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Sample records for 3d collagen matrix

  1. Tuning 3D Collagen Matrix Stiffness Independently of Collagen Concentration Modulates Endothelial Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Brooke N.; Starchenko, Alina; Williams, Rebecca M.; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have described the effects of matrix stiffening on cell behavior using two dimensional (2D) synthetic surfaces; however less is known about the effects of matrix stiffening on cells embedded in three dimensional (3D) in vivo-like matrices. A primary limitation in investigating the effects of matrix stiffness in 3D is the lack of materials that can be tuned to control stiffness independently of matrix density. Here, we use collagen-based scaffolds where the mechanical properties are tuned using non-enzymatic glycation of the collagen in solution, prior to polymerization. Collagen solutions glycated prior to polymerization result in collagen gels with a 3-fold increase in compressive modulus without significant changes to the collagen architecture. Using these scaffolds, we show that endothelial cell spreading increases with matrix stiffness, as does the number and length of angiogenic sprouts and the overall spheroid outgrowth. Differences in sprout length are maintained even when the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts is inhibited. Our results demonstrate the ability to de-couple matrix stiffness from matrix density and structure in collagen gels, and that increased matrix stiffness results in increased sprouting and outgrowth. PMID:22902816

  2. Quantitative Assessment of Local Collagen Matrix Remodeling in 3-D Culture: The Role of Rho Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Areum; Lakshman, Neema; Petroll, W.Matthew

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively assess the role of Rho kinase in modulating the pattern and amount of local cell-induced collagen matrix remodeling. Human corneal fibroblasts were plated inside 100 μm thick fibrillar collagen matrices and cultured for 24 hours in media with or without the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632. Cells were then fixed and stained with phalloidin. Fluorescent (for f-actin) and reflected light (for collagen fibrils) 3-D optical section images were acquired using laser confocal microscopy. Fourier transform analysis was used to assess collagen fibril alignment, and 3-D cell morphology and local collagen density were measured using MetaMorph. Culture in serum-containing media induced significant global matrix contraction, which was inhibited by blocking Rho kinase (p < 0.001). Fibroblasts generally had a bipolar morphology and intracellular stress fibers. Collagen fibrils were compacted and aligned parallel to stress fibers and pseudopodia. When Rho kinase was inhibited, cells had a more cortical f-actin distribution and dendritic morphology. Both local collagen fibril density and alignment were significantly reduced (p<0.01). Overall, the data suggests that Rho kinase dependent contractile force generation leads to co-alignment of cells and collagen fibrils along the plane of greatest resistance, and that this process contributes to global matrix contraction. PMID:16978606

  3. Vinculin is required for cell polarization, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling in 3D collagen.

    PubMed

    Thievessen, Ingo; Fakhri, Nikta; Steinwachs, Julian; Kraus, Viola; McIsaac, R Scott; Gao, Liang; Chen, Bi-Chang; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Betzig, Eric; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Waterman, Clare M; Fabry, Ben

    2015-11-01

    Vinculin is filamentous (F)-actin-binding protein enriched in integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Whereas studies in 2-dimensional (2D) tissue culture models have suggested that vinculin negatively regulates cell migration by promoting cytoskeleton-ECM coupling to strengthen and stabilize adhesions, its role in regulating cell migration in more physiologic, 3-dimensional (3D) environments is unclear. To address the role of vinculin in 3D cell migration, we analyzed the morphodynamics, migration, and ECM remodeling of primary murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with cre/loxP-mediated vinculin gene disruption in 3D collagen I cultures. We found that vinculin promoted 3D cell migration by increasing directional persistence. Vinculin was necessary for persistent cell protrusion, cell elongation, and stable cell orientation in 3D collagen, but was dispensable for lamellipodia formation, suggesting that vinculin-mediated cell adhesion to the ECM is needed to convert actin-based cell protrusion into persistent cell shape change and migration. Consistent with this finding, vinculin was necessary for efficient traction force generation in 3D collagen without affecting myosin II activity and promoted 3D collagen fiber alignment and macroscopical gel contraction. Our results suggest that vinculin promotes directionally persistent cell migration and tension-dependent ECM remodeling in complex 3D environments by increasing cell-ECM adhesion and traction force generation. PMID:26195589

  4. Fibroblast cluster formation on 3D collagen matrices requires cell contraction dependent fibronectin matrix organization.

    PubMed

    da Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno; Ho, Chin-Han; Grinnell, Frederick

    2013-02-15

    Fibroblasts incubated on 3D collagen matrices in serum or lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-containing medium self-organize into clusters through a mechanism that requires cell contraction. However, in platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-containing medium, cells migrate as individuals and do not form clusters even though they constantly encounter each other. Here, we present evidence that a required function of cell contraction in clustering is formation of fibronectin (FN) fibrillar matrix. We found that in serum or LPA but not in PDGF or basal medium, cells organized FN (both serum and cellular) into a fibrillar, detergent-insoluble matrix. Cell clusters developed concomitant with FN matrix formation. FN fibrils accumulated beneath cells and along the borders of cell clusters in regions of cell-matrix tension. Blocking Rho kinase or myosin II activity prevented FN matrix assembly and cell clustering. Using siRNA silencing and function-blocking antibodies and peptides, we found that cell clustering and FN matrix assembly required α5β1 integrins and fibronectin. Cells were still able to exert contractile force and compact the collagen matrix under the latter conditions, which showed that contraction was not sufficient for cell clustering to occur. Our findings provide new insights into how procontractile (serum/LPA) and promigratory (PDGF) growth factor environments can differentially regulate FN matrix assembly by fibroblasts interacting with collagen matrices and thereby influence mesenchymal cell morphogenetic behavior under physiologic circumstances such as wound repair, morphogenesis and malignancy. PMID:23117111

  5. Planar Gradient Diffusion System to Investigate Chemotaxis in a 3D Collagen Matrix.

    PubMed

    Stout, David A; Toyjanova, Jennet; Franck, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The importance of cell migration can be seen through the development of human life. When cells migrate, they generate forces and transfer these forces to their surrounding area, leading to cell movement and migration. In order to understand the mechanisms that can alter and/or affect cell migration, one can study these forces. In theory, understanding the fundamental mechanisms and forces underlying cell migration holds the promise of effective approaches for treating diseases and promoting cellular transplantation. Unfortunately, modern chemotaxis chambers that have been developed are usually restricted to two dimensions (2D) and have complex diffusion gradients that make the experiment difficult to interpret. To this end, we have developed, and describe in this paper, a direct-viewing chamber for chemotaxis studies, which allows one to overcome modern chemotaxis chamber obstacles able to measure cell forces and specific concentration within the chamber in a 3D environment to study cell 3D migration. More compelling, this approach allows one to successfully model diffusion through 3D collagen matrices and calculate the coefficient of diffusion of a chemoattractant through multiple different concentrations of collagen, while keeping the system simple and user friendly for traction force microscopy (TFM) and digital volume correlation (DVC) analysis. PMID:26131645

  6. Highlighting the impact of aging on type I collagen: label-free investigation using confocal reflectance microscopy and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in 3D matrix model

    PubMed Central

    Terryn, Christine; Garnotel, Roselyne; Jeannesson, Pierre; Sockalingum, Ganesh D.; Manfait, Michel; Perraut, François; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Koenig, Anne; Piot, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    During aging, alterations of extracellular matrix proteins contribute to various pathological phenotypes. Among these alterations, type I collagen cross-linking and associated glycation products accumulation over time detrimentally affects its physico-chemical properties, leading to alterations of tissue biomechanical stability. Here, different-age collagen 3D matrices using non-destructive and label-free biophotonic techniques were analysed to highlight the impact of collagen I aging on 3D constructs, at macroscopic and microscopic levels. Matrices were prepared with collagens extracted from tail tendons of rats (newborns, young and old adults) to be within the physiological aging process. The data of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy reveal that aging leads to an inhibition of fibril assembly and a resulting decrease of gel density. Investigations by confocal reflectance microscopy highlight poor-fibrillar structures in oldest collagen networks most likely related to the glycation products accumulation. Complementarily, an infrared analysis brings out marked spectral variations in the Amide I profile, specific of the peptidic bond conformation and for carbohydrates vibrations as function of collagen-age. Interestingly, we also highlight an unexpected behavior for newborn collagen, exhibiting poorly-organized networks and microscopic features close to the oldest collagen. These results demonstrate that changes in collagen optical properties are relevant for investigating the incidence of aging in 3D matrix models. PMID:26885896

  7. Two-way regulation between cells and aligned collagen fibrils: local 3D matrix formation and accelerated neural differentiation of human decidua parietalis placental stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Zhu, Bofan; Strakova, Zuzana; Wang, Rong

    2014-08-01

    It has been well established that an aligned matrix provides structural and signaling cues to guide cell polarization and cell fate decision. However, the modulation role of cells in matrix remodeling and the feedforward effect on stem cell differentiation have not been studied extensively. In this study, we report on the concerted changes of human decidua parietalis placental stem cells (hdpPSCs) and the highly ordered collagen fibril matrix in response to cell-matrix interaction. With high-resolution imaging, we found the hdpPSCs interacted with the matrix by deforming the cell shape, harvesting the nearby collagen fibrils, and reorganizing the fibrils around the cell body to transform a 2D matrix to a localized 3D matrix. Such a unique 3D matrix prompted high expression of β-1 integrin around the cell body that mediates and facilitates the stem cell differentiation toward neural cells. The study offers insights into the coordinated, dynamic changes at the cell-matrix interface and elucidates cell modulation of its matrix to establish structural and biochemical cues for effective cell growth and differentiation. PMID:25003322

  8. Multiphoton microscopy of engineered dermal substitutes: assessment of 3-D collagen matrix remodeling induced by fibroblast contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, Ana-Maria; Fagot, Dominique; Olive, Christian; Michelet, Jean-François; Galey, Jean-Baptiste; Leroy, Frédéric; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Martin, Jean-Louis; Colonna, Anne; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2010-09-01

    Dermal fibroblasts are responsible for the generation of mechanical forces within their surrounding extracellular matrix and can be potentially targeted by anti-aging ingredients. Investigation of the modulation of fibroblast contraction by these ingredients requires the implementation of three-dimensional in situ imaging methodologies. We use multiphoton microscopy to visualize unstained engineered dermal tissue by combining second-harmonic generation that reveals specifically fibrillar collagen and two-photon excited fluorescence from endogenous cellular chromophores. We study the fibroblast-induced reorganization of the collagen matrix and quantitatively evaluate the effect of Y-27632, a RhoA-kinase inhibitor, on dermal substitute contraction. We observe that collagen fibrils rearrange around fibroblasts with increasing density in control samples, whereas collagen fibrils show no remodeling in the samples containing the RhoA-kinase inhibitor. Moreover, we show that the inhibitory effects are reversible. Our study demonstrates the relevance of multiphoton microscopy to visualize three-dimensional remodeling of the extracellular matrix induced by fibroblast contraction or other processes.

  9. Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes in 3D Collagen I culture: an in vitro physiological environment for the study of extracellular matrix and host cell interactions

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Juliany C.F.; Viana, Nathan B.; Pontes, Bruno; Pereira, Camila F.A.; Silva-Filho, Fernando C.

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis is the causative agent of American cutaneous leishmaniasis, an important neglected tropical disease. Once Leishmania amazonensis is inoculated into the human host, promastigotes are exposed to the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the dermis. However, little is known about the interaction between the ECM and Leishmania promastigotes. In this study we established L. amazonensis promastigote culture in a three-dimensional (3D) environment mainly composed of Collagen I (COL I). This 3D culture recreates in vitro some aspects of the human host infection site, enabling the study of the interaction mechanisms of L. amazonensis with the host ECM. Promastigotes exhibited “freeze and run” migration in the 3D COL I matrix, which is completely different from the conventional in vitro swimming mode of migration. Moreover, L. amazonensis promastigotes were able to invade, migrate inside, and remodel the 3D COL I matrix. Promastigote trans-matrix invasion and the freeze and run migration mode were also observed when macrophages were present in the matrix. At least two classes of proteases, metallo- and cysteine proteases, are involved in the 3D COL I matrix degradation caused by Leishmania. Treatment with a mixture of protease inhibitors significantly reduced promastigote invasion and migration through this matrix. Together our results demonstrate that L. amazonensis promastigotes release proteases and actively remodel their 3D environment, facilitating their migration. This raises the possibility that promastigotes actively interact with their 3D environment during the search for their cellular “home”—macrophages. Supporting this hypothesis, promastigotes migrated faster than macrophages in a novel 3D co-culture model. PMID:24765565

  10. Biocompatible 3D Matrix with Antimicrobial Properties.

    PubMed

    Ion, Alberto; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Rădulescu, Dragoș; Rădulescu, Marius; Iordache, Florin; Vasile, Bogdan Ștefan; Surdu, Adrian Vasile; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Maniu, Horia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Holban, Alina Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, characterize and assess the biological activity of a new regenerative 3D matrix with antimicrobial properties, based on collagen (COLL), hydroxyapatite (HAp), β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and usnic acid (UA). The prepared 3D matrix was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Microscopy (FT-IRM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). In vitro qualitative and quantitative analyses performed on cultured diploid cells demonstrated that the 3D matrix is biocompatible, allowing the normal development and growth of MG-63 osteoblast-like cells and exhibited an antimicrobial effect, especially on the Staphylococcus aureus strain, explained by the particular higher inhibitory activity of usnic acid (UA) against Gram positive bacterial strains. Our data strongly recommend the obtained 3D matrix to be used as a successful alternative for the fabrication of three dimensional (3D) anti-infective regeneration matrix for bone tissue engineering. PMID:26805790

  11. Generation of 3D Collagen Gels with Controlled Diverse Architectures.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Rat tail collagen solutions have been used as polymerizable in vitro three dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) gels for single and collective cell migration assays as well as spheroid formation. Factors such as ECM concentration, pH, ionic concentration, and temperature can alter collagen polymerization and ECM architecture. This unit describes how to generate 3D collagen gels that have distinct architectures ranging from a highly reticular meshwork of short thin fibrils with small pores to a loose matrix consisting of stiff, parallel-bundled long fibrils by changing collagen polymerization temperature. This permits analysis of 3D cell migration in different ECM architectures found in vivo while maintaining a similar ECM concentration. Also included are collagen labeling techniques helpful for ECM visualization during live fluorescence imaging. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27580704

  12. Treatment with Y-27632, a ROCK Inhibitor, Increases the Proinvasive Nature of SW620 Cells on 3D Collagen Type 1 Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Vishnubhotla, Ramana; Bharadwaj, Shruthi; Sun, Shan; Metlushko, Vitali; Glover, Sarah C.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of using tissue density as a mechanism to diagnose a tumor has been around for centuries. However, this concept has not been sufficiently explored in a laboratory setting. Therefore, in this paper, we observed the effects of cell density and extracellular matrix (ECM) density on colon cancer invasion and proliferation using SW620 cells. We also attempted to inhibit ROCK-I to determine its effect on cell invasion and proliferation using standard molecular biology techniques and advanced imaging. Increasing cell seeding density resulted in a 2-fold increase in cell invasion as well as cell proliferation independent of treatment with Y-27632. Increasing collagen I scaffold density resulted in a 2.5-fold increase in cell proliferation while treatment with Y-27632 attenuated this effect although 1.5 fold increase in cell invasion was observed in ROCK inhibited samples. Intriguingly, ROCK inhibition also resulted in a 3.5-fold increase in cell invasion within 3D collagen scaffolds for cells seeded at lower densities. We show in this paper that ROCK-I inhibition leads to increased invasion within 3D collagen I microenvironments. This data suggests that although ROCK inhibitors have been used clinically to treat several medical conditions, its effect largely depends on the surrounding microenvironment. PMID:22690219

  13. Matrix forming characteristics of inner and outer human meniscus cells on 3D collagen scaffolds under normal and low oxygen tensions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    toward chondrogenic phenotype and ECM production. Oxygen tension played a key role in modulating the redifferentiation of meniscal fibrochondrocytes on a 3D collagen scaffold in vitro. PMID:24330551

  14. Epidermal growth factor promotes a mesenchymal over an amoeboid motility of MDA-MB-231 cells embedded within a 3D collagen matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geum, Dongil T.; Kim, Beum Jun; Chang, Audrey E.; Hall, Matthew S.; Wu, Mingming

    2016-01-01

    The receptor of epidermal growth factor (EGFR) critically regulates tumor cell invasion and is a potent therapeutic target for treatment of many types of cancers, including carcinomas and glioblastomas. It is known that EGF regulates cell motility when tumor cells are embedded within a 3D biomatrix. However, roles of EGF in modulating tumor cell motility phenotype are largely unknown. In this article, we report that EGF promotes a mesenchymal over an amoeboid motility phenotype using a malignant breast tumor cell line, MDA-MB-231, embedded within a 3D collagen matrix. Amoeboid cells are rounded in shape, while mesenchymal cells are elongated, and their migrations are governed by a distinctly different set of biomolecules. Using single cell tracking analysis, we also show that EGF promotes cell dissemination through a significant increase in cell persistence along with a moderate increase of speed. The increase of persistence is correlated with the increase of the percentage of the mesenchymal cells within the population. Our work reveals a novel role of microenvironmental cue, EGF, in modulating heterogeneity and plasticity of tumor cell motility phenotype. In addition, it suggests a potential visual cue for diagnosing invasive states of breast cancer cells. This work can be easily extended beyond breast cancer cells.

  15. Integrin {beta}1-dependent invasive migration of irradiation-tolerant human lung adenocarcinoma cells in 3D collagen matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Seiichiro; Haga, Hisashi; Yasuda, Motoaki; Mizutani, Takeomi; Kawabata, Kazushige; Shirato, Hiroki; Nishioka, Takeshi

    2010-06-04

    Radiotherapy is one of the effective therapies used for treating various malignant tumors. However, the emergence of tolerant cells after irradiation remains problematic due to their high metastatic ability, sometimes indicative of poor prognosis. In this study, we showed that subcloned human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549P-3) that are irradiation-tolerant indicate high invasive activity in vitro, and exhibit an integrin {beta}1 activity-dependent migratory pattern. In collagen gel overlay assay, majority of the A549P-3 cells displayed round morphology and low migration activity, whereas a considerable number of A549P-3IR cells surviving irradiation displayed a spindle morphology and high migration rate. Blocking integrin {beta}1 activity reduced the migration rate of A549P-3IR cells and altered the cell morphology allowing them to assume a round shape. These results suggest that the A549P-3 cells surviving irradiation acquire a highly invasive integrin {beta}1-dependent phenotype, and integrin {beta}1 might be a potentially effective therapeutic target in combination with radiotherapy.

  16. Toward single cell traction microscopy within 3D collagen matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Matthew S.; Long, Rong; Feng, Xinzeng; Huang, YuLing; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Wu, Mingming

    2013-10-01

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Cells require the three-dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, current understanding of cell–ECM and cell–cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D cell traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. 3D cell traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single animal cells embedded in either synthetic or natively derived fibrous gels. We discuss here the development of 3D cell traction microscopy, its current limitations, and perspectives on the future of this technology. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying 3D cell traction microscopy to individual tumor cell migration within collagen gels. - Highlights: • Review of the current state of the art in 3D cell traction force microscopy. • Bulk and micro-characterization of remodelable fibrous collagen gels. • Strategies for performing 3D cell traction microscopy within collagen gels.

  17. FIBROBLAST MECHANICS IN 3D COLLAGEN MATRICES

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Sangmyung; Grinnell, Frederick

    2007-01-01

    Connective tissues provide mechanical support and frameworks for the other tissues of the body. Type 1 collagen is the major protein component of ordinary connective tissue, and fibroblasts are the cell type primarily responsible for its biosynthesis and remodeling. Research on fibroblasts interacting with collagen matrices explores all four quadrants of cell mechanics: pro-migratory vs. pro-contractile growth factor environments on one axis; high tension vs. low tension cell-matrix interactions on the other. The dendritic fibroblast – probably equivalent to the resting tissue fibroblast – can be observed only in the low tension quadrant and generally has not been appreciated from research on cells incubated with planar culture surfaces. Fibroblasts in the low tension quadrant require microtubules for formation of dendritic extensions, whereas fibroblasts in the high tension quadrant require microtubules for polarization but not for spreading. Ruffling of dendritic extensions rather than their overall protrusion or retraction provides the mechanism for remodeling of floating collagen matrices, and floating matrix remodeling likely reflects a model of tissue mechanical homeostasis. PMID:17825456

  18. Towards Single Cell Traction Microscopy within 3D Collagen Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Matthew S.; Long, Rong; Feng, Xinzeng; Huang, YuLing; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Wu, Mingming

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Cells require the three dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, current understanding of cell-ECM and cell-cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D cell traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. 3D cell traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single animal cells embedded in either synthetic or natively derived fibrous gels. We discuss here the development of 3D cell traction microscopy, its current limitations, and perspectives on the future of this technology. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying 3D cell traction microscopy to individual tumor cells migration within collagen gels. PMID:23806281

  19. Single Cell Traction Microscopy within 3D Collagen Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mingming

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion and migration. Cells require the three dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, our current understanding of cell-ECM and cell-cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. It is now clear that what we learn about cellular behavior on a 2D substrate does not always apply to cells embedded within a 3D biomatrix. 3D traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single cells embedded in 3D gel, but current methods cannot account for the fibrous and nonlinear properties of collagen gel. In this talk, I will present a forward computation algorithm that we have developed for 3D cell traction measurements within collagen gels. The application of this technology to understanding cancer migration and invasion will be discussed. This work is supported by the National Center for Research Resources (5R21RR025801-03, NIH) and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (8 R21 GM103388-03,NIH), and the Cornell Center on the Microenvironment & Metastasis.

  20. Experimental validation of an extended Jones matrix calculus model to study the 3D structural orientation of the collagen fibers in articular cartilage using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kasaragod, Deepa K.; Lu, Zenghai; Jacobs, James; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    We report results to verify a theoretical framework to analyze the 3D depth-wise structural organization of collagen fibers in articular cartilage using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography. Apparent birefringence data obtained from multi-angle measurements using a time domain polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography system has been compared with simulated data based on the extended Jones matrix calculus. Experimental data has been shown to agree with the lamellar model previously proposed for the cartilage microstructure based on scanning electron microscopy data. This tool could have potential application in mapping the collagen structural orientation information of cartilage non-invasively during arthroscopy. PMID:22435087

  1. Engineering 3D Cellularized Collagen Gels for Vascular Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Meghezi, Sébastien; Seifu, Dawit G.; Bono, Nina; Unsworth, Larry; Mequanint, Kibret; Mantovani, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic materials are known to initiate clinical complications such as inflammation, stenosis, and infections when implanted as vascular substitutes. Collagen has been extensively used for a wide range of biomedical applications and is considered a valid alternative to synthetic materials due to its inherent biocompatibility (i.e., low antigenicity, inflammation, and cytotoxic responses). However, the limited mechanical properties and the related low hand-ability of collagen gels have hampered their use as scaffold materials for vascular tissue engineering. Therefore, the rationale behind this work was first to engineer cellularized collagen gels into a tubular-shaped geometry and second to enhance smooth muscle cells driven reorganization of collagen matrix to obtain tissues stiff enough to be handled. The strategy described here is based on the direct assembling of collagen and smooth muscle cells (construct) in a 3D cylindrical geometry with the use of a molding technique. This process requires a maturation period, during which the constructs are cultured in a bioreactor under static conditions (without applied external dynamic mechanical constraints) for 1 or 2 weeks. The “static bioreactor” provides a monitored and controlled sterile environment (pH, temperature, gas exchange, nutrient supply and waste removal) to the constructs. During culture period, thickness measurements were performed to evaluate the cells-driven remodeling of the collagen matrix, and glucose consumption and lactate production rates were measured to monitor the cells metabolic activity. Finally, mechanical and viscoelastic properties were assessed for the resulting tubular constructs. To this end, specific protocols and a focused know-how (manipulation, gripping, working in hydrated environment, and so on) were developed to characterize the engineered tissues. PMID:26132527

  2. Engineering 3D Cellularized Collagen Gels for Vascular Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Meghezi, Sébastien; Seifu, Dawit G; Bono, Nina; Unsworth, Larry; Mequanint, Kibret; Mantovani, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic materials are known to initiate clinical complications such as inflammation, stenosis, and infections when implanted as vascular substitutes. Collagen has been extensively used for a wide range of biomedical applications and is considered a valid alternative to synthetic materials due to its inherent biocompatibility (i.e., low antigenicity, inflammation, and cytotoxic responses). However, the limited mechanical properties and the related low hand-ability of collagen gels have hampered their use as scaffold materials for vascular tissue engineering. Therefore, the rationale behind this work was first to engineer cellularized collagen gels into a tubular-shaped geometry and second to enhance smooth muscle cells driven reorganization of collagen matrix to obtain tissues stiff enough to be handled. The strategy described here is based on the direct assembling of collagen and smooth muscle cells (construct) in a 3D cylindrical geometry with the use of a molding technique. This process requires a maturation period, during which the constructs are cultured in a bioreactor under static conditions (without applied external dynamic mechanical constraints) for 1 or 2 weeks. The "static bioreactor" provides a monitored and controlled sterile environment (pH, temperature, gas exchange, nutrient supply and waste removal) to the constructs. During culture period, thickness measurements were performed to evaluate the cells-driven remodeling of the collagen matrix, and glucose consumption and lactate production rates were measured to monitor the cells metabolic activity. Finally, mechanical and viscoelastic properties were assessed for the resulting tubular constructs. To this end, specific protocols and a focused know-how (manipulation, gripping, working in hydrated environment, and so on) were developed to characterize the engineered tissues. PMID:26132527

  3. 3D cancer cell migration in a confined matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alobaidi, Amani; Sun, Bo

    Cancer cell migration is widely studied in 2D motion, which does not mimic the invasion processes in vivo. More recently, 3D cell migration studies have been performed. The ability of cancer cells to migrate within the extracellular matrix depends on the physical and biochemical features of the extracellular matrix. We present a model of cell motility in confined matrix geometry. The aim of the study is to study cancer migration in collagen matrix, as a soft tissue, to investigate their motility within the confined and surrounding collagen environment. Different collagen concentrations have been used to show the ability of these cancer cells to move through such a complex structure by measuring Cancer cell migration velocity as well as the displacement. Graduate student physics department.

  4. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells from the sand rat: transforming growth factor beta and 3D co-culture with human disc cells stimulate proteoglycan and collagen type I rich extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Tapp, Hazel; Deepe, Ray; Ingram, Jane A; Kuremsky, Marshall; Hanley, Edward N; Gruber, Helen E

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Adult mesenchymal stem cell therapy has a potential application in the biological treatment of disc degeneration. Our objectives were: to direct adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSC) from the sand rat to produce a proteoglycan and collagen type I extracellular matrix (ECM) rich in known ECM components of the annulus fibrosis of disc; and to stimulate proteoglycan production by co-culture of human annulus cells with AD-MSC. Methods AD-MSC were isolated and characterised by adherence to plastic, appropriate expression of cluster of differentiation (CD) markers, and differentiation to osteoblasts and chondrocytes in vitro. AD-MSC were grown in three-dimensional (3D) culture and treated with or without transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) to direct them to produce annulus-like ECM as determined by proteoglycan content and collagen expression. AD-MSC were co-cultured with human annulus cells and grown in 3D culture. Results AD-MSC produced a proteoglycan and collagen type I rich ECM after treatment with TGFβ in 3D culture as confirmed by a 48% increase in proteoglycan content assayed by 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue (DMB), and by immunohistochemical identification of ECM components. Co-culture of human annulus and sand rat AD-MSC in 3D culture resulted in a 20% increase in proteoglycan production compared with the predicted value of the sum of the individual cultures. Conclusion Results support the hypothesis that AD-MSC have potential in cell-based therapy for disc degeneration. PMID:18691412

  5. Enhancement of neurite outgrowth in neuron cancer stem cells by growth on 3-D collagen scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Kuo, Shyh Ming; Liu, Guei-Sheung; Chen, Wan-Nan U.; Chuang, Chin-Wen; Liu, Li-Feng

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neuron cancer stem cells (NCSCs) behave high multiply of growth on collagen scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhancement of NCSCs neurite outgrowth on porous collagen scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3-D collagen culture of NCSCs shows an advance differentiation than 2-D culture. -- Abstract: Collagen is one component of the extracellular matrix that has been widely used for constructive remodeling to facilitate cell growth and differentiation. The 3-D distribution and growth of cells within the porous scaffold suggest a clinical significance for nerve tissue engineering. In the current study, we investigated proliferation and differentiation of neuron cancer stem cells (NCSCs) on a 3-D porous collagen scaffold that mimics the natural extracellular matrix. We first generated green fluorescence protein (GFP) expressing NCSCs using a lentiviral system to instantly monitor the transitions of morphological changes during growth on the 3-D scaffold. We found that proliferation of GFP-NCSCs increased, and a single cell mass rapidly grew with unrestricted expansion between days 3 and 9 in culture. Moreover, immunostaining with neuronal nuclei (NeuN) revealed that NCSCs grown on the 3-D collagen scaffold significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth. Our findings confirmed that the 80 {mu}m porous collagen scaffold could enhance attachment, viability and differentiation of the cancer neural stem cells. This result could provide a new application for nerve tissue engineering and nerve regeneration.

  6. Engineering extracellular matrix structure in 3D multiphase tissues

    PubMed Central

    Gillette, Brian M.; Rossen, Ninna S.; Das, Nikkan; Leong, Debra; Wang, Meixin; Dugar, Arushi; Sia, Samuel K.

    2011-01-01

    In native tissues, microscale variations in the extracellular matrix (ECM) structure can drive different cellular behaviors. Although control over ECM structure could prove useful in tissue engineering and in studies of cellular behavior, isotropic 3D matrices poorly replicate variations in local microenvironments. In this paper, we demonstrate a method to engineer local variations in the density and size of collagen fibers throughout 3D tissues. The results showed that, in engineered multiphase tissues, the structures of collagen fibers in both the bulk ECM phases (as measured by mesh size and width of fibers) as well as at tissue interfaces (as measured by density of fibers and thickness of tissue interfaces) could be modulated by varying the collagen concentrations and gelling temperatures. As the method makes use of a previously published technique for tissue bonding, we also confirmed that significant adhesion strength at tissue interfaces was achieved under all conditions tested. Hence, this study demonstrates how collagen fiber structures can be engineered within all regions of a tightly integrated multiphase tissue scaffold by exploiting knowledge of collagen assembly. PMID:21840047

  7. Primary human osteoblast culture on 3D porous collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gemma L; Walton, Robin; Czernuszka, Jan; Griffiths, Sarah L; El Haj, Alicia J; Cartmell, Sarah H

    2010-09-15

    There is a need in tissue-engineering for 3D scaffolds that mimic the natural extracellular matrix of bone to enhance cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. The scaffold is also required to be degradable. A highly porous scaffold has been developed to incorporate two of the extracellular components found in bone-collagen and hydroxyapatite (HA). The scaffold's collagen component is an afibrillar monomeric type I atelocollagen extracted from foetal calf's skin. This provided a novel environment for the inclusion of HA powder. Five hundred thousand primary human osteoblasts were seeded onto 4 mm cubed scaffolds that varied in ratio of HA to collagen. Weight ratios of 1:99, 25:75, 50:50, and 75:25 hydroxyapatite:collagen (HA:Collagen) were analysed. The scaffolds plus cells were cultured for 21 days. DNA assays and live/dead viability staining demonstrated that all of the scaffolds supported cell proliferation and viability. An alkaline phosphatase assay showed similar osteoblast phenotype maintenance on all of the 3D scaffolds analysed at 21 days. MicroCT analysis demonstrated an increase in total sample volume (correlating to increase in unmineralised matrix production). An even distribution of HA throughout the collagen matrix was observed using this technique. Also at 3 weeks, reductions in the percentage of the mineralised phase of the constructs were seen. These results indicate that each of the ratios of HA/collagen scaffolds have great potential for bone tissue engineering. PMID:20694991

  8. MMP Regulation of Corneal Keratocyte Motility and Mechanics in 3-D Collagen Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chengxin; Petroll, W. Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) can stimulate corneal keratocyte spreading and migration within 3-D collagen matrices, without inducing transformation to a contractile, fibroblastic phenotype. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in regulating PDGF-induced changes in keratocyte motility and mechanical differentiation. Rabbit corneal keratocytes were isolated and cultured in serum-free media (S-) to maintain their quiescent phenotype. A nested collagen matrix construct was used to assess 3-D cell migration, and a standard collagen matrix model was used to assess cell morphology and cell-mediated matrix contraction. In both cases constructs were cultured in S- supplemented with PDGF, with or without the broad spectrum MMP inhibitors GM6001 or BB-94. After 4 days, f-actin, nuclei and collagen fibrils were imaged using confocal microscopy. To assess sub-cellular mechanical activity (extension and retraction of cell processes), time-lapse DIC imaging was also performed. MT1-MMP expression and MMP-mediated collagen degradation by were also examined. Results demonstrated that neither GM6001 nor BB-94 affected corneal keratocyte viability or proliferation in 3-D culture. PDGF stimulated elongation and migration of corneal keratocytes within type I collagen matrices, without causing a loss of their dendritic morphology or inducing formation of intracellular stress fibers. Treatment with GM6001 and BB-94 inhibited PDGF-induced keratocyte spreading and migration. Relatively low levels of keratocyte-induced matrix contraction were also maintained in PDGF, and the amount of PDGF-induced collagen degradation was similar to that observed in S- controls. The collagen degradation pattern was consistent with membrane-associated MMP activity, and keratocytes showed positive staining for MT1-MMP, albeit weak. Both matrix contraction and collagen degradation were reduced by MMP inhibition. For most

  9. Phenotypic analysis of bovine chondrocytes cultured in 3D collagen sponges: effect of serum substitutes.

    PubMed

    Yates, Karen E; Allemann, Florin; Glowacki, Julie

    2005-01-01

    Repair of damaged cartilage usually requires replacement tissue or substitute material. Tissue engineering is a promising means to produce replacement cartilage from autologous or allogeneic cell sources. Scaffolds provide a three-dimensional (3D) structure that is essential for chondrocyte function and synthesis of cartilage-specific matrix proteins (collagen type II, aggrecan) and sulfated proteoglycans. In this study, we assessed porous, 3D collagen sponges for in vitro engineering of cartilage in both standard and serum-free culture conditions. Bovine articular chondrocytes (bACs) cultured in 3D sponges accumulated and maintained cartilage matrix over 4 weeks, as assessed by quantitative measures of matrix content, synthesis, and gene expression. Chondrogenesis by bACs cultured with Nutridoma as a serum replacement was equivalent or better than control cultures in serum. In contrast, chondrogenesis in insulin-transferrin-selenium (ITS(+3)) serum replacement cultures was poor, apparently due to decreased cell survival. These data indicate that porous 3D collagen sponges maintain chondrocyte viability, shape, and synthetic activity by providing an environment favorable for high-density chondrogenesis. With quantitative assays for cartilage-specific gene expression and biochemical measures of chondrogenesis in these studies, we conclude that the collagen sponges have potential as a scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:15735900

  10. 3D Extracellular Matrix from Sectioned Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Catherine B; Cukierman, Edna; Artym, Vira V

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) matrices have significant advantages compared to conventional two-dimensional (2D) matrices for studying cell adhesion, migration, and tissue organization. Cellular behavior is dependent on the surrounding matrix environment for signaling and induction of biological responses (Carletti, et al., 2011; Pampaloni, et al., 2007; Vlodavsky, 1999). 2D cultures induce an artificial polarity in cultured cells between upper and lower surfaces not present normally in the in vivo environment. No longer nonpolar, many aspects of cellular behavior are altered (Beacham, et al., 2007; Grinnell and Petroll, 2010; Yamada and Cukierman, 2007). In addition, 2D models lack the physical properties of 3D matrix, such as topography, stiffness, and dimensionality. To begin to mimic the 3D environment of in vivo connective tissue extracellular matrix (ECM), collagen gels have been used widely (see Unit 10.3). Culture of cells in collagen gels results in a bipolar fibroblast morphology that resembles the in vivo phenotype (Friedl and Brocker, 2000; Even-Ram and Yamada, 2005; Grinnell and Petroll, 2010). Although more physiological, 3D collagen gels lack the complex biochemical and physical microenvironment present in an in vivo ECM that regulates cellular physiological properties (Beacham, et al., 2007). A variety of methods to create a more in vivo-like ECM have been published (Yamada and Cukierman, 2007). Adding critical ECM components to 3D collagen matrices, including fibronectin, hyaluronan, link protein and glycosaminoglycans, can more accurately mimic the structural microenvironment of the native ECM (Friedl and Brocker, 2000). Other ECM models use cultured cell lines, such as fibroblasts, to derive an ECM lattice through secretion of an organized ECM (Beacham, et al., 2007). Different cell lines have been chosen to generate a specific microenvironment for study of particularly types of cellular behavior (Kutys and Yamada, 2013). For example, cultured bovine

  11. Microfabricated collagen tracks facilitate single cell metastatic invasion in 3D.

    PubMed

    Kraning-Rush, Casey M; Carey, Shawn P; Lampi, Marsha C; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2013-03-01

    While the mechanisms employed by metastatic cancer cells to migrate remain poorly understood, it has been widely accepted that metastatic cancer cells can invade the tumor stroma by degrading the extracellular matrix (ECM) with matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Although MMP inhibitors showed early promise in preventing metastasis in animal models, they have largely failed clinically. Recently, studies have shown that some cancer cells can use proteolysis to mechanically rearrange their ECM to form tube-like "microtracks" which other cells can follow without using MMPs themselves. We speculate that this mode of migration in the secondary cells may be one example of migration which can occur without endogenous protease activity in the secondary cells. Here we present a technique to study this migration in a 3D, collagen-based environment which mimics the size and topography of the tracks produced by proteolytically active cancer cells. Using time-lapse phase-contrast microscopy, we find that these microtracks permit the rapid and persistent migration of noninvasive MCF10A mammary epithelial cells, which are unable to otherwise migrate in 3D collagen. Additionally, while highly metastatic MDAMB231 breast cancer cells are able to invade a 3D collagen matrix, seeding within the patterned microtracks induced significantly increased cell migration speed, which was not decreased by pharmacological MMP inhibition. Together, these data suggest that microtracks within a 3D ECM may facilitate the migration of cells in an MMP-independent fashion, and may reveal novel insight into the clinical challenges facing MMP inhibitors. PMID:23388698

  12. An Experimental Model for Assessing Fibroblast Migration in 3-D Collagen Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Karamichos, Dimitris; Lakshman, Neema; Petroll, W. Matthew

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and test a novel culture model for studying fibroblast migration in 3-D collagen matrices. Human corneal fibroblasts were seeded within dense, randomly oriented compressed collagen matrices. A 6 mm diameter button of this cell-seeded matrix was placed in the middle of an acellular, less dense outer collagen matrix. These constructs were cultured for 1, 3, 5 or 7 days in serum-free media, 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), or 50 ng/ml PDGF. Constructs were then fixed and labeled with AlexaFluor 546 phalloidin (for f-actin) and TOTO-3 (for nuclei). Cell-matrix interactions were assessed using a combination of fluorescent and reflected light confocal imaging. Human corneal fibroblasts in serum-free media showed minimal migration into the outer (non-compressed) matrix. In contrast, culture in serum or PDGF stimulated cell migration. Cell-induced collagen matrix reorganization in the outer matrix could be directly visualized using reflected light imaging, and was highest following culture in 10% FBS. Cellular contraction in 10% FBS often led to alignment of cells parallel to the outer edge of the inner matrix, similar to the pattern observed during corneal wound healing following incisional surgery. Overall, this 3-D model allows the effects of different culture conditions on cell migration and matrix remodeling to be assessed simultaneously. In addition, the design allows for ECM density, geometry and mechanical constraints to be varied in a controlled fashion. These initial results demonstrate differences in cell and matrix patterning during migration in response to serum and PDGF. PMID:19061246

  13. Rapid Quantification of 3D Collagen Fiber Alignment and Fiber Intersection Correlations with High Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meng; Bloom, Alexander B.; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cancers aggressively reorganize collagen in their microenvironment. For example, radially orientated collagen fibers have been observed surrounding tumor cell clusters in vivo. The degree of fiber alignment, as a consequence of this remodeling, has often been difficult to quantify. In this paper, we present an easy to implement algorithm for accurate detection of collagen fiber orientation in a rapid pixel-wise manner. This algorithm quantifies the alignment of both computer generated and actual collagen fiber networks of varying degrees of alignment within 5°°. We also present an alternative easy method to calculate the alignment index directly from the standard deviation of fiber orientation. Using this quantitative method for determining collagen alignment, we demonstrate that the number of collagen fiber intersections has a negative correlation with the degree of fiber alignment. This decrease in intersections of aligned fibers could explain why cells move more rapidly along aligned fibers than unaligned fibers, as previously reported. Overall, our paper provides an easier, more quantitative and quicker way to quantify fiber orientation and alignment, and presents a platform in studying effects of matrix and cellular properties on fiber alignment in complex 3D environments. PMID:26158674

  14. Rapid Quantification of 3D Collagen Fiber Alignment and Fiber Intersection Correlations with High Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meng; Bloom, Alexander B; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cancers aggressively reorganize collagen in their microenvironment. For example, radially orientated collagen fibers have been observed surrounding tumor cell clusters in vivo. The degree of fiber alignment, as a consequence of this remodeling, has often been difficult to quantify. In this paper, we present an easy to implement algorithm for accurate detection of collagen fiber orientation in a rapid pixel-wise manner. This algorithm quantifies the alignment of both computer generated and actual collagen fiber networks of varying degrees of alignment within 5°°. We also present an alternative easy method to calculate the alignment index directly from the standard deviation of fiber orientation. Using this quantitative method for determining collagen alignment, we demonstrate that the number of collagen fiber intersections has a negative correlation with the degree of fiber alignment. This decrease in intersections of aligned fibers could explain why cells move more rapidly along aligned fibers than unaligned fibers, as previously reported. Overall, our paper provides an easier, more quantitative and quicker way to quantify fiber orientation and alignment, and presents a platform in studying effects of matrix and cellular properties on fiber alignment in complex 3D environments. PMID:26158674

  15. Engineered 3D Silk-collagen-based Model of Polarized Neural Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Chwalek, Karolina; Sood, Disha; Cantley, William L.; White, James D.; Tang-Schomer, Min; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite huge efforts to decipher the anatomy, composition and function of the brain, it remains the least understood organ of the human body. To gain a deeper comprehension of the neural system scientists aim to simplistically reconstruct the tissue by assembling it in vitro from basic building blocks using a tissue engineering approach. Our group developed a tissue-engineered silk and collagen-based 3D brain-like model resembling the white and gray matter of the cortex. The model consists of silk porous sponge, which is pre-seeded with rat brain-derived neurons, immersed in soft collagen matrix. Polarized neuronal outgrowth and network formation is observed with separate axonal and cell body localization. This compartmental architecture allows for the unique development of niches mimicking native neural tissue, thus enabling research on neuronal network assembly, axonal guidance, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and electrical functions. PMID:26555926

  16. Control of vascular network location in millimeter-sized 3D-tissues by micrometer-sized collagen coated cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Yen; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2016-03-25

    Engineering three-dimensional (3D) vascularized constructs remains a central challenge because capillary network structures are important for sufficient oxygen and nutrient exchange to sustain the viability of engineered constructs. However, construction of 3D-tissues at single cell level has yet to be reported. Previously, we established a collagen coating method for fabricating a micrometer-sized collagen matrix on cell surfaces to control cell distance or cell densities inside tissues. In this study, a simple fabrication method is presented for constructing vascular networks in 3D-tissues over micrometer-sized or even millimeter-sized with controlled cell densities. From the results, well vascularized 3D network structures can be observed with a fluorescence label method mixing collagen coated cells and endothelia cells, indicating that constructed ECM rich tissues have the potential for vascularization, which opens up the possibility for various applications in pharmaceutical or tissue engineering fields. PMID:26920051

  17. Effect of HDAC Inhibitors on Corneal Keratocyte Mechanical Phenotypes in 3-D Collagen Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Koppaka, Vindhya; Lakshman, Neema

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDAC) have been shown to inhibit the TGFβ-induced myofibroblast transformation of corneal fibroblasts in 2-D culture. However, the effect of HDAC inhibitors on keratocyte spreading, contraction, and matrix remodeling in 3-D culture has not been directly assessed. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of the HDAC inhibitors Trichostatin A (TSA) and Vorinostat (SAHA) on corneal keratocyte mechanical phenotypes in 3-D culture using defined serum-free culture conditions. Methods: Rabbit corneal keratocytes were plated within standard rat tail type I collagen matrices (2.5 mg/ml) or compressed collagen matrices (~100 mg/ml) and cultured for up to 4 days in serum-free media, PDGF BB, TGFβ1, and either 50 nM TSA, 10 μM SAHA, or vehicle (DMSO). F-actin, α-SM-actin, and collagen fibrils were imaged using confocal microscopy. Cell morphology and global matrix contraction were quantified digitally. The expression of α-SM-actin was assessed using western blotting. Results: Corneal keratocytes in 3-D matrices had a quiescent mechanical phenotype, as indicated by a dendritic morphology, a lack of stress fibers, and minimal cell-induced matrix remodeling. This phenotype was generally maintained following the addition of TSA or SAHA. TGFβ1 induced a contractile phenotype, as indicated by a loss of dendritic cell processes, the development of stress fibers, and significant matrix compaction. In contrast, cells cultured in TGFβ1 plus TSA or SAHA remained dendritic and did not form stress fibers or induce ECM compaction. Western blotting showed that the expression of α-SM actin after treatment with TGFβ1 was inhibited by TSA and SAHA. PDGF BB stimulated the elongation of keratocytes and the extension of dendritic processes within 3-D matrices without inducing stress fiber formation or collagen reorganization. This spreading response was maintained in the presence of TSA or SAHA. Conclusions: Overall, HDAC inhibitors

  18. Mueller matrix three-dimensional directional imaging of collagen fibers.

    PubMed

    Ellingsen, Pål Gunnar; Aas, Lars Martin Sandvik; Hagen, Vegard Stenhjem; Kumar, Rajesh; Lilledahl, Magnus Borstad; Kildemo, Morten

    2014-02-01

    A method for measuring three-dimensional (3-D) direction images of collagen fibers in biological tissue is presented. Images of the 3-D directions are derived from the measured transmission Mueller matrix images (MMIs), acquired at different incidence angles, by taking advantage of the form birefringence of the collagen fibers. The MMIs are decomposed using the recently developed differential decomposition, which is more suited to biological tissue samples than the common polar decomposition method. Validation of the 3-D direction images was performed by comparing them with images from second-harmonic generation microscopy. The comparison found a good agreement between the two methods. It is envisaged that 3-D directional imaging could become a useful tool for understanding the collagen framework for fibers smaller than the diffraction limit. PMID:24503637

  19. Development of bioartificial myocardium by electrostimulation of 3D collagen scaffolds seeded with stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Haneef, Kanwal; Lila, Nermine; Benadda, Samira; Legrand, Fabien; Carpentier, Alain; Chachques, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Electrostimulation (ES) can be defined as a safe physical method to induce stem cell differentiation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of ES on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) seeded in collagen scaffolds in terms of proliferation and differentiation into cardiomyocytes. BMSCs were isolated from Wistar rats and seeded into 3D collagen type 1 templates measuring 25 × 25 × 6 mm. Bipolar in vitro ES was performed during 21 days. Electrical impedance and cell proliferation were measured. Expression of cardiac markers was assessed by immunocytochemistry. Viscoelasticity of collagen matrix was evaluated. Electrical impedance assessments showed a low resistance of 234±41 Ohms which indicates good electrical conductivity of collagen matrix. Cell proliferation at 570 nm as significantly increased in ES groups after seven day (ES 0.129±0.03 vs non-stimulated control matrix 0.06±0.01, P=0.002) and after 21 days, (ES 0.22±0.04 vs control 0.13±0.01, P=0.01). Immunocytoche mistry of BMSCs after 21 days ES showed positive staining of cardiac markers, troponin I, connexin 43, sarcomeric alpha-actinin, slow myosin, fast myosin and desmin. Staining for BMSCs marker CD29 after 21 days was negative. Electrostimulation of cell-seeded collagen matrix changed stem cell morphology and biochemical characteristics, increasing the expression of cardiac markers. Thus, MSC-derived differentiated cells by electrostimulation grafted in biological scaffolds might result in a convenient tissue engineering source for myocardial diseases. PMID:23185681

  20. Collagen matrix as a tool in studying fibroblastic cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Kanta, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen is a fibrillar protein, a member of a large family of collagen proteins. It is present in most body tissues, usually in combination with other collagens and other components of extracellular matrix. Its synthesis is increased in various pathological situations, in healing wounds, in fibrotic tissues and in many tumors. After extraction from collagen-rich tissues it is widely used in studies of cell behavior, especially those of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Cells cultured in a classical way, on planar plastic dishes, lack the third dimension that is characteristic of body tissues. Collagen I forms gel at neutral pH and may become a basis of a 3D matrix that better mimics conditions in tissue than plastic dishes. PMID:25734486

  1. Collagen matrix as a tool in studying fibroblastic cell behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kanta, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen is a fibrillar protein, a member of a large family of collagen proteins. It is present in most body tissues, usually in combination with other collagens and other components of extracellular matrix. Its synthesis is increased in various pathological situations, in healing wounds, in fibrotic tissues and in many tumors. After extraction from collagen-rich tissues it is widely used in studies of cell behavior, especially those of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Cells cultured in a classical way, on planar plastic dishes, lack the third dimension that is characteristic of body tissues. Collagen I forms gel at neutral pH and may become a basis of a 3D matrix that better mimics conditions in tissue than plastic dishes. PMID:25734486

  2. Hyaluronan in aged collagen matrix increases prostate epithelial cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Damodarasamy, Mamatha; Vernon, Robert B.; Chan, Christina K.; Plymate, Stephen R.; Wight, Thomas N.

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of the prostate, which is comprised primarily of collagen, becomes increasingly disorganized with age, a property that may influence the development of hyperplasia and cancer. Collageous ECM extracted from the tails of aged mice exhibits many characteristics of collagen in aged tissues, including the prostate. When polymerized into a 3-dimensional (3D) gel, these collagen extracts can serve as models for the study of specific cell-ECM interactions. In the present study, we examined the behaviors of human prostatic epithelial cell lines representing normal prostate epithelial cells (PEC), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH-1), and adenocarcinoma (LNCaP) cultured in contact with 3D gels made from collagen extracts of young and aged mice. We found that proliferation of PEC, BPH-1, and LNCaP cells were all increased by culture on aged collagen gels relative to young collagen gels. In examining age-associated differences in the composition of the collagen extracts, we found that aged and young collagen had a similar amount of several collagen-associated ECM components, but aged collagen had a much greater content of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA) than young collagen. The addition of HA (of similar size and concentration to that found in aged collagen extracts) to cells placed in young collagen elicited significantly increased proliferation in BPH-1 cells, but not in PEC or LNCaP cells, relative to controls not exposed to HA. Of note, histochemical analyses of human prostatic tissues showed significantly higher expression of HA in BPH and prostate cancer stroma relative to stroma of normal prostate. Collectively, these results suggest that changes in ECM involving increased levels of HA contribute to the growth of prostatic epithelium with aging. PMID:25124870

  3. Individual versus Collective Fibroblast Spreading and Migration: Regulation by Matrix Composition in 3-D Culture

    PubMed Central

    Miron-Mendoza, Miguel; Lin, Xihui; Ma, Lisha; Ririe, Peter; Petroll, W. Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) supplies both physical and chemical signals to cells and provides a substrate through which fibroblasts migrate during wound repair. To directly assess how ECM composition regulates this process, we used a nested 3D matrix model in which cell-populated collagen buttons were embedded in cell-free collagen or fibrin matrices. Time-lapse microscopy was used to record the dynamic pattern of cell migration into the outer matrices, and 3-D confocal imaging was used to assess cell connectivity and cytoskeletal organization. Corneal fibroblasts stimulated with PDGF migrated more rapidly into collagen as compared to fibrin. In addition, the pattern of fibroblast migration into fibrin and collagen ECMs was strikingly different. Corneal fibroblasts migrating into collagen matrices developed dendritic processes and moved independently, whereas cells migrating into fibrin matrices had a more fusiform morphology and formed an interconnected meshwork. A similar pattern was observed when using dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that this response in not unique to corneal cells. We next cultured corneal fibroblasts within and on top of standard collagen and fibrin matrices to assess the impact of ECM composition on the cell spreading response. Similar differences in cell morphology and connectivity were observed – cells remained separated on collagen but coalesced into clusters on fibrin. Cadherin was localized to junctions between interconnected cells, whereas fibronectin was present both between cells and at the tips of extending cell processes. Cells on fibrin matrices also developed more prominent stress fibers than those on collagen matrices. Importantly, these spreading and migration patterns were consistently observed on both rigid and compliant substrates, thus differences in ECM mechanical stiffness were not the underlying cause. Overall, these results demonstrate for the first time that ECM protein composition alone (collagen vs. fibrin) can

  4. Local 3D matrix confinement determines division axis through cell shape

    PubMed Central

    He, Lijuan; Chen, Weitong; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Jimenez, Angela; Wong, Bin Sheng; San, Angela; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Wirtz, Denis

    2016-01-01

    How the division axis is determined in mammalian cells embedded in three-dimensional (3D) matrices remains elusive, despite that many types of cells divide in 3D environments. Cells on two-dimensional (2D) substrates typically round up completely to divide. Here, we show that in 3D collagen matrices, mammalian cells such as HT1080 human fibrosarcoma and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exhibit division modes distinct from their Counterparts on 2D substrates, with a markedly higher fraction of cells remaining highly elongated through mitosis in 3D matrices. The long axis of elongated mitotic cells accurately predicts the division axis, independently of matrix density and cell-matrix interactions. This 3D-specific elongated division mode is determined by the local confinement produced by the matrix and the ability of cells to protrude and locally remodel the matrix via β1 integrin. Elongated division is readily recapitulated using collagen-coated microfabricated channels. Cells depleted of β1 integrin still divide in the elongated mode in microchannels, suggesting that 3D confinement is sufficient to induce the elongated cell-division phenotype. PMID:26515603

  5. Fabrication of 3D tissue equivalent: an in vitro platform for understanding collagen evolution in healthy and diseased models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urciuolo, F.; Imparato, G.; Casale, C.; Scamardella, S.; Netti, P.

    2013-04-01

    In this study we realized a three-dimensional human dermis equivalent (3D-HDE) and, by exploiting multi-photon microscopy (MPM) we validated its use as an in vitro model to study collagen network re-arrangement under simulated solar exposure. The realization of 3D-HDE has been pursed by means of a bottom-up tissue engineering strategy that comprises firstly the fabrication of micron sized tissue building blocks and then their assembly in a 3D tissue construct. The building blocks injected in a maturation chamber, and cultured under optimized culture condition, were able to fuse due to the establishment of cell-cell and cell-extra cellular matrix (ECM) interactions that induced a biological sintering process resulting in 3D-HDE production. The final 3D tissue was made-up by fibroblasts embedded in their own ECM rich in endogenous collagen type I, resembling the composition and the architecture of native human dermis. Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (TPEF) imaging have been exploited to assess modification in collagen assembly before and after UV irradiation. Textural features and SHG to TPFE ratio of the endogenous ECM within 3D-HDE have been shown to vary after UVA irradiation, proving the hypothesis that the 3DHDE realized can be used as biological platform in vitro to study ECM modifications induced by photo-damage.

  6. Flexible Fabrication of Shape-Controlled Collagen Building Blocks for Self-Assembly of 3D Microtissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Meng, Zhaoxu; Ma, Jingyun; Shi, Yang; Xu, Hui; Lykkemark, Simon; Qin, Jianhua

    2015-08-12

    Creating artificial tissue-like structures that possess the functionality, specificity, and architecture of native tissues remains a big challenge. A new and straightforward strategy for generating shape-controlled collagen building blocks with a well-defined architecture is presented, which can be used for self-assembly of complex 3D microtissues. Collagen blocks with tunable geometries are controllably produced and released via a membrane-templated microdevice. The formation of functional microtissues by embedding tissue-specific cells into collagen blocks with expression of specific proteins is described. The spontaneous self-assembly of cell-laden collagen blocks into organized tissue constructs with predetermined configurations is demonstrated, which are largely driven by the synergistic effects of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. This new strategy would open up new avenues for the study of tissue/organ morphogenesis, and tissue engineering applications. PMID:25920010

  7. Fibronectin- and Collagen-Mimetic Ligands Regulate BMSC Chondrogenesis in 3D Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, J.T.; Petrie, T.A.; García, A.J.; Levenston, M.E.

    2016-01-01

    Modification of tissue engineering scaffolds with bioactive molecules is a potential strategy for modulating cell behavior and guiding tissue regeneration. While adhesion to RGD peptides has been shown to inhibit in vitro chondrogenesis, the effects of extracellular matrix (ECM)-mimetic ligands with complex secondary and tertiary structures are unknown. This study aimed to determine whether collagen- and fibronectin-mimetic ligands would retain biologic functionality in three-dimensional (3D) hydrogels, whether different ECM-mimetic ligands differentially influence in vitro chondrogenesis, and if effects of ligands on differentiation depend on soluble biochemical stimuli. A linear RGD peptide, a recombinant fibronectin fragment containing the seven to 10 Type III repeats (FnIII7-10) and a triple helical, collagen mimetic peptide with the GFOGER motif were covalently coupled to agarose gels using the sulfo-SANPAH crosslinker, and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were cultured within the 3D hydrogels.. The ligands retained biologic functionality within the agarose gels and promoted density-dependent BMSC spreading. Interactions with all adhesive ligands inhibited stimulation by chondrogenic factors of collagen Type II and aggrecanmRNA levels and deposition of sulfated glycosaminoglycans. In medium containing fetal bovine serum, interactions with the GFOGER peptide enhanced mRNA expression of the osteogenic gene osteocalcin whereas FnIII7-10 inhibited osteocalcin expression. In conclusion, modification of agarose hydrogels with ECM-mimetic ligands can influence the differentiation of BMSCs in a manner that depends strongly on the presence and nature of soluble biochemical stimuli. PMID:21932193

  8. Collagen esterification enhances the function and survival of pancreatic β cells in 2D and 3D culture systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Jae Hyung; Kim, Yang Hee; Jeong, Seong Hee; Lee, Song; Park, Si-Nae; Shim, In Kyong; Kim, Song Cheol

    2015-08-07

    Collagen, one of the most important components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), may play a role in the survival of pancreatic islet cells. In addition, chemical modifications that change the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification have been shown to increase the adhesion and proliferation of various cell types. The purpose of this study was to characterize and compare the effects of native collagen (NC) and esterified collagen (EC) on β cell function and survival. After isolation by the collagenase digestion technique, rat islets were cultured with NC and EC in 2 dimensional (2D) and 3 dimensional (3D) environments for a long-term duration in vitro. The cells were assessed for islet adhesion, morphology, viability, glucose-induced insulin secretion, and mRNA expression of glucose metabolism-related genes, and visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Islet cells attached tightly in the NC group, but islet cell viability was similar in both the NC and EC groups. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was higher in the EC group than in the NC group in both 2D and 3D culture. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of glucokinase in the EC group were higher than those in the NC group and were associated with glucose metabolism and insulin secretion. Finally, SEM observation confirmed that islets had more intact component cells on EC sponges than on NC sponges. These results indicate that modification of collagen may offer opportunities to improve function and viability of islet cells. - Highlights: • We changed the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen improved survival in both 2D and 3D culture. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin release. • High levels of glucokinase mRNA may be associated with increased insulin release.

  9. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Andrew D; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils. PMID:26548801

  10. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils. PMID:26548801

  11. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-11-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  12. A Novel 3D Fibril Force Assay Implicates Src in Tumor Cell Force Generation in Collagen Networks

    PubMed Central

    Polackwich, Robert J.; Koch, Daniel; Arevalo, Richard; Miermont, Anne M.; Jee, Kathleen J.; Lazar, John; Urbach, Jeffrey; Mueller, Susette C.; McAllister, Ryan G.

    2013-01-01

    New insight into the biomechanics of cancer cell motility in 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) environments would significantly enhance our understanding of aggressive cancers and help identify new targets for intervention. While several methods for measuring the forces involved in cell-matrix interactions have been developed, previous to this study none have been able to measure forces in a fibrillar environment. We have developed a novel assay for simultaneously measuring cell mechanotransduction and motility in 3D fibrillar environments. The assay consists of a controlled-density fibrillar collagen gel atop a controlled-stiffness polyacrylamide (PAA) surface. Forces generated by living cells and their migration in the 3D collagen gel were measured with the 3D motion of tracer beads within the PAA layer. Here, this 3D fibril force assay is used to study the role of the invasion-associated protein kinase Src in mechanotransduction and motility. Src expression and activation are linked with proliferation, invasion, and metastasis, and have been shown to be required in 2D for invadopodia membranes to direct and mediate invasion. Breast cancer cell line MDA-MD-231 was stably transfected with GFP-tagged constitutively active Src or wild-type Src. In 3D fibrillar collagen matrices we found that, relative to wild-type Src, constitutively active Src: 1) increased the strength of cell-induced forces on the ECM, 2) did not significantly change migration speed, and 3) increased both the duration and the length, but not the number, of long membrane protrusions. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that Src controls invasion by controlling the ability of the cell to form long lasting cellular protrusions to enable penetration through tissue barriers, in addition to its role in promoting invadopodia matrix-degrading activity. PMID:23536784

  13. Quantitative analysis of 3D extracellular matrix remodelling by pancreatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Benjamin K.; Cortes, Ernesto; Rice, Alistair J.; Sarper, Muge

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling is integral to numerous physiological and pathological processes in biology, such as embryogenesis, wound healing, fibrosis and cancer. Until recently, most cellular studies have been conducted on 2D environments where mechanical cues significantly differ from physiologically relevant 3D environments, impacting cellular behaviour and masking the interpretation of cellular function in health and disease. We present an integrated methodology where cell-ECM interactions can be investigated in 3D environments via ECM remodelling. Monitoring and quantification of collagen-I structure in remodelled matrices, through designated algorithms, show that 3D matrices can be used to correlate remodelling with increased ECM stiffness observed in fibrosis. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are the key effectors of the stromal fibrosis associated to pancreatic cancer. We use PSCs to implement our methodology and demonstrate that PSC matrix remodelling capabilities depend on their contractile machinery and β1 integrin-mediated cell-ECM attachment. PMID:27170254

  14. Heterogeneous Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in 3D Extracellular Matrix Composites

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jangwook P.; Bache-Wiig, Meredith K.; Provenzano, Paolo P.; Ogle, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are structural elements of tissue and also potent signaling molecules. Previously, our laboratory showed that ECM of 2D coatings can trigger differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into mesodermal lineages in an ECM-specific manner over 14 days, in some cases comparable to chemical induction. To test whether a similar effect was possible in a 3D, tissue-like environment, we designed a synthetic-natural biomaterial composite. The composite can present whole-molecule ECM proteins to cells, even those that do not spontaneously form hydrogels ex vivo, in 3D. To this end, we entrapped collagen type I, laminin-111, or fibronectin in ECM composites with MSCs and directly compared markers of mesodermal differentiation including cardiomyogenic (ACTC1), osteogenic (SPP1), adipogenic (PPARG), and chondrogenic (SOX9) in 2D versus 3D. We found the 3D condition largely mimicked the 2D condition such that the addition of type I collagen was the most potent inducer of differentiation to all lineages tested. One notable difference between 2D and 3D was pronounced adipogenic differentiation in 3D especially in the presence of exogenous collagen type I. In particular, PPARG gene expression was significantly increased ∼16-fold relative to chemical induction, in 3D and not in 2D. Unexpectedly, 3D engagement of ECM proteins also altered immunomodulatory function of MSCs in that expression of IL-6 gene was elevated relative to basal levels in 2D. In fact, levels of IL-6 gene expression in 3D composites containing exogenously supplied collagen type I or fibronectin were statistically similar to levels attained in 2D with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) stimulation and these levels were sustained over a 2-week period. Thus, this novel biomaterial platform allowed us to compare the biochemical impact of whole-molecule ECM proteins in 2D versus 3D indicating enhanced adipogenic differentiation and IL-6 expression

  15. Heterogeneous Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in 3D Extracellular Matrix Composites.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jangwook P; Bache-Wiig, Meredith K; Provenzano, Paolo P; Ogle, Brenda M

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are structural elements of tissue and also potent signaling molecules. Previously, our laboratory showed that ECM of 2D coatings can trigger differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into mesodermal lineages in an ECM-specific manner over 14 days, in some cases comparable to chemical induction. To test whether a similar effect was possible in a 3D, tissue-like environment, we designed a synthetic-natural biomaterial composite. The composite can present whole-molecule ECM proteins to cells, even those that do not spontaneously form hydrogels ex vivo, in 3D. To this end, we entrapped collagen type I, laminin-111, or fibronectin in ECM composites with MSCs and directly compared markers of mesodermal differentiation including cardiomyogenic (ACTC1), osteogenic (SPP1), adipogenic (PPARG), and chondrogenic (SOX9) in 2D versus 3D. We found the 3D condition largely mimicked the 2D condition such that the addition of type I collagen was the most potent inducer of differentiation to all lineages tested. One notable difference between 2D and 3D was pronounced adipogenic differentiation in 3D especially in the presence of exogenous collagen type I. In particular, PPARG gene expression was significantly increased ∼16-fold relative to chemical induction, in 3D and not in 2D. Unexpectedly, 3D engagement of ECM proteins also altered immunomodulatory function of MSCs in that expression of IL-6 gene was elevated relative to basal levels in 2D. In fact, levels of IL-6 gene expression in 3D composites containing exogenously supplied collagen type I or fibronectin were statistically similar to levels attained in 2D with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) stimulation and these levels were sustained over a 2-week period. Thus, this novel biomaterial platform allowed us to compare the biochemical impact of whole-molecule ECM proteins in 2D versus 3D indicating enhanced adipogenic differentiation and IL-6 expression of MSC in

  16. Micro-structured materials and mechanical cues in 3D collagen gels.

    PubMed

    Phillips, James B; Brown, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Collagen gels provide a versatile and widely used substrate for three-dimensional (3D) cell culture. Here we describe how cell-seeded Type-I collagen gels can be adapted to provide powerful 3D models to support a wide range of research applications where cell/substrate alignment, density, stiffness/compliance, and strain are critical factors. In their fully hydrated form, rectangular collagen gels can be tethered such that endogenous forces generated as resident cells attach to and remodel the fibrillar collagen network can align the substrate in a controllable, predictable, and quantifiable manner. By removing water from collagen gels (plastic compression), their density increases towards that of body tissues, facilitating the engineering of a range of biomimetic constructs with controllable mechanical properties. This dense collagen can be used in combination with other components to achieve a range of functional properties from controlled perfusion, or tensile/compressive strength to new micro-structures. Detailed methodology is provided for the assembly of a range of 3D collagen materials including tethered aligned hydrogels and plastic compressed constructs. A range of techniques for analysing cell behaviour within these models, including microscopy and molecular analyses are described. These systems therefore provide a highly controllable mechanical and chemical micro-environment for investigating a wide range of cellular responses. PMID:21042973

  17. Cell Proliferation on Macro/Nano Surface Structure and Collagen Immobilization of 3D Polycaprolactone Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Ouk; Myung, Sung-Woon; Kook, Min-Suk; Jung, Sang-Chul; Kim, Byung-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    In this study, 3D polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technique. The macro/nano morphology of, 3D PCL scaffolds surface was etched with oxygen plasma. Acrylic acid (AA) plasma-polymerization was performed to functionalize the macro/nano surface with carboxyl groups and then collagen was immobilized with plasma-polymerized 3D PCL scaffolds. After O2 plasma and AA plasma-polymerization, contact angles were decreased. The FE-SEM and AFM results showed that O2 plasma is increased the surface roughness. The MTT assay results showed that proliferation of the M3CT3-E1 cells increased on the oxygen plasma treated and collagen immobilized 3D PCL scaffolds. PMID:27433597

  18. Strategies for Directing the Structure and Function of 3D Collagen Biomaterials across Length Scales

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Brandan D.; Stegemann, Jan P.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen type I is a widely used natural biomaterial that has found utility in a variety of biological and medical applications. Its well characterized structure and role as an extracellular matrix protein make it a highly relevant material for controlling cell function and mimicking tissue properties. Collagen type I is abundant in a number of tissues, and can be isolated as a purified protein. This review focuses on hydrogel biomaterials made by reconstituting collagen type I from a solubilized form, with an emphasis on in vitro studies in which collagen structure can be controlled. The hierarchical structure of collagen from the nanoscale to the macroscale is described, with an emphasis on how structure is related to function across scales. Methods of reconstituting collagen into hydrogel materials are presented, including molding of macroscopic constructs, creation of microscale modules, and electrospinning of nanoscale fibers. The modification of collagen biomaterials to achieve desired structures and functions is also addressed, with particular emphasis on mechanical control of collagen structure, creation of collagen composite materials, and crosslinking of collagenous matrices. Biomaterials scientists have made remarkable progress in rationally designing collagen-based biomaterials and in applying them to both the study of biology and for therapeutic benefit. This broad review illustrates recent examples of techniques used to control collagen structure, and to thereby direct its biological and mechanical functions. PMID:24012608

  19. Screening for Stromal and Matrix Effects in 3D Microenvironments of Breast Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanez-Sauri, Sara I.

    Breast cancer progression ensures through the acquisition of genetic mutations, the uncontrollable growth of cells, and their progression to invasion. Studies have shown that the surrounding three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment can also influence breast cancer cell progression by controlling the morphology, differentiation, proliferation, and migration of cells. However, most of the currently available in vitro screening platforms are based on the two-dimensional (2D) culture of cells, and do not provide cells with the complex 3D microenvironment that exists in vivo. Therefore, there is a need for more biologically relevant in vitro platforms to help decipher the complexity of the microenvironment and its influence in breast cancer. In this dissertation we present an automated microfluidic platform that allows to efficiently screen for the effect of multiple matrix and stromal microenvironment in 3D cultures of breast cancer cells. Several extracellular matrix (ECM) compositions and stromal cells are included in the 3D microenvironments to examine their influence on breast cancer cell behavior. The screening results suggest that collagen gels with fibronectin might be influencing paracrine signals between breast cancer cells and stromal cells. The ability of the platform to culture and treat cells in 3D microenvironments offers a powerful screening tool for the identification of compounds and interactions using more in vivo-like 3D microenvironments. The identification of these mechanisms will increase our current understanding of breast cancer, and will aid in the identification of potential therapeutics.

  20. Wound healing properties of a 3-D scaffold comprising soluble silkworm gland hydrolysate and human collagen.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyu-Oh; Lee, Youngjun; Hwang, Jung-Wook; Kim, Hojin; Kim, Sun Mi; Chang, Sung Woon; Lee, Heui Sam; Choi, Yong-Soo

    2014-04-01

    Biomaterials that serve as scaffolds for cell proliferation and differentiation are increasingly being used in wound repair. In this study, the potential regenerative properties of a 3-D scaffold containing soluble silkworm gland hydrolysate (SSGH) and human collagen were evaluated. The scaffold was generated by solid-liquid phase separation and a freeze-drying method using a homogeneous aqueous solution. The porosity, swelling behavior, protein release, cytotoxicity, and antioxidative properties of scaffolds containing various ratios of SSGH and collagen were evaluated. SSGH/collagen scaffolds had a high porosity of 61-81% and swelling behavior studies demonstrated a 50-75% increase in swelling, along with complete protein release in the presence of phosphate-buffered saline. Cytocompatibility of the SSGH/collagen scaffold was demonstrated using mesenchymal stem cells from human umbilical cord. Furthermore, SSGH/collagen efficiently attenuated oxidative stress-induced cell damage. In an in vivo mouse model of wound healing, the SSGH/collagen scaffold accelerated wound re-epithelialization over a 15-day period. Overall, the microporous SSGH/collagen 3-D scaffold maintained optimal hydration of the exposed tissues and decreased wound healing time. These results contribute to the generation of advanced wound healing materials and may have future therapeutic implications. PMID:24503353

  1. 3D Printing of Composite Calcium Phosphate and Collagen Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Inzana, Jason A.; Olvera, Diana; Fuller, Seth M.; Kelly, James P.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Schwarz, Edward M.; Kates, Stephen L.; Awad, Hani A.

    2014-01-01

    Low temperature 3D printing of calcium phosphate scaffolds holds great promise for fabricating synthetic bone graft substitutes with enhanced performance over traditional techniques. Many design parameters, such as the binder solution properties, have yet to be optimized to ensure maximal biocompatibility and osteoconductivity with sufficient mechanical properties. This study tailored the phosphoric acid-based binder solution concentration to 8.75 wt% to maximize cytocompatibility and mechanical strength, with a supplementation of Tween 80 to improve printing. To further enhance the formulation, collagen was dissolved into the binder solution to fabricate collagen-calcium phosphate composites. Reducing the viscosity and surface tension through a physiologic heat treatment and Tween 80, respectively, enabled reliable thermal inkjet printing of the collagen solutions. Supplementing the binder solution with 1–2 wt% collagen significantly improved maximum flexural strength and cell viability. To assess the bone healing performance, we implanted 3D printed scaffolds into a critically sized murine femoral defect for 9 weeks. The implants were confirmed to be osteoconductive, with new bone growth incorporating the degrading scaffold materials. In conclusion, this study demonstrates optimization of material parameters for 3D printed calcium phosphate scaffolds and enhancement of material properties by volumetric collagen incorporation via inkjet printing. PMID:24529628

  2. Microfluidic Generation of Haptotactic Gradients through 3D Collagen Gels for Enhanced Neurite Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaghavan, Harini G.; Masand, Shirley N.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We adapted a microfluidic system used previously to generate durotactic gradients of stiffness in a 3D collagen gel, to produce haptotactic gradients of adhesive ligands through the collagen gel. Oligopeptide sequences that included bioactive peptide sequences from laminin, YIGSR, or IKVAV, were grafted separately onto type I collagen using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC). Solutions of peptide-grafted collagen and untreated collagen were then used as source and sink input solutions, respectively, in an H-shaped microfluidic network fabricated using traditional soft lithography. One-dimensional gradients of the peptide-grafted collagen solution were generated in the channel that connected the source and sink channels, and these gradients became immobilized upon self-assembly of the collagen into a 3D fibrillar gel. The slope and average concentration of the gradients were adjusted by changing the concentration of the source solutions and by changing the length of the cross-channel. A separate, underlying channel in the microfluidic construct allowed the introduction of a chick embryo dorsal root ganglion into the network. Neurites from these explants grew significantly longer up steep gradients of YIGSR, but shallow gradients of IKVAV in comparison to untreated collagen controls. When these two gradients were presented in combination, the bias in growth acceleration was the largest and most consistent. No differences were observed in the number of neurites choosing to grow up or down the gradients in any condition. These results suggest that the incorporation of distinct gradients of multiple bioactive ligands can improve directional acceleration of regenerating axons. PMID:21473683

  3. 3D magnetotelluric inversion with full distortion matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribenko, A. V.; Zhdanov, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Distortion of regional electric fields by local structures represent one of the major problems facing three-dimensional magnetotelluric (MT) interpretation. Effect of 3D local inhomogenities on MT data can be described by a real 2x2 distortion matrix. In this project we develop a method of simultaneous inversion of the full MT impedance data for 3D conductivity distribution and for the distortion matrix. Tikhonov regularization is employed to solve the resulting inverse problem. Integral equations method is used to compute MT responses. Minimization of the cost functional is achieved via conjugate gradient method. The inversion algorithm is tested on the synthetic data from Dublin Secret Model II (DSM 2) for which multiple inversion solutions are available for comparison. Inclusion of the distortion matrix provides faster convergence and allows coarser discretization of the near-surface while achievingsimilar or better data fits as inversion for the conductivity only with finely discretized shallow regions. As a field data example we chose a subset of the EarthScope MT dataset covering Great Basin and adjacent areas of the Western United States. Great Basin data inversion identified several prominent conductive zones which correlate well with areas of tectonic and geothermal activity.

  4. Effects of Matrix Alignment and Mechanical Constraints on Cellular Behavior in 3D Engineered Microtissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Prasenjit; Eyckmans, Jeroen; Chen, Christopher; Reich, Daniel

    The adhesion of cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a crucial role in a variety of cellular functions. The main building blocks of the ECM are 3D networks of fibrous proteins whose structure and alignments varies with tissue type. However, the impact of ECM alignment on cellular behaviors such as cell adhesion, spreading, extension and mechanics remains poorly understood. We present results on the development of a microtissue-based system that enables control of the structure, orientation, and degree of fibrillar alignment in 3D fibroblast-populated collagen gels. The tissues self-assemble from cell-laden collagen gels placed in micro-fabricated wells containing sets of elastic pillars. The contractile action of the cells leads to controlled alignment of the fibrous collagen, depending on the number and location of the pillars in each well. The pillars are elastic, and are utilized to measure the contractile forces of the microtissues, and by incorporating magnetic material in selected pillars, time-varying forces can be applied to the tissues for dynamic stimulation and measurement of mechanical properties. Results on the effects of varying pillar shape, spacing, location, and stiffness on microtissue organization and contractility will be presented. This work is supported by NSF CMMI-1463011.

  5. 3D Raman mapping of the collagen fibril orientation in human osteonal lamellae.

    PubMed

    Schrof, Susanne; Varga, Peter; Galvis, Leonardo; Raum, Kay; Masic, Admir

    2014-09-01

    Chemical composition and fibrillar organization are the major determinants of osteonal bone mechanics. However, prominent methodologies commonly applied to investigate mechanical properties of bone on the micro scale are usually not able to concurrently describe both factors. In this study, we used polarized Raman spectroscopy (PRS) to simultaneously analyze structural and chemical information of collagen fibrils in human osteonal bone in a single experiment. Specifically, the three-dimensional arrangement of collagen fibrils in osteonal lamellae was assessed. By analyzing the anisotropic intensity of the amide I Raman band of collagen as a function of the orientation of the incident laser polarization, different parameters related to the orientation of the collagen fibrils and the degree of alignment of the fibrils were derived. Based on the analysis of several osteons, two major fibrillar organization patterns were identified, one with a monotonic and another with a periodically changing twist direction. These results confirm earlier reported twisted and oscillating plywood arrangements, respectively. Furthermore, indicators of the degree of alignment suggested the presence of disordered collagen within the lamellar organization of the osteon. The results show the versatility of the analytical PRS approach and demonstrate its capability in providing not only compositional, but also 3D structural information in a complex hierarchically structured biological material. The concurrent assessment of chemical and structural features may contribute to a comprehensive characterization of the microstructure of bone and other collagen-based tissues. PMID:25025981

  6. Techniques for Assessing 3-D Cell-Matrix Mechanical Interactions In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Miron-Mendoza, Miguel; Koppaka, Vindhya; Zhou, Chengxin; Petroll, W. Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Cellular interactions with extracellular matrices (ECM) through the application of mechanical forces mediate numerous biological processes including developmental morphogenesis, wound healing and cancer metastasis. They also play a key role in the cellular repopulation and/or remodeling of engineered tissues and organs. While 2-D studies can provide important insights into many aspects of cellular mechanobiology, cells reside within 3-D ECMs in vivo, and matrix structure and dimensionality have been shown to impact cell morphology, protein organization and mechanical behavior. Global measurements of cell-induced compaction of 3-D collagen matrices can provide important insights into the regulation of overall cell contractility by various cytokines and signaling pathways. However, to understand how the mechanics of cell spreading, migration, contraction and matrix remodeling are regulated at the molecular level, these processes must also be studied in individual cells. Here we review the evolution and application of techniques for imaging and assessing local cell-matrix mechanical interactions in 3-D culture models, tissue explants and living animals. PMID:23819988

  7. Techniques for assessing 3-D cell-matrix mechanical interactions in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Miron-Mendoza, Miguel; Koppaka, Vindhya; Zhou, Chengxin; Petroll, W Matthew

    2013-10-01

    Cellular interactions with extracellular matrices (ECM) through the application of mechanical forces mediate numerous biological processes including developmental morphogenesis, wound healing and cancer metastasis. They also play a key role in the cellular repopulation and/or remodeling of engineered tissues and organs. While 2-D studies can provide important insights into many aspects of cellular mechanobiology, cells reside within 3-D ECMs in vivo, and matrix structure and dimensionality have been shown to impact cell morphology, protein organization and mechanical behavior. Global measurements of cell-induced compaction of 3-D collagen matrices can provide important insights into the regulation of overall cell contractility by various cytokines and signaling pathways. However, to understand how the mechanics of cell spreading, migration, contraction and matrix remodeling are regulated at the molecular level, these processes must also be studied in individual cells. Here we review the evolution and application of techniques for imaging and assessing local cell-matrix mechanical interactions in 3-D culture models, tissue explants and living animals. PMID:23819988

  8. Microscale 3D collagen cell culture assays in conventional flat-bottom 384-well plates.

    PubMed

    Leung, Brendan M; Moraes, Christopher; Cavnar, Stephen P; Luker, Kathryn E; Luker, Gary D; Takayama, Shuichi

    2015-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture systems such as cell-laden hydrogels are superior to standard two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures for many drug-screening applications. However, their adoption into high-throughput screening (HTS) has been lagging, in part because of the difficulty of incorporating these culture formats into existing robotic liquid handling and imaging infrastructures. Dispensing cell-laden prepolymer solutions into 2D well plates is a potential solution but typically requires large volumes of reagents to avoid evaporation during polymerization, which (1) increases costs, (2) makes drug penetration variable and (3) complicates imaging. Here we describe a technique to efficiently produce 3D microgels using automated liquid-handling systems and standard, nonpatterned, flat-bottomed, 384-well plates. Sub-millimeter-diameter, cell-laden collagen gels are deposited on the bottom of a ~2.5 mm diameter microwell with no concerns about evaporation or meniscus effects at the edges of wells, using aqueous two-phase system patterning. The microscale cell-laden collagen-gel constructs are readily imaged and readily penetrated by drugs. The cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutics was monitored by bioluminescence and demonstrated that 3D cultures confer chemoresistance as compared with similar 2D cultures. Hence, these data demonstrate the importance of culturing cells in 3D to obtain realistic cellular responses. Overall, this system provides a simple and inexpensive method for integrating 3D culture capability into existing HTS infrastructure. PMID:25510473

  9. Texture analysis of the 3D collagen network and automatic classification of the physiology of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaojuan; Wu, Jianping; Swift, Benjamin; Kirk, Thomas Brett

    2015-07-01

    A close relationship has been found between the 3D collagen structure and physiological condition of articular cartilage (AC). Studying the 3D collagen network in AC offers a way to determine the condition of the cartilage. However, traditional qualitative studies are time consuming and subjective. This study aims to develop a computer vision-based classifier to automatically determine the condition of AC tissue based on the structural characteristics of the collagen network. Texture analysis was applied to quantitatively characterise the 3D collagen structure in normal (International Cartilage Repair Society, ICRS, grade 0), aged (ICRS grade 1) and osteoarthritic cartilages (ICRS grade 2). Principle component techniques and linear discriminant analysis were then used to classify the microstructural characteristics of the 3D collagen meshwork and the condition of the AC. The 3D collagen meshwork in the three physiological condition groups displayed distinctive characteristics. Texture analysis indicated a significant difference in the mean texture parameters of the 3D collagen network between groups. The principle component and linear discriminant analysis of the texture data allowed for the development of a classifier for identifying the physiological status of the AC with an expected prediction error of 4.23%. An automatic image analysis classifier has been developed to predict the physiological condition of AC (from ICRS grade 0 to 2) based on texture data from the 3D collagen network in the tissue. PMID:24428581

  10. Study of the collagen structure in the superficial zone and physiological state of articular cartilage using a 3D confocal imaging technique

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian P; Kirk, Thomas B; Zheng, Ming H

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The collagen structure in the superficial zone of articular cartilage is critical to the tissue's durability. Early osteoarthritis is often characterized with fissures on the articular surface. This is closely related to the disruption of the collagen network. However, the traditional histology can not offer visualization of the collagen structure in articular cartilage because it uses conventional optical microscopy that does not have insufficient imaging resolution to resolve collagen from proteoglycans in hyaline articular cartilage. This study examines the 3D collagen network of articular cartilage scored from 0 to 2 in the scoring system of International Cartilage Repair Society, and aims to develop a 3D histology for assessing early osteoarthritis. Methods Articular cartilage was visually classified into five physiological groups: normal cartilage, aged cartilage, cartilage with artificial and natural surface disruption, and fibrillated. The 3D collagen matrix of the cartilage was acquired using a 3D imaging technique developed previously. Traditional histology was followed to grade the physiological status of the cartilage in the scoring system of International Cartilage Repair Society. Results Normal articular cartilage contains interwoven collagen bundles near the articular surface, approximately within the lamina splendens. However, its collagen fibres in the superficial zone orient predominantly in a direction spatially oblique to the articular surface. With age and disruption of the articular surface, the interwoven collagen bundles are gradually disappeared, and obliquely oriented collagen fibres change to align predominantly in a direction spatially perpendicular to the articular surface. Disruption of the articular surface is well related to the disappearance of the interwoven collagen bundles. Conclusion A 3D histology has been developed to supplement the traditional histology and study the subtle changes in the collagen network in the

  11. Longitudinal Measurement of Extracellular Matrix Rigidity in 3D Tumor Models Using Particle-tracking Microrheology

    PubMed Central

    El-Hamidi, Hamid; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical microenvironment has been shown to act as a crucial regulator of tumor growth behavior and signaling, which is itself remodeled and modified as part of a set of complex, two-way mechanosensitive interactions. While the development of biologically-relevant 3D tumor models have facilitated mechanistic studies on the impact of matrix rheology on tumor growth, the inverse problem of mapping changes in the mechanical environment induced by tumors remains challenging. Here, we describe the implementation of particle-tracking microrheology (PTM) in conjunction with 3D models of pancreatic cancer as part of a robust and viable approach for longitudinally monitoring physical changes in the tumor microenvironment, in situ. The methodology described here integrates a system of preparing in vitro 3D models embedded in a model extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold of Type I collagen with fluorescently labeled probes uniformly distributed for position- and time-dependent microrheology measurements throughout the specimen. In vitro tumors are plated and probed in parallel conditions using multiwell imaging plates. Drawing on established methods, videos of tracer probe movements are transformed via the Generalized Stokes Einstein Relation (GSER) to report the complex frequency-dependent viscoelastic shear modulus, G*(ω). Because this approach is imaging-based, mechanical characterization is also mapped onto large transmitted-light spatial fields to simultaneously report qualitative changes in 3D tumor size and phenotype. Representative results showing contrasting mechanical response in sub-regions associated with localized invasion-induced matrix degradation as well as system calibration, validation data are presented. Undesirable outcomes from common experimental errors and troubleshooting of these issues are also presented. The 96-well 3D culture plating format implemented in this protocol is conducive to correlation of microrheology measurements with therapeutic

  12. Microscale 3-D collagen cell culture assays in conventional flat-bottom 384-well plates

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Brendan M.; Moraes, Christopher; Cavnar, Stephen; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional culture systems such as cell-laden hydrogels are superior to standard 2-D monolayer cultures for many drug-screening applications. However, their adoption in high throughput screening (HTS) have been lagging, in part due to the difficulty of incorporating these culture formats into existing robotic liquid handling and imaging infrastructures. Dispensing cell-laden pre-polymer solutions into 2-D well-plates is a potential solution, but typically requires large volumes of reagents to avoid evaporation during polymerization, which increases cost, makes drug penetration variable and imaging complex. Here we describe a technique to efficiently produce 3-D ‘microgels’ using automated liquid handling systems and standard, non-patterned, flat-bottomed, 384-well plates. Sub-millimeter-diameter, cell-laden collagen gels are deposited on the bottom of ~2.5 mm-diameter microwell with no concerns over evaporation and meniscus effects at the edges of wells, using aqueous two-phase system patterning. The microscale cell-laden collagen-gel constructs are readily imaged and readily penetrated by drugs. Cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutics were monitored by bioluminescence and demonstrates that 3-D cultures confer chemoresistance, as compared to similar 2-D culture. This data hence, demonstrates the importance of culturing cells in 3-D to obtain realistic cellular responses. Overall, this system provided a simple and inexpensive method for integrating 3-D culture capability into existing HTS infrastructure. PMID:25510473

  13. Human astrocytes develop physiological morphology and remain quiescent in a novel 3D matrix.

    PubMed

    Placone, Amanda L; McGuiggan, Patricia M; Bergles, Dwight E; Guerrero-Cazares, Hugo; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Searson, Peter C

    2015-02-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant glial cells in the brain and are responsible for diverse functions, from modulating synapse function to regulating the blood-brain barrier. In vivo, these cells exhibit a star-shaped morphology with multiple radial processes that contact synapses and completely surround brain capillaries. In response to trauma or CNS disease, astrocytes become activated, a state associated with profound changes in gene expression, including upregulation of intermediate filament proteins, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). The inability to recapitulate the complex structure of astrocytes and maintain their quiescent state in vitro is a major roadblock to further developments in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here, we characterize astrocyte morphology and activation in various hydrogels to assess the feasibility of developing a matrix that mimics key aspects of the native microenvironment. We show that astrocytes seeded in optimized matrix composed of collagen, hyaluronic acid, and matrigel exhibit a star-shaped morphology with radial processes and do not upregulate GFAP expression, hallmarks of quiescent astrocytes in the brain. In these optimized gels, collagen I provides structural support, HA mimics the brain extracellular matrix, and matrigel provides endothelial cell compatibility and was found to minimize GFAP upregulation. This defined 3D microenvironment for maintaining human astrocytes in vitro provides new opportunities for developing improved models of the blood-brain barrier and studying their response to stress signals. PMID:25542801

  14. 3-D stamp forming of thermoplastic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, M.; Friedrich, K.

    1994-03-01

    In this investigation a mould with hemispherical cavity and 80 kN hydraulic press, allowing variable stamping speeds, are employed for experimentally studying of the 3-D stamp forming process of continuous fiber reinforced thermoplastic laminates. In particular, glass fiber (GF) reinforced polyetherimide (PEI) woven fabric made of sheath surrounded, polymer powder impregnated fiber bundles manufactured by Enichem, Italy, is used. Pre-consolidated laminates are heated by contact heating in an external heater up to about 120°C above the glass transition temperature ( T g) of the polymer matrix; they are then stamp formed in a cold matched metal tool. Typical cycle times (including preheating time of the preconsolidated laminates) are in the range of 3 min. Useful processing conditions, such as stamping temperature, stamping velocity and hold-down pressure required for stamp forming of this composite are determined. In addition the effect of die geometries (deformation radian) and original laminate dimensions are studied. The results describe the correlations between processing parameters and fiber buckling. Finally the thickness distribution in stamped parts are investigated in relation to different directions of fiber orientation.

  15. Comparison of the Expression of Hepatic Genes by Human Wharton’s Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cells Cultured in 2D and 3D Collagen Culture Systems

    PubMed Central

    Khodabandeh, Zahra; Vojdani, Zahra; Talaei-Khozani, Tahereh; Jaberipour, Mansoureh; Hosseini, Ahmad; Bahmanpour, Soghra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human Wharton’s jelly mesenchymal stem cells (HWJMSCs) express liver-specific markers such as albumin, alpha-fetoprotein, cytokeratin-19, cytokeratin-18, and glucose-6-phosphatase. Therefore, they can be considered as a good source for cell replacement therapy for liver diseases. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of various culture systems on the hepatocyte-specific gene expression pattern of naïve HWJMSCs. Methods: HWJMSCs were characterized as MSCs by detecting the surface CD markers and capability to differentiate toward osteoblast and adipocyte. HWJMSCs were cultured in 2D collagen films and 3D collagen scaffolds for 21 days and were compared to control cultures. Real time RT-PCR was used to evaluate the expression of liver-specific genes. Results: The HWJMSCs which were grown on non-coated culture plates expressed cytokeratin-18 and -19, alpha-fetoprotein, albumin, glucose-6-phosphatase, and claudin. The expression of the hepatic nuclear factor 4 (HNF4) was very low. The cells showed a significant increase in caludin expression when they cultured in 3D collagen scaffolds compared to the conventional monolayer culture and 2D collagen scaffold. Conclusion: Various culture systems did not influence on hepatocyte specific marker expression by HWJMSCs, except for claudin. The expression of claudin showed that 3D collagen scaffold provided the extracellular matrix for induction of the cells to interconnect with each other. PMID:26722142

  16. Microencapsulation of Neuroblastoma Cells and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Collagen Microspheres: A 3D Model for Cancer Cell Niche Study

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Pan; Sin, Hoi Shun; Chan, Shing; Chan, Godfrey Chi Fung; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing trend for researchers to use in vitro 3D models in cancer studies, as they can better recapitulate the complex in vivo situation. And the fact that the progression and development of tumor are closely associated to its stromal microenvironment has been increasingly recognized. The establishment of such tumor supportive niche is vital in understanding tumor progress and metastasis. The mesenchymal origin of many cells residing in the cancer niche provides the rationale to include MSCs in mimicking the niche in neuroblastoma. Here we co-encapsulate and co-culture NBCs and MSCs in a 3D in vitro model and investigate the morphology, growth kinetics and matrix remodeling in the reconstituted stromal environment. Results showed that the incorporation of MSCs in the model lead to accelerated growth of cancer cells as well as recapitulation of at least partially the tumor microenvironment in vivo. The current study therefore demonstrates the feasibility for the collagen microsphere to act as a 3D in vitro cancer model for various topics in cancer studies. PMID:26657086

  17. Increasing 3D Matrix Rigidity Strengthens Proliferation and Spheroid Development of Human Liver Cells in a Constant Growth Factor Environment.

    PubMed

    Bomo, Jérémy; Ezan, Frédéric; Tiaho, François; Bellamri, Medjda; Langouët, Sophie; Theret, Nathalie; Baffet, Georges

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical forces influence the growth and shape of virtually all tissues and organs. Recent studies show that increased cell contractibility, growth and differentiation might be normalized by modulating cell tensions. Particularly, the role of these tensions applied by the extracellular matrix during liver fibrosis could influence the hepatocarcinogenesis process. The objective of this study is to determine if 3D stiffness could influence growth and phenotype of normal and transformed hepatocytes and to integrate extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness to tensional homeostasis. We have developed an appropriate 3D culture model: hepatic cells within three-dimensional collagen matrices with varying rigidity. Our results demonstrate that the rigidity influenced the cell phenotype and induced spheroid clusters development whereas in soft matrices, Huh7 transformed cells were less proliferative, well-spread and flattened. We confirmed that ERK1 played a predominant role over ERK2 in cisplatin-induced death, whereas ERK2 mainly controlled proliferation. As compared to 2D culture, 3D cultures are associated with epithelial markers expression. Interestingly, proliferation of normal hepatocytes was also induced in rigid gels. Furthermore, biotransformation activities are increased in 3D gels, where CYP1A2 enzyme can be highly induced/activated in primary culture of human hepatocytes embedded in the matrix. In conclusion, we demonstrated that increasing 3D rigidity could promote proliferation and spheroid developments of liver cells demonstrating that 3D collagen gels are an attractive tool for studying rigidity-dependent homeostasis of the liver cells embedded in the matrix and should be privileged for both chronic toxicological and pharmacological drug screening. PMID:26331987

  18. 3D composites based on the blends of chitosan and collagen with the addition of hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Sionkowska, Alina; Kaczmarek, Beata; Lewandowska, Katarzyna; Grabska, Sylwia; Pokrywczyńska, Marta; Kloskowski, Tomasz; Drewa, Tomasz

    2016-08-01

    3D porous composites based on blends of chitosan, collagen and hyaluronic acid were obtained through the lyophilization process. Mechanical properties, swelling behavior and thermal stability of the blends were studied. Moreover, SEM images were taken and the structure of the blends was studied. Biological properties of the materials obtained were investigated by analyzing of proliferation rate of fibroblast cells incubated with biomaterial extract using MTT assay (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide). The results showed that the properties of 3D composites based on the blends of chitosan and collagen were altered after the addition 1%, 2% and 5% of hyaluronic acid. Mechanical properties and thermal stability of chitosan/collagen blends were improved in the presence of hyaluronic acid in the composite. New 3D materials based on the blends of chitosan, collagen and hyaluronic acid were non-toxic and did not significantly affect cell morphology. PMID:27151670

  19. Type VI Collagen Regulates Dermal Matrix Assembly and Fibroblast Motility.

    PubMed

    Theocharidis, Georgios; Drymoussi, Zoe; Kao, Alexander P; Barber, Asa H; Lee, David A; Braun, Kristin M; Connelly, John T

    2016-01-01

    Type VI collagen is a nonfibrillar collagen expressed in many connective tissues and implicated in extracellular matrix (ECM) organization. We hypothesized that type VI collagen regulates matrix assembly and cell function within the dermis of the skin. In the present study we examined the expression pattern of type VI collagen in normal and wounded skin and investigated its specific function in new matrix deposition by human dermal fibroblasts. Type VI collagen was expressed throughout the dermis of intact human skin, at the expanding margins of human keloid samples, and in the granulation tissue of newly deposited ECM in a mouse model of wound healing. Generation of cell-derived matrices (CDMs) by human dermal fibroblasts with stable knockdown of COL6A1 revealed that type VI collagen-deficient matrices were significantly thinner and contained more aligned, thicker, and widely spaced fibers than CDMs produced by normal fibroblasts. In addition, there was significantly less total collagen and sulfated proteoglycans present in the type VI collagen-depleted matrices. Normal fibroblasts cultured on de-cellularized CDMs lacking type VI collagen displayed increased cell spreading, migration speed, and persistence. Taken together, these findings indicate that type VI collagen is a key regulator of dermal matrix assembly, composition, and fibroblast behavior and may play an important role in wound healing and tissue regeneration. PMID:26763426

  20. Control of 3-dimensional collagen matrix polymerization for reproducible human mammary fibroblast cell culture in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Sung, Kyung Eun; Su, Gui; Pehlke, Carolyn; Trier, Steven M; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Keely, Patricia J; Friedl, Andreas; Beebe, David J

    2009-09-01

    Interest in constructing a reliable 3-dimensional (3D) collagen culture platform in microfabricated systems is increasing as researchers strive to investigate reciprocal interaction between extracellular matrix (ECM) and cells under various conditions. However, in comparison to conventional 2-dimensional (2D) cell culture research, relatively little work has been reported about the polymerization of collagen type I matrix in microsystems. We, thus, present a study of 3D collagen polymerization to achieve reproducible 3D cell culture in microfluidic devices. Array-based microchannels are employed to efficiently examine various polymerization conditions, providing more replicates with less sample volume than conventional means. Collagen fibers assembled in microchannels were almost two-times thinner than those in conventional gels prepared under similar conditions, and the fiber thickness difference influenced viability and morphology of embedded human mammary fibroblast (HMF) cells. HMF cells contained more actin stress fibers and showed increased viability in 3D collagen matrix composed of thicker collagen fibers. Relatively low pH of the collagen solution within a physiological pH range (6.5-8.5) and pre-incubation at low temperature (approximately 4 degrees C) before polymerization at 37 degrees C allow sufficient time for molecular assembly, generating thicker collagen fibers and enhancing HMF cell viability. The results provide the basis for improved process control and reproducibility of 3D collagen matrix culture in microchannels, allowing predictable modifications to provide optimum conditions for specific cell types. In addition, the presented method lays the foundation for high throughput 3D cellular screening. PMID:19540580

  1. Role of Cell-Matrix Interactions on VIC Phenotype and Tissue Deposition in 3D PEG Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Sarah T.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2014-01-01

    Valvular interstitial cells (VICs) respond to 3D matrix interactions in a complex manner, but better understanding these effects on VIC function is important for applications ranging from valve tissue engineering to studying valve disease. Here, we encapsulated VICs in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels modified with three different adhesive ligands derived from fibronectin (RGDS), elastin (VGVAPG), and collagen-1 (P15). By day 14, VICs became significantly more elongated in RGDS containing gels compared to VGVAPG or P15. This difference in cell morphology appeared to correlate with global matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, as VICs encapsulated in RGDS-functionalized hydrogels secreted higher levels of active MMP at day 2. VIC activation to a myofibroblast phenotype was also characterized by staining for α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) at day 14. The percentage of αSMA+ VICs in the VGVAPG gels was the highest (56%) compared to RGDS (33%) or P15 (38%) gels. Matrix deposition and composition were also characterized at day 14 and 42 and found to depend on the initial hydrogel composition. All gel formulations had similar levels of collagen, elastin, and chondroitin sulfate deposited as the porcine aortic valve. However, the composition of collagen deposited by VICs in VGVAPG functionalized gels had a significantly higher collagen-X to collagen-1 ratio, which is associated with stenotic valves. Taken together, these data suggest that peptide functionalized PEG hydrogels are a useful system to culture VICs in 3D, and with the ability to systematically alter biochemical and biophysical properties, this platform may prove useful in manipulating VIC function for valve regeneration. PMID:24130082

  2. Collagen XXVII Organises the Pericellular Matrix in the Growth Plate

    PubMed Central

    Plumb, Darren A.; Ferrara, Laila; Torbica, Tanja; Knowles, Lynnette; Mironov, Aleksandr; Kadler, Karl E.; Briggs, Michael D.; Boot-Handford, Raymond P.

    2011-01-01

    In order to characterise the function of the novel fibrillar type XXVII collagen, a series of mice expressing mutant forms of the collagen were investigated. Mice harboring a glycine to cysteine substitution in the collagenous domain were phenotypically normal when heterozygote and displayed a mild disruption of growth plate architecture in the homozygous state. Mice expressing an 87 amino acid deletion in the collagenous domain of collagen XXVII were phenotypically normal as heterozygotes whereas homozygotes exhibited a severe chondrodysplasia and died perinatally from a lung defect. Animals expressing the 87 amino acid deletion targeted specifically to cartilage were viable but severely dwarfed. The pericellular matrix of proliferative chondrocytes was disrupted and the proliferative cells exhibited a decreased tendency to flatten and form vertical columns. Collagen XXVII plays an important structural role in the pericellular extracellular matrix of the growth plate and is required for the organisation of the proliferative zone. PMID:22206015

  3. Bioactive fish collagen/polycaprolactone composite nanofibrous scaffolds fabricated by electrospinning for 3D cell culture.

    PubMed

    Choi, Da Jeong; Choi, Seung Mi; Kang, Hae Yeong; Min, Hye-Jin; Lee, Rira; Ikram, Muhammad; Subhan, Fazli; Jin, Song Wan; Jeong, Young Hun; Kwak, Jong-Young; Yoon, Sik

    2015-07-10

    One of the most challenging objectives of 3D cell culture is the development of scaffolding materials with outstanding biocompatibility and favorable mechanical strength. In this study, we fabricated a novel nanofibrous scaffold composed of fish collagen (FC) and polycaprolactone (PCL) blends by using the electrospinning method. Nanofibrous scaffolds were characterized using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and it was revealed that the diameter of nanofibers decreased as FC content was increased in the FC/PCL composite nanofibers. The cytocompatibility of the FC/PCL scaffolds was evaluated by SEM, WST-1 assay, confocal microscopy, western blot, and RT-PCR. It was found that the scaffolds not only facilitated the adhesion, spreading, protrusions, and proliferation of thymic epithelial cells (TECs), but also stimulated the expression of genes and proteins involved in cell adhesion and T-cell development. Thus, these results suggest that the FC/PCL composite nanofibrous scaffolds will be a useful model of 3D cell culture for TECs and may have wide applicability in the future for engineering tissues or organs. PMID:25617682

  4. Shrinking mechanism of a porous collagen matrix immersed in solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Yang; Hsieh, Hsyue-Jen; Huang, Lynn L H

    2014-12-01

    The porous structure of collagen-based matrices enables the infiltration of cells both in in vitro and clinical applications. Reconstituted porous collagen matrices often collapse when they are in contact with aqueous solutions; however, the mechanism for the collapse of the pores is not understood. We, therefore, investigated the interactions between the collagen matrix and different solutions, and discuss the mechanisms for the change in microstructure of the matrix on immersing it in solution. When a dried collagen matrix was immersed in aqueous solutions, the matrix shrunk and pores close to the surface closed. The shrinkage ratio and thickness of the compact microstructure close to the superficial area decreased with increasing ethanol content in the solution. The original porous structure of the collagen matrix was preserved when the matrix was immersed in absolute ethanol. The shrinkage of a porous collagen matrix in contact with aqueous solutions was attributed to the liquid/gas interfacial tension. The average pore diameter of the matrix also significantly affected the shrinkage of the matrix. The shrinkage of the matrix, explained using the Young-Laplace equation, was found to result from the pressure drop, and especially in the pores located superficially, leading to the collapse of the matrix microstructure. The integrity of the porous microstructure allows better penetration of cells in medical applications. The numbers of NIH/3T3 fibroblasts penetrated through the hydrated Col/PBS porous collagen matrices pre-immersed in absolute ethanol with subsequent water and DMEM culture medium replacements were significantly higher than those through matrices hydrated directly in DMEM. PMID:24678021

  5. Collaboration of 3D context and extracellular matrix in the development of glioma stemness in a 3D model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Nina K L; Lim, Jia Kai; Leong, Meng Fatt; Sandanaraj, Edwin; Ang, Beng Ti; Tang, Carol; Wan, Andrew C A

    2016-02-01

    A hierarchy of cellular stemness exists in certain cancers, and any successful strategy to treat such cancers would have to eliminate the self-renewing tumor-initiating cells at the apex of the hierarchy. The cellular microenvironment, in particular the extracellular matrix (ECM), is believed to have a role in regulating stemness. In this work, U251 glioblastoma cells are cultured on electrospun polystyrene (ESPS) scaffolds coated with an array of 7 laminin isoforms to provide a 3D model for stem cell-related genes and proteins expression studies. We observed collaboration between 3D context and laminins in promoting glioma stemness. Depending on the laminin isoform presented, U251 cells cultured on ESPS scaffolds (3D) exhibited increased expression of stemness markers compared to those cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (2D). Our results indicate the influence of 3D (versus 2D) context on integrin expression, specifically, the upregulation of the laminin-binding integrins alpha 6 and beta 4. By a colony forming assay, we showed enhanced clonogenicity of cells grown on ESPS scaffolds in collaboration with laminins 411, 421, 511 and 521. Evaluation of patient glioma databases demonstrated significant enrichment of integrin and ECM pathway networks in tumors of worse prognosis, consistent with our observations. The present results demonstrate how 3D versus 2D context profoundly affects ECM signaling, leading to stemness. PMID:26684838

  6. 3D bioprinting of BMSC-laden methacrylamide gelatin scaffolds with CBD-BMP2-collagen microfibers.

    PubMed

    Du, Mingchun; Chen, Bing; Meng, Qingyuan; Liu, Sumei; Zheng, Xiongfei; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Heran; Li, Hongyi; Wang, Nuo; Dai, Jianwu

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting combines biomaterials, cells and functional components into complex living tissues. Herein, we assembled function-control modules into cell-laden scaffolds using 3D bioprinting. A customized 3D printer was able to tune the microstructure of printed bone mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC)-laden methacrylamide gelatin scaffolds at the micrometer scale. For example, the pore size was adjusted to 282 ± 32 μm and 363 ± 60 μm. To match the requirements of the printing nozzle, collagen microfibers with a length of 22 ± 13 μm were prepared with a high-speed crusher. Collagen microfibers bound bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) with a collagen binding domain (CBD) as differentiation-control module, from which BMP2 was able to be controllably released. The differentiation behaviors of BMSCs in the printed scaffolds were compared in three microenvironments: samples without CBD-BMP2-collagen microfibers in the growth medium, samples without microfibers in the osteogenic medium and samples with microfibers in the growth medium. The results indicated that BMSCs showed high cell viability (>90%) during printing; CBD-BMP2-collagen microfibers induced BMSC differentiation into osteocytes within 14 days more efficiently than the osteogenic medium. Our studies suggest that these function-control modules are attractive biomaterials and have potential applications in 3D bioprinting. PMID:26684899

  7. Vascular tube formation on matrix metalloproteinase-1-damaged collagen

    PubMed Central

    Varani, J; Perone, P; Warner, R L; Dame, M K; Kang, S; Fisher, G J; Voorhees, J J

    2008-01-01

    Connective tissue damage and angiogenesis are both important features of tumour growth and invasion. Here, we show that endothelial cells maintained on a three-dimensional lattice of intact polymerised collagen formed a monolayer of cells with a cobblestone morphology. When the collagen was exposed to organ culture fluid from human basal cell tumours of the skin (containing a high level of active matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1)), degradation of the collagen matrix occurred. The major degradation products were the $3over 4$- and $1over 4$-sized fragments known to result from the action of MMP-1 on type I collagen. When endothelial cells were maintained on the partially degraded collagen, the cells organised into a network of vascular tubes. Pretreatment of the organ culture fluid with either tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) or neutralising antibody to MMP-1 prevented degradation of the collagen lattice and concomitantly inhibited endothelial cell organisation into the vascular network. Purified (activated) MMP-1 duplicated the effects of skin organ culture fluid, but other enzymes including MMP-9 (gelatinase B), elastase or trypsin failed to produce measurable fragments from intact collagen and also failed to promote vascular tube formation. Together, these studies suggest that damage to the collagenous matrix is itself an important inducer of new vessel formation. PMID:18443597

  8. Topographical guidance of 3D tumor cell migration at an interface of collagen densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeleau, Francois; Tang, Lauren N.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2013-12-01

    During cancer progression, metastatic cells leave the primary tumor and invade into the fibrous extracellular matrix (ECM) within the surrounding stroma. This ECM network is highly heterogeneous, and interest in understanding how this network can affect cell behavior has increased in the past several decades. However, replicating this heterogeneity has proven challenging. Here, we designed and utilized a method to create a well-defined interface between two distinct regions of high- and low-density collagen gels to mimic the heterogeneities in density found in the tumor stroma. We show that cells will invade preferentially from the high-density side into the low-density side. We also demonstrate that the net cell migration is a function of the density of the collagen in which the cells are embedded, and the difference in density between the two regions has minimal effect on cell net displacement and distance travelled. Our data further indicate that a low-to-high density interface promotes directional migration and induces formation of focal adhesion on the interface surface. Together, the current results demonstrate how ECM heterogeneities, in the form of interfacial boundaries, can affect cell migration.

  9. Modeling of 3-D Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Sullivan, Roy M.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2003-01-01

    Three different approaches are being pursued at the NASA Glenn Research Center to predict the nanostructural behavior of three-dimensional woven ceramic matrix composites. These are: a micromechanics-based approach using W-CEMCAN (Woven Ceramic Matrix Composite Analyzer), a laminate analogy method and a structural frame approach (based on the finite element method). All three techniques are applied to predict the thermomechanical properties of a three-dimensional woven angle interlock C/SiC composite. The properties are predicted for room temperature and 1100 C and the predicted properties are compared to measurements. General observations regarding the three approaches for three-dimensional composite modeling are discussed.

  10. Role of cell-matrix interactions on VIC phenotype and tissue deposition in 3D PEG hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Gould, Sarah T; Anseth, Kristi S

    2013-10-16

    Valvular interstitial cells (VICs) respond to 3D matrix interactions in a complex manner, but understanding these effects on VIC function better is important for applications ranging from valve tissue engineering to studying valve disease. Here, we encapsulated VICs in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels modified with three different adhesive ligands, derived from fibronectin (RGDS), elastin (VGVAPG) and collagen-1 (P15). By day 14, VICs became significantly more elongated in RGDS-containing gels compared to VGVAPG or P15. This difference in cell morphology appeared to correlate with global matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, as VICs encapsulated in RGDS-functionalized hydrogels secreted higher levels of active MMP at day 2. VIC activation to a myofibroblast phenotype was also characterized by staining for α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) at day 14. The percentage of αSMA(+) VICs in the VGVAPG gels was the highest (56%) compared to RGDS (33%) or P15 (38%) gels. Matrix deposition and composition were also characterized at days 14 and 42 and found to depend on the initial hydrogel composition. All gel formulations had similar levels of collagen, elastin and chondroitin sulphate deposited as the porcine aortic valve. However, the composition of collagen deposited by VICs in VGVAPG-functionalized gels had a significantly higher collagen-X:collagen-1 ratio, which is associated with stenotic valves. Taken together, these data suggest that peptide-functionalized PEG hydrogels are a useful system for culturing VICs three-dimensionally and, with the ability to systematically alter biochemical and biophysical properties, this platform may prove useful in manipulating VIC function for valve regeneration. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24130082

  11. Extracellular Protease Inhibition Alters the Phenotype of Chondrogenically Differentiating Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) in 3D Collagen Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sejin; Li, Yuk Yin; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Matrix remodeling of cells is highly regulated by proteases and their inhibitors. Nevertheless, how would the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) be affected, when the balance of the matrix remodeling is disturbed by inhibiting matrix proteases, is incompletely known. Using a previously developed collagen microencapsulation platform, we investigated whether exposing chondrogenically differentiating MSCs to intracellular and extracellular protease inhibitors will affect the extracellular matrix remodeling and hence the outcomes of chondrogenesis. Results showed that inhibition of matrix proteases particularly the extracellular ones favors the phenotype of fibrocartilage rather than hyaline cartilage in chondrogenically differentiating hMSCs by upregulating type I collagen protein deposition and type II collagen gene expression without significantly altering the hypertrophic markers at gene level. This study suggests the potential of manipulating extracellular proteases to alter the outcomes of hMSC chondrogenesis, contributing to future development of differentiation protocols for fibrocartilage tissues for intervertebral disc and meniscus tissue engineering. PMID:26760956

  12. Electrical and Neurotrophin Enhancement of Neurite Outgrowth within a 3D Collagen Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Robert D.; Rendell, Sara R.; Counts, Lauren R.; Papke, Jason B.; Willits, Rebecca K.; Harkins, Amy B.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical and chemical stimulation have been studied as potent mechanisms of enhancing nerve regeneration and wound healing. However, it remains unclear how electrical stimuli affect nerve growth, particularly in the presence of neurotrophic factors. The objective of this study was to explore (1) the effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) supplementation to support neurite outgrowth in a 3D scaffold, and (2) the effect of brief, low voltage, electrical stimulation (ES) on neurite outgrowth prior to neurotrophin supplementation. Dissociated E11 chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were seeded within a 1.5 mg/mL type-I collagen scaffold. For neurotrophin treatments, scaffolds were incubated for 24 hrs in culture media containing nerve growth factor (NGF, 10 ng/mL) or BDNF (200 ng/mL), or both. For ES groups, scaffolds containing neurons were stimulated for 10 min at 8–10 V/m DC, then incubated for 24 hrs with neurotrophin. Fixed and labeled neurons were imaged to measure neurite growth and directionality. BDNF supplementation was not as effective as NGF at supporting DRG neurite outgrowth. ES prior to NGF supplementation improved DRG neurite outgrowth compared to NGF alone. This combination of brief ES with NGF treatment was the most effective treatment compared to NGF or BDNF alone. Brief ES had no impact on neurite directionality in the 3D scaffolds. These results demonstrate that ES improves neurite outgrowth in the presence of neurotrophins, and could provide a potential therapeutic approach to improve nerve regeneration when coupled with neurotrophin treatment. PMID:24710795

  13. Fabrication of Compositionally and Topographically Complex Robust Tissue Forms by 3D-Electrochemical Compaction of Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Younesi, Mousa; Islam, Anowarul; Kishore, Vipuil; Panit, Stefi; Akkus, Ozan

    2015-01-01

    Collagen solutions are phase-transformed to mechanically robust shell structures with curviplanar topographies using electrochemically induced pH gradients. The process enables rapid layer-by-layer deposition of collagen-rich mixtures over the entire field simultaneously to obtain compositionally diverse multilayered structures. In-plane tensile strength and modulus of the electrocompacted collagen sheet samples were 5200 -fold and 2300 -fold greater than that of uncompacted collagen samples. Out of plane compression tests showed 27 -fold and fold increase in compressive stress and 46 -fold increase in compressive modulus compared to uncompacted collagen sheets. Cells proliferated 4.9 times faster, and cellular area spread was 2.7 times greater on compacted collagen sheets. Electrocompaction also resulted in 2.9 times greater focal adhesion area than on regular collagen hydrogel. The reported improvements in the cell-matrix interactions with electrocompaction would serve to expedite the population of electrocompacted collagen scaffolds by cells. The capacity of the method to fabricate nonlinear curved topographies with compositional heterogeneous layers is demonstrated by sequential deposition of collagenhydroxyapatite layer over a collagen layer. The complex curved topography of the nasal structure is replicated by the electrochemical compaction method. The presented electrochemical compaction process is an enabling modality which holds significant promise for reconstruction of a wide spectrum of topographically complex systems such as joint surfaces, craniofacial defects, ears, nose or urogenital forms. PMID:26069162

  14. Characterizing matrix remodeling in collagen gels using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitz, David; Hinds, Monica T.; Hanson, Stephen R.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2010-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has shown promise at non-destructively characterizing engineered tissues such as collagen gels. However, as the collagen gels develop, the OCT images lose contrast of structures as the gels develop, making visual assessment difficult. Our group proposed quantitatively characterizing these gels by fitting the optical properties from the OCT signals. In this paper, we imaged collagen gels seeded with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) over a 5-day period and used the data to measure their optical properties. Our results showed that over time, the reflectivity of the samples increased 10-fold, corresponding to a decrease in anisotropy factor g, without much change in the scattering coefficient μs. Overall, the optical properties appeared to be dominated by scattering from the collagen matrix, not the cells. However, SMCs remodeled the collagen matrix, and this collagen remodeling by the cells is what causes the observed changes in optical properties. Moreover, the data showed that the optical properties were sensitive to the activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), enzymes that break down local collagen fibrils into smaller fragments. Blocking MMPs in the SMC gels greatly impeded both the remodeling process and change in optical properties at day 5. Treating day 1 acellular gels with MMP-8 for 3 hr managed to partially reproduce the remodeling observed in SMC gels at day 5. Altogether, we conclude that matrix remodeling in general, and MMPs specifically, greatly affect the local optical properties of the sample, and OCT is a unique tool that can assess MMP activity in collagen gels both non-destructively and label free.

  15. 3D Linear Transformations in the Form of Matrix and Vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua

    2008-11-01

    In this article, results of four 3D linear transformations (translation, rotation, scale and shear) in the form of matrix and vector are simplified into a same 3D physical coordinates system. Comparing the simplified results of those four linear transformations, the results obtained from matrix form are exactly the same as what obtained from vector algebra in final expressions, although they are different from original expressions.

  16. A collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment targeting tumors with a collagen-rich extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hui; Li, Xiaoran; Wang, Bin; Chen, Bing; Zhao, Yannan; Sun, Jie; Zhuang, Yan; Shi, Jiajia; Shen, He; Zhang, Zhijun; Dai, Jianwu

    2016-01-01

    Many tumors over-express collagen, which constitutes the physical scaffold of tumor microenvironment. Collagen has been considered to be a target for cancer therapy. The collagen-binding domain (CBD) is a short peptide, which could bind to collagen and achieve the sustained release of CBD-fused proteins in collagen scaffold. Here, a collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment was designed and expressed for targeting the collagen-rich extracellular matrix in tumors. The antibody fragment (Fab) of cetuximab was fused with CBD (CBD-Fab) and expressed in Pichia pastoris. CBD-Fab maintained antigen binding and anti-tumor activity of cetuximab and obtained a collagen-binding ability in vitro. The results also showed CBD-Fab was mainly enriched in tumors and had longer retention time in tumors in A431 s.c. xenografts. Furthermore, CBD-Fab showed a similar therapeutic efficacy as cetuximab in A431 xenografts. Although CBD-Fab hasn’t showed better therapeutic effects than cetuximab, its smaller molecular and special target may be applicable as antibody–drug conjugates (ADC) or immunotoxins. PMID:26883295

  17. Maintenance of a bone collagen phenotype by osteoblast-like cells in 3D periodic porous titanium (Ti-6Al-4 V) structures fabricated by selective electron beam melting

    PubMed Central

    Hrabe, Nikolas W.; Heinl, Peter; Bordia, Rajendra K.; Körner, Carolin; Fernandes, Russell J.

    2013-01-01

    Regular 3D periodic porous Ti-6Al-4 V structures were fabricated by the selective electron beam melting method (EBM) over a range of relative densities (0.17–0.40) and pore sizes (500–1500 μm). Structures were seeded with human osteoblast-like cells (SAOS-2) and cultured for four weeks. Cells multiplied within these structures and extracellular matrix collagen content increased. Type I and type V collagens typically synthesized by osteoblasts were deposited in the newly formed matrix with time in culture. High magnification scanning electron microscopy revealed cells attached to surfaces on the interior of the structures with an increasingly fibrous matrix. The in-vitro results demonstrate that the novel EBM-processed porous structures, designed to address the effect of stress-shielding, are conducive to osteoblast attachment, proliferation and deposition of a collagenous matrix characteristic of bone. PMID:23869614

  18. Ovine-Based Collagen Matrix Dressing: Next-Generation Collagen Dressing for Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Gregory; Liden, Brock; Schultz, Gregory; Yang, Qingping; Gibson, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Broad-spectrum metalloproteinase (MMP) reduction along with inherent aspects of an extracellular matrix (ECM) dressing can bring about improved wound healing outcomes and shorter treatment duration. Initial reports of clinical effectiveness of a new ovine-based collagen extracellular matrix (CECM) dressing demonstrate benefits in chronic wound healing. Recent Advances: CECM dressings are processed differently than oxidized regenerated cellulose/collagen dressings. CECM dressings consist primarily of collagens I and III arranged as native fibers that retain the three-dimensional architecture present in tissue ECM. As such, ovine-based ECM dressings represent a new generation of collagen dressings capable of impacting a broad spectrum of MMP excess known to be present in chronic wounds. Critical Issues: While MMPs are essential in normal healing, elevated presence of MMPs has been linked to wound failure. Collagen has been shown to reduce levels of MMPs, acting as a sacrificial substrate for excessive proteases in a chronic wound. Preserving collagen dressings in a more native state enhances bioactivity in terms of the ability to affect the chronic wound environment. Clinical observation and assessment may not be sufficient to identify a wound with elevated protease activity that can break down ECM, affect wound fibroblasts, and impair growth factor response. Future Directions: Collagen dressings that target broad-spectrum excessive MMP levels and can be applied early in the course of care may positively impact healing rates in difficult wounds. Next-generation collagen dressings offer broader MMP reduction capacity while providing a provisional dermal matrix or ECM. PMID:26858910

  19. Tumor matrix protein collagen XIα1 in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raglow, Zoe; Thomas, Sufi M

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is increasingly recognized as an essential player in cancer development and progression. Collagens are one of the most important components of the extracellular matrix, and have themselves been implicated in many aspects of neoplastic transformation. Collagen XI is a minor collagen whose main physiologic function is to regulate the diameter of major collagen fibrils. The α1 chain of collagen XI (colXIα1), has known pathogenic roles in several musculoskeletal disorders. Recent research has highlighted the importance of colXIα1 in many types of cancer, including its roles in metastasis, angiogenesis, and drug resistance, as well as its potential utility in screening tests and as a therapeutic target. High levels of colXIα1 overexpression have been reported in multiple expression profile studies examining differences between cancerous and normal tissue, and between beginning and advanced stage cancer. Its expression has been linked to poor progression-free and overall survival. The consistency of this data across cancer types is particularly striking, including colorectal, ovarian, breast, head and neck, lung, and brain cancers. This review discusses the role of collagen XIα1 in cancer and its potential as a target for cancer therapy. PMID:25511741

  20. Collagen-poly(dialdehyde) guar gum based porous 3D scaffolds immobilized with growth factor for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Ragothaman, Murali; Palanisamy, Thanikaivelan; Kalirajan, Cheirmadurai

    2014-12-19

    Here we report the preparation of collagen-poly(dialdehyde) guar gum based hybrid functionalized scaffolds covalently immobilized with platelet derived growth factor - BB for tissue engineering applications. Poly(dialdehyde) guar gum was synthesized from selective oxidation of guar gum using sodium periodate. The synthesized poly(dialdehyde) guar gum not only promotes crosslinking of collagen but also immobilizes the platelet derived growth factor through imine bonds. The covalent crosslinking formed in collagen improves thermal, swelling and biodegradation properties of the hybrid scaffolds. The prepared hybrid scaffolds show 3D interconnected honeycomb porous structure when viewed under a microscope. The release of immobilized platelet derived growth factor was seen up to 13th day of incubation thereby proving its sustained delivery. The developed hybrid scaffold leads to a quantum increase in NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell density and proliferation thereby demonstrating its potential for tissue engineering applications. PMID:25263907

  1. Collagen-binding VEGF mimetic peptide: Structure, matrix interaction, and endothelial cell activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Tania R.

    Long term survival of artificial tissue constructs depends greatly on proper vascularization. In nature, differentiation of endothelial cells and formation of vasculature are directed by dynamic spatio-temporal cues in the extracellular matrix that are difficult to reproduce in vitro. In this dissertation, we present a novel bifunctional peptide that mimics matrix-bound vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which can be used to encode spatially controlled angiogenic signals in collagen-based scaffolds. The peptide, QKCMP, contains a collagen mimetic domain (CMP) that binds to type I collagen by a unique triple helix hybridization mechanism and a VEGF mimetic domain (QK) with pro-angiogenic activity. We demonstrate QKCMP's ability to hybridize with native and heat denatured collagens through a series of binding studies on collagen and gelatin substrates. Circular dichroism experiments show that the peptide retains the triple helical structure vital for collagen binding, and surface plasmon resonance study confirms the molecular interaction between the peptide and collagen strands. Cell culture studies demonstrate QKCMP's ability to induce endothelial cell morphogenesis and network formation as a matrix-bound factor in 2D and 3D collagen scaffolds. We also show that the peptide can be used to spatially modify collagen-based substrates to promote localized endothelial cell activation and network formation. To probe the biological events that govern these angiogenic cellular responses, we investigated the cell signaling pathways activated by collagen-bound QKCMP and determined short and long-term endothelial cell response profiles for p38, ERK1/2, and Akt signal transduction cascades. Finally, we present our efforts to translate the peptide's in vitro bioactivity to an in vivo burn injury animal model. When implanted at the wound site, QKCMP functionalized biodegradable hydrogels induce enhanced neovascularization in the granulation tissue. The results show QKCMP

  2. Dynamic Interactions of Epidermal Collagen XVII with the Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Nishie, Wataru; Kiritsi, Dimitra; Nyström, Alexander; Hofmann, Silke C.; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena

    2011-01-01

    Transmembrane collagen XVII, a major component of the hemidesmosomes, is crucial for stable adhesion of the epidermis and dermis in the skin, and its dysfunction results in blistering diseases. The ectodomain of collagen XVII (Ecto-ColXVII) is constitutively shed from the cell surface, but its binding partner(s) in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the physiologic roles of the ligand interactions remain elusive. Herein, we used a new cleavage site–specific antibody to address the dynamics of collagen XVII shedding and the interactions of Ecto-ColXVII with the ECM. Ecto-ColXVII was present in the migration tracks of primary human keratinocytes and co-localized with laminin 332. The presence of this laminin, but also of collagen IV and Matrigel, in the ECM enhanced shedding and incorporation of Ecto-ColXVII into the matrix. Laminin 332 is a major, but not exclusive, interaction partner in vivo because Ecto-ColXVII deposited in the ECM of laminin 332–deficient keratinocytes was drastically reduced, but Ecto-ColXVII was present in laminin 332–negative human skin. Expression of collagen XVII deletion mutants in HEK 293 cells identified the C-terminal ectodomain stretch Ser978-Pro1497 as necessary for ECM binding. Taken together, migrating keratinocytes shed the Ecto-ColXVII, and this dynamically binds via its C-terminal domain to distinct partners in the ECM. PMID:21801871

  3. Corneal Stromal Cells use both High- and Low-Contractility Migration Mechanisms in 3-D Collagen Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Areum; Zhou, Chengxin; Lakshman, Neema; Petroll, W. Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Corneal keratocyte migration can impact both corneal clarity and refractive outcome following injury or refractive surgery. In this study, we investigated how culture conditions, ECM properties, and Rho kinase activity regulate the mechanics of keratocyte migration, using a nested collagen matrix model. Time-lapse imaging demonstrated that both serum and PDGF stimulate keratocyte migration into the outer matrix. Although the velocity of cell migration was similar, cells in serum were bipolar and induced significant matrix deformation during migration, whereas PDGF induced extension of branching dendritic processes with smaller, more localized force generation. These differences in cell-induced matrix reorganization were verified with a global matrix contraction assay and confocal reflection imaging, using both bovine and rat tail collagen. When constructs were detached from the substrate to lower the effective stiffness, migration was significantly reduced in serum; but was unchanged in PDGF. These differences in migration mechanics were mediated, in part, by Rho kinase. Overall, corneal keratocytes can effectively migrate through collagen matrices using varying degrees of cellular force generation. Low-contractility migration may facilitate keratocyte repopulation of the stroma following surgery or injury, without altering the structural and mechanical properties that are critical to maintaining corneal transparency. PMID:22233682

  4. Nanospiderwebs: artificial 3D extracellular matrix from nanofibers by novel clinical grade electrospinning for stem cell delivery.

    PubMed

    Alamein, Mohammad A; Liu, Qin; Stephens, Sebastien; Skabo, Stuart; Warnke, Frauke; Bourke, Robert; Heiner, Peter; Warnke, Patrick H

    2013-05-01

    Novel clinical grade electrospinning methods could provide three-dimensional (3D) nanostructured biomaterials comprising of synthetic or natural biopolymer nanofibers. Such advanced materials could potentially mimic the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) accurately and may provide superior niche-like spaces on the subcellular scale for optimal stem-cell attachment and individual cell homing in regenerative therapies. The goal of this study was to design several novel "nanofibrous extracellular matrices" (NF-ECMs) with a natural mesh-like 3D architecture through a unique needle-free multi-jet electrospinning method in highly controlled manner to comply with good manufacturing practices (GMP) for the production of advanced healthcare materials for regenerative medicine, and to test cellular behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells (HMSCs) on these. Biopolymers manufactured as 3D NF-ECM meshes under clinical grade GMP-like conditions show higher intrinsic cytobiocompatibility with superior cell integration and proliferation if compared to their 2D counterparts or a clinically-approved collagen membrane. PMID:23184860

  5. Microrheology and ROCK Signaling of Human Endothelial Cells Embedded in a 3D Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Panorchan, Porntula; Lee, Jerry S. H.; Kole, Thomas P.; Tseng, Yiider; Wirtz, Denis

    2006-01-01

    Cell function is profoundly affected by the geometry of the extracellular environment confining the cell. Whether and how cells plated on a two-dimensional matrix or embedded in a three-dimensional (3D) matrix mechanically sense the dimensionality of their environment is mostly unknown, partly because individual cells in an extended matrix are inaccessible to conventional cell-mechanics probes. Here we develop a functional assay based on multiple particle tracking microrheology coupled with ballistic injection of nanoparticles to measure the local intracellular micromechanical properties of individual cells embedded inside a matrix. With our novel assay, we probe the mechanical properties of the cytoplasm of individual human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) embedded in a 3D peptide hydrogel in the presence or absence of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We found that VEGF treatment, which enhances endothelial migration, increases the compliance and reduces the elasticity of the cytoplasm of HUVECs in a matrix. This VEGF-induced softening response of the cytoplasm is abrogated by specific Rho-kinase (ROCK) inhibition. These results establish combined particle-tracking microrheology and ballistic injection as the first method able to probe the micromechanical properties and mechanical response to agonists and/or drug treatments of individual cells inside a matrix. These results suggest that ROCK plays an essential role in the regulation of the intracellular mechanical response to VEGF of endothelial cells in a 3D matrix. PMID:16891369

  6. 3D printed nanocomposite matrix for the study of breast cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Holmes, Benjamin; Glazer, Robert I; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    Bone is one of the most common metastatic sites of breast cancer, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, in part due to an absence of advanced platforms for cancer culture and study that mimic the bone microenvironment. In the present study, we integrated a novel stereolithography-based 3D printer and a unique 3D printed nano-ink consisting of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles suspended in hydrogel to create a biomimetic bone-specific environment for evaluating breast cancer bone invasion. Breast cancer cells cultured in a geometrically optimized matrix exhibited spheroid morphology and migratory characteristics. Co-culture of tumor cells with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells increased the formation of spheroid clusters. The 3D matrix also allowed for higher drug resistance of breast cancer cells than 2D culture. These results validate that our 3D bone matrix can mimic tumor bone microenvironments, suggesting that it can serve as a tool for studying metastasis and assessing drug sensitivity. From the Clinical Editor: Cancer remains a major cause of mortality for patients in the clinical setting. For breast cancer, bone is one of the most common metastatic sites. In this intriguing article, the authors developed a bone-like environment using 3D printing technology to investigate the underlying biology of bone metastasis. Their results would also allow a new model for other researchers who work on cancer to use. PMID:26472048

  7. Generation of compartmentalized pressure by a nuclear piston governs cell motility in a 3D matrix.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Ryan J; Koo, Hyun; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2014-08-29

    Cells use actomyosin contractility to move through three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrices. Contractility affects the type of protrusions cells use to migrate in 3D, but the mechanisms are unclear. In this work, we found that contractility generated high-pressure lobopodial protrusions in human cells migrating in a 3D matrix. In these cells, the nucleus physically divided the cytoplasm into forward and rear compartments. Actomyosin contractility with the nucleoskeleton-intermediate filament linker protein nesprin-3 pulled the nucleus forward and pressurized the front of the cell. Reducing expression of nesprin-3 decreased and equalized the intracellular pressure. Thus, the nucleus can act as a piston that physically compartmentalizes the cytoplasm and increases the hydrostatic pressure between the nucleus and the leading edge of the cell to drive lamellipodia-independent 3D cell migration. PMID:25170155

  8. SEM evaluation of nanoparticulate silver penetration into dentine collagen matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessudnova, Nadezda O.; Bilenko, David I.; Venig, Sergey B.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study a novel approach to caries management based on the application of nanoparticles of different nature to increase the mineral phase of demineralized dentin has been developed. Silver nanoparticles have been tested as a material for dentine matrix infiltration. Research findings clearly show that collagen fibers of demineralized dentine could be considered as a scaffold for mineral component delivery and the place where mineral growth can occur.

  9. Extracellular matrix composition and rigidity regulate invasive behavior and response to PDT in 3D pancreatic tumor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Gwendolyn; El-Hamidi, Hamid; Jafari, Seyedehrojin; Jones, Dustin P.; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2016-03-01

    The composition and mechanical compliance of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to serve as regulators of tumor growth and invasive behavior. These effects may be particularly relevant in tumors of the pancreas, noted for a profound desmoplastic reaction and an abundance of stroma rich in ECM. In view of recent progress in the clinical implementation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for pancreatic tumors, in this report we examine how ECM composition and rheological properties impact upon invasive behavior and response to PDT in 3D multicellular pancreatic tumor spheroids in ECM environments with characterized rheological properties. Tumor spheroids were cultured initially in attachment-free conditions to form millimeter-sized spheroids that were transplanted into reconstituted ECM microenvironments (Matrigel and Type I Collagen) that were characterized using bulk oscillatory shear rheology. Analysis of growth behavior shows that the soft collagen ECM promoted growth and extensive invasion and this microenvironment was used in subsequent assessment of PDT and chemotherapy response. Evaluation of treatment response revealed that primary tumor nodule growth is inhibited more effectively with PDT, while verteporfin PDT response is significantly enhanced in the ECM-infiltrating populations that are non-responsive to oxaliplatin chemotherapy. This finding is potentially significant, suggesting the potential for PDT to target these clinically problematic invasive populations that are associated with aggressive metastatic progression and chemoresistance. Experiments to further validate and identify the mechanistic basis of this observation are ongoing.

  10. Carbon nanotube based 3-D matrix for enabling three-dimensional nano-magneto-electronics [corrected].

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeongmin; Stefanescu, Eugenia; Liang, Ping; Joshi, Nikhil; Xue, Song; Litvinov, Dmitri; Khizroev, Sakhrat

    2012-01-01

    This letter describes the use of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT)-based arrays with estimated 2-nm thick cobalt (Co) nanoparticles deposited inside individual tubes to unravel the possibility of using the unique templates for ultra-high-density low-energy 3-D nano-magneto-electronic devices. The presence of oriented 2-nm thick Co layers within individual nanotubes in the CNT-based 3-D matrix is confirmed through VSM measurements as well as an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). PMID:22808192

  11. Matrix metalloproteinase 9 modulates collagen matrices and wound repair

    PubMed Central

    LeBert, Danny C.; Squirrell, Jayne M.; Rindy, Julie; Broadbridge, Elizabeth; Lui, Yuming; Zakrzewska, Anna; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Meijer, Annemarie H.; Huttenlocher, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic injuries are characterized by leukocyte infiltration into tissues. Although matrix metalloproteinase 9 (Mmp9) has been implicated in both conditions, its role in wound repair remains unclear. We previously reported a zebrafish chronic inflammation mutant caused by an insertion in the hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor gene 1 (hai1; also known as spint1) that is characterized by epithelial extrusions and neutrophil infiltration into the fin. Here, we performed a microarray analysis and found increased inflammatory gene expression in the mutant larvae, including a marked increase in mmp9 expression. Depletion of mmp9 partially rescued the chronic inflammation and epithelial phenotypes, in addition to restoring collagen fiber organization, as detected by second-harmonic generation imaging. Additionally, we found that acute wounding induces epithelial cell mmp9 expression and is associated with a thickening of collagen fibers. Interestingly, depletion of mmp9 impaired this collagen fiber reorganization. Moreover, mmp9 depletion impaired tissue regeneration after tail transection, implicating Mmp9 in acute wound repair. Thus, Mmp9 regulates both acute and chronic tissue damage and plays an essential role in collagen reorganization during wound repair. PMID:26015541

  12. AB173. Fibroblast-derived extracellular matrix formation in the 3D fiber-deposited polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold for tunica albuginea replacement

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Suk; Park, Jinju; Lee, Mina; Yu, Ho Song; Yim, Sang Un; Park, Su A.; Park, Kwangsung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of growth factors fibroblast-derived extracellular matrix formation in the 3D fiber-deposited polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold fabricated by 3D printing technique for tissue engineering applications of tunica albuginea. Methods PCL scaffold was fabricated by 3D bioprinting system. For in vitro cell study, scaffolds were seeded with human fibroblast cell at 5×105 cells and were cultured for up to 2 weeks. Cell survival and cell proliferation were monitored by EZ-cytox assay. The effect of growth factors on the extracellular matrix formation was evaluated by fastin elastin assay and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Results SEM images showed the surface morphology of PCL scaffolds. Human fibroblasts were grown on 3D PCL scaffolds in the presence/absence of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1). bFGF or TGF-β1 stimulated proliferation of fibroblasts and also increased collagen and elastin formation in vitro study. Conclusions This study shows that bFGF or TGF-β1 modulates the fibroblast-derived extracellular matrix formation in the 3D PCL scaffold.

  13. Dense collagen matrix accelerates osteogenic differentiation and rescues the apoptotic response to MMP inhibition.

    PubMed

    Buxton, P G; Bitar, M; Gellynck, K; Parkar, M; Brown, R A; Young, A M; Knowles, J C; Nazhat, S N

    2008-08-01

    Bone is distinguished from other tissues by its mechanical properties, in particular stiffness. However, we know little of how osteoblasts react to the stiffness of their microenvironment; in this study we describe their response to a dense (>10 wt.%) collagenous 3D environment. Primary pre-osteoblasts were seeded within a novel form of native collagen, dense collagen, and cultured for up to 14 days in the presence and absence of osteogenic supplements: analysis was via Q-PCR, histology, fluorescent in situ zymography, MMP loss-of-function and tensile testing. Differentiation as measured through the up-regulation of Bsp (247-fold), Alp (14.2-fold), Col1A1 (4.5-fold), Mmp-13 (8.0-fold) and Runx2 (1.2-fold) transcripts was greatly accelerated compared to 2D plastic at 7 and 14 days in the same medium. The scale of this enhancement was confirmed through the use of growth factor stimulation on 2D via the addition of BMP-6 and the Hedgehog agonist purmorphamine. In concert, these molecules were capable of the same level of osteo-induction (measured by Bsp and Alp expression) as the dense collagen alone. Mineralisation was initially localised to remodelled pericellular regions, but by 14 days embedded cells were discernible within regions of apatite (confirmed by MicroRaman). Tensile testing of the matrices showed that this had resulted in a significant increase in Young's modulus at low strain values, consistent with a stiffening of the matrix. To determine the need for matrix remodelling in the mineralisation event the broad spectrum MMP Inhibitor Ilomastat was used. It was found that in its presence mineralisation could still occur (though serum-specific) and the apoptosis associated with MMP inhibition in hydrated collagen gels was abrogated. Analysis of gene expression indicated that this was due to the up-regulation of Mmp-13 in the presence of Ilomastat in dense collagen (400-fold), demonstrating a powerful feedback loop and a potential mechanism for the rescue

  14. Implementation of parallel matrix decomposition for NIKE3D on the KSR1 system

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Philip S.; Fulton, R.E.; Zacharia, T.

    1995-06-01

    New massively parallel computer architecture has revolutionized the design of computer algorithms and promises to have significant influence on algorithms for engineering computations. Realistic engineering problems using finite element analysis typically imply excessively large computational requirements. Parallel supercomputers that have the potential for significantly increasing calculation speeds can meet these computational requirements. This report explores the potential for the parallel Cholesky (U{sup T}DU) matrix decomposition algorithm on NIKE3D through actual computations. The examples of two- and three-dimensional nonlinear dynamic finite element problems are presented on the Kendall Square Research (KSR1) multiprocessor system, with 64 processors, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The numerical results indicate that the parallel Cholesky (U{sup T}DU) matrix decomposition algorithm is attractive for NIKE3D under multi-processor system environments.

  15. Measurement Matrix Optimization and Mismatch Problem Compensation for DLSLA 3-D SAR Cross-Track Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bao, Qian; Jiang, Chenglong; Lin, Yun; Tan, Weixian; Wang, Zhirui; Hong, Wen

    2016-01-01

    With a short linear array configured in the cross-track direction, downward looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (DLSLA 3-D SAR) can obtain the 3-D image of an imaging scene. To improve the cross-track resolution, sparse recovery methods have been investigated in recent years. In the compressive sensing (CS) framework, the reconstruction performance depends on the property of measurement matrix. This paper concerns the technique to optimize the measurement matrix and deal with the mismatch problem of measurement matrix caused by the off-grid scatterers. In the model of cross-track reconstruction, the measurement matrix is mainly affected by the configuration of antenna phase centers (APC), thus, two mutual coherence based criteria are proposed to optimize the configuration of APCs. On the other hand, to compensate the mismatch problem of the measurement matrix, the sparse Bayesian inference based method is introduced into the cross-track reconstruction by jointly estimate the scatterers and the off-grid error. Experiments demonstrate the performance of the proposed APCs' configuration schemes and the proposed cross-track reconstruction method. PMID:27556471

  16. A 3D printed nano bone matrix for characterization of breast cancer cell and osteoblast interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Castro, Nathan J.; Cui, Haitao; Zhou, Xuan; Boualam, Benchaa; McGrane, Robert; Glazer, Robert I.; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-08-01

    Bone metastasis is one of the most prevalent complications of late-stage breast cancer, in which the native bone matrix components, including osteoblasts, are intimately involved in tumor progression. The development of a successful in vitro model would greatly facilitate understanding the underlying mechanism of breast cancer bone invasion as well as provide a tool for effective discovery of novel therapeutic strategies. In the current study, we fabricated a series of in vitro bone matrices composed of a polyethylene glycol hydrogel and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite of varying concentrations to mimic the native bone microenvironment for the investigation of breast cancer bone metastasis. A stereolithography-based three-dimensional (3D) printer was used to fabricate the bone matrices with precisely controlled architecture. The interaction between breast cancer cells and osteoblasts was investigated in the optimized bone matrix. Using a Transwell® system to separate the two cell lines, breast cancer cells inhibited osteoblast proliferation, while osteoblasts stimulated breast cancer cell growth, whereas, both cell lines increased IL-8 secretion. Breast cancer cells co-cultured with osteoblasts within the 3D bone matrix formed multi-cellular spheroids in comparison to two-dimensional monolayers. These findings validate the use of our 3D printed bone matrices as an in vitro metastasis model, and highlights their potential for investigating breast cancer bone metastasis.

  17. Compression loading-induced stress responses in intervertebral disc cells encapsulated in 3D collagen constructs

    PubMed Central

    Chooi, Wai Hon; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Cells protect themselves from stresses through a cellular stress response. In the interverebral disc, such response was also demonstrated to be induced by various environmental stresses. However, whether compression loading will cause cellular stress response in the nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) is not well studied. By using an in vitro collagen microencapsulation model, we investigated the effect of compression loading on the stress response of NPCs. Cell viability tests, and gene and protein expression experiments were conducted, with primers for the heat shock response (HSR: HSP70, HSF1, HSP27 and HSP90), and unfolded protein response (UPR: GRP78, GRP94, ATF4 and CHOP) genes and an antibody to HSP72. Different gene expression patterns occurred due to loading type throughout experiments. Increasing the loading strain for a short duration did not increase the stress response genes significantly, but over longer durations, HSP70 and HSP27 were upregulated. Longer loading durations also resulted in a continuous upregulation of HSR genes and downregulation of UPR genes, even after load removal. The rate of apoptosis did not increase significantly after loading, suggesting that stress response genes might play a role in cell survival following mechanical stress. These results demonstrate how mechanical stress might induce and control the expression of HSR and UPR genes in NPCs. PMID:27197886

  18. Compression loading-induced stress responses in intervertebral disc cells encapsulated in 3D collagen constructs.

    PubMed

    Chooi, Wai Hon; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Cells protect themselves from stresses through a cellular stress response. In the interverebral disc, such response was also demonstrated to be induced by various environmental stresses. However, whether compression loading will cause cellular stress response in the nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) is not well studied. By using an in vitro collagen microencapsulation model, we investigated the effect of compression loading on the stress response of NPCs. Cell viability tests, and gene and protein expression experiments were conducted, with primers for the heat shock response (HSR: HSP70, HSF1, HSP27 and HSP90), and unfolded protein response (UPR: GRP78, GRP94, ATF4 and CHOP) genes and an antibody to HSP72. Different gene expression patterns occurred due to loading type throughout experiments. Increasing the loading strain for a short duration did not increase the stress response genes significantly, but over longer durations, HSP70 and HSP27 were upregulated. Longer loading durations also resulted in a continuous upregulation of HSR genes and downregulation of UPR genes, even after load removal. The rate of apoptosis did not increase significantly after loading, suggesting that stress response genes might play a role in cell survival following mechanical stress. These results demonstrate how mechanical stress might induce and control the expression of HSR and UPR genes in NPCs. PMID:27197886

  19. Ornamenting 3D printed scaffolds with cell-laid extracellular matrix for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pati, Falguni; Song, Tae-Ha; Rijal, Girdhari; Jang, Jinah; Kim, Sung Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    3D printing technique is the most sophisticated technique to produce scaffolds with tailorable physical properties. But, these scaffolds often suffer from limited biological functionality as they are typically made from synthetic materials. Cell-laid mineralized ECM was shown to be potential for improving the cellular responses and drive osteogenesis of stem cells. Here, we intend to improve the biological functionality of 3D-printed synthetic scaffolds by ornamenting them with cell-laid mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM) that mimics a bony microenvironment. We developed bone graft substitutes by using 3D printed scaffolds made from a composite of polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and mineralized ECM laid by human nasal inferior turbinate tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hTMSCs). A rotary flask bioreactor was used to culture hTMSCs on the scaffolds to foster formation of mineralized ECM. A freeze/thaw cycle in hypotonic buffer was used to efficiently decellularize (97% DNA reduction) the ECM-ornamented scaffolds while preserving its main organic and inorganic components. The ECM-ornamented 3D printed scaffolds supported osteoblastic differentiation of newly-seeded hTMSCs by upregulating four typical osteoblastic genes (4-fold higher RUNX2; 3-fold higher ALP; 4-fold higher osteocalcin; and 4-fold higher osteopontin) and increasing calcium deposition compared to bare 3D printed scaffolds. In vivo, in ectopic and orthotopic models in rats, ECM-ornamented scaffolds induced greater bone formation than that of bare scaffolds. These results suggest a valuable method to produce ECM-ornamented 3D printed scaffolds as off-the-shelf bone graft substitutes that combine tunable physical properties with physiological presentation of biological signals. PMID:25453953

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of the collagen matrix in tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnosselskaia, Lada Vadimovna

    Understanding of complex interactions of water with macromolecules is a prerequisite for quantitative musculoskeletal imaging and this dissertation presents a study on NMR characteristics of water in anisotropic environment of the collagen extracellular matrix of tendon. The first chapter of the dissertation analyzes a "magic angle" effect, a well known in clinical practice artifact of a sudden signal increase in normal tendons and ligaments at the orientation of 55° with respect to the static magnetic field of an MRI scanner. The physical basis of the orientation dependence of the free induction decay is studied in ex-vivo mammalian tissue at the field strength of 2 Tesla. Obtained quantitative measures are related to the model of heterogeneous water phases in the collagen extracellular matrix of tendon. A novel effect of central frequency shift of the water signal is reported and hypothesis on the origin of the effect is put forward. Clinical applications of NMR and MRI constantly benefit from adopting methods and techniques from the field of NMR of liquids, solids and liquid crystals. In the second chapter, a pseudo solid echo technique is evaluated for the purpose of detecting slow motions in the collagen matrix at different hydration and temperatures, at the field strength of 11.74 Tesla (500 MHz). The pseudo solid echo is shown capable in detecting motions on the scale of 10-3-10-6 seconds. 1H spin-lattice relaxation study at different levels of hydration and temperatures is presented in the third chapter. Predictions of the molecular model of collagen hydration are verified at the field strength of 11.74 Tesla (500 MHz) and temperature of 6°C, 26°C and 37°C. In the fourth chapter, an efficient adaptive mesh numerical code is developed on the basis of the octal tree data structure for assessment of the bulk magnetic susceptibility effects. The code allows calculation of the microscopic magnetic field as "seen by the nucleus" for uniformly magnetized

  1. Effects of pore size in 3-D fibrous matrix on human trophoblast tissue development.

    PubMed

    Ma, T; Li, Y; Yang, S T; Kniss, D A

    2000-12-20

    The effects of pore size in a 3-D polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nonwoven fibrous matrix on long-term tissue development of human trophoblast ED27 cells were studied. Thermal compression was used to modify the porosity and pore size of the PET matrix. The pore size distributions in PET matrices were quantified using a liquid extrusion method. Cell metabolic activities, estradiol production, and cell proliferation and differentiation were studied for ED27 cells cultured in the thermally compressed PET matrices with known pore structure characteristics. In general, metabolic activities and proliferation rate were higher initially for cultures grown in the low-porosity (LP) PET matrix (porosity of 0.849, average pore size of 30 microm in diameter) than those in the high-porosity (HP) matrix (porosity of 0.896, average pore size of 39 microm in diameter). However, 17beta-estradiol production and cell differentiation activity in the HP matrix surpassed those in the LP matrix after 12 days. The expression levels of cyclin B1 and p27kip1 in cells revealed progressively decreasing proliferation and increasing differentiation activities for cells grown in PET matrices. Also, difference in pore size controlled the cell spatial organization in the PET matrices and contributed to the tissue development in varying degrees of proliferation and differentiation. It was also found that cells grown on the 2-D surface behaved differently in cell cycle progression and did not show increased differentiation activities after growth had stopped and proliferation activities had lowered to a minimal level. The results from this study suggest that the 3-D cell organization guided by the tissue scaffold is important to tissue formation in vitro. PMID:11064329

  2. Design and characterization of microcapsules-integrated collagen matrixes as multifunctional three-dimensional scaffolds for soft tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Del Mercato, Loretta L; Passione, Laura Gioia; Izzo, Daniela; Rinaldi, Rosaria; Sannino, Alessandro; Gervaso, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds based on collagen are promising candidates for soft tissue engineering applications. The addition of stimuli-responsive carriers (nano- and microparticles) in the current approaches to tissue reconstruction and repair brings about novel challenges in the design and conception of carrier-integrated polymer scaffolds. In this study, a facile method was developed to functionalize 3D collagen porous scaffolds with biodegradable multilayer microcapsules. The effects of the capsule charge as well as the influence of the functionalization methods on the binding efficiency to the scaffolds were studied. It was found that the binding of cationic microcapsules was higher than that of anionic ones, and application of vacuum during scaffolds functionalization significantly hindered the attachment of the microcapsules to the collagen matrix. The physical properties of microcapsules-integrated scaffolds were compared to pristine scaffolds. The modified scaffolds showed swelling ratios, weight losses and mechanical properties similar to those of unmodified scaffolds. Finally, in vitro diffusional tests proved that the collagen scaffolds could stably retain the microcapsules over long incubation time in Tris-HCl buffer at 37°C without undergoing morphological changes, thus confirming their suitability for tissue engineering applications. The obtained results indicate that by tuning the charge of the microcapsules and by varying the fabrication conditions, collagen scaffolds patterned with high or low number of microcapsules can be obtained, and that the microcapsules-integrated scaffolds fully retain their original physical properties. PMID:27219851

  3. Alveolar Ridge Preservation Using Xenogeneic Collagen Matrix and Bone Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Parashis, Andreas O.; Kalaitzakis, Charalampos J.; Tatakis, Dimitris N.; Tosios, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar ridge preservation (ARP) has been shown to prevent postextraction bone loss. The aim of this report is to highlight the clinical, radiographic, and histological outcomes following use of a bilayer xenogeneic collagen matrix (XCM) in combination with freeze-dried bone allograft (FDBA) for ARP. Nine patients were treated after extraction of 18 teeth. Following minimal flap elevation and atraumatic extraction, sockets were filled with FDBA. The XCM was adapted to cover the defect and 2-3 mm of adjacent bone and flaps were repositioned. Healing was uneventful in all cases, the XCM remained in place, and any matrix exposure was devoid of further complications. Exposed matrix portions were slowly vascularized and replaced by mature keratinized tissue within 2-3 months. Radiographic and clinical assessment indicated adequate volume of bone for implant placement, with all planned implants placed in acceptable positions. When fixed partial dentures were placed, restorations fulfilled aesthetic demands without requiring further augmentation procedures. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis from 9 sites (4 patients) indicated normal mucosa with complete incorporation of the matrix and absence of inflammatory response. The XCM + FDBA combination resulted in minimal complications and desirable soft and hard tissue therapeutic outcomes, suggesting the feasibility of this approach for ARP. PMID:25328523

  4. Editorial on the original article entitled “3D printing of composite calcium phosphate and collagen scaffolds for bone regeneration” published in the Biomaterials on February 14, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lan

    2015-01-01

    The paper entitled “3D printing of composite calcium phosphate and collagen scaffolds for bone regeneration” published in the Biomaterials recently illuminated the way to make particular scaffolds with calcium phosphate (CaP) powder, phosphoric acid, type I collagen and Tween 80 in low temperature. After the optimal concentration of each component was determined, the scaffolds were evaluated in a critically sized murine femoral defect model and exhibited good material properties. We made some related introduction of materials applied in 3D printing for bone tissue engineering based on this article to demonstrate the current progress in this field of study. PMID:26046065

  5. Fibrin and Collagen Differentially but Synergistically Regulate Sprout Angiogenesis of Human Dermal Microvascular Endothelial Cells in 3-Dimensional Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Tonnesen, Marcia G.; Mousa, Shaker A.; Clark, Richard A. F.

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a highly regulated event involving complex, dynamic interactions between microvascular endothelial cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Alteration of ECM composition and architecture is a hallmark feature of wound clot and tumor stroma. We previously reported that during angiogenesis, endothelial cell responses to growth factors are modulated by the compositional and mechanical properties of a surrounding three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) that is dominated by either cross-linked fibrin or type I collagen. However, the role of 3D ECM in the regulation of angiogenesis associated with wound healing and tumor growth is not well defined. This study investigates the correlation of sprout angiogenesis and ECM microenvironment using in vivo and in vitro 3D angiogenesis models. It demonstrates that fibrin and type I collagen 3D matrices differentially but synergistically regulate sprout angiogenesis. Thus blocking both integrin alpha v beta 3 and integrin alpha 2 beta 1 might be a novel strategy to synergistically block sprout angiogenesis in solid tumors. PMID:23737792

  6. Inelastic behaviour of collagen networks in cell–matrix interactions and mechanosensation

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Hamid; Arora, Pamma D.; Simmons, Craig A.; Janmey, Paul A.; McCulloch, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of extracellular matrix proteins strongly influence cell-induced tension in the matrix, which in turn influences cell function. Despite progress on the impact of elastic behaviour of matrix proteins on cell–matrix interactions, little is known about the influence of inelastic behaviour, especially at the large and slow deformations that characterize cell-induced matrix remodelling. We found that collagen matrices exhibit deformation rate-dependent behaviour, which leads to a transition from pronounced elastic behaviour at fast deformations to substantially inelastic behaviour at slow deformations (1 μm min−1, similar to cell-mediated deformation). With slow deformations, the inelastic behaviour of floating gels was sensitive to collagen concentration, whereas attached gels exhibited similar inelastic behaviour independent of collagen concentration. The presence of an underlying rigid support had a similar effect on cell–matrix interactions: cell-induced deformation and remodelling were similar on 1 or 3 mg ml−1 attached collagen gels while deformations were two- to fourfold smaller in floating gels of high compared with low collagen concentration. In cross-linked collagen matrices, which did not exhibit inelastic behaviour, cells did not respond to the presence of the underlying rigid foundation. These data indicate that at the slow rates of collagen compaction generated by fibroblasts, the inelastic responses of collagen gels, which are influenced by collagen concentration and the presence of an underlying rigid foundation, are important determinants of cell–matrix interactions and mechanosensation. PMID:25392399

  7. Collagen in the spicule organic matrix of the gorgonian Leptogorgia virgulata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsley, R. J.; Tsuzaki, M.; Watabe, N.; Mechanic, G. L.

    1990-01-01

    Decalcification of the calcareous spicules from the gorgonian Leptogorgia virgulata reveals an organic matrix that may be divided into water insoluble and soluble fractions. The insoluble fraction displays characteristics typical of collagen, which is an unusual component of an invertebrate calcium carbonate structure. This matrix fraction exhibits a collagenous amino acid profile and behavior upon SDS-PAGE. Furthermore, the reducible crosslink, dihydroxylysinonorleucine (DHLNL), is detected in this fraction. The composition of the matrix varies seasonally; i.e., the collagenous composition is most prevalent in the summer. These results indicate that the insoluble matrix is a dynamic structure. Potential roles of this matrix in spicule calcification are discussed.

  8. Blueberry consumption prevents loss of collagen in bone matrix and inhibits senescence pathways in osteoblastic cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ovariectomy (OVX)-induced bone loss has been linked to increased bone turnover and higher bone matrix collagen degradation as the result of osteoclast activation. However, the role of degraded collagen matrix in the fate of resident bone-forming cells is unclear. In this report, we show that OVX-i...

  9. Integration of 3D Printed and Micropatterned Polycaprolactone Scaffolds for Guidance of Oriented Collagenous Tissue Formation In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Pilipchuk, Sophia P; Monje, Alberto; Jiao, Yizu; Hao, Jie; Kruger, Laura; Flanagan, Colleen L; Hollister, Scott J; Giannobile, William V

    2016-03-01

    Scaffold design incorporating multiscale cues for clinically relevant, aligned tissue regeneration has potential to improve structural and functional integrity of multitissue interfaces. The objective of this preclinical study is to develop poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds with mesoscale and microscale architectural cues specific to human ligament progenitor cells and assess their ability to form aligned bone-ligament-cementum complexes in vivo. PCL scaffolds are designed to integrate a 3D printed bone region with a micropatterned PCL thin film consisting of grooved pillars. The patterned film region is seeded with human ligament cells, fibroblasts transduced with bone morphogenetic protein-7 genes seeded within the bone region, and a tooth dentin segment positioned on the ligament region prior to subcutaneous implantation into a murine model. Results indicate increased tissue alignment in vivo using micropatterned PCL films, compared to random-porous PCL. At week 6, 30 μm groove depth significantly enhances oriented collagen fiber thickness, overall cell alignment, and nuclear elongation relative to 10 μm groove depth. This study demonstrates for the first time that scaffolds with combined hierarchical mesoscale and microscale features can align cells in vivo for oral tissue repair with potential for improving the regenerative response of other bone-ligament complexes. PMID:26820240

  10. Response of microscale cell/matrix constructs to successive force application in a 3D environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Alan; Chen, Christopher; Reich, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical dilation of arteries by pulsatile blood flow is directly opposed by coordinated contraction of a band of smooth muscle tissue that envelops the vessels. This mechanical adaptation of smooth muscle cells to external loading is a critical feature of normal blood vessel function. While most previous studies on biomechanical systems have focused on single cells or large excised tissue, we utilize a device to apply forces to engineered smooth muscle microtissues. This device consists of arrayed pairs of elastomeric micro-cantilevers capable of magnetic actuation. Tissues are formed through self-assembly following the introduction of cell-infused collagen gel to the array. With this system, we are able to dynamically stretch and relax these sub-millimeter sized tissues. The timing and magnitude of the force application can be precisely controlled and thus can be used to mimic a wide range of physiological behavior. In particular, we will discuss results that show that the interval between successive force applications mediates the both the subsequent mechanical and active dynamics of the cell/matrix composite system. Understanding this process will lead to better understanding of the interplay between cell and extracellular matrix responses to mechanical stimulus at a novel length scale.

  11. Construction of a 3D rGO-collagen hybrid scaffold for enhancement of the neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Yu, Xin; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Jianhua; Tang, Wei; Li, Zhou; Mou, Xiaoning; Liu, Hong; Wang, Zhonglin

    2016-01-01

    The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold because the surface of the scaffold can determine the fate of stem cells. A conductive surface is required for a scaffold to direct stem cells toward neural differentiation. However, most conductive polymers are toxic and not amenable to biological degradation, which restricts the design of neural tissue engineering scaffolds. In this study, we used a bioactive three-dimensional (3D) porcine acellular dermal matrix (PADM), which is mainly composed of type I collagen, as a basic material and successfully assembled a layer of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets on the surface of the PADM channels to obtain a porous 3D, biodegradable, conductive and biocompatible PADM-rGO hybrid neural tissue engineering scaffold. Compared with the PADM scaffold, assembling the rGO into the scaffold did not induce a significant change in the microstructure but endowed the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold with good conductivity. A comparison of the neural differentiation of rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was performed by culturing the MSCs on PADM and PADM-rGO scaffolds in neuronal culture medium, followed by the determination of gene expression and immunofluorescence staining. The results of both the gene expression and protein level assessments suggest that the rGO-assembled PADM scaffold may promote the differentiation of MSCs into neuronal cells with higher protein and gene expression levels after 7 days under neural differentiation conditions. This study demonstrated that the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold is a promising scaffold for neural tissue engineering; this scaffold can not only support the growth of MSCs at a high proliferation rate but also enhance the differentiation of MSCs into neural cells.The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold

  12. Impaired keratinocyte function on matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) damaged collagen

    PubMed Central

    Perone, Patricia; Deming, Monica O’Brien; Warner, Roscoe L.; Aslam, Muhammad N.; Bhagavathula, Narasimharao; Dame, Michael K.; Voorhees, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Healing of superficial skin wounds depends on the proliferation and migration of keratinocytes at the wound margin. When human epidermal keratinocytes were incubated on polymerized type I collagen, they rapidly attached and spread. The cells underwent a proliferative response and, over the subsequent 6-day period, covered the collagen surface with a monolayer of cells. When keratinocytes were plated on collagen that had been fragmented by exposure to matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1, collagenase-1), the cells attached as readily as to intact collagen but spread more slowly and less completely. Growth was reduced by approximately 50%. Instead of covering the collagen surface, the keratinocytes remained localized to the site of attachment. Keratinocytes on fragmented collagen expressed a more differentiated phenotype as indicated by a higher level of surface E-cadherin. Based on these findings, we suggest that damage to the underlying collagenous matrix may impede efficient keratinocyte function and retard wound closure. PMID:19352688

  13. Noncanonical roles of membranous lysyl-tRNA synthetase in transducing cell-substrate signaling for invasive dissemination of colon cancer spheroids in 3D collagen I gels

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seo Hee; Kim, Doyeun; Lee, Mi-Sook; Lee, Doohyung; Kwak, Tae Kyoung; Kang, Minkyung; Ryu, Jihye; Kim, Hye-Jin; Song, Haeng Eun; Choi, Jungeun; Lee, Gyu-Ho; Kim, Sang-Yeob; Park, Song Hwa; Kim, Dae Gyu; Kwon, Nam Hoon; Kim, Tai Young; Thiery, Jean Paul; Kim, Sunghoon; Lee, Jung Weon

    2015-01-01

    The adhesion properties of cells are involved in tumor metastasis. Although KRS at the plasma membrane is shown important for cancer metastasis, additionally to canonical roles of cytosolic KRS in protein translation, how KRS and its downstream effectors promote the metastatic migration remains unexplored. Disseminative behaviors (an earlier metastatic process) of colon cancer cell spheroids embedded in 3D collagen gels were studied with regards to cell adhesion properties, and relevance in KRS−/+ knocked-down animal and clinical colon cancer tissues. Time-lapse imaging revealed KRS-dependent cell dissemination from the spheroids, whereas KRS-suppressed spheroids remained static due to the absence of outbound movements supported by cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion. While keeping E-cadherin at the outward disseminative cells, KRS caused integrin-involved intracellular signaling for ERK/c-Jun, paxillin, and cell-ECM adhesion-mediated signaling to modulate traction force for crawling movement. KRS-suppressed spheroids became disseminative following ERK or paxillin re-expression. The KRS-dependent intracellular signaling activities correlated with the invasiveness in clinical colon tumor tissues and in KRS−/+ knocked-down mice tissues. Collectively, these observations indicate that KRS at the plasma membrane plays new roles in metastatic migration as a signaling inducer, and causes intracellular signaling for cancer dissemination, involving cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesion, during KRS-mediated metastasis. PMID:26091349

  14. Construction of a 3D rGO-collagen hybrid scaffold for enhancement of the neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Yu, Xin; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Jianhua; Tang, Wei; Li, Zhou; Mou, Xiaoning; Liu, Hong; Wang, Zhonglin

    2016-01-28

    The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold because the surface of the scaffold can determine the fate of stem cells. A conductive surface is required for a scaffold to direct stem cells toward neural differentiation. However, most conductive polymers are toxic and not amenable to biological degradation, which restricts the design of neural tissue engineering scaffolds. In this study, we used a bioactive three-dimensional (3D) porcine acellular dermal matrix (PADM), which is mainly composed of type I collagen, as a basic material and successfully assembled a layer of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets on the surface of the PADM channels to obtain a porous 3D, biodegradable, conductive and biocompatible PADM-rGO hybrid neural tissue engineering scaffold. Compared with the PADM scaffold, assembling the rGO into the scaffold did not induce a significant change in the microstructure but endowed the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold with good conductivity. A comparison of the neural differentiation of rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was performed by culturing the MSCs on PADM and PADM-rGO scaffolds in neuronal culture medium, followed by the determination of gene expression and immunofluorescence staining. The results of both the gene expression and protein level assessments suggest that the rGO-assembled PADM scaffold may promote the differentiation of MSCs into neuronal cells with higher protein and gene expression levels after 7 days under neural differentiation conditions. This study demonstrated that the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold is a promising scaffold for neural tissue engineering; this scaffold can not only support the growth of MSCs at a high proliferation rate but also enhance the differentiation of MSCs into neural cells. PMID:26750302

  15. Cell mediated contraction in 3D cell-matrix constructs leads to spatially regulated osteogenic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Klumpers, Darinka D.; Zhao, Xuanhe; Mooney, David J.; Smit, Theo H.

    2013-01-01

    During embryonic development, morphogenetic processes give rise to a variety of shapes and patterns that lead to functional tissues and organs. While the impact of chemical signals in these processes is widely studied, the role of physical cues is less understood. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the interplay of cell mediated contraction and mechanical boundary conditions alone can result in spatially regulated differentiation in simple 3D constructs. An experimental model consisting of a 3D cell-gel construct and a finite element (FE) model were used to study the effect of cellular traction exerted by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on an initially homogeneous matrix under inhomogeneous boundary conditions. A robust shape change is observed due to contraction under time-varying mechanical boundary conditions, which is explained by the finite element model. Furthermore, distinct local differences of osteogenic differentiation are observed, with a spatial pattern independent of osteogenic factors in the culture medium. Regions that are predicted to have experienced relatively high shear stress at any time during contraction, correlate with the regions of distinct osteogenesis. Taken together, these results support the underlying hypothesis that cellular contractility and mechanical boundary conditions alone can result in spatially regulated differentiation. These results will have important implications for tissue engineering and regeneration. PMID:23925497

  16. Assessment of angiogenesis in osseointegration of a silica-collagen biomaterial using 3D-nano-CT.

    PubMed

    Alt, Volker; Kögelmaier, Daniela Vera; Lips, Katrin S; Witt, Vera; Pacholke, Sabine; Heiss, Christian; Kampschulte, Marian; Heinemann, Sascha; Hanke, Thomas; Thormann, Ulrich; Schnettler, Reinhard; Langheinrich, Alexander C

    2011-10-01

    Bony integration of biomaterials is a complex process in which angiogenesis plays a crucial role. We evaluated micro- and nano-CT imaging to demonstrate and quantify neovascularization in bony integration of a biomaterial and to give an image based estimation for the needed resolution for imaging angiogenesis in an animal model of femora defect healing. In 8 rats 5mm full-size defects were created at the left femur that was filled with silica-collagen bone substitute material and internally fixed with plate osteosynthesis. After 6 weeks the femora were infused in situ with Microfil, harvested and scanned for micro-CT (9 μm)(3) and nano-CT (3 μm)(3) imaging. Using those 3D images, the newly formed blood vessels in the area of the biomaterial were assessed and the total vascular volume fraction, the volume of the bone substitute material and the volume of the bone defect were quantitatively characterized. Results were complemented by histology. Differences were statistically assessed using (ANOVA). High-resolution nano-CT demonstrated new blood vessel formation surrounding the biomaterial in all animals at capillary level. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the newly formed blood vessels surrounding the bone substitute material. The mean vascular volume fraction (VVF) around the implant was calculated to be 3.01 ± 0.4%. The VVF was inversely correlated with the volume of the bone substitute material (r=0.8) but not with the dimension of the fracture zone (r=0.3). Nano-CT imaging is feasible for quantitative analysis of angiogenesis during bony integration of biomaterials and a promising tool in this context for the future. PMID:21723963

  17. Glucose Gradients Influence Zonal Matrix Deposition in 3D Cartilage Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Spitters, Tim W.G.M.; Mota, Carlos M.D.; Uzoechi, Samuel C.; Slowinska, Barbara; Martens, Dirk E.; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Reproducing the native collagen structure and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) distribution in tissue-engineered cartilage constructs is still a challenge. Articular cartilage has a specific nutrient supply and mechanical environment due to its location and function in the body. Efforts to simulate this native environment have been reported through the use of bioreactor systems. However, few of these devices take into account the existence of gradients over cartilage as a consequence of the nutrient supply by diffusion. We hypothesized that culturing chondrocytes in an environment, in which gradients of nutrients can be mimicked, would induce zonal differentiation. Indeed, we show that glucose gradients facilitating a concentration distribution as low as physiological glucose levels enhanced a zonal chondrogenic capacity similar to the one found in native cartilage. Furthermore, we found that the glucose consumption rates of cultured chondrocytes were higher under physiological glucose concentrations and that GAG production rates were highest in 5 mM glucose. From these findings, we concluded that this condition is better suited for matrix deposition compared to 20 mM glucose standard used in a chondrocyte culture system. Reconsidering the culture conditions in cartilage tissue engineering strategies can lead to cartilaginous constructs that have better mechanical and structural properties, thus holding the potential of further enhancing integration with the host tissue. PMID:24903611

  18. Glucose gradients influence zonal matrix deposition in 3D cartilage constructs.

    PubMed

    Spitters, Tim W G M; Mota, Carlos M D; Uzoechi, Samuel C; Slowinska, Barbara; Martens, Dirk E; Moroni, Lorenzo; Karperien, Marcel

    2014-12-01

    Reproducing the native collagen structure and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) distribution in tissue-engineered cartilage constructs is still a challenge. Articular cartilage has a specific nutrient supply and mechanical environment due to its location and function in the body. Efforts to simulate this native environment have been reported through the use of bioreactor systems. However, few of these devices take into account the existence of gradients over cartilage as a consequence of the nutrient supply by diffusion. We hypothesized that culturing chondrocytes in an environment, in which gradients of nutrients can be mimicked, would induce zonal differentiation. Indeed, we show that glucose gradients facilitating a concentration distribution as low as physiological glucose levels enhanced a zonal chondrogenic capacity similar to the one found in native cartilage. Furthermore, we found that the glucose consumption rates of cultured chondrocytes were higher under physiological glucose concentrations and that GAG production rates were highest in 5 mM glucose. From these findings, we concluded that this condition is better suited for matrix deposition compared to 20 mM glucose standard used in a chondrocyte culture system. Reconsidering the culture conditions in cartilage tissue engineering strategies can lead to cartilaginous constructs that have better mechanical and structural properties, thus holding the potential of further enhancing integration with the host tissue. PMID:24903611

  19. Probing cell-matrix interactions in RGD-decorated macroporous poly (ethylene glycol) hydrogels for 3D chondrocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Mujeeb, Ayeesha; Du, Yanan; Lin, Jianhao; Ge, Zigang

    2015-06-01

    Macroporous hydrogels have shown great promise as scaffolds for cartilage engineering by facilitating nutrition transport and tissue in growth. Cell-matrix adhesion-a fundamental process in tissue engineering-has shown a profound effect on subsequent cell phenotype, extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation, and tissue reorganization. In this study, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) was introduced to macroporous hydrogels of poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) to fabricate PEG-G400 (with 0.4mM RGD) and PEG-G2000 (2mM RGD) to probe the cell-matrix interactions within hydrogels. Primary chondrocytes demonstrated a slightly stretched morphology with increasing RGD concentration and PEG-G2000 hydrogels boosted cell viability, proliferation, and deposition of collagen II and GAG, in comparison to the PEG-G400 and PEG-RED groups. Results also revealed chondrocytes within the cell aggregates underwent dedifferentiation and hypertrophy within RGD incorporated hydrogels, as evidenced by the high level of gene expression of collagen I on day 14 and strong immunohistological staining of collagen X and collagen I on day 35. Evidently, a high concentration of RGD (2mM RGD) enhanced cell-matrix interactions through elevating the expression of integrin β1 and vinculin. Thus, the integration of RGD in macroporous hydrogels with a concentration of 2 mM may be sufficient for improving cell functionality, with a slight probability of dedifferentiation and hypertrophy of chondrocytes. PMID:26107534

  20. Nanorod mediated collagen scaffolds as extra cellular matrix mimics.

    PubMed

    Vedhanayagam, Mohan; Mohan, Ranganathan; Nair, Balachandran Unni; Sreeram, Kalarical Janardhanan

    2015-12-01

    Creating collagen scaffolds that mimic extracellular matrices without using toxic exogenous materials remains a big challenge. A new strategy to create scaffolds through end-to-end crosslinking through functionalized nanorods leading to well-designed architecture is presented here. Self-assembled scaffolds with a denaturation temperature of 110 °C, porosity of 70%, pore size of 0.32 μm and Young's modulus of 231 MPa were developed largely driven by imine bonding between 3-mercapto-1-propanal (MPA) functionalized ZnO nanorods and collagen. The mechanical properties obtained were much higher than that of native collagen, collagen-MPA, collagen-3-mercapto-1-propanol (3MPOH) or collagen- 3-MPOH-ZnO, clearly bringing out the relevance of nanorod mediated assembly of fibrous networks. This new strategy has led to scaffolds with mechanical properties much higher than earlier reports and can provide support for cell growth and facilitation of cell attachment. PMID:26586667

  1. A membrane-type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP)-discoidin domain receptor 1 axis regulates collagen-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Assent, Delphine; Bourgot, Isabelle; Hennuy, Benoît; Geurts, Pierre; Noël, Agnès; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Maquoi, Erik

    2015-01-01

    During tumour dissemination, invading breast carcinoma cells become confronted with a reactive stroma, a type I collagen-rich environment endowed with anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. To develop metastatic capabilities, tumour cells must acquire the capacity to cope with this novel microenvironment. How cells interact with and respond to their microenvironment during cancer dissemination remains poorly understood. To address the impact of type I collagen on the fate of tumour cells, human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells were cultured within three-dimensional type I collagen gels (3D COL1). Using this experimental model, we have previously demonstrated that membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), a proteinase overexpressed in many aggressive tumours, promotes tumour progression by circumventing the collagen-induced up-regulation of BIK, a pro-apoptotic tumour suppressor, and hence apoptosis. Here we performed a transcriptomic analysis to decipher the molecular mechanisms regulating 3D COL1-induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. Control and MT1-MMP expressing MCF-7 cells were cultured on two-dimensional plastic plates or within 3D COL1 and a global transcriptional time-course analysis was performed. Shifting the cells from plastic plates to 3D COL1 activated a complex reprogramming of genes implicated in various biological processes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a 3D COL1-mediated alteration of key cellular functions including apoptosis, cell proliferation, RNA processing and cytoskeleton remodelling. By using a panel of pharmacological inhibitors, we identified discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a receptor tyrosine kinase specifically activated by collagen, as the initiator of 3D COL1-induced apoptosis. Our data support the concept that MT1-MMP contributes to the inactivation of the DDR1-BIK signalling axis through the cleavage of collagen fibres and/or the alteration of DDR1 receptor signalling unit, without triggering a

  2. Endocytosis of collagen by hepatic stellate cells regulates extracellular matrix dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Yan; Mukhopadhyay, Dhriti; Drinane, Mary; Ji, Baoan; Li, Xing; Cao, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) generate matrix, which in turn may also regulate HSCs function during liver fibrosis. We hypothesized that HSCs may endocytose matrix proteins to sense and respond to changes in microenvironment. Primary human HSCs, LX2, or mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) [wild-type; c-abl−/−; or Yes, Src, and Fyn knockout mice (YSF−/−)] were incubated with fluorescent-labeled collagen or gelatin. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and confocal microscopy were used for measuring cellular internalization of matrix proteins. Targeted PCR array and quantitative real-time PCR were used to evaluate gene expression changes. HSCs and LX2 cells endocytose collagens in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Endocytosed collagen colocalized with Dextran 10K, a marker of macropinocytosis, and 5-ethylisopropyl amiloride, an inhibitor of macropinocytosis, reduced collagen internalization by 46%. Cytochalasin D and ML7 blocked collagen internalization by 47% and 45%, respectively, indicating that actin and myosin are critical for collagen endocytosis. Wortmannin and AKT inhibitor blocked collagen internalization by 70% and 89%, respectively, indicating that matrix macropinocytosis requires phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling. Overexpression of dominant-negative dynamin-2 K44A blocked matrix internalization by 77%, indicating a role for dynamin-2 in matrix macropinocytosis. Whereas c-abl−/− MEF showed impaired matrix endocytosis, YSF−/− MEF surprisingly showed increased matrix endocytosis. It was also associated with complex gene regulations that related with matrix dynamics, including increased matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) mRNA levels and zymographic activity. HSCs endocytose matrix proteins through macropinocytosis that requires a signaling network composed of PI3K/AKT, dynamin-2, and c-abl. Interaction with extracellular matrix regulates matrix dynamics through modulating multiple gene expressions including MMP-9

  3. Manipulation of in vitro collagen matrix architecture for scaffolds of improved physiological relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapach, Lauren A.; VanderBurgh, Jacob A.; Miller, Joseph P.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2015-12-01

    Type I collagen is a versatile biomaterial that is widely used in medical applications due to its weak antigenicity, robust biocompatibility, and its ability to be modified for a wide array of applications. As such, collagen has become a major component of many tissue engineering scaffolds, drug delivery platforms, and substrates for in vitro cell culture. In these applications, collagen constructs are fabricated to recapitulate a diverse set of conditions. Collagen fibrils can be aligned during or post-fabrication, cross-linked via numerous techniques, polymerized to create various fibril sizes and densities, and copolymerized into a wide array of composite scaffolds. Here, we review approaches that have been used to tune collagen to better recapitulate physiological environments for use in tissue engineering applications and studies of basic cell behavior. We discuss techniques to control fibril alignment, methods for cross-linking collagen constructs to modulate stiffness, and composite collagen constructs to better mimic physiological extracellular matrix.

  4. Manipulation of in vitro collagen matrix architecture for scaffolds of improved physiological relevance.

    PubMed

    Hapach, Lauren A; VanderBurgh, Jacob A; Miller, Joseph P; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen is a versatile biomaterial that is widely used in medical applications due to its weak antigenicity, robust biocompatibility, and its ability to be modified for a wide array of applications. As such, collagen has become a major component of many tissue engineering scaffolds, drug delivery platforms, and substrates for in vitro cell culture. In these applications, collagen constructs are fabricated to recapitulate a diverse set of conditions. Collagen fibrils can be aligned during or post-fabrication, cross-linked via numerous techniques, polymerized to create various fibril sizes and densities, and copolymerized into a wide array of composite scaffolds. Here, we review approaches that have been used to tune collagen to better recapitulate physiological environments for use in tissue engineering applications and studies of basic cell behavior. We discuss techniques to control fibril alignment, methods for cross-linking collagen constructs to modulate stiffness, and composite collagen constructs to better mimic physiological extracellular matrix. PMID:26689380

  5. Improving nanoparticle diffusion through tumor collagen matrix by photo-thermal gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeesi, Vahid; Chan, Warren C. W.

    2016-06-01

    Collagen (I) impairs the targeting of nanoparticles to tumor cells by obstructing their diffusion inside dense tumor interstitial matrix. This potentially makes large nanoparticles (>50 nm) reside near the tumor vessels and thereby compromises their functionality. Here we propose a strategy to locally improve nanoparticle transport inside collagen (I) component of the tumor tissue. We first used heat generating gold nanorods to alter collagen (I) matrix by local temperature elevation. We then explored this impact on the transport of 50 nm and 120 nm inorganic nanoparticles inside collagen (I). We demonstrated an increase in average diffusivity of 50 nm and 120 nm in the denatured collagen (I) by ~14 and ~21 fold, respectively, compared to intact untreated collagen (I) matrix. This study shows how nanoparticle-mediated hyperthermia inside tumor tissue can improve the transport of large nanoparticles through collagen (I) matrix. The ability to increase nanoparticles diffusion inside tumor stroma allows their targeting or other functionalities to take effect, thereby significantly improving cancer therapeutic or diagnostic outcome.Collagen (I) impairs the targeting of nanoparticles to tumor cells by obstructing their diffusion inside dense tumor interstitial matrix. This potentially makes large nanoparticles (>50 nm) reside near the tumor vessels and thereby compromises their functionality. Here we propose a strategy to locally improve nanoparticle transport inside collagen (I) component of the tumor tissue. We first used heat generating gold nanorods to alter collagen (I) matrix by local temperature elevation. We then explored this impact on the transport of 50 nm and 120 nm inorganic nanoparticles inside collagen (I). We demonstrated an increase in average diffusivity of 50 nm and 120 nm in the denatured collagen (I) by ~14 and ~21 fold, respectively, compared to intact untreated collagen (I) matrix. This study shows how nanoparticle-mediated hyperthermia inside

  6. Biotinylated GHK peptide incorporated collagenous matrix: A novel biomaterial for dermal wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Arul, V; Gopinath, D; Gomathi, K; Jayakumar, R

    2005-05-01

    Matrikines are small peptide fragments of extracellular matrix proteins that display potent tissue repair activities. Difficulties in achieving sustained delivery of bioactive concentration of matrikines in the affected area limits their therapeutic use. The present study evaluates the effects biotinylated matrikine peptide (bio-glycyl-histidyl-lysine) incorporated collagen membrane for dermal wound healing processes in rats. Biotinylated peptide incorporated collagen matrix (PIC) showed better healing when compared to wounds treated with collagen matrix [CF (collagen film)] and without collagen [CR (control)]. Binding studies indicate that biotinylated GHK (Bio-GHK) binds effectively to the collagen matrix and red blood cell (RBC) membrane when compared with t-butyloxycarbonyl substituted GHK (Boc-GHK). Wound contraction, increased cell proliferation, and high expression of antioxidant enzymes in PIC treated group indicate enhanced wound healing activity when compared to CF and CR groups. Interestingly Bio-GHK incorporated collagen increases the copper concentration by ninefold at the wound site indicating the wound healing property of Bio-GHK can also be linked with both copper localization and matrikine activities. These results demonstrate the possibility of using Bio-GHK incorporated collagen film as a therapeutic agent in the wound healing process. PMID:15803494

  7. Cross-Linking in Collagen by Nonenzymatic Glycation Increases the Matrix Stiffness in Rabbit Achilles Tendon

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of connective tissue matrix proteins is a major contributor to the pathology of diabetes and aging. Previously the author and colleagues have shown that nonenzymatic glycation significantly enhances the matrix stability in the Achilles tendon (Reddy et al., 2002, Arch. Biochem. Biophys., 399, 174–180). The present study was designed to gain further insight into glycation-induced collagen cross-linking and its relationship to matrix stiffness in the rabbit Achilles tendon. The glycation process was initiated by incubating the Achilles tendons (n = 6) in phosphate-buffered saline containing ribose, whereas control tendons (n = 6) were incubated in phosphate-buffered saline without ribose. Eight weeks following glycation, the biomechanical attributes as well as the degree of collagen cross-linking were determined to examine the potential associations between matrix stiffness and molecular properties of collagen. Compared to nonglycated tendons, the glycated tendons showed increased maximum load, stress, strain, Young's modulus of elasticity, and toughness indicating that glycation increases the matrix stiffness in the tendons. Glycation of tendons resulted in a considerable decrease in soluble collagen content and a significant increase in insoluble collagen and pentosidine. Analysis of potential associations between the matrix stiffness and degree of collagen cross-linking showed that both insoluble collagen and pentosidine exhibited a significant positive correlation with the maximum load, stress, and strain, Young's modulus of elasticity, and toughness (r values ranging from .61 to .94) in the Achilles tendons. However, the soluble collagen content present in neutral salt buffer, acetate buffer, and acetate buffer containing pepsin showed an inverse relation with the various biomechanical attributes tested (r values ranging from .22 to .84) in the Achilles tendons. The results of the study demonstrate that glycation-induced collagen cross

  8. Patterning hypoxic multicellular spheroids in a 3D matrix - a promising method for anti-tumor drug screening.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingyun; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Yang; Yu, Haibo; Liu, Lianqing; Shi, Yang; Li, Yanfeng; Qin, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    3D multicellular spheroid models are of great value in the investigation of tumor biology and tumor responses to chemotherapy and radiation. To establish a mimicking tumor microenvironment in vitro, we developed a straightforward method by patterning hypoxic multicellular spheroids in a 3D matrix. The efficacy of this approach was evaluated by characterizing spheroid formation, invasive capability and phenotypic transition in aggressive human glioma cells. We observed enhanced cell proliferation, spheroid formation and invasive capability in U87 glioma cells transfected with hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) compared with non-treated cells. We also demonstrated that the overexpression of HIFs in hypoxic glioma cells may promote cell migration by epithelial-mesenchymal transition within the 3D matrix. Compared with conventional 3D culturing techniques, the simple operation, rapid prototyping, low cost and high throughput format of the micro-patterning method facilitates the characterization of cell proliferation, migration, phenotypic function and drug evaluation in physiologically relevant 3D microenvironments. This in vitro 3D system can recapitulate the physiologically relevant tumor microenvironment and is a promising method for 3D anti-tumor drug screening and the identification of novel targets for tumor invasion and angiogenesis. PMID:26647062

  9. Deficiency of CRTAP in non-lethal recessive osteogenesis imperfecta reduces collagen deposition into matrix

    PubMed Central

    Valli, M; Barnes, AM; Gallanti, A; Cabral, WA; Viglio, S; Weis, MA; Makareeva, E; Eyre, D; Leikin, S; Antoniazzi, F; Marini, JC; Mottes, M

    2013-01-01

    Deficiency of any component of the ER-resident collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex causes recessive osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). The complex modifies the α1(I)Pro986 residue and contains cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP), prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1) and cyclophilin B (CyPB). Fibroblasts normally secrete about 10% of CRTAP. Most CRTAP mutations cause a null allele and lethal type VII OI. We identified a 7-year-old Egyptian boy with non-lethal type VII OI and investigated the effects of his null CRTAP mutation on collagen biochemistry, the prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex, and collagen in extracellular matrix. The proband is homozygous for an insertion/deletion in CRTAP (c.118_133del16insTACCC). His dermal fibroblasts synthesize fully overmodified type I collagen, and 3-hydroxylate only 5% of α1(I)Pro986. CRTAP transcripts are 10% of control. CRTAP protein is absent from proband cells, with residual P3H1 and normal CyPB levels. Dermal collagen fibril diameters are significantly increased. By immunofluorescence of long-term cultures, we identified a severe deficiency (10–15% of control) of collagen deposited in extracellular matrix, with disorganization of the minimal fibrillar network. Quantitative pulse-chase experiments corroborate deficiency of matrix deposition, rather than increased matrix turnover. We conclude that defects of extracellular matrix, as well as intracellular defects in collagen modification, contribute to the pathology of type VII OI. PMID:21955071

  10. 3D texture analysis of solitary pulmonary nodules using co-occurrence matrix from volumetric lung CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhara, Ashis Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we have investigated a new approach for texture features extraction using co-occurrence matrix from volumetric lung CT image. Traditionally texture analysis is performed in 2D and is suitable for images collected from 2D imaging modality. The use of 3D imaging modalities provide the scope of texture analysis from 3D object and 3D texture feature are more realistic to represent 3D object. In this work, Haralick's texture features are extended in 3D and computed from volumetric data considering 26 neighbors. The optimal texture features to characterize the internal structure of Solitary Pulmonary Nodules (SPN) are selected based on area under curve (AUC) values of ROC curve and p values from 2-tailed Student's t-test. The selected texture feature in 3D to represent SPN can be used in efficient Computer Aided Diagnostic (CAD) design plays an important role in fast and accurate lung cancer screening. The reduced number of input features to the CAD system will decrease the computational time and classification errors caused by irrelevant features. In the present work, SPN are classified from Ground Glass Nodule (GGN) using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) classifier considering top five 3D texture features and top five 2D texture features separately. The classification is performed on 92 SPN and 25 GGN from Imaging Database Resources Initiative (IDRI) public database and classification accuracy using 3D texture features and 2D texture features provide 97.17% and 89.1% respectively.

  11. In vitro 3D angiogenesis assay in egg white matrix: comparison to Matrigel, compatibility to various species, and suitability for drug testing.

    PubMed

    Mousseau, Yoanne; Mollard, Séverine; Qiu, Hao; Richard, Laurence; Cazal, Raphael; Nizou, Angélique; Vedrenne, Nicolas; Rémi, Séverine; Baaj, Yasser; Fourcade, Laurent; Funalot, Benoit; Sturtz, Franck G

    2014-03-01

    In vitro angiogenesis assays are commonly used to assess pro- or anti-angiogenic drug properties. Extracellular matrix (ECM) substitutes such as Matrigel and collagen gel became very popular in in vitro 3D angiogenesis assays as they enable tubule formation by endothelial cells from culture or aortic rings. However, these assays are usually used with a single cell type, lacking the complex cellular interactions occurring during angiogenesis. Here, we report a novel angiogenesis assay using egg white as ECM substitute. We found that, similar to Matrigel, egg white elicited prevascular network formation by endothelial and/or smooth muscle cell coculture. This matrix was suitable for various cells from human, mouse, and rat origin. It is compatible with aortic ring assay and also enables vascular and tumor cell coculture. Through simple labeling (DAPI, Hoechst 33258), cell location and resulting prevascular network formation can easily be quantified. Cell transfection with green fluorescent protein improved whole cell visualization and 3D structure characterization. Finally, egg-based assay dedicated to angiogenesis studies represents a reliable and cost-effective way to produce and analyze data regarding drug effects on vascular cells. PMID:24395110

  12. Probing the 3D structure of cornea-like collagen liquid crystals with polarization-resolved SHG microscopy.

    PubMed

    Teulon, Claire; Tidu, Aurélien; Portier, François; Mosser, Gervaise; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2016-07-11

    This work aims at characterizing the three-dimensional organization of liquid crystals composed of collagen, in order to determine the physico-chemical conditions leading to highly organized structures found in biological tissues such as cornea. To that end, we use second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy, since aligned collagen structures have been shown to exhibit intrinsic SHG signals. We combine polarization-resolved SHG experiments (P-SHG) with the theoretical derivation of the SHG signal of collagen molecules tilted with respect to the focal plane. Our P-SHG images exhibit striated patterns with variable contrast, as expected from our analytical and numerical calculations for plywood-like nematic structures similar to the ones found in the cornea. This study demonstrates the benefits of P-SHG microscopy for in situ characterization of highly organized biopolymers at micrometer scale, and the unique sensitivity of this nonlinear optical technique to the orientation of collagen molecules. PMID:27410876

  13. Improving nanoparticle diffusion through tumor collagen matrix by photo-thermal gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Raeesi, Vahid; Chan, Warren C W

    2016-07-01

    Collagen (I) impairs the targeting of nanoparticles to tumor cells by obstructing their diffusion inside dense tumor interstitial matrix. This potentially makes large nanoparticles (>50 nm) reside near the tumor vessels and thereby compromises their functionality. Here we propose a strategy to locally improve nanoparticle transport inside collagen (I) component of the tumor tissue. We first used heat generating gold nanorods to alter collagen (I) matrix by local temperature elevation. We then explored this impact on the transport of 50 nm and 120 nm inorganic nanoparticles inside collagen (I). We demonstrated an increase in average diffusivity of 50 nm and 120 nm in the denatured collagen (I) by ∼14 and ∼21 fold, respectively, compared to intact untreated collagen (I) matrix. This study shows how nanoparticle-mediated hyperthermia inside tumor tissue can improve the transport of large nanoparticles through collagen (I) matrix. The ability to increase nanoparticles diffusion inside tumor stroma allows their targeting or other functionalities to take effect, thereby significantly improving cancer therapeutic or diagnostic outcome. PMID:26822539

  14. Role of collagen membrane in lateral onlay grafting with bovine hydroxyapatite incorporated with collagen matrix in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ui-Won; Lee, Jung-Seok; Lee, Geun; Lee, In-Kyeong; Hwang, Ji-Wan; Kim, Min-Soo; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to elucidate the role of collagen membranes (CMs) when used in conjunction with bovine hydroxyapatite particles incorporated with collagen matrix (BHC) for lateral onlay grafts in dogs. Methods The first, second, and third premolars in the right maxilla of mongrel dogs (n=5) were extracted. After 2 months of healing, two BHC blocks (4 mm×4 mm×5 mm) were placed on the buccal ridge, one with and one without the coverage by a CM. The animals were sacrificed after 8 weeks for histometric analysis. Results The collagen network of the membranes remained and served as a barrier. The quantity and quality of bone regeneration were all significantly greater in the membrane group than in the no-membrane group (P<0.05). Conclusions The use of barrier membranes in lateral onlay grafts leads to superior new bone formation and bone quality compared with bone graft alone. PMID:23678389

  15. Tyrosine-rich acidic matrix protein (TRAMP) accelerates collagen fibril formation in vitro.

    PubMed

    MacBeath, J R; Shackleton, D R; Hulmes, D J

    1993-09-15

    Tyrosine-rich acidic matrix protein (TRAMP) is a recently discovered protein that co-purifies with porcine skin lysyl oxidase and is equivalent to the M(r) 22,000 extracellular matrix protein from bovine skin that co-purifies with dermatan sulfate proteoglycans (Cronshaw, A. D., MacBeath, J. R. E., Shackleton, D. R., Collins, J. F., Fothergill-Gilmore, L. A., and Hulmes, D. J. S. (1993) Matrix 13, 255-266; Neame, P. J., Choi, H. U., and Rosenberg, L. C. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 5474-5479). The effect of TRAMP on collagen fibril formation was studied in vitro by reconstitution of fibrils from lathyritic rat skin collagen I. Fibril formation was initiated by the warm start procedure, in which acidic collagen solutions and double strength neutral buffer, both preincubated separately at 34 degrees C, were mixed. When monitored by turbidimetry, TRAMP was found to accelerate collagen fibril formation. Acceleration occurred at sub-stoichiometric molar ratios of TRAMP collagen, and the presence of TRAMP stabilized the fibrils against low temperature dissociation. It was confirmed by centrifugation that the amount of fibrillar collagen formed in the presence of TRAMP was greater than in its absence. By SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and scanning densitometry, binding of TRAMP to collagen was detected that approached saturation with a molar ratio of TRAMP to collagen of approximately 1:2. Fibrils formed in the presence of TRAMP were normal when observed by electron microscopy, although fibril diameters were smaller than the controls. TRAMP was found to partially reverse the inhibitory effects of urea and increased ionic strength on the kinetics of fibril formation, although inhibition by glucose was unaffected. TRAMP also accelerated the assembly of pepsin-treated collagen, where the non-helical, telopeptide regions were partially removed. Acceleration of collagen fibril formation by TRAMP is discussed in the light of the known effects of other extracellular matrix

  16. Propolis Modifies Collagen Types I and III Accumulation in the Matrix of Burnt Tissue.

    PubMed

    Olczyk, Pawel; Wisowski, Grzegorz; Komosinska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Stojko, Jerzy; Klimek, Katarzyna; Olczyk, Monika; Kozma, Ewa M

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing represents an interactive process which requires highly organized activity of various cells, synthesizing cytokines, growth factors, and collagen. Collagen types I and III, serving as structural and regulatory molecules, play pivotal roles during wound healing. The aim of this study was to compare the propolis and silver sulfadiazine therapeutic efficacy throughout the quantitative and qualitative assessment of collagen types I and III accumulation in the matrix of burnt tissues. Burn wounds were inflicted on pigs, chosen for the evaluation of wound repair because of many similarities between pig and human skin. Isolated collagen types I and III were estimated by the surface plasmon resonance method with a subsequent collagenous quantification using electrophoretic and densitometric analyses. Propolis burn treatment led to enhanced collagens and its components expression, especially during the initial stage of the study. Less expressed changes were observed after silver sulfadiazine (AgSD) application. AgSD and, with a smaller intensity, propolis stimulated accumulation of collagenous degradation products. The assessed propolis therapeutic efficacy, throughout quantitatively and qualitatively analyses of collagen types I and III expression and degradation in wounds matrix, may indicate that apitherapeutic agent can generate favorable biochemical environment supporting reepithelization. PMID:23781260

  17. Matrix metalloproteinase-11/stromelysin-3 exhibits collagenolytic function against collagen VI under normal and malignant conditions.

    PubMed

    Motrescu, E R; Blaise, S; Etique, N; Messaddeq, N; Chenard, M-P; Stoll, I; Tomasetto, C; Rio, M-C

    2008-10-23

    The substrate of matrix metalloproteinase 11 (MMP11) remains unknown. We have recently shown that MMP11 is a negative regulator of adipogenesis, able to reduce and even to revert mature adipocyte differentiation. Here, we have used mouse 3T3L1 cells and human U87MG and SaOS cells to show that MMP11 cleaves the native alpha3 chain of collagen VI, which is an adipocyte-related extracellular matrix component. It is known that extracellular proteolytic processing of this chain is required for correct collagen VI folding. Interestingly, MMP11-deficient fat tissue is less cohesive and exhibits collagen VI alteration, dramatic adipocyte plasma and basement membrane abnormalities and lipid leakage. MMP11 is thus required for correct collagen VI folding and therefore for fat tissue cohesion and adipocyte function. Both MMP11 and collagen VI favor tumor progression. Similar spatio-temporal overexpression at the adipocyte-cancer cell interface has been reported for the two proteins. MMP11-dependent collagen VI processing might therefore be expected to occur during malignancy. Accordingly, collagen VI no longer delineates adipocytes located at the invasive front of breast carcinomas. In conclusion, the native alpha3 chain of collagen VI constitutes a specific MMP11 substrate. This MMP11 collagenolytic activity is functional in fat tissue ontogenesis as well as during cancer invasive steps. PMID:18622425

  18. Abnormal Compartmentalization of Cartilage Matrix Components in Mice Lacking Collagen X: Implications for Function

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Kin Ming; Pang, Michael K.M.; Zhou, Sheila; Cowan, Soot Keng; Kong, Richard Y.C.; Pfordte, Tim; Olsen, Bjorn R.; Sillence, David O.; Tam, Patrick P.L.; Cheah, Kathryn S.E.

    1997-01-01

    There are conflicting views on whether collagen X is a purely structural molecule, or regulates bone mineralization during endochondral ossification. Mutations in the human collagen α1(X) gene (COL10A1) in Schmid metaphyseal chondrodysplasia (SMCD) suggest a supportive role. But mouse collagen α1(X) gene (Col10a1) null mutants were previously reported to show no obvious phenotypic change. We have generated collagen X deficient mice, which shows that deficiency does have phenotypic consequences which partly resemble SMCD, such as abnormal trabecular bone architecture. In particular, the mutant mice develop coxa vara, a phenotypic change common in human SMCD. Other consequences of the mutation are reduction in thickness of growth plate resting zone and articular cartilage, altered bone content, and atypical distribution of matrix components within growth plate cartilage. We propose that collagen X plays a role in the normal distribution of matrix vesicles and proteoglycans within the growth plate matrix. Collagen X deficiency impacts on the supporting properties of the growth plate and the mineralization process, resulting in abnormal trabecular bone. This hypothesis would accommodate the previously conflicting views of the function of collagen X and of the molecular pathogenesis of SMCD. PMID:9015315

  19. The exopolysaccharide matrix modulates the interaction between 3D architecture and virulence of a mixed-species oral biofilm.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jin; Klein, Marlise I; Falsetta, Megan L; Lu, Bingwen; Delahunty, Claire M; Yates, John R; Heydorn, Arne; Koo, Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Virulent biofilms are responsible for a range of infections, including oral diseases. All biofilms harbor a microbial-derived extracellular-matrix. The exopolysaccharides (EPS) formed on tooth-pellicle and bacterial surfaces provide binding sites for microorganisms; eventually the accumulated EPS enmeshes microbial cells. The metabolic activity of the bacteria within this matrix leads to acidification of the milieu. We explored the mechanisms through which the Streptococcus mutans-produced EPS-matrix modulates the three-dimensional (3D) architecture and the population shifts during morphogenesis of biofilms on a saliva-coated-apatitic surface using a mixed-bacterial species system. Concomitantly, we examined whether the matrix influences the development of pH-microenvironments within intact-biofilms using a novel 3D in situ pH-mapping technique. Data reveal that the production of the EPS-matrix helps to create spatial heterogeneities by forming an intricate network of exopolysaccharide-enmeshed bacterial-islets (microcolonies) through localized cell-to-matrix interactions. This complex 3D architecture creates compartmentalized acidic and EPS-rich microenvironments throughout the biofilm, which triggers the dominance of pathogenic S. mutans within a mixed-species system. The establishment of a 3D-matrix and EPS-enmeshed microcolonies were largely mediated by the S. mutans gtfB/gtfC genes, expression of which was enhanced in the presence of Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus oralis. Acidic pockets were found only in the interiors of bacterial-islets that are protected by EPS, which impedes rapid neutralization by buffer (pH 7.0). As a result, regions of low pH (<5.5) were detected at specific locations along the surface of attachment. Resistance to chlorhexidine was enhanced in cells within EPS-microcolony complexes compared to those outside such structures within the biofilm. Our results illustrate the critical interaction between matrix architecture and p

  20. The Exopolysaccharide Matrix Modulates the Interaction between 3D Architecture and Virulence of a Mixed-Species Oral Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jin; Klein, Marlise I.; Falsetta, Megan L.; Lu, Bingwen; Delahunty, Claire M.; Yates, John R.; Heydorn, Arne; Koo, Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Virulent biofilms are responsible for a range of infections, including oral diseases. All biofilms harbor a microbial-derived extracellular-matrix. The exopolysaccharides (EPS) formed on tooth-pellicle and bacterial surfaces provide binding sites for microorganisms; eventually the accumulated EPS enmeshes microbial cells. The metabolic activity of the bacteria within this matrix leads to acidification of the milieu. We explored the mechanisms through which the Streptococcus mutans-produced EPS-matrix modulates the three-dimensional (3D) architecture and the population shifts during morphogenesis of biofilms on a saliva-coated-apatitic surface using a mixed-bacterial species system. Concomitantly, we examined whether the matrix influences the development of pH-microenvironments within intact-biofilms using a novel 3D in situ pH-mapping technique. Data reveal that the production of the EPS-matrix helps to create spatial heterogeneities by forming an intricate network of exopolysaccharide-enmeshed bacterial-islets (microcolonies) through localized cell-to-matrix interactions. This complex 3D architecture creates compartmentalized acidic and EPS-rich microenvironments throughout the biofilm, which triggers the dominance of pathogenic S. mutans within a mixed-species system. The establishment of a 3D-matrix and EPS-enmeshed microcolonies were largely mediated by the S. mutans gtfB/gtfC genes, expression of which was enhanced in the presence of Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus oralis. Acidic pockets were found only in the interiors of bacterial-islets that are protected by EPS, which impedes rapid neutralization by buffer (pH 7.0). As a result, regions of low pH (<5.5) were detected at specific locations along the surface of attachment. Resistance to chlorhexidine was enhanced in cells within EPS-microcolony complexes compared to those outside such structures within the biofilm. Our results illustrate the critical interaction between matrix architecture and p

  1. Tooth periodontal ligament: Direct 3D microCT visualization of the collagen network and how the network changes when the tooth is loaded.

    PubMed

    Naveh, Gili R S; Brumfeld, Vlad; Shahar, Ron; Weiner, Steve

    2013-02-01

    The periodontal ligament (PDL), a soft tissue connecting the tooth and the bone, is essential for tooth movement, bone remodeling and force dissipation. A collagenous network that connects the tooth root surface to the alveolar jaw bone is one of the major components of the PDL. The organization of the collagenous component and how it changes under load is still poorly understood. Here using a state-of-the-art custom-made loading apparatus and a humidified environment inside a microCT, we visualize the PDL collagenous network of a fresh rat molar in 3D at 1 μm voxel size without any fixation or contrasting agents. We demonstrate that the PDL collagen network is organized in sheets. The spaces between sheets vary thus creating dense and sparse networks. Upon vertical loading, the sheets in both networks are stretched into well aligned arrays. The sparse network is located mainly in areas which undergo compressive loading as the tooth moves towards the bone, whereas the dense network functions mostly in tension as the tooth moves further from the bone. This new visualization method can be used to study other non-mineralized or partially mineralized tissues, and in particular those that are subjected to mechanical loads. The method will also be valuable for characterizing diseased tissues, as well as better understanding the phenotypic expressions of genetic mutants. PMID:23110851

  2. The Effects of Laser Irradiation of Cartilage on Chondrocyte Gene Expression and the Collagen Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Paul K.; Li, Chao; Da Costa, Victor; Sun, Chung-Ho; Bryant, Susan V.; Gardiner, David M.; Wong, Brian J.F.

    2014-01-01

    collagen matrix which likely allows chondrocyte recovery on an intact scaffold. PMID:19639619

  3. Collective epithelial cell invasion overcomes mechanical barriers of collagenous extracellular matrix by a narrow tube-like geometry and MMP14-dependent local softening†

    PubMed Central

    Alcaraz, Jordi; Mori, Hidetoshi; Ghajar, Cyrus M.; Brownfield, Doug; Galgoczy, Roland; Bissell, Mina J.

    2013-01-01

    Collective cell invasion (CCI) through interstitial collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucial to the initial stages of branching morphogenesis, and a hallmark of tissue repair and dissemination of certain tumors. The collagenous ECM acts as a mechanical barrier against CCI. However, the physical nature of this barrier and how it is overcome by cells remains incompletely understood. To address these questions, we performed theoretical and experimental analysis of mammary epithelial branching morphogenesis in 3D type I collagen (collagen-I) gels. We found that the mechanical resistance of collagen-I is largely due to its elastic rather than its viscous properties. We also identified two strategies utilized by mammary epithelial cells that can independently minimize ECM mechanical resistance during CCI. First, cells adopt a narrow tube-like geometry during invasion, which minimizes the elastic opposition from the ECM as revealed by theoretical modeling of the most frequent invasive shapes and sizes. Second, the stiffness of the collagenous ECM is reduced at invasive fronts due to its degradation by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), as indicated by direct measurements of collagen-I microelasticity by atomic force microscopy. Molecular techniques further specified that the membrane-bound MMP14 mediates degradation of collagen-I at invasive fronts. Thus, our findings reveal that MMP14 is necessary to efficiently reduce the physical restraints imposed by collagen-I during branching morphogenesis, and help our overall understanding of how forces are balanced between cells and their surrounding ECM to maintain collective geometry and mechanical stability during CCI. PMID:21993836

  4. The 3-D collagen structure of equine articular cartilage, characterized using variable-angle-of-incidence polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Gangnus, Sergei V.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2005-08-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography has been used to spatially map the birefringence of equine articular cartilage. Images obtained in the vicinity of visible osteoarthritic lesions display a characteristic disruption of the regular birefringence bands shown by normal cartilage. We also note that significant (e.g. ×2) variations in the apparent birefringence of samples taken from young (18 month) animals that otherwise appear visually homogeneous are found over spatial scales of a few millimeters. We suggest that whilst some of this variation may be due to changes in the intrinsic birefringence of the tissue, the 3-D orientation of the collagen fibers relative to the plane of the joint surface should also be taken into account. We propose a method based on multiple angles of illumination to determine the polar angle of the collagen fibers.

  5. Comparison of 3D reconstructive technologies used for morphometric research and the translation of knowledge using a decision matrix.

    PubMed

    Martin, Charys M; Roach, Victoria A; Nguyen, Ngan; Rice, Charles L; Wilson, Timothy D

    2013-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) models for education, pre-operative assessment, presurgical planning, and measurement have become more prevalent. With the increase in prevalence of 3D models there has also been an increase in 3D reconstructive software programs that are used to create these models. These software programs differ in reconstruction concepts, operating system requirements, user features, cost, and no one program has emerged as the standard. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic comparison of three widely available 3D reconstructive software programs, Amira(®), OsiriX, and Mimics(®) , with respect to the software's ability to be used in two broad themes: morphometric research and education to translate morphological knowledge. Cost, system requirements, and inherent features of each program were compared. A novel concept selection tool, a decision matrix, was used to objectify comparisons of usability of the interface, quality of the output, and efficiency of the tools. Findings indicate that Mimics was the best-suited program for construction of 3D anatomical models and morphometric analysis, but for creating a learning tool the results were less clear. OsiriX was very user-friendly; however, it had limited capabilities. Conversely, although Amira had endless potential and could create complex dynamic videos, it had a challenging interface. These results provide a resource for morphometric researchers and educators to assist the selection of appropriate reconstruction programs when starting a new 3D modeling project. PMID:23633266

  6. Electrical conduction mechanisms in PbSe and PbS nano crystals 3D matrix layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbell, Matan; Hechster, Elad; Sarusi, Gabby

    2016-02-01

    A simulation study and measurements of the electrical conductance in a PbSe and PbS spherical Nano-crystal 3D matrix layer was carried out focusing on its dependences of Nano-crystal size distribution and size gradient along the layer thickness (z-direction). The study suggests a new concept of conductance enhancement by utilizing a size gradient along the layer thickness from mono-layer to the next mono-layer of the Nano-crystals, in order to create a gradient of the energy levels and thus improve directional conductance in this direction. A Monte Carlo simulation of the charge carriers path along the layer thickness of the Nano-crystals 3D matrix using the Miller-Abrahams hopping model was performed. We then compared the conductance characteristics of the gradual size 3D matrix layer to a constant-sized 3D matrix layer that was used as a reference in the simulation. The numerical calculations provided us with insights into the actual conductance mechanism of the PbSe and PbS Nano-crystals 3D matrix and explained the discrepancies in actual conductance and the variability in measured mobilities published in the literature. It is found that the mobility and thus conductance are dependent on a critical electrical field generated between two adjacent nano-crystals. Our model explains the conductance dependents on the: Cathode-Anode distance, the distance between the adjacent nano-crystals in the 3D matrix layer and the size distribution along the current direction. Part of the model (current-voltage dependence) was validated using a current-voltage measurements taken on a constant size normal distribution nano-crystals PbS layer (330nm thick) compared with the predicted I-V curves. It is shown that under a threshold bias, the current is very low, while after above a threshold bias the conductance is significantly increased due to increase of hopping probability. Once reaching the maximum probability the current tend to level-off reaching the maximal conductance

  7. Laser nanostructuring 3-D bioconstruction based on carbon nanotubes in a water matrix of albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimenko, Alexander Y.; Ichkitidze, Levan P.; Podgaetsky, Vitaly M.; Savelyev, Mikhail S.; Selishchev, Sergey V.

    2016-04-01

    3-D bioconstructions were created using the evaporation method of the water-albumin solution with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by the continuous and pulsed femtosecond laser radiation. It is determined that the volume structure of the samples created by the femtosecond radiation has more cavities than the one created by the continuous radiation. The average diameter for multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) samples was almost two times higher (35-40 nm) than for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) samples (20-30 nm). The most homogenous 3-D bioconstruction was formed from MWCNTs by the continuous laser radiation. The hardness of such samples totaled up to 370 MPa at the nanoscale. High strength properties and the resistance of the 3-D bioconstructions produced by the laser irradiation depend on the volume nanotubes scaffold forming inside them. The scaffold was formed by the electric field of the directed laser irradiation. The covalent bond energy between the nanotube carbon molecule and the oxygen of the bovine serum albumin aminoacid residue amounts 580 kJ/mol. The 3-D bioconstructions based on MWCNTs and SWCNTs becomes overgrown with the cells (fibroblasts) over the course of 72 hours. The samples based on the both types of CNTs are not toxic for the cells and don't change its normal composition and structure. Thus the 3-D bioconstructions that are nanostructured by the pulsed and continuous laser radiation can be applied as implant materials for the recovery of the connecting tissues of the living body.

  8. Cell-secreted extracellular matrix formation and differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells in 3D alginate scaffolds with tunable properties.

    PubMed

    Guneta, Vipra; Loh, Qiu Li; Choong, Cleo

    2016-05-01

    Three dimensional (3D) alginate scaffolds with tunable mechanical and structural properties are explored for investigating the effect of the scaffold properties on stem cell behavior and extracellular matrix (ECM) formation. Varying concentrations of crosslinker (20 - 60%) are used to tune the stiffness, porosity, and the pore sizes of the scaffolds post-fabrication. Enhanced cell proliferation and adipogenesis occur in scaffolds with 3.52 ± 0.59 kPa stiffness, 87.54 ± 18.33% porosity and 68.33 ± 0.88 μm pore size. On the other hand, cells in scaffolds with stiffness greater than 11.61 ± 1.74 kPa, porosity less than 71.98 ± 6.25%, and pore size less than 64.15 ± 4.34 μm preferentially undergo osteogenesis. When cultured in differentiation media, adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) undergoing terminal adipogenesis in 20% firming buffer (FB) scaffolds and osteogenesis in 40% and 60% FB scaffolds show the highest secretion of collagen as compared to other groups of scaffolds. Overall, this study demonstrates the three-way relationship between 3D scaffolds, ECM composition, and stem cell differentiation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1090-1101, 2016. PMID:26749566

  9. Evaluation of cell binding to collagen and gelatin: a study of the effect of 2D and 3D architecture and surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Davidenko, Natalia; Schuster, Carlos F; Bax, Daniel V; Farndale, Richard W; Hamaia, Samir; Best, Serena M; Cameron, Ruth E

    2016-10-01

    Studies of cell attachment to collagen-based materials often ignore details of the binding mechanisms-be they integrin-mediated or non-specific. In this work, we have used collagen and gelatin-based substrates with different dimensional characteristics (monolayers, thin films and porous scaffolds) in order to establish the influence of composition, crosslinking (using carbodiimide) treatment and 2D or 3D architecture on integrin-mediated cell adhesion. By varying receptor expression, using cells with collagen-binding integrins (HT1080 and C2C12 L3 cell lines, expressing α2β1, and Rugli expressing α1β1) and a parent cell line C2C12 with gelatin-binding receptors (αvβ3 and α5β1), the nature of integrin binding sites was studied in order to explain the bioactivity of different protein formulations. We have shown that alteration of the chemical identity, conformation and availability of free binding motifs (GxOGER and RGD), resulting from addition of gelatin to collagen and crosslinking, have a profound effect on the ability of cells to adhere to these formulations. Carbodiimide crosslinking ablates integrin-dependent cell activity on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional architectures while the three-dimensional scaffold structure also leads to a high level of non-specific interactions remaining on three-dimensional samples even after a rigorous washing regime. This phenomenon, promoted by crosslinking, and attributed to cell entrapment, should be considered in any assessment of the biological activity of three-dimensional substrates. Spreading data confirm the importance of integrin-mediated cell engagement for further cell activity on collagen-based compositions. In this work, we provide a simple, but effective, means of deconvoluting the effects of chemistry and dimensional characteristics of a substrate, on the cell activity of protein-derived materials, which should assist in tailoring their biological properties for specific tissue engineering

  10. Mechanical forces regulate the interactions of fibronectin and collagen I in extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Kubow, Kristopher E.; Vukmirovic, Radmila; Zhe, Lin; Klotzsch, Enrico; Smith, Michael L.; Gourdon, Delphine; Luna, Sheila; Vogel, Viola

    2015-01-01

    Despite the crucial role of extracellular matrix (ECM) in directing cell fate in healthy and diseased tissues—particularly in development, wound healing, tissue regeneration and cancer—the mechanisms that direct the assembly and regulate hierarchical architectures of ECM are poorly understood. Collagen I matrix assembly in vivo requires active fibronectin (Fn) fibrillogenesis by cells. Here we exploit Fn-FRET probes as mechanical strain sensors and demonstrate that collagen I fibres preferentially co-localize with more-relaxed Fn fibrils in the ECM of fibroblasts in cell culture. Fibre stretch-assay studies reveal that collagen I's Fn-binding domain is responsible for the mechano-regulated interaction. Furthermore, we show that Fn-collagen interactions are reciprocal: relaxed Fn fibrils act as multivalent templates for collagen assembly, but once assembled, collagen fibres shield Fn fibres from being stretched by cellular traction forces. Thus, in addition to the well-recognized, force-regulated, cell-matrix interactions, forces also tune the interactions between different structural ECM components. PMID:26272817

  11. The role of the non-collagenous matrix in tendon function

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Birch, Helen L; Clegg, Peter D; Screen, Hazel RC

    2013-01-01

    Tendon consists of highly ordered type I collagen molecules that are grouped together to form subunits of increasing diameter. At each hierarchical level, the type I collagen is interspersed with a predominantly non-collagenous matrix (NCM) (Connect. Tissue Res., 6, 1978, 11). Whilst many studies have investigated the structure, organization and function of the collagenous matrix within tendon, relatively few have studied the non-collagenous components. However, there is a growing body of research suggesting the NCM plays an important role within tendon; adaptations to this matrix may confer the specific properties required by tendons with different functions. Furthermore, age-related alterations to non-collagenous proteins have been identified, which may affect tendon resistance to injury. This review focuses on the NCM within the tensional region of developing and mature tendon, discussing the current knowledge and identifying areas that require further study to fully understand structure–function relationships within tendon. This information will aid in the development of appropriate techniques for tendon injury prevention and treatment. PMID:23718692

  12. Epidermal Growth Factor–induced Enhancement of Glioblastoma Cell Migration in 3D Arises from an Intrinsic Increase in Speed But an Extrinsic Matrix- and Proteolysis-dependent Increase in Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Do; Guo, Tiffany W.; Wu, Angela P.; Wells, Alan; Gertler, Frank B.

    2008-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor-mediated cell migration plays a vital role in invasion of many tumor types. EGF receptor ligands increase invasiveness in vivo, but it remains unclear how consequent effects on intrinsic cell motility behavior versus effects on extrinsic matrix properties integrate to result in net increase of translational speed and/or directional persistence of migration in a 3D environment. Understanding this convolution is important for therapeutic targeting of tumor invasion, as key regulatory pathways for intrinsic versus extrinsic effects may not be coincident. Accordingly, we have undertaken a quantitative single-cell imaging study of glioblastoma cell movement in 3D matrices and on 2D substrata across a range of collagen densities with systematic variation of protease-mediated matrix degradation. In 3D, EGF induced a mild increase in cell speed and a strong increase in directional persistence, the latter depending heavily on matrix density and EGF-stimulated protease activity. In contrast, in 2D, EGF induced a similarly mild increase in speed but conversely a decrease in directional persistence (both independent of protease activity). Thus, the EGF-enhanced 3D tumor cell migration results only partially from cell-intrinsic effects, with override of cell-intrinsic persistence decrease by protease-mediated cell-extrinsic reduction of matrix steric hindrance. PMID:18632979

  13. The 3D structure of the collagen fibril network in human trabecular bone: relation to trabecular organization.

    PubMed

    Reznikov, Natalie; Chase, Hila; Brumfeld, Vlad; Shahar, Ron; Weiner, Steve

    2015-02-01

    Trabecular bone is morphologically and functionally different from compact bone at the tissue level, but both are composed of lamellae at the micrometer-scale level. We present a three-dimensional study of the collagenous network of human trabecular lamellar bone from the proximal femur using the FIB-SEM serial surface view method. The results are compared to human compact lamellar bone of the femoral shaft, studied by the same method. Both demineralized trabecular and compact lamellar bone display the same overall structural organization, namely the presence of ordered and disordered materials and the confinement of the canalicular network to the disordered material. However, in trabecular bone lamellae a significant proportion of the ordered collagen fibril arrays is aligned with the long axis of the trabecula and, unlike in compact bone, is not related to the anatomical axis of the whole femur. The remaining ordered collagen fibrils are offset from the axis of a trabecula either by about 30° or 70°. Interestingly, at the tissue scale of millimeters, the most abundant angles between any two connected trabeculae - the inter-trabecular angles - center around 30° and 70°. This implies that within a framework of interconnected trabeculae the same lamellar structure will always have a significant component of the fibrils aligned with the long axes of connected trabeculae. This structural complementarity at different hierarchical levels presumably reflects an adaptation of trabecular bone to function. PMID:25445457

  14. Extracellular matrix-mimetic poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels engineered to regulate smooth muscle cell proliferation in 3-D.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Marchant, Roger E; Zhu, Junmin; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this project is to engineer a defined, synthetic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel as a model system to investigate smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation in three-dimensions (3-D). To mimic the properties of extracellular matrix, both cell-adhesive peptide (GRGDSP) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) sensitive peptide (VPMSMRGG or GPQGIAGQ) were incorporated into the PEG macromer chain. Copolymerization of the biomimetic macromers results in the formation of bioactive hydrogels with the dual properties of cell adhesion and proteolytic degradation. Using these biomimetic scaffolds, the authors studied the effect of scaffold properties, including RGD concentration, MMP sensitivity, and network crosslinking density, as well as heparin as an exogenous factor on 3-D SMC proliferation. The results indicated that the incorporation of cell-adhesive ligand significantly enhanced SMC spreading and proliferation, with cell-adhesive ligand concentration mediating 3-D SMC proliferation in a biphasic manner. The faster degrading hydrogels promoted SMC proliferation and spreading. In addition, 3-D SMC proliferation was inhibited by increasing network crosslinking density and exogenous heparin treatment. These constructs are a good model system for studying the effect of hydrogel properties on SMC functions and show promise as a tissue engineering platform for vascular in vivo applications. PMID:25173839

  15. Effect of Collagen Nanotopography on Keloid Fibroblast Proliferation and Matrix Synthesis: Implications for Dermal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Muthusubramaniam, Lalitha; Zaitseva, Tatiana; Paukshto, Michael; Martin, George

    2014-01-01

    Keloids are locally exuberant dermal scars characterized by excessive fibroblast proliferation and matrix accumulation. Although treatment strategies include surgical removal and intralesional steroid injections, an effective regimen is yet to be established due to a high rate of recurrence. The regressing center and growing margin of the keloid have different collagen architecture and also differ in the rate of proliferation. To investigate whether proliferation is responsive to collagen topography, keloid, scar, and dermal fibroblasts were cultured on nanopatterned scaffolds varying in collagen fibril diameter and alignment-small and large diameter, aligned and random fibrils, and compared to cells grown on flat collagen-coated substrates, respectively. Cell morphology, proliferation, and expression of six genes related to proliferation (cyclin D1), phenotype (α-smooth muscle actin), and matrix synthesis (collagens I and III, and matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -2) were measured to evaluate cell response. Fibril alignment was shown to reduce proliferation and matrix synthesis in all three types of fibroblasts. Further, keloid cells were found to be most responsive to nanotopography. PMID:24724556

  16. Longitudinal, 3D Imaging of Collagen Remodeling in Murine Hypertrophic Scars In Vivo using Polarization-sensitive Optical Frequency Domain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lo, William C. Y.; Villiger, Martin; Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G. Felix; Khan, Saiqa; Lian, Christine G.; Austen, William G.; Yarmush, Martin; Bouma, Brett E.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS), frequently seen after traumatic injuries and surgery, remain a major clinical challenge due to the limited success of existing therapies. A significant obstacle to understanding HTS etiology is the lack of tools to monitor scar remodeling longitudinally and non-invasively. We present an in vivo, label-free technique using polarization-sensitive optical frequency domain imaging (PS-OFDI) for the 3D, longitudinal assessment of collagen remodeling in murine HTS. In this study, HTS was induced with a mechanical tension device for 4 to 10 days on incisional wounds and imaged up to one month after device removal; an excisional HTS model was also imaged at 6 months after injury to investigate deeper and more mature scars. We showed that local retardation (LR) and degree of polarization (DOP) provide a robust signature for HTS. Compared to normal skin with heterogeneous LR and low DOP, HTS was characterized by an initially low LR, which increased as collagen fibers remodeled, and a persistently high DOP. This study demonstrates that PS-OFDI offers a powerful tool to gain significant biological insights into HTS remodeling by enabling longitudinal assessment of collagen in vivo, which is critical to elucidating HTS etiology and developing more effective HTS therapies. PMID:26763427

  17. Longitudinal, 3D Imaging of Collagen Remodeling in Murine Hypertrophic Scars In Vivo Using Polarization-Sensitive Optical Frequency Domain Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lo, William C Y; Villiger, Martin; Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G Felix; Khan, Saiqa; Lian, Christine G; Austen, William G; Yarmush, Martin; Bouma, Brett E

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS), frequently seen after traumatic injuries and surgery, remain a major clinical challenge because of the limited success of existing therapies. A significant obstacle to understanding HTS etiology is the lack of tools to monitor scar remodeling longitudinally and noninvasively. We present an in vivo, label-free technique using polarization-sensitive optical frequency domain imaging for the 3D, longitudinal assessment of collagen remodeling in murine HTS. In this study, HTS was induced with a mechanical tension device for 4-10 days on incisional wounds and imaged up to 1 month after device removal; an excisional HTS model was also imaged at 6 months after injury to investigate deeper and more mature scars. We showed that local retardation and degree of polarization provide a robust signature for HTS. Compared with normal skin with heterogeneous local retardation and low degree of polarization, HTS was characterized by an initially low local retardation, which increased as collagen fibers remodeled, and a persistently high degree of polarization. This study demonstrates that polarization-sensitive optical frequency domain imaging offers a powerful tool to gain significant biological insights into HTS remodeling by enabling longitudinal assessment of collagen in vivo, which is critical to elucidating HTS etiology and developing more effective HTS therapies. PMID:26763427

  18. Candidate Cell and Matrix Interaction Domains on the Collagen Fibril, the Predominant Protein of Vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Shawn M.; Orgel, Joseph P.; Fertala, Andrzej; McAuliffe, Jon D.; Turner, Kevin R.; Di Lullo, Gloria A.; Chen, Steven; Antipova, Olga; Perumal, Shiamalee; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Forlinoi, Antonella; Cabral, Wayne A.; Barnes, Aileen M.; Marini, Joan C.; San Antonio, James D.

    2008-07-18

    Type I collagen, the predominant protein of vertebrates, polymerizes with type III and V collagens and non-collagenous molecules into large cable-like fibrils, yet how the fibril interacts with cells and other binding partners remains poorly understood. To help reveal insights into the collagen structure-function relationship, a data base was assembled including hundreds of type I collagen ligand binding sites and mutations on a two-dimensional model of the fibril. Visual examination of the distribution of functional sites, and statistical analysis of mutation distributions on the fibril suggest it is organized into two domains. The 'cell interaction domain' is proposed to regulate dynamic aspects of collagen biology, including integrin-mediated cell interactions and fibril remodeling. The 'matrix interaction domain' may assume a structural role, mediating collagen cross-linking, proteoglycan interactions, and tissue mineralization. Molecular modeling was used to superimpose the positions of functional sites and mutations from the two-dimensional fibril map onto a three-dimensional x-ray diffraction structure of the collagen microfibril in situ, indicating the existence of domains in the native fibril. Sequence searches revealed that major fibril domain elements are conserved in type I collagens through evolution and in the type II/XI collagen fibril predominant in cartilage. Moreover, the fibril domain model provides potential insights into the genotype-phenotype relationship for several classes of human connective tissue diseases, mechanisms of integrin clustering by fibrils, the polarity of fibril assembly, heterotypic fibril function, and connective tissue pathology in diabetes and aging.

  19. 3D self-consistent modeling of a matrix source of negative hydrogen ions.

    PubMed

    Tarnev, Kh; Demerdjiev, A; Shivarova, A; Lishev, St

    2016-02-01

    The paper is in the scope of studies on the rf driving of a matrix source of negative hydrogen ions: a matrix of small radius discharges with planar-coil inductive driving and single aperture extraction from each discharge. The results from a three-dimensional model, in which plasma description is coupled to electrodynamics, confirm former conclusion that a single coil driving of the whole matrix by a zigzag coil with an omega-shaped conductor on the bottom of each discharge tube ensures efficient rf power deposition to the plasma. The latter is due to similarities with the rf driving of a single discharge by a single planar coil, shown by the obtained induced current and spatial distribution of the plasma parameters. Distinctions associated with the coil configuration as a single coil for the whole matrix are also discussed. PMID:26932005

  20. Cervical collagen imaging for determining preterm labor risks using a colposcope with full Mueller matrix capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoff, Susan; Chue-Sang, Joseph; Holness, Nola A.; Gandjbakhche, Amir; Chernomordik, Viktor; Ramella-Roman, Jessica

    2016-02-01

    Preterm birth is a worldwide health issue, as the number one cause of infant mortality and neurological disorders. Although affecting nearly 10% of all births, an accurate, reliable diagnostic method for preterm birth has, yet, to be developed. The primary constituent of the cervix, collagen, provides the structural support and mechanical strength to maintain cervical closure, through specific organization, during fetal gestation. As pregnancy progresses, the disorganization of the cervical collagen occurs to allow eventual cervical pliability so the baby can be birthed through the cervical opening. This disorganization of collagen affects the mechanical properties of the cervix and, if the changes occur prematurely, may be a significant factor leading to preterm birth. The organization of collagen can be analyzed through the use of Mueller Matrix Polarimetric imaging of the characteristic birefringence of collagen. In this research, we have built a full Mueller Matrix Polarimetry attachment to a standard colposcope to enable imaging of human cervixes during standard prenatal exams at various stages of fetal gestation. Analysis of the polarimetric images provides information of quantity and organization of cervical collagen at specific gestational stages of pregnancy. This quantitative information may provide an indication of risk of preterm birth.

  1. The promotion of hepatic maturation of human pluripotent stem cells in 3D co-culture using type I collagen and Swiss 3T3 cell sheets.

    PubMed

    Nagamoto, Yasuhito; Tashiro, Katsuhisa; Takayama, Kazuo; Ohashi, Kazuo; Kawabata, Kenji; Sakurai, Fuminori; Tachibana, Masashi; Hayakawa, Takao; Furue, Miho Kusuda; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2012-06-01

    Hepatocyte-like cells differentiated from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are known to be a useful cell source for drug screening. We recently developed an efficient hepatic differentiation method from hESCs and hiPSCs by sequential transduction of FOXA2 and HNF1α. It is known that the combination of three-dimensional (3D) culture and co-culture, namely 3D co-culture, can maintain the functions of primary hepatocytes. However, hepatic maturation of hESC- or hiPSC-derived hepatocyte-like cells (hEHs or hiPHs, respectively) by 3D co-culture systems has not been examined. Therefore, we utilized a cell sheet engineering technology to promote hepatic maturation. The gene expression levels of hepatocyte-related markers (such as cytochrome P450 enzymes and conjugating enzymes) and the amount of albumin secretion in the hEHs or hiPHs, which were 3D co-cultured with the Swiss 3T3 cell sheet, were significantly up-regulated in comparison with those in the hEHs or hiPHs cultured in a monolayer. Furthermore, we found that type I collagen synthesized in Swiss 3T3 cells plays an important role in hepatic maturation. The hEHs or hiPHs that were 3D co-cultured with the Swiss 3T3 cell sheet would be powerful tools for medical applications, such as drug screening. PMID:22445253

  2. Electrospun polyvinyl alcohol-collagen-hydroxyapatite nanofibers: a biomimetic extracellular matrix for osteoblastic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Markel, David C.; Wang, Sunxi; Shi, Tong; Mao, Guangzhao; Ren, Weiping

    2012-03-01

    The failure of prosthesis after total joint replacement is due to the lack of early implant osseointegration. In this study polyvinyl alcohol-collagen-hydroxyapatite (PVA-Col-HA) electrospun nanofibrous meshes were fabricated as a biomimetic bone-like extracellular matrix for the modification of orthopedic prosthetic surfaces. In order to reinforce the PVA nanofibers, HA nanorods and Type I collagen were incorporated into the nanofibers. We investigated the morphology, biodegradability, mechanical properties and biocompatibility of the prepared nanofibers. Our results showed these inorganic-organic blended nanofibers to be degradable in vitro. The encapsulated nano-HA and collagen interacted with the PVA content, reinforcing the hydrolytic resistance and mechanical properties of nanofibers that provided longer lasting stability. The encapsulated nano-HA and collagen also enhanced the adhesion and proliferation of murine bone cells (MC3T3) in vitro. We propose the PVA-Col-HA nanofibers might be promising modifying materials on implant surfaces for orthopedic applications.

  3. Using a decellularized splenic matrix as a 3D scaffold for hepatocyte cultivation in vitro: a preliminary trial.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xing-Long; Xiang, Jun-Xi; Wu, Wan-Quan; Wang, Bo; Liu, Wen-Yan; Gao, Rui; Dong, Ding-Hui; Lv, Yi

    2015-08-01

    Using a decellularized liver matrix (DLM) to reengineer liver tissue is a promising therapy for end-stage liver disease. However, the limited supply of donor organs still hampers its potential clinical application, while a xenogenic decellularized matrix may bring a risk of zoonosis and immunological rejection. Therefore, an appropriate alternative scaffold is needed. In this research, we established a decellularized splenic matrix (DSM) in a rodent model, which preserved the 3D ultrastructure, the components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the native vascular network. The DSM and DLM had similar components of ECM, and similar mechanical properties. Hepatocytes were seeded to the DSM and DLM for dynamic culturing up to 6 d, and distributed both in decellularized sinusoidal spaces and around the vessels. The TUNEL-positive cell percentage in a dynamic culturing decellularized splenic matrix (dDSM) was 10.7%  ±  3.6% at 3d and 25.8%  ±  5.6% at 5d, although 14.2%  ±  4.5% and 24.8%  ±  2.9%, respectively, in a dynamic culturing decellularized liver matrix (dDLM) at the same time point (p  >  0.05). Primary hepatocytes in the dDSM and dDLM expressed albumin, G6pc and Ugt1a1. The gene expression of Cyp2b1, Cyp1a2 and HNF1α in the gene transcription level revealed hepatocytes had lower gene expression levels in the dDSM compared with the dDLM at 3d, but better than those in a sandwich culture. The cumulative albumin production at 6 d of culture was 80.7   ±   9.6 μg per million cells in the dDSM and 89.6   ±   4.6 μg per million cells in the dDLM (p  >  0.05). In summary, the DSM is a promising 3D scaffold for hepatocyte cultivation in vitro. PMID:26290516

  4. The extracellular matrix of hydra is a porous sheet and contains type IV collagen.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroshi; Aufschnaiter, Roland; Li, Li; Sarras, Michael P; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Abrahamson, Dale R; Sado, Yoshikazu; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2008-01-01

    Hydra, as an early diploblastic metazoan, has a well-defined extracellular matrix (ECM) called mesoglea. It is organized in a tri-laminar pattern with one centrally located interstitial matrix that contains type I collagen and two sub-epithelial zones that resemble a basal lamina containing laminin and possibly type IV collagen. This study used monoclonal antibodies to the three hydra mesoglea components (type I, type IV collagens and laminin) and immunofluorescent staining to visualize hydra mesoglea structure and the relationship between these mesoglea components. In addition, hydra mesoglea was isolated free of cells and studied with immunofluorescence and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Our results show that type IV collagen co-localizes with laminin in the basal lamina whereas type I collagen forms a grid pattern of fibers in the interstitial matrix. The isolated mesoglea can maintain its structural stability without epithelial cell attachment. Hydra mesoglea is porous with multiple trans-mesoglea pores ranging from 0.5 to 1 microm in diameter and about six pores per 100 microm(2) in density. We think these trans-mesoglea pores provide a structural base for epithelial cells on both sides to form multiple trans-mesoglea cell-cell contacts. Based on these findings, we propose a new model of hydra mesoglea structure. PMID:18602803

  5. The extracellular matrix of hydra is a porous sheet and contains type IV collagen

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Hiroshi; Aufschnaiter, Roland; Li, Li; Sarras, Michael P.; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Abrahamson, Dale R.; Sado, Yoshikazu; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2008-01-01

    Hydra, as an early diploblastic metazoan, has a well defined extracellular matrix (ECM) called-mesoglea. It is organized in a tri-laminar pattern with one centrally located interstitial matrix that contains type I collagen and two sub-epithelial zones that resemble a basal lamina containing laminin and possibly type IV collagen. This study used monoclonal antibodies to the three hydra mesoglea components (type I, type IV collagens and laminin) and immunofluorescent staining to visualize hydra mesoglea structure and the relationship between these mesoglea components. In addition, hydra mesoglea was isolated free of cells and studied with immunofluorescence and SEM. Our results show that type IV collagen co-localizes with laminin in the basal lamina whereas type I collagen forms a grid pattern of fibers in the interstitial matrix. The isolated-mesoglea can maintain its structural stability without epithelial cell attachment. Hydra mesogleais porous with multiple trans-mesoglea pores ranging from 0.5 to 1 µm in diameter and about 6 pores per 100 µm2 in density. We think these trans-mesoglea pores provide a structural base for epithelial cells on both sides to form multiple trans-mesoglea cell-cell contacts. Based on these findings, we propose a new model of hydra mesoglea structure. PMID:18602803

  6. Variable angle-of-incidence polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography: its use to study the 3D collagen structure of equine articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Gangnus, Sergei V.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2006-02-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography has been used to spatially map the birefringence of equine articular cartilage. The polar orientation of the collagen fibers relative to the plane of the joint surface must be taken into account if a quantitative measurement of true birefringence is required. Using a series of images taken at different angles of illumination, we determine the fiber polar angle and true birefringence at one site on a sample of equine cartilage, on the assumption that the fibers lie within the plane of imaging. We propose a more general method based on the extended Jones matrix formalism to determine both the polar and azimuthal orientation of the collagen fibers as well as the true birefringence as functions of depth.

  7. Magnetic properties of 3D nanocomposites consisting of an opal matrix with embedded spinel ferrite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinkevich, A. B.; Korolev, A. V.; Samoylovich, M. I.; Kleshcheva, S. M.; Perov, D. V.

    2016-02-01

    The magnetic properties of 3D nanocomposites representing Mn-Zn, Ni-Zn, Co-Zn, La-Co-Zn, and Nd-Co-Zn spinel ferrite particles embedded in the interspherical spaces of opal matrices are studied. Experimental data are obtained in the temperature interval 2-300 K by measuring the magnetization at a static magnetic field strength of up to 50 kOe and the ac magnetic susceptibility at an alternating magnetic field amplitude of 4 kOe and a frequency of 80 Hz.

  8. Cyclic mechanical strain induces TGFβ1-signalling in dermal fibroblasts embedded in a 3D collagen lattice.

    PubMed

    Peters, Andreas S; Brunner, Georg; Krieg, Thomas; Eckes, Beate

    2015-03-01

    Many tissues are constantly exposed to mechanical stress, e.g. shear stress in vascular endothelium, compression forces in cartilage or tensile strain in the skin. Dermal fibroblasts can differentiate into contractile myofibroblasts in a process requiring the presence of TGFβ1 in addition to mechanical load. We aimed at investigating the effect of cyclic mechanical strain on dermal fibroblasts grown in a three-dimensional environment. Therefore, murine dermal fibroblasts were cultured in collagen gels and subjected to cyclic tension at a frequency of 0.1 Hz (6 cycles/min) with a maximal increase in surface area of 10 % for 24 h. This treatment resulted in a significant increase in active TGFβ1 levels, leaving the amount of total TGFβ1 unaffected. TGFβ1 activation led to pSMAD2-mediated transcriptional elevation of downstream mediators, such as CTGF, and an auto-induction of TGFβ1, respectively. PMID:25348252

  9. Blueberry consumption prevents loss of collagen in bone matrix and inhibits senescence pathways in osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Lazarenko, Oxana P; Blackburn, Michael L; Badger, Thomas M; Ronis, Martin J J; Chen, Jin-Ran

    2013-06-01

    Ovariectomy (OVX)-induced bone loss has been linked to increased bone turnover and higher bone matrix collagen degradation as the result of osteoclast activation. However, the role of degraded collagen matrix in the fate of resident bone-forming cells is unclear. In this report, we show that OVX-induced bone loss is associated with profound decreases in collagen 1 and Sirt1. This was accompanied by increases in expression and activity of the senescence marker collagenase and expression of p16/p21 in bone. Feeding a diet supplemented with blueberries (BB) to pre-pubertal rats throughout development or only prior to puberty [postnatal day 21 (PND21) to PND34] prevents OVX-induced effects on expression of these molecules at PND68. In order to provide more evidence and gain a better understanding on the association between bone collagen matrix and resident bone cell fate, in vitro studies on the cellular senescence pathway using primary calvarial cells and three cell lines (ST2 cells, OB6, and MLO-Y4) were conducted. We found that senescence was inhibited by collagen in a dose-response manner. Treatment of cells with serum from OVX rats accelerated osteoblastic cell senescence pathways, but serum from BB-fed OVX rats had no effect. In the presence of low collagen or treatment with OVX rat serum, ST2 cells exhibited higher potential to differentiate into adipocytes. Finally, we demonstrated that bone cell senescence is associated with decreased Sirt1 expression and activated p53, p16, and p21. These results suggest that (1) a significant prevention of OVX-induced bone cell senescence from adult rats can occur after only 14 days consumption of a BB-containing diet immediately prior to puberty, and (2) the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect involves, at least in part, prevention of collagen degradation. PMID:22555620

  10. 3D ToF-SIMS Analysis of Peptide Incorporation into MALDI Matrix Crystals with Sub-micrometer Resolution.

    PubMed

    Körsgen, Martin; Pelster, Andreas; Dreisewerd, Klaus; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F

    2016-02-01

    The analytical sensitivity in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is largely affected by the specific analyte-matrix interaction, in particular by the possible incorporation of the analytes into crystalline MALDI matrices. Here we used time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to visualize the incorporation of three peptides with different hydrophobicities, bradykinin, Substance P, and vasopressin, into two classic MALDI matrices, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCCA). For depth profiling, an Ar cluster ion beam was used to gradually sputter through the matrix crystals without causing significant degradation of matrix or biomolecules. A pulsed Bi3 ion cluster beam was used to image the lateral analyte distribution in the center of the sputter crater. Using this dual beam technique, the 3D distribution of the analytes and spatial segregation effects within the matrix crystals were imaged with sub-μm resolution. The technique could in the future enable matrix-enhanced (ME)-ToF-SIMS imaging of peptides in tissue slices at ultra-high resolution. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26419771

  11. 3D ToF-SIMS Analysis of Peptide Incorporation into MALDI Matrix Crystals with Sub-micrometer Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körsgen, Martin; Pelster, Andreas; Dreisewerd, Klaus; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F.

    2016-02-01

    The analytical sensitivity in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is largely affected by the specific analyte-matrix interaction, in particular by the possible incorporation of the analytes into crystalline MALDI matrices. Here we used time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to visualize the incorporation of three peptides with different hydrophobicities, bradykinin, Substance P, and vasopressin, into two classic MALDI matrices, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCCA). For depth profiling, an Ar cluster ion beam was used to gradually sputter through the matrix crystals without causing significant degradation of matrix or biomolecules. A pulsed Bi3 ion cluster beam was used to image the lateral analyte distribution in the center of the sputter crater. Using this dual beam technique, the 3D distribution of the analytes and spatial segregation effects within the matrix crystals were imaged with sub-μm resolution. The technique could in the future enable matrix-enhanced (ME)-ToF-SIMS imaging of peptides in tissue slices at ultra-high resolution.

  12. Evaluation of Non-Watertight Dural Reconstruction with Collagen Matrix Onlay Graft in Posterior Fossa Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Bjorn; Lim, Joshua; Sade, Burak; Oya, Soichi; Lee, Joung H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Many surgeons advocate for watertight dural reconstruction after posterior fossa surgery given the significant risk of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. Little evidence exists for posterior fossa dural reconstruction utilizing monolayer collagen matrix onlay graft in a non-watertight fashion. Our objective was to report the results of using collagen matrix in a non-watertight fashion for posterior fossa dural reconstruction. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of operations performed by the senior author from 2004–2011 identified collagen matrix (DuraGen) use in 84 posterior fossa operations. Wound complications such as CSF leak, infection, pseudomeningocele, and aseptic meningitis were noted. Fisher's exact test was performed to assess risk factor association with specific complications. Results Incisional CSF leak rate was 8.3% and non-incisional CSF leak rate was 3.6%. Incidence of aseptic meningitis was 7.1% and all cases resolved with steroids alone. Incidence of palpable and symptomatic pseudomeningocele in follow-up was 10.7% and 3.6% respectively. Postoperative infection rate was 4.8%. Previous surgery was associated with pseudomeningocele development (p<0.05). Conclusion When primary dural closure after posterior fossa surgery is undesirable or not feasible, non-watertight dural reconstruction with collagen matrix resulted in incisional CSF leak in 8.3%. Incidence of pseudomeningocele, aseptic meningitis, and wound infection were within acceptable range. Data from this study may be used to compare alternative methods of dural reconstruction in posterior fossa surgery. PMID:26885286

  13. Fibroblast-derived 3D matrix differentially regulates the growth and drug-responsiveness of human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Acacia; Golemis, Erica A.; Cukierman, Edna

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the importance of cellular microenvironment in modulating cell growth and signaling. In vitro, collagen matrices, Matrigel, and other synthetic support systems have been used to simulate in vivo microenvironments, and epithelial cells grown in these matrices manifest significant differences in proliferation, differentiation, response to drugs, and other parameters. However, these substrates do not closely resemble the mesenchymal microenvironment that is typically associated with advanced carcinomas in vivo, which is produced to a large extent by fibroblasts. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of a fibroblast-derived three-dimensional matrix to regulate the growth of a panel of 11 human tumor epithelial cell lines. Although proliferative and morphological responses to three-dimensional cues segregated independently, general responsiveness to the matrix correlated with the ability of matrix to influence drug responses. Fibroblast-derived three-dimensional matrix increased β1-integrin-dependent survival of a subset of human cancer cell lines during taxol treatment, while it sensitized or minimally influenced survival of other cells. β1-integrin-dependent changes in cell resistance to taxol did not correlate with degree of modulation of FAK and Akt, implying additional signaling factors are involved. Based on these results, we propose these matrices potentially have value as in vitro drug screening platforms. PMID:18411046

  14. Experimental studies of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles doped silica matrix 3D magneto-photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Diwan, E.; Royer, F.; Kekesi, R.; Jamon, D.; Blanc-Mignon, M. F.; Neveu, S.; Rousseau, J. J.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present the synthesis and the optical properties of 3D magneto-photonic structures. The elaboration process consists in firstly preparing then infiltrating polystyrene direct opals with a homogeneous solution of sol-gel silica precursors doped by cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, and finally dissolving the polystyrene spheres. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images of the prepared samples clearly evidence a periodic arrangement. Using a home-made polarimetric optical bench, the transmittance as a function of the wavelength, the Faraday rotation as a function of the applied magnetic field, and the Faraday ellipticity as a function of the wavelength and as a function of the applied magnetic field were measured. The existence of deep photonic band gaps (PBG), the unambiguous magnetic character of the samples and the qualitative modification of the Faraday ellipticity in the area of the PBG are evidenced.

  15. Multi-ray-based system matrix generation for 3D PET reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Moehrs, Sascha; Defrise, Michel; Belcari, Nicola; Guerra, Alberto Del; Bartoli, Antonietta; Fabbri, Serena; Zanetti, Gianluigi

    2008-12-01

    Iterative image reconstruction algorithms for positron emission tomography (PET) require a sophisticated system matrix (model) of the scanner. Our aim is to set up such a model offline for the YAP-(S)PET II small animal imaging tomograph in order to use it subsequently with standard ML-EM (maximum-likelihood expectation maximization) and OSEM (ordered subset expectation maximization) for fully three-dimensional image reconstruction. In general, the system model can be obtained analytically, via measurements or via Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper, we present the multi-ray method, which can be considered as a hybrid method to set up the system model offline. It incorporates accurate analytical (geometric) considerations as well as crystal depth and crystal scatter effects. At the same time, it has the potential to model seamlessly other physical aspects such as the positron range. The proposed method is based on multiple rays which are traced from/to the detector crystals through the image volume. Such a ray-tracing approach itself is not new; however, we derive a novel mathematical formulation of the approach and investigate the positioning of the integration (ray-end) points. First, we study single system matrix entries and show that the positioning and weighting of the ray-end points according to Gaussian integration give better results compared to equally spaced integration points (trapezoidal integration), especially if only a small number of integration points (rays) are used. Additionally, we show that, for a given variance of the single matrix entries, the number of rays (events) required to calculate the whole matrix is a factor of 20 larger when using a pure Monte-Carlo-based method. Finally, we analyse the quality of the model by reconstructing phantom data from the YAP-(S)PET II scanner. PMID:19001696

  16. A 3D-1D substitution matrix for protein fold recognition that includes predicted secondary structure of the sequence.

    PubMed

    Rice, D W; Eisenberg, D

    1997-04-11

    In protein fold recognition, a probe amino acid sequence is compared to a library of representative folds of known structure to identify a structural homolog. In cases where the probe and its homolog have clear sequence similarity, traditional residue substitution matrices have been used to predict the structural similarity. In cases where the probe is sequentially distant from its homolog, we have developed a (7 x 3 x 2 x 7 x 3) 3D-1D substitution matrix (called H3P2), calculated from a database of 119 structural pairs. Members of each pair share a similar fold, but have sequence identity less than 30%. Each probe sequence position is defined by one of seven residue classes and three secondary structure classes. Each homologous fold position is defined by one of seven residue classes, three secondary structure classes, and two burial classes. Thus the matrix is five-dimensional and contains 7 x 3 x 2 x 7 x 3 = 882 elements or 3D-1D scores. The first step in assigning a probe sequence to its homologous fold is the prediction of the three-state (helix, strand, coil) secondary structure of the probe; here we use the profile based neural network prediction of secondary structure (PHD) program. Then a dynamic programming algorithm uses the H3P2 matrix to align the probe sequence with structures in a representative fold library. To test the effectiveness of the H3P2 matrix a challenging, fold class diverse, and cross-validated benchmark assessment is used to compare the H3P2 matrix to the GONNET, PAM250, BLOSUM62 and a secondary structure only substitution matrix. For distantly related sequences the H3P2 matrix detects more homologous structures at higher reliabilities than do these other substitution matrices, based on sensitivity versus specificity plots (or SENS-SPEC plots). The added efficacy of the H3P2 matrix arises from its information on the statistical preferences for various sequence-structure environment combinations from very distantly related proteins. It

  17. FERM3D: A finite element R-matrix electron molecule scattering code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonzani, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    FERM3D is a three-dimensional finite element program, for the elastic scattering of a low energy electron from a general polyatomic molecule, which is converted to a potential scattering problem. The code is based on tricubic polynomials in spherical coordinates. The electron-molecule interaction is treated as a sum of three terms: electrostatic, exchange, and polarization. The electrostatic term can be extracted directly from ab initio codes ( GAUSSIAN 98 in the work described here), while the exchange term is approximated using a local density functional. A local polarization potential based on density functional theory [C. Lee, W. Yang, R.G. Parr, Phys. Rev. B 37 (1988) 785] describes the long range attraction to the molecular target induced by the scattering electron. Photoionization calculations are also possible and illustrated in the present work. The generality and simplicity of the approach is important in extending electron-scattering calculations to more complex targets than it is possible with other methods. Program summaryTitle of program:FERM3D Catalogue identifier:ADYL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYL_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested:Intel Xeon, AMD Opteron 64 bit, Compaq Alpha Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested:HP Tru64 Unix v5.1, Red Hat Linux Enterprise 3 Programming language used:Fortran 90 Memory required to execute with typical data:900 MB (neutral CO 2), 2.3 GB (ionic CO 2), 1.4 GB (benzene) No. of bits in a word:32 No. of processors used:1 Has the code been vectorized?:No No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:58 383 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:561 653 Distribution format:tar.gzip file CPC Program library subprograms used:ADDA, ACDP Nature of physical problem:Scattering of an

  18. Fibronectin provides a conduit for fibroblast transmigration from collagenous stroma into fibrin clot provisional matrix.

    PubMed

    Greiling, D; Clark, R A

    1997-04-01

    After injury, the wound space is filled with a fibrin/fibronectin clot containing growth factors released by platelets and monocytes. In response to these factors, fibroblasts migrate into the fibrin clot and contribute to the formation of granulation tissue. The functional mechanisms allowing fibroblasts to leave the collagenous matrix of normal connective tissue and invade the provisional matrix of the fibrin clot have not been fully defined. To investigate these mechanisms we established a new in vitro model which simulates specific aspects of early wound healing, that is, the migration of fibroblasts from a three-dimensional collagen matrix into a fibrin clot. This transmigration could be induced by physiological concentrations of platelet releasate or platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) in a concentration-dependent manner. At 24 hours irradiated fibroblasts invaded the fibrin gel almost as well as non-irradiated cells, indicating that transmigration was independent of proliferation. Plasminogen and its activators appear to be necessary for invasion of the fibrin clot since protease inhibitors decreased the amount of migration. These serine proteases, however, were not necessary for exit from the collagen gel as fibroblasts migrated out of the collagen gel onto a surface coated with fibrin fibrils even in the presence of inhibitors. Removal of fibronectin (FN) from either the collagen gel or the fibrin gel markedly decreased the number of migrating cells, suggesting that FN provides a conduit for transmigration. Cell movement in the in vitro model was inhibited by RGD peptide, and by monoclonal antibodies against the subunits of the alpha5 beta1 and alpha v beta3 integrin receptor. Thus, the functional requirements for fibroblast transmigration from collagen-rich to fibrin-rich matrices, such as occurs in early wound healing, have been partially defined using an in vitro paradigm of this important biologic process. PMID:9133673

  19. A Collagen-based Scaffold Delivering Exogenous MicroRNA-29B to Modulate Extracellular Matrix Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Michael; Browne, Shane; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Pandit, Abhay

    2014-01-01

    Directing appropriate extracellular matrix remodeling is a key aim of regenerative medicine strategies. Thus, antifibrotic interfering RNA (RNAi) therapy with exogenous microRNA (miR)-29B was proposed as a method to modulate extracellular matrix remodeling following cutaneous injury. It was hypothesized that delivery of miR-29B from a collagen scaffold will efficiently modulate the extracellular matrix remodeling response and reduce maladaptive remodeling such as aggressive deposition of collagen type I after injury. The release of RNA from the scaffold was assessed and its ability to silence collagen type I and collagen type III expression was evaluated in vitro. When primary fibroblasts were cultured with scaffolds doped with miR-29B, reduced levels of collagen type I and collagen type III mRNA expression were observed for up to 2 weeks of culture. When the scaffolds were applied to full thickness wounds in vivo, reduced wound contraction, improved collagen type III/I ratios and a significantly higher matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-8: tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 ratio were detected when the scaffolds were functionalized with miR-29B. Furthermore, these effects were significantly influenced by the dose of miR-29B in the collagen scaffold (0.5 versus 5 μg). This study shows a potential of combining exogenous miRs with collagen scaffolds to improve extracellular matrix remodeling following injury. PMID:24402185

  20. Biosynthesis of collagen and other matrix proteins by articular cartilage in experimental osteoarthrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, D R; McDevitt, C A; Billingham, M E; Muir, H

    1980-01-01

    Osteoarthrosis was induced in one knee joint of dogs by an established surgical procedure. Changes in the articular cartilage in the biosynthesis of collagen and other proteins were sought by radiochemical labelling in vivo, with the following findings. (1) Collagen synthesis was stimulated in all cartilage surfaces of the experimental joints at 2, 8 and 24 weeks after surgery. Systemic labelling with [3H]proline showed that over 10 times more collagen was being deposited per dry weight of experimental cartilage compared with control cartilage in the unoperated knee. (2) Type-II collagen was the radiolabelled product in all samples of experimental cartilage ranging in quality from undamaged to overtly fibrillated, and was the only collagen detected chemically in the matrix of osteoarthrotic cartilage from either dog or human joints. (3) Hydroxylysine glycosylation was examined in the newly synthesized cartilage collagen by labelling dog joints in vivo with [3H]lysine. In experimental knees the new collagen was less glycosylated than in controls. However, no difference in glycosylation of the total collagen in the tissues was observed by chemical analysis. (4) Over half the protein-bound tritium was extracted by 4 M-guanidinium chloride from control cartilage labelled with [3H]proline, compared with one-quarter or less from experimental cartilage. Two-thirds of the extracted tritium separated in the upper fraction on density-gradient centrifugation in CsCl under associative conditions. Much of this ran with a single protein band on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions. The identity of this protein was unknown, although it resembled serum albumin in mobility afte disulphide-bond cleavage. Images Fig. 3. PMID:7470037

  1. Cellular Response to a Novel Fetal Acellular Collagen Matrix: Implications for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rennert, Robert C.; Garg, Ravi K.; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. PriMatrix (TEI Biosciences Inc., Boston, MA, USA) is a novel acellular collagen matrix derived from fetal bovine dermis that is designed for use in partial- and full-thickness wounds. This study analyzes the cellular response to PriMatrix in vivo, as well as the ability of this matrix to facilitate normal tissue regeneration. Methods. Five by five mm squares of rehydrated PriMatrix were implanted in a subcutaneous fashion on the dorsum of wild-type mice. Implant site tissue was harvested for histology, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and flow cytometric analyses at multiple time points until day 28. Results. PriMatrix implants were found to go through a biological progression initiated by a transient infiltrate of inflammatory cells, followed by mesenchymal cell recruitment and vascular development. IHC analysis revealed that the majority of the implanted fetal dermal collagen fibers persisted through day 28 but underwent remodeling and cellular repopulation to form tissue with a density and morphology consistent with healthy dermis. Conclusions. PriMatrix implants undergo progressive in vivo remodeling, facilitating the regeneration of histologically normal tissue through a mild inflammatory and progenitor cell response. Regeneration of normal tissue is especially important in a wound environment, and these findings warrant further investigation of PriMatrix in this setting. PMID:23970899

  2. Multi-scale Characterisation of the 3D Microstructure of a Thermally-Shocked Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Bodey, Andrew J; Sui, Tan; Kockelmann, Winfried; Rau, Christoph; Korsunsky, Alexander M; Mi, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    Bulk metallic glass matrix composites (BMGMCs) are a new class of metal alloys which have significantly increased ductility and impact toughness, resulting from the ductile crystalline phases distributed uniformly within the amorphous matrix. However, the 3D structures and their morphologies of such composite at nano and micrometre scale have never been reported before. We have used high density electric currents to thermally shock a Zr-Ti based BMGMC to different temperatures, and used X-ray microtomography, FIB-SEM nanotomography and neutron diffraction to reveal the morphologies, compositions, volume fractions and thermal stabilities of the nano and microstructures. Understanding of these is essential for optimizing the design of BMGMCs and developing viable manufacturing methods. PMID:26725519

  3. Multi-scale Characterisation of the 3D Microstructure of a Thermally-Shocked Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composite

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Bodey, Andrew J.; Sui, Tan; Kockelmann, Winfried; Rau, Christoph; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Mi, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    Bulk metallic glass matrix composites (BMGMCs) are a new class of metal alloys which have significantly increased ductility and impact toughness, resulting from the ductile crystalline phases distributed uniformly within the amorphous matrix. However, the 3D structures and their morphologies of such composite at nano and micrometre scale have never been reported before. We have used high density electric currents to thermally shock a Zr-Ti based BMGMC to different temperatures, and used X-ray microtomography, FIB-SEM nanotomography and neutron diffraction to reveal the morphologies, compositions, volume fractions and thermal stabilities of the nano and microstructures. Understanding of these is essential for optimizing the design of BMGMCs and developing viable manufacturing methods. PMID:26725519

  4. Integration of a 3D hydrogel matrix within a hollow core photonic crystal fibre for DNA probe immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutowska, Monika S.; Garcia Gunning, Fatima C.; Kivlehan, Francine; Moore, Eric; Brennan, Des; Galvin, Paul; Ellis, Andrew D.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the integration of a 3D hydrogel matrix within a hollow core photonic crystal fibre (HC-PCF). In addition, we also show the fluorescence of Cy5-labelled DNA molecules immobilized within the hydrogel formed in two different types of HC-PCF. The 3D hydrogel matrix is designed to bind with the amino groups of biomolecules using an appropriate cross-linker, providing higher sensitivity and selectivity than the standard 2D coverage, enabling a greater number of probe molecules to be available per unit area. The HC-PCFs, on the other hand, can be designed to maximize the capture of fluorescence to improve sensitivity and provide longer interaction lengths. This could enable the development of fibre-based point-of-care and remote systems, where the enhanced sensitivity would relax the constraints placed on sources and detectors. In this paper, we will discuss the formation of such polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels within a HC-PCF, including their optical properties such as light propagation and auto-fluorescence.

  5. Co-Culture of Tumor Spheroids and Fibroblasts in a Collagen Matrix-Incorporated Microfluidic Chip Mimics Reciprocal Activation in Solid Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Su-Yeong; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Yoojin; Chung, Seok; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular 3D culture and interaction with stromal components are considered essential elements in establishing a ‘more clinically relevant’ tumor model. Matrix-embedded 3D cultures using a microfluidic chip platform can recapitulate the microscale interaction within tumor microenvironments. As a major component of tumor microenvironment, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a role in cancer progression and drug resistance. Here, we present a microfluidic chip-based tumor tissue culture model that integrates 3D tumor spheroids (TSs) with CAF in proximity within a hydrogel scaffold. HT-29 human colorectal carcinoma cells grew into 3D TSs and the growth was stimulated when co-cultured with fibroblasts as shown by 1.5-folds increase of % changes in diameter over 5 days. TS cultured for 6 days showed a reduced expression of Ki-67 along with increased expression of fibronectin when co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to mono-cultured TSs. Fibroblasts were activated under co-culture conditions, as demonstrated by increases in α-SMA expression and migratory activity. When exposed to paclitaxel, a survival advantage was observed in TSs co-cultured with activated fibroblasts. Overall, we demonstrated the reciprocal interaction between TSs and fibroblasts in our 7-channel microfluidic chip. The co-culture of 3D TS-CAF in a collagen matrix-incorporated microfluidic chip may be useful to study the tumor microenvironment and for evaluation of drug screening and evaluation. PMID:27391808

  6. Co-Culture of Tumor Spheroids and Fibroblasts in a Collagen Matrix-Incorporated Microfluidic Chip Mimics Reciprocal Activation in Solid Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Su-Yeong; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Yoojin; Chung, Seok; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular 3D culture and interaction with stromal components are considered essential elements in establishing a 'more clinically relevant' tumor model. Matrix-embedded 3D cultures using a microfluidic chip platform can recapitulate the microscale interaction within tumor microenvironments. As a major component of tumor microenvironment, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a role in cancer progression and drug resistance. Here, we present a microfluidic chip-based tumor tissue culture model that integrates 3D tumor spheroids (TSs) with CAF in proximity within a hydrogel scaffold. HT-29 human colorectal carcinoma cells grew into 3D TSs and the growth was stimulated when co-cultured with fibroblasts as shown by 1.5-folds increase of % changes in diameter over 5 days. TS cultured for 6 days showed a reduced expression of Ki-67 along with increased expression of fibronectin when co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to mono-cultured TSs. Fibroblasts were activated under co-culture conditions, as demonstrated by increases in α-SMA expression and migratory activity. When exposed to paclitaxel, a survival advantage was observed in TSs co-cultured with activated fibroblasts. Overall, we demonstrated the reciprocal interaction between TSs and fibroblasts in our 7-channel microfluidic chip. The co-culture of 3D TS-CAF in a collagen matrix-incorporated microfluidic chip may be useful to study the tumor microenvironment and for evaluation of drug screening and evaluation. PMID:27391808

  7. Long-term stability of dentin matrix following treatment with various natural collagen cross-linkers

    PubMed Central

    Castellan, Carina Strano; Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina; Karol, Sachin; Rodrigues Pereira, Patrícia Nóbrega

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Collagen disorganization is one of the main degradation patterns found in unsuccessful adhesive restorations. The hypothesis of this study was that pretreatment using natural collagen cross-linking agents rich in proanthocyanidin (PA) would improve mechanical properties and stability over time of the dentin collagen and, thus, confer a more resistant and lasting substrate for adhesive restorations. Methods PA-based extracts, from grape seed (GSE), cocoa seed (CSE), cranberry (CRE), cinnamon (CNE) and açaí berry (ACE) were applied over the demineralized dentin. The apparent elastic modulus (E) of the treated dentin collagen was analyzed over a 12 months period. Specimens were immersed in the respective solution and E values were obtained by a micro-flexural test at baseline, 10, 30, 60, 120 and 240 min. Samples were stored in artificial saliva and re-tested after 3, 6 and 12 months. Data was analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey test. Results GSE and CSE extracts showed a time-dependant effect and were able to improve [240 min (MPa): GSE=108.96±56.08; CSE=59.21±24.87] and stabilize the E of the organic matrix [12 months (MPa): GSE=40.91±19.69; CSE= 42.11±13.46]. CRE and CNE extracts were able to maintain the E of collagen matrices constant over 12 months [CRE=11.17±7.22; CNE= 9,96±6.11; MPa]. ACE (2.64±1.22 MPa) and control groups immersed in neat distilled water (1.37±0.69 MPa) and ethanol water (0.95±0.33MPa) showed no effect over dentin organic matrix and enable their degradation and reduction of mechanical properties. Significance Some PA-based extracts were capable of improving and stabilizing collagen matrices through exogenous cross-links induction. PMID:21783144

  8. Optimizing dentin bond durability: control of collagen degradation by matrix metalloproteinases and cysteine cathepsins

    PubMed Central

    Tjäderhane, Leo; Nascimento, Fabio D.; Breschi, Lorenzo; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Tersariol, Ivarne L.S.; Geraldeli, Saulo; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Carrilho, Marcela R.; Carvalho, Ricardo M.; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Contemporary adhesives lose their bond strength to dentin regardless of the bonding system used. This loss relates to the hydrolysis of collagen matrix of the hybrid layers. The preservation of the collagen matrix integrity is a key issue in the attempts to improve the dentin bonding durability. Methods Dentin contains collagenolytic enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins, which are responsible for the hydrolytic degradation of collagen matrix in the bonded interface. Results The identities, roles and function of collagenolytic enzymes in mineralized dentin has been gathered only within last 15 years, but they have already been demonstrated to have an important role in dental hard tissue pathologies, including the degradation of the hybrid layer. Identifying responsible enzymes facilitates the development of new, more efficient methods to improve the stability of dentin-adhesive bond and durability of bond strength. Significance Understanding the nature and role of proteolytic degradation of dentin-adhesive interfaces has improved immensely and has practically grown to a scientific field of its own within only 10 years, holding excellent promise that stable resin-dentin bonds will be routinely available in a daily clinical setting already in a near future. PMID:22901826

  9. 3D Epitaxy of Graphene nanostructures in the Matrix of Ag, Al and Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamanca-Riba, Lourdes; Isaacs, Romaine; Wuttig, Manfred; Lemieux, Melburne; Hu, Liangbing; Iftekhar, Jaim; Rashkeev, Sergey; Kukla, Maija; Rabin, Oded; Mansour, Azzam

    2015-03-01

    Graphene nanostructures in the form ribbons were embedded in the lattice of metals such as Ag, Cu, and Al in concentrations up to 36.4 at.%, 21.8 at% and 10.5 at.%, respectively. These materials are called covetics. Raman scattering from Ag and Al covetics indicate variations in the intensity of peaks at ~ 1,300 cm-1 and 1,600 cm-1 with position on the sample. These peaks are associated with the D (defects) and G (graphite E2g mode) peaks of graphitic carbon with sp2 bonding and reveal various degrees of imperfections in the graphene layers. First principles calculations of the dynamic matrix of Ag and Al covetics show bonding between C and the metal. EELS mapping of the C-K edge and high resolution lattice images show that the graphene-like regions form ribbons with epitaxial orientation with the metal lattice of Ag and Al. The temperature dependences of the resistivites of Ag and Cu covetics are similar to those of the pure metals with only slight increase in resistivity. Films of Cu covetic deposited by e-beam evaporation and PLD show higher transmittance and resistance to oxidation than pure metal films of the same thickness indicating that copper covetic films can be used for transparent electrodes. Funded by DARPA/ARL Grant No. W911NF-13-1-0058, and ONR Award No N000141410042.

  10. Electron scattering from large molecules: a 3d finite element R-matrix approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonzani, Stefano; Greene, Chris H.

    2005-05-01

    To solve the Schr"odinger equation for scattering of a low energy electron from a molecule, we present a three-dimensional finite element R-matrix method [S. Tonzani and C. H. Greene, J. Chem. Phys. 122 01411, (2005)]. Using the static exchange and local density approximations, we can use directly the molecular potentials extracted from ab initio codes (GAUSSIAN 98 in the work described here). A local polarization potential based on density functional theory [F. A. Gianturco and A. Rodriguez-Ruiz, Phys. Rev. A 47, 1075 (1993)] approximately describes the long range attraction to the molecular target induced by the scattering electron without adjustable parameters. We have used this approach successfully in calculations of cross sections for small and medium sized molecules (like SF6, XeF6, C60 and Uracil). This method will be useful to treat the electron-induced dynamics of extended molecular systems, possibly of biological interest, where oth er more complex ab initio methods are difficult to apply.

  11. Preparation and characterization of an advanced collagen aggregate from porcine acellular dermal matrix.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhua; Dan, Nianhua; Dan, Weihua

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to extract and characterize an advanced collagen aggregate (Ag-col) from porcine acellular dermal matrix (pADM). Based on histological examination, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM), Ag-col was composed of the D-periodic cross-striated collagen fibrils and thick collagen fiber bundles with uneven diameters and non-orientated arrangement. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of pADM, Ag-col and Col were similar and revealed the presence of the triple helix. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis exhibited a slightly higher content of α-helix but inappreciably less amount of random coil structure in Ag-col compared to Col. Moreover, imino acid contents of pADM, Ag-col and Col were 222.43, 218.30 and 190.01 residues/1000 residues, respectively. From zeta potential analysis, a net charge of zero was found at pH 6.45 and 6.11 for Ag-col and Col, respectively. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study suggested that the Td of Ag-col was 20°C higher than that of Col as expected, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) indicated that Ag-col possessed a higher storage modulus but similar loss factor compared to Col. Therefore, the collagen aggregate from pADM could serve as a better alternative source of collagens for further applications in food and biological industries. PMID:27039117

  12. Extracellular compartments in matrix morphogenesis: collagen fibril, bundle, and lamellar formation by corneal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Birk, D E; Trelstad, R L

    1984-12-01

    The regulation of collagen fibril, bundle, and lamella formation by the corneal fibroblasts, as well as the organization of these elements into an orthogonal stroma, was studied by transmission electron microscopy and high voltage electron microscopy. Transmission and high voltage electron microscopy of chick embryo corneas each demonstrated a series of unique extracellular compartments. Collagen fibrillogenesis occurred within small surface recesses. These small recesses usually contained between 5 and 12 collagen fibrils with typically mature diameters and constant intrafibrillar spacing. The lateral fusion of the recesses resulted in larger recesses and consequent formation of prominent cell surface foldings. Within these surface foldings, bundles that contained 50-100 collagen fibrils were formed. The surface foldings continued to fuse and the cell surface retracted, forming large surface-associated compartments in which bundles coalesced to form lamellae. High voltage electron microscopy of 0.5 micron sections cut parallel to the corneal surface revealed that the corneal fibroblasts and their processes had two major axes at approximately right angles to one another. The surface compartments involved in the production of the corneal stroma were aligned along the fibroblast axes and the orthogonality of the cell was in register with that of the extracellular matrix. In this manner, corneal fibroblasts formed collagen fibrils, bundles, and lamellae within a controlled environment and thereby determined the architecture of the corneal stroma by the configuration of the cell and its associated compartments. PMID:6542105

  13. Antioxidant functionality in hepatocytes using the enhanced collagen extracellular matrix under different oxygen tensions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Ho; Coger, Robin N; Clemens, Mark G

    2006-10-01

    Improvement of O(2) supply in bioartificial liver devices remains a critical issue in maintaining hepatocyte viability and functions. Therefore, the current study investigates whether enhanced oxygen (O(2)) transport through collagen extracellular matrix (ECM) can produce a more stable antioxidant defense in different O(2) tensions during prolonged incubation times. Total glutathione concentration of cultured hepatocytes in enhanced ECM was significantly higher than in normal ECM under the lowest O(2) tension phase (2.60mm of thickness from O(2) source), and was also significantly increased in 0.52 mm transport distance of hypoxia as compared to normoxic conditions. Catalase and glutathione reductase activities for hepatocytes within enhanced ECM were also significantly preserved relative to their values for the normal collagen ECM. Specifically, the enhanced ECM produced higher activities at a further transport distance (1.56 mm) from the O(2) source at the 24 h time-point, and remained higher up to the 96 h incubation time. In contrast, the glutathione peroxidase activities in both collagen ECM systems were similar. Hepatocyte viability in the enhanced ECM system was also consistently greater than that for normal ECM. These results suggest that the O(2) enhanced collagen ECM preserves the antioxidant defense system as compared to normal collagen ECM, ostensibly via increased micropathways for O(2) transport to the hepatocytes. PMID:17518651

  14. Peroxidase Enzymes Regulate Collagen Biosynthesis and Matrix Mineralization by Cultured Human Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Shoubridge, Alexandra J; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Liapis, Vasilios; Zysk, Aneta; Zinonos, Irene; Hay, Shelley; Atkins, Gerald J; Findlay, David M; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The early recruitment of inflammatory cells to sites of bone fracture and trauma is a critical determinant in successful fracture healing. Released by infiltrating inflammatory cells, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) are heme-containing enzymes, whose functional involvement in bone repair has mainly been studied in the context of providing a mechanism for oxidative defense against invading microorganisms. We report here novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes have the capacity to stimulate osteoblastic cells to secrete collagen I protein and generate a mineralized extracellular matrix in vitro. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured osteoblasts show that peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl hydroxylase-dependent manner, which does not require ascorbic acid. Our studies demonstrate that osteoblasts rapidly bind and internalize both MPO and EPO, and the catalytic activity of these peroxidase enzymes is essential to support collagen I biosynthesis and subsequent release of collagen by osteoblasts. We show that EPO is capable of regulating osteogenic gene expression and matrix mineralization in culture, suggesting that peroxidase enzymes may play an important role not only in normal bone repair, but also in the progression of pathological states where infiltrating inflammatory cells are known to deposit peroxidases. PMID:26643175

  15. Membrane Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase Regulates Monocyte Migration and Collagen Destruction in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sathyamoorthy, Tarangini; Tezera, Liku B.; Walker, Naomi F.; Brilha, Sara; Saraiva, Luisa; Mauri, Francesco A.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Friedland, Jon S.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global pandemic and drug resistance is rising. Multicellular granuloma formation is the pathological hallmark of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP or MMP-14) is a collagenase that is key in leukocyte migration and collagen destruction. In patients with TB, induced sputum MT1-MMP mRNA levels were increased 5.1-fold compared with matched controls and correlated positively with extent of lung infiltration on chest radiographs (r = 0.483; p < 0.05). M. tuberculosis infection of primary human monocytes increased MT1-MMP surface expression 31.7-fold and gene expression 24.5-fold. M. tuberculosis–infected monocytes degraded collagen matrix in an MT1-MMP–dependent manner, and MT1-MMP neutralization decreased collagen degradation by 73%. In human TB granulomas, MT1-MMP immunoreactivity was observed in macrophages throughout the granuloma. Monocyte–monocyte networks caused a 17.5-fold increase in MT1-MMP surface expression dependent on p38 MAPK and G protein–coupled receptor-dependent signaling. Monocytes migrating toward agarose beads impregnated with conditioned media from M. tuberculosis–infected monocytes expressed MT1-MMP. Neutralization of MT1-MMP activity decreased this M. tuberculosis network–dependent monocyte migration by 44%. Taken together, we demonstrate that MT1-MMP is central to two key elements of TB pathogenesis, causing collagen degradation and regulating monocyte migration. PMID:26091717

  16. Comparison of basis functions for 3D PET reconstruction using a Monte Carlo system matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabello, Jorge; Rafecas, Magdalena

    2012-04-01

    In emission tomography, iterative statistical methods are accepted as the reconstruction algorithms that achieve the best image quality. The accuracy of these methods relies partly on the quality of the system response matrix (SRM) that characterizes the scanner. The more physical phenomena included in the SRM, the higher the SRM quality, and therefore higher image quality is obtained from the reconstruction process. High-resolution small animal scanners contain as many as 103-104 small crystal pairs, while the field of view (FOV) is divided into hundreds of thousands of small voxels. These two characteristics have a significant impact on the number of elements to be calculated in the SRM. Monte Carlo (MC) methods have gained popularity as a way of calculating the SRM, due to the increased accuracy achievable, at the cost of introducing some statistical noise and long simulation times. In the work presented here the SRM is calculated using MC methods exploiting the cylindrical symmetries of the scanner, significantly reducing the simulation time necessary to calculate a high statistical quality SRM and the storage space necessary. The use of cylindrical symmetries makes polar voxels a convenient basis function. Alternatively, spherically symmetric basis functions result in improved noise properties compared to cubic and polar basis functions. The quality of reconstructed images using polar voxels, spherically symmetric basis functions on a polar grid, cubic voxels and post-reconstruction filtered polar and cubic voxels is compared from a noise and spatial resolution perspective. This study demonstrates that polar voxels perform as well as cubic voxels, reducing the simulation time necessary to calculate the SRM and the disk space necessary to store it. Results showed that spherically symmetric functions outperform polar and cubic basis functions in terms of noise properties, at the cost of slightly degraded spatial resolution, larger SRM file size and longer

  17. PAK1 regulates breast cancer cell invasion through secretion of matrix metalloproteinases in response to prolactin and three-dimensional collagen IV.

    PubMed

    Rider, Leah; Oladimeji, Peter; Diakonova, Maria

    2013-07-01

    p21-Activated serine-threonine kinase (PAK1) is implicated in breast cancer. We have shown previously that PAK1 is tyrosyl phosphorylated by prolactin (PRL)-activated Janus tyrosine kinase (JAK2). Although a role for both PRL and PAK1 in breast cancer is widely acknowledged, the mechanism remains poorly understood. In the present study, PRL-activated PAK1 stimulates the invasion of TMX2-28 human breast cancer cells through Matrigel. Three-dimensional (3D) collagen IV stimulates the secretion of the matrix proteases, metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and -3 that is further enhanced by the PRL-dependent tyrosyl phosphorylation of PAK1. 3D collagen IV also stimulates the expression and secretion of MMP-2, but in contrast to MMP-1 and -3, PRL/PAK1 signaling down-regulates MMP-2 expression and secretion. In contrast, MMP-9 expression and secretion are stimulated by 3D collagen I, not collagen IV, and are not affected by PRL but are down-regulated by PAK1. MMP-1 and -3 are required and MMP-2 contributes to PRL-dependent invasion. ERK1/2 signaling appears to be required for the enhanced expression and secretion of MMP-1 and -3 and enhanced PRL-dependent invasion. p38 MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 pathways participate in production of MMP-1 and -3 as well as in PRL/PAK1-dependent cell invasion. Together, these data illustrate the complex interaction between the substratum and PRL/PAK1 signaling in human breast cancer cells and suggest a pivotal role for PRL-dependent PAK1 tyrosyl phosphorylation in MMP secretion. PMID:23744893

  18. Deformation simulation of cells seeded on a collagen-GAG scaffold in a flow perfusion bioreactor using a sequential 3D CFD-elastostatics model.

    PubMed

    Jungreuthmayer, C; Jaasma, M J; Al-Munajjed, A A; Zanghellini, J; Kelly, D J; O'Brien, F J

    2009-05-01

    Tissue-engineered bone shows promise in meeting the huge demand for bone grafts caused by up to 4 million bone replacement procedures per year, worldwide. State-of-the-art bone tissue engineering strategies use flow perfusion bioreactors to apply biophysical stimuli to cells seeded on scaffolds and to grow tissue suitable for implantation into the patient's body. The aim of this study was to quantify the deformation of cells seeded on a collagen-GAG scaffold which was perfused by culture medium inside a flow perfusion bioreactor. Using a microCT scan of an unseeded collagen-GAG scaffold, a sequential 3D CFD-deformation model was developed. The wall shear stress and the hydrostatic wall pressure acting on the cells were computed through the use of a CFD simulation and fed into a linear elastostatics model in order to calculate the deformation of the cells. The model used numerically seeded cells of two common morphologies where cells are either attached flatly on the scaffold wall or bridging two struts of the scaffold. Our study showed that the displacement of the cells is primarily determined by the cell morphology. Although cells of both attachment profiles were subjected to the same mechanical load, cells bridging two struts experienced a deformation up to 500 times higher than cells only attached to one strut. As the scaffold's pore size determines both the mechanical load and the type of attachment, the design of an optimal scaffold must take into account the interplay of these two features and requires a design process that optimizes both parameters at the same time. PMID:19109048

  19. Fabrication of type I collagen microcarrier using a microfluidic 3D T-junction device and its application for the quantitative analysis of cell-ECM interactions.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Junghyo; Kim, Jaehoon; Jeong, Hyo Eun; Sudo, Ryo; Park, Myung-Jin; Chung, Seok

    2016-01-01

    We presented a new quantitative analysis for cell and extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions, using cell-coated ECM hydrogel microbeads (hydrobeads) made of type I collagen. The hydrobeads can carry cells as three-dimensional spheroidal forms with an ECM inside, facilitating a direct interaction between the cells and ECM. The cells on hydrobeads do not have a hypoxic core, which opens the possibility for using as a cell microcarrier for bottom-up tissue reconstitution. This technique can utilize various types of cells, even MDA-MB-231 cells, which have weak cell-cell interactions and do not form spheroids in conventional spheroid culture methods. Morphological indices of the cell-coated hydrobead visually present cell-ECM interactions in a quantitative manner. PMID:27563029

  20. Bioprinting 3D cell-laden hydrogel microarray for screening human periodontal ligament stem cell response to extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yufei; Ji, Yuan; Huang, Guoyou; Ling, Kai; Zhang, Xiaohui; Xu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease negatively affecting up to 15% of adults worldwide. Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) hold great promises for periodontal tissue regeneration, where it is necessary to find proper extracellular matrix (ECM) materials (e.g., composition, concentration). In this study, we proposed a bioprinting-based approach to generate nano-liter sized three-dimensional (3D) cell-laden hydrogel array with gradient of ECM components, through controlling the volume ratio of two hydrogels, such as gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) dimethacrylate. The resulting cell-laden array with a gradient of GelMA/PEG composition was used to screen human PDLSC response to ECM. The behavior (e.g., cell viability, spreading) of human PDLSCs in GelMA/PEG array were found to be depended on the volume ratios of GelMA/PEG, with cell viability and spreading area decreased along with increasing the ratio of PEG. The developed approach would be useful for screening cell-biomaterial interaction in 3D and promoting regeneration of functional tissue. PMID:26696269

  1. Comparison of Uncultured Marrow Mononuclear Cells and Culture-Expanded Mesenchymal Stem Cells in 3D Collagen-Chitosan Microbeads for Orthopedic Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Joel K.; Alford, Andrea I.; Goldstein, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies have shown promise in enhancing repair of bone and cartilage. Marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are typically expanded in vitro to increase cell number, but this process is lengthy, costly, and there is a risk of contamination and altered cellular properties. Potential advantages of using fresh uncultured bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) include heterotypic cell and paracrine interactions between MSC and other marrow-derived cells including hematopoietic, endothelial, and other progenitor cells. In the present study, we compared the osteogenic and chondrogenic potential of freshly isolated BMMC to that of cultured-expanded MSC, when encapsulated in three-dimensional (3D) collagen-chitosan microbeads. The effect of low and high oxygen tension on cell function and differentiation into orthopedic lineages was also examined. Freshly isolated rat BMMC (25×106 cells/mL, containing an estimated 5×104 MSC/mL) or purified and culture-expanded rat bone marrow-derived MSC (2×105 cells/mL) were added to a 65–35 wt% collagen-chitosan hydrogel mixture and fabricated into 3D microbeads by emulsification and thermal gelation. Microbeads were cultured in control MSC growth media in either 20% O2 (normoxia) or 5% O2 (hypoxia) for an initial 3 days, and then in control, osteogenic, or chondrogenic media for an additional 21 days. Microbead preparations were evaluated for viability, total DNA content, calcium deposition, and osteocalcin and sulfated glycosaminoglycan expression, and they were examined histologically. Hypoxia enhanced initial progenitor cell survival in fresh BMMC-microbeads, but it did not enhance osteogenic potential. Fresh uncultured BMMC-microbeads showed a similar degree of osteogenesis as culture-expanded MSC-microbeads, even though they initially contained only 1/10th the number of MSC. Chondrogenic differentiation was not strongly supported in any of the microbead formulations. This study demonstrates the microbead

  2. Reproducing Electric Field Observations during Magnetic Storms by means of Rigorous 3-D Modelling and Distortion Matrix Co-estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Püthe, Christoph; Manoj, Chandrasekharan; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2015-04-01

    Electric fields induced in the conducting Earth during magnetic storms drive currents in power transmission grids, telecommunication lines or buried pipelines. These geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) can cause severe service disruptions. The prediction of GIC is thus of great importance for public and industry. A key step in the prediction of the hazard to technological systems during magnetic storms is the calculation of the geoelectric field. To address this issue for mid-latitude regions, we developed a method that involves 3-D modelling of induction processes in a heterogeneous Earth and the construction of a model of the magnetospheric source. The latter is described by low-degree spherical harmonics; its temporal evolution is derived from observatory magnetic data. Time series of the electric field can be computed for every location on Earth's surface. The actual electric field however is known to be perturbed by galvanic effects, arising from very local near-surface heterogeneities or topography, which cannot be included in the conductivity model. Galvanic effects are commonly accounted for with a real-valued time-independent distortion matrix, which linearly relates measured and computed electric fields. Using data of various magnetic storms that occurred between 2000 and 2003, we estimated distortion matrices for observatory sites onshore and on the ocean bottom. Strong correlations between modellings and measurements validate our method. The distortion matrix estimates prove to be reliable, as they are accurately reproduced for different magnetic storms. We further show that 3-D modelling is crucial for a correct separation of galvanic and inductive effects and a precise prediction of electric field time series during magnetic storms. Since the required computational resources are negligible, our approach is suitable for a real-time prediction of GIC. For this purpose, a reliable forecast of the source field, e.g. based on data from satellites

  3. Interstitial flow promotes vascular fibroblast, myofibroblast, and smooth muscle cell motility in 3-D collagen I via upregulation of MMP-1

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhong-Dong; Ji, Xin-Ying; Qazi, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Neointima formation often occurs in regions where the endothelium has been damaged and the transmural interstitial flow is elevated. Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and fibroblasts/myofibroblasts (FBs/MFBs) contribute to intimal thickening by migrating from the media and adventitia into the site of injury. In this study, for the first time, the direct effects of interstitial flow on SMC and FB/MFB migration were investigated in an in vitro three-dimensional system. Collagen I gels were used to mimic three-dimensional extracellular matrix (ECM) for rat aortic SMCs and FBs/MFBs. Exposure to interstitial flow induced by 1 cmH2O pressure differential (shear stress, ∼0.05 dyn/cm2; flow velocity, ∼0.5 μm/s; and Darcy permeability, ∼10−11 cm2) substantially enhanced cell motility. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor (GM-6001) abolished flow-induced migration augmentation, which suggested that the enhanced motility was MMP dependent. The upregulation of MMP-1 played a critical role for the flow-enhanced motility, which was further confirmed by silencing MMP-1 gene expression. Longer exposures to higher flows suppressed the number of migrated cells, although MMP-1 gene expression remained high. This suppression was a result of both flow-induced tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 upregulation and increased apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Interstitial flow did not affect MMP-2 gene expression or activity in the collagen I gel for any cell type. Our findings shed light on the mechanism by which vascular SMCs and FBs/MFBs contribute to intimal thickening in regions of vascular injury where interstitial flow is elevated. PMID:19465549

  4. Rapid Fabrication of Living Tissue Models by Collagen Plastic Compression: Understanding Three-Dimensional Cell Matrix Repair In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cheema, Umber; Brown, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To produce biomimetic collagen scaffolds for tissue modeling and as tissue-engineered implants. Approach Control of collagen fibril material parameters in collagen hydrogel scaffolds by using plastic compression (PC), resulting in direct control of cell proliferation, cell migration, and cell–cell interaction. Results We were able to control the density of collagen in such scaffolds from between 0.2% and 30%, and controllably layer the fibrils in the Z-plane. Cell migration was observed in gels where a gradient of collagen density was present. In these gels, cells preferentially migrated toward the collagen-dense areas. Cell proliferation rates were measurably higher in dense collagen gels. Innovation The use of PC to control material properties of collagen hydrogels results in collagen scaffolds that are biomimetic. These collagen gels reproduce the relevant matrix-mechanical environment in which behavior is more representative of that found in vivo. Conclusion The material properties of native collagen type I gels can be engineered to match those found in tissues in vivo to elicit more biomimetic cell behavior. PMID:24527341

  5. Aligned 3D human aortic smooth muscle tissue via layer by layer technique inside microchannels with novel combination of collagen and oxidized alginate hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Rayatpisheh, Shahrzad; Poon, Yin Fun; Cao, Ye; Feng, Jie; Chan, Vincent; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2011-08-01

    Tissue engineering of the small diameter blood vessel medial layer has been challenging. Recreation of the circumferentially aligned multilayer smooth muscle tissue has been one of the major technical difficulties. Some research has utilized cyclic stress to align smooth muscle cells (SMCs) but due to the long time conditioning needed, it was not possible to use primary human cells because of expeditious senescence occurred . We demonstrate rapid buildup of a homogeneous relatively thick (30-40 μm) aligned smooth muscle tissue via layer by layer (LBL) technique within microchannels and a soft cell-adhesive hydrogel. Using a microchannelled scaffold with gapped microwalls, two layers of primary human SMCs separated by an interlayer hydrogel were cultured to confluence within the microchannels. The SMCs aligned along the microchannels because of the physically constraining microwalls. A novel double layered gel consisting of a mixture of pristine and oxidized alginate hydrogel coated with collagen was designed to place between each layer of cells, leading to a thicker tissue in a shorter time. The SMCs penetrated the soft thin interlayer hydrogel within 6 days of seeding of the 2nd cell layer so that the entire construct became more or less homogeneously populated by the SMCs. The unique LBL technique applied within the micropatterned scaffold using a soft cell-adhesive gel interlayer allows rapid growth and confluence of SMCs on 2D surface but at the same time aligns the cells and builds up multiple layers into a 3D tissue. This pseudo-3D buildup method avoids the typical steric resistance of hydrogel embedding. PMID:21548018

  6. Evidence for enhanced collagen type III deposition focally in the territorial matrix of osteoarthritic hip articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Hosseininia, S.; Weis, M.A.; Rai, J.; Kim, L.; Funk, S.; Dahlberg, L.E.; Eyre, D.R.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective To determine if type III collagen is concentrated in the chymotrypsin-extractable collagen pool from osteoarthritic articular cartilage to assess its potential as a biomarker of Osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenic mechanisms. Methods Full thickness articular cartilage from grossly normal surfaces was analyzed from femoral heads, obtained at hip replacement surgery, from OA (n = 10) and fracture (n = 10) patients. Collagen, extracted by α-chymotrypsin, was characterized by SDS-PAGE/Western blot analysis, ELISA and immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies specific to collagens types II and III. Results α-Chymotrypsin extracted more collagen from OA than control cartilage. The extractable pool included collagen types II and III from both OA and control hips. Importantly, OA cartilage contained 6-fold more collagen type III than control cartilage, based on ELISA. The estimated total tissue ratio of collagen III/II was in the 1–10% range for individual OA cartilage samples, based on pepsin-solubilized collagen using SDS-PAGE densitometry. Collagen type III N-propeptide trimers were the main molecular fragments seen on Western blot analysis of OA and control extracts. The chymotrypsin-extracted type II collagen gave primarily full-length α1(II) chains and chain fragments of α1(II) on Western blot analysis from both OA and control tissues. Immunohistochemistry showed that type III collagen was more concentrated in the upper half of OA cartilage and in the territorial matrix around individual chondrocytes and chondrocyte clusters. Conclusions The findings confirm that collagen type III deposition occurs in adult articular cartilage but significantly more pronounced in osteoarthritic joints, presenting a potential marker of matrix repair or pathobiology. PMID:26790721

  7. Role of Collagen Matrix in Tumor Angiogenesis and Glioblastoma Multiforme Progression

    PubMed Central

    Mammoto, Tadanori; Jiang, Amanda; Jiang, Elisabeth; Panigrahy, Dipak; Kieran, Mark W.; Mammoto, Akiko

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma is a highly vascularized brain tumor, and antiangiogenic therapy improves its progression-free survival. However, current antiangiogenic therapy induces serious adverse effects including neuronal cytotoxicity and tumor invasiveness and resistance to therapy. Although it has been suggested that the physical microenvironment has a key role in tumor angiogenesis and progression, the mechanism by which physical properties of extracellular matrix control tumor angiogenesis and glioblastoma progression is not completely understood. Herein we show that physical compaction (the process in which cells gather and pack together and cause associated changes in cell shape and size) of human glioblastoma cell lines U87MG, U251, and LN229 induces expression of collagen types IV and VI and the collagen crosslinking enzyme lysyl oxidase and up-regulates in vitro expression of the angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor. The lysyl oxidase inhibitor β-aminopropionitrile disrupts collagen structure in the tumor and inhibits tumor angiogenesis and glioblastoma multiforme growth in a mouse orthotopic brain tumor model. Similarly, d-penicillamine, which inhibits lysyl oxidase enzymatic activity by depleting intracerebral copper, also exhibits antiangiogenic effects on brain tumor growth in mice. These findings suggest that tumor microenvironment controlled by collagen structure is important in tumor angiogenesis and brain tumor progression. PMID:23928381

  8. Host-derived Loss of Dentin Matrix Stiffness Associated with Solubilization of Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Carrilho, Marcela R.; Tay, Franklin R.; Donnelly, Adam M.; Agee, Kelli A.; Tjäderhane, Leo; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Breschi, Lorenzo; Foulger, Stephen; Pashley, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) bound to dentin matrices are activated during adhesive bonding procedures and are thought to contribute to the progressive degradation of resin-dentin bonds over time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in mechanical, biochemical and structural properties of demineralized dentin treated with or without chlorhexidine (CHX), a known MMP-inhibitor. After demineralizing dentin beams in EDTA or phosphoric acid (PA), the baseline modulus of elasticity (E) of each beam was measured by 3-point flexure. Specimens were pretreated with water (control) or with 2% CHX (experimental) and then incubated in artificial saliva (AS) at 37°C for 4 weeks. The E of each specimen was remeasured weekly and, the media was analyzed for solubilized dentin collagen at first and fourth week of incubation. Some specimens were processed for electron microscopy (TEM) immediately after demineralization and after 4 weeks of incubation. In EDTA and PA-demineralized specimens, the E of the control specimens fell (p<0.05) after incubation in AS, while there were no changes in E in the CHX-pretreated specimens over time. More collagen was solubilized from PA-demineralized controls (p<0.05) than from EDTA-demineralized matrices after 1 or 4 weeks. Less collagen (p<0.05) was solubilized from CHX-pretreated specimens demineralized in EDTA compared to PA. TEM examination of control beams revealed that prolonged demineralization of dentin in 10% PA (12 h) did not denature the collagen fibrils. PMID:19090493

  9. The endogenous fluorescence of fibroblast in collagen gels as indicator of stiffness of the extracellular matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Martinez, J. P.; Ortega-Martinez, A.; Franco, W.

    2016-03-01

    The stiffness or rigidity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cell response. Established mechanical tests to measure stiffness, such as indentation and tensile tests, are invasive and destructive to the sample. Endogenous or native molecules to cells and ECM components, like tryptophan and cross-links of collagen, display fluorescence upon irradiation with ultraviolet light. Most likely, the concentration of these endogenous fluorophores changes as the stiffness of the ECM changes. In this work we investigate the endogenous fluorescence of collagen gels containing fibroblasts as a non-invasive non-destructive method to measure stiffness of the ECM. Human fibroblast cells were cultured in three-dimensional gels of type I collagen (50,000 cells/ml). This construct is a simple model of tissue contraction. During contraction, changes in the excitation-emission matrix (a fluorescence map in the 240-520/290-530 nm range) of constructs were measured with a spectrofluoremeter, and changes in stiffness were measured with a standard indentation test over 16 days. Results show that a progressive increase in fluorescence of the 290/340 nm excitation-emission pair correlates with a progressive increase in stiffness (r=0.9, α=0.5). The fluorescence of this excitation-emission pair is ascribed to tryptophan and variations in the fluorescence of this pair correlate with cellular proliferation. In this tissue model, the endogenous functional fluorescence of proliferating fibroblast cells is a biomechanical marker of stiffness of the ECM.

  10. Osteoblasts extracellular matrix induces vessel like structures through glycosylated collagen I

    SciTech Connect

    Palmieri, D.; Valli, M.; Viglio, S.; Ferrari, N.; Ledda, B.; Volta, C.; Manduca, P.

    2010-03-10

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a fundamental role in angiogenesis affecting endothelial cells proliferation, migration and differentiation. Vessels-like network formation in vitro is a reliable test to study the inductive effects of ECM on angiogenesis. Here we utilized matrix deposed by osteoblasts as substrate where the molecular and structural complexity of the endogenous ECM is preserved, to test if it induces vessel-like network formation by endothelial cells in vitro. ECM is more similar to the physiological substrate in vivo than other substrates previously utilized for these studies in vitro. Osteogenic ECM, prepared in vitro from mature osteoblasts at the phase of maximal deposition and glycosylation of collagen I, induces EAhy926, HUVEC, and HDMEC endothelial cells to form vessels-like structures and promotes the activation of metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2); the functionality of the p-38/MAPK signaling pathway is required. Osteogenic ECM also induces a transient increase of CXCL12 and a decrease of the receptor CXCR4. The induction of vessel-like networks is dependent from proper glycosylation of collagens and does not occur on osteogenic ECMs if deglycosylated by -galactosidase or on less glycosylated ECMs derived from preosteoblasts and normal fibroblasts, while is sustained on ECM from osteogenesis imperfecta fibroblasts only when their mutation is associated with over-glycosylation of collagen type I. These data support that post-translational glycosylation has a role in the induction in endothelial cells in vitro of molecules conductive to self-organization in vessels-like structures.

  11. Aging and the cardiac collagen matrix: Novel mediators of fibrotic remodelling.

    PubMed

    Horn, Margaux A; Trafford, Andrew W

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide and there is a pressing need for new therapeutic strategies to treat such conditions. The risk of developing cardiovascular disease increases dramatically with age, yet the majority of experimental research is executed using young animals. The cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM), consisting predominantly of fibrillar collagen, preserves myocardial integrity, provides a means of force transmission and supports myocyte geometry. Disruptions to the finely balanced control of collagen synthesis, post-synthetic deposition, post-translational modification and degradation may have detrimental effects on myocardial functionality. It is now well established that the aged heart is characterized by fibrotic remodelling, but the mechanisms responsible for this are incompletely understood. Furthermore, studies using aged animal models suggest that interstitial remodelling with disease may be age-dependent. Thus with the identification of new therapeutic strategies targeting fibrotic remodelling, it may be necessary to consider age-dependent mechanisms. In this review, we discuss remodelling of the cardiac collagen matrix as a function of age, whilst highlighting potential novel mediators of age-dependent fibrotic pathways. PMID:26578393

  12. Enhanced osteoprogenitor elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by bioactive glass ionic silicon dependent on Sp7 (osterix) transcription.

    PubMed

    Varanasi, Venu G; Odatsu, Tetsurou; Bishop, Timothy; Chang, Joyce; Owyoung, Jeremy; Loomer, Peter M

    2016-10-01

    Bioactive glasses release ions, those enhance osteoblast collagen matrix synthesis and osteogenic marker expression during bone healing. Collagen matrix density and osteogenic marker expression depend on osteogenic transcription factors, (e.g., Osterix (OSX)). We hypothesize that enhanced expression and formation of collagen by Si(4+) depends on enhanced expression of OSX transcription. Experimental bioactive glass (6P53-b) and commercial Bioglass(TM) (45S5) were dissolved in basal medium to make glass conditioned medium (GCM). ICP-MS analysis was used to measure bioactive glass ion release rates. MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured for 20 days, and gene expression and extracellular matrix collagen formation was analyzed. In a separate study, siRNA was used to determine the effect of OSX knockdown on impacting the effect of Si(4+) on osteogenic markers and matrix collagen formation. Each bioactive glass exhibited similar ion release rates for all ions, except Mg(2+) released by 6P53-b. Gene expression results showed that GCM markedly enhanced many osteogenic markers, and 45S5 GCM showed higher levels of expression and collagen matrix fiber bundle density than 6P53-b GCM. Upon knockdown of OSX transcription, collagen type 5, alkaline phosphatase, and matrix density were not enhanced as compared to wild type cells. This study illustrates that the enhancement of elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by Si(±) depends on OSX transcription. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2604-2615, 2016. PMID:27279631

  13. Surface topography induces 3D self-orientation of cells and extracellular matrix resulting in improved tissue function†

    PubMed Central

    Guillemette, Maxime D.; Cui, Bo; Roy, Emmanuel; Gauvin, Robert; Giasson, Claude J.; Esch, Mandy B.; Carrier, Patrick; Deschambeault, Alexandre; Dumoulin, Michel; Toner, Mehmet; Germain, Lucie; Veres, Teodor

    2015-01-01

    The organization of cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) in native tissues plays a crucial role in their functionality. However, in tissue engineering, cells and ECM are randomly distributed within a scaffold. Thus, the production of engineered-tissue with complex 3D organization remains a challenge. In the present study, we used contact guidance to control the interactions between the material topography, the cells and the ECM for three different tissues, namely vascular media, corneal stroma and dermal tissue. Using a specific surface topography on an elastomeric material, we observed the orientation of a first cell layer along the patterns in the material. Orientation of the first cell layer translates into a physical cue that induces the second cell layer to follow a physiologically consistent orientation mimicking the structure of the native tissue. Furthermore, secreted ECM followed cell orientation in every layer, resulting in an oriented self-assembled tissue sheet. These self-assembled tissue sheets were then used to create 3 different structured engineered-tissue: cornea, vascular media and dermis. We showed that functionality of such structured engineered-tissue was increased when compared to the same qnon-structured tissue. Dermal tissues were used as a negative control in response to surface topography since native dermal fibroblasts are not preferentially oriented in vivo. Non-structured surfaces were also used to produce randomly oriented tissue sheets to evaluate the impact of tissue orientation on functional output. This novel approach for the production of more complex 3D tissues would be useful for clinical purposes and for in vitro physiological tissue model to better understand long standing questions in biology. PMID:20023803

  14. A volume of intersection approach for on-the-fly system matrix calculation in 3D PET image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lougovski, A.; Hofheinz, F.; Maus, J.; Schramm, G.; Will, E.; van den Hoff, J.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is the evaluation of on-the-fly volume of intersection computation for system’s geometry modelling in 3D PET image reconstruction. For this purpose we propose a simple geometrical model in which the cubic image voxels on the given Cartesian grid are approximated with spheres and the rectangular tubes of response (ToRs) are approximated with cylinders. The model was integrated into a fully 3D list-mode PET reconstruction for performance evaluation. In our model the volume of intersection between a voxel and the ToR is only a function of the impact parameter (the distance between voxel centre to ToR axis) but is independent of the relative orientation of voxel and ToR. This substantially reduces the computational complexity of the system matrix calculation. Based on phantom measurements it was determined that adjusting the diameters of the spherical voxel size and the ToR in such a way that the actual voxel and ToR volumes are conserved leads to the best compromise between high spatial resolution, low noise, and suppression of Gibbs artefacts in the reconstructed images. Phantom as well as clinical datasets from two different PET systems (Siemens ECAT HR+ and Philips Ingenuity-TF PET/MR) were processed using the developed and the respective vendor-provided (line of intersection related) reconstruction algorithms. A comparison of the reconstructed images demonstrated very good performance of the new approach. The evaluation showed the respective vendor-provided reconstruction algorithms to possess 34-41% lower resolution compared to the developed one while exhibiting comparable noise levels. Contrary to explicit point spread function modelling our model has a simple straight-forward implementation and it should be easy to integrate into existing reconstruction software, making it competitive to other existing resolution recovery techniques.

  15. Collagen VI regulates pericellular matrix properties, chondrocyte swelling, and mechanotransduction in articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Zelenski, Nicole A.; Leddy, Holly A.; Sanchez-Adams, Johannah; Zhang, Jinzi; Bonaldo, Paolo; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Guilak, Farshid

    2015-01-01

    Objective Mechanical factors play a critical role in the physiology and pathology of articular cartilage, although the mechanisms of mechanical signal transduction are not fully understood. We examined the hypothesis that type VI collagen is necessary for mechanotransduction in articular cartilage, by determining the effects of type VI collagen knockout on the activation of the mechano-osmosensitive calcium-permeable channel, transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), osmotically-induced chondrocyte swelling, and pericellular matrix (PCM) mechanical properties. Methods Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to image TRPV4-mediated calcium signaling and osmotically-induced cell swelling in intact femora from 2 and 9 month old wild type (WT) and type VI collagen deficient (Col6a1−/−) mice. Immunofluorescence-guided atomic force microscopy was used to map PCM mechanical properties based on the presence of perlecan. Results Hypo-osmotic stress induced TRPV4-mediated calcium signaling was increased in Col6a1−/− mice relative to WT controls at 2 months. Col6a1−/− mice exhibited significantly increased osmotically-induced cell swelling and decreased PCM moduli relative to WT controls at both ages. Conclusion In contrast to our original hypothesis, type VI collagen was not required for TRPV4-mediated Ca2+ signaling; however, knockout of type VI collagen altered the mechanical properties of the PCM, which in turn increased the extent of cell swelling and osmotically-induced TRPV4 signaling in an age-dependent manner. These findings emphasize the role of the PCM as a transducer of mechanical and physicochemical signals, and suggest that alterations in PCM properties, as may occur with aging or osteoarthritis, can influence mechanotransduction via TRPV4 or other ion channels. PMID:25604429

  16. Mutations in the collagen XII gene define a new form of extracellular matrix-related myopathy.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Debbie; Farsani, Golara Torabi; Laval, Steven; Collins, James; Sarkozy, Anna; Martoni, Elena; Shah, Ashoke; Zou, Yaqun; Koch, Manuel; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Roberts, Mark; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker

    2014-05-01

    Bethlem myopathy (BM) [MIM 158810] is a slowly progressive muscle disease characterized by contractures and proximal weakness, which can be caused by mutations in one of the collagen VI genes (COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3). However, there may be additional causal genes to identify as in ∼50% of BM cases no mutations in the COL6 genes are identified. In a cohort of -24 patients with a BM-like phenotype, we first sequenced 12 candidate genes based on their function, including genes for known binding partners of collagen VI, and those enzymes involved in its correct post-translational modification, assembly and secretion. Proceeding to whole-exome sequencing (WES), we identified mutations in the COL12A1 gene, a member of the FACIT collagens (fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices) in five individuals from two families. Both families showed dominant inheritance with a clinical phenotype resembling classical BM. Family 1 had a single-base substitution that led to the replacement of one glycine residue in the triple-helical domain, breaking the Gly-X-Y repeating pattern, and Family 2 had a missense mutation, which created a mutant protein with an unpaired cysteine residue. Abnormality at the protein level was confirmed in both families by the intracellular retention of collagen XII in patient dermal fibroblasts. The mutation in Family 2 leads to the up-regulation of genes associated with the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway and swollen, dysmorphic rough-ER. We conclude that the spectrum of causative genes in extracellular matrix (ECM)-related myopathies be extended to include COL12A1. PMID:24334769

  17. Scaffolds for bone regeneration made of hydroxyapatite microspheres in a collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Cholas, Rahmatullah; Kunjalukkal Padmanabhan, Sanosh; Gervaso, Francesca; Udayan, Gayatri; Monaco, Graziana; Sannino, Alessandro; Licciulli, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Biomimetic scaffolds with a structural and chemical composition similar to native bone tissue may be promising for bone tissue regeneration. In the present work hydroxyapatite mesoporous microspheres (mHA) were incorporated into collagen scaffolds containing an ordered interconnected macroporosity. The mHA were obtained by spray drying of a nano hydroxyapatite slurry prepared by the precipitation technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed that the microspheres were composed only of hydroxyapatite (HA) phase, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed the Ca/P ratio to be 1.69 which is near the value for pure HA. The obtained microspheres had an average diameter of 6μm, a specific surface area of 40m(2)/g as measured by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis, and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) analysis showed a mesoporous structure with an average pore diameter of 16nm. Collagen/HA-microsphere (Col/mHA) composite scaffolds were prepared by freeze-drying followed by dehydrothermal crosslinking. SEM observations of Col/mHA scaffolds revealed HA microspheres embedded within a porous collagen matrix with a pore size ranging from a few microns up to 200μm, which was also confirmed by histological staining of sections of paraffin embedded scaffolds. The compressive modulus of the composite scaffold at low and high strain values was 1.7 and 2.8 times, respectively, that of pure collagen scaffolds. Cell proliferation measured by the MTT assay showed more than a 3-fold increase in cell number within the scaffolds after 15days of culture for both pure collagen scaffolds and Col/mHA composite scaffolds. Attractive properties of this composite scaffold include the potential to load the microspheres for drug delivery and the controllability of the pore structure at various length scales. PMID:27040244

  18. Comparison of 3D Reconstructive Technologies Used for Morphometric Research and the Translation of Knowledge Using a Decision Matrix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Charys M.; Roach, Victoria A.; Nguyen, Ngan; Rice, Charles L.; Wilson, Timothy D.

    2013-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) models for education, pre-operative assessment, presurgical planning, and measurement have become more prevalent. With the increase in prevalence of 3D models there has also been an increase in 3D reconstructive software programs that are used to create these models. These software programs differ in…

  19. Elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with collagen microfibers for soft tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Caves, Jeffrey M; Cui, Wanxing; Wen, Jing; Kumar, Vivek A; Haller, Carolyn A; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2011-08-01

    Artificial composites designed to mimic the structure and properties of native extracellular matrix may lead to acellular materials for soft tissue repair and replacement, which display mechanical strength, stiffness, and resilience resembling native tissue. We describe the fabrication of thin lamellae consisting of continuous collagen microfiber embedded at controlled orientations and densities in a recombinant elastin-like protein polymer matrix. Multilamellar stacking affords flexible, protein-based composite sheets whose properties are dependent upon both the elastomeric matrix and collagen content and organization. Sheets are produced with properties that range over 13-fold in elongation to break (23-314%), six-fold in Young's modulus (5.3-33.1 MPa), and more than two-fold in tensile strength (1.85-4.08 MPa), exceeding that of a number of native human tissues, including urinary bladder, pulmonary artery, and aorta. A sheet approximating the mechanical response of human abdominal wall fascia is investigated as a fascial substitute for ventral hernia repair. Protein-based composite patches prevent hernia recurrence in Wistar rats over an 8-week period with new tissue formation and sustained structural integrity. PMID:21550111

  20. Elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with collagen microfibers for soft tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Caves, Jeffrey M.; Cui, Wanxing; Wen, Jing; Kumar, Vivek A.; Haller, Carolyn A.; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2011-01-01

    Artificial composites designed to mimic the structure and properties of native extracellular matrix may lead to acellular materials for soft tissue repair and replacement, which display mechanical strength, stiffness, and resilience resembling native tissue. We describe the fabrication of thin lamellae consisting of continuous collagen microfiber embedded at controlled orientations and densities in a recombinant elastin-like protein polymer matrix. Multilamellar stacking affords flexible, protein-based composite sheets whose properties are dependent upon both the elastomeric matrix and collagen content and organization. Sheets are produced with properties that range over 13-fold in elongation to break (23 – 314%), six-fold in Young’s modulus (5.3 to 33.1 MPa), and more than two-fold in tensile strength (1.85 to 4.08 MPa), exceeding that of a number of native human tissues, including urinary bladder, pulmonary artery, and aorta. A sheet approximating the mechanical response of human abdominal wall fascia is investigated as a fascial substitute for ventral hernia repair. Protein-based composite patches prevent hernia recurrence in Wistar rats over an 8-week period with new tissue formation and sustained structural integrity. PMID:21550111

  1. Bioengineered 3D brain tumor model to elucidate the effects of matrix stiffness on glioblastoma cell behavior using PEG-based hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Christine; Tong, Xinming; Yang, Fan

    2014-07-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive form of primary brain tumor with a median survival of 12-15 months, and the mechanisms underlying GBM tumor progression remain largely elusive. Given the importance of tumor niche signaling in driving GBM progression, there is a strong need to develop in vitro models to facilitate analysis of brain tumor cell-niche interactions in a physiologically relevant and controllable manner. Here we report the development of a bioengineered 3D brain tumor model to help elucidate the effects of matrix stiffness on GBM cell fate using poly(ethylene-glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels with brain-mimicking biochemical and mechanical properties. We have chosen PEG given its bioinert nature and tunable physical property, and the resulting hydrogels allow tunable matrix stiffness without changing the biochemical contents. To facilitate cell proliferation and migration, CRGDS and a MMP-cleavable peptide were chemically incorporated. Hyaluronic acid (HA) was also incorporated to mimic the concentration in the brain extracellular matrix. Using U87 cells as a model GBM cell line, we demonstrate that such biomimetic hydrogels support U87 cell growth, spreading, and migration in 3D over the course of 3 weeks in culture. Gene expression analyses showed U87 cells actively deposited extracellular matrix and continued to upregulate matrix remodeling genes. To examine the effects of matrix stiffness on GBM cell fate in 3D, we encapsulated U87 cells in soft (1 kPa) or stiff (26 kPa) hydrogels, which respectively mimics the matrix stiffness of normal brain or GBM tumor tissues. Our results suggest that changes in matrix stiffness induce differential GBM cell proliferation, morphology, and migration modes in 3D. Increasing matrix stiffness led to delayed U87 cell proliferation inside hydrogels, but cells formed denser spheroids with extended cell protrusions. Cells cultured in stiff hydrogels also showed upregulation of HA synthase 1 and matrix

  2. Fluid flow increases mineralized matrix deposition in 3D perfusion culture of marrow stromal osteoblasts in a dose-dependent manner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bancroft, Gregory N.; Sikavitsas, Vassilios I.; van den Dolder, Juliette; Sheffield, Tiffany L.; Ambrose, Catherine G.; Jansen, John A.; Mikos, Antonios G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Bone is a complex highly structured mechanically active 3D tissue composed of cellular and matrix elements. The true biological environment of a bone cell is thus derived from a dynamic interaction between responsively active cells experiencing mechanical forces and a continuously changing 3D matrix architecture. To investigate this phenomenon in vitro, marrow stromal osteoblasts were cultured on 3D scaffolds under flow perfusion with different rates of flow for an extended period to permit osteoblast differentiation and significant matrix production and mineralization. With all flow conditions, mineralized matrix production was dramatically increased over statically cultured constructs with the total calcium content of the cultured scaffolds increasing with increasing flow rate. Flow perfusion induced de novo tissue modeling with the formation of pore-like structures in the scaffolds and enhanced the distribution of cells and matrix throughout the scaffolds. These results represent reporting of the long-term effects of fluid flow on primary differentiating osteoblasts and indicate that fluid flow has far-reaching effects on osteoblast differentiation and phenotypic expression in vitro. Flow perfusion culture permits the generation and study of a 3D, actively modeled, mineralized matrix and can therefore be a valuable tool for both bone biology and tissue engineering.

  3. A Prototype PZT Matrix Transducer With Low-Power Integrated Receive ASIC for 3-D Transesophageal Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Raghunathan, Shreyas B; Yu, Zili; Shabanimotlagh, Maysam; Chen, Zhao; Chang, Zu-yao; Blaak, Sandra; Prins, Christian; Ponte, Jacco; Noothout, Emile; Vos, Hendrik J; Bosch, Johan G; Verweij, Martin D; de Jong, Nico; Pertijs, Michiel A P

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, and experimental evaluation of a prototype lead zirconium titanate (PZT) matrix transducer with an integrated receive ASIC, as a proof of concept for a miniature three-dimensional (3-D) transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) probe. It consists of an array of 9 ×12 piezoelectric elements mounted on the ASIC via an integration scheme that involves direct electrical connections between a bond-pad array on the ASIC and the transducer elements. The ASIC addresses the critical challenge of reducing cable count, and includes front-end amplifiers with adjustable gains and micro-beamformer circuits that locally process and combine echo signals received by the elements of each 3 ×3 subarray. Thus, an order-of-magnitude reduction in the number of receive channels is achieved. Dedicated circuit techniques are employed to meet the strict space and power constraints of TEE probes. The ASIC has been fabricated in a standard 0.18-μm CMOS process and consumes only 0.44 mW/channel. The prototype has been acoustically characterized in a water tank. The ASIC allows the array to be presteered across ±37° while achieving an overall dynamic range of 77 dB. Both the measured characteristics of the individual transducer elements and the performance of the ASIC are in good agreement with expectations, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed techniques. PMID:26540683

  4. Physiological regulation of extracellular matrix collagen and elastin in the arterial wall of rats by noradrenergic tone and angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Dab, Houcine; Kacem, Kamel; Hachani, Rafik; Dhaouadi, Nadra; Hodroj, Wassim; Sakly, Mohsen; Randon, Jacques; Bricca, Giampiero

    2012-03-01

    The interactions between the effects of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and angiotensin II (ANG II) on vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis were determined in rats. The mRNA and protein content of collagen I, collagen III and elastin in the abdominal aorta (AA) and femoral artery (FA) was investigated in Wistar-Kyoto rats treated for 5 weeks with guanethidine, a sympathoplegic, losartan, an ANG II AT1 receptor (AT1R) blocker, or both. The effects of noradrenaline (NE) and ANG II on collagen III and elastin mRNA, and the receptor involved, were tested in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Guanethidine increased collagen types I and III and decreased elastin, while losartan had an opposite effect, although without effect on collagen III. The combination of treatments abrogated changes induced by simple treatment with collagen I and elastin, but increased collagen III mRNA in AA and not in FA. NE stimulated collagen III mRNA via β receptors and elastin via α1 and α2 receptors. ANG II stimulated collagen III but inhibited elastin mRNA via AT1R. Overall, SNS and ANG II exert opposite and antagonistic effects on major components of ECM in the vascular wall. This may be of relevance for the choice of a therapeutic strategy in vascular diseases. PMID:21729992

  5. Implementing a Matrix-free Analytical Jacobian to Handle Nonlinearities in Models of 3D Lithospheric Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaus, B.; Popov, A.

    2015-12-01

    The analytical expression for the Jacobian is a key component to achieve fast and robust convergence of the nonlinear Newton-Raphson iterative solver. Accomplishing this task in practice often requires a significant algebraic effort. Therefore it is quite common to use a cheap alternative instead, for example by approximating the Jacobian with a finite difference estimation. Despite its simplicity it is a relatively fragile and unreliable technique that is sensitive to the scaling of the residual and unknowns, as well as to the perturbation parameter selection. Unfortunately no universal rule can be applied to provide both a robust scaling and a perturbation. The approach we use here is to derive the analytical Jacobian for the coupled set of momentum, mass, and energy conservation equations together with the elasto-visco-plastic rheology and a marker in cell/staggered finite difference method. The software project LaMEM (Lithosphere and Mantle Evolution Model) is primarily developed for the thermo-mechanically coupled modeling of the 3D lithospheric deformation. The code is based on a staggered grid finite difference discretization in space, and uses customized scalable solvers form PETSc library to efficiently run on the massively parallel machines (such as IBM Blue Gene/Q). Currently LaMEM relies on the Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) nonlinear solver, which approximates the Jacobian-vector product using a simple finite difference formula. This approach never requires an assembled Jacobian matrix and uses only the residual computation routine. We use an approximate Jacobian (Picard) matrix to precondition the Krylov solver with the Galerkin geometric multigrid. Because of the inherent problems of the finite difference Jacobian estimation, this approach doesn't always result in stable convergence. In this work we present and discuss a matrix-free technique in which the Jacobian-vector product is replaced by analytically-derived expressions and compare results

  6. Libby amphibole-induced mesothelial cell autoantibodies bind to surface plasminogen and alter collagen matrix remodeling.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Robert; Evilia, Caryn; Gilmer, John; Woods, Linda; Black, Brad; Flores, Raja; Pfau, Jean C

    2016-08-01

    Lamellar pleural thickening (LPT) is a fibrotic disease induced by exposure to Libby amphibole (LA) asbestos that causes widespread scarring around the lung, resulting in deterioration of pulmonary function. Investigating the effects of autoantibodies to mesothelial cells (MCAA) present in the study populations has been a major part of the effort to understand the mechanism of pathogenesis. It has been shown in vitro that human mesothelial cells (Met5a) exposed to MCAA increase collagen deposition into the extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we sought to further elucidate how MCAA drive increased collagen deposition by identifying the protein targets bound by MCAA on the cellular surface using biotinylation to label and isolate surface proteins. Isolated surface protein fractions were identified as containing MCAA targets using ELISA The fractions that demonstrated binding by MCAA were then analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and MASCOT analysis. The most promising result from the MASCOT analysis, plasminogen (PLG), was tested for MCAA binding using purified human PLG in an ELISA We report that serum containing MCAA bound at an optical density (OD) 3 times greater than that of controls, and LA-exposed subjects had a high frequency of positive tests for anti-PLG autoantibodies. This work implicates the involvement of the plasminogen/plasmin system in the mechanism of excess collagen deposition in Met5a cells exposed to MCAA Elucidating this mechanism could contribute to the understanding of LPT. PMID:27519611

  7. Significant Type I and Type III Collagen Production from Human Periodontal Ligament Fibroblasts in 3D Peptide Scaffolds without Extra Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kumada, Yoshiyuki; Zhang, Shuguang

    2010-01-01

    We here report the development of two peptide scaffolds designed for periodontal ligament fibroblasts. The scaffolds consist of one of the pure self-assembling peptide scaffolds RADA16 through direct coupling to short biologically active motifs. The motifs are 2-unit RGD binding sequence PRG (PRGDSGYRGDS) and laminin cell adhesion motif PDS (PDSGR). RGD and laminin have been previously shown to promote specific biological activities including periodontal ligament fibroblasts adhesion, proliferation and protein production. Compared to the pure RADA16 peptide scaffold, we here show that these designer peptide scaffolds significantly promote human periodontal ligament fibroblasts to proliferate and migrate into the scaffolds (for ∼300 µm/two weeks). Moreover these peptide scaffolds significantly stimulated periodontal ligament fibroblasts to produce extracellular matrix proteins without using extra additional growth factors. Immunofluorescent images clearly demonstrated that the peptide scaffolds were almost completely covered with type I and type III collagens which were main protein components of periodontal ligament. Our results suggest that these designer self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds may be useful for promoting wound healing and especially periodontal ligament tissue regeneration. PMID:20421985

  8. A mouse 3T6 fibroblast cell culture model for the study of normal and protein-engineered collagen synthesis and deposition into the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Lamandé, S R; Bateman, J F

    1993-07-01

    Mouse 3T6 fibroblasts deposited an organized collagenous extracellular matrix during long-term culture in the presence of ascorbic acid. The matrix produced by the cells had a similar distribution of collagen types as the mouse dermal matrix, comprising predominantly type I with smaller amounts of types III and V collagens. By day 8 of culture more than 70% of the collagen in the 3T6 matrix was involved in covalent crosslinkages and required pepsin digestion for extraction. Incorporation of NaB3H4 into reducible crosslinks and aldehydes directly demonstrated the involvement of the alpha 1 (I)CB6 and alpha 2(I)CB3.5 in crosslinks. The pattern of reducible crosslinks in the in vitro 3T6 matrix was similar to that in mouse skin suggesting a comparable fibril organization. Processing of procollagen to collagen occurred efficiently throughout the culture period and the rate of collagen production was unaltered during 15 days of culture, indicating that the development of a collagenous matrix does not directly play a role in procollagen processing or biosynthetic regulation. The existence of a preformed matrix did however, increase the efficiency with which newly synthesised collagen was incorporated into the pericellular matrix. At day 0, when there was no measurable matrix present, 29% of the collagen synthesised was deposited, while by day 15, 88% of the collagen was laid down in the matrix. The development of this 3T6 culture system, where collagen is efficiently incorporated into an organized extracellular matrix, will facilitate detailed studies on matrix organization and regulation and provide a system in which protein-engineered mutant collagens can be expressed to determine their effects on the production of a functional extracellular matrix. PMID:8412990

  9. A nondenatured, noncrosslinked collagen matrix to deliver stem cells to the heart

    PubMed Central

    Kouris, Nicholas A; Squirrell, Jayne M; Jung, Jangwook P; Pehlke, Carolyn A; Hacker, Timothy; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Ogle, Brenda M

    2011-01-01

    Aims Stem cell transplantation holds promise as a therapeutic approach for the repair of damaged myocardial tissue. One challenge of this approach is efficient delivery and long-term retention of the stem cells. Although several synthetic and natural biomaterials have been developed for this purpose, the ideal formulation has yet to be identified. Materials & methods Here we investigate the utility of a nondenatured, noncrosslinked, commercially available natural biomaterial (TissueMend® [TEI Biosciences, Boston, MA, USA]) for delivery of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to the murine heart. Results We found that MSCs attached, proliferated and migrated within and out of the TissueMend matrix in vitro. Human MSCs delivered to damaged murine myocardium via the matrix (2.3 × 104 ± 0.8 × 104 CD73+ cells/matrix) were maintained in vivo for 3 weeks and underwent at least three population doublings during that period (21.9 × 104 ± 14.4 × 104 CD73+ cells/matrix). In addition, collagen within the TissueMend matrix could be remodeled by MSCs in vivo, resulting in a significant decrease in the coefficient of alignment of fibers (0.12 ± 0.12) compared with the matrix alone (0.28 ± 0.07), and the MSCs were capable of migrating out of the matrix and into the host tissue. Conclusion Thus, TissueMend matrix offers a commercially available, biocompatible and malleable vehicle for the delivery and retention of stem cells to the heart. PMID:21916593

  10. Endothelial cell culture on fibrillar collagen: model to study platelet adhesion and liposome targeting to intercellular collagen matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Chazov, E I; Alexeev, A V; Antonov, A S; Koteliansky, V E; Leytin, V L; Lyubimova, E V; Repin, V S; Sviridov, D D; Torchilin, V P; Smirnov, V N

    1981-01-01

    Human umbilical endothelial cells (ECs) were grown on fibrillar type I collagen in 16.4-mm multiwell tissue culture plates. Human platelets were added to the wells, and platelet adhesion to collagen was examined by scanning electron microscopy and radioisotopic technique in the absence of ECs and in preconfluent and confluent EC cultures. Single adherent platelets of different shapes as well as small aggregates were seen on collagen surface. Human plasma fibronectin added to the system stimulated platelet adhesion and their spreading on collagen. ECs had no effect on the percentage of platelets adherent to collagen-coated gaps in preconfluent culture but decreased the number of spread platelets. It is demonstrated that collagen-coated gaps can bind 14C-labeled liposome--antibody and 14-C-labeled liposome--fibronectin conjugates. ECs grown on fibrillar collagen are suggested as useful models for screening of antiplatelet drugs and for the study of drug targeting to the areas of vascular injury for prevention of thrombosis. Images PMID:6946497

  11. The crucial role of collagen-binding integrins in maintaining the mechanical properties of human scleral fibroblasts-seeded collagen matrix

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shoulong; Cui, Dongmei; Yang, Xiao; Hu, Jianmin; Wan, Wenjuan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to identify the presence of collagen-binding integrin subunits in human scleral fibroblasts (HSFs) and investigate their actual functions in maintaining the mechanical creep properties of the HSFs-seeded collagen matrix. Methods Primary HSFs were cultured in vitro. Reverse- transcription PCR was used to detect mRNA expression of integrin α1, α2, and β1 subunits in HSFs. In addition, western blot analysis and immunofluorescence were used to detect their protein in HSFs. Monoclonal antibodies were applied directly against the extracellular domains of integrin subunits in HSFs cultured in the three-dimensional collagen gels to block the interaction between HSFs and the extracellular collagen matrix. The effects of anti-integrin antibodies on HSFs morphology in collagen gel were observed. The effects of the added antibodies on fibroblast-mediated collagen gels’ contraction were evaluated. Furthermore, the changes in mechanical creep properties of collagen gel were measured by a biomechanics test instrument. Results The mRNA and protein expressions of collagen-binding integrin α1, α2, and β1 subunits were present in HSFs. The elongated bipolar cells converted to spherical shapes after 6 h after the addition of integrin α1β1 and α2β1 antibody. The blocking of integrin α1β1 and α2β1 subunits noticeably decreased the contraction in the collagen gels. In addition, all samples were subjected to a constantly applied load of 0.03 N for 600 s. The blocking of integrin α1β1 and α2β1 subunits also induced increases in the values of final extension, creep extension, and creep rate, compared to those of the controls (p<0.01). Furthermore, the creep elements were significantly increased with the augmentation of the integrin antibody dose (p<0.01). The final extension of the integrin α2β1 antibody (1 μg/ml or 4 μg/ml) group was significantly higher compared to that of the integrin α1β1 antibody (1 μg/ml or 4 μg/ml) group

  12. A microfluidic device for 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D cell navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamloo, Amir; Amirifar, Leyla

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices have received wide attention and shown great potential in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Investigating cell response to various stimulations is much more accurate and comprehensive with the aid of microfluidic devices. In this study, we introduced a microfluidic device by which the matrix density as a mechanical property and the concentration profile of a biochemical factor as a chemical property could be altered. Our microfluidic device has a cell tank and a cell culture chamber to mimic both 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D migration of three types of cells. Fluid shear stress is negligible on the cells and a stable concentration gradient can be obtained by diffusion. The device was designed by a numerical simulation so that the uniformity of the concentration gradients throughout the cell culture chamber was obtained. Adult neural cells were cultured within this device and they showed different branching and axonal navigation phenotypes within varying nerve growth factor (NGF) concentration profiles. Neural stem cells were also cultured within varying collagen matrix densities while exposed to NGF concentrations and they experienced 3D to 3D collective migration. By generating vascular endothelial growth factor concentration gradients, adult human dermal microvascular endothelial cells also migrated in a 2D to 3D manner and formed a stable lumen within a specific collagen matrix density. It was observed that a minimum absolute concentration and concentration gradient were required to stimulate migration of all types of the cells. This device has the advantage of changing multiple parameters simultaneously and is expected to have wide applicability in cell studies.

  13. Microarray-based transcriptional and epigenetic profiling of matrix metalloproteinases, collagens, and related genes in cancer.

    PubMed

    Chernov, Andrei V; Baranovskaya, Svetlana; Golubkov, Vladislav S; Wakeman, Dustin R; Snyder, Evan Y; Williams, Roy; Strongin, Alex Y

    2010-06-18

    Epigenetic parameters (DNA methylation, histone modifications, and miRNAs) play a significant role in cancer. To identify the common epigenetic signatures of both the individual matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the additional genes, the function of which is also linked to proteolysis, migration, and tumorigenesis, we performed epigenetic profiling of 486 selected genes in unrelated non-migratory MCF-7 breast carcinoma and highly migratory U251 glioma cells. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and microRNA analyses were used to support the results of our epigenetic studies. Transcriptional silencing in both glioma and breast carcinoma cells predominantly involved the repressive histone H3 Lys-27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) mark. In turn, epigenetic stimulation was primarily performed through a gain in the histone H3 Lys-4 dimethylation (H3K4me2) and H3 hyperacetylation and by a global reduction of H3K27me3. Inactive pro-invasive genes in MCF-7 cells but not in U251 cells frequently exhibited a stem cell-like bivalent mark (enrichment in both H3K27me3 and H3K4me2), a characteristic of developmental genes. In contrast with other MMPs, MMP-8 was epigenetically silenced in both cell types, thus providing evidence for the strict epigenetic control of this anti-tumorigenic proteinase in cancer. Epigenetic stimulation of multiple collagen genes observed in cultured glioma cells was then directly confirmed using orthotopic xenografts and tumor specimens. We suggest that the epigenetic mechanisms allow gliomas to deposit an invasion-promoting collagen-enriched matrix and then to use this matrix to accomplish their rapid migration through the brain tissue. PMID:20404328

  14. Location of type XV collagen in human tissues and its accumulation in the interstitial matrix of the fibrotic kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Hägg, P. M.; Hägg, P. O.; Peltonen, S.; Autio-Harmainen, H.; Pihlajaniemi, T.

    1997-01-01

    An antipeptide antibody was produced against the carboxyl-terminal noncollagenous domain of human type XV collagen and used to localize this recently described collagen in a number of human tissues. The most conspicuous findings were powerful staining of most of the capillaries and staining of the basement membrane (BM) zones of muscle cells. Not all of the BM zones were positive, however, as shown by the lack of staining in the developing fetal alveoli and some of the tubules in developing kidney. Nor was type XV collagen staining restricted to the BM zones, as some could be observed in the fibrillar collagen matrix of the papillary dermis and placental villi, for example. Interestingly, differences in the expression of type XV collagen could be observed during kidney development, and staining of fetal lung tissue suggested that changes in its expression may also occur during the formation of vascular structures. Another intriguing finding was pronounced renal interstitial type XV collagen staining in patients with kidney fibrosis due to different pathological processes. This suggests that the accumulation of type XV collagen may accompany fibrotic processes. Full-length human type XV collagen chains with an apparent molecular mass of approximately 200 kd were produced in insect cells using a baculovirus expression system. The fact that these had a markedly higher molecular mass than the 100- to 110-kd type XV collagen chains found in homogenates of heart and kidney tissue suggests either proteolytic processing during the synthesis of type XV collagen or an inability to solubilize complete molecules from tissues. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9176399

  15. Enterococcus faecalis adhesin, ace, mediates attachment to extracellular matrix proteins collagen type IV and laminin as well as collagen type I.

    PubMed

    Nallapareddy, S R; Qin, X; Weinstock, G M; Höök, M; Murray, B E

    2000-09-01

    Adhesin-mediated binding to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins is thought to be a crucial step in the pathogenic process of many bacterial infections. We have previously reported conditional adherence of most Enterococcus faecalis isolates, after growth at 46 degrees C, to ECM proteins collagen types I and IV and laminin; identified an E. faecalis-specific gene, ace, whose encoded protein has characteristics of a bacterial adhesin; and implicated Ace in binding to collagen type I. In this study, we constructed an ace disruption mutant from E. faecalis strain OG1RF that showed marked reduction in adherence to collagen types I and IV and laminin when compared to the parental OG1RF strain after growth at 46 degrees C. Polyclonal immune serum raised against the OG1RF-derived recombinant Ace A domain reacted with a single approximately 105-kDa band of mutanolysin extracts from OG1RF grown at 46 degrees C, while no band was detected in extracts from OG1RF grown at 37 degrees C, nor from the OG1RF ace mutant grown at 37 or 46 degrees C. IgGs purified from the anti-Ace A immune serum inhibited adherence of 46 degrees C-grown E. faecalis OG1RF to immobilized collagen type IV and laminin as well as collagen type I, at a concentration as low as 1 microg/ml, and also inhibited the 46 degrees C-evoked adherence of two clinical isolates tested. We also showed in vitro interaction of collagen type IV with Ace from OG1RF mutanolysin extracts on a far-Western blot. Binding of recombinant Ace A to immobilized collagen types I and IV and laminin was demonstrated in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and was shown to be concentration dependent. These results indicate that Ace A mediates the conditional binding of E. faecalis OG1RF to collagen type IV and laminin in addition to collagen type I. PMID:10948147

  16. Raman microspectroscopy: a noninvasive analysis tool for monitoring of collagen-containing extracellular matrix formation in a medium-throughput culture system.

    PubMed

    Kunstar, Aliz; Otto, Cees; Karperien, Marcel; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; van Apeldoorn, Aart

    2011-07-01

    The three-dimensional environment is known to play an important role in promoting cell-matrix interactions. We have investigated the possibility of using Raman microspectroscopy--which has the great advantage of noninvasive sensing--for in vitro monitoring of extracellular matrix (ECM) formation in a medium-throughput pellet (3D) culture system with soft-litography, agarose-microwell arrays. Chondrocytes were seeded in the agarose microwells in basic or chondrocyte medium. After 3, 7, and 14 days of culture, samples were analyzed for ECM formation by Raman microspectroscopy, histology, and immunofluorescence. ECM formation in the chondrocyte medium-cultured samples was detected by histology and immunofluorescence, and also noninvasively by Raman microspectroscopy. The Raman band of collagen found at 937 cm(-1) can be used as a Raman marker for collagen-containing ECM formation over time in the chondrocyte pellets. This culture system can be implemented as a medium-throughput platform for Raman applications and screening microtissue formation, since with these agarose-microwell arrays relatively large numbers of cell pellets could be screened in a short time in situ, without having to transfer the pellets onto microscopic slides. Moreover, in this manner the culture system is suitable for long-term, real-time live-cell measurements. PMID:21410304

  17. Matrix Cracking in 3D Orthogonal Melt-Infiltrated SiC/SiC Composites with Various Z-Fiber Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Yun, Hee Mann; DiCarlo, James A.

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of matrix cracks in melt-infiltrated SiC/SiC composites with a 3D orthogonal architecture was determined at room temperature for specimens tested in tension oriented in the X-direction (parallel to Z-bundle weave direction) and Y-direction (perpendicular to Z-bundle weave direction) and Y-direction (perpendicular to Z-bundle weave direction). The fiber-types were Sylramic and Sylramic-IBN in the X and Y-directions and lower modulus ZMI, T300, and rayon in the Z-direction. Acoustic emission (AE) was used to monitor the matrix cracking activity. For Y-direction composites, the AE data was used to determine the exact (+/- 0.25 mm) location where matrix cracks occurred in the 3D orthogonal architecture. This enabled the determination of the stress-dependent matrix crack distributions for small but repeatable matrix rich 'unidirectional' and the matrix poor 'cross-ply' regions within the architecture. It was found that matrix cracking initiated at very low stresses (approx. 40 MPa) in the 'unidirectional' regions for the largest z-direction fiber tow composites. Decreasing the size of the z-fiber bundle, increased the stress for matrix cracking in the 'unidirectional' regions. Matrix cracking in the 'cross-ply' regions always occurred at higher stresses than in 'unidirectional' regions, and the stress-dependent matrix crack distribution of the 'cross-ply' regions was always over a wider stress-range than the 'unidirectional' regions. For composites tested in the X-direction, a lower elastic modulus and a narrower and lower stress-range for matrix cracking were observed compared to composites tested in the Y-direction.

  18. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy to Quantify Collagen and Elastin in an In Vitro Model of Extracellular Matrix Degradation in Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Cheheltani, Rabee; McGoverin, Cushla M.; Rao, Jayashree; Vorp, David A.; Kiani, Mohammad F.; Pleshko, N.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key component and regulator of many biological tissues including aorta. Several aortic pathologies are associated with significant changes in the composition of the matrix, especially in the content, quality and type of aortic structural proteins, collagen and elastin. The purpose of this study was to develop an infrared spectroscopic methodology that is comparable to biochemical assays to quantify collagen and elastin in aorta. Enzymatically degraded porcine aorta samples were used as a model of ECM degradation in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). After enzymatic treatment, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of the aortic tissue were acquired by an infrared fiber optic probe (IFOP) and FTIR imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS). Collagen and elastin content were quantified biochemically and partial least squares (PLS) models were developed to predict collagen and elastin content in aorta based on FTIR spectra. PLS models developed from FT-IRIS spectra were able to predict elastin and collagen content of the samples with strong correlations (RMSE of validation = 8.4% and 11.1% of the range respectively), and IFOP spectra were successfully used to predict elastin content (RMSE = 11.3% of the range). The PLS regression coefficients from the FT-IRIS models were used to map collagen and elastin in tissue sections of degraded porcine aortic tissue as well as a human AAA biopsy tissue, creating a similar map of each component compared to histology. These results support further application of FTIR spectroscopic techniques for evaluation of AAA tissues. PMID:24761431

  19. Biomechanical evaluation of acellular collagen matrix augmented Achilles tendon repair in sheep.

    PubMed

    Song, Lin; Olsen, Raymond E; Spalazzi, Jeffrey P; Davisson, Twana

    2010-01-01

    The rate of rerupture of repaired Achilles tendon in young and athletic populations remains high despite improvement in surgical techniques, suture design, and postsurgical management. Acellular biological matrices can be used to enhance the immediate strength of repaired tendons and to serve as scaffolds for cell in-growth and constructive tissue remodeling. A number of commercially available matrices have been used clinically, albeit with varying degrees of success and failure. The disparity is likely attributable to the different physical and biochemical properties of individual matrices. In this study, we investigated the biomechanical characteristics of 2 different acellular collagen matrices, namely TissueMend and GraftJacket, using a sheep Achilles tendon repair model. Static and cyclic creep, cyclic and linear construct stiffness, maximum load to failure, and displacement at maximum load were determined at time zero. We found that the maximum load to failure, displacement, and ultimate failure mode were similar between tendons augmented with either acellular collagen matrix; however, TissueMend augmentation yielded lower creep and smaller construct elongation than did GraftJacket. The results indicated that the strength of TissueMend-augmented tendons and GraftJacket-augmented tendons was not statistically significantly different, although tendons augmented with TissueMend displayed greater stiffness, which may be clinically advantageous in the restoration of ruptured tendons. PMID:20797586

  20. Objective Assessment and Design Improvement of a Staring, Sparse Transducer Array by the Spatial Crosstalk Matrix for 3D Photoacoustic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kosik, Ivan; Raess, Avery

    2015-01-01

    Accurate reconstruction of 3D photoacoustic (PA) images requires detection of photoacoustic signals from many angles. Several groups have adopted staring ultrasound arrays, but assessment of array performance has been limited. We previously reported on a method to calibrate a 3D PA tomography (PAT) staring array system and analyze system performance using singular value decomposition (SVD). The developed SVD metric, however, was impractical for large system matrices, which are typical of 3D PAT problems. The present study consisted of two main objectives. The first objective aimed to introduce the crosstalk matrix concept to the field of PAT for system design. Figures-of-merit utilized in this study were root mean square error, peak signal-to-noise ratio, mean absolute error, and a three dimensional structural similarity index, which were derived between the normalized spatial crosstalk matrix and the identity matrix. The applicability of this approach for 3D PAT was validated by observing the response of the figures-of-merit in relation to well-understood PAT sampling characteristics (i.e. spatial and temporal sampling rate). The second objective aimed to utilize the figures-of-merit to characterize and improve the performance of a near-spherical staring array design. Transducer arrangement, array radius, and array angular coverage were the design parameters examined. We observed that the performance of a 129-element staring transducer array for 3D PAT could be improved by selection of optimal values of the design parameters. The results suggested that this formulation could be used to objectively characterize 3D PAT system performance and would enable the development of efficient strategies for system design optimization. PMID:25875177

  1. Fast and efficient fully 3D PET image reconstruction using sparse system matrix factorization with GPU acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian; Qi, Jinyi

    2011-10-01

    Statistically based iterative image reconstruction has been widely used in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The quality of reconstructed images depends on the accuracy of the system matrix that defines the mapping from the image space to the data space. However, an accurate system matrix is often associated with high computation cost and huge storage requirement. In this paper, we present a method to address this problem using sparse matrix factorization and graphics processor unit (GPU) acceleration. We factor the accurate system matrix into three highly sparse matrices: a sinogram blurring matrix, a geometric projection matrix and an image blurring matrix. The geometrical projection matrix is precomputed based on a simple line integral model, while the sinogram and image blurring matrices are estimated from point-source measurements. The resulting factored system matrix has far less nonzero elements than the original system matrix, which substantially reduces the storage and computation cost. The smaller matrix size also allows an efficient implementation of the forward and backward projectors on a GPU, which often has a limited memory space. Our experimental studies show that the proposed method can dramatically reduce the computation cost of high-resolution iterative image reconstruction, while achieving better performance than existing factorization methods.

  2. An in vitro force measurement assay to study the early mechanical interaction between corneal fibroblasts and collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Roy, P; Petroll, W M; Cavanagh, H D; Chuong, C J; Jester, J V

    1997-04-10

    An in vitro force measurement assay has been developed to quantify the forces exerted by single corneal fibroblasts during the early interaction with a collagen matrix. Corneal fibroblasts were sparsely seeded on top of collagen matrices whose stiffness was predetermined by micromanipulation with calibrated fine glass microneedles. The forces exerted by individual cells were calculated from time-lapse videomicroscopic recordings of the 2-D elastic distortion of the matrix. In additional experiments, the degree of permanent reorganization of the collagen matrices was assessed by lysing the cells with 1% Triton X-100 solution at the end of a 2-hour incubation and recording the subsequent relaxation. The data suggest that a cell can exert comparable centripetal force during either extension of a cell process or partial retraction of an extended pseudopodia. The rates of force associated with pseudopodial extension and partial retraction were 0.180 +/- 0.091 (x 10(-8)) N/min (n = 8 experiments) and 0.213 +/- 0.063 (x 10(-8)) N/min (n = 8 experiments), respectively. Rupture of pseudopodial adhesion associated with cell locomotion causes a release of force on the matrix and a complete recoil of the pseudopodia concerned; a simultaneous release of force on the matrix was also observed at the opposite end of the cell. Lysis of cells resulted in 84 +/- 18% relaxation of the matrix, suggesting that little permanent remodeling of matrix is produced by the actions of isolated migrating cells. PMID:9141627

  3. Effect of advanced glycation end products, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer and matrix metalloproteinases on type-I collagen metabolism

    PubMed Central

    LI, WANG; LING, WANG; TENG, XIAOMEI; QUAN, CUIXIA; CAI, SHENGNAN; HU, SHUQUN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the association among advanced glycation end products (AGEs), extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs), and investigate whether AGEs affect type I collagen (COL-I) through EMMPRIN or MMPs. A co-culture system with the osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3E1) and mouse RAW264.7 cells was employed to examine the effects of AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA) (50 mg/l), EMMPRIN antibody (5 mg/l) and AGE-BSA+EMMPRIN antibody separately on COL-I expression for 24 h. Culture media were analyzed for the content of COL-I by ELISA. The effect of different concentrations of AGE-BSA (0, 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/l) for 24 h was assessed on COL-I levels. Finally, semiquantitative RT-PCR was used to detect the osteoblast COL-I mRNA expression and MMP-2 and MMP-9's PMAO were also measured in the culture medium. COL-I content in the culture medium decreased significantly following treatment with AGE-BSA (P<0.05). EMMPRIN antibody increased COL-I content (P<0.05). EMMPRIN antibody+AGE-BSA increased COL-I significantly (P<0.05). Different concentrations of AGE-BSA increased COL-I mRNA expression significantly compared with the control group (P<0.05), and were enhanced with increasing AGE-BSA concentration (P<0.05). Also MMP-2 and MMP-9 secretion increased significantly (P<0.05), with the increasing AGE-BSA concentration. In conclusion, an increase in AGE levels in vitro stimulates the secretion of EMMPRIN/MMPs, promotes the degradation of COL-I and reduces bone strength. PMID:27284408

  4. The Role of Collagen Charge Clusters in the Modulation of Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Lauer, Janelle L.; Bhowmick, Manishabrata; Tokmina-Roszyk, Dorota; Lin, Yan; Van Doren, Steven R.; Fields, Gregg B.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family selectively cleave collagens in vivo. Several substrate structural features that direct MMP collagenolysis have been identified. The present study evaluated the role of charged residue clusters in the regulation of MMP collagenolysis. A series of 10 triple-helical peptide (THP) substrates were constructed in which either Lys-Gly-Asp or Gly-Asp-Lys motifs replaced Gly-Pro-Hyp (where Hyp is 4-hydroxy-l-proline) repeats. The stabilities of THPs containing the two different motifs were analyzed, and kinetic parameters for substrate hydrolysis by six MMPs were determined. A general trend for virtually all enzymes was that, as Gly-Asp-Lys motifs were moved from the extreme N and C termini to the interior next to the cleavage site sequence, kcat/Km values increased. Additionally, all Gly-Asp-Lys THPs were as good or better substrates than the parent THP in which Gly-Asp-Lys was not present. In turn, the Lys-Gly-Asp THPs were also always better substrates than the parent THP, but the magnitude of the difference was considerably less compared with the Gly-Asp-Lys series. Of the MMPs tested, MMP-2 and MMP-9 most greatly favored the presence of charged residues with preference for the Gly-Asp-Lys series. Lys-Gly-(Asp/Glu) motifs are more commonly found near potential MMP cleavage sites than Gly-(Asp/Glu)-Lys motifs. As Lys-Gly-Asp is not as favored by MMPs as Gly-Asp-Lys, the Lys-Gly-Asp motif appears advantageous over the Gly-Asp-Lys motif by preventing unwanted MMP hydrolysis. More specifically, the lack of Gly-Asp-Lys clusters may diminish potential MMP-2 and MMP-9 collagenolytic activity. The present study indicates that MMPs have interactions spanning the P23–P23′ subsites of collagenous substrates. PMID:24297171

  5. Maturational changes in laminin, fibronectin, collagen IV, and perlecan in germinal matrix, cortex, and white matter and effect of betamethasone.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongmin; Hu, Furong; Sado, Yoshikazu; Ninomiya, Yoshifumi; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Ungvari, Zoltan; Lagamma, Edmund F; Csiszar, Anna; Nedergaard, Maiken; Ballabh, Praveen

    2008-05-15

    Germinal matrix is selectively vulnerable to hemorrhage in premature infants, and use of prenatal betamethasone is associated with a lower occurrence of germinal matrix hemorrhage. Because the major components of extracellular matrix of the cerebral vasculature-laminin, fibronectin, collagen IV, and perlecan-provide structural stability to blood vessels, we examined whether the expression of these molecules was decreased in the germinal matrix and affected by betamethasone. In both human fetuses and premature infants, fibronectin was significantly lower in the germinal matrix than in the cortical mantle or white matter anlagen. Conversely, laminin alpha1 gene expression was greater in the human germinal matrix compared with the cortical mantle or white matter. Expression of alpha1- and alpha2(IV) collagen chains increased with advancing gestational age. Low-dose prenatal betamethasone treatment enhanced fibronectin level by 1.5-2-fold whereas a high dose reduced fibronectin expression by 2-fold in rabbit pups. Because fibronectin provides structural stability to the blood vessels, its reduced expression in the germinal matrix may contribute to the fragility of germinal matrix vasculature and the propensity to hemorrhage in premature neonates. PMID:18214989

  6. Granule Size–Dependent Bone Regenerative Capacity of Octacalcium Phosphate in Collagen Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Tanuma, Yuji; Anada, Takahisa; Honda, Yoshitomo; Kawai, Tadashi; Kamakura, Shinji; Echigo, Seishi

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine whether the osteoconductivity of octacalcium phosphate–collagen (OCP/Col) composite can be improved by controlling the granule size of OCP. The granules of synthetic OCP, with diameters in the range of 53 to 300, 300 to 500, and 500 to 1000 μm, were used as an inorganic source of composite materials mixed with atelo-Col. After vacuum dehydrothemal treatment, OCP/Col disks were implanted into critical-sized calvaria defects in Wistar rats for 4, 8, and 12 weeks and examined radiographically, histologically, histomorphometrically, and histochemically. The materials were characterized according to mercury intrusion porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction was performed before and after implantation. The dissolution of OCP crystals in a Col matrix was determined by immersing OCP/Col disks in a culture medium. OCP/Col had a constant pore size (∼30 μm) regardless of OCP granule size. OCP in the Col matrix tended to convert to hydroxyapatite (HA) during the implantation. OCP/Col with the smallest granules of OCP enhances both bone regeneration and biodegradation the most through tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclastic cellular resorption of OCP granules. The smallest OCP granules in the Col matrix showed the highest dissolution and had the greatest potential to form HA. The results indicated that the size of the included OCP granules can controll the osteoconductivity of OCP/Col. The overall results suggest that the physicochemical property of OCP crystals is a factor that determines the bone regenerative capacity of OCP/Col in critical-sized calvaria large bone defects in rats. PMID:21942921

  7. In vitro enhancement of collagen matrix formation and crosslinking for applications in tissue engineering: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Lareu, Ricky R; Arsianti, Irma; Subramhanya, Harve Karthik; Yanxian, Peng; Raghunath, Michael

    2007-02-01

    The construction of stable engineered tissue depends on the formation of a functional connective tissue produced by cells locally. A major component of connective tissue is collagen. Its deposition into a stable matrix depends on the enzymatic extracellular conversion of procollagen to collagen. This step is very slow in vitro and we hypothesized that this is due to a lack of crowdedness and insufficient excluded volume effect (EVE) in culture media. We used neutral (670 kDa) and negatively charged dextran sulfate (DxS, 500 kDa) to create EVE in cell cultures and to enhance in vitro matrix formation by accelerating procollagen conversion. Biochemical analyses in 2 human fibroblast lines revealed mostly unprocessed procollagen in uncrowded culture medium, whereas in the presence of DxS, procollagen conversion occurred and most of the collagen was associated with the cell layer. Immunocytochemistry confirmed DxS-related collagen deposition that colocalized with fibronectin. The large neutral dextran showed, in identical concentration ranges, no effects that correlated well with its smaller hydrodynamic radius as determined by dynamic light scattering. This predicted a 10 times bigger crowding power of DxS and benchmarks it as a potentially promising crowding agent facilitating the formation of extracellular matrix in vitro. PMID:17518571

  8. Disulfide-Based Diblock Copolymer Worm Gels: A Wholly-Synthetic Thermoreversible 3D Matrix for Sheet-Based Cultures.

    PubMed

    Simon, Karen A; Warren, Nicholas J; Mosadegh, Bobak; Mohammady, Marym R; Whitesides, George M; Armes, Steven P

    2015-12-14

    It is well-known that 3D in vitro cell cultures provide a much better model than 2D cell cultures for understanding the in vivo microenvironment of cells. However, significant technical challenges in handling and analyzing 3D cell cultures remain, which currently limits their widespread application. Herein, we demonstrate the application of wholly synthetic thermoresponsive block copolymer worms in sheet-based 3D cell culture. These worms form a soft, free-standing gel reversibly at 20-37 °C, which can be rapidly converted into a free-flowing dispersion of spheres on cooling to 5 °C. Functionalization of the worms with disulfide groups was found to be essential for ensuring sufficient mechanical stability of these hydrogels to enable long-term cell culture. These disulfide groups are conveniently introduced via statistical copolymerization of a disulfide-based dimethacrylate under conditions that favor intramolecular cyclization and subsequent thiol/disulfide exchange leads to the formation of reversible covalent bonds between adjacent worms within the gel. This new approach enables cells to be embedded within micrometer-thick slabs of gel with good viability, permits cell culture for at least 12 days, and facilitates recovery of viable cells from the gel simply by incubating the culture in buffer at 4 °C (thus, avoiding the enzymatic degradation required for cell harvesting when using commercial protein-based gels, such as Matrigel). PMID:26509930

  9. A Novel Matrix Protein Hic31 from the Prismatic Layer of Hyriopsis Cumingii Displays a Collagen-Like Structure

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shaojian; Jin, Can; Li, Jiale

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we clone and characterize a novel matrix protein, hic31, from the mantle of Hyriopsis cumingii. The amino acid composition of hic31 consists of a high proportion of Glycine residues (26.67%). Tissue expression detection by RT-PCR indicates that hic31 is expressed specifically at the mantle edge. In situ hybridization results reveals strong signals from the dorsal epithelial cells of the outer fold at the mantle edge, and weak signals from inner epithelial cells of the same fold, indicating that hic31 is a prismatic-layer matrix protein. Although BLASTP results identify no shared homology with other shell-matrix proteins or any other known proteins, the hic31 tertiary structure is similar to that of collagen I, alpha 1 and alpha 2. It has been well proved that collagen forms the basic organic frameworks in way of collagen fibrils and minerals present within or outside of these fibrils. Therefore, hic31 might be a framework-matrix protein involved in the prismatic-layer biomineralization. Besides, the gene expression of hic31 increase in the early stages of pearl sac development, indicating that hic31 may play important roles in biomineralization of the pearl prismatic layer. PMID:26262686

  10. Keratocytes are induced to produce collagen type II: A new strategy for in vivo corneal matrix regeneration.

    PubMed

    Greene, Carol Ann; Green, Colin R; Dickinson, Michelle E; Johnson, Virginia; Sherwin, Trevor

    2016-09-10

    The stroma, the middle layer of the cornea, is a connective tissue making up most of the corneal thickness. The stromal extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of highly organised lamellae which are made up of tightly packed fibrils primarily composed of collagens type I and V. This layer is interspersed with keratocytes, mesenchymal cells of neural crest origin. We have previously shown that adult corneal keratocytes exhibit phenotypic plasticity and can be induced into a neuronal phenotype. In the current study we evaluated the potential of keratocytes to produce collagen type II via phenotypic reprogramming with exogenous chondrogenic factors. The cornea presents a challenge to tissue engineers owing to its high level of organisation and the phenotypic instability of keratocytes. Traditional approaches based on a scar model do not support the engineering of functional stromal tissue. Type II collagen is not found in the adult cornea but is reported to be expressed during corneal development, raising the possibility of using such an approach to regenerate the corneal ECM. Keratocytes in culture and within intact normal and diseased tissue were induced to produce collagen type II upon treatment with transforming growth factor Beta3 (TGFβ3) and dexamethasone. In vivo treatment of rat corneas also resulted in collagen type II deposition and a threefold increase in corneal hardness and elasticity. Furthermore, the treatment of corneas and subsequent deposition of collagen type II did not cause opacity, fibrosis or scarring. The induction of keratocytes with specific exogenous factors and resulting deposition of type II collagen in the stroma can potentially be controlled by withdrawal of the factors. This might be a promising new approach for in vivo corneal regeneration strategies aimed at increasing corneal integrity in diseases associated with weakened ectatic corneal tissue such as keratoconus. PMID:27539660

  11. Computational Characterization of Type I collagen-based Extra-cellular Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Long; Jones, Christopher Allen Rucksack; Lin, Daniel; Jiao, Yang; Sun, Bo

    2015-03-01

    A model of extracellular matrix (ECM) of collagen fibers has been built, in which cells could communicate with distant partners via fiber-mediated long-range-transmitted stress states. The ECM is modeled as a spring-like fiber network derived from skeletonized confocal microscopy data. Different local and global perturbations have been performed on the network, each followed by an optimized global Monte-Carlo (MC) energy minimization leading to the deformed network in response to the perturbations. In the optimization, a highly efficient local energy update procedure is employed and force-directed MC moves are used, which results in a convergence to the energy minimum state 20 times faster than the commonly used random displacement trial moves in MC. Further analysis and visualization of the distribution and correlation of the resulting force network reveal that local perturbations can give rise to global impacts: the force chains formed with a linear extent much further than the characteristic length scale associated with the perturbation sites and average fiber length. This behavior provides a strong evidence for our hypothesis of fiber-mediated long-range force transmission in ECM networks and the resulting long-range cell-cell mechanical signaling. ASU Seed Grant.

  12. Collagen-Glycosaminoglycan Matrix Implantation Promotes Angiogenesis following Surgical Brain Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Cherng; Hsiao, Jong-Kai; Chen, Gunng-Shinng; Wang, Jia-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Surgical brain injury (SBI) is unavoidable during many neurosurgical procedures intrinsically linked to postoperative neurological deficits. We have previously demonstrated that implantation of collagen glycosaminoglycan (CG) following surgical brain injury could significantly promote functional recovery and neurogenesis. In this study we further hypothesized that this scaffold may provide a microenvironment by promoting angiogenesis to favor neurogenesis and subsequent functional recovery. Using the rodent model of surgical brain injury as we previously established, we divided Sprague-Dawley male rats (weighting 300–350 g) into three groups: (1) sham (2) surgical injury with a lesion (L), and (3) L with CG matrix implantation (L + CG). Our results demonstrated that L + CG group showed a statistically significant increase in the density of vascular endothelial cells and blood vessels over time. In addition, tissue concentrations of angiogenic growth factors (such as VEGF, FGF2, and PDGF) significantly increased in L + CG group. These results suggest that implantation of a CG scaffold can promote vascularization accompanied by neurogenesis. This opens prospects for use of CG scaffolds in conditions such as brain injury including trauma and ischemia. PMID:25309917

  13. Path to Collagenolysis: COLLAGEN V TRIPLE-HELIX MODEL BOUND PRODUCTIVELY AND IN ENCOUNTERS BY MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE-12.

    PubMed

    Prior, Stephen H; Byrne, Todd S; Tokmina-Roszyk, Dorota; Fields, Gregg B; Van Doren, Steven R

    2016-04-01

    Collagenolysis is essential in extracellular matrix homeostasis, but its structural basis has long been shrouded in mystery. We have developed a novel docking strategy guided by paramagnetic NMR that positions a triple-helical collagen V mimic (synthesized with nitroxide spin labels) in the active site of the catalytic domain of matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12 or macrophage metalloelastase) primed for catalysis. The collagenolytically productive complex forms by utilizing seven distinct subsites that traverse the entire length of the active site. These subsites bury ∼1,080 Å(2)of surface area, over half of which is contributed by the trailing strand of the synthetic collagen V mimic, which also appears to ligate the catalytic zinc through the glycine carbonyl oxygen of its scissile G∼VV triplet. Notably, the middle strand also occupies the full length of the active site where it contributes extensive interfacial contacts with five subsites. This work identifies, for the first time, the productive and specific interactions of a collagen triple helix with an MMP catalytic site. The results uniquely demonstrate that the active site of the MMPs is wide enough to accommodate two strands from collagen triple helices. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancements also reveal an extensive array of encounter complexes that form over a large part of the catalytic domain. These transient complexes could possibly facilitate the formation of collagenolytically active complexes via directional Brownian tumbling. PMID:26887942

  14. Filamin A Mediates Wound Closure by Promoting Elastic Deformation and Maintenance of Tension in the Collagen Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Hamid; Pinto, Vanessa I.; Wang, Yongqiang; Hinz, Boris; Janmey, Paul A.; McCulloch, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-mediated remodeling and wound closure are critical for efficient wound healing, but the contribution of actin-binding proteins to contraction of the extracellular matrix is not defined. We examined the role of filamin A (FLNa), an actin filament cross-linking protein, in wound contraction and maintenance of matrix tension. Conditional deletion of FLNa in fibroblasts in mice was associated with ~ 4 day delay of full-thickness skin wound contraction compared with wild-type (WT) mice. We modeled the healing wound matrix using cultured fibroblasts plated on grid-supported collagen gels that create lateral boundaries, which are analogues to wound margins. In contrast to WT cells, FLNa knockdown (KD) cells could not completely maintain tension when matrix compaction was resisted by boundaries, which manifested as relaxed matrix tension. Similarly, WT cells on cross-linked collagen, which requires higher levels of sustained tension, exhibited approximately fivefold larger deformation fields and approximately twofold greater fiber alignment compared with FLNa KD cells. Maintenance of boundary-resisted tension markedly influenced the elongation of cell extensions: in WT cells, the number (~50%) and length (~300%) of cell extensions were greater than FLNa KD cells. We conclude that FLNa is required for wound contraction, in part by enabling elastic deformation and maintenance of tension in the matrix. PMID:26134946

  15. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 enhances platelet deposition on collagen under flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Guglielmini, Giuseppe; Appolloni, Viviana; Momi, Stefania; De Groot, Philip G; Battiston, Monica; De Marco, Luigi; Falcinelli, Emanuela; Gresele, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Platelets contain and release matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) that in turn potentiates platelet aggregation. Platelet deposition on a damaged vascular wall is the first, crucial, step leading to thrombosis. Little is known about the effects of MMP-2 on platelet activation and adhesion under flow conditions. We studied the effect of MMP-2 on shear-dependent platelet activation using the O'Brien filtration system, and on platelet deposition using a parallel-plate perfusion chamber. Preincubation of human whole blood with active MMP-2 (50 ng/ml, i.e. 0.78 nM) shortened filter closure time (from 51.8 ± 3.6 sec to 40 ± 2.7 sec, p<0.05) and increased retained platelets (from 72.3 ± 2.3% to 81.1 ± 1.8%, p<0.05) in the O'Brien system, an effect prevented by a specific MMP-2 inhibitor. High shear stress induced the release of MMP-2 from platelets, while TIMP-2 levels were not significantly reduced, therefore, the MMP-2/TIMP-2 ratio increased significantly showing enhanced MMP-2 activity. Preincubation of whole blood with active MMP-2 (0.5 to 50 ng/ml, i.e 0.0078 to 0.78 nM) increased dose-dependently human platelet deposition on collagen under high shear-rate flow conditions (3000 sec⁻¹) (maximum +47.0 ± 11.9%, p<0.05, with 50 ng/ml), while pre-incubation with a MMP-2 inhibitor reduced platelet deposition. In real-time microscopy studies, increased deposition of platelets on collagen induced by MMP-2 started 85 sec from the beginning of perfusion, and was abolished by a GPIIb/IIIa antagonist, while MMP-2 had no effect on platelet deposition on fibrinogen or VWF. Confocal microscopy showed that MMP-2 enhances thrombus volume (+20.0 ± 3.0% vs control) rather than adhesion. In conclusion, we show that MMP-2 potentiates shear-induced platelet activation by enhancing thrombus formation. PMID:26510894

  16. Disentangling the multifactorial contributions of fibronectin, collagen and cyclic strain on MMP expression and extracellular matrix remodeling by fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Lin, Zhe; Foolen, Jasper; Schoen, Ingmar; Santoro, Alberto; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy; Vogel, Viola

    2014-11-01

    Early wound healing is associated with fibroblasts assembling a provisional fibronectin-rich extracellular matrix (ECM), which is subsequently remodeled and interlaced by type I collagen. This exposes fibroblasts to time-variant sets of matrices during different stages of wound healing. Our goal was thus to gain insight into the ECM-driven functional regulation of human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) being either anchored to a fibronectin (Fn) or to a collagen-decorated matrix, in the absence or presence of cyclic mechanical strain. While the cells reoriented in response to the onset of uniaxial cyclic strain, cells assembled exogenously added Fn with a preferential Fn-fiber alignment along their new orientation. Exposure of HFFs to exogenous Fn resulted in an increase in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression levels, i.e. MMP-15 (RT-qPCR), and MMP-9 activity (zymography), while subsequent exposure to collagen slightly reduced MMP-15 expression and MMP-9 activity compared to Fn-exposure alone. Cyclic strain upregulated Fn fibrillogenesis and actin stress fiber formation, but had comparatively little effect on MMP activity. We thus propose that the appearance of collagen might start to steer HFFs towards homeostasis, as it decreased both MMP secretion and the tension of Fn matrix fibrils as assessed by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer. These results suggest that HFFs might have a high ECM remodeling or repair capacity in contact with Fn alone (early event), which is reduced in the presence of Col1 (later event), thereby down-tuning HFF activity, a processes which would be required in a tissue repair process to finally reach tissue homeostasis. PMID:25217861

  17. Mineralisation of reconstituted collagen using polyvinylphosphonic acid/polyacrylic acid templating matrix protein analogues in the presence of calcium, phosphate and hydroxyl ions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Kyung; Gu, Li-sha; Bryan, Thomas E.; Kim, Jong Ryul; Chen, Liang; Liu, Yan; Yoon, James C.; Breschi, Lorenzo; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2010-01-01

    The complex morphologies of mineralised collagen fibrils are regulated through interactions between the collagen matrix and non-collagenous extracellular proteins. In the present study, polyvinylphosphonic acid, a biomimetic analogue of matrix phosphoproteins, was synthesised and confirmed with FTIR and NMR. Biomimetic mineralisation of reconstituted collagen fibrils devoid of natural non-collagenous proteins was demonstrated with TEM using a Portland cement-containing resin composite and a phosphate-containing fluid in the presence of polyacrylic acid as sequestration, and polyvinylphosphonic acid as templating matrix protein analogues. In the presence of these dual biomimetic analogues in the mineralisation medium, intrafibrillar and extrafibrillar mineralisation via bottom-up nanoparticle assembly based on the nonclassical crystallisation pathway could be identified. Conversely, only large mineral spheres with no preferred association with collagen fibrils were observed in the absence of biomimetic analogues in the medium. Mineral phases were evident within the collagen fibrils as early as 4 hours after the initially-formed amorphous calcium phosphate nanoprecursors were transformed into apatite nanocrystals. Selected area electron diffraction patterns of highly mineralised collagen fibrils were nearly identical to those of natural bone, with apatite crystallites preferentially aligned along the collagen fibril axes. PMID:20621767

  18. Mineralisation of reconstituted collagen using polyvinylphosphonic acid/polyacrylic acid templating matrix protein analogues in the presence of calcium, phosphate and hydroxyl ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Kyung; Gu, Li-sha; Bryan, Thomas E; Kim, Jong R; Chen, Liang; Liu, Yan; Yoon, James C; Breschi, Lorenzo; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2010-09-01

    The complex morphologies of mineralised collagen fibrils are regulated through interactions between the collagen matrix and non-collagenous extracellular proteins. In the present study, polyvinylphosphonic acid, a biomimetic analogue of matrix phosphoproteins, was synthesised and confirmed with FTIR and NMR. Biomimetic mineralisation of reconstituted collagen fibrils devoid of natural non-collagenous proteins was demonstrated with TEM using a Portland cement-containing resin composite and a phosphate-containing fluid in the presence of polyacrylic acid as sequestration, and polyvinylphosphonic acid as templating matrix protein analogues. In the presence of these dual biomimetic analogues in the mineralisation medium, intrafibrillar and extrafibrillar mineralisation via bottom-up nanoparticle assembly based on the non-classical crystallisation pathway could be identified. Conversely, only large mineral spheres with no preferred association with collagen fibrils were observed in the absence of biomimetic analogues in the medium. Mineral phases were evident within the collagen fibrils as early as 4 h after the initially-formed amorphous calcium phosphate nanoprecursors were transformed into apatite nanocrystals. Selected area electron diffraction patterns of highly mineralised collagen fibrils were nearly identical to those of natural bone, with apatite crystallites preferentially aligned along the collagen fibril axes. PMID:20621767

  19. Collagen-hyaluronic acid scaffolds for adipose tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Davidenko, N; Campbell, J J; Thian, E S; Watson, C J; Cameron, R E

    2010-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) in vitro models of the mammary gland require a scaffold matrix that supports the development of adipose stroma within a robust freely permeable matrix. 3-D porous collagen-hyaluronic acid (HA: 7.5% and 15%) scaffolds were produced by controlled freeze-drying technique and crosslinking with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide hydrochloride. All scaffolds displayed uniform, interconnected pore structure (total porosity approximately 85%). Physical and chemical analysis showed no signs of collagen denaturation during the formation process. The values of thermal characteristics indicated that crosslinking occurred and that its efficiency was enhanced by the presence of HA. Although the crosslinking reduced the swelling of the strut material in water, the collagen-HA matrix as a whole tended to swell more and show higher dissolution resistance than pure collagen samples. The compressive modulus and elastic collapse stress were higher for collagen-HA composites. All the scaffolds were shown to support the proliferation and differentiation 3T3-L1 preadipocytes while collagen-HA samples maintained a significantly increased proportion of cycling cells (Ki-67+). Furthermore, collagen-HA composites displayed significantly raised Adipsin gene expression with adipogenic culture supplementation for 8 days vs. control conditions. These results indicate that collagen-HA scaffolds may offer robust, freely permeable 3-D matrices that enhance mammary stromal tissue development in vitro. PMID:20466086

  20. D-Glucose as a modifying agent in gelatin/collagen matrix and reservoir nanoparticles for Calendula officinalis delivery.

    PubMed

    Lam, P-L; Kok, S H-L; Bian, Z-X; Lam, K-H; Tang, J C-O; Lee, K K-H; Gambari, R; Chui, C-H

    2014-05-01

    Gelatin/Collagen-based matrix and reservoir nanoparticles require crosslinkers to stabilize the formed nanosuspensions, considering that physical instability is the main challenge of nanoparticulate systems. The use of crosslinkers improves the physical integrity of nanoformulations under the-host environment. Aldehyde-based fixatives, such as formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde, have been widely applied to the crosslinking process of polymeric nanoparticles. However, their potential toxicity towards human beings has been demonstrated in many previous studies. In order to tackle this problem, D-glucose was used during nanoparticle formation to stabilize the gelatin/collagen-based matrix wall and reservoir wall for the deliveries of Calendula officinalis powder and oil, respectively. In addition, therapeutic selectivity between malignant and normal cells could be observed. The C. officinalis powder loaded nanoparticles significantly strengthened the anti-cancer effect towards human breast adenocarcinoma MCF7 cells and human hepatoma SKHep1 cells when compared with the free powder. On the contrary, the nanoparticles did not show significant cytotoxicity towards normal esophageal epithelial NE3 cells and human skin keratinocyte HaCaT cells. On the basis of these evidences, D-glucose modified gelatin/collagen matrix nanoparticles containing C. officinalis powder might be proposed as a safer alternative vehicle for anti-cancer treatments. PMID:24657927

  1. Maintaining human fetal pancreatic stellate cell function and proliferation require β1 integrin and collagen I matrix interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bijun; Li, Jinming; Fellows, George F.; Sun, Zilin; Wang, Rennian

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PaSCs) are cells that are located around the acinar, ductal, and vasculature tissue of the rodent and human pancreas, and are responsible for regulating extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover and maintaining the architecture of pancreatic tissue. This study examines the contributions of integrin receptor signaling in human PaSC function and survival. Human PaSCs were isolated from pancreata collected during the 2nd trimester of pregnancy and identified by expression of stellate cell markers, ECM proteins and associated growth factors. Multiple integrins are found in isolated human PaSCs, with high levels of β1, α3 and α5. Cell adhesion and migration assays demonstrated that human PaSCs favour collagen I matrix, which enhanced PaSC proliferation and increased TGFβ1, CTGF and α3β1 integrin. Significant activation of FAK/ERK and AKT signaling pathways, and up-regulation of cyclin D1 protein levels, were observed within PaSCs cultured on collagen I matrix. Blocking β1 integrin significantly decreased PaSC adhesion, migration and proliferation, further complementing the aforementioned findings. This study demonstrates that interaction of β1 integrin with collagen I is required for the proliferation and function of human fetal PaSCs, which may contribute to the biomedical engineering of the ECM microenvironment needed for the efficient regulation of pancreatic development. PMID:26062655

  2. Mussel adhesive protein provides cohesive matrix for collagen type-1α

    PubMed Central

    Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R.; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Wei, Wei; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the interactions between collagen and adhesive mussel foot proteins (mfps) can lead to improved medical and dental adhesives, particularly for collagen-rich tissues. Here we investigated interactions between collagen type-1, the most abundant loadbearing animal protein, and mussel foot protein-3 (mfp-3) using a quartz crystal microbalance and surface forces apparatus (SFA). Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic variants of mfp-3 were exploited to probe the nature of the interaction between the protein and collagen. Our chief findings are: 1) mfp-3 is an effective chaperone for tropocollagen adsorption to TiO2 and mica surfaces; 2) at pH 3, collagen addition between two mfp-3 films (Wc = 5.4 ± 0.2 mJ/m2) increased their cohesion by nearly 35%; 3) oxidation of Dopa in mfp-3 by periodate did not abolish the adhesion between collagen and mfp-3 films, and 4) collagen bridging between both hydrophilic and hydrophobic mfp-3 variant films is equally robust, suggesting that hydrophobic interactions play a minor role. Extensive H-bonding, π-cation and electrostatic interactions are more plausible to explain the reversible bridging of mfp-3 films by collagen. PMID:25770997

  3. Mussel adhesive protein provides cohesive matrix for collagen type-1α.

    PubMed

    Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Wei, Wei; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the interactions between collagen and adhesive mussel foot proteins (mfps) can lead to improved medical and dental adhesives, particularly for collagen-rich tissues. Here we investigated interactions between collagen type-1, the most abundant load-bearing animal protein, and mussel foot protein-3 (mfp-3) using a quartz crystal microbalance and surface forces apparatus (SFA). Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic variants of mfp-3 were exploited to probe the nature of the interaction between the protein and collagen. Our chief findings are: 1) mfp-3 is an effective chaperone for tropocollagen adsorption to TiO2 and mica surfaces; 2) at pH 3, collagen addition between two mfp-3 films (Wc = 5.4 ± 0.2 mJ/m(2)) increased their cohesion by nearly 35%; 3) oxidation of Dopa in mfp-3 by periodate did not abolish the adhesion between collagen and mfp-3 films, and 4) collagen bridging between both hydrophilic and hydrophobic mfp-3 variant films is equally robust, suggesting that hydrophobic interactions play a minor role. Extensive H-bonding, π-cation and electrostatic interactions are more plausible to explain the reversible bridging of mfp-3 films by collagen. PMID:25770997

  4. A composite SWNT-collagen matrix: characterization and preliminary assessment as a conductive peripheral nerve regeneration matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosun, Z.; McFetridge, P. S.

    2010-12-01

    Unique in their structure and function, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have received significant attention due to their potential to create unique conductive materials. For neural applications, these conductive materials hold promise as they may enhance regenerative processes. However, like other nano-scaled biomaterials it is important to have a comprehensive understanding how these materials interact with cell systems and how the biological system responds to their presence. These investigations aim to further our understanding of SWNT-cell interactions by assessing the effect SWNT/collagen hydrogels have on PC12 neuronal-like cells seeded within and (independently) on top of the composite material. Two types of collagen hydrogels were prepared: (1) SWNTs dispersed directly within the collagen (SWNT/COL) and (2) albumin-coated SWNTs prepared using the surfactant 'sodium cholate' to improve dispersion (AL-SWNT/COL) and collagen alone serving as a control (COL). SWNT dispersion was significantly improved when using surfactant-assisted dispersion. The enhanced dispersion resulted in a stiffer, more conductive material with an increased collagen fiber diameter. Short-term cell interactions with PC12 cells and SWNT composites have shown a stimulatory effect on cell proliferation relative to plain collagen controls. In parallel to these results, p53 gene displayed normal expression levels, which indicates the absence of nanoparticle-induced DNA damage. In summary, these mechanically tunable SWNT-collagen scaffolds show the potential for enhanced electrical activity and have shown positive in vitro biocompatibility results offering further evidence that SWNT-based materials have an important role in promoting neuronal regeneration.

  5. PDGF‑stimulated dispersal of cell clusters and disruption of fibronectin matrix on three-dimensional collagen matrices requires matrix metalloproteinase-2

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno; Ho, Chin-Han; Grinnell, Frederick

    2015-01-01

    Formation of cell clusters is a common morphogenic cell behavior observed during tissue and organ development and homeostasis, as well as during pathological disorders. Dynamic regulation of cell clustering depends on the balance between contraction of cells into clusters and migration of cells as dispersed individuals. Previously we reported that under procontractile culture conditions, fibronectin fibrillar matrix assembly by human fibroblasts functioned as a nucleation center for cell clustering on three-dimensional collagen matrices. Here we report that switching preformed cell clusters from procontractile to promigratory culture conditions results in cell dispersal out of clusters and disruption of FN matrix. Experiments using small interfering RNA silencing and pharmacological inhibition demonstrated that matrix metalloproteinase activity involving MMP-2 was necessary for fibronectin matrix disruption and dispersal of cell clusters. PMID:25589674

  6. Activated hepatic stellate cells are dependent on self-collagen, cleaved by membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase for their growth.

    PubMed

    Birukawa, Naoko Kubo; Murase, Kazuyuki; Sato, Yasushi; Kosaka, Akemi; Yoneda, Akihiro; Nishita, Hiroki; Fujita, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Miyuki; Ninomiya, Takafumi; Kajiwara, Keiko; Miyazaki, Miyono; Nakashima, Yusuke; Ota, Sigenori; Murakami, Yuya; Tanaka, Yasunobu; Minomi, Kenjiro; Tamura, Yasuaki; Niitsu, Yoshiro

    2014-07-18

    Stellate cells are distributed throughout organs, where, upon chronic damage, they become activated and proliferate to secrete collagen, which results in organ fibrosis. An intriguing property of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is that they undergo apoptosis when collagen is resolved by stopping tissue damage or by treatment, even though the mechanisms are unknown. Here we disclose the fact that HSCs, normal diploid cells, acquired dependence on collagen for their growth during the transition from quiescent to active states. The intramolecular RGD motifs of collagen were exposed by cleavage with their own membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP). The following evidence supports this conclusion. When rat activated HSCs (aHSCs) were transduced with siRNA against the collagen-specific chaperone gp46 to inhibit collagen secretion, the cells underwent autophagy followed by apoptosis. Concomitantly, the growth of aHSCs was suppressed, whereas that of quiescent HSCs was not. These in vitro results are compatible with the in vivo observation that apoptosis of aHSCs was induced in cirrhotic livers of rats treated with siRNAgp46. siRNA against MT1-MMP and addition of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2), which mainly inhibits MT1-MMP, also significantly suppressed the growth of aHSCs in vitro. The RGD inhibitors echistatin and GRGDS peptide and siRNA against the RGD receptor αVβ1 resulted in the inhibition of aHSCs growth. Transduction of siRNAs against gp46, αVβ1, and MT1-MMP to aHSCs inhibited the survival signal of PI3K/AKT/IκB. These results could provide novel antifibrosis strategies. PMID:24867951

  7. Lentiviral shRNA knockdown of ADAMTS-5 and -9 restores matrix deposition in 3D chondrocyte culture

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, Teresa C; Crawford, Aileen; Goldring, Mary B; Hatton, Paul V; Barker, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    Aggrecan is one of the two major constituents of articular cartilage, and during diseases such as osteoarthritis (OA) it is subject to degradation by proteolytic enzymes. The primary proteases responsible for aggrecan cleavage are the aggrecanases, identified as members of the ADAMTS family of proteases, which are upregulated in response to inflammatory stimuli. It is uncertain which of the 6 aggrecanases (ADAMTS-1, -4, -5, -8, -9 and -15) are primarily responsible for the degradation of aggrecan in human cartilage. Here we show that 4 of the 6 aggrecanases are expressed in immortalized chondrocyte cell-lines and can be up-regulated in response to inflammatory cytokines. Using RNA interference, we demonstrate robust knockdown of ADAMTS-5 and -9 expression in these cells, and by culturing them on 3 dimensional scaffolds, show that reduction in expression of ADAMTS-5 enzyme results in an increase in matrix deposition. These data suggest that the quality of tissue-engineered cartilage matrix might be improved by targeted depletion of aggrecanase expression. Moreover, this work also provides further evidence that ADAMTS-5 may be a therapeutic target in the treatment of arthritic disease. PMID:20568084

  8. Xenogeneic collagen matrix for periodontal plastic surgery procedures: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Atieh, M A; Alsabeeha, N; Tawse-Smith, A; Payne, A G T

    2016-08-01

    Several clinical trials describe the effectiveness of xenogeneic collagen matrix (XCM) as an alternative option to surgical mucogingival procedures for the treatment of marginal tissue recession and augmentation of insufficient zones of keratinized tissue (KT). The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the clinical and patient-centred outcomes of XCM compared to other mucogingival procedures. Applying guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta analyses statement, randomized controlled trials were searched for in electronic databases and complemented by hand searching. The risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's Risk of Bias tool and data were analysed using statistical software. A total of 645 studies were identified, of which, six trials were included with 487 mucogingival defects in 170 participants. Overall meta-analysis showed that connective tissue graft (CTG) in conjunction with the coronally advanced flap (CAF) had a significantly higher percentage of complete/mean root coverage and mean recession reduction than XCM. Insufficient evidence was found to determine any significant differences in width of KT between XCM and CTG. The XCM had a significantly higher mean root coverage, recession reduction and gain in KT compared to CAF alone. No significant differences in patient's aesthetic satisfaction were found between XCM and CTG, except for postoperative morbidity in favour of XCM. Operating time was significantly reduced with the use of XCM compared with CTG but not with CAF alone. There is no evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of XCM in achieving greater root coverage, recession reduction and gain in KT compared to CTG plus CAF. Superior short-term results in treating root coverage compared with CAF alone are possible. There is limited evidence that XCM may improve aesthetic satisfaction, reduce postoperative morbidity and shorten the operating time. Further long

  9. The use of an acellular collagen matrix in penile augmentation: A pilot study in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Tealab, Alaa A.; Maarouf, Aref M.; Habous, Mohamed; Ralph, David J.; Abohashem, Safwat

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess the use of an acellular collagen matrix (Pelvicol, Bard Medical, Covington, GA, USA), a successful agent for reconstructive surgery, for enhancing penile girth. Patients and methods Between June and December 2011, 18 patients (mean age 24 years, range 19–38) had their penis augmented with Pelvicol; the mean (range) penile circumference was 9.2 (7–13) cm before treatment. They were divided into two groups; the first (10 patients) had a Pelvicol sheet of 8 × 12 cm inserted through a V–Y suprapubic incision and wrapped around the shaft in a bilayer under the dartos fascia, but not covering the urethra, with division of the suspensory ligament. The second group of eight patients had the Pelvicol inserted through a subcoronal degloving incision and placed in one layer. The penile circumference was measured at 6 and 12 months after surgery. Patient satisfaction at 1 year after surgery was assessed as ‘poor’, ‘unsatisfied’, ‘moderately satisfied’, ‘highly satisfied’, or ‘excellent’. Results The mean (range) increase in girth (circumference) was 2.8 (2–3.2) cm in group 1 and 1.7 (1.2–2) cm in group 2. In group 1, two patients were highly satisfied, four moderately satisfied and four unsatisfied; in group 2, three were moderately satisfied and five unsatisfied. Complications were common in both groups, with five patients in group 1 and three in group 2 developing severe penile oedema and ischaemic shaft ulcers. Removal of the graft was required in two patients in each group. Conclusion This pilot study shows that Pelvicol is not an ideal option for enhancing penile girth, and the method of placement did not apparently influence the result. PMID:26558077

  10. Mechanical, Electromagnetic, and X-ray Shielding Characterization of a 3D Printable Tungsten-Polycarbonate Polymer Matrix Composite for Space-Based Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemelya, Corey M.; Rivera, Armando; Perez, Angel Torrado; Rocha, Carmen; Liang, Min; Yu, Xiaoju; Kief, Craig; Alexander, David; Stegeman, James; Xin, Hao; Wicker, Ryan B.; MacDonald, Eric; Roberson, David A.

    2015-08-01

    Material-extrusion three-dimensional (3D) printing has recently attracted much interest because of its process flexibility, rapid response to design alterations, and ability to create structures "on-the-go". For this reason, 3D printing has possible applications in rapid creation of space-based devices, for example cube satellites (CubeSat). This work focused on fabrication and characterization of tungsten-doped polycarbonate polymer matrix composites specifically designed for x-ray radiation-shielding applications. The polycarbonate-tungsten polymer composite obtained intentionally utilizes low loading levels to provide x-ray shielding while limiting effects on other properties of the material, for example weight, electromagnetic functionality, and mechanical strength. The fabrication process, from tungsten functionalization to filament extrusion and material characterization, is described, including printability, determination of x-ray attenuation, tensile strength, impact resistance, and gigahertz permittivity, and failure analysis. The proposed materials are uniquely advantageous when implemented in 3D printed structures, because even a small volume fraction of tungsten has been shown to substantially alter the properties of the resulting composite.

  11. Type VII Collagen is Enriched in the Enamel Organic Matrix Associated with the Dentin-Enamel Junction of Mature Human Teeth

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Jacob D.; Walker, Mary P.; Mousa, Ahmad; Wang, Yong; Gorski, Jeff P.

    2014-01-01

    The inner enamel region of erupted teeth is known to exhibit higher fracture toughness and crack growth resistance than bulk phase enamel. However, an explanation for this behavior has been hampered by the lack of compositional information for the residual enamel organic matrix. Since enamel-forming ameloblasts are known to express type VII collagen and type VII collagen null mice display abnormal amelogenesis, the aim of this study was to determine whether type VII collagen is a component of the enamel organic matrix at the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) of mature human teeth. Immunofluorescent confocal microscopy of demineralized tooth sections localized type VII collagen to the organic matrix surrounding individual enamel rods near the DEJ. Morphologically, immunoreactive type VII collagen helical-bundles resembled the gnarled-pattern of enamel rods detected by Coomassie Blue staining. Western blotting of whole crown or enamel matrix extracts also identified characteristic Mr=280 and 230 kDa type VII dimeric forms, which resolved into 75 and 25 kDa bands upon reduction. As expected, the collagenous domain of type VII collagen was resistant to pepsin digestion, but was susceptible to purified bacterial collagenase. These results demonstrate the inner enamel organic matrix in mature teeth contains macromolecular type VII collagen. Based on its physical association with the DEJ and its well-appreciated capacity to complex with other collagens, we hypothesize that enamel embedded type VII collagen fibrils may contribute not only to the structural resilience of enamel, but may also play a role in bonding enamel to dentin. PMID:24594343

  12. Thermal Destabilization of Collagen Matrix Hierarchical Structure by Freeze/Thaw

    PubMed Central

    Ozcelikkale, Altug; Han, Bumsoo

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to characterize and understand the effects of freezing on collagen structures and functionality. Specifically, thermodynamic destabilization of collagen at molecular- and fibril-levels by combination of low temperatures and freezing were experimentally characterized using modulated differential scanning calorimetry. In order to delineate the effects of sub-zero temperature and water-ice phase change, we hypothesized that the extent of destabilization can be determined based on post-thaw heat induced thermal denaturation of collagen. It is found that thermal denaturation temperature of collagen in hydrogel decreases by 1.4–1.6°C after freeze/thaw while no such decrease is observed in the case of molecular solution. The destabilization is predominantly due to ice formation. Exposure to low temperatures in the absence of ice has only minimal effect. Calorimetry measurements combined with morphological examination of collagen matrices by scanning electron microscopy suggest that freezing results in destabilization of collagen fibrils due to expansion of intrafibrillar space by ice formation. This fibril-level damage can be alleviated by use of cryoprotectant DMSO at concentrations as low as 0.5 M. A theoretical model explaining the change in collagen post-thaw thermal stability by freezing-induced fibril expansion is also proposed. PMID:26765741

  13. In vitro adipogenesis of adipose-derived stem cells in 3D fibrin matrix of low component concentration.

    PubMed

    Peterbauer-Scherb, A; Danzer, M; Gabriel, C; van Griensven, M; Redl, H; Wolbank, S

    2012-06-01

    This study evaluated the suitability of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) combined with fibrin matrix of variable composition for adipose tissue-equivalent formation in vitro. Therefore, undifferentiated ASCs were embedded in fibrin clots composed of 2 IU/ml thrombin and fibrinogen of varying concentrations (6.25, 12.5 and 25 mg/ml) and kept under control or adipogenic conditions. Fibrin-cell composites were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, live/dead staining, lactate-dehydrogenase (LDH) assay, quantitative PCR for the adipogenic markers fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), peroxisome proliferative activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) and leptin, leptin ELISA and oil red O staining. Cells were found homogeneously distributed throughout the clot. Their number increased to day 7 (up to 3.62-fold median) and decreased thereafter until day 28. The proliferation was unaffected by fibrinogen concentration in the control. Adipogenic conditions generally yielded higher cell numbers, which were in addition increasing with increasing fibrinogen concentrations. FABP4, PPARγ and leptin mRNA expression was strongly upregulated by adipogenic medium, which was confirmed by the levels of leptin secretion and lipid vesicles formation demonstrated by oil red O staining. When embedded in 25 mg/ml fibrinogen clots, ASCs showed the highest expression levels of FABP4 (up to 629.0-fold), PPARγ (up to 1.6-fold) and leptin (up to 57.9-fold), corroborated by significantly elevated leptin secretion (median 33.29 ng/ml) on day 14. Constructs composed of fibrin matrix of low component concentrations-allowing homogeneous cell distribution-with ASCs should represent a suitable strategy for adipose tissue formation in vivo. PMID:21815273

  14. Optimum 3D Matrix Stiffness for Maintenance of Cancer Stem Cells Is Dependent on Tissue Origin of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Esmaiel; Sarvestani, Samaneh K.; Daneshian, Leily; Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The growth and expression of cancer stem cells (CSCs) depend on many factors in the tumor microenvironment. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of cancer cells’ tissue origin on the optimum matrix stiffness for CSC growth and marker expression in a model polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel without the interference of other factors in the microenvironment. Methods Human MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma, HCT116 colorectal and AGS gastric carcinoma, and U2OS osteosarcoma cells were used. The cells were encapsulated in PEGDA gels with compressive moduli in the 2-70 kPa range and optimized cell seeding density of 0.6x106 cells/mL. Micropatterning was used to optimize the growth of encapsulated cells with respect to average tumorsphere size. The CSC sub-population of the encapsulated cells was characterized by cell number, tumorsphere size and number density, and mRNA expression of CSC markers. Results The optimum matrix stiffness for growth and marker expression of CSC sub-population of cancer cells was 5 kPa for breast MCF7 and MDA231, 25 kPa for colorectal HCT116 and gastric AGS, and 50 kPa for bone U2OS cells. Conjugation of a CD44 binding peptide to the gel stopped tumorsphere formation by cancer cells from different tissue origin. The expression of YAP/TAZ transcription factors by the encapsulated cancer cells was highest at the optimum stiffness indicating a link between the Hippo transducers and CSC growth. The optimum average tumorsphere size for CSC growth and marker expression was 50 μm. Conclusion The marker expression results suggest that the CSC sub-population of cancer cells resides within a niche with optimum stiffness which depends on the cancer cells’ tissue origin. PMID:26168187

  15. Biophysical properties of dermal building-blocks affects extra cellular matrix assembly in 3D endogenous macrotissue.

    PubMed

    Urciuolo, F; Garziano, A; Imparato, G; Panzetta, V; Fusco, S; Casale, C; Netti, P A

    2016-03-01

    The fabrication of functional tissue units is one of the major challenges in tissue engineering due to their in vitro use in tissue-on-chip systems, as well as in modular tissue engineering for the construction of macrotissue analogs. In this work, we aim to engineer dermal tissue micromodules obtained by culturing human dermal fibroblasts into porous gelatine microscaffold. We proved that such stromal cells coupled with gelatine microscaffolds are able to synthesize and to assemble an endogenous extracellular matrix (ECM) resulting in tissue micromodules, which evolve their biophysical features over the time. In particular, we found a time-dependent variation of oxygen consumption kinetic parameters, of newly formed ECM stiffness and of micromodules self-aggregation properties. As consequence when used as building blocks to fabricate larger tissues, the initial tissue micromodules state strongly affects the ECM organization and maturation in the final macrotissue. Such results highlight the role of the micromodules properties in controlling the formation of three-dimensional macrotissue in vitro, defining an innovative design criterion for selecting tissue-building blocks for modular tissue engineering. PMID:26824879

  16. Analytical finite element matrix elements and global matrix assembly for hierarchical 3-D vector basis functions within the hybrid finite element boundary integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Wang, K.; Li, H.; Eibert, T. F.

    2014-11-01

    A hybrid higher-order finite element boundary integral (FE-BI) technique is discussed where the higher-order FE matrix elements are computed by a fully analytical procedure and where the gobal matrix assembly is organized by a self-identifying procedure of the local to global transformation. This assembly procedure applys to both, the FE part as well as the BI part of the algorithm. The geometry is meshed into three-dimensional tetrahedra as finite elements and nearly orthogonal hierarchical basis functions are employed. The boundary conditions are implemented in a strong sense such that the boundary values of the volume basis functions are directly utilized within the BI, either for the tangential electric and magnetic fields or for the asssociated equivalent surface current densities by applying a cross product with the unit surface normals. The self-identified method for the global matrix assembly automatically discerns the global order of the basis functions for generating the matrix elements. Higher order basis functions do need more unknowns for each single FE, however, fewer FEs are needed to achieve the same satisfiable accuracy. This improvement provides a lot more flexibility for meshing and allows the mesh size to raise up to λ/3. The performance of the implemented system is evaluated in terms of computation time, accuracy and memory occupation, where excellent results with respect to precision and computation times of large scale simulations are found.

  17. MicroRNA-96 inhibits FoxO3a function in IPF fibroblasts on type I collagen matrix

    PubMed Central

    Im, Jintaek; Ho, Yen-Yi; Hergert, Polla

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a lethal and progressive lung disease characterized by persistent (myo)fibroblasts and the relentless accumulation of collagen matrix. Unlike normal lung fibroblasts, IPF lung fibroblasts have suppressed forkhead box O3a (FoxO3a) activity, which allows them to expand in this diseased environment. microRNA-96 (miR-96) has recently been found to directly bind to the 3′-untranslated region of FoxO3a mRNA, which subsequently inhibits its function. We examined whether aberrantly low FoxO3a expression is in part due to increased miR-96 levels in IPF fibroblasts on polymerized collagen, thereby causing IPF fibroblasts to maintain their pathological properties. miR-96 expression was upregulated in IPF fibroblasts compared with control fibroblasts when cultured on collagen. In contrast, FoxO3a mRNA levels were reduced in most IPF fibroblasts. However, when miR-96 function was inhibited, FoxO3a mRNA and protein expression were increased, suppressing IPF fibroblast proliferation and promoting their cell death in a dose-dependent fashion. Likewise, FoxO3a and its target proteins p21, p27, and Bim expression was also increased in the presence of a miR-96 inhibitor in IPF fibroblasts. However, when control fibroblasts were treated with miR-96 mimic, FoxO3a, p27, p21, and Bim mRNA and protein levels were decreased. In situ hybridization analysis further revealed the presence of enhanced miR-96 expression in cells within the fibroblastic foci of IPF lung tissue. Our results suggest that when IPF fibroblasts interact with collagen-rich matrix, pathologically altered miR-96 expression inhibits FoxO3a function, causing IPF fibroblasts to maintain their pathological phenotype, which may contribute to the progression of IPF. PMID:25172912

  18. Generation of biologically active endostatin fragments from human collagen XVIII by distinct matrix metalloproteases

    SciTech Connect

    Heljasvaara, Ritva; Nyberg, Pia; Luostarinen, Jani; Parikka, Mataleena; Heikkilae, Pia; Rehn, Marko; Sorsa, Timo; Salo, Tuula; Pihlajaniemi, Taina . E-mail: taina.pihlajaniemi@oulu.fi

    2005-07-15

    Endostatin, a potent inhibitor of endothelial cell proliferation, migration, angiogenesis and tumor growth, is proteolytically cleaved from the C-terminal noncollagenous NC1 domain of type XVIII collagen. We investigated the endostatin formation from human collagen XVIII by several MMPs in vitro. The generation of endostatin fragments differing in molecular size (24-30 kDa) and in N-terminal sequences was identified in the cases of MMP-3, -7, -9, -13 and -20. The cleavage sites were located in the protease-sensitive hinge region between the trimerization and endostatin domains of NC1. MMP-1, -2, -8 and -12 did not show any significant activity against the C-terminus of collagen XVIII. The anti-proliferative effect of the 20-kDa endostatin, three longer endostatin-containing fragments generated in vitro by distinct MMPs and the entire NC1 domain, on bFGF-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells was established. The anti-migratory potential of some of these fragments was also studied. In addition, production of endostatin fragments between 24-30 kDa by human hepatoblastoma cells was shown to be due to MMP action on type XVIII collagen. Our results indicate that certain, especially cancer-related, MMP family members can generate biologically active endostatin-containing polypeptides from collagen XVIII and thus, by releasing endostatin fragments, may participate in the inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, migration and angiogenesis.

  19. Nonlinear optical microscopy reveals invading endothelial cells anisotropically alter three-dimensional collagen matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, P.-F.; Yeh, Alvin T.; Bayless, Kayla J.

    2009-02-01

    The interactions between endothelial cells (ECs) and the extracellular matrix (ECM) are fundamental in mediating various steps of angiogenesis, including cell adhesion, migration and sprout formation. Here, we used a noninvasive and non-destructive nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) technique to optically image endothelial sprouting morphogenesis in three-dimensional (3D) collagen matrices. We simultaneously captured signals from collagen fibers and endothelial cells using second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF), respectively. Dynamic 3D imaging revealed EC interactions with collagen fibers along with quantifiable alterations in collagen matrix density elicited by EC movement through and morphogenesis within the matrix. Specifically, we observed increased collagen density in the area between bifurcation points of sprouting structures and anisotropic increases in collagen density around the perimeter of lumenal structures, but not advancing sprout tips. Proteinase inhibition studies revealed membrane-associated matrix metalloproteinase were utilized for sprout advancement and lumen expansion. Rho-associated kinase (p160ROCK) inhibition demonstrated that the generation of cell tension increased collagen matrix alterations. This study followed sprouting ECs within a 3D matrix and revealed that the advancing structures recognize and significantly alter their extracellular environment at the periphery of lumens as they progress.

  20. Biocompatible nanoparticles sensing the matrix metallo-proteinase 2 for the on-demand release of anticancer drugs in 3D tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Marco; Guarnieri, Daniela; Biondi, Marco; Belli, Valentina; Profeta, Martina; Raiola, Luca; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-11-01

    The balance between dose-dependent tolerability, effectiveness and toxicity of systemically administered antitumor drugs is extremely delicate. This issue highlights the striking need for targeted release of chemotherapeutic drugs within tumors. In this work, a smart strategy of drug targeting to tumors relying upon biodegradable/biocompatible nanoparticles releasing cytotoxic drugs after sensing physiological variations intrinsic to the very nature of tumor tissues is exploited. Here, the well-known over-expression of matrix metallo-proteinase 2 (MMP2) enzyme in tumors has been chosen as a trigger for the release of a cytotoxic drug. Nanoparticles made up of a biodegradable poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)--block--polyethylene glycol (PEG) copolymer (namely PELGA), blended with a tumor-activated prodrug (TAP) composed of a MMP2-sensitive peptide bound to doxorubicin (Dox) and to PLGA chain have been produced. The obtained devices are able to release Dox specifically upon MMP2 cleavage of the TAP. More interestingly, they can sense the differences in the expression levels of endogenous MMP2 protein, thus modulating drug penetration within a three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid matrix, accordingly. Therefore, the proposed nanoparticles hold promise as a useful tool for in vivo investigations aimed at an improved therapeutic efficacy of the conjugated drug payload. PMID:26340360

  1. Suppression of α Smooth Muscle Actin Accumulation by Bovine Fetal Dermal Collagen Matrix in Full Thickness Skin Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Lineaweaver, William; Bush, Katie; James, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The suppression of elements associated with wound contracture and unfavorable scarring is a potentially important strategy in clinical wound management. In this study, the presence of α smooth muscle actin (αSMA), a protein involved in wound contraction, was analyzed in a series of wounds in which bovine fetal collagen (BFC) acellular dermal matrix (PriMatrix) was used in staged split thickness skin graft procedures. The results obtained through histological and quantitative image analyses of incidental biopsies from these wounds demonstrated a suppression of αSMA in the wound regions occupied by assimilated BFC relative to increased levels of αSMA found in other areas of the wound. The αSMA levels found in assimilated BFC were similar to αSMA levels in uninjured human dermis. These findings suggest a mechanism by which application of BFC could decrease contraction of full thickness skin wounds. PMID:25695450

  2. Megakaryocytes contribute to the bone marrow-matrix environment by expressing fibronectin, type IV collagen and laminin

    PubMed Central

    Malara, Alessandro; Currao, Manuela; Gruppi, Cristian; Celesti, Giuseppe; Viarengo, Gianluca; Buracchi, Chiara; Laghi, Luigi; Kaplan, David L.; Balduini, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Megakaryocytes associate with the bone marrow vasculature where they convert their cytoplasm into proplatelets that protrude through the vascular endothelium into the lumen and release platelets. The extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment plays a critical role in regulating these processes. In this work we demonstrate that, among bone marrow ECM components, fibronectin, type IV collagen and laminin are the most abundant around bone marrow sinusoids and constitute a peri-cellular matrix surrounding megakaryocytes. Most importantly, we report, for the first time, that megakaryocytes express components of the basement membrane and that these molecules contribute to the regulation of megakaryocyte development and bone marrow ECM homeostasis both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, fibronectin induced a three-fold increase in the proliferation rate of mouse hematopoietic stem cells leading to higher megakaryocyte output with respect to cells treated only with thrombopoietin or other matrices. However, megakaryocyte ploidy level in fibronectin-treated cultures was significantly reduced. Stimulation with type IV collagen resulted in a 1.4-fold increase in megakaryocyte output, while all tested matrices supported proplatelet formation to a similar extent in megakaryocytes derived from fetal liver progenitor cells. In vivo, megakaryocyte expression of fibronectin and basement membrane components was up-regulated during bone marrow reconstitution upon 5-fluorouracil induced myelosuppression, while only type IV collagen resulted up-regulated upon induced thrombocytopenia. In conclusion, this work demonstrates that ECM components impact megakaryocyte behavior differently during their differentiation and highlights a new role for megakaryocyte as ECM-producing cells for the establishment of cell niches during bone marrow regeneration. PMID:24357118

  3. The Methoxyflavonoid Isosakuranetin Suppresses UV-B-Induced Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Expression and Collagen Degradation Relevant for Skin Photoaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hana; Lee, Eunjoo H; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cho, Man-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a main extrinsic factor for skin aging. Chronic exposure of the skin to UV radiation causes the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), such as MMP-1, and consequently results in alterations of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and skin photoaging. Flavonoids are considered as potent anti-photoaging agents due to their UV-absorbing and antioxidant properties and inhibitory activity against UV-mediated MMP induction. To identify anti-photoaging agents, in the present study we examined the preventative effect of methoxyflavonoids, such as sakuranetin, isosakuranetin, homoeriodictyol, genkwanin, chrysoeriol and syringetin, on UV-B-induced skin photo-damage. Of the examined methoxyflavonoids, pretreatment with isosakuranetin strongly suppressed the UV-B-mediated induction of MMP-1 in human keratinocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Isosakuranetin inhibited UV-B-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling components, ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and p38 proteins. This result suggests that the ERK1/2 kinase pathways likely contribute to the inhibitory effects of isosakuranetin on UV-induced MMP-1 production in human keratinocytes. Isosakuranetin also prevented UV-B-induced degradation of type-1 collagen in human dermal fibroblast cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that isosakuranetin has the potential for development as a protective agent for skin photoaging through the inhibition of UV-induced MMP-1 production and collagen degradation. PMID:27598131

  4. Characterization of collagen fibers by means of texture analysis of second harmonic generation images using orientation-dependent gray level co-occurrence matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wenyan; Li, Hui; Wang, Chunyou; Gou, Shanmiao; Fu, Ling

    2012-02-01

    Collagen is the most prominent protein in the human body, making up 30% of the total protein content. Quantitative studies have shown structural differences between collagen fibers of the normal and diseased tissues, due to the remodeling of the extracellular matrix during the pathological process. The dominant orientation, which is an important characteristic of collagen fibers, has not been taken into consideration for quantitative collagen analysis. Based on the conventional gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) method, the authors proposed the orientation-dependent GLCM (OD-GLCM) method by estimating the dominant orientation of collagen fibers. The authors validated the utility of the OD-GLCM method on second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopic images of tendons from rats with different ages. Compared with conventional GLCM method, the authors' method has not only improved the discrimination between different tissues but also provided additional texture information of the orderliness of collagen fibers and the fiber size. The OD-GLCM method was further applied to the differentiation of the preliminary SHG images of normal and cancerous human pancreatic tissues. The combination of SHG microscopy and the OD-GLCM method might be helpful for the evaluation of diseases marked with abnormal collagen morphology.

  5. Alterations of collagen matrix in weight-bearing bones during skeletal unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiiba, M.; Arnaud, S. B.; Tanzawa, H.; Uzawa, K.; Yamauchi, M.

    2001-01-01

    Skeletal unloading induces loss of bone mineral density in weight-bearing bones. The objectives of this study were to characterize the post-translational modifications of collagen of weight-bearing bones subjected to hindlimb unloading for 8 weeks. In unloaded bones, tibiae and femurs, while the overall amino acid composition was essentially identical in the unloaded and control tibiae and femurs, the collagen cross-link profile showed significant differences. Two major reducible cross-links (analyzed as dihydroxylysinonorleucine and hydroxylysinonorleucine) were increased in the unloaded bones. In addition, the ratios of the former to the latter as well as pyridinoline to deoxypyridinoline were significantly decreased in the unloaded bones indicating a difference in the extent of lysine hydroxylation at the cross-linking sites between these two groups. These results indicate that upon skeletal unloading the relative pool of newly synthesized collagen is increased and it is post-translationally altered. The alteration could be associated with impaired osteoblastic differentiation induced by skeletal unloading that results in a mineralization defect.

  6. Identification of a novel matrix protein contained in a protein aggregate associated with collagen in fish otoliths.

    PubMed

    Tohse, Hidekazu; Takagi, Yasuaki; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2008-05-01

    In the biomineralization processes, proteins are thought to control the polymorphism and morphology of the crystals by forming complexes of structural and mineral-associated proteins. To identify such proteins, we have searched for proteins that may form high-molecular-weight (HMW) aggregates in the matrix of fish otoliths that have aragonite and vaterite as their crystal polymorphs. By screening a cDNA library of the trout inner ear using an antiserum raised against whole otolith matrix, a novel protein, named otolith matrix macromolecule-64 (OMM-64), was identified. The protein was found to have a molecular mass of 64 kDa, and to contain two tandem repeats and a Glu-rich region. The structure of the protein and that of its DNA are similar to those of starmaker, a protein involved in the polymorphism control in the zebrafish otoliths [Söllner C, Burghammer M, Busch-Nentwich E, Berger J, Schwarz H, Riekel C & Nicolson T (2003) Science302, 282-286]. (45)Ca overlay analysis revealed that the Glu-rich region has calcium-binding activity. Combined analysis by western blotting and deglycosylation suggested that OMM-64 is present in an HMW aggregate with heparan sulfate chains. Histological observations revealed that OMM-64 is expressed specifically in otolith matrix-producing cells and deposited onto the otolith. Moreover, the HMW aggregate binds to the inner ear-specific short-chain collagen otolin-1, and the resulting complex forms ring-like structures in the otolith matrix. Overall, OMM-64, by forming a calcium-binding aggregate that binds to otolin-1 and forming matrix protein architectures, may be involved in the control of crystal morphology during otolith biomineralization. PMID:18410381

  7. Microfabricated tissue gauges to measure and manipulate forces from 3D microtissues

    PubMed Central

    Legant, Wesley R.; Pathak, Amit; Yang, Michael T.; Deshpande, Vikram S.; McMeeking, Robert M.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    Physical forces generated by cells drive morphologic changes during development and can feedback to regulate cellular phenotypes. Because these phenomena typically occur within a 3-dimensional (3D) matrix in vivo, we used microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology to generate arrays of microtissues consisting of cells encapsulated within 3D micropatterned matrices. Microcantilevers were used to simultaneously constrain the remodeling of a collagen gel and to report forces generated during this process. By concurrently measuring forces and observing matrix remodeling at cellular length scales, we report an initial correlation and later decoupling between cellular contractile forces and changes in tissue morphology. Independently varying the mechanical stiffness of the cantilevers and collagen matrix revealed that cellular forces increased with boundary or matrix rigidity whereas levels of cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins correlated with levels of mechanical stress. By mapping these relationships between cellular and matrix mechanics, cellular forces, and protein expression onto a bio-chemo-mechanical model of microtissue contractility, we demonstrate how intratissue gradients of mechanical stress can emerge from collective cellular contractility and finally, how such gradients can be used to engineer protein composition and organization within a 3D tissue. Together, these findings highlight a complex and dynamic relationship between cellular forces, ECM remodeling, and cellular phenotype and describe a system to study and apply this relationship within engineered 3D microtissues. PMID:19541627

  8. Tissue Engineering: Biomimetic Concealing of PLGA Microspheres in a 3D Scaffold to Prevent Macrophage Uptake (Small 11/2016).

    PubMed

    Minardi, Silvia; Corradetti, Bruna; Taraballi, Francesca; Sandri, Monica; Martinez, Jonathan O; Powell, Sebastian T; Tampieri, Anna; Weiner, Bradley K; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2016-03-01

    Avoiding the clearance of drug delivery systems from 3D scaffolds is crucial to preserve the bioactivity of their therapeutic payload. This is accomplished on page 1479, by E. Tasciotti and co-workers, through a "concealing" strategy: cloaking PLGA microspheres with the type I collagen matrix of a biomimetic scaffold, which enables the control of the production of inflammatory mediators. PMID:26970527

  9. Effects of hydroxycamptothecin on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), tissue inhibitor of MMP-1, and type I collagen in rats with pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hu, G-X; Yao, S-T; Zeng, L-H; Peng, Y-Z; Zheng, J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), tissue inhibitor of MMP-1 (TIMP-1), and type I collagen in the lung tissue of rats with pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin A5. We used hematoxylin eosin staining to observe the degree of pulmonary fibrosis in rats; Masson staining, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry were used to observe the expression of collagen, MMP-1, and TIMP-1, and type I collagen. The expression of MMP-1 in the model group decreased significantly, while the expression of TIMP-1 and type I collagen significantly increased. After treatment with HCPT, the degree of pulmonary fibrosis and the expression of TIMP-1 and type I collagen decreased in all treatment groups. However, the expression of MMP-1 increased in a dose-dependent manner. Our results showed that HCPT decreased the pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin A5 in rats, and an increase in MMP-1 expression and decrease in the TIMP-1 and type I collagen expression may be the mechanism that regulates the metabolism of the extracellular matrix. PMID:25966236

  10. Angelica archangelia Prevented Collagen Degradation by Blocking Production of Matrix Metalloproteinases in UVB-exposed Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhengwang; Hwang, Eunson; Park, Sang Yong; Zhang, Mengyang; Gao, Wei; Lin, Pei; Yi, Tae-Hoo

    2016-07-01

    Angelica archangelia (AA), a traditional herb, has attracted attention as an agent with potential for use in the prevention of chronic skin diseases. This study examined the photoprotective effects of AA on the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and collagen degradation in UVB-irradiated normal human dermal fibroblasts. Our results showed that AA markedly blocked collagen degradation by restraining the production of MMPs in UVB-exposed fibroblasts. We also investigated the underlying mechanism behind the effects of AA. AA attenuated UVB-triggered interleukin-6 (IL-6) and promoted the expression of transforming growth factor β1. Application of AA extract (10, 100 μg mL(-1) ) significantly diminished UVB-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Jun-N-terminal kinase phosphorylation, which consequently reduced phosphorylated c-Fos and c-Jun. Our results indicated that AA inhibited the UVB-induced expression of MMPs by inhibiting mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways and activator protein-1 activation. Our results suggest that AA is a promising botanical agent for use against skin photoaging. PMID:27128690

  11. Increased expression of platelet-derived growth factor A and collagenous matrix proteins in congenital multicystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Liapis, H; Yu, H; Flath, A; Steinhardt, G F

    1997-01-01

    The expression of platelet-derived growth factor A (PDGF-A), and its spatial and temporal relationship to interstitial collagens in kidneys with congenital multicystic dysplasia using in situ hybridization, have been examined. Seventeen dysplastic kidneys (16 weeks to 7 months) and 20 normal age-matched controls were used in the study. Increased PDGF-A mRNA was detected in dysplastic compared to normal kidneys in all age groups including extensively fibrotic postnatal kidneys. An abundant PDGF-A mRNA signal was seen within the epithelial cells of cystically dilated or dysplastic tubules and within interstitial fibroblasts and disorganized primitive mesenchyme. A comparable amount of PDGF-A protein was detected by Western blotting. Procollagen I and III mRNA were increased in fibroblasts surrounding cystic and dysplastic tubules. We conclude that tubular epithelial production of PDGF-A may induce collagenous matrix production by adjacent fibroblasts, while marked up-regulation of PDGF-A by interstitial cells may be responsible for sustainable fibrogenic effects in the fetal kidney contributing to renal maldevelopment. PMID:9200407

  12. Harnessing the Versatility of Bacterial Collagen to Improve the Chondrogenic Potential of Porous Collagen Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Paresh A; St-Pierre, Jean-Philippe; Chow, Lesley W; Puetzer, Jennifer L; Stoichevska, Violet; Peng, Yong Y; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Ramshaw, John A M; Stevens, Molly M

    2016-07-01

    Collagen I foams are used in the clinic as scaffolds to promote articular cartilage repair as they provide a bioactive environment for cells with chondrogenic potential. However, collagen I as a base material does not allow for precise control over bioactivity. Alternatively, recombinant bacterial collagens can be used as "blank slate" collagen molecules to offer a versatile platform for incorporation of selected bioactive sequences and fabrication into 3D scaffolds. Here, we show the potential of Streptococcal collagen-like 2 (Scl2) protein foams modified with peptides designed to specifically and noncovalently bind hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate to improve chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) compared to collagen I foams. Specific compositions of functionalized Scl2 foams lead to improved chondrogenesis compared to both nonfunctionalized Scl2 and collagen I foams, as indicated by gene expression, extracellular matrix accumulation, and compression moduli. hMSCs cultured in functionalized Scl2 foams exhibit decreased collagens I and X gene and protein expression, suggesting an advantage over collagen I foams in promoting a chondrocytic phenotype. These highly modular foams can be further modified to improve specific aspects chondrogenesis. As such, these scaffolds also have the potential to be tailored for other regenerative medicine applications. PMID:27219220

  13. Extracellular matrix of adipogenically differentiated mesenchymal stem cells reveals a network of collagen filaments, mostly interwoven by hexagonal structural units.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Mujib; Sittinger, Michael; Ringe, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is the non-cellular component of tissues, which not only provides biological shelter but also takes part in the cellular decisions for diverse functions. Every tissue has an ECM with unique composition and topology that governs the process of determination, differentiation, proliferation, migration and regeneration of cells. Little is known about the structural organization of matrix especially of MSC-derived adipogenic ECM. Here, we particularly focus on the composition and architecture of the fat ECM to understand the cellular behavior on functional bases. Thus, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were adipogenically differentiated, then, were transferred to adipogenic propagation medium, whereas they started the release of lipid droplets leaving bare network of ECM. Microarray analysis was performed, to indentify the molecular machinery of matrix. Adipogenesis was verified by Oil Red O staining of lipid droplets and by qPCR of adipogenic marker genes PPARG and FABP4. Antibody staining demonstrated the presence of collagen type I, II and IV filaments, while alkaline phosphatase activity verified the ossified nature of these filaments. In the adipogenic matrix, the hexagonal structures were abundant followed by octagonal structures, whereas they interwoven in a crisscross manner. Regarding molecular machinery of adipogenic ECM, the bioinformatics analysis revealed the upregulated expression of COL4A1, ITGA7, ITGA7, SDC2, ICAM3, ADAMTS9, TIMP4, GPC1, GPC4 and downregulated expression of COL14A1, ADAMTS5, TIMP2, TIMP3, BGN, LAMA3, ITGA2, ITGA4, ITGB1, ITGB8, CLDN11. Moreover, genes associated with integrins, glycoproteins, laminins, fibronectins, cadherins, selectins and linked signaling pathways were found. Knowledge of the interactive-language between cells and matrix could be beneficial for the artificial designing of biomaterials and bioscaffolds. PMID:23851162

  14. Expression and characterization of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) matrix metalloproteinase-2 and its activity against type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ci; Zhan, Chun-Lan; Cai, Qiu-Feng; Du, Cui-Hong; Liu, Guang-Ming; Su, Wen-Jin; Cao, Min-Jie

    2014-05-10

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play essential roles in the metabolism of animal collagen while few reports are available for MMPs in aquatic animals. In this study, we report the complete sequence of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) gene from common carp (Cyprinus carpio) skeletal muscle. The full-length cDNA of MMP-2 was 2792bp which contains an open reading frame of 1974bp, corresponding to a protein of 657 amino acid residues. Based on the structural feature of MMP-2, the gene of the catalytic domain containing 351 amino acid residues was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. SDS-PAGE showed that the truncated recombinant MMP-2 (trMMP-2) with molecular mass of approximately 38kDa was in the form of inclusion body. The trMMP-2 was further purified by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. After renaturation, similar to native MMP-2, the trMMP-2 exhibited high hydrolyzing activity toward gelatin as appeared on gelatin zymography and optimal activity was at pH 8.0 and 40°C. The activity of the trMMP-2 was completely suppressed by metalloproteinase inhibitors, including EDTA, EGTA and 1,10-phenanthroline while other proteinase inhibitors did not show any inhibitory effect. Divalent metal ion Ca(2+) was necessary for the gelatinolytic activity, suggesting it is a calcium-dependent metalloproteinase. Moreover, the trMMP-2 effectively hydrolyzed native type I collagen at 37°C and even at 4°C, implying its potential application value as a collagenase for preparation of biologically active oligopeptides. PMID:24613299

  15. Modification of Ti6Al4V surfaces using collagen I, III, and fibronectin. I. Biochemical and morphological characteristics of the adsorbed matrix.

    PubMed

    Bierbaum, Susanne; Beutner, René; Hanke, Thomas; Scharnweber, Dieter; Hempel, Ute; Worch, Hartmut

    2003-11-01

    Studies in developmental and cell biology have established the fact that responses of cells are influenced to a large degree by morphology and composition of the extracellular matrix. Goal of this work is to use this basic principle to improve the biological acceptance of implants by modifying the surfaces with components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Aiming at load-bearing applications in bone contact, in this study the modification of titanium surfaces with the collagen types I and III in combination with fibronectin was undertaken; fibrillogenesis, fibril morphology and adsorption of type I, III and I/III-cofibrils onto titanium were assessed. Increasing the collagen type III amount resulted in a decrease of fibril diameter, while no significant changes in adsorption could be detected. The amount of fibronectin bound to the heterotypic fibrils depended on fibrillogenesis parameters such as ionic strength or concentration of phosphate, and varied with the percentage of integrated type III collagen. PMID:14566782

  16. Comparison of osteoclastogenesis and resorption activity of human osteoclasts on tissue culture polystyrene and on natural extracellular bone matrix in 2D and 3D.

    PubMed

    Kleinhans, C; Schmid, F F; Schmid, F V; Kluger, P J

    2015-07-10

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by osteoblasts (bone formation) and osteoclasts (bone resorption). While there have been numerous studies investigating mesenchymal stem cells and their potential to differentiate into osteoblasts as well as their interaction with different bone substitute materials, there is only limited knowledge concerning in vitro generated osteoclasts. Due to the increasing development of degradable bone-grafting materials and the need of sophisticated in vitro test methods, it is essential to gain deeper insight into the process of osteoclastogenesis and the resorption functionality of human osteoclasts. Therefore, we focused on the comparison of osteoclastogenesis and resorption activity on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) and bovine extracellular bone matrices (BMs). Cortical bone slices were used as two-dimensional (2D) substrates, whereas a thermally treated cancellous bone matrix was used for three-dimensional (3D) experiments. We isolated primary human monocytes and induced osteoclastogenesis by medium supplementation. Subsequently, the expression of the vitronectin receptor (αVβ3) and cathepsin K as well as the characteristic actin formation on TCPS and the two BMs were examined. The cell area of human osteoclasts was analyzed on TCPS and on BMs, whereas significantly larger osteoclasts could be detected on BMs. Additionally, we compared the diameter of the sealing zones with the measured diameter of the resorption pits on the BMs and revealed similar diameters of the sealing zones and the resorption pits. We conclude that using TCPS as culture substrate does not affect the expression of osteoclast-specific markers. The analysis of resorption activity can successfully be conducted on cortical as well as on cancellous bone matrices. For new in vitro test systems concerning bone resorption, we suggest the establishment of a 2D assay for high throughput screening of new degradable bone substitute materials with osteoclasts. PMID:25562421

  17. A Novel 2D Image Compression Algorithm Based on Two Levels DWT and DCT Transforms with Enhanced Minimize-Matrix-Size Algorithm for High Resolution Structured Light 3D Surface Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddeq, M. M.; Rodrigues, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    Image compression techniques are widely used on 2D image 2D video 3D images and 3D video. There are many types of compression techniques and among the most popular are JPEG and JPEG2000. In this research, we introduce a new compression method based on applying a two level discrete cosine transform (DCT) and a two level discrete wavelet transform (DWT) in connection with novel compression steps for high-resolution images. The proposed image compression algorithm consists of four steps. (1) Transform an image by a two level DWT followed by a DCT to produce two matrices: DC- and AC-Matrix, or low and high frequency matrix, respectively, (2) apply a second level DCT on the DC-Matrix to generate two arrays, namely nonzero-array and zero-array, (3) apply the Minimize-Matrix-Size algorithm to the AC-Matrix and to the other high-frequencies generated by the second level DWT, (4) apply arithmetic coding to the output of previous steps. A novel decompression algorithm, Fast-Match-Search algorithm (FMS), is used to reconstruct all high-frequency matrices. The FMS-algorithm computes all compressed data probabilities by using a table of data, and then using a binary search algorithm for finding decompressed data inside the table. Thereafter, all decoded DC-values with the decoded AC-coefficients are combined in one matrix followed by inverse two levels DCT with two levels DWT. The technique is tested by compression and reconstruction of 3D surface patches. Additionally, this technique is compared with JPEG and JPEG2000 algorithm through 2D and 3D root-mean-square-error following reconstruction. The results demonstrate that the proposed compression method has better visual properties than JPEG and JPEG2000 and is able to more accurately reconstruct surface patches in 3D.

  18. Cell-surface serglycin promotes adhesion of myeloma cells to collagen type I and affects the expression of matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Skliris, Antonis; Labropoulou, Vassiliki T; Papachristou, Dionysios J; Aletras, Alexios; Karamanos, Nikos K; Theocharis, Achilleas D

    2013-05-01

    Serglycin (SG) is mainly expressed by hematopoetic cells as an intracellular proteoglycan. Multiple myeloma cells constitutively secrete SG, which is also localized on the cell surface in some cell lines. In this study, SG isolated from myeloma cells was found to interact with collagen type I (Col I), which is a major bone matrix component. Notably, myeloma cells positive for cell-surface SG (csSG) adhered significantly to Col I, compared to cells lacking csSG. Removal of csSG by treatment of the cells with chondroitinase ABC or blocking of csSG by an SG-specific polyclonal antibody significantly reduced the adhesion of myeloma cells to Col I. Significant up-regulation of expression of the matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 at both the mRNA and protein levels was observed when culturing csSG-positive myeloma cells on Col I-coated dishes or in the presence of soluble Col I. MMP-9 and MMP-2 were also expressed in increased amounts by myeloma cells in the bone marrow of patients with multiple myeloma. Our data indicate that csSG of myeloma cells affects key functional properties, such as adhesion to Col I and the expression of MMPs, and imply that csSG may serve as a potential prognostic factor and/or target for pharmacological interventions in multiple myeloma. PMID:23387827

  19. The role of the cytoskeleton in cellular force generation in 2D and 3D environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraning-Rush, Casey M.; Carey, Shawn P.; Califano, Joseph P.; Smith, Brooke N.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2011-02-01

    To adhere and migrate, cells generate forces through the cytoskeleton that are transmitted to the surrounding matrix. While cellular force generation has been studied on 2D substrates, less is known about cytoskeletal-mediated traction forces of cells embedded in more in vivo-like 3D matrices. Recent studies have revealed important differences between the cytoskeletal structure, adhesion, and migration of cells in 2D and 3D. Because the cytoskeleton mediates force, we sought to directly compare the role of the cytoskeleton in modulating cell force in 2D and 3D. MDA-MB-231 cells were treated with agents that perturbed actin, microtubules, or myosin, and analyzed for changes in cytoskeletal organization and force generation in both 2D and 3D. To quantify traction stresses in 2D, traction force microscopy was used; in 3D, force was assessed based on single cell-mediated collagen fibril reorganization imaged using confocal reflectance microscopy. Interestingly, even though previous studies have observed differences in cell behaviors like migration in 2D and 3D, our data indicate that forces generated on 2D substrates correlate with forces within 3D matrices. Disruption of actin, myosin or microtubules in either 2D or 3D microenvironments disrupts cell-generated force. These data suggest that despite differences in cytoskeletal organization in 2D and 3D, actin, microtubules and myosin contribute to contractility and matrix reorganization similarly in both microenvironments.

  20. Effect of collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffold pore size on matrix mineralization and cellular behavior in different cell types.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Ciara M; Duffy, Garry P; Schindeler, Aaron; O'brien, Fergal J

    2016-01-01

    We have previously examined osteoblast behavior on porous collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) scaffolds with a range of mean pore sizes demonstrating superior cell attachment and migration in scaffolds with the largest pores (325 μm). Scaffolds provide a framework for construct development; therefore, it is crucial to identify the optimal pore size for augmented tissue formation. Utilizing the same range of scaffolds (85 μm - 325 μm), this study aimed to examine the effects of mean pore size on subsequent osteoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization, and to understand the mechanism by which pore size influences behavior of different cell types. Consequently, primary mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were assessed and their behavior compared to osteoblasts. Results demonstrated that scaffolds with the largest pore size (325 μm) facilitated improved osteoblast infiltration, earlier expression of mature bone markers osteopontin (OPN) and osteocalcin (OCN), and increased mineralization. MSCs responded similarly to osteoblasts whereby cell attachment and scaffold infiltration improved with increasing pore size. However, MSCs showed reduced cell motility, proliferation, and scaffold infiltration compared to osteoblasts. This was associated with differences in the profile of integrin subunits (α2) and collagen receptors (CD44), indicating that osteoblasts have a stronger affinity for CG scaffolds compared to MSCs. In summary, these results reveal how larger pores promote improved cell infiltration, essential for construct development, however the optimal scaffold pore size can be cell type specific. As such, this study highlights a necessity to tailor both scaffold micro-architecture and cell-type when designing constructs for successful bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:26386362

  1. Quantifying the surface chemistry of 3D matrices in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeranis, Dimitrios S.; So, Peter T. C.; Yannas, Ioannis V.

    2014-03-01

    Despite the major role of the matrix (the insoluble environment around cells) in physiology and pathology, there are very few and limited methods that can quantify the surface chemistry of a 3D matrix such as a biomaterial or tissue ECM. This study describes a novel optical-based methodology that can quantify the surface chemistry (density of adhesion ligands for particular cell adhesion receptors) of a matrix in situ. The methodology utilizes fluorescent analogs (markers) of the receptor of interest and a series of binding assays, where the amount of bound markers on the matrix is quantified via spectral multi-photon imaging. The study provides preliminary results for the quantification of the ligands for the two major collagen-binding integrins (α1β1, α2β1) in porous collagen scaffolds that have been shown to be able to induce maximum regeneration in transected peripheral nerves. The developed methodology opens the way for quantitative descriptions of the insoluble microenvironment of cells in physiology and pathology, and for integrating the matrix in quantitative models of cell signaling. α

  2. The Collagen Family

    PubMed Central

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Collagens are the most abundant proteins in mammals. The collagen family comprises 28 members that contain at least one triple-helical domain. Collagens are deposited in the extracellular matrix where most of them form supramolecular assemblies. Four collagens are type II membrane proteins that also exist in a soluble form released from the cell surface by shedding. Collagens play structural roles and contribute to mechanical properties, organization, and shape of tissues. They interact with cells via several receptor families and regulate their proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Some collagens have a restricted tissue distribution and hence specific biological functions. PMID:21421911

  3. Biodegradable 3D-Porous Collagen Matrix (Ologen) Compared with Mitomycin C for Treatment of Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma: Results at 5 Years

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fei; Li, Lei; Chen, Xiuping; Yan, Xiang; Wang, Liyang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of the Ologen as an aid for trabeculectomy performed for primary open-angle glaucoma compared with mitomycin C. Methods. In this prospective, randomized, parallel assignment, comparative study, 31 eyes of 21 primary open-angle glaucoma patients were allocated for trabeculectomy with the Ologen implant; another 32 eyes of 23 patients were treated with trabeculectomy augmented with mitomycin C. The patients were followed up for 5 years and evaluated for intraocular pressure, rate of success, status of the bleb, and adverse events. Result. The mean postoperative intraocular pressure was statistically different at 3 m, 6 m, 1 y, 3 y, and 5 y follow-up. The rates of both complete success (P = 0.017) and overall success (P = 0.031) in the Ologen group were significantly higher than those in the mitomycin C group. The difference of the bleb extent and vascularity was statistically significant in both groups. There was no significant difference in postoperative complication. Conclusions. Ologen provides higher rates of surgical success compared with mitomycin C for patients with primary open-angle glaucoma undergoing trabeculectomy. It may be a new, safe, simple, and effective therapeutic approach for treating primary open-angle glaucoma. PMID:26078875

  4. A novel component of epidermal cell-matrix and cell-cell contacts: transmembrane protein type XIII collagen.

    PubMed

    Peltonen, S; Hentula, M; Hägg, P; Ylä-Outinen, H; Tuukkanen, J; Lakkakorpi, J; Rehn, M; Pihlajaniemi, T; Peltonen, J

    1999-10-01

    Type XIII collagen is a short chain collagen which has recently been shown to be a transmembrane protein. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the presence and localization of type XIII collagen in normal human skin and cultured keratinocytes. Expression of type XIII collagen was demonstrated in normal human skin and epidermis at the RNA level using reverse transcription followed by polymerase chain reaction and at the protein level using western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence labeling. Immunolabeling of epidermis revealed type XIII collagen both in the cell-cell contact sites and in the dermal-epidermal junction. In cultured keratinocytes type XIII collagen epitopes were detected in focal contacts and in intercellular contacts. The results of this study show very little colocalization of type XIII collagen and desmosomal components at the light microscopic level. Thus, these results suggest that type XIII collagen is unlikely to be a component of desmosomes. Instead, the punctate labeling pattern of type XIII collagen at the cell-cell contact sites and high degree of colocalization with E-cadherin suggests that type XIII collagen is very likely to be closely associated with adherens type junctions, and may, in fact, be a component of these junctions. PMID:10504453

  5. Use of a Collagen Matrix as a Substitute for Free Mucosal Grafts in Pre-Prosthetic Surgery: 1 Year Results From a Clinical Prospective Study on 15 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Maiorana, Carlo; Beretta, Mario; Pivetti, Luca; Stoffella, Enrico; Grossi, Giovanni B.; Herford, Alan S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The presence of keratinized tissue around dental implants is more than desirable either from a functional and aesthetic point of view, making soft tissue grafting a common practice in implant rehabilitation. Autogenous soft tissue grafting procedures are usually associated with high morbidity. Aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a xenogeneic collagen matrix as a substitute for soft tissue grafting around dental implants. Methods: 15 consecutive patients underwent a vestibuloplasty and grafting, both in the mandible and the maxilla, with a collagen matrix. Results: The primary endpoint was to evaluate the resorption of the graft along with the re-epithelization grafted area. The percentage of the resorption was 44,4%, with a mean gain in vestibular height of 3 mm. Secondary endpoints evaluated the clinical appearance, the hemostatic effect and the post-operative pain. All subjects referred minimal pain with no bleeding. No adverse reaction nor infection were noted. Conclusion: This study showed that the used collagen matrix can find major interest in those patients who need a greater aesthetic outcome as the matrix has a perfect integration with the surrounding tissues. Furthermore it is strongly recommended for those patients who can bear little pain. Clinical Significance: Post-operative morbidity of autologous grafts is the biggest concern of this type of surgery. The possibility to use a soft tissue substitute is a great achievement as morbidity decreases and bigger areas can be treated in a single surgery. The present study showed the efficacy of a collagen matrix as this kind of substitute. PMID:27583050

  6. A Randomized Comparative Study of Two Techniques to Optimize the Root Coverage Using a Porcine Collagen Matrix.

    PubMed

    Reino, Danilo Maeda; Maia, Luciana Prado; Fernandes, Patrícia Garani; Souza, Sergio Luis Scombatti de; Taba Junior, Mario; Palioto, Daniela Bazan; Grisi, Marcio Fermandes de Moraes; Jr, Arthur Belém Novaes

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled clinical study was to compare the extended flap technique (EFT) with the coronally advanced flap technique (CAF) using a porcine collagen matrix (PCM) for root coverage. Twenty patients with two bilateral gingival recessions, Miller class I or II on non-molar teeth were treated with CAF+PCM (control group) or EFT+PCM (test group). Clinical measurements of probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL), recession height (RH), keratinized tissue height (KTH), keratinized mucosa thickness (KMT) were determined at baseline, 3 and 6 months post-surgery. At 6 months, the mean root coverage for test group was 81.89%, and for control group it was 62.80% (p<0.01). The change of recession depth from baseline was statistically significant between test and control groups, with an mean of 2.21 mm gained at the control sites and 2.84 mm gained at the test sites (p=0.02). There were no statistically significant differences for KTH, PPD or CAL comparing the two therapies. The extended flap technique presented better root coverage than the coronally advanced flap technique when PCM was used. PMID:26647926

  7. Weft-knitted silk-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) mesh scaffold combined with collagen matrix and seeded with mesenchymal stem cells for rabbit Achilles tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenyuan; Yang, Yadong; Zhang, Keji; Li, Ying; Fang, Guojian

    2015-02-01

    Natural silk fibroin fiber scaffolds have excellent mechanical properties, but degrade slowly. In this study, we used poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA, 10:90) fibers to adjust the overall degradation rate of the scaffolds and filled them with collagen to reserve space for cell growth. Silk fibroin-PLGA (36:64) mesh scaffolds were prepared using weft-knitting, filled with type I collagen, and incubated with rabbit autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). These scaffold-cells composites were implanted into rabbit Achilles tendon defects. At 16 weeks after implantation, morphological and histological observations showed formation of tendon-like tissues that expressed type I collagen mRNA and a uniformly dense distribution of collagen fibers. The maximum load of the regenerated Achilles tendon was 58.32% of normal Achilles tendon, which was significantly higher than control group without MSCs. These findings suggest that it is feasible to construct tissue engineered tendon using weft-knitted silk fibroin-PLGA fiber mesh/collagen matrix seeded with MSCs for rabbit Achilles tendon defect repair. PMID:25333819

  8. Artesunate modulates expression of matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors as well as collagen-IV to attenuate pulmonary fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Huang, G; Mo, B; Wang, C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of artesunate on extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation and the expression of collagen-IV, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP) to understand the pharmacological role of artesunate in pulmonary fibrosis. Eighty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four groups that were administered saline alone, bleomycin (BLM) alone, BLM + artesunate, or artesunate alone for 28 days. Lung tissues from 10 rats in each group were used to obtain lung fibroblast (LF) primary cells, and the rest were used to analyze protein expression. The mRNA expression of collagen-IV, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 in lung fibroblasts was detected by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The protein levels of collagen-IV, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 protein in lung tissues were analyzed by western blotting. Artesunate treatment alleviated alveolitis and pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin in rats, as indicated by a decreased lung coefficient and improvement of lung tissue morphology. Artesunate treatment also led to decreased collagen-IV protein levels, which might be a result of its downregulated expression and increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein and mRNA levels. Increased TIMP-1 and TIMP- 2 protein and mRNA levels were detected after artesunate treatment in lung tissues and primary lung fibroblast cells and may contribute to enhanced activity of MMP-2 and -9. These findings suggested that artesunate attenuates alveolitis and pulmonary fibrosis by regulating expression of collagen-IV, TIMP-1 and 2, as well as MMP-2 and -9, to reduce ECM accumulation. PMID:27323108

  9. Tamibarotene-loaded citric acid-crosslinked alkali-treated collagen matrix as a coating material for a drug-eluting stent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Motoki; Takayanagi, Mariko; Fujiu, Katsuhito; Manabe, Ichiro; Nagai, Ryozo; Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2012-12-01

    Tamibarotene-loaded biodegradable matrices with antithrombogenic and drug-releasing properties were prepared in a crosslinking reaction between amino groups of alkali-treated collagen (AlCol) and active ester groups of trisuccinimidyl citrate. The resulting matrices were characterized by their residual amino group concentrations, swelling ratios and thermal, antithrombogenic and drug-releasing properties. It was clarified that the addition of tamibarotene does not inhibit matrix formation. After immersion in water, the swelling ratio of a matrix became lower than that prior to immersion. Thermal analysis indicated that AlCol interacted with tamibarotene. The addition of tamibarotene to the matrix did not influence the antithrombogenic property of the resulting matrix. A matrix with a high crosslinking density had a prolonged tamibarotene elution time. These results demonstrate that tamibarotene-loaded matrices have great potential as a coating material for drug-eluting stents.

  10. Use of collagen gel as an alternative extracellular matrix for the in vitro and in vivo growth of murine small intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Jabaji, Ziyad; Sears, Connie M; Brinkley, Garrett J; Lei, Nan Ye; Joshi, Vaidehi S; Wang, Jiafang; Lewis, Michael; Stelzner, Matthias; Martín, Martín G; Dunn, James C Y

    2013-12-01

    Methods for the in vitro culture of primary small intestinal epithelium have improved greatly in recent years. A critical barrier for the translation of this methodology to the patient's bedside is the ability to grow intestinal stem cells using a well-defined extracellular matrix. Current methods rely on the use of Matrigel(™), a proprietary basement membrane-enriched extracellular matrix gel produced in mice that is not approved for clinical use. We demonstrate for the first time the capacity to support the long-term in vitro growth of murine intestinal epithelium in monoculture, using type I collagen. We further demonstrate successful in vivo engraftment of enteroids co-cultured with intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts in collagen gel. Small intestinal crypts were isolated from 6 to 10 week old transgenic enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP+) mice and suspended within either Matrigel or collagen gel; cultures were supported using previously reported media and growth factors. After 1 week, cultures were either lysed for DNA or RNA extraction or were implanted subcutaneously in syngeneic host mice. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to determine expansion of the transgenic eGFP-DNA and to determine the mRNA gene expression profile. Immunohistochemistry was performed on in vitro cultures and recovered in vivo explants. Small intestinal crypts reliably expanded to form enteroids in either Matrigel or collagen in both mono- and co-cultures as confirmed by microscopy and eGFP-DNA qPCR quantification. Collagen-based cultures yielded a distinct morphology with smooth enteroids and epithelial monolayer growth at the gel surface; both enteroid and monolayer cells demonstrated reactivity to Cdx2, E-cadherin, CD10, Periodic Acid-Schiff, and lysozyme. Collagen-based enteroids were successfully subcultured in vitro, whereas pure monolayer epithelial sheets did not survive passaging. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction

  11. Effects of in vivo static compressive loading on aggrecan and type II and X collagens in the rat growth plate extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Cancel, Mathilde; Grimard, Guy; Thuillard-Crisinel, Delphine; Moldovan, Florina; Villemure, Isabelle

    2009-02-01

    Mechanical loads are essential to normal bone growth, but excessive loads can lead to progressive deformities. In addition, growth plate extracellular matrix remodelling is essential to regulate the normal longitudinal bone growth process and to ensure physiological bone mineralization. In order to investigate the effects of static compression on growth plate extracellular matrix using an in vivo animal model, a loading device was used to precisely apply a compressive stress of 0.2 MPa for two weeks on the seventh caudal vertebra (Cd7) of rats during the pubertal growth spurt. Control, sham and loaded groups were studied. Growth modulation was quantified based on calcein labelling, and three matrix components (type II and X collagens, and aggrecan) were assessed using immunohistochemistry/safranin-O staining. As well, extracellular matrix components and enzymes (MMP-3 and -13, ADAMTS-4 and -5) were studied by qRT-PCR. Loading reduced Cd7 growth by 29% (p<0.05) and 15% (p=0.07) when compared to controls and shams respectively. No significant change could be observed in the mRNA expression of collagens and the proteolytic enzyme MMP-13. However, MMP-3 was significantly increased in the loaded group as compared to the control group (p<0.05). No change was observed in aggrecan and ADAMTS-4 and -5 expression. Low immunostaining for type II and X collagens was observed in 83% of the loaded rats as compared to the control rats. This in vivo study shows that, during pubertal growth spurt, two-week static compression reduced caudal vertebrae growth rates; this mechanical growth modulation occurred with decreased type II and X collagen proteins in the growth plate. PMID:18849019

  12. Degradation of connective tissue matrices by macrophages. II. Influence of matrix composition on proteolysis of glycoproteins, elastin, and collagen by macrophages in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.A.; Werb, Z.

    1980-12-01

    Thioglycollate-elicited mouse peritoneal macrophages were cultured in contact with the mixture of extracellular matrix proteins produced by rat smooth muscle cells in culture. Both live macrophages and their conditioned media hydrolyzed glycoproteins, elastin, and collagen. Live macrophages also degraded extracellular connective tissue proteins secreted by endothelial cells and fibroblasts. The glycoproteins in the matrix markedly inhibited the rate of digestion of the other macromolecules, particularly elastin. When plasminogen was added to the matrix, activation of plasminogen to plasmin resulted in the hydrolysis of the glycoprotein components, which then allowed the macrophage elastase easier access to its substrate, elastin. Thus, although plasmin has no direct elastinolytic activity, its presence accelerated the rate of hydrolysis of elastin and therefore the rate of matrix degradation. These findings may be important in an understanding of disease states, such as emphysema and atherosclerosis, that are characterized by the destruction of connective tissue.

  13. Measuring Actin Flow in 3D Cell Protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chi-Li; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Actin dynamics is important in determining cell shape, tension, and migration. Methods such as fluorescent speckle microscopy and spatial temporal image correlation spectroscopy have been used to capture high-resolution actin turnover dynamics within cells in two dimensions. However, these methods are not directly applicable in 3D due to lower resolution and poor contrast. Here, we propose to capture actin flow in 3D with high spatial-temporal resolution by combining nanoscale precise imaging by rapid beam oscillation and fluctuation spectroscopy techniques. To measure the actin flow along cell protrusions in cell expressing actin-eGFP cultured in a type I collagen matrix, the laser was orbited around the protrusion and its trajectory was modulated in a clover-shaped pattern perpendicularly to the protrusion. Orbits were also alternated at two positions closely spaced along the protrusion axis. The pair cross-correlation function was applied to the fluorescence fluctuation from these two positions to capture the flow of actin. Measurements done on nonmoving cellular protrusion tips showed no pair-correlation at two orbital positions indicating a lack of flow of F-actin bundles. However, in some protrusions, the pair-correlation approach revealed directional flow of F-actin bundles near the protrusion surface with flow rates in the range of ∼1 μm/min, comparable to results in two dimensions using fluorescent speckle microscopy. Furthermore, we found that the actin flow rate is related to the distance to the protrusion tip. We also observed collagen deformation by concomitantly detecting collagen fibers with reflectance detection during these actin motions. The implementation of the nanoscale precise imaging by rapid beam oscillation method with a cloverleaf-shaped trajectory in conjunction with the pair cross-correlation function method provides a quantitative way of capturing dynamic flows and organization of proteins during cell migration in 3D in conditions of

  14. DEVELOPMENTAL AND OSTEOARTHRITIC CHANGES IN Col6a1 KNOCKOUT MICE: THE BIOMECHANICS OF COLLAGEN VI IN THE CARTILAGE PERICELLULAR MATRIX

    PubMed Central

    Alexopoulos, Leonidas G.; Youn, Inchan; Bonaldo, Paolo; Guilak, Farshid

    2009-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the sole cell type in articular cartilage and maintain the extracellular matrix through a homeostatic balance of anabolic and catabolic activities that are influenced by genetic factors, soluble mediators, and biophysical factors such as mechanical stress. Chondrocytes are encapsulated by a narrow tissue region termed the “pericellular matrix”, which in normal cartilage is defined by the exclusive presence of type VI collagen. Because the pericellular matrix completely surrounds each cell, it is hypothesized to serve as a filter or transducer for biochemical and/or biomechanical signals from the cartilage extracellular matrix. In this study, we used Col6a1−/− mice to investigate whether the lack of collagen VI may affect the development and biomechanical function of the pericellular matrix and alter the mechanical environment of the chondrocytes during joint loading. Col6a1−/− and Col6a1+/− mice possessed structurally intact pericellular matrices, but with significantly reduced mechanical properties as compared to wild-type controls. With age, Col6a1−/− showed accelerated development of osteoarthritic joint degeneration, as well as other musculoskeletal abnormalities such as delayed secondary ossification process and reduced bone mineral density. These findings suggest an important role for type VI collagen in regulating the physiology of the synovial joint, and provide indirect evidence that alterations in the mechanical environment of the chondrocytes, either due to loss of pericellular matrix properties or Col6α1−/− derived joint laxity, can lead to the progression of osteoarthritis. PMID:19248115

  15. Adamts1 is highly induced in rachitic bones of FGF23 transgenic mice and participates in degradation of non-mineralized bone matrix collagen.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lijuan; Andersson, Göran; Jonsson, Kenneth B; Melhus, Håkan; Lind, Thomas

    2013-01-18

    Transgenic mice overexpressing fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) in osteoblasts have a rachitic bone phenotype. These mice display hypomineralized bones, increased expression of osteoblast markers, but osteoclast numbers are unaltered or slightly reduced. Paradoxically, they show increased serum levels of the bone resorption marker CTX, a type I collagen degradation fragment. Here we analyzed a matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP-) like secreted protease, Adamts1, that has previously been associated with osteoblastic type I collagen breakdown in vitro. Bones from FGF23 transgenic (tg) mice displayed increased Adamts1 protein upon both immunohistological staining and Western blotting. We further found Adamts1 protein together with excessively degraded type I collagen in the non-mineralized bone fraction of FGF23 tg mice. A similar degradation pattern of type I collagen was noticed upon forced expression of Adamts1 in osteoblastic cells in vitro. Importantly, these Adamts1-expressing osteoblastic cells exhibited increased release of CTX fragments when cultured on demineralized bone discs. Together, these results demonstrate for the first time that Adamts1 can be highly induced in bone tissue and that this MMP-like protease can increase osteoblastic release of CTX fragments from non-mineralized bone. Thus, Adamts1 potentially contributes to the increased serum levels of CTX in rickets/osteomalacia. PMID:23261447

  16. MT1-MMP promotes cell growth and ERK activation through c-Src and paxillin in three-dimensional collagen matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Takino, Takahisa; Tsuge, Hisashi; Ozawa, Terumasa; Sato, Hiroshi

    2010-06-11

    Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is essential for tumor invasion and growth. We show here that MT1-MMP induces extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in cancer cells cultured in collagen gel, which is indispensable for their proliferation. Inhibition of MT1-MMP by MMP inhibitor or small interfering RNA suppressed activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and ERK in MT1-MMP-expressing cancer cells, which resulted in up-regulation of p21{sup WAF1} and suppression of cell growth in collagen gel. Cell proliferation was also abrogated by the inhibitor against ERK pathway without affecting FAK phosphorylation. MT1-MMP and integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} were shown to be involved in c-Src activation, which induced FAK and ERK activation in collagen gel. These MT1-MMP-mediated signal transductions were paxillin dependent, as knockdown of paxillin reduced cell growth and ERK activation, and co-expression of MT1-MMP with paxillin induced ERK activation. The results suggest that MT1-MMP contributes to proliferation of cancer cells in the extracellular matrix by activating ERK through c-Src and paxillin.

  17. The use of microfiber composites of elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with synthetic collagen in the design of vascular grafts

    PubMed Central

    Caves, Jeffrey M.; Kumar, Vivek A.; Martinez, Adam W.; Kim, Jeong; Ripberger, Carrie M.; Haller, Carolyn A.; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen and elastin networks contribute to highly specialized biomechanical responses in numerous tissues and species. Biomechanical properties such as modulus, elasticity, and strength ultimately affect tissue function and durability, as well as local cellular behavior. In the case of vascular bypass grafts, compliance at physiologic pressures is correlated with increased patency due to a reduction in anastomotic intimal hyerplasia. In this report, we combine extracellular matrix (ECM) protein analogues to yield multilamellar vascular grafts comprised of a recombinant elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with synthetic collagen microfibers. Structural analysis revealed that the fabrication scheme permits a range of fiber orientations and volume fractions, leading to tunable mechanical properties. Burst strengths of 239–2760 mm Hg, compliances of 2.8–8.4%/100 mm Hg, and suture retention strengths of 35–192 gf were observed. The design most closely approximating all target criteria displayed a burst strength of 1483 ± 43 mm Hg, a compliance of 5.1 ± 0.8%/100 mm Hg, and a suture retention strength of 173 ± 4 gf. These results indicate that through incorporation of reinforcing collagen microfibers, recombinant elastomeric protein-based biomaterials can play a significant role in load bearing tissue substitutes. We believe that similar composites can be incorporated into tissue engineering schemes that seek to integrate cells within the structure, prior to or after implantation in vivo. PMID:20584549

  18. Zinc l-pyrrolidone carboxylate inhibits the UVA-induced production of matrix metalloproteinase-1 by in vitro cultured skin fibroblasts, whereas it enhances their collagen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Takino, Y; Okura, F; Kitazawa, M; Iwasaki, K; Tagami, H

    2012-02-01

    Reduced collagen matrix in the dermis constitutes one of the characteristic features of chronologically aged skin, which is further enhanced on the sun-exposed portions of the body by chronic ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation, inducing the unique changes associated with skin photoageing. The zinc salt of l-pyrrolidone carboxylate (Zinc PCA) has long been used as a cosmetic ingredient, because of its astringent and anti-microbial properties. In the present study, by employing cultured normal human dermal fibroblasts, we found that Zinc PCA suppressed UVA-induced activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and reduced matrix metalloproteinase-1 production in these cells, which is thought to be involved in collagen degradation in photoaged skin. Moreover, Zinc PCA treatment of the cells increased the expression of an ascorbic acid transporter mRNA, SVCT2, but not SVCT1, resulting in the enhanced production of type I collagen. Based on these in vitro findings, we consider Zinc PCA to be a promising candidate for an anti-skin ageing agent. PMID:21834944

  19. Abnormal arrangement of a collagen/apatite extracellular matrix orthogonal to osteoblast alignment is constructed by a nanoscale periodic surface structure.

    PubMed

    Matsugaki, Aira; Aramoto, Gento; Ninomiya, Takafumi; Sawada, Hiroshi; Hata, Satoshi; Nakano, Takayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Morphological and directional alteration of cells is essential for structurally appropriate construction of tissues and organs. In particular, osteoblast alignment is crucial for the realization of anisotropic bone tissue microstructure. In this article, the orientation of a collagen/apatite extracellular matrix (ECM) was established by controlling osteoblast alignment using a surface geometry with nanometer-sized periodicity induced by laser ablation. Laser irradiation induced self-organized periodic structures (laser-induced periodic surface structures; LIPSS) with a spatial period equal to the wavelength of the incident laser on the surface of biomedical alloys of Ti-6Al-4V and Co-Cr-Mo. Osteoblast orientation was successfully induced parallel to the grating structure. Notably, both the fibrous orientation of the secreted collagen matrix and the c-axis of the produced apatite crystals were orientated orthogonal to the cell direction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that bone tissue anisotropy is controllable, including the characteristic organization of a collagen/apatite composite orthogonal to the osteoblast orientation, by controlling the cell alignment using periodic surface geometry. PMID:25453944

  20. Bilayered, non-cross-linked collagen matrix for regeneration of facial defects after skin cancer removal: a new perspective for biomaterial-based tissue reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ghanaati, Shahram; Kovács, Adorján; Barbeck, Mike; Lorenz, Jonas; Teiler, Anna; Sadeghi, Nader; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Sader, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Classically skin defects are covered by split thickness skin grafts or by means of local or regional skin flaps. In the presented case series for the first time a bilayered, non-crossed-linked collagen matrix has been used in an off-label fashion in order to reconstruct facial skin defects following different types of skin cancer resection. The material is of porcine origin and consists of a spongy and a compact layer. The ratio of the two layers is 1:3 in favour of the spongy layer. The aim of the study was to investigate the potential of this matrix for skin regeneration as an alternative to the standard techniques of skin grafts or flaps. Six patients between 39 and 83 years old were included in the study based on a therapeutic trial. The collagen matrix was used in seven defects involving the nose, eyelid, forehead- and posterior scalp regions, and ranging from 1,2 to 6 cm in diameter. Two different head and neck surgeons at two different institutions performed the operations. Each used a different technique in covering the wound following surgery, i.e. with and without a latex-based sheet under the pressure dressing. In three cases cylindrical biopsies were taken after 14 days. In all cases the biomaterial application was performed without any complication and no adverse effects were observed. Clinically, the collagen matrix contributed to a tension-free skin regeneration, independent of the wound dressing used. The newly regenerated skin showed strong similarity to the adjacent normal tissue both in quality and colour. Histological analysis indicated that the spongy layer replaced the defective connective tissue, by providing stepwise integration into the surrounding implantation bed, while the compact layer was infiltrated by mononuclear cells and contributed to its epithelialization by means of a "conductive"process from the surrounding epithelial cells. The clinical and histological data demonstrate that the collagen bilayered matrix used in this series

  1. A quasi steady state method for solving transient Darcy flow in complex 3D fractured networks accounting for matrix to fracture flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nœtinger, B.

    2015-02-01

    Modeling natural Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN) receives more and more attention in applied geosciences, from oil and gas industry, to geothermal recovery and aquifer management. The fractures may be either natural, or artificial in case of well stimulation. Accounting for the flow inside the fracture network, and accounting for the transfers between the matrix and the fractures, with the same level of accuracy is an important issue for calibrating the well architecture and for setting up optimal resources recovery strategies. Recently, we proposed an original method allowing to model transient pressure diffusion in the fracture network only [1]. The matrix was assumed to be impervious. A systematic approximation scheme was built, allowing to model the initial DFN by a set of N unknowns located at each identified intersection between fractures. The higher N, the higher the accuracy of the model. The main assumption was using a quasi steady state hypothesis, that states that the characteristic diffusion time over one single fracture is negligible compared with the characteristic time of the macroscopic problem, e.g. change of boundary conditions. In that context, the lowest order approximation N = 1 has the form of solving a transient problem in a resistor/capacitor network, a so-called pipe network. Its topology is the same as the network of geometrical intersections between fractures. In this paper, we generalize this approach in order to account for fluxes from matrix to fractures. The quasi steady state hypothesis at the fracture level is still kept. Then, we show that in the case of well separated time scales between matrix and fractures, the preceding model needs only to be slightly modified in order to incorporate these fluxes. The additional knowledge of the so-called matrix to fracture transfer function allows to modify the mass matrix that becomes a time convolution operator. This is reminiscent of existing space averaged transient dual porosity models.

  2. Collagen-binding Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecule (MSCRAMM) of Gram-positive Bacteria Inhibit Complement Activation via the Classical Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Mingsong; Ko, Ya-Ping; Liang, Xiaowen; Ross, Caná L.; Liu, Qing; Murray, Barbara E.; Höök, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Members of a family of collagen-binding microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) from Gram-positive bacteria are established virulence factors in several infectious diseases models. Here, we report that these adhesins also can bind C1q and act as inhibitors of the classical complement pathway. Molecular analyses of Cna from Staphylococcus aureus suggested that this prototype MSCRAMM bound to the collagenous domain of C1q and interfered with the interactions of C1r with C1q. As a result, C1r2C1s2 was displaced from C1q, and the C1 complex was deactivated. This novel function of the Cna-like MSCRAMMs represents a potential immune evasion strategy that could be used by numerous Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:23720782

  3. Impact of intense pulse light irradiation on BALB/c mouse skin-in vivo study on collagens, matrix metalloproteinases and vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dan; Cao, Yan; Wu, Di; Xu, Yang; Chen, Bin; Xue, Zhuyun

    2009-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the effects of intense pulsed light (IPL) on collagen expression in BALB/c mouse skin and confirm its relative molecular mechanisms. The dorsal skin of BALB/c mice was irradiated by IPL. Before treatment and from 1 day to 8 weeks (1 day, 3 days, 5 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 weeks, 4 weeks, 6 weeks and 8 weeks) after treatment, the irradiated skin specimens were examined. The histology showed dermis thickening, accompanied with increased collagen and better organization. After IPL irradiation from 2 W up to 8 W, the staining of collagen types I and III in the IPL-treated groups was stronger than in the sham groups (P < 0.05), and the mRNA expression levels of the procollagen types I and III had also increased (P < 0.05). The up-regulation effects of IPL irradiation were time-dependent. The mRNA expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-2 decreased progressively after IPL irradiation at 2 W up to 8 W (P < 0.05), and this down-regulation effect of IPL was also time-dependent. However, the mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) had shown no obvious change by the end of the experiment (P > 0.05). Taking these factors together, we can conclude that IPL irradiation can not only enhance new collagen production, but also decrease collagen degradation in photo-rejuvenation mechanisms in mouse skin. PMID:18084809

  4. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  5. Distribution of non-collagenous dentin matrix proteins and proteoglycans, and their relation to calcium accumulation in bisphosphonate-affected rat incisors.

    PubMed

    Ohma, N; Takagi, Y; Takano, Y

    2000-06-01

    It has been reported that multiple injections of 1-hydroxyethylidene- 1,1-bisphosphonate (HEBP) to rats prevent mineralization of incisor dentin, thereby revealing high concentrations of calcium in the non-mineralized matrix of circumpulpal dentin. To identify the molecules responsible for calcium accumulation in circumpulpal dentin matrix, rats were injected daily with HEBP (8 mg P/kg) for 7 d, and the incisors processed for various histochemical and immunohistochemical staining of non-collagenous matrices of dentin. Cuprolinic blue reactions for proteoglycans (PGs) were equally distributed in non-mineralized matrix of mantle and circumpulpal dentin layers. Dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and osteopontin (OPN) immunoreactions were found in non-mineralized circumpulpal dentin matrix, but not in mantle dentin. In normal incisors, however, predentin matrix showing significant DSP immunoreactivity was negative for Ca-GBHA reactions. HEBP-affected, non-mineralized OPN immunopositive bone matrix was also non-reactive for calcium. From these observations, neither PGs, OPN nor DSP appear to be responsible for calcium accumulation in HEBP-affected circumpulpal dentin. Stains-all reactive component, possibly dentin phosphoprotein (DPP), only showed the same distribution as that of Ca-GBHA in both HEBP-affected and normal dentin matrix, implicating a possible contribution of DPP to calcium accumulation in circumpulpal dentin and, hence, to appositional mineralization of dentin. PMID:10872993

  6. Scanning electron microscopy subsequent to a combined treatment of NaOCl and EDTA in some non-collagenous calcified matrixes.

    PubMed

    Kodaka, T; Sano, T; Mori, R

    2000-01-01

    Using backscattered electron (BSE) imaging and scanning electron microscopy, subsequent to a combined treatment of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) or only with EDTA etching, we observed some structures of non-collagenous calcified matrixes with the aim of revealing the correlation of deposition between calcification degree and organic amount. In human tooth enamel, the NaOCl-EDTA method eroded more intensively the hypocalcified prisms of enamel tufts containing a relatively large amount of EDTA-insoluble organic matter than the hypercalcified normal prismatic enamel containing a small amount of the organic matter. Afibrillar cementum, one of the non-collagenous calcified tissues similar to the enamel, has been reported to consist of organic-rich and poor incremental lamellae. The BSE imaging showed an alternation pattern of hypocalcification and hypercalcification. The hypocalcified lamellae were retained by EDTA etching, while the hypercalcified lamellae showed a resistance against the NaOCl-EDTA method. In the non-collagenous calcareous concretions of human pineal body, organic-rich and poor, and hyper- and hypocalcified incremental lamellae have been reported. The deposition pattern of calcification degree and organic amount was similar to that in afibrillar cementum, and the hypercalcified lamellae showed a resistance against the NaOCl-EDTA method. In conclusion, the high and the lower calcified regions of non-collagenous calcified matrixes contained smaller and larger amounts of EDTA-insoluble organic matter respectively. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy subsequent to the NaOCl-EDTA method corresponding to the BSE imaging clearly showed fine calcified structures compared with the BSE imaging. PMID:10791437

  7. Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) Plays a Critical Role in the Softening of Common Carp Muscle during Chilled Storage by Degradation of Type I and V Collagens.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Wang, Cheng; Cai, Qiu-Feng; Zhang, Qian; Weng, Ling; Liu, Guang-Ming; Su, Wen-Jin; Cao, Min-Jie

    2015-12-30

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are proposed to play important roles in the degradation of collagens, thus causing the post-mortem softening of fish muscle, although the specific mechanism remains largely unresolved. Previously, we reported the existence of gelatinase-like proteinases in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) muscle. The primary structures of these proteinases, however, have never been investigated. In the present study, two MMPs with molecular masses of 66 and 65 kDa were purified to homogeneity from common carp muscle by ammonium sulfate fractionation and a series of column chromatographies. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS) analysis indicated that they are completely identical to MMP-2 from common carp. During chilled storage of common carp at 4 °C, the enzymatic activity of MMP-2 increased to 212% in 12 h while the texture profile increased over the first 2 h and gradually decreased. On the other hand, type V collagen was purified to homogeneity and a specific polyclonal antibody against this protein was prepared. Both type I and V collagens were effectively hydrolyzed by MMP-2 at 30 °C and even at 4 °C. Furthermore, injection of metalloproteinase proteinase inhibitor EDTA into the blood vessel of live common carp suppressed post-mortem tenderization significantly. All of these results confirmed that MMP-2 is a major proteinase responsible for the degradation of collagens, resulting in the softening of fish muscle during chilled storage. PMID:26653826

  8. Biphasic response of cell invasion to matrix stiffness in 3-dimensional biopolymer networks

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Nadine R.; Skodzek, Kai; Hurst, Sebastian; Mainka, Astrid; Steinwachs, Julian; Schneider, Julia; Aifantis, Katerina E.; Fabry, Ben

    2015-01-01

    When cells come in contact with an adhesive matrix, they begin to spread and migrate with a speed that depends on the stiffness of the extracellular matrix. On a flat surface, migration speed decreases with matrix stiffness mainly due to an increased stability of focal adhesions. In a 3-dimensional (3D) environment, cell migration is thought to be additionally impaired by the steric hindrance imposed by the surrounding matrix. For porous 3D biopolymer networks such as collagen gels, however, the effect of matrix stiffness on cell migration is difficult to separate from effects of matrix pore size and adhesive ligand density, and is therefore unknown. Here we used glutaraldehyde as a crosslinker to increase the stiffness of self-assembled collagen biopolymer networks independently of collagen concentration or pore size. Breast carcinoma cells were seeded onto the surface of 3D collagen gels, and the invasion depth was measured after 3 days of culture. Cell invasion in gels with pore sizes larger than 5 μm increased with higher gel stiffness, whereas invasion in gels with smaller pores decreased with higher gel stiffness. These data show that 3D cell invasion is enhanced by higher matrix stiffness, opposite to cell behavior in 2D, as long as the pore size does not fall below a critical value where it causes excessive steric hindrance. These findings may be important for optimizing the recellularization of soft tissue implants or for the design of 3D invasion models in cancer research. PMID:25462839

  9. High power enzymatic biofuel cell based on naphthoquinone-mediated oxidation of glucose by glucose oxidase in a carbon nanotube 3D matrix.

    PubMed

    Reuillard, Bertrand; Le Goff, Alan; Agnès, Charles; Holzinger, Michael; Zebda, Abdelkader; Gondran, Chantal; Elouarzaki, Kamal; Cosnier, Serge

    2013-04-14

    We report the design of a novel glucose/O2 biofuel cell (GBFC) integrating carbon nanotube-based 3D bioelectrodes and using naphthoquinone-mediated oxidation of glucose by glucose oxidase and direct oxygen reduction by laccase. The GBFCs exhibit high open circuit voltages of 0.76 V, high current densities of 4.47 mA cm(-2), and maximum power output of 1.54 mW cm(-2), 1.92 mW mL(-1) and 2.67 mW g(-1). The GBFC is able to constantly deliver 0.56 mW h cm(-2) under discharge at 0.5 V, showing among the best in vitro performances for a GBFC. Using a charge pump, the GBFC finally powered a Light Emitting Diode (LED), demonstrating its ability to amplify micro watts to power mW-demanding electronic devices. PMID:23455694

  10. Mechanisms of lamellar collagen formation in connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Ghazanfari, Samaneh; Khademhosseini, Ali; Smit, Theodoor H

    2016-08-01

    The objective of tissue engineering is to regenerate functional tissues. Engineering functional tissues requires an understanding of the mechanisms that guide the formation and evolution of structure in the extracellular matrix (ECM). In particular, the three-dimensional (3D) collagen fiber arrangement is important as it is the key structural determinant that provides mechanical integrity and biological function. In this review, we survey the current knowledge on collagen organization mechanisms that can be applied to create well-structured functional lamellar tissues and in particular intervertebral disc and cornea. Thus far, the mechanisms behind the formation of cross-aligned collagen fibers in the lamellar structures is not fully understood. We start with cell-induced collagen alignment and strain-stabilization behavior mechanisms which can explain a single anisotropically aligned collagen fiber layer. These mechanisms may explain why there is anisotropy in a single layer in the first place. However, they cannot explain why a consecutive collagen layer is laid down with an alternating alignment. Therefore, we explored another mechanism, called liquid crystal phasing. While dense concentrations of collagen show such behavior, there is little evidence that the conditions for liquid crystal phasing are actually met in vivo. Instead, lysyl aldehyde-derived collagen cross-links have been found essential for correct lamellar matrix deposition. Furthermore, we suggest that supra-cellular (tissue-level) shear stress may be instrumental in the alignment of collagen fibers. Understanding the potential mechanisms behind the lamellar collagen structure in connective tissues will lead to further improvement of the regeneration strategies of functional complex lamellar tissues. PMID:27162076

  11. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Sense Three Dimensional Type I Collagen through Discoidin Domain Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Lund, A.W.; Stegemann, J.P.; Plopper, G.E.

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix provides structural and organizational cues for tissue development and defines and maintains cellular phenotype during cell fate determination. Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells use this matrix to tightly regulate the balance between their differentiation potential and self-renewal in the native niche. When understood, the mechanisms that govern cell-matrix crosstalk during differentiation will allow for efficient engineering of natural and synthetic matrices to specifically direct and maintain stem cell phenotype. This work identifies the discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a collagen activated receptor tyrosine kinase, as a potential link through which stem cells sense and respond to the 3D organization of their extracellular matrix microenvironment. DDR1 is dependent upon both the structure and proteolytic state of its collagen ligand and is specifically expressed and localized in three dimensional type I collagen culture. Inhibition of DDR1 expression results in decreased osteogenic potential, increased cell spreading, stress fiber formation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Additionally, loss of DDR1 activity alters the cell-mediated organization of the naïve type I collagen matrix. Taken together, these results demonstrate a role for DDR1 in the stem cell response to and interaction with three dimensional type I collagen. Dynamic changes in cell shape in 3D culture and the tuning of the local ECM microstructure, directs crosstalk between DDR1 and two dimensional mechanisms of osteogenesis that can alter their traditional roles. PMID:20589230

  12. Boundary Stiffness Regulates Fibroblast Behavior in Collagen Gels

    PubMed Central

    John, Jeffrey; Quinlan, Angela Throm; Silvestri, Chiara; Billiar, Kristen

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have illustrated the profound dependence of cellular behavior on the stiffness of 2D culture substrates. The goal of this study was to develop a method to alter the stiffness cells experience in a standard 3D collagen gel model without affecting the physiochemical properties of the extracellular matrix. A device was developed utilizing compliant anchors (0.048–0.64 N m−1) to tune the boundary stiffness of suspended collagen gels in between the commonly utilized free and fixed conditions (zero and infinite stiffness boundary stiffness). We demonstrate the principle of operation with finite element analyses and a wide range of experimental studies. In all cases, boundary stiffness has a strong influence on cell behavior, most notably eliciting higher basal tension and activated force (in response to KCl) and more pronounced remodeling of the collagen matrix at higher boundary stiffness levels. Measured equibiaxial forces for gels seeded with 3 million human foreskin fibroblasts range from 0.05 to 1 mN increasing monotonically with boundary stiffness. Estimated force per cell ranges from 17 to 100 nN utilizing representative volume element analysis. This device provides a valuable tool to independently study the effect of the mechanical environment of the cell in a 3D collagen matrix. PMID:20012205

  13. Biologic variability of human foreskin fibroblasts in 2D and 3D culture: implications for a wound healing model

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The fibroblast-populated 3D collagen matrix is a model of tissue and healing which has been used since the 1980's. It was hypothesized that anchorage disruption of the collagen matrix would produce p53-dependent apoptosis in the embedded fibroblasts, but results of hypothesis testing were variant. Findings The response of p53 to anchorage disruption in 3D culture or to UV irradiation in 2D culture was influenced both by fibroblast strain and culture conditions. It also was determined that data scatter in a collagen matrix contraction assay was related to fibroblast strain and possibly to technical factors, such as cell culture technician and/or number of matrices utilized. Subsequent analysis suggested that phenotypic drift and/or inter-strain genetic variability may have been responsible for the data scatter. In addition, several technical factors were identified that may have contributed to the scatter. Conclusion Experimentation with human foreskin fibroblasts in both 2D and 3D culture can produce variant data. The underlying cause of the data scatter appears to be partially due to the biologic variability of the fibroblast. PMID:19922655

  14. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  15. Changes in global gene expression associated with 3D structure of tumors: an ex vivo matrix-free mesothelioma spheroid model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heungnam; Phung, Yen; Ho, Mitchell

    2012-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments present significant barriers to anti-tumor agents. Molecules involved in multicellular tumor microenvironments, however, are difficult to study ex vivo. Here, we generated a matrix-free tumor spheroid model using the NCI-H226 mesothelioma cell line and compared the gene expression profiles of spheroids and monolayers using microarray analysis. Microarray analysis revealed that 142 probe sets were differentially expressed between tumor spheroids and monolayers. Gene ontology analysis revealed that upregulated genes were primarily related to immune response, wound response, lymphocyte stimulation and response to cytokine stimulation, whereas downregulated genes were primarily associated with apoptosis. Among the 142 genes, 27 are located in the membrane and related to biologic processes of cellular movement, cell-to-cell signaling, cellular growth and proliferation and morphology. Western blot analysis validated elevation of MMP2, BAFF/BLyS/TNFSF13B, RANTES/CCL5 and TNFAIP6/TSG-6 protein expression in spheroids as compared to monolayers. Thus, we have reported the first large scale comparison of the transcriptional profiles using an ex vivo matrix-free spheroid model to identify genes specific to the three-dimensional biological structure of tumors. The method described here can be used for gene expression profiling of tumors other than mesothelioma. PMID:22737246

  16. Dinitrosyl iron complexes with glutathione incorporated into a collagen matrix as a base for the design of drugs accelerating skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Shekhter, Anatoly B; Rudenko, Tatyana G; Istranov, Leonid P; Guller, Anna E; Borodulin, Rostislav R; Vanin, Anatoly F

    2015-10-12

    Composites of a collagen matrix and dinitrosyl iron complexes with glutathione (DNIC-GS) (in a dose of 4.0 μmoles per item) in the form of spongy sheets (DNIC-Col) were prepared and then topically applied in rat excisional full-thickness skin wound model. The effects of DNIC-Col were studied in comparison with spontaneously healing wounds (SpWH) and wounds treated with collagen sponges (Col) without DNIC-GS. The composites induced statistically and clinically significant acceleration of complete wound closure (21±1 day versus 23±1 day and 26±1 day for DNIC-Col, Col and SpWH, respectively). Histological examination of wound tissues on days 4, 14, 18 and 21 after surgery demonstrated that this improvement was supported by enhanced growth, maturation and fibrous transformation of granulation tissue and earlier epithelization of the injured area in rats treated with DNIC-Col composites benchmarked against Col and SpWH. It is suggested that the positive effect of the new pharmaceutical material on wound healing is based on the release of NO from decomposing DNIC. This effect is believed to be potentiated by the synergy of DNIC and collagen. PMID:26066410

  17. Interleukin-13 induces collagen type-1 expression through matrix metalloproteinase-2 and transforming growth factor-β1 in airway fibroblasts in asthma.

    PubMed

    Firszt, Rafael; Francisco, Dave; Church, Tony D; Thomas, Joseph M; Ingram, Jennifer L; Kraft, Monica

    2014-02-01

    Airway remodelling is a feature of asthma that contributes to loss of lung function. One of the central components of airway remodelling is subepithelial fibrosis. Interleukin (IL)-13 is a key T-helper 2 cytokine and is believed to be the central mediator of allergic asthma including remodelling, but the mechanism driving the latter has not been elucidated in human asthma. We hypothesised that IL-13 stimulates collagen type-1 production by the airway fibroblast in a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)- and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-dependent manner in human asthma as compared to healthy controls. Fibroblasts were cultured from endobronchial biopsies in 14 subjects with mild asthma and 13 normal controls that underwent bronchoscopy. Airway fibroblasts were treated with various mediators including IL-13 and specific MMP-inhibitors. IL-13 significantly stimulated collagen type-1 production in asthma compared to normal controls. Inhibitors of MMP-2 significantly attenuated collagen production in asthma but had no effect in normal controls. IL-13 significantly increased total and active forms of TGF-β1, and this activation was blocked using an MMP-2 inhibitor. IL-13 activated endogenous MMP-2 in asthma patients as compared to normal controls. In an ex vivo model, IL-13 potentiates airway remodelling through a mechanism involving TGF-β1 and MMP-2. These effects provide insights into the mechanism involved in IL-13-directed airway remodelling in asthma. PMID:23682108

  18. Distinct functions of the laminin β LN domain and collagen IV during cardiac extracellular matrix formation and stabilization of alary muscle attachments revealed by EMS mutagenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Drosophila heart (dorsal vessel) is a relatively simple tubular organ that serves as a model for several aspects of cardiogenesis. Cardiac morphogenesis, proper heart function and stability require structural components whose identity and ways of assembly are only partially understood. Structural components are also needed to connect the myocardial tube with neighboring cells such as pericardial cells and specialized muscle fibers, the so-called alary muscles. Results Using an EMS mutagenesis screen for cardiac and muscular abnormalities in Drosophila embryos we obtained multiple mutants for two genetically interacting complementation groups that showed similar alary muscle and pericardial cell detachment phenotypes. The molecular lesions underlying these defects were identified as domain-specific point mutations in LamininB1 and Cg25C, encoding the extracellular matrix (ECM) components laminin β and collagen IV α1, respectively. Of particular interest within the LamininB1 group are certain hypomorphic mutants that feature prominent defects in cardiac morphogenesis and cardiac ECM layer formation, but in contrast to amorphic mutants, only mild defects in other tissues. All of these alleles carry clustered missense mutations in the laminin LN domain. The identified Cg25C mutants display weaker and largely temperature-sensitive phenotypes that result from glycine substitutions in different Gly-X-Y repeats of the triple helix-forming domain. While initial basement membrane assembly is not abolished in Cg25C mutants, incorporation of perlecan is impaired and intracellular accumulation of perlecan as well as the collagen IV α2 chain is detected during late embryogenesis. Conclusions Assembly of the cardiac ECM depends primarily on laminin, whereas collagen IV is needed for stabilization. Our data underscore the importance of a correctly assembled ECM particularly for the development of cardiac tissues and their lateral connections. The mutational

  19. [Simultaneous resolution and determination of tyrosine, tryptophan and phenylalanine by alternating penalty trilinear decomposition algorithm coupled with 3D emission-excitation matrix fluorometry].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jin; Ren, Feng-lian; Song, Ge; Liao, Lü; Yu, Wen-feng; Zeng, Tao

    2007-10-01

    A new method using alternating penalty trilinear decomposition algorithm coupled with excitation-emission matrix fluorometry has been developed for simultaneous resolution and determination of tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan. Their correlation coefficients were 0.9987, 0.9995 and 0.9993 respectively. The contents of tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan in Hibiscus syriacus L. leaves were also be determined by this method after being extracted by ultrasonic. The coefficients of variation and the recoveries of the three amino acids were 0.84%, 0.36%, 1.59% and 101.0%-92.7%, 106.5%-93.0%, 103.0%-95.0% respectively. All these show that this is a simple, fast and cridible method. PMID:18306802

  20. Type V collagen controls the initiation of collagen fibril assembly.

    PubMed

    Wenstrup, Richard J; Florer, Jane B; Brunskill, Eric W; Bell, Sheila M; Chervoneva, Inna; Birk, David E

    2004-12-17

    Vertebrate collagen fibrils are heterotypically composed of a quantitatively major and minor fibril collagen. In non-cartilaginous tissues, type I collagen accounts for the majority of the collagen mass, and collagen type V, the functions of which are poorly understood, is a minor component. Type V collagen has been implicated in the regulation of fibril diameter, and we reported recently preliminary evidence that type V collagen is required for collagen fibril nucleation (Wenstrup, R. J., Florer, J. B., Cole, W. G., Willing, M. C., and Birk, D. E. (2004) J. Cell. Biochem. 92, 113-124). The purpose of this study was to define the roles of type V collagen in the regulation of collagen fibrillogenesis and matrix assembly. Mouse embryos completely deficient in pro-alpha1(V) chains were created by homologous recombination. The col5a1-/- animals die in early embryogenesis, at approximately embryonic day 10. The type V collagen-deficient mice demonstrate a virtual lack of collagen fibril formation. In contrast, the col5a1+/- animals are viable. The reduced type V collagen content is associated with a 50% reduction in fibril number and dermal collagen content. In addition, relatively normal, cylindrical fibrils are assembled with a second population of large, structurally abnormal collagen fibrils. The structural properties of the abnormal matrix are decreased relative to the wild type control animals. These data indicate a central role for the evolutionary, ancient type V collagen in the regulation of fibrillogenesis. The complete dependence of fibril formation on type V collagen is indicative of the critical role of the latter in early fibril initiation. In addition, this fibril collagen is important in the determination of fibril structure and matrix organization. PMID:15383546

  1. Superelastic, superabsorbent and 3D nanofiber-assembled scaffold for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiming; Ma, Jun; Zhu, Lei; Morsi, Yosry; Ei-Hamshary, Hany; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Mo, Xiumei

    2016-06-01

    Fabrication of 3D scaffold to mimic the nanofibrous structure of the nature extracellular matrix (ECM) with appropriate mechanical properties and excellent biocompatibility, remain an important technical challenge in tissue engineering. The present study reports the strategy to fabricate a 3D nanofibrous scaffold with similar structure to collagen in ECM by combining electrospinning and freeze-drying technique. With the technique reported here, a nanofibrous structure scaffold with hydrophilic and superabsorbent properties can be readily prepared by Gelatin and Polylactic acid (PLA). In wet state the scaffold also shows a super-elastic property, which could bear a compressive strain as high as 80% and recovers its original shape afterwards. Moreover, after 6 days of culture, L-929 cells grow, proliferate and infiltrated into the scaffold. The results suggest that this 3D nanofibrous scaffold would be promising for varied field of tissue engineering application. PMID:26954082

  2. Type I collagen aging impairs discoidin domain receptor 2-mediated tumor cell growth suppression.

    PubMed

    Saby, Charles; Buache, Emilie; Brassart-Pasco, Sylvie; El Btaouri, Hassan; Courageot, Marie-Pierre; Van Gulick, Laurence; Garnotel, Roselyne; Jeannesson, Pierre; Morjani, Hamid

    2016-05-01

    Tumor cells are confronted to a type I collagen rich environment which regulates cell proliferation and invasion. Biological aging has been associated with structural changes of type I collagen. Here, we address the effect of collagen aging on cell proliferation in a three-dimensional context (3D).We provide evidence for an inhibitory effect of adult collagen, but not of the old one, on proliferation of human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells. This effect involves both the activation of the tyrosine kinase Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) and the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2. DDR2 and SHP-2 were less activated in old collagen. DDR2 inhibition decreased SHP-2 phosphorylation in adult collagen and increased cell proliferation to a level similar to that observed in old collagen.In the presence of old collagen, a high level of JAK2 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation was observed while expression of the cell cycle negative regulator p21CIP1 was decreased. Inhibition of DDR2 kinase function also led to an increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation and a decrease in p21CIP1 expression. Similar signaling profile was observed when DDR2 was inhibited in adult collagen. Altogether, these data suggest that biological collagen aging could increase tumor cell proliferation by reducingthe activation of the key matrix sensor DDR2. PMID:27121132

  3. Tissuelike 3D Assemblies of Human Broncho-Epithelial Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissuelike assemblies (TLAs) of human broncho-epithelial (HBE) cells have been developed for use in in vitro research on infection of humans by respiratory viruses. The 2D monolayer HBE cell cultures heretofore used in such research lack the complex cell structures and interactions characteristic of in vivo tissues and, consequently, do not adequately emulate the infection dynamics of in-vivo microbial adhesion and invasion. In contrast, the 3D HBE TLAs are characterized by more-realistic reproductions of the geometrical and functional complexity, differentiation of cells, cell-to-cell interactions, and cell-to-matrix interactions characteristic of human respiratory epithelia. Hence, the 3D HBE TLAs are expected to make it possible to perform at least some of the research in vitro under more-realistic conditions, without need to infect human subjects. The TLAs are grown on collagen-coated cyclodextran microbeads under controlled conditions in a nutrient liquid in the simulated microgravitational environment of a bioreactor of the rotating- wall-vessel type. Primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells are used as a foundation matrix, while adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cells are used as the overlying component. The beads become coated with cells, and cells on adjacent beads coalesce into 3D masses. The resulting TLAs have been found to share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelia including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The differentiation of the cells in these TLAs into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues is confirmed by the presence of compounds, including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium marker compounds, and by the production of tissue mucin. In a series of initial infection tests, TLA cultures were inoculated with human respiratory syncytial viruses and parainfluenza type 3 viruses. Infection was confirmed by photomicrographs that

  4. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  5. Evaluation and Comparison of the Biopathology of Collagen and Inflammation in the Extracellular Matrix of Oral Epithelial Dysplasias and Inflammatory Fibrous Hyperplasia Using Picrosirius Red Stain and Polarising Microscopy: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Soma Susan; Sarojini, Sreenivasan Bargavan; George, Giju Baby; Vinod, Sankar; Mathew, Philips; Babu, Anulekh; Sebastian, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background: The role of tumour inflammation and the dysplastic epithelial-stromal interactions on the nature of collagen fibres in the extracellular matrix of dysplastic epithelium is not fully understood. The present study was aimed to evaluate and compare the inflammation and pathological stromal collagen (loosely packed thin disorganized collagen) present in mild, moderate and severe epithelial dysplasias with that of inflammatory fibrous hyperplasias. The basement membrane intactness of epithelial dysplasias was also evaluated to determine if dysplastic epithelial mesenchymal interaction has any role in the integrity of stromal collagen in epithelial dysplasia. Methods: Oral epithelial dysplasias, inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia and normal oral mucosal samples were used for the study. Packing, thickness and orientation of collagen fibres in mild, moderate and severe grades of oral epithelial dysplasias (n = 24), inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia (n = 8) and normal oral mucosal samples (n = 8) were analysed based on the polarisation of collagen fibres in picrosirius red polarising stain under polarising microscope. Results: All the grades of epithelial dysplasias showed greenish yellow birefringence confirming the presence of loosely arranged pathological collagen in the presence of moderate inflammation. All the cases of inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia showed red polarisation hue and moderate inflammation. A statistically significant difference was found in the packing and orientation of collagen when epithelial dysplasias and inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia were compared (P < 0.01). When the intactness of basement membrane integrity was compared in all the groups of epithelial dysplasia, a statistically significant result was obtained (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Presence of significant amount of loosely packed thin disoriented collagen even in mild epithelial dysplasia suggests that tumourigenic factors are released to connective tissue stroma much earlier than

  6. Treatment of life-threatening wounds with a combination of allogenic platelet-rich plasma, fibrin glue and collagen matrix, and a literature review

    PubMed Central

    ASADI, MEHDI; ALAMDARI, DARYOUSH HAMIDI; RAHIMI, HAMID REZA; ALIAKBARIAN, MOHSEN; JANGJOO, ALI; ABDOLLAHI, ABBAS; BAHAR, MOSTAFA MEHRABI; AZADMAND, ALI; FORGHANI, NASER; SADEGH, MOHAMMAD NORI; KHAYAMY, MOHAMMAD ESMAIL; SEIFALIAN, ALEXANDER

    2014-01-01

    Currently there is no ideal procedure for the treatment of recalcitrant ulcers that are unresponsive to the majority of common treatments. However, several novel approaches have been proposed, including bone marrow stem cells, platelets, fibrin glue and collagen matrix. For the first approach treatment of a chronic wound, a non-invasive method is highly desirable. The present study was undertaken with the aim of evaluating the effect of a combination of platelets, fibrin glue and collagen matrix (PFC) in one treatment. A total of ten patients with aggressive, refractory, life-threatening wounds were recruited for the study and their treatment effects were evaluated. Initially, the ulcers were extensively debrided, measured and photographed at weekly intervals. The PFC combination was applied topically to the wound every two days. Following treatment, the wound was completely closed in nine patients and was markedly reduced in the other patient. The mean 100% healing time for the nine patients was 11.3±5.22 weeks. There was no evidence of local or systemic complications or any abnormal tissue formation, keloid or hypertrophic scarring. Therefore, the results of the present study indicate that in the first approach, the combination of PFC components may be used safely in order to synergize the effect of chronic wound healing. PMID:25009595

  7. Tenogenic Induction of Human MSCs by Anisotropically Aligned Collagen Biotextiles

    PubMed Central

    Younesi, Mousa; Islam, Anowarul; Kishore, Vipuil; Anderson, James M.; Akkus, Ozan

    2015-01-01

    A novel biofabrication modality, electrophoretic compaction with macromolecular alignment, was utilized to make collagen threads that mimic the native tendon’s structure and mechanical properties. A device with kinematic electrodes was designed to fabricate collagen threads in continuous length. For the first time, a 3D-biotextile was woven purely from collagen. Mechanical properties and load-displacement behavior of the biotextile mimicked those of the native tendon while presenting a porosity of 80%. The open pore network facilitated cell seeding across the continuum of the bioscaffold. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded in the woven scaffold underwent tenogenic differentiation in the absence of growth factors and synthesized a matrix that was positive for tenomodulin, COMP and type I collagen. Up-regulation of tenomodulin, a tendon specific marker, was 11.6 ± 3.5 fold, COMP was up-regulated 16.7 ± 5.5 fold, and Col I was up-regulated 6.9 ± 2.7 fold greater on ELAC threads when compared to randomly oriented collagen gels. These results demonstrate that a bioscaffold woven by using collagen threads with densely compacted and anisotropically aligned substrate texture stimulates tenogenesis topographically, rendering the electrochemically aligned collagen as a promising candidate for functional repair of tendons and ligaments. PMID:25750610

  8. Enigmatic insight into collagen.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  9. Enigmatic insight into collagen

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  10. Age-associated reduction of cellular spreading/mechanical force up-regulates matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression and collagen fibril fragmentation via c-Jun/AP-1 in human dermal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhaoping; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J; Quan, Taihao

    2014-01-01

    The dermal compartment of human skin is largely composed of dense collagen-rich fibrils, which provide structural and mechanical support. Skin dermal fibroblasts, the major collagen-producing cells, are interact with collagen fibrils to maintain cell spreading and mechanical force for function. A characteristic feature of aged human skin is fragmentation of collagen fibrils, which is initiated by matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1). Fragmentation impairs fibroblast attachment and thereby reduces spreading. Here, we investigated the relationship among fibroblast spreading, mechanical force, MMP-1 expression, and collagen fibril fragmentation. Reduced fibroblast spreading due to cytoskeletal disruption was associated with reduced cellular mechanical force, as determined by atomic force microscopy. These reductions substantially induced MMP-1 expression, which led to collagen fibril fragmentation and disorganization in three-dimensional collagen lattices. Constraining fibroblast size by culturing on slides coated with collagen micropatterns also significantly induced MMP-1 expression. Reduced spreading/mechanical force induced transcription factor c-Jun and its binding to a canonical AP-1 binding site in the MMP-1 proximal promoter. Blocking c-Jun function with dominant negative mutant c-Jun significantly reduced induction of MMP-1 expression in response to reduced spreading/mechanical force. Furthermore, restoration of fibroblast spreading/mechanical force led to decline of c-Jun and MMP-1 levels and eliminated collagen fibril fragmentation and disorganization. These data reveal a novel mechanism by which alteration of fibroblast shape/mechanical force regulates c-Jun/AP-1-dependent expression of MMP-1 and consequent collagen fibril fragmentation. This mechanism provides a foundation for understanding the cellular and molecular basis of age-related collagen fragmentation in human skin. PMID:25201474

  11. DNA damage intensity in fibroblasts in a 3-dimensional collagen matrix correlates with the Bragg curve energy distribution of a high LET particle

    PubMed Central

    Roig, Andres I.; Hight, Suzie K.; Minna, John D.; Shay, Jerry W.; Rusek, Adam; Story, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The DNA double-strand break (DSB) damage response induced by high energy charged particles on lung fibroblast cells embedded in a 3-dimensional (3-D) collagen tissue equivalents was investigated using antibodies to the DNA damage response proteins gamma-histone 2AX (γ-H2AX) and phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (p-DNA-PKcs). Materials and methods 3-D tissue equivalents were irradiated in positions across the linear distribution of the Bragg curve profiles of 307.7 MeV/nucleon, 556.9 MeV/nucleon, or 967.0 MeV/nucleon 56Fe ions at a dose of 0.30 Gy. Results Patterns of discrete DNA damage streaks across nuclei or saturated nuclear damage were observed, with saturated nuclear damage being more predominant as samples were positioned closer to the physical Bragg peak. Quantification of the DNA damage signal intensities at each distance for each of the examined energies revealed a biological Bragg curve profile with a pattern of DNA damage intensity similar to the physical Bragg curve for the particular energy. Deconvolution microscopy of nuclei with streaked or saturated nuclear damage pattern revealed more details of the damage, with evidence of double-strand breaks radially distributed from the main particle track as well as multiple discrete tracks within saturated damage nuclei. Conclusions These 3-D culture systems can be used as a biological substrate to better understand the interaction of heavy charged particles of different energies with tissue and could serve as a basis to model space-radiation-induced cancer initiation and progression. PMID:20201648

  12. Low-level laser therapy in 3D cell culture model using gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Basso, Fernanda G; Soares, Diana G; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto; Hebling, Josimeri

    2016-07-01

    Besides extensive data about the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on different cell types, so far, these results were obtained from monolayer cell culture models, which have limitations in terms of cell morphology and phenotype expression. Therefore, for better in vitro evaluation of the effects of LLLT, this study was performed with a 3D cell culture model, where gingival fibroblasts were seeded in collagen matrix. Cells isolated from a healthy patient were seeded in wells of 24-well plates with culture medium (DMEM) supplemented with 10 % fetal bovine serum and collagen type I solution. After 5 days, a serum-free DMEM was added to the matrices with cells that were subjected or not to three consecutive irradiations of LLLT by means of the LaserTABLE diode device (780 nm, 25 mW) at 0.5, 1.5, and 3 J/cm(2). Twenty-four hours after the last irradiation, cell viability and morphology as well as gene expression of growth factors were assessed. Histological evaluation of matrices demonstrated uniform distribution and morphology of gingival fibroblasts within the collagen matrix. LLLT at 3 J/cm(2) increased gingival fibroblast viability. Enhanced gene expression of hCOL-I and hEGF was observed for 0.5 J/cm(2), while no significant changes were detected for the other irradiation densities tested. In conclusion, LLLT promoted biostimulation of gingival fibroblasts seeded in a 3D cell culture model, demonstrating that this model can be applied for phototherapy studies and that LLLT could penetrate the collagen matrix to increase cell functions related to tissue repair. PMID:27126408

  13. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  14. Chemotherapeutic efficiency of drugs in vitro: Comparison of doxorubicin exposure in 3D and 2D culture matrices.

    PubMed

    Casey, A; Gargotti, M; Bonnier, F; Byrne, H J

    2016-06-01

    The interest in the use of 3D matrices for in vitro analysis, with a view to increasing the relevance of in vitro studies and reducing the dependence on in vivo studies, has been growing in recent years. Cells grown in a 3D in vitro matrix environment have been reported to exhibit significantly different properties to those in a conventional 2D culture environment. However, comparison of 2D and 3D cell culture models have recently been noted to result in differing responses of cytotoxic assays, without any associated change in viability. The effect was attributed to differing conversion rates and effective concentrations of the resazurin assay in 2D and 3D environments, rather than differences in cellular metabolism. In this study, the efficacy of a chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin, is monitored and compared in conventional 2D and 3D collagen gel exposures of immortalized human cervical cells. Viability was monitored with the aid of the Alamar Blue assay and drug internalisation was verified using confocal microscopy. Drug uptake and retention within the collagen matrix was monitored by absorption spectroscopy. The viability studies showed apparent differences between the 2D and 3D culture systems, the differences attributed in part to the physical transition from 2D to a 3D environment causing alterations to dye resazurin uptake and conversion rates. The use of 3D culture matrices has widely been interpreted to result in "reduced" toxicity or cellular "resistance" to the chemotherapeutic agent. The results of this study show that the reduced efficiency of the drug to cells grown in the 3D environment can be accounted for by a sequential reduction of the effective concentration of the test compound and assay. This is due to absorption within the collagen gel inducing a higher uptake of both drug and assay thereby influencing the toxic impact of the drug and conversion rate of resazurin, and. The increased effective surface area of the cell exposed to the drug

  15. Microtubule regulation of corneal fibroblast morphology and mechanical activity in 3-D culture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Areum; Petroll, W. Matthew

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of microtubules in regulating corneal fibroblast structure and mechanical behavior using static (3-D) and dynamic (4-D) imaging of both cells and their surrounding matrix. Human corneal fibroblasts transfected to express GFP-zyxin (to label focal adhesions) or GFP-tubulin (to label microtubules) were plated at low density inside 100 μm thick type I collagen matrices. After 24 hours, the effects of nocodazole (to depolymerize microtubules), cytochalasin D (to disrupt f-actin), and/or Y-27632 (to block Rho-kinase) were evaluated using 3-D and 4-D imaging of both cells and ECM. After 24 hours of incubation, cells had well organized microtubules and prominent focal adhesions, and significant cell-induced matrix compaction was observed. Addition of nocodazole induced rapid microtubule disruption which resulted in Rho activation and additional cellular contraction. The matrix was pulled inward by retracting pseudopodial processes, and focal adhesions appeared to mediate this process, when present. Following 24 hour exposure to nocodazole, there was an even greater increase in both the number of stress fibers and the amount of matrix compaction and alignment at the ends of cells. When Rho-kinase was inhibited, disruption of microtubules resulted in retraction of dendritic cell processes, and rapid formation and extension of lamellipodial processes at random locations along the cell body, eventually leading to a convoluted, disorganized cell shape. These data suggest that microtubules modulate both cellular contractility and local collagen matrix reorganization via regulation of Rho/Rho kinase activity. In addition, microtubules appear to play a central role in dynamic regulation of cell spreading mechanics, morphology and polarity in 3-D culture. PMID:17716657

  16. Hot embossing for fabrication of a microfluidic 3D cell culture platform

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jessie S.; Chung, Seok; Kamm, Roger D.; Charest, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    Clinically relevant studies of cell function in vitro require a physiologically-representative microenvironment possessing aspects such as a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) and controlled biochemical and biophysical parameters. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic system with a 3D collagen gel has previously served for analysis of factors inducing different responses of cells in a 3D microenvironment under controlled biochemical and biophysical parameters. In the present study, applying the known commercially-viable manufacturing methods to a cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) material resulted in a microfluidic device with enhanced 3D gel capabilities, controlled surface properties, and improved potential to serve high-volume applications. Hot embossing and roller lamination molded and sealed the microfluidic device. A combination of oxygen plasma and thermal treatments enhanced the sealing, ensured proper placement of the 3D gel, and created controlled and stable surface properties within the device. Culture of cells in the new device indicated no adverse effects of the COC material or processing as compared to previous PDMS devices. The results demonstrate a methodology to transition microfludic devices for 3D cell culture from scientific research to high-volume applications with broad clinical impact. PMID:21113663

  17. Surgical Therapy by Sandwich Transplantation using a Dermal Collagen-Elastin Matrix and Full Thickness Split Grafts and Gait Rehabilitation with Individualized Orthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Heinig, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    Painful callosities of the feet (PCOF) are a rare complaint in children with severe impairment of mobility and quality of life. There is no medical treatment available. We investigated the usefulness of a recently developed combined transplant technique-the sandwich transplantation with dermal collagen-elastin template in this rare condition. A 14-year-old boy suffered from PCOF for several years without any improvement by topical therapy, dermabrasion, and oral retinoids. He was unable to walk normally and suffered from severe pain. We performed a complete deep excision of the hyperkeratotic plantar tissue in general anaesthesia in combination with sandwich transplantation in the same setting. Dry sheets of collagen-elastin matrix (1 mm thickness) were placed on the soft tissue defects and covered by full-thickness mesh graft transplants from the upper leg. An individualized orthosis was produced for gait rehabilitation. Two weeks after surgery the gait-related pain was reduced remarkably. Using the orthosis, the boy was able to walk pain-free even on staircase. Surgery of PCOF with sandwich transplantation and gait rehabilitation appears to be a promising strategy for this rare condition. PMID:23378711

  18. Surgical Therapy by Sandwich Transplantation using a Dermal Collagen-Elastin Matrix and Full Thickness Split Grafts and Gait Rehabilitation with Individualized Orthesis.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Heinig, Birgit

    2012-10-01

    Painful callosities of the feet (PCOF) are a rare complaint in children with severe impairment of mobility and quality of life. There is no medical treatment available. We investigated the usefulness of a recently developed combined transplant technique-the sandwich transplantation with dermal collagen-elastin template in this rare condition. A 14-year-old boy suffered from PCOF for several years without any improvement by topical therapy, dermabrasion, and oral retinoids. He was unable to walk normally and suffered from severe pain. We performed a complete deep excision of the hyperkeratotic plantar tissue in general anaesthesia in combination with sandwich transplantation in the same setting. Dry sheets of collagen-elastin matrix (1 mm thickness) were placed on the soft tissue defects and covered by full-thickness mesh graft transplants from the upper leg. An individualized orthosis was produced for gait rehabilitation. Two weeks after surgery the gait-related pain was reduced remarkably. Using the orthosis, the boy was able to walk pain-free even on staircase. Surgery of PCOF with sandwich transplantation and gait rehabilitation appears to be a promising strategy for this rare condition. PMID:23378711

  19. A Top-down Approach to Elucidate the Role of Matrix-Bound Phosphoproteins in Control of Collagen Biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Lausch, Alexander J; Sone, Eli D

    2015-07-13

    The periodontium is the set of tissues responsible for tooth anchorage, and consists of interconnected layers of mineralized and unmineralized tissues (bone, ligament and cementum). The ligament-cementum interface is a particularly elegant example of biological control of mineralization and the controlling factors are poorly understood. Here we use a tissue-based in vitro model of mineralization, in which sections of demineralized mouse jaw remineralize with the same selectivity as found in vivo, to probe the molecular mechanism of control over collagen mineralization in the periodontium. Removal or enzymatic cleavage of noncollagenous proteins have very similar effects: a reduction in the rate of remineralization that is much more drastic in cementum than in dentin. The periodontal ligament does not mineralize within experimental parameters even after protein removal/digestion. Dephosphorylation results in a slight reduction in mineralization in dentin and cementum. Understanding the mechanisms controlling selective mineralization in the periodontium will help elucidate the molecular factors controlling collagen biomienralization, and provide inspiration for the development of scaffolds for regeneration of hard-soft tissue interfaces. PMID:26010164

  20. Collagen and gelatin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dasong; Nikoo, Mehdi; Boran, Gökhan; Zhou, Peng; Regenstein, Joe M

    2015-01-01

    Collagen and gelatin have been widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries due to their excellent biocompatibility, easy biodegradability, and weak antigenicity. Fish collagen and gelatin are of renewed interest, owing to the safety and religious concerns of their mammalian counterparts. The structure of collagen has been studied using various modern technologies, and interpretation of the raw data should be done with caution. The structure of collagen may vary with sources and seasons, which may affect its applications and optimal extraction conditions. Numerous studies have investigated the bioactivities and biological effects of collagen, gelatin, and their hydrolysis peptides, using both in vitro and in vivo assay models. In addition to their established nutritional value as a protein source, collagen and collagen-derived products may exert various potential biological activities on cells in the extracellular matrix through the corresponding food-derived peptides after ingestion, and this might justify their applications in dietary supplements and pharmaceutical preparations. Moreover, an increasing number of novel applications have been found for collagen and gelatin. Therefore, this review covers the current understanding of the structure, bioactivities, and biological effects of collagen, gelatin, and gelatin hydrolysates as well as their most recent applications. PMID:25884286

  1. TRACE 3-D documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, K.R.

    1987-08-01

    TRACE 3-D is an interactive beam-dynamics program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined transport system. TRACE 3-D provides an immediate graphics display of the envelopes and the phase-space ellipses and allows nine types of beam-matching options. This report describes the beam-dynamics calculations and gives detailed instruction for using the code. Several examples are described in detail.

  2. In Situ Quantification of Surface Chemistry in Porous Collagen Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Tzeranis, Dimitrios S; Soller, Eric C; Buydash, Melissa C; So, Peter T C; Yannas, Ioannis V

    2016-03-01

    Cells inside a 3D matrix (such as tissue extracellular matrix or biomaterials) sense their insoluble environment through specific binding interactions between their adhesion receptors and ligands present on the matrix surface. Despite the critical role of the insoluble matrix in cell regulation, there exist no widely-applicable methods for quantifying the chemical stimuli provided by a matrix to cells. Here, we describe a general-purpose technique for quantifying in situ the density of ligands for specific cell adhesion receptors of interest on the surface of a 3D matrix. This paper improves significantly the accuracy of the procedure introduced in a previous publication by detailed marker characterization, optimized staining, and improved data interpretation. The optimized methodology is utilized to quantify the ligands of integrins α 1 β 1, α 2 β 1 on two kinds of matched porous collagen scaffolds, which are shown to possess significantly different ligand density, and significantly different ability to induce peripheral nerve regeneration in vivo. Data support the hypothesis that cell adhesion regulates contractile cell phenotypes, recently shown to be inversely related to organ regeneration. The technique provides a standardized way to quantify the surface chemistry of 3D matrices, and a means for introducing matrix effects in quantitative biological models. PMID:26369635

  3. Rapid onset of perfused blood vessels after implantation of ECFCs and MPCs in collagen, PuraMatrix and fibrin provisional matrices.

    PubMed

    Allen, Patrick; Kang, Kyu-Tae; Bischoff, Joyce

    2015-05-01

    We developed an in vivo vascularization model in which human endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and human mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) form blood vessel networks when co-injected (ECFC + MPC) into nude mice in rat tail type I collagen, bovine fibrin or synthetic peptide PuraMatrix matrices. We used three approaches to determine the onset of functional vascularization when ECFC + MPC suspended in these matrices were implanted in vivo. The first was immunohistochemistry to detect vessels lined by human endothelial cells and filled with red blood cells. The second was in vivo vascular staining by tail vein injection of a mixture of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), a lectin specific for human endothelium, and Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B4 (GS-IB4 ), a lectin specific for rodent endothelium. The third approach employed contrast-enhanced ultrasound to measure the perfusion volumes of implants in individual animals over time. Human endothelial-lined tubular structures were detected in vivo on days 1 and 2 after implantation, with perfused human vessels detected on days 3 and 4. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound revealed significant perfusion of ECFC + MPC/collagen implants on days 1-4, at up to 14% perfused vascular volume. ECFC + MPC implanted in fibrin and PuraMatrix matrices also supported perfusion at day 1, as assessed by ultrasound (at 12% and 23% perfused vascular volume, respectively). This model demonstrates that ECFC + MPC suspended in any of the three matrices initiated a rapid onset of vascularization. We propose that ECFC + MPC delivered in vivo provide a means to achieve rapid perfusion of tissue-engineered organs or for in situ tissue repair. PMID:23955835

  4. 3-D woven, mullite matrix, composite filter

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, J.E.; Painter, C.J.; Radford, K.C. LeCostaouec, J.F.

    1995-12-01

    Westinghouse, with Techniweave as a major subcontractor, is conducting a three-phase program aimed at providing advanced candle filters for a 1996 pilot scale demonstration in one of the two hot gas filter systems at Southern Company Service`s Wilsonville PSD Facility. The Base Program (Phases I and II) objective is to develop and demonstrate the suitability of the Westinghouse/Techniweave next generation composite candle filter for use in Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) and/or Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation systems. The Optional Task (Phase M, Task 5) objective is to fabricate, inspect and ship to Wilsonville Hot gas particulate filters are key components for the successful commercializaion of advanced coal-based power-generation systems such as Pressurized Fluidized-bed Combustion (PFBC), including second-generation PFBC, and Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (IGCC). Current generation monolithic ceramic filters are subject to catastrophic failure because they have very low resistance to crack propagation. To overcome this problem, a damage-tolerant ceramic filter element is needed.

  5. Engineering Human TMJ Discs with Protein-Releasing 3D-Printed Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Legemate, K; Tarafder, S; Jun, Y; Lee, C H

    2016-07-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc is a heterogeneous fibrocartilaginous tissue positioned between the mandibular condyle and glenoid fossa of the temporal bone, with important roles in TMJ functions. Tissue engineering TMJ discs has emerged as an alternative approach to overcoming limitations of current treatments for TMJ disorders. However, the anisotropic collagen orientation and inhomogeneous fibrocartilaginous matrix distribution present challenges in the tissue engineering of functional TMJ discs. Here, we developed 3-dimensional (3D)-printed anatomically correct scaffolds with region-variant microstrand alignment, mimicking anisotropic collagen alignment in the TMJ disc and corresponding mechanical properties. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGFβ3) were then delivered in the scaffolds by spatially embedding CTGF- or TGFβ3-encapsulated microspheres (µS) to reconstruct the regionally variant fibrocartilaginous matrix in the native TMJ disc. When cultured with human mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs) for 6 wk, 3D-printed scaffolds with CTGF/TGFβ3-µS resulted in a heterogeneous fibrocartilaginous matrix with overall distribution of collagen-rich fibrous structure in the anterior/posterior (AP) bands and fibrocartilaginous matrix in the intermediate zone, reminiscent of the native TMJ disc. High dose of CTGF/TGFβ3-µS (100 mg µS/g of scaffold) showed significantly more collagen II and aggrecan in the intermediate zone than a low dose (50 mg µS/g of scaffold). Similarly, a high dose of CTGF/TGFβ3-µS yielded significantly higher collagen I expression in the AP bands compared with the low-dose and empty µS. From stress relaxation tests, the ratio of relaxation modulus to instantaneous modulus was significantly smaller with CTGF/TGFβ3-µS than empty µS. Similarly, a significantly higher coefficient of viscosity was achieved with the high dose of CTGF/TGFβ3-µS compared with the low-dose and empty

  6. Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells Collectively Invade Collagen by Following a Glucose Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Austin, Robert; Liu, Liyu; Duclos, Guillaume; Lee, Jeongseog; Wu, Amy; Kam, Yooseok; Sontag, Eduardo; Stone, Howard; Sturm, James; Gatenby, Robert

    2013-03-01

    We show that MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast cancer cells collectively invade a three dimensional collagen matrix by following a glucose gradient. We observe that due to the 3D physical deformation of the matrix, as measured by the displacement of reporter beads within the matrix, there exists a long range deformation mechanical field inside the matrix which serves to couple the motions of the invading metastatic cell. The invasion front of the cells is a dynamic one, with different cells assuming the lead on a time scale of 24 hours due to certain cells having higher speeds of penetration, which are not sustained. The front cell leadership is dynamic presumably due to metabolic costs associated with the long range strain field which proceeds the invading cell front, which we have imaged using confocal imaging and marker beads imbedded in the collagen matrix. Sponsored by the NCI/NIH Physical Sciences Oncology Centers

  7. Severe Extracellular Matrix Abnormalities and Chondrodysplasia in Mice Lacking Collagen Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase Isoenzyme II in Combination with a Reduced Amount of Isoenzyme I*

    PubMed Central

    Aro, Ellinoora; Salo, Antti M.; Khatri, Richa; Finnilä, Mikko; Miinalainen, Ilkka; Sormunen, Raija; Pakkanen, Outi; Holster, Tiina; Soininen, Raija; Prein, Carina; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke; Aszódi, Attila; Tuukkanen, Juha; Kivirikko, Kari I.; Schipani, Ernestina; Myllyharju, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylases (C-P4H-I, C-P4H-II, and C-P4H-III) catalyze formation of 4-hydroxyproline residues required to form triple-helical collagen molecules. Vertebrate C-P4Hs are α2β2 tetramers differing in their catalytic α subunits. C-P4H-I is the major isoenzyme in most cells, and inactivation of its catalytic subunit (P4ha1−/−) leads to embryonic lethality in mouse, whereas P4ha1+/− mice have no abnormalities. To study the role of C-P4H-II, which predominates in chondrocytes, we generated P4ha2−/− mice. Surprisingly, they had no apparent phenotypic abnormalities. To assess possible functional complementarity, we established P4ha1+/−;P4ha2−/− mice. They were smaller than their littermates, had moderate chondrodysplasia, and developed kyphosis. A transient inner cell death phenotype was detected in their developing growth plates. The columnar arrangement of proliferative chondrocytes was impaired, the amount of 4-hydroxyproline and the Tm of collagen II were reduced, and the extracellular matrix was softer in the growth plates of newborn P4ha1+/−;P4ha2−/− mice. No signs of uncompensated ER stress were detected in the mutant growth plate chondrocytes. Some of these defects were also found in P4ha2−/− mice, although in a much milder form. Our data show that C-P4H-I can to a large extent compensate for the lack of C-P4H-II in proper endochondral bone development, but their combined partial and complete inactivation, respectively, leads to biomechanically impaired extracellular matrix, moderate chondrodysplasia, and kyphosis. Our mouse data suggest that inactivating mutations in human P4HA2 are not likely to lead to skeletal disorders, and a simultaneous decrease in P4HA1 function would most probably be required to generate such a disease phenotype. PMID:26001784

  8. Oxidative damage to collagen.

    PubMed

    Monboisse, J C; Borel, J P

    1992-01-01

    Extracellular matrix molecules, such as collagens, are good targets for oxygen free radicals. Collagen is the only protein susceptible to fragmentation by superoxide anion as demonstrated by the liberation of small 4-hydroxyproline-containing-peptides. It seems likely that hydroxyl radicals in the presence of oxygen cleave collagen into small peptides, and the cleavage seems to be specific to proline or 4-hydroxyproline residues. Hydroxyl radicals in the absence of oxygen or hypochlorous acid do not induce fragmentation of collagen molecules, but they trigger a polymerization of collagen through the formation of new cross-links such as dityrosine or disulfure bridges. Moreover, these cross-links can not explain the totality of high molecular weight components generated under these experimental conditions, and the nature of new cross-links induced by hydroxyl radicals or hypochlorous acid remains unclear. PMID:1333311

  9. Peptide Hydrogels – Versatile Matrices for 3D Cell Culture in Cancer Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Worthington, Peter; Pochan, Darrin J.; Langhans, Sigrid A.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional two-dimensional (2D) cell culture systems have contributed tremendously to our understanding of cancer biology but have significant limitations in mimicking in vivo conditions such as the tumor microenvironment. In vitro, three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models represent a more accurate, intermediate platform between simplified 2D culture models and complex and expensive in vivo models. 3D in vitro models can overcome 2D in vitro limitations caused by the oversupply of nutrients, and unphysiological cell–cell and cell–material interactions, and allow for dynamic interactions between cells, stroma, and extracellular matrix. In addition, 3D cultures allow for the development of concentration gradients, including oxygen, metabolites, and growth factors, with chemical gradients playing an integral role in many cellular functions ranging from development to signaling in normal epithelia and cancer environments in vivo. Currently, the most common matrices used for 3D culture are biologically derived materials such as matrigel and collagen. However, in recent years, more defined, synthetic materials have become available as scaffolds for 3D culture with the advantage of forming well-defined, designed, tunable materials to control matrix charge, stiffness, porosity, nanostructure, degradability, and adhesion properties, in addition to other material and biological properties. One important area of synthetic materials currently available for 3D cell culture is short sequence, self-assembling peptide hydrogels. In addition to the review of recent work toward the control of material, structure, and mechanical properties, we will also discuss the biochemical functionalization of peptide hydrogels and how this functionalization, coupled with desired hydrogel material characteristics, affects tumor cell behavior in 3D culture. PMID:25941663

  10. Stromal matrix metalloprotease-13 knockout alters Collagen I structure at the tumor-host interface and increases lung metastasis of C57BL/6 syngeneic E0771 mammary tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteases and collagen are key participants in breast cancer, but their precise roles in cancer etiology and progression remain unclear. MMP13 helps regulate collagen structure and has been ascribed largely harmful roles in cancer, but some studies demonstrate that MMP13 may also protect against tumor pathology. Other studies indicate that collagen’s organizational patterns at the breast tumor-host interface influence metastatic potential. Therefore we investigated how MMP13 modulates collagen I, a principal collagen subtype in breast tissue, and affects tumor pathology and metastasis in a mouse model of breast cancer. Methods Tumors were implanted into murine mammary tissues, and their growth analyzed in Wildtype and MMP13 KO mice. Following extraction, tumors were analyzed for collagen I levels and collagen I macro- and micro-structural properties at the tumor-host boundary using immunocytochemistry and two-photon and second harmonic generation microscopy. Lungs were analyzed for metastases counts, to correlate collagen I changes with a clinically significant functional parameter. Statistical analyses were performed by t-test, analysis of variance, or Wilcoxon-Mann–Whitney tests as appropriate. Results We found that genetic ablation of host stromal MMP13 led to: 1. Increased mammary tumor collagen I content, 2. Marked changes in collagen I spatial organization, and 3. Altered collagen I microstructure at the tumor-host boundary, as well as 4. Increased metastasis from the primary mammary tumor to lungs. Conclusions These results implicate host MMP13 as a key regulator of collagen I structure and metastasis in mammary tumors, thus making it an attractive potential therapeutic target by which we might alter metastatic potential, one of the chief determinants of clinical outcome in breast cancer. In addition to identifying stromal MMP13 is an important regulator of the tumor microenvironment and metastasis, these results also suggest

  11. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  12. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-01

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions < ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge C T . We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N . We also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  13. Fetal Bovine Collagen Matrix in the Treatment of a Full Thickness Burn Wound: A Case Report With Long-Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Amy L.; Bennett, Danielle K.; Spreen, Elizabeth B.; Adhvaryu, Dhaval V.; Littleton, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of full thickness skin wounds commonly associated with large burns continues to represent a challenging clinical entity. The current treatment for large TBSA burns is split thickness autologous skin grafting; however, this treatment often results in poor textural durability, hypertrophic scarring, and fibrotic contractures. In this case report, we describe our experience and long-term follow-up results after the application of fetal bovine collagen (FBC) matrix (PriMatrix, TEI Biosciences, Boston, MA) to burn wounds clinically assessed as full thickness that healed without the need for subsequent skin grafting. The patient presented with 25% TBSA burns and was debrided and covered with FBC on postburn day 7. By postoperative day 12, the patient had large areas of reepithelialization distributed throughout the wound bed. By postoperative day 26, the patient had significantly more areas of wound closure and was discharged. Reepithelialization and repigmentation continued, and long-term follow-up after 26 months demonstrated complete reepithelialization and nearly complete repigmentation, without the appearance of contractures or hypertrophic scarring. This case report highlights the use of FBC as a scaffold capable of dermal regeneration and spontaneous reepithelialization with an excellent long-term functional and cosmetic outcome. PMID:25494213

  14. Fetal Bovine Collagen Matrix in the Treatment of a Full Thickness Burn Wound: A Case Report With Long-Term Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Strong, Amy L; Bennett, Danielle K; Spreen, Elizabeth B; Adhvaryu, Dhaval V; Littleton, Jeffrey C; Mencer, Ernest J

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of full thickness skin wounds commonly associated with large burns continues to represent a challenging clinical entity. The current treatment for large TBSA burns is split thickness autologous skin grafting; however, this treatment often results in poor textural durability, hypertrophic scarring, and fibrotic contractures. In this case report, we describe our experience and long-term follow-up results after the application of fetal bovine collagen (FBC) matrix (PriMatrix, TEI Biosciences, Boston, MA) to burn wounds clinically assessed as full thickness that healed without the need for subsequent skin grafting. The patient presented with 25% TBSA burns and was debrided and covered with FBC on postburn day 7. By postoperative day 12, the patient had large areas of reepithelialization distributed throughout the wound bed. By postoperative day 26, the patient had significantly more areas of wound closure and was discharged. Reepithelialization and repigmentation continued, and long-term follow-up after 26 months demonstrated complete reepithelialization and nearly complete repigmentation, without the appearance of contractures or hypertrophic scarring. This case report highlights the use of FBC as a scaffold capable of dermal regeneration and spontaneous reepithelialization with an excellent long-term functional and cosmetic outcome. PMID:25494213

  15. Cumulative influence of elastin peptides and plasminogen on matrix metalloproteinase activation and type I collagen invasion by HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Huet, Eric; Brassart, Bertrand; Cauchard, Jean-Hubert; Debelle, Laurent; Birembaut, Philippe; Wallach, Jean; Emonard, Herve; Polette, Myriam; Hornebeck, William

    2002-01-01

    HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells express at their plasma membrane the elastin-binding protein (EBP). Occupancy of EBP by elastin fragments, tropoelastin or XGVAPG peptides was found to trigger procollagenase-1 (proMMP-1) overproduction by HT-1080 cells at the protein and enzyme levels. RT-PCR analysis indicated that elastin peptides did not modify the MMP-1 mRNA steady state levels, suggesting the involvement of a post-transcriptional mechanism. We previously reported that binding of elastin peptides to EBP induced other matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MT1-MMP) expression. Since those peptides were here found to also accelerate the secretion of urokinase from HT-1080 cells, culture medium was supplemented with plasminogen together with elastin peptides at aims to induce or potentiate MMPs activation cascades. In such conditions, plasmin activity was generated and exacerbate proMMP-1 and proMMP-2 activation. As a consequence, elastin peptides and plasminogen-treated HT-1080 cells displayed a significant type I collagen matrix invasive capacity. PMID:11964074

  16. Altered bone material properties in HLA-B27 rats include reduced mineral to matrix ratio and altered collagen cross-links.

    PubMed

    Gamsjaeger, Sonja; Srivastava, Apurva K; Wergedal, Jon E; Zwerina, Jochen; Klaushofer, Klaus; Paschalis, Eleftherios P; Tatakis, Dimitris N

    2014-11-01

    Spondyloarthropathy and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, are often associated with severe osteopenia/osteoporosis in both children and adults. HLA-B27 transgenic rats present a phenotype that includes severe colitis and severely accelerated alveolar bone loss. The purpose of this study was to evaluate long bone density status, systemic bone metabolic markers, and intrinsic bone material properties in HLA-B27 transgenic (TG) rats, and compare them with those of age- and sex-matched wild-type (WT) animals. The results indicate that in the HLA-B27 rat, an animal susceptible to both alveolar bone loss (ABL) and long bone osteopenia, there is a statistically significant negative correlation between ABL and long bone bone mineral density (BMD), as well as mineral/matrix ratio at active bone-forming trabecular surfaces. The TG animals had a lower mineral/matrix ratio and higher relative proteoglycan and advanced glycation end product (ϵ-N-Carboxymethyl-L-lysine) content and pyridinoline/divalent collagen cross-link ratio compared with WT. These results may provide better understanding of the interrelationship between osteoporosis and oral bone loss, the underlying causes of the inferior bone strength in the HLA-B27 transgenic animals, and could prove to be a useful model in the elucidation of the pathophysiology of spondyloarthropathy and IBD-associated osteopenia/osteoporosis and in the evaluation of pharmacological intervention(s) against such conditions. PMID:24771481

  17. Fabrication of injectable, cellular, anisotropic collagen tissue equivalents with modular fibrillar densities.

    PubMed

    Marelli, Benedetto; Ghezzi, Chiara E; James-Bhasin, Mark; Nazhat, Showan N

    2015-01-01

    Technological improvements in collagen gel fabrication are highly desirable as they may enable significant advances in the formation of tissue-equivalent biomaterials for regenerative medicine, three-dimensional (3D) in vitro tissue models, and injectable scaffolds for cell and drug delivery applications. Thus, strategies to modulate collagen gel fibrillar density and organization in the mesostructure have been pursued to fabricate collagenous matrices with extracellular matrix-like features. Herein, we introduce a robust and simple method, namely gel aspiration-ejection (GAE), to engineer 3D, anisotropic, cell seeded, injectable dense collagen (I-DC) gels with controllable fibrillar densities, without the use of crosslinking. GAE allows for the hybridization of collagen gels with bioactive agents for increased functionality and supports highly aligned homogenous cell seeding, thus providing I-DC gels with distinct properties when compared to isotropic DC gels of random fibrillar orientation. The hybridization of I-DC with anionic fibroin derived polypeptides resulted in the nucleation of carbonated hydroxyapatite within the aligned nanofibrillar network upon exposure to simulated body fluid, yielding a 3D, anisotropic, mineralized collagen matrix. In addition, I-DC gels accelerated the osteoblastic differentiation of seeded murine mesenchymal stem cells (m-MSCs) when exposed to osteogenic supplements, which resulted in the cell-mediated, bulk mineralization of the osteoid-like gels. In addition, and upon exposure to neuronal transdifferentiation medium, I-DC gels supported and accelerated the differentiation of m-MSCs toward neuronal cells. In conclusion, collagen GAE presents interesting opportunities in a number of fields spanning tissue engineering and regenerative medicine to drug and cell delivery. PMID:25453949

  18. Cartilage Tissue Engineering: Preventing Tissue Scaffold Contraction Using a 3D-Printed Polymeric Cage.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Dafydd O; Bos, Ernst J; Peeters, Mirte; Kuzmin, Nikolay V; Groot, Marie Louise; Helder, Marco N; van Zuijlen, Paul P M

    2016-06-01

    Scaffold contraction is a common but underestimated problem in the field of tissue engineering. It becomes particularly problematic when creating anatomically complex shapes such as the ear. The aim of this study was to develop a contraction-free biocompatible scaffold construct for ear cartilage tissue engineering. To address this aim, we used three constructs: (i) a fibrin/hyaluronic acid (FB/HA) hydrogel, (ii) a FB/HA hydrogel combined with a collagen I/III scaffold, and (iii) a cage construct containing (ii) surrounded by a 3D-printed poly-ɛ-caprolactone mold. A wide range of different cell types were tested within these constructs, including chondrocytes, perichondrocytes, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells, and their combinations. After in vitro culturing for 1, 14, and 28 days, all constructs were analyzed. Macroscopic observation showed severe contraction of the cell-seeded hydrogel (i). This could be prevented, in part, by combining the hydrogel with the collagen scaffold (ii) and prevented in total using the 3D-printed cage construct (iii). (Immuno)histological analysis, multiphoton laser scanning microscopy, and biomechanical analysis showed extracellular matrix deposition and increased Young's modulus and thereby the feasibility of ear cartilage engineering. These results demonstrated that the 3D-printed cage construct is an adequate model for contraction-free ear cartilage engineering using a range of cell combinations. PMID:27089896

  19. A Hormone-responsive 3D Culture Model of the Human Mammary Gland Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Speroni, Lucia; Sweeney, Michael F; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M

    2016-01-01

    The process of mammary epithelial morphogenesis is influenced by hormones. The study of hormone action on the breast epithelium using 2D cultures is limited to cell proliferation and gene expression endpoints. However, in the organism, mammary morphogenesis occurs in a 3D environment. 3D culture systems help bridge the gap between monolayer cell culture (2D) and the complexity of the organism. Herein, we describe a 3D culture model of the human breast epithelium that is suitable to study hormone action. It uses the commercially available hormone-responsive human breast epithelial cell line, T47D, and rat tail collagen type 1 as a matrix. This 3D culture model responds to the main mammotropic hormones: estradiol, progestins and prolactin. The influence of these hormones on epithelial morphogenesis can be observed after 1- or 2-week treatment according to the endpoint. The 3D cultures can be harvested for analysis of epithelial morphogenesis, cell proliferation and gene expression. PMID:26891095

  20. Improving 2D and 3D Skin In Vitro Models Using Macromolecular Crowding.

    PubMed

    Benny, Paula; Badowski, Cedric; Lane, E Birgitte; Raghunath, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The glycoprotein family of collagens represents the main structural proteins in the human body, and are key components of biomaterials used in modern tissue engineering. A technical bottleneck is the deposition of collagen in vitro, as it is notoriously slow, resulting in sub-optimal formation of connective tissue and subsequent tissue cohesion, particularly in skin models. Here, we describe a method which involves the addition of differentially-sized sucrose co-polymers to skin cultures to generate macromolecular crowding (MMC), which results in a dramatic enhancement of collagen deposition. Particularly, dermal fibroblasts deposited a significant amount of collagen I/IV/VII and fibronectin under MMC in comparison to controls. The protocol also describes a method to decellularize crowded cell layers, exposing significant amounts of extracellular matrix (ECM) which were retained on the culture surface as evidenced by immunocytochemistry. Total matrix mass and distribution pattern was studied using interference reflection microscopy. Interestingly, fibroblasts, keratinocytes and co-cultures produced cell-derived matrices (CDM) of varying composition and morphology. CDM could be used as "bio-scaffolds" for secondary cell seeding, where the current use of coatings or scaffolds, typically from xenogenic animal sources, can be avoided, thus moving towards more clinically relevant applications. In addition, this protocol describes the application of MMC during the submerged phase of a 3D-organotypic skin co-culture model which was sufficient to enhance ECM deposition in the dermo-epidermal junction (DEJ), in particular, collagen VII, the major component of anchoring fibrils. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of anchoring fibrils in cultures developed with MMC, as compared to controls. This is significant as anchoring fibrils tether the dermis to the epidermis, hence, having a pre-formed mature DEJ may benefit skin graft recipients in terms of graft stability and

  1. A titanium surface with nano-ordered spikes and pores enhances human dermal fibroblastic extracellular matrix production and integration of collagen fibers.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masahiro; Kato, Eiji; Yamamoto, Akiko; Sakurai, Kaoru

    2016-02-01

    The acquisition of substantial dermal sealing determines the prognosis of percutaneous titanium-based medical devices or prostheses. A nano-topographic titanium surface with ordered nano-spikes and pores has been shown to induce periodontal-like connective tissue attachment and activate gingival fibroblastic functions. This in vitro study aimed to determine whether an alkali-heat (AH) treatment-created nano-topographic titanium surface could enhance human dermal fibroblastic functions and binding strength to the deposited collagen on the titanium surface. The surface topographies of commercially pure titanium machined discs exposed to two different AH treatments were evaluated. Human dermal fibroblastic cultures grown on the discs were evaluated in terms of cellular morphology, proliferation, extracellular matrix (ECM) and proinflammatory cytokine synthesis, and physicochemical binding strength of surface-deposited collagen. An isotropically-patterned, shaggy nano-topography with a sponge-like inner network and numerous well-organized, anisotropically-patterned fine nano-spikes and pores were observed on each nano-topographic surface type via scanning electron microscopy. In contrast to the typical spindle-shaped cells on the machined surfaces, the isotropically- and anisotropically-patterned nano-topographic titanium surfaces had small circular/angular cells containing contractile ring-like structures and elongated, multi-shaped cells with a developed cytoskeletal network and multiple filopodia and lamellipodia, respectively. These nano-topographic surfaces enhanced dermal-related ECM synthesis at both the protein and gene levels, without proinflammatory cytokine synthesis or reduced proliferative activity. Deposited collagen fibers were included in these surfaces and sufficiently bound to the nano-topographies to resist the physical, enzymatic and chemical detachment treatments, in contrast to machined surfaces. Well-organized, isotropically

  2. Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells on Hydrogel Scaffolds Derived from Decellularized Bone Extracellular Matrix and Collagen Type I

    PubMed Central

    White, Lisa J.; Shakesheff, Kevin M.; Tatullo, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) on hydrogel scaffolds derived from bone extracellular matrix (bECM) in comparison to those seeded on collagen I (Col-I), one of the main components of dental pulp ECM. Methods DPSCs isolated from human third molars were characterized for surface marker expression and odontogenic potential prior to seeding into bECM or Col-I hydrogel scaffolds. The cells were then seeded onto bECM and Col-I hydrogel scaffolds and cultured under basal conditions or with odontogenic and growth factor (GF) supplements. DPSCs cultivated on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) with and without supplements were used as controls. Gene expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP-1) and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and mineral deposition was observed by Von Kossa staining. Results When DPSCs were cultured on bECM hydrogels, the mRNA expression levels of DSPP, DMP-1 and MEPE genes were significantly upregulated with respect to those cultured on Col-I scaffolds or TCPS in the absence of extra odontogenic inducers. In addition, more mineral deposition was observed on bECM hydrogel scaffolds as demonstrated by Von Kossa staining. Moreover, DSPP, DMP-1 and MEPE mRNA expressions of DPSCs cultured on bECM hydrogels were further upregulated by the addition of GFs or osteo/odontogenic medium compared to Col-I treated cells in the same culture conditions. Significance These results demonstrate the potential of the bECM hydrogel scaffolds to stimulate odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs. PMID:26882351

  3. Bio-inspired microstructures in collagen type I hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Yahya; Verbridge, Scott S; Agah, Masoud

    2015-06-01

    This article presents a novel technique to fabricate complex type I collagen hydrogel structures, with varying depth and width defined by a single fabrication step. This technique takes advantage of reactive ion etching lag to fabricate three-dimensional (3-D) structures in silicon. Then, a polydimethylsiloxane replica was fabricated utilizing soft lithography and used as a stamp on collagen hydrogel to transfer these patterns. Endothelial cells were seeded on the hydrogel devices to measure their interaction with these more physiologically relevant cell culture surfaces. Confocal imaging was utilized to image the hydrogel devices to demonstrate the robustness of the fabrication technique, and to study the cell-extracellular matrix interaction after cell seeding. In this study, we observed that endothelial cells remodeled the sharp scallops of collagen hydrogel structures and compressed the structures with low degree of slope. Such patterning techniques will enhance the physiological relevance of existing 3-D cell culture platforms by providing a technical bridge between the high resolution yet planar techniques of standard lithography with more complex yet low resolution 3-D printing methods. PMID:25346472

  4. Collagen type-I leads to in vivo matrix mineralization and secondary stabilization of Mg-Zr-Ca alloy implants.

    PubMed

    Mushahary, Dolly; Wen, Cuie; Kumar, Jerald Mahesh; Lin, Jixing; Harishankar, Nemani; Hodgson, Peter; Pande, Gopal; Li, Yuncang

    2014-10-01

    Biodegradable magnesium-zirconia-calcium (Mg-Zr-Ca) alloy implants were coated with Collagen type-I (Coll-I) and assessed for their rate and efficacy of bone mineralization and implant stabilization. The phases, microstructure and mechanical properties of these alloys were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy and compression test, respectively, and the corrosion behavior was established by their hydrogen production rate in simulated body fluid (SBF). Coll-I extracted from rat tail, and characterized using fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, was used for dip-coating the Mg-based alloys. The coated alloys were implanted into the femur bones of male New Zealand white rabbits. In vivo bone formation around the implants was quantified by measuring the bone mineral content/density (BMC/BMD) using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Osseointegration of the implant and new bone mineralization was visualized by histological and immunohistochemical analysis. Upon surface coating with Coll-I, these alloys demonstrated high surface energy showing enhanced performance as an implant material that is suitable for rapid and efficient new bone tissue induction with optimal mineral content and cellular properties. The results demonstrate that Coll-I coated Mg-Zr-Ca alloys have a tendency to form superior trabecular bone structure with better osteoinduction around the implants and higher implant secondary stabilization, through the phenomenon of contact osteogenesis, compared to the control and uncoated ones in shorter periods of implantation. Hence, Coll-I surface coating of Mg-Zr-Ca alloys is a promising method for expediting new bone formation in vivo and enhancing osseointegration in load bearing implant applications. PMID:25179112

  5. Measurements of the constituent contributions to the physical properties of fibroblast populated collagen microtissues with magnetic micro-tissue stretchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ruogang; Liu, Alan; Boudou, Thomas; Chen, Christopher; Reich, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical properties of fibroblast populated collagen matrix (FPCM) provide important physical cues to regulate physiological and pathological processes of encapsulated cells. The mechanical strength of FPCM is arises from both of its constituents: the collagen matrix and the fibroblasts. Existing methods to separate the contribution of individual constituents by treating cm-scale tissue samples with decellularization drugs for prolonged periods have been shown to adversely affect the properties of the collagen matrix. To minimize such matrix damage, we have developed a magnetic microtissue stretching system that allows us to grow arrays of sub-mm scale microtissues that can be rapidly decellularized. This consists of arrays of paired micro-cantilevers that support the 3D FPCM and can be driven by incorporated magnetic material via externally applied magnetic fields. By measuring the tensile force applied to the FPCM and the tissue strain, we found the stiffness of the matured FPCM is 28.1 +- 1.8 kPa and that of the decellularized collagen matrix is 23.1 +- 3.1 kPa. These measurements of the stiffness of the intact collagen matrix in a remodeled FPCM can provide important clues on the mechanical environment that regulates the biological function of encapsulated cells.

  6. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Esteban Arango, Juan; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability.

  7. 3D microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Keigo

    2008-02-01

    In order to circumvent the fact that only one observer can view the image from a stereoscopic microscope, an attachment was devised for displaying the 3D microscopic image on a large LCD monitor for viewing by multiple observers in real time. The principle of operation, design, fabrication, and performance are presented, along with tolerance measurements relating to the properties of the cellophane half-wave plate used in the design.

  8. COLLAGEN PROCESSING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Collagen dispersions, produced from fibrils recovered from milled bovine collagen, have shown promise in environmental remediation in applications as settling aids, filtration aids, fractionation media, oil drop stabilizers, and water purification aids. Macroporous structures, processed by controll...

  9. 3D camera tracking from disparity images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kiyoung; Woo, Woontack

    2005-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a robust camera tracking method that uses disparity images computed from known parameters of 3D camera and multiple epipolar constraints. We assume that baselines between lenses in 3D camera and intrinsic parameters are known. The proposed method reduces camera motion uncertainty encountered during camera tracking. Specifically, we first obtain corresponding feature points between initial lenses using normalized correlation method. In conjunction with matching features, we get disparity images. When the camera moves, the corresponding feature points, obtained from each lens of 3D camera, are robustly tracked via Kanade-Lukas-Tomasi (KLT) tracking algorithm. Secondly, relative pose parameters of each lens are calculated via Essential matrices. Essential matrices are computed from Fundamental matrix calculated using normalized 8-point algorithm with RANSAC scheme. Then, we determine scale factor of translation matrix by d-motion. This is required because the camera motion obtained from Essential matrix is up to scale. Finally, we optimize camera motion using multiple epipolar constraints between lenses and d-motion constraints computed from disparity images. The proposed method can be widely adopted in Augmented Reality (AR) applications, 3D reconstruction using 3D camera, and fine surveillance systems which not only need depth information, but also camera motion parameters in real-time.

  10. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    PubMed Central

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  11. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  12. Three-Dimensional Collagen Type I Matrix Up-Regulates Nuclear Isoforms of the Microtubule Associated Protein Tau Implicated in Resistance to Paclitaxel Therapy in Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gurler, Hilal; Yu, Yi; Choi, Jacqueline; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre A.; Barbolina, Maria V.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian carcinoma is the deadliest gynecologic malignancy. One reason underlying treatment failure is resistance to paclitaxel. Expression of the microtubule associated protein tau has recently been proposed as a predictor of response to paclitaxel in ovarian carcinoma patients. Expression of tau was probed using immunohistochemistry in 312 specimens of primary, and 40 specimens of metastatic, ovarian carcinoma. Serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma cell line models were used to determine the expression of tau by Western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Subcellular fractionation and Western blot were employed to examine nuclear and cytoplasmic localization of tau. Gene silencing and clonogenic assays were used to evaluate paclitaxel response. Tau was expressed in 44% of all tested cases. Among the primary serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma cases, 46% were tau-positive. Among the metastatic serous epithelial ovarian carcinomas, 63% were tau-positive. Cell culture experiments demonstrated that tau was expressed in multiple isoforms. Three-dimensional collagen I matrix culture conditions resulted in up-regulation of tau protein. Silencing of tau with specific siRNAs in a combination with three-dimensional culture conditions led to a significant decrease of the clonogenic ability of cells treated with paclitaxel. The data suggest that reduction of tau expression may sensitize ovarian carcinoma to the paclitaxel treatment. PMID:25658796

  13. The Effector Protein BPE005 from Brucella abortus Induces Collagen Deposition and Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Downmodulation via Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Rey Serantes, Diego; Herrmann, Claudia Karina; Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Vanzulli, Silvia; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Comerci, Diego José; Delpino, María Victoria

    2016-02-01

    The liver is frequently affected in patients with active brucellosis. In the present study, we identified a virulence factor involved in the modulation of hepatic stellate cell function and consequent fibrosis during Brucella abortus infection. This study assessed the role of BPE005 protein from B. abortus in the fibrotic phenotype induced on hepatic stellate cells during B. abortus infection in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that the fibrotic phenotype induced by B. abortus on hepatic stellate (LX-2) cells was dependent on BPE005, a protein associated with the type IV secretion system (T4SS) VirB from B. abortus. Our results indicated that B. abortus inhibits matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) secretion through the activity of the BPE005-secreted protein and induces concomitant collagen deposition by LX-2 cells. BPE005 is a small protein containing a cyclic nucleotide monophosphate binding domain (cNMP) that modulates the LX-2 cell phenotype through a mechanism that is dependent on the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. Altogether, these results indicate that B. abortus tilts LX-2 cells to a profibrogenic phenotype employing a functional T4SS and the secreted BPE005 protein through a mechanism that involves the cAMP and PKA signaling pathway. PMID:26667834

  14. Multiviewer 3D monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrzewski, Andrew A.; Aye, Tin M.; Kim, Dai Hyun; Esterkin, Vladimir; Savant, Gajendra D.

    1998-09-01

    Physical Optics Corporation has developed an advanced 3-D virtual reality system for use with simulation tools for training technical and military personnel. This system avoids such drawbacks of other virtual reality (VR) systems as eye fatigue, headaches, and alignment for each viewer, all of which are due to the need to wear special VR goggles. The new system is based on direct viewing of an interactive environment. This innovative holographic multiplexed screen technology makes it unnecessary for the viewer to wear special goggles.

  15. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  16. 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative real-time imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in three dimensions based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32×32 matrix-array probe. Its capability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3-D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging and finally 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3-D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, for the first time, the complex 3-D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, and the 3-D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3-D real-time mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra- and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  17. Non-collagenous protein screening in the human chondrodysplasias: link proteins, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), and fibromodulin.

    PubMed

    Stanescu, V; Do, T P; Chaminade, F; Maroteaux, P; Stanescu, R

    1994-05-15

    A gel-electrophoretic screening for link proteins, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), and fibromodulin abnormalities was performed in fetuses, newborn infants, and children with various types of chondrodysplasia. Microdissected freeze-dried sections of upper tibial growth cartilage were extracted with 4M guanidinium chloride in the presence of proteolysis inhibitors. After dialysis against 8M urea, the extracts were submitted to stepwise ion-exchange chromatography to separate the large proteoglycans (aggrecans) from the other components. The latter were analyzed by gel electrophoresis, electrotransferred onto nitrocellulose membranes, and reacted with specific antibodies. Control samples from individuals with apparently normal growth were analyzed in the same runs. Two link protein bands with abnormal electrophoretic migration were found in a sporadic case of spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, Kozlowski type. Three link protein bands with the same migration as in the control samples were found in thanatophoric dysplasia, homozygous achondroplasia, achondrogenesis type II, hypochondrogenesis, Goldblatt syndrome, Desbuquois dysplasia, pseudoachondroplasia, and diastrophic dysplasia. In several pathologic cases with normal electrophoretic pattern of the link proteins, small link protein fragments appeared after reduction. The gel electrophoretic pattern of COMP was studied in thanatophoric dysplasia, diastrophic dysplasia, homozygous achondroplasia, fibrochondrogenesis, hypochondrogenesis, Goldblatt syndrome, and Kniest dysplasia. In all these cases the pattern was the same as in the control samples. The main band of fibromodulin had a normal migration rate in fibrochondrogenesis, Desbuquois dysplasia, Kniest dysplasia, and pseudoachondroplasia. It was delayed in diastrophic dysplasia. PMID:8030664

  18. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  19. Short Stimulation of Electro-Responsive PAA/Fibrin Hydrogel Induces Collagen Production

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Nastaran; Swennen, Geertje; Verbruggen, Sanne; Scibiorek, Martyna; Molin, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    Acrylic acid/fibrin hydrogel can mechanically stimulate cells when an external electrical field is applied, enabling them to migrate and align throughout the depth of the gel. The ability of electro-responsive polyacrylic acid (PAA)/fibrin hydrogel to promote collagen production and remodeling has been investigated by three-dimensional (3D) culturing and conditioning of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). SMCs-seeded hydrogels were subjected to an alternating electrical field (0.06 V/mm) for 2 h for one, two, or three times per week during 4 weeks of culturing. Fluorescent images of collagen structure and accumulation, assessed by CNA-35 probe, showed increased collagen content (>100-fold at 1× stimulation/week) in the center of the hydrogels after 4 weeks of culture. The increase in collagen production correlated with increasing extracellular matrix gene expression and resulted in significantly improved mechanical properties of the stimulated hydrogels. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 activity was also significantly enhanced by stimulation, which probably has a role in the reorganization of the collagen. Short stimulation (2 h) induced a favorable response in the cells and enhanced tissue formation and integrity of the scaffold by inducing collagen production. The presented set up could be used for conditioning and improving the functionality of current tissue-engineered vascular grafts. PMID:24341313

  20. 3D-Printed ABS and PLA Scaffolds for Cartilage and Nucleus Pulposus Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, Derek H.; Carelli, Eric; Steffen, Thomas; Jarzem, Peter; Haglund, Lisbet

    2015-01-01

    Painful degeneration of soft tissues accounts for high socioeconomic costs. Tissue engineering aims to provide biomimetics recapitulating native tissues. Biocompatible thermoplastics for 3D printing can generate high-resolution structures resembling tissue extracellular matrix. Large-pore 3D-printed acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polylactic acid (PLA) scaffolds were compared for cell ingrowth, viability, and tissue generation. Primary articular chondrocytes and nucleus pulposus (NP) cells were cultured on ABS and PLA scaffolds for three weeks. Both cell types proliferated well, showed high viability, and produced ample amounts of proteoglycan and collagen type II on both scaffolds. NP generated more matrix than chondrocytes; however, no difference was observed between scaffold types. Mechanical testing revealed sustained scaffold stability. This study demonstrates that chondrocytes and NP cells can proliferate on both ABS and PLA scaffolds printed with a simplistic, inexpensive desktop 3D printer. Moreover, NP cells produced more proteoglycan than chondrocytes, irrespective of thermoplastic type, indicating that cells maintain individual phenotype over the three-week culture period. Future scaffold designs covering larger pore sizes and better mimicking native tissue structure combined with more flexible or resorbable materials may provide implantable constructs with the proper structure, function, and cellularity necessary for potential cartilage and disc tissue repair in vivo. PMID:26151846

  1. 3D-Printed ABS and PLA Scaffolds for Cartilage and Nucleus Pulposus Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, Derek H; Carelli, Eric; Steffen, Thomas; Jarzem, Peter; Haglund, Lisbet

    2015-01-01

    Painful degeneration of soft tissues accounts for high socioeconomic costs. Tissue engineering aims to provide biomimetics recapitulating native tissues. Biocompatible thermoplastics for 3D printing can generate high-resolution structures resembling tissue extracellular matrix. Large-pore 3D-printed acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polylactic acid (PLA) scaffolds were compared for cell ingrowth, viability, and tissue generation. Primary articular chondrocytes and nucleus pulposus (NP) cells were cultured on ABS and PLA scaffolds for three weeks. Both cell types proliferated well, showed high viability, and produced ample amounts of proteoglycan and collagen type II on both scaffolds. NP generated more matrix than chondrocytes; however, no difference was observed between scaffold types. Mechanical testing revealed sustained scaffold stability. This study demonstrates that chondrocytes and NP cells can proliferate on both ABS and PLA scaffolds printed with a simplistic, inexpensive desktop 3D printer. Moreover, NP cells produced more proteoglycan than chondrocytes, irrespective of thermoplastic type, indicating that cells maintain individual phenotype over the three-week culture period. Future scaffold designs covering larger pore sizes and better mimicking native tissue structure combined with more flexible or resorbable materials may provide implantable constructs with the proper structure, function, and cellularity necessary for potential cartilage and disc tissue repair in vivo. PMID:26151846

  2. Encapsulation of adult human mesenchymal stem cells within collagen-agarose microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Batorsky, Anna; Liao, Jiehong; Lund, Amanda W; Plopper, George E; Stegemann, Jan P

    2005-11-20

    Reliable control over the process of cell differentiation is a major challenge in moving stem cell-based therapies forward. The composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is known to play an important role in modulating differentiation. We have developed a system to encapsulate adult human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) within spherical three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments consisting of a defined mixture of collagen Type I and agarose polymers. These protein-based beads were produced by emulsification of liquid hMSC-matrix suspensions in a silicone fluid phase and subsequent gelation to form hydrogel beads, which were collected by centrifugation and placed in culture. Bead size and size distribution could be varied by changing the encapsulation parameters (impeller speed and blade separation), and beads in the range of 30-150 microns in diameter were reliably produced. Collagen concentrations up to 40% (wt/wt) could be incorporated into the bead matrix. Visible light and fluorescence microscopy confirmed that the collagen matrix was uniformly distributed throughout the beads. Cell viability post-encapsulation was in the range of 75-90% for all bead formulations (similar to control slab gels) and remained at this level for 8 days in culture. Fluorescent staining of the actin cytoskeleton revealed that hMSC spreading increased with increasing collagen concentration. This system of producing 3D microenvironments of defined matrix composition therefore offers a way to control cell-matrix interactions and thereby guide hMSC differentiation. The bead format allows the use of small amounts of matrix proteins, and such beads can potentially be used as a cell delivery vehicle in tissue repair applications. PMID:16080186

  3. 3D polarimetric purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, José J.; San José, Ignacio

    2010-11-01

    From our previous definition of the indices of polarimetric purity for 3D light beams [J.J. Gil, J.M. Correas, P.A. Melero and C. Ferreira, Monogr. Semin. Mat. G. de Galdeano 31, 161 (2004)], an analysis of their geometric and physical interpretation is presented. It is found that, in agreement with previous results, the first parameter is a measure of the degree of polarization, whereas the second parameter (called the degree of directionality) is a measure of the mean angular aperture of the direction of propagation of the corresponding light beam. This pair of invariant, non-dimensional, indices of polarimetric purity contains complete information about the polarimetric purity of a light beam. The overall degree of polarimetric purity is obtained as a weighted quadratic average of the degree of polarization and the degree of directionality.

  4. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  5. 'Bonneville' in 3-D!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this 3-D navigation camera mosaic of the crater called 'Bonneville' after driving approximately 13 meters (42.7 feet) to get a better vantage point. Spirit's current position is close enough to the edge to see the interior of the crater, but high enough and far enough back to get a view of all of the walls. Because scientists and rover controllers are so pleased with this location, they will stay here for at least two more martian days, or sols, to take high resolution panoramic camera images of 'Bonneville' in its entirety. Just above the far crater rim, on the left side, is the rover's heatshield, which is visible as a tiny reflective speck.

  6. Natural assembly of platelet lysate-loaded nanocarriers into enriched 3D hydrogels for cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Santo, Vítor E; Popa, Elena G; Mano, João F; Gomes, Manuela E; Reis, Rui L

    2015-06-01

    The role of Platelet Lysates (PLs) as a source of growth factors (GFs) and as main element of three-dimensional (3D) hydrogels has been previously described. However, the resulting hydrogels usually suffer from high degree of contraction, limiting their usefulness. This work describes the development of a stable biomimetic 3D hydrogel structure based on PLs, through the spontaneous assembling of a high concentration of chitosan-chondroitin sulfate nanoparticles (CH/CS NPs) with PLs loaded by adsorption. The interactions between the NPs and the lysates resemble the ones observed in the extracellular matrix (ECM) native environment between glycosaminoglycans and ECM proteins. In vitro release studies were carried out focusing on the quantification of PDGF-BB and TGF-β1 GFs. Human adipose derived stem cells (hASCs) were entrapped in these 3D hydrogels and cultured in vitro under chondrogenic stimulus, in order to assess their potential use for cartilage regeneration. Histological, immunohistological and gene expression analysis demonstrated that the PL-assembled constructs entrapping hASCs exhibited results similar to the positive control (hASCS cultured in pellets), concerning the levels of collagen II expression and immunolocalization of collagen type I and II and aggrecan. Moreover, the deposition of new cartilage ECM was detected by alcian blue and safranin-O positive stainings. This work demonstrates the potential of PLs to act simultaneously as a source/carrier of GFs and as a 3D structure of support, through the application of a "bottom-up" approach involving the assembly of NPs, resulting in an enriched construct for cartilage regeneration applications. PMID:25795623

  7. Shim3d Helmholtz Solution Package

    2009-01-29

    This suite of codes solves the Helmholtz Equation for the steady-state propagation of single-frequency electromagnetic radiation in an arbitrary 2D or 3D dielectric medium. Materials can be either transparent or absorptive (including metals) and are described entirely by their shape and complex dielectric constant. Dielectric boundaries are assumed to always fall on grid boundaries and the material within a single grid cell is considered to be uniform. Input to the problem is in the formmore » of a Dirichlet boundary condition on a single boundary, and may be either analytic (Gaussian) in shape, or a mode shape computed using a separate code (such as the included eigenmode solver vwave20), and written to a file. Solution is via the finite difference method using Jacobi iteration for 3D problems or direct matrix inversion for 2D problems. Note that 3D problems that include metals will require different iteration parameters than described in the above reference. For structures with curved boundaries not easily modeled on a rectangular grid, the auxillary codes helmholtz11(2D), helm3d (semivectoral), and helmv3d (full vectoral) are provided. For these codes the finite difference equations are specified on a topological regular triangular grid and solved using Jacobi iteration or direct matrix inversion as before. An automatic grid generator is supplied.« less

  8. Nanomechanics of collagen microfibrils

    PubMed Central

    Vesentini, Simone; Redaelli, Alberto; Gautieri, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Summary Collagen constitutes one third of the human proteome, providing mechanical stability, elasticity and strength to organisms and is thus the prime construction material in biology. Collagen is also the dominating material in the extracellular matrix where its stiffness controls cell differentiation, growth and pathology. We use atomistic-based hierarchical multiscale modeling to describe this complex biological material from the bottom up. This includes the use and development of large-scale computational modeling tools to investigate several aspects related to collagen-based tissues, including source of visco-elasticity and deformation mechanisms at the nanoscale level. The key innovation of this research is that until now, collagen materials have primarily been described at macroscopic scales, without explicitly understanding the mechanical contributions at the molecular and fibrillar levels. The major impact of this research will be the development of fundamental models of collagenous tissues, important to the design of new scaffolding biomaterials for regenerative medicine as well as for the understanding of collagen-related diseases. PMID:23885342

  9. Uncovering cancer cell behavioral phenotype in 3-D in vitro metastatic landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Sun, Bo; Duclos, Guillaume; Kam, Yoonseok; Gatenby, Robert; Stone, Howard; Austin, Robert

    2012-02-01

    One well-known fact is that cancer cell genetics determines cell metastatic potentials. However, from a physics point of view, genetics as cell properties cannot directly act on metastasis. An agent is needed to unscramble the genetics first before generating dynamics for metastasis. Exactly this agent is cell behavioral phenotype, which is rarely studied due to the difficulties of real-time cell tracking in in vivo tissue. Here we have successfully constructed a micro in vitro environment with collagen based Extracellular Matrix (ECM) structures for cell 3-D metastasis. With stable nutrition (glucose) gradient inside, breast cancer cell MDA-MB-231 is able to invade inside the collagen from the nutrition poor site towards the nutrition rich site. Continuous confocal microscopy captures images of the cells every 12 hours and tracks their positions in 3-D space. The micro fluorescent beads pre-mixed inside the ECM demonstrate that invasive cells have altered the structures through mechanics. With the observation and the analysis of cell collective behaviors, we argue that game theory may exist between the pioneering cells and their followers in the metastatic cell group. The cell collaboration may explain the high efficiency of metastasis.

  10. Development of a cultured dermal substitute composed of a spongy matrix of hyaluronic acid and atelo-collagen combined with fibroblasts: cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Kentaro; Kuroyanagi, Yoshimitsu

    2004-02-01

    An allogeneic cultured dermal substitute (CDS) was prepared by cultivating fibroblasts on a two-layered spongy matrix of hyaluronic acid (HA) and atelo-collagen (Col). The ability of fibroblasts to secrete cytokines is dependent on the conditions of freezing and thawing. The first experiment was designed to investigate the effects of supplements in a cryoprotective medium, that is, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), glycerol, and fetal bovine serum (FBS). In each experiment we measured the cell viability after thawing and the cell growth in CDS recultured after thawing. In addition, the amount of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) released from the CDS recultured for one week after thawing was measured. The highest values of cell viability, cell growth, and the amount of VEGF released were obtained when CDS was frozen in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) supplemented with 10% DMSO and 40% FBS, and then thawed quickly in a water bath at 37 degrees C. However, due to the high cost of FBS, in clinical applications CDS is usually frozen in DMEM supplemented with 10% DMSO and 20% FBS. In practice, however, physicians often cannot use CDS immediately after thawing, depending on clinical conditions. Therefore, in the second experiment we investigated cell viability at different time points after thawing. In addition, we investigated cell growth and the amount of VEGF released from fibroblasts in CDS at different time points after thawing under different conditions, and after further reculturing for one week. We recommend that CDS be rinsed with lactated Ringer's solution immediately after thawing, and that it be used within 4 h after thawing. PMID:14961958

  11. Prediction of antiarthritic drug efficacies by monitoring active matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) levels in collagen-induced arthritic mice using the MMP-3 probe.

    PubMed

    Lee, Aeju; Park, Kyeongsoon; Choi, Sung-Jae; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kim, Han Sung; Choi, Kuiwon; Kwon, Ick Chan; Yoon, Soo-Young; Youn, Inchan

    2014-05-01

    Active matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) is a prognostic marker of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We recently developed an MMP-3 probe that can specifically detect the active form of MMP-3. The aim of this study was to investigate whether detection and monitoring of active MMP-3 could be useful to predict therapeutic drug responses in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. During the period of treatment with drugs such as methotrexate (MTX) or infliximab (IFX), MMP-3 mRNA and protein levels were correlated with fluorescence signals in arthritic joint tissues and in the serum of CIA mice. Also, bone volume density and erosion in the knee joints and the paws of CIA mice were measured with microcomputed tomography (micro-CT), X-ray, and histology to confirm drug responses. In joint tissues and serum of CIA mice, strong fluorescence signals induced by the action of active MMP-3 were significantly decreased when drugs were applied. The decrease in RA scores in drug-treated CIA mice led to fluorescence reductions, mainly as a result of down-regulation of MMP-3 mRNA or protein. The micro-CT, X-ray, and histology results clearly showed marked decreases in bone and cartilage destruction, which were consistent with the reduction of fluorescence by down-regulation of active MMP-3 in drug-treated CIA mice. We suggest that the MMP-3 diagnostic kit could be used to detect and monitor the active form of MMP-3 in CIA mice serum during a treatment course and thereby used to predict the drug response or resistance to RA therapies at an earlier stage. We hope that monitoring of active MMP-3 levels in arthritis patients using the MMP-3 diagnostic kit will be a promising tool for drug discovery, drug development, and monitoring of drug responses in RA therapy. PMID:24673659

  12. Imaging Mass Spectrometry by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization and Stress-Strain Measurements in Iontophoresis Transepithelial Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Mencucci, Rita; Camesasca, Fabrizio I.; Favuzza, Eleonora

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To compare biomechanical effect, riboflavin penetration and distribution in transepithelial corneal collagen cross-linking with iontophoresis (I-CXL), with standard cross linking (S-CXL) and current transepithelial protocol (TE-CXL). Materials and Methods. The study was divided into two different sections, considering, respectively, rabbit and human cadaver corneas. In both sections corneas were divided according to imbibition protocols and irradiation power. Imaging mass spectrometry by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI-IMS) and stress-strain measurements were used. Forty-eight rabbit and twelve human cadaver corneas were evaluated. Results. MALDI-IMS showed a deep riboflavin penetration throughout the corneal layers with I-CXL, with a roughly lower concentration in the deepest layers when compared to S-CXL, whereas with TE-CXL penetration was considerably less. In rabbits, there was