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Sample records for 3d collagen matrix

  1. Vinculin is required for cell polarization, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling in 3D collagen.

    PubMed

    Thievessen, Ingo; Fakhri, Nikta; Steinwachs, Julian; Kraus, Viola; McIsaac, R Scott; Gao, Liang; Chen, Bi-Chang; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Betzig, Eric; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Waterman, Clare M; Fabry, Ben

    2015-11-01

    Vinculin is filamentous (F)-actin-binding protein enriched in integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Whereas studies in 2-dimensional (2D) tissue culture models have suggested that vinculin negatively regulates cell migration by promoting cytoskeleton-ECM coupling to strengthen and stabilize adhesions, its role in regulating cell migration in more physiologic, 3-dimensional (3D) environments is unclear. To address the role of vinculin in 3D cell migration, we analyzed the morphodynamics, migration, and ECM remodeling of primary murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with cre/loxP-mediated vinculin gene disruption in 3D collagen I cultures. We found that vinculin promoted 3D cell migration by increasing directional persistence. Vinculin was necessary for persistent cell protrusion, cell elongation, and stable cell orientation in 3D collagen, but was dispensable for lamellipodia formation, suggesting that vinculin-mediated cell adhesion to the ECM is needed to convert actin-based cell protrusion into persistent cell shape change and migration. Consistent with this finding, vinculin was necessary for efficient traction force generation in 3D collagen without affecting myosin II activity and promoted 3D collagen fiber alignment and macroscopical gel contraction. Our results suggest that vinculin promotes directionally persistent cell migration and tension-dependent ECM remodeling in complex 3D environments by increasing cell-ECM adhesion and traction force generation.

  2. Tracking immune-related cell responses to drug delivery microparticles in 3D dense collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Obarzanek-Fojt, Magdalena; Curdy, Catherine; Loggia, Nicoletta; Di Lena, Fabio; Grieder, Kathrin; Bitar, Malak; Wick, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Beyond the therapeutic purpose, the impact of drug delivery microparticles on the local tissue and inflammatory responses remains to be further elucidated specifically for reactions mediated by the host immune cells. Such immediate and prolonged reactions may adversely influence the release efficacy and intended therapeutic pathway. The lack of suitable in vitro platforms limits our ability to gain insight into the nature of immune responses at a single cell level. In order to establish an in vitro 3D system mimicking the connective host tissue counterpart, we utilized reproducible, compressed, rat-tail collagen polymerized matrices. THP1 cells (human acute monocytic leukaemia cells) differentiated into macrophage-like cells were chosen as cell model and their functionality was retained in the dense rat-tail collagen matrix. Placebo microparticles were later combined in the immune cell seeded system during collagen polymerization and secreted pro-inflammatory factors: TNFα and IL-8 were used as immune response readout (ELISA). Our data showed an elevated TNFα and IL-8 secretion by macrophage THP1 cells indicating that Placebo microparticles trigger certain immune cell responses under 3D in vivo like conditions. Furthermore, we have shown that the system is sensitive to measure the differences in THP1 macrophage pro-inflammatory responses to Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) microparticles with different API release kinetics. We have successfully developed a tissue-like, advanced, in vitro system enabling selective "readouts" of specific responses of immune-related cells. Such system may provide the basis of an advanced toolbox enabling systemic evaluation and prediction of in vivo microparticle reactions on human immune-related cells.

  3. An extracellular-matrix-specific GEF-GAP interaction regulates Rho GTPase crosstalk for 3D collagen migration.

    PubMed

    Kutys, Matthew L; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2014-09-01

    Rho-family GTPases govern distinct types of cell migration on different extracellular matrix proteins in tissue culture or three-dimensional (3D) matrices. We searched for mechanisms selectively regulating 3D cell migration in different matrix environments and discovered a form of Cdc42-RhoA crosstalk governing cell migration through a specific pair of GTPase activator and inhibitor molecules. We first identified βPix, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), as a specific regulator of migration in 3D collagen using an affinity-precipitation-based GEF screen. Knockdown of βPix specifically blocks cell migration in fibrillar collagen microenvironments, leading to hyperactive cellular protrusion accompanied by increased collagen matrix contraction. Live FRET imaging and RNAi knockdown linked this βPix knockdown phenotype to loss of polarized Cdc42 but not Rac1 activity, accompanied by enhanced, de-localized RhoA activity. Mechanistically, collagen phospho-regulates βPix, leading to its association with srGAP1, a GTPase-activating protein (GAP), needed to suppress RhoA activity. Our results reveal a matrix-specific pathway controlling migration involving a GEF-GAP interaction of βPix with srGAP1 that is critical for maintaining suppressive crosstalk between Cdc42 and RhoA during 3D collagen migration.

  4. [Experimental study of the collagen matrix for increase the gums using a 3D-modeling].

    PubMed

    Baulin, I M; Badalyan, V A; Ryakhovsky, A N

    2015-01-01

    In an experimental study on mini-pigs demonstrated that the use of collagen matrix Mucograft open method leads to the formation of mature connective tissue around the implants, more pronounced after 70 days, and the width of attached mucosa already 45th day (from 4.4 ± 0.3 to 7.7 ± 0.5 mm) is comparable to that of free gingival graft. Three-dimensional computer modeling of jaws experimental animals showed the soft tissue augmentation by 0.8 ± 0.1 cm3 after use of collagen matrix Mucograft and 1.1 ± 0.12 cm3 after free gingival graft.

  5. Planar Gradient Diffusion System to Investigate Chemotaxis in a 3D Collagen Matrix.

    PubMed

    Stout, David A; Toyjanova, Jennet; Franck, Christian

    2015-06-12

    The importance of cell migration can be seen through the development of human life. When cells migrate, they generate forces and transfer these forces to their surrounding area, leading to cell movement and migration. In order to understand the mechanisms that can alter and/or affect cell migration, one can study these forces. In theory, understanding the fundamental mechanisms and forces underlying cell migration holds the promise of effective approaches for treating diseases and promoting cellular transplantation. Unfortunately, modern chemotaxis chambers that have been developed are usually restricted to two dimensions (2D) and have complex diffusion gradients that make the experiment difficult to interpret. To this end, we have developed, and describe in this paper, a direct-viewing chamber for chemotaxis studies, which allows one to overcome modern chemotaxis chamber obstacles able to measure cell forces and specific concentration within the chamber in a 3D environment to study cell 3D migration. More compelling, this approach allows one to successfully model diffusion through 3D collagen matrices and calculate the coefficient of diffusion of a chemoattractant through multiple different concentrations of collagen, while keeping the system simple and user friendly for traction force microscopy (TFM) and digital volume correlation (DVC) analysis.

  6. Multiphoton microscopy of engineered dermal substitutes: assessment of 3D collagen matrix remodeling induced by fibroblasts contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, A.-M.; Olive, C.; Michelet, J.-F.; Galey, J.-B.; Fagot, D.; Leroy, F.; Martin, J.-L.; Colonna, A.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2010-02-01

    One of the main functions of dermal fibroblasts is the generation of mechanical forces within their surrounding extracellular matrix. Investigating molecules that could modulate fibroblast contraction and act as potent anti aging ingredients requires the development of three-dimensional in situ imaging methodologies for dermal substitute analysis. Here we use multiphoton microscopy in order to investigate the fibroblast-induced collagen matrix reorganization in engineered dermal tissue and to evaluate the effect of Y27632, a RhoA kinase inhibitor on dermal substitutes contraction. We observe that collagen fibrils rearrange around fibroblast with increasing density in control samples, whereas collagen fibrils show no remodeling in the samples containing the RhoA kinase inhibitor. Moreover, when the culture medium containing the inhibitor was replaced with a control medium, the dermal substitutes presented the same 3D reorganization as the control samples, which indicates that the inhibitory effects are reversible. In conclusion, our study demonstrates the relevance of multiphoton microscopy to visualize three-dimensional remodeling of the matrix induced by fibroblast contraction.

  7. Matrix density alters zyxin phosphorylation, which limits peripheral process formation and extension in endothelial cells invading 3D collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Abbey, Colette A; Bayless, Kayla J

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to determine the optimal conditions required for known pro-angiogenic stimuli to elicit successful endothelial sprouting responses. We used an established, quantifiable model of endothelial cell (EC) sprout initiation where ECs were tested for invasion in low (1 mg/mL) and high density (5 mg/mL) 3D collagen matrices. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) alone, or S1P combined with stromal derived factor-1α (SDF) and phorbol ester (TPA), elicited robust sprouting responses. The ability of these factors to stimulate sprouting was more effective in higher density collagen matrices. S1P stimulation resulted in a significant increase in invasion distance, and with the exception of treatment groups containing phorbol ester, invasion distance was longer in 1mg/mL compared to 5mg/mL collagen matrices. Closer examination of cell morphology revealed that increasing matrix density and supplementing with SDF and TPA enhanced the formation of multicellular structures more closely resembling capillaries. TPA enhanced the frequency and size of lumen formation and correlated with a robust increase in phosphorylation of p42/p44 Erk kinase, while S1P and SDF did not. Also, a higher number of significantly longer extended processes formed in 5mg/mL compared to 1mg/mL collagen matrices. Because collagen matrices at higher density have been reported to be stiffer, we tested for changes in the mechanosensitive protein, zyxin. Interestingly, zyxin phosphorylation levels inversely correlated with matrix density, while levels of total zyxin did not change significantly. Immunofluorescence and localization studies revealed that total zyxin was distributed evenly throughout invading structures, while phosphorylated zyxin was slightly more intense in extended peripheral processes. Silencing zyxin expression increased extended process length and number of processes, while increasing zyxin levels decreased extended process length. Altogether these data indicate that ECs

  8. Highlighting the impact of aging on type I collagen: label-free investigation using confocal reflectance microscopy and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in 3D matrix model.

    PubMed

    Guilbert, Marie; Roig, Blandine; Terryn, Christine; Garnotel, Roselyne; Jeannesson, Pierre; Sockalingum, Ganesh D; Manfait, Michel; Perraut, François; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Koenig, Anne; Piot, Olivier

    2016-02-23

    During aging, alterations of extracellular matrix proteins contribute to various pathological phenotypes. Among these alterations, type I collagen cross-linking and associated glycation products accumulation over time detrimentally affects its physico-chemical properties, leading to alterations of tissue biomechanical stability. Here, different-age collagen 3D matrices using non-destructive and label-free biophotonic techniques were analysed to highlight the impact of collagen I aging on 3D constructs, at macroscopic and microscopic levels. Matrices were prepared with collagens extracted from tail tendons of rats (newborns, young and old adults) to be within the physiological aging process. The data of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy reveal that aging leads to an inhibition of fibril assembly and a resulting decrease of gel density. Investigations by confocal reflectance microscopy highlight poor-fibrillar structures in oldest collagen networks most likely related to the glycation products accumulation. Complementarily, an infrared analysis brings out marked spectral variations in the Amide I profile, specific of the peptidic bond conformation and for carbohydrates vibrations as function of collagen-age. Interestingly, we also highlight an unexpected behavior for newborn collagen, exhibiting poorly-organized networks and microscopic features close to the oldest collagen. These results demonstrate that changes in collagen optical properties are relevant for investigating the incidence of aging in 3D matrix models.

  9. Highlighting the impact of aging on type I collagen: label-free investigation using confocal reflectance microscopy and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in 3D matrix model

    PubMed Central

    Terryn, Christine; Garnotel, Roselyne; Jeannesson, Pierre; Sockalingum, Ganesh D.; Manfait, Michel; Perraut, François; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Koenig, Anne; Piot, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    During aging, alterations of extracellular matrix proteins contribute to various pathological phenotypes. Among these alterations, type I collagen cross-linking and associated glycation products accumulation over time detrimentally affects its physico-chemical properties, leading to alterations of tissue biomechanical stability. Here, different-age collagen 3D matrices using non-destructive and label-free biophotonic techniques were analysed to highlight the impact of collagen I aging on 3D constructs, at macroscopic and microscopic levels. Matrices were prepared with collagens extracted from tail tendons of rats (newborns, young and old adults) to be within the physiological aging process. The data of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy reveal that aging leads to an inhibition of fibril assembly and a resulting decrease of gel density. Investigations by confocal reflectance microscopy highlight poor-fibrillar structures in oldest collagen networks most likely related to the glycation products accumulation. Complementarily, an infrared analysis brings out marked spectral variations in the Amide I profile, specific of the peptidic bond conformation and for carbohydrates vibrations as function of collagen-age. Interestingly, we also highlight an unexpected behavior for newborn collagen, exhibiting poorly-organized networks and microscopic features close to the oldest collagen. These results demonstrate that changes in collagen optical properties are relevant for investigating the incidence of aging in 3D matrix models. PMID:26885896

  10. Breast epithelial tissue morphology is affected in 3D cultures by species-specific collagen-based extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Dhimolea, Eugen; Soto, Ana M; Sonnenschein, Carlos

    2012-11-01

    Collagen-based gels have been widely used to determine the factors that regulate branching morphogenesis in the mammary gland. The patterns of biomechanical gradients and collagen reorganization influence the shape and orientation of epithelial structures in three-dimensional (3D) conditions. We explored in greater detail whether collagen type I fibers with distinct biomechanical and fiber-assembling properties, isolated from either bovine or rat tail tendon, differentially affected the epithelial phenotype in a tissue culture model of the human breast. Rat tail collagen fibers were densely packed into significantly longer and thicker bundles compared to those of the bovine type (average fascicle length 7.35 and 2.29 μm, respectively; p = 0.0001), indicating increased fiber alignment and biomechanical enablement in the former. MCF10A epithelial cells formed elaborated branched tubular structures in bovine but only nonbranched ducts and acini in rat tail collagen matrices. Ductal branching in bovine collagen was associated with interactions between neighboring structures mediated through packed collagen fibers; these fiber-mediated interactions were absent in rat tail collagen gels. Normal breast fibroblasts increased the final size and number of ducts only in rat tail collagen gels while not affecting branching. Our results suggest that the species of origin of collagen used in organotypic cultures may influence epithelial differentiation into alveolar or ductal structures and the patterns of epithelial branching. These observations underscore the importance of considering the species of origin and fiber alignment properties of collagen when engineering branching organs in 3D matrices and interpreting their role in the tissue phenotype.

  11. 3-D ultrastructure and collagen composition of healthy and overloaded human tendon: evidence of tenocyte and matrix buckling

    PubMed Central

    Pingel, Jessica; Lu, Yinhui; Starborg, Tobias; Fredberg, Ulrich; Langberg, Henning; Nedergaard, Anders; Weis, MaryAnn; Eyre, David; Kjaer, Michael; Kadler, Karl E

    2014-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathies display focal tissue thickening with pain and ultrasonography changes. Whilst complete rupture might be expected to induce changes in tissue organization and protein composition, little is known about the consequences of non-rupture-associated tendinopathies, especially with regards to changes in the content of collagen type I and III (the major collagens in tendon), and changes in tendon fibroblast (tenocyte) shape and organization of the extracellular matrix (ECM). To gain new insights, we took biopsies from the tendinopathic region and flanking healthy region of Achilles tendons of six individuals with clinically diagnosed tendinopathy who had no evidence of cholesterol, uric acid and amyloid accumulation. Biochemical analyses of collagen III/I ratio were performed on all six individuals, and electron microscope analysis using transmission electron microscopy and serial block face-scanning electron microscopy were made on two individuals. In the tendinopathic regions, compared with the flanking healthy tissue, we observed: (i) an increase in the ratio of collagen III : I proteins; (ii) buckling of the collagen fascicles in the ECM; (iii) buckling of tenocytes and their nuclei; and (iv) an increase in the ratio of small-diameter : large-diameter collagen fibrils. In summary, load-induced non-rupture tendinopathy in humans is associated with localized biochemical changes, a shift from large-to small-diameter fibrils, buckling of the tendon ECM, and buckling of the cells and their nuclei. PMID:24571576

  12. Multiphoton microscopy of engineered dermal substitutes: assessment of 3-D collagen matrix remodeling induced by fibroblast contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, Ana-Maria; Fagot, Dominique; Olive, Christian; Michelet, Jean-François; Galey, Jean-Baptiste; Leroy, Frédéric; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Martin, Jean-Louis; Colonna, Anne; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2010-09-01

    Dermal fibroblasts are responsible for the generation of mechanical forces within their surrounding extracellular matrix and can be potentially targeted by anti-aging ingredients. Investigation of the modulation of fibroblast contraction by these ingredients requires the implementation of three-dimensional in situ imaging methodologies. We use multiphoton microscopy to visualize unstained engineered dermal tissue by combining second-harmonic generation that reveals specifically fibrillar collagen and two-photon excited fluorescence from endogenous cellular chromophores. We study the fibroblast-induced reorganization of the collagen matrix and quantitatively evaluate the effect of Y-27632, a RhoA-kinase inhibitor, on dermal substitute contraction. We observe that collagen fibrils rearrange around fibroblasts with increasing density in control samples, whereas collagen fibrils show no remodeling in the samples containing the RhoA-kinase inhibitor. Moreover, we show that the inhibitory effects are reversible. Our study demonstrates the relevance of multiphoton microscopy to visualize three-dimensional remodeling of the extracellular matrix induced by fibroblast contraction or other processes.

  13. Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes in 3D Collagen I culture: an in vitro physiological environment for the study of extracellular matrix and host cell interactions

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Juliany C.F.; Viana, Nathan B.; Pontes, Bruno; Pereira, Camila F.A.; Silva-Filho, Fernando C.

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis is the causative agent of American cutaneous leishmaniasis, an important neglected tropical disease. Once Leishmania amazonensis is inoculated into the human host, promastigotes are exposed to the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the dermis. However, little is known about the interaction between the ECM and Leishmania promastigotes. In this study we established L. amazonensis promastigote culture in a three-dimensional (3D) environment mainly composed of Collagen I (COL I). This 3D culture recreates in vitro some aspects of the human host infection site, enabling the study of the interaction mechanisms of L. amazonensis with the host ECM. Promastigotes exhibited “freeze and run” migration in the 3D COL I matrix, which is completely different from the conventional in vitro swimming mode of migration. Moreover, L. amazonensis promastigotes were able to invade, migrate inside, and remodel the 3D COL I matrix. Promastigote trans-matrix invasion and the freeze and run migration mode were also observed when macrophages were present in the matrix. At least two classes of proteases, metallo- and cysteine proteases, are involved in the 3D COL I matrix degradation caused by Leishmania. Treatment with a mixture of protease inhibitors significantly reduced promastigote invasion and migration through this matrix. Together our results demonstrate that L. amazonensis promastigotes release proteases and actively remodel their 3D environment, facilitating their migration. This raises the possibility that promastigotes actively interact with their 3D environment during the search for their cellular “home”—macrophages. Supporting this hypothesis, promastigotes migrated faster than macrophages in a novel 3D co-culture model. PMID:24765565

  14. Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes in 3D Collagen I culture: an in vitro physiological environment for the study of extracellular matrix and host cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Petropolis, Debora B; Rodrigues, Juliany C F; Viana, Nathan B; Pontes, Bruno; Pereira, Camila F A; Silva-Filho, Fernando C

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis is the causative agent of American cutaneous leishmaniasis, an important neglected tropical disease. Once Leishmania amazonensis is inoculated into the human host, promastigotes are exposed to the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the dermis. However, little is known about the interaction between the ECM and Leishmania promastigotes. In this study we established L. amazonensis promastigote culture in a three-dimensional (3D) environment mainly composed of Collagen I (COL I). This 3D culture recreates in vitro some aspects of the human host infection site, enabling the study of the interaction mechanisms of L. amazonensis with the host ECM. Promastigotes exhibited "freeze and run" migration in the 3D COL I matrix, which is completely different from the conventional in vitro swimming mode of migration. Moreover, L. amazonensis promastigotes were able to invade, migrate inside, and remodel the 3D COL I matrix. Promastigote trans-matrix invasion and the freeze and run migration mode were also observed when macrophages were present in the matrix. At least two classes of proteases, metallo- and cysteine proteases, are involved in the 3D COL I matrix degradation caused by Leishmania. Treatment with a mixture of protease inhibitors significantly reduced promastigote invasion and migration through this matrix. Together our results demonstrate that L. amazonensis promastigotes release proteases and actively remodel their 3D environment, facilitating their migration. This raises the possibility that promastigotes actively interact with their 3D environment during the search for their cellular "home"-macrophages. Supporting this hypothesis, promastigotes migrated faster than macrophages in a novel 3D co-culture model.

  15. A 3D in situ cell counter reveals that breast tumor cell (MDA-MB-231) proliferation rate is reduced by the collagen matrix density

    PubMed Central

    Bunaciu, Rodica P.; Yen, Andrew; Wu, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    Many cell types require the biophysical and biochemical cues within the 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) to exhibit their true physiologically relevant behavior. As a result, cell culture platforms have been evolving from traditional 2D petri-dish plates into 3D biomatrices, and there is a need for developing analytic tools to characterize 3D cell culture. The existing cell counting method, using a hemocytometer or coulter counter, requires that cells are suspended in fluids prior to counting. This poses a challenge for 3D cell culture as cells are embedded in a 3D biomatrix. We use a facile 3D cell counting method that overcomes this limitation and allows for in situ cell counting in a 3D cell culture using equipment that is commonly available in a biology lab. Using a breast tumor cell line, MDA-MB-231, as a model system, we demonstrated that MDA-MB-231 cells (1) grow slower within a 3D collagen matrix than on a 2D substrate for an extended growth time (a week) with a comparable, initial cell-to-cell distance, (2) their cell growth rate decreases with the increase of collagen concentration, showing a linear growth rate rather than an exponential growth rate. Further work using flow cytometry showed that the observed growth rate reduction was consistent with the retardation of the transition to S (synthesis) phase in the cell cycle. This work demonstrates the validity of the 3D cell counting method and the importance of cell-ECM interactions in cell proliferation. PMID:25683564

  16. Biocompatible 3D Matrix with Antimicrobial Properties.

    PubMed

    Ion, Alberto; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Rădulescu, Dragoș; Rădulescu, Marius; Iordache, Florin; Vasile, Bogdan Ștefan; Surdu, Adrian Vasile; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Maniu, Horia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Holban, Alina Maria

    2016-01-20

    The aim of this study was to develop, characterize and assess the biological activity of a new regenerative 3D matrix with antimicrobial properties, based on collagen (COLL), hydroxyapatite (HAp), β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and usnic acid (UA). The prepared 3D matrix was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Microscopy (FT-IRM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). In vitro qualitative and quantitative analyses performed on cultured diploid cells demonstrated that the 3D matrix is biocompatible, allowing the normal development and growth of MG-63 osteoblast-like cells and exhibited an antimicrobial effect, especially on the Staphylococcus aureus strain, explained by the particular higher inhibitory activity of usnic acid (UA) against Gram positive bacterial strains. Our data strongly recommend the obtained 3D matrix to be used as a successful alternative for the fabrication of three dimensional (3D) anti-infective regeneration matrix for bone tissue engineering.

  17. Maturation of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) in 3D collagen matrix: Effects of niche cell supplementation and mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Kong, C W; Tong, M H; Chooi, W H; Huang, N; Li, R A; Chan, B P

    2017-02-01

    Cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC-CMs) are regarded as a promising source for regenerative medicine, drug testing and disease modeling. Nevertheless, cardiomyocytes are immature in terms of their contractile structure, metabolism and electrophysiological properties. Here, we fabricate cardiac muscle strips by encapsulating hESC-CMs in collagen-based biomaterials. Supplementation of niche cells at 3% to the number of hESC-CMs enhance the maturation of the hESC-CMs in 3D tissue matrix. The benefits of adding mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are comparable to that of adding fibroblasts. These two cell types demonstrate similar effects in promoting the compaction and cell spreading, as well as expression of maturation markers at both gene and protein levels. Mechanical loading, particularly cyclic stretch, produces engineered cardiac tissues with higher maturity in terms of twitch force, elastic modulus, sarcomere length and molecular signature, when comparing to static stretch or non-stretched controls. The current study demonstrates that the application of niche cells and mechanical stretch both stimulate the maturation of hESC-CMs in 3D architecture. Our results therefore suggest that this 3D model can be used for in vitro cardiac maturation study.

  18. Epidermal growth factor promotes a mesenchymal over an amoeboid motility of MDA-MB-231 cells embedded within a 3D collagen matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geum, Dongil T.; Kim, Beum Jun; Chang, Audrey E.; Hall, Matthew S.; Wu, Mingming

    2016-01-01

    The receptor of epidermal growth factor (EGFR) critically regulates tumor cell invasion and is a potent therapeutic target for treatment of many types of cancers, including carcinomas and glioblastomas. It is known that EGF regulates cell motility when tumor cells are embedded within a 3D biomatrix. However, roles of EGF in modulating tumor cell motility phenotype are largely unknown. In this article, we report that EGF promotes a mesenchymal over an amoeboid motility phenotype using a malignant breast tumor cell line, MDA-MB-231, embedded within a 3D collagen matrix. Amoeboid cells are rounded in shape, while mesenchymal cells are elongated, and their migrations are governed by a distinctly different set of biomolecules. Using single cell tracking analysis, we also show that EGF promotes cell dissemination through a significant increase in cell persistence along with a moderate increase of speed. The increase of persistence is correlated with the increase of the percentage of the mesenchymal cells within the population. Our work reveals a novel role of microenvironmental cue, EGF, in modulating heterogeneity and plasticity of tumor cell motility phenotype. In addition, it suggests a potential visual cue for diagnosing invasive states of breast cancer cells. This work can be easily extended beyond breast cancer cells.

  19. Integrin {beta}1-dependent invasive migration of irradiation-tolerant human lung adenocarcinoma cells in 3D collagen matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Seiichiro; Haga, Hisashi; Yasuda, Motoaki; Mizutani, Takeomi; Kawabata, Kazushige; Shirato, Hiroki; Nishioka, Takeshi

    2010-06-04

    Radiotherapy is one of the effective therapies used for treating various malignant tumors. However, the emergence of tolerant cells after irradiation remains problematic due to their high metastatic ability, sometimes indicative of poor prognosis. In this study, we showed that subcloned human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549P-3) that are irradiation-tolerant indicate high invasive activity in vitro, and exhibit an integrin {beta}1 activity-dependent migratory pattern. In collagen gel overlay assay, majority of the A549P-3 cells displayed round morphology and low migration activity, whereas a considerable number of A549P-3IR cells surviving irradiation displayed a spindle morphology and high migration rate. Blocking integrin {beta}1 activity reduced the migration rate of A549P-3IR cells and altered the cell morphology allowing them to assume a round shape. These results suggest that the A549P-3 cells surviving irradiation acquire a highly invasive integrin {beta}1-dependent phenotype, and integrin {beta}1 might be a potentially effective therapeutic target in combination with radiotherapy.

  20. Toward single cell traction microscopy within 3D collagen matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Matthew S.; Long, Rong; Feng, Xinzeng; Huang, YuLing; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Wu, Mingming

    2013-10-01

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Cells require the three-dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, current understanding of cell–ECM and cell–cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D cell traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. 3D cell traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single animal cells embedded in either synthetic or natively derived fibrous gels. We discuss here the development of 3D cell traction microscopy, its current limitations, and perspectives on the future of this technology. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying 3D cell traction microscopy to individual tumor cell migration within collagen gels. - Highlights: • Review of the current state of the art in 3D cell traction force microscopy. • Bulk and micro-characterization of remodelable fibrous collagen gels. • Strategies for performing 3D cell traction microscopy within collagen gels.

  1. Discoidin domain receptor 2 regulates the adhesion of fibroblasts to 3D collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daehwan; You, Eunae; Min, Na Young; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Rhee, Sangmyung

    2013-05-01

    The collagen matrix constitutes the primary extracellular matrix (ECM) portion of mammalian connective tissues in which the interaction of the cell and the surrounding collagen fibers has a significant impact on cell and tissue physiology, including morphogenesis, development and motility. Discoidin domain receptors (DDR1 and DDR2) have been identified as the receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated upon collagen binding. However, there is a lack of evidence regarding the effect of DDRs on the mechanical interaction between fibroblasts and ECM. In this study, we demonstrated that one of the major phosphotyrosine proteins in human fibroblasts during 3D collagen matrix polymerization is DDR2. Treatment of fibroblasts in 3D collagen matrices with platelet-derived growth factor (PDFG) has been shown to increase DDR2 phosphorylation. Silencing of DDR2 with siRNA in fibroblasts significantly reduced the number of dendritic extensions regardless of whether cells were cultured in the collagen or fibronectin 3D matrices. Decreasing dendritic extensions in DDR2-silenced cells has also been shown to decrease the ability of fibroblast entanglement to collagen fibrils in 3D collagen matrices. Finally, we also showed that the silencing of DDR2 decreased the cell migration in 3D nested collagen matrices but had no effect on 3D floating matrix contraction. Collectively, these results suggest that DDR2 functioning is required for the membrane dynamics to control the mechanical attachment of fibroblasts to the 3D collagen matrices in an integrin-independent manner.

  2. Towards Single Cell Traction Microscopy within 3D Collagen Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Matthew S.; Long, Rong; Feng, Xinzeng; Huang, YuLing; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Wu, Mingming

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Cells require the three dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, current understanding of cell-ECM and cell-cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D cell traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. 3D cell traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single animal cells embedded in either synthetic or natively derived fibrous gels. We discuss here the development of 3D cell traction microscopy, its current limitations, and perspectives on the future of this technology. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying 3D cell traction microscopy to individual tumor cells migration within collagen gels. PMID:23806281

  3. Engineering 3D Cellularized Collagen Gels for Vascular Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Meghezi, Sébastien; Seifu, Dawit G; Bono, Nina; Unsworth, Larry; Mequanint, Kibret; Mantovani, Diego

    2015-06-16

    Synthetic materials are known to initiate clinical complications such as inflammation, stenosis, and infections when implanted as vascular substitutes. Collagen has been extensively used for a wide range of biomedical applications and is considered a valid alternative to synthetic materials due to its inherent biocompatibility (i.e., low antigenicity, inflammation, and cytotoxic responses). However, the limited mechanical properties and the related low hand-ability of collagen gels have hampered their use as scaffold materials for vascular tissue engineering. Therefore, the rationale behind this work was first to engineer cellularized collagen gels into a tubular-shaped geometry and second to enhance smooth muscle cells driven reorganization of collagen matrix to obtain tissues stiff enough to be handled. The strategy described here is based on the direct assembling of collagen and smooth muscle cells (construct) in a 3D cylindrical geometry with the use of a molding technique. This process requires a maturation period, during which the constructs are cultured in a bioreactor under static conditions (without applied external dynamic mechanical constraints) for 1 or 2 weeks. The "static bioreactor" provides a monitored and controlled sterile environment (pH, temperature, gas exchange, nutrient supply and waste removal) to the constructs. During culture period, thickness measurements were performed to evaluate the cells-driven remodeling of the collagen matrix, and glucose consumption and lactate production rates were measured to monitor the cells metabolic activity. Finally, mechanical and viscoelastic properties were assessed for the resulting tubular constructs. To this end, specific protocols and a focused know-how (manipulation, gripping, working in hydrated environment, and so on) were developed to characterize the engineered tissues.

  4. 3D cancer cell migration in a confined matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alobaidi, Amani; Sun, Bo

    Cancer cell migration is widely studied in 2D motion, which does not mimic the invasion processes in vivo. More recently, 3D cell migration studies have been performed. The ability of cancer cells to migrate within the extracellular matrix depends on the physical and biochemical features of the extracellular matrix. We present a model of cell motility in confined matrix geometry. The aim of the study is to study cancer migration in collagen matrix, as a soft tissue, to investigate their motility within the confined and surrounding collagen environment. Different collagen concentrations have been used to show the ability of these cancer cells to move through such a complex structure by measuring Cancer cell migration velocity as well as the displacement. Graduate student physics department.

  5. Enhancement of neurite outgrowth in neuron cancer stem cells by growth on 3-D collagen scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Kuo, Shyh Ming; Liu, Guei-Sheung; Chen, Wan-Nan U.; Chuang, Chin-Wen; Liu, Li-Feng

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neuron cancer stem cells (NCSCs) behave high multiply of growth on collagen scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhancement of NCSCs neurite outgrowth on porous collagen scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3-D collagen culture of NCSCs shows an advance differentiation than 2-D culture. -- Abstract: Collagen is one component of the extracellular matrix that has been widely used for constructive remodeling to facilitate cell growth and differentiation. The 3-D distribution and growth of cells within the porous scaffold suggest a clinical significance for nerve tissue engineering. In the current study, we investigated proliferation and differentiation of neuron cancer stem cells (NCSCs) on a 3-D porous collagen scaffold that mimics the natural extracellular matrix. We first generated green fluorescence protein (GFP) expressing NCSCs using a lentiviral system to instantly monitor the transitions of morphological changes during growth on the 3-D scaffold. We found that proliferation of GFP-NCSCs increased, and a single cell mass rapidly grew with unrestricted expansion between days 3 and 9 in culture. Moreover, immunostaining with neuronal nuclei (NeuN) revealed that NCSCs grown on the 3-D collagen scaffold significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth. Our findings confirmed that the 80 {mu}m porous collagen scaffold could enhance attachment, viability and differentiation of the cancer neural stem cells. This result could provide a new application for nerve tissue engineering and nerve regeneration.

  6. Modeling Extracellular Matrix Reorganization in 3D Environments

    PubMed Central

    Harjanto, Dewi; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling is a key physiological process that occurs in a number of contexts, including cell migration, and is especially important for cellular form and function in three-dimensional (3D) matrices. However, there have been few attempts to computationally model how cells modify their environment in a manner that accounts for both cellular properties and the architecture of the surrounding ECM. To this end, we have developed and validated a novel model to simulate matrix remodeling that explicitly defines cells in a 3D collagenous matrix. In our simulation, cells can degrade, deposit, or pull on local fibers, depending on the fiber density around each cell. The cells can also move within the 3D matrix. Different cell phenotypes can be modeled by varying key cellular parameters. Using the model we have studied how two model cancer cell lines, of differing invasiveness, modify matrices with varying fiber density in their vicinity by tracking the metric of fraction of matrix occupied by fibers. Our results quantitatively demonstrate that in low density environments, cells deposit more collagen to uniformly increase fibril fraction. On the other hand, in higher density environments, the less invasive model cell line reduced the fibril fraction as compared to the highly invasive phenotype. These results show good qualitative and quantitative agreement with existing experimental literature. Our simulation is therefore able to function as a novel platform to provide new insights into the clinically relevant and physiologically critical process of matrix remodeling by helping identify critical parameters that dictate cellular behavior in complex native-like environments. PMID:23341900

  7. Multiphoton crosslinking for biocompatible 3D printing of type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Bell, Alex; Kofron, Matthew; Nistor, Vasile

    2015-09-03

    Multiphoton fabrication is a powerful technique for three-dimensional (3D) printing of structures at the microscale. Many polymers and proteins have been successfully structured and patterned using this method. Type I collagen comprises a large part of the extracellular matrix for most tissue types and is a widely used cellular scaffold material for tissue engineering. Current methods for creating collagen tissue scaffolds do not allow control of local geometry on a cellular scale. This means the environment experienced by cells may be made up of the native material but unrelated to native cellular-scale structure. In this study, we present a novel method to allow multiphoton crosslinking of type I collagen with flavin mononucleotide photosensitizer. The method detailed allows full 3D printing of crosslinked structures made from unmodified type I collagen and uses only demonstrated biocompatible materials. Resolution of 1 μm for both standing lines and high-aspect ratio gaps between structures is demonstrated and complex 3D structures are fabricated. This study demonstrates a means for 3D printing with one of the most widely used tissue scaffold materials. High-resolution, 3D control of the fabrication of collagen scaffolds will facilitate higher fidelity recreation of the native extracellular environment for engineered tissues.

  8. Heterogeneous force network in 3D cellularized collagen networks.

    PubMed

    Liang, Long; Jones, Christopher; Chen, Shaohua; Sun, Bo; Jiao, Yang

    2016-10-25

    Collagen networks play an important role in coordinating and regulating collective cellular dynamics via a number of signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the transmission of forces generated by contractile cells in 3D collagen-I networks. Specifically, the graph (bond-node) representations of collagen networks with collagen concentrations of 1, 2 and 4 mg ml(-1) are derived from confocal microscopy data and used to model the network microstructure. Cell contraction is modeled by applying correlated displacements at specific nodes of the network, representing the focal adhesion sites. A nonlinear elastic model is employed to characterize the mechanical behavior of individual fiber bundles including strain hardening during stretching and buckling under compression. A force-based relaxation method is employed to obtain equilibrium network configurations under cell contraction. We find that for all collagen concentrations, the majority of the forces are carried by a small number of heterogeneous force chains emitted from the contracting cells, which is qualitatively consistent with our experimental observations. The force chains consist of fiber segments that either possess a high degree of alignment before cell contraction or are aligned due to fiber reorientation induced by cell contraction. The decay of the forces along the force chains is significantly slower than the decay of radially averaged forces in the system, suggesting that the fibreous nature of biopolymer network structure can support long-range force transmission. The force chains emerge even at very small cell contractions, and the number of force chains increases with increasing cell contraction. At large cell contractions, the fibers close to the cell surface are in the nonlinear regime, and the nonlinear region is localized in a small neighborhood of the cell. In addition, the number of force chains increases with increasing collagen concentration, due to the larger number of focal adhesion sites

  9. Heterogeneous force network in 3D cellularized collagen networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Long; Jones, Christopher; Chen, Shaohua; Sun, Bo; Jiao, Yang

    2016-12-01

    Collagen networks play an important role in coordinating and regulating collective cellular dynamics via a number of signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the transmission of forces generated by contractile cells in 3D collagen-I networks. Specifically, the graph (bond-node) representations of collagen networks with collagen concentrations of 1, 2 and 4 mg ml-1 are derived from confocal microscopy data and used to model the network microstructure. Cell contraction is modeled by applying correlated displacements at specific nodes of the network, representing the focal adhesion sites. A nonlinear elastic model is employed to characterize the mechanical behavior of individual fiber bundles including strain hardening during stretching and buckling under compression. A force-based relaxation method is employed to obtain equilibrium network configurations under cell contraction. We find that for all collagen concentrations, the majority of the forces are carried by a small number of heterogeneous force chains emitted from the contracting cells, which is qualitatively consistent with our experimental observations. The force chains consist of fiber segments that either possess a high degree of alignment before cell contraction or are aligned due to fiber reorientation induced by cell contraction. The decay of the forces along the force chains is significantly slower than the decay of radially averaged forces in the system, suggesting that the fibreous nature of biopolymer network structure can support long-range force transmission. The force chains emerge even at very small cell contractions, and the number of force chains increases with increasing cell contraction. At large cell contractions, the fibers close to the cell surface are in the nonlinear regime, and the nonlinear region is localized in a small neighborhood of the cell. In addition, the number of force chains increases with increasing collagen concentration, due to the larger number of focal adhesion sites

  10. Vinculin Regulates Directionality and Cell Polarity in 2D, 3D Matrix and 3D Microtrack Migration.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Aniqua; Carey, Shawn P; Kraning-Rush, Casey M; Goldblatt, Zachary E; Bordeleau, Francois; Lampi, Marsha C; Lin, Deanna Y; García, Andrés J; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2016-03-09

    During metastasis, cells can use proteolytic activity to form tube-like "microtracks" within the extracellular matrix (ECM). Using these microtracks, cells can migrate unimpeded through the stroma. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of microtrack migration, we developed an in vitro 3D micromolded collagen platform. When in microtracks, cells tend to migrate unidirectionally. Since focal adhesions are the primary mechanism by which cells interact with the ECM, we examined the roles of several focal adhesion molecules in driving unidirectional motion. Vinculin knockdown results in the repeated reversal of migration direction compared with control cells. Tracking the position of the Golgi centroid relative to the position of the nucleus centroid reveals that vinculin knockdown disrupts cell polarity in microtracks. Vinculin also directs migration on 2D substrates and in 3D uniform collagen matrices, indicated by reduced speed, shorter net displacement and decreased directionality in vinculin-deficient cells. In addition, vinculin is necessary for Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) activation in 3D as vinculin knockdown results in reduced FAK activation in both 3D uniform collagen matrices and microtracks, but not on 2D substrates, and accordingly, FAK inhibition halts cell migration in 3D microtracks. Together, these data indicate that vinculin plays a key role in polarization during migration.

  11. 3D in vitro bioengineered tumors based on collagen I hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Szot, Christopher S.; Buchanan, Cara F.; Freeman, Joseph W.; Rylander, Marissa N.

    2011-01-01

    Cells cultured within a three-dimensional (3D) in vitro environment have the ability to acquire phenotypes and respond to stimuli analogous to in vivo biological systems. This approach has been utilized in tissue engineering and can also be applied to the development of a physiologically relevant in vitro tumor model. In this study, collagen I hydrogels cultured with MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells were bioengineered as a platform for in vitro solid tumor development. The cell–cell and cell-matrix interactions present during in vivo tissue progression were encouraged within the 3D hydrogel architecture, and the biocompatibility of collagen I supported unconfined cellular proliferation. The development of necrosis beyond a depth of ~150–200 μm and the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α were demonstrated in the in vitro bioengineered tumors. Oxygen and nutrient diffusion limitations through the collagen I matrix as well as competition for available nutrients resulted in growing levels of intra-cellular hypoxia, quantified by a statistically significant (p < 0.01) upregulation of HIF-1α gene expression. The bioengineered tumors also demonstrated promising angiogenic potential with a statistically significant (p < 0.001) upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A gene expression. In addition, comparable gene expression analysis demonstrated a statistically significant increase of HIF-1α (p < 0.05) and VEGF-A (p < 0.001) by MDA-MB-231 cells cultured in the 3D collagen I hydrogels compared to cells cultured in a monolayer on two-dimensional tissue culture polystyrene. The results presented in this study demonstrate the capacity of collagen I hydrogels to facilitate the development of 3D in vitro bioengineered tumors that are representative of the pre-vascularized stages of in vivo solid tumor progression. PMID:21782234

  12. Structure of collagen-glycosaminoglycan matrix and the influence to its integrity and stability.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yuying; Patra, Prabir; Faezipour, Miad

    2014-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) is a chain-like disaccharide that is linked to polypeptide core to connect two collagen fibrils/fibers and provide the intermolecular force in Collagen-GAG matrix (C-G matrix). Thus, the distribution of GAG in C-G matrix contributes to the integrity and mechanical properties of the matrix and related tissue. This paper analyzes the transverse isotropic distribution of GAG in C-G matrix. The angle of GAGs related to collagen fibrils is used as parameters to qualify the GAGs isotropic characteristic in both 3D and 2D rendering. Statistical results included that over one third of GAGs were perpendicular directed to collagen fibril with symmetrical distribution for both 3D matrix and 2D plane cross through collagen fibrils. The three factors tested in this paper: collagen radius, collagen distribution, and GAGs density, were not statistically significant for the strength of Collagen-GAG matrix in 3D rendering. However in 2D rendering, a significant factor found was the radius of collagen in matrix for the GAGs directed to orthogonal plane of Collagen-GAG matrix. Between two cross-section selected from Collagen-GAG matrix model, the plane cross through collagen fibrils was symmetrically distributed but the total percentage of perpendicular directed GAG was deducted by decreasing collagen radius. There were some symmetry features of GAGs angle distribution in selected 2D plane that passed through space between collagen fibrils, but most models showed multiple peaks in GAGs angle distribution. With less GAGs directed to perpendicular of collagen fibril, strength in collagen cross-section weakened. Collagen distribution was also a factor that influences GAGs angle distribution in 2D rendering. True hexagonal collagen packaging is reported in this paper to have less strength at collagen cross-section compared to quasi-hexagonal collagen arrangement. In this work focus is on GAGs matrix within the collagen and its relevance to anisotropy.

  13. A novel ultrathin collagen nanolayer assembly for 3-D microtissue engineering: Layer-by-layer collagen deposition for long-term stable microfluidic hepatocyte culture.

    PubMed

    McCarty, William J; Usta, O Berk; Luitje, Martha; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Bhushan, Abhinav; Hegde, Manjunath; Golberg, Inna; Jindal, Rohit; Yarmush, Martin L

    2014-03-01

    The creation of stable hepatocyte cultures using cell-matrix interactions has proven difficult in microdevices due to dimensional constraints limiting the utility of classic tissue culture techniques that involve the use of hydrogels such as the collagen "double gel" or "overlay". To translate the collagen overlay technique into microdevices, we modified collagen using succinylation and methylation reactions to create polyanionic and polycationic collagen solutions, and deposited them layer-by-layer to create ultrathin collagen nanolayers on hepatocytes. These ultrathin collagen layers covered hepatocytes in microdevices and 1) maintained cell morphology, viability, and polarity, 2) induced bile canalicular formation and actin reorganization, and 3) maintained albumin and urea secretions and CYP activity similar to those observed in hepatocytes in collagen double gel hepatocytes in plate cultures. Beyond the immediate applications of this technique to create stable, in vitro microfluidic hepatocyte cultures for drug toxicity testing, this technique is generally applicable as a thin biomaterial for other 3D microtissues.

  14. Development of bioartificial myocardium by electrostimulation of 3D collagen scaffolds seeded with stem cells.

    PubMed

    Haneef, Kanwal; Lila, Nermine; Benadda, Samira; Legrand, Fabien; Carpentier, Alain; Chachques, Juan C

    2012-06-05

    Electrostimulation (ES) can be defined as a safe physical method to induce stem cell differentiation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of ES on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) seeded in collagen scaffolds in terms of proliferation and differentiation into cardiomyocytes. BMSCs were isolated from Wistar rats and seeded into 3D collagen type 1 templates measuring 25 × 25 × 6 mm. Bipolar in vitro ES was performed during 21 days. Electrical impedance and cell proliferation were measured. Expression of cardiac markers was assessed by immunocytochemistry. Viscoelasticity of collagen matrix was evaluated. Electrical impedance assessments showed a low resistance of 234±41 Ohms which indicates good electrical conductivity of collagen matrix. Cell proliferation at 570 nm as significantly increased in ES groups after seven day (ES 0.129±0.03 vs non-stimulated control matrix 0.06±0.01, P=0.002) and after 21 days, (ES 0.22±0.04 vs control 0.13±0.01, P=0.01). Immunocytoche mistry of BMSCs after 21 days ES showed positive staining of cardiac markers, troponin I, connexin 43, sarcomeric alpha-actinin, slow myosin, fast myosin and desmin. Staining for BMSCs marker CD29 after 21 days was negative. Electrostimulation of cell-seeded collagen matrix changed stem cell morphology and biochemical characteristics, increasing the expression of cardiac markers. Thus, MSC-derived differentiated cells by electrostimulation grafted in biological scaffolds might result in a convenient tissue engineering source for myocardial diseases.

  15. In the beginning there were soft collagen-cell gels: towards better 3D connective tissue models?

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert A

    2013-10-01

    In the 40 years since Elsdale and Bard's analysis of fibroblast culture in collagen gels we have moved far beyond the concept that such 3D fibril network systems are better models than monolayer cultures. This review analyses key aspects of that progression of models, against a background of what exactly each model system tries to mimic. This story tracks our increasing understanding of fibroblast responses to soft collagen gels, in particularly their cytoskeletal contraction, migration and integrin attachment. The focus on fibroblast mechano-function has generated models designed to directly measure the overall force generated by fibroblast populations, their reaction to external loads and the role of the matrix structure. Key steps along this evolution of 3D collagen models have been designed to mimic normal skin, wound repair, tissue morphogenesis and remodelling, growth and contracture during scarring/fibrosis. As new models are developed to understand cell-mechanical function in connective tissues the collagen material has become progressively more important, now being engineered to mimic more complex aspects of native extracellular matrix structure. These have included collagen fibril density, alignment and hierarchical structure, controlling material stiffness and anisotropy. But of these, tissue-like collagen density is key in that it contributes to control of the others. It is concluded that across this 40 year window major progress has been made towards establishing a family of 3D experimental collagen tissue-models, suitable to investigate normal and pathological fibroblast mechano-functions.

  16. Engineering multi-layered skeletal muscle tissue by using 3D microgrooved collagen scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shangwu; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2015-12-01

    Preparation of three-dimensional (3D) micropatterned porous scaffolds remains a great challenge for engineering of highly organized tissues such as skeletal muscle tissue and cardiac tissue. Two-dimensional (2D) micropatterned surfaces with periodic features (several nanometers to less than 100 μm) are commonly used to guide the alignment of muscle myoblasts and myotubes and lead to formation of pre-patterned cell sheets. However, cell sheets from 2D patterned surfaces have limited thickness, and harvesting the cell sheets for implantation is inconvenient and can lead to less alignment of myotubes. 3D micropatterned scaffolds can promote cell alignment and muscle tissue formation. In this study, we developed a novel type of 3D porous collagen scaffolds with concave microgrooves that mimic muscle basement membrane to engineer skeletal muscle tissue. Highly aligned and multi-layered muscle bundle tissues were engineered by controlling the size of microgrooves and cell seeding concentration. Myoblasts in the engineered muscle tissue were well-aligned and had high expression of myosin heavy chain and synthesis of muscle extracellular matrix. The microgrooved collagen scaffolds could be used to engineer organized multi-layered muscle tissue for implantation to repair/restore the function of diseased tissues or be used to investigate the cell-cell interaction in 3D microscale topography.

  17. Individual versus collective fibroblast spreading and migration: regulation by matrix composition in 3D culture.

    PubMed

    Miron-Mendoza, Miguel; Lin, Xihui; Ma, Lisha; Ririe, Peter; Petroll, W Matthew

    2012-06-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) supplies both physical and chemical signals to cells and provides a substrate through which fibroblasts migrate during wound repair. To directly assess how ECM composition regulates this process, we used a nested 3D matrix model in which cell-populated collagen buttons were embedded in cell-free collagen or fibrin matrices. Time-lapse microscopy was used to record the dynamic pattern of cell migration into the outer matrices, and 3D confocal imaging was used to assess cell connectivity and cytoskeletal organization. Corneal fibroblasts stimulated with PDGF migrated more rapidly into collagen as compared to fibrin. In addition, the pattern of fibroblast migration into fibrin and collagen ECMs was strikingly different. Corneal fibroblasts migrating into collagen matrices developed dendritic processes and moved independently, whereas cells migrating into fibrin matrices had a more fusiform morphology and formed an interconnected meshwork. A similar pattern was observed when using dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that this response is not unique to corneal cells. We next cultured corneal fibroblasts within and on top of standard collagen and fibrin matrices to assess the impact of ECM composition on the cell spreading response. Similar differences in cell morphology and connectivity were observed – cells remained separated on collagen but coalesced into clusters on fibrin. Cadherin was localized to junctions between interconnected cells, whereas fibronectin was present both between cells and at the tips of extending cell processes. Cells on fibrin matrices also developed more prominent stress fibers than those on collagen matrices. Importantly, these spreading and migration patterns were consistently observed on both rigid and compliant substrates, thus differences in ECM mechanical stiffness were not the underlying cause. Overall, these results demonstrate for the first time that ECM protein composition alone (collagen vs. fibrin) can induce

  18. Local 3D matrix confinement determines division axis through cell shape.

    PubMed

    He, Lijuan; Chen, Weitong; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Jimenez, Angela; Wong, Bin Sheng; San, Angela; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Wirtz, Denis

    2016-02-09

    How the division axis is determined in mammalian cells embedded in three-dimensional (3D) matrices remains elusive, despite that many types of cells divide in 3D environments. Cells on two-dimensional (2D) substrates typically round up completely to divide. Here, we show that in 3D collagen matrices, mammalian cells such as HT1080 human fibrosarcoma and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exhibit division modes distinct from their Counterparts on 2D substrates, with a markedly higher fraction of cells remaining highly elongated through mitosis in 3D matrices. The long axis of elongated mitotic cells accurately predicts the division axis, independently of matrix density and cell-matrix interactions. This 3D-specific elongated division mode is determined by the local confinement produced by the matrix and the ability of cells to protrude and locally remodel the matrix via β1 integrin. Elongated division is readily recapitulated using collagen-coated microfabricated channels. Cells depleted of β1 integrin still divide in the elongated mode in microchannels, suggesting that 3D confinement is sufficient to induce the elongated cell-division phenotype.

  19. An in vitro 3D model using collagen coated gelatin nanofibers for studying breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Janani, G; Pillai, Mamatha M; Selvakumar, R; Bhattacharyya, Amitava; Sabarinath, C

    2017-02-07

    The study of breast cancer metastasis is limited due to poor knowledge of molecular progression of breast tumor and varied heterogeneity. For a better understanding of tumor metastasis, a reliable 3D in vitro model bridging the gap between 2D cultures and in vivo animal model studies is essential. Our study is focused on two key points: (i) designing a 3D microenvironment for studying metastasis and (ii) simulating the metastasis milieu by inducing epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET). An electrospun gelatin nanofiber matrix (EGNF) was fabricated using electrospinning and further dip coated with different concentrations of collagen to obtain surface complexity and mechanical properties, similar to connective tissues. Nanofiber matrices were physically characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The FTIR, AFM, and FESEM results indicated the crosslinking and confirmed the presence of pores in the nanofiber matrices. Comparative studies on biocompatibility, cell attachment, and the proliferation of MCF-7 cells on EGNF and collagen coated gelatin nanofibrous matrix (CCGM) revealed higher cellular attachment and proliferation in CCGM. CCGM with human metastatic breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) was taken to study breast cancer metastasis using estrogen (induces EMT) and progesterone (induces MET) hormones for 24 h. Quantitative real-time PCR was used for quantifying the expression of metastasis related genes, and fluorescence microscopy for verifying the invasion of cells to the matrices. The expression of E-cadherin and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP 2) confirmed the occurrence of EMT and MET. Live cell imaging and cellular attachment showed significant increase of cellular invasion in crosslinked 0.15% CCGM that serves as a suitable non-toxic, biocompatible, and affordable scaffold for studying breast cancer

  20. Role of dynamin in elongated cell migration in a 3D matrix.

    PubMed

    Lees, Justin G; Gorgani, Nick N; Ammit, Alaina J; McCluskey, Adam; Robinson, Phillip J; O'Neill, Geraldine M

    2015-03-01

    The use of 3-dimensional (3D) collagen gels has yielded new insights into the migratory behaviour of cancer cells. While the large GTPase dynamin has emerged as an important regulator of cancer cell migration and invasion under 2D conditions, its role in 3D migration is unclear. We have used a potent dynamin modulator, a bis-tyrphostin derivative, Ryngo® 1-23, to investigate the role of dynamin in 3D migration in 3 different cell lines. The compound specifically inhibits persistent, elongated 3D migration in U87MG and SMA-560 cells. Treated U87MG cells adopt a rounded morphology that is not due to apoptosis, loss of matrix metalloprotease activity or inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Given that Ryngo 1-23 is known to regulate dynamin oligomerisation and actin dynamics at the leading edge, we analysed actin filament distribution. Ryngo 1-23 induced a switch in actin filament organization in 3D cultures resulting in the generation of multiple short actin-rich microspikes. Correlated with the change in actin filament distribution, cells displayed reduced collagen gel contraction. Since acto-myosin force transmission to the extra-cellular matrix underpins persistent, elongated migration, our results suggest that Ryngo 1-23 modulates this process in 3D migration via dynamin-mediated regulation of acto-myosin force transmission to the extra-cellular matrix.

  1. Microfabricated electrospun collagen membranes for 3-D cancer models and drug screening applications

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Olga; Zhang, Chu; Adams, Elizabeth L.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Petrelli, Nicholas J.; Chase, Bruce D.; Rabolt, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Invasive epithelial tumors form from cells that are released from their natural basement membrane and form 3-D structures that interact with each other and with the microenvironment of the stromal tissues around the tumor, which often contains collagen. Cancer cells, growing as monolayers on tissue culture plastic, do not reflect many of the properties of whole tumors. This shortcoming limits their ability to serve as models for testing of pharmacologically active compounds, including those that are being tested as anti-neoplastics. This work seeks to create new 3-D cellular materials possessing properties similar to those in native tissues surrounding cancers, specifically electrospun micro- and nanofibrous collagen scaffolds that support tumor growth in 3-D. We hypothesize that a 3-D culture system will provide a better replica of tumor growth in a native environment, and thus better report the bioactivity of anti-neoplastic agents. In addition, we optimized conditions, and identified physical characteristics that support growth of the highly invasive, prostate cancer bone metastatic cell line C4-2B on these matrices for use in anti-cancer drug studies. The effects of matrix porosity, fiber diameter, elasticity and surface roughness on growth of cancer cells were evaluated. Data indicates that while cells attach and grow well on both nano- and microfibrous electrospun membranes, the microfibrous membrane represented a better approximation of the tumor microenvironemt. It was also observed that C4-2B non-adherent cells migrated through the depth of two electrospun membranes and formed colonies resembling tumors on day 3. An apoptosis study revealed that cells on electrospun substrates were more resistant to both anti-neoplastic agents, docetaxel (DOC) and camptothecin (CAM), compared to the cells grown on standard collagen-coated tissue culture polystyrene (TCP). Growth, survival, and apoptosis were measured, as well as the differences in the apoptotic

  2. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils. PMID:26548801

  3. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Andrew D; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2015-11-09

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  4. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-11-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  5. The enhancement of cancer stem cell properties of MCF-7 cells in 3D collagen scaffolds for modeling of cancer and anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Xiao, Zhifeng; Meng, Yue; Zhao, Yannan; Han, Jin; Su, Guannan; Chen, Bing; Dai, Jianwu

    2012-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture could partially simulate in vivo conditions. In this work, we developed a 3D collagen scaffold to investigate cellular properties of MCF-7 cells. The porous scaffolds not only induced the diversification of cell morphologies but also extended cell proliferation. The expression of pro-angiogenic growth factors and the transcriptions of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were significantly increased in cells cultured in 3D collagen scaffolds. In addition, 3D collagen scaffolds could generate a cell population with the properties of cancer stem cells (CSCs). The upregulation of EMT markers and the downregulation of the epithelial cell marker were observed in cells cultured in collagen scaffolds. The expression of stem cell markers, including OCT4A and SOX2, and breast cancer stem cell signatures, including SOX4, JAG1 and CD49F, was significantly unregulated in 3D collagen scaffolds. The proportion of cells with CSC-like CD44(+)/CD24(-/low) phenotype was notably increased. High-level expression of CSC-associated properties of MCF-7 cells cultured in 3D was further confirmed by high tumorigenicity in vivo. Moreover, xenografts with 3D cells formed larger tumors. The properties of MCF-7 cells in 3D may have partially simulated their in vivo behaviors. Thus, 3D collagen scaffolds might provide a useful platform for anti-cancer therapeutics and CSC research.

  6. Flexible Fabrication of Shape-Controlled Collagen Building Blocks for Self-Assembly of 3D Microtissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Meng, Zhaoxu; Ma, Jingyun; Shi, Yang; Xu, Hui; Lykkemark, Simon; Qin, Jianhua

    2015-08-12

    Creating artificial tissue-like structures that possess the functionality, specificity, and architecture of native tissues remains a big challenge. A new and straightforward strategy for generating shape-controlled collagen building blocks with a well-defined architecture is presented, which can be used for self-assembly of complex 3D microtissues. Collagen blocks with tunable geometries are controllably produced and released via a membrane-templated microdevice. The formation of functional microtissues by embedding tissue-specific cells into collagen blocks with expression of specific proteins is described. The spontaneous self-assembly of cell-laden collagen blocks into organized tissue constructs with predetermined configurations is demonstrated, which are largely driven by the synergistic effects of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. This new strategy would open up new avenues for the study of tissue/organ morphogenesis, and tissue engineering applications.

  7. Collagen esterification enhances the function and survival of pancreatic β cells in 2D and 3D culture systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Jae Hyung; Kim, Yang Hee; Jeong, Seong Hee; Lee, Song; Park, Si-Nae; Shim, In Kyong; Kim, Song Cheol

    2015-08-07

    Collagen, one of the most important components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), may play a role in the survival of pancreatic islet cells. In addition, chemical modifications that change the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification have been shown to increase the adhesion and proliferation of various cell types. The purpose of this study was to characterize and compare the effects of native collagen (NC) and esterified collagen (EC) on β cell function and survival. After isolation by the collagenase digestion technique, rat islets were cultured with NC and EC in 2 dimensional (2D) and 3 dimensional (3D) environments for a long-term duration in vitro. The cells were assessed for islet adhesion, morphology, viability, glucose-induced insulin secretion, and mRNA expression of glucose metabolism-related genes, and visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Islet cells attached tightly in the NC group, but islet cell viability was similar in both the NC and EC groups. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was higher in the EC group than in the NC group in both 2D and 3D culture. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of glucokinase in the EC group were higher than those in the NC group and were associated with glucose metabolism and insulin secretion. Finally, SEM observation confirmed that islets had more intact component cells on EC sponges than on NC sponges. These results indicate that modification of collagen may offer opportunities to improve function and viability of islet cells. - Highlights: • We changed the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen improved survival in both 2D and 3D culture. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin release. • High levels of glucokinase mRNA may be associated with increased insulin release.

  8. Quantitative analysis of 3D extracellular matrix remodelling by pancreatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Benjamin K.; Cortes, Ernesto; Rice, Alistair J.; Sarper, Muge

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling is integral to numerous physiological and pathological processes in biology, such as embryogenesis, wound healing, fibrosis and cancer. Until recently, most cellular studies have been conducted on 2D environments where mechanical cues significantly differ from physiologically relevant 3D environments, impacting cellular behaviour and masking the interpretation of cellular function in health and disease. We present an integrated methodology where cell-ECM interactions can be investigated in 3D environments via ECM remodelling. Monitoring and quantification of collagen-I structure in remodelled matrices, through designated algorithms, show that 3D matrices can be used to correlate remodelling with increased ECM stiffness observed in fibrosis. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are the key effectors of the stromal fibrosis associated to pancreatic cancer. We use PSCs to implement our methodology and demonstrate that PSC matrix remodelling capabilities depend on their contractile machinery and β1 integrin-mediated cell-ECM attachment. PMID:27170254

  9. Comparative mechanisms of cancer cell migration through 3D matrix and physiological microtracks.

    PubMed

    Carey, Shawn P; Rahman, Aniqua; Kraning-Rush, Casey M; Romero, Bethsabe; Somasegar, Sahana; Torre, Olivia M; Williams, Rebecca M; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2015-03-15

    Tumor cell invasion through the stromal extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key feature of cancer metastasis, and understanding the cellular mechanisms of invasive migration is critical to the development of effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Since cancer cell migration is highly adaptable to physiochemical properties of the ECM, it is critical to define these migration mechanisms in a context-specific manner. Although extensive work has characterized cancer cell migration in two- and three-dimensional (3D) matrix environments, the migration program employed by cells to move through native and cell-derived microtracks within the stromal ECM remains unclear. We previously reported the development of an in vitro model of patterned type I collagen microtracks that enable matrix metalloproteinase-independent microtrack migration. Here we show that collagen microtracks closely resemble channel-like gaps in native mammary stroma ECM and examine the extracellular and intracellular mechanisms underlying microtrack migration. Cell-matrix mechanocoupling, while critical for migration through 3D matrix, is not necessary for microtrack migration. Instead, cytoskeletal dynamics, including actin polymerization, cortical tension, and microtubule turnover, enable persistent, polarized migration through physiological microtracks. These results indicate that tumor cells employ context-specific mechanisms to migrate and suggest that selective targeting of cytoskeletal dynamics, but not adhesion, proteolysis, or cell traction forces, may effectively inhibit cancer cell migration through preformed matrix microtracks within the tumor stroma.

  10. A novel ultrathin collagen nanolayer assembly for 3-D microtissue engineering: Layer-by-layer collagen deposition for long-term stable microfluidic hepatocyte culture

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, William J.; Usta, O. Berk; Luitje, Martha; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Bhushan, Abhinav; Hegde, Manjunath; Golberg, Inna; Jindal, Rohit; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2014-01-01

    The creation of stable hepatocyte cultures using cell-matrix interactions has proven difficult in microdevices due to dimensional constraints limiting the utility of classic tissue culture techniques that involve the use of hydrogels such as the collagen “double gel” or “overlay”. To translate the collagen overlay technique into microdevices, we modified collagen using succinylation and methylation reactions to create polyanionic and polycationic collagen solutions, and deposited them layer-by-layer to create ultrathin collagen nanolayers on hepatocytes. These ultrathin collagen layers covered hepatocytes in microdevices and 1) maintained cell morphology, viability, and polarity, 2) induced bile canalicular formation and actin reorganization, and 3) maintained albumin and urea secretions and CYP activity similar to those observed in hepatocytes in collagen double gel hepatocytes in plate cultures. Beyond the immediate applications of this technique to create stable, in vitro microfluidic hepatocyte cultures for drug toxicity testing, this technique is generally applicable as a thin biomaterial for other 3D microtissues. PMID:24932459

  11. Matrix metalloproteinase interactions with collagen and elastin

    PubMed Central

    Van Doren, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Most abundant in the extracellular matrix are collagens, joined by elastin that confers elastic recoil to the lung, aorta, and skin. These fibrils are highly resistant to proteolysis but can succumb to a minority of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Considerable inroads to understanding how such MMPs move to the susceptible sites in collagen and then unwind the triple helix of collagen monomers have been gained. The essential role in unwinding of the hemopexin-like domain of interstitial collagenases or the collagen binding domain of gelatinases is highlighted. Elastolysis is also facilitated by the collagen binding domain in the cases of MMP-2 and MMP-9, and remote exosites of the catalytic domain in the case of MMP-12. PMID:25599938

  12. Screening for Stromal and Matrix Effects in 3D Microenvironments of Breast Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanez-Sauri, Sara I.

    Breast cancer progression ensures through the acquisition of genetic mutations, the uncontrollable growth of cells, and their progression to invasion. Studies have shown that the surrounding three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment can also influence breast cancer cell progression by controlling the morphology, differentiation, proliferation, and migration of cells. However, most of the currently available in vitro screening platforms are based on the two-dimensional (2D) culture of cells, and do not provide cells with the complex 3D microenvironment that exists in vivo. Therefore, there is a need for more biologically relevant in vitro platforms to help decipher the complexity of the microenvironment and its influence in breast cancer. In this dissertation we present an automated microfluidic platform that allows to efficiently screen for the effect of multiple matrix and stromal microenvironment in 3D cultures of breast cancer cells. Several extracellular matrix (ECM) compositions and stromal cells are included in the 3D microenvironments to examine their influence on breast cancer cell behavior. The screening results suggest that collagen gels with fibronectin might be influencing paracrine signals between breast cancer cells and stromal cells. The ability of the platform to culture and treat cells in 3D microenvironments offers a powerful screening tool for the identification of compounds and interactions using more in vivo-like 3D microenvironments. The identification of these mechanisms will increase our current understanding of breast cancer, and will aid in the identification of potential therapeutics.

  13. Strategies for Directing the Structure and Function of 3D Collagen Biomaterials across Length Scales

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Brandan D.; Stegemann, Jan P.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen type I is a widely used natural biomaterial that has found utility in a variety of biological and medical applications. Its well characterized structure and role as an extracellular matrix protein make it a highly relevant material for controlling cell function and mimicking tissue properties. Collagen type I is abundant in a number of tissues, and can be isolated as a purified protein. This review focuses on hydrogel biomaterials made by reconstituting collagen type I from a solubilized form, with an emphasis on in vitro studies in which collagen structure can be controlled. The hierarchical structure of collagen from the nanoscale to the macroscale is described, with an emphasis on how structure is related to function across scales. Methods of reconstituting collagen into hydrogel materials are presented, including molding of macroscopic constructs, creation of microscale modules, and electrospinning of nanoscale fibers. The modification of collagen biomaterials to achieve desired structures and functions is also addressed, with particular emphasis on mechanical control of collagen structure, creation of collagen composite materials, and crosslinking of collagenous matrices. Biomaterials scientists have made remarkable progress in rationally designing collagen-based biomaterials and in applying them to both the study of biology and for therapeutic benefit. This broad review illustrates recent examples of techniques used to control collagen structure, and to thereby direct its biological and mechanical functions. PMID:24012608

  14. Synthesis of highly interconnected 3D scaffold from Arothron stellatus skin collagen for tissue engineering application.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Giriprasath; Singaravelu, Sivakumar; Raja, M D; Sivagnanam, Uma Tiruchirapalli

    2015-11-01

    The substrate which is avidly used for tissue engineering applications should have good mechanical and biocompatible properties, and all these parameters are often considered as essential for dermal reformation. Highly interconnected three dimensional (3D) wound dressing material with enhanced structural integrity was synthesized from Arothron stellatus fish skin (AsFS) collagen for tissue engineering applications. The synthesized 3D collagen sponge (COL-SPG) was further characterized by different physicochemical methods. The scanning electron microscopy analysis of the material demonstrated that well interconnected pores with homogeneous microstructure on the surface aids higher swelling index and that the material also possessed good mechanical properties with a Young's modulus of 0.89±0.2 MPa. Biocompatibility of the 3D COL-SPG showed 92% growth for both NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Overall, the study revealed that synthesized 3D COL-SPG from fish skin will act as a promising wound dressing in skin tissue engineering.

  15. 3D printing of composite calcium phosphate and collagen scaffolds for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Inzana, Jason A; Olvera, Diana; Fuller, Seth M; Kelly, James P; Graeve, Olivia A; Schwarz, Edward M; Kates, Stephen L; Awad, Hani A

    2014-04-01

    Low temperature 3D printing of calcium phosphate scaffolds holds great promise for fabricating synthetic bone graft substitutes with enhanced performance over traditional techniques. Many design parameters, such as the binder solution properties, have yet to be optimized to ensure maximal biocompatibility and osteoconductivity with sufficient mechanical properties. This study tailored the phosphoric acid-based binder solution concentration to 8.75 wt% to maximize cytocompatibility and mechanical strength, with a supplementation of Tween 80 to improve printing. To further enhance the formulation, collagen was dissolved into the binder solution to fabricate collagen-calcium phosphate composites. Reducing the viscosity and surface tension through a physiologic heat treatment and Tween 80, respectively, enabled reliable thermal inkjet printing of the collagen solutions. Supplementing the binder solution with 1-2 wt% collagen significantly improved maximum flexural strength and cell viability. To assess the bone healing performance, we implanted 3D printed scaffolds into a critically sized murine femoral defect for 9 weeks. The implants were confirmed to be osteoconductive, with new bone growth incorporating the degrading scaffold materials. In conclusion, this study demonstrates optimization of material parameters for 3D printed calcium phosphate scaffolds and enhancement of material properties by volumetric collagen incorporation via inkjet printing.

  16. 3D Printing of Composite Calcium Phosphate and Collagen Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Inzana, Jason A.; Olvera, Diana; Fuller, Seth M.; Kelly, James P.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Schwarz, Edward M.; Kates, Stephen L.; Awad, Hani A.

    2014-01-01

    Low temperature 3D printing of calcium phosphate scaffolds holds great promise for fabricating synthetic bone graft substitutes with enhanced performance over traditional techniques. Many design parameters, such as the binder solution properties, have yet to be optimized to ensure maximal biocompatibility and osteoconductivity with sufficient mechanical properties. This study tailored the phosphoric acid-based binder solution concentration to 8.75 wt% to maximize cytocompatibility and mechanical strength, with a supplementation of Tween 80 to improve printing. To further enhance the formulation, collagen was dissolved into the binder solution to fabricate collagen-calcium phosphate composites. Reducing the viscosity and surface tension through a physiologic heat treatment and Tween 80, respectively, enabled reliable thermal inkjet printing of the collagen solutions. Supplementing the binder solution with 1–2 wt% collagen significantly improved maximum flexural strength and cell viability. To assess the bone healing performance, we implanted 3D printed scaffolds into a critically sized murine femoral defect for 9 weeks. The implants were confirmed to be osteoconductive, with new bone growth incorporating the degrading scaffold materials. In conclusion, this study demonstrates optimization of material parameters for 3D printed calcium phosphate scaffolds and enhancement of material properties by volumetric collagen incorporation via inkjet printing. PMID:24529628

  17. Microfluidic assay of endothelial cell migration in 3D interpenetrating polymer semi-network HA-Collagen hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Gi Seok; Kwon, Gu Han; Kang, Ah Ran; Jung, Bo Young; Park, Yongdoo; Chung, Seok; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2011-08-01

    Cell migration through the extracellular matrix (ECM) is one of the key features for physiological and pathological processes such as angiogenesis, cancer metastasis, and wound healing. In particular, the quantitative assay of endothelial cell migration under the well-defined three dimensional (3D) microenvironment is important to analyze the angiogenesis mechanism. In this study, we report a microfluidic assay of endothelial cell sprouting and migration into an interpenetrating polymer semi-network HA-Collagen (SIPNs CH) hydrogel as ECM providing an enhanced in vivo mimicking 3D microenvironment to cells. The microfluidic chip could provide a well-controlled gradient of growth factor to cells, whereas the hydrogel could mimic a well-defined 3D microenvironment in vivo. (In addition/Furthermore, the microfluidic chip gives a well-controlled gradient of growth factor to cells) For this reason, three types of hydrogel, composed of semi-interpenetrating networks of collagen and hyaluronic acid were prepared, and firstly we proved the role of the hydrogel in endothelial cell migration. The diffusion property and swelling ratio of the hydrogel were characterized. It modulated the migration of endothelial cells in quantified manner, also being influenced by additional synthesis of Matrix metalloproteinase(MMP)-sensitive remodeling peptides and Arginine-glycine-lycinee (RGD) cell adhesion peptides. We successfully established a novel cell migration platform by changing major determinants such as ECM material under biochemical synthesis and under growth factor gradients in a microfluidic manner.

  18. Epidermal growth factor improves the migration and contractility of aged fibroblasts cultured on 3D collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daehwan; Kim, So Young; Mun, Seog Kyun; Rhee, Sangmyung; Kim, Beom Joon

    2015-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) plays a critical role in fibroblasts by stimulating the production of collagen and supports cell renewal through the interaction between keratinocytes and fibroblasts. It is well known that the contractile activity of fibroblasts is required for the remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which contributes to skin elasticity. However, the role of EGF in the contraction of aged fibroblasts under 3-dimensional (3D) culture conditions is not yet fully understood. In the present study, we demonstrated that young fibroblasts spread and proliferated more rapidly than aged fibroblasts under 2-dimensional (2D) culture conditions. Cell migration assay using a nested collagen matrix revealed that the migration of young fibroblasts was also greater than that of aged fibroblasts under 3D culture conditions. However, the addition of recombinant human EGF (rhEGF) resulted in the enhanced migration of aged fibroblasts; the migration rate was similar to that of the young fibroblasts. The aged fibroblasts showed decreased cluster formation compared with the young fibroblasts on the collagen matrix, which was improved by the addition of rhEGF. Furthermore, cell contraction assay revealed that the basal contractility of the aged fibroblasts was lower than that of the young fibroblasts; however, following treatment with rhEGF, the contractility was restored to levels similar or even higher to those of the young fibroblasts. Taken together, our results suggest that rhEGF is a potential renewal agent that acts to improve the migration and contraction of aged fibroblasts more efficiently than young fibroblasts under 3D culture conditions; thus, EGF may have valuable regenerative effects on aged skin.

  19. Effects of Matrix Alignment and Mechanical Constraints on Cellular Behavior in 3D Engineered Microtissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Prasenjit; Eyckmans, Jeroen; Chen, Christopher; Reich, Daniel

    The adhesion of cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a crucial role in a variety of cellular functions. The main building blocks of the ECM are 3D networks of fibrous proteins whose structure and alignments varies with tissue type. However, the impact of ECM alignment on cellular behaviors such as cell adhesion, spreading, extension and mechanics remains poorly understood. We present results on the development of a microtissue-based system that enables control of the structure, orientation, and degree of fibrillar alignment in 3D fibroblast-populated collagen gels. The tissues self-assemble from cell-laden collagen gels placed in micro-fabricated wells containing sets of elastic pillars. The contractile action of the cells leads to controlled alignment of the fibrous collagen, depending on the number and location of the pillars in each well. The pillars are elastic, and are utilized to measure the contractile forces of the microtissues, and by incorporating magnetic material in selected pillars, time-varying forces can be applied to the tissues for dynamic stimulation and measurement of mechanical properties. Results on the effects of varying pillar shape, spacing, location, and stiffness on microtissue organization and contractility will be presented. This work is supported by NSF CMMI-1463011.

  20. Primary cilium mechanotransduction of tensile strain in 3D culture: Finite element analyses of strain amplification caused by tensile strain applied to a primary cilium embedded in a collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Pattie S; Bodle, Josephine C; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2014-06-27

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC) exhibit multilineage differentiation potential with lineage specification that is dictated by both the chemical and mechanical stimuli to which they are exposed. We have previously shown that 10% cyclic tensile strain increases hASC osteogenesis and cell-mediated calcium accretion. We have also recently shown that primary cilia are present on hASC and that chemically-induced lineage specification of hASC concurrently results in length and conformation changes of the primary cilia. Further, we have observed cilia length changes in hASC cultured within a collagen I gel in response to 10% cyclic tensile strain. We therefore hypothesize that primary cilia may play a key mechanotransduction role for hASC exposed to tensile strain. The goal of this study was to use finite element analysis (FEA) to determine strains occurring within the ciliary membrane in response to 10% tensile strain applied parallel, or perpendicular, to cilia orientation. To elucidate the mechanical environment experienced by the cilium, several lengths were modeled and evaluated based on cilia lengths measured on hASC grown under varied culture conditions. Principal tensile strains in both hASC and ciliary membranes were calculated using FEA, and the magnitude and location of maximum principal tensile strain determined. We found that maximum principal tensile strain was concentrated at the base of the cilium. In the linear elastic model, applying strain perpendicular to the cilium resulted in maximum strains within the ciliary membrane from 150% to 200%, while applying strain parallel to the cilium resulted in much higher strains, approximately 400%. In the hyperelastic model, applying strain perpendicular to the cilium resulted in maximum strains within the ciliary membrane around 30%, while applying strain parallel to the cilium resulted in much higher strains ranging from 50% to 70%. Interestingly, FEA results indicated that primary cilium length was not

  1. Primary Cilium Mechanotransduction of Tensile Strain in 3D Culture: Finite Element Analyses of Strain Amplification Caused by 10% Tensile Strain Applied to a Primary Cilium Embedded in a Collagen Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Pattie S.; Bodle, Josephine C.; Loboa, Elizabeth G.

    2014-01-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC) exhibit multilineage differentiation potential with lineage specification that is dictated by both the chemical and mechanical stimuli to which they are exposed. We have previously shown that 10% cyclic tensile strain increases hASC osteogenesis and cell-mediated calcium accretion. We have also recently shown that primary cilia are present on hASC and that chemically-induced lineage specification of hASC concurrently results in length and conformation changes of the primary cilia. Further, we have observed cilia length changes on hASC cultured within a collagen I gel in response to 10% cyclic tensile strain. We therefore hypothesize that primary cilia may play a key mechanotransduction role for hASC exposed to tensile strain. The goal of this study was to use finite element analysis (FEA) to determine strains occurring within the ciliary membrane in response to 10% tensile strain applied parallel, or perpendicular, to cilia orientation. To elucidate the mechanical environment experienced by the cilium, several lengths were modeled and evaluated based on cilia lengths measured on hASC grown under varied culture conditions. Principal tensile strains in both hASC and ciliary membranes were calculated using FEA, and the magnitude and location of maximum principal tensile strain determined. We found that maximum principal tensile strain was concentrated at the base of the cilium. In the linear elastic model, applying strain perpendicular to the cilium resulted in maximum strains within the ciliary membrane from 150 to 200%, while applying strain parallel to the cilium resulted in much higher strains, approximately 400%. In the hyperelastic model, applying strain perpendicular to the cilium resulted in maximum strains within the ciliary membrane around 30%, while applying strain parallel to the cilium resulted in much higher strains ranging from 50% to 70% . Interestingly, FEA results indicated that primary cilium length was not

  2. Effects of extracellular fiber architecture on cell membrane shear stress in a 3D fibrous matrix.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, John A; Boschetti, Federica; Swartz, Melody A

    2007-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow has been shown to affect the organization and behavior of cells in 3D environments in vivo and in vitro, yet the forces driving such responses are not clear. Due to the complex architecture of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the difficulty of measuring fluid flow near cells embedded in it, the levels of shear stress experienced by cells in this environment are typically estimated using bulk-averaged matrix parameters such as hydraulic permeability. While this is useful for estimating average stresses, it cannot yield insight into how local matrix fiber architecture-which is cell-controlled in the immediate pericellular environment-affects the local stresses imposed on the cell surface. To address this, we used computational fluid dynamics to study flow through an idealized mesh constructed of a cubic lattice of fibers simulating a typical in vitro collagen gel. We found that, in such high porosity matrices, the fibers strongly affect the flow fields near the cell, with peak shear stresses up to five times higher than those predicted by the Brinkman equation. We also found that minor remodeling of the fibers near the cell surface had major effects on the shear stress profile on the cell. These findings demonstrate the importance of fiber architecture to the fluid forces on a cell embedded in a 3D matrix, and also show how small modifications in the local ECM can lead to large changes in the mechanical environment of the cell.

  3. Modeling the formation of cell-matrix adhesions on a single 3D matrix fiber.

    PubMed

    Escribano, J; Sánchez, M T; García-Aznar, J M

    2015-11-07

    Cell-matrix adhesions are crucial in different biological processes like tissue morphogenesis, cell motility, and extracellular matrix remodeling. These interactions that link cell cytoskeleton and matrix fibers are built through protein clutches, generally known as adhesion complexes. The adhesion formation process has been deeply studied in two-dimensional (2D) cases; however, the knowledge is limited for three-dimensional (3D) cases. In this work, we simulate different local extracellular matrix properties in order to unravel the fundamental mechanisms that regulate the formation of cell-matrix adhesions in 3D. We aim to study the mechanical interaction of these biological structures through a three dimensional discrete approach, reproducing the transmission pattern force between the cytoskeleton and a single extracellular matrix fiber. This numerical model provides a discrete analysis of the proteins involved including spatial distribution, interaction between them, and study of the different phenomena, such as protein clutches unbinding or protein unfolding.

  4. Human Astrocytes Develop Physiological Morphology and Remain Quiescent in a Novel 3D Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Placone, Amanda F.; McGuiggan, Patricia M.; Bergles, Dwight E.; Guerrero-Cazares, Hugo; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Searson, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant glial cells in the brain and are responsible for diverse functions, from modulating synapse function to regulating the blood-brain barrier. In vivo, these cells exhibit a star-shaped morphology with multiple radial processes that contact synapses and completely surround brain capillaries. In response to trauma or CNS disease, astrocytes become reactive, a state associated with profound changes in gene expression, including upregulation of intermediate filament proteins, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). The inability to recapitulate the complex structure of astrocytes and maintain their quiescent state in vitro is a major roadblock to further developments in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here, we characterize astrocyte morphology and activation in various hydrogels to assess the feasibility of developing a matrix that mimics key aspects of the native microenvironment. We show that astrocytes seeded in optimized matrix composed of collagen, hyaluronic acid, and matrigel exhibit a star-shaped morphology with radial processes and do not upregulate GFAP expression, hallmarks of quiescent astrocytes in the brain. In these optimized gels, collagen I provides structural support, HA mimics the brain extracellular matrix, and matrigel provides endothelial cell compatibility and was found to minimize GFAP upregulation. This defined 3D microenvironment for maintaining human astrocytes in vitro provides new opportunities for developing improved models of the blood-brain barrier and studying their response to stress signals. PMID:25542801

  5. Tensin 2 modulates cell contractility in 3D collagen gels through the RhoGAP DLC1.

    PubMed

    Clark, Katherine; Howe, Jonathan D; Pullar, Christine E; Green, J Angelo; Artym, Vira V; Yamada, Kenneth M; Critchley, David R

    2010-03-01

    Cytoskeletal proteins of the tensin family couple integrins to the actin cytoskeleton. They are found in both focal adhesions and the fibrillar adhesions formed between cells and the fibronectin matrix. There are four tensin genes which encode three large (approximately 200 kDa) tensin isoforms (tensin 1, 2, 3) and one short isoform (cten). However, the subcellular localization and function of the individual isoforms is poorly understood. Using human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs), and imaging on both fixed and live cells, we show that GFP-tensin 2 is enriched in dynamic focal adhesions at the leading edge of the cell, whereas GFP-tensin 3 translocates rearward, and is enriched in fibrillar adhesions. To investigate the possible role of tensins in cell-matrix remodeling, we used siRNAs to knockdown each tensin isoform. We discovered that tensin 2 knockdown significantly reduced the ability of HFFs to contract 3D collagen gels, whilst no effect on fibronectin fibrillogenesis was observed. This inhibition of collagen gel contraction was associated with a substantial reduction in Rho activity, and it was reversed by depletion of DLC1, a RhoGAP that binds to tensin in focal adhesions. These findings suggest that focal adhesion-localized tensin 2 negatively regulates DLC1 to permit Rho-mediated actomyosin contraction and remodeling of collagen fibers.

  6. Exosite Interactions Impact Matrix Metalloproteinase Collagen Specificities*

    PubMed Central

    Robichaud, Trista K.; Steffensen, Bjorn; Fields, Gregg B.

    2011-01-01

    Members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family selectively cleave collagens in vivo. However, the substrate structural determinants that facilitate interaction with specific MMPs are not well defined. We hypothesized that type I–III collagen sequences located N- or C-terminal to the physiological cleavage site mediate substrate selectivity among MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-8, MMP-13, and MMP-14/membrane-type 1 (MT1)-MMP. The enzyme kinetics for hydrolysis of three fluorogenic triple-helical peptides (fTHPs) was evaluated herein. The first fTHP contained consensus residues 769–783 from type I–III collagens, the second inserted α1(II) collagen residues 763–768 N-terminal to the consensus sequence, and the third inserted α1(II) collagen residues 784–792 C-terminal to the consensus sequence. Our analyses showed that insertion of the C-terminal residues significantly increased kcat/Km and kcat for MMP-1. MMP-13 showed the opposite behavior with a decreased kcat/Km and kcat and a greatly improved Km in response to the C-terminal residues. Insertion of the N-terminal residues enhanced kcat/Km and kcat for MMP-8 and MT1-MMP. For MMP-2, the C-terminal residues enhanced Km and dramatically decreased kcat, resulting in a decrease in the overall activity. These changes in activities and kinetic parameters represented the collagen preferences of MMP-8, MMP-13, and MT1-MMP well. Thus, interactions with secondary binding sites (exosites) helped direct the specificity of these enzymes. However, MMP-1 collagen preferences were not recapitulated by the fTHP studies. The preference of MMP-1 for type III collagen appears to be primarily based on the flexibility of the hydrolysis site of type III collagen compared with types I and II. Further characterization of exosite determinants that govern interactions of MMPs with collagenous substrates should aid the development of pharmacotherapeutics that target individual MMPs. PMID:21896477

  7. Human platelet lysate improves human cord blood derived ECFC survival and vasculogenesis in three dimensional (3D) collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyojin; Prasain, Nutan; Vemula, Sasidhar; Ferkowicz, Michael J; Yoshimoto, Momoko; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L; Yoder, Mervin C

    2015-09-01

    Human cord blood (CB) is enriched in circulating endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) that display high proliferative potential and in vivo vessel forming ability. Since diminished ECFC survival is known to dampen the vasculogenic response in vivo, we tested how long implanted ECFC survive and generate vessels in three-dimensional (3D) type I collagen matrices in vitro and in vivo. We hypothesized that human platelet lysate (HPL) would promote cell survival and enhance vasculogenesis in the 3D collagen matrices. We report that the percentage of ECFC co-cultured with HPL that were alive was significantly enhanced on days 1 and 3 post-matrix formation, compared to ECFC alone containing matrices. Also, co-culture of ECFC with HPL displayed significantly more vasculogenic activity compared to ECFC alone and expressed significantly more pro-survival molecules (pAkt, p-Bad and Bcl-xL) in the 3D collagen matrices in vitro. Treatment with Akt1 inhibitor (A-674563), Akt2 inhibitor (CCT128930) and Bcl-xL inhibitor (ABT-263/Navitoclax) significantly decreased the cell survival and vasculogenesis of ECFC co-cultured with or without HPL and implicated activation of the Akt1 pathway as the critical mediator of the HPL effect on ECFC in vitro. A significantly greater average vessel number and total vascular area of human CD31(+) vessels were present in implants containing ECFC and HPL, compared to the ECFC alone implants in vivo. We conclude that implantation of ECFC with HPL in vivo promotes vasculogenesis and augments blood vessel formation via diminishing apoptosis of the implanted ECFC.

  8. Mean deformation metrics for quantifying 3D cell–matrix interactions without requiring information about matrix material properties

    PubMed Central

    Stout, David A.; Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Estrada, Jonathan B.; Toyjanova, Jennet; Kesari, Haneesh; Reichner, Jonathan S.; Franck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Mechanobiology relates cellular processes to mechanical signals, such as determining the effect of variations in matrix stiffness with cell tractions. Cell traction recorded via traction force microscopy (TFM) commonly takes place on materials such as polyacrylamide- and polyethylene glycol-based gels. Such experiments remain limited in physiological relevance because cells natively migrate within complex tissue microenvironments that are spatially heterogeneous and hierarchical. Yet, TFM requires determination of the matrix constitutive law (stress–strain relationship), which is not always readily available. In addition, the currently achievable displacement resolution limits the accuracy of TFM for relatively small cells. To overcome these limitations, and increase the physiological relevance of in vitro experimental design, we present a new approach and a set of associated biomechanical signatures that are based purely on measurements of the matrix's displacements without requiring any knowledge of its constitutive laws. We show that our mean deformation metrics (MDM) approach can provide significant biophysical information without the need to explicitly determine cell tractions. In the process of demonstrating the use of our MDM approach, we succeeded in expanding the capability of our displacement measurement technique such that it can now measure the 3D deformations around relatively small cells (∼10 micrometers), such as neutrophils. Furthermore, we also report previously unseen deformation patterns generated by motile neutrophils in 3D collagen gels. PMID:26929377

  9. Mean deformation metrics for quantifying 3D cell-matrix interactions without requiring information about matrix material properties.

    PubMed

    Stout, David A; Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Estrada, Jonathan B; Toyjanova, Jennet; Kesari, Haneesh; Reichner, Jonathan S; Franck, Christian

    2016-03-15

    Mechanobiology relates cellular processes to mechanical signals, such as determining the effect of variations in matrix stiffness with cell tractions. Cell traction recorded via traction force microscopy (TFM) commonly takes place on materials such as polyacrylamide- and polyethylene glycol-based gels. Such experiments remain limited in physiological relevance because cells natively migrate within complex tissue microenvironments that are spatially heterogeneous and hierarchical. Yet, TFM requires determination of the matrix constitutive law (stress-strain relationship), which is not always readily available. In addition, the currently achievable displacement resolution limits the accuracy of TFM for relatively small cells. To overcome these limitations, and increase the physiological relevance of in vitro experimental design, we present a new approach and a set of associated biomechanical signatures that are based purely on measurements of the matrix's displacements without requiring any knowledge of its constitutive laws. We show that our mean deformation metrics (MDM) approach can provide significant biophysical information without the need to explicitly determine cell tractions. In the process of demonstrating the use of our MDM approach, we succeeded in expanding the capability of our displacement measurement technique such that it can now measure the 3D deformations around relatively small cells (∼10 micrometers), such as neutrophils. Furthermore, we also report previously unseen deformation patterns generated by motile neutrophils in 3D collagen gels.

  10. Properties and modification of porous 3-D collagen/hydroxyapatite composites.

    PubMed

    Sionkowska, A; Kozłowska, J

    2013-01-01

    A freeze drying technique was used to form porous three-dimensional collagen matrixes modified by the addition of a variable amount of nano-hydroxyapatite. For chemical cross-linking EDC/NHS were used. Physical cross-linking was achieved by dehydrothermal treatment. Mechanical properties, morphology, dissolution, porosity, density, enzymatic degradation and swelling properties of materials have been studied after cross-linking. The density of scaffolds and its compressive modulus increased with an increasing amount of hydroxyapatite and collagen concentration in the composite scaffold, while the swelling ratio and porosity decreased. The studied scaffolds dissolved slowly in PBS solution. DHT cross-linked collagen matrices showed a much faster degradation rate after exposure to collagenase than the EDC cross-linked samples.

  11. Regeneration of chronic tympanic membrane perforation using 3D collagen with topical umbilical cord serum.

    PubMed

    Jang, Chul Ho; Cho, Yong Beom; Yeo, MyungGu; Lee, Hyeongjin; Min, Eun Jung; Lee, Byung Hhwa; Kim, Geun Hyung

    2013-11-01

    Chronic tympanic membrane (TM) perforation is one of the most common otology complications. Current surgical management of TM perforation includes myringoplasty and tympanoplasty. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of three dimensional (3D) porous collagen scaffolds with topically applied human umbilical cord serum (UCS) for the regeneration of chronic TM perforation in guinea pigs. To achieve this goal, we fabricated porous 3D collagen scaffolds (avg. strut diameter of 236 ± 51 μm, avg. pore size of 382 ± 67 μm, and a porosity of 96%) by using a 3 axis robot dispensing and low temperature plate systems. Guinea pigs were used in a model of chronic TM perforation. In the experimental group (n=10), 3D collagen scaffold was placed on the perforation and topically applied of UCS every other day for a period of 8 days. The control group ears (n=10) were treated with paper discs and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) only using the same regimen. Healing time, acoustic-mechanical properties, and morphological analysis were performed by otoendoscopy, auditory brainstem response (ABR), single-point laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and light microscopic evaluation. The closure of the TM perforation was achieved in 100% of the experimental group vs. 43% of the control group, and this difference was statistically significant (p=0.034). The ABR threshold at all frequencies of the experimental group was significantly recovered to the normal level compared to the control group. TM vibration velocity in the experimental group recovered similar to the normal control level. The difference is very small and they are not statistically significant below 1 kHz (p=0.074). By OCT and light microscopic examination, regenerated TM of the experimental group showed thickened fibrous and mucosal layer. In contrast, the control group showed absence of fibrous layer like a dimeric TM.

  12. Microencapsulation of Neuroblastoma Cells and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Collagen Microspheres: A 3D Model for Cancer Cell Niche Study

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Pan; Sin, Hoi Shun; Chan, Shing; Chan, Godfrey Chi Fung; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing trend for researchers to use in vitro 3D models in cancer studies, as they can better recapitulate the complex in vivo situation. And the fact that the progression and development of tumor are closely associated to its stromal microenvironment has been increasingly recognized. The establishment of such tumor supportive niche is vital in understanding tumor progress and metastasis. The mesenchymal origin of many cells residing in the cancer niche provides the rationale to include MSCs in mimicking the niche in neuroblastoma. Here we co-encapsulate and co-culture NBCs and MSCs in a 3D in vitro model and investigate the morphology, growth kinetics and matrix remodeling in the reconstituted stromal environment. Results showed that the incorporation of MSCs in the model lead to accelerated growth of cancer cells as well as recapitulation of at least partially the tumor microenvironment in vivo. The current study therefore demonstrates the feasibility for the collagen microsphere to act as a 3D in vitro cancer model for various topics in cancer studies. PMID:26657086

  13. Nonlinear Optical Macroscopic Assessment of 3-D Corneal Collagen Organization and Axial Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Moritz; Chai, Dongyul; Kriling, Shelsea; Nien, Chyong Jy; Brown, Donald J.; Jester, Bryan; Juhasz, Tibor

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To characterize and quantify the collagen fiber (lamellar) organization of human corneas in three dimensions by using nonlinear optical high-resolution macroscopy (NLO-HRMac) and to correlate these findings with mechanical data obtained by indentation testing of corneal flaps. Methods. Twelve corneas from 10 donors were studied. Vibratome sections, 200 μm thick, from five donor eyes were cut along the vertical meridian from limbus to limbus (arc length, 12 mm). Backscattered second harmonic–generated (SHG) NLO signals from these sections were collected as a series of overlapping 3-D images, which were concatenated to form a single 3-D mosaic (pixel resolution: 0.44 μm lateral, 2 μm axial). Collagen fiber intertwining was quantified by determining branching point density as a function of stromal depth. Mechanical testing was performed on corneal flaps from seven additional eyes. Corneas were cut into three layers (anterior, middle, and posterior) using a femtosecond surgical laser system and underwent indentation testing to determine the elastic modulus for each layer. Results. The 3-D reconstructions revealed complex collagen fiber branching patterns in the anterior cornea, with fibers extending from the anterior limiting lamina (ALL, Bowman's layer), intertwining with deeper fibers and reinserting back to the ALL, forming bow spring–like structures. Measured branching-point density was four times higher in the anterior third of the cornea than in the posterior third and decreased logarithmically with increasing distance from the ALL. Indentation testing showed an eightfold increase in elastic modulus in the anterior stroma. Conclusions. The axial gradient in lamellar intertwining appears to be associated with an axial gradient in the effective elastic modulus of the cornea, suggesting that collagen fiber intertwining and formation of bow spring–like structures provide structural support similar to cross-beams in bridges and large-scale structures

  14. The Rho family GEF Asef2 regulates cell migration in three dimensional (3D) collagen matrices through myosin II.

    PubMed

    Jean, Léolène; Yang, Lijie; Majumdar, Devi; Gao, Yandong; Shi, Mingjian; Brewer, Bryson M; Li, Deyu; Webb, Donna J

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to a variety of physiological processes, including tissue development, homeostasis, and regeneration. Migration has been extensively studied with cells on 2-dimensional (2D) substrates, but much less is known about cell migration in 3D environments. Tissues and organs are 3D, which is the native environment of cells in vivo, pointing to a need to understand migration and the mechanisms that regulate it in 3D environments. To investigate cell migration in 3D environments, we developed microfluidic devices that afford a controlled, reproducible platform for generating 3D matrices. Using these devices, we show that the Rho family guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Asef2 inhibits cell migration in 3D type I collagen (collagen I) matrices. Treatment of cells with the myosin II (MyoII) inhibitor blebbistatin abolished the decrease in migration by Asef2. Moreover, Asef2 enhanced MyoII activity as shown by increased phosphorylation of serine 19 (S19). Furthermore, Asef2 increased activation of Rac, which is a Rho family small GTPase, in 3D collagen I matrices. Inhibition of Rac activity by treatment with the Rac-specific inhibitor NSC23766 abrogated the Asef2-promoted increase in S19 MyoII phosphorylation. Thus, our results indicate that Asef2 regulates cell migration in 3D collagen I matrices through a Rac-MyoII-dependent mechanism.

  15. Concentric gel system to study the biophysical role of matrix microenvironment on 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kurniawan, Nicholas Agung; Chaudhuri, Parthiv Kant; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2015-04-03

    The ability of cells to migrate is crucial in a wide variety of cell functions throughout life from embryonic development and wound healing to tumor and cancer metastasis. Despite intense research efforts, the basic biochemical and biophysical principles of cell migration are still not fully understood, especially in the physiologically relevant three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments. Here, we describe an in vitro assay designed to allow quantitative examination of 3D cell migration behaviors. The method exploits the cell's mechanosensing ability and propensity to migrate into previously unoccupied extracellular matrix (ECM). We use the invasion of highly invasive breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231, in collagen gels as a model system. The spread of cell population and the migration dynamics of individual cells over weeks of culture can be monitored using live-cell imaging and analyzed to extract spatiotemporally-resolved data. Furthermore, the method is easily adaptable for diverse extracellular matrices, thus offering a simple yet powerful way to investigate the role of biophysical factors in the microenvironment on cell migration.

  16. Concentric Gel System to Study the Biophysical Role of Matrix Microenvironment on 3D Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Kurniawan, Nicholas Agung; Chaudhuri, Parthiv Kant; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2015-01-01

    The ability of cells to migrate is crucial in a wide variety of cell functions throughout life from embryonic development and wound healing to tumor and cancer metastasis. Despite intense research efforts, the basic biochemical and biophysical principles of cell migration are still not fully understood, especially in the physiologically relevant three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments. Here, we describe an in vitro assay designed to allow quantitative examination of 3D cell migration behaviors. The method exploits the cell’s mechanosensing ability and propensity to migrate into previously unoccupied extracellular matrix (ECM). We use the invasion of highly invasive breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231, in collagen gels as a model system. The spread of cell population and the migration dynamics of individual cells over weeks of culture can be monitored using live-cell imaging and analyzed to extract spatiotemporally-resolved data. Furthermore, the method is easily adaptable for diverse extracellular matrices, thus offering a simple yet powerful way to investigate the role of biophysical factors in the microenvironment on cell migration. PMID:25867104

  17. 3D composites based on the blends of chitosan and collagen with the addition of hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Sionkowska, Alina; Kaczmarek, Beata; Lewandowska, Katarzyna; Grabska, Sylwia; Pokrywczyńska, Marta; Kloskowski, Tomasz; Drewa, Tomasz

    2016-08-01

    3D porous composites based on blends of chitosan, collagen and hyaluronic acid were obtained through the lyophilization process. Mechanical properties, swelling behavior and thermal stability of the blends were studied. Moreover, SEM images were taken and the structure of the blends was studied. Biological properties of the materials obtained were investigated by analyzing of proliferation rate of fibroblast cells incubated with biomaterial extract using MTT assay (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide). The results showed that the properties of 3D composites based on the blends of chitosan and collagen were altered after the addition 1%, 2% and 5% of hyaluronic acid. Mechanical properties and thermal stability of chitosan/collagen blends were improved in the presence of hyaluronic acid in the composite. New 3D materials based on the blends of chitosan, collagen and hyaluronic acid were non-toxic and did not significantly affect cell morphology.

  18. Analysis of cell migration within a three-dimensional collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Rommerswinkel, Nadine; Niggemann, Bernd; Keil, Silvia; Zänker, Kurt S; Dittmar, Thomas

    2014-10-05

    The ability to migrate is a hallmark of various cell types and plays a crucial role in several physiological processes, including embryonic development, wound healing, and immune responses. However, cell migration is also a key mechanism in cancer enabling these cancer cells to detach from the primary tumor to start metastatic spreading. Within the past years various cell migration assays have been developed to analyze the migratory behavior of different cell types. Because the locomotory behavior of cells markedly differs between a two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) environment it can be assumed that the analysis of the migration of cells that are embedded within a 3D environment would yield in more significant cell migration data. The advantage of the described 3D collagen matrix migration assay is that cells are embedded within a physiological 3D network of collagen fibers representing the major component of the extracellular matrix. Due to time-lapse video microscopy real cell migration is measured allowing the determination of several migration parameters as well as their alterations in response to pro-migratory factors or inhibitors. Various cell types could be analyzed using this technique, including lymphocytes/leukocytes, stem cells, and tumor cells. Likewise, also cell clusters or spheroids could be embedded within the collagen matrix concomitant with analysis of the emigration of single cells from the cell cluster/ spheroid into the collagen lattice. We conclude that the 3D collagen matrix migration assay is a versatile method to analyze the migration of cells within a physiological-like 3D environment.

  19. Characterization of riboflavin-modified dentin collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Fawzy, A; Nitisusanta, L; Iqbal, K; Daood, U; Beng, L T; Neo, J

    2012-11-01

    Crosslinking is considered a possible approach to increasing the mechanical and structural stability and biodegradation resistance of the dentin collagen matrix. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanical and chemical variations and collagen degradation resistance associated with crosslinking of the dentin collagen matrix with UVA-activated riboflavin. Dentin collagen matrix specimens were treated with 0.1 and 1% riboflavin for 2 min and photo-activated with 7 mW/cm(2) UVA (368 nm) for 2 min. The structural change of the dentin collagen network with collagenase exposure was investigated by AFM and SEM at different time-points. The variations in surface/bulk mechanical properties and biodegradation resistance were characterized by nano-indentation, conventional mechanical testing, and hydroxyproline liberation at different time-points. Chemical changes associated with riboflavin/collagen-matrix interaction were analyzed by micro-Raman spectroscopy. UVA-activated riboflavin increased the mechanical properties, mechanical stability, and biodegradation resistance of the dentin collagen matrix. Higher collagen-network structural resistance against collagenolytic challenges was found with crosslinking. micro-Raman spectroscopy showed a strong dependency, in both intensity and wave-number, of certain Raman bands (1242-1667 cm(-1)) with crosslinking indicating the collagen/riboflavin interactions. UVA-activated riboflavin (1%) more efficiently crosslinked the dentin collagen matrix within a relatively clinically acceptable time-frame compared with 0.1% riboflavin.

  20. Development of a 3D matrix for modeling mammalian spinal cord injury in vitro.

    PubMed

    Diaz Quiroz, Juan Felipe; Li, Yuping; Aparicio, Conrado; Echeverri, Karen

    2016-11-01

    Spinal cord injury affects millions of people around the world, however, limited therapies are available to improve the quality of life of these patients. Spinal cord injury is usually modeled in rats and mice using contusion or complete transection models and this has led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular complexities of the injury. However, it has not to date led to development of successful novel therapies, this is in part due to the complexity of the injury and the difficulty of deciphering the exact roles and interactions of different cells within this complex environment. Here we developed a collagen matrix that can be molded into the 3D tubular shape with a lumen and can hence support cell interactions in a similar architecture to a spinal cord. We show that astrocytes can be successfully grown on this matrix in vitro and when injured, the cells respond as they do in vivo and undergo reactive gliosis, one of the steps that lead to formation of a glial scar, the main barrier to spinal cord regeneration. In the future, this system can be used to quickly assess the effect of drugs on glial scar protein activity or to perform live imaging of labeled cells after exposure to drugs.

  1. Development of a 3D matrix for modeling mammalian spinal cord injury in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Diaz Quiroz, Juan Felipe; Li, Yuping; Aparicio, Conrado; Echeverri, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury affects millions of people around the world, however, limited therapies are available to improve the quality of life of these patients. Spinal cord injury is usually modeled in rats and mice using contusion or complete transection models and this has led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular complexities of the injury. However, it has not to date led to development of successful novel therapies, this is in part due to the complexity of the injury and the difficulty of deciphering the exact roles and interactions of different cells within this complex environment. Here we developed a collagen matrix that can be molded into the 3D tubular shape with a lumen and can hence support cell interactions in a similar architecture to a spinal cord. We show that astrocytes can be successfully grown on this matrix in vitro and when injured, the cells respond as they do in vivo and undergo reactive gliosis, one of the steps that lead to formation of a glial scar, the main barrier to spinal cord regeneration. In the future, this system can be used to quickly assess the effect of drugs on glial scar protein activity or to perform live imaging of labeled cells after exposure to drugs. PMID:28123426

  2. Fluorescein diacetate for determination of cell viability in 3D fibroblast-collagen-GAG constructs.

    PubMed

    Powell, Heather M; Armour, Alexis D; Boyce, Steven T

    2011-01-01

    Quantification of cell viability and distribution within engineered tissues currently relies on representative histology, phenotypic assays, and destructive assays of viability. To evaluate uniformity of cell density throughout 3D collagen scaffolds prior to in vivo use, a nondestructive, field assessment of cell viability is advantageous. Here, we describe a field measure of cell viability in lyophilized collagen-glycosaminoglycan (C-GAG) scaffolds in vitro using fluorescein diacetate (FdA). Fibroblast-C-GAG constructs are stained 1 day after cellular inoculation using 0.04 mg/ml FdA followed by exposure to 366 nm UV light. Construct fluorescence quantified using Metamorph image analysis is correlated with inoculation density, MTT values, and histology of corresponding biopsies. Construct fluorescence correlates significantly with inoculation density (p  <  0.001) and MTT values (p  <  0.001) of biopsies collected immediately after FdA staining. No toxicity is detected in the constructs, as measured by MTT assay before and after the FdA assay at different time points; normal in vitro histology is demonstrated for the FdA-exposed constructs. In conclusion, measurement of intracellular fluorescence with FdA allows for the early, comprehensive measurement of cellular distributions and viability in engineered tissue.

  3. Fibrillogenesis from nanosurfaces: multiphoton imaging and stereological analysis of collagen 3D self-assembly dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Decencière, Etienne; Machairas, Vaïa; Albert, Claire; Coradin, Thibaud; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Aimé, Carole

    2014-09-21

    The assembly of proteins into fibrillar structures is an important process that concerns different biological contexts, including molecular medicine and functional biomaterials. Engineering of hybrid biomaterials can advantageously provide synergetic interactions of the biopolymers with an inorganic component to ensure specific supramolecular organization and dynamics. To this aim, we designed hybrid systems associating collagen and surface-functionalized silica particles and we built a new strategy to investigate fibrillogenesis processes in such multicomponents systems, working at the crossroads of chemistry, physics and mathematics. The self-assembly process was investigated by bimodal multiphoton imaging coupling second harmonic generation (SHG) and 2 photon excited fluorescence (2PEF). The in-depth spatial characterization of the system was further achieved using the three-dimensional analysis of the SHG/2PEF data via mathematical morphology processing. Quantitation of collagen distribution around particles offers strong evidence that the chemically induced confinement of the protein on the silica nanosurfaces has a key influence on the spatial extension of fibrillogenesis. This new approach is unique in the information it can provide on 3D dynamic hybrid systems and may be extended to other associations of fibrillar molecules with optically responsive nano-objects.

  4. Modeling of 3-D Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Sullivan, Roy M.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2003-01-01

    Three different approaches are being pursued at the NASA Glenn Research Center to predict the nanostructural behavior of three-dimensional woven ceramic matrix composites. These are: a micromechanics-based approach using W-CEMCAN (Woven Ceramic Matrix Composite Analyzer), a laminate analogy method and a structural frame approach (based on the finite element method). All three techniques are applied to predict the thermomechanical properties of a three-dimensional woven angle interlock C/SiC composite. The properties are predicted for room temperature and 1100 C and the predicted properties are compared to measurements. General observations regarding the three approaches for three-dimensional composite modeling are discussed.

  5. Fibroblast morphogenesis on 3D collagen matrices: the balance between cell clustering and cell migration.

    PubMed

    da Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno; Grinnell, Frederick

    2013-10-01

    Fibroblast clusters have been observed in tissues under a variety of circumstances: in fibrosis and scar, in the formation of hair follicle dermal papilla, and as part of the general process of mesenchymal condensation that takes place during development. Cell clustering has been shown to depend on features of the extracellular matrix, growth factor environment, and mechanisms to stabilize cell-cell interactions. In vitro studies have shown that increasing the potential for cell-cell adhesion relative to cell-substrate adhesion promotes cell clustering. Experimental models to study fibroblast clustering have utilized centrifugation, hanging drops, and substrata with poorly adhesive, soft and mechanically unstable properties. In this review, we summarize work on a new, highly tractable, cell clustering research model in which human fibroblasts are incubated on the surfaces of collagen matrices. Fibroblast clustering occurs under procontractile growth factor conditions (e.g., serum or the serum lipid agonist lysophosphatidic acid) but not under promigratory growth factor conditions (e.g., platelet-derived growth factor) and can be reversed by switching growth factor environments. Cell contraction plays a dual role in clustering to bring cells closer together and to stimulate cells to organize fibronectin into a fibrillar matrix. Binding of fibroblasts to a shared fibronectin fibrillar matrix stabilizes clusters, and fragmentation of the fibrillar matrix occurs when growth factor conditions are switched to promote cell dispersal.

  6. Molecular weight specific impact of soluble and immobilized hyaluronan on CD44 expressing melanoma cells in 3D collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Sapudom, Jiranuwat; Ullm, Franziska; Martin, Steve; Kalbitzer, Liv; Naab, Johanna; Möller, Stephanie; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Anderegg, Ulf; Schmidt, Stephan; Pompe, Tilo

    2017-03-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) and its principal receptor CD44 are known to be involved in regulating tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. The direct correlation of CD44-HA interaction on proliferation and invasion of tumor cells in dependence on the molecular weight and the presentation form of HA is not fully understood because of lack of appropriate matrix models. To address this issue, we reconstituted 3D collagen (Coll I) matrices and functionalized them with HA of molecular weight of 30-50kDa (low molecular weight; LMW-HA) and 500-750kDa (high molecular weight; HMW-HA). A post-modification strategy was applied to covalently immobilize HA to reconstituted fibrillar Coll I matrices, resulting in a non-altered Coll I network microstructure and stable immobilization over days. Functionalized Coll I matrices were characterized regarding topological and mechanical characteristics as well as HA amount using confocal laser scanning microscopy, colloidal probe force spectroscopy and quantitative Alcian blue assay, respectively. To elucidate HA dependent tumor cell behavior, BRO melanoma cell lines with and without CD44 receptor expression were used for in vitro cell experiments. We demonstrated that only soluble LMW-HA promoted cell proliferation in a CD44 dependent manner, while HMW-HA and immobilized LMW-HA did not. Furthermore, an enhanced cell invasion was found only for immobilized LMW-HA. Both findings correlated with a very strong and specific adhesive interaction of LMW-HA and CD44+ cells quantified in single cell adhesion measurements using soft colloidal force spectroscopy. Overall, our results introduce an in vitro biomaterials model allowing to test presentation mode and molecular weight specificity of HA in a 3D fibrillar matrix thus mimicking important in vivo features of tumor microenvironments.

  7. 3D bioprinting of BMSC-laden methacrylamide gelatin scaffolds with CBD-BMP2-collagen microfibers.

    PubMed

    Du, Mingchun; Chen, Bing; Meng, Qingyuan; Liu, Sumei; Zheng, Xiongfei; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Heran; Li, Hongyi; Wang, Nuo; Dai, Jianwu

    2015-12-18

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting combines biomaterials, cells and functional components into complex living tissues. Herein, we assembled function-control modules into cell-laden scaffolds using 3D bioprinting. A customized 3D printer was able to tune the microstructure of printed bone mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC)-laden methacrylamide gelatin scaffolds at the micrometer scale. For example, the pore size was adjusted to 282 ± 32 μm and 363 ± 60 μm. To match the requirements of the printing nozzle, collagen microfibers with a length of 22 ± 13 μm were prepared with a high-speed crusher. Collagen microfibers bound bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) with a collagen binding domain (CBD) as differentiation-control module, from which BMP2 was able to be controllably released. The differentiation behaviors of BMSCs in the printed scaffolds were compared in three microenvironments: samples without CBD-BMP2-collagen microfibers in the growth medium, samples without microfibers in the osteogenic medium and samples with microfibers in the growth medium. The results indicated that BMSCs showed high cell viability (>90%) during printing; CBD-BMP2-collagen microfibers induced BMSC differentiation into osteocytes within 14 days more efficiently than the osteogenic medium. Our studies suggest that these function-control modules are attractive biomaterials and have potential applications in 3D bioprinting.

  8. Topographical guidance of 3D tumor cell migration at an interface of collagen densities.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Francois; Tang, Lauren N; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2013-12-01

    During cancer progression, metastatic cells leave the primary tumor and invade into the fibrous extracellular matrix (ECM) within the surrounding stroma. This ECM network is highly heterogeneous, and interest in understanding how this network can affect cell behavior has increased in the past several decades. However, replicating this heterogeneity has proven challenging. Here, we designed and utilized a method to create a well-defined interface between two distinct regions of high- and low-density collagen gels to mimic the heterogeneities in density found in the tumor stroma. We show that cells will invade preferentially from the high-density side into the low-density side. We also demonstrate that the net cell migration is a function of the density of the collagen in which the cells are embedded, and the difference in density between the two regions has minimal effect on cell net displacement and distance travelled. Our data further indicate that a low-to-high density interface promotes directional migration and induces formation of focal adhesion on the interface surface. Together, the current results demonstrate how ECM heterogeneities, in the form of interfacial boundaries, can affect cell migration.

  9. The role of phosphoinositide 3-kinases in neutrophil migration in 3D collagen gels.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kayleigh J S; Muessel, Michelle J; Pullar, Christine E; Willars, Gary B; Wardlaw, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    The entry of neutrophils into tissue has been well characterised; however the fate of these cells once inside the tissue microenvironment is not fully understood. A variety of signal transduction pathways including those involving class I PI3 Kinases have been suggested to be involved in neutrophil migration. This study aims to determine the involvement of PI3 Kinases in chemokinetic and chemotactic neutrophil migration in response to CXCL8 and GM-CSF in a three-dimensional collagen gel, as a model of tissue. Using a three-dimensional collagen assay chemokinetic and chemotactic migration induced by CXCL8 was inhibited with the pan PI3 Kinase inhibitor wortmannin. Analysis of the specific Class I PI3 Kinase catalytic isoforms alpha, delta and gamma using the inhibitors PIK-75, PIK-294 and AS-605240 respectively indicated differential roles in CXCL8-induced neutrophil migration. PIK-294 inhibited both chemokinetic and chemotactic CXCL8-induced migration. AS-605240 markedly reduced CXCL8 induced chemokinetic migration but had no effect on CXCL8 induced chemotactic migration. In contrast PIK-75 inhibited chemotactic migration but not chemokinetic migration. At optimal concentrations of GM-CSF the inhibitors had no effect on the percentage of neutrophil migration in comparison to the control however at suboptimal concentrations wortmannin, AS-605240 and PIK-294 inhibited chemokinesis. This study suggests that PI3 Kinase is necessary for CXCL8 induced migration in a 3D tissue environment but that chemokinetic and chemotactic migration may be controlled by different isoforms with gamma shown to be important in chemokinesis and alpha important in chemotaxis. Neutrophil migration in response to suboptimal concentrations of GM-CSF is dependent on PI3 Kinase, particularly the gamma and delta catalytic isoforms.

  10. Extracellular Protease Inhibition Alters the Phenotype of Chondrogenically Differentiating Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) in 3D Collagen Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sejin; Li, Yuk Yin; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Matrix remodeling of cells is highly regulated by proteases and their inhibitors. Nevertheless, how would the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) be affected, when the balance of the matrix remodeling is disturbed by inhibiting matrix proteases, is incompletely known. Using a previously developed collagen microencapsulation platform, we investigated whether exposing chondrogenically differentiating MSCs to intracellular and extracellular protease inhibitors will affect the extracellular matrix remodeling and hence the outcomes of chondrogenesis. Results showed that inhibition of matrix proteases particularly the extracellular ones favors the phenotype of fibrocartilage rather than hyaline cartilage in chondrogenically differentiating hMSCs by upregulating type I collagen protein deposition and type II collagen gene expression without significantly altering the hypertrophic markers at gene level. This study suggests the potential of manipulating extracellular proteases to alter the outcomes of hMSC chondrogenesis, contributing to future development of differentiation protocols for fibrocartilage tissues for intervertebral disc and meniscus tissue engineering. PMID:26760956

  11. Shrinking mechanism of a porous collagen matrix immersed in solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Yang; Hsieh, Hsyue-Jen; Huang, Lynn L H

    2014-12-01

    The porous structure of collagen-based matrices enables the infiltration of cells both in in vitro and clinical applications. Reconstituted porous collagen matrices often collapse when they are in contact with aqueous solutions; however, the mechanism for the collapse of the pores is not understood. We, therefore, investigated the interactions between the collagen matrix and different solutions, and discuss the mechanisms for the change in microstructure of the matrix on immersing it in solution. When a dried collagen matrix was immersed in aqueous solutions, the matrix shrunk and pores close to the surface closed. The shrinkage ratio and thickness of the compact microstructure close to the superficial area decreased with increasing ethanol content in the solution. The original porous structure of the collagen matrix was preserved when the matrix was immersed in absolute ethanol. The shrinkage of a porous collagen matrix in contact with aqueous solutions was attributed to the liquid/gas interfacial tension. The average pore diameter of the matrix also significantly affected the shrinkage of the matrix. The shrinkage of the matrix, explained using the Young-Laplace equation, was found to result from the pressure drop, and especially in the pores located superficially, leading to the collapse of the matrix microstructure. The integrity of the porous microstructure allows better penetration of cells in medical applications. The numbers of NIH/3T3 fibroblasts penetrated through the hydrated Col/PBS porous collagen matrices pre-immersed in absolute ethanol with subsequent water and DMEM culture medium replacements were significantly higher than those through matrices hydrated directly in DMEM.

  12. Fabrication of Compositionally and Topographically Complex Robust Tissue Forms by 3D-Electrochemical Compaction of Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Younesi, Mousa; Islam, Anowarul; Kishore, Vipuil; Panit, Stefi; Akkus, Ozan

    2015-01-01

    Collagen solutions are phase-transformed to mechanically robust shell structures with curviplanar topographies using electrochemically induced pH gradients. The process enables rapid layer-by-layer deposition of collagen-rich mixtures over the entire field simultaneously to obtain compositionally diverse multilayered structures. In-plane tensile strength and modulus of the electrocompacted collagen sheet samples were 5200 -fold and 2300 -fold greater than that of uncompacted collagen samples. Out of plane compression tests showed 27 -fold and fold increase in compressive stress and 46 -fold increase in compressive modulus compared to uncompacted collagen sheets. Cells proliferated 4.9 times faster, and cellular area spread was 2.7 times greater on compacted collagen sheets. Electrocompaction also resulted in 2.9 times greater focal adhesion area than on regular collagen hydrogel. The reported improvements in the cell-matrix interactions with electrocompaction would serve to expedite the population of electrocompacted collagen scaffolds by cells. The capacity of the method to fabricate nonlinear curved topographies with compositional heterogeneous layers is demonstrated by sequential deposition of collagenhydroxyapatite layer over a collagen layer. The complex curved topography of the nasal structure is replicated by the electrochemical compaction method. The presented electrochemical compaction process is an enabling modality which holds significant promise for reconstruction of a wide spectrum of topographically complex systems such as joint surfaces, craniofacial defects, ears, nose or urogenital forms. PMID:26069162

  13. Fabrication of high-density collagen fibril matrix gels by renaturation of triple-helix collagen from gelatin.

    PubMed

    Ohyabu, Yoshimi; Yunoki, Shunji; Hatayama, Hirosuke; Teranishi, Yoshikazu

    2013-11-01

    Collagen-based 3-D hydrogels often lack sufficient mechanical strength for tissue engineering. We developed a method for fabrication of high-density collagen fibril matrix (CFM) gels from concentrated solutions of uncleaved gelatin (UCG). Denatured random-coil UCG exhibited more rapid and efficient renaturation into collagen triple-helix than cleaved gelatin (CG) over a broad range of setting temperatures. The UCG solution formed opaque gels with high-density reconstituted collagen fibrils at 28-32 °C and transparent gels similar to CG at <25 °C. The unique gelation properties of UCG enabled the encapsulation of cultured cells in CFM of high solid volume (>5%) and elasticity (1.28 ± 0.15 kPa at 5% and 4.82 ± 0.38 kPa at 8%) with minimal cell loss. The elastic modulus of these gels was higher than that of conventional CFM containing 0.5% collagen. High-strength CFM may provide more durable hydrogels for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  14. Extracellular Matrix Fibronectin Stimulates the Self-Assembly of Microtissues on Native Collagen Gels

    PubMed Central

    Sevilla, Carlos A.; Dalecki, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Fibronectin is an adhesive glycoprotein that is polymerized into extracellular matrices via a tightly regulated, cell-dependent process. Here, we demonstrate that fibronectin matrix polymerization induces the self-assembly of multicellular structures in vitro, termed tissue bodies. Fibronectin-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts adherent to compliant gels of polymerized type I collagen failed to spread or proliferate. In contrast, addition of fibronectin to collagen-adherent fibronectin-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts resulted in a dose-dependent increase in cell number, and induced the formation of three-dimensional (3D) multicellular structures that remained adherent and well-spread on the native collagen substrate. An extensive fibrillar fibronectin matrix formed throughout the microtissue. Blocking fibronectin matrix polymerization inhibited both cell proliferation and microtissue formation, demonstrating the importance of fibronectin fibrillogenesis in triggering cellular self-organization. Cell proliferation, tissue body formation, and tissue body shape were dependent on both fibronectin and collagen concentrations, suggesting that the relative proportion of collagen and fibronectin fibrils polymerized into the extracellular matrix influences the extent of cell proliferation and the final shape of microtissues. These data demonstrate a novel role for cell-mediated fibronectin fibrillogenesis in the formation and vertical assembly of microtissues, and provide a novel approach for engineering complex tissue architecture. PMID:20673131

  15. Bile canaliculi formation and biliary transport in 3D sandwich-cultured hepatocytes in dependence of the extracellular matrix composition.

    PubMed

    Deharde, Daniela; Schneider, Christin; Hiller, Thomas; Fischer, Nicolas; Kegel, Victoria; Lübberstedt, Marc; Freyer, Nora; Hengstler, Jan G; Andersson, Tommy B; Seehofer, Daniel; Pratschke, Johann; Zeilinger, Katrin; Damm, Georg

    2016-10-01

    Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are still considered as gold standard for investigation of in vitro metabolism and hepatotoxicity in pharmaceutical research. It has been shown that the three-dimensional (3D) cultivation of PHH in a sandwich configuration between two layers of extracellular matrix (ECM) enables the hepatocytes to adhere three dimensionally leading to formation of in vivo like cell-cell contacts and cell-matrix interactions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of different ECM compositions on morphology, cellular arrangement and bile canaliculi formation as well as bile excretion processes in PHH sandwich cultures systematically. Freshly isolated PHH were cultured for 6 days between two ECM layers made of collagen and/or Matrigel in four different combinations. The cultures were investigated by phase contrast microscopy and immunofluorescence analysis with respect to cell-cell connections, repolarization as well as bile canaliculi formation. The influence of the ECM composition on cell activity and viability was measured using the XTT assay and a fluorescent dead or alive assay. Finally, the bile canalicular transport was analyzed by live cell imaging to monitor the secretion and accumulation of the fluorescent substance CDF in bile canaliculi. Using collagen and Matrigel in different compositions in sandwich cultures of hepatocytes, we observed differences in morphology, cellular arrangement and cell activity of PHH in dependence of the ECM composition. Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes with an underlay of collagen seem to represent the best in vivo tissue architecture in terms of formation of trabecular cell arrangement. Cultures overlaid with collagen were characterized by the formation of abundant bile canaliculi, while the bile canaliculi network in hepatocytes cultured on a layer of Matrigel and overlaid with collagen showed the most branched and stable canalicular network. All cultures showed a time-dependent leakage of

  16. Surface Topography and Mechanical Strain Promote Keratocyte Phenotype and Extracellular Matrix Formation in a Biomimetic 3D Corneal Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Jialin; Backman, Ludvig J; Malm, Adam D; Danielson, Patrik

    2017-03-01

    The optimal functionality of the native corneal stroma is mainly dependent on the well-ordered arrangement of extracellular matrix (ECM) and the pressurized structure. In order to develop an in vitro corneal model, it is crucial to mimic the in vivo microenvironment of the cornea. In this study, the influence of surface topography and mechanical strain on keratocyte phenotype and ECM formation within a biomimetic 3D corneal model is studied. By modifying the surface topography of materials, it is found that patterned silk fibroin film with 600 grooves mm(-1) optimally supports cell alignment and ECM arrangement. Furthermore, treatment with 3% dome-shaped mechanical strain, which resembles the shape and mechanics of native cornea, significantly enhances the expression of keratocyte markers as compared to flat-shaped strain. Accordingly, a biomimetic 3D corneal model, in the form of a collagen-modified, silk fibroin-patterned construct subjected to 3% dome-shaped strain, is created. Compared to traditional 2D cultures, it supports a significantly higher expression of keratocyte and ECM markers, and in conclusion better maintains keratocyte phenotype, alignment, and fusiform cell shape. Therefore, the novel biomimetic 3D corneal model developed in this study serves as a useful in vitro 3D culture model to improve current 2D cultures for corneal studies.

  17. Polarized Raman anisotropic response of collagen in tendon: towards 3D orientation mapping of collagen in tissues.

    PubMed

    Galvis, Leonardo; Dunlop, John W C; Duda, Georg; Fratzl, Peter; Masic, Admir

    2013-01-01

    In this study, polarized Raman spectroscopy (PRS) was used to characterize the anisotropic response of the amide I band of collagen as a basis for evaluating three-dimensional collagen fibril orientation in tissues. Firstly, the response was investigated theoretically by applying classical Raman theory to collagen-like peptide crystal structures. The theoretical methodology was then tested experimentally, by measuring amide I intensity anisotropy in rat tail as a function of the orientation of the incident laser polarization. For the theoretical study, several collagen-like triple-helical peptide crystal structures obtained from the Protein Data Bank were rotated "in plane" and "out of plane" to evaluate the role of molecular orientation on the intensity of the amide I band. Collagen-like peptides exhibit a sinusoidal anisotropic response when rotated "in plane" with respect to the polarized incident laser. Maximal intensity was obtained when the polarization of the incident light is perpendicular to the molecule and minimal when parallel. In the case of "out of plane" rotation of the molecular structure a decreased anisotropic response was observed, becoming completely isotropic when the structure was perpendicular to the plane of observation. The theoretical Raman response of collagen was compared to that of alpha helical protein fragments. In contrast to collagen, alpha helices have a maximal signal when incident light is parallel to the molecule and minimal when perpendicular. For out-of-plane molecular orientations alpha-helix structures display a decreased average intensity. Results obtained from experiments on rat tail tendon are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions, thus demonstrating the high potential of PRS for experimental evaluation of the three-dimensional orientation of collagen fibers in biological tissues.

  18. Three-dimensional collagen matrix induces a mechanosensitive invasive epithelial phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Shawn P.; Martin, Karen E.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2017-01-01

    A critical step in breast cancer progression is local tissue invasion, during which cells pass from the epithelial compartment to the stromal compartment. We recently showed that malignant leader cells can promote the invasion of otherwise non-invasive epithelial follower cells, but the effects of this induced-invasion phenomenon on follower cell phenotype remain unclear. Notably, this process can expose epithelial cells to the stromal extracellular matrix (ECM), which is distinct from the ECM within the normal epithelial microenvironment. Here, we used a 3D epithelial morphogenesis model in which cells were cultured in biochemically and mechanically defined matrices to examine matrix-mediated gene expression and the associated phenotypic response. We found that 3D collagen matrix promoted expression of mesenchymal genes including MT1-MMP, which was required for collagen-stimulated invasive behavior. Epithelial invasion required matrix anchorage as well as signaling through Src, PI3K, and Rac1, and increasingly stiff collagen promoted dispersive epithelial cell invasion. These results suggest that leader cell-facilitated access to the stromal ECM may trigger an invasive phenotype in follower epithelial cells that could enable them to actively participate in local tissue invasion. PMID:28186196

  19. Maintenance of a bone collagen phenotype by osteoblast-like cells in 3D periodic porous titanium (Ti-6Al-4 V) structures fabricated by selective electron beam melting.

    PubMed

    Hrabe, Nikolas W; Heinl, Peter; Bordia, Rajendra K; Körner, Carolin; Fernandes, Russell J

    2013-01-01

    Regular 3D periodic porous Ti-6Al-4 V structures were fabricated by the selective electron beam melting method (EBM) over a range of relative densities (0.17-0.40) and pore sizes (500-1500 µm). Structures were seeded with human osteoblast-like cells (SAOS-2) and cultured for four weeks. Cells multiplied within these structures and extracellular matrix collagen content increased. Type I and type V collagens typically synthesized by osteoblasts were deposited in the newly formed matrix with time in culture. High magnification scanning electron microscopy revealed cells attached to surfaces on the interior of the structures with an increasingly fibrous matrix. The in-vitro results demonstrate that the novel EBM-processed porous structures, designed to address the effect of stress-shielding, are conducive to osteoblast attachment, proliferation and deposition of a collagenous matrix characteristic of bone.

  20. Extended gray level co-occurrence matrix computation for 3D image volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salih, Nurulazirah M.; Dewi, Dyah Ekashanti Octorina

    2017-02-01

    Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) is one of the main techniques for texture analysis that has been widely used in many applications. Conventional GLCMs usually focus on two-dimensional (2D) image texture analysis only. However, a three-dimensional (3D) image volume requires specific texture analysis computation. In this paper, an extended 2D to 3D GLCM approach based on the concept of multiple 2D plane positions and pixel orientation directions in the 3D environment is proposed. The algorithm was implemented by breaking down the 3D image volume into 2D slices based on five different plane positions (coordinate axes and oblique axes) resulting in 13 independent directions, then calculating the GLCMs. The resulted GLCMs were averaged to obtain normalized values, then the 3D texture features were calculated. A preliminary examination was performed on a 3D image volume (64 x 64 x 64 voxels). Our analysis confirmed that the proposed technique is capable of extracting the 3D texture features from the extended GLCMs approach. It is a simple and comprehensive technique that can contribute to the 3D image analysis.

  1. A method for the quantification of the pressure dependent 3D collagen configuration in the arterial adventitia.

    PubMed

    Schrauwen, J T C; Vilanova, A; Rezakhaniha, R; Stergiopulos, N; van de Vosse, F N; Bovendeerd, P H M

    2012-11-01

    Collagen plays an important role in the response of the arterial wall to mechanical loading and presumably has a load-bearing function preventing overdistension. Collagen configuration is important for understanding this role, in particular in mathematical models of arterial wall mechanics. In this study a new method is presented to image and quantify this configuration. Collagen in the arterial adventitia is stained with CNA35, and imaged in situ at high resolution with confocal microscopy at luminal pressures from 0 to 140mm Hg. The images are processed with a new automatic approach, utilizing techniques intended for MRI-DTI data. Collagen configuration is quantified through three parameters: the waviness, the transmural angle and the helical angle. The method is demonstrated for the case of carotid arteries of the white New Zealand rabbit. The waviness indicated a gradual straightening between 40 and 80mm Hg. The transmural angle was about zero indicating that the fibers stayed within an axial-circumferential plane at all pressures. The helical angle was characterized by a symmetrical distribution around the axial direction, indicating a double symmetrical helix. The method is the first to combine high resolution imaging with a new automatic image processing approach to quantify the 3D configuration of collagen in the adventitia as a function of pressure.

  2. In vitro bone formation by mesenchymal stem cells with 3D collagen/β-TCP composite scaffold.

    PubMed

    Todo, Mitsugu; Arahira, Takaaki

    2013-01-01

    Recent years, various kinds of natural polymers and bioceramics has been used to develop porous scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Among of them, collagen guarantees good biological conditions, and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) possesses good oseteoconductivity, cellular adhesion, accelerated differentiation and mechanical property. In this study, rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rMSC) were cultured in β-TCP/collagen composite scaffolds up to 28 days in order to assess the time-dependent behavior of the extracellular matrix formation and the mechanical performance of the scaffold-cell system. The cell number and ALP activity were evaluated using a spectrophotometric plate reader. Gene expression of osteogenesis was analyzed using the real-time PCR reactions. Compression tests were also conducted periodically by using a conventional testing machine to evaluate the elastic modulus. The increasing behaviors of cell number and ALP activity in the composite scaffold were much better than in the collagen scaffold. The gene expression of osteocalcin and collagen type-I in collagen/β-TCP scaffold was higher than that of the collagen scaffold. The compressive modulus also increased up to 28 days. These results clearly showed that the distribution of micro β-TCP particles is very effective to increase the elastic modulus and promote cell growth.

  3. Collagen Matrix Density Drives the Metabolic Shift in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Morris, Brett A; Burkel, Brian; Ponik, Suzanne M; Fan, Jing; Condeelis, John S; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A; Castracane, James; Denu, John M; Keely, Patricia J

    2016-11-01

    Increased breast density attributed to collagen I deposition is associated with a 4-6 fold increased risk of developing breast cancer. Here, we assessed cellular metabolic reprogramming of mammary carcinoma cells in response to increased collagen matrix density using an in vitro 3D model. Our initial observations demonstrated changes in functional metabolism in both normal mammary epithelial cells and mammary carcinoma cells in response to changes in matrix density. Further, mammary carcinoma cells grown in high density collagen matrices displayed decreased oxygen consumption and glucose metabolism via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle compared to cells cultured in low density matrices. Despite decreased glucose entry into the TCA cycle, levels of glucose uptake, cell viability, and ROS were not different between high and low density matrices. Interestingly, under high density conditions the contribution of glutamine as a fuel source to drive the TCA cycle was significantly enhanced. These alterations in functional metabolism mirrored significant changes in the expression of metabolic genes involved in glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, and the serine synthesis pathway. This study highlights the broad importance of the collagen microenvironment to cellular expression profiles, and shows that changes in density of the collagen microenvironment can modulate metabolic shifts of cancer cells.

  4. Collagen-binding VEGF mimetic peptide: Structure, matrix interaction, and endothelial cell activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Tania R.

    Long term survival of artificial tissue constructs depends greatly on proper vascularization. In nature, differentiation of endothelial cells and formation of vasculature are directed by dynamic spatio-temporal cues in the extracellular matrix that are difficult to reproduce in vitro. In this dissertation, we present a novel bifunctional peptide that mimics matrix-bound vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which can be used to encode spatially controlled angiogenic signals in collagen-based scaffolds. The peptide, QKCMP, contains a collagen mimetic domain (CMP) that binds to type I collagen by a unique triple helix hybridization mechanism and a VEGF mimetic domain (QK) with pro-angiogenic activity. We demonstrate QKCMP's ability to hybridize with native and heat denatured collagens through a series of binding studies on collagen and gelatin substrates. Circular dichroism experiments show that the peptide retains the triple helical structure vital for collagen binding, and surface plasmon resonance study confirms the molecular interaction between the peptide and collagen strands. Cell culture studies demonstrate QKCMP's ability to induce endothelial cell morphogenesis and network formation as a matrix-bound factor in 2D and 3D collagen scaffolds. We also show that the peptide can be used to spatially modify collagen-based substrates to promote localized endothelial cell activation and network formation. To probe the biological events that govern these angiogenic cellular responses, we investigated the cell signaling pathways activated by collagen-bound QKCMP and determined short and long-term endothelial cell response profiles for p38, ERK1/2, and Akt signal transduction cascades. Finally, we present our efforts to translate the peptide's in vitro bioactivity to an in vivo burn injury animal model. When implanted at the wound site, QKCMP functionalized biodegradable hydrogels induce enhanced neovascularization in the granulation tissue. The results show QKCMP

  5. Mechanical model for a collagen fibril pair in extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yue; Cox, Grant M; Haverkamp, Richard G; Hill, James M

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we model the mechanics of a collagen pair in the connective tissue extracellular matrix that exists in abundance throughout animals, including the human body. This connective tissue comprises repeated units of two main structures, namely collagens as well as axial, parallel and regular anionic glycosaminoglycan between collagens. The collagen fibril can be modeled by Hooke's law whereas anionic glycosaminoglycan behaves more like a rubber-band rod and as such can be better modeled by the worm-like chain model. While both computer simulations and continuum mechanics models have been investigated for the behavior of this connective tissue typically, authors either assume a simple form of the molecular potential energy or entirely ignore the microscopic structure of the connective tissue. Here, we apply basic physical methodologies and simple applied mathematical modeling techniques to describe the collagen pair quantitatively. We found that the growth of fibrils was intimately related to the maximum length of the anionic glycosaminoglycan and the relative displacement of two adjacent fibrils, which in return was closely related to the effectiveness of anionic glycosaminoglycan in transmitting forces between fibrils. These reveal the importance of the anionic glycosaminoglycan in maintaining the structural shape of the connective tissue extracellular matrix and eventually the shape modulus of human tissues. We also found that some macroscopic properties, like the maximum molecular energy and the breaking fraction of the collagen, were also related to the microscopic characteristics of the anionic glycosaminoglycan.

  6. Extracellular matrix composition and rigidity regulate invasive behavior and response to PDT in 3D pancreatic tumor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Gwendolyn; El-Hamidi, Hamid; Jafari, Seyedehrojin; Jones, Dustin P.; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2016-03-01

    The composition and mechanical compliance of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to serve as regulators of tumor growth and invasive behavior. These effects may be particularly relevant in tumors of the pancreas, noted for a profound desmoplastic reaction and an abundance of stroma rich in ECM. In view of recent progress in the clinical implementation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for pancreatic tumors, in this report we examine how ECM composition and rheological properties impact upon invasive behavior and response to PDT in 3D multicellular pancreatic tumor spheroids in ECM environments with characterized rheological properties. Tumor spheroids were cultured initially in attachment-free conditions to form millimeter-sized spheroids that were transplanted into reconstituted ECM microenvironments (Matrigel and Type I Collagen) that were characterized using bulk oscillatory shear rheology. Analysis of growth behavior shows that the soft collagen ECM promoted growth and extensive invasion and this microenvironment was used in subsequent assessment of PDT and chemotherapy response. Evaluation of treatment response revealed that primary tumor nodule growth is inhibited more effectively with PDT, while verteporfin PDT response is significantly enhanced in the ECM-infiltrating populations that are non-responsive to oxaliplatin chemotherapy. This finding is potentially significant, suggesting the potential for PDT to target these clinically problematic invasive populations that are associated with aggressive metastatic progression and chemoresistance. Experiments to further validate and identify the mechanistic basis of this observation are ongoing.

  7. The Synergistic Effects of Matrix Stiffness and Composition on the Response of Chondroprogenitor Cells in a 3D Precondensation Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Carrion, Bita; Souzanchi, Mohammad F; Wang, Victor T; Tiruchinapally, Gopinath; Shikanov, Ariella; Putnam, Andrew J; Coleman, Rhima M

    2016-05-01

    Improve functional quality of cartilage tissue engineered from stem cells requires a better understanding of the functional evolution of native cartilage tissue. Therefore, a biosynthetic hydrogel was developed containing RGD, hyaluronic acid and/or type-I collagen conjugated to poly(ethylene glycol) acrylate to recapitulate the precondensation microenvironment of the developing limb. Conjugation of any combination of the three ligands did not alter the shear moduli or diffusion properties of the PEG hydrogels; thus, the influence of ligand composition on chondrogenesis could be investigated in the context of varying matrix stiffness. Gene expression of ligand receptors (CD44 and the b1-integrin) as well as markers of condensation (cell clustering and N-cadherin gene expression) and chondrogenesis (Col2a1 gene expression and sGAG production) by chondroprogenitor cells in this system were modulated by both matrix stiffness and ligand composition, with the highest gene expression occurring in softer hydrogels containing all three ligands. Cell proliferation in these 3D matrices for 7 d prior to chondrogenic induction increased the rate of sGAG production in a stiffness-dependent manner. This biosynthetic hydrogel supports the features of early limb-bud condensation and chondrogenesis and is a novel platform in which the influence of the matrix physicochemical properties on these processes can be elucidated.

  8. Implementation of parallel matrix decomposition for NIKE3D on the KSR1 system

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Philip S.; Fulton, R.E.; Zacharia, T.

    1995-06-01

    New massively parallel computer architecture has revolutionized the design of computer algorithms and promises to have significant influence on algorithms for engineering computations. Realistic engineering problems using finite element analysis typically imply excessively large computational requirements. Parallel supercomputers that have the potential for significantly increasing calculation speeds can meet these computational requirements. This report explores the potential for the parallel Cholesky (U{sup T}DU) matrix decomposition algorithm on NIKE3D through actual computations. The examples of two- and three-dimensional nonlinear dynamic finite element problems are presented on the Kendall Square Research (KSR1) multiprocessor system, with 64 processors, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The numerical results indicate that the parallel Cholesky (U{sup T}DU) matrix decomposition algorithm is attractive for NIKE3D under multi-processor system environments.

  9. Measurement Matrix Optimization and Mismatch Problem Compensation for DLSLA 3-D SAR Cross-Track Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Qian; Jiang, Chenglong; Lin, Yun; Tan, Weixian; Wang, Zhirui; Hong, Wen

    2016-01-01

    With a short linear array configured in the cross-track direction, downward looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (DLSLA 3-D SAR) can obtain the 3-D image of an imaging scene. To improve the cross-track resolution, sparse recovery methods have been investigated in recent years. In the compressive sensing (CS) framework, the reconstruction performance depends on the property of measurement matrix. This paper concerns the technique to optimize the measurement matrix and deal with the mismatch problem of measurement matrix caused by the off-grid scatterers. In the model of cross-track reconstruction, the measurement matrix is mainly affected by the configuration of antenna phase centers (APC), thus, two mutual coherence based criteria are proposed to optimize the configuration of APCs. On the other hand, to compensate the mismatch problem of the measurement matrix, the sparse Bayesian inference based method is introduced into the cross-track reconstruction by jointly estimate the scatterers and the off-grid error. Experiments demonstrate the performance of the proposed APCs’ configuration schemes and the proposed cross-track reconstruction method. PMID:27556471

  10. Measurement Matrix Optimization and Mismatch Problem Compensation for DLSLA 3-D SAR Cross-Track Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bao, Qian; Jiang, Chenglong; Lin, Yun; Tan, Weixian; Wang, Zhirui; Hong, Wen

    2016-08-22

    With a short linear array configured in the cross-track direction, downward looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (DLSLA 3-D SAR) can obtain the 3-D image of an imaging scene. To improve the cross-track resolution, sparse recovery methods have been investigated in recent years. In the compressive sensing (CS) framework, the reconstruction performance depends on the property of measurement matrix. This paper concerns the technique to optimize the measurement matrix and deal with the mismatch problem of measurement matrix caused by the off-grid scatterers. In the model of cross-track reconstruction, the measurement matrix is mainly affected by the configuration of antenna phase centers (APC), thus, two mutual coherence based criteria are proposed to optimize the configuration of APCs. On the other hand, to compensate the mismatch problem of the measurement matrix, the sparse Bayesian inference based method is introduced into the cross-track reconstruction by jointly estimate the scatterers and the off-grid error. Experiments demonstrate the performance of the proposed APCs' configuration schemes and the proposed cross-track reconstruction method.

  11. A 3D printed nano bone matrix for characterization of breast cancer cell and osteoblast interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Castro, Nathan J.; Cui, Haitao; Zhou, Xuan; Boualam, Benchaa; McGrane, Robert; Glazer, Robert I.; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-08-01

    Bone metastasis is one of the most prevalent complications of late-stage breast cancer, in which the native bone matrix components, including osteoblasts, are intimately involved in tumor progression. The development of a successful in vitro model would greatly facilitate understanding the underlying mechanism of breast cancer bone invasion as well as provide a tool for effective discovery of novel therapeutic strategies. In the current study, we fabricated a series of in vitro bone matrices composed of a polyethylene glycol hydrogel and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite of varying concentrations to mimic the native bone microenvironment for the investigation of breast cancer bone metastasis. A stereolithography-based three-dimensional (3D) printer was used to fabricate the bone matrices with precisely controlled architecture. The interaction between breast cancer cells and osteoblasts was investigated in the optimized bone matrix. Using a Transwell® system to separate the two cell lines, breast cancer cells inhibited osteoblast proliferation, while osteoblasts stimulated breast cancer cell growth, whereas, both cell lines increased IL-8 secretion. Breast cancer cells co-cultured with osteoblasts within the 3D bone matrix formed multi-cellular spheroids in comparison to two-dimensional monolayers. These findings validate the use of our 3D printed bone matrices as an in vitro metastasis model, and highlights their potential for investigating breast cancer bone metastasis.

  12. Immunomodulatory effects of amniotic membrane matrix incorporated into collagen scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Hortensius, Rebecca A.; Ebens, Jill H.; Harley, Brendan A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Adult tendon wound repair is characterized by the formation of disorganized collagen matrix which leads to decreases in mechanical properties and scar formation. Studies have linked this scar formation to the inflammatory phase of wound healing. Instructive biomaterials designed for tendon regeneration are often designed to provide both structural and cellular support. In order to facilitate regeneration, success may be found by tempering the body’s inflammatory response. This work combines collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds, previously developed for tissue regeneration, with matrix materials (hyaluronic acid and amniotic membrane) that have been shown to promote healing and decreased scar formation in skin studies. The results presented show that scaffolds containing amniotic membrane matrix have significantly increased mechanical properties and that tendon cells within these scaffolds have increased metabolic activity even when the media is supplemented with the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta. Collagen scaffolds containing hyaluronic acid or amniotic membrane also temper the expression of genes associated with the inflammatory response in normal tendon healing (TNF-α, COLI, MMP-3). These results suggest that alterations to scaffold composition, to include matrix known to decrease scar formation in vivo, can modify the inflammatory response in tenocytes. PMID:26799369

  13. Biochemical changes in the collagenous matrix of osteoporotic avian bone.

    PubMed Central

    Knott, L; Whitehead, C C; Fleming, R H; Bailey, A J

    1995-01-01

    No detailed biochemical analysis has been carried out of the compositional changes in the collagen matrix of avian bone in relation to increased bone fragility in osteoporosis. We have shown that osteoporosis in avian bone is certainly not just a simple loss of apatite and collagen, but involves significant changes in the biochemistry of the collagen molecule and consequently in the physical properties of the fibre. The decreased mechanical strength and the change in the thermal stability can be directly related to changes in post-translational modifications, i.e. lysine hydroxylation and the intermolecular cross-link profile. The increased hydroxylation and change in cross-linking are consistent with increased turnover of the collagen, possibly in an attempt to initiate a repair mechanism which, in fact, leads to an acceleration in the increase in fragility of the bone. Clearly there are post-translational modifications of the newly synthesized collagen in avian osteoporosis, and these changes may play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Images Figure 1 PMID:7575401

  14. Ornamenting 3D printed scaffolds with cell-laid extracellular matrix for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pati, Falguni; Song, Tae-Ha; Rijal, Girdhari; Jang, Jinah; Kim, Sung Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    3D printing technique is the most sophisticated technique to produce scaffolds with tailorable physical properties. But, these scaffolds often suffer from limited biological functionality as they are typically made from synthetic materials. Cell-laid mineralized ECM was shown to be potential for improving the cellular responses and drive osteogenesis of stem cells. Here, we intend to improve the biological functionality of 3D-printed synthetic scaffolds by ornamenting them with cell-laid mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM) that mimics a bony microenvironment. We developed bone graft substitutes by using 3D printed scaffolds made from a composite of polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and mineralized ECM laid by human nasal inferior turbinate tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hTMSCs). A rotary flask bioreactor was used to culture hTMSCs on the scaffolds to foster formation of mineralized ECM. A freeze/thaw cycle in hypotonic buffer was used to efficiently decellularize (97% DNA reduction) the ECM-ornamented scaffolds while preserving its main organic and inorganic components. The ECM-ornamented 3D printed scaffolds supported osteoblastic differentiation of newly-seeded hTMSCs by upregulating four typical osteoblastic genes (4-fold higher RUNX2; 3-fold higher ALP; 4-fold higher osteocalcin; and 4-fold higher osteopontin) and increasing calcium deposition compared to bare 3D printed scaffolds. In vivo, in ectopic and orthotopic models in rats, ECM-ornamented scaffolds induced greater bone formation than that of bare scaffolds. These results suggest a valuable method to produce ECM-ornamented 3D printed scaffolds as off-the-shelf bone graft substitutes that combine tunable physical properties with physiological presentation of biological signals.

  15. Imaging of collagen matrix remodeling in three-dimensional space using second harmonic generation and two photon excitation fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Thomas; Carthy, Jon; McManus, Bruce

    2009-02-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG), a nonlinear optical phenomenon, exhibits several in-common characteristics of twophoton excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy. These characteristics include identical equipment requirements from experiment to experiment and the intrinsic capability of generating 3-dimensional (D) high resolution images. Structural protein arrays that are highly ordered, such as collagen, produce strong SHG signals without the need for any exogenous label (stain). SHG and TPEF can be used together to provide information on structural rearrangements in 3D space of the collagen matrix associated with various physiological processes. In this study, we used SHG and TPEF to detect cellmediated structural reorganization of the extracellular collagen matrix in 3D space triggered by dimensional changes of embedded fibroblasts. These fibroblasts were cultured in native type I collagen gels and were stimulated to contract for a period of 24 hours. The gels were stained for cell nuclei with Hoechst and for actin with phalloidin conjugated to Alexa Fluor 488. We used non-de-scanned detectors and spectral scanning mode both in the reflection geometry for generating the 3D images and for SHG spectra, respectively. We used a tunable infrared laser with 100-fs pulses at a repetition rate of 80-MHz tuned to 800-nm for Hoechst and Alexa 488 excitations. We employed a broad range of excitation wavelengths (800 to 880-nm) with a scan interval of 10 nm to detect the SHG signal. We found that spectrally clean SHG signal peaked at 414-nm with excitation wavelength of 830-nm. The SHG spectrum has a full width half maximum (FWHM) bandwidth of 6.60-nm, which is consistent with its scaling relation to FWHM bandwidth 100-fs excitation pulses. When stimulated to contract, we found the fibroblasts to be highly elongated as well as interconnected in 2D space, and the collagen matrix, in the form of a visibly clear fibril structure, accumulated around the cells. In the absence of

  16. SEM evaluation of nanoparticulate silver penetration into dentine collagen matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessudnova, Nadezda O.; Bilenko, David I.; Venig, Sergey B.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study a novel approach to caries management based on the application of nanoparticles of different nature to increase the mineral phase of demineralized dentin has been developed. Silver nanoparticles have been tested as a material for dentine matrix infiltration. Research findings clearly show that collagen fibers of demineralized dentine could be considered as a scaffold for mineral component delivery and the place where mineral growth can occur.

  17. Podosomes in space: macrophage migration and matrix degradation in 2D and 3D settings.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Christiane; Le-Cabec, Véronique; El Azzouzi, Karim; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Linder, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Migration of macrophages is a key process for a variety of physiological functions, such as pathogen clearance or tissue homeostasis. However, it can also be part of pathological scenarios, as in the case of tumor-associated macrophages. This review presents an overview of the different migration modes macrophages can adopt, depending on the physical and chemical properties of specific environments, and the constraints they impose upon cells. We discuss the importance of these environmental and also of cellular parameters, as well as their relative impact on macrophage migration and on the formation of matrix-lytic podosomes in 2D and 3D. Moreover, we present an overview of routinely used and also newly developed assays for the study of macrophage migration in both 2D and 3D contexts, their respective advantages and limitations, and also their potential to reliably mimic in vivo situations.

  18. Fatigue of a 3D Orthogonal Non-crimp Woven Polymer Matrix Composite at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, M. P.; Ruggles-Wrenn, M. B.

    2017-02-01

    Tension-tension fatigue behavior of two polymer matrix composites (PMCs) was studied at elevated temperature. The two PMCs consist of the NRPE polyimide matrix reinforced with carbon fibers, but have different fiber architectures: the 3D PMC is a singly-ply non-crimp 3D orthogonal weave composite and the 2D PMC, a laminated composite reinforced with 15 plies of an eight harness satin weave (8HSW) fabric. In order to assess the performance and suitability of the two composites for use in aerospace components designed to contain high-temperature environments, mechanical tests were performed under temperature conditions simulating the actual operating conditions. In all elevated temperature tests performed in this work, one side of the test specimen was at 329 °C while the other side was open to ambient laboratory air. The tensile stress-strain behavior of the two composites was investigated and the tensile properties measured for both on-axis (0/90) and off-axis (±45) fiber orientations. Elevated temperature had little effect on the on-axis tensile properties of the two composites. The off-axis tensile strength of both PMCs decreased slightly at elevated temperature. Tension-tension fatigue tests were conducted at elevated temperature at a frequency of 1.0 Hz with a ratio of minimum stress to maximum stress of R = 0.05. Fatigue run-out was defined as 2 × 105 cycles. Both strain accumulation and modulus evolution during cycling were analyzed for each fatigue test. The laminated 2D PMC exhibited better fatigue resistance than the 3D composite. Specimens that achieved fatigue run-out were subjected to tensile tests to failure to characterize the retained tensile properties. Post-test examination under optical microscope revealed severe delamination in the laminated 2D PMC. The non-crimp 3D orthogonal weave composite offered improved delamination resistance.

  19. 3D Bioprinting a Cell-Laden Bone Matrix for Breast Cancer Metastasis Study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Zhu, Wei; Nowicki, Margaret; Miao, Shida; Cui, Haitao; Holmes, Benjamin; Glazer, Robert I; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-11-09

    Metastasis is one of the deadliest consequences of breast cancer, with bone being one of the primary sites of occurrence. Insufficient 3D biomimetic models currently exist to replicate this process in vitro. In this study, we developed a biomimetic bone matrix using 3D bioprinting technology to investigate the interaction between breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone stromal cells (fetal osteoblasts and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)). A tabletop stereolithography 3D bioprinter was employed to fabricate a series of bone matrices consisting of osteoblasts or MSCs encapsulated in gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogel with nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA). When BrCa cells were introduced into the stromal cell-laden bioprinted matrices, we found that the growth of BrCa cells was enhanced by the presence of osteoblasts or MSCs, whereas the proliferation of the osteoblasts or MSCs was inhibited by the BrCa cells. The BrCa cells co-cultured with MSCs or osteoblasts presented increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion in comparison to that of monocultured BrCa cells. Additionally, the alkaline phosphatase activity of MSCs or osteoblasts was reduced after BrCa cell co-culture. These results demonstrate that the 3D bioprinted matrix, with BrCa cells and bone stromal cells, provides a suitable model with which to study the interactive effects of cells in the context of an artificial bone microenvironment and thus may serve as a valuable tool for the investigation of postmetastatic breast cancer progression in bone.

  20. Patterning of Fibroblast and Matrix Anisotropy within 3D Confinement is Driven by the Cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Serbo, Janna V; Kuo, Scot; Lewis, Shawna; Lehmann, Matthew; Li, Jiuru; Gracias, David H; Romer, Lewis H

    2016-01-07

    Effects of 3D confinement on cellular growth and matrix assembly are important in tissue engineering, developmental biology, and regenerative medicine. Polydimethylsiloxane wells with varying anisotropy are microfabicated using soft-lithography. Microcontact printing of bovine serum albumin is used to block cell adhesion to surfaces between wells. The orientations of fibroblast stress fibers, microtubules, and fibronectin fibrils are examined 1 day after cell seeding using laser scanning confocal microscopy, and anisotropy is quantified using a custom autocorrelation analysis. Actin, microtubules, and fibronectin exhibit higher anisotropy coefficients for cells grown in rectangular wells with aspect ratios of 1:4 and 1:8, as compared to those in wells with lower aspect ratios or in square wells. The effects of disabling individual cytoskeletal components on fibroblast responses to anisotropy are then tested by applying actin or microtubule polymerization inhibitors, Rho kinase inhibitor, or by siRNA-mediated knockdown of AXL or cofilin-1. Latrunculin A decreases cytoskeletal and matrix anisotropy, nocodazole ablates both, and Y27632 mutes cellular polarity while decreasing matrix anisotropy. AXL siRNA knockdown has little effect, as does siRNA knockdown of cofilin-1. These data identify several specific cytoskeletal strategies as targets for the manipulation of anisotropy in 3D tissue constructs.

  1. Role of LRP-1 in cancer cell migration in 3-dimensional collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Appert-Collin, Aline; Bennasroune, Amar; Jeannesson, Pierre; Terryn, Christine; Fuhrmann, Guy; Morjani, Hamid; Dedieu, Stéphane

    2016-07-27

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1) is a member of Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor (LDLR) family, which is ubiquitously expressed and which is described as a multifunctional endocytic receptor which mediates the clearance of various extracellular matrix molecules including serine proteinases, proteinase-inhibitor complexes, and matricellular proteins. Several studies showed that high LRP-1 expression promotes breast cancer cell invasiveness, and LRP-1 invalidation leads to cell motility abrogation in both tumor and non-tumor cells. Furthermore, our group has reported that LRP-1 silencing prevents the invasion of a follicular thyroid carcinoma despite increased pericellular proteolytic activities from MMP2 and uPA using a 2D-cell culture model. As the use of 3D culture systems is becoming more and more popular due to their promise as enhanced models of tissue physiology, the aim of the present work is to characterize for the first time how the 3D collagen type I matrix may impact the ability of LRP-1 to regulate the migratory properties of thyroid carcinoma using as a model FTC-133 cells. Our results show that inhibition of LRP-1 activity or expression leads to morphological changes affecting cell-matrix interactions, reorganizations of the actin-cytoskeleton especially by inhibiting FAK activation and increasing RhoA activity and MLC-2 phosphorylation, thus preventing cell migration. Taken together, our results suggest that LRP-1 silencing leads to a decrease of cell migratory capacity in a 3D configuration.

  2. Collagen/heparin sulfate scaffolds fabricated by a 3D bioprinter improved mechanical properties and neurological function after spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chong; Zhao, Ming-Liang; Zhang, Ren-Kun; Lu, Gang; Zhao, Chang-Yu; Fu, Feng; Sun, Hong-Tao; Zhang, Sai; Tu, Yue; Li, Xiao-Hong

    2017-01-25

    Effective treatments promoting axonal regeneration and functional recovery for spinal cord injury (SCI) are still in the early stages of development. Most approaches have been focused on providing supportive substrates for guiding neurons and overcoming the physical and chemical barriers to healing that arise after SCI. Although collagen has become a promising natural substrate with good compatibility, its low mechanical properties restrict its potential applications. The mechanical properties mainly rely on the composition and pore structure of scaffolds. For the composition of a scaffold, we used heparin sulfate to react with collagen by crosslinking. For the structure, we adopted a three-dimensional (3D) printing technology to fabricate a scaffold with a uniform pore distributions. We observed that the internal structure of the scaffold printed with a 3D bioprinter was regular and porous. We also found that both the compression modulus and strengths of the scaffold were significantly enhanced by the collagen/heparin sulfate composition compared to a collagen scaffold. Meanwhile, the collagen/heparin sulfate scaffold presented good biocompatibility when it was co-cultured with neural stem cells in vitro. We also demonstrated that heparin sulfate modification significantly improved bFGF immobilization and absorption to the collagen by examining the release kinetics of bFGF from scaffolds. Two months after implantating the scaffold into transection lesions in T10 of the spinal cord in rats, the collagen/heparin sulfate group demonstrated significant recovery of locomotor function and according to electrophysiological examinations. Parallel to functional recovery, collagen/heparin sulfate treatment further ameliorated the pathological process and markedly increased the number of neurofilament (NF) positive cells compared to collagen treatment alone. These data suggested that a collagen/heparin sulfate scaffold fabricated by a 3D bioprinter could enhance the

  3. Matrix metalloproteinase 9 modulates collagen matrices and wound repair

    PubMed Central

    LeBert, Danny C.; Squirrell, Jayne M.; Rindy, Julie; Broadbridge, Elizabeth; Lui, Yuming; Zakrzewska, Anna; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Meijer, Annemarie H.; Huttenlocher, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic injuries are characterized by leukocyte infiltration into tissues. Although matrix metalloproteinase 9 (Mmp9) has been implicated in both conditions, its role in wound repair remains unclear. We previously reported a zebrafish chronic inflammation mutant caused by an insertion in the hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor gene 1 (hai1; also known as spint1) that is characterized by epithelial extrusions and neutrophil infiltration into the fin. Here, we performed a microarray analysis and found increased inflammatory gene expression in the mutant larvae, including a marked increase in mmp9 expression. Depletion of mmp9 partially rescued the chronic inflammation and epithelial phenotypes, in addition to restoring collagen fiber organization, as detected by second-harmonic generation imaging. Additionally, we found that acute wounding induces epithelial cell mmp9 expression and is associated with a thickening of collagen fibers. Interestingly, depletion of mmp9 impaired this collagen fiber reorganization. Moreover, mmp9 depletion impaired tissue regeneration after tail transection, implicating Mmp9 in acute wound repair. Thus, Mmp9 regulates both acute and chronic tissue damage and plays an essential role in collagen reorganization during wound repair. PMID:26015541

  4. Flow integration transform: detecting shapes in matrix-array 3D ultrasound data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetten, George D.; Caines, Michael; von Ramm, Olaf T.

    1995-03-01

    Matrix-array ultrasound produces real-time 3D images of the heart, by employing a square array of transducers to steer the ultrasound beam in three dimensions electronically with no moving parts. Other 3D modalities such as MR, MUGA, and CT require the use of gated studies, which combine many cardiac cycles to produce a single average cycle. Three- dimensional ultrasound eliminates this restriction, in theory permitting the continuous measurement of cardiac ventricular volume, which we call the volumetricardiogram. Towards implementing the volumetricardiogram, we have developed the flow integration transform (FIT), which operates on a 2D slice within the volumetric ultrasound data. The 3D ultrasound machine's scan converter produces a set of such slices in real time, at any desired location and orientation, to which the FIT may then be applied. Although lacking rotational or scale invariance, the FIT is designed to operate in dedicated hardware where an entire transform could be completed within a few microseconds with present integrated circuit technology. This speed would permit the application of a large battery of test shapes, or the evolution of the test shape to converge on that of the actual target.

  5. Front-end receiver electronics for a matrix transducer for 3-D transesophageal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zili; Blaak, Sandra; Chang, Zu-yao; Yao, Jiajian; Bosch, Johan G; Prins, Christian; Lancée, Charles T; de Jong, Nico; Pertijs, Michiel A P; Meijer, Gerard C M

    2012-07-01

    There is a clear clinical need for creating 3-D images of the heart. One promising technique is the use of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). To enable 3-D TEE, we are developing a miniature ultrasound probe containing a matrix piezoelectric transducer with more than 2000 elements. Because a gastroscopic tube cannot accommodate the cables needed to connect all transducer elements directly to an imaging system, a major challenge is to locally reduce the number of channels, while maintaining a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. This can be achieved by using front-end receiver electronics bonded to the transducers to provide appropriate signal conditioning in the tip of the probe. This paper presents the design of such electronics, realizing time-gain compensation (TGC) and micro-beamforming using simple, low-power circuits. Prototypes of TGC amplifiers and micro-beamforming cells have been fabricated in 0.35-μm CMOS technology. These prototype chips have been combined on a printed circuit board (PCB) to form an ultrasound-receiver system capable of reading and combining the signals of three transducer elements. Experimental results show that this design is a suitable candidate for 3-D TEE.

  6. Migration and Proliferative Activity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in 3D Polylactide Scaffolds Depends on Cell Seeding Technique and Collagen Modification.

    PubMed

    Rodina, A V; Tenchurin, T Kh; Saprykin, V P; Shepelev, A D; Mamagulashvili, V G; Grigor'ev, T E; Lukanina, K I; Orekhov, A S; Moskaleva, E Yu; Chvalun, S N

    2016-11-01

    We analyzed viability of mesenchymal stem cells seeded by static and dynamic methods to highly porous fibrous 3D poly-L-lactide scaffolds with similar physical and chemical properties, but different spatial organization modified with collagen. Standard collagen coating promoted protein adsorption on the scaffold surface and improved adhesive properties of 100 μ-thick scaffolds. Modification of 600-μ scaffolds with collagen under pressure increased proliferative activity of mesenchymal stem cells seeded under static and dynamic (delivery of 100,000 cells in 10 ml medium in a perfusion system at a rate of 1 ml/min) conditions by 47 and 648%, respectively (measured after 120-h culturing by MTT test). Dynamic conditions provide more uniform distribution of collagen on scaffold fibers and promote cell penetration into 3D poly-L-lactide scaffolds with thickness >600 μ.

  7. Human bronchial epithelial cells differentiate to 3D glandular acini on basement membrane matrix.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaofang; Peters-Hall, Jennifer R; Bose, Sumit; Peña, Maria T; Rose, Mary C

    2011-06-01

    To create a model system that investigates mechanisms resulting in hyperplasia and hypertrophy of respiratory tract submucosal glands, we developed an in vitro three-dimensional (3D) system wherein normal human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells differentiated into glandular acini when grown on a basement membrane matrix. The differentiation of primary HBE cells into glandular acini was monitored temporally by light microscopy. Apoptosis-induced lumen formation was observed by immunofluorescence analysis. The acinar cells expressed and secreted MUC5B mucin (marker for glandular mucous cells) and lysozyme, lactoferrin, and zinc-α2-glycoprotein (markers for glandular serous cells) at Day 22. β-Tubulin IV, a marker for ciliated cells, was not detected. Expression of mucous and serous cell markers in HBE glandular acini demonstrated that HBE cells grown on a basement membrane matrix differentiated into acini that exhibit molecular characteristics of respiratory tract glandular acinar cells. Inhibition studies with neutralizing antibodies resulted in a marked decrease in size of the spheroids at Day 7, demonstrating that laminin (a major component of the basement membrane matrix), the cell surface receptor integrin α6, and the cell junction marker E-cadherin have functional roles in HBE acinar morphogenesis. No significant variability was detected in the average size of glandular acini formed by HBE cells from two normal individuals. These results demonstrated that this in vitro model system is reproducible, stable, and potentially useful for studies of glandular differentiation and hyperplasia.

  8. Response of microscale cell/matrix constructs to successive force application in a 3D environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Alan; Chen, Christopher; Reich, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical dilation of arteries by pulsatile blood flow is directly opposed by coordinated contraction of a band of smooth muscle tissue that envelops the vessels. This mechanical adaptation of smooth muscle cells to external loading is a critical feature of normal blood vessel function. While most previous studies on biomechanical systems have focused on single cells or large excised tissue, we utilize a device to apply forces to engineered smooth muscle microtissues. This device consists of arrayed pairs of elastomeric micro-cantilevers capable of magnetic actuation. Tissues are formed through self-assembly following the introduction of cell-infused collagen gel to the array. With this system, we are able to dynamically stretch and relax these sub-millimeter sized tissues. The timing and magnitude of the force application can be precisely controlled and thus can be used to mimic a wide range of physiological behavior. In particular, we will discuss results that show that the interval between successive force applications mediates the both the subsequent mechanical and active dynamics of the cell/matrix composite system. Understanding this process will lead to better understanding of the interplay between cell and extracellular matrix responses to mechanical stimulus at a novel length scale.

  9. Alveolar Ridge Preservation Using Xenogeneic Collagen Matrix and Bone Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Parashis, Andreas O.; Kalaitzakis, Charalampos J.; Tatakis, Dimitris N.; Tosios, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar ridge preservation (ARP) has been shown to prevent postextraction bone loss. The aim of this report is to highlight the clinical, radiographic, and histological outcomes following use of a bilayer xenogeneic collagen matrix (XCM) in combination with freeze-dried bone allograft (FDBA) for ARP. Nine patients were treated after extraction of 18 teeth. Following minimal flap elevation and atraumatic extraction, sockets were filled with FDBA. The XCM was adapted to cover the defect and 2-3 mm of adjacent bone and flaps were repositioned. Healing was uneventful in all cases, the XCM remained in place, and any matrix exposure was devoid of further complications. Exposed matrix portions were slowly vascularized and replaced by mature keratinized tissue within 2-3 months. Radiographic and clinical assessment indicated adequate volume of bone for implant placement, with all planned implants placed in acceptable positions. When fixed partial dentures were placed, restorations fulfilled aesthetic demands without requiring further augmentation procedures. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis from 9 sites (4 patients) indicated normal mucosa with complete incorporation of the matrix and absence of inflammatory response. The XCM + FDBA combination resulted in minimal complications and desirable soft and hard tissue therapeutic outcomes, suggesting the feasibility of this approach for ARP. PMID:25328523

  10. Pore structure and dielectric behaviour of the 3D collagen-DAC scaffolds designed for nerve tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Pietrucha, Krystyna; Marzec, Ewa; Kudzin, Marcin

    2016-11-01

    The design and selection of a suitable scaffold with well-defined pores size distribution and dielectric properties are critical features for neural tissue engineering. In this study we use mercury porosimetry and the dielectric spectroscopy in the alpha-dispersion region of the electric field to determine the microarchitecture and activation energy of collagen (Col) modified by 2,3 dialdehyde cellulose (DAC). The scaffold was synthesized in three steps: (i) preparation of DAC by oxidation of cellulose, (ii) construction of a 3D Col sponge-shape or film, (iii) cross-linkage of the Col samples using DAC. The activation energy needed to break the bonds formed by water in the Col-DAC composite is approximately 2 times lower than that in the unmodified Col. In addition, the magnitude of conductivity for modified Col at 70°C is approximately 40% lower than that recorded for the unmodified Col. The largest fraction, of which at least 70% of the total pore volume comprises the sponge, is occupied by pores ranging from 20 to 100μm in size. The knowledge on the dielectric behaviour and microstructure of the Col-DAC scaffold may prove relevant to neural tissue engineering focused on the regeneration of the nervous system.

  11. Integration of 3D Printed and Micropatterned Polycaprolactone Scaffolds for Guidance of Oriented Collagenous Tissue Formation In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pilipchuk, Sophia P; Monje, Alberto; Jiao, Yizu; Hao, Jie; Kruger, Laura; Flanagan, Colleen L; Hollister, Scott J

    2016-01-01

    Scaffold design incorporating multi-scale cues for clinically-relevant, aligned tissue regeneration has potential to improve structural and functional integrity of multi-tissue interfaces. The objective of this pre-clinical study was to develop poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds with mesoscale and microscale architectural cues specific to human ligament progenitor cells and assess their ability to form aligned bone-ligament-cementum complexes in vivo. PCL scaffolds were designed to integrate a 3D printed bone region with a micropatterned PCL thin film consisting of grooved pillars. The patterned film region was seeded with human ligament cells, fibroblasts transduced with BMP-7 genes seeded within the bone region, and a tooth dentin segment positioned on the ligament region prior to subcutaneous implantation into a murine model. Results indicated increased tissue alignment in vivo using micropatterned PCL films, compared to random-porous PCL. At 6 weeks, 30um groove depth significantly enhanced oriented collagen fiber thickness, overall cell alignment, and nuclear elongation relative to 10um groove depth. This study demonstrates for the first time that scaffolds with combined hierarchical mesoscale and microscale features can align cells in vivo for oral tissue repair with potential for improving the regenerative response of other bone-ligament complexes. PMID:26820240

  12. Integration of 3D Printed and Micropatterned Polycaprolactone Scaffolds for Guidance of Oriented Collagenous Tissue Formation In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Pilipchuk, Sophia P; Monje, Alberto; Jiao, Yizu; Hao, Jie; Kruger, Laura; Flanagan, Colleen L; Hollister, Scott J; Giannobile, William V

    2016-03-01

    Scaffold design incorporating multiscale cues for clinically relevant, aligned tissue regeneration has potential to improve structural and functional integrity of multitissue interfaces. The objective of this preclinical study is to develop poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds with mesoscale and microscale architectural cues specific to human ligament progenitor cells and assess their ability to form aligned bone-ligament-cementum complexes in vivo. PCL scaffolds are designed to integrate a 3D printed bone region with a micropatterned PCL thin film consisting of grooved pillars. The patterned film region is seeded with human ligament cells, fibroblasts transduced with bone morphogenetic protein-7 genes seeded within the bone region, and a tooth dentin segment positioned on the ligament region prior to subcutaneous implantation into a murine model. Results indicate increased tissue alignment in vivo using micropatterned PCL films, compared to random-porous PCL. At week 6, 30 μm groove depth significantly enhances oriented collagen fiber thickness, overall cell alignment, and nuclear elongation relative to 10 μm groove depth. This study demonstrates for the first time that scaffolds with combined hierarchical mesoscale and microscale features can align cells in vivo for oral tissue repair with potential for improving the regenerative response of other bone-ligament complexes.

  13. Construction of a 3D rGO-collagen hybrid scaffold for enhancement of the neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Yu, Xin; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Jianhua; Tang, Wei; Li, Zhou; Mou, Xiaoning; Liu, Hong; Wang, Zhonglin

    2016-01-01

    The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold because the surface of the scaffold can determine the fate of stem cells. A conductive surface is required for a scaffold to direct stem cells toward neural differentiation. However, most conductive polymers are toxic and not amenable to biological degradation, which restricts the design of neural tissue engineering scaffolds. In this study, we used a bioactive three-dimensional (3D) porcine acellular dermal matrix (PADM), which is mainly composed of type I collagen, as a basic material and successfully assembled a layer of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets on the surface of the PADM channels to obtain a porous 3D, biodegradable, conductive and biocompatible PADM-rGO hybrid neural tissue engineering scaffold. Compared with the PADM scaffold, assembling the rGO into the scaffold did not induce a significant change in the microstructure but endowed the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold with good conductivity. A comparison of the neural differentiation of rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was performed by culturing the MSCs on PADM and PADM-rGO scaffolds in neuronal culture medium, followed by the determination of gene expression and immunofluorescence staining. The results of both the gene expression and protein level assessments suggest that the rGO-assembled PADM scaffold may promote the differentiation of MSCs into neuronal cells with higher protein and gene expression levels after 7 days under neural differentiation conditions. This study demonstrated that the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold is a promising scaffold for neural tissue engineering; this scaffold can not only support the growth of MSCs at a high proliferation rate but also enhance the differentiation of MSCs into neural cells.The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold

  14. Fibrin and collagen differentially but synergistically regulate sprout angiogenesis of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells in 3-dimensional matrix.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaodong; Tonnesen, Marcia G; Mousa, Shaker A; Clark, Richard A F

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a highly regulated event involving complex, dynamic interactions between microvascular endothelial cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Alteration of ECM composition and architecture is a hallmark feature of wound clot and tumor stroma. We previously reported that during angiogenesis, endothelial cell responses to growth factors are modulated by the compositional and mechanical properties of a surrounding three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) that is dominated by either cross-linked fibrin or type I collagen. However, the role of 3D ECM in the regulation of angiogenesis associated with wound healing and tumor growth is not well defined. This study investigates the correlation of sprout angiogenesis and ECM microenvironment using in vivo and in vitro 3D angiogenesis models. It demonstrates that fibrin and type I collagen 3D matrices differentially but synergistically regulate sprout angiogenesis. Thus blocking both integrin alpha v beta 3 and integrin alpha 2 beta 1 might be a novel strategy to synergistically block sprout angiogenesis in solid tumors.

  15. Optical Measurement of Micromechanics and Structure in a 3D Fibrin Extracellular Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotlarchyk, Maxwell Aaron

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, a significant number of studies have focused on linking substrate mechanics to cell function using standard methodologies to characterize the bulk properties of the hydrogel substrates. However, current understanding of the correlations between the microstructural mechanical properties of hydrogels and cell function in 3D is poor, in part because of a lack of appropriate techniques. Methods for tuning extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanics in 3D cell culture that rely on increasing the concentration of either protein or cross-linking molecules fail to control important parameters such as pore size, ligand density, and molecular diffusivity. Alternatively, ECM stiffness can be modulated independently from protein concentration by mechanically loading the ECM. We have developed an optical tweezers-based microrheology system to investigate the fundamental role of ECM mechanical properties in determining cellular behavior. Further, this thesis outlines the development of a novel device for generating stiffness gradients in naturally derived ECMs, where stiffness is tuned by inducing strain, while local structure and mechanical properties are directly determined by laser tweezers-based passive and active microrheology respectively. Hydrogel substrates polymerized within 35 mm diameter Petri dishes are strained non-uniformly by the precise rotation of an embedded cylindrical post, and exhibit a position-dependent stiffness with little to no modulation of local mesh geometry. Here we present microrheological studies in the context of fibrin hydrogels. Microrheology and confocal imaging were used to directly measure local changes in micromechanics and structure respectively in unstrained hydrogels of increasing fibrinogen concentration, as well as in our strain gradient device, in which the concentration of fibrinogen is held constant. Orbital particle tracking, and raster image correlation analysis are used to quantify changes in fibrin mechanics on the

  16. Collagen in the spicule organic matrix of the gorgonian Leptogorgia virgulata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsley, R. J.; Tsuzaki, M.; Watabe, N.; Mechanic, G. L.

    1990-01-01

    Decalcification of the calcareous spicules from the gorgonian Leptogorgia virgulata reveals an organic matrix that may be divided into water insoluble and soluble fractions. The insoluble fraction displays characteristics typical of collagen, which is an unusual component of an invertebrate calcium carbonate structure. This matrix fraction exhibits a collagenous amino acid profile and behavior upon SDS-PAGE. Furthermore, the reducible crosslink, dihydroxylysinonorleucine (DHLNL), is detected in this fraction. The composition of the matrix varies seasonally; i.e., the collagenous composition is most prevalent in the summer. These results indicate that the insoluble matrix is a dynamic structure. Potential roles of this matrix in spicule calcification are discussed.

  17. Angiogenic Type I Collagen Extracellular Matrix Integrated with Recombinant Bacteriophages Displaying Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Junghyo; Korkmaz Zirpel, Nuriye; Park, Hyun-Ji; Han, Sewoon; Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Shin, Jisoo; Cho, Seung-Woo; Nam, Chang-Hoon; Chung, Seok

    2016-01-21

    Here, a growth-factor-integrated natural extracellular matrix of type I collagen is presented that induces angiogenesis. The developed matrix adapts type I collagen nanofibers integrated with synthetic colloidal particles of recombinant bacteriophages that display vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The integration is achieved during or after gelation of the type I collagen and the matrix enables spatial delivery of VEGF into a desired region. Endothelial cells that contact the VEGF are found to invade into the matrix to form tube-like structures both in vitro and in vivo, proving the angiogenic potential of the matrix.

  18. Directional conductivity in SWNT-collagen-fibrin composite biomaterials through strain-induced matrix alignment.

    PubMed

    Voge, Christopher M; Kariolis, Mihalis; MacDonald, Rebecca A; Stegemann, Jan P

    2008-07-01

    Composite biomaterials incorporating fibroblast cells, collagen Type I, fibrin, and 2 wt % carboxylated SWNT were created, and their properties were compared with similar control constructs without SWNT. Alignment of the matrix was stimulated by application of 8% cyclic strain for three 12-h periods over three days. All constructs underwent cell-mediated gel compaction to 15-20% of their initial volume, which was not affected by SWNT loading. Mechanical strain increased the rate of compaction, and strained constructs were significantly more compacted than unstrained controls by day 3. Cell viability and morphology were similar in both control and SWNT-loaded constructs, but unstrained samples exhibited a more stellate appearance with more numerous cellular projections. Application of mechanical strain caused clear alignment of both the cells and matrix in the direction of the applied strain. Bioimpedance measurements showed that SWNT loading increased the electrical conductivity of composite constructs, and that mechanically-induced alignment of the matrix/SWNT caused a further increase in conductivity. These results demonstrate that SWNT can be used to augment the electrical properties of 3D protein hydrogels, and that anisotropy in the matrix further enhances these properties. Such electrically conductive biopolymers may have a variety of applications in tissue engineering and biosensor development.

  19. Blueberry consumption prevents loss of collagen in bone matrix and inhibits senescence pathways in osteoblastic cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ovariectomy (OVX)-induced bone loss has been linked to increased bone turnover and higher bone matrix collagen degradation as the result of osteoclast activation. However, the role of degraded collagen matrix in the fate of resident bone-forming cells is unclear. In this report, we show that OVX-i...

  20. BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF A SYNTHETIC EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX ON IMMORTALIZED VOCAL FOLD FIBROBLASTS IN 3D CULTURE

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xia

    2010-01-01

    In order to promote wound repair and induce tissue regeneration, an engineered hyaluronan (HA) hydrogel – Carbylan GSX, which contains di(thiopropionyl) bishydrazide-modified hyaluronic acid (HA-DTPH), di(thiopropionyl) bishydrazide-modified gelatin (Gtn-DTPH) and polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA), has been developed for extracellular matrix (ECM) defects of the superficial and middle layers of the lamina propria. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of Carbylan GSX in a previously established immortalized human vocal fold fibroblast (hVFF) cell line prior to human clinical trials. Immortalized hVFF proliferation, viability, apoptosis and transcript analysis for both ECM constituents and inflammatory markers were measured for two-dimensional and three-dimensional culture conditions. There were no significant differences in morphology, cell marker protein expression, proliferation, viability and apoptosis of hVFF cultured with Carbylan GSX compared to Matrigel, a commercial 3D control, after one week. Gene expression levels for fibromodulin, TGF-β1, and TNF-α were similar between Carbylan GSX and Matrigel. Fibronectin, hyaluronidase 1 and COX2 expression levels were induced by Carbylan GSX; whereas IL6, IL8. COL1 and hyaluronic acid synthase 3 expression levels were decreased by Carbylan GSX. This investigation demonstrates that Carbylan GSX may serve as a natural biomaterial for tissue engineering of human vocal folds. PMID:20109588

  1. Assessment of angiogenesis in osseointegration of a silica-collagen biomaterial using 3D-nano-CT.

    PubMed

    Alt, Volker; Kögelmaier, Daniela Vera; Lips, Katrin S; Witt, Vera; Pacholke, Sabine; Heiss, Christian; Kampschulte, Marian; Heinemann, Sascha; Hanke, Thomas; Thormann, Ulrich; Schnettler, Reinhard; Langheinrich, Alexander C

    2011-10-01

    Bony integration of biomaterials is a complex process in which angiogenesis plays a crucial role. We evaluated micro- and nano-CT imaging to demonstrate and quantify neovascularization in bony integration of a biomaterial and to give an image based estimation for the needed resolution for imaging angiogenesis in an animal model of femora defect healing. In 8 rats 5mm full-size defects were created at the left femur that was filled with silica-collagen bone substitute material and internally fixed with plate osteosynthesis. After 6 weeks the femora were infused in situ with Microfil, harvested and scanned for micro-CT (9 μm)(3) and nano-CT (3 μm)(3) imaging. Using those 3D images, the newly formed blood vessels in the area of the biomaterial were assessed and the total vascular volume fraction, the volume of the bone substitute material and the volume of the bone defect were quantitatively characterized. Results were complemented by histology. Differences were statistically assessed using (ANOVA). High-resolution nano-CT demonstrated new blood vessel formation surrounding the biomaterial in all animals at capillary level. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the newly formed blood vessels surrounding the bone substitute material. The mean vascular volume fraction (VVF) around the implant was calculated to be 3.01 ± 0.4%. The VVF was inversely correlated with the volume of the bone substitute material (r=0.8) but not with the dimension of the fracture zone (r=0.3). Nano-CT imaging is feasible for quantitative analysis of angiogenesis during bony integration of biomaterials and a promising tool in this context for the future.

  2. 3-D-Observation of Matrix of MIL 090657 Meteorite by Absorption-Phase Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyama, Sugimoto; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Matsuno, Junya; Miyake, Akira; Nakano, Tsukasa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Takigawa, Aki; Takayama, Akiko; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Burton, Aaron S.; Messenger, Scott

    2017-01-01

    MIL 090657 meteorite (CR2.7) is one of the least altered primitive carbonaceous c hondrites [1]. This meteorite has amorphous silicates like GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfide), which are characteristically contained in cometary dust, in matrix [2,3] as with the Paris meteorite [4]. Three lithologies have been recognized; lithology-1 (L 1) dominated by submicron anhydrous silicates, lithology-2 (L2) by GEMS-like amorphous silicates and lithology-3 (L3) by phyllosilicates [2]. Organic materials are abundant in L 1 and L2 [2,3]. L 1 and L2 were further divided into sub-lithology respectively based on their textures and compositions [5]. These studies were performed by 2D SEM and TEM observations of sample surfaces and thin sections that are unable to reveal what constitute each lithology and how these lithologies are distributed and related to each other. This information will provide important insights into alteration and aggregation processes on asteroids and in the early solar nebula. In this study, MIL 090657 matrix was examined in 3D using two types of X-ray tomography; DET (dual-energy tomography) [6] and SIXM (scanning-imaging X-ray microscopy) [7]. Mineral phases can be discriminated based on absorption contrasts at two different X-ray energies in DET. In SIXM, materials composed of light elements such as water or organic materials can be identified based on phase and absorption contrasts. By combining these methods, we can discriminate not only organic materials from voids but also hydrous alteration products, such as hydrated silicates and carbonates, from anhydrous minerals [8]. In this study, we first observed cross sections of MIL 090657 matrix fragments C1 00 mm) in detail using FE-SEM/ EDS. Based on the results, three house-shaped samples (3 0 -50 mm) were extracted from L 1, L2 and their boundary (H1, H3 and H5, respectively) using FIB. 3D imaging of these samples were conducted at BL47XU of SPring-8, a synchrotron radiation facility, with

  3. 3D texture analysis of solitary pulmonary nodules using co-occurrence matrix from volumetric lung CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhara, Ashis Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we have investigated a new approach for texture features extraction using co-occurrence matrix from volumetric lung CT image. Traditionally texture analysis is performed in 2D and is suitable for images collected from 2D imaging modality. The use of 3D imaging modalities provide the scope of texture analysis from 3D object and 3D texture feature are more realistic to represent 3D object. In this work, Haralick's texture features are extended in 3D and computed from volumetric data considering 26 neighbors. The optimal texture features to characterize the internal structure of Solitary Pulmonary Nodules (SPN) are selected based on area under curve (AUC) values of ROC curve and p values from 2-tailed Student's t-test. The selected texture feature in 3D to represent SPN can be used in efficient Computer Aided Diagnostic (CAD) design plays an important role in fast and accurate lung cancer screening. The reduced number of input features to the CAD system will decrease the computational time and classification errors caused by irrelevant features. In the present work, SPN are classified from Ground Glass Nodule (GGN) using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) classifier considering top five 3D texture features and top five 2D texture features separately. The classification is performed on 92 SPN and 25 GGN from Imaging Database Resources Initiative (IDRI) public database and classification accuracy using 3D texture features and 2D texture features provide 97.17% and 89.1% respectively.

  4. Strategy to Achieve Highly Porous/Biocompatible Macroscale Cell Blocks, Using a Collagen/Genipin-bioink and an Optimal 3D Printing Process.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Bok; Lee, Hyeongjin; Kim, Geun Hyung

    2016-11-30

    Recently, a three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting process for obtaining a cell-laden structure has been widely applied because of its ability to fabricate biomimetic complex structures embedded with and without cells. To successfully obtain a cell-laden porous block, the cell-delivering vehicle, bioink, is one of the significant factors. Until now, various biocompatible hydrogels (synthetic and natural biopolymers) have been utilized in the cell-printing process, but a bioink satisfying both biocompatibility and print-ability requirements to achieve a porous structure with reasonable mechanical strength has not been issued. Here, we propose a printing strategy with optimal conditions including a safe cross-linking procedure for obtaining a 3D porous cell block composed of a biocompatible collagen-bioink and genipin, a cross-linking agent. To obtain the optimal processing conditions, we modified the 3D printing machine and selected an optimal cross-linking condition (∼1 mM and 1 h) of genipin solution. To show the feasibility of the process, 3D pore-interconnected cell-laden constructs were manufactured using osteoblast-like cells (MG63) and human adipose stem cells (hASCs). Under these processing conditions, a macroscale 3D collagen-based cell block of 21 × 21 × 12 mm(3) and over 95% cell viability was obtained. In vitro biological testing of the cell-laden 3D porous structure showed that the embedded cells were sufficiently viable, and their proliferation was significantly higher; the cells also exhibited increased osteogenic activities compared to the conventional alginate-based bioink (control). The results indicated the fabrication process using the collagen-bioink would be an innovative platform to design highly biocompatible and mechanically stable cell blocks.

  5. One-step direct-laser metal writing of sub-100 nm 3D silver nanostructures in a gelatin matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, SeungYeon; Vora, Kevin; Mazur, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Developing an ability to fabricate high-resolution, 3D metal nanostructures in a stretchable 3D matrix is a critical step to realizing novel optoelectronic devices such as tunable bulk metal-dielectric optical devices and THz metamaterial devices that are not feasible with alternative techniques. We report a new chemistry method to fabricate high-resolution, 3D silver nanostructures using a femtosecond-laser direct metal writing technique. Previously, only fabrication of 3D polymeric structures or single-/few-layer metal structures was possible. Our method takes advantage of unique gelatin properties to overcome such previous limitations as limited freedom in 3D material design and short sample lifetime. We fabricate more than 15 layers of 3D silver nanostructures with a resolution of less than 100 nm in a stable dielectric matrix that is flexible and has high large transparency that is well-matched for potential applications in the optical and THz metamaterial regimes. This is a single-step process that does not require any further processing. This work will be of interest to those interested in fabrication methods that utilize nonlinear light-matter interactions and the realization of future metamaterials.

  6. A Membrane-Type-1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) – Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Axis Regulates Collagen-Induced Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Assent, Delphine; Bourgot, Isabelle; Hennuy, Benoît; Geurts, Pierre; Noël, Agnès; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Maquoi, Erik

    2015-01-01

    During tumour dissemination, invading breast carcinoma cells become confronted with a reactive stroma, a type I collagen-rich environment endowed with anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. To develop metastatic capabilities, tumour cells must acquire the capacity to cope with this novel microenvironment. How cells interact with and respond to their microenvironment during cancer dissemination remains poorly understood. To address the impact of type I collagen on the fate of tumour cells, human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells were cultured within three-dimensional type I collagen gels (3D COL1). Using this experimental model, we have previously demonstrated that membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), a proteinase overexpressed in many aggressive tumours, promotes tumour progression by circumventing the collagen-induced up-regulation of BIK, a pro-apoptotic tumour suppressor, and hence apoptosis. Here we performed a transcriptomic analysis to decipher the molecular mechanisms regulating 3D COL1-induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. Control and MT1-MMP expressing MCF-7 cells were cultured on two-dimensional plastic plates or within 3D COL1 and a global transcriptional time-course analysis was performed. Shifting the cells from plastic plates to 3D COL1 activated a complex reprogramming of genes implicated in various biological processes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a 3D COL1-mediated alteration of key cellular functions including apoptosis, cell proliferation, RNA processing and cytoskeleton remodelling. By using a panel of pharmacological inhibitors, we identified discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a receptor tyrosine kinase specifically activated by collagen, as the initiator of 3D COL1-induced apoptosis. Our data support the concept that MT1-MMP contributes to the inactivation of the DDR1-BIK signalling axis through the cleavage of collagen fibres and/or the alteration of DDR1 receptor signalling unit, without triggering a

  7. 3D porous sol-gel matrix incorporated microdevice for effective large volume cell sample pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chan Joo; Jung, Jae Hwan; Seo, Tae Seok

    2012-06-05

    In this study, we demonstrated an effective sample pretreatment microdevice that could perform the capture, purification, and release of pathogenic bacteria with a large-volume sample and at a high speed and high-capture yield. We integrated a sol-gel matrix into the microdevice which forms three-dimensional (3D) micropores for the cell solution to pass through and provides a large surface area for the immobilization of antibodies to capture the target Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) cells. The antibody was linked to the surface of the sol-gel via a photocleavable linker, allowing the cell-captured antibody moiety to be released by UV irradiation. In addition to the optimization of the antibody immobilization and UV cleavage processes, the cell-capture efficiency was maximized by controlling the sample flow rate with a pumping scheme (3 steps, 5 steps: 3 steps with one flutter step, 7 steps: 3 steps with two flutter steps) and the pumping time (100, 200, and 300 ms). A quantitative capture analysis was performed by targeting a specific gene site of protein A of S. aureus in real-time PCR (RT-PCR). While the 3-step process with an actuation time of 100 ms showed the fastest flow rate (1 mL sample processing time in 10 min), the pumping scheme with the 7-step process and the 300 ms actuation time revealed the highest cell-capture efficiency. A limit of detection study with the 7-step and the 300 ms pumping scheme demonstrated that 100 cells per 100 μL were detected with a 70% yield, and even a single cell could be analyzed via on-chip sample preparation. Thus, our novel sol-gel based microdevice was proven more cost-effective, simple, and efficient in terms of its sample pretreatment ability compared to the use of a conventional 2D flat microdevice. This proposed sample pretreatment device can be further incorporated to an analytical functional unit to realize a micrototal analysis system (μTAS) with sample-in-answer-out capability in the fields of biomedical

  8. The Exopolysaccharide Matrix Modulates the Interaction between 3D Architecture and Virulence of a Mixed-Species Oral Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jin; Klein, Marlise I.; Falsetta, Megan L.; Lu, Bingwen; Delahunty, Claire M.; Yates, John R.; Heydorn, Arne; Koo, Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Virulent biofilms are responsible for a range of infections, including oral diseases. All biofilms harbor a microbial-derived extracellular-matrix. The exopolysaccharides (EPS) formed on tooth-pellicle and bacterial surfaces provide binding sites for microorganisms; eventually the accumulated EPS enmeshes microbial cells. The metabolic activity of the bacteria within this matrix leads to acidification of the milieu. We explored the mechanisms through which the Streptococcus mutans-produced EPS-matrix modulates the three-dimensional (3D) architecture and the population shifts during morphogenesis of biofilms on a saliva-coated-apatitic surface using a mixed-bacterial species system. Concomitantly, we examined whether the matrix influences the development of pH-microenvironments within intact-biofilms using a novel 3D in situ pH-mapping technique. Data reveal that the production of the EPS-matrix helps to create spatial heterogeneities by forming an intricate network of exopolysaccharide-enmeshed bacterial-islets (microcolonies) through localized cell-to-matrix interactions. This complex 3D architecture creates compartmentalized acidic and EPS-rich microenvironments throughout the biofilm, which triggers the dominance of pathogenic S. mutans within a mixed-species system. The establishment of a 3D-matrix and EPS-enmeshed microcolonies were largely mediated by the S. mutans gtfB/gtfC genes, expression of which was enhanced in the presence of Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus oralis. Acidic pockets were found only in the interiors of bacterial-islets that are protected by EPS, which impedes rapid neutralization by buffer (pH 7.0). As a result, regions of low pH (<5.5) were detected at specific locations along the surface of attachment. Resistance to chlorhexidine was enhanced in cells within EPS-microcolony complexes compared to those outside such structures within the biofilm. Our results illustrate the critical interaction between matrix architecture and p

  9. Production and in vitro characterization of 3D porous scaffolds made of magnesium carbonate apatite (MCA)/anionic collagen using a biomimetic approach.

    PubMed

    Sader, Marcia S; Martins, Virginia C A; Gomez, Santiago; LeGeros, Racquel Z; Soares, Gloria A

    2013-10-01

    3D porous scaffolds are relevant biomaterials to bone engineering as they can be used as templates to tissue reconstruction. The aim of the present study was to produce and characterize in vitro 3D magnesium-carbonate apatite/collagen (MCA/col) scaffolds. They were prepared by using biomimetic approach, followed by cross-linking with 0.25% glutaraldehyde solution (GA) and liofilization. Results obtained with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirmed the type-B carbonate substitution, while by X-ray diffraction (XRD), a crystallite size of ~10nm was obtained. Optical and electron microscopy showed that the cylindrical samples exhibited an open-porous morphology, with apatite nanocrystals precipitated on collagen fibrils. The cross-linked 3D scaffolds showed integrity when immersed in culture medium up to 14 days. Also, the immersion of such samples into an acid buffer solution, to mimic the osteoclastic resorption environment, promotes the release of important ions for bone repair, such as calcium, phosphorus and magnesium. Bone cells (SaOs2) adhered, and proliferated on the 3D composite scaffolds, showing that synthesis and the cross-linking processes did not induce cytotoxicity.

  10. Human pancreatic stellate cells modulate 3D collagen alignment to promote the migration of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Drifka, Cole R; Loeffler, Agnes G; Esquibel, Corinne R; Weber, Sharon M; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Kao, W John

    2016-12-01

    A hallmark of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the ability for cancer cells to aggressively infiltrate and navigate through a dense stroma during the metastatic process. Key features of the PDAC stroma include an abundant population of activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and highly aligned collagen fibers; however, important questions remain regarding how collagen becomes aligned and what the biological manifestations are. To better understand how PSCs, aligned collagen, and PDAC cells might cooperate during the transition to invasion, we utilized a microchannel-based in vitro tumor model and advanced imaging technologies to recreate and examine in vivo-like heterotypic interactions. We found that PSCs participate in a collaborative process with cancer cells by orchestrating the alignment of collagen fibers that, in turn, are permissive to enhanced cell migration. Additionally, direct contact between PSCs, collagen, and PDAC cells is critical to invasion and co-migration of both cell types. This suggests PSCs may accompany and assist in navigating PDAC cells through the stromal terrain. Together, our data provides a new role for PSCs in stimulating the metastatic process and underscores the importance of collagen alignment in cancer progression.

  11. Manipulation of in vitro collagen matrix architecture for scaffolds of improved physiological relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapach, Lauren A.; VanderBurgh, Jacob A.; Miller, Joseph P.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2015-12-01

    Type I collagen is a versatile biomaterial that is widely used in medical applications due to its weak antigenicity, robust biocompatibility, and its ability to be modified for a wide array of applications. As such, collagen has become a major component of many tissue engineering scaffolds, drug delivery platforms, and substrates for in vitro cell culture. In these applications, collagen constructs are fabricated to recapitulate a diverse set of conditions. Collagen fibrils can be aligned during or post-fabrication, cross-linked via numerous techniques, polymerized to create various fibril sizes and densities, and copolymerized into a wide array of composite scaffolds. Here, we review approaches that have been used to tune collagen to better recapitulate physiological environments for use in tissue engineering applications and studies of basic cell behavior. We discuss techniques to control fibril alignment, methods for cross-linking collagen constructs to modulate stiffness, and composite collagen constructs to better mimic physiological extracellular matrix.

  12. Evaluation of 3D printed PCL/PLGA/β-TCP versus collagen membranes for guided bone regeneration in a beagle implant model.

    PubMed

    Won, J-Y; Park, C-Y; Bae, J-H; Ahn, G; Kim, C; Lim, D-H; Cho, D-W; Yun, W-S; Shim, J-H; Huh, J-B

    2016-10-07

    Here, we compared 3D-printed polycaprolactone/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/β-tricalcium phosphate (PCL/PLGA/β-TCP) membranes with the widely used collagen membranes for guided bone regeneration (GBR) in beagle implant models. For mechanical property comparison in dry and wet conditions and cytocompatibility determination, we analyzed the rate and pattern of cell proliferation of seeded fibroblasts and preosteoblasts using the cell counting kit-8 assay and scanning electron microscopy. Osteogenic differentiation was verified using alizarin red S staining. At 8 weeks following implantation in vivo using beagle dogs, computed tomography and histological analyses were performed after sacrifice. Cell proliferation rates in vitro indicated that early cell attachment was higher in collagen than in PCL/PLGA/β-TCP membranes; however, the difference subsided by day 7. Similar outcomes were found for osteogenic differentiation, with approximately 2.5 times greater staining in collagen than PCL/PLGA/β-TCP, but without significant difference by day 14. In vivo, bone regeneration in the defect area, represented by new bone formation and bone-to-implant contact, paralleled those associated with collagen membranes. However, tensile testing revealed that whereas the PCL/PLGA/β-TCP membrane mechanical properties were conserved in both wet and dry states, the tensile property of collagen was reduced by 99% under wet conditions. Our results demonstrate in vitro and in vivo that PCL/PLGA/β-TCP membranes have similar levels of biocompatibility and bone regeneration as collagen membranes. In particular, considering that GBR is always applied to a wet environment (e.g. blood, saliva), we demonstrated that PCL/PLGA/β-TCP membranes maintained their form more reliably than collagen membranes in a wet setting, confirming their appropriateness as a GBR membrane.

  13. Improving nanoparticle diffusion through tumor collagen matrix by photo-thermal gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeesi, Vahid; Chan, Warren C. W.

    2016-06-01

    Collagen (I) impairs the targeting of nanoparticles to tumor cells by obstructing their diffusion inside dense tumor interstitial matrix. This potentially makes large nanoparticles (>50 nm) reside near the tumor vessels and thereby compromises their functionality. Here we propose a strategy to locally improve nanoparticle transport inside collagen (I) component of the tumor tissue. We first used heat generating gold nanorods to alter collagen (I) matrix by local temperature elevation. We then explored this impact on the transport of 50 nm and 120 nm inorganic nanoparticles inside collagen (I). We demonstrated an increase in average diffusivity of 50 nm and 120 nm in the denatured collagen (I) by ~14 and ~21 fold, respectively, compared to intact untreated collagen (I) matrix. This study shows how nanoparticle-mediated hyperthermia inside tumor tissue can improve the transport of large nanoparticles through collagen (I) matrix. The ability to increase nanoparticles diffusion inside tumor stroma allows their targeting or other functionalities to take effect, thereby significantly improving cancer therapeutic or diagnostic outcome.Collagen (I) impairs the targeting of nanoparticles to tumor cells by obstructing their diffusion inside dense tumor interstitial matrix. This potentially makes large nanoparticles (>50 nm) reside near the tumor vessels and thereby compromises their functionality. Here we propose a strategy to locally improve nanoparticle transport inside collagen (I) component of the tumor tissue. We first used heat generating gold nanorods to alter collagen (I) matrix by local temperature elevation. We then explored this impact on the transport of 50 nm and 120 nm inorganic nanoparticles inside collagen (I). We demonstrated an increase in average diffusivity of 50 nm and 120 nm in the denatured collagen (I) by ~14 and ~21 fold, respectively, compared to intact untreated collagen (I) matrix. This study shows how nanoparticle-mediated hyperthermia inside

  14. Comparison of 3D reconstructive technologies used for morphometric research and the translation of knowledge using a decision matrix.

    PubMed

    Martin, Charys M; Roach, Victoria A; Nguyen, Ngan; Rice, Charles L; Wilson, Timothy D

    2013-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) models for education, pre-operative assessment, presurgical planning, and measurement have become more prevalent. With the increase in prevalence of 3D models there has also been an increase in 3D reconstructive software programs that are used to create these models. These software programs differ in reconstruction concepts, operating system requirements, user features, cost, and no one program has emerged as the standard. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic comparison of three widely available 3D reconstructive software programs, Amira(®), OsiriX, and Mimics(®) , with respect to the software's ability to be used in two broad themes: morphometric research and education to translate morphological knowledge. Cost, system requirements, and inherent features of each program were compared. A novel concept selection tool, a decision matrix, was used to objectify comparisons of usability of the interface, quality of the output, and efficiency of the tools. Findings indicate that Mimics was the best-suited program for construction of 3D anatomical models and morphometric analysis, but for creating a learning tool the results were less clear. OsiriX was very user-friendly; however, it had limited capabilities. Conversely, although Amira had endless potential and could create complex dynamic videos, it had a challenging interface. These results provide a resource for morphometric researchers and educators to assist the selection of appropriate reconstruction programs when starting a new 3D modeling project.

  15. NEDD9 stabilizes focal adhesions, increases binding to the extra-cellular matrix and differentially effects 2D versus 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jessie; Baquiran, Jaime B; Bonakdar, Navid; Lees, Justin; Ching, Yu Wooi; Pugacheva, Elena; Fabry, Ben; O'Neill, Geraldine M

    2012-01-01

    The speed of cell migration on 2-dimensional (2D) surfaces is determined by the rate of assembly and disassembly of clustered integrin receptors known as focal adhesions. Different modes of cell migration that have been described in 3D environments are distinguished by their dependence on integrin-mediated interactions with the extra-cellular matrix. In particular, the mesenchymal invasion mode is the most dependent on focal adhesion dynamics. The focal adhesion protein NEDD9 is a key signalling intermediary in mesenchymal cell migration, however whether NEDD9 plays a role in regulating focal adhesion dynamics has not previously been reported. As NEDD9 effects on 2D migration speed appear to depend on the cell type examined, in the present study we have used mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) from mice in which the NEDD9 gene has been depleted (NEDD9 -/- MEFs). This allows comparison with effects of other focal adhesion proteins that have previously been demonstrated using MEFs. We show that focal adhesion disassembly rates are increased in the absence of NEDD9 expression and this is correlated with increased paxillin phosphorylation at focal adhesions. NEDD9-/- MEFs have increased rates of migration on 2D surfaces, but conversely, migration of these cells is significantly reduced in 3D collagen gels. Importantly we show that myosin light chain kinase is activated in 3D in the absence of NEDD9 and is conversely inhibited in 2D cultures. Measurement of adhesion strength reveals that NEDD9-/- MEFs have decreased adhesion to fibronectin, despite upregulated α5β1 fibronectin receptor expression. We find that β1 integrin activation is significantly suppressed in the NEDD9-/-, suggesting that in the absence of NEDD9 there is decreased integrin receptor activation. Collectively our data suggest that NEDD9 may promote 3D cell migration by slowing focal adhesion disassembly, promoting integrin receptor activation and increasing adhesion force to the ECM.

  16. Laser nanostructuring 3-D bioconstruction based on carbon nanotubes in a water matrix of albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimenko, Alexander Y.; Ichkitidze, Levan P.; Podgaetsky, Vitaly M.; Savelyev, Mikhail S.; Selishchev, Sergey V.

    2016-04-01

    3-D bioconstructions were created using the evaporation method of the water-albumin solution with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by the continuous and pulsed femtosecond laser radiation. It is determined that the volume structure of the samples created by the femtosecond radiation has more cavities than the one created by the continuous radiation. The average diameter for multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) samples was almost two times higher (35-40 nm) than for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) samples (20-30 nm). The most homogenous 3-D bioconstruction was formed from MWCNTs by the continuous laser radiation. The hardness of such samples totaled up to 370 MPa at the nanoscale. High strength properties and the resistance of the 3-D bioconstructions produced by the laser irradiation depend on the volume nanotubes scaffold forming inside them. The scaffold was formed by the electric field of the directed laser irradiation. The covalent bond energy between the nanotube carbon molecule and the oxygen of the bovine serum albumin aminoacid residue amounts 580 kJ/mol. The 3-D bioconstructions based on MWCNTs and SWCNTs becomes overgrown with the cells (fibroblasts) over the course of 72 hours. The samples based on the both types of CNTs are not toxic for the cells and don't change its normal composition and structure. Thus the 3-D bioconstructions that are nanostructured by the pulsed and continuous laser radiation can be applied as implant materials for the recovery of the connecting tissues of the living body.

  17. Collagen XII and XIV, new partners of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in the skin extracellular matrix suprastructure.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Pallavi; Zwolanek, Daniela; Keene, Douglas R; Schulz, Jan-Niklas; Blumbach, Katrin; Heinegård, Dick; Zaucke, Frank; Paulsson, Mats; Krieg, Thomas; Koch, Manuel; Eckes, Beate

    2012-06-29

    The tensile and scaffolding properties of skin rely on the complex extracellular matrix (ECM) that surrounds cells, vasculature, nerves, and adnexus structures and supports the epidermis. In the skin, collagen I fibrils are the major structural component of the dermal ECM, decorated by proteoglycans and by fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices such as collagens XII and XIV. Here we show that the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), an abundant component of cartilage ECM, is expressed in healthy human skin. COMP expression is detected in the dermal compartment of skin and in cultured fibroblasts, whereas epidermis and HaCaT cells are negative. In addition to binding collagen I, COMP binds to collagens XII and XIV via their C-terminal collagenous domains. All three proteins codistribute in a characteristic narrow zone in the superficial papillary dermis of healthy human skin. Ultrastructural analysis by immunogold labeling confirmed colocalization and further revealed the presence of COMP along with collagens XII and XIV in anchoring plaques. On the basis of these observations, we postulate that COMP functions as an adapter protein in human skin, similar to its function in cartilage ECM, by organizing collagen I fibrils into a suprastructure, mainly in the vicinity of anchoring plaques that stabilize the cohesion between the upper dermis and the basement membrane zone.

  18. Real-time 3-d intracranial ultrasound with an endoscopic matrix array transducer.

    PubMed

    Light, Edward D; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Wolf, Patrick D; Smith, Stephen W

    2007-08-01

    A transducer originally designed for transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) was adapted for real-time volumetric endoscopic imaging of the brain. The transducer consists of a 36 x 36 array with an interelement spacing of 0.18 mm. There are 504 transmitting and 252 receive channels placed in a regular pattern in the array. The operating frequency is 4.5 MHz with a -6 dB bandwidth of 30%. The transducer is fabricated on a 10-layer flexible circuit from Microconnex (Snoqualmie, WA, USA). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical feasibility of real-time 3-D intracranial ultrasound with this device. The Volumetrics Medical Imaging (Durham, NC, USA) 3-D scanner was used to obtain images in a canine model. A transcalvarial acoustic window was created under general anesthesia in the animal laboratory by placing a 10-mm burr hole in the high parietal calvarium of a 50-kg canine subject. The burr-hole was placed in a left parasagittal location to avoid the sagittal sinus, and the transducer was placed against the intact dura mater for ultrasound imaging. Images of the lateral ventricles were produced, including real-time 3-D guidance of a needle puncture of one ventricle. In a second canine subject, contrast-enhanced 3-D Doppler color flow images were made of the cerebral vessels including the complete Circle of Willis. Clinical applications may include real-time 3-D guidance of cerebrospinal fluid extraction from the lateral ventricles and bedside evaluation of critically ill patients where computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging techniques are unavailable.

  19. Monte Carlo - Metropolis Investigations of Shape and Matrix Effects in 2D and 3D Spin-Crossover Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerroudj, Salim; Caballero, Rafael; De Zela, Francisco; Jureschi, Catalin; Linares, Jorge; Boukheddaden, Kamel

    2016-08-01

    The Ising like model, taking into account short-, long-range interaction as well as surface effects is used to investigate size and shape effects on the thermal behaviour of 2D and 3D spin crossover (SCO) nanoparticles embedded in a matrix. We analyze the role of the parametert, representing the ratio between the number of surface and volume molecules, on the unusual thermal hysteresis behaviour (appearance of the hysteresis and a re-entrance phase transition) at small scales.

  20. Migration of tumor cells in 3D matrices is governed by matrix stiffness along with cell-matrix adhesion and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Muhammad H.; Trapani, Linda M.; Sieminski, Alisha; MacKellar, Drew; Gong, Haiyan; Kamm, Roger D.; Wells, Alan; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Cell migration on 2D surfaces is governed by a balance between counteracting tractile and adhesion forces. Although biochemical factors such as adhesion receptor and ligand concentration and binding, signaling through cell adhesion complexes, and cytoskeletal structure assembly/disassembly have been studied in detail in a 2D context, the critical biochemical and biophysical parameters that affect cell migration in 3D matrices have not been quantitatively investigated. We demonstrate that, in addition to adhesion and tractile forces, matrix stiffness is a key factor that influences cell movement in 3D. Cell migration assays in which Matrigel density, fibronectin concentration, and β1 integrin binding are systematically varied show that at a specific Matrigel density the migration speed of DU-145 human prostate carcinoma cells is a balance between tractile and adhesion forces. However, when biochemical parameters such as matrix ligand and cell integrin receptor levels are held constant, maximal cell movement shifts to matrices exhibiting lesser stiffness. This behavior contradicts current 2D models but is predicted by a recent force-based computational model of cell movement in a 3D matrix. As expected, this 3D motility through an extracellular environment of pore size much smaller than cellular dimensions does depend on proteolytic activity as broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors limit the migration of DU-145 cells and also HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. Our experimental findings here represent, to our knowledge, discovery of a previously undescribed set of balances of cell and matrix properties that govern the ability of tumor cells to migration in 3D environments. PMID:16832052

  1. Migration of tumor cells in 3D matrices is governed by matrix stiffness along with cell-matrix adhesion and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Muhammad H; Trapani, Linda M; Sieminski, Alisha L; Siemeski, Alisha; Mackellar, Drew; Gong, Haiyan; Kamm, Roger D; Wells, Alan; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-07-18

    Cell migration on 2D surfaces is governed by a balance between counteracting tractile and adhesion forces. Although biochemical factors such as adhesion receptor and ligand concentration and binding, signaling through cell adhesion complexes, and cytoskeletal structure assembly/disassembly have been studied in detail in a 2D context, the critical biochemical and biophysical parameters that affect cell migration in 3D matrices have not been quantitatively investigated. We demonstrate that, in addition to adhesion and tractile forces, matrix stiffness is a key factor that influences cell movement in 3D. Cell migration assays in which Matrigel density, fibronectin concentration, and beta1 integrin binding are systematically varied show that at a specific Matrigel density the migration speed of DU-145 human prostate carcinoma cells is a balance between tractile and adhesion forces. However, when biochemical parameters such as matrix ligand and cell integrin receptor levels are held constant, maximal cell movement shifts to matrices exhibiting lesser stiffness. This behavior contradicts current 2D models but is predicted by a recent force-based computational model of cell movement in a 3D matrix. As expected, this 3D motility through an extracellular environment of pore size much smaller than cellular dimensions does depend on proteolytic activity as broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors limit the migration of DU-145 cells and also HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. Our experimental findings here represent, to our knowledge, discovery of a previously undescribed set of balances of cell and matrix properties that govern the ability of tumor cells to migration in 3D environments.

  2. The 3-D collagen structure of equine articular cartilage, characterized using variable-angle-of-incidence polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Gangnus, Sergei V.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2005-08-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography has been used to spatially map the birefringence of equine articular cartilage. Images obtained in the vicinity of visible osteoarthritic lesions display a characteristic disruption of the regular birefringence bands shown by normal cartilage. We also note that significant (e.g. ×2) variations in the apparent birefringence of samples taken from young (18 month) animals that otherwise appear visually homogeneous are found over spatial scales of a few millimeters. We suggest that whilst some of this variation may be due to changes in the intrinsic birefringence of the tissue, the 3-D orientation of the collagen fibers relative to the plane of the joint surface should also be taken into account. We propose a method based on multiple angles of illumination to determine the polar angle of the collagen fibers.

  3. Elucidating the role of matrix stiffness in 3D cell migration and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ehrbar, M; Sala, A; Lienemann, P; Ranga, A; Mosiewicz, K; Bittermann, A; Rizzi, S C; Weber, F E; Lutolf, M P

    2011-01-19

    Reductionist in vitro model systems which mimic specific extracellular matrix functions in a highly controlled manner, termed artificial extracellular matrices (aECM), have increasingly been used to elucidate the role of cell-ECM interactions in regulating cell fate. To better understand the interplay of biophysical and biochemical effectors in controlling three-dimensional cell migration, a poly(ethylene glycol)-based aECM platform was used in this study to explore the influence of matrix cross-linking density, represented here by stiffness, on cell migration in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, the migration behavior of single preosteoblastic cells within hydrogels of varying stiffness and susceptibilities to degradation by matrix metalloproteases was assessed by time-lapse microscopy. Migration behavior was seen to be strongly dependent on matrix stiffness, with two regimes identified: a nonproteolytic migration mode dominating at relatively low matrix stiffness and proteolytic migration at higher stiffness. Subsequent in vivo experiments revealed a similar stiffness dependence of matrix remodeling, albeit less sensitive to the matrix metalloprotease sensitivity. Therefore, our aECM model system is well suited to unveil the role of biophysical and biochemical determinants of physiologically relevant cell migration phenomena.

  4. Collagen Matrix Remodeling in Stented Pulmonary Arteries after Transapical Heart Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Ghazanfari, Samaneh; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Baaijens, Frank P T; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2016-01-01

    The use of valved stents for minimally invasive replacement of semilunar heart valves is expected to change the extracellular matrix and mechanical function of the native artery and may thus impair long-term functionality of the implant. Here we investigate the impact of the stent on matrix remodeling of the pulmonary artery in a sheep model, focusing on matrix composition and collagen (re)orientation of the host tissue. Ovine native pulmonary arteries were harvested 8 (n = 2), 16 (n = 4) and 24 (n = 2) weeks after transapical implantation of self-expandable stented heart valves. Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy was used to assess the collagen (re)orientation of fresh tissue samples. The collagen and elastin content was quantified using biochemical assays. SHG microscopy revealed regional differences in collagen organization in all explants. In the adventitial layer of the arterial wall far distal to the stent (considered as the control tissue), we observed wavy collagen fibers oriented in the circumferential direction. These circumferential fibers were more straightened in the adventitial layer located behind the stent. On the luminal side of the wall behind the stent, collagen fibers were aligned along the stent struts and randomly oriented between the struts. Immediately distal to the stent, however, fibers on both the luminal and the adventitial side of the wall were oriented in the axial direction, demonstrating the stent impact on the collagen structure of surrounding arterial tissues. Collagen orientation patterns did not change with implantation time, and biochemical analyses showed no changes in the trend of collagen and elastin content with implantation time or location of the vascular wall. We hypothesize that the collagen fibers on the adventitial side of the arterial wall and behind the stent straighten in response to the arterial stretch caused by oversizing of the stent. However, the collagen organization on the luminal side suggests that

  5. Collagen Matrix Remodeling in Stented Pulmonary Arteries after Transapical Heart Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ghazanfari, Samaneh; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Hoerstrup, Simon P.; Baaijens, Frank P.T.; Bouten, Carlijn V.C.

    2016-01-01

    The use of valved stents for minimally invasive replacement of semilunar heart valves is expected to change the extracellular matrix and mechanical function of the native artery and may thus impair long-term functionality of the implant. Here we investigate the impact of the stent on matrix remodeling of the pulmonary artery in a sheep model, focusing on matrix composition and collagen (re)orientation of the host tissue. Ovine native pulmonary arteries were harvested 8 (n = 2), 16 (n = 4) and 24 (n = 2) weeks after transapical implantation of self-expandable stented heart valves. Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy was used to assess the collagen (re)orientation of fresh tissue samples. The collagen and elastin content was quantified using biochemical assays. SHG microscopy revealed regional differences in collagen organization in all explants. In the adventitial layer of the arterial wall far distal to the stent (considered as the control tissue), we observed wavy collagen fibers oriented in the circumferential direction. These circumferential fibers were more straightened in the adventitial layer located behind the stent. On the luminal side of the wall behind the stent, collagen fibers were aligned along the stent struts and randomly oriented between the struts. Immediately distal to the stent, however, fibers on both the luminal and the adventitial side of the wall were oriented in the axial direction, demonstrating the stent impact on the collagen structure of surrounding arterial tissues. Collagen orientation patterns did not change with implantation time, and biochemical analyses showed no changes in the trend of collagen and elastin content with implantation time or location of the vascular wall. We hypothesize that the collagen fibers on the adventitial side of the arterial wall and behind the stent straighten in response to the arterial stretch caused by oversizing of the stent. However, the collagen organization on the luminal side suggests that

  6. WARP interacts with collagen VI-containing microfibrils in the pericellular matrix of human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Uwe; Allen, Justin M; White, Rachel; Moscibrocki, Cathleen; Bruckner, Peter; Bateman, John F; Fitzgerald, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    Collagen VI and WARP are extracellular structural macromolecules present in cartilage and associated with BM suprastructures in non-skeletal tissues. We have previously shown that in WARP-deficient mice, collagen VI is specifically reduced in regions of the peripheral nerve ECM where WARP is expressed, suggesting that both macromolecules are part of the same suprastructure. The object of this study was to conduct a detailed analysis of WARP-collagen VI interactions in vitro in cartilage, a tissue rich in WARP and collagen VI. Immunohistochemical analysis of mouse and human articular cartilage showed that WARP and collagen VI co-localize in the pericellular matrix of superficial zone articular chondrocytes. EM analysis on extracts of human articular cartilage showed that WARP associates closely with collagen VI-containing suprastructures. Additional evidence of an interaction is provided by immunogold EM and immunoblot analysis showing that WARP was present in collagen VI-containing networks isolated from cartilage. Further characterization were done by solid phase binding studies and reconstitution experiments using purified recombinant WARP and isolated collagen VI. Collagen VI binds to WARP with an apparent K(d) of approximately 22 nM and the binding site(s) for WARP resides within the triple helical domain since WARP binds to both intact collagen VI tetramers and pepsinized collagen VI. Together, these data confirm and extend our previous findings by demonstrating that WARP and collagen VI form high affinity associations in vivo in cartilage. We conclude that WARP is ideally placed to function as an adapter protein in the cartilage pericellular matrix.

  7. Structural and functional features of a collagen-binding matrix protein from the mussel byssus.

    PubMed

    Suhre, Michael H; Gertz, Melanie; Steegborn, Clemens; Scheibel, Thomas

    2014-02-26

    Blue mussels adhere to surfaces by the byssus, a holdfast structure composed of individual threads representing a collagen fibre reinforced composite. Here, we present the crystal structure and function of one of its matrix proteins, the proximal thread matrix protein 1, which is present in the proximal section of the byssus. The structure reveals two von Willebrand factor type A domains linked by a two-β-stranded linker yielding a novel structural arrangement. In vitro, the protein binds heterologous collagens with high affinity and affects collagen assembly, morphology and arrangement of its fibrils. By providing charged surface clusters as well as insufficiently coordinated metal ions, the proximal thread matrix protein 1 might interconnect other byssal proteins and thereby contribute to the integrity of the byssal threads in vivo. Moreover, the protein could be used for adjusting the mechanical properties of collagen materials, a function likely important in the natural byssus.

  8. Using a decellularized splenic matrix as a 3D scaffold for hepatocyte cultivation in vitro: a preliminary trial.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xing-Long; Xiang, Jun-Xi; Wu, Wan-Quan; Wang, Bo; Liu, Wen-Yan; Gao, Rui; Dong, Ding-Hui; Lv, Yi

    2015-08-18

    Using a decellularized liver matrix (DLM) to reengineer liver tissue is a promising therapy for end-stage liver disease. However, the limited supply of donor organs still hampers its potential clinical application, while a xenogenic decellularized matrix may bring a risk of zoonosis and immunological rejection. Therefore, an appropriate alternative scaffold is needed. In this research, we established a decellularized splenic matrix (DSM) in a rodent model, which preserved the 3D ultrastructure, the components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the native vascular network. The DSM and DLM had similar components of ECM, and similar mechanical properties. Hepatocytes were seeded to the DSM and DLM for dynamic culturing up to 6 d, and distributed both in decellularized sinusoidal spaces and around the vessels. The TUNEL-positive cell percentage in a dynamic culturing decellularized splenic matrix (dDSM) was 10.7%  ±  3.6% at 3d and 25.8%  ±  5.6% at 5d, although 14.2%  ±  4.5% and 24.8%  ±  2.9%, respectively, in a dynamic culturing decellularized liver matrix (dDLM) at the same time point (p  >  0.05). Primary hepatocytes in the dDSM and dDLM expressed albumin, G6pc and Ugt1a1. The gene expression of Cyp2b1, Cyp1a2 and HNF1α in the gene transcription level revealed hepatocytes had lower gene expression levels in the dDSM compared with the dDLM at 3d, but better than those in a sandwich culture. The cumulative albumin production at 6 d of culture was 80.7   ±   9.6 μg per million cells in the dDSM and 89.6   ±   4.6 μg per million cells in the dDLM (p  >  0.05). In summary, the DSM is a promising 3D scaffold for hepatocyte cultivation in vitro.

  9. 2D protrusion but not motility predicts growth factor-induced cancer cell migration in 3D collagen.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Aaron S; Hughes-Alford, Shannon K; Kay, Jennifer E; Castillo, Amalchi; Wells, Alan; Gertler, Frank B; Lauffenburger, Douglas A

    2012-06-11

    Growth factor-induced migration is a critical step in the dissemination and metastasis of solid tumors. Although differences in properties characterizing cell migration on two-dimensional (2D) substrata versus within three-dimensional (3D) matrices have been noted for particular growth factor stimuli, the 2D approach remains in more common use as an efficient surrogate, especially for high-throughput experiments. We therefore were motivated to investigate which migration properties measured in various 2D assays might be reflective of 3D migratory behavioral responses. We used human triple-negative breast cancer lines stimulated by a panel of receptor tyrosine kinase ligands relevant to mammary carcinoma progression. Whereas 2D migration properties did not correlate well with 3D behavior across multiple growth factors, we found that increased membrane protrusion elicited by growth factor stimulation did relate robustly to enhanced 3D migration properties of the MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-157 lines. Interestingly, we observed this to be a more reliable relationship than cognate receptor expression or activation levels across these and two additional mammary tumor lines.

  10. 3D ToF-SIMS Analysis of Peptide Incorporation into MALDI Matrix Crystals with Sub-micrometer Resolution.

    PubMed

    Körsgen, Martin; Pelster, Andreas; Dreisewerd, Klaus; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F

    2016-02-01

    The analytical sensitivity in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is largely affected by the specific analyte-matrix interaction, in particular by the possible incorporation of the analytes into crystalline MALDI matrices. Here we used time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to visualize the incorporation of three peptides with different hydrophobicities, bradykinin, Substance P, and vasopressin, into two classic MALDI matrices, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCCA). For depth profiling, an Ar cluster ion beam was used to gradually sputter through the matrix crystals without causing significant degradation of matrix or biomolecules. A pulsed Bi3 ion cluster beam was used to image the lateral analyte distribution in the center of the sputter crater. Using this dual beam technique, the 3D distribution of the analytes and spatial segregation effects within the matrix crystals were imaged with sub-μm resolution. The technique could in the future enable matrix-enhanced (ME)-ToF-SIMS imaging of peptides in tissue slices at ultra-high resolution. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  11. 3D ToF-SIMS Analysis of Peptide Incorporation into MALDI Matrix Crystals with Sub-micrometer Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körsgen, Martin; Pelster, Andreas; Dreisewerd, Klaus; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F.

    2016-02-01

    The analytical sensitivity in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is largely affected by the specific analyte-matrix interaction, in particular by the possible incorporation of the analytes into crystalline MALDI matrices. Here we used time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to visualize the incorporation of three peptides with different hydrophobicities, bradykinin, Substance P, and vasopressin, into two classic MALDI matrices, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCCA). For depth profiling, an Ar cluster ion beam was used to gradually sputter through the matrix crystals without causing significant degradation of matrix or biomolecules. A pulsed Bi3 ion cluster beam was used to image the lateral analyte distribution in the center of the sputter crater. Using this dual beam technique, the 3D distribution of the analytes and spatial segregation effects within the matrix crystals were imaged with sub-μm resolution. The technique could in the future enable matrix-enhanced (ME)-ToF-SIMS imaging of peptides in tissue slices at ultra-high resolution.

  12. Collective epithelial cell invasion overcomes mechanical barriers of collagenous extracellular matrix by a narrow tube-like geometry and MMP14-dependent local softening†

    PubMed Central

    Alcaraz, Jordi; Mori, Hidetoshi; Ghajar, Cyrus M.; Brownfield, Doug; Galgoczy, Roland; Bissell, Mina J.

    2013-01-01

    Collective cell invasion (CCI) through interstitial collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucial to the initial stages of branching morphogenesis, and a hallmark of tissue repair and dissemination of certain tumors. The collagenous ECM acts as a mechanical barrier against CCI. However, the physical nature of this barrier and how it is overcome by cells remains incompletely understood. To address these questions, we performed theoretical and experimental analysis of mammary epithelial branching morphogenesis in 3D type I collagen (collagen-I) gels. We found that the mechanical resistance of collagen-I is largely due to its elastic rather than its viscous properties. We also identified two strategies utilized by mammary epithelial cells that can independently minimize ECM mechanical resistance during CCI. First, cells adopt a narrow tube-like geometry during invasion, which minimizes the elastic opposition from the ECM as revealed by theoretical modeling of the most frequent invasive shapes and sizes. Second, the stiffness of the collagenous ECM is reduced at invasive fronts due to its degradation by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), as indicated by direct measurements of collagen-I microelasticity by atomic force microscopy. Molecular techniques further specified that the membrane-bound MMP14 mediates degradation of collagen-I at invasive fronts. Thus, our findings reveal that MMP14 is necessary to efficiently reduce the physical restraints imposed by collagen-I during branching morphogenesis, and help our overall understanding of how forces are balanced between cells and their surrounding ECM to maintain collective geometry and mechanical stability during CCI. PMID:21993836

  13. Environmental Dependence of Artifact CD Peaks of Chiral Schiff Base 3d-4f Complexes in Soft Mater PMMA Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Yu; Nidaira, Keisuke; Akitsu, Takashiro

    2011-01-01

    Four chiral Schiff base binuclear 3d-4f complexes (NdNi, NdCu, GdNi, and GdCu) have been prepared and characterized by means of electronic and CD spectra, IR spectra, magnetic measurements, and X-ray crystallography (NdNi). A so-called artifact peak of solid state CD spectra, which was characteristic of oriented molecules without free molecular rotation, appeared at about 470 nm. Magnetic data of the complexes in the solid state (powder) and in PMMA cast films or solutions indicated that only GdCu preserved molecular structures in various matrixes of soft maters. For the first time, we have used the changes of intensity of artifact CD peaks to detect properties of environmental (media solid state (KBr pellets), PMMA cast films, concentration dependence of PMMA in acetone solutions, and pure acetone solution) for chiral 3d-4f complexes (GdCu). Rigid matrix keeping anisotropic orientation exhibited a decrease in the intensity of the artifact CD peak toward negative values. The present results suggest that solid state artifact CD peaks can be affected by environmental viscosity of a soft mater matrix. PMID:22072930

  14. Experimental studies of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles doped silica matrix 3D magneto-photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Diwan, E.; Royer, F.; Kekesi, R.; Jamon, D.; Blanc-Mignon, M. F.; Neveu, S.; Rousseau, J. J.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present the synthesis and the optical properties of 3D magneto-photonic structures. The elaboration process consists in firstly preparing then infiltrating polystyrene direct opals with a homogeneous solution of sol-gel silica precursors doped by cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, and finally dissolving the polystyrene spheres. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images of the prepared samples clearly evidence a periodic arrangement. Using a home-made polarimetric optical bench, the transmittance as a function of the wavelength, the Faraday rotation as a function of the applied magnetic field, and the Faraday ellipticity as a function of the wavelength and as a function of the applied magnetic field were measured. The existence of deep photonic band gaps (PBG), the unambiguous magnetic character of the samples and the qualitative modification of the Faraday ellipticity in the area of the PBG are evidenced.

  15. Changes in cell, matrix compartment, and fibrillar collagen volumes between growth-plate zones.

    PubMed

    Noonan, K J; Hunziker, E B; Nessler, J; Buckwalter, J A

    1998-07-01

    To define the contributions of changes in cell, matrix compartment, and fibrillar collagen volumes to longitudinal bone growth, we measured the differences in cell, pericellular/territorial matrix and interterritorial matrix volumes, and fibrillar collagen concentrations between the upper proliferative and lower hypertrophic zones of the proximal tibial physes of six miniature pigs. The mean numerical density of cells decreased from 110,000 cells/mm3 in the upper proliferative zone to 59,900 cells/mm3 in the lower hypertrophic zone. The mean cell volume increased nearly 5-fold (from 1,174 to 5,530 microm3), and the total matrix volume per cell increased 46% (from 8,040 to 11,760 microm3/cell) between the upper proliferative and lower hypertrophic zones. Both the pericellular/territorial matrix volume per cell and the interterritorial matrix volume per cell increased between the upper proliferative and lower hypertrophic zones; the pericellular/territorial matrix volume per cell increased 61% (from 4,580 to 7,390 microm3/cell), whereas the interterritorial matrix volume per cell increased 26% (from 3,460 to 4,370 microm3/cell). The total increase in mean cell volume of 4,356 microm3 exceeded the total increase in mean matrix volume per cell of 3,720 microm3; the total mean pericellular/territorial matrix volume per cell increased more than the total mean interterritorial matrix volume per cell (2,810 compared with 910 microm3/cell). Fibrillar collagen concentration was greater in the interterritorial matrix than in the pericellular/territorial matrix in both zones and increased in both matrix compartments between the upper proliferative and lower hypertrophic zones. The amount of fibrillar collagen per cell also increased in both matrix compartments between the upper proliferative and lower hypertrophic zones (from 1,720 to 3,100 microm3/cell in the pericellular/territorial matrix and from 1,490 to 2,230 microm3/cell in the interterritorial matrix; thus, the total

  16. Longitudinal, 3D Imaging of Collagen Remodeling in Murine Hypertrophic Scars In Vivo using Polarization-sensitive Optical Frequency Domain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lo, William C. Y.; Villiger, Martin; Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G. Felix; Khan, Saiqa; Lian, Christine G.; Austen, William G.; Yarmush, Martin; Bouma, Brett E.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS), frequently seen after traumatic injuries and surgery, remain a major clinical challenge due to the limited success of existing therapies. A significant obstacle to understanding HTS etiology is the lack of tools to monitor scar remodeling longitudinally and non-invasively. We present an in vivo, label-free technique using polarization-sensitive optical frequency domain imaging (PS-OFDI) for the 3D, longitudinal assessment of collagen remodeling in murine HTS. In this study, HTS was induced with a mechanical tension device for 4 to 10 days on incisional wounds and imaged up to one month after device removal; an excisional HTS model was also imaged at 6 months after injury to investigate deeper and more mature scars. We showed that local retardation (LR) and degree of polarization (DOP) provide a robust signature for HTS. Compared to normal skin with heterogeneous LR and low DOP, HTS was characterized by an initially low LR, which increased as collagen fibers remodeled, and a persistently high DOP. This study demonstrates that PS-OFDI offers a powerful tool to gain significant biological insights into HTS remodeling by enabling longitudinal assessment of collagen in vivo, which is critical to elucidating HTS etiology and developing more effective HTS therapies. PMID:26763427

  17. Longitudinal, 3D Imaging of Collagen Remodeling in Murine Hypertrophic Scars In Vivo Using Polarization-Sensitive Optical Frequency Domain Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lo, William C Y; Villiger, Martin; Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G Felix; Khan, Saiqa; Lian, Christine G; Austen, William G; Yarmush, Martin; Bouma, Brett E

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS), frequently seen after traumatic injuries and surgery, remain a major clinical challenge because of the limited success of existing therapies. A significant obstacle to understanding HTS etiology is the lack of tools to monitor scar remodeling longitudinally and noninvasively. We present an in vivo, label-free technique using polarization-sensitive optical frequency domain imaging for the 3D, longitudinal assessment of collagen remodeling in murine HTS. In this study, HTS was induced with a mechanical tension device for 4-10 days on incisional wounds and imaged up to 1 month after device removal; an excisional HTS model was also imaged at 6 months after injury to investigate deeper and more mature scars. We showed that local retardation and degree of polarization provide a robust signature for HTS. Compared with normal skin with heterogeneous local retardation and low degree of polarization, HTS was characterized by an initially low local retardation, which increased as collagen fibers remodeled, and a persistently high degree of polarization. This study demonstrates that polarization-sensitive optical frequency domain imaging offers a powerful tool to gain significant biological insights into HTS remodeling by enabling longitudinal assessment of collagen in vivo, which is critical to elucidating HTS etiology and developing more effective HTS therapies.

  18. Collagen Fragmentation Promotes Oxidative Stress and Elevates Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 in Fibroblasts in Aged Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Gary J.; Quan, Taihao; Purohit, Trupta; Shao, Yuan; Cho, Moon Kyun; He, Tianyuan; Varani, James; Kang, Sewon; Voorhees, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Aged human skin is fragile because of fragmentation and loss of type I collagen fibrils, which confer strength and resiliency. We report here that dermal fibroblasts express increased levels of collagen-degrading matrix metalloproteinases-1 (MMP-1) in aged (>80 years old) compared with young (21 to 30 years old) human skin in vivo. Transcription factor AP-1 and α2β1 integrin, which are key regulators of MMP-1 expression, are also elevated in fibroblasts in aged human skin in vivo. MMP-1 treatment of young skin in organ culture causes fragmentation of collagen fibrils and reduces fibroblast stretch, consistent with reduced mechanical tension, as observed in aged human skin. Limited fragmentation of three-dimensional collagen lattices with exogenous MMP-1 also reduces fibroblast stretch and mechanical tension. Furthermore, fibroblasts cultured in fragmented collagen lattices express elevated levels of MMP-1, AP-1, and α2β1 integrin. Importantly, culture in fragmented collagen raises intracellular oxidant levels and treatment with antioxidant MitoQ10 significantly reduces MMP-1 expression. These data identify positive feedback regulation that couples age-dependent MMP-1-catalyzed collagen fragmentation and oxidative stress. We propose that this self perpetuating cycle promotes human skin aging. These data extend the current understanding of the oxidative theory of aging beyond a cellular-centric view to include extracellular matrix and the critical role that connective tissue microenvironment plays in the biology of aging. PMID:19116368

  19. Variable angle-of-incidence polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography: its use to study the 3D collagen structure of equine articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Gangnus, Sergei V.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2006-02-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography has been used to spatially map the birefringence of equine articular cartilage. The polar orientation of the collagen fibers relative to the plane of the joint surface must be taken into account if a quantitative measurement of true birefringence is required. Using a series of images taken at different angles of illumination, we determine the fiber polar angle and true birefringence at one site on a sample of equine cartilage, on the assumption that the fibers lie within the plane of imaging. We propose a more general method based on the extended Jones matrix formalism to determine both the polar and azimuthal orientation of the collagen fibers as well as the true birefringence as functions of depth.

  20. Globular and Optically Transparent Photonic Crystals Based on 3D-opal Matrix and REE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivicheva, S. N.; Kargin, Yu. F.; Gorelik, V. S.

    By repeatedly filling the octahedral and tetrahedral pores of 3D-silica opal matrices with silica sol doped with rare-earth elements with subsequent heat treatment globular photonic crystals filled with mesoporous glass and optically transparent photonic crystals (quantytes) containing 10-30 ppm REE were produced, depending on the annealing temperature. Voids of fcc lattice formed by amorphous spherical globules of SiO2 in globular photonic crystals are filled (up to 70%) by mesoporous glass doped with rare earth elements. Pores in the transparent photonic crystals disappear during sintering of globules of silica and mesoporous glass, but the periodic arrangement of REE-enriched silica areas (quantum dots) is retained. The reflection and luminescence spectra of photonic crystals filled with sols doped with europium Eu3+ and terbium Tb3+ were experimentally studied. A significant increase in the photoluminescence intensity of Eu3+ ions at the approach of the spectral position of the transition 5D0 → 7F2 to the edge of the bandgaps of the photonic crystal was determined. The authors come to the conclusion that a lowering of the threshold for lasing transitions in ions of rare elements is possible.

  1. Multi-scale Characterisation of the 3D Microstructure of a Thermally-Shocked Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composite

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Bodey, Andrew J.; Sui, Tan; Kockelmann, Winfried; Rau, Christoph; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Mi, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    Bulk metallic glass matrix composites (BMGMCs) are a new class of metal alloys which have significantly increased ductility and impact toughness, resulting from the ductile crystalline phases distributed uniformly within the amorphous matrix. However, the 3D structures and their morphologies of such composite at nano and micrometre scale have never been reported before. We have used high density electric currents to thermally shock a Zr-Ti based BMGMC to different temperatures, and used X-ray microtomography, FIB-SEM nanotomography and neutron diffraction to reveal the morphologies, compositions, volume fractions and thermal stabilities of the nano and microstructures. Understanding of these is essential for optimizing the design of BMGMCs and developing viable manufacturing methods. PMID:26725519

  2. Multi-scale Characterisation of the 3D Microstructure of a Thermally-Shocked Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Bodey, Andrew J.; Sui, Tan; Kockelmann, Winfried; Rau, Christoph; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Mi, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    Bulk metallic glass matrix composites (BMGMCs) are a new class of metal alloys which have significantly increased ductility and impact toughness, resulting from the ductile crystalline phases distributed uniformly within the amorphous matrix. However, the 3D structures and their morphologies of such composite at nano and micrometre scale have never been reported before. We have used high density electric currents to thermally shock a Zr-Ti based BMGMC to different temperatures, and used X-ray microtomography, FIB-SEM nanotomography and neutron diffraction to reveal the morphologies, compositions, volume fractions and thermal stabilities of the nano and microstructures. Understanding of these is essential for optimizing the design of BMGMCs and developing viable manufacturing methods.

  3. Microscale Diffusion Properties of the Cartilage Pericellular Matrix Measured Using 3D Scanning Microphotolysis

    PubMed Central

    Leddy, Holly A.; Christensen, Susan E.; Guilak, Farshid

    2009-01-01

    Chondrocytes (cartilage cells) are enclosed within a pericellular matrix (PCM) whose composition and structure differ from those of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Since the PCM surrounds each cell, molecules that interact with the chondrocyte must pass through the pericellular environment. A quantitative understanding of the diffusional properties of the PCM will help elucidate the PCM’s regulatory role in controlling transport to and from the chondrocyte. The diffusivity of a fluorescently-labeled 70 kDa dextran was quantified within the PCM of porcine articular cartilage using a newly-developed mathematical model of scanning microphotolysis (SCAMP). SCAMP is a rapid, line photobleaching method that accounts for out-of-plane bleaching attributable to high magnification. Data were analyzed by best-fit comparison to simulations generated using a discretization of the diffusion-reaction equation in conjunction with the microscope-specific three-dimensional excitation and detection profiles. The diffusion coefficient of dextran was significantly lower in the PCM than in the ECM in normal cartilage. In early-stage arthritic tissue, however, no significant differences in diffusivity were detectable. These results support the hypothesis that the diffusivity of the PCM is lower than that of the ECM, presumably due to differences in proteoglycan content, and that osteoarthritic changes in tissue affect the transport properties of the PCM. PMID:19045531

  4. Incorporation of Ag metallic nanoparticles in 3D gelatin matrix via the green strategy solution plasma.

    PubMed

    Pootawang, Panuphong; Kim, Seong Cheol; Kim, Jung Wan; Lee, Sang Yul

    2013-01-01

    The environmental concern pays much attention to the recent cause of the global warming effect. The reduction of the chemical uses is one of many ways to avoid this crucial problem. Herein, the green process for silver nanometallic particle formation and incorporation in gelatin are proposed. By using a novel discharge process in solution named solution plasma, the silver nanometallic particle formation and its incorporation in gelatin could be accomplished in one-batch reactor during discharge by using silver nitrate (AgNO3) solution as the precursor and controlling systematical parameters. The three-dimensional scaffolds of gelatin/silver biocomposite were fabricated using lyophilizer and the water-soluble property of gelatin was improved by irradiation of ultraviolet ray. The well dispersed silver nanoparticles with the mean particle size 10-20 nm in the good texture of gelatin matrix were obtained. The density of micropore in gelatin/silver scaffold was proportional to the gelatin concentration. In addition, thermal stability of prepared samples had no change comparing with pure gelatin, indicating that the incorporation of silver nanoparticles in gelatin matrix did not affect to the nature of gelatin.

  5. A multiparallel bioreactor for the cultivation of mammalian cells in a 3D-ceramic matrix.

    PubMed

    Goralczyk, Vicky; Driemel, Gregor; Bischof, Andreas; Peter, Andrea; Berthold, Almuth; Kroh, Lothar; Blessing, Lucienne; Schubert, Helmut; King, Rudibert

    2010-01-01

    For adherently growing cells, cultivation is limited by the provided growth surface. Excellent surface-to-volume ratios are found in highly porous matrices, which have to face the challenge of nutrient supply inside the matrices' caverns. Therefore, perfusion strategies are recommended which often have to deal with the need of developing an encompassing bioreactor periphery. We present a modular bioreactor system based on a porous ceramic matrix that enables the supply of cells with oxygen and nutrients by perfusion. The present version of the reactor system focuses on simple testing of various inoculation and operation modes. Moreover, it can be used to efficiently test different foam structures. Protocols are given to set-up the system together with handling procedures for long-time cultivation of a CHO cell line. Experimental results confirm vital growth of cells inside the matrices' caverns.

  6. Collagen Unfolding Accelerates Water Influx, Determining Hydration in the Interstitial Matrix

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Maria P.; Morykwas, Michael; Shelton, Julie; Argenta, Louis

    2012-01-01

    In the interstitial matrix, collagen unfolding at physiologic temperatures is thought to facilitate interactions with enzymes and scaffold molecules during inflammation, tissue remodeling, and wound healing. We tested the hypothesis that it also plays a role in modulating flows and matrix hydration potential. After progressively unfolding dermal collagen in situ, we measured the hydration parameters by osmotic stress techniques and modeled them as linear functions of unfolded collagen, quantified by differential scanning calorimetry after timed heat treatment. Consistent with the hypothetical model, the thermodynamic and flow parameters obtained experimentally were related linearly to the unfolded collagen fraction. The increases in relative humidity and intensity of T2 maps were also consistent with interfacial energy contributions to the hydration potential and the hydrophobic character of the newly formed protein/water interfaces. As a plausible explanation, we propose that increased tension at interfaces formed during collagen unfolding generate local gradients in the matrix that accelerate water transfer in the dermis. This mechanism adds a convective component to interstitial transfer of biological fluids that, unlike diffusion, can speed the dispersion of water and large solutes within the matrix. PMID:23200049

  7. Effect of Collagen Nanotopography on Keloid Fibroblast Proliferation and Matrix Synthesis: Implications for Dermal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Muthusubramaniam, Lalitha; Zaitseva, Tatiana; Paukshto, Michael; Martin, George

    2014-01-01

    Keloids are locally exuberant dermal scars characterized by excessive fibroblast proliferation and matrix accumulation. Although treatment strategies include surgical removal and intralesional steroid injections, an effective regimen is yet to be established due to a high rate of recurrence. The regressing center and growing margin of the keloid have different collagen architecture and also differ in the rate of proliferation. To investigate whether proliferation is responsive to collagen topography, keloid, scar, and dermal fibroblasts were cultured on nanopatterned scaffolds varying in collagen fibril diameter and alignment-small and large diameter, aligned and random fibrils, and compared to cells grown on flat collagen-coated substrates, respectively. Cell morphology, proliferation, and expression of six genes related to proliferation (cyclin D1), phenotype (α-smooth muscle actin), and matrix synthesis (collagens I and III, and matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -2) were measured to evaluate cell response. Fibril alignment was shown to reduce proliferation and matrix synthesis in all three types of fibroblasts. Further, keloid cells were found to be most responsive to nanotopography. PMID:24724556

  8. Cells in 3D matrices under interstitial flow: effects of extracellular matrix alignment on cell shear stress and drag forces.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, John A; Lichter, Seth; Swartz, Melody A

    2010-03-22

    Interstitial flow is an important regulator of various cell behaviors both in vitro and in vivo, yet the forces that fluid flow imposes on cells embedded in a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM), and the effects of matrix architecture on those forces, are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate how fiber alignment can affect the shear and pressure forces on the cell and ECM. Using computational fluid dynamics simulations, we show that while the solutions of the Brinkman equation accurately estimate the average fluid shear stress and the drag forces on a cell within a 3D fibrous medium, the distribution of shear stress on the cellular surface as well as the peak shear stresses remain intimately related to the pericellular fiber architecture and cannot be estimated using bulk-averaged properties. We demonstrate that perpendicular fiber alignment of the ECM yields lower shear stress and pressure forces on the cells and higher stresses on the ECM, leading to decreased permeability, while parallel fiber alignment leads to higher stresses on cells and increased permeability, as compared to a cubic lattice arrangement. The Spielman-Goren permeability relationships for fibrous media agreed well with CFD simulations of flow with explicitly considered fibers. These results suggest that the experimentally observed active remodeling of ECM fibers by fibroblasts under interstitial flow to a perpendicular alignment could serve to decrease the shear and drag forces on the cell.

  9. 3D printed complex tissue construct using stem cell-laden decellularized extracellular matrix bioinks for cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jinah; Park, Hun-Jun; Kim, Seok-Won; Kim, Heejin; Park, Ju Young; Na, Soo Jin; Kim, Hyeon Ji; Park, Moon Nyeo; Choi, Seung Hyun; Park, Sun Hwa; Kim, Sung Won; Kwon, Sang-Mo; Kim, Pum-Joon; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising therapeutic method for the treatment of ischemic heart diseases; however, some challenges prohibit the efficacy after cell delivery due to hostile microenvironment of the injured myocardium. 3D printed pre-vascularized stem cell patch can enhance the therapeutic efficacy for cardiac repair through promotion of rapid vascularization after patch transplantation. In this study, stem cell-laden decellularized extracellular matrix bioinks are used in 3D printing of pre-vascularized and functional multi-material structures. The printed structure composed of spatial patterning of dual stem cells improves cell-to-cell interactions and differentiation capability and promotes functionality for tissue regeneration. The developed stem cell patch promoted strong vascularization and tissue matrix formation in vivo. The patterned patch exhibited enhanced cardiac functions, reduced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, increased migration from patch to the infarct area, neo-muscle and capillary formation along with improvements in cardiac functions. Therefore, pre-vascularized stem cell patch provides cardiac niche-like microenvironment, resulting in beneficial effects on cardiac repair.

  10. Development of multifunctional collagen scaffolds directed by collagen mimetic peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Lan (Allen)

    Collagen is widely used for soft tissue replacement and tissue engineering scaffold. Functionalized collagen may offer new and improved applications for collagen-based biomaterials. But passively adsorbed molecules readily diffuse out from collagen matrix, and conventional chemical reactions on collagen are difficult to control and may compromise the biochemical feature of natural collagen. Hence, the aim of this dissertation is to develop a new physical collagen modification method through the non-covalent immobilization of collagen mimetic peptides (CMPs) and CMP derivatives on collagen scaffolds, thereby evading the drawbacks of passive and chemical modifications. Most of the research on CMPs over the past three decades has focused on synthesizing CMPs and understanding the effects of amino acid sequence on the peptide structural stability. Although few attempts have been made to develop biomaterials based on pure CMP, CMP has never used in complex with natural collagen. We demonstrate that CMPs with varying chain lengths have strong propensity to associate with natural 2-D and 3-D collagen substrates. We also show that CMPs can recognize and bind to reconstituted type I collagen fibers as well as collagens of ex vivo human liver tissue. The practical use of CMPs conjugated with linear and multi-arm poly(ethylene glycol)s allows to control cell organization in 2-D collagen substrates. Our cell adhesion studies suggest that under certain conditions (e.g. high incubation temperature, small CMP size), the bound CMP derivatives can be released from the collagen matrix, which may provide new opportunities for manipulating cell behavior especially by dynamically controlling the amount of signaling molecules in the collagen matrix. Polyanionic charged CMP was synthesized to modulate tubulogenesis of endothelial cells by attracting VEGF with 3-D collagen gel and a new PEG hydrogel using bifunctional CMP conjugates was synthesized as physico-chemical crosslinkers for

  11. Macrophage podosomes go 3D.

    PubMed

    Van Goethem, Emeline; Guiet, Romain; Balor, Stéphanie; Charrière, Guillaume M; Poincloux, Renaud; Labrousse, Arnaud; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Le Cabec, Véronique

    2011-01-01

    Macrophage tissue infiltration is a critical step in the immune response against microorganisms and is also associated with disease progression in chronic inflammation and cancer. Macrophages are constitutively equipped with specialized structures called podosomes dedicated to extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. We recently reported that these structures play a critical role in trans-matrix mesenchymal migration mode, a protease-dependent mechanism. Podosome molecular components and their ECM-degrading activity have been extensively studied in two dimensions (2D), but yet very little is known about their fate in three-dimensional (3D) environments. Therefore, localization of podosome markers and proteolytic activity were carefully examined in human macrophages performing mesenchymal migration. Using our gelled collagen I 3D matrix model to obligate human macrophages to perform mesenchymal migration, classical podosome markers including talin, paxillin, vinculin, gelsolin, cortactin were found to accumulate at the tip of F-actin-rich cell protrusions together with β1 integrin and CD44 but not β2 integrin. Macrophage proteolytic activity was observed at podosome-like protrusion sites using confocal fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. The formation of migration tunnels by macrophages inside the matrix was accomplished by degradation, engulfment and mechanic compaction of the matrix. In addition, videomicroscopy revealed that 3D F-actin-rich protrusions of migrating macrophages were as dynamic as their 2D counterparts. Overall, the specifications of 3D podosomes resembled those of 2D podosome rosettes rather than those of individual podosomes. This observation was further supported by the aspect of 3D podosomes in fibroblasts expressing Hck, a master regulator of podosome rosettes in macrophages. In conclusion, human macrophage podosomes go 3D and take the shape of spherical podosome rosettes when the cells perform mesenchymal migration. This work

  12. Candidate Cell and Matrix Interaction Domains on the Collagen Fibril, the Predominant Protein of Vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Shawn M.; Orgel, Joseph P.; Fertala, Andrzej; McAuliffe, Jon D.; Turner, Kevin R.; Di Lullo, Gloria A.; Chen, Steven; Antipova, Olga; Perumal, Shiamalee; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Forlinoi, Antonella; Cabral, Wayne A.; Barnes, Aileen M.; Marini, Joan C.; San Antonio, James D.

    2008-07-18

    Type I collagen, the predominant protein of vertebrates, polymerizes with type III and V collagens and non-collagenous molecules into large cable-like fibrils, yet how the fibril interacts with cells and other binding partners remains poorly understood. To help reveal insights into the collagen structure-function relationship, a data base was assembled including hundreds of type I collagen ligand binding sites and mutations on a two-dimensional model of the fibril. Visual examination of the distribution of functional sites, and statistical analysis of mutation distributions on the fibril suggest it is organized into two domains. The 'cell interaction domain' is proposed to regulate dynamic aspects of collagen biology, including integrin-mediated cell interactions and fibril remodeling. The 'matrix interaction domain' may assume a structural role, mediating collagen cross-linking, proteoglycan interactions, and tissue mineralization. Molecular modeling was used to superimpose the positions of functional sites and mutations from the two-dimensional fibril map onto a three-dimensional x-ray diffraction structure of the collagen microfibril in situ, indicating the existence of domains in the native fibril. Sequence searches revealed that major fibril domain elements are conserved in type I collagens through evolution and in the type II/XI collagen fibril predominant in cartilage. Moreover, the fibril domain model provides potential insights into the genotype-phenotype relationship for several classes of human connective tissue diseases, mechanisms of integrin clustering by fibrils, the polarity of fibril assembly, heterotypic fibril function, and connective tissue pathology in diabetes and aging.

  13. Effects of increased collagen-matrix density on the mechanical properties and in vivo absorbability of hydroxyapatite-collagen composites as artificial bone materials.

    PubMed

    Yunoki, Shunji; Sugiura, Hiroaki; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Eiji; Yasuda, Kazunori; Tanaka, Junzo

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increased collagen-matrix density on the mechanical properties and in vivo absorbability of porous hydroxyapatite (HAp)-collagen composites as artificial bone materials. Seven types of porous HAp-collagen composites were prepared from HAp nanocrystals and dense collagen fibrils. Their densities and HAp/collagen weight ratios ranged from 122 to 331 mg cm⁻³ and from 20/80 to 80/20, respectively. The flexural modulus and strength increased with an increase in density, reaching 2.46 ± 0.48 and 0.651 ± 0.103 MPa, respectively. The porous composites with a higher collagen-matrix density exhibited much higher mechanical properties at the same densities, suggesting that increasing the collagen-matrix density is an effective way of improving the mechanical properties. It was also suggested that other structural factors in addition to collagen-matrix density are required to achieve bone-like mechanical properties. The in vivo absorbability of the composites was investigated in bone defects of rabbit femurs, demonstrating that the absorption rate decreased with increases in the composite density. An exhaustive increase in density is probably limited by decreases in absorbability as artificial bones.

  14. Cervical collagen imaging for determining preterm labor risks using a colposcope with full Mueller matrix capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoff, Susan; Chue-Sang, Joseph; Holness, Nola A.; Gandjbakhche, Amir; Chernomordik, Viktor; Ramella-Roman, Jessica

    2016-02-01

    Preterm birth is a worldwide health issue, as the number one cause of infant mortality and neurological disorders. Although affecting nearly 10% of all births, an accurate, reliable diagnostic method for preterm birth has, yet, to be developed. The primary constituent of the cervix, collagen, provides the structural support and mechanical strength to maintain cervical closure, through specific organization, during fetal gestation. As pregnancy progresses, the disorganization of the cervical collagen occurs to allow eventual cervical pliability so the baby can be birthed through the cervical opening. This disorganization of collagen affects the mechanical properties of the cervix and, if the changes occur prematurely, may be a significant factor leading to preterm birth. The organization of collagen can be analyzed through the use of Mueller Matrix Polarimetric imaging of the characteristic birefringence of collagen. In this research, we have built a full Mueller Matrix Polarimetry attachment to a standard colposcope to enable imaging of human cervixes during standard prenatal exams at various stages of fetal gestation. Analysis of the polarimetric images provides information of quantity and organization of cervical collagen at specific gestational stages of pregnancy. This quantitative information may provide an indication of risk of preterm birth.

  15. Collagen cross-linking: insights on the evolution of metazoan extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Pascual, Fernando; Slatter, David Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Collagens constitute a large family of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins that play a fundamental role in supporting the structure of various tissues in multicellular animals. The mechanical strength of fibrillar collagens is highly dependent on the formation of covalent cross-links between individual fibrils, a process initiated by the enzymatic action of members of the lysyl oxidase (LOX) family. Fibrillar collagens are present in a wide variety of animals, therefore often being associated with metazoan evolution, where the emergence of an ancestral collagen chain has been proposed to lead to the formation of different clades. While LOX-generated collagen cross-linking metabolites have been detected in different metazoan families, there is limited information about when and how collagen acquired this particular modification. By analyzing telopeptide and helical sequences, we identified highly conserved, potential cross-linking sites throughout the metazoan tree of life. Based on this analysis, we propose that they have importantly contributed to the formation and further expansion of fibrillar collagens. PMID:27876853

  16. Electrospun polyvinyl alcohol-collagen-hydroxyapatite nanofibers: a biomimetic extracellular matrix for osteoblastic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Markel, David C.; Wang, Sunxi; Shi, Tong; Mao, Guangzhao; Ren, Weiping

    2012-03-01

    The failure of prosthesis after total joint replacement is due to the lack of early implant osseointegration. In this study polyvinyl alcohol-collagen-hydroxyapatite (PVA-Col-HA) electrospun nanofibrous meshes were fabricated as a biomimetic bone-like extracellular matrix for the modification of orthopedic prosthetic surfaces. In order to reinforce the PVA nanofibers, HA nanorods and Type I collagen were incorporated into the nanofibers. We investigated the morphology, biodegradability, mechanical properties and biocompatibility of the prepared nanofibers. Our results showed these inorganic-organic blended nanofibers to be degradable in vitro. The encapsulated nano-HA and collagen interacted with the PVA content, reinforcing the hydrolytic resistance and mechanical properties of nanofibers that provided longer lasting stability. The encapsulated nano-HA and collagen also enhanced the adhesion and proliferation of murine bone cells (MC3T3) in vitro. We propose the PVA-Col-HA nanofibers might be promising modifying materials on implant surfaces for orthopedic applications.

  17. Reproducing electric field observations during magnetic storms by means of rigorous 3-D modelling and distortion matrix co-estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Püthe, Christoph; Manoj, Chandrasekharan; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2014-12-01

    Electric fields induced in the conducting Earth by geomagnetic disturbances drive currents in power transmission grids, telecommunication lines or buried pipelines, which can cause service disruptions. A key step in the prediction of the hazard to technological systems during magnetic storms is the calculation of the geoelectric field. To address this issue for mid-latitude regions, we revisit a method that involves 3-D modelling of induction processes in a heterogeneous Earth and the construction of a magnetospheric source model described by low-degree spherical harmonics from observatory magnetic data. The actual electric field, however, is known to be perturbed by galvanic effects, arising from very local near-surface heterogeneities or topography, which cannot be included in the model. Galvanic effects are commonly accounted for with a real-valued time-independent distortion matrix, which linearly relates measured and modelled electric fields. Using data of six magnetic storms that occurred between 2000 and 2003, we estimate distortion matrices for observatory sites onshore and on the ocean bottom. Reliable estimates are obtained, and the modellings are found to explain up to 90% of the measurements. We further find that 3-D modelling is crucial for a correct separation of galvanic and inductive effects and a precise prediction of the shape of electric field time series during magnetic storms. Since the method relies on precomputed responses of a 3-D Earth to geomagnetic disturbances, which can be recycled for each storm, the required computational resources are negligible. Our approach is thus suitable for real-time prediction of geomagnetically induced currents by combining it with reliable forecasts of the source field.

  18. Neck Contracture Release With Matriderm Collagen/Elastin Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, John E.; Mackie, Ian P.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: To demonstrate success with immediate split-skin graft application over Matriderm dermal matrix in a difficult neck contracture release. Methods: An aggressive neck contracture release, accompanied by complete platysmectomy, was followed by application of Matriderm, split-skin graft, Mepitel, and vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) dressing. Results: At VAC removal (day 7), graft take was almost complete over the dermal matrix and with minor “touch-up” were complete by day 9 postrepair. Results at 4 months show graft contraction and a marked diminution of the release obtained. The results, however, are still good and the patient is very happy. Conclusion: Immediate grafting over a dermal matrix appears to provide a good solution, with a gentle surgical learning curve, in this difficult postburn scenario. Postrelease contraction is, however, as inevitable as with other techniques. PMID:21451729

  19. Comparison of 3D-Printed Poly-ɛ-Caprolactone Scaffolds Functionalized with Tricalcium Phosphate, Hydroxyapatite, Bio-Oss, or Decellularized Bone Matrix.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Ethan; Rindone, Alexandra; Dorafshar, Amir; Grayson, Warren L

    2017-02-07

    Three-dimensional (3D)-printing facilitates rapid, custom manufacturing of bone scaffolds with a wide range of material choices. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential for 3D-printing bioactive (i.e., osteo-inductive) scaffolds for use in bone regeneration applications. In this study, we 3D-printed porous poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds using a fused deposition modeling (FDM) process and functionalized them with mineral additives that have been widely used commercially and clinically: tricalcium phosphate (TCP), hydroxyapatite (HA), Bio-Oss (BO), or decellularized bone matrix (DCB). We assessed the "print quality" of the composite scaffolds and found that the print quality of PCL-TCP, PCL-BO, and PCL-DCB measured ∼0.7 and was statistically lower than PCL and PCL-HA scaffolds (∼0.8). We found that the incorporation of mineral particles did not significantly decrease the compressive modulus of the graft, which was on the order of 260 MPa for solid blocks and ranged from 32 to 83 MPa for porous scaffolds. Raman spectroscopy revealed the surfaces of the scaffolds maintained the chemical profile of their dopants following the printing process. We evaluated the osteo-inductive properties of each scaffold composite by culturing adipose-derived stromal/stem cells in vitro and assessing their differentiation into osteoblasts. The calcium content (normalized to DNA) increased significantly in PCL-TCP (p < 0.05), PCL-BO (p < 0.001), and PCL-DCB (p < 0.0001) groups relative to PCL only. The calcium content also increased in PCL-HA but was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Collagen 1 expression was 10-fold greater than PCL in PCL-BO and PCL-DCB (p < 0.05) and osteocalcin expression was 10-fold greater in PCL-BO and PCL-DCB (p < 0.05) as measured by quantitative-real time-polymerase chain reaction. This study suggests that PCL-BO and PCL-DCB hybrid material may be advantageous for bone healing applications over PCL-HA or PCL

  20. Representing 3-D cloud radiation effects in two-stream schemes: 2. Matrix formulation and broadband evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Robin J.; Schäfer, Sophia A. K.; Klinger, Carolin; Chiu, J. Christine; Mayer, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    Estimating the impact of radiation transport through cloud sides on the global energy budget is hampered by the lack of a fast radiation scheme suitable for use in global atmospheric models that can represent these effects in both the shortwave and longwave. This two-part paper describes the development of such a scheme, which we refer to as the Speedy Algorithm for Radiative Transfer through Cloud Sides (SPARTACUS). The principle of the method is to add extra terms to the two-stream equations to represent lateral transport between clear and cloudy regions, which vary in proportion to the length of cloud edge as a function of height. The present paper describes a robust and accurate method for solving the coupled system of equations in both the shortwave and longwave in terms of matrix exponentials. This solver has been coupled to a correlated-k model for gas absorption. We then confirm the accuracy of SPARTACUS by performing broadband comparisons with fully 3-D radiation calculations by the Monte Carlo model "MYSTIC" for a cumulus cloud field, examining particularly the percentage change in cloud radiative effect (CRE) when 3-D effects are introduced. In the shortwave, SPARTACUS correctly captures this change to CRE, which varies with solar zenith angle between -25% and +120%. In the longwave, SPARTACUS captures well the increase in radiative cooling of the cloud, although it is only able to correctly simulate the 30% increase in surface CRE (around 4 W m-2) if an approximate correction is made for cloud clustering.

  1. Reproducing Electric Field Observations during Magnetic Storms by means of Rigorous 3-D Modelling and Distortion Matrix Co-estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Püthe, Christoph; Manoj, Chandrasekharan; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2015-04-01

    Electric fields induced in the conducting Earth during magnetic storms drive currents in power transmission grids, telecommunication lines or buried pipelines. These geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) can cause severe service disruptions. The prediction of GIC is thus of great importance for public and industry. A key step in the prediction of the hazard to technological systems during magnetic storms is the calculation of the geoelectric field. To address this issue for mid-latitude regions, we developed a method that involves 3-D modelling of induction processes in a heterogeneous Earth and the construction of a model of the magnetospheric source. The latter is described by low-degree spherical harmonics; its temporal evolution is derived from observatory magnetic data. Time series of the electric field can be computed for every location on Earth's surface. The actual electric field however is known to be perturbed by galvanic effects, arising from very local near-surface heterogeneities or topography, which cannot be included in the conductivity model. Galvanic effects are commonly accounted for with a real-valued time-independent distortion matrix, which linearly relates measured and computed electric fields. Using data of various magnetic storms that occurred between 2000 and 2003, we estimated distortion matrices for observatory sites onshore and on the ocean bottom. Strong correlations between modellings and measurements validate our method. The distortion matrix estimates prove to be reliable, as they are accurately reproduced for different magnetic storms. We further show that 3-D modelling is crucial for a correct separation of galvanic and inductive effects and a precise prediction of electric field time series during magnetic storms. Since the required computational resources are negligible, our approach is suitable for a real-time prediction of GIC. For this purpose, a reliable forecast of the source field, e.g. based on data from satellites

  2. 3D model of a matrix source of negative ions: RF driving by a large area planar coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demerdzhiev, A.; Lishev, St.; Tarnev, Kh.; Shivarova, A.

    2015-04-01

    Based on three-dimensional (3D) modeling, different manners of a planar-coil inductive discharge driving of a plasma source completed as a matrix of small-radius hydrogen discharges are studied regarding a proper choice of an efficient and alike rf power deposition into the separate discharges of the matrix. Driving the whole matrix by a single coil and splitting it to blocks of discharge tubes, with single coil driving of each block, are the two cases considered. The results from the self-consistent model presented for a block of discharge tubes show its reliability in ensuring the same spatial distribution of the plasma parameters in the discharges completing the block. Since regarding the construction of the matrix, its driving as a whole by a single coil is the most reasonable decision, three modifications of the coil design have been tested: two zigzag coils with straight conductors passing, respectively, between and through the bottoms of the discharge tubes and a coil with an "omega" shaped conductor on the bottom of each tube. Among these three configurations, the latter ‒ a coil with an Ω-shaped conductor on the bottom of each tube ‒ shows up with the highest rf efficiency of an inductive discharge driving, shown by results for the rf current induced in the discharges obtained from an electrodynamical description. In all the cases considered the spatial distribution of the induced current density is analysed based on the manner of the penetration into the plasma of the wave field sustaining the inductive discharges.

  3. Replacement of animal-derived collagen matrix by human fibroblast-derived dermal matrix for human skin equivalent products.

    PubMed

    El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Commandeur, Suzan; Rietveld, Marion H; Mulder, Aat A; Willemze, Rein

    2009-01-01

    Reconstructed human skin equivalents (HSEs) are representative models of human skin and widely used for research purposes and clinical applications. Traditional methods to generate HSEs are based on the seeding of human keratinocytes onto three-dimensional human fibroblast-populated non-human collagen matrices. Current HSEs have a limited lifespan of approximately 8 weeks, rendering them unsuitable for long-term studies. Here we present a new generation of HSEs being fully composed of human components and which can be cultured up to 20 weeks. This model is generated on a primary human fibroblast-derived dermal matrix. Pro-collagen type I secretion by human fibroblasts stabilized during long-term culture, providing a continuous and functional human dermal matrix. In contrast to rat-tail collagen-based HSEs, the present fibroblast-derived matrix-based HSEs contain more continuity in the number of viable cell layers in long-term cultures. In addition, these new skin models exhibit normal differentiation and proliferation, based on expression of K10/K15, and K16/K17, respectively. Detection of collagen types IV and VII and laminin 332 was confined to the epidermal-dermal junction, as in native skin. The presence of hemidesmosomes and anchoring fibrils was demonstrated by electron microscopy. Finally, we show that the presented HSE contained a higher concentration of the normal moisturizing factor compared to rat-tail collagen-based skin models, providing a further representation of functional normal human skin in vitro. This study, therefore, demonstrates the role of the dermal microenvironment on epidermal regeneration and lifespan in vitro.

  4. Quantitative regulation of bone-mimetic, oriented collagen/apatite matrix structure depends on the degree of osteoblast alignment on oriented collagen substrates.

    PubMed

    Matsugaki, Aira; Isobe, Yoshihiro; Saku, Taro; Nakano, Takayoshi

    2015-02-01

    Bone tissue has a specific anisotropic morphology derived from collagen fiber alignment and the related apatite crystal orientation as a bone quality index. However, the precise mechanism of cellular regulation of the crystallographic orientation of apatite has not been clarified. In this study, anisotropic construction of cell-produced mineralized matrix in vitro was established by initiating organized cellular alignment and subsequent oriented bone-like matrix (collagen/apatite) production. The oriented collagen substrates with three anisotropic levels were prepared by a hydrodynamic method. Primary osteoblasts were cultured on the fabricated substrates until mineralized matrix formation is confirmed. Osteoblast alignment was successfully regulated by the level of substrate collagen orientation, with preferential alignment along the direction of the collagen fibers. Notably, both fibrous orientation of newly synthesized collagen matrix and c-axis of produced apatite crystals showed preferential orientation along the cell direction. Because the degree of anisotropy of the deposited apatite crystals showed dependency on the directional distribution of osteoblasts cultured on the oriented collagen substrates, the cell orientation determines the crystallographic anisotropy of produced apatite crystals. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that bone tissue anisotropy, even the alignment of apatite crystals, is controllable by varying the degree of osteoblast alignment via regulating the level of substrate orientation.

  5. Enhanced osteoprogenitor elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by bioactive glass ionic silicon dependent on Sp7 (osterix) transcription.

    PubMed

    Varanasi, Venu G; Odatsu, Tetsurou; Bishop, Timothy; Chang, Joyce; Owyoung, Jeremy; Loomer, Peter M

    2016-10-01

    Bioactive glasses release ions, those enhance osteoblast collagen matrix synthesis and osteogenic marker expression during bone healing. Collagen matrix density and osteogenic marker expression depend on osteogenic transcription factors, (e.g., Osterix (OSX)). We hypothesize that enhanced expression and formation of collagen by Si(4+) depends on enhanced expression of OSX transcription. Experimental bioactive glass (6P53-b) and commercial Bioglass(TM) (45S5) were dissolved in basal medium to make glass conditioned medium (GCM). ICP-MS analysis was used to measure bioactive glass ion release rates. MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured for 20 days, and gene expression and extracellular matrix collagen formation was analyzed. In a separate study, siRNA was used to determine the effect of OSX knockdown on impacting the effect of Si(4+) on osteogenic markers and matrix collagen formation. Each bioactive glass exhibited similar ion release rates for all ions, except Mg(2+) released by 6P53-b. Gene expression results showed that GCM markedly enhanced many osteogenic markers, and 45S5 GCM showed higher levels of expression and collagen matrix fiber bundle density than 6P53-b GCM. Upon knockdown of OSX transcription, collagen type 5, alkaline phosphatase, and matrix density were not enhanced as compared to wild type cells. This study illustrates that the enhancement of elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by Si(±) depends on OSX transcription. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2604-2615, 2016.

  6. Disorganized collagen scaffold interferes with fibroblast mediated deposition of organized extracellular matrix in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Saeidi, Nima; Guo, Xiaoqing; Hutcheon, Audrey E. K.; Sander, Edward A.; Bale, Shyam Sundar; Melotti, Suzanna A.; Zieske, James D.; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery; Ruberti, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Many tissue engineering applications require the remodeling of a degradable scaffold either in vitro or in situ. Although inefficient remodeling or failure to fully remodel the temporary matrix can result in a poor clinical outcome, very few investigations have examined in detail, the interaction of regenerative cells with temporary scaffoldings. In a recent series of investigations, randomly oriented collagen gels were directly implanted into human corneal pockets and followed for 24 months. The resulting remodeling response exhibited a high degree of variability which likely reflects differing regenerative/synthetic capacity across patients. Given this variability, we hypothesize that a disorganized, degradable provisional scaffold could be disruptive to a uniform, organized reconstruction of stromal matrix. In this investigation, two established corneal stroma tissue engineering culture systems (collagen scaffold-based and scaffold-free) were compared to determine if the presence of the disorganized collagen gel influenced matrix production and organizational control exerted by primary human corneal fibroblast cells (PHCFCs). PHCFCs were cultured on thin disorganized reconstituted collagen substrate (RCS - 5 donors: average age 34.4) or on a bare polycarbonate membrane (5 donors: average age 32.4-controls). The organization and morphology of the two culture systems were compared over the long-term at 4, 8 and 11/12 weeks. Construct thickness and extracellular matrix organization/alignment was tracked optically with bright field and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. The details of cell/matrix morphology and cell/matrix interaction were examined with standard transmission, cuprolinic blue and quick-freeze/deep-etch electron microscopy. Both the scaffold-free and the collagen-based scaffold cultures produced organized arrays of collagen fibrils. However, at all time points, the amount of organized cell-derived matrix in the scaffold

  7. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), the main extracellular matrix (ECM) enzymes in collagen degradation, as a target for anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Jabłońska-Trypuć, Agata; Matejczyk, Marzena; Rosochacki, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    The main group of enzymes responsible for the collagen and other protein degradation in extracellular matrix (ECM) are matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Collagen is the main structural component of connective tissue and its degradation is a very important process in the development, morphogenesis, tissue remodeling, and repair. Typical structure of MMPs consists of several distinct domains. MMP family can be divided into six groups: collagenases, gelatinases, stromelysins, matrilysins, membrane-type MMPs, and other non-classified MMPs. MMPs and their inhibitors have multiple biological functions in all stages of cancer development: from initiation to outgrowth of clinically relevant metastases and likewise in apoptosis and angiogenesis. MMPs and their inhibitors are extensively examined as potential anticancer drugs. MMP inhibitors can be divided into two main groups: synthetic and natural inhibitors. Selected synthetic inhibitors are in clinical trials on humans, e.g. synthetic peptides, non-peptidic molecules, chemically modified tetracyclines, and bisphosphonates. Natural MMP inhibitors are mainly isoflavonoids and shark cartilage.

  8. The skin autofluorescence reflects the posttranslational glycation grade of the matrix protein collagen.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Kathleen; Navarrete Santos, Alexander; Simm, Andreas; Silber, Rolf-Edgar; Hofmann, Britt

    2014-10-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) seem to be involved in ageing as well as in the development of cardiovascular diseases. Accumulation of AGEs contribute to tissue stiffness and organ dysfunction by crosslinking extracellular matrix proteins like collagen. We aimed to assess whether AGE-modified cardiac tissue collagen and AGE related skin autofluorescence may reflect the cardiac function and have a prognostic value for the outcome of coronary artery bypass surgery patients. Therefore, AGE-modifications in collagen from 72 male patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery were analyzed. Collagen fractions were isolated from the right atrial auricle and the residual bypass graft material (saphenous vein) of these patients and quantified by 4-hydroxyproline assay. AGE modifications were determined by the AGE intrinsic fluorescence (excitation 360nm/emission 440nm). The skin autofluorescence (sAF) as a non-invasive parameter was measured using the AGE reader. The non-extractable collagen contained the highest amounts of AGEs and positively correlates with the patients age (p=0.0001), blood glucose level (p=0.002), HbA1c level (p=0.01) and sAF (p=0.008). The right atrial auricle collagen showed significantly more modifications compared to vein graft material of the same patient (p=0,001). Skin autofluorescence positively correlates with AGE content in cardiac tissue (p=0.01) and therefore could be used as a predictor of tissue stiffness in patients with coronary heart disease.

  9. Fibronectin provides a conduit for fibroblast transmigration from collagenous stroma into fibrin clot provisional matrix.

    PubMed

    Greiling, D; Clark, R A

    1997-04-01

    After injury, the wound space is filled with a fibrin/fibronectin clot containing growth factors released by platelets and monocytes. In response to these factors, fibroblasts migrate into the fibrin clot and contribute to the formation of granulation tissue. The functional mechanisms allowing fibroblasts to leave the collagenous matrix of normal connective tissue and invade the provisional matrix of the fibrin clot have not been fully defined. To investigate these mechanisms we established a new in vitro model which simulates specific aspects of early wound healing, that is, the migration of fibroblasts from a three-dimensional collagen matrix into a fibrin clot. This transmigration could be induced by physiological concentrations of platelet releasate or platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) in a concentration-dependent manner. At 24 hours irradiated fibroblasts invaded the fibrin gel almost as well as non-irradiated cells, indicating that transmigration was independent of proliferation. Plasminogen and its activators appear to be necessary for invasion of the fibrin clot since protease inhibitors decreased the amount of migration. These serine proteases, however, were not necessary for exit from the collagen gel as fibroblasts migrated out of the collagen gel onto a surface coated with fibrin fibrils even in the presence of inhibitors. Removal of fibronectin (FN) from either the collagen gel or the fibrin gel markedly decreased the number of migrating cells, suggesting that FN provides a conduit for transmigration. Cell movement in the in vitro model was inhibited by RGD peptide, and by monoclonal antibodies against the subunits of the alpha5 beta1 and alpha v beta3 integrin receptor. Thus, the functional requirements for fibroblast transmigration from collagen-rich to fibrin-rich matrices, such as occurs in early wound healing, have been partially defined using an in vitro paradigm of this important biologic process.

  10. Co-Culture of Tumor Spheroids and Fibroblasts in a Collagen Matrix-Incorporated Microfluidic Chip Mimics Reciprocal Activation in Solid Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Su-Yeong; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Yoojin; Chung, Seok; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular 3D culture and interaction with stromal components are considered essential elements in establishing a ‘more clinically relevant’ tumor model. Matrix-embedded 3D cultures using a microfluidic chip platform can recapitulate the microscale interaction within tumor microenvironments. As a major component of tumor microenvironment, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a role in cancer progression and drug resistance. Here, we present a microfluidic chip-based tumor tissue culture model that integrates 3D tumor spheroids (TSs) with CAF in proximity within a hydrogel scaffold. HT-29 human colorectal carcinoma cells grew into 3D TSs and the growth was stimulated when co-cultured with fibroblasts as shown by 1.5-folds increase of % changes in diameter over 5 days. TS cultured for 6 days showed a reduced expression of Ki-67 along with increased expression of fibronectin when co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to mono-cultured TSs. Fibroblasts were activated under co-culture conditions, as demonstrated by increases in α-SMA expression and migratory activity. When exposed to paclitaxel, a survival advantage was observed in TSs co-cultured with activated fibroblasts. Overall, we demonstrated the reciprocal interaction between TSs and fibroblasts in our 7-channel microfluidic chip. The co-culture of 3D TS-CAF in a collagen matrix-incorporated microfluidic chip may be useful to study the tumor microenvironment and for evaluation of drug screening and evaluation. PMID:27391808

  11. Adapting collagen/CNT matrix in directing hESC differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Indumathi; Kim, Taeyoung; Wang, Rong

    2009-04-17

    The lineage selection in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) differentiation relies on both the growth factors and small molecules in the media and the physical characteristics of the micro-environment. In this work, we utilized various materials, including the collagen-carbon nanotube (collagen/CNT) composite material, as cell culture matrices to examine the impact of matrix properties on hESC differentiation. Our AFM analysis indicated that the collagen/CNT formed rigid fibril bundles, which polarized the growth and differentiation of hESCs, resulting in more than 90% of the cells to the ectodermal lineage in Day 3 in the media commonly used for spontaneous differentiation. We also observed the differentiated cells followed the coarse alignment of the collagen/CNT matrix. The research not only revealed the responsiveness of hESCs to matrix properties, but also provided a simple yet efficient way to direct the hESC differentiation, and imposed the potential of forming neural-cell based bio-devices for further applications.

  12. Comparative study of tube assembly in three-dimensional collagen matrix and on Matrigel coats.

    PubMed

    Montañez, Eloi; Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo P; Vilaró, Senén; Pagan, Roser

    2002-01-01

    This study compares phenotypic changes of human umbilical endothelial vein cells cultured in three-dimensional collagen matrixes in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor or on Matrigel coats. Under both conditions, endothelial cells rapidly assembled into an irregular network of tubular structures with a high frequency of intercellular or lumen-like spaces. Tubular structures were characterized and compared by phase-contrast, confocal and electron microscopy. The dominant mechanism of lumen-like formation was highly model-dependent. Ultrastructural analyses of capillary-like structures and the mechanism of lumen-like formation indicated that the in vivo angiogenesis was better reproduced in the collagen model.

  13. Modeling and Analysis of Granite Matrix Pore Structure and Hydraulic Characteristics in 2D and 3D Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdik, L.; Polak, M.; Zaruba, J.; Vanecek, M.

    2010-12-01

    A geological environment labeled as a Granite massif represents in terms of groundwater flow and transport a distinct hydrogeological environment from that of sedimentary basins, the characterisation of which is generally more complex and uncertain. Massifs are composed of hard crystalline rocks with the very low effective porosity. Due to their rheological properties such rocks are predisposed to brittle deformation resulting from changes in stress conditions. Our specific research project (Research on the influence of intergrangular porosity on deep geological disposal: geological formations, methodology and the development of measurement apparatus) is focussed on the problem of permeable zones within apparently undisturbed granitic rock matrix. The project including the both laboratory and in-situ tracer tests study migration along and through mineral grains in fresh and altered granite. The objective of the project is to assess whether intergranular porosity is a general characteristic of the granitic rock matrix or subject to significant evolution resulting from geochemical and/or hydrogeochemical processes, geotechnical and/or mechanical processes. Moreover, the research is focussed on evaluating methods quantifying intergranular porosity by both physical testing and mathematical modelling using verified standard hydrological software tools. Groundwater flow in microfractures and intergranular pores in granite rock matrix were simulated in three standard hydrogeological modeling programs with completely different conceptual approaches: MODFLOW (Equivalent Continuum concept), FEFLOW (Discrete Fracture and Equivalent Continuum concepts) and NAPSAC (Discrete Fracture Network concept). Specialized random fracture generators were used for creation of several 2D and 3D models in each of the chosen program. Percolation characteristics of these models were tested and analyzed. Several scenarios of laboratory tests of the rock samples permeability made in triaxial

  14. Deformation simulation of cells seeded on a collagen-GAG scaffold in a flow perfusion bioreactor using a sequential 3D CFD-elastostatics model.

    PubMed

    Jungreuthmayer, C; Jaasma, M J; Al-Munajjed, A A; Zanghellini, J; Kelly, D J; O'Brien, F J

    2009-05-01

    Tissue-engineered bone shows promise in meeting the huge demand for bone grafts caused by up to 4 million bone replacement procedures per year, worldwide. State-of-the-art bone tissue engineering strategies use flow perfusion bioreactors to apply biophysical stimuli to cells seeded on scaffolds and to grow tissue suitable for implantation into the patient's body. The aim of this study was to quantify the deformation of cells seeded on a collagen-GAG scaffold which was perfused by culture medium inside a flow perfusion bioreactor. Using a microCT scan of an unseeded collagen-GAG scaffold, a sequential 3D CFD-deformation model was developed. The wall shear stress and the hydrostatic wall pressure acting on the cells were computed through the use of a CFD simulation and fed into a linear elastostatics model in order to calculate the deformation of the cells. The model used numerically seeded cells of two common morphologies where cells are either attached flatly on the scaffold wall or bridging two struts of the scaffold. Our study showed that the displacement of the cells is primarily determined by the cell morphology. Although cells of both attachment profiles were subjected to the same mechanical load, cells bridging two struts experienced a deformation up to 500 times higher than cells only attached to one strut. As the scaffold's pore size determines both the mechanical load and the type of attachment, the design of an optimal scaffold must take into account the interplay of these two features and requires a design process that optimizes both parameters at the same time.

  15. Fabrication of type I collagen microcarrier using a microfluidic 3D T-junction device and its application for the quantitative analysis of cell-ECM interactions.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Junghyo; Kim, Jaehoon; Jeong, Hyo Eun; Sudo, Ryo; Park, Myung-Jin; Chung, Seok

    2016-08-26

    We presented a new quantitative analysis for cell and extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions, using cell-coated ECM hydrogel microbeads (hydrobeads) made of type I collagen. The hydrobeads can carry cells as three-dimensional spheroidal forms with an ECM inside, facilitating a direct interaction between the cells and ECM. The cells on hydrobeads do not have a hypoxic core, which opens the possibility for using as a cell microcarrier for bottom-up tissue reconstitution. This technique can utilize various types of cells, even MDA-MB-231 cells, which have weak cell-cell interactions and do not form spheroids in conventional spheroid culture methods. Morphological indices of the cell-coated hydrobead visually present cell-ECM interactions in a quantitative manner.

  16. A volume of intersection approach for on-the-fly system matrix calculation in 3D PET image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lougovski, A.; Hofheinz, F.; Maus, J.; Schramm, G.; Will, E.; van den Hoff, J.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is the evaluation of on-the-fly volume of intersection computation for system’s geometry modelling in 3D PET image reconstruction. For this purpose we propose a simple geometrical model in which the cubic image voxels on the given Cartesian grid are approximated with spheres and the rectangular tubes of response (ToRs) are approximated with cylinders. The model was integrated into a fully 3D list-mode PET reconstruction for performance evaluation. In our model the volume of intersection between a voxel and the ToR is only a function of the impact parameter (the distance between voxel centre to ToR axis) but is independent of the relative orientation of voxel and ToR. This substantially reduces the computational complexity of the system matrix calculation. Based on phantom measurements it was determined that adjusting the diameters of the spherical voxel size and the ToR in such a way that the actual voxel and ToR volumes are conserved leads to the best compromise between high spatial resolution, low noise, and suppression of Gibbs artefacts in the reconstructed images. Phantom as well as clinical datasets from two different PET systems (Siemens ECAT HR+ and Philips Ingenuity-TF PET/MR) were processed using the developed and the respective vendor-provided (line of intersection related) reconstruction algorithms. A comparison of the reconstructed images demonstrated very good performance of the new approach. The evaluation showed the respective vendor-provided reconstruction algorithms to possess 34-41% lower resolution compared to the developed one while exhibiting comparable noise levels. Contrary to explicit point spread function modelling our model has a simple straight-forward implementation and it should be easy to integrate into existing reconstruction software, making it competitive to other existing resolution recovery techniques.

  17. Optimizing dentin bond durability: control of collagen degradation by matrix metalloproteinases and cysteine cathepsins

    PubMed Central

    Tjäderhane, Leo; Nascimento, Fabio D.; Breschi, Lorenzo; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Tersariol, Ivarne L.S.; Geraldeli, Saulo; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Carrilho, Marcela R.; Carvalho, Ricardo M.; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Contemporary adhesives lose their bond strength to dentin regardless of the bonding system used. This loss relates to the hydrolysis of collagen matrix of the hybrid layers. The preservation of the collagen matrix integrity is a key issue in the attempts to improve the dentin bonding durability. Methods Dentin contains collagenolytic enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins, which are responsible for the hydrolytic degradation of collagen matrix in the bonded interface. Results The identities, roles and function of collagenolytic enzymes in mineralized dentin has been gathered only within last 15 years, but they have already been demonstrated to have an important role in dental hard tissue pathologies, including the degradation of the hybrid layer. Identifying responsible enzymes facilitates the development of new, more efficient methods to improve the stability of dentin-adhesive bond and durability of bond strength. Significance Understanding the nature and role of proteolytic degradation of dentin-adhesive interfaces has improved immensely and has practically grown to a scientific field of its own within only 10 years, holding excellent promise that stable resin-dentin bonds will be routinely available in a daily clinical setting already in a near future. PMID:22901826

  18. Collagen and matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 in the ewe cervix during the estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Piñón, M; Tasende, C; Casuriaga, D; Bielli, A; Genovese, P; Garófalo, E G

    2015-09-15

    The cervical collagen remodeling during the estrous cycle of the ewe was examined. The collagen concentration determined by a hydroxyproline assay and the area occupied by collagen fibers (%C), determined by van Gieson staining, were assessed in the cranial and caudal cervix of Corriedale ewes on Days 1 (n = 6), 6 (n = 5), or 13 (n = 6) after estrous detection (defined as Day 0). In addition, the gelatinase activity by in situ and SDS-PAGE gelatin zymographies and matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (MMP-2 and MMP-9, respectively) expression by immunohistochemistry were determined. The collagen concentration and %C were lowest on Day 1 of the estrous cycle (P < 0.04), when MMP-2 activity was highest (P < 0.006) and the ratio of activated to latent MMP-2 trend to be highest (P = 0.0819). The MMP-2 activity was detected in 73% of the homogenized cervical samples, and its expression was mainly detected in active fibroblasts. By contrast, the MMP-9 activity was detected in 9% of the samples, and its scarce expression was associated with plasmocytes, macrophages, and lymphocytes. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression was maximal on Day 1 in the cranial cervix and on Day 13 in the caudal cervix and was lower in the cranial than in the caudal cervix (P < 0.0001). This time-dependent increase in MMP-2 expression that differed between the cranial and caudal cervix may reflect their different physiological roles. The decrease in the collagen content and increase in fibroblast MMP-2 activity in sheep cervix on Day 1 of the estrous cycle suggests that cervical dilation at estrus is due to the occurrence of collagen fiber degradation modulated by changes in periovulatory hormone levels.

  19. Long-term stability of dentin matrix following treatment with various natural collagen cross-linkers

    PubMed Central

    Castellan, Carina Strano; Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina; Karol, Sachin; Rodrigues Pereira, Patrícia Nóbrega

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Collagen disorganization is one of the main degradation patterns found in unsuccessful adhesive restorations. The hypothesis of this study was that pretreatment using natural collagen cross-linking agents rich in proanthocyanidin (PA) would improve mechanical properties and stability over time of the dentin collagen and, thus, confer a more resistant and lasting substrate for adhesive restorations. Methods PA-based extracts, from grape seed (GSE), cocoa seed (CSE), cranberry (CRE), cinnamon (CNE) and açaí berry (ACE) were applied over the demineralized dentin. The apparent elastic modulus (E) of the treated dentin collagen was analyzed over a 12 months period. Specimens were immersed in the respective solution and E values were obtained by a micro-flexural test at baseline, 10, 30, 60, 120 and 240 min. Samples were stored in artificial saliva and re-tested after 3, 6 and 12 months. Data was analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey test. Results GSE and CSE extracts showed a time-dependant effect and were able to improve [240 min (MPa): GSE=108.96±56.08; CSE=59.21±24.87] and stabilize the E of the organic matrix [12 months (MPa): GSE=40.91±19.69; CSE= 42.11±13.46]. CRE and CNE extracts were able to maintain the E of collagen matrices constant over 12 months [CRE=11.17±7.22; CNE= 9,96±6.11; MPa]. ACE (2.64±1.22 MPa) and control groups immersed in neat distilled water (1.37±0.69 MPa) and ethanol water (0.95±0.33MPa) showed no effect over dentin organic matrix and enable their degradation and reduction of mechanical properties. Significance Some PA-based extracts were capable of improving and stabilizing collagen matrices through exogenous cross-links induction. PMID:21783144

  20. Comparison of 3D Reconstructive Technologies Used for Morphometric Research and the Translation of Knowledge Using a Decision Matrix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Charys M.; Roach, Victoria A.; Nguyen, Ngan; Rice, Charles L.; Wilson, Timothy D.

    2013-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) models for education, pre-operative assessment, presurgical planning, and measurement have become more prevalent. With the increase in prevalence of 3D models there has also been an increase in 3D reconstructive software programs that are used to create these models. These software programs differ in…

  1. Ex vivo generation of a highly potent population of circulating angiogenic cells using a collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Kuraitis, Drew; Hou, Chenchen; Zhang, Yan; Vulesevic, Branka; Sofrenovic, Tanja; McKee, Daniel; Sharif, Zahra; Ruel, Marc; Suuronen, Erik J

    2011-08-01

    Biomaterials that have the ability to augment angiogenesis are highly sought-after for applications in regenerative medicine, particularly for revascularization of ischemic and infarcted tissue. We evaluated the culture of human circulating angiogenic cells (CAC) on collagen type I-based matrices, and compared this to traditional selective-adhesion cultures on fibronectin. Culture on a collagen matrix supported the proliferation of CD133(+) and CD34(+)CD133(+) CACs. When subjected to serum starvation, the matrix conferred a resistance to cell death for CD34(+) and CD133(+) progenitors and increased phosphorylation of Akt. After 4days of culture, phenotypically enriched populations of endothelial cells (CD31(+)CD144(+)) and progenitor cells (CD34(+)CD133(+)) emerged. Culture on matrix upregulated the phosphorylation and activation of ERK1/2 pathway members, and matrix-cultured cells also had an enhanced functional capacity for adhesion and invasion. These functional improvements were abrogated when cultured in the presence of ERK inhibitors. The formation of vessel-like structures in an angiogenesis assay was augmented with matrix-cultured cells, which were also more likely to physically associate with such structures compared to CACs taken from culture on fibronectin. In vivo, treatment with matrix-cultured cells increased the size and density of arterioles, and was superior at restoring perfusion in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia, compared to fibronectin-cultured cell treatment. This work suggests that a collagen-based matrix, as a novel substrate for CAC culture, possesses the ability to enrich endothelial and angiogenic populations and lead to clinically relevant functional enhancements.

  2. Bioengineered 3D brain tumor model to elucidate the effects of matrix stiffness on glioblastoma cell behavior using PEG-based hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Christine; Tong, Xinming; Yang, Fan

    2014-07-07

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive form of primary brain tumor with a median survival of 12-15 months, and the mechanisms underlying GBM tumor progression remain largely elusive. Given the importance of tumor niche signaling in driving GBM progression, there is a strong need to develop in vitro models to facilitate analysis of brain tumor cell-niche interactions in a physiologically relevant and controllable manner. Here we report the development of a bioengineered 3D brain tumor model to help elucidate the effects of matrix stiffness on GBM cell fate using poly(ethylene-glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels with brain-mimicking biochemical and mechanical properties. We have chosen PEG given its bioinert nature and tunable physical property, and the resulting hydrogels allow tunable matrix stiffness without changing the biochemical contents. To facilitate cell proliferation and migration, CRGDS and a MMP-cleavable peptide were chemically incorporated. Hyaluronic acid (HA) was also incorporated to mimic the concentration in the brain extracellular matrix. Using U87 cells as a model GBM cell line, we demonstrate that such biomimetic hydrogels support U87 cell growth, spreading, and migration in 3D over the course of 3 weeks in culture. Gene expression analyses showed U87 cells actively deposited extracellular matrix and continued to upregulate matrix remodeling genes. To examine the effects of matrix stiffness on GBM cell fate in 3D, we encapsulated U87 cells in soft (1 kPa) or stiff (26 kPa) hydrogels, which respectively mimics the matrix stiffness of normal brain or GBM tumor tissues. Our results suggest that changes in matrix stiffness induce differential GBM cell proliferation, morphology, and migration modes in 3D. Increasing matrix stiffness led to delayed U87 cell proliferation inside hydrogels, but cells formed denser spheroids with extended cell protrusions. Cells cultured in stiff hydrogels also showed upregulation of HA synthase 1 and matrix

  3. Preparation and characterization of an advanced collagen aggregate from porcine acellular dermal matrix.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhua; Dan, Nianhua; Dan, Weihua

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to extract and characterize an advanced collagen aggregate (Ag-col) from porcine acellular dermal matrix (pADM). Based on histological examination, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM), Ag-col was composed of the D-periodic cross-striated collagen fibrils and thick collagen fiber bundles with uneven diameters and non-orientated arrangement. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of pADM, Ag-col and Col were similar and revealed the presence of the triple helix. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis exhibited a slightly higher content of α-helix but inappreciably less amount of random coil structure in Ag-col compared to Col. Moreover, imino acid contents of pADM, Ag-col and Col were 222.43, 218.30 and 190.01 residues/1000 residues, respectively. From zeta potential analysis, a net charge of zero was found at pH 6.45 and 6.11 for Ag-col and Col, respectively. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study suggested that the Td of Ag-col was 20°C higher than that of Col as expected, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) indicated that Ag-col possessed a higher storage modulus but similar loss factor compared to Col. Therefore, the collagen aggregate from pADM could serve as a better alternative source of collagens for further applications in food and biological industries.

  4. Peroxidase Enzymes Regulate Collagen Biosynthesis and Matrix Mineralization by Cultured Human Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Shoubridge, Alexandra J; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Liapis, Vasilios; Zysk, Aneta; Zinonos, Irene; Hay, Shelley; Atkins, Gerald J; Findlay, David M; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The early recruitment of inflammatory cells to sites of bone fracture and trauma is a critical determinant in successful fracture healing. Released by infiltrating inflammatory cells, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) are heme-containing enzymes, whose functional involvement in bone repair has mainly been studied in the context of providing a mechanism for oxidative defense against invading microorganisms. We report here novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes have the capacity to stimulate osteoblastic cells to secrete collagen I protein and generate a mineralized extracellular matrix in vitro. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured osteoblasts show that peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl hydroxylase-dependent manner, which does not require ascorbic acid. Our studies demonstrate that osteoblasts rapidly bind and internalize both MPO and EPO, and the catalytic activity of these peroxidase enzymes is essential to support collagen I biosynthesis and subsequent release of collagen by osteoblasts. We show that EPO is capable of regulating osteogenic gene expression and matrix mineralization in culture, suggesting that peroxidase enzymes may play an important role not only in normal bone repair, but also in the progression of pathological states where infiltrating inflammatory cells are known to deposit peroxidases.

  5. Fluid flow increases mineralized matrix deposition in 3D perfusion culture of marrow stromal osteoblasts in a dose-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Bancroft, Gregory N.; Sikavitsas, Vassilios I.; van den Dolder, Juliette; Sheffield, Tiffany L.; Ambrose, Catherine G.; Jansen, John A.; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2002-01-01

    Bone is a complex highly structured mechanically active 3D tissue composed of cellular and matrix elements. The true biological environment of a bone cell is thus derived from a dynamic interaction between responsively active cells experiencing mechanical forces and a continuously changing 3D matrix architecture. To investigate this phenomenon in vitro, marrow stromal osteoblasts were cultured on 3D scaffolds under flow perfusion with different rates of flow for an extended period to permit osteoblast differentiation and significant matrix production and mineralization. With all flow conditions, mineralized matrix production was dramatically increased over statically cultured constructs with the total calcium content of the cultured scaffolds increasing with increasing flow rate. Flow perfusion induced de novo tissue modeling with the formation of pore-like structures in the scaffolds and enhanced the distribution of cells and matrix throughout the scaffolds. These results represent reporting of the long-term effects of fluid flow on primary differentiating osteoblasts and indicate that fluid flow has far-reaching effects on osteoblast differentiation and phenotypic expression in vitro. Flow perfusion culture permits the generation and study of a 3D, actively modeled, mineralized matrix and can therefore be a valuable tool for both bone biology and tissue engineering. PMID:12242339

  6. Fluid flow increases mineralized matrix deposition in 3D perfusion culture of marrow stromal osteoblasts in a dose-dependent manner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bancroft, Gregory N.; Sikavitsas, Vassilios I.; van den Dolder, Juliette; Sheffield, Tiffany L.; Ambrose, Catherine G.; Jansen, John A.; Mikos, Antonios G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Bone is a complex highly structured mechanically active 3D tissue composed of cellular and matrix elements. The true biological environment of a bone cell is thus derived from a dynamic interaction between responsively active cells experiencing mechanical forces and a continuously changing 3D matrix architecture. To investigate this phenomenon in vitro, marrow stromal osteoblasts were cultured on 3D scaffolds under flow perfusion with different rates of flow for an extended period to permit osteoblast differentiation and significant matrix production and mineralization. With all flow conditions, mineralized matrix production was dramatically increased over statically cultured constructs with the total calcium content of the cultured scaffolds increasing with increasing flow rate. Flow perfusion induced de novo tissue modeling with the formation of pore-like structures in the scaffolds and enhanced the distribution of cells and matrix throughout the scaffolds. These results represent reporting of the long-term effects of fluid flow on primary differentiating osteoblasts and indicate that fluid flow has far-reaching effects on osteoblast differentiation and phenotypic expression in vitro. Flow perfusion culture permits the generation and study of a 3D, actively modeled, mineralized matrix and can therefore be a valuable tool for both bone biology and tissue engineering.

  7. Intracellular nanomanipulation by a photonic-force microscope with real-time acquisition of a 3D stiffness matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertseva, E.; Singh, A. S. G.; Lekki, J.; Thévenaz, P.; Lekka, M.; Jeney, S.; Gremaud, G.; Puttini, S.; Nowak, W.; Dietler, G.; Forró, L.; Unser, M.; Kulik, A. J.

    2009-07-01

    A traditional photonic-force microscope (PFM) results in huge sets of data, which requires tedious numerical analysis. In this paper, we propose instead an analog signal processor to attain real-time capabilities while retaining the richness of the traditional PFM data. Our system is devoted to intracellular measurements and is fully interactive through the use of a haptic joystick. Using our specialized analog hardware along with a dedicated algorithm, we can extract the full 3D stiffness matrix of the optical trap in real time, including the off-diagonal cross-terms. Our system is also capable of simultaneously recording data for subsequent offline analysis. This allows us to check that a good correlation exists between the classical analysis of stiffness and our real-time measurements. We monitor the PFM beads using an optical microscope. The force-feedback mechanism of the haptic joystick helps us in interactively guiding the bead inside living cells and collecting information from its (possibly anisotropic) environment. The instantaneous stiffness measurements are also displayed in real time on a graphical user interface. The whole system has been built and is operational; here we present early results that confirm the consistency of the real-time measurements with offline computations.

  8. Implementing a Matrix-free Analytical Jacobian to Handle Nonlinearities in Models of 3D Lithospheric Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaus, B.; Popov, A.

    2015-12-01

    The analytical expression for the Jacobian is a key component to achieve fast and robust convergence of the nonlinear Newton-Raphson iterative solver. Accomplishing this task in practice often requires a significant algebraic effort. Therefore it is quite common to use a cheap alternative instead, for example by approximating the Jacobian with a finite difference estimation. Despite its simplicity it is a relatively fragile and unreliable technique that is sensitive to the scaling of the residual and unknowns, as well as to the perturbation parameter selection. Unfortunately no universal rule can be applied to provide both a robust scaling and a perturbation. The approach we use here is to derive the analytical Jacobian for the coupled set of momentum, mass, and energy conservation equations together with the elasto-visco-plastic rheology and a marker in cell/staggered finite difference method. The software project LaMEM (Lithosphere and Mantle Evolution Model) is primarily developed for the thermo-mechanically coupled modeling of the 3D lithospheric deformation. The code is based on a staggered grid finite difference discretization in space, and uses customized scalable solvers form PETSc library to efficiently run on the massively parallel machines (such as IBM Blue Gene/Q). Currently LaMEM relies on the Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) nonlinear solver, which approximates the Jacobian-vector product using a simple finite difference formula. This approach never requires an assembled Jacobian matrix and uses only the residual computation routine. We use an approximate Jacobian (Picard) matrix to precondition the Krylov solver with the Galerkin geometric multigrid. Because of the inherent problems of the finite difference Jacobian estimation, this approach doesn't always result in stable convergence. In this work we present and discuss a matrix-free technique in which the Jacobian-vector product is replaced by analytically-derived expressions and compare results

  9. Dissection and culture of mouse dopaminergic and striatal explants in three-dimensional collagen matrix assays.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ewoud R E; Morello, Francesca; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen

    2012-03-23

    Midbrain dopamine (mdDA) neurons project via the medial forebrain bundle towards several areas in the telencephalon, including the striatum(1). Reciprocally, medium spiny neurons in the striatum that give rise to the striatonigral (direct) pathway innervate the substantia nigra(2). The development of these axon tracts is dependent upon the combinatorial actions of a plethora of axon growth and guidance cues including molecules that are released by neurites or by (intermediate) target regions(3,4). These soluble factors can be studied in vitro by culturing mdDA and/or striatal explants in a collagen matrix which provides a three-dimensional substrate for the axons mimicking the extracellular environment. In addition, the collagen matrix allows for the formation of relatively stable gradients of proteins released by other explants or cells placed in the vicinity (e.g. see references 5 and 6). Here we describe methods for the purification of rat tail collagen, microdissection of dopaminergic and striatal explants, their culture in collagen gels and subsequent immunohistochemical and quantitative analysis. First, the brains of E14.5 mouse embryos are isolated and dopaminergic and striatal explants are microdissected. These explants are then (co)cultured in collagen gels on coverslips for 48 to 72 hours in vitro. Subsequently, axonal projections are visualized using neuronal markers (e.g. tyrosine hydroxylase, DARPP32, or βIII tubulin) and axon growth and attractive or repulsive axon responses are quantified. This neuronal preparation is a useful tool for in vitro studies of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of mesostriatal and striatonigral axon growth and guidance during development. Using this assay, it is also possible to assess other (intermediate) targets for dopaminergic and striatal axons or to test specific molecular cues.

  10. Direct correlation of collagen matrix deformation with focal adhesion dynamics in living corneal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Petroll, W Matthew; Ma, Lisha; Jester, James V

    2003-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop and apply a new model for investigating how the organization and movement of cell-matrix adhesion sites correlate with force generation by corneal fibroblasts on a fibrillar collagen extracellular matrix. Primary cultures of rabbit corneal fibroblasts were transfected using a vector encoding GFP-zyxin to allow visualization of adhesion sites. Cells were plated at low density on top of 100 micro m thick fibrillar collagen lattices embedded with 2 micro m diameter red fluorescent beads. Time-lapse imaging was performed at one minute intervals for up to 3 hours. At each time interval, GFP-zyxin, bead and DIC images were acquired in rapid succession using filter wheels. Cells were treated with cytochalasin D and/or Triton X-100 at the end of each experiment. The movements of adhesions and nearby matrix landmarks were measured and correlated from the time-lapse digital images, and the size, intensity and orientation of the adhesions were quantified. GFP-zyxin was detected in adhesions of transfected corneal fibroblasts as confirmed using vinculin counterstaining. Time-lapse imaging revealed extensions and retractions of cell processes and displacements of the fiduciary beads that were similar to control cells. Extending processes exhibited the most complex behavior, with new adhesions continuously forming at the leading edge while existing adhesions moved backward in a retrograde fashion. This process generated tractional forces as indicated by pulling in of the extracellular matrix in front of the cell. Interestingly, during extension, adhesions along the ventral surface of the cell body generally moved toward those at the tip, resulting in contractile-like shortening and matrix compression at the base of lamellipodia. Overall, a high correlation was found between both the magnitude (R=0.87, P<0.001) and direction (R=0.98, P<0.001) of the adhesions and nearby matrix displacements. Cytochalasin D induced rapid and reversible

  11. A collagen matrix derived from bladder can be used to engineer smooth muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Soo; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2008-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a collagen matrix derived from lamina propria, commonly known as bladder submucosa (BSM matrix), is a suitable biomaterial for several urologic applications, including reconstruction of the bladder and urethra in experimental models and clinical trials. In the present study, we evaluated the physical properties of BSM as well as its biocompatibility, cellular interactions, and ability to support the formation of functional tissue in order to determine whether this biomaterial could serve as a matrix for urinary smooth muscle tissue engineering. BSM matrix resembles the extracellular matrix of bladder submucosa in its native structure, composition, and mechanical properties. BSM matrix supported normal mitochondrial metabolic and proliferative functions of human urinary smooth muscle cells and did not induce cytotoxic effects in vitro. When implanted in vivo, BSM matrix promoted the regeneration of urinary smooth muscle tissues with contractility, which is a smooth muscle-specific tissue function. These results suggest that BSM matrix would be a useful biomaterial for urinary smooth muscle reconstruction.

  12. Characterization of a rainbow trout matrix metalloproteinase capable of degrading type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Saito, M; Sato, K; Kunisaki, N; Kimura, S

    2000-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are widely distributed in vertebrate tissues and form a large family consisting of at least four distinct subfamilies. Higher vertebrate MMP-13 is well-known as collagenase-3, which represents the third member of a collagenase subfamily. In this study, we cloned cDNA coding for a unique fish homologue of human MMP-13 from a rainbow trout fibroblast cDNA library. The cDNA was 2.1 kb long and contained an open reading frame encoding a protein of 475 amino acids. The catalytic domain of the protein was 66% identical to the human counterpart with the greatest degree of identity occurring in the zinc binding site. In addition, it possessed three amino-acid residues (Tyr122, Asp233 and Gly235) characteristic of the collagenase subfamily, together with a six residue insertion which did not occur in the collagenase subfamily. Then the isolated cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli and the recombinant protein was found to degrade gelatin and skin type I collagen. It is worth noting that rainbow trout type I collagen was more susceptible to proteolysis with the recombinant protein when compared with the calf one. It appeared that the recombinant protein also cleaved the nonhelical regions of rainbow trout muscle type V collagen. These results have revealed that the cDNA encodes a unique MMP-13 of rainbow trout. This is the first report of cDNA coding for fish MMP capable of degrading type I collagen.

  13. The endogenous fluorescence of fibroblast in collagen gels as indicator of stiffness of the extracellular matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Martinez, J. P.; Ortega-Martinez, A.; Franco, W.

    2016-03-01

    The stiffness or rigidity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cell response. Established mechanical tests to measure stiffness, such as indentation and tensile tests, are invasive and destructive to the sample. Endogenous or native molecules to cells and ECM components, like tryptophan and cross-links of collagen, display fluorescence upon irradiation with ultraviolet light. Most likely, the concentration of these endogenous fluorophores changes as the stiffness of the ECM changes. In this work we investigate the endogenous fluorescence of collagen gels containing fibroblasts as a non-invasive non-destructive method to measure stiffness of the ECM. Human fibroblast cells were cultured in three-dimensional gels of type I collagen (50,000 cells/ml). This construct is a simple model of tissue contraction. During contraction, changes in the excitation-emission matrix (a fluorescence map in the 240-520/290-530 nm range) of constructs were measured with a spectrofluoremeter, and changes in stiffness were measured with a standard indentation test over 16 days. Results show that a progressive increase in fluorescence of the 290/340 nm excitation-emission pair correlates with a progressive increase in stiffness (r=0.9, α=0.5). The fluorescence of this excitation-emission pair is ascribed to tryptophan and variations in the fluorescence of this pair correlate with cellular proliferation. In this tissue model, the endogenous functional fluorescence of proliferating fibroblast cells is a biomechanical marker of stiffness of the ECM.

  14. Osteoblasts extracellular matrix induces vessel like structures through glycosylated collagen I

    SciTech Connect

    Palmieri, D.; Valli, M.; Viglio, S.; Ferrari, N.; Ledda, B.; Volta, C.; Manduca, P.

    2010-03-10

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a fundamental role in angiogenesis affecting endothelial cells proliferation, migration and differentiation. Vessels-like network formation in vitro is a reliable test to study the inductive effects of ECM on angiogenesis. Here we utilized matrix deposed by osteoblasts as substrate where the molecular and structural complexity of the endogenous ECM is preserved, to test if it induces vessel-like network formation by endothelial cells in vitro. ECM is more similar to the physiological substrate in vivo than other substrates previously utilized for these studies in vitro. Osteogenic ECM, prepared in vitro from mature osteoblasts at the phase of maximal deposition and glycosylation of collagen I, induces EAhy926, HUVEC, and HDMEC endothelial cells to form vessels-like structures and promotes the activation of metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2); the functionality of the p-38/MAPK signaling pathway is required. Osteogenic ECM also induces a transient increase of CXCL12 and a decrease of the receptor CXCR4. The induction of vessel-like networks is dependent from proper glycosylation of collagens and does not occur on osteogenic ECMs if deglycosylated by -galactosidase or on less glycosylated ECMs derived from preosteoblasts and normal fibroblasts, while is sustained on ECM from osteogenesis imperfecta fibroblasts only when their mutation is associated with over-glycosylation of collagen type I. These data support that post-translational glycosylation has a role in the induction in endothelial cells in vitro of molecules conductive to self-organization in vessels-like structures.

  15. Electrospun collagen mimicking the reconstituted extracellular matrix improves osteoblastic differentiation onto titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Iafiscol, Michele; Quirici, Nadia; Foltran, Ismaela; Rimondini, Lia

    2013-07-01

    Titanium and its alloys are the current materials to manufacture oral implants because of their excellent mechanical properties and biocompatibility. However the increasing needs of the patients to receive fast and reliable rehabilitation have forced materials scientists to modified the surface of the materials in order to increase the rate of osseointegration and minimize the times for healing. The presence of a reconstituted extracellular matrix (ECM), constituted of proteins and polysaccharides is a key factor for healing and regeneration of the tissues. The nano-fibrous feature of ECM improves cells proliferation and addresses their phenotype. Electrospinning technique is an efficient processing method to manufacture micro- and nano-sized fibrous structures mimicking the ECM. In this work we describe a method to obtain collagen coating made of nano-fibers onto titanium for oral implant manufacturing, using electrospinning. The obtained collagen coatings showed morphology, structure and chemical composition similar to that of ECM. Moreover the stem cells cultured onto titanium samples coated with electrospun collagen showed faster osteoblastic differentiation and more efficient deposition of mineralized matrix in comparison with those onto uncoated substrates. This effect was amplified using osteogenetic media.

  16. Development of a synthetic tissue engineered 3D printed bioceramic-based bone graft with homogenously distributed osteoblasts and mineralizing bone matrix in vitro.

    PubMed

    Adel-Khattab, Doaa; Giacomini, Francesca; Gildenhaar, Renate; Berger, Georg; Gomes, Cynthia; Linow, Ulf; Hardt, Martin; Peleska, Barbara; Günster, Jens; Stiller, Michael; Houshmand, Alireza; Abdel Ghaffar, Khaled; Gamal, Ahmed; El-Mofty, Mohamed; Knabe, Christine

    2016-11-15

    Over the last decade there have been increasing efforts to develop 3D scaffolds for bone tissue engineering from bioactive ceramics with 3D printing emerging as a promising technology. The overall objective of the present study was to generate a tissue engineered synthetic bone graft with homogenously distributed osteoblasts and mineralizing bone matrix in vitro, thereby mimicking the advantageous properties of autogenous bone grafts and facilitating usage for reconstructing segmental discontinuity defects in vivo. To this end, 3D scaffolds were developed from a silica containing calciumalkaliorthophosphate utilizing first a replica technique namely the Schwartzwalder Somers method (SSM), and second 3D printing, (i.e. rapid prototyping, RP). The mechanical and physical scaffold properties and their potential to facilitate homogenous colonization by osteogenic cells and extracellular bone matrix formation throughout the porous scaffold architecture were examined. To this end, osteoblastic cells were dynamically cultured for 7d on both scaffold types with two different concentrations of 1.5 and 3x10(6) cells/ml. The amount of cells and bone matrix formed and osteogenic marker expression were evaluated using hard tissue histology, immunohistochemical and histomorphometric analysis. 3D printed scaffolds (RPS) exhibited more micropores, greater compressive strength and silica release. RPS seeded with 3x10(6) cells/ml displayed greatest cell and extracellular matrix formation, mineralization and osteocalcin expression. In conclusion, RPS displayed superior mechanical and biological properties and facilitated generating a tissue engineered synthetic bone graft in vitro, which mimics the advantageous properties of autogenous bone grafts, by containing homogenously distributed terminally differentiated osteoblasts and mineralizing bone matrix and therefore is suitable for subsequent in vivo implantation for regenerating segmental discontinuity bone defects.

  17. A microfluidic device for 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D cell navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamloo, Amir; Amirifar, Leyla

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices have received wide attention and shown great potential in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Investigating cell response to various stimulations is much more accurate and comprehensive with the aid of microfluidic devices. In this study, we introduced a microfluidic device by which the matrix density as a mechanical property and the concentration profile of a biochemical factor as a chemical property could be altered. Our microfluidic device has a cell tank and a cell culture chamber to mimic both 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D migration of three types of cells. Fluid shear stress is negligible on the cells and a stable concentration gradient can be obtained by diffusion. The device was designed by a numerical simulation so that the uniformity of the concentration gradients throughout the cell culture chamber was obtained. Adult neural cells were cultured within this device and they showed different branching and axonal navigation phenotypes within varying nerve growth factor (NGF) concentration profiles. Neural stem cells were also cultured within varying collagen matrix densities while exposed to NGF concentrations and they experienced 3D to 3D collective migration. By generating vascular endothelial growth factor concentration gradients, adult human dermal microvascular endothelial cells also migrated in a 2D to 3D manner and formed a stable lumen within a specific collagen matrix density. It was observed that a minimum absolute concentration and concentration gradient were required to stimulate migration of all types of the cells. This device has the advantage of changing multiple parameters simultaneously and is expected to have wide applicability in cell studies.

  18. Scaffolds for bone regeneration made of hydroxyapatite microspheres in a collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Cholas, Rahmatullah; Kunjalukkal Padmanabhan, Sanosh; Gervaso, Francesca; Udayan, Gayatri; Monaco, Graziana; Sannino, Alessandro; Licciulli, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Biomimetic scaffolds with a structural and chemical composition similar to native bone tissue may be promising for bone tissue regeneration. In the present work hydroxyapatite mesoporous microspheres (mHA) were incorporated into collagen scaffolds containing an ordered interconnected macroporosity. The mHA were obtained by spray drying of a nano hydroxyapatite slurry prepared by the precipitation technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed that the microspheres were composed only of hydroxyapatite (HA) phase, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed the Ca/P ratio to be 1.69 which is near the value for pure HA. The obtained microspheres had an average diameter of 6 μm, a specific surface area of 40 m(2)/g as measured by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis, and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) analysis showed a mesoporous structure with an average pore diameter of 16 nm. Collagen/HA-microsphere (Col/mHA) composite scaffolds were prepared by freeze-drying followed by dehydrothermal crosslinking. SEM observations of Col/mHA scaffolds revealed HA microspheres embedded within a porous collagen matrix with a pore size ranging from a few microns up to 200 μm, which was also confirmed by histological staining of sections of paraffin embedded scaffolds. The compressive modulus of the composite scaffold at low and high strain values was 1.7 and 2.8 times, respectively, that of pure collagen scaffolds. Cell proliferation measured by the MTT assay showed more than a 3-fold increase in cell number within the scaffolds after 15 days of culture for both pure collagen scaffolds and Col/mHA composite scaffolds. Attractive properties of this composite scaffold include the potential to load the microspheres for drug delivery and the controllability of the pore structure at various length scales.

  19. Matrix Cracking in 3D Orthogonal Melt-Infiltrated SiC/SiC Composites with Various Z-Fiber Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Yun, Hee Mann; DiCarlo, James A.

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of matrix cracks in melt-infiltrated SiC/SiC composites with a 3D orthogonal architecture was determined at room temperature for specimens tested in tension oriented in the X-direction (parallel to Z-bundle weave direction) and Y-direction (perpendicular to Z-bundle weave direction) and Y-direction (perpendicular to Z-bundle weave direction). The fiber-types were Sylramic and Sylramic-IBN in the X and Y-directions and lower modulus ZMI, T300, and rayon in the Z-direction. Acoustic emission (AE) was used to monitor the matrix cracking activity. For Y-direction composites, the AE data was used to determine the exact (+/- 0.25 mm) location where matrix cracks occurred in the 3D orthogonal architecture. This enabled the determination of the stress-dependent matrix crack distributions for small but repeatable matrix rich 'unidirectional' and the matrix poor 'cross-ply' regions within the architecture. It was found that matrix cracking initiated at very low stresses (approx. 40 MPa) in the 'unidirectional' regions for the largest z-direction fiber tow composites. Decreasing the size of the z-fiber bundle, increased the stress for matrix cracking in the 'unidirectional' regions. Matrix cracking in the 'cross-ply' regions always occurred at higher stresses than in 'unidirectional' regions, and the stress-dependent matrix crack distribution of the 'cross-ply' regions was always over a wider stress-range than the 'unidirectional' regions. For composites tested in the X-direction, a lower elastic modulus and a narrower and lower stress-range for matrix cracking were observed compared to composites tested in the Y-direction.

  20. Elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with collagen microfibers for soft tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Caves, Jeffrey M.; Cui, Wanxing; Wen, Jing; Kumar, Vivek A.; Haller, Carolyn A.; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2011-01-01

    Artificial composites designed to mimic the structure and properties of native extracellular matrix may lead to acellular materials for soft tissue repair and replacement, which display mechanical strength, stiffness, and resilience resembling native tissue. We describe the fabrication of thin lamellae consisting of continuous collagen microfiber embedded at controlled orientations and densities in a recombinant elastin-like protein polymer matrix. Multilamellar stacking affords flexible, protein-based composite sheets whose properties are dependent upon both the elastomeric matrix and collagen content and organization. Sheets are produced with properties that range over 13-fold in elongation to break (23 – 314%), six-fold in Young’s modulus (5.3 to 33.1 MPa), and more than two-fold in tensile strength (1.85 to 4.08 MPa), exceeding that of a number of native human tissues, including urinary bladder, pulmonary artery, and aorta. A sheet approximating the mechanical response of human abdominal wall fascia is investigated as a fascial substitute for ventral hernia repair. Protein-based composite patches prevent hernia recurrence in Wistar rats over an 8-week period with new tissue formation and sustained structural integrity. PMID:21550111

  1. Tension-Compression Fatigue Behavior of 2D and 3D Polymer Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-21

    performance in elevated temperature environments. High- temperature polymer matrix composites (HTPMCs) are being considered for such applications . However...the polymer matrix in most HTPMCs cannot operate at temperatures required for many aerospace structural applications . Continuous research seeks to...temperature polymer matrix composites (HTPMCs) applications , other polyimide resins replacement are being researched and developed due to the carcinogenic

  2. Study of the structure of 3-D composites based on carbon nanotubes in bovine serum albumin matrix by X-ray microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatov, D.; Zhurbina, N.; Gerasimenko, A.

    2017-01-01

    3-D composites are widely used in tissue engineering. A comprehensive analysis by X-ray microtomography was conducted to study the structure of the 3-D composites. Comprehensive analysis of the structure of the 3-D composites consisted of scanning, image reconstruction of shadow projections, two-dimensional and three-dimensional visualization of the reconstructed images and quantitative analysis of the samples. Experimental samples of composites were formed by laser vaporization of the aqueous dispersion BSA and single-walled (SWCNTs) and multi-layer (MWCNTs) carbon nanotubes. The samples have a homogeneous structure over the entire volume, the percentage of porosity of 3-D composites based on SWCNTs and MWCNTs - 16.44%, 28.31%, respectively. An average pore diameter of 3-D composites based on SWCNTs and MWCNTs - 45 μm 93 μm. 3-D composites based on carbon nanotubes in bovine serum albumin matrix can be used in tissue engineering of bone and cartilage, providing cell proliferation and blood vessel sprouting.

  3. Physiological regulation of extracellular matrix collagen and elastin in the arterial wall of rats by noradrenergic tone and angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Dab, Houcine; Kacem, Kamel; Hachani, Rafik; Dhaouadi, Nadra; Hodroj, Wassim; Sakly, Mohsen; Randon, Jacques; Bricca, Giampiero

    2012-03-01

    The interactions between the effects of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and angiotensin II (ANG II) on vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis were determined in rats. The mRNA and protein content of collagen I, collagen III and elastin in the abdominal aorta (AA) and femoral artery (FA) was investigated in Wistar-Kyoto rats treated for 5 weeks with guanethidine, a sympathoplegic, losartan, an ANG II AT1 receptor (AT1R) blocker, or both. The effects of noradrenaline (NE) and ANG II on collagen III and elastin mRNA, and the receptor involved, were tested in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Guanethidine increased collagen types I and III and decreased elastin, while losartan had an opposite effect, although without effect on collagen III. The combination of treatments abrogated changes induced by simple treatment with collagen I and elastin, but increased collagen III mRNA in AA and not in FA. NE stimulated collagen III mRNA via β receptors and elastin via α1 and α2 receptors. ANG II stimulated collagen III but inhibited elastin mRNA via AT1R. Overall, SNS and ANG II exert opposite and antagonistic effects on major components of ECM in the vascular wall. This may be of relevance for the choice of a therapeutic strategy in vascular diseases.

  4. Collagenous extracellular matrix of cartilage submitted to mechanical forces studied by second harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Werkmeister, Elisabeth; de Isla, Natalia; Netter, Patrick; Stoltz, Jean-François; Dumas, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative pathology leading to degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Similar effects can be visualized when applying mechanical or biochemical constraints on cartilaginous tissue. Here, we characterized modification of the ECM appearing under mechanical compression and/or biochemical action (hypoxia environment, nitric oxide and collagenase action). In recent decades, multiphoton microscopy has proved its interest for observing living, thick and opaque biological tissues. Thus, the main components of the cartilaginous ECM can be observed without fluorescent labeling. In particular, the collagen network emits strong second harmonic generation (SHG) signal which could be collected at half of the excitation wavelength. Combining autofluorescence and SHG signal detection enables to obtain complementary structural information. Here, we proved that multiphoton microscopy represents an appropriate tool for ex vitro cartilage imaging. First, we showed that SHG signal specifically comes from collagen (collagenase digestion). Further, we verified that the use of an appropriate band-pass filter enables to reject the autofluorescence from the ECM. Once this specificity was shown, we followed modification of the cartilage ECM submitted to mechanical or biochemical constraints (compression, enzymatic digestion). By performing textural analysis of SHG images (Haralick's method), we showed the restructuration of the collagen network according to constraints.

  5. Improved bone morphogenetic protein-2 retention in an injectable collagen matrix using bifunctional peptides.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Paul T; Jansen, Michelle S; Ganesan, Sathya; Benson, R Edward; Hyde-Deruyscher, Robin; Beyer, Wayne F; Gile, Joseph C; Nair, Shrikumar A; Hodges, Jonathan A; Grøn, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    To promote healing of many orthopedic injuries, tissue engineering approaches are being developed that combine growth factors such as Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMP) with biomaterial carriers. Although these technologies have shown great promise, they still face limitations. We describe a generalized approach to create target-specific modular peptides that bind growth factors to implantable biomaterials. These bifunctional peptide coatings provide a novel way to modulate biology on the surface of an implant. Using phage display techniques, we have identified peptides that bind with high affinity to BMP-2. The peptides that bind to BMP-2 fall into two different sequence clusters. The first cluster of peptide sequences contains the motif W-X-X-F-X-X-L (where X can be any amino acid) and the second cluster contains the motif F-P-L-K-G. We have synthesized bifunctional peptide linkers that contain BMP-2 and collagen-binding domains. Using a rat ectopic bone formation model, we have injected rhBMP-2 into a collagen matrix with or without a bifunctional BMP-2: collagen peptide (BC-1). The presence of BC-1 significantly increased osteogenic cellular activity, the area of bone formed, and bone maturity at the site of injection. Our results suggest that bifunctional peptides that can simultaneously bind to a growth factor and an implantable biomaterial can be used to control the delivery and release of growth factors at the site of implantation.

  6. A nondenatured, noncrosslinked collagen matrix to deliver stem cells to the heart

    PubMed Central

    Kouris, Nicholas A; Squirrell, Jayne M; Jung, Jangwook P; Pehlke, Carolyn A; Hacker, Timothy; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Ogle, Brenda M

    2011-01-01

    Aims Stem cell transplantation holds promise as a therapeutic approach for the repair of damaged myocardial tissue. One challenge of this approach is efficient delivery and long-term retention of the stem cells. Although several synthetic and natural biomaterials have been developed for this purpose, the ideal formulation has yet to be identified. Materials & methods Here we investigate the utility of a nondenatured, noncrosslinked, commercially available natural biomaterial (TissueMend® [TEI Biosciences, Boston, MA, USA]) for delivery of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to the murine heart. Results We found that MSCs attached, proliferated and migrated within and out of the TissueMend matrix in vitro. Human MSCs delivered to damaged murine myocardium via the matrix (2.3 × 104 ± 0.8 × 104 CD73+ cells/matrix) were maintained in vivo for 3 weeks and underwent at least three population doublings during that period (21.9 × 104 ± 14.4 × 104 CD73+ cells/matrix). In addition, collagen within the TissueMend matrix could be remodeled by MSCs in vivo, resulting in a significant decrease in the coefficient of alignment of fibers (0.12 ± 0.12) compared with the matrix alone (0.28 ± 0.07), and the MSCs were capable of migrating out of the matrix and into the host tissue. Conclusion Thus, TissueMend matrix offers a commercially available, biocompatible and malleable vehicle for the delivery and retention of stem cells to the heart. PMID:21916593

  7. The use of collagen matrix (Ologen) as a patch graft in glaucoma tube shunt surgery, a retrospective chart review

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, John D.; Sarkisian, Jr., Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety and efficacy of collagen matrix as a patch graft in glaucoma drainage surgery. Collagen matrix grafts may be advantageous because they do not need to be harvested from human donors. Methods: An institutional, retrospective review of 43 patients with at least 12 months follow-up status post-glaucoma drainage implant surgery were evaluated for signs of tube erosion after initial placement of collagen matrix patch graft. Results: Forty-one of 43 eyes (95.3%) required no intervention for patch graft melting with tube erosion. Average time of follow-up was 32 months (range: 12-45). Two cases had tube erosion at 4 months and 26 months post-op requiring tube revision, which was successfully revised with conjunctiva (4 month erosion) and donor sclera (26 month erosion). Conclusion:  Our results suggest that collagen matrix patch grafts may be used successfully as a patch graft in glaucoma tube shunt surgery, and may be advantageous because they do not have to be harvested from human donors. It is possible that exposure rates may be higher after longer follow-up and with larger numbers of patients. Further research is needed to compare Ologen to traditional graft materials to conclusively determine the safety and efficacy of collagen matrix as a novel patch graft material. PMID:28184280

  8. Implants of polyanionic collagen matrix in bone defects of ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Marcelo Rodrigues; Santos, Arnaldo Rodrigues; Goissis, Gilberto; Genari, Selma C

    2008-03-01

    In recent years, there has been a great interest in the development of biomaterials that could be used in the repair of bone defects. Collagen matrix (CM) has the advantage that it can be modified chemically to improve its mechanical properties. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of three-dimensional membranes of native or anionic (submitted to alkaline treatment for 48 or 96 h) collagen matrix on the consolidation of osteoporosis bone fractures resulting from the gonadal hormone alterations caused by ovariectomy in rats subjected to hormone replacement therapy. The animals received the implants 4 months after ovariectomy and were sacrificed 8 weeks after implantation of the membranes into 4-mm wide bone defects created in the distal third of the femur with a surgical bur. Macroscopic analysis revealed the absence of pathological alterations in the implanted areas, suggesting that the material was biocompatible. Microscopic analysis showed a lower amount of bone ingrowth in the areas receiving the native membrane compared to the bone defects filled with the anionic membranes. In ovariectomized animals receiving anionic membranes, a delay in bone regeneration was observed mainly in animals not subjected to hormone replacement therapy. We conclude that anionic membranes treated with alkaline solution for 48 and 96 h presented better results in terms of bone ingrowth.

  9. Preparation and characterization of malonic acid cross-linked chitosan and collagen 3D scaffolds: an approach on non-covalent interactions.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Tapas; Sailakshmi, G; Gnanamani, A; Mandal, A B

    2012-05-01

    The present study emphasizes the influence of non-covalent interactions on the mechanical and thermal properties of the scaffolds of chitosan/collagen origin. Malonic acid (MA), a bifuncitonal diacid was chosen to offer non-covalent cross-linking. Three dimensional scaffolds was prepared using chitosan at 1.0% (w/v) and MA at 0.2% (w/v), similarly collagen 0.5% (w/v) and MA 0.2% (w/v) and characterized. Results on FT-IR, TGA, DSC, SEM and mechanical properties (tensile strength, stiffness, Young's modulus, etc.) assessment demonstrated the existence of non-covalent interaction between MA and chitosan/collagen, which offered flexibility and high strength to the scaffolds suitable for tissue engineering research. Studies using NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells suggested biocompatibility nature of the scaffolds. Docking simulation study further supports the intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions between MA and chitosan/collagen.

  10. Contractile force generation by 3D hiPSC-derived cardiac tissues is enhanced by rapid establishment of cellular interconnection in matrix with muscle-mimicking stiffness.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soah; Serpooshan, Vahid; Tong, Xinming; Venkatraman, Sneha; Lee, Meelim; Lee, Jaecheol; Chirikian, Orlando; Wu, Joseph C; Wu, Sean M; Yang, Fan

    2017-03-30

    Engineering 3D human cardiac tissues is of great importance for therapeutic and pharmaceutical applications. As cardiac tissue substitutes, extracellular matrix-derived hydrogels have been widely explored. However, they exhibit premature degradation and their stiffness is often orders of magnitude lower than that of native cardiac tissue. There are no reports on establishing interconnected cardiomyocytes in 3D hydrogels at physiologically-relevant cell density and matrix stiffness. Here we bioengineer human cardiac microtissues by encapsulating human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) in chemically-crosslinked gelatin hydrogels (1.25 × 10(8)/mL) with tunable stiffness and degradation. In comparison to the cells in high stiffness (16 kPa)/slow degrading hydrogels, hiPSC-CMs in low stiffness (2 kPa)/fast degrading and intermediate stiffness (9 kPa)/intermediate degrading hydrogels exhibit increased intercellular network formation, α-actinin and connexin-43 expression, and contraction velocity. Only the 9 kPa microtissues exhibit organized sarcomeric structure and significantly increased contractile stress. This demonstrates that muscle-mimicking stiffness together with robust cellular interconnection contributes to enhancement in sarcomeric organization and contractile function of the engineered cardiac tissue. This study highlights the importance of intercellular connectivity, physiologically-relevant cell density, and matrix stiffness to best support 3D cardiac tissue engineering.

  11. Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 Mediates Collagen-Induced Activation of Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase in Human Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Majkowska, Iwona; Shitomi, Yasuyuki; Ito, Noriko; Gray, Nathanael S; Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2017-03-07

    Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is a membrane-bound MMP that is highly expressed in cells with invading capacity including fibroblasts and invasive cancer cell. A potential physiological stimulus for MT1-MMP expression is fibrillar collagen, and it has been shown that it upregulates both MT1-MMP gene and functions in various cell types. However, the mechanisms of collagen-mediated MT1-MMP activation is not clearly understood. In this study we identified discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) as a crucial receptor that mediates this process in human fibroblasts. Knocking down DDR2, but not β1 integrin subunit, a common subunit for all collagen-binding integrins, inhibited collagen-induced activation of proMMP-2 and upregulation of MT1-MMP at the gene and protein level. Interestingly DDR2 knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of DDR2 also inhibited MT1-MMP-dependent cellular degradation of collagen film, suggesting that cell surface collagen degradation by MT1-MMP involves DDR2-mediated collagen signalling. This DDR2-mediated mechanism is only present in non-transformed mesenchymal cells, as collagen-induced MT1-MMP activation in HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells and MT1-MMP function in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells were not affected by DDR kinase inhibition. DDR2 activation was found to be noticeably more effective when cells were stimulated by collagen without non-helical telopeptides region compared to intact collagen fibrils. Those data suggest that DDR2 is a microenvironmental sensor that regulates fibroblasts migration in collagen-rich environment.

  12. Hydrolysis of triple-helical collagen peptide models by matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Lauer-Fields, J L; Tuzinski, K A; Shimokawa, K i; Nagase, H; Fields, G B

    2000-05-05

    The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family has been implicated in the process of a variety of diseases such as arthritis, atherosclerosis, and tumor cell metastasis. To study the mechanisms of MMP action on collagenous substrates, we have constructed homotrimeric triple-helical peptide (THP) models of the collagenase cleavage sites in types I and II collagen. The THPs incorporate either the alpha1(I)772-786 or the alpha1(II)772-783 sequence. The alpha1(I)772-786 and alpha1(II)772-783 THPs were hydrolyzed by MMP-1 at the Gly-Ile and Gly-Leu bonds, respectively, analogous to the bonds cleaved in corresponding native collagens. Thus, the THPs contained all necessary information to direct MMP-1 binding and proteolysis. Subsequent investigations using the alpha1(I)772-786 THP showed hydrolysis by MMP-2, MMP-13, and a COOH-terminal domain-deleted MMP-1 (MMP-1(Delta(243-450))) but not by MMP-3 or a COOH-terminal domain-deleted MMP-3 (MMP-3(Delta(248-460))). Kinetic analyses showed a k(cat)/K(m) value of 1,808 s(-1) m(-1) for MMP-1 hydrolysis of alpha1(I)772-786 THP, approximately 10-fold lower than for type I collagen. The effect is caused primarily by relative K(m) values. MMP-2 and MMP-13 cleaved the THP more rapidly than MMP-1, but MMP-2 cleavage occurred at distinct multiple sites. Comparison of MMP-1 and MMP-1(Delta(243-450)) hydrolysis of alpha1(I)772-786 THP showed that both can cleave a triple-helical substrate with a slightly higher K(m) value for MMP-1(Delta(243-450)). We propose that the COOH-terminal domain of MMPs is necessary for orienting whole, native collagen molecules but may not be necessary for binding to and cleaving a THP. This proposal is consistent with the large distance between the MMP-1 catalytic and COOH-terminal domains observed by three-dimensional structural analysis and supports previous suggestions that the features of the catalytic domain contribute significantly toward enzyme specificity.

  13. Cell-laden 3D bioprinting hydrogel matrix depending on different compositions for soft tissue engineering: Characterization and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jisun; Lee, Sang Jin; Chung, Solchan; Lee, Jun Hee; Kim, Wan Doo; Lee, Jae Young; Park, Su A

    2017-02-01

    Cell-printing techniques that can construct three-dimensional (3D) structures with biocompatible materials and cells are of great interest for various biomedical applications, such as tissue engineering and drug-screening studies. For successful cell-printing with cells, bioinks are critical for both the processability of printing and the viability of printed cells. However, the influence of composition on 3D bio-printing with cells has not been well explored. In this study, we investigated different compositions of alginate bioinks by varying the concentrations of high molecular weight alginate (High Alg) and low molecular weight alginate (Low Alg). Bioinks of 3wt% alginate containing High Alg alone or a 1:2 (Low Alg:High Alg) composite allowed for the construction of 3D scaffolds with good processability and shapes. Cell-printing with fibroblasts and in vitro culture studies revealed good viability and growth of the printed cells after up to 7days of culture. Bioinks prepared with High and Low Alg at a 2:1 ratio exhibited better cell growth compared with those of other compositions. This study progresses the design and applications of alginate-based bioinks for cell-printing platforms in soft tissue engineering.

  14. Microenvironment complexity and matrix stiffness regulate breast cancer cell activity in a 3D in vitro model

    PubMed Central

    Cavo, Marta; Fato, Marco; Peñuela, Leonardo; Beltrame, Francesco; Raiteri, Roberto; Scaglione, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures represent fundamental tools for the comprehension of cellular phenomena both in normal and in pathological conditions. In particular, mechanical and chemical stimuli play a relevant role on cell fate, cancer onset and malignant evolution. Here, we use mechanically-tuned alginate hydrogels to study the role of substrate elasticity on breast adenocarcinoma cell activity. The hydrogel elastic modulus (E) was measured via atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a remarkable range (150–4000 kPa) was obtained. A breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, was seeded within the 3D gels, on standard Petri and alginate-coated dishes (2D controls). Cells showed dramatic morphological differences when cultured in 3D versus 2D, exhibiting a flat shape in both 2D conditions, while maintaining a circular, spheroid-organized (cluster) conformation within the gels, similar to those in vivo. Moreover, we observed a strict correlation between cell viability and substrate elasticity; in particular, the number of MCF-7 cells decreased constantly with increasing hydrogel elasticity. Remarkably, the highest cellular proliferation rate, associated with the formation of cell clusters, occurred at two weeks only in the softest hydrogels (E = 150–200 kPa), highlighting the need to adopt more realistic and a priori defined models for in vitro cancer studies. PMID:27734939

  15. Changes in skeletal collagen crosslinks and matrix hydration in high and low turnover chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Matthew R.; Newman, Christopher L.; Chen, Neal; Granke, Mathilde; Nyman, Jeffry S.; Moe, Sharon M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Introduction Clinical data have documented a clear increase in fracture risk associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Preclinical studies have shown reductions in bone mechanical properties although the tissue-level mechanisms for these differences remain unclear. The goal of this study was to assess collagen cross-links and matrix hydration, two variables known to affect mechanical properties, in animals with either high or low turnover CKD. Methods At 35 weeks of age (>75% reduction in kidney function), the femoral diaphysis of male Cy/+ rats with high or low bone turnover rates, along with normal littermate (NL) controls, were assessed for collagen cross-links (pyridinoline (PYD), deoxypyridinoline (DPD), and pentosidine (PE)) using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay as well as pore and bound water per volume (pw and bw) using a 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique. Material-level biomechanical properties were calculated based on previously published whole bone mechanical tests. Results Cortical bone from animals with high turnover disease had lower Pyd and Dpd crosslink levels (−21% each), lower bw (−10%), higher PE (+71%), and higher pw (+46%), compared to NL. Animals with low turnover had higher Dpd, PE (+71%), and bw (+7%) along with lower pw (−60%) compared to NL. Both high and low turnover animals had reduced material-level bone toughness compared to NL animals as determined by three-point bending. Conclusions These data document an increase in skeletal PE with advanced CKD that is independent of bone turnover rate and inversely related to decline in kidney function. Although hydration changes occur in both high and low turnover disease, the data suggest that non-enzymatic collagen crosslinks may be a key factor in compromised mechanical properties of CKD. PMID:25466530

  16. Non-enzymatic glycosylation of a type I collagen matrix: effects on osteoblastic development and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Antonio D; Etcheverry, Susana B; Bruzzone, Liliana; Lettieri, Gabriela; Barrio, Daniel A; Cortizo, Ana M

    2001-01-01

    Background The tissue accumulation of protein-bound advanced glycation endproducts (AGE) may be involved in the etiology of diabetic chronic complications, including osteopenia. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an AGE-modified type I collagen substratum on the adhesion, spreading, proliferation and differentiation of rat osteosarcoma UMR106 and mouse non-transformed MC3T3E1 osteoblastic cells. We also studied the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression on these AGE-collagen mediated effects. Results AGE-collagen decreased the adhesion of UMR106 cells, but had no effect on the attachment of MC3T3E1 cells. In the UMR106 cell line, AGE-collagen also inhibited cellular proliferation, spreading and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. In preosteoblastic MC3T3E1 cells (24-hour culture), proliferation and spreading were significantly increased by AGE-collagen. After one week of culture (differentiated MC3T3E1 osteoblasts) AGE-collagen inhibited ALP activity, but had no effect on cell number. In mineralizing MC3T3E1 cells (3-week culture) AGE-collagen induced a decrease in the number of surviving cells and of extracellular nodules of mineralization, without modifying their ALP activity. Intracellular ROS production, measured after a 48-hour culture, was decreased by AGE-collagen in MC3T3E1 cells, but was increased by AGE-collagen in UMR106 cells. After a 24-hour culture, AGE-collagen increased the expression of endothelial and inducible NOS, in both osteoblastic cell lines. Conclusions These results suggest that the accumulation of AGE on bone extracellular matrix could regulate the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic cells. These effects appear to depend on the stage of osteoblastic development, and possibly involve the modulation of NOS expression and intracellular ROS pathways. PMID:11518540

  17. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to quantify collagen and elastin in an in vitro model of extracellular matrix degradation in aorta.

    PubMed

    Cheheltani, Rabee; McGoverin, Cushla M; Rao, Jayashree; Vorp, David A; Kiani, Mohammad F; Pleshko, Nancy

    2014-06-21

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key component and regulator of many biological tissues including aorta. Several aortic pathologies are associated with significant changes in the composition of the matrix, especially in the content, quality and type of aortic structural proteins, collagen and elastin. The purpose of this study was to develop an infrared spectroscopic methodology that is comparable to biochemical assays to quantify collagen and elastin in aorta. Enzymatically degraded porcine aorta samples were used as a model of ECM degradation in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). After enzymatic treatment, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of the aortic tissue were acquired by an infrared fiber optic probe (IFOP) and FTIR imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS). Collagen and elastin content were quantified biochemically and partial least squares (PLS) models were developed to predict collagen and elastin content in aorta based on FTIR spectra. PLS models developed from FT-IRIS spectra were able to predict elastin and collagen content of the samples with strong correlations (RMSE of validation = 8.4% and 11.1% of the range respectively), and IFOP spectra were successfully used to predict elastin content (RMSE = 11.3% of the range). The PLS regression coefficients from the FT-IRIS models were used to map collagen and elastin in tissue sections of degraded porcine aortic tissue as well as a human AAA biopsy tissue, creating a similar map of each component compared to histology. These results support further application of FTIR spectroscopic techniques for evaluation of AAA tissues.

  18. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy to Quantify Collagen and Elastin in an In Vitro Model of Extracellular Matrix Degradation in Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Cheheltani, Rabee; McGoverin, Cushla M.; Rao, Jayashree; Vorp, David A.; Kiani, Mohammad F.; Pleshko, N.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key component and regulator of many biological tissues including aorta. Several aortic pathologies are associated with significant changes in the composition of the matrix, especially in the content, quality and type of aortic structural proteins, collagen and elastin. The purpose of this study was to develop an infrared spectroscopic methodology that is comparable to biochemical assays to quantify collagen and elastin in aorta. Enzymatically degraded porcine aorta samples were used as a model of ECM degradation in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). After enzymatic treatment, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of the aortic tissue were acquired by an infrared fiber optic probe (IFOP) and FTIR imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS). Collagen and elastin content were quantified biochemically and partial least squares (PLS) models were developed to predict collagen and elastin content in aorta based on FTIR spectra. PLS models developed from FT-IRIS spectra were able to predict elastin and collagen content of the samples with strong correlations (RMSE of validation = 8.4% and 11.1% of the range respectively), and IFOP spectra were successfully used to predict elastin content (RMSE = 11.3% of the range). The PLS regression coefficients from the FT-IRIS models were used to map collagen and elastin in tissue sections of degraded porcine aortic tissue as well as a human AAA biopsy tissue, creating a similar map of each component compared to histology. These results support further application of FTIR spectroscopic techniques for evaluation of AAA tissues. PMID:24761431

  19. Mechanical and structural contribution of non-fibrillar matrix in uniaxial tension: a collagen-agarose co-gel model.

    PubMed

    Lake, Spencer P; Barocas, Victor H

    2011-07-01

    The mechanical role of non-fibrillar matrix and the nature of its interaction with the collagen network in soft tissues remain poorly understood, in part because of the lack of a simple experimental model system to quantify these interactions. This study's objective was to examine mechanical and structural properties of collagen-agarose co-gels, utilized as a simplified model system, to understand better the relationships between the collagen network and non-fibrillar matrix. We hypothesized that the presence of agarose would have a pronounced effect on microstructural reorganization and mechanical behavior. Samples fabricated from gel solutions containing 1.0 mg/mL collagen and 0, 0.125, or 0.25% w/v agarose were evaluated via scanning electron microscopy, incremental tensile stress-relaxation tests, and polarized light imaging. While the incorporation of agarose did not dramatically alter collagen network morphology, agarose led to concentration-dependent changes in mechanical and structural properties. Specifically, resistance of co-gels to volume change corresponded with differences in fiber reorientation and elastic/viscoelastic mechanics. Results demonstrate strong relationships between tissue properties and offer insight into behavior of tissues of varying Poisson's ratio and fiber kinematics. Results also suggest that non-fibrillar material may have significant effects on properties of artificial and native tissues even in tension, which is generally assumed to be collagen dominated.

  20. In situ cell-matrix mechanics in tendon fascicles and seeded collagen gels: implications for the multiscale design of biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Neil A; Bruehlmann, Sabina B; Hunter, Christopher J; Shao, Xinxin; Kelly, Elizabeth J

    2014-01-01

    Designing biomaterials to mimic and function within the complex mechanobiological conditions of connective tissues requires a detailed understanding of the micromechanical environment of the cell. The objective of our study was to measure the in situ cell-matrix strains from applied tension in both tendon fascicles and cell-seeded type I collagen scaffolds using laser scanning confocal microscopy techniques. Tendon fascicles and collagen gels were fluorescently labelled to simultaneously visualise the extracellular matrix and cell nuclei under applied tensile strains of 5%. There were significant differences observed in the micromechanics at the cell-matrix scale suggesting that the type I collagen scaffold did not replicate the pattern of native tendon strains. In particular, although the overall in situ tensile strains in the matrix were quite similar (∼2.5%) between the tendon fascicles and the collagen scaffolds, there were significant differences at the cell-matrix boundary with visible shear across cell nuclei of >1 μm measured in native tendon which was not observed at all in the collagen scaffolds. Similarly, there was significant non-uniformity of intercellular strains with relative sliding observed between cell rows in tendon which again was not observed in the collagen scaffolds where the strain environment was much more uniform. If the native micromechanical environment is not replicated in biomaterial scaffolds, then the cells may receive incorrect or mixed mechanical signals which could affect their biosynthetic response to mechanical load in tissue engineering applications. This study highlights the importance of considering the microscale mechanics in the design of biomaterial scaffolds and the need to incorporate such features in computational models of connective tissues.

  1. Collagen type I matrix affects molecular and cellular behavior of purified porcine dental follicle cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, S; Honda, M J; Shinohara, Y; Saito, M; Ueda, M

    2008-02-01

    We investigated porcine dental follicle cells at the early crown-formation stage and examined the behavior of cells grown in a collagen type I (Col-I) matrix. Clone-porcine dental follicle cells (DFC-I) and controls, viz., dental follicle itself, nonclone-dental follicle cells, periodontal ligament cells (PDLC), and bone marrow stromal cells, were obtained from 6-month-old pigs. DFC-I showed a different gene expression pattern from controls by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. In addition, Col-I treatment enhanced DFC-I proliferation and increased their alkaline phosphatase activity compared with nontreated DFC-I. The expression of periostin, biglycan, and osteocalcin (OCN) in cells growing on collagen was upregulated, similar to the pattern seen in PDLC. DFC-I with and without Col-I treatment were combined with beta-tricalcium phosphate particles and implanted into immunodeficient mice. Significant differences were found in the gene expression patterns of bone sialoprotein, OCN, and periostin in both treated and non-treated implants at 2 and/or 4 weeks. The results showed that Col-I induced the mineralization pathway in these cells. Hard tissue formation was observed in both implant types at 8 weeks. Our results suggest that Col-I facilitates the differentiation of DFC-I along the mineralization process.

  2. Dynamic culture of a thermosensitive collagen hydrogel as an extracellular matrix improves the construction of tissue-engineered peripheral nerve

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lanfeng; Li, Rui; Liu, Wanguo; Dai, Jin; Du, Zhenwu; Wang, Xiaonan; Ma, Jianchao; Zhao, Jinsong

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering technologies offer new treatment strategies for the repair of peripheral nerve injury, but cell loss between seeding and adhesion to the scaffold remains inevitable. A thermosensitive collagen hydrogel was used as an extracellular matrix in this study and combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to construct tissue-engineered peripheral nerve composites in vitro. Dynamic culture was performed at an oscillating frequency of 0.5 Hz and 35° swing angle above and below the horizontal plane. The results demonstrated that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells formed membrane-like structures around the poly-L-lactic acid scaffolds and exhibited regular alignment on the composite surface. Collagen was used to fill in the pores, and seeded cells adhered onto the poly-L-lactic acid fibers. The DNA content of the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells was higher in the composites constructed with a thermosensitive collagen hydrogel compared with that in collagen I scaffold controls. The cellular DNA content was also higher in the thermosensitive collagen hydrogel composites constructed with the thermosensitive collagen hydrogel in dynamic culture than that in static culture. These results indicate that tissue-engineered composites formed with thermosensitive collagen hydrogel in dynamic culture can maintain larger numbers of seeded cells by avoiding cell loss during the initial adhesion stage. Moreover, seeded cells were distributed throughout the material. PMID:25221594

  3. Laser-Deposited In Situ TiC-Reinforced Nickel Matrix Composites: 3D Microstructure and Tribological Properties (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-03

    laser-engineered net shaping TM process. These composites consist of an in situ formed and homogeneously distributed titanium carbide (TiC) phase...distributed primary and eutectic titanium carbide precipitates as well as a graphitic phase encompassing the primary carbides within the nickel...distributed titanium carbide (TiC) phase reinforcing the nickel matrix. Additionally, by tailoring the Ti/C ratio in these composites, an additional

  4. Efficient fully 3D list-mode TOF PET image reconstruction using a factorized system matrix with an image domain resolution model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian; Qi, Jinyi

    2014-01-01

    A factorized system matrix utilizing an image domain resolution model is attractive in fully 3D TOF PET image reconstruction using list-mode data. In this paper, we study a factored model based on sparse matrix factorization that is comprised primarily of a simplified geometrical projection matrix and an image blurring matrix. Beside the commonly-used Siddon's raytracer, we propose another more simplified geometrical projector based on the Bresenham's raytracer which further reduces the computational cost. We discuss in general how to obtain an image blurring matrix associated with a geometrical projector, and provide theoretical analysis that can be used to inspect the efficiency in model factorization. In simulation studies, we investigate the performance of the proposed sparse factorization model in terms of spatial resolution, noise properties and computational cost. The quantitative results reveal that the factorization model can be as efficient as a nonfactored model such as the analytical model while its computational cost can be much lower. In addition we conduct Monte Carlo simulations to identify the conditions under which the image resolution model can become more efficient in terms of image contrast recovery. We verify our observations using the provided theoretical analysis. The result offers a general guide to achieve optimal reconstruction performance based on a sparse factorization model with an only image domain resolution model. PMID:24434568

  5. Efficient fully 3D list-mode TOF PET image reconstruction using a factorized system matrix with an image domain resolution model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Qi, Jinyi

    2014-02-07

    A factorized system matrix utilizing an image domain resolution model is attractive in fully 3D time-of-flight PET image reconstruction using list-mode data. In this paper, we study a factored model based on sparse matrix factorization that is comprised primarily of a simplified geometrical projection matrix and an image blurring matrix. Beside the commonly-used Siddon's ray-tracer, we propose another more simplified geometrical projector based on the Bresenham's ray-tracer which further reduces the computational cost. We discuss in general how to obtain an image blurring matrix associated with a geometrical projector, and provide theoretical analysis that can be used to inspect the efficiency in model factorization. In simulation studies, we investigate the performance of the proposed sparse factorization model in terms of spatial resolution, noise properties and computational cost. The quantitative results reveal that the factorization model can be as efficient as a non-factored model, while its computational cost can be much lower. In addition we conduct Monte Carlo simulations to identify the conditions under which the image resolution model can become more efficient in terms of image contrast recovery. We verify our observations using the provided theoretical analysis. The result offers a general guide to achieve the optimal reconstruction performance based on a sparse factorization model with an image domain resolution model.

  6. Phenotypic changes in proliferation, differentiation, and migration of chondrocytes: 3D in vitro models for joint wound healing.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Hui; Chen, Chun-Wei; Lai, Wen-Fu T; Tang, Ja-Reng; Deng, Win-Ping; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Chung, Andrew; Zuo, Chun S; Bowley, John F

    2010-03-01

    We aim to establish a 3D model of cartilage wound healing, and explore the involvement of chondrocytes in its repair. To characterize chondrocyte involvement in wound healing, an in vitro 3D model composed of chondrocyte mixing with either type II/I collagen or type I collagen matrix was established. The "defects" measuring 5 mm in diameter were made on each collagen matrix-chondrocyte construct to mimic in vivo cartilage defects. The effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on chondrocytes migration and differentiation were studied. The migration and Glucosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis of chondrocytes in the defect areas were observed by microscopy after Alcian-blue staining. In the presence of bFGF, GAG expression increased significantly when chondrocytes were cultured in type II/I collagen matrix compared to type I collagen matrix. However, mild GAG accumulation was also found when cells were cultured in either type I or type II/I collagens without bFGF. In a 3D model of cartilage wound healing, bFGF promote chondrocyte proliferation, migration and differentiation in the presence of type II/I collagen matrix, and showed potential to regulate wound healing. These wound healing models may provide feasible methods to explore various drugs prior to human trials.

  7. Chondrocyte calcium signaling in response to fluid flow is regulated by matrix adhesion in 3-D alginate scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Degala, Satish; Zipfel, Warren R; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between chondrocytes and their surrounding extracellular matrix plays an important role in regulating cartilage metabolism in response to environmental cues. This study characterized the role of cell adhesion on the calcium signaling response of chondrocytes to fluid flow. Bovine chondrocytes were suspended in alginate hydrogels functionalized with RGD at concentrations of 0-400μM. The hydrogels were perfused and the calcium signaling response of the cells was measured over a range of fluid velocities from 0 to 68μm/s. Attachment to RGD-alginate doubled the sensitivity of chondrocytes to flows in the range of 8-13μm/s, but at higher fluid velocities, the contribution of cell adhesion to the observed calcium signaling response was no longer apparent. The enhanced sensitivity to flow was dependent on the density of RGD-ligand present in the scaffolds. The RGD-enhanced sensitivity to flow was completely inhibited by the addition of soluble RGD which acted as a competitive inhibitor. The results of this study indicate a role for matrix adhesion in regulating chondrocyte response to fluid flow through a calcium dependent mechanism.

  8. Human pathogens utilize host extracellular matrix proteins laminin and collagen for adhesion and invasion of the host.

    PubMed

    Singh, Birendra; Fleury, Christophe; Jalalvand, Farshid; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2012-11-01

    Laminin (Ln) and collagen are multifunctional glycoproteins that play an important role in cellular morphogenesis, cell signalling, tissue repair and cell migration. These proteins are ubiquitously present in tissues as a part of the basement membrane (BM), constitute a protective layer around blood capillaries and are included in the extracellular matrix (ECM). As a component of BMs, both Lns and collagen(s), thus function as major mechanical containment molecules that protect tissues from pathogens. Invasive pathogens breach the basal lamina and degrade ECM proteins of interstitial spaces and connective tissues using various ECM-degrading proteases or surface-bound plasminogen and matrix metalloproteinases recruited from the host. Most pathogens associated with the respiratory, gastrointestinal, or urogenital tracts, as well as with the central nervous system or the skin, have the capacity to bind and degrade Lns and collagen(s) in order to adhere to and invade host tissues. In this review, we focus on the adaptability of various pathogens to utilize these ECM proteins as enhancers for adhesion to host tissues or as a targets for degradation in order to breach the cellular barriers. The major pathogens discussed are Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Salmonella, Yersinia, Treponema, Mycobacterium, Clostridium, Listeria, Porphyromonas and Haemophilus; Candida, Aspergillus, Pneumocystis, Cryptococcus and Coccidioides; Acanthamoeba, Trypanosoma and Trichomonas; retrovirus and papilloma virus.

  9. In Vitro Expression of the Extracellular Matrix Components Aggrecan, Collagen Types I and II by Articular Cartilage-Derived Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Schneevoigt, J; Fabian, C; Leovsky, C; Seeger, J; Bahramsoltani, M

    2017-02-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of hyaline cartilage is perfectly suited to transmit articular pressure load to the subchondral bone. Pressure is transferred by a high amount of aggrecan-based proteoglycans and collagen type II fibres in particular. After any injury, the hyaline cartilage is replaced by fibrocartilage, which is low in proteoglycans and contains collagen type I predominantly. Until now, long-term results of therapeutic procedures including cell-based therapies like autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) lead to a replacement tissue meeting the composition of fibrocartilage. Therefore, it is of particular interest to discover how and to what extent isolation and in vitro cultivation of chondrocytes affect the cells and their expression of ECM components. Hyaline cartilage-derived chondrocytes were cultivated in vitro and observed microscopically over a time period of 35 days. The expression of collagen type I, collagen type II and aggrecan was analysed using RT-qPCR and Western blot at several days of cultivation. Chondrocytes presented a longitudinal shape for the entire cultivation period. While expression of collagen type I prevailed within the first days, only prolonged cultivation led to an increase in collagen type II and aggrecan expression. The results indicate that chondrocyte isolation and in vitro cultivation lead to a dedifferentiation at least to the stage of chondroprogenitor cells.

  10. Mechanical, Electromagnetic, and X-ray Shielding Characterization of a 3D Printable Tungsten-Polycarbonate Polymer Matrix Composite for Space-Based Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemelya, Corey M.; Rivera, Armando; Perez, Angel Torrado; Rocha, Carmen; Liang, Min; Yu, Xiaoju; Kief, Craig; Alexander, David; Stegeman, James; Xin, Hao; Wicker, Ryan B.; MacDonald, Eric; Roberson, David A.

    2015-08-01

    Material-extrusion three-dimensional (3D) printing has recently attracted much interest because of its process flexibility, rapid response to design alterations, and ability to create structures "on-the-go". For this reason, 3D printing has possible applications in rapid creation of space-based devices, for example cube satellites (CubeSat). This work focused on fabrication and characterization of tungsten-doped polycarbonate polymer matrix composites specifically designed for x-ray radiation-shielding applications. The polycarbonate-tungsten polymer composite obtained intentionally utilizes low loading levels to provide x-ray shielding while limiting effects on other properties of the material, for example weight, electromagnetic functionality, and mechanical strength. The fabrication process, from tungsten functionalization to filament extrusion and material characterization, is described, including printability, determination of x-ray attenuation, tensile strength, impact resistance, and gigahertz permittivity, and failure analysis. The proposed materials are uniquely advantageous when implemented in 3D printed structures, because even a small volume fraction of tungsten has been shown to substantially alter the properties of the resulting composite.

  11. The Role of Collagen Charge Clusters in the Modulation of Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Lauer, Janelle L.; Bhowmick, Manishabrata; Tokmina-Roszyk, Dorota; Lin, Yan; Van Doren, Steven R.; Fields, Gregg B.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family selectively cleave collagens in vivo. Several substrate structural features that direct MMP collagenolysis have been identified. The present study evaluated the role of charged residue clusters in the regulation of MMP collagenolysis. A series of 10 triple-helical peptide (THP) substrates were constructed in which either Lys-Gly-Asp or Gly-Asp-Lys motifs replaced Gly-Pro-Hyp (where Hyp is 4-hydroxy-l-proline) repeats. The stabilities of THPs containing the two different motifs were analyzed, and kinetic parameters for substrate hydrolysis by six MMPs were determined. A general trend for virtually all enzymes was that, as Gly-Asp-Lys motifs were moved from the extreme N and C termini to the interior next to the cleavage site sequence, kcat/Km values increased. Additionally, all Gly-Asp-Lys THPs were as good or better substrates than the parent THP in which Gly-Asp-Lys was not present. In turn, the Lys-Gly-Asp THPs were also always better substrates than the parent THP, but the magnitude of the difference was considerably less compared with the Gly-Asp-Lys series. Of the MMPs tested, MMP-2 and MMP-9 most greatly favored the presence of charged residues with preference for the Gly-Asp-Lys series. Lys-Gly-(Asp/Glu) motifs are more commonly found near potential MMP cleavage sites than Gly-(Asp/Glu)-Lys motifs. As Lys-Gly-Asp is not as favored by MMPs as Gly-Asp-Lys, the Lys-Gly-Asp motif appears advantageous over the Gly-Asp-Lys motif by preventing unwanted MMP hydrolysis. More specifically, the lack of Gly-Asp-Lys clusters may diminish potential MMP-2 and MMP-9 collagenolytic activity. The present study indicates that MMPs have interactions spanning the P23–P23′ subsites of collagenous substrates. PMID:24297171

  12. The role of collagen charge clusters in the modulation of matrix metalloproteinase activity.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Janelle L; Bhowmick, Manishabrata; Tokmina-Roszyk, Dorota; Lin, Yan; Van Doren, Steven R; Fields, Gregg B

    2014-01-24

    Members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family selectively cleave collagens in vivo. Several substrate structural features that direct MMP collagenolysis have been identified. The present study evaluated the role of charged residue clusters in the regulation of MMP collagenolysis. A series of 10 triple-helical peptide (THP) substrates were constructed in which either Lys-Gly-Asp or Gly-Asp-Lys motifs replaced Gly-Pro-Hyp (where Hyp is 4-hydroxy-L-proline) repeats. The stabilities of THPs containing the two different motifs were analyzed, and kinetic parameters for substrate hydrolysis by six MMPs were determined. A general trend for virtually all enzymes was that, as Gly-Asp-Lys motifs were moved from the extreme N and C termini to the interior next to the cleavage site sequence, kcat/Km values increased. Additionally, all Gly-Asp-Lys THPs were as good or better substrates than the parent THP in which Gly-Asp-Lys was not present. In turn, the Lys-Gly-Asp THPs were also always better substrates than the parent THP, but the magnitude of the difference was considerably less compared with the Gly-Asp-Lys series. Of the MMPs tested, MMP-2 and MMP-9 most greatly favored the presence of charged residues with preference for the Gly-Asp-Lys series. Lys-Gly-(Asp/Glu) motifs are more commonly found near potential MMP cleavage sites than Gly-(Asp/Glu)-Lys motifs. As Lys-Gly-Asp is not as favored by MMPs as Gly-Asp-Lys, the Lys-Gly-Asp motif appears advantageous over the Gly-Asp-Lys motif by preventing unwanted MMP hydrolysis. More specifically, the lack of Gly-Asp-Lys clusters may diminish potential MMP-2 and MMP-9 collagenolytic activity. The present study indicates that MMPs have interactions spanning the P23-P23' subsites of collagenous substrates.

  13. Effect of Ultraviolet A-induced Crosslinking on Dentin Collagen Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Seseogullari-Dirihan, Roda; Tjäderhane, Leo; Pashley, David H; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of using UVA-induced crosslinking with or without riboflavin as photosensitizers on degradation of dentin matrix by dentin proteases. Methods Demineralized dentin specimens (0.4×3×6mm, n=10/group) were subjected to: (RP1), 0.1% riboflavin-5 phosphate/UVA for 1 min; (RP5), 0.1% riboflavin-5 phosphate/UVA for 5 min; (R1), 0.1% riboflavin/UVA for 1 min; (R5), 0.1% riboflavin-UVA for 5 min; (UV1), UVA for 1 min; (UV5), UVA for 5 min. Specimens were incubated in 1 mL zinc and calcium containing media for 1 day and 1 week. An untreated group served as control (CM). After incubation, the loss of dry mass of samples was measured and aliquots of media were analyzed for the release of C-terminal fragment telopeptide (ICTP vs CTX) of collagen to evaluate for cathepsin K (CA-K) and total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-mediated degradation. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA at α=0.05. Results Although UVA radiation alone reduced dentin degradation, UVA-activated riboflavin or riboflavin-5 phosphate inhibited MMP and CA-K activities more than UVA alone. The effects of crosslinking were more pronounced in 7-day samples; only with CA-K were the effects of crosslinking with or without photosensitizer significantly different from controls in 1-day samples. Significance The use of bioactive forms (RP) or longer treatment time did not result with better effect. The use of UVA crosslinking reduces dentin matrix degradation, especially with photosensitizers. PMID:26314255

  14. Granule Size–Dependent Bone Regenerative Capacity of Octacalcium Phosphate in Collagen Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Tanuma, Yuji; Anada, Takahisa; Honda, Yoshitomo; Kawai, Tadashi; Kamakura, Shinji; Echigo, Seishi

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine whether the osteoconductivity of octacalcium phosphate–collagen (OCP/Col) composite can be improved by controlling the granule size of OCP. The granules of synthetic OCP, with diameters in the range of 53 to 300, 300 to 500, and 500 to 1000 μm, were used as an inorganic source of composite materials mixed with atelo-Col. After vacuum dehydrothemal treatment, OCP/Col disks were implanted into critical-sized calvaria defects in Wistar rats for 4, 8, and 12 weeks and examined radiographically, histologically, histomorphometrically, and histochemically. The materials were characterized according to mercury intrusion porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction was performed before and after implantation. The dissolution of OCP crystals in a Col matrix was determined by immersing OCP/Col disks in a culture medium. OCP/Col had a constant pore size (∼30 μm) regardless of OCP granule size. OCP in the Col matrix tended to convert to hydroxyapatite (HA) during the implantation. OCP/Col with the smallest granules of OCP enhances both bone regeneration and biodegradation the most through tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclastic cellular resorption of OCP granules. The smallest OCP granules in the Col matrix showed the highest dissolution and had the greatest potential to form HA. The results indicated that the size of the included OCP granules can controll the osteoconductivity of OCP/Col. The overall results suggest that the physicochemical property of OCP crystals is a factor that determines the bone regenerative capacity of OCP/Col in critical-sized calvaria large bone defects in rats. PMID:21942921

  15. An {alpha}1(II) Gly{sup 913} to cys substitution prevents the matrix incorporation of type II collagen which is replaced with type I and III collagens in cartilage from a patient with hypochondrogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mundlos, S.; Chan, D.; Bateman, J.F.; McGill, J.

    1996-05-03

    A heterozygous mutation in the COL2A1 gene was identified in a patient with hypochondrogenesis. The mutation was a single nucleotide transition of G3285T that resulted in an amino acid substitution of Cys for Gly{sup 913} in the {alpha}1(II) chain of type II collagen. This amino acid change disrupted the obligatory Gly-X-Y triplet motif required for the normal formation of a stable collagen triple helix and prevented the deposition of type II collagen into the proposita`s cartilage, which contained predominantly type I and III collagens and minor amounts of type XI collagen. Biosynthetic analysis of collagens produced and secreted by the patient`s chondrocytes cultured in alginate beads was consistent with the in vivo matrix composition, demonstrating that the main products were type I and III collagens, along with type XI collagen. The synthesis of the cartilage-specific type XI collagen at similar levels to controls indicated that the isolated cartilage cells had re-differentiated to the chondrocyte phenotype. The chondrocytes also produced small amounts of type II collagen, but this was post-translationally overmodified and not secreted. These data further delineate the biochemical and phenotypic consequences of mutations in the COL2A1 gene and suggest that cartilage formation and bone development can take place in the absence of type II collagen. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  16. A Novel Matrix Protein Hic31 from the Prismatic Layer of Hyriopsis Cumingii Displays a Collagen-Like Structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojun; Zeng, Shimei; Dong, Shaojian; Jin, Can; Li, Jiale

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we clone and characterize a novel matrix protein, hic31, from the mantle of Hyriopsis cumingii. The amino acid composition of hic31 consists of a high proportion of Glycine residues (26.67%). Tissue expression detection by RT-PCR indicates that hic31 is expressed specifically at the mantle edge. In situ hybridization results reveals strong signals from the dorsal epithelial cells of the outer fold at the mantle edge, and weak signals from inner epithelial cells of the same fold, indicating that hic31 is a prismatic-layer matrix protein. Although BLASTP results identify no shared homology with other shell-matrix proteins or any other known proteins, the hic31 tertiary structure is similar to that of collagen I, alpha 1 and alpha 2. It has been well proved that collagen forms the basic organic frameworks in way of collagen fibrils and minerals present within or outside of these fibrils. Therefore, hic31 might be a framework-matrix protein involved in the prismatic-layer biomineralization. Besides, the gene expression of hic31 increase in the early stages of pearl sac development, indicating that hic31 may play important roles in biomineralization of the pearl prismatic layer.

  17. A Novel Matrix Protein Hic31 from the Prismatic Layer of Hyriopsis Cumingii Displays a Collagen-Like Structure

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shaojian; Jin, Can; Li, Jiale

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we clone and characterize a novel matrix protein, hic31, from the mantle of Hyriopsis cumingii. The amino acid composition of hic31 consists of a high proportion of Glycine residues (26.67%). Tissue expression detection by RT-PCR indicates that hic31 is expressed specifically at the mantle edge. In situ hybridization results reveals strong signals from the dorsal epithelial cells of the outer fold at the mantle edge, and weak signals from inner epithelial cells of the same fold, indicating that hic31 is a prismatic-layer matrix protein. Although BLASTP results identify no shared homology with other shell-matrix proteins or any other known proteins, the hic31 tertiary structure is similar to that of collagen I, alpha 1 and alpha 2. It has been well proved that collagen forms the basic organic frameworks in way of collagen fibrils and minerals present within or outside of these fibrils. Therefore, hic31 might be a framework-matrix protein involved in the prismatic-layer biomineralization. Besides, the gene expression of hic31 increase in the early stages of pearl sac development, indicating that hic31 may play important roles in biomineralization of the pearl prismatic layer. PMID:26262686

  18. Studies of collagen in bone and dentin matrix of a Columbian mammoth (late Pleistocene) of central Utah.

    PubMed

    Schaedler, J M; Krook, L; Wootton, J A; Hover, B; Brodsky, B; Naresh, M D; Gillette, D D; Madsen, D B; Horne, R H; Minor, R R

    1992-08-01

    A Columbian mammoth, Mammuthus columbi, was excavated at an elevation of 9000 feet in Huntington Canyon, Emery County, Utah. Radiocarbon dates on the skeleton indicated death approximately 11,200 years ago. The skeleton was removed from postglacial, Late Quaternary, lake sediments deposited as glacial runoff approximately 9500 years ago. The bones and teeth were especially well preserved in a saturated lake bed. After excavation the bones and teeth were preserved by controlled desiccation, without hardeners, over a period of 9 months. Microradiography, light and electron microscopy, medium and high angle X-ray diffraction, amino acid analysis and cyanogen bromide peptide mapping were undertaken to evaluate the packing, organization, and preservation of collagen in bone and dentin of this mammoth. Microradiography and light microscopy showed that the bone consisted of especially well preserved compact and trabecular bone, and electron microscopy of demineralized bone and tusk showed that the matrix consisted of lamellae of densely packed cylindrical collagen fibrils. Cell remnants with intact nuclei, with or without a nucleolus, as well as variable lengths of plasma membrane were occasionally present on the surface of bony trabecula. Remnants of odontoblast processes were present in some dentin tubules. High and low angle X-ray diffraction demonstrated that the demineralized matrix contained native collagen molecules and amino acid analysis showed that the composition was comparable to that of type I collagen. Cyanogen bromide peptide mapping indicated that the major peptides of type I collagen were present and had the same electrophoretic mobility as that of type I collagen of demineralized Asian elephant bone and rat tail tendon.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Tunability of collagen matrix mechanical properties via multiple modes of mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lester J.; Deymier, Alix C.; Boyle, John J.; Li, Zhen; Linderman, Stephen W.; Pasteris, Jill D.; Xia, Younan; Genin, Guy M.; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2016-01-01

    Functionally graded, mineralized collagen tissues exist at soft-to-hard material attachments throughout the body. However, the details of how collagen and hydroxyapatite mineral (HA) interact are not fully understood, hampering efforts to develop tissue-engineered constructs that can assist with repair of injuries at the attachments of soft tissues to bone. In this study, spatial control of mineralization was achieved in collagen matrices using simulated body fluids (SBFs). Based upon previous observations of poor bonding between reconstituted collagen and HA deposited using SBF, we hypothesized that mineralizing collagen in the presence of fetuin (which inhibits surface mineralization) would lead to more mineral deposition within the scaffold and therefore a greater increase in stiffness and toughness compared with collagen mineralized without fetuin. We tested this hypothesis through integrated synthesis, mechanical testing and modelling of graded, mineralized reconstituted collagen constructs. Results supported the hypothesis, and further suggested that mineralization on the interior of reconstituted collagen constructs, as promoted by fetuin, led to superior bonding between HA and collagen. The results provide us guidance for the development of mineralized collagen scaffolds, with implications for bone and tendon-to-bone tissue engineering. PMID:26855755

  20. A Comparative Study of Collagen Matrix Density Effect on Endothelial Sprout Formation Using Experimental and Computational Approaches.

    PubMed

    Shamloo, Amir; Mohammadaliha, Negar; Heilshorn, Sarah C; Bauer, Amy L

    2016-04-01

    A thorough understanding of determining factors in angiogenesis is a necessary step to control the development of new blood vessels. Extracellular matrix density is known to have a significant influence on cellular behaviors and consequently can regulate vessel formation. The utilization of experimental platforms in combination with numerical models can be a powerful method to explore the mechanisms of new capillary sprout formation. In this study, using an integrative method, the interplay between the matrix density and angiogenesis was investigated. Owing the fact that the extracellular matrix density is a global parameter that can affect other parameters such as pore size, stiffness, cell-matrix adhesion and cross-linking, deeper understanding of the most important biomechanical or biochemical properties of the ECM causing changes in sprout morphogenesis is crucial. Here, we implemented both computational and experimental methods to analyze the mechanisms responsible for the influence of ECM density on the sprout formation that is difficult to be investigated comprehensively using each of these single methods. For this purpose, we first utilized an innovative approach to quantify the correspondence of the simulated collagen fibril density to the collagen density in the experimental part. Comparing the results of the experimental study and computational model led to some considerable achievements. First, we verified the results of the computational model using the experimental results. Then, we reported parameters such as the ratio of proliferating cells to migrating cells that was difficult to obtain from experimental study. Finally, this integrative system led to gain an understanding of the possible mechanisms responsible for the effect of ECM density on angiogenesis. The results showed that stable and long sprouts were observed at an intermediate collagen matrix density of 1.2 and 1.9 mg/ml due to a balance between the number of migrating and proliferating

  1. Changes of the peri-implant soft tissue thickness after grafting with a collagen matrix

    PubMed Central

    Zafiropoulos, Gregory-George; Deli, Giorgio; Hoffmann, Oliver; John, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the treatment outcome of the use of a porcine monolayer collagen matrix (mCM) to increase soft-tissue volume as a part of implant site development. Materials and Methods: Implants were placed in single sites in 27 patients. In the test group, mCM was used for soft-tissue augmentation. No graft was placed in the control group. Soft-tissue thickness (STTh) was measured at the time of surgery (T0) and 6 months postoperatively (T1) at two sites (STTh 1, 1 mm below the gingival margin; STTh 2, 3 mm below the mucogingival margin). Results: Significant increases (P < 0.001) in STTh (STTh 1 = 1.06 mm, 117%; STTh 2 = 0.89 mm, 81%) were observed in the test group. Biopsy results showed angiogenesis and mature connective tissue covered by keratinized epithelium. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it could be concluded that mCM leads to a significant increase of peri-implant soft-tissue thickness, with good histological integration and replacement by soft tissue and may serve as an alternative to connective tissue grafting. PMID:28298828

  2. Keratocytes are induced to produce collagen type II: A new strategy for in vivo corneal matrix regeneration.

    PubMed

    Greene, Carol Ann; Green, Colin R; Dickinson, Michelle E; Johnson, Virginia; Sherwin, Trevor

    2016-09-10

    The stroma, the middle layer of the cornea, is a connective tissue making up most of the corneal thickness. The stromal extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of highly organised lamellae which are made up of tightly packed fibrils primarily composed of collagens type I and V. This layer is interspersed with keratocytes, mesenchymal cells of neural crest origin. We have previously shown that adult corneal keratocytes exhibit phenotypic plasticity and can be induced into a neuronal phenotype. In the current study we evaluated the potential of keratocytes to produce collagen type II via phenotypic reprogramming with exogenous chondrogenic factors. The cornea presents a challenge to tissue engineers owing to its high level of organisation and the phenotypic instability of keratocytes. Traditional approaches based on a scar model do not support the engineering of functional stromal tissue. Type II collagen is not found in the adult cornea but is reported to be expressed during corneal development, raising the possibility of using such an approach to regenerate the corneal ECM. Keratocytes in culture and within intact normal and diseased tissue were induced to produce collagen type II upon treatment with transforming growth factor Beta3 (TGFβ3) and dexamethasone. In vivo treatment of rat corneas also resulted in collagen type II deposition and a threefold increase in corneal hardness and elasticity. Furthermore, the treatment of corneas and subsequent deposition of collagen type II did not cause opacity, fibrosis or scarring. The induction of keratocytes with specific exogenous factors and resulting deposition of type II collagen in the stroma can potentially be controlled by withdrawal of the factors. This might be a promising new approach for in vivo corneal regeneration strategies aimed at increasing corneal integrity in diseases associated with weakened ectatic corneal tissue such as keratoconus.

  3. Evolution of the vertebrate bone matrix: an expression analysis of the network forming collagen paralogues in amphibian osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Aldea, Daniel; Hanna, Patricia; Munoz, David; Espinoza, Javier; Torrejon, Marcela; Sachs, Laurent; Buisine, Nicolas; Oulion, Silvan; Escriva, Hector; Marcellini, Sylvain

    2013-09-01

    The emergence of vertebrates is closely associated to the evolution of mineralized bone tissue. However, the molecular basis underlying the origin and subsequent diversification of the skeletal mineralized matrix is still poorly understood. One efficient way to tackle this issue is to compare the expression, between vertebrate species, of osteoblastic genes coding for bone matrix proteins. In this work, we have focused on the evolution of the network forming collagen family which contains the Col8a1, Col8a2, and Col10a1 genes. Both phylogeny and synteny reveal that these three paralogues are vertebrate-specific and derive from two independent duplications in the vertebrate lineage. To shed light on the evolution of this family, we have analyzed the osteoblastic expression of the network forming collagens in endochondral and intramembraneous skeletal elements of the amphibian Xenopus tropicalis. Remarkably, we find that amphibian osteoblasts express Col10a1, a gene strongly expressed in osteoblasts in actinopterygians but not in amniotes. In addition, while Col8a1 is known to be robustly expressed in mammalian osteoblasts, the expression levels of its amphibian orthologue are dramatically reduced. Our work reveals that while a skeletal expression of network forming collagen members is widespread throughout vertebrates, osteoblasts from divergent vertebrate lineages express different combinations of network forming collagen paralogues.

  4. Path to Collagenolysis: COLLAGEN V TRIPLE-HELIX MODEL BOUND PRODUCTIVELY AND IN ENCOUNTERS BY MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE-12.

    PubMed

    Prior, Stephen H; Byrne, Todd S; Tokmina-Roszyk, Dorota; Fields, Gregg B; Van Doren, Steven R

    2016-04-08

    Collagenolysis is essential in extracellular matrix homeostasis, but its structural basis has long been shrouded in mystery. We have developed a novel docking strategy guided by paramagnetic NMR that positions a triple-helical collagen V mimic (synthesized with nitroxide spin labels) in the active site of the catalytic domain of matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12 or macrophage metalloelastase) primed for catalysis. The collagenolytically productive complex forms by utilizing seven distinct subsites that traverse the entire length of the active site. These subsites bury ∼1,080 Å(2)of surface area, over half of which is contributed by the trailing strand of the synthetic collagen V mimic, which also appears to ligate the catalytic zinc through the glycine carbonyl oxygen of its scissile G∼VV triplet. Notably, the middle strand also occupies the full length of the active site where it contributes extensive interfacial contacts with five subsites. This work identifies, for the first time, the productive and specific interactions of a collagen triple helix with an MMP catalytic site. The results uniquely demonstrate that the active site of the MMPs is wide enough to accommodate two strands from collagen triple helices. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancements also reveal an extensive array of encounter complexes that form over a large part of the catalytic domain. These transient complexes could possibly facilitate the formation of collagenolytically active complexes via directional Brownian tumbling.

  5. New collagen matrix to avoid the reduction of keratinized tissue during guided bone regeneration in postextraction sites.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Daniele; Cucchi, Alessandro; de Gemmis, Antonio; Nocini Pier, Francesco

    2012-05-01

    For decades, there has been an ongoing controversy regarding the need for an "adequate" width of keratinized gingiva/mucosa to preserve periodontal and implant health. Today, the presence of a certain width of keratinized tissue is recommended for achieving long-term periodontal and implant success, and therefore, a new collagen matrix has been developed to enhance the width of keratinized gingiva/mucosa. During postextraction socket preservation, guided bone regeneration techniques require complete coverage of the barrier membrane to reduce the risk of infection, occasionally causing a reduction of the width of keratinized tissue. Using the new collagen matrix, it is possible to leave the membrane intentionally uncovered, without suturing the surgical flap above it, to avoid the reduction of such tissue.

  6. Lagrangian advection scheme with shape matrix (LASM) v0.2: interparcel mixing, physics-dynamics coupling and 3-D extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, L.; Wang, B.; Liu, L.; Huang, Y.

    2015-08-01

    The interparcel mixing algorithm in the Lagrangian advection scheme with shape matrix (LASM) is updated to make the scheme more robust. The linear degeneration criterion is replaced by the maximum deviation of the skeleton points so that the new algorithm is more effective in controlling the shape of parcels, which is vital for long time simulation. LASM is inherently shape-preserving without any complicated filter or limiter, and it is linear. This fact contributes to the ability to preserve the sum of multiple tracers exactly on the parcels in LASM. A newly proposed terminator "toy"-chemistry test is used to test LASM, which shows that LASM can preserve the weighted sum of two reactive species precisely. The physics-dynamics coupling (i.e., tendency evaluation type) is also discussed. A flow generated by a WRF large-eddy simulation is also used to test the 3-D extension of LASM.

  7. Fabrication of 3D lawn-shaped N-doped porous carbon matrix/polyaniline nanocomposite as the electrode material for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiuling; Ma, Li; Gan, Mengyu; Fu, Gang; Jin, Meng; Lei, Yao; Yang, Peishu; Yan, Maofa

    2017-02-01

    A facile approach to acquire electrode materials with prominent electrochemical property is pivotal to the progress of supercapacitors. 3D nitrogen-doped porous carbon matrix (PCM), with high specific surface area (SSA) up to 2720 m2 g-1, was obtained from the carbonization and activation of the nitrogen-enriched composite precursor (graphene/polyaniline). Then 3D lawn-shaped PCM/PANI composite was obtained by the simple in-situ polymerization. The morphology and structure of these resulting composites were characterized by combining SEM and TEM measurements, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy analyses and Raman spectroscope. The element content of all samples was evaluated using CHN analysis. The results of electrochemical testing indicated that the PCM/PANI composite displays a higher capacitance value of 527 F g-1 at 1 A g-1 compared to 338 F g-1 for pure PANI, and exhibits appreciable rate capability with a retention of 76% at 20 A g-1 as well as fine long-term cycling performance (with 88% retention of specific capacitance after 1000 cycles at 10 A g-1). Simultaneously, the excellent capacitance performance coupled with the facile synthesis of PCM/PANI indicates it is a promising electrode material for supercapacitors.

  8. Inhibitory effect of quercetin on epithelial to mesenchymal transition in SK-MEL-28 human melanoma cells defined by in vitro analysis on 3D collagen gels

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dhairya H; Sharma, Neeti

    2016-01-01

    Considering the emerging concept of complementary and alternative medicine under the paucity of effective treatment for melanoma, we aimed to understand the effect of quercetin (Qu) on collagen I-induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) in melanoma cells. To investigate the effect of Qu in melanoma cells, we used multiple methods, including real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, migration assay, and wound healing assay. We found that EMT was altered by Qu in melanoma cells. Qu-treated cells exhibited decreased migration and invasion activities. Mechanistically, a high expression of epithelial markers and a decrease in the expression of mesenchymal markers were found to be associated with reversal of EMT in melanoma cells. Time-dependent apoptosis was observed in Qu-treated melanoma cells, which was further confirmed by the upregulation in the protein levels of Caspase 3, a proapoptotic marker. Thus, our findings suggest Qu as a promising dietary compound under the new complementary and alternative medicine category of therapeutic drugs in the chemoprevention of melanoma. PMID:27799792

  9. Mineralisation of reconstituted collagen using polyvinylphosphonic acid/polyacrylic acid templating matrix protein analogues in the presence of calcium, phosphate and hydroxyl ions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Kyung; Gu, Li-sha; Bryan, Thomas E.; Kim, Jong Ryul; Chen, Liang; Liu, Yan; Yoon, James C.; Breschi, Lorenzo; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2010-01-01

    The complex morphologies of mineralised collagen fibrils are regulated through interactions between the collagen matrix and non-collagenous extracellular proteins. In the present study, polyvinylphosphonic acid, a biomimetic analogue of matrix phosphoproteins, was synthesised and confirmed with FTIR and NMR. Biomimetic mineralisation of reconstituted collagen fibrils devoid of natural non-collagenous proteins was demonstrated with TEM using a Portland cement-containing resin composite and a phosphate-containing fluid in the presence of polyacrylic acid as sequestration, and polyvinylphosphonic acid as templating matrix protein analogues. In the presence of these dual biomimetic analogues in the mineralisation medium, intrafibrillar and extrafibrillar mineralisation via bottom-up nanoparticle assembly based on the nonclassical crystallisation pathway could be identified. Conversely, only large mineral spheres with no preferred association with collagen fibrils were observed in the absence of biomimetic analogues in the medium. Mineral phases were evident within the collagen fibrils as early as 4 hours after the initially-formed amorphous calcium phosphate nanoprecursors were transformed into apatite nanocrystals. Selected area electron diffraction patterns of highly mineralised collagen fibrils were nearly identical to those of natural bone, with apatite crystallites preferentially aligned along the collagen fibril axes. PMID:20621767

  10. D-Glucose as a modifying agent in gelatin/collagen matrix and reservoir nanoparticles for Calendula officinalis delivery.

    PubMed

    Lam, P-L; Kok, S H-L; Bian, Z-X; Lam, K-H; Tang, J C-O; Lee, K K-H; Gambari, R; Chui, C-H

    2014-05-01

    Gelatin/Collagen-based matrix and reservoir nanoparticles require crosslinkers to stabilize the formed nanosuspensions, considering that physical instability is the main challenge of nanoparticulate systems. The use of crosslinkers improves the physical integrity of nanoformulations under the-host environment. Aldehyde-based fixatives, such as formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde, have been widely applied to the crosslinking process of polymeric nanoparticles. However, their potential toxicity towards human beings has been demonstrated in many previous studies. In order to tackle this problem, D-glucose was used during nanoparticle formation to stabilize the gelatin/collagen-based matrix wall and reservoir wall for the deliveries of Calendula officinalis powder and oil, respectively. In addition, therapeutic selectivity between malignant and normal cells could be observed. The C. officinalis powder loaded nanoparticles significantly strengthened the anti-cancer effect towards human breast adenocarcinoma MCF7 cells and human hepatoma SKHep1 cells when compared with the free powder. On the contrary, the nanoparticles did not show significant cytotoxicity towards normal esophageal epithelial NE3 cells and human skin keratinocyte HaCaT cells. On the basis of these evidences, D-glucose modified gelatin/collagen matrix nanoparticles containing C. officinalis powder might be proposed as a safer alternative vehicle for anti-cancer treatments.

  11. Functional Hierarchy of Simultaneously Expressed Adhesion Receptors: Integrin α2β1 but Not CD44 Mediates MV3 Melanoma Cell Migration and Matrix Reorganization within Three-dimensional Hyaluronan-containing Collagen MatricesV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Maaser, Kerstin; Wolf, Katarina; Klein, C. Eberhard; Niggemann, Bernd; Zänker, Kurt S.; Bröcker, Eva-B.; Friedl, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Haptokinetic cell migration across surfaces is mediated by adhesion receptors including β1 integrins and CD44 providing adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) ligands such as collagen and hyaluronan (HA), respectively. Little is known, however, about how such different receptor systems synergize for cell migration through three-dimensionally (3-D) interconnected ECM ligands. In highly motile human MV3 melanoma cells, both β1 integrins and CD44 are abundantly expressed, support migration across collagen and HA, respectively, and are deposited upon migration, whereas only β1 integrins but not CD44 redistribute to focal adhesions. In 3-D collagen lattices in the presence or absence of HA and cross-linking chondroitin sulfate, MV3 cell migration and associated functions such as polarization and matrix reorganization were blocked by anti-β1 and anti-α2 integrin mAbs, whereas mAbs blocking CD44, α3, α5, α6, or αv integrins showed no effect. With use of highly sensitive time-lapse videomicroscopy and computer-assisted cell tracking techniques, promigratory functions of CD44 were excluded. 1) Addition of HA did not increase the migratory cell population or its migration velocity, 2) blocking of the HA-binding Hermes-1 epitope did not affect migration, and 3) impaired migration after blocking or activation of β1 integrins was not restored via CD44. Because α2β1-mediated migration was neither synergized nor replaced by CD44–HA interactions, we conclude that the biophysical properties of 3-D multicomponent ECM impose more restricted molecular functions of adhesion receptors, thereby differing from haptokinetic migration across surfaces. PMID:10512851

  12. A composite SWNT-collagen matrix: characterization and preliminary assessment as a conductive peripheral nerve regeneration matrix.

    PubMed

    Tosun, Z; McFetridge, P S

    2010-12-01

    Unique in their structure and function, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have received significant attention due to their potential to create unique conductive materials. For neural applications, these conductive materials hold promise as they may enhance regenerative processes. However, like other nano-scaled biomaterials it is important to have a comprehensive understanding how these materials interact with cell systems and how the biological system responds to their presence. These investigations aim to further our understanding of SWNT-cell interactions by assessing the effect SWNT/collagen hydrogels have on PC12 neuronal-like cells seeded within and (independently) on top of the composite material. Two types of collagen hydrogels were prepared: (1) SWNTs dispersed directly within the collagen (SWNT/COL) and (2) albumin-coated SWNTs prepared using the surfactant 'sodium cholate' to improve dispersion (AL-SWNT/COL) and collagen alone serving as a control (COL). SWNT dispersion was significantly improved when using surfactant-assisted dispersion. The enhanced dispersion resulted in a stiffer, more conductive material with an increased collagen fiber diameter. Short-term cell interactions with PC12 cells and SWNT composites have shown a stimulatory effect on cell proliferation relative to plain collagen controls. In parallel to these results, p53 gene displayed normal expression levels, which indicates the absence of nanoparticle-induced DNA damage. In summary, these mechanically tunable SWNT-collagen scaffolds show the potential for enhanced electrical activity and have shown positive in vitro biocompatibility results offering further evidence that SWNT-based materials have an important role in promoting neuronal regeneration.

  13. Mussel adhesive protein provides cohesive matrix for collagen type-1α.

    PubMed

    Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Wei, Wei; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the interactions between collagen and adhesive mussel foot proteins (mfps) can lead to improved medical and dental adhesives, particularly for collagen-rich tissues. Here we investigated interactions between collagen type-1, the most abundant load-bearing animal protein, and mussel foot protein-3 (mfp-3) using a quartz crystal microbalance and surface forces apparatus (SFA). Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic variants of mfp-3 were exploited to probe the nature of the interaction between the protein and collagen. Our chief findings are: 1) mfp-3 is an effective chaperone for tropocollagen adsorption to TiO2 and mica surfaces; 2) at pH 3, collagen addition between two mfp-3 films (Wc = 5.4 ± 0.2 mJ/m(2)) increased their cohesion by nearly 35%; 3) oxidation of Dopa in mfp-3 by periodate did not abolish the adhesion between collagen and mfp-3 films, and 4) collagen bridging between both hydrophilic and hydrophobic mfp-3 variant films is equally robust, suggesting that hydrophobic interactions play a minor role. Extensive H-bonding, π-cation and electrostatic interactions are more plausible to explain the reversible bridging of mfp-3 films by collagen.

  14. Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells Are Dependent on Self-collagen, Cleaved by Membrane Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase for Their Growth

    PubMed Central

    Birukawa, Naoko Kubo; Murase, Kazuyuki; Sato, Yasushi; Kosaka, Akemi; Yoneda, Akihiro; Nishita, Hiroki; Fujita, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Miyuki; Ninomiya, Takafumi; Kajiwara, Keiko; Miyazaki, Miyono; Nakashima, Yusuke; Ota, Sigenori; Murakami, Yuya; Tanaka, Yasunobu; Minomi, Kenjiro; Tamura, Yasuaki; Niitsu, Yoshiro

    2014-01-01

    Stellate cells are distributed throughout organs, where, upon chronic damage, they become activated and proliferate to secrete collagen, which results in organ fibrosis. An intriguing property of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is that they undergo apoptosis when collagen is resolved by stopping tissue damage or by treatment, even though the mechanisms are unknown. Here we disclose the fact that HSCs, normal diploid cells, acquired dependence on collagen for their growth during the transition from quiescent to active states. The intramolecular RGD motifs of collagen were exposed by cleavage with their own membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP). The following evidence supports this conclusion. When rat activated HSCs (aHSCs) were transduced with siRNA against the collagen-specific chaperone gp46 to inhibit collagen secretion, the cells underwent autophagy followed by apoptosis. Concomitantly, the growth of aHSCs was suppressed, whereas that of quiescent HSCs was not. These in vitro results are compatible with the in vivo observation that apoptosis of aHSCs was induced in cirrhotic livers of rats treated with siRNAgp46. siRNA against MT1-MMP and addition of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2), which mainly inhibits MT1-MMP, also significantly suppressed the growth of aHSCs in vitro. The RGD inhibitors echistatin and GRGDS peptide and siRNA against the RGD receptor αVβ1 resulted in the inhibition of aHSCs growth. Transduction of siRNAs against gp46, αVβ1, and MT1-MMP to aHSCs inhibited the survival signal of PI3K/AKT/IκB. These results could provide novel antifibrosis strategies. PMID:24867951

  15. Activated hepatic stellate cells are dependent on self-collagen, cleaved by membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase for their growth.

    PubMed

    Birukawa, Naoko Kubo; Murase, Kazuyuki; Sato, Yasushi; Kosaka, Akemi; Yoneda, Akihiro; Nishita, Hiroki; Fujita, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Miyuki; Ninomiya, Takafumi; Kajiwara, Keiko; Miyazaki, Miyono; Nakashima, Yusuke; Ota, Sigenori; Murakami, Yuya; Tanaka, Yasunobu; Minomi, Kenjiro; Tamura, Yasuaki; Niitsu, Yoshiro

    2014-07-18

    Stellate cells are distributed throughout organs, where, upon chronic damage, they become activated and proliferate to secrete collagen, which results in organ fibrosis. An intriguing property of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is that they undergo apoptosis when collagen is resolved by stopping tissue damage or by treatment, even though the mechanisms are unknown. Here we disclose the fact that HSCs, normal diploid cells, acquired dependence on collagen for their growth during the transition from quiescent to active states. The intramolecular RGD motifs of collagen were exposed by cleavage with their own membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP). The following evidence supports this conclusion. When rat activated HSCs (aHSCs) were transduced with siRNA against the collagen-specific chaperone gp46 to inhibit collagen secretion, the cells underwent autophagy followed by apoptosis. Concomitantly, the growth of aHSCs was suppressed, whereas that of quiescent HSCs was not. These in vitro results are compatible with the in vivo observation that apoptosis of aHSCs was induced in cirrhotic livers of rats treated with siRNAgp46. siRNA against MT1-MMP and addition of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2), which mainly inhibits MT1-MMP, also significantly suppressed the growth of aHSCs in vitro. The RGD inhibitors echistatin and GRGDS peptide and siRNA against the RGD receptor αVβ1 resulted in the inhibition of aHSCs growth. Transduction of siRNAs against gp46, αVβ1, and MT1-MMP to aHSCs inhibited the survival signal of PI3K/AKT/IκB. These results could provide novel antifibrosis strategies.

  16. Measurement of spatiotemporal intracellular deformation of cells adhered to collagen matrix during freezing of biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soham; Craig Dutton, J; Han, Bumsoo

    2014-02-01

    Preservation of structural integrity inside cells and at cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interfaces is a key challenge during freezing of biomaterials. Since the post-thaw functionality of cells depends on the extent of change in the cytoskeletal structure caused by complex cell-ECM adhesion, spatiotemporal deformation inside the cell was measured using a newly developed microbead-mediated particle tracking deformetry (PTD) technique using fibroblast-seeded dermal equivalents as a model tissue. Fibronectin-coated 500 nm diameter microbeads were internalized in cells, and the microbead-labeled cells were used to prepare engineered tissue with type I collagen matrices. After a 24 h incubation the engineered tissues were directionally frozen, and the cells were imaged during the process. The microbeads were tracked, and spatiotemporal deformation inside the cells was computed from the tracking data using the PTD method. Effects of particle size on the deformation measurement method were tested, and it was found that microbeads represent cell deformation to acceptable accuracy. The results showed complex spatiotemporal deformation patterns in the cells. Large deformation in the cells and detachments of cells from the ECM were observed. At the cellular scale, variable directionality of the deformation was found in contrast to the one-dimensional deformation pattern observed at the tissue scale, as found from earlier studies. In summary, this method can quantify the spatiotemporal deformation in cells and can be correlated to the freezing-induced change in the structure of cytosplasm and of the cell-ECM interface. As a broader application, this method may be used to compute deformation of cells in the ECM environment for physiological processes, namely cell migration, stem cell differentiation, vasculogenesis, and cancer metastasis, which have relevance to quantify mechanotransduction.

  17. Proportion of collagen type II in the extracellular matrix promotes the differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells into nucleus pulposus cells.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yiqing; Zhou, Xiaopeng; Liu, Dongyu; Li, Hao; Liang, Chengzhen; Li, Fangcai; Chen, Qixin

    2016-01-01

    During degeneration process, the catabolism of collagen type II and anabolism of collagen type I in nucleus pulposus (NP) may influence the bioactivity of transplanted cells. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSCs) were cultured as a micromass or in a series of gradual proportion hydrogels of a mix of collagen types I and II. Cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were detected using CCK-8 and LDH assays respectively. The expression of differentiation-related genes and proteins, including SOX9, aggrecan, collagen type I, and collagen type II, was examined using RT-qPCR and Western blotting. Novel phenotypic genes were also detected by RT-qPCR and western blotting. Alcian blue and dimethylmethylene blue assays were used to investigate sulfate proteoglycan expression, and PI3K/AKT, MAPK/ERK, and Smad signaling pathways were examined by Western blotting. The results showed collagen hydrogels have good biocompatibility, and cell proliferation increased after collagen type II treatment. Expressions of SOX9, aggrecan, and collagen type II were increased in a collagen type II dependent manner. Sulfate proteoglycan synthesis increased in proportion to collagen type II concentration. Only hADMSCs highly expressed NP cell marker KRT19 in collagen type II culture. Additionally, phosphorylated Smad3, which is associated with phosphorylated ERK, was increased after collagen type II-stimulation. The concentration and type of collagen affect hADMSC differentiation into NP cells. Collagen type II significantly ameliorates hADMSC differentiation into NP cells and promotes extracellular matrix synthesis. Therefore, anabolism of collagen type I and catabolism of type II may attenuate the differentiation and biosynthesis of transplanted stem cells.

  18. Thermal Destabilization of Collagen Matrix Hierarchical Structure by Freeze/Thaw.

    PubMed

    Ozcelikkale, Altug; Han, Bumsoo

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to characterize and understand the effects of freezing on collagen structures and functionality. Specifically, thermodynamic destabilization of collagen at molecular- and fibril-levels by combination of low temperatures and freezing were experimentally characterized using modulated differential scanning calorimetry. In order to delineate the effects of sub-zero temperature and water-ice phase change, we hypothesized that the extent of destabilization can be determined based on post-thaw heat induced thermal denaturation of collagen. It is found that thermal denaturation temperature of collagen in hydrogel decreases by 1.4-1.6°C after freeze/thaw while no such decrease is observed in the case of molecular solution. The destabilization is predominantly due to ice formation. Exposure to low temperatures in the absence of ice has only minimal effect. Calorimetry measurements combined with morphological examination of collagen matrices by scanning electron microscopy suggest that freezing results in destabilization of collagen fibrils due to expansion of intrafibrillar space by ice formation. This fibril-level damage can be alleviated by use of cryoprotectant DMSO at concentrations as low as 0.5 M. A theoretical model explaining the change in collagen post-thaw thermal stability by freezing-induced fibril expansion is also proposed.

  19. High resolution three-dimensional reconstruction of the collagenous matrix of the human optic nerve head.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Moritz; Jester, Bryan; Nien-Shy, Chyong; Massei, Salina; Minckler, Don S; Jester, James V; Brown, Donald J

    2010-02-15

    Glaucoma is the second most common cause of blindness worldwide, leading to irreversible loss of vision. Prior studies indicate that ocular pressure-induced displacement of the lamina cribrosa (LC) may be responsible for retinal ganglion cell axon damage inside the neural canal. We present a novel approach to imaging the entire lamina cribrosa and the scleral canal at high lateral and axial resolution by using a combination of array tomography and nonlinear optical imaging of serial ultrathin orthogonal sections to detect second harmonic generated (SHG) signals from collagen. The resulting images can be analyzed individually or combined to form a three-dimensional reconstruction of the lamina. Due to the specificity of SHG generated from collagen the density and distribution of collagen inside the scleral canal can be objectively quantified with a high degree of accuracy. The reconstruction shows a non-uniform distribution of collagen along both the longitudinal and orthogonal axes. Mapping the collagen density by geographic region reveals significant differences in collagen content that result in "thin spots" with low collagen density as well as areas of very high collagen content. This suggests a non-uniform mechanical stiffness across the lamina that may account for increased axon damage observed in glaucoma patients. The inferior temporal region of the ONH in particular is marked by low collagen density, which corresponds with clinical observations identifying this region as being more susceptible to damage during the onset of glaucoma. Further application of this technique will help characterize the relationship of age, race and gender on the morphology of the LC.

  20. When size matters: differences in demineralized bone matrix particles affect collagen structure, mesenchymal stem cell behavior, and osteogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Dozza, B; Lesci, I G; Duchi, S; Della Bella, E; Martini, L; Salamanna, F; Falconi, M; Cinotti, S; Fini, M; Lucarelli, E; Donati, D

    2017-04-01

    Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) is a natural, collagen-based, osteoinductive biomaterial. Nevertheless, there are conflicting reports on the efficacy of this product. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether DBM collagen structure is affected by particle size and can influence DBM cytocompatibility and osteoinductivity. Sheep cortical bone was ground and particles were divided in three fractions with different sizes, defined as large (L, 1-2 mm), medium (M, 0.5-1 mm), and small (S, <0.5 mm). After demineralization, the chemical-physical analysis clearly showed a particle size-dependent alteration in collagen structure, with DBM-M being altered but not as much as DBM-S. DBM-M displayed a preferable trend in almost all biological characteristics tested, although all DBM particles revealed an optimal cytocompatibility. Subcutaneous implantation of DBM particles into immunocompromised mice resulted in bone induction only for DBM-M. When sheep MSC were seeded onto particles before implantation, all DBM particles were able to induce new bone formation with the best incidence for DBM-M and DBM-S. In conclusion, the collagen alteration in DBM-M is likely the best condition to promote bone induction in vivo. Furthermore, the choice of 0.5-1 mm particles may enable to obtain more efficient and consistent results among different research groups in bone tissue-engineering applications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1019-1033, 2017.

  1. The relative roles of collagen adhesive receptor DDR2 activation and matrix stiffness on the downregulation of focal adhesion kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Bhadriraju, Kiran; Chung, Koo-Hyun; Spurlin, Tighe A; Haynes, Ross J; Elliott, John T; Plant, Anne L

    2009-12-01

    Cells within tissues derive mechanical anchorage and specific molecular signals from the insoluble extracellular matrix (ECM) that surrounds them. Understanding the role of different cues that extracellular matrices provide cells is critical for controlling and predicting cell response to scaffolding materials. Using an engineered extracellular matrix of Type I collagen we examined how the stiffness, supramolecular structure, and glycosylation of collagen matrices influence the protein levels of cellular FAK and the activation of myosin II. Our results show that (1) cellular FAK is downregulated on collagen fibrils, but not on a non-fibrillar monolayer of collagen, (2) the downregulation of FAK is independent of the stiffness of the collagen fibrils, and (3) FAK levels are correlated with levels of tyrosine phosphorylation of the collagen adhesion receptor DDR2. Further, siRNA depletion of DDR2 blocks FAK downregulation. Our results suggest that the collagen receptor DDR2 is involved in the regulation of FAK levels in vSMC adhered to Type I collagen matrices, and that regulation of FAK levels in these cells appears to be independent of matrix stiffness.

  2. Integrating focal adhesion dynamics, cytoskeleton remodeling, and actin motor activity for predicting cell migration on 3D curved surfaces of the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Cheol; Kim, Choong; Wood, Levi; Neal, Devin; Kamm, Roger D; Asada, H Harry

    2012-11-01

    An integrative cell migration model incorporating focal adhesion (FA) dynamics, cytoskeleton and nucleus remodeling and actin motor activity is developed for predicting cell migration behaviors on 3-dimensional curved surfaces, such as cylindrical lumens in the 3-D extracellular matrix (ECM). The work is motivated by 3-D microfluidic migration experiments suggesting that the migration speed and direction may vary depending on the cross sectional shape of the lumen along which the cell migrates. In this paper, the mechanical structure of the cell is modeled as double elastic membranes of cell and nucleus. The two elastic membranes are connected by stress fibers, which are extended from focal adhesions on the cell surface to the nuclear membrane. The cell deforms and gains traction as transmembrane integrins distributed over the outer cell membrane bind to ligands on the ECM, form focal adhesions, and activate stress fibers. Probabilities at which integrin ligand-receptor bonds are formed as well as ruptures are affected by the surface geometry, resulting in diverse migration behaviors that depend on the curvature of the surface. Monte Carlo simulations of the integrative model reveal that (a) the cell migration speed is dependent on the cross sectional area of the lumen with a maximum speed at a particular diameter or width, (b) as the lumen diameter increases, the cell tends to spread and migrate around the circumference of the lumen, while it moves in the longitudinal direction as the lumen diameter narrows, (c) once the cell moves in one direction, it tends to stay migrating in the same direction despite the stochastic nature of migration. The relationship between the cell migration speed and the lumen width agrees with microfluidic experimental data for cancer cell migration.

  3. Nonpolarized signaling reveals two distinct modes of 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Ryan J; Gavara, Núria; Chadwick, Richard S; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2012-04-30

    We search in this paper for context-specific modes of three-dimensional (3D) cell migration using imaging for phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) and active Rac1 and Cdc42 in primary fibroblasts migrating within different 3D environments. In 3D collagen, PIP3 and active Rac1 and Cdc42 were targeted to the leading edge, consistent with lamellipodia-based migration. In contrast, elongated cells migrating inside dermal explants and the cell-derived matrix (CDM) formed blunt, cylindrical protrusions, termed lobopodia, and Rac1, Cdc42, and PIP3 signaling was nonpolarized. Reducing RhoA, Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), or myosin II activity switched the cells to lamellipodia-based 3D migration. These modes of 3D migration were regulated by matrix physical properties. Specifically, experimentally modifying the elasticity of the CDM or collagen gels established that nonlinear elasticity supported lamellipodia-based migration, whereas linear elasticity switched cells to lobopodia-based migration. Thus, the relative polarization of intracellular signaling identifies two distinct modes of 3D cell migration governed intrinsically by RhoA, ROCK, and myosin II and extrinsically by the elastic behavior of the 3D extracellular matrix.

  4. Expression of catalytically active Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 in dermal fibroblasts induces collagen fragmentation and functional alterations that resemble aged human skin

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Wei; Hammerberg, Craig; Li, Yong; He, Tianyuan; Quan, Taihao; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Summary Increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and reduced production of type I collagen by dermal fibroblasts are prominent features of aged human skin. We have proposed that MMP-1-mediated collagen fibril fragmentation is a key driver of age-related decline of skin function. To investigate this hypothesis, we constructed, characterized, and expressed constitutively active MMP-1 mutant (MMP-1 V94G) in adult human skin in organ culture and fibroblasts in three dimensional collagen lattice cultures. Expression of MMP-1 V94G in young skin in organ culture caused fragmentation and ultrastructural alterations of collagen fibrils similar to those observed in aged human skin in vivo. Expression of MMP-1 V94G in dermal fibroblasts cultured in three-dimensional collagen lattices caused substantial collagen fragmentation, which was markedly reduced by MMP-1 siRNA-mediated knockdown or MMP inhibitor MMI270. Importantly, fibroblasts cultured in MMP-1 V94G-fragmented collagen lattices displayed many alterations observed in fibroblasts in aged human skin, including reduced cytoplasmic area, disassembled actin cytoskeleton, impaired TGF-β pathway, and reduced collagen production. These results support the concept that MMP-1-mediated fragmentation of dermal collagen fibrils alters the morphology and function of dermal fibroblasts, and provide a foundation for understanding specific mechanisms that link collagen fibril fragmentation to age-related decline of fibroblast function. PMID:23601157

  5. Fibroblast populated collagen matrix promotes islet survival and reduces the number of islets required for diabetes reversal.

    PubMed

    Jalili, Reza B; Moeen Rezakhanlou, Alireza; Hosseini-Tabatabaei, Azadeh; Ao, Ziliang; Warnock, Garth L; Ghahary, Aziz

    2011-07-01

    Islet transplantation represents a viable treatment for type 1 diabetes. However, due to loss of substantial mass of islets early after transplantation, islets from two or more donors are required to achieve insulin independence. Islet-extracellular matrix disengagement, which occurs during islet isolation process, leads to subsequent islet cell apoptosis and is an important contributing factor to early islet loss. In this study, we developed a fibroblast populated collagen matrix (FPCM) as a novel scaffold to improve islet cell viability and function post-transplantation. FPCM was developed by embedding fibroblasts within type-I collagen and used as scaffold for islet grafts. Viability and insulin secretory function of islets embedded within FPCM was evaluated in vitro and in a syngeneic murine islet transplantation model. Islets embedded within acellular matrix or naked islets were used as control. Islet cell survival and function was markedly improved particularly after embedding within FPCM. The composite scaffold significantly promoted islet isograft survival and reduced the critical islet mass required for diabetes reversal by half (from 200 to 100 islets per recipient). Fibroblast embedded within FPCM produced fibronectin and growth factors and induced islet cell proliferation. No evidence of fibroblast over-growth within composite grafts was noticed. These results confirm that FPCM significantly promotes islet viability and functionality, enhances engraftment of islet grafts and decreases the critical islet mass needed to reverse hyperglycemia. This promising finding offers a new approach to reducing the number of islet donors per recipient and improving islet transplant outcome.

  6. In vitro analysis of chemotactic leukocyte migration in 3D environments.

    PubMed

    Sixt, Michael; Lämmermann, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Cell migration on two-dimensional (2D) substrates follows entirely different rules than cell migration in three-dimensional (3D) environments. This is especially relevant for leukocytes that are able to migrate in the absence of adhesion receptors within the confined geometry of artificial 3D extracellular matrix scaffolds and within the interstitial space in vivo. Here, we describe in detail a simple and economical protocol to visualize dendritic cell migration in 3D collagen scaffolds along chemotactic gradients. This method can be adapted to other cell types and may serve as a physiologically relevant paradigm for the directed locomotion of most amoeboid cells.

  7. Nonlinear optical microscopy reveals invading endothelial cells anisotropically alter three-dimensional collagen matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, P.-F.; Yeh, Alvin T.; Bayless, Kayla J.

    2009-02-01

    The interactions between endothelial cells (ECs) and the extracellular matrix (ECM) are fundamental in mediating various steps of angiogenesis, including cell adhesion, migration and sprout formation. Here, we used a noninvasive and non-destructive nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) technique to optically image endothelial sprouting morphogenesis in three-dimensional (3D) collagen matrices. We simultaneously captured signals from collagen fibers and endothelial cells using second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF), respectively. Dynamic 3D imaging revealed EC interactions with collagen fibers along with quantifiable alterations in collagen matrix density elicited by EC movement through and morphogenesis within the matrix. Specifically, we observed increased collagen density in the area between bifurcation points of sprouting structures and anisotropic increases in collagen density around the perimeter of lumenal structures, but not advancing sprout tips. Proteinase inhibition studies revealed membrane-associated matrix metalloproteinase were utilized for sprout advancement and lumen expansion. Rho-associated kinase (p160ROCK) inhibition demonstrated that the generation of cell tension increased collagen matrix alterations. This study followed sprouting ECs within a 3D matrix and revealed that the advancing structures recognize and significantly alter their extracellular environment at the periphery of lumens as they progress.

  8. Development of a three-dimensional unit cell to model the micromechanical response of a collagen-based extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Susilo, Monica E; Roeder, Blayne A; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L; Kokini, Klod; Nauman, Eric A

    2010-04-01

    The three-dimensional microstructure and mechanical properties of the collagen fibrils within the extracellular matrix (ECM) is now being recognized as a primary factor in regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, an appreciation of the mechanical aspects by which a cell interacts with its ECM is required for the development of engineered tissues. Ultimately, using these interactions to design tissue equivalents requires mathematical models with three-dimensional architecture. In this study, a three-dimensional model of a collagen fibril matrix undergoing uniaxial tensile stress was developed by making use of cellular solids. A structure consisting of thin struts was chosen to represent the arrangement of collagen fibrils within an engineered ECM. To account for the large deformation of tissues, the collagen fibrils were modeled as hyperelastic neo-Hookean or Mooney-Rivlin materials. The use of cellular solids allowed the fibril properties to be related to the ECM properties in closed form, which, in turn, allowed the estimation of fibril properties using ECM experimental data. A set of previously obtained experimental data consisting of simultaneous measures of the fibril microstructure and mechanical tests was used to evaluate the model's capability to estimate collagen fibril mechanical property when given tissue-scale data and to predict the tissue-scale mechanical properties when given estimated fibril stiffness. The fibril tangent modulus was found to be 1.26 + or - 0.70 and 1.62 + or - 0.88 MPa when the fibril was modeled as neo-Hookean and Mooney-Rivlin material, respectively. There was no statistical significance of the estimated fibril tangent modulus among the different groups. Sensitivity analysis showed that the fibril mechanical properties and volume fraction were the two input parameters which required accurate values. While the volume fraction was easily obtained from the initial image of the gel, the fibril mechanical properties

  9. Cell-mediated degradation of type IV collagen and gelatin films is dependent on the activation of matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, S J; Ward, R V; Reynolds, J J; Murphy, G

    1992-01-01

    The ability of normal rabbit dermal fibroblasts to degrade films of type IV collagen and gelatin when stimulated by phorbol ester was shown to be dependent on the induction, secretion and activation of 95 kDa gelatinase B and the secretion and activation of 72 kDa gelatinase A and stromelysin. Degradation was inhibited by exogenous human recombinant tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1, specific antibodies to gelatinase and stromelysin and by the reactive-oxygen-metabolite inhibitor catalase. We discuss the various pathways for activation of matrix metalloproteinases in this model system and conclude that, although plasmin may play a key role in the activation of gelatinase B and stromelysin, gelatinase A is activated by a mechanism which has yet to be elucidated. The involvement of oxygen radicals in the direct activation of matrix metalloproteinases in this model is thought to be unlikely. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1463464

  10. The Methoxyflavonoid Isosakuranetin Suppresses UV-B-Induced Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Expression and Collagen Degradation Relevant for Skin Photoaging

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hana; Lee, Eunjoo H.; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cho, Man-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a main extrinsic factor for skin aging. Chronic exposure of the skin to UV radiation causes the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), such as MMP-1, and consequently results in alterations of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and skin photoaging. Flavonoids are considered as potent anti-photoaging agents due to their UV-absorbing and antioxidant properties and inhibitory activity against UV-mediated MMP induction. To identify anti-photoaging agents, in the present study we examined the preventative effect of methoxyflavonoids, such as sakuranetin, isosakuranetin, homoeriodictyol, genkwanin, chrysoeriol and syringetin, on UV-B-induced skin photo-damage. Of the examined methoxyflavonoids, pretreatment with isosakuranetin strongly suppressed the UV-B-mediated induction of MMP-1 in human keratinocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Isosakuranetin inhibited UV-B-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling components, ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and p38 proteins. This result suggests that the ERK1/2 kinase pathways likely contribute to the inhibitory effects of isosakuranetin on UV-induced MMP-1 production in human keratinocytes. Isosakuranetin also prevented UV-B-induced degradation of type-1 collagen in human dermal fibroblast cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that isosakuranetin has the potential for development as a protective agent for skin photoaging through the inhibition of UV-induced MMP-1 production and collagen degradation. PMID:27598131

  11. Ultrastructure of collagen fibers and distribution of extracellular matrix in the temporomandibular disk of the human fetus and adult.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H; Sato, I

    2001-12-01

    We quantitatively examined the distribution of these differences in extracellular matrices (collagen types I, III, and fibronectin) and elastic fibers under confocal laser scanning microscopy and electron scanning microscopy in terms of their contribution to the mechanics of the TMJ during development and in adults. Elastic fibers were found in the anterior and posterior bands in adults aged 40 years, and a few elastic fibers in the anterior band of the disk in adults aged 80 to 90 years. The extracellular matrix contents of the TMJ disk are shown in various detected levels in the anterior, intermediate, posterior bands of TMJ disk. During development, collagen fibers are arranged in a complex fashion from 28 weeks' gestation. These ultrastructures of the embryonic TMJ are resembled to that of adults aged the 40s, however the difference in extracellular matrix distribution found in embryonic stages and adults. They might reflect the differences in function between mastication and sucking or the changes in shape and form as results of functional disorders of the TMJ.

  12. The Methoxyflavonoid Isosakuranetin Suppresses UV-B-Induced Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Expression and Collagen Degradation Relevant for Skin Photoaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hana; Lee, Eunjoo H; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cho, Man-Ho

    2016-09-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a main extrinsic factor for skin aging. Chronic exposure of the skin to UV radiation causes the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), such as MMP-1, and consequently results in alterations of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and skin photoaging. Flavonoids are considered as potent anti-photoaging agents due to their UV-absorbing and antioxidant properties and inhibitory activity against UV-mediated MMP induction. To identify anti-photoaging agents, in the present study we examined the preventative effect of methoxyflavonoids, such as sakuranetin, isosakuranetin, homoeriodictyol, genkwanin, chrysoeriol and syringetin, on UV-B-induced skin photo-damage. Of the examined methoxyflavonoids, pretreatment with isosakuranetin strongly suppressed the UV-B-mediated induction of MMP-1 in human keratinocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Isosakuranetin inhibited UV-B-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling components, ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and p38 proteins. This result suggests that the ERK1/2 kinase pathways likely contribute to the inhibitory effects of isosakuranetin on UV-induced MMP-1 production in human keratinocytes. Isosakuranetin also prevented UV-B-induced degradation of type-1 collagen in human dermal fibroblast cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that isosakuranetin has the potential for development as a protective agent for skin photoaging through the inhibition of UV-induced MMP-1 production and collagen degradation.

  13. Characterization of collagen fibers by means of texture analysis of second harmonic generation images using orientation-dependent gray level co-occurrence matrix method.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenyan; Li, Hui; Wang, Chunyou; Gou, Shanmiao; Fu, Ling

    2012-02-01

    Collagen is the most prominent protein in the human body, making up 30% of the total protein content. Quantitative studies have shown structural differences between collagen fibers of the normal and diseased tissues, due to the remodeling of the extracellular matrix during the pathological process. The dominant orientation, which is an important characteristic of collagen fibers, has not been taken into consideration for quantitative collagen analysis. Based on the conventional gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) method, the authors proposed the orientation-dependent GLCM (OD-GLCM) method by estimating the dominant orientation of collagen fibers. The authors validated the utility of the OD-GLCM method on second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopic images of tendons from rats with different ages. Compared with conventional GLCM method, the authors' method has not only improved the discrimination between different tissues but also provided additional texture information of the orderliness of collagen fibers and the fiber size. The OD-GLCM method was further applied to the differentiation of the preliminary SHG images of normal and cancerous human pancreatic tissues. The combination of SHG microscopy and the OD-GLCM method might be helpful for the evaluation of diseases marked with abnormal collagen morphology.

  14. Characterization of collagen fibers by means of texture analysis of second harmonic generation images using orientation-dependent gray level co-occurrence matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wenyan; Li, Hui; Wang, Chunyou; Gou, Shanmiao; Fu, Ling

    2012-02-01

    Collagen is the most prominent protein in the human body, making up 30% of the total protein content. Quantitative studies have shown structural differences between collagen fibers of the normal and diseased tissues, due to the remodeling of the extracellular matrix during the pathological process. The dominant orientation, which is an important characteristic of collagen fibers, has not been taken into consideration for quantitative collagen analysis. Based on the conventional gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) method, the authors proposed the orientation-dependent GLCM (OD-GLCM) method by estimating the dominant orientation of collagen fibers. The authors validated the utility of the OD-GLCM method on second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopic images of tendons from rats with different ages. Compared with conventional GLCM method, the authors' method has not only improved the discrimination between different tissues but also provided additional texture information of the orderliness of collagen fibers and the fiber size. The OD-GLCM method was further applied to the differentiation of the preliminary SHG images of normal and cancerous human pancreatic tissues. The combination of SHG microscopy and the OD-GLCM method might be helpful for the evaluation of diseases marked with abnormal collagen morphology.

  15. Alterations of collagen matrix in weight-bearing bones during skeletal unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiiba, M.; Arnaud, S. B.; Tanzawa, H.; Uzawa, K.; Yamauchi, M.

    2001-01-01

    Skeletal unloading induces loss of bone mineral density in weight-bearing bones. The objectives of this study were to characterize the post-translational modifications of collagen of weight-bearing bones subjected to hindlimb unloading for 8 weeks. In unloaded bones, tibiae and femurs, while the overall amino acid composition was essentially identical in the unloaded and control tibiae and femurs, the collagen cross-link profile showed significant differences. Two major reducible cross-links (analyzed as dihydroxylysinonorleucine and hydroxylysinonorleucine) were increased in the unloaded bones. In addition, the ratios of the former to the latter as well as pyridinoline to deoxypyridinoline were significantly decreased in the unloaded bones indicating a difference in the extent of lysine hydroxylation at the cross-linking sites between these two groups. These results indicate that upon skeletal unloading the relative pool of newly synthesized collagen is increased and it is post-translationally altered. The alteration could be associated with impaired osteoblastic differentiation induced by skeletal unloading that results in a mineralization defect.

  16. The role of the cytoskeleton in cellular force generation in 2D and 3D environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraning-Rush, Casey M.; Carey, Shawn P.; Califano, Joseph P.; Smith, Brooke N.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2011-02-01

    To adhere and migrate, cells generate forces through the cytoskeleton that are transmitted to the surrounding matrix. While cellular force generation has been studied on 2D substrates, less is known about cytoskeletal-mediated traction forces of cells embedded in more in vivo-like 3D matrices. Recent studies have revealed important differences between the cytoskeletal structure, adhesion, and migration of cells in 2D and 3D. Because the cytoskeleton mediates force, we sought to directly compare the role of the cytoskeleton in modulating cell force in 2D and 3D. MDA-MB-231 cells were treated with agents that perturbed actin, microtubules, or myosin, and analyzed for changes in cytoskeletal organization and force generation in both 2D and 3D. To quantify traction stresses in 2D, traction force microscopy was used; in 3D, force was assessed based on single cell-mediated collagen fibril reorganization imaged using confocal reflectance microscopy. Interestingly, even though previous studies have observed differences in cell behaviors like migration in 2D and 3D, our data indicate that forces generated on 2D substrates correlate with forces within 3D matrices. Disruption of actin, myosin or microtubules in either 2D or 3D microenvironments disrupts cell-generated force. These data suggest that despite differences in cytoskeletal organization in 2D and 3D, actin, microtubules and myosin contribute to contractility and matrix reorganization similarly in both microenvironments.

  17. The protective effects of long-term oral administration of marine collagen hydrolysate from chum salmon on collagen matrix homeostasis in the chronological aged skin of Sprague-Dawley male rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiang; Pei, Xinrong; Zhang, Zhaofeng; Wang, Nan; Wang, Junbo; Li, Yong

    2010-10-01

    To investigate the long-term effects of marine collagen hydrolysate (MCH) from Chum Salmon skin on the aberrant collagen matrix homeostasis in chronological aged skin, Sprague-Dawley male rats of 4-wk-old were orally administrated with MCH at the diet concentrations of 2.25% and 4.5% for 24 mo. Histological and biochemical analysis revealed that MCH had the potential to inhibit the collagen loss and collagen fragmentation in chronological aged skin. Based on immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis, collagen type I and III protein expression levels in MCH-treated groups significantly increased as compared with the aged control group. Furthermore, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis showed MCH was able to increase the expressions of procollagen type I and III mRNA (COL1A2 and COL3A1) through activating Smad signaling pathway with up-regulated TGF-βRII (TβRII) expression level. Meanwhile, MCH was shown to inhibit the age-related increased collagen degradation through attenuating MMP-1 expression and increasing tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, MCH could alleviate the oxidative stress in chronological aged skin, which was revealed from the data of superoxide dismutase activity and the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances level in skin homogenates. Therefore, MCH was demonstrated to have the protective effects on chronological skin aging due to the influence on collagen matrix homeostasis. And the antioxidative property of MCH might play an important role in the process.

  18. Reconstitution of bone-like matrix in osteogenically differentiated mesenchymal stem cell–collagen constructs: A three-dimensional in vitro model to study hematopoietic stem cell niche

    PubMed Central

    Lai, WY; Li, YY; Mak, SK; Ho, FC; Chow, ST; Chooi, WH; Chow, CH; Leung, AY

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) and osteoblasts are important niche cells for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in bone marrow osteoblastic niche. Here, we aim to partially reconstitute the bone marrow HSC niche in vitro using collagen microencapsulation for investigation of the interactions between HSCs and MSCs. Mouse MSCs (mMSCs) microencapsulated in collagen were osteogenically differentiated to derive a bone-like matrix consisting of osteocalcin, osteopontin, and calcium deposits and secreted bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP2). Decellularized bone-like matrix was seeded with fluorescence-labeled human MSCs and HSCs. Comparing with pure collagen scaffold, significantly more HSCs and HSC–MSC pairs per unit area were found in the decellularized bone-like matrix. Moreover, incubation with excess neutralizing antibody of BMP2 resulted in a significantly higher number of HSC per unit area than that without in the decellularized matrix. This work suggests that the osteogenic differentiated MSC–collagen microsphere is a valuable three-dimensional in vitro model to elucidate cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions in HSC niche. PMID:24555007

  19. Extracellular matrix of adipogenically differentiated mesenchymal stem cells reveals a network of collagen filaments, mostly interwoven by hexagonal structural units.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Mujib; Sittinger, Michael; Ringe, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is the non-cellular component of tissues, which not only provides biological shelter but also takes part in the cellular decisions for diverse functions. Every tissue has an ECM with unique composition and topology that governs the process of determination, differentiation, proliferation, migration and regeneration of cells. Little is known about the structural organization of matrix especially of MSC-derived adipogenic ECM. Here, we particularly focus on the composition and architecture of the fat ECM to understand the cellular behavior on functional bases. Thus, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were adipogenically differentiated, then, were transferred to adipogenic propagation medium, whereas they started the release of lipid droplets leaving bare network of ECM. Microarray analysis was performed, to indentify the molecular machinery of matrix. Adipogenesis was verified by Oil Red O staining of lipid droplets and by qPCR of adipogenic marker genes PPARG and FABP4. Antibody staining demonstrated the presence of collagen type I, II and IV filaments, while alkaline phosphatase activity verified the ossified nature of these filaments. In the adipogenic matrix, the hexagonal structures were abundant followed by octagonal structures, whereas they interwoven in a crisscross manner. Regarding molecular machinery of adipogenic ECM, the bioinformatics analysis revealed the upregulated expression of COL4A1, ITGA7, ITGA7, SDC2, ICAM3, ADAMTS9, TIMP4, GPC1, GPC4 and downregulated expression of COL14A1, ADAMTS5, TIMP2, TIMP3, BGN, LAMA3, ITGA2, ITGA4, ITGB1, ITGB8, CLDN11. Moreover, genes associated with integrins, glycoproteins, laminins, fibronectins, cadherins, selectins and linked signaling pathways were found. Knowledge of the interactive-language between cells and matrix could be beneficial for the artificial designing of biomaterials and bioscaffolds.

  20. The crystal structure of the signature domain of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein: implications for collagen, glycosaminoglycan and integrin binding.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kemin; Duquette, Mark; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Lawler, Jack

    2009-08-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), or thrombospondin-5 (TSP-5), is a secreted glycoprotein that is important for growth plate organization and function. Mutations in COMP cause two skeletal dysplasias, pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (EDM1). In this study, we determined the structure of a recombinant protein that contains the last epidermal growth factor repeat, the type 3 repeats and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of COMP to 3.15-A resolution limit by X-ray crystallography. The CTD is a beta-sandwich that is composed of 15 antiparallel beta-strands, and the type 3 repeats are a contiguous series of calcium binding sites that associate with the CTD at multiple points. The crystal packing reveals an exposed potential metal-ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) on one edge of the beta-sandwich that is common to all TSPs and may serve as a binding site for collagens and other ligands. Disease-causing mutations in COMP disrupt calcium binding, disulfide bond formation, intramolecular interactions, or sites for potential ligand binding. The structure presented here and its unique molecular packing in the crystal identify potential interactive sites for glycosaminoglycans, integrins, and collagens, which are key to cartilage structure and function.

  1. Absence of fibromodulin affects matrix composition, collagen deposition and cell turnover in healthy and fibrotic lung parenchyma

    PubMed Central

    Rydell-Törmänen, Kristina; Andréasson, Kristofer; Hesselstrand, Roger; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla

    2014-01-01

    The ECM exerts great effects on cells, and changed composition may therefore have profound impact. Small leucine-rich proteoglycans, e.g. fibromodulin, are essential in collagen assembly. Our aim was to investigate the role of fibromodulin in healthy and fibrotic lung parenchyma, theorizing that fibromodulin-deficient animals would be protected against fibrosis. Repeated subcutaneous bleomycin-injections were given to wild type and fibromodulin-deficient mice, inducing pulmonary fibrosis. Development of fibrosis, ECM composition, cell turnover and inflammatory responses were investigated. Fibromodulin-deficient animals were not protected from fibrosis, but the composition of the matrix was affected, with decreased Collagen I in fibromodulin-deficient animals, both in controls (0.07 ± 0.04% vs. 0.18 ± 0.07% tissue area) and after bleomycin (0.37 ± 0.16% vs. 0.61 ± 0.21% tissue area). Biglycan was increased in fibromodulin-deficient animals, whereas decorin was decreased. Furthermore, bleomycin increased cell turnover in wild type, but only proliferation in fibromodulin-deficient animals, resulting in hyperplasia. In addition, the bleomycin-induced immune response was affected in fibromodulin-deficient animals. We thus conclude that fibromodulin has a profound effect on ECM, both in healthy and fibrotic lung parenchyma, and may be providing a permissive microenvironment affecting cell turnover. Furthermore, this study highlights the need to acknowledge specific ECM components, when assessing tissue properties and ultimately cell behaviour. PMID:25230586

  2. Defective Endochondral Ossification-Derived Matrix and Bone Cells Alter the Lymphopoietic Niche in Collagen X Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Elizabeth; Roberts, Douglas; Lin, Angela; Guldberg, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Despite the appreciated interdependence of skeletal and hematopoietic development, the cell and matrix components of the hematopoietic niche remain to be fully defined. Utilizing mice with disrupted function of collagen X (ColX), a major hypertrophic cartilage matrix protein associated with endochondral ossification, our data identified a cytokine defect in trabecular bone cells at the chondro-osseous hematopoietic niche as a cause for aberrant B lymphopoiesis in these mice. Specifically, analysis of ColX transgenic and null mouse chondro-osseous regions via micro-computed tomography revealed an altered trabecular bone environment. Additionally, cocultures with hematopoietic and chondro-osseous cell types highlighted impaired hematopoietic support by ColX transgenic and null mouse derived trabecular bone cells. Further, cytokine arrays with conditioned media from the trabecular osteoblast cocultures suggested an aberrant hematopoietic cytokine milieu within the chondro-osseous niche of the ColX deficient mice. Accordingly, B lymphopoiesis was rescued in the ColX mouse derived trabecular osteoblast cocultures with interlukin-7, stem cell factor, and stromal derived factor-1 supplementation. Moreover, B cell development was restored in vivo after injections of interlukin-7. These data support our hypothesis that endrochondrally-derived trabecular bone cells and matrix constituents provide cytokine-rich niches for hematopoiesis. Furthermore, this study contributes to the emerging concept that niche defects may underlie certain immuno-osseous and hematopoietic disorders. PMID:23656481

  3. Structural diversity of a collagen-binding matrix protein from the byssus of blue mussels upon refolding.

    PubMed

    Suhre, Michael H; Scheibel, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Blue mussels firmly adhere to a variety of different substrates by the byssus, an extracorporal structure consisting of several protein threads. These threads are mainly composed of fibrillar collagens called preCols which are embedded in a proteinaceous matrix. One of the two so far identified matrix proteins is the Proximal Thread Matrix Protein 1 (PTMP1). PTMP1 comprises two von Willebrand factor type A-like domains (A1 and A2) in a special arrangement. Here, we describe the refolding of recombinant PTMP1 from inclusion bodies. PTMP1 refolded into two distinct monomeric isoforms. Both isomers exhibited alternative intramolecular disulfide bonds. One of these isomers is thermodynamically favored and presumably represents the native form of PTMP1, while the other isoform is kinetically favored but is likely non-native. Oligomerization during refolding was influenced by, but not strictly dependent on disulfide formation. The conformational stability of PTMP1 indicates an influence of intramolecular disulfides on the native state, but not on unfolding intermediates. Monomeric PTMP1 exhibited a high thermal stability, dependent on the pH of the surrounding environment. Especially under acidic conditions the disulfide bonds were critically involved in thermal stability.

  4. A 3D tension bioreactor platform to study the interplay between ECM stiffness and tumor phenotype.

    PubMed

    Cassereau, Luke; Miroshnikova, Yekaterina A; Ou, Guanqing; Lakins, Johnathon; Weaver, Valerie M

    2015-01-10

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) structure, composition, and stiffness have profound effects on tissue development and pathologies such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Accordingly, a variety of synthetic hydrogel systems have been designed to study the impact of ECM composition, density, mechanics, and topography on cell and tissue phenotype. However, these synthetic systems fail to accurately recapitulate the biological properties and structure of the native tissue ECM. Natural three dimensional (3D) ECM hydrogels, such as collagen or hyaluronic acid, feature many of the chemical and physical properties of tissue, yet, these systems have limitations including the inability to independently control biophysical properties such as stiffness and pore size. Here, we present a 3D tension bioreactor system that permits precise mechanical tuning of collagen hydrogel stiffness, while maintaining consistent composition and pore size. We achieve this by mechanically loading collagen hydrogels covalently-conjugated to a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane to induce hydrogel stiffening. We validated the biological application of this system with oncogenically transformed mammary epithelial cell organoids embedded in a 3D collagen I hydrogel, either uniformly stiffened or calibrated to create a gradient of ECM stiffening, to visually demonstrate the impact of ECM stiffening on transformation and tumor cell invasion. As such, this bioreactor presents the first tunable 3D natural hydrogel system that is capable of independently assessing the role of ECM stiffness on tissue phenotype.

  5. A Microfabricated 96-Well 3D Assay Enabling High-Throughput Quantification of Cellular Invasion Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Rui; Wei, Yuanchen; Li, Chaobo; Chen, Feng; Chen, Deyong; Zhao, Xiaoting; Luan, Shaoliang; Fan, Beiyuan; Guo, Wei; Wang, Junbo; Chen, Jian

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a 96-well microfabricated assay to study three-dimensional (3D) invasion of tumor cells. A 3D cluster of tumor cells was first generated within each well by seeding cells onto a micro-patterned surface consisting of a central fibronectin-coated area that promotes cellular attachment, surrounded by a poly ethylene glycol (PEG) coated area that is resistant to cellular attachment. Following the formation of the 3D cell clusters, a 3D collagen extracellular matrix was formed in each well by thermal-triggered gelation. Invasion of the tumor cells into the extracellular matrix was subsequently initiated and monitored. Two modes of cellular infiltration were observed: A549 cells invaded into the extracellular matrix following the surfaces previously coated with PEG molecules in a pseudo-2D manner, while H1299 cells invaded into the extracellular matrix in a truly 3D manner including multiple directions. Based on the processing of 2D microscopic images, a key parameter, namely, equivalent invasion distance (the area of invaded cells divided by the circumference of the initial cell cluster) was obtained to quantify migration capabilities of these two cell types. These results validate the feasibility of the proposed platform, which may function as a high-throughput 3D cellular invasion assay. PMID:28240272

  6. A Microfabricated 96-Well 3D Assay Enabling High-Throughput Quantification of Cellular Invasion Capabilities.

    PubMed

    Hao, Rui; Wei, Yuanchen; Li, Chaobo; Chen, Feng; Chen, Deyong; Zhao, Xiaoting; Luan, Shaoliang; Fan, Beiyuan; Guo, Wei; Wang, Junbo; Chen, Jian

    2017-02-27

    This paper presents a 96-well microfabricated assay to study three-dimensional (3D) invasion of tumor cells. A 3D cluster of tumor cells was first generated within each well by seeding cells onto a micro-patterned surface consisting of a central fibronectin-coated area that promotes cellular attachment, surrounded by a poly ethylene glycol (PEG) coated area that is resistant to cellular attachment. Following the formation of the 3D cell clusters, a 3D collagen extracellular matrix was formed in each well by thermal-triggered gelation. Invasion of the tumor cells into the extracellular matrix was subsequently initiated and monitored. Two modes of cellular infiltration were observed: A549 cells invaded into the extracellular matrix following the surfaces previously coated with PEG molecules in a pseudo-2D manner, while H1299 cells invaded into the extracellular matrix in a truly 3D manner including multiple directions. Based on the processing of 2D microscopic images, a key parameter, namely, equivalent invasion distance (the area of invaded cells divided by the circumference of the initial cell cluster) was obtained to quantify migration capabilities of these two cell types. These results validate the feasibility of the proposed platform, which may function as a high-throughput 3D cellular invasion assay.

  7. Activated matrix metalloproteinase and disrupted myocardial collagen matrix in increased sympathetic activity following stimulation of dorsal medulla in the vagotomized feline model.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ching-Chang; Tung, Kwong-Chung; Fu, Yun-Ching; Gong, Chi-Li; Chen, Ying-Tsung; Lin, Nai-Nu; Lin, James A; Chiu, Yung-Tsung

    2008-02-29

    Sympathetic hyperactivation in many kinds of neurocardiogenic injury can result in obvious heart failure. We generated a vagotomized feline model in which sympathetic hyperactivation was induced by electrical stimulation of dorsal medulla (ESDM) of brain stem to investigate the relationship between disruption of extracellular collagen matrix (ECM) and activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in myocardium in the sympathetic hyperactivity. Mean blood pressure, heart rate and plasma norepinephrine were all significantly increased from baseline to a peak at 5 min after ESDM. Echocardiographic study showed significant left ventricular dilatation and hypokinesia (ejection fraction: from 87.7 +/- 6.3% to 39.4 +/- 7.8%) from baseline to 180 mm after ESDM. Histopathological finding revealed significant overstretching or spring-like disappearance and disruption of ECM. MMP-2 expression was significantly increased in left ventricular myocardium as compared to sham. These results suggest that ESDM-induced sympathetic hyperactivity causes the expression of MMP-2 that disrupts myocardial ECM, contributing to the development of cardiac dysfunction.

  8. Cultivation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in a three-dimensional bovine collagen-elastin matrix (Matriderm®) and application for full thickness wound coverage in vivo.

    PubMed

    Killat, Jasper; Reimers, Kerstin; Choi, Claudia Y; Jahn, Sabrina; Vogt, Peter M; Radtke, Christine

    2013-07-11

    New skin substitutes for burn medicine or reconstructive surgery pose an important issue in plastic surgery. Matriderm® is a clinically approved three-dimensional bovine collagen-elastin matrix which is already used as a dermal substitute of full thickness burn wounds. The drawback of an avital matrix is the limited integration in full thickness skin defects, depending on the defect size. To further optimize this process, Matriderm® has also been studied as a matrix for tissue engineering of skin albeit long-term cultivation of the matrix with cells has been difficult. Cells have generally been seeded onto the matrix with high cell loss and minimal time-consuming migration. Here we developed a cell seeded skin equivalent after microtransfer of cells directly into the matrix. First, cells were cultured, and microinjected into Matriderm®. Then, cell viability in the matrix was determined by histology in vitro. As a next step, the skin substitute was applied in vivo into a full thickness rodent wound model. The wound coverage and healing was observed over a period of two weeks followed by histological examination assessing cell viability, proliferation and integration into the host. Viable and proliferating cells could be found throughout the entire matrix. The presented skin substitute resembles healthy skin in morphology and integrity. Based on this study, future investigations are planned to examine behaviour of epidermal stem cells injected into a collagen-elastin matrix under the aspects of establishment of stem cell niches and differentiation.

  9. Computational model of mesenchymal migration in 3D under chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, F. O.; Gómez-Benito, M. J.; Folgado, J.; Fernandes, P. R.; García-Aznar, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Cell chemotaxis is an important characteristic of cellular migration, which takes part in crucial aspects of life and development. In this work, we propose a novel in silico model of mesenchymal 3D migration with competing protrusions under a chemotactic gradient. Based on recent experimental observations, we identify three main stages that can regulate mesenchymal chemotaxis: chemosensing, dendritic protrusion dynamics and cell–matrix interactions. Therefore, each of these features is considered as a different module of the main regulatory computational algorithm. The numerical model was particularized for the case of fibroblast chemotaxis under a PDGF-bb gradient. Fibroblasts migration was simulated embedded in two different 3D matrices – collagen and fibrin – and under several PDGF-bb concentrations. Validation of the model results was provided through qualitative and quantitative comparison with in vitro studies. Our numerical predictions of cell trajectories and speeds were within the measured in vitro ranges in both collagen and fibrin matrices. Although in fibrin, the migration speed of fibroblasts is very low, because fibrin is a stiffer and more entangling matrix. Testing PDGF-bb concentrations, we noticed that an increment of this factor produces a speed increment. At 1 ng mL−1 a speed peak is reached after which the migration speed diminishes again. Moreover, we observed that fibrin exerts a dampening behavior on migration, significantly affecting the migration efficiency. PMID:27336322

  10. Computational model of mesenchymal migration in 3D under chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, F O; Gómez-Benito, M J; Folgado, J; Fernandes, P R; García-Aznar, J M

    2017-01-01

    Cell chemotaxis is an important characteristic of cellular migration, which takes part in crucial aspects of life and development. In this work, we propose a novel in silico model of mesenchymal 3D migration with competing protrusions under a chemotactic gradient. Based on recent experimental observations, we identify three main stages that can regulate mesenchymal chemotaxis: chemosensing, dendritic protrusion dynamics and cell-matrix interactions. Therefore, each of these features is considered as a different module of the main regulatory computational algorithm. The numerical model was particularized for the case of fibroblast chemotaxis under a PDGF-bb gradient. Fibroblasts migration was simulated embedded in two different 3D matrices - collagen and fibrin - and under several PDGF-bb concentrations. Validation of the model results was provided through qualitative and quantitative comparison with in vitro studies. Our numerical predictions of cell trajectories and speeds were within the measured in vitro ranges in both collagen and fibrin matrices. Although in fibrin, the migration speed of fibroblasts is very low, because fibrin is a stiffer and more entangling matrix. Testing PDGF-bb concentrations, we noticed that an increment of this factor produces a speed increment. At 1 ng mL(-1) a speed peak is reached after which the migration speed diminishes again. Moreover, we observed that fibrin exerts a dampening behavior on migration, significantly affecting the migration efficiency.

  11. Hybrid Gel Composed of Native Heart Matrix and Collagen Induces Cardiac Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells without Supplemental Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yi; Liu, Zen; O'Neill, John; Wan, Leo Q.; Freytes, Donald O.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2011-01-01

    Our goal was to assess the ability of native heart extracellular matrix (ECM) to direct cardiac differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in vitro. In order to probe the effects of cardiac matrix on hESC differentiation, a series of hydrogels was prepared from decellularized ECM from porcine hearts by mixing ECM and collagen type I at varying ratios. Maturation of cardiac function in embryoid bodies formed from hESCs was documented in terms of spontaneous contractile behavior and the mRNA and protein expression of cardiac markers. Hydrogel with high ECM content (75% ECM, 25% collagen, no supplemental soluble factors) increased the fraction of cells expressing cardiac marker troponin T, when compared with either hydrogel with low ECM content (25% ECM, 75% collagen, no supplemental soluble factors) or collagen hydrogel (100% collagen, with supplemental soluble factors). Furthermore, cardiac maturation was promoted in high-ECM content hydrogels, as evidenced by the striation patterns of cardiac troponin I and by upregulation of Cx43 gene. Consistently, high-ECM content hydrogels improved the contractile function of cardiac cells, as evidenced by increased numbers of contracting cells and increased contraction amplitudes. The ability of native ECM hydrogel to induce cardiac differentiation of hESCs without the addition of soluble factors makes it an attractive biomaterial system for basic studies of cardiac development and potentially for the delivery of therapeutic cells into the heart. PMID:21744185

  12. Transcript-activated collagen matrix as sustained mRNA delivery system for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Badieyan, Zohreh Sadat; Berezhanskyy, Taras; Utzinger, Maximilian; Aneja, Manish Kumar; Emrich, Daniela; Erben, Reinhold; Schüler, Christiane; Altpeter, Philipp; Ferizi, Mehrije; Hasenpusch, Günther; Rudolph, Carsten; Plank, Christian

    2016-10-10

    Transcript therapies using chemically modified messenger RNAs (cmRNAs) are emerging as safe and promising alternatives for gene and recombinant protein therapies. However, their applications have been limited due to transient translation and relatively low stability of cmRNAs compared to DNA. Here we show that vacuum-dried cmRNA-loaded collagen sponges, termed transcript activated matrices (TAMs), can serve as depots for sustained delivery of cmRNA. TAMs provide steady state protein production for up to six days, and substantial residual expression until 11days post transfection. Another advantage of this technology was nearly 100% transfection efficiency as well as low toxicity in vitro. TAMs were stable for at least 6months at room temperature. Human BMP-2-encoding TAMs induced osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells in vitro and bone regeneration in a non-critical rat femoral bone defect model in vivo. In summary, TAMs are a promising tool for bone regeneration and potentially also for other applications in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  13. Wound bed preparation 2014 update: management of critical colonization with a gentian violet and methylene blue absorbent antibacterial dressing and elevated levels of matrix metalloproteases with an ovine collagen extracellular matrix dressing.

    PubMed

    Sibbald, R Gary; Ovington, Liza G; Ayello, Elizabeth A; Goodman, Laurie; Elliott, James A

    2014-03-01

    Wound bed preparation (WBP) is a paradigm for holistic patient care that includes treatment of the cause along with patient-centered concerns before optimizing the components of local wound care (debridement, infection/inflammation, moisture balance, and, when required, the edge effect). This review incorporates a methylene blue and gentian violet bound foam dressing for critical colonization and an ovine collagen extracellular matrix dressing for reduction of elevated levels of matrix metalloproteases into the WBP paradigm.

  14. ZEB1 Induces LOXL2-Mediated Collagen Stabilization and Deposition in the Extracellular Matrix to Drive Lung Cancer Invasion and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, David H.; Ungewiss, Christin; Tong, Pan; Byers, Lauren A.; Wang, Jing; Canales, Jaime Rodriguez; Villalobos, Pamela A.; Uraoka, Naohiro; Mino, Barbara; Behrens, Carmen; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Han, Richard I; Wanna, Charles A.; Fahrenholtz, Monica; Grande-Allen, Kathryn Jane; Creighton, Chad J.; Gibbons, Don L.

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death, primarily due to distant metastatic disease. Metastatic lung cancer cells can undergo an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) regulated by many transcription factors, including double-negative feedback loop between the microRNA-200 (miR-200) family and ZEB1, but the precise mechanisms by which ZEB1-dependent EMT promotes malignancy remain largely undefined. While the cell-intrinsic effects of EMT are important for tumor progression, the reciprocal dynamic crosstalk between mesenchymal cancer cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) is equally critical in regulating invasion and metastasis. Investigating the collaborative effect of EMT and ECM in the metastatic process reveals increased collagen deposition in metastatic tumor tissues as a direct consequence of amplified collagen gene expression in ZEB1-activated mesenchymal lung cancer cells. Additionally, collagen fibers in metastatic lung tumors exhibit greater linearity and organization as a result of collagen crosslinking by the lysyl oxidase (LOX) family of enzymes. Expression of the LOX and LOXL2 isoforms is directly regulated by miR-200 and ZEB1, respectively, and their upregulation in metastatic tumors and mesenchymal cell lines is coordinated to that of collagen. Functionally, LOXL2, as opposed to LOX, is the principle isoform that crosslinks and stabilizes insoluble collagen deposition in tumor tissues. In turn, focal adhesion formation and FAK/SRC signaling is activated in mesenchymal tumor cells by crosslinked collagen in the ECM. Our study is the first to validate direct regulation of LOX and LOXL2 by the miR-200/ZEB1 axis, defines a novel mechanism driving tumor metastasis, delineates collagen as a prognostic marker, and identifies LOXL2 as a potential therapeutic target against tumor progression. PMID:27694892

  15. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  16. A quasi steady state method for solving transient Darcy flow in complex 3D fractured networks accounting for matrix to fracture flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nœtinger, B.

    2015-02-01

    Modeling natural Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN) receives more and more attention in applied geosciences, from oil and gas industry, to geothermal recovery and aquifer management. The fractures may be either natural, or artificial in case of well stimulation. Accounting for the flow inside the fracture network, and accounting for the transfers between the matrix and the fractures, with the same level of accuracy is an important issue for calibrating the well architecture and for setting up optimal resources recovery strategies. Recently, we proposed an original method allowing to model transient pressure diffusion in the fracture network only [1]. The matrix was assumed to be impervious. A systematic approximation scheme was built, allowing to model the initial DFN by a set of N unknowns located at each identified intersection between fractures. The higher N, the higher the accuracy of the model. The main assumption was using a quasi steady state hypothesis, that states that the characteristic diffusion time over one single fracture is negligible compared with the characteristic time of the macroscopic problem, e.g. change of boundary conditions. In that context, the lowest order approximation N = 1 has the form of solving a transient problem in a resistor/capacitor network, a so-called pipe network. Its topology is the same as the network of geometrical intersections between fractures. In this paper, we generalize this approach in order to account for fluxes from matrix to fractures. The quasi steady state hypothesis at the fracture level is still kept. Then, we show that in the case of well separated time scales between matrix and fractures, the preceding model needs only to be slightly modified in order to incorporate these fluxes. The additional knowledge of the so-called matrix to fracture transfer function allows to modify the mass matrix that becomes a time convolution operator. This is reminiscent of existing space averaged transient dual porosity models.

  17. Use of a Collagen Matrix as a Substitute for Free Mucosal Grafts in Pre-Prosthetic Surgery: 1 Year Results From a Clinical Prospective Study on 15 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Maiorana, Carlo; Beretta, Mario; Pivetti, Luca; Stoffella, Enrico; Grossi, Giovanni B.; Herford, Alan S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The presence of keratinized tissue around dental implants is more than desirable either from a functional and aesthetic point of view, making soft tissue grafting a common practice in implant rehabilitation. Autogenous soft tissue grafting procedures are usually associated with high morbidity. Aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a xenogeneic collagen matrix as a substitute for soft tissue grafting around dental implants. Methods: 15 consecutive patients underwent a vestibuloplasty and grafting, both in the mandible and the maxilla, with a collagen matrix. Results: The primary endpoint was to evaluate the resorption of the graft along with the re-epithelization grafted area. The percentage of the resorption was 44,4%, with a mean gain in vestibular height of 3 mm. Secondary endpoints evaluated the clinical appearance, the hemostatic effect and the post-operative pain. All subjects referred minimal pain with no bleeding. No adverse reaction nor infection were noted. Conclusion: This study showed that the used collagen matrix can find major interest in those patients who need a greater aesthetic outcome as the matrix has a perfect integration with the surrounding tissues. Furthermore it is strongly recommended for those patients who can bear little pain. Clinical Significance: Post-operative morbidity of autologous grafts is the biggest concern of this type of surgery. The possibility to use a soft tissue substitute is a great achievement as morbidity decreases and bigger areas can be treated in a single surgery. The present study showed the efficacy of a collagen matrix as this kind of substitute. PMID:27583050

  18. Development of three-dimensional memory (3D-M)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hong-Yu; Shen, Chen; Jiang, Lingli; Dong, Bin; Zhang, Guobiao

    2016-10-01

    Since the invention of 3-D ROM in 1996, three-dimensional memory (3D-M) has been under development for nearly two decades. In this presentation, we'll review the 3D-M history and compare different 3D-Ms (including 3D-OTP from Matrix Semiconductor, 3D-NAND from Samsung and 3D-XPoint from Intel/Micron).

  19. Tamibarotene-loaded citric acid-crosslinked alkali-treated collagen matrix as a coating material for a drug-eluting stent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Motoki; Takayanagi, Mariko; Fujiu, Katsuhito; Manabe, Ichiro; Nagai, Ryozo; Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2012-12-01

    Tamibarotene-loaded biodegradable matrices with antithrombogenic and drug-releasing properties were prepared in a crosslinking reaction between amino groups of alkali-treated collagen (AlCol) and active ester groups of trisuccinimidyl citrate. The resulting matrices were characterized by their residual amino group concentrations, swelling ratios and thermal, antithrombogenic and drug-releasing properties. It was clarified that the addition of tamibarotene does not inhibit matrix formation. After immersion in water, the swelling ratio of a matrix became lower than that prior to immersion. Thermal analysis indicated that AlCol interacted with tamibarotene. The addition of tamibarotene to the matrix did not influence the antithrombogenic property of the resulting matrix. A matrix with a high crosslinking density had a prolonged tamibarotene elution time. These results demonstrate that tamibarotene-loaded matrices have great potential as a coating material for drug-eluting stents.

  20. A comparative study of combined treatment with a collagen membrane and enamel matrix proteins for the regeneration of intraosseous defects.

    PubMed

    Minabe, Masato; Kodama, Toshiro; Kogou, Tatsuji; Takeuchi, Kayo; Fushimi, Hajime; Sugiyama, Takashi; Mitarai, Eiko

    2002-12-01

    Recent clinical study shows that periodontal regeneration therapy using enamel matrix proteins (Emdogain; EMD) is expected to have the same therapeutic effect as guided tissue regeneration (GTR). However, reports on the combined effect of both therapies are limited, and the clinical significance is not definite. In this study, clinical effects were studied by comparing a combination of EMD and GTR using a collagen membrane for intrabony defects with GTR monotherapy and EMD monotherapy. Sixty-one patients with 69 intrabony defects were included. Efficacy of treatment was evaluated at 6 months and 1 year by assessment of reduction of probing depth, probing attachment gain, and radiographic bone gain. There were no statistically significant differences between presurgical soft tissue measurements and defect characteristics for the three treatment groups. The results showed no significant differences in reduction of probing depth, probing attachment gain, or radiographic bone gain between the three treatment groups at both evaluation times. The combination of GTR using a resorbable membrane for intrabony defects and EMD did not enhance the therapeutic effect compared with each monotherapy.

  1. Artesunate modulates expression of matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors as well as collagen-IV to attenuate pulmonary fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Huang, G; Mo, B; Wang, C

    2016-06-03

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of artesunate on extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation and the expression of collagen-IV, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP) to understand the pharmacological role of artesunate in pulmonary fibrosis. Eighty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four groups that were administered saline alone, bleomycin (BLM) alone, BLM + artesunate, or artesunate alone for 28 days. Lung tissues from 10 rats in each group were used to obtain lung fibroblast (LF) primary cells, and the rest were used to analyze protein expression. The mRNA expression of collagen-IV, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 in lung fibroblasts was detected by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The protein levels of collagen-IV, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 protein in lung tissues were analyzed by western blotting. Artesunate treatment alleviated alveolitis and pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin in rats, as indicated by a decreased lung coefficient and improvement of lung tissue morphology. Artesunate treatment also led to decreased collagen-IV protein levels, which might be a result of its downregulated expression and increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein and mRNA levels. Increased TIMP-1 and TIMP- 2 protein and mRNA levels were detected after artesunate treatment in lung tissues and primary lung fibroblast cells and may contribute to enhanced activity of MMP-2 and -9. These findings suggested that artesunate attenuates alveolitis and pulmonary fibrosis by regulating expression of collagen-IV, TIMP-1 and 2, as well as MMP-2 and -9, to reduce ECM accumulation.

  2. Astragaloside IV controls collagen reduction in photoaging skin by improving transforming growth factor-β/Smad signaling suppression and inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase-1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Li, Ran; Yan, Ning; Chen, Gang; Qian, Wen; Jiang, Hui-Li; Ji, Chao; Bi, Zhi-Gang

    2015-05-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light reduces levels of type I collagen in the dermis and results in human skin damage and premature skin aging (photoaging). This leads to a wrinkled appearance through the inhibition of transforming growth factor‑β (TGF‑β)/Smad signaling. UV irradiation increases type I collagen degradation through upregulating matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression. Astragaloside IV (AST) is one of the major active components extracted from Astragalus membranaceus. However, its multiple anti‑photoaging effects remain to be elucidated. In the present study, the effects of AST against collagen reduction in UV‑induced skin aging in human skin fibroblasts were investigated. The expression of type I procollagen (COL1), MMP‑1, TGF‑βRⅡ and Smad7 were determined using reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and ELISA, respectively. UV irradiation inhibits type I collagen production by suppressing the TGF‑β/Smad signaling pathway and increasing COL1 degradation by inducing MMP‑1 expression. Transforming growth factor‑β type II protein and COL1 mRNA decreased but MMP‑1 and Smad7 levels increased in the photoaging model group, which was reversed by topical application of AST. AST prevents collagen reduction from UV irradiation in photoaging skin by improving TGF‑β/Smad signaling suppression and inhibiting MMP‑1, thus AST may be a potential agent against skin photoaging.

  3. Supplementating with dietary astaxanthin combined with collagen hydrolysate improves facial elasticity and decreases matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -12 expression: a comparative study with placebo.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyun-Sun; Cho, Hyun Hee; Cho, Soyun; Lee, Se-Rah; Shin, Mi-Hee; Chung, Jin Ho

    2014-07-01

    Photoaging accounts for most age-related changes in skin appearance. It has been suggested that both astaxanthin, a potent antioxidant, and collagen hydrolysate can be used as antiaging modalities in photoaged skin. However, there is no clinical study using astaxanthin combined with collagen hydrolysate. We investigated the effects of using a combination of dietary astaxanthin and collagen hydrolysate supplementation on moderately photoaged skin in humans. A total of 44 healthy subjects were recruited and treated with astaxanthin (2 mg/day) combined with collagen hydrolysate (3 g/day) or placebos, which were identical in appearance and taste to the active supplementation for 12 weeks. The elasticity and hydration properties of facial skin were evaluated using noninvasive objective devices. In addition, we also evaluated the expression of procollagen type I, fibrillin-1, matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and -12, and ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage in artificially UV-irradiated buttock skin before and after treatment. The supplement group showed significant improvements in skin elasticity and transepidermal water loss in photoaged facial skin after 12 weeks compared with the placebo group. In the supplement group, expression of procollagen type I mRNA increased and expression of MMP-1 and -12 mRNA decreased compared with those in the placebo group. In contrast, there was no significant difference in UV-induced DNA damage between groups. These results demonstrate that dietary astaxanthin combined with collagen hydrolysate can improve elasticity and barrier integrity in photoaged human facial skin, and such treatment is well tolerated.

  4. Immunohistochemical response in rats of beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) with or without BMP-2 in the production of collagen matrix critical defects.

    PubMed

    Luvizuto, Eloá Rodrigues; de Oliveira, Júlio César Silva; Gomes-Ferreira, Pedro Henrique Silva; Pereira, Cassiano Costa Silva; Faverani, Leonardo Perez; Antoniali, Cristina; Okamoto, Roberta

    2017-03-02

    This study aimed to assess the biological response of BMP-2 (bone morphogenetic protein-2) in supplementation with β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) as a carrier in the bone healing of surgical defects in rats' calvaria. A critical-size defect (5mm in diameter) was filled with β-TCP alone or added with that plus 5mg of BMP-2 at 5, 15, and 30 postoperative days. Histomorphometric and immunohistochemical (osteocalcin, collagen type I, and metalloproteinase-9) analysis was performed to assess the features of bone healing. Histological behavior and collagen type I labeling showed increased formation of the collagen matrix, leading to a higher percentage of newly formed bone and biomaterial for tissue and more total mineralization of pure TCP when compared to the other groups. The supplementation with BMP-2 promoted faster TCP remodeling; however, there was no statistically significant difference for the bone formed in both groups (P>0.05). Collagen-matrix formation and new bone formation reached maximum levels when the defects were filled with pure TCP, even exceeding the levels from BMP-2 supplementation.

  5. PEP-1-SIRT2-induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -13 modulates type II collagen expression via ERK signaling in rabbit articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Eo, Seong-Hui; Choi, Soo Young; Kim, Song Ja

    2016-11-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are critical for the degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which includes cartilage-specific collagen types I, II and XI. We previously found that PEP-1-sirtuin (SIRT)2 could induce dedifferentiation of articular chondrocytes; however, the underlying mechanisms remains unclear. We addressed this in the present study by examining the association between PEP-1-SIRT2 and the expression of MMP-1 and MMP-13 and type II collagen in rabbit articular chondrocytes. We found that PEP-1-SIRT2 increased MMP-1 and -13 expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as determined by western blotting. A similar trend in MMP-1 and -13 levels was observed in cultures during expansion to four passages. Pharmacological inhibition of MMP-1 and -13 blocked the PEP-1-SIRT2-induced decrease in type II collagen level. Phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) was increased by PEP-1-SIRT2; however, treatment with the mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor PD98059 suppressed PEP-1-SIRT2-induced MMP-1 and -13 expression and dedifferentiation while restoring type II collagen expression in passage 2 cells. These results suggest that PEP-1-SIRT2 promotes MMP-induced dedifferentiation via ERK signaling in articular chondrocytes.

  6. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; ...

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  7. Decoupling diffusional from dimensional control of signaling in 3D culture reveals a role for myosin in tubulogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Srivatsan; Shen, Colette J.; Desai, Ravi A.; Sniadecki, Nathan J.; Nelson, Celeste M.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel microfabricated platform to culture cells within arrays of micrometer-scale three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix scaffolds (microgels). These microscale cultures eliminate diffusion barriers that are intrinsic to traditional 3D culture systems (macrogels) and enable uniform cytokine stimulation of the entire culture population, as well as allow immunolabeling, imaging and population-based biochemical assays across the relatively coplanar microgels. Examining early signaling associated with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-mediated scattering and tubulogenesis of MDCK cells revealed that 3D culture modulates cellular responses both through dimensionality and altered stimulation rates. Comparing responses in 2D culture, microgels and macrogels demonstrated that HGF-induced ERK signaling was driven by the dynamics of stimulation and not by whether cells were in a 2D or 3D environment, and that this ERK signaling was equally important for HGF-induced cell scattering on 2D substrates and tubulogenesis in 3D. By contrast, we discovered a specific HGF-induced increase in myosin expression leading to sustained downregulation of myosin activity that occurred only within 3D contexts and was required for 3D tubulogenesis but not 2D scattering. Interestingly, although absent in cells on collagen-coated plates, downregulation of myosin activity also occurred for cells on collagen gels, but was transient and mediated by a combination of myosin dephosphorylation and enhanced myosin expression. Furthermore, upregulating myosin activity via siRNA targeted to a myosin phosphatase did not attenuate scattering in 2D but did inhibit tubulogenesis in 3D. Together, these results demonstrate that cellular responses to soluble cues in 3D culture are regulated by both rates of stimulation and by matrix dimensionality, and highlight the importance of decoupling these effects to identify early signals relevant to cellular function in 3D environments. PMID:20682635

  8. Microstructural and Mechanical Differences Between Digested Collagen-Fibrin Co-Gels and Pure Collagen and Fibrin Gels

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Victor K.; Frey, Christina R.; Kerandi, Allan M.; Lake, Spencer P.; Tranquillo, Robert T.; Barocas, Victor H.

    2012-01-01

    Collagen and fibrin are important extra-cellular matrix (ECM) components in the body, providing structural integrity to various tissues. These biopolymers are also common scaffolds used in tissue engineering. This study investigated how co-gelation of collagen and fibrin affected the properties of each individual protein network. Collagen-fibrin co-gels were cast and subsequently digested using either plasmin or collagenase; the microstructure and mechanical behavior of the resulting networks were then compared with respective pure collagen or fibrin gels of the same protein concentration. The morphologies of the collagen networks were further analyzed via 3-D network reconstruction from confocal image z-stacks. Both collagen and fibrin exhibited a decrease in mean fiber diameter when formed in the co-gels compared to the pure gels; this microstructural change was accompanied by increased failure strain and decreased tangent modulus for both collagen and fibrin following selected digestion of the co-gels. In addition, analysis of the reconstructed collagen networks indicated presence of very long fibers and clustering of fibrils, resulting in very high connectivities for collagen networks formed in co-gels. PMID:22828381

  9. Degradation of connective tissue matrices by macrophages. II. Influence of matrix composition on proteolysis of glycoproteins, elastin, and collagen by macrophages in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.A.; Werb, Z.

    1980-12-01

    Thioglycollate-elicited mouse peritoneal macrophages were cultured in contact with the mixture of extracellular matrix proteins produced by rat smooth muscle cells in culture. Both live macrophages and their conditioned media hydrolyzed glycoproteins, elastin, and collagen. Live macrophages also degraded extracellular connective tissue proteins secreted by endothelial cells and fibroblasts. The glycoproteins in the matrix markedly inhibited the rate of digestion of the other macromolecules, particularly elastin. When plasminogen was added to the matrix, activation of plasminogen to plasmin resulted in the hydrolysis of the glycoprotein components, which then allowed the macrophage elastase easier access to its substrate, elastin. Thus, although plasmin has no direct elastinolytic activity, its presence accelerated the rate of hydrolysis of elastin and therefore the rate of matrix degradation. These findings may be important in an understanding of disease states, such as emphysema and atherosclerosis, that are characterized by the destruction of connective tissue.

  10. The effect of stromelysin-1 (MMP-3) on non-collagenous extracellular matrix proteins of demineralized dentin and the adhesive properties of restorative resins.

    PubMed

    Boukpessi, T; Menashi, S; Camoin, L; Tencate, J M; Goldberg, M; Chaussain-Miller, C

    2008-11-01

    Dentin non-collagenous matrix components (NCPs) are structural proteins involved in the formation, the architecture and the mineralization of the extracellular matrix (ECM). We investigated here how recombinant metalloproteinase stromelysin-1, also termed MMP-3, initiates the release of ECM molecules from artificially demineralized human dentin. Analysis of the supernatants by Western blotting reveals that MMP-3 extracts PGs (decorin, biglycan), and also a series of phosphorylated proteins: dentin sialoprotein (DSP), osteopontin (OPN), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and MEPE, but neither dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP1), another member of the SIBLING family, nor osteocalcin (OC), a non-phosphorylated matrix molecule. After treatment of dentin surfaces by MMP-3, scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination of resin replica shows an increased penetration of the resin into the dentin tubules when compared to surfaces only treated by demineralizing solutions. This preclinical investigation suggests that MMP-3 may be used to improve the adhesive properties of restorative materials.

  11. Linear expansion of the eigenvalues of a Hermitian matrix and its application to the analysis of the electronic spectra of 3 d ions in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seijo, L.; Pueyo, L.

    1985-02-01

    It is shown that the eigenvalues Ei of a Hermitian matrix H with matrix elements Hij = ΣkAkijak, where Akij are known numbers and ak a set of parameters, can be exactly expanded as E i = Σ k( {∂E i}/{∂a k})a k. This property is applied to the analysis of the optical spectra of transition metal ions in crystals proposed by L. Pueyo, M. Bermejo, and J. W. Richardson ( J. Solid State Chem.31, 217, 1980), and it is shown that this method represents the best fit of the Hamiltonian eigenvalues to the observed (or calculated) spectrum. Further advantages of using this property, in connection with the spectral analysis, are the minimization of the errors associated with the numerical approximations and a reduction in computer time. In the molecular orbital calculation of the optical or uv spectra of these systems, this linear expansion of the eigenvalues give a detailed interpretation of the improvements produced by refined calculations, such as those including configuration interaction. In particular, the changes in one-electron energy and in open-shell repulsion interactions associated with the refinement can be clearly and easily formulated. As examples, the computed spectra of CrF 4-6 and CrF 3-6 are discussed.

  12. Design of nano- and microfiber combined scaffolds by electrospinning of collagen onto starch-based fiber meshes: a man-made equivalent of natural extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Tuzlakoglu, Kadriye; Santos, Marina I; Neves, Nuno; Reis, Rui L

    2011-02-01

    Mimicking the structural organization and biologic function of natural extracellular matrix has been one of the main goals of tissue engineering. Nevertheless, the majority of scaffolding materials for bone regeneration highlights biochemical functionality in detriment of mechanical properties. In this work we present a rather innovative construct that combines in the same structure electrospun type I collagen nanofibers with starch-based microfibers. These combined structures were obtained by a two-step methodology and structurally consist in a type I collagen nano-network incorporated on a macro starch-based support. The morphology of the developed structures was assessed by several microscopy techniques and the collagenous nature of the nano-network was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. In addition, and especially regarding the requirements of large bone defects, we also successfully introduced the concept of layer by layer, as a way to produce thicker structures. In an attempt to recreate bone microenvironment, the design and biochemical composition of the combined structures also envisioned bone-forming cells and endothelial cells (ECs). The inclusion of a type I collagen nano-network induced a stretched morphology and improved the metabolic activity of osteoblasts. Regarding ECs, the presence of type I collagen on the combined structures provided adhesive support and obviated the need of precoating with fibronectin. It was also importantly observed that ECs on the nano-network organized into circular structures, a three-dimensional arrangement distinct from that observed for osteoblasts and resembling the microcappillary-like organizations formed during angiogenesis. By providing simultaneously physical and chemical cues for cells, the herein-proposed combined structures hold a great potential in bone regeneration as a man-made equivalent of extracellular matrix.

  13. Integrin-linked kinase regulates cellular mechanics facilitating the motility in 3D extracellular matrices.

    PubMed

    Kunschmann, Tom; Puder, Stefanie; Fischer, Tony; Perez, Jeremy; Wilharm, Nils; Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2017-03-01

    The motility of cells plays an important role for many processes such as wound healing and malignant progression of cancer. The efficiency of cell motility is affected by the microenvironment. The connection between the cell and its microenvironment is facilitated by cell-matrix adhesion receptors and upon their activation focal adhesion proteins such as integrin-linked kinase (ILK) are recruited to sites of focal adhesion formation. In particular, ILK connects cell-matrix receptors to the actomyosin cytoskeleton. However, ILK's role in cell mechanics regulating cellular motility in 3D collagen matrices is still not well understood. We suggest that ILK facilitates 3D motility by regulating cellular mechanical properties such as stiffness and force transmission. Thus, ILK wild-type and knock-out cells are analyzed for their ability to migrate on 2D substrates serving as control and in dense 3D extracellular matrices. Indeed, ILK wild-type cells migrated faster on 2D substrates and migrated more numerous and deeper in 3D matrices. Hence, we analyzed cellular deformability, Young's modulus (stiffness) and adhesion forces. We found that ILK wild-type cells are less deformable (stiffer) and produce higher cell-matrix adhesion forces compared to ILK knock-out cells. Finally, ILK is essential for providing cellular mechanical stiffness regulating 3D motility.

  14. Detection of active matrix metalloproteinase-3 in serum and fibroblast-like synoviocytes of collagen-induced arthritis mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Aeju; Choi, Sung-Jae; Park, Kyeongsoon; Park, Jong Woong; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Choi, Kuiwon; Yoon, Soo-Young; Youn, Inchan

    2013-06-19

    The activity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) correlates with the expression of proteases. Among several proteases, matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) is one of the biological markers used to diagnose RA. The active form of MMP-3 is a key enzyme involved in RA-associated destruction of cartilage and bone. Thus, detection of active MMP-3 in serum or in vivo is very important for early diagnosis of RA. In this study, a soluble MMP-3 probe was prepared to monitor RA progression by detecting expression of active MMP-3 in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice in vivo in both serum and fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs). The MMP-3 probe exhibited strong sensitivity to MMP-3 and moderate sensitivity to MMP-7 at nanomolecular concentrations, but was not sensitive to other MMPs such as MMP-2, MMP-9, and MMP-13. In an optical imaging study, the MMP-3 probe produced early and strong NIR fluorescence signals prior to observation of erythema and swelling in CIA mice. The MMP-3 probe was able to rapidly and selectively detect and monitor active MMP-3 in diluted serum from CIA mice. Furthermore, histological data demonstrated that activated FLSs in arthritic knee joints expressed active MMP-3. Together, our results demonstrated that the MMP-3 probe may be useful for detecting active MMP-3 for diagnosis of RA. More importantly, the MMP-3 probe was able to detect active MMP-3 in diluted serum with high sensitivity. Therefore, the MMP-3 probe developed in this study may be a very promising probe, useful as a biomarker for early detection and diagnosis of RA.

  15. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  16. Collagen matrix-induced expression of integrin αVβ3 in circulating angiogenic cells can be targeted by matricellular protein CCN1 to enhance their function.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Brian; Vulesevic, Branka; Ostojic, Aleksandra; Ruel, Marc; Suuronen, Erik J

    2015-04-01

    Circulating angiogenic cells (CACs) play an important role in vascular homeostasis and hold therapeutic promise for treating a variety of cardiovascular diseases. However, further improvements are needed because the effects of CAC therapy remain minimal or transient. The regenerative potential of these cells can be improved by culture on a collagen-based matrix through the up-regulation of key integrin proteins. We found that human CAC function was enhanced by using the matricellular protein CCN1 (CYR61/CTGF/NOV family member 1) to target integrin αV and β3, which are up-regulated on matrix. Compared to matrix-cultured CACs, CCN1-matrix CACs exhibited a 2.2-fold increase in cell proliferation, 1.8-fold greater migration toward VEGF, and 1.7-fold more incorporation into capillary-like structures in an angiogenesis assay. In vivo, intramuscular injection of CCN1-matrix-cultured CACs into ischemic hind limbs of CD-1 nude mice resulted in blood flow recovery to 80% of baseline, which was greater than matrix-cultured CACs (66%) and PBS (35%) treatment groups. Furthermore, transplanted CCN1-matrix CACs exhibited greater engraftment (11-fold) and stimulated the up-regulation of survival and angiogenic genes (>3-fold). These findings reveal the importance of cell-matrix interactions in regulating CAC function and also reveal a mechanism by which these may be exploited to enhance cell therapies for ischemic disease.

  17. Comparative analysis of basal lamina type IV collagen α chains, matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 expressions in oral dysplasia and invasive carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tamamura, Ryo; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi; Siar, Chong Huat; Katase, Naoki; Naito, Ichiro; Sado, Yoshikazu; Nagai, Noriyuki

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the expressions of basal lamina (BL) collagen IV α chains and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 in oral dysplasia (OED) and invasive carcinoma. Ten cases each of OEDs, carcinomas-in situ and oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) were examined by immunohistochemistry. Another 5 cases, each of normal and hyperplastic oral mucosa, served as controls. Results showed that α1(IV)/α2(IV) and α5(IV)/α6(IV) chains were intact in BLs of control and OEDs. In BLs of carcinoma-in situ, α1(IV)/α2(IV) chains preceded α5(IV)/α6(IV) chains in showing incipient signs of disruption. OSCCs exhibited varying degrees of collagen α(IV) chain degradation. MMP-2 and MMP-9 were absent in controls and OED, but weakly detectable in carcinoma-in situ. In OSCC, these proteolytic enzymes were expressed in areas corresponding to collagen α(IV) chain loss. Enzymatic activity was enhanced in higher grade OSCC, and along the tumor advancing front. Overall the present findings suggest that loss of BL collagen α(IV) chains coincided with gain of expression for MMP-2 and MMP-9, and that these protein alterations are crucial events during progression from OED to OSCC.

  18. LOXL4 knockdown enhances tumor growth and lung metastasis through collagen-dependent extracellular matrix changes in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sul Ki; Kim, Hoe Suk; Jin, Tiefeng; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2017-01-02

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) family genes catalyze collagen cross-link formation. To determine the effects of lysyl oxidase-like 4 (LOXL4) expression on breast tumor formation and metastasis, we evaluated primary tumor growth and lung metastasis in mice injected with LOXL4-knockdown MDA-MB-231 triple-negative human breast cancer cells. In addition, we analyzed overall survival in breast cancer patients based on LOXL4 expression using a public online database. In the mouse xenograft model, LOXL4 knockdown increased primary tumor growth and lung colonization as well as collagen I and IV, lysine hydroxylase 1 and 2, and prolyl 4-hydroxylase subunit alpha 1 and 2 levels. Second harmonic generation imaging revealed that LOXL4 knockdown resulted in the thickening of collagen bundles within tumors. In addition, weak LOXL4 expression was associated with poor overall survival in breast cancer patients from the BreastMark dataset, and this association was strongest in triple-negative breast cancer patients. These results demonstrate that weak LOXL4 expression leads to remodeling of the extracellular matrix through induction of collagen synthesis, deposition, and structural changes. These alterations in turn promote tumor growth and metastasis and are associated with poor clinical outcomes in triple-negative breast cancer.

  19. Bilayered, non-cross-linked collagen matrix for regeneration of facial defects after skin cancer removal: a new perspective for biomaterial-based tissue reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ghanaati, Shahram; Kovács, Adorján; Barbeck, Mike; Lorenz, Jonas; Teiler, Anna; Sadeghi, Nader; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Sader, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Classically skin defects are covered by split thickness skin grafts or by means of local or regional skin flaps. In the presented case series for the first time a bilayered, non-crossed-linked collagen matrix has been used in an off-label fashion in order to reconstruct facial skin defects following different types of skin cancer resection. The material is of porcine origin and consists of a spongy and a compact layer. The ratio of the two layers is 1:3 in favour of the spongy layer. The aim of the study was to investigate the potential of this matrix for skin regeneration as an alternative to the standard techniques of skin grafts or flaps. Six patients between 39 and 83 years old were included in the study based on a therapeutic trial. The collagen matrix was used in seven defects involving the nose, eyelid, forehead- and posterior scalp regions, and ranging from 1,2 to 6 cm in diameter. Two different head and neck surgeons at two different institutions performed the operations. Each used a different technique in covering the wound following surgery, i.e. with and without a latex-based sheet under the pressure dressing. In three cases cylindrical biopsies were taken after 14 days. In all cases the biomaterial application was performed without any complication and no adverse effects were observed. Clinically, the collagen matrix contributed to a tension-free skin regeneration, independent of the wound dressing used. The newly regenerated skin showed strong similarity to the adjacent normal tissue both in quality and colour. Histological analysis indicated that the spongy layer replaced the defective connective tissue, by providing stepwise integration into the surrounding implantation bed, while the compact layer was infiltrated by mononuclear cells and contributed to its epithelialization by means of a "conductive"process from the surrounding epithelial cells. The clinical and histological data demonstrate that the collagen bilayered matrix used in this series

  20. Tissuelike 3D Assemblies of Human Broncho-Epithelial Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissuelike assemblies (TLAs) of human broncho-epithelial (HBE) cells have been developed for use in in vitro research on infection of humans by respiratory viruses. The 2D monolayer HBE cell cultures heretofore used in such research lack the complex cell structures and interactions characteristic of in vivo tissues and, consequently, do not adequately emulate the infection dynamics of in-vivo microbial adhesion and invasion. In contrast, the 3D HBE TLAs are characterized by more-realistic reproductions of the geometrical and functional complexity, differentiation of cells, cell-to-cell interactions, and cell-to-matrix interactions characteristic of human respiratory epithelia. Hence, the 3D HBE TLAs are expected to make it possible to perform at least some of the research in vitro under more-realistic conditions, without need to infect human subjects. The TLAs are grown on collagen-coated cyclodextran microbeads under controlled conditions in a nutrient liquid in the simulated microgravitational environment of a bioreactor of the rotating- wall-vessel type. Primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells are used as a foundation matrix, while adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cells are used as the overlying component. The beads become coated with cells, and cells on adjacent beads coalesce into 3D masses. The resulting TLAs have been found to share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelia including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The differentiation of the cells in these TLAs into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues is confirmed by the presence of compounds, including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium marker compounds, and by the production of tissue mucin. In a series of initial infection tests, TLA cultures were inoculated with human respiratory syncytial viruses and parainfluenza type 3 viruses. Infection was confirmed by photomicrographs that

  1. Zinc l-pyrrolidone carboxylate inhibits the UVA-induced production of matrix metalloproteinase-1 by in vitro cultured skin fibroblasts, whereas it enhances their collagen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Takino, Y; Okura, F; Kitazawa, M; Iwasaki, K; Tagami, H

    2012-02-01

    Reduced collagen matrix in the dermis constitutes one of the characteristic features of chronologically aged skin, which is further enhanced on the sun-exposed portions of the body by chronic ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation, inducing the unique changes associated with skin photoageing. The zinc salt of l-pyrrolidone carboxylate (Zinc PCA) has long been used as a cosmetic ingredient, because of its astringent and anti-microbial properties. In the present study, by employing cultured normal human dermal fibroblasts, we found that Zinc PCA suppressed UVA-induced activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and reduced matrix metalloproteinase-1 production in these cells, which is thought to be involved in collagen degradation in photoaged skin. Moreover, Zinc PCA treatment of the cells increased the expression of an ascorbic acid transporter mRNA, SVCT2, but not SVCT1, resulting in the enhanced production of type I collagen. Based on these in vitro findings, we consider Zinc PCA to be a promising candidate for an anti-skin ageing agent.

  2. Abnormal arrangement of a collagen/apatite extracellular matrix orthogonal to osteoblast alignment is constructed by a nanoscale periodic surface structure.

    PubMed

    Matsugaki, Aira; Aramoto, Gento; Ninomiya, Takafumi; Sawada, Hiroshi; Hata, Satoshi; Nakano, Takayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Morphological and directional alteration of cells is essential for structurally appropriate construction of tissues and organs. In particular, osteoblast alignment is crucial for the realization of anisotropic bone tissue microstructure. In this article, the orientation of a collagen/apatite extracellular matrix (ECM) was established by controlling osteoblast alignment using a surface geometry with nanometer-sized periodicity induced by laser ablation. Laser irradiation induced self-organized periodic structures (laser-induced periodic surface structures; LIPSS) with a spatial period equal to the wavelength of the incident laser on the surface of biomedical alloys of Ti-6Al-4V and Co-Cr-Mo. Osteoblast orientation was successfully induced parallel to the grating structure. Notably, both the fibrous orientation of the secreted collagen matrix and the c-axis of the produced apatite crystals were orientated orthogonal to the cell direction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that bone tissue anisotropy is controllable, including the characteristic organization of a collagen/apatite composite orthogonal to the osteoblast orientation, by controlling the cell alignment using periodic surface geometry.

  3. MT1-MMP promotes cell growth and ERK activation through c-Src and paxillin in three-dimensional collagen matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Takino, Takahisa; Tsuge, Hisashi; Ozawa, Terumasa; Sato, Hiroshi

    2010-06-11

    Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is essential for tumor invasion and growth. We show here that MT1-MMP induces extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in cancer cells cultured in collagen gel, which is indispensable for their proliferation. Inhibition of MT1-MMP by MMP inhibitor or small interfering RNA suppressed activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and ERK in MT1-MMP-expressing cancer cells, which resulted in up-regulation of p21{sup WAF1} and suppression of cell growth in collagen gel. Cell proliferation was also abrogated by the inhibitor against ERK pathway without affecting FAK phosphorylation. MT1-MMP and integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} were shown to be involved in c-Src activation, which induced FAK and ERK activation in collagen gel. These MT1-MMP-mediated signal transductions were paxillin dependent, as knockdown of paxillin reduced cell growth and ERK activation, and co-expression of MT1-MMP with paxillin induced ERK activation. The results suggest that MT1-MMP contributes to proliferation of cancer cells in the extracellular matrix by activating ERK through c-Src and paxillin.

  4. The use of microfiber composites of elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with synthetic collagen in the design of vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Caves, Jeffrey M; Kumar, Vivek A; Martinez, Adam W; Kim, Jeong; Ripberger, Carrie M; Haller, Carolyn A; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2010-09-01

    Collagen and elastin networks contribute to highly specialized biomechanical responses in numerous tissues and species. Biomechanical properties such as modulus, elasticity, and strength ultimately affect tissue function and durability, as well as local cellular behavior. In the case of vascular bypass grafts, compliance at physiologic pressures is correlated with increased patency due to a reduction in anastomotic intimal hyperplasia. In this report, we combine extracellular matrix (ECM) protein analogues to yield multilamellar vascular grafts comprised of a recombinant elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with synthetic collagen microfibers. Structural analysis revealed that the fabrication scheme permits a range of fiber orientations and volume fractions, leading to tunable mechanical properties. Burst strengths of 239-2760 mm Hg, compliances of 2.8-8.4%/100 mm Hg, and suture retention strengths of 35-192 gf were observed. The design most closely approximating all target criteria displayed a burst strength of 1483 +/- 143 mm Hg, a compliance of 5.1 +/- 0.8%/100 mm Hg, and a suture retention strength of 173 +/- 4 gf. These results indicate that through incorporation of reinforcing collagen microfibers, recombinant elastomeric protein-based biomaterials can play a significant role in load bearing tissue substitutes. We believe that similar composites can be incorporated into tissue engineering schemes that seek to integrate cells within the structure, prior to or after implantation in vivo.

  5. Superelastic, superabsorbent and 3D nanofiber-assembled scaffold for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiming; Ma, Jun; Zhu, Lei; Morsi, Yosry; Ei-Hamshary, Hany; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Mo, Xiumei

    2016-06-01

    Fabrication of 3D scaffold to mimic the nanofibrous structure of the nature extracellular matrix (ECM) with appropriate mechanical properties and excellent biocompatibility, remain an important technical challenge in tissue engineering. The present study reports the strategy to fabricate a 3D nanofibrous scaffold with similar structure to collagen in ECM by combining electrospinning and freeze-drying technique. With the technique reported here, a nanofibrous structure scaffold with hydrophilic and superabsorbent properties can be readily prepared by Gelatin and Polylactic acid (PLA). In wet state the scaffold also shows a super-elastic property, which could bear a compressive strain as high as 80% and recovers its original shape afterwards. Moreover, after 6 days of culture, L-929 cells grow, proliferate and infiltrated into the scaffold. The results suggest that this 3D nanofibrous scaffold would be promising for varied field of tissue engineering application.

  6. Microscale mechanisms of agarose-induced disruption of collagen remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Theresa A; Lee, Tae Geol; Shon, Hyun Kyong; Moon, Dae Won; Kumar, Sanjay

    2011-08-01

    Cells are strongly influenced by the local structure and mechanics of the extracellular matrix (ECM). We recently showed that adding agarose to soft collagen ECMs can mechanically stiffen these hydrogels by two orders of magnitude while limiting 3D cell motility, which we speculated might derive from agarose-mediated inhibition of collagen fiber deformation and remodeling. Here, we directly address this hypothesis by investigating the effects of agarose on cell-collagen interactions at the microscale. Addition of agarose progressively restricts cell spreading, reduces stress fiber and focal adhesion assembly, and inhibits macroscopic gel compaction. While time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy fail to reveal agarose-induced alterations in collagen ligand presentation, the latter modality shows that agarose strongly impairs cell-directed assembly of large collagen bundles. Agarose-mediated inhibition of cell spreading and cytoarchitecture can be rescued by β-agarase digestion or by covalently crosslinking the matrix with glutaraldehyde. Based on these results, we argue that cell spreading and motility on collagen requires local matrix stiffening, which can be achieved via cell-mediated fiber remodeling or by chemically crosslinking the fibers. These findings provide new mechanistic insights into the regulatory function of agarose and bear general implications for cell adhesion and motility in fibrous ECMs.

  7. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  8. Biofunctionalized Hydrogel Microscaffolds Promote 3D Hepatic Sheet Morphology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung Hee; Kumar, Supriya K; Shirahama, Hitomi; Seo, Jeongeun; Lee, Jae-Ho; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-03-01

    Development of artificial tissues providing the proper geometrical, mechanical, and environmental cues for cells is highly coveted in the field of tissue engineering. Recently, microfabrication strategies in combination with other chemistries have been utilized to capture the architectural complexity of intricate organs, such as the liver, in in vitro platforms. Here it is shown that a biofunctionalized poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel scaffold, fabricated using a sphere-template, facilitates hepatic sheet formation that follows the microscale patterns of the scaffold surface. The design takes advantage of the excellent diffusion properties of porous, uniform 3D hydrogel platforms, and the enhanced-cell-extracellular matrix interaction with the display of conjugated collagen type I, which in turn elicits favorable Huh-7.5 response. Collectively, the experimental findings and corresponding simulations demonstrate the importance of biofunctionalized porous scaffolds and indicate that the microscaffold shows promise in liver tissue engineering applications and provides distinct advantages over current cell sheet and hepatocyte spheroid technologies.

  9. Collagen-binding Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecule (MSCRAMM) of Gram-positive Bacteria Inhibit Complement Activation via the Classical Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Mingsong; Ko, Ya-Ping; Liang, Xiaowen; Ross, Caná L.; Liu, Qing; Murray, Barbara E.; Höök, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Members of a family of collagen-binding microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) from Gram-positive bacteria are established virulence factors in several infectious diseases models. Here, we report that these adhesins also can bind C1q and act as inhibitors of the classical complement pathway. Molecular analyses of Cna from Staphylococcus aureus suggested that this prototype MSCRAMM bound to the collagenous domain of C1q and interfered with the interactions of C1r with C1q. As a result, C1r2C1s2 was displaced from C1q, and the C1 complex was deactivated. This novel function of the Cna-like MSCRAMMs represents a potential immune evasion strategy that could be used by numerous Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:23720782

  10. Mechanisms of lamellar collagen formation in connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Ghazanfari, Samaneh; Khademhosseini, Ali; Smit, Theodoor H

    2016-08-01

    The objective of tissue engineering is to regenerate functional tissues. Engineering functional tissues requires an understanding of the mechanisms that guide the formation and evolution of structure in the extracellular matrix (ECM). In particular, the three-dimensional (3D) collagen fiber arrangement is important as it is the key structural determinant that provides mechanical integrity and biological function. In this review, we survey the current knowledge on collagen organization mechanisms that can be applied to create well-structured functional lamellar tissues and in particular intervertebral disc and cornea. Thus far, the mechanisms behind the formation of cross-aligned collagen fibers in the lamellar structures is not fully understood. We start with cell-induced collagen alignment and strain-stabilization behavior mechanisms which can explain a single anisotropically aligned collagen fiber layer. These mechanisms may explain why there is anisotropy in a single layer in the first place. However, they cannot explain why a consecutive collagen layer is laid down with an alternating alignment. Therefore, we explored another mechanism, called liquid crystal phasing. While dense concentrations of collagen show such behavior, there is little evidence that the conditions for liquid crystal phasing are actually met in vivo. Instead, lysyl aldehyde-derived collagen cross-links have been found essential for correct lamellar matrix deposition. Furthermore, we suggest that supra-cellular (tissue-level) shear stress may be instrumental in the alignment of collagen fibers. Understanding the potential mechanisms behind the lamellar collagen structure in connective tissues will lead to further improvement of the regeneration strategies of functional complex lamellar tissues.

  11. Collagen-based cell migration models in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Katarina; Alexander, Stephanie; Schacht, Vivien; Coussens, Lisa M.; von Andrian, Ulrich; van Rheenen, Jacco; Deryugina, Elena; Friedl, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Fibrillar collagen is the most abundant extracellular matrix (ECM) constituent which maintains the structure of most interstitial tissues and organs, including skin, gut, and breast. Density and spatial alignment of the three-dimensional (3D) collagen architecture define mechanical tissue properties, i.e. stiffness and porosity, which guide or oppose cell migration and positioning in different contexts, such as morphogenesis, regeneration, immune response, and cancer progression. To reproduce interstitial cell movement in vitro with high in vivo fidelity, 3D collagen lattices are being reconstituted from extracted collagen monomers, resulting in the reassembly of a fibrillar meshwork of defined porosity and stiffness. With a focus on tumor invasion studies, we here evaluate different in vitro collagen-based cell invasion models, employing either pepsinized or un-pepsinized collagen extracts, and compare their structure to connective tissue in vivo, including mouse dermis and mammary gland, chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), and human dermis. Using confocal reflection and two-photon-excited second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy, we here show that, depending on the collagen source, in vitro models yield homogeneous fibrillar texture with variable pore sizes, whereas all in vivo scaffolds comprise a range from low- to high-density fibrillar networks and heterogeneous pore sizes within the same tissue. Future in-depth comparison of structure and physical properties between 3D ECM-based models in vitro and in vivo are mandatory to better understand the mechanisms and limits of interstitial cell movements in distinct tissue environments. PMID:19682592

  12. Galactosylated collagen matrix enhanced in vitro maturation of human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Ghodsizadeh, Arefeh; Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Piryaei, Abbas; Pournasr, Behshad; Najarasl, Mostafa; Hiraoka, Yosuke; Baharvand, Hossein

    2014-05-01

    Due to their important biomedical applications, functional human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (hESC-HLCs) are an attractive topic in the field of stem cell differentiation. Here, we have initially differentiated hESCs into functional hepatic endoderm (HE) and continued the differentiation by replating them onto galactosylated collagen (GC) and collagen matrices. The differentiation of hESC-HE cells into HLCs on GC substrate showed significant up-regulation of hepatic-specific genes such as ALB, HNF4α, CYP3A4, G6P, and ASGR1. There was more albumin secretion and urea synthesis, as well as more cytochrome p450 activity, in differentiated HLCs on GC compared to the collagen-coated substrate. These results suggested that GC substrate has the potential to be used for in vitro maturation of hESC-HLCs.

  13. AE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, Donald A

    2016-06-20

    AE3D solves for the shear Alfven eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies in a torodal magnetic fusion confinement device. The configuration can be either 2D (e.g. tokamak, reversed field pinch) or 3D (e.g. stellarator, helical reversed field pinch, tokamak with ripple). The equations solved are based on a reduced MHD model and sound wave coupling effects are not currently included.

  14. Low-level laser therapy in 3D cell culture model using gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Basso, Fernanda G; Soares, Diana G; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto; Hebling, Josimeri

    2016-07-01

    Besides extensive data about the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on different cell types, so far, these results were obtained from monolayer cell culture models, which have limitations in terms of cell morphology and phenotype expression. Therefore, for better in vitro evaluation of the effects of LLLT, this study was performed with a 3D cell culture model, where gingival fibroblasts were seeded in collagen matrix. Cells isolated from a healthy patient were seeded in wells of 24-well plates with culture medium (DMEM) supplemented with 10 % fetal bovine serum and collagen type I solution. After 5 days, a serum-free DMEM was added to the matrices with cells that were subjected or not to three consecutive irradiations of LLLT by means of the LaserTABLE diode device (780 nm, 25 mW) at 0.5, 1.5, and 3 J/cm(2). Twenty-four hours after the last irradiation, cell viability and morphology as well as gene expression of growth factors were assessed. Histological evaluation of matrices demonstrated uniform distribution and morphology of gingival fibroblasts within the collagen matrix. LLLT at 3 J/cm(2) increased gingival fibroblast viability. Enhanced gene expression of hCOL-I and hEGF was observed for 0.5 J/cm(2), while no significant changes were detected for the other irradiation densities tested. In conclusion, LLLT promoted biostimulation of gingival fibroblasts seeded in a 3D cell culture model, demonstrating that this model can be applied for phototherapy studies and that LLLT could penetrate the collagen matrix to increase cell functions related to tissue repair.

  15. Quantification of substrate and cellular strains in stretchable 3D cell cultures: an experimental and computational framework.

    PubMed

    González-Avalos, P; Mürnseer, M; Deeg, J; Bachmann, A; Spatz, J; Dooley, S; Eils, R; Gladilin, E

    2017-03-07

    The mechanical cell environment is a key regulator of biological processes . In living tissues, cells are embedded into the 3D extracellular matrix and permanently exposed to mechanical forces. Quantification of the cellular strain state in a 3D matrix is therefore the first step towards understanding how physical cues determine single cell and multicellular behaviour. The majority of cell assays are, however, based on 2D cell cultures that lack many essential features of the in vivo cellular environment. Furthermore, nondestructive measurement of substrate and cellular mechanics requires appropriate computational tools for microscopic image analysis and interpretation. Here, we present an experimental and computational framework for generation and quantification of the cellular strain state in 3D cell cultures using a combination of 3D substrate stretcher, multichannel microscopic imaging and computational image analysis. The 3D substrate stretcher enables deformation of living cells embedded in bead-labelled 3D collagen hydrogels. Local substrate and cell deformations are determined by tracking displacement of fluorescent beads with subsequent finite element interpolation of cell strains over a tetrahedral tessellation. In this feasibility study, we debate diverse aspects of deformable 3D culture construction, quantification and evaluation, and present an example of its application for quantitative analysis of a cellular model system based on primary mouse hepatocytes undergoing transforming growth factor (TGF-β) induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

  16. Chemotherapeutic efficiency of drugs in vitro: Comparison of doxorubicin exposure in 3D and 2D culture matrices.

    PubMed

    Casey, A; Gargotti, M; Bonnier, F; Byrne, H J

    2016-06-01

    The interest in the use of 3D matrices for in vitro analysis, with a view to increasing the relevance of in vitro studies and reducing the dependence on in vivo studies, has been growing in recent years. Cells grown in a 3D in vitro matrix environment have been reported to exhibit significantly different properties to those in a conventional 2D culture environment. However, comparison of 2D and 3D cell culture models have recently been noted to result in differing responses of cytotoxic assays, without any associated change in viability. The effect was attributed to differing conversion rates and effective concentrations of the resazurin assay in 2D and 3D environments, rather than differences in cellular metabolism. In this study, the efficacy of a chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin, is monitored and compared in conventional 2D and 3D collagen gel exposures of immortalized human cervical cells. Viability was monitored with the aid of the Alamar Blue assay and drug internalisation was verified using confocal microscopy. Drug uptake and retention within the collagen matrix was monitored by absorption spectroscopy. The viability studies showed apparent differences between the 2D and 3D culture systems, the differences attributed in part to the physical transition from 2D to a 3D environment causing alterations to dye resazurin uptake and conversion rates. The use of 3D culture matrices has widely been interpreted to result in "reduced" toxicity or cellular "resistance" to the chemotherapeutic agent. The results of this study show that the reduced efficiency of the drug to cells grown in the 3D environment can be accounted for by a sequential reduction of the effective concentration of the test compound and assay. This is due to absorption within the collagen gel inducing a higher uptake of both drug and assay thereby influencing the toxic impact of the drug and conversion rate of resazurin, and. The increased effective surface area of the cell exposed to the drug

  17. Tumor necrosis factor-α-accelerated degradation of type I collagen in human skin is associated with elevated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-3 ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ågren, Magnus S.; Schnabel, Reinhild; Christensen, Lise H.; Mirastschijski, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α induces matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that may disrupt skin integrity. We have investigated the effects and mechanisms of exogenous TNF-α on collagen degradation by incubating human skin explants in defined serum-free media with or without TNF-α (10 ng/ml) in the absence or presence of the nonselective MMP inhibitor GM6001 for 8 days. The basal culture conditions promoted type I collagen catabolism that was accelerated by TNF-α (p < 0.005) and accomplished by MMPs (p < 0.005). Levels of the collagenases MMP-8 and MMP-13 were insignificant and neither MMP-2 nor MMP-14 were associated with increased collagen degradation. TNF-α increased secretion of MMP-1 (p < 0.01) but had no impact on MMP-1 quantities in the tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed similar tissue MMP-1 expression with or without TNF-α with epidermis being the major source of MMP-1. Increased tissue-derived collagenolytic activity with TNF-α exposure was blocked by neutralizing MMP-1 monoclonal antibody and was not due to down-regulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1. TNF-α increased production (p < 0.01), tissue levels (p < 0.005) and catalytic activity of the endogenous MMP-1 activator MMP-3. Type I collagen degradation correlated with MMP-3 tissue levels (rs = 0.68, p < 0.05) and was attenuated with selective MMP-3 inhibitor. Type I collagen formation was down-regulated in cultured compared with native skin explants but was not reduced further by TNF-α. TNF-α had no significant effect on epidermal apoptosis. Our data indicate that TNF-α augments collagenolytic activity of MMP-1, possibly through up-regulation of MMP-3 leading to gradual loss of type I collagen in human skin. PMID:25457675

  18. A multifunctional 3D co-culture system for studies of mammary tissue morphogenesis and stem cell biology.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jonathan J; Davidenko, Natalia; Caffarel, Maria M; Cameron, Ruth E; Watson, Christine J

    2011-01-01

    Studies on the stem cell niche and the efficacy of cancer therapeutics require complex multicellular structures and interactions between different cell types and extracellular matrix (ECM) in three dimensional (3D) space. We have engineered a 3D in vitro model of mammary gland that encompasses a defined, porous collagen/hyaluronic acid (HA) scaffold forming a physiologically relevant foundation for epithelial and adipocyte co-culture. Polarized ductal and acinar structures form within this scaffold recapitulating normal tissue morphology in the absence of reconstituted basement membrane (rBM) hydrogel. Furthermore, organoid developmental outcome can be controlled by the ratio of collagen to HA, with a higher HA concentration favouring acinar morphological development. Importantly, this culture system recapitulates the stem cell niche as primary mammary stem cells form complex organoids, emphasising the utility of this approach for developmental and tumorigenic studies using genetically altered animals or human biopsy material, and for screening cancer therapeutics for personalised medicine.

  19. 3D in vitro technology for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein

    2012-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro systems that can mimic organ and tissue structure and function in vivo, will be of great benefit for a variety of biological applications from basic biology to toxicity testing and drug discovery. There have been several attempts to generate 3D tissue models but most of these models require costly equipment, and the most serious disadvantage in them is that they are too far from the mature human organs in vivo. Because of these problems, research and development in drug discovery, toxicity testing and biotech industries are highly expensive, and involve sacrifice of countless animals and it takes several years to bring a single drug/product to the market or to find the toxicity or otherwise of chemical entities. Our group has been actively working on several alternative models by merging biomaterials science, nanotechnology and biological principles to generate 3D in vitro living organs, to be called "Human Organs-on-Chip", to mimic natural organ/tissues, in order to reduce animal testing and clinical trials. We have fabricated a novel type of mechanically and biologically bio-mimicking collagen-based hydrogel that would provide for interconnected mini-wells in which 3D cell/organ culture of human samples in a manner similar to human organs with extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules would be possible. These products mimic the physical, chemical, and biological properties of natural organs and tissues at different scales. This paper will review the outcome of our several experiments so far in this direction and the future perspectives.

  20. Cell-instructive starPEG-heparin-collagen composite matrices.

    PubMed

    Binner, Marcus; Bray, Laura J; Friedrichs, Jens; Freudenberg, Uwe; Tsurkan, Mikhail V; Werner, Carsten

    2017-02-16

    Polymer hydrogels can be readily modulated with regard to their physical properties and functionalized to recapitulate molecular cues of the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, they remain structurally different from the hierarchical supramolecular assemblies of natural ECM. Accordingly, we herein report a set of hydrogel composite materials made from starPEG-peptide conjugates, maleimide-functionalized heparin and collagen type I that combine semisynthetic and ECM-derived components. Collagen fibrillogenesis was controlled by temperature and collagen concentration to form collagen microstructures which were then homogeneously distributed within the 3D composite matrix during hydrogel formation. The collagen-laden hydrogel materials showed a heterogeneous local variation of the stiffness and adhesion ligand density. Composite gels functionalized with growth factors and cell adhesive peptides (RGDSP) supported the growth of embedded human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and induced the alignment of embedded bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to the collagen microstructures in vitro. The introduced composite hydrogel material is concluded to faithfully mimic cell-instructive features of the ECM.

  1. Type I collagen aging impairs discoidin domain receptor 2-mediated tumor cell growth suppression.

    PubMed

    Saby, Charles; Buache, Emilie; Brassart-Pasco, Sylvie; El Btaouri, Hassan; Courageot, Marie-Pierre; Van Gulick, Laurence; Garnotel, Roselyne; Jeannesson, Pierre; Morjani, Hamid

    2016-05-03

    Tumor cells are confronted to a type I collagen rich environment which regulates cell proliferation and invasion. Biological aging has been associated with structural changes of type I collagen. Here, we address the effect of collagen aging on cell proliferation in a three-dimensional context (3D).We provide evidence for an inhibitory effect of adult collagen, but not of the old one, on proliferation of human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells. This effect involves both the activation of the tyrosine kinase Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) and the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2. DDR2 and SHP-2 were less activated in old collagen. DDR2 inhibition decreased SHP-2 phosphorylation in adult collagen and increased cell proliferation to a level similar to that observed in old collagen.In the presence of old collagen, a high level of JAK2 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation was observed while expression of the cell cycle negative regulator p21CIP1 was decreased. Inhibition of DDR2 kinase function also led to an increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation and a decrease in p21CIP1 expression. Similar signaling profile was observed when DDR2 was inhibited in adult collagen. Altogether, these data suggest that biological collagen aging could increase tumor cell proliferation by reducingthe activation of the key matrix sensor DDR2.

  2. Donor-dependent and dose-dependent variation in the induction of T lymphocyte locomotion in a three-dimensional collagen matrix system by a mistletoe preparation (Iscador).

    PubMed

    Nikolai, G; Friedl, P; Werner, M; Zänker, K S

    1997-04-01

    Controlled activation of non-specific and specific immune defence mechanisms can beneficially manipulate the host's ability to attack malignant cells. In this context, migration and tissue distribution of immunocompetent cells may be prerequisites for an efficient immune surveillance. The effect of various non-cytotoxic concentrations of the Viscum album L. (mistletoe) preparation Iscadore QuFrF on the locomotory activity of immunomagnetically isolated human CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes from healthy donors was investigated. Cellular migration was examined within a three-dimensional collagen matrix. Donor-dependent variations in baseline activities of spontaneously locomoting T cells were accompanied by individual response patterns of T cells from different donors in the presence of various concentrations of mistletoe preparation (0.25-2.5 micrograms/ml). Using the three-dimensional collagen matrix assay an induction of locomotory activity was detected in a highly reproducible fashion although the optimal concentration of mistletoe preparation and the time point of maximal response were individual for each donor. Our data suggest that the direct stimulation of T-cell migration by mistletoe components may modulate the system of immune surveillance and recognition in patients under mistletoe therapy.

  3. Biological response of osteoblast-like UMR-106 cells to the modified PHBV matrix--effects of porosity and collagen dip coating.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Raghavan, Dharmaraj; Melaku, Samuel; Stubbs, John

    2010-03-01

    In this study, we related porosity and collagen coating of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) scaffold to the degree of cell proliferation on the engineered PHBV scaffold. Based on the [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2h-tetrazolium, inner salt] (MTS) assay, we established that UMR-106 cell proliferation is maximum in collagen-coated porous PHBV film followed by porous PHBV film and least in nonporous PHBV film. RT-PCR analysis of the proliferated cells on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) and porous and nonporous PHBV scaffolds revealed that the proliferated cells retained their osteoblastic phenotype characteristics. Atomic absorption analysis was performed to measure the extent of calcium conversion by the cells grown on PHBV and TCPS. The calcium content of the culture media was used to indirectly measure the mineralization ability of the cells. The extent of calcium conversion by the cells was found to depend on the incubation time. Based on the results of the study, modified PHBV matrix seems to be a suitable matrix candidate for bone tissue engineering application.

  4. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  5. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  6. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; ...

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  7. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  8. Tenogenic Induction of Human MSCs by Anisotropically Aligned Collagen Biotextiles

    PubMed Central

    Younesi, Mousa; Islam, Anowarul; Kishore, Vipuil; Anderson, James M.; Akkus, Ozan

    2015-01-01

    A novel biofabrication modality, electrophoretic compaction with macromolecular alignment, was utilized to make collagen threads that mimic the native tendon’s structure and mechanical properties. A device with kinematic electrodes was designed to fabricate collagen threads in continuous length. For the first time, a 3D-biotextile was woven purely from collagen. Mechanical properties and load-displacement behavior of the biotextile mimicked those of the native tendon while presenting a porosity of 80%. The open pore network facilitated cell seeding across the continuum of the bioscaffold. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded in the woven scaffold underwent tenogenic differentiation in the absence of growth factors and synthesized a matrix that was positive for tenomodulin, COMP and type I collagen. Up-regulation of tenomodulin, a tendon specific marker, was 11.6 ± 3.5 fold, COMP was up-regulated 16.7 ± 5.5 fold, and Col I was up-regulated 6.9 ± 2.7 fold greater on ELAC threads when compared to randomly oriented collagen gels. These results demonstrate that a bioscaffold woven by using collagen threads with densely compacted and anisotropically aligned substrate texture stimulates tenogenesis topographically, rendering the electrochemically aligned collagen as a promising candidate for functional repair of tendons and ligaments. PMID:25750610

  9. Venus in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, Jeffrey J.

    1993-01-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  10. DNA damage intensity in fibroblasts in a 3-dimensional collagen matrix correlates with the Bragg curve energy distribution of a high LET particle

    PubMed Central

    Roig, Andres I.; Hight, Suzie K.; Minna, John D.; Shay, Jerry W.; Rusek, Adam; Story, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The DNA double-strand break (DSB) damage response induced by high energy charged particles on lung fibroblast cells embedded in a 3-dimensional (3-D) collagen tissue equivalents was investigated using antibodies to the DNA damage response proteins gamma-histone 2AX (γ-H2AX) and phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (p-DNA-PKcs). Materials and methods 3-D tissue equivalents were irradiated in positions across the linear distribution of the Bragg curve profiles of 307.7 MeV/nucleon, 556.9 MeV/nucleon, or 967.0 MeV/nucleon 56Fe ions at a dose of 0.30 Gy. Results Patterns of discrete DNA damage streaks across nuclei or saturated nuclear damage were observed, with saturated nuclear damage being more predominant as samples were positioned closer to the physical Bragg peak. Quantification of the DNA damage signal intensities at each distance for each of the examined energies revealed a biological Bragg curve profile with a pattern of DNA damage intensity similar to the physical Bragg curve for the particular energy. Deconvolution microscopy of nuclei with streaked or saturated nuclear damage pattern revealed more details of the damage, with evidence of double-strand breaks radially distributed from the main particle track as well as multiple discrete tracks within saturated damage nuclei. Conclusions These 3-D culture systems can be used as a biological substrate to better understand the interaction of heavy charged particles of different energies with tissue and could serve as a basis to model space-radiation-induced cancer initiation and progression. PMID:20201648

  11. 3D Viscoelastic traction force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Toyjanova, Jennet; Hannen, Erin; Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Darling, Eric M; Henann, David L; Franck, Christian

    2014-10-28

    Native cell-material interactions occur on materials differing in their structural composition, chemistry, and physical compliance. While the last two decades have shown the importance of traction forces during cell-material interactions, they have been almost exclusively presented on purely elastic in vitro materials. Yet, most bodily tissue materials exhibit some level of viscoelasticity, which could play an important role in how cells sense and transduce tractions. To expand the realm of cell traction measurements and to encompass all materials from elastic to viscoelastic, this paper presents a general, and comprehensive approach for quantifying 3D cell tractions in viscoelastic materials. This methodology includes the experimental characterization of the time-dependent material properties for any viscoelastic material with the subsequent mathematical implementation of the determined material model into a 3D traction force microscopy (3D TFM) framework. Utilizing this new 3D viscoelastic TFM (3D VTFM) approach, we quantify the influence of viscosity on the overall material traction calculations and quantify the error associated with omitting time-dependent material effects, as is the case for all other TFM formulations. We anticipate that the 3D VTFM technique will open up new avenues of cell-material investigations on even more physiologically relevant time-dependent materials including collagen and fibrin gels.

  12. 3D photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Jeffrey J. L.; Roumeliotis, Michael; Chaudhary, Govind; Stodilka, Robert Z.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-06-01

    Our group has concentrated on development of a 3D photoacoustic imaging system for biomedical imaging research. The technology employs a sparse parallel detection scheme and specialized reconstruction software to obtain 3D optical images using a single laser pulse. With the technology we have been able to capture 3D movies of translating point targets and rotating line targets. The current limitation of our 3D photoacoustic imaging approach is its inability ability to reconstruct complex objects in the field of view. This is primarily due to the relatively small number of projections used to reconstruct objects. However, in many photoacoustic imaging situations, only a few objects may be present in the field of view and these objects may have very high contrast compared to background. That is, the objects have sparse properties. Therefore, our work had two objectives: (i) to utilize mathematical tools to evaluate 3D photoacoustic imaging performance, and (ii) to test image reconstruction algorithms that prefer sparseness in the reconstructed images. Our approach was to utilize singular value decomposition techniques to study the imaging operator of the system and evaluate the complexity of objects that could potentially be reconstructed. We also compared the performance of two image reconstruction algorithms (algebraic reconstruction and l1-norm techniques) at reconstructing objects of increasing sparseness. We observed that for a 15-element detection scheme, the number of measureable singular vectors representative of the imaging operator was consistent with the demonstrated ability to reconstruct point and line targets in the field of view. We also observed that the l1-norm reconstruction technique, which is known to prefer sparseness in reconstructed images, was superior to the algebraic reconstruction technique. Based on these findings, we concluded (i) that singular value decomposition of the imaging operator provides valuable insight into the capabilities of

  13. Enigmatic insight into collagen

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  14. Focal adhesion kinase activity is required for actomyosin contractility-based invasion of cells into dense 3D matrices

    PubMed Central

    Mierke, Claudia T.; Fischer, Tony; Puder, Stefanie; Kunschmann, Tom; Soetje, Birga; Ziegler, Wolfgang H.

    2017-01-01

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) regulates the dynamics of integrin-based cell adhesions important for motility. FAK’s activity regulation is involved in stress-sensing and focal-adhesion turnover. The effect of FAK on 3D migration and cellular mechanics is unclear. We analyzed FAK knock-out mouse embryonic fibroblasts and cells expressing a kinase-dead FAK mutant, R454-FAK, in comparison to FAK wild-type cells. FAK knock-out and FAKR454/R454 cells invade dense 3D matrices less efficiently. These results are supported by FAK knock-down in wild-type fibroblasts and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells showing reduced invasiveness. Pharmacological interventions indicate that in 3D matrices, cells deficient in FAK or kinase-activity behave similarly to wild-type cells treated with inhibitors of Src-activity or actomyosin-contractility. Using magnetic tweezers experiments, FAKR454/R454 cells are shown to be softer and exhibit impaired adhesion to fibronectin and collagen, which is consistent with their reduced 3D invasiveness. In line with this, FAKR454/R454 cells cannot contract the matrix in contrast to FAK wild-type cells. Finally, our findings demonstrate that active FAK facilitates 3D matrix invasion through increased cellular stiffness and transmission of actomyosin-dependent contractile force in dense 3D extracellular matrices. PMID:28202937

  15. Age-Dependent Expression of Collagen Receptors and Deformation of Type I Collagen Substrates by Rat Cardiac Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Christopher G.; Stone, John W.; Fowlkes, Vennece; Morales, Mary O.; Murphy, Catherine J.; Baxter, Sarah C.; Goldsmith, Edie C.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about how age influences the ways in which cardiac fibroblasts interact with the extracellular matrix. We investigated the deformation of collagen substrates by neonatal and adult rat cardiac fibroblasts in monolayer and three-dimensional (3D) cultures, and quantified the expression of three collagen receptors [discoidin domain receptor (DDR) 1, DDR2, and β1 integrin] and the contractile protein alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in these cells. We report that adult fibroblasts contracted 3D collagen substrates significantly less than their neonate counterparts, whereas no differences were observed in monolayer cultures. Adult cells had lower expression of β1 integrin and α-SMA than neonate cultures, and we detected significant correlations between the expression of α-SMA and each of the collagen receptors in neonate cells but not in adult cells. Consistent with recent work demonstrating age-dependent interactions with myocytes, our results indicate that interactions between cardiac fibroblasts and the extracellular matrix change with age. PMID:21740617

  16. 3D texture analysis for classification of second harmonic generation images of human ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Bruce; Campbell, Kirby R.; Tilbury, Karissa; Nadiarnykh, Oleg; Brewer, Molly A.; Patankar, Manish; Singh, Vikas; Eliceiri, Kevin. W.; Campagnola, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Remodeling of the collagen architecture in the extracellular matrix (ECM) has been implicated in ovarian cancer. To quantify these alterations we implemented a form of 3D texture analysis to delineate the fibrillar morphology observed in 3D Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy image data of normal (1) and high risk (2) ovarian stroma, benign ovarian tumors (3), low grade (4) and high grade (5) serous tumors, and endometrioid tumors (6). We developed a tailored set of 3D filters which extract textural features in the 3D image sets to build (or learn) statistical models of each tissue class. By applying k-nearest neighbor classification using these learned models, we achieved 83–91% accuracies for the six classes. The 3D method outperformed the analogous 2D classification on the same tissues, where we suggest this is due the increased information content. This classification based on ECM structural changes will complement conventional classification based on genetic profiles and can serve as an additional biomarker. Moreover, the texture analysis algorithm is quite general, as it does not rely on single morphological metrics such as fiber alignment, length, and width but their combined convolution with a customizable basis set. PMID:27767180

  17. 3D texture analysis for classification of second harmonic generation images of human ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Bruce; Campbell, Kirby R.; Tilbury, Karissa; Nadiarnykh, Oleg; Brewer, Molly A.; Patankar, Manish; Singh, Vikas; Eliceiri, Kevin. W.; Campagnola, Paul J.

    2016-10-01

    Remodeling of the collagen architecture in the extracellular matrix (ECM) has been implicated in ovarian cancer. To quantify these alterations we implemented a form of 3D texture analysis to delineate the fibrillar morphology observed in 3D Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy image data of normal (1) and high risk (2) ovarian stroma, benign ovarian tumors (3), low grade (4) and high grade (5) serous tumors, and endometrioid tumors (6). We developed a tailored set of 3D filters which extract textural features in the 3D image sets to build (or learn) statistical models of each tissue class. By applying k-nearest neighbor classification using these learned models, we achieved 83–91% accuracies for the six classes. The 3D method outperformed the analogous 2D classification on the same tissues, where we suggest this is due the increased information content. This classification based on ECM structural changes will complement conventional classification based on genetic profiles and can serve as an additional biomarker. Moreover, the texture analysis algorithm is quite general, as it does not rely on single morphological metrics such as fiber alignment, length, and width but their combined convolution with a customizable basis set.

  18. Autologous collagen induced chondrogenesis (ACIC: Shetty-Kim technique) - A matrix based acellular single stage arthroscopic cartilage repair technique.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Asode Ananthram; Kim, Seok Jung; Shetty, Vishvas; Jang, Jae Deog; Huh, Sung Woo; Lee, Dong Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The defects of articular cartilage in the knee joint are a common degenerative disease and currently there are several established techniques to treat this problem, each with their own advantages and shortcomings. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is the current gold standard but the technique is expensive, time-consuming and most versions require two stage procedures and an arthrotomy. Autologous collagen induced chondrogenesis (ACIC) is a single-stage arthroscopic procedure and we developed. This method uses microfracture technique with atelocollagen mixed with fibrin gel to treat articular cartilage defects. We introduce this ACIC techniques and its scientific background.

  19. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-07

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability.

  20. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Esteban Arango, Juan; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability.

  1. Cotransfected human chondrocytes: over-expression of IGF-I and SOX9 enhances the synthesis of cartilage matrix components collagen-II and glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Simental-Mendía, M; Lara-Arias, J; Álvarez-Lozano, E; Said-Fernández, S; Soto-Domínguez, A; Padilla-Rivas, G R; Martínez-Rodríguez, H G

    2015-12-01

    Damage to cartilage causes a loss of type II collagen (Col-II) and glycosaminoglycans (GAG). To restore the original cartilage architecture, cell factors that stimulate Col-II and GAG production are needed. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and transcription factor SOX9are essential for the synthesis of cartilage matrix, chondrocyte proliferation, and phenotype maintenance. We evaluated the combined effect of IGF-I and SOX9 transgene expression on Col-II and GAG production by cultured human articular chondrocytes. Transient transfection and cotransfection were performed using two mammalian expression plasmids (pCMV-SPORT6), one for each transgene. At day 9 post-transfection, the chondrocytes that were over-expressing IGF-I/SOX9 showed 2-fold increased mRNA expression of the Col-II gene, as well as a 57% increase in Col-II protein, whereas type I collagen expression (Col-I) was decreased by 59.3% compared with controls. The production of GAG by these cells increased significantly compared with the controls at day 9 (3.3- vs 1.8-times, an increase of almost 83%). Thus, IGF-I/SOX9 cotransfected chondrocytes may be useful for cell-based articular cartilage therapies.

  2. Characterization of whole fibril-forming collagen proteins of types I, III, and V from fetal calf skin by infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dreisewerd, Klaus; Rohlfing, Andreas; Spottke, Beatrice; Urbanke, Claus; Henkel, Werner

    2004-07-01

    Fibril-forming collagen proteins of the types I, III, and V were extracted from fetal calf skin, purified by differential salt precipitation, and analyzed by infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (IR-MALDI-TOF-MS). Glycerol was used as liquid IR-MALDI matrix. Noncovalently bound triple helices of the types I and V were detected from the NaCl precipitate. After heating at 43 degrees C for 10 min, resulting in the dissociation of the triple helix, the single alpha-chain subunits were detected. For type I, mass spectra acquired from molecular sieve chromatography fractions revealed the presence of further substructures of dimeric type and of supramolecular complexes up to the tetramer. Triple helices of type III, stabilized by covalent disulfide bonds, were detected from the total protein precipitate also after heat treatment. For type III, even hexamer and nonamer structures with molecular weights close to 600 and 900 kDa were recorded. For comparison, ultraviolet (UV-)MALDI-MS measurements with 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid as matrix were carried out with some of the samples. Here, only the single alpha-chains were detected with significantly reduced sensitivity.

  3. Modulation of the membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase cytoplasmic tail enhances tumor cell invasion and proliferation in three-dimensional collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Moss, Natalie M; Wu, Yi I; Liu, Yueying; Munshi, H G; Stack, M Sharon

    2009-07-24

    Increasing evidence suggests that the cytoplasmic tail of membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is subject to phosphorylation and that this modification may influence its enzymatic activity at the cell surface. In this study, phosphorylated MT1-MMP is detected using a phospho-specific antibody recognizing a protein kinase C consensus sequence (phospho-TXR), and a MT1-MMP tail peptide is phosphorylated by exogenous protein kinase C. To characterize the potential role of cytoplasmic residue Thr(567) in these processes, mutants that mimic a state of either constitutive (T567E) or defective phosphorylation (T567A) were expressed and analyzed for their functional effects on MT1-MMP activity and cellular behavior. Phospho-mimetic mutants of Thr(567) exhibit enhanced matrix invasion as well as more extensive growth within a three-dimensional type I collagen matrix. Together, these findings suggest that MT1-MMP surface action is regulated by phosphorylation at cytoplasmic tail residue Thr(567) and that this modification plays a critical role in processes that are linked to tumor progression.

  4. Dll4-containing exosomes induce capillary sprout retraction in a 3D microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Sharghi-Namini, Soheila; Tan, Evan; Ong, Lee-Ling Sharon; Ge, Ruowen; Asada, H Harry

    2014-02-07

    Delta-like 4 (Dll4), a membrane-bound Notch ligand, plays a fundamental role in vascular development and angiogenesis. Dll4 is highly expressed in capillary endothelial tip cells and is involved in suppressing neighboring stalk cells to become tip cells during angiogenesis. Dll4-Notch signaling is mediated either by direct cell-cell contact or by Dll4-containing exosomes from a distance. However, whether Dll4-containing exosomes influence tip cells of existing capillaries is unknown. Using a 3D microfluidic device and time-lapse confocal microscopy, we show here for the first time that Dll4-containing exosomes causes tip cells to lose their filopodia and trigger capillary sprout retraction in collagen matrix. We demonstrate that Dll4 exosomes can freely travel through 3D collagen matrix and transfer Dll4 protein to distant tip cells. Upon reaching endothelial sprout, it causes filopodia and tip cell retraction. Continuous application of Dll4 exosomes from a distance lead to significant reduction of sprout formation. This effect correlates with Notch signaling activation upon Dll4-containing exosome interaction with recipient endothelial cells. Furthermore, we show that Dll4-containing exosomes increase endothelial cell motility while suppressing their proliferation. These data revealed novel functions of Dll4 in angiogenesis through exosomes.

  5. FSH-initiated differentiation of newt spermatogonia to primary spermatocytes in germ-somatic cell reaggregates cultured within a collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Ito, R; Abé, S I

    1999-03-01

    We previously cultured fragments of newt testes in chemically defined media and showed that mammalian follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) stimulates proliferation of spermatogonia as well as their differentiation into primary spermatocytes (Ji et al., 1992; Abe and Ji, 1994). Next, we indicated in cultures composed of spermatogonia and somatic cells (mainly Sertoli cells) that FSH stimulates germ cell proliferation via Sertoli cells (Maekawa et al., 1995). However, the spermatogonia did not differentiate into primary spermatocytes, but instead died. In the present study, we embedded large reaggregates of spermatogonia and somatic cells (mainly Sertoli cells) within a collagen matrix and cultured the reaggregates on a filter that floated on chemically defined media containing FSH; in this revised culture system, spermatogonia proliferated and differentiated into primary spermatocytes. The viability and percentage of germ cells differentiating into primary spermatocytes were proportional to the percentage of somatic cells in the culture, indicating that differentiation of spermatogonia into primary spermatocytes is mediated by Sertoli cells.

  6. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  7. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    PubMed Central

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  8. Rapid onset of perfused blood vessels after implantation of ECFCs and MPCs in collagen, PuraMatrix and fibrin provisional matrices.

    PubMed

    Allen, Patrick; Kang, Kyu-Tae; Bischoff, Joyce

    2015-05-01

    We developed an in vivo vascularization model in which human endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and human mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) form blood vessel networks when co-injected (ECFC + MPC) into nude mice in rat tail type I collagen, bovine fibrin or synthetic peptide PuraMatrix matrices. We used three approaches to determine the onset of functional vascularization when ECFC + MPC suspended in these matrices were implanted in vivo. The first was immunohistochemistry to detect vessels lined by human endothelial cells and filled with red blood cells. The second was in vivo vascular staining by tail vein injection of a mixture of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), a lectin specific for human endothelium, and Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B4 (GS-IB4 ), a lectin specific for rodent endothelium. The third approach employed contrast-enhanced ultrasound to measure the perfusion volumes of implants in individual animals over time. Human endothelial-lined tubular structures were detected in vivo on days 1 and 2 after implantation, with perfused human vessels detected on days 3 and 4. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound revealed significant perfusion of ECFC + MPC/collagen implants on days 1-4, at up to 14% perfused vascular volume. ECFC + MPC implanted in fibrin and PuraMatrix matrices also supported perfusion at day 1, as assessed by ultrasound (at 12% and 23% perfused vascular volume, respectively). This model demonstrates that ECFC + MPC suspended in any of the three matrices initiated a rapid onset of vascularization. We propose that ECFC + MPC delivered in vivo provide a means to achieve rapid perfusion of tissue-engineered organs or for in situ tissue repair.

  9. Silk-based anisotropical 3D biotextiles for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Viviana P; Silva-Correia, Joana; Nascimento, Ana I; da Silva Morais, Alain; Marques, Alexandra P; Ribeiro, Ana S; Silva, Carla J; Bonifácio, Graça; Sousa, Rui A; Oliveira, Joaquim M; Oliveira, Ana L; Reis, Rui L

    2017-04-01

    Bone loss in the craniofacial complex can been treated using several conventional therapeutic strategies that face many obstacles and limitations. In this work, novel three-dimensional (3D) biotextile architectures were developed as a possible strategy for flat bone regeneration applications. As a fully automated processing route, this strategy as potential to be easily industrialized. Silk fibroin (SF) yarns were processed into weft-knitted fabrics spaced by a monofilament of polyethylene terephthalate (PET). A comparative study with a similar 3D structure made entirely of PET was established. Highly porous scaffolds with homogeneous pore distribution were observed using micro-computed tomography analysis. The wet state dynamic mechanical analysis revealed a storage modulus In the frequency range tested, the storage modulus values obtained for SF-PET scaffolds were higher than for the PET scaffolds. Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) cultured on the SF-PET spacer structures showed the typical pattern for ALP activity under osteogenic culture conditions. Osteogenic differentiation of hASCs on SF-PET and PET constructs was also observed by extracellular matrix mineralization and expression of osteogenic-related markers (osteocalcin, osteopontin and collagen type I) after 28 days of osteogenic culture, in comparison to the control basal medium. The quantification of convergent macroscopic blood vessels toward the scaffolds by a chick chorioallantoic membrane assay, showed higher angiogenic response induced by the SF-PET textile scaffolds than PET structures and gelatin sponge controls. Subcutaneous implantation in CD-1 mice revealed tissue ingrowth's accompanied by blood vessels infiltration in both spacer constructs. The structural adaptability of textile structures combined to the structural similarities of the 3D knitted spacer fabrics to craniofacial bone tissue and achieved biological performance, make these scaffolds a possible solution for tissue

  10. Twin Peaks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The two hills in the distance, approximately one to two kilometers away, have been dubbed the 'Twin Peaks' and are of great interest to Pathfinder scientists as objects of future study. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The white areas on the left hill, called the 'Ski Run' by scientists, may have been formed by hydrologic processes.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  11. 3D and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Y. C.

    1995-05-01

    This conference on physiology and function covers a wide range of subjects, including the vasculature and blood flow, the flow of gas, water, and blood in the lung, the neurological structure and function, the modeling, and the motion and mechanics of organs. Many technologies are discussed. I believe that the list would include a robotic photographer, to hold the optical equipment in a precisely controlled way to obtain the images for the user. Why are 3D images needed? They are to achieve certain objectives through measurements of some objects. For example, in order to improve performance in sports or beauty of a person, we measure the form, dimensions, appearance, and movements.

  12. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  13. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  14. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    An area of rocky terrain near the landing site of the Sagan Memorial Station can be seen in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  15. 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative real-time imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in three dimensions based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32×32 matrix-array probe. Its capability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3-D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging and finally 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3-D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, for the first time, the complex 3-D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, and the 3-D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3-D real-time mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra- and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  16. The interplay of fibronectin functionalization and TGF-β1 presence on fibroblast proliferation, differentiation and migration in 3D matrices.

    PubMed

    Sapudom, Jiranuwat; Rubner, Stefan; Martin, Steve; Thoenes, Stephan; Anderegg, Ulf; Pompe, Tilo

    2015-09-01

    Defined biomimetic three-dimensional (3D) matrices are needed to decipher the complex cellular signalling during wound healing at high resolution in vitro. Soluble factors like TGF-β1 and adhesion promoting structural components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are known to be key regulators of fibroblast behaviour. The ECM component fibronectin (FN) bears a complex function as adhesion promoter, fibrillar element and soluble factor binder. However, its implementation in biomimetic 3D matrices is frequently ill defined. To study the impact of FN on fibroblast cellular function under differentiating conditions (TGF-β1 stimulation), we functionalized 3D collagen I matrices with FN using two strategies: co-assembly and adsorptive immobilization. In comparison to co-assembly, adsorptive immobilization provided no alteration in collagen microstructure as well as mechanical properties. Moreover, this approach provided a controllable FN amount and a homogenous distribution of FN throughout collagen networks. A strong interplay of FN amount and TGF-β1 stimulation on fibroblast function was found in terms of proliferation, migration and myofibroblast differentiation. High levels of FN alone reduced proliferation and showed no effect on differentiation of fibroblasts, but increased migration. In contrast, fibroblast stimulation with high amounts of FN together with TGF-β1 increased proliferation. Independent of FN, the TGF-β1 stimulation enhanced mRNA expression of matrix components like collagen type I alpha 1 chain (Coll I(a1), FN with extra domain A (EDA-FN) and reduced cell migration. The latter cell behaviour indicated a FN independent differentiation into a myofibroblast phenotype. Overall, our 3D biomimetic matrices allow dissecting the overlapping action of the ECM protein FN and the soluble factor TGF-β1 on fibroblast proliferation, migration and differentiation in 3D microenvironments. Furthermore, this model enables the mimicking of important steps of the

  17. Structure-based development of a novel collagen inhibitor for MMP-1: re-designing the functions of a matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, James M; Yeh, Li-An

    2004-09-01

    Collagenases are a highly specific class of enzymes. In their native states, collagenases cleave only native triple helical collagen molecules at a single peptide bond between Gly775-Leu776 for Type I collagen and Gly775-Ile776 for Type II collagen. The linear sequence of collagen is about 1050 amino acids in length, where three linear peptide sequences are required to form a triple helical collagen molecule. At present, there exist no crystallographic structures of collagenase bound to native triple helical collagen; nor has it been shown that collagenase recognizes the triple helical conformation of collagen. In our study, we have used an inhibitor design structure-activity based approach to show that collagenase recognizes and cleaves triple helical collagen conformations in preference to non-triple helical collagen conformations.

  18. DDR2 plays a role in fibroblast migration independent of adhesion ligand and collagen activated DDR2 tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Herrera, Mireya Liliana; Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto

    2012-12-07

    Discoidin domain receptor-2 (DDR2) is a cell surface tyrosine kinase receptor that can be activated by soluble collagen and has been implicated in diverse physiological functions including organism growth and wound repair. In the current studies, we used fibronectin and collagen-coated 2D surfaces and collagen matrices in combination with siRNA technology to investigate the role of DDR2 in a range of fibroblast motile activ