and application to colloids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transport of solutes and colloids in porous media is influenced by a variety of physical and chemical nonequilibrium processes. A combined physical–chemical nonequilibrium (PCNE) model was therefore used to describe general mass transport. The model partitions the pore space into “mobile” and “i...

  2. 3D Printed Molecules and Extended Solid Models for Teaching Symmetry and Point Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scalfani, Vincent F.; Vaid, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    Tangible models help students and researchers visualize chemical structures in three dimensions (3D). 3D printing offers a unique and straightforward approach to fabricate plastic 3D models of molecules and extended solids. In this article, we prepared a series of digital 3D design files of molecular structures that will be useful for teaching…

  3. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  4. Ultracold polar molecules in a 3D optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bo

    2015-05-01

    Ultracold polar molecules, with their long-range electric dipolar interactions, offer new opportunities for studying quantum magnetism and many-body physics. KRb molecules loaded into a three-dimensional (3D) optical lattice allow one to study such a spin-lattice system in a stable environment without losses arising from chemical reactions. In the case with strong lattice confinement along two directions and a weak lattice potential along the third, we find the loss rate is suppressed by the quantum Zeno effect. In a deep 3D lattice with no tunneling, we observe evidences for spin exchange interactions. We use Ramsey spectroscopy to investigate the spin dynamics. By choosing the appropriate lattice polarizations and implementing a spin echo sequence, the single particle dephasing is largely suppressed, leaving the dipolar exchange interactions as the dominant contribution to the observed dynamics. This is supported by many-body theoretical calculations. While this initial demonstration was done with low lattice fillings, our current experimental efforts are focused on increasing the lattice filling fraction. This will greatly benefit the study of complex many-body dynamics with long-range interactions, such as transport of excitations in an out-of-equilibrium system and spin-orbit coupling in a lattice.

  5. Acoustic charge transport induced by the surface acoustic wave in chemical doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Shijun; Zhang, Hao; Feng, Zhihong; Yu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Rui; Sun, Chongling; Liu, Jing; Duan, Xuexin; Pang, Wei; Zhang, Daihua

    2016-10-01

    A graphene/LiNbO3 hybrid device is used to investigate the acoustic induced charge transport in chemical doped graphene. The chemical doping of graphene via its physisorption of gas molecules affects the surface acoustic wave (SAW) charge carrier transport in a manner different from electric field drift. That transport induces doping dependent macroscopic acoustoelectric current. The chemical doping can manipulate majority carriers and induces unique acoustoelectric features. The observation is explained by a classical relaxation model. Eventually the device based on acoustoelectric current is proved to outperform the common chemiresistor for chemicals. Our finding provides insight into acoustic charge carrier transport during chemical doping. The doping affects interaction of carriers with SAW phonon and facilitates the understanding of nanoscale acoustoelectric effect. The exploration inspires potential acoustoelectric application for chemical detection involving emerging 2D nanomaterials.

  6. MSV3d: database of human MisSense Variants mapped to 3D protein structure.

    PubMed

    Luu, Tien-Dao; Rusu, Alin-Mihai; Walter, Vincent; Ripp, Raymond; Moulinier, Luc; Muller, Jean; Toursel, Thierry; Thompson, Julie D; Poch, Olivier; Nguyen, Hoan

    2012-01-01

    The elucidation of the complex relationships linking genotypic and phenotypic variations to protein structure is a major challenge in the post-genomic era. We present MSV3d (Database of human MisSense Variants mapped to 3D protein structure), a new database that contains detailed annotation of missense variants of all human proteins (20 199 proteins). The multi-level characterization includes details of the physico-chemical changes induced by amino acid modification, as well as information related to the conservation of the mutated residue and its position relative to functional features in the available or predicted 3D model. Major releases of the database are automatically generated and updated regularly in line with the dbSNP (database of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) and SwissVar releases, by exploiting the extensive Décrypthon computational grid resources. The database (http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/msv3d) is easily accessible through a simple web interface coupled to a powerful query engine and a standard web service. The content is completely or partially downloadable in XML or flat file formats. Database URL: http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/msv3d.

  7. Forensic 3D scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles Q.; Small, Daniel E.; Peters, Ralph R.; Rigdon, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a fieldable prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  8. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  9. Comparing swimsuits in 3D.

    PubMed

    van Geer, Erik; Molenbroek, Johan; Schreven, Sander; deVoogd-Claessen, Lenneke; Toussaint, Huib

    2012-01-01

    In competitive swimming, suits have become more important. These suits influence friction, pressure and wave drag. Friction drag is related to the surface properties whereas both pressure and wave drag are greatly influenced by body shape. To find a relationship between the body shape and the drag, the anthropometry of several world class female swimmers wearing different suits was accurately defined using a 3D scanner and traditional measuring methods. The 3D scans delivered more detailed information about the body shape. On the same day the swimmers did performance tests in the water with the tested suits. Afterwards the result of the performance tests and the differences found in body shape was analyzed to determine the deformation caused by a swimsuit and its effect on the swimming performance. Although the amount of data is limited because of the few test subjects, there is an indication that the deformation of the body influences the swimming performance.

  10. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  11. 3D-graphite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Belenkov, E. A. Ali-Pasha, V. A.

    2011-01-15

    The structure of clusters of some new carbon 3D-graphite phases have been calculated using the molecular-mechanics methods. It is established that 3D-graphite polytypes {alpha}{sub 1,1}, {alpha}{sub 1,3}, {alpha}{sub 1,5}, {alpha}{sub 2,1}, {alpha}{sub 2,3}, {alpha}{sub 3,1}, {beta}{sub 1,2}, {beta}{sub 1,4}, {beta}{sub 1,6}, {beta}{sub 2,1}, and {beta}{sub 3,2} consist of sp{sup 2}-hybridized atoms, have hexagonal unit cells, and differ in regards to the structure of layers and order of their alternation. A possible way to experimentally synthesize new carbon phases is proposed: the polymerization and carbonization of hydrocarbon molecules.

  12. Sensitivity of chemical transport model simulations to the duration of chemical and transport operators: a case study with GEOS-Chem v10-01

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, S.; Martin, R. V.; Keller, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    Chemical transport models involve considerable computational expense. Fine temporal resolution offers accuracy at the expense of computation time. Assessment is needed of the sensitivity of simulation accuracy to the duration of chemical and transport operators. We conduct a series of simulations with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model at different temporal and spatial resolutions to examine the sensitivity of simulated atmospheric composition to temporal resolution. Subsequently, we compare the tracers simulated with operator durations from 10 to 60 min as typically used by global chemical transport models, and identify the timesteps that optimize both computational expense and simulation accuracy. We found that longer transport timesteps increase concentrations of emitted species such as nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide since a more homogeneous distribution reduces loss through chemical reactions and dry deposition. The increased concentrations of ozone precursors increase ozone production at longer transport timesteps. Longer chemical timesteps decrease sulfate and ammonium but increase nitrate due to feedbacks with in-cloud sulfur dioxide oxidation and aerosol thermodynamics. The simulation duration decreases by an order of magnitude from fine (5 min) to coarse (60 min) temporal resolution. We assess the change in simulation accuracy with resolution by comparing the root mean square difference in ground-level concentrations of nitrogen oxides, ozone, carbon monoxide and secondary inorganic aerosols with a finer temporal or spatial resolution taken as truth. Simulation error for these species increases by more than a factor of 5 from the shortest (5 min) to longest (60 min) temporal resolution. Chemical timesteps twice that of the transport timestep offer more simulation accuracy per unit computation. However, simulation error from coarser spatial resolution generally exceeds that from longer timesteps; e.g. degrading from 2° × 2.5° to 4° × 5

  13. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  14. 78 FR 1765 - Requirements for Chemical Oxygen Generators Installed on Transport Category Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 RIN 2120-AK14 Requirements for Chemical Oxygen Generators... requirements for chemical oxygen generators installed on transport category airplanes so the generators are... Committee COG--Chemical Oxygen Generator LOARC--Lavatory Oxygen Aviation Rulemaking Committee SaO 2...

  15. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer the second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.

  16. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  17. Insights into Chemical Transport and Oxidative Processing in the Arctic Springtime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Flocke, F. M.; Hall, S. R.; Hills, A. J.; Montzka, D.; Orlando, J. J.; Turnipseed, A. A.; Ullmann, K.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Mauldin, L.; Riemer, D. D.; Shepson, P. B.; Sive, B. C.; Staebler, R. M.; Blake, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    Gas-phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured at several levels between the snow surface and 6 m in the Arctic boundary layer in Barrow, Alaska for the OASIS-2009 field campaign during March and April 2009, as part of the International Polar Year (IPY). Nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) from C4-C8 and oxygenated VOCs, including alcohols, aldehydes and ketones were quantified multiple times per hour, day and night during the campaign using in-situ fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (fast-GC/MS). Samples were also collected in canisters two to three times daily and subsequently analyzed for C2-C8 NMHCs. The NMHCs and aldehydes all showed decreasing mixing ratios with time during the experiment whereas acetone and MEK showed increases. These results are interpreted in the context of a box model and a 3D chemical transport model. After adjusting for seasonal trends in the VOCs, acetone, MEK and 2-pentanone were all negatively correlated with O3, while NMHCs, methanol, ethanol, acetaldehyde, propanal and butanal were all positively correlated with O3. Several ozone depletion events (ODEs) during the study provided an opportunity to investigate the large perturbations due to halogen chemistry on the production and loss of VOCs in the air masses at the sampling site. Notably, aldehyde mixing ratios dropped below the detection limit of the instrument (< 3 pptv) during the ODEs. The NCAR Master Mechanism (MM) (0-D box model), which was updated to include halogen chemistry, was able to reproduce the bromine explosion and showed consistency with key observations including the aldehyde data. Further, no clear positive or negative air-snow flux could be identified for any of the VOCs observed by fast-GC/MS during the study.

  18. Extreme Chemical Disorder and the Electrical Transport Properties of Concentrated Solid Solution Alloys: From Binaries to High Entropy Alloys Replace this text with your abstract title

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocks, G. Malcolm; Samolyuk, German; Khan, Suffian; Daene, Markus; Wimmer, Sebastian; Sales, Brian; Bei, Hongbin; Jin, Ke

    We present the results of experimental and theoretical studies of electrical transport properties of a family of 2, 3, 4 and 5-component concentrated solid solution alloys (CSA) comprising subsets of the 3d- and 4d-transition metal elements Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Pd. Many of this family of CSA show unusual mechanical, magnetic and transport properties as well as indications of increased radiation resistance that are clearly related to the underlying chemical disorder. Here we show the results of calculations of the electrical transport properties that are based on the ab initio Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker coherent-potential-approximation (KKR-CPA) method for treating the effect of substitutional disorder, and necessary configurational averaging, on the underlying electronic structure. We compare calculated residual (T =0K) resistivities to corresponding experimental measurements and relate the variations in residual resistivity, which span almost two orders of magnitude, to the underlying electron structure.

  19. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  20. What Lies Ahead (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed 'Mazatzal' and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as 'Site 22, Position 32.' This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

  1. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manos, Harry

    2016-03-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the TPT theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity well tailored to specific class lessons. Most of the supplies are readily available in the home or at school: rubbing alcohol, a rag, two colors of spray paint, art brushes, and masking tape. The cost of these supplies, if you don't have them, is less than 20.

  2. A Clean Adirondack (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of an area measuring 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across on the rock called Adirondack. The image was taken at Gusev Crater on the 33rd day of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's journey (Feb. 5, 2004), after the rover used its rock abrasion tool brush to clean the surface of the rock. Dust, which was pushed off to the side during cleaning, can still be seen to the left and in low areas of the rock.

  3. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie

    2015-01-09

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  4. The PRISM3D paleoenvironmental reconstruction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.; Robinson, M.; Haywood, A.M.; Salzmann, U.; Hill, Daniel; Sohl, L.E.; Chandler, M.; Williams, Mark; Foley, K.; Stoll, D.K.

    2010-01-01

    The Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping (PRISM) paleoenvironmental reconstruction is an internally consistent and comprehensive global synthesis of a past interval of relatively warm and stable climate. It is regularly used in model studies that aim to better understand Pliocene climate, to improve model performance in future climate scenarios, and to distinguish model-dependent climate effects. The PRISM reconstruction is constantly evolving in order to incorporate additional geographic sites and environmental parameters, and is continuously refined by independent research findings. The new PRISM three dimensional (3D) reconstruction differs from previous PRISM reconstructions in that it includes a subsurface ocean temperature reconstruction, integrates geochemical sea surface temperature proxies to supplement the faunal-based temperature estimates, and uses numerical models for the first time to augment fossil data. Here we describe the components of PRISM3D and describe new findings specific to the new reconstruction. Highlights of the new PRISM3D reconstruction include removal of Hudson Bay and the Great Lakes and creation of open waterways in locations where the current bedrock elevation is less than 25m above modern sea level, due to the removal of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and the reduction of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. The mid-Piacenzian oceans were characterized by a reduced east-west temperature gradient in the equatorial Pacific, but PRISM3D data do not imply permanent El Niño conditions. The reduced equator-to-pole temperature gradient that characterized previous PRISM reconstructions is supported by significant displacement of vegetation belts toward the poles, is extended into the Arctic Ocean, and is confirmed by multiple proxies in PRISM3D. Arctic warmth coupled with increased dryness suggests the formation of warm and salty paleo North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) and a more vigorous thermohaline circulation system that may

  5. Positional Awareness Map 3D (PAM3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Monica; Allen, Earl L.; Yount, John W.; Norcross, April Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center needed to address the aging software and hardware of its current situational awareness display application, the Global Real-Time Interactive Map (GRIM). GRIM was initially developed in the late 1980s and executes on older PC architectures using a Linux operating system that is no longer supported. Additionally, the software is difficult to maintain due to its complexity and loss of developer knowledge. It was decided that a replacement application must be developed or acquired in the near future. The replacement must provide the functionality of the original system, the ability to monitor test flight vehicles in real-time, and add improvements such as high resolution imagery and true 3-dimensional capability. This paper will discuss the process of determining the best approach to replace GRIM, and the functionality and capabilities of the first release of the Positional Awareness Map 3D.

  6. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  7. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C−1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  8. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    PubMed Central

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  9. Martian terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at lower left in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  10. Martian terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at the lower area of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  11. 3D structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, William M.; Goodwin, Paul C.

    2011-03-01

    Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy achieves double the lateral and axial resolution of wide-field microscopy, using conventional fluorescent dyes, proteins and sample preparation techniques. A three-dimensional interference-fringe pattern excites the fluorescence, filling in the "missing cone" of the wide field optical transfer function, thereby enabling axial (z) discrimination. The pattern acts as a spatial carrier frequency that mixes with the higher spatial frequency components of the image, which usually succumb to the diffraction limit. The fluorescence image encodes the high frequency content as a down-mixed, moiré-like pattern. A series of images is required, wherein the 3D pattern is shifted and rotated, providing down-mixed data for a system of linear equations. Super-resolution is obtained by solving these equations. The speed with which the image series can be obtained can be a problem for the microscopy of living cells. Challenges include pattern-switching speeds, optical efficiency, wavefront quality and fringe contrast, fringe pitch optimization, and polarization issues. We will review some recent developments in 3D-SIM hardware with the goal of super-resolved z-stacks of motile cells.

  12. SURFACE CHEMICAL EFFECTS ON COLLOID STABILITY AND TRANSPORT THROUGH NATURAL POROUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface chemical effects on colloidal stability and transport through porous media were investigated using laboratory column techniques. Approximately 100 nm diameter, spherical, iron oxide particles were synthesized as the mobile colloidal phase. The column packing material was ...

  13. Magnon spin transport driven by the magnon chemical potential in a magnetic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, L. J.; Peters, K. J. H.; Bauer, G. E. W.; Duine, R. A.; van Wees, B. J.

    2016-07-01

    We develop a linear-response transport theory of diffusive spin and heat transport by magnons in magnetic insulators with metallic contacts. The magnons are described by a position-dependent temperature and chemical potential that are governed by diffusion equations with characteristic relaxation lengths. Proceeding from a linearized Boltzmann equation, we derive expressions for length scales and transport coefficients. For yttrium iron garnet (YIG) at room temperature we find that long-range transport is dominated by the magnon chemical potential. We compare the model's results with recent experiments on YIG with Pt contacts [L. J. Cornelissen et al., Nat. Phys. 11, 1022 (2015), 10.1038/nphys3465] and extract a magnon spin conductivity of σm=5 ×105 S/m. Our results for the spin Seebeck coefficient in YIG agree with published experiments. We conclude that the magnon chemical potential is an essential ingredient for energy and spin transport in magnetic insulators.

  14. A Review of the Thermodynamic, Transport, and Chemical Reaction Rate Properties of High-temperature Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C Frederick; Heims, Steve P

    1958-01-01

    Thermodynamic and transport properties of high temperature air, and the reaction rates for the important chemical processes which occur in air, are reviewed. Semiempirical, analytic expressions are presented for thermodynamic and transport properties of air. Examples are given illustrating the use of these properties to evaluate (1) equilibrium conditions following shock waves, (2) stagnation region heat flux to a blunt high-speed body, and (3) some chemical relaxation lengths in stagnation region flow.

  15. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-06

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction.

  16. Coherent structures in 3D viscous time-periodic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Znaien, J. G.; Speetjens, M. F. M.; Trieling, R. R.; Clercx, H. J. H.

    2010-11-01

    Periodically driven laminar flows occur in many industrial processes from food-mixing devices to micro-mixer in lab-on-a-chip systems. The present study is motivated by better understanding fundamental transport phenomena in three-dimensional viscous time-periodic flows. Both numerical simulation and three-dimensional Particle Tracking Velocimetry measurements are performed to investigate the 3D advection of a passive scalar in a lid-driven cylindrical cavity flow. The flow is forced by a time-periodic in-plane motion of one endwall via a given forcing protocol. We concentrate on the formation and interaction of coherent structures due to fluid inertia, which play an important role in 3D mixing by geometrically determining the tracer transport. The disintegration of these structures by fluid inertia reflects an essentially 3D route to chaos. Data from tracking experiments of small particles will be compared with predictions from numerical simulations on transport of passive tracers.

  17. Quasi 3D dispersion experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakucz, P.

    2003-04-01

    This paper studies the problem of tracer dispersion in a coloured fluid flowing through a two-phase 3D rough channel-system in a 40 cm*40 cm plexi-container filled by homogen glass fractions and colourless fluid. The unstable interface between the driving coloured fluid and the colourless fluid develops viscous fingers with a fractal structure at high capillary number. Five two-dimensional fractal fronts have been observed at the same time using four cameras along the vertical side-walls and using one camera located above the plexi-container. In possession of five fronts the spatial concentration contours are determined using statistical models. The concentration contours are self-affine fractal curves with a fractal dimension D=2.19. This result is valid for disperison at high Péclet numbers.

  18. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  19. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    ScienceCinema

    Love, Lonnie

    2016-11-02

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  20. An Inverse Analysis Approach to the Characterization of Chemical Transport in Paints

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Matthew P.; Stevenson, Shawn M.; Pearl, Thomas P.; Mantooth, Brent A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to directly characterize chemical transport and interactions that occur within a material (i.e., subsurface dynamics) is a vital component in understanding contaminant mass transport and the ability to decontaminate materials. If a material is contaminated, over time, the transport of highly toxic chemicals (such as chemical warfare agent species) out of the material can result in vapor exposure or transfer to the skin, which can result in percutaneous exposure to personnel who interact with the material. Due to the high toxicity of chemical warfare agents, the release of trace chemical quantities is of significant concern. Mapping subsurface concentration distribution and transport characteristics of absorbed agents enables exposure hazards to be assessed in untested conditions. Furthermore, these tools can be used to characterize subsurface reaction dynamics to ultimately design improved decontaminants or decontamination procedures. To achieve this goal, an inverse analysis mass transport modeling approach was developed that utilizes time-resolved mass spectroscopy measurements of vapor emission from contaminated paint coatings as the input parameter for calculation of subsurface concentration profiles. Details are provided on sample preparation, including contaminant and material handling, the application of mass spectrometry for the measurement of emitted contaminant vapor, and the implementation of inverse analysis using a physics-based diffusion model to determine transport properties of live chemical warfare agents including distilled mustard (HD) and the nerve agent VX. PMID:25226346

  1. An inverse analysis approach to the characterization of chemical transport in paints.

    PubMed

    Willis, Matthew P; Stevenson, Shawn M; Pearl, Thomas P; Mantooth, Brent A

    2014-08-29

    The ability to directly characterize chemical transport and interactions that occur within a material (i.e., subsurface dynamics) is a vital component in understanding contaminant mass transport and the ability to decontaminate materials. If a material is contaminated, over time, the transport of highly toxic chemicals (such as chemical warfare agent species) out of the material can result in vapor exposure or transfer to the skin, which can result in percutaneous exposure to personnel who interact with the material. Due to the high toxicity of chemical warfare agents, the release of trace chemical quantities is of significant concern. Mapping subsurface concentration distribution and transport characteristics of absorbed agents enables exposure hazards to be assessed in untested conditions. Furthermore, these tools can be used to characterize subsurface reaction dynamics to ultimately design improved decontaminants or decontamination procedures. To achieve this goal, an inverse analysis mass transport modeling approach was developed that utilizes time-resolved mass spectroscopy measurements of vapor emission from contaminated paint coatings as the input parameter for calculation of subsurface concentration profiles. Details are provided on sample preparation, including contaminant and material handling, the application of mass spectrometry for the measurement of emitted contaminant vapor, and the implementation of inverse analysis using a physics-based diffusion model to determine transport properties of live chemical warfare agents including distilled mustard (HD) and the nerve agent VX.

  2. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  3. Reaction induced fractures in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulven, Ole Ivar; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2014-05-01

    The process of fracture formation due to volume changing processes has been studied numerically in a variety of different settings, e.g. fracture initiation in general volume increasing reactions by Ulven et al.[4], weathering of dolerites by Røyne et al.[2], and volume reduction during chemical decomposition prosesses by Malthe-Sørenssen et al.[1]. Common to many previous works is that the simulations were performed in a 2D setting, due to computational limitations. Fractures observed both in field studies and in experiments are in many cases three dimensional. It remains an open question in what cases the simplification to 2D systems is applicable, and when a full 3D simulation is necessary. In this study, we use a newly developed 3D code combining elements from the discrete element model (DEM) with elements from Peridynamics[3]. We study fracture formation in fully three dimensional simulations, and compare them with simulation results from 2D DEM, thus gaining insight in both qualitative and quantitative differences between results from 2D and 3D simulations. References [1] Malthe-Sørenssen, A., Jamtveit, B., and Meakin, P., 'Fracture Patterns Generated by Diffusion Controlled Volume Changing Reactions,' Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 2006, pp. 245501-1 - 245501-4. [2] Røyne, A., Jamtveit, B., and Malthe-Sørenssen, A., 'Controls on rock weathering rates by reaction-induced hierarchial fracturing,' Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 275, 2008, pp. 364 - 369. [3] Silling, S. A., 'Reformulation of elasticity theory for discontinuities and long-range forces,' J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 48, Issue 1, 2000, pp. 175 - 209 [4] Ulven, O. I., Storheim, H., Austrheim, H., and Malthe-Sørenssen, A., 'Fracture Initiation During Volume Increasing Reactions in Rocks and Applications for CO2 Sequestration', Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 389C, 2014, pp. 132 - 142.

  4. Interfacial Chemical Reactions and Transport Phenomena in Flow Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    CONVESTIVE DIFFUSION ENERGY TRANSFER COMBUSTION THERMAL DIFFUSION FOULING INERTIAL IMPACTION THERMOPHORESIS LLJ HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSIS FLOW REACTORS...i) the influence of particle thermophoresis on mass transport across ,onisothermal boundary layers, and iiI) inertial effects on particle deposi- tion...Approach: We are currently developing theoretical methods to generalize the laws of convective mass and energy transfer to include thermophoresis

  5. Wave Tank Studies On Formation And Transport Of OMA From The Chemically Dispersed Oil

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction of chemical dispersants and suspended sediments with crude oil influences the fate and transport of oil spills in coastal waters. A wave tank study was conducted to investigate the effects of chemical dispersants and mineral fines on dispersion of oil, formation ...

  6. CONSISTENT USE OF THE KALMAN FILTER IN CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELS (CTMS) FOR DEDUCING EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Past research has shown that emissions can be deduced using observed concentrations of a chemical, a Chemical Transport Model (CTM), and the Kalman filter in an inverse modeling application. An expression was derived for the relationship between the "observable" (i.e., the con...

  7. MODELING MULTICOMPONENT ORGANIC CHEMICAL TRANSPORT IN THREE FLUID PHASE POROUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A two-dimensional finite-element model was developed to predict coupled transient flow and multicomponent transport of organic chemicals which can partition between nonaqueous phase liquid, water, gas and solid phases in porous media under the assumption of local chemical equilib...

  8. Distributed Model for Overland Hydrology, Sediment and Chemical Transport in Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Johnson, B. E.; Dortch, M. S.

    2004-12-01

    Contaminants from non-point or distributed sources can adversely affect the quality of downstream waters and groundwater. Reliable models can help understanding the fate and transport of contaminants on the overland as well as the shallow subsurface and lead to better management strategies of the environmental response and security. In this study, a watershed is represented by discretizing contributing areas into a cascade of one dimensional (1D) overland flow using DEM data. A distributed watershed model is developed to simulate overland flow and processes of sediment and chemical detachment and their transport in runoff. The model, consisting of linked hydrology, sediment and chemical transport components, is physically based and process oriented. In the model, the overland flow component uses fully implicit nonlinear finite difference scheme combined with a linear scheme to numerically solve the 1D kinematic wave equations. The erosion and sediment transport component simulates the movement of eroded soil along with the movement of surface water, calculates the sediment transport capacity and the potential sediment supply, chooses whichever is less and routes it throughout the watershed. Erosion is the sum of splash detachment by raindrops and flow detachment by runoff. The process of chemical transport in the soluble phase is simulated by a 1D advection, diffusion and adsorption-desorption processes equation. Chemical transport by suspended sediment is described by the advection-diffusion equations with the sink-source term including erosion-deposition exchange processes. Both sediment and chemical transport components are developed as separate blocks of the watershed overland modeling system. A 1D model in overland studies can provide plenty of useful information without requiring many input parameters. The model will be incorporated into the Army Risk Assessment Modeling System (ARAMS) as a watershed module to satisfy the need for simulating hydrological

  9. 3D printed quantum dot light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong Lin; Tamargo, Ian A; Kim, Hyoungsoo; Johnson, Blake N; Gupta, Maneesh K; Koh, Tae-Wook; Chin, Huai-An; Steingart, Daniel A; Rand, Barry P; McAlpine, Michael C

    2014-12-10

    Developing the ability to 3D print various classes of materials possessing distinct properties could enable the freeform generation of active electronics in unique functional, interwoven architectures. Achieving seamless integration of diverse materials with 3D printing is a significant challenge that requires overcoming discrepancies in material properties in addition to ensuring that all the materials are compatible with the 3D printing process. To date, 3D printing has been limited to specific plastics, passive conductors, and a few biological materials. Here, we show that diverse classes of materials can be 3D printed and fully integrated into device components with active properties. Specifically, we demonstrate the seamless interweaving of five different materials, including (1) emissive semiconducting inorganic nanoparticles, (2) an elastomeric matrix, (3) organic polymers as charge transport layers, (4) solid and liquid metal leads, and (5) a UV-adhesive transparent substrate layer. As a proof of concept for demonstrating the integrated functionality of these materials, we 3D printed quantum dot-based light-emitting diodes (QD-LEDs) that exhibit pure and tunable color emission properties. By further incorporating the 3D scanning of surface topologies, we demonstrate the ability to conformally print devices onto curvilinear surfaces, such as contact lenses. Finally, we show that novel architectures that are not easily accessed using standard microfabrication techniques can be constructed, by 3D printing a 2 × 2 × 2 cube of encapsulated LEDs, in which every component of the cube and electronics are 3D printed. Overall, these results suggest that 3D printing is more versatile than has been demonstrated to date and is capable of integrating many distinct classes of materials.

  10. 3D printing of microscopic bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Jodi L.; Ritschdorff, Eric T.; Whiteley, Marvin; Shear, Jason B.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria communicate via short-range physical and chemical signals, interactions known to mediate quorum sensing, sporulation, and other adaptive phenotypes. Although most in vitro studies examine bacterial properties averaged over large populations, the levels of key molecular determinants of bacterial fitness and pathogenicity (e.g., oxygen, quorum-sensing signals) may vary over micrometer scales within small, dense cellular aggregates believed to play key roles in disease transmission. A detailed understanding of how cell–cell interactions contribute to pathogenicity in natural, complex environments will require a new level of control in constructing more relevant cellular models for assessing bacterial phenotypes. Here, we describe a microscopic three-dimensional (3D) printing strategy that enables multiple populations of bacteria to be organized within essentially any 3D geometry, including adjacent, nested, and free-floating colonies. In this laser-based lithographic technique, microscopic containers are formed around selected bacteria suspended in gelatin via focal cross-linking of polypeptide molecules. After excess reagent is removed, trapped bacteria are localized within sealed cavities formed by the cross-linked gelatin, a highly porous material that supports rapid growth of fully enclosed cellular populations and readily transmits numerous biologically active species, including polypeptides, antibiotics, and quorum-sensing signals. Using this approach, we show that a picoliter-volume aggregate of Staphylococcus aureus can display substantial resistance to β-lactam antibiotics by enclosure within a shell composed of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:24101503

  11. Terrain and rock 'Yogi' - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The left portion of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3, shows the large rock nicknamed 'Yogi.' 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Portions of a petal and deflated airbag are in the foreground. Yogi has been an object of study for rover Sojourner's Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) instrument. The APXS will help Pathfinder scientists learn more about the chemical composition of that rock. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  12. CHEMICAL TRANSPORT FACILITATED BY COLLOIDAL-SIZED ORGANIC MOLECULES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fluid passing through the pores of soils and geologic materials is not just water with dissolved inorganic chemicals, but a complex mixture of organic and inorganic molecules. Large organic molecules such as humic and fulvic materials may impact the movement of contaminants. ...

  13. Sperm navigation along helical paths in 3D chemoattractant landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jikeli, Jan F.; Alvarez, Luis; Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Wilson, Laurence G.; Pascal, René; Colin, Remy; Pichlo, Magdalena; Rennhack, Andreas; Brenker, Christoph; Kaupp, U. Benjamin

    2015-08-01

    Sperm require a sense of direction to locate the egg for fertilization. They follow gradients of chemical and physical cues provided by the egg or the oviduct. However, the principles underlying three-dimensional (3D) navigation in chemical landscapes are unknown. Here using holographic microscopy and optochemical techniques, we track sea urchin sperm navigating in 3D chemoattractant gradients. Sperm sense gradients on two timescales, which produces two different steering responses. A periodic component, resulting from the helical swimming, gradually aligns the helix towards the gradient. When incremental path corrections fail and sperm get off course, a sharp turning manoeuvre puts sperm back on track. Turning results from an `off' Ca2+ response signifying a chemoattractant stimulation decrease and, thereby, a drop in cyclic GMP concentration and membrane voltage. These findings highlight the computational sophistication by which sperm sample gradients for deterministic klinotaxis. We provide a conceptual and technical framework for studying microswimmers in 3D chemical landscapes.

  14. Sperm navigation along helical paths in 3D chemoattractant landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Jikeli, Jan F.; Alvarez, Luis; Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Wilson, Laurence G.; Pascal, René; Colin, Remy; Pichlo, Magdalena; Rennhack, Andreas; Brenker, Christoph; Kaupp, U. Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Sperm require a sense of direction to locate the egg for fertilization. They follow gradients of chemical and physical cues provided by the egg or the oviduct. However, the principles underlying three-dimensional (3D) navigation in chemical landscapes are unknown. Here using holographic microscopy and optochemical techniques, we track sea urchin sperm navigating in 3D chemoattractant gradients. Sperm sense gradients on two timescales, which produces two different steering responses. A periodic component, resulting from the helical swimming, gradually aligns the helix towards the gradient. When incremental path corrections fail and sperm get off course, a sharp turning manoeuvre puts sperm back on track. Turning results from an ‘off' Ca2+ response signifying a chemoattractant stimulation decrease and, thereby, a drop in cyclic GMP concentration and membrane voltage. These findings highlight the computational sophistication by which sperm sample gradients for deterministic klinotaxis. We provide a conceptual and technical framework for studying microswimmers in 3D chemical landscapes. PMID:26278469

  15. Modeling acid transport in chemically amplified resist films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Abhijit A.; Doxastakis, Manolis; Stein, Gila E.

    2014-03-01

    The acid-catalyzed deprotection of glassy poly(4-hydroxystyrene-co-tert butyl acrylate) films was studied with infrared absorbance spectroscopy and stochastic simulations. Experimental data were interpreted with a simple description of subdiffusive acid transport coupled to second-order acid loss. This model predicts key attributes of observed deprotection rates, such as fast reaction at short times, slow reaction at long times, and a non-linear dependence on acid loading. The degree of anomalous character is reduced by increasing the post-exposure bake temperature or adding plasticizing agents to the polymer resin. These findings indicate that the acid mobility and overall deprotection kinetics are coupled to glassy matrix dynamics. Furthermore, the acid diffusion lengths were calculated from the anomalous transport model and compared with nanopattern line widths. The consistent scaling between experiments and simulations suggests that the anomalous diffusion model could be further developed into a predictive lithography tool.

  16. Quantifying solute transport processes: are chemically "conservative" tracers electrically conservative?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singha, Kamini; Li, Li; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Regberg, Aaron B.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of a nonreactive or conservative tracer, commonly invoked in investigations of solute transport, requires additional study in the context of electrical geophysical monitoring. Tracers that are commonly considered conservative may undergo reactive processes, such as ion exchange, thus changing the aqueous composition of the system. As a result, the measured electrical conductivity may reflect not only solute transport but also reactive processes. We have evaluated the impacts of ion exchange reactions, rate-limited mass transfer, and surface conduction on quantifying tracer mass, mean arrival time, and temporal variance in laboratory-scale column experiments. Numerical examples showed that (1) ion exchange can lead to resistivity-estimated tracer mass, velocity, and dispersivity that may be inaccurate; (2) mass transfer leads to an overestimate in the mobile tracer mass and an underestimate in velocity when using electrical methods; and (3) surface conductance does not notably affect estimated moments when high-concentration tracers are used, although this phenomenon may be important at low concentrations or in sediments with high and/or spatially variable cation-exchange capacity. In all cases, colocated groundwater concentration measurements are of high importance for interpreting geophysical data with respect to the controlling transport processes of interest.

  17. Transport Properties of a Kinetic Model for Chemical Reactions without Barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Giselle M.; Kremer, Gilberto M.; Soares, Ana Jacinta

    2011-05-20

    A kinetic model of the Boltzmann equation for chemical reactions without energy barrier is considered here with the aim of evaluating the reaction rate and characterizing the transport coefficient of shear viscosity for the reactive system. The Chapman-Enskog solution of the Boltzmann equation is used to compute the chemical reaction effects, in a flow regime for which the reaction process is close to the final equilibrium state. Some numerical results are provided illustrating that the considered chemical reaction without energy barrier can induce an appreciable influence on the reaction rate and on the transport coefficient of shear viscosity.

  18. Truck transport of hazardous chemicals: 1-butanol. Final report, September 1993-April 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The transport of hazardous materials by all modes is a major concern of the U.S. Department of Transportation. Estimates place the total amount of hazardous materials transported in the United States in excess of 1.5 billion tons per year. Highway, water, and rail account for nearly all hazardous materials shipments; air shipments are negligible. Fuels, such as gasoline and diesel, account for about half of all hazardous materials transported. Chemicals account for most of the remainder. This report presents estimates of truck shipments of 1-butanol, one of the 147 large-volume chemicals that account for at least 80 percent of U.S. truck shipments of hazardous chemicals. All of the reports in this series are based on the best available information at the time the research was conducted.

  19. Sequential assembly of 3D perfusable microfluidic hydrogels.

    PubMed

    He, Jiankang; Zhu, Lin; Liu, Yaxiong; Li, Dichen; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-11-01

    Bottom-up tissue engineering provides a promising way to recreate complex structural organizations of native organs in artificial constructs by assembling functional repeating modules. However, it is challenging for current bottom-up strategies to simultaneously produce a controllable and immediately perfusable microfluidic network in modularly assembled 3D constructs. Here we presented a bottom-up strategy to produce perfusable microchannels in 3D hydrogels by sequentially assembling microfluidic modules. The effects of agarose-collagen composition on microchannel replication and 3D assembly of hydrogel modules were investigated. The unique property of predefined microchannels in transporting fluids within 3D assemblies was evaluated. Endothelial cells were incorporated into the microfluidic network of 3D hydrogels for dynamic culture in a house-made bioreactor system. The results indicated that the sequential assembly method could produce interconnected 3D predefined microfluidic networks in optimized agarose-collagen hydrogels, which were fully perfusable and successfully functioned as fluid pathways to facilitate the spreading of endothelial cells. We envision that the presented method could be potentially used to engineer 3D vascularized parenchymal constructs by encapsulating primary cells in bulk hydrogels and incorporating endothelial cells in predefined microchannels.

  20. Embedding objects during 3D printing to add new functionalities.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Po Ki

    2016-07-01

    A novel method for integrating and embedding objects to add new functionalities during 3D printing based on fused deposition modeling (FDM) (also known as fused filament fabrication or molten polymer deposition) is presented. Unlike typical 3D printing, FDM-based 3D printing could allow objects to be integrated and embedded during 3D printing and the FDM-based 3D printed devices do not typically require any post-processing and finishing. Thus, various fluidic devices with integrated glass cover slips or polystyrene films with and without an embedded porous membrane, and optical devices with embedded Corning(®) Fibrance™ Light-Diffusing Fiber were 3D printed to demonstrate the versatility of the FDM-based 3D printing and embedding method. Fluid perfusion flow experiments with a blue colored food dye solution were used to visually confirm fluid flow and/or fluid perfusion through the embedded porous membrane in the 3D printed fluidic devices. Similar to typical 3D printed devices, FDM-based 3D printed devices are translucent at best unless post-polishing is performed and optical transparency is highly desirable in any fluidic devices; integrated glass cover slips or polystyrene films would provide a perfect optical transparent window for observation and visualization. In addition, they also provide a compatible flat smooth surface for biological or biomolecular applications. The 3D printed fluidic devices with an embedded porous membrane are applicable to biological or chemical applications such as continuous perfusion cell culture or biocatalytic synthesis but without the need for any post-device assembly and finishing. The 3D printed devices with embedded Corning(®) Fibrance™ Light-Diffusing Fiber would have applications in display, illumination, or optical applications. Furthermore, the FDM-based 3D printing and embedding method could also be utilized to print casting molds with an integrated glass bottom for polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) device replication

  1. 3D Kitaev spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, Maria

    The Kitaev honeycomb model has become one of the archetypal spin models exhibiting topological phases of matter, where the magnetic moments fractionalize into Majorana fermions interacting with a Z2 gauge field. In this talk, we discuss generalizations of this model to three-dimensional lattice structures. Our main focus is the metallic state that the emergent Majorana fermions form. In particular, we discuss the relation of the nature of this Majorana metal to the details of the underlying lattice structure. Besides (almost) conventional metals with a Majorana Fermi surface, one also finds various realizations of Dirac semi-metals, where the gapless modes form Fermi lines or even Weyl nodes. We introduce a general classification of these gapless quantum spin liquids using projective symmetry analysis. Furthermore, we briefly outline why these Majorana metals in 3D Kitaev systems provide an even richer variety of Dirac and Weyl phases than possible for electronic matter and comment on possible experimental signatures. Work done in collaboration with Kevin O'Brien and Simon Trebst.

  2. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  3. Crowdsourcing Based 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, A.; Barsi, A.; Molnar, B.; Lovas, T.

    2016-06-01

    Web-based photo albums that support organizing and viewing the users' images are widely used. These services provide a convenient solution for storing, editing and sharing images. In many cases, the users attach geotags to the images in order to enable using them e.g. in location based applications on social networks. Our paper discusses a procedure that collects open access images from a site frequently visited by tourists. Geotagged pictures showing the image of a sight or tourist attraction are selected and processed in photogrammetric processing software that produces the 3D model of the captured object. For the particular investigation we selected three attractions in Budapest. To assess the geometrical accuracy, we used laser scanner and DSLR as well as smart phone photography to derive reference values to enable verifying the spatial model obtained from the web-album images. The investigation shows how detailed and accurate models could be derived applying photogrammetric processing software, simply by using images of the community, without visiting the site.

  4. Analysis of 3D multi-layer microfluidic gradient generator.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jang Ho; Kim, Tae Hyeon; Lee, Jong Min; Ahrberg, Christian D; Chung, Bong Geun

    2017-01-01

    We developed a three-dimensional (3D) simple multi-layer microfluidic gradient generator to create molecular gradients on the centimeter scale with a wide range of flow rates. To create the concentration gradients, a main channel (MC) was orthogonally intersected with vertical side microchannel (SC) in a 3D multi-layer microfluidic device. Through sequential dilution from the SC, a spatial gradient was generated in the MC. Two theoretical models were created to assist in the design of the 3D multi-layer microfluidic gradient generator and to compare its performance against a two-dimensional equivalent. A first mass balance model was used to predict the steady-state concentrations reached, while a second computational fluid dynamic model was employed to predict spatial development of the gradient by considering convective as well as diffusive mass transport. Furthermore, the theoretical simulations were verified through experiments to create molecular gradients in a 3D multi-layer microfluidic gradient generator.

  5. Computation of transport coefficients of chemically reacting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmelkov, Yu. B.; Samuilov, E. V.

    2013-12-01

    A new method is proposed for computing the thermal conductivity of a gaseous mixture with regard for chemical reactions occurring therein, which enables the estimation of the thermal conductivity from each separate reaction to the chemical component of thermal conductivity. The method for determining the paired collision integrals, which is used in the work, is also briefly presented. The results computed by the proposed method are compared with experimental data and the data obtained by the existing computational methods in the temperature range from 500 to 2500 K under atmospheric pressure. The comparison was done both for pure gases and for the gaseous mixtures, including the combustion products of solid fuels. The obtained results may be applied for the development and design of systems related to heat exchange, gas dynamics, processing of solid and liquid fuels, for example, boiler aggregates, aviation engines, and in other applications.

  6. Adequacy of transport parameters obtained in soil column experiments for selected chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymundo-Raymundo, E.; Nikolskii, Yu. N.; Guber, A. K.; Landeros-Sanchez, C.

    2012-07-01

    The transport parameters were determined for the 18O isotope (in the form of H2 18O), the Br- ion, and atrazine in intact columns of allophanic Andosol (Mexico State, Mexico). A one-dimensional model for the convective-dispersive transport of chemicals with account for the decomposition and equilibrium adsorption (HYDRUS-1D), which is widely applied for assessing the risk of the chemical and bacterial contamination of natural waters, was used. The model parameters were obtained by solving the inverse problem on the basis of laboratory experiments on the transport of the 18O isotope, the Br- ion, and atrazine in intact soil columns at a fixed filtration velocity. The hydrodynamic dispersion parameters determined for the 18O and Br- ions in one column were of the same order of magnitude, and those for atrazine were higher by 3-4 times. The obtained parameters were used to calculate the transport of these substances in another column with different values of the water content and filtration velocity. The transport process was adequately described only for the 18O isotope. In the case of the Br- ion, the model significantly underestimated the transport velocity; for atrazine, its peak concentration in the column was overestimated. The column study of the transport of the three chemical compounds showed that transport parameters could not be reliably predicted from the results of a single experiment, even when several compounds were used in this experiment.

  7. Photochemical Copper Coating on 3D Printed Thermoplastics.

    PubMed

    Yung, Winco K C; Sun, Bo; Huang, Junfeng; Jin, Yingdi; Meng, Zhengong; Choy, Hang Shan; Cai, Zhixiang; Li, Guijun; Ho, Cheuk Lam; Yang, Jinlong; Wong, Wai Yeung

    2016-08-09

    3D printing using thermoplastics has become very popular in recent years, however, it is challenging to provide a metal coating on 3D objects without using specialized and expensive tools. Herein, a novel acrylic paint containing malachite for coating on 3D printed objects is introduced, which can be transformed to copper via one-step laser treatment. The malachite containing pigment can be used as a commercial acrylic paint, which can be brushed onto 3D printed objects. The material properties and photochemical transformation processes have been comprehensively studied. The underlying physics of the photochemical synthesis of copper was characterized using density functional theory calculations. After laser treatment, the surface coating of the 3D printed objects was transformed to copper, which was experimentally characterized by XRD. 3D printed prototypes, including model of the Statue of Liberty covered with a copper surface coating and a robotic hand with copper interconnections, are demonstrated using this painting method. This composite material can provide a novel solution for coating metals on 3D printed objects. The photochemical reduction analysis indicates that the copper rust in malachite form can be remotely and photo-chemically reduced to pure copper with sufficient photon energy.

  8. Photochemical Copper Coating on 3D Printed Thermoplastics

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Winco K. C.; Sun, Bo; Huang, Junfeng; Jin, Yingdi; Meng, Zhengong; Choy, Hang Shan; Cai, Zhixiang; Li, Guijun; Ho, Cheuk Lam; Yang, Jinlong; Wong, Wai Yeung

    2016-01-01

    3D printing using thermoplastics has become very popular in recent years, however, it is challenging to provide a metal coating on 3D objects without using specialized and expensive tools. Herein, a novel acrylic paint containing malachite for coating on 3D printed objects is introduced, which can be transformed to copper via one-step laser treatment. The malachite containing pigment can be used as a commercial acrylic paint, which can be brushed onto 3D printed objects. The material properties and photochemical transformation processes have been comprehensively studied. The underlying physics of the photochemical synthesis of copper was characterized using density functional theory calculations. After laser treatment, the surface coating of the 3D printed objects was transformed to copper, which was experimentally characterized by XRD. 3D printed prototypes, including model of the Statue of Liberty covered with a copper surface coating and a robotic hand with copper interconnections, are demonstrated using this painting method. This composite material can provide a novel solution for coating metals on 3D printed objects. The photochemical reduction analys