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Sample records for 3d collagen matrix

  1. Tuning 3D Collagen Matrix Stiffness Independently of Collagen Concentration Modulates Endothelial Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Brooke N.; Starchenko, Alina; Williams, Rebecca M.; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have described the effects of matrix stiffening on cell behavior using two dimensional (2D) synthetic surfaces; however less is known about the effects of matrix stiffening on cells embedded in three dimensional (3D) in vivo-like matrices. A primary limitation in investigating the effects of matrix stiffness in 3D is the lack of materials that can be tuned to control stiffness independently of matrix density. Here, we use collagen-based scaffolds where the mechanical properties are tuned using non-enzymatic glycation of the collagen in solution, prior to polymerization. Collagen solutions glycated prior to polymerization result in collagen gels with a 3-fold increase in compressive modulus without significant changes to the collagen architecture. Using these scaffolds, we show that endothelial cell spreading increases with matrix stiffness, as does the number and length of angiogenic sprouts and the overall spheroid outgrowth. Differences in sprout length are maintained even when the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts is inhibited. Our results demonstrate the ability to de-couple matrix stiffness from matrix density and structure in collagen gels, and that increased matrix stiffness results in increased sprouting and outgrowth. PMID:22902816

  2. Vinculin is required for cell polarization, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling in 3D collagen.

    PubMed

    Thievessen, Ingo; Fakhri, Nikta; Steinwachs, Julian; Kraus, Viola; McIsaac, R Scott; Gao, Liang; Chen, Bi-Chang; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Betzig, Eric; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Waterman, Clare M; Fabry, Ben

    2015-11-01

    Vinculin is filamentous (F)-actin-binding protein enriched in integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Whereas studies in 2-dimensional (2D) tissue culture models have suggested that vinculin negatively regulates cell migration by promoting cytoskeleton-ECM coupling to strengthen and stabilize adhesions, its role in regulating cell migration in more physiologic, 3-dimensional (3D) environments is unclear. To address the role of vinculin in 3D cell migration, we analyzed the morphodynamics, migration, and ECM remodeling of primary murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with cre/loxP-mediated vinculin gene disruption in 3D collagen I cultures. We found that vinculin promoted 3D cell migration by increasing directional persistence. Vinculin was necessary for persistent cell protrusion, cell elongation, and stable cell orientation in 3D collagen, but was dispensable for lamellipodia formation, suggesting that vinculin-mediated cell adhesion to the ECM is needed to convert actin-based cell protrusion into persistent cell shape change and migration. Consistent with this finding, vinculin was necessary for efficient traction force generation in 3D collagen without affecting myosin II activity and promoted 3D collagen fiber alignment and macroscopical gel contraction. Our results suggest that vinculin promotes directionally persistent cell migration and tension-dependent ECM remodeling in complex 3D environments by increasing cell-ECM adhesion and traction force generation.

  3. Fibroblast cluster formation on 3D collagen matrices requires cell contraction dependent fibronectin matrix organization.

    PubMed

    da Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno; Ho, Chin-Han; Grinnell, Frederick

    2013-02-15

    Fibroblasts incubated on 3D collagen matrices in serum or lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-containing medium self-organize into clusters through a mechanism that requires cell contraction. However, in platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-containing medium, cells migrate as individuals and do not form clusters even though they constantly encounter each other. Here, we present evidence that a required function of cell contraction in clustering is formation of fibronectin (FN) fibrillar matrix. We found that in serum or LPA but not in PDGF or basal medium, cells organized FN (both serum and cellular) into a fibrillar, detergent-insoluble matrix. Cell clusters developed concomitant with FN matrix formation. FN fibrils accumulated beneath cells and along the borders of cell clusters in regions of cell-matrix tension. Blocking Rho kinase or myosin II activity prevented FN matrix assembly and cell clustering. Using siRNA silencing and function-blocking antibodies and peptides, we found that cell clustering and FN matrix assembly required α5β1 integrins and fibronectin. Cells were still able to exert contractile force and compact the collagen matrix under the latter conditions, which showed that contraction was not sufficient for cell clustering to occur. Our findings provide new insights into how procontractile (serum/LPA) and promigratory (PDGF) growth factor environments can differentially regulate FN matrix assembly by fibroblasts interacting with collagen matrices and thereby influence mesenchymal cell morphogenetic behavior under physiologic circumstances such as wound repair, morphogenesis and malignancy. PMID:23117111

  4. Tracking immune-related cell responses to drug delivery microparticles in 3D dense collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Obarzanek-Fojt, Magdalena; Curdy, Catherine; Loggia, Nicoletta; Di Lena, Fabio; Grieder, Kathrin; Bitar, Malak; Wick, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Beyond the therapeutic purpose, the impact of drug delivery microparticles on the local tissue and inflammatory responses remains to be further elucidated specifically for reactions mediated by the host immune cells. Such immediate and prolonged reactions may adversely influence the release efficacy and intended therapeutic pathway. The lack of suitable in vitro platforms limits our ability to gain insight into the nature of immune responses at a single cell level. In order to establish an in vitro 3D system mimicking the connective host tissue counterpart, we utilized reproducible, compressed, rat-tail collagen polymerized matrices. THP1 cells (human acute monocytic leukaemia cells) differentiated into macrophage-like cells were chosen as cell model and their functionality was retained in the dense rat-tail collagen matrix. Placebo microparticles were later combined in the immune cell seeded system during collagen polymerization and secreted pro-inflammatory factors: TNFα and IL-8 were used as immune response readout (ELISA). Our data showed an elevated TNFα and IL-8 secretion by macrophage THP1 cells indicating that Placebo microparticles trigger certain immune cell responses under 3D in vivo like conditions. Furthermore, we have shown that the system is sensitive to measure the differences in THP1 macrophage pro-inflammatory responses to Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) microparticles with different API release kinetics. We have successfully developed a tissue-like, advanced, in vitro system enabling selective "readouts" of specific responses of immune-related cells. Such system may provide the basis of an advanced toolbox enabling systemic evaluation and prediction of in vivo microparticle reactions on human immune-related cells.

  5. Planar Gradient Diffusion System to Investigate Chemotaxis in a 3D Collagen Matrix.

    PubMed

    Stout, David A; Toyjanova, Jennet; Franck, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The importance of cell migration can be seen through the development of human life. When cells migrate, they generate forces and transfer these forces to their surrounding area, leading to cell movement and migration. In order to understand the mechanisms that can alter and/or affect cell migration, one can study these forces. In theory, understanding the fundamental mechanisms and forces underlying cell migration holds the promise of effective approaches for treating diseases and promoting cellular transplantation. Unfortunately, modern chemotaxis chambers that have been developed are usually restricted to two dimensions (2D) and have complex diffusion gradients that make the experiment difficult to interpret. To this end, we have developed, and describe in this paper, a direct-viewing chamber for chemotaxis studies, which allows one to overcome modern chemotaxis chamber obstacles able to measure cell forces and specific concentration within the chamber in a 3D environment to study cell 3D migration. More compelling, this approach allows one to successfully model diffusion through 3D collagen matrices and calculate the coefficient of diffusion of a chemoattractant through multiple different concentrations of collagen, while keeping the system simple and user friendly for traction force microscopy (TFM) and digital volume correlation (DVC) analysis. PMID:26131645

  6. Highlighting the impact of aging on type I collagen: label-free investigation using confocal reflectance microscopy and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in 3D matrix model.

    PubMed

    Guilbert, Marie; Roig, Blandine; Terryn, Christine; Garnotel, Roselyne; Jeannesson, Pierre; Sockalingum, Ganesh D; Manfait, Michel; Perraut, François; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Koenig, Anne; Piot, Olivier

    2016-02-23

    During aging, alterations of extracellular matrix proteins contribute to various pathological phenotypes. Among these alterations, type I collagen cross-linking and associated glycation products accumulation over time detrimentally affects its physico-chemical properties, leading to alterations of tissue biomechanical stability. Here, different-age collagen 3D matrices using non-destructive and label-free biophotonic techniques were analysed to highlight the impact of collagen I aging on 3D constructs, at macroscopic and microscopic levels. Matrices were prepared with collagens extracted from tail tendons of rats (newborns, young and old adults) to be within the physiological aging process. The data of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy reveal that aging leads to an inhibition of fibril assembly and a resulting decrease of gel density. Investigations by confocal reflectance microscopy highlight poor-fibrillar structures in oldest collagen networks most likely related to the glycation products accumulation. Complementarily, an infrared analysis brings out marked spectral variations in the Amide I profile, specific of the peptidic bond conformation and for carbohydrates vibrations as function of collagen-age. Interestingly, we also highlight an unexpected behavior for newborn collagen, exhibiting poorly-organized networks and microscopic features close to the oldest collagen. These results demonstrate that changes in collagen optical properties are relevant for investigating the incidence of aging in 3D matrix models.

  7. Highlighting the impact of aging on type I collagen: label-free investigation using confocal reflectance microscopy and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in 3D matrix model

    PubMed Central

    Terryn, Christine; Garnotel, Roselyne; Jeannesson, Pierre; Sockalingum, Ganesh D.; Manfait, Michel; Perraut, François; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Koenig, Anne; Piot, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    During aging, alterations of extracellular matrix proteins contribute to various pathological phenotypes. Among these alterations, type I collagen cross-linking and associated glycation products accumulation over time detrimentally affects its physico-chemical properties, leading to alterations of tissue biomechanical stability. Here, different-age collagen 3D matrices using non-destructive and label-free biophotonic techniques were analysed to highlight the impact of collagen I aging on 3D constructs, at macroscopic and microscopic levels. Matrices were prepared with collagens extracted from tail tendons of rats (newborns, young and old adults) to be within the physiological aging process. The data of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy reveal that aging leads to an inhibition of fibril assembly and a resulting decrease of gel density. Investigations by confocal reflectance microscopy highlight poor-fibrillar structures in oldest collagen networks most likely related to the glycation products accumulation. Complementarily, an infrared analysis brings out marked spectral variations in the Amide I profile, specific of the peptidic bond conformation and for carbohydrates vibrations as function of collagen-age. Interestingly, we also highlight an unexpected behavior for newborn collagen, exhibiting poorly-organized networks and microscopic features close to the oldest collagen. These results demonstrate that changes in collagen optical properties are relevant for investigating the incidence of aging in 3D matrix models. PMID:26885896

  8. Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes in 3D Collagen I culture: an in vitro physiological environment for the study of extracellular matrix and host cell interactions

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Juliany C.F.; Viana, Nathan B.; Pontes, Bruno; Pereira, Camila F.A.; Silva-Filho, Fernando C.

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis is the causative agent of American cutaneous leishmaniasis, an important neglected tropical disease. Once Leishmania amazonensis is inoculated into the human host, promastigotes are exposed to the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the dermis. However, little is known about the interaction between the ECM and Leishmania promastigotes. In this study we established L. amazonensis promastigote culture in a three-dimensional (3D) environment mainly composed of Collagen I (COL I). This 3D culture recreates in vitro some aspects of the human host infection site, enabling the study of the interaction mechanisms of L. amazonensis with the host ECM. Promastigotes exhibited “freeze and run” migration in the 3D COL I matrix, which is completely different from the conventional in vitro swimming mode of migration. Moreover, L. amazonensis promastigotes were able to invade, migrate inside, and remodel the 3D COL I matrix. Promastigote trans-matrix invasion and the freeze and run migration mode were also observed when macrophages were present in the matrix. At least two classes of proteases, metallo- and cysteine proteases, are involved in the 3D COL I matrix degradation caused by Leishmania. Treatment with a mixture of protease inhibitors significantly reduced promastigote invasion and migration through this matrix. Together our results demonstrate that L. amazonensis promastigotes release proteases and actively remodel their 3D environment, facilitating their migration. This raises the possibility that promastigotes actively interact with their 3D environment during the search for their cellular “home”—macrophages. Supporting this hypothesis, promastigotes migrated faster than macrophages in a novel 3D co-culture model. PMID:24765565

  9. Reduced serum content and increased matrix stiffness promote the cardiac myofibroblast transition in 3D collagen matrices.

    PubMed Central

    Galie, Peter A.; Westfall, Margaret V.; Stegemann, Jan P.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The fibroblast-myofibroblast transition is an important event in the development of cardiac fibrosis and scar formation initiated after myocardial ischemia. The goals of the present study were to better understand the contribution of environmental factors to this transition and determine whether myofibroblasts provide equally important feedback to the surrounding environment. Methods The influence of matrix stiffness and serum concentration on the myofibroblast transition was assessed by measuring message levels of a panel of cardiac fibroblast phenotype markers using quantitative rtPCR. Cell-mediated gel compaction measured the influence of environmental factors on cardiac fibroblast contractility. Immunohistochemistry characterized α-SMA expression and cell morphology, while static and dynamic compression testing evaluated the effect of the cell response on the mechanical properties of the cell-seeded collagen hydrogels. Results Both reduced serum content and increased matrix stiffness contributed to the myofibroblast transition, as indicated by contractile compaction of the gels, increased message levels of col3α1 and α-SMA, and a less stellate morphology. However, the effects of serum and matrix stiffness were not additive. Mechanical testing indicated the cell-seeded gels became less viscoelastic with time, and that reduced serum content also increased the initial elastic properties of the gel. Conclusions The results suggest that reduced serum and increased matrix stiffness promote the myofibroblast phenotype in the myocardium. This transition both enhances and is promoted by matrix stiffness, indicating the presence of positive feedback that may contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis. Summary Lower serum content and increased matrix stiffness accelerated the transition of cardiac fibroblasts seeded in collagen hydrogels to a myofibroblast phenotype, though their effects were not additive. Reduced serum also affected mechanical

  10. Generation of 3D Collagen Gels with Controlled Diverse Architectures.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Rat tail collagen solutions have been used as polymerizable in vitro three dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) gels for single and collective cell migration assays as well as spheroid formation. Factors such as ECM concentration, pH, ionic concentration, and temperature can alter collagen polymerization and ECM architecture. This unit describes how to generate 3D collagen gels that have distinct architectures ranging from a highly reticular meshwork of short thin fibrils with small pores to a loose matrix consisting of stiff, parallel-bundled long fibrils by changing collagen polymerization temperature. This permits analysis of 3D cell migration in different ECM architectures found in vivo while maintaining a similar ECM concentration. Also included are collagen labeling techniques helpful for ECM visualization during live fluorescence imaging. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27580704

  11. Epidermal growth factor promotes a mesenchymal over an amoeboid motility of MDA-MB-231 cells embedded within a 3D collagen matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geum, Dongil T.; Kim, Beum Jun; Chang, Audrey E.; Hall, Matthew S.; Wu, Mingming

    2016-01-01

    The receptor of epidermal growth factor (EGFR) critically regulates tumor cell invasion and is a potent therapeutic target for treatment of many types of cancers, including carcinomas and glioblastomas. It is known that EGF regulates cell motility when tumor cells are embedded within a 3D biomatrix. However, roles of EGF in modulating tumor cell motility phenotype are largely unknown. In this article, we report that EGF promotes a mesenchymal over an amoeboid motility phenotype using a malignant breast tumor cell line, MDA-MB-231, embedded within a 3D collagen matrix. Amoeboid cells are rounded in shape, while mesenchymal cells are elongated, and their migrations are governed by a distinctly different set of biomolecules. Using single cell tracking analysis, we also show that EGF promotes cell dissemination through a significant increase in cell persistence along with a moderate increase of speed. The increase of persistence is correlated with the increase of the percentage of the mesenchymal cells within the population. Our work reveals a novel role of microenvironmental cue, EGF, in modulating heterogeneity and plasticity of tumor cell motility phenotype. In addition, it suggests a potential visual cue for diagnosing invasive states of breast cancer cells. This work can be easily extended beyond breast cancer cells.

  12. Toward single cell traction microscopy within 3D collagen matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Matthew S.; Long, Rong; Feng, Xinzeng; Huang, YuLing; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Wu, Mingming

    2013-10-01

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Cells require the three-dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, current understanding of cell–ECM and cell–cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D cell traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. 3D cell traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single animal cells embedded in either synthetic or natively derived fibrous gels. We discuss here the development of 3D cell traction microscopy, its current limitations, and perspectives on the future of this technology. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying 3D cell traction microscopy to individual tumor cell migration within collagen gels. - Highlights: • Review of the current state of the art in 3D cell traction force microscopy. • Bulk and micro-characterization of remodelable fibrous collagen gels. • Strategies for performing 3D cell traction microscopy within collagen gels.

  13. Towards Single Cell Traction Microscopy within 3D Collagen Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Matthew S.; Long, Rong; Feng, Xinzeng; Huang, YuLing; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Wu, Mingming

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Cells require the three dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, current understanding of cell-ECM and cell-cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D cell traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. 3D cell traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single animal cells embedded in either synthetic or natively derived fibrous gels. We discuss here the development of 3D cell traction microscopy, its current limitations, and perspectives on the future of this technology. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying 3D cell traction microscopy to individual tumor cells migration within collagen gels. PMID:23806281

  14. 3D cancer cell migration in a confined matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alobaidi, Amani; Sun, Bo

    Cancer cell migration is widely studied in 2D motion, which does not mimic the invasion processes in vivo. More recently, 3D cell migration studies have been performed. The ability of cancer cells to migrate within the extracellular matrix depends on the physical and biochemical features of the extracellular matrix. We present a model of cell motility in confined matrix geometry. The aim of the study is to study cancer migration in collagen matrix, as a soft tissue, to investigate their motility within the confined and surrounding collagen environment. Different collagen concentrations have been used to show the ability of these cancer cells to move through such a complex structure by measuring Cancer cell migration velocity as well as the displacement. Graduate student physics department.

  15. Enhancement of neurite outgrowth in neuron cancer stem cells by growth on 3-D collagen scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Kuo, Shyh Ming; Liu, Guei-Sheung; Chen, Wan-Nan U.; Chuang, Chin-Wen; Liu, Li-Feng

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neuron cancer stem cells (NCSCs) behave high multiply of growth on collagen scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhancement of NCSCs neurite outgrowth on porous collagen scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3-D collagen culture of NCSCs shows an advance differentiation than 2-D culture. -- Abstract: Collagen is one component of the extracellular matrix that has been widely used for constructive remodeling to facilitate cell growth and differentiation. The 3-D distribution and growth of cells within the porous scaffold suggest a clinical significance for nerve tissue engineering. In the current study, we investigated proliferation and differentiation of neuron cancer stem cells (NCSCs) on a 3-D porous collagen scaffold that mimics the natural extracellular matrix. We first generated green fluorescence protein (GFP) expressing NCSCs using a lentiviral system to instantly monitor the transitions of morphological changes during growth on the 3-D scaffold. We found that proliferation of GFP-NCSCs increased, and a single cell mass rapidly grew with unrestricted expansion between days 3 and 9 in culture. Moreover, immunostaining with neuronal nuclei (NeuN) revealed that NCSCs grown on the 3-D collagen scaffold significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth. Our findings confirmed that the 80 {mu}m porous collagen scaffold could enhance attachment, viability and differentiation of the cancer neural stem cells. This result could provide a new application for nerve tissue engineering and nerve regeneration.

  16. Imaging and 3D morphological analysis of collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Altendorf, H; Decencière, E; Jeulin, D; De sa Peixoto, P; Deniset-Besseau, A; Angelini, E; Mosser, G; Schanne-Klein, M-C

    2012-08-01

    The recent booming of multiphoton imaging of collagen fibrils by means of second harmonic generation microscopy generates the need for the development and automation of quantitative methods for image analysis. Standard approaches sequentially analyse two-dimensional (2D) slices to gain knowledge on the spatial arrangement and dimension of the fibrils, whereas the reconstructed three-dimensional (3D) image yields better information about these characteristics. In this work, a 3D analysis method is proposed for second harmonic generation images of collagen fibrils, based on a recently developed 3D fibre quantification method. This analysis uses operators from mathematical morphology. The fibril structure is scanned with a directional distance transform. Inertia moments of the directional distances yield the main fibre orientation, corresponding to the main inertia axis. The collaboration of directional distances and fibre orientation delivers a geometrical estimate of the fibre radius. The results include local maps as well as global distribution of orientation and radius of the fibrils over the 3D image. They also bring a segmentation of the image into foreground and background, as well as a classification of the foreground pixels into the preferred orientations. This accurate determination of the spatial arrangement of the fibrils within a 3D data set will be most relevant in biomedical applications. It brings the possibility to monitor remodelling of collagen tissues upon a variety of injuries and to guide tissues engineering because biomimetic 3D organizations and density are requested for better integration of implants.

  17. MMP Regulation of Corneal Keratocyte Motility and Mechanics in 3-D Collagen Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chengxin; Petroll, W. Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) can stimulate corneal keratocyte spreading and migration within 3-D collagen matrices, without inducing transformation to a contractile, fibroblastic phenotype. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in regulating PDGF-induced changes in keratocyte motility and mechanical differentiation. Rabbit corneal keratocytes were isolated and cultured in serum-free media (S-) to maintain their quiescent phenotype. A nested collagen matrix construct was used to assess 3-D cell migration, and a standard collagen matrix model was used to assess cell morphology and cell-mediated matrix contraction. In both cases constructs were cultured in S- supplemented with PDGF, with or without the broad spectrum MMP inhibitors GM6001 or BB-94. After 4 days, f-actin, nuclei and collagen fibrils were imaged using confocal microscopy. To assess sub-cellular mechanical activity (extension and retraction of cell processes), time-lapse DIC imaging was also performed. MT1-MMP expression and MMP-mediated collagen degradation by were also examined. Results demonstrated that neither GM6001 nor BB-94 affected corneal keratocyte viability or proliferation in 3-D culture. PDGF stimulated elongation and migration of corneal keratocytes within type I collagen matrices, without causing a loss of their dendritic morphology or inducing formation of intracellular stress fibers. Treatment with GM6001 and BB-94 inhibited PDGF-induced keratocyte spreading and migration. Relatively low levels of keratocyte-induced matrix contraction were also maintained in PDGF, and the amount of PDGF-induced collagen degradation was similar to that observed in S- controls. The collagen degradation pattern was consistent with membrane-associated MMP activity, and keratocytes showed positive staining for MT1-MMP, albeit weak. Both matrix contraction and collagen degradation were reduced by MMP inhibition. For most

  18. Multiphoton crosslinking for biocompatible 3D printing of type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Bell, Alex; Kofron, Matthew; Nistor, Vasile

    2015-09-01

    Multiphoton fabrication is a powerful technique for three-dimensional (3D) printing of structures at the microscale. Many polymers and proteins have been successfully structured and patterned using this method. Type I collagen comprises a large part of the extracellular matrix for most tissue types and is a widely used cellular scaffold material for tissue engineering. Current methods for creating collagen tissue scaffolds do not allow control of local geometry on a cellular scale. This means the environment experienced by cells may be made up of the native material but unrelated to native cellular-scale structure. In this study, we present a novel method to allow multiphoton crosslinking of type I collagen with flavin mononucleotide photosensitizer. The method detailed allows full 3D printing of crosslinked structures made from unmodified type I collagen and uses only demonstrated biocompatible materials. Resolution of 1 μm for both standing lines and high-aspect ratio gaps between structures is demonstrated and complex 3D structures are fabricated. This study demonstrates a means for 3D printing with one of the most widely used tissue scaffold materials. High-resolution, 3D control of the fabrication of collagen scaffolds will facilitate higher fidelity recreation of the native extracellular environment for engineered tissues.

  19. 3D Extracellular Matrix from Sectioned Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Catherine B; Cukierman, Edna; Artym, Vira V

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) matrices have significant advantages compared to conventional two-dimensional (2D) matrices for studying cell adhesion, migration, and tissue organization. Cellular behavior is dependent on the surrounding matrix environment for signaling and induction of biological responses (Carletti, et al., 2011; Pampaloni, et al., 2007; Vlodavsky, 1999). 2D cultures induce an artificial polarity in cultured cells between upper and lower surfaces not present normally in the in vivo environment. No longer nonpolar, many aspects of cellular behavior are altered (Beacham, et al., 2007; Grinnell and Petroll, 2010; Yamada and Cukierman, 2007). In addition, 2D models lack the physical properties of 3D matrix, such as topography, stiffness, and dimensionality. To begin to mimic the 3D environment of in vivo connective tissue extracellular matrix (ECM), collagen gels have been used widely (see Unit 10.3). Culture of cells in collagen gels results in a bipolar fibroblast morphology that resembles the in vivo phenotype (Friedl and Brocker, 2000; Even-Ram and Yamada, 2005; Grinnell and Petroll, 2010). Although more physiological, 3D collagen gels lack the complex biochemical and physical microenvironment present in an in vivo ECM that regulates cellular physiological properties (Beacham, et al., 2007). A variety of methods to create a more in vivo-like ECM have been published (Yamada and Cukierman, 2007). Adding critical ECM components to 3D collagen matrices, including fibronectin, hyaluronan, link protein and glycosaminoglycans, can more accurately mimic the structural microenvironment of the native ECM (Friedl and Brocker, 2000). Other ECM models use cultured cell lines, such as fibroblasts, to derive an ECM lattice through secretion of an organized ECM (Beacham, et al., 2007). Different cell lines have been chosen to generate a specific microenvironment for study of particularly types of cellular behavior (Kutys and Yamada, 2013). For example, cultured bovine

  20. MCPIP1 regulates fibroblast migration in 3D collagen matrices downstream of MAP kinases and NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jie; Dai, Xiaoniu; Peña, Tiffany; Doyle, David A.; Guenther, Timothy M.; Carlson, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The fibroblast-populated 3D collagen matrix has been used to model matrix contraction, cell motility, and general fibroblast biology. MCPIP1 (monocyte chemotactic protein-induced protein 1) has been shown to regulate inflammation, angiogenesis, and cellular motility. In the present study, we demonstrated induction of MCPIP1 in human fibroblasts embedded in the stress-released 3D collagen matrix, which occurred through activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, and NF-κB. Furthermore, MCPIP1 induction was associated with inhibition of fibroblast migration out of the nested collagen matrix. MCPIP1 induction or ectopic expression also upregulated p53. RNA interference of p53 prevented the inhibition of migration produced by induction or ectopic expression of MCPIP1. Our findings suggest a new role for MCPIP1 as a molecular switch that regulates fibroblast migration in the nested collagen matrix model. PMID:26399696

  1. An Experimental Model for Assessing Fibroblast Migration in 3-D Collagen Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Karamichos, Dimitris; Lakshman, Neema; Petroll, W. Matthew

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and test a novel culture model for studying fibroblast migration in 3-D collagen matrices. Human corneal fibroblasts were seeded within dense, randomly oriented compressed collagen matrices. A 6 mm diameter button of this cell-seeded matrix was placed in the middle of an acellular, less dense outer collagen matrix. These constructs were cultured for 1, 3, 5 or 7 days in serum-free media, 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), or 50 ng/ml PDGF. Constructs were then fixed and labeled with AlexaFluor 546 phalloidin (for f-actin) and TOTO-3 (for nuclei). Cell-matrix interactions were assessed using a combination of fluorescent and reflected light confocal imaging. Human corneal fibroblasts in serum-free media showed minimal migration into the outer (non-compressed) matrix. In contrast, culture in serum or PDGF stimulated cell migration. Cell-induced collagen matrix reorganization in the outer matrix could be directly visualized using reflected light imaging, and was highest following culture in 10% FBS. Cellular contraction in 10% FBS often led to alignment of cells parallel to the outer edge of the inner matrix, similar to the pattern observed during corneal wound healing following incisional surgery. Overall, this 3-D model allows the effects of different culture conditions on cell migration and matrix remodeling to be assessed simultaneously. In addition, the design allows for ECM density, geometry and mechanical constraints to be varied in a controlled fashion. These initial results demonstrate differences in cell and matrix patterning during migration in response to serum and PDGF. PMID:19061246

  2. 3D in vitro bioengineered tumors based on collagen I hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Szot, Christopher S.; Buchanan, Cara F.; Freeman, Joseph W.; Rylander, Marissa N.

    2011-01-01

    Cells cultured within a three-dimensional (3D) in vitro environment have the ability to acquire phenotypes and respond to stimuli analogous to in vivo biological systems. This approach has been utilized in tissue engineering and can also be applied to the development of a physiologically relevant in vitro tumor model. In this study, collagen I hydrogels cultured with MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells were bioengineered as a platform for in vitro solid tumor development. The cell–cell and cell-matrix interactions present during in vivo tissue progression were encouraged within the 3D hydrogel architecture, and the biocompatibility of collagen I supported unconfined cellular proliferation. The development of necrosis beyond a depth of ~150–200 μm and the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α were demonstrated in the in vitro bioengineered tumors. Oxygen and nutrient diffusion limitations through the collagen I matrix as well as competition for available nutrients resulted in growing levels of intra-cellular hypoxia, quantified by a statistically significant (p < 0.01) upregulation of HIF-1α gene expression. The bioengineered tumors also demonstrated promising angiogenic potential with a statistically significant (p < 0.001) upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A gene expression. In addition, comparable gene expression analysis demonstrated a statistically significant increase of HIF-1α (p < 0.05) and VEGF-A (p < 0.001) by MDA-MB-231 cells cultured in the 3D collagen I hydrogels compared to cells cultured in a monolayer on two-dimensional tissue culture polystyrene. The results presented in this study demonstrate the capacity of collagen I hydrogels to facilitate the development of 3D in vitro bioengineered tumors that are representative of the pre-vascularized stages of in vivo solid tumor progression. PMID:21782234

  3. Engineered 3D Silk-collagen-based Model of Polarized Neural Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Chwalek, Karolina; Sood, Disha; Cantley, William L.; White, James D.; Tang-Schomer, Min; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite huge efforts to decipher the anatomy, composition and function of the brain, it remains the least understood organ of the human body. To gain a deeper comprehension of the neural system scientists aim to simplistically reconstruct the tissue by assembling it in vitro from basic building blocks using a tissue engineering approach. Our group developed a tissue-engineered silk and collagen-based 3D brain-like model resembling the white and gray matter of the cortex. The model consists of silk porous sponge, which is pre-seeded with rat brain-derived neurons, immersed in soft collagen matrix. Polarized neuronal outgrowth and network formation is observed with separate axonal and cell body localization. This compartmental architecture allows for the unique development of niches mimicking native neural tissue, thus enabling research on neuronal network assembly, axonal guidance, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and electrical functions. PMID:26555926

  4. Effect of HDAC Inhibitors on Corneal Keratocyte Mechanical Phenotypes in 3-D Collagen Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Koppaka, Vindhya; Lakshman, Neema

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDAC) have been shown to inhibit the TGFβ-induced myofibroblast transformation of corneal fibroblasts in 2-D culture. However, the effect of HDAC inhibitors on keratocyte spreading, contraction, and matrix remodeling in 3-D culture has not been directly assessed. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of the HDAC inhibitors Trichostatin A (TSA) and Vorinostat (SAHA) on corneal keratocyte mechanical phenotypes in 3-D culture using defined serum-free culture conditions. Methods: Rabbit corneal keratocytes were plated within standard rat tail type I collagen matrices (2.5 mg/ml) or compressed collagen matrices (~100 mg/ml) and cultured for up to 4 days in serum-free media, PDGF BB, TGFβ1, and either 50 nM TSA, 10 μM SAHA, or vehicle (DMSO). F-actin, α-SM-actin, and collagen fibrils were imaged using confocal microscopy. Cell morphology and global matrix contraction were quantified digitally. The expression of α-SM-actin was assessed using western blotting. Results: Corneal keratocytes in 3-D matrices had a quiescent mechanical phenotype, as indicated by a dendritic morphology, a lack of stress fibers, and minimal cell-induced matrix remodeling. This phenotype was generally maintained following the addition of TSA or SAHA. TGFβ1 induced a contractile phenotype, as indicated by a loss of dendritic cell processes, the development of stress fibers, and significant matrix compaction. In contrast, cells cultured in TGFβ1 plus TSA or SAHA remained dendritic and did not form stress fibers or induce ECM compaction. Western blotting showed that the expression of α-SM actin after treatment with TGFβ1 was inhibited by TSA and SAHA. PDGF BB stimulated the elongation of keratocytes and the extension of dendritic processes within 3-D matrices without inducing stress fiber formation or collagen reorganization. This spreading response was maintained in the presence of TSA or SAHA. Conclusions: Overall, HDAC inhibitors

  5. Control of vascular network location in millimeter-sized 3D-tissues by micrometer-sized collagen coated cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Yen; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2016-03-25

    Engineering three-dimensional (3D) vascularized constructs remains a central challenge because capillary network structures are important for sufficient oxygen and nutrient exchange to sustain the viability of engineered constructs. However, construction of 3D-tissues at single cell level has yet to be reported. Previously, we established a collagen coating method for fabricating a micrometer-sized collagen matrix on cell surfaces to control cell distance or cell densities inside tissues. In this study, a simple fabrication method is presented for constructing vascular networks in 3D-tissues over micrometer-sized or even millimeter-sized with controlled cell densities. From the results, well vascularized 3D network structures can be observed with a fluorescence label method mixing collagen coated cells and endothelia cells, indicating that constructed ECM rich tissues have the potential for vascularization, which opens up the possibility for various applications in pharmaceutical or tissue engineering fields.

  6. Development of bioartificial myocardium by electrostimulation of 3D collagen scaffolds seeded with stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Haneef, Kanwal; Lila, Nermine; Benadda, Samira; Legrand, Fabien; Carpentier, Alain; Chachques, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Electrostimulation (ES) can be defined as a safe physical method to induce stem cell differentiation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of ES on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) seeded in collagen scaffolds in terms of proliferation and differentiation into cardiomyocytes. BMSCs were isolated from Wistar rats and seeded into 3D collagen type 1 templates measuring 25 × 25 × 6 mm. Bipolar in vitro ES was performed during 21 days. Electrical impedance and cell proliferation were measured. Expression of cardiac markers was assessed by immunocytochemistry. Viscoelasticity of collagen matrix was evaluated. Electrical impedance assessments showed a low resistance of 234±41 Ohms which indicates good electrical conductivity of collagen matrix. Cell proliferation at 570 nm as significantly increased in ES groups after seven day (ES 0.129±0.03 vs non-stimulated control matrix 0.06±0.01, P=0.002) and after 21 days, (ES 0.22±0.04 vs control 0.13±0.01, P=0.01). Immunocytoche mistry of BMSCs after 21 days ES showed positive staining of cardiac markers, troponin I, connexin 43, sarcomeric alpha-actinin, slow myosin, fast myosin and desmin. Staining for BMSCs marker CD29 after 21 days was negative. Electrostimulation of cell-seeded collagen matrix changed stem cell morphology and biochemical characteristics, increasing the expression of cardiac markers. Thus, MSC-derived differentiated cells by electrostimulation grafted in biological scaffolds might result in a convenient tissue engineering source for myocardial diseases. PMID:23185681

  7. Development of bioartificial myocardium by electrostimulation of 3D collagen scaffolds seeded with stem cells.

    PubMed

    Haneef, Kanwal; Lila, Nermine; Benadda, Samira; Legrand, Fabien; Carpentier, Alain; Chachques, Juan C

    2012-06-01

    Electrostimulation (ES) can be defined as a safe physical method to induce stem cell differentiation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of ES on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) seeded in collagen scaffolds in terms of proliferation and differentiation into cardiomyocytes. BMSCs were isolated from Wistar rats and seeded into 3D collagen type 1 templates measuring 25 × 25 × 6 mm. Bipolar in vitro ES was performed during 21 days. Electrical impedance and cell proliferation were measured. Expression of cardiac markers was assessed by immunocytochemistry. Viscoelasticity of collagen matrix was evaluated. Electrical impedance assessments showed a low resistance of 234±41 Ohms which indicates good electrical conductivity of collagen matrix. Cell proliferation at 570 nm as significantly increased in ES groups after seven day (ES 0.129±0.03 vs non-stimulated control matrix 0.06±0.01, P=0.002) and after 21 days, (ES 0.22±0.04 vs control 0.13±0.01, P=0.01). Immunocytoche mistry of BMSCs after 21 days ES showed positive staining of cardiac markers, troponin I, connexin 43, sarcomeric alpha-actinin, slow myosin, fast myosin and desmin. Staining for BMSCs marker CD29 after 21 days was negative. Electrostimulation of cell-seeded collagen matrix changed stem cell morphology and biochemical characteristics, increasing the expression of cardiac markers. Thus, MSC-derived differentiated cells by electrostimulation grafted in biological scaffolds might result in a convenient tissue engineering source for myocardial diseases.

  8. In the beginning there were soft collagen-cell gels: towards better 3D connective tissue models?

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert A

    2013-10-01

    In the 40 years since Elsdale and Bard's analysis of fibroblast culture in collagen gels we have moved far beyond the concept that such 3D fibril network systems are better models than monolayer cultures. This review analyses key aspects of that progression of models, against a background of what exactly each model system tries to mimic. This story tracks our increasing understanding of fibroblast responses to soft collagen gels, in particularly their cytoskeletal contraction, migration and integrin attachment. The focus on fibroblast mechano-function has generated models designed to directly measure the overall force generated by fibroblast populations, their reaction to external loads and the role of the matrix structure. Key steps along this evolution of 3D collagen models have been designed to mimic normal skin, wound repair, tissue morphogenesis and remodelling, growth and contracture during scarring/fibrosis. As new models are developed to understand cell-mechanical function in connective tissues the collagen material has become progressively more important, now being engineered to mimic more complex aspects of native extracellular matrix structure. These have included collagen fibril density, alignment and hierarchical structure, controlling material stiffness and anisotropy. But of these, tissue-like collagen density is key in that it contributes to control of the others. It is concluded that across this 40 year window major progress has been made towards establishing a family of 3D experimental collagen tissue-models, suitable to investigate normal and pathological fibroblast mechano-functions.

  9. Engineering multi-layered skeletal muscle tissue by using 3D microgrooved collagen scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shangwu; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2015-12-01

    Preparation of three-dimensional (3D) micropatterned porous scaffolds remains a great challenge for engineering of highly organized tissues such as skeletal muscle tissue and cardiac tissue. Two-dimensional (2D) micropatterned surfaces with periodic features (several nanometers to less than 100 μm) are commonly used to guide the alignment of muscle myoblasts and myotubes and lead to formation of pre-patterned cell sheets. However, cell sheets from 2D patterned surfaces have limited thickness, and harvesting the cell sheets for implantation is inconvenient and can lead to less alignment of myotubes. 3D micropatterned scaffolds can promote cell alignment and muscle tissue formation. In this study, we developed a novel type of 3D porous collagen scaffolds with concave microgrooves that mimic muscle basement membrane to engineer skeletal muscle tissue. Highly aligned and multi-layered muscle bundle tissues were engineered by controlling the size of microgrooves and cell seeding concentration. Myoblasts in the engineered muscle tissue were well-aligned and had high expression of myosin heavy chain and synthesis of muscle extracellular matrix. The microgrooved collagen scaffolds could be used to engineer organized multi-layered muscle tissue for implantation to repair/restore the function of diseased tissues or be used to investigate the cell-cell interaction in 3D microscale topography.

  10. Mueller matrix three-dimensional directional imaging of collagen fibers.

    PubMed

    Ellingsen, Pål Gunnar; Aas, Lars Martin Sandvik; Hagen, Vegard Stenhjem; Kumar, Rajesh; Lilledahl, Magnus Borstad; Kildemo, Morten

    2014-02-01

    A method for measuring three-dimensional (3-D) direction images of collagen fibers in biological tissue is presented. Images of the 3-D directions are derived from the measured transmission Mueller matrix images (MMIs), acquired at different incidence angles, by taking advantage of the form birefringence of the collagen fibers. The MMIs are decomposed using the recently developed differential decomposition, which is more suited to biological tissue samples than the common polar decomposition method. Validation of the 3-D direction images was performed by comparing them with images from second-harmonic generation microscopy. The comparison found a good agreement between the two methods. It is envisaged that 3-D directional imaging could become a useful tool for understanding the collagen framework for fibers smaller than the diffraction limit.

  11. Mueller matrix three-dimensional directional imaging of collagen fibers.

    PubMed

    Ellingsen, Pål Gunnar; Aas, Lars Martin Sandvik; Hagen, Vegard Stenhjem; Kumar, Rajesh; Lilledahl, Magnus Borstad; Kildemo, Morten

    2014-02-01

    A method for measuring three-dimensional (3-D) direction images of collagen fibers in biological tissue is presented. Images of the 3-D directions are derived from the measured transmission Mueller matrix images (MMIs), acquired at different incidence angles, by taking advantage of the form birefringence of the collagen fibers. The MMIs are decomposed using the recently developed differential decomposition, which is more suited to biological tissue samples than the common polar decomposition method. Validation of the 3-D direction images was performed by comparing them with images from second-harmonic generation microscopy. The comparison found a good agreement between the two methods. It is envisaged that 3-D directional imaging could become a useful tool for understanding the collagen framework for fibers smaller than the diffraction limit. PMID:24503637

  12. Collagen matrix as a tool in studying fibroblastic cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Kanta, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen is a fibrillar protein, a member of a large family of collagen proteins. It is present in most body tissues, usually in combination with other collagens and other components of extracellular matrix. Its synthesis is increased in various pathological situations, in healing wounds, in fibrotic tissues and in many tumors. After extraction from collagen-rich tissues it is widely used in studies of cell behavior, especially those of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Cells cultured in a classical way, on planar plastic dishes, lack the third dimension that is characteristic of body tissues. Collagen I forms gel at neutral pH and may become a basis of a 3D matrix that better mimics conditions in tissue than plastic dishes.

  13. Collagen matrix as a tool in studying fibroblastic cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Kanta, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen is a fibrillar protein, a member of a large family of collagen proteins. It is present in most body tissues, usually in combination with other collagens and other components of extracellular matrix. Its synthesis is increased in various pathological situations, in healing wounds, in fibrotic tissues and in many tumors. After extraction from collagen-rich tissues it is widely used in studies of cell behavior, especially those of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Cells cultured in a classical way, on planar plastic dishes, lack the third dimension that is characteristic of body tissues. Collagen I forms gel at neutral pH and may become a basis of a 3D matrix that better mimics conditions in tissue than plastic dishes. PMID:25734486

  14. Individual versus Collective Fibroblast Spreading and Migration: Regulation by Matrix Composition in 3-D Culture

    PubMed Central

    Miron-Mendoza, Miguel; Lin, Xihui; Ma, Lisha; Ririe, Peter; Petroll, W. Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) supplies both physical and chemical signals to cells and provides a substrate through which fibroblasts migrate during wound repair. To directly assess how ECM composition regulates this process, we used a nested 3D matrix model in which cell-populated collagen buttons were embedded in cell-free collagen or fibrin matrices. Time-lapse microscopy was used to record the dynamic pattern of cell migration into the outer matrices, and 3-D confocal imaging was used to assess cell connectivity and cytoskeletal organization. Corneal fibroblasts stimulated with PDGF migrated more rapidly into collagen as compared to fibrin. In addition, the pattern of fibroblast migration into fibrin and collagen ECMs was strikingly different. Corneal fibroblasts migrating into collagen matrices developed dendritic processes and moved independently, whereas cells migrating into fibrin matrices had a more fusiform morphology and formed an interconnected meshwork. A similar pattern was observed when using dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that this response in not unique to corneal cells. We next cultured corneal fibroblasts within and on top of standard collagen and fibrin matrices to assess the impact of ECM composition on the cell spreading response. Similar differences in cell morphology and connectivity were observed – cells remained separated on collagen but coalesced into clusters on fibrin. Cadherin was localized to junctions between interconnected cells, whereas fibronectin was present both between cells and at the tips of extending cell processes. Cells on fibrin matrices also developed more prominent stress fibers than those on collagen matrices. Importantly, these spreading and migration patterns were consistently observed on both rigid and compliant substrates, thus differences in ECM mechanical stiffness were not the underlying cause. Overall, these results demonstrate for the first time that ECM protein composition alone (collagen vs. fibrin) can

  15. Local 3D matrix confinement determines division axis through cell shape.

    PubMed

    He, Lijuan; Chen, Weitong; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Jimenez, Angela; Wong, Bin Sheng; San, Angela; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Wirtz, Denis

    2016-02-01

    How the division axis is determined in mammalian cells embedded in three-dimensional (3D) matrices remains elusive, despite that many types of cells divide in 3D environments. Cells on two-dimensional (2D) substrates typically round up completely to divide. Here, we show that in 3D collagen matrices, mammalian cells such as HT1080 human fibrosarcoma and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exhibit division modes distinct from their Counterparts on 2D substrates, with a markedly higher fraction of cells remaining highly elongated through mitosis in 3D matrices. The long axis of elongated mitotic cells accurately predicts the division axis, independently of matrix density and cell-matrix interactions. This 3D-specific elongated division mode is determined by the local confinement produced by the matrix and the ability of cells to protrude and locally remodel the matrix via β1 integrin. Elongated division is readily recapitulated using collagen-coated microfabricated channels. Cells depleted of β1 integrin still divide in the elongated mode in microchannels, suggesting that 3D confinement is sufficient to induce the elongated cell-division phenotype.

  16. Local 3D matrix confinement determines division axis through cell shape

    PubMed Central

    He, Lijuan; Chen, Weitong; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Jimenez, Angela; Wong, Bin Sheng; San, Angela; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Wirtz, Denis

    2016-01-01

    How the division axis is determined in mammalian cells embedded in three-dimensional (3D) matrices remains elusive, despite that many types of cells divide in 3D environments. Cells on two-dimensional (2D) substrates typically round up completely to divide. Here, we show that in 3D collagen matrices, mammalian cells such as HT1080 human fibrosarcoma and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exhibit division modes distinct from their Counterparts on 2D substrates, with a markedly higher fraction of cells remaining highly elongated through mitosis in 3D matrices. The long axis of elongated mitotic cells accurately predicts the division axis, independently of matrix density and cell-matrix interactions. This 3D-specific elongated division mode is determined by the local confinement produced by the matrix and the ability of cells to protrude and locally remodel the matrix via β1 integrin. Elongated division is readily recapitulated using collagen-coated microfabricated channels. Cells depleted of β1 integrin still divide in the elongated mode in microchannels, suggesting that 3D confinement is sufficient to induce the elongated cell-division phenotype. PMID:26515603

  17. 3D culture model of fibroblast-mediated collagen creep to identify abnormal cell behaviour.

    PubMed

    Kureshi, A K; Afoke, A; Wohlert, S; Barker, S; Brown, R A

    2015-11-01

    Native collagen gels are important biomimetic cell support scaffolds, and a plastic compression process can now be used to rapidly remove fluid to any required collagen density, producing strong 3D tissue-like models. This study aimed to measure the mechanical creep properties of such scaffolds and to quantify any enhanced creep occurring in the presence of cells (cell-mediated creep). The test rig developed applies constant creep tension during culture and measures real-time extension due to cell action. This was used to model extracellular matrix creep, implicated in the transversalis fascia (TF) in inguinal hernia. Experiments showed that at an applied tension equivalent to 15% break strength, cell-mediated creep over 24-h culture periods was identified at creep rates of 0.46 and 0.38%/h for normal TF and human dermal fibroblasts, respectively. However, hernia TF fibroblasts produced negligible cell-mediated creep levels under the same conditions. Raising the cell culture temperature from 4 to 37 °C was used to demonstrate live cell dependence of this creep. This represents the first in vitro demonstration of TF cell-mediated collagen creep and to our knowledge the first demonstration of a functional, hernia-related cell abnormality. PMID:25862069

  18. Fabrication of 3D tissue equivalent: an in vitro platform for understanding collagen evolution in healthy and diseased models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urciuolo, F.; Imparato, G.; Casale, C.; Scamardella, S.; Netti, P.

    2013-04-01

    In this study we realized a three-dimensional human dermis equivalent (3D-HDE) and, by exploiting multi-photon microscopy (MPM) we validated its use as an in vitro model to study collagen network re-arrangement under simulated solar exposure. The realization of 3D-HDE has been pursed by means of a bottom-up tissue engineering strategy that comprises firstly the fabrication of micron sized tissue building blocks and then their assembly in a 3D tissue construct. The building blocks injected in a maturation chamber, and cultured under optimized culture condition, were able to fuse due to the establishment of cell-cell and cell-extra cellular matrix (ECM) interactions that induced a biological sintering process resulting in 3D-HDE production. The final 3D tissue was made-up by fibroblasts embedded in their own ECM rich in endogenous collagen type I, resembling the composition and the architecture of native human dermis. Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (TPEF) imaging have been exploited to assess modification in collagen assembly before and after UV irradiation. Textural features and SHG to TPFE ratio of the endogenous ECM within 3D-HDE have been shown to vary after UVA irradiation, proving the hypothesis that the 3DHDE realized can be used as biological platform in vitro to study ECM modifications induced by photo-damage.

  19. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-11-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  20. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Andrew D; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils. PMID:26548801

  1. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils. PMID:26548801

  2. Flexible Fabrication of Shape-Controlled Collagen Building Blocks for Self-Assembly of 3D Microtissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Meng, Zhaoxu; Ma, Jingyun; Shi, Yang; Xu, Hui; Lykkemark, Simon; Qin, Jianhua

    2015-08-12

    Creating artificial tissue-like structures that possess the functionality, specificity, and architecture of native tissues remains a big challenge. A new and straightforward strategy for generating shape-controlled collagen building blocks with a well-defined architecture is presented, which can be used for self-assembly of complex 3D microtissues. Collagen blocks with tunable geometries are controllably produced and released via a membrane-templated microdevice. The formation of functional microtissues by embedding tissue-specific cells into collagen blocks with expression of specific proteins is described. The spontaneous self-assembly of cell-laden collagen blocks into organized tissue constructs with predetermined configurations is demonstrated, which are largely driven by the synergistic effects of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. This new strategy would open up new avenues for the study of tissue/organ morphogenesis, and tissue engineering applications.

  3. Flexible Fabrication of Shape-Controlled Collagen Building Blocks for Self-Assembly of 3D Microtissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Meng, Zhaoxu; Ma, Jingyun; Shi, Yang; Xu, Hui; Lykkemark, Simon; Qin, Jianhua

    2015-08-12

    Creating artificial tissue-like structures that possess the functionality, specificity, and architecture of native tissues remains a big challenge. A new and straightforward strategy for generating shape-controlled collagen building blocks with a well-defined architecture is presented, which can be used for self-assembly of complex 3D microtissues. Collagen blocks with tunable geometries are controllably produced and released via a membrane-templated microdevice. The formation of functional microtissues by embedding tissue-specific cells into collagen blocks with expression of specific proteins is described. The spontaneous self-assembly of cell-laden collagen blocks into organized tissue constructs with predetermined configurations is demonstrated, which are largely driven by the synergistic effects of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. This new strategy would open up new avenues for the study of tissue/organ morphogenesis, and tissue engineering applications. PMID:25920010

  4. Collagen esterification enhances the function and survival of pancreatic β cells in 2D and 3D culture systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Jae Hyung; Kim, Yang Hee; Jeong, Seong Hee; Lee, Song; Park, Si-Nae; Shim, In Kyong; Kim, Song Cheol

    2015-08-07

    Collagen, one of the most important components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), may play a role in the survival of pancreatic islet cells. In addition, chemical modifications that change the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification have been shown to increase the adhesion and proliferation of various cell types. The purpose of this study was to characterize and compare the effects of native collagen (NC) and esterified collagen (EC) on β cell function and survival. After isolation by the collagenase digestion technique, rat islets were cultured with NC and EC in 2 dimensional (2D) and 3 dimensional (3D) environments for a long-term duration in vitro. The cells were assessed for islet adhesion, morphology, viability, glucose-induced insulin secretion, and mRNA expression of glucose metabolism-related genes, and visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Islet cells attached tightly in the NC group, but islet cell viability was similar in both the NC and EC groups. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was higher in the EC group than in the NC group in both 2D and 3D culture. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of glucokinase in the EC group were higher than those in the NC group and were associated with glucose metabolism and insulin secretion. Finally, SEM observation confirmed that islets had more intact component cells on EC sponges than on NC sponges. These results indicate that modification of collagen may offer opportunities to improve function and viability of islet cells. - Highlights: • We changed the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen improved survival in both 2D and 3D culture. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin release. • High levels of glucokinase mRNA may be associated with increased insulin release.

  5. A Novel 3D Fibril Force Assay Implicates Src in Tumor Cell Force Generation in Collagen Networks

    PubMed Central

    Polackwich, Robert J.; Koch, Daniel; Arevalo, Richard; Miermont, Anne M.; Jee, Kathleen J.; Lazar, John; Urbach, Jeffrey; Mueller, Susette C.; McAllister, Ryan G.

    2013-01-01

    New insight into the biomechanics of cancer cell motility in 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) environments would significantly enhance our understanding of aggressive cancers and help identify new targets for intervention. While several methods for measuring the forces involved in cell-matrix interactions have been developed, previous to this study none have been able to measure forces in a fibrillar environment. We have developed a novel assay for simultaneously measuring cell mechanotransduction and motility in 3D fibrillar environments. The assay consists of a controlled-density fibrillar collagen gel atop a controlled-stiffness polyacrylamide (PAA) surface. Forces generated by living cells and their migration in the 3D collagen gel were measured with the 3D motion of tracer beads within the PAA layer. Here, this 3D fibril force assay is used to study the role of the invasion-associated protein kinase Src in mechanotransduction and motility. Src expression and activation are linked with proliferation, invasion, and metastasis, and have been shown to be required in 2D for invadopodia membranes to direct and mediate invasion. Breast cancer cell line MDA-MD-231 was stably transfected with GFP-tagged constitutively active Src or wild-type Src. In 3D fibrillar collagen matrices we found that, relative to wild-type Src, constitutively active Src: 1) increased the strength of cell-induced forces on the ECM, 2) did not significantly change migration speed, and 3) increased both the duration and the length, but not the number, of long membrane protrusions. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that Src controls invasion by controlling the ability of the cell to form long lasting cellular protrusions to enable penetration through tissue barriers, in addition to its role in promoting invadopodia matrix-degrading activity. PMID:23536784

  6. Quantitative analysis of 3D extracellular matrix remodelling by pancreatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Benjamin K.; Cortes, Ernesto; Rice, Alistair J.; Sarper, Muge

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling is integral to numerous physiological and pathological processes in biology, such as embryogenesis, wound healing, fibrosis and cancer. Until recently, most cellular studies have been conducted on 2D environments where mechanical cues significantly differ from physiologically relevant 3D environments, impacting cellular behaviour and masking the interpretation of cellular function in health and disease. We present an integrated methodology where cell-ECM interactions can be investigated in 3D environments via ECM remodelling. Monitoring and quantification of collagen-I structure in remodelled matrices, through designated algorithms, show that 3D matrices can be used to correlate remodelling with increased ECM stiffness observed in fibrosis. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are the key effectors of the stromal fibrosis associated to pancreatic cancer. We use PSCs to implement our methodology and demonstrate that PSC matrix remodelling capabilities depend on their contractile machinery and β1 integrin-mediated cell-ECM attachment. PMID:27170254

  7. Heterogeneous Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in 3D Extracellular Matrix Composites

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jangwook P.; Bache-Wiig, Meredith K.; Provenzano, Paolo P.; Ogle, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are structural elements of tissue and also potent signaling molecules. Previously, our laboratory showed that ECM of 2D coatings can trigger differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into mesodermal lineages in an ECM-specific manner over 14 days, in some cases comparable to chemical induction. To test whether a similar effect was possible in a 3D, tissue-like environment, we designed a synthetic-natural biomaterial composite. The composite can present whole-molecule ECM proteins to cells, even those that do not spontaneously form hydrogels ex vivo, in 3D. To this end, we entrapped collagen type I, laminin-111, or fibronectin in ECM composites with MSCs and directly compared markers of mesodermal differentiation including cardiomyogenic (ACTC1), osteogenic (SPP1), adipogenic (PPARG), and chondrogenic (SOX9) in 2D versus 3D. We found the 3D condition largely mimicked the 2D condition such that the addition of type I collagen was the most potent inducer of differentiation to all lineages tested. One notable difference between 2D and 3D was pronounced adipogenic differentiation in 3D especially in the presence of exogenous collagen type I. In particular, PPARG gene expression was significantly increased ∼16-fold relative to chemical induction, in 3D and not in 2D. Unexpectedly, 3D engagement of ECM proteins also altered immunomodulatory function of MSCs in that expression of IL-6 gene was elevated relative to basal levels in 2D. In fact, levels of IL-6 gene expression in 3D composites containing exogenously supplied collagen type I or fibronectin were statistically similar to levels attained in 2D with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) stimulation and these levels were sustained over a 2-week period. Thus, this novel biomaterial platform allowed us to compare the biochemical impact of whole-molecule ECM proteins in 2D versus 3D indicating enhanced adipogenic differentiation and IL-6 expression

  8. Heterogeneous Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in 3D Extracellular Matrix Composites.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jangwook P; Bache-Wiig, Meredith K; Provenzano, Paolo P; Ogle, Brenda M

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are structural elements of tissue and also potent signaling molecules. Previously, our laboratory showed that ECM of 2D coatings can trigger differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into mesodermal lineages in an ECM-specific manner over 14 days, in some cases comparable to chemical induction. To test whether a similar effect was possible in a 3D, tissue-like environment, we designed a synthetic-natural biomaterial composite. The composite can present whole-molecule ECM proteins to cells, even those that do not spontaneously form hydrogels ex vivo, in 3D. To this end, we entrapped collagen type I, laminin-111, or fibronectin in ECM composites with MSCs and directly compared markers of mesodermal differentiation including cardiomyogenic (ACTC1), osteogenic (SPP1), adipogenic (PPARG), and chondrogenic (SOX9) in 2D versus 3D. We found the 3D condition largely mimicked the 2D condition such that the addition of type I collagen was the most potent inducer of differentiation to all lineages tested. One notable difference between 2D and 3D was pronounced adipogenic differentiation in 3D especially in the presence of exogenous collagen type I. In particular, PPARG gene expression was significantly increased ∼16-fold relative to chemical induction, in 3D and not in 2D. Unexpectedly, 3D engagement of ECM proteins also altered immunomodulatory function of MSCs in that expression of IL-6 gene was elevated relative to basal levels in 2D. In fact, levels of IL-6 gene expression in 3D composites containing exogenously supplied collagen type I or fibronectin were statistically similar to levels attained in 2D with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) stimulation and these levels were sustained over a 2-week period. Thus, this novel biomaterial platform allowed us to compare the biochemical impact of whole-molecule ECM proteins in 2D versus 3D indicating enhanced adipogenic differentiation and IL-6 expression of MSC in

  9. The impact of laminin on 3D neurite extension in collagen gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindle-Reilly, Katelyn E.; Papke, Jason B.; Kutosky, Hannah P.; Throm, Allison; Hammer, Joshua A.; Harkins, Amy B.; Kuntz Willits, Rebecca

    2012-08-01

    The primary goal of this research was to characterize the effect of laminin on three-dimensional (3D) neurite growth. Gels were formed using type I collagen at concentrations of 0.4-2.0 mg mL-1 supplemented with laminin at concentrations of 0, 1, 10, or 100 µg mL-1. When imaged with confocal microscopy, laminin was shown to follow the collagen fibers; however, the addition of laminin had minimal effect on the stiffness of the scaffolds at any concentration of collagen. Individual neurons dissociated from E9 chick dorsal root ganglia were cultured in the gels for 24 h, and neurite lengths were measured. For collagen gels without laminin, a typical bimodal response of neurite outgrowth was observed, with increased growth at lower concentrations of collagen gel. However, alteration of the chemical nature of the collagen gel by the laminin additive shifted, or completely mitigated, the bimodal neurite growth response seen in gels without laminin. Expression of integrin subunits, α1, α3, α6 and β1, were confirmed by PCR and immunolabeling in the 3D scaffolds. These results provide insight into the interplay between mechanical and chemical environment to support neurite outgrowth in 3D. Understanding the relative impact of environmental factors on 3D nerve growth may improve biomaterial design for nerve cell regeneration.

  10. Cell Proliferation on Macro/Nano Surface Structure and Collagen Immobilization of 3D Polycaprolactone Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Ouk; Myung, Sung-Woon; Kook, Min-Suk; Jung, Sang-Chul; Kim, Byung-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    In this study, 3D polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technique. The macro/nano morphology of, 3D PCL scaffolds surface was etched with oxygen plasma. Acrylic acid (AA) plasma-polymerization was performed to functionalize the macro/nano surface with carboxyl groups and then collagen was immobilized with plasma-polymerized 3D PCL scaffolds. After O2 plasma and AA plasma-polymerization, contact angles were decreased. The FE-SEM and AFM results showed that O2 plasma is increased the surface roughness. The MTT assay results showed that proliferation of the M3CT3-E1 cells increased on the oxygen plasma treated and collagen immobilized 3D PCL scaffolds. PMID:27433597

  11. Strategies for Directing the Structure and Function of 3D Collagen Biomaterials across Length Scales

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Brandan D.; Stegemann, Jan P.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen type I is a widely used natural biomaterial that has found utility in a variety of biological and medical applications. Its well characterized structure and role as an extracellular matrix protein make it a highly relevant material for controlling cell function and mimicking tissue properties. Collagen type I is abundant in a number of tissues, and can be isolated as a purified protein. This review focuses on hydrogel biomaterials made by reconstituting collagen type I from a solubilized form, with an emphasis on in vitro studies in which collagen structure can be controlled. The hierarchical structure of collagen from the nanoscale to the macroscale is described, with an emphasis on how structure is related to function across scales. Methods of reconstituting collagen into hydrogel materials are presented, including molding of macroscopic constructs, creation of microscale modules, and electrospinning of nanoscale fibers. The modification of collagen biomaterials to achieve desired structures and functions is also addressed, with particular emphasis on mechanical control of collagen structure, creation of collagen composite materials, and crosslinking of collagenous matrices. Biomaterials scientists have made remarkable progress in rationally designing collagen-based biomaterials and in applying them to both the study of biology and for therapeutic benefit. This broad review illustrates recent examples of techniques used to control collagen structure, and to thereby direct its biological and mechanical functions. PMID:24012608

  12. Synthesis of highly interconnected 3D scaffold from Arothron stellatus skin collagen for tissue engineering application.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Giriprasath; Singaravelu, Sivakumar; Raja, M D; Sivagnanam, Uma Tiruchirapalli

    2015-11-01

    The substrate which is avidly used for tissue engineering applications should have good mechanical and biocompatible properties, and all these parameters are often considered as essential for dermal reformation. Highly interconnected three dimensional (3D) wound dressing material with enhanced structural integrity was synthesized from Arothron stellatus fish skin (AsFS) collagen for tissue engineering applications. The synthesized 3D collagen sponge (COL-SPG) was further characterized by different physicochemical methods. The scanning electron microscopy analysis of the material demonstrated that well interconnected pores with homogeneous microstructure on the surface aids higher swelling index and that the material also possessed good mechanical properties with a Young's modulus of 0.89±0.2 MPa. Biocompatibility of the 3D COL-SPG showed 92% growth for both NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Overall, the study revealed that synthesized 3D COL-SPG from fish skin will act as a promising wound dressing in skin tissue engineering.

  13. 3D Printing of Composite Calcium Phosphate and Collagen Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Inzana, Jason A.; Olvera, Diana; Fuller, Seth M.; Kelly, James P.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Schwarz, Edward M.; Kates, Stephen L.; Awad, Hani A.

    2014-01-01

    Low temperature 3D printing of calcium phosphate scaffolds holds great promise for fabricating synthetic bone graft substitutes with enhanced performance over traditional techniques. Many design parameters, such as the binder solution properties, have yet to be optimized to ensure maximal biocompatibility and osteoconductivity with sufficient mechanical properties. This study tailored the phosphoric acid-based binder solution concentration to 8.75 wt% to maximize cytocompatibility and mechanical strength, with a supplementation of Tween 80 to improve printing. To further enhance the formulation, collagen was dissolved into the binder solution to fabricate collagen-calcium phosphate composites. Reducing the viscosity and surface tension through a physiologic heat treatment and Tween 80, respectively, enabled reliable thermal inkjet printing of the collagen solutions. Supplementing the binder solution with 1–2 wt% collagen significantly improved maximum flexural strength and cell viability. To assess the bone healing performance, we implanted 3D printed scaffolds into a critically sized murine femoral defect for 9 weeks. The implants were confirmed to be osteoconductive, with new bone growth incorporating the degrading scaffold materials. In conclusion, this study demonstrates optimization of material parameters for 3D printed calcium phosphate scaffolds and enhancement of material properties by volumetric collagen incorporation via inkjet printing. PMID:24529628

  14. 3D printing of composite calcium phosphate and collagen scaffolds for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Inzana, Jason A; Olvera, Diana; Fuller, Seth M; Kelly, James P; Graeve, Olivia A; Schwarz, Edward M; Kates, Stephen L; Awad, Hani A

    2014-04-01

    Low temperature 3D printing of calcium phosphate scaffolds holds great promise for fabricating synthetic bone graft substitutes with enhanced performance over traditional techniques. Many design parameters, such as the binder solution properties, have yet to be optimized to ensure maximal biocompatibility and osteoconductivity with sufficient mechanical properties. This study tailored the phosphoric acid-based binder solution concentration to 8.75 wt% to maximize cytocompatibility and mechanical strength, with a supplementation of Tween 80 to improve printing. To further enhance the formulation, collagen was dissolved into the binder solution to fabricate collagen-calcium phosphate composites. Reducing the viscosity and surface tension through a physiologic heat treatment and Tween 80, respectively, enabled reliable thermal inkjet printing of the collagen solutions. Supplementing the binder solution with 1-2 wt% collagen significantly improved maximum flexural strength and cell viability. To assess the bone healing performance, we implanted 3D printed scaffolds into a critically sized murine femoral defect for 9 weeks. The implants were confirmed to be osteoconductive, with new bone growth incorporating the degrading scaffold materials. In conclusion, this study demonstrates optimization of material parameters for 3D printed calcium phosphate scaffolds and enhancement of material properties by volumetric collagen incorporation via inkjet printing.

  15. 3D magnetotelluric inversion with full distortion matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribenko, A. V.; Zhdanov, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Distortion of regional electric fields by local structures represent one of the major problems facing three-dimensional magnetotelluric (MT) interpretation. Effect of 3D local inhomogenities on MT data can be described by a real 2x2 distortion matrix. In this project we develop a method of simultaneous inversion of the full MT impedance data for 3D conductivity distribution and for the distortion matrix. Tikhonov regularization is employed to solve the resulting inverse problem. Integral equations method is used to compute MT responses. Minimization of the cost functional is achieved via conjugate gradient method. The inversion algorithm is tested on the synthetic data from Dublin Secret Model II (DSM 2) for which multiple inversion solutions are available for comparison. Inclusion of the distortion matrix provides faster convergence and allows coarser discretization of the near-surface while achievingsimilar or better data fits as inversion for the conductivity only with finely discretized shallow regions. As a field data example we chose a subset of the EarthScope MT dataset covering Great Basin and adjacent areas of the Western United States. Great Basin data inversion identified several prominent conductive zones which correlate well with areas of tectonic and geothermal activity.

  16. 2D and 3D collagen and fibrin biopolymers promote specific ECM and integrin gene expression by vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    HONG, HELEN; STEGEMANN, JAN P.

    2009-01-01

    Collagen Type I and fibrin are polymeric proteins commonly used in the field of regenerative medicine as the foundational matrix of engineered tissues. We examined the response of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) to both two-dimensional (2D) substrates as well as three-dimensional (3D) matrices of these biopolymers. Pure collagen Type I, pure fibrin and composite matrices consisting of 1:1 mixtures of collagen and fibrin were studied. Relative gene expression of three ECM molecules (collagen Type I and III, and tropoelastin) and three integrin subunits (integrins α1, β1 and β3) was determined over 7 days in culture using quantitative RT-PCR. Expression of all of these marker genes was up-regulated in 3D matrices, relative to 2D substrates. Tropoelastin, integrin α1 and integrin β1 were highest in collagen matrices, while collagen III and integrin β3 expression were highest in pure fibrin, and collagen I expression was highest in the collagen-fibrin composite materials. Both the compositional and temporal expression patterns of these specific ECM-related genes were suggestive of a wound healing response. These results illuminate the short-term responses of VSMC to 2D and 3D biopolymer matrices, and have relevance to tissue engineering and cardiovascular biology. PMID:18854122

  17. Effects of Matrix Alignment and Mechanical Constraints on Cellular Behavior in 3D Engineered Microtissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Prasenjit; Eyckmans, Jeroen; Chen, Christopher; Reich, Daniel

    The adhesion of cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a crucial role in a variety of cellular functions. The main building blocks of the ECM are 3D networks of fibrous proteins whose structure and alignments varies with tissue type. However, the impact of ECM alignment on cellular behaviors such as cell adhesion, spreading, extension and mechanics remains poorly understood. We present results on the development of a microtissue-based system that enables control of the structure, orientation, and degree of fibrillar alignment in 3D fibroblast-populated collagen gels. The tissues self-assemble from cell-laden collagen gels placed in micro-fabricated wells containing sets of elastic pillars. The contractile action of the cells leads to controlled alignment of the fibrous collagen, depending on the number and location of the pillars in each well. The pillars are elastic, and are utilized to measure the contractile forces of the microtissues, and by incorporating magnetic material in selected pillars, time-varying forces can be applied to the tissues for dynamic stimulation and measurement of mechanical properties. Results on the effects of varying pillar shape, spacing, location, and stiffness on microtissue organization and contractility will be presented. This work is supported by NSF CMMI-1463011.

  18. Techniques for Assessing 3-D Cell-Matrix Mechanical Interactions In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Miron-Mendoza, Miguel; Koppaka, Vindhya; Zhou, Chengxin; Petroll, W. Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Cellular interactions with extracellular matrices (ECM) through the application of mechanical forces mediate numerous biological processes including developmental morphogenesis, wound healing and cancer metastasis. They also play a key role in the cellular repopulation and/or remodeling of engineered tissues and organs. While 2-D studies can provide important insights into many aspects of cellular mechanobiology, cells reside within 3-D ECMs in vivo, and matrix structure and dimensionality have been shown to impact cell morphology, protein organization and mechanical behavior. Global measurements of cell-induced compaction of 3-D collagen matrices can provide important insights into the regulation of overall cell contractility by various cytokines and signaling pathways. However, to understand how the mechanics of cell spreading, migration, contraction and matrix remodeling are regulated at the molecular level, these processes must also be studied in individual cells. Here we review the evolution and application of techniques for imaging and assessing local cell-matrix mechanical interactions in 3-D culture models, tissue explants and living animals. PMID:23819988

  19. Collagen esterification enhances the function and survival of pancreatic β cells in 2D and 3D culture systems.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jae Hyung; Kim, Yang Hee; Jeong, Seong Hee; Lee, Song; Park, Si-Nae; Shim, In Kyong; Kim, Song Cheol

    2015-08-01

    Collagen, one of the most important components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), may play a role in the survival of pancreatic islet cells. In addition, chemical modifications that change the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification have been shown to increase the adhesion and proliferation of various cell types. The purpose of this study was to characterize and compare the effects of native collagen (NC) and esterified collagen (EC) on β cell function and survival. After isolation by the collagenase digestion technique, rat islets were cultured with NC and EC in 2 dimensional (2D) and 3 dimensional (3D) environments for a long-term duration in vitro. The cells were assessed for islet adhesion, morphology, viability, glucose-induced insulin secretion, and mRNA expression of glucose metabolism-related genes, and visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Islet cells attached tightly in the NC group, but islet cell viability was similar in both the NC and EC groups. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was higher in the EC group than in the NC group in both 2D and 3D culture. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of glucokinase in the EC group were higher than those in the NC group and were associated with glucose metabolism and insulin secretion. Finally, SEM observation confirmed that islets had more intact component cells on EC sponges than on NC sponges. These results indicate that modification of collagen may offer opportunities to improve function and viability of islet cells.

  20. Longitudinal Measurement of Extracellular Matrix Rigidity in 3D Tumor Models Using Particle-tracking Microrheology

    PubMed Central

    El-Hamidi, Hamid; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical microenvironment has been shown to act as a crucial regulator of tumor growth behavior and signaling, which is itself remodeled and modified as part of a set of complex, two-way mechanosensitive interactions. While the development of biologically-relevant 3D tumor models have facilitated mechanistic studies on the impact of matrix rheology on tumor growth, the inverse problem of mapping changes in the mechanical environment induced by tumors remains challenging. Here, we describe the implementation of particle-tracking microrheology (PTM) in conjunction with 3D models of pancreatic cancer as part of a robust and viable approach for longitudinally monitoring physical changes in the tumor microenvironment, in situ. The methodology described here integrates a system of preparing in vitro 3D models embedded in a model extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold of Type I collagen with fluorescently labeled probes uniformly distributed for position- and time-dependent microrheology measurements throughout the specimen. In vitro tumors are plated and probed in parallel conditions using multiwell imaging plates. Drawing on established methods, videos of tracer probe movements are transformed via the Generalized Stokes Einstein Relation (GSER) to report the complex frequency-dependent viscoelastic shear modulus, G*(ω). Because this approach is imaging-based, mechanical characterization is also mapped onto large transmitted-light spatial fields to simultaneously report qualitative changes in 3D tumor size and phenotype. Representative results showing contrasting mechanical response in sub-regions associated with localized invasion-induced matrix degradation as well as system calibration, validation data are presented. Undesirable outcomes from common experimental errors and troubleshooting of these issues are also presented. The 96-well 3D culture plating format implemented in this protocol is conducive to correlation of microrheology measurements with therapeutic

  1. Microscale 3D collagen cell culture assays in conventional flat-bottom 384-well plates.

    PubMed

    Leung, Brendan M; Moraes, Christopher; Cavnar, Stephen P; Luker, Kathryn E; Luker, Gary D; Takayama, Shuichi

    2015-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture systems such as cell-laden hydrogels are superior to standard two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures for many drug-screening applications. However, their adoption into high-throughput screening (HTS) has been lagging, in part because of the difficulty of incorporating these culture formats into existing robotic liquid handling and imaging infrastructures. Dispensing cell-laden prepolymer solutions into 2D well plates is a potential solution but typically requires large volumes of reagents to avoid evaporation during polymerization, which (1) increases costs, (2) makes drug penetration variable and (3) complicates imaging. Here we describe a technique to efficiently produce 3D microgels using automated liquid-handling systems and standard, nonpatterned, flat-bottomed, 384-well plates. Sub-millimeter-diameter, cell-laden collagen gels are deposited on the bottom of a ~2.5 mm diameter microwell with no concerns about evaporation or meniscus effects at the edges of wells, using aqueous two-phase system patterning. The microscale cell-laden collagen-gel constructs are readily imaged and readily penetrated by drugs. The cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutics was monitored by bioluminescence and demonstrated that 3D cultures confer chemoresistance as compared with similar 2D cultures. Hence, these data demonstrate the importance of culturing cells in 3D to obtain realistic cellular responses. Overall, this system provides a simple and inexpensive method for integrating 3D culture capability into existing HTS infrastructure. PMID:25510473

  2. Creation of a long-lifespan ciliated epithelial tissue structure using a 3D collagen scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuchi; Wong, Lid B.; Mao, Hua

    2009-01-01

    We describe a method of using a 3D collagen gel scaffold applied at the air-liquid interface to culture dissociated primary tracheal-bronchial ciliated cells into a ciliated epithelial tissue structure (CETS). This 3D collagen gel culture system enables the induction of ciliogenesis and continuously provides support, maintenance, development, differentiation and propagation for the growth of cilia into the CETS. The CETS developed by this system resembles the ciliary metachronal motility and morphological, histological and physiopharmacological characteristics of cells found in native and in vivo ciliated epithelia. The CETS can be sustained for months with a straightforward and simple maintenance protocol. The integrity of the functional ciliary activity of this CETS enables the evaluation of long-term effects of many pulmonary drug candidates without using animals. PMID:19836831

  3. Study of the collagen structure in the superficial zone and physiological state of articular cartilage using a 3D confocal imaging technique

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian P; Kirk, Thomas B; Zheng, Ming H

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The collagen structure in the superficial zone of articular cartilage is critical to the tissue's durability. Early osteoarthritis is often characterized with fissures on the articular surface. This is closely related to the disruption of the collagen network. However, the traditional histology can not offer visualization of the collagen structure in articular cartilage because it uses conventional optical microscopy that does not have insufficient imaging resolution to resolve collagen from proteoglycans in hyaline articular cartilage. This study examines the 3D collagen network of articular cartilage scored from 0 to 2 in the scoring system of International Cartilage Repair Society, and aims to develop a 3D histology for assessing early osteoarthritis. Methods Articular cartilage was visually classified into five physiological groups: normal cartilage, aged cartilage, cartilage with artificial and natural surface disruption, and fibrillated. The 3D collagen matrix of the cartilage was acquired using a 3D imaging technique developed previously. Traditional histology was followed to grade the physiological status of the cartilage in the scoring system of International Cartilage Repair Society. Results Normal articular cartilage contains interwoven collagen bundles near the articular surface, approximately within the lamina splendens. However, its collagen fibres in the superficial zone orient predominantly in a direction spatially oblique to the articular surface. With age and disruption of the articular surface, the interwoven collagen bundles are gradually disappeared, and obliquely oriented collagen fibres change to align predominantly in a direction spatially perpendicular to the articular surface. Disruption of the articular surface is well related to the disappearance of the interwoven collagen bundles. Conclusion A 3D histology has been developed to supplement the traditional histology and study the subtle changes in the collagen network in the

  4. Human platelet lysate improves human cord blood derived ECFC survival and vasculogenesis in three dimensional (3D) collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyojin; Prasain, Nutan; Vemula, Sasidhar; Ferkowicz, Michael J; Yoshimoto, Momoko; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L; Yoder, Mervin C

    2015-09-01

    Human cord blood (CB) is enriched in circulating endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) that display high proliferative potential and in vivo vessel forming ability. Since diminished ECFC survival is known to dampen the vasculogenic response in vivo, we tested how long implanted ECFC survive and generate vessels in three-dimensional (3D) type I collagen matrices in vitro and in vivo. We hypothesized that human platelet lysate (HPL) would promote cell survival and enhance vasculogenesis in the 3D collagen matrices. We report that the percentage of ECFC co-cultured with HPL that were alive was significantly enhanced on days 1 and 3 post-matrix formation, compared to ECFC alone containing matrices. Also, co-culture of ECFC with HPL displayed significantly more vasculogenic activity compared to ECFC alone and expressed significantly more pro-survival molecules (pAkt, p-Bad and Bcl-xL) in the 3D collagen matrices in vitro. Treatment with Akt1 inhibitor (A-674563), Akt2 inhibitor (CCT128930) and Bcl-xL inhibitor (ABT-263/Navitoclax) significantly decreased the cell survival and vasculogenesis of ECFC co-cultured with or without HPL and implicated activation of the Akt1 pathway as the critical mediator of the HPL effect on ECFC in vitro. A significantly greater average vessel number and total vascular area of human CD31(+) vessels were present in implants containing ECFC and HPL, compared to the ECFC alone implants in vivo. We conclude that implantation of ECFC with HPL in vivo promotes vasculogenesis and augments blood vessel formation via diminishing apoptosis of the implanted ECFC. PMID:26122935

  5. Peroxidase enzymes regulate collagen extracellular matrix biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Rayner, Timothy E; Borowicz, Romana A; Greenwood, John E; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase are heme-containing enzymes often physically associated with fibrotic tissue and cancer in various organs, without any direct involvement in promoting fibroblast recruitment and extracellular matrix (ECM) biosynthesis at these sites. We report herein novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes possess a well-conserved profibrogenic capacity to stimulate the migration of fibroblastic cells and promote their ability to secrete collagenous proteins to generate a functional ECM both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured fibroblasts show that these cells are capable of rapidly binding and internalizing both myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase. Peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl 4-hydroxylase-dependent manner that does not require ascorbic acid. This response was blocked by the irreversible myeloperoxidase inhibitor 4-amino-benzoic acid hydrazide, indicating peroxidase catalytic activity is essential for collagen biosynthesis. These results suggest that peroxidase enzymes, such as myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase, may play a fundamental role in regulating the recruitment of fibroblast and the biosynthesis of collagen ECM at sites of normal tissue repair and fibrosis, with enormous implications for many disease states where infiltrating inflammatory cells deposit peroxidases.

  6. Mean deformation metrics for quantifying 3D cell–matrix interactions without requiring information about matrix material properties

    PubMed Central

    Stout, David A.; Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Estrada, Jonathan B.; Toyjanova, Jennet; Kesari, Haneesh; Reichner, Jonathan S.; Franck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Mechanobiology relates cellular processes to mechanical signals, such as determining the effect of variations in matrix stiffness with cell tractions. Cell traction recorded via traction force microscopy (TFM) commonly takes place on materials such as polyacrylamide- and polyethylene glycol-based gels. Such experiments remain limited in physiological relevance because cells natively migrate within complex tissue microenvironments that are spatially heterogeneous and hierarchical. Yet, TFM requires determination of the matrix constitutive law (stress–strain relationship), which is not always readily available. In addition, the currently achievable displacement resolution limits the accuracy of TFM for relatively small cells. To overcome these limitations, and increase the physiological relevance of in vitro experimental design, we present a new approach and a set of associated biomechanical signatures that are based purely on measurements of the matrix's displacements without requiring any knowledge of its constitutive laws. We show that our mean deformation metrics (MDM) approach can provide significant biophysical information without the need to explicitly determine cell tractions. In the process of demonstrating the use of our MDM approach, we succeeded in expanding the capability of our displacement measurement technique such that it can now measure the 3D deformations around relatively small cells (∼10 micrometers), such as neutrophils. Furthermore, we also report previously unseen deformation patterns generated by motile neutrophils in 3D collagen gels. PMID:26929377

  7. Mean deformation metrics for quantifying 3D cell-matrix interactions without requiring information about matrix material properties.

    PubMed

    Stout, David A; Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Estrada, Jonathan B; Toyjanova, Jennet; Kesari, Haneesh; Reichner, Jonathan S; Franck, Christian

    2016-03-15

    Mechanobiology relates cellular processes to mechanical signals, such as determining the effect of variations in matrix stiffness with cell tractions. Cell traction recorded via traction force microscopy (TFM) commonly takes place on materials such as polyacrylamide- and polyethylene glycol-based gels. Such experiments remain limited in physiological relevance because cells natively migrate within complex tissue microenvironments that are spatially heterogeneous and hierarchical. Yet, TFM requires determination of the matrix constitutive law (stress-strain relationship), which is not always readily available. In addition, the currently achievable displacement resolution limits the accuracy of TFM for relatively small cells. To overcome these limitations, and increase the physiological relevance of in vitro experimental design, we present a new approach and a set of associated biomechanical signatures that are based purely on measurements of the matrix's displacements without requiring any knowledge of its constitutive laws. We show that our mean deformation metrics (MDM) approach can provide significant biophysical information without the need to explicitly determine cell tractions. In the process of demonstrating the use of our MDM approach, we succeeded in expanding the capability of our displacement measurement technique such that it can now measure the 3D deformations around relatively small cells (∼10 micrometers), such as neutrophils. Furthermore, we also report previously unseen deformation patterns generated by motile neutrophils in 3D collagen gels. PMID:26929377

  8. Microencapsulation of Neuroblastoma Cells and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Collagen Microspheres: A 3D Model for Cancer Cell Niche Study

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Pan; Sin, Hoi Shun; Chan, Shing; Chan, Godfrey Chi Fung; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing trend for researchers to use in vitro 3D models in cancer studies, as they can better recapitulate the complex in vivo situation. And the fact that the progression and development of tumor are closely associated to its stromal microenvironment has been increasingly recognized. The establishment of such tumor supportive niche is vital in understanding tumor progress and metastasis. The mesenchymal origin of many cells residing in the cancer niche provides the rationale to include MSCs in mimicking the niche in neuroblastoma. Here we co-encapsulate and co-culture NBCs and MSCs in a 3D in vitro model and investigate the morphology, growth kinetics and matrix remodeling in the reconstituted stromal environment. Results showed that the incorporation of MSCs in the model lead to accelerated growth of cancer cells as well as recapitulation of at least partially the tumor microenvironment in vivo. The current study therefore demonstrates the feasibility for the collagen microsphere to act as a 3D in vitro cancer model for various topics in cancer studies. PMID:26657086

  9. The use of flow perfusion culture and subcutaneous implantation with fibroblast-seeded PLLA-collagen 3D scaffolds for abdominal wall repair.

    PubMed

    Pu, Fanrong; Rhodes, Nicholas P; Bayon, Yves; Chen, Rui; Brans, Gerben; Benne, Remco; Hunt, John A

    2010-05-01

    Highly cellularised 3D-tissue constructs designed to repair large, complex abdominal wall defects were prepared using poly (lactic acid) (PLLA)-collagen scaffolds in vitro using a flow perfusion bioreactor. The PLLA-collagen scaffolds had a unique structure consisting of a collagen sponge formed within the pores of a mechanically stable knitted mesh of PLLA. The effect of the flow perfusion bioreactor culturing conditions was investigated in vitro for 0, 7, 14 and 28 days on scaffolds seeded with dermal fibroblasts. The cultured constructs were subsequently studied subcutaneously (SC) in an in vivo animal model. The results of in vitro studies demonstrated that the perfusion system facilitated increased cell proliferation and homogenous distribution in the PLLA-collagen scaffolds compared to static conditions. A highly cellularised 3D-tissue construct was formed by 7 days incubation under perfusion conditions, with increased cellularity by the 28 day time point. The in vivo model demonstrated that implanting constructs with high cellularity resulted in exceptional cell stabilisation, with the survival of implanted cells and expression of the phenotypically-relevant extracellular matrix proteins collagen types I and III, studied by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and immunohistochemistry. The implantation of this porous PPLA-collagen scaffold seeded with dermal fibroblasts following in vitro maturation using a flow perfusion bioreactor system suggests a significant advance over current state-of-the-art procedures for the reconstruction of large, complex abdominal wall tissue defects. PMID:20219244

  10. Nonlinear Optical Macroscopic Assessment of 3-D Corneal Collagen Organization and Axial Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Moritz; Chai, Dongyul; Kriling, Shelsea; Nien, Chyong Jy; Brown, Donald J.; Jester, Bryan; Juhasz, Tibor

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To characterize and quantify the collagen fiber (lamellar) organization of human corneas in three dimensions by using nonlinear optical high-resolution macroscopy (NLO-HRMac) and to correlate these findings with mechanical data obtained by indentation testing of corneal flaps. Methods. Twelve corneas from 10 donors were studied. Vibratome sections, 200 μm thick, from five donor eyes were cut along the vertical meridian from limbus to limbus (arc length, 12 mm). Backscattered second harmonic–generated (SHG) NLO signals from these sections were collected as a series of overlapping 3-D images, which were concatenated to form a single 3-D mosaic (pixel resolution: 0.44 μm lateral, 2 μm axial). Collagen fiber intertwining was quantified by determining branching point density as a function of stromal depth. Mechanical testing was performed on corneal flaps from seven additional eyes. Corneas were cut into three layers (anterior, middle, and posterior) using a femtosecond surgical laser system and underwent indentation testing to determine the elastic modulus for each layer. Results. The 3-D reconstructions revealed complex collagen fiber branching patterns in the anterior cornea, with fibers extending from the anterior limiting lamina (ALL, Bowman's layer), intertwining with deeper fibers and reinserting back to the ALL, forming bow spring–like structures. Measured branching-point density was four times higher in the anterior third of the cornea than in the posterior third and decreased logarithmically with increasing distance from the ALL. Indentation testing showed an eightfold increase in elastic modulus in the anterior stroma. Conclusions. The axial gradient in lamellar intertwining appears to be associated with an axial gradient in the effective elastic modulus of the cornea, suggesting that collagen fiber intertwining and formation of bow spring–like structures provide structural support similar to cross-beams in bridges and large-scale structures

  11. Physicochemical properties of 3D collagen-CS scaffolds for potential use in neural tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Pietrucha, Krystyna

    2015-09-01

    Collagen-based composite scaffolds have considerable potential due to their well-known ability to regenerate skin, bone and cartilage. However, the precise composition and structure of scaffolds that optimize their interaction with neural cells remains incompletely understood and yet to be explored. In the present study, a new family of bi-component 3D scaffolds consisting of collagen (Col) and chondroitin sulphate (CS) were synthesized using a two-stage process: multiple freeze-drying followed by carbodiimide modification. Col-CS matrices had an average pore diameter of 31 μm and a relatively high surface area to pore volume ratio. Importantly, the FTIR data indicated that the ratio between the intensity of amide III and 1452 cm(-1) for Col-CS scaffold was 0.87, which indicates that the Col triple helix was preserved during the formation of the bond between Col and CS. All experiments also clearly showed that the Col-CS matrices have a lower enzyme sensitivity and higher thermal resistance than Col alone. These differences are likely due to the relatively large amount of CS in the collagen sponges, which hinders access for attack at specific active sites of the Col triple helix. Improved binary composite scaffolds were designed for neural tissue engineering applications.

  12. Analysis of Cell Migration within a Three-dimensional Collagen Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Rommerswinkel, Nadine; Niggemann, Bernd; Keil, Silvia; Zänker, Kurt S.; Dittmar, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The ability to migrate is a hallmark of various cell types and plays a crucial role in several physiological processes, including embryonic development, wound healing, and immune responses. However, cell migration is also a key mechanism in cancer enabling these cancer cells to detach from the primary tumor to start metastatic spreading. Within the past years various cell migration assays have been developed to analyze the migratory behavior of different cell types. Because the locomotory behavior of cells markedly differs between a two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) environment it can be assumed that the analysis of the migration of cells that are embedded within a 3D environment would yield in more significant cell migration data. The advantage of the described 3D collagen matrix migration assay is that cells are embedded within a physiological 3D network of collagen fibers representing the major component of the extracellular matrix. Due to time-lapse video microscopy real cell migration is measured allowing the determination of several migration parameters as well as their alterations in response to pro-migratory factors or inhibitors. Various cell types could be analyzed using this technique, including lymphocytes/leukocytes, stem cells, and tumor cells. Likewise, also cell clusters or spheroids could be embedded within the collagen matrix concomitant with analysis of the emigration of single cells from the cell cluster/ spheroid into the collagen lattice. We conclude that the 3D collagen matrix migration assay is a versatile method to analyze the migration of cells within a physiological-like 3D environment. PMID:25350138

  13. Analysis of cell migration within a three-dimensional collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Rommerswinkel, Nadine; Niggemann, Bernd; Keil, Silvia; Zänker, Kurt S; Dittmar, Thomas

    2014-10-05

    The ability to migrate is a hallmark of various cell types and plays a crucial role in several physiological processes, including embryonic development, wound healing, and immune responses. However, cell migration is also a key mechanism in cancer enabling these cancer cells to detach from the primary tumor to start metastatic spreading. Within the past years various cell migration assays have been developed to analyze the migratory behavior of different cell types. Because the locomotory behavior of cells markedly differs between a two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) environment it can be assumed that the analysis of the migration of cells that are embedded within a 3D environment would yield in more significant cell migration data. The advantage of the described 3D collagen matrix migration assay is that cells are embedded within a physiological 3D network of collagen fibers representing the major component of the extracellular matrix. Due to time-lapse video microscopy real cell migration is measured allowing the determination of several migration parameters as well as their alterations in response to pro-migratory factors or inhibitors. Various cell types could be analyzed using this technique, including lymphocytes/leukocytes, stem cells, and tumor cells. Likewise, also cell clusters or spheroids could be embedded within the collagen matrix concomitant with analysis of the emigration of single cells from the cell cluster/ spheroid into the collagen lattice. We conclude that the 3D collagen matrix migration assay is a versatile method to analyze the migration of cells within a physiological-like 3D environment.

  14. Type VI Collagen Regulates Dermal Matrix Assembly and Fibroblast Motility.

    PubMed

    Theocharidis, Georgios; Drymoussi, Zoe; Kao, Alexander P; Barber, Asa H; Lee, David A; Braun, Kristin M; Connelly, John T

    2016-01-01

    Type VI collagen is a nonfibrillar collagen expressed in many connective tissues and implicated in extracellular matrix (ECM) organization. We hypothesized that type VI collagen regulates matrix assembly and cell function within the dermis of the skin. In the present study we examined the expression pattern of type VI collagen in normal and wounded skin and investigated its specific function in new matrix deposition by human dermal fibroblasts. Type VI collagen was expressed throughout the dermis of intact human skin, at the expanding margins of human keloid samples, and in the granulation tissue of newly deposited ECM in a mouse model of wound healing. Generation of cell-derived matrices (CDMs) by human dermal fibroblasts with stable knockdown of COL6A1 revealed that type VI collagen-deficient matrices were significantly thinner and contained more aligned, thicker, and widely spaced fibers than CDMs produced by normal fibroblasts. In addition, there was significantly less total collagen and sulfated proteoglycans present in the type VI collagen-depleted matrices. Normal fibroblasts cultured on de-cellularized CDMs lacking type VI collagen displayed increased cell spreading, migration speed, and persistence. Taken together, these findings indicate that type VI collagen is a key regulator of dermal matrix assembly, composition, and fibroblast behavior and may play an important role in wound healing and tissue regeneration. PMID:26763426

  15. Fibrillogenesis from nanosurfaces: multiphoton imaging and stereological analysis of collagen 3D self-assembly dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Decencière, Etienne; Machairas, Vaïa; Albert, Claire; Coradin, Thibaud; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Aimé, Carole

    2014-09-21

    The assembly of proteins into fibrillar structures is an important process that concerns different biological contexts, including molecular medicine and functional biomaterials. Engineering of hybrid biomaterials can advantageously provide synergetic interactions of the biopolymers with an inorganic component to ensure specific supramolecular organization and dynamics. To this aim, we designed hybrid systems associating collagen and surface-functionalized silica particles and we built a new strategy to investigate fibrillogenesis processes in such multicomponents systems, working at the crossroads of chemistry, physics and mathematics. The self-assembly process was investigated by bimodal multiphoton imaging coupling second harmonic generation (SHG) and 2 photon excited fluorescence (2PEF). The in-depth spatial characterization of the system was further achieved using the three-dimensional analysis of the SHG/2PEF data via mathematical morphology processing. Quantitation of collagen distribution around particles offers strong evidence that the chemically induced confinement of the protein on the silica nanosurfaces has a key influence on the spatial extension of fibrillogenesis. This new approach is unique in the information it can provide on 3D dynamic hybrid systems and may be extended to other associations of fibrillar molecules with optically responsive nano-objects. PMID:25058449

  16. Modeling of 3-D Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Sullivan, Roy M.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2003-01-01

    Three different approaches are being pursued at the NASA Glenn Research Center to predict the nanostructural behavior of three-dimensional woven ceramic matrix composites. These are: a micromechanics-based approach using W-CEMCAN (Woven Ceramic Matrix Composite Analyzer), a laminate analogy method and a structural frame approach (based on the finite element method). All three techniques are applied to predict the thermomechanical properties of a three-dimensional woven angle interlock C/SiC composite. The properties are predicted for room temperature and 1100 C and the predicted properties are compared to measurements. General observations regarding the three approaches for three-dimensional composite modeling are discussed.

  17. 3D bioprinting of BMSC-laden methacrylamide gelatin scaffolds with CBD-BMP2-collagen microfibers.

    PubMed

    Du, Mingchun; Chen, Bing; Meng, Qingyuan; Liu, Sumei; Zheng, Xiongfei; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Heran; Li, Hongyi; Wang, Nuo; Dai, Jianwu

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting combines biomaterials, cells and functional components into complex living tissues. Herein, we assembled function-control modules into cell-laden scaffolds using 3D bioprinting. A customized 3D printer was able to tune the microstructure of printed bone mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC)-laden methacrylamide gelatin scaffolds at the micrometer scale. For example, the pore size was adjusted to 282 ± 32 μm and 363 ± 60 μm. To match the requirements of the printing nozzle, collagen microfibers with a length of 22 ± 13 μm were prepared with a high-speed crusher. Collagen microfibers bound bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) with a collagen binding domain (CBD) as differentiation-control module, from which BMP2 was able to be controllably released. The differentiation behaviors of BMSCs in the printed scaffolds were compared in three microenvironments: samples without CBD-BMP2-collagen microfibers in the growth medium, samples without microfibers in the osteogenic medium and samples with microfibers in the growth medium. The results indicated that BMSCs showed high cell viability (>90%) during printing; CBD-BMP2-collagen microfibers induced BMSC differentiation into osteocytes within 14 days more efficiently than the osteogenic medium. Our studies suggest that these function-control modules are attractive biomaterials and have potential applications in 3D bioprinting. PMID:26684899

  18. 3D bioprinting of BMSC-laden methacrylamide gelatin scaffolds with CBD-BMP2-collagen microfibers.

    PubMed

    Du, Mingchun; Chen, Bing; Meng, Qingyuan; Liu, Sumei; Zheng, Xiongfei; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Heran; Li, Hongyi; Wang, Nuo; Dai, Jianwu

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting combines biomaterials, cells and functional components into complex living tissues. Herein, we assembled function-control modules into cell-laden scaffolds using 3D bioprinting. A customized 3D printer was able to tune the microstructure of printed bone mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC)-laden methacrylamide gelatin scaffolds at the micrometer scale. For example, the pore size was adjusted to 282 ± 32 μm and 363 ± 60 μm. To match the requirements of the printing nozzle, collagen microfibers with a length of 22 ± 13 μm were prepared with a high-speed crusher. Collagen microfibers bound bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) with a collagen binding domain (CBD) as differentiation-control module, from which BMP2 was able to be controllably released. The differentiation behaviors of BMSCs in the printed scaffolds were compared in three microenvironments: samples without CBD-BMP2-collagen microfibers in the growth medium, samples without microfibers in the osteogenic medium and samples with microfibers in the growth medium. The results indicated that BMSCs showed high cell viability (>90%) during printing; CBD-BMP2-collagen microfibers induced BMSC differentiation into osteocytes within 14 days more efficiently than the osteogenic medium. Our studies suggest that these function-control modules are attractive biomaterials and have potential applications in 3D bioprinting.

  19. Role of cell-matrix interactions on VIC phenotype and tissue deposition in 3D PEG hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Gould, Sarah T; Anseth, Kristi S

    2013-10-16

    Valvular interstitial cells (VICs) respond to 3D matrix interactions in a complex manner, but understanding these effects on VIC function better is important for applications ranging from valve tissue engineering to studying valve disease. Here, we encapsulated VICs in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels modified with three different adhesive ligands, derived from fibronectin (RGDS), elastin (VGVAPG) and collagen-1 (P15). By day 14, VICs became significantly more elongated in RGDS-containing gels compared to VGVAPG or P15. This difference in cell morphology appeared to correlate with global matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, as VICs encapsulated in RGDS-functionalized hydrogels secreted higher levels of active MMP at day 2. VIC activation to a myofibroblast phenotype was also characterized by staining for α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) at day 14. The percentage of αSMA(+) VICs in the VGVAPG gels was the highest (56%) compared to RGDS (33%) or P15 (38%) gels. Matrix deposition and composition were also characterized at days 14 and 42 and found to depend on the initial hydrogel composition. All gel formulations had similar levels of collagen, elastin and chondroitin sulphate deposited as the porcine aortic valve. However, the composition of collagen deposited by VICs in VGVAPG-functionalized gels had a significantly higher collagen-X:collagen-1 ratio, which is associated with stenotic valves. Taken together, these data suggest that peptide-functionalized PEG hydrogels are a useful system for culturing VICs three-dimensionally and, with the ability to systematically alter biochemical and biophysical properties, this platform may prove useful in manipulating VIC function for valve regeneration. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24130082

  20. Electrical and Neurotrophin Enhancement of Neurite Outgrowth within a 3D Collagen Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Robert D.; Rendell, Sara R.; Counts, Lauren R.; Papke, Jason B.; Willits, Rebecca K.; Harkins, Amy B.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical and chemical stimulation have been studied as potent mechanisms of enhancing nerve regeneration and wound healing. However, it remains unclear how electrical stimuli affect nerve growth, particularly in the presence of neurotrophic factors. The objective of this study was to explore (1) the effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) supplementation to support neurite outgrowth in a 3D scaffold, and (2) the effect of brief, low voltage, electrical stimulation (ES) on neurite outgrowth prior to neurotrophin supplementation. Dissociated E11 chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were seeded within a 1.5 mg/mL type-I collagen scaffold. For neurotrophin treatments, scaffolds were incubated for 24 hrs in culture media containing nerve growth factor (NGF, 10 ng/mL) or BDNF (200 ng/mL), or both. For ES groups, scaffolds containing neurons were stimulated for 10 min at 8–10 V/m DC, then incubated for 24 hrs with neurotrophin. Fixed and labeled neurons were imaged to measure neurite growth and directionality. BDNF supplementation was not as effective as NGF at supporting DRG neurite outgrowth. ES prior to NGF supplementation improved DRG neurite outgrowth compared to NGF alone. This combination of brief ES with NGF treatment was the most effective treatment compared to NGF or BDNF alone. Brief ES had no impact on neurite directionality in the 3D scaffolds. These results demonstrate that ES improves neurite outgrowth in the presence of neurotrophins, and could provide a potential therapeutic approach to improve nerve regeneration when coupled with neurotrophin treatment. PMID:24710795

  1. Shrinking mechanism of a porous collagen matrix immersed in solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Yang; Hsieh, Hsyue-Jen; Huang, Lynn L H

    2014-12-01

    The porous structure of collagen-based matrices enables the infiltration of cells both in in vitro and clinical applications. Reconstituted porous collagen matrices often collapse when they are in contact with aqueous solutions; however, the mechanism for the collapse of the pores is not understood. We, therefore, investigated the interactions between the collagen matrix and different solutions, and discuss the mechanisms for the change in microstructure of the matrix on immersing it in solution. When a dried collagen matrix was immersed in aqueous solutions, the matrix shrunk and pores close to the surface closed. The shrinkage ratio and thickness of the compact microstructure close to the superficial area decreased with increasing ethanol content in the solution. The original porous structure of the collagen matrix was preserved when the matrix was immersed in absolute ethanol. The shrinkage of a porous collagen matrix in contact with aqueous solutions was attributed to the liquid/gas interfacial tension. The average pore diameter of the matrix also significantly affected the shrinkage of the matrix. The shrinkage of the matrix, explained using the Young-Laplace equation, was found to result from the pressure drop, and especially in the pores located superficially, leading to the collapse of the matrix microstructure. The integrity of the porous microstructure allows better penetration of cells in medical applications. The numbers of NIH/3T3 fibroblasts penetrated through the hydrated Col/PBS porous collagen matrices pre-immersed in absolute ethanol with subsequent water and DMEM culture medium replacements were significantly higher than those through matrices hydrated directly in DMEM.

  2. Extracellular Protease Inhibition Alters the Phenotype of Chondrogenically Differentiating Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) in 3D Collagen Microspheres.

    PubMed

    Han, Sejin; Li, Yuk Yin; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Matrix remodeling of cells is highly regulated by proteases and their inhibitors. Nevertheless, how would the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) be affected, when the balance of the matrix remodeling is disturbed by inhibiting matrix proteases, is incompletely known. Using a previously developed collagen microencapsulation platform, we investigated whether exposing chondrogenically differentiating MSCs to intracellular and extracellular protease inhibitors will affect the extracellular matrix remodeling and hence the outcomes of chondrogenesis. Results showed that inhibition of matrix proteases particularly the extracellular ones favors the phenotype of fibrocartilage rather than hyaline cartilage in chondrogenically differentiating hMSCs by upregulating type I collagen protein deposition and type II collagen gene expression without significantly altering the hypertrophic markers at gene level. This study suggests the potential of manipulating extracellular proteases to alter the outcomes of hMSC chondrogenesis, contributing to future development of differentiation protocols for fibrocartilage tissues for intervertebral disc and meniscus tissue engineering. PMID:26760956

  3. Extracellular Protease Inhibition Alters the Phenotype of Chondrogenically Differentiating Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) in 3D Collagen Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sejin; Li, Yuk Yin; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Matrix remodeling of cells is highly regulated by proteases and their inhibitors. Nevertheless, how would the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) be affected, when the balance of the matrix remodeling is disturbed by inhibiting matrix proteases, is incompletely known. Using a previously developed collagen microencapsulation platform, we investigated whether exposing chondrogenically differentiating MSCs to intracellular and extracellular protease inhibitors will affect the extracellular matrix remodeling and hence the outcomes of chondrogenesis. Results showed that inhibition of matrix proteases particularly the extracellular ones favors the phenotype of fibrocartilage rather than hyaline cartilage in chondrogenically differentiating hMSCs by upregulating type I collagen protein deposition and type II collagen gene expression without significantly altering the hypertrophic markers at gene level. This study suggests the potential of manipulating extracellular proteases to alter the outcomes of hMSC chondrogenesis, contributing to future development of differentiation protocols for fibrocartilage tissues for intervertebral disc and meniscus tissue engineering. PMID:26760956

  4. Extracellular Protease Inhibition Alters the Phenotype of Chondrogenically Differentiating Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) in 3D Collagen Microspheres.

    PubMed

    Han, Sejin; Li, Yuk Yin; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Matrix remodeling of cells is highly regulated by proteases and their inhibitors. Nevertheless, how would the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) be affected, when the balance of the matrix remodeling is disturbed by inhibiting matrix proteases, is incompletely known. Using a previously developed collagen microencapsulation platform, we investigated whether exposing chondrogenically differentiating MSCs to intracellular and extracellular protease inhibitors will affect the extracellular matrix remodeling and hence the outcomes of chondrogenesis. Results showed that inhibition of matrix proteases particularly the extracellular ones favors the phenotype of fibrocartilage rather than hyaline cartilage in chondrogenically differentiating hMSCs by upregulating type I collagen protein deposition and type II collagen gene expression without significantly altering the hypertrophic markers at gene level. This study suggests the potential of manipulating extracellular proteases to alter the outcomes of hMSC chondrogenesis, contributing to future development of differentiation protocols for fibrocartilage tissues for intervertebral disc and meniscus tissue engineering.

  5. Chick tendon fibroblast transcriptome and shape depend on whether the cell has made its own collagen matrix

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Ching-Yan Chloé; Zeef, Leo A. H.; Lallyett, Chloe; Lu, Yinhui; Canty-Laird, Elizabeth G.; Kadler, Karl E.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen- and fibrin-based gels are extensively used to study cell behaviour. However, 2D–3D and collagen-fibrin comparisons of gene expression, cell shape and mechanotransduction, with an in vivo reference, have not been reported. Here we compared chick tendon fibroblasts (CTFs) at three stages of embryonic development with CTFs cultured in collagen- or fibrin-based tissue engineered constructs (TECs). CTFs synthesised their own collagen matrix in fibrin-based TECs and better recapitulated the gene expression, collagen fibril alignment and cell shape seen in vivo. In contrast, cells in 3D collagen gels exhibited a 2D-like morphology and expressed fewer of the genes expressed in vivo. Analysis of YAP/TAZ target genes showed that collagen gels desensitise mechanotransduction pathways. In conclusion, gene expression and cell shape are similar on plastic and 3D collagen whereas cells in 3D fibrin have a shape and transcriptome better resembling the in vivo situation. Implications for wound healing are discussed. PMID:26337655

  6. Fabrication of Compositionally and Topographically Complex Robust Tissue Forms by 3D-Electrochemical Compaction of Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Younesi, Mousa; Islam, Anowarul; Kishore, Vipuil; Panit, Stefi; Akkus, Ozan

    2015-01-01

    Collagen solutions are phase-transformed to mechanically robust shell structures with curviplanar topographies using electrochemically induced pH gradients. The process enables rapid layer-by-layer deposition of collagen-rich mixtures over the entire field simultaneously to obtain compositionally diverse multilayered structures. In-plane tensile strength and modulus of the electrocompacted collagen sheet samples were 5200 -fold and 2300 -fold greater than that of uncompacted collagen samples. Out of plane compression tests showed 27 -fold and fold increase in compressive stress and 46 -fold increase in compressive modulus compared to uncompacted collagen sheets. Cells proliferated 4.9 times faster, and cellular area spread was 2.7 times greater on compacted collagen sheets. Electrocompaction also resulted in 2.9 times greater focal adhesion area than on regular collagen hydrogel. The reported improvements in the cell-matrix interactions with electrocompaction would serve to expedite the population of electrocompacted collagen scaffolds by cells. The capacity of the method to fabricate nonlinear curved topographies with compositional heterogeneous layers is demonstrated by sequential deposition of collagenhydroxyapatite layer over a collagen layer. The complex curved topography of the nasal structure is replicated by the electrochemical compaction method. The presented electrochemical compaction process is an enabling modality which holds significant promise for reconstruction of a wide spectrum of topographically complex systems such as joint surfaces, craniofacial defects, ears, nose or urogenital forms. PMID:26069162

  7. 3D Linear Transformations in the Form of Matrix and Vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua

    2008-11-01

    In this article, results of four 3D linear transformations (translation, rotation, scale and shear) in the form of matrix and vector are simplified into a same 3D physical coordinates system. Comparing the simplified results of those four linear transformations, the results obtained from matrix form are exactly the same as what obtained from vector algebra in final expressions, although they are different from original expressions.

  8. Bile canaliculi formation and biliary transport in 3D sandwich-cultured hepatocytes in dependence of the extracellular matrix composition.

    PubMed

    Deharde, Daniela; Schneider, Christin; Hiller, Thomas; Fischer, Nicolas; Kegel, Victoria; Lübberstedt, Marc; Freyer, Nora; Hengstler, Jan G; Andersson, Tommy B; Seehofer, Daniel; Pratschke, Johann; Zeilinger, Katrin; Damm, Georg

    2016-10-01

    Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are still considered as gold standard for investigation of in vitro metabolism and hepatotoxicity in pharmaceutical research. It has been shown that the three-dimensional (3D) cultivation of PHH in a sandwich configuration between two layers of extracellular matrix (ECM) enables the hepatocytes to adhere three dimensionally leading to formation of in vivo like cell-cell contacts and cell-matrix interactions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of different ECM compositions on morphology, cellular arrangement and bile canaliculi formation as well as bile excretion processes in PHH sandwich cultures systematically. Freshly isolated PHH were cultured for 6 days between two ECM layers made of collagen and/or Matrigel in four different combinations. The cultures were investigated by phase contrast microscopy and immunofluorescence analysis with respect to cell-cell connections, repolarization as well as bile canaliculi formation. The influence of the ECM composition on cell activity and viability was measured using the XTT assay and a fluorescent dead or alive assay. Finally, the bile canalicular transport was analyzed by live cell imaging to monitor the secretion and accumulation of the fluorescent substance CDF in bile canaliculi. Using collagen and Matrigel in different compositions in sandwich cultures of hepatocytes, we observed differences in morphology, cellular arrangement and cell activity of PHH in dependence of the ECM composition. Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes with an underlay of collagen seem to represent the best in vivo tissue architecture in terms of formation of trabecular cell arrangement. Cultures overlaid with collagen were characterized by the formation of abundant bile canaliculi, while the bile canaliculi network in hepatocytes cultured on a layer of Matrigel and overlaid with collagen showed the most branched and stable canalicular network. All cultures showed a time-dependent leakage of

  9. Maintenance of a bone collagen phenotype by osteoblast-like cells in 3D periodic porous titanium (Ti-6Al-4 V) structures fabricated by selective electron beam melting.

    PubMed

    Hrabe, Nikolas W; Heinl, Peter; Bordia, Rajendra K; Körner, Carolin; Fernandes, Russell J

    2013-01-01

    Regular 3D periodic porous Ti-6Al-4 V structures were fabricated by the selective electron beam melting method (EBM) over a range of relative densities (0.17-0.40) and pore sizes (500-1500 µm). Structures were seeded with human osteoblast-like cells (SAOS-2) and cultured for four weeks. Cells multiplied within these structures and extracellular matrix collagen content increased. Type I and type V collagens typically synthesized by osteoblasts were deposited in the newly formed matrix with time in culture. High magnification scanning electron microscopy revealed cells attached to surfaces on the interior of the structures with an increasingly fibrous matrix. The in-vitro results demonstrate that the novel EBM-processed porous structures, designed to address the effect of stress-shielding, are conducive to osteoblast attachment, proliferation and deposition of a collagenous matrix characteristic of bone.

  10. A collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment targeting tumors with a collagen-rich extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hui; Li, Xiaoran; Wang, Bin; Chen, Bing; Zhao, Yannan; Sun, Jie; Zhuang, Yan; Shi, Jiajia; Shen, He; Zhang, Zhijun; Dai, Jianwu

    2016-01-01

    Many tumors over-express collagen, which constitutes the physical scaffold of tumor microenvironment. Collagen has been considered to be a target for cancer therapy. The collagen-binding domain (CBD) is a short peptide, which could bind to collagen and achieve the sustained release of CBD-fused proteins in collagen scaffold. Here, a collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment was designed and expressed for targeting the collagen-rich extracellular matrix in tumors. The antibody fragment (Fab) of cetuximab was fused with CBD (CBD-Fab) and expressed in Pichia pastoris. CBD-Fab maintained antigen binding and anti-tumor activity of cetuximab and obtained a collagen-binding ability in vitro. The results also showed CBD-Fab was mainly enriched in tumors and had longer retention time in tumors in A431 s.c. xenografts. Furthermore, CBD-Fab showed a similar therapeutic efficacy as cetuximab in A431 xenografts. Although CBD-Fab hasn’t showed better therapeutic effects than cetuximab, its smaller molecular and special target may be applicable as antibody–drug conjugates (ADC) or immunotoxins. PMID:26883295

  11. Ovine-Based Collagen Matrix Dressing: Next-Generation Collagen Dressing for Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Gregory; Liden, Brock; Schultz, Gregory; Yang, Qingping; Gibson, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Broad-spectrum metalloproteinase (MMP) reduction along with inherent aspects of an extracellular matrix (ECM) dressing can bring about improved wound healing outcomes and shorter treatment duration. Initial reports of clinical effectiveness of a new ovine-based collagen extracellular matrix (CECM) dressing demonstrate benefits in chronic wound healing. Recent Advances: CECM dressings are processed differently than oxidized regenerated cellulose/collagen dressings. CECM dressings consist primarily of collagens I and III arranged as native fibers that retain the three-dimensional architecture present in tissue ECM. As such, ovine-based ECM dressings represent a new generation of collagen dressings capable of impacting a broad spectrum of MMP excess known to be present in chronic wounds. Critical Issues: While MMPs are essential in normal healing, elevated presence of MMPs has been linked to wound failure. Collagen has been shown to reduce levels of MMPs, acting as a sacrificial substrate for excessive proteases in a chronic wound. Preserving collagen dressings in a more native state enhances bioactivity in terms of the ability to affect the chronic wound environment. Clinical observation and assessment may not be sufficient to identify a wound with elevated protease activity that can break down ECM, affect wound fibroblasts, and impair growth factor response. Future Directions: Collagen dressings that target broad-spectrum excessive MMP levels and can be applied early in the course of care may positively impact healing rates in difficult wounds. Next-generation collagen dressings offer broader MMP reduction capacity while providing a provisional dermal matrix or ECM. PMID:26858910

  12. Collagen-binding VEGF mimetic peptide: Structure, matrix interaction, and endothelial cell activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Tania R.

    Long term survival of artificial tissue constructs depends greatly on proper vascularization. In nature, differentiation of endothelial cells and formation of vasculature are directed by dynamic spatio-temporal cues in the extracellular matrix that are difficult to reproduce in vitro. In this dissertation, we present a novel bifunctional peptide that mimics matrix-bound vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which can be used to encode spatially controlled angiogenic signals in collagen-based scaffolds. The peptide, QKCMP, contains a collagen mimetic domain (CMP) that binds to type I collagen by a unique triple helix hybridization mechanism and a VEGF mimetic domain (QK) with pro-angiogenic activity. We demonstrate QKCMP's ability to hybridize with native and heat denatured collagens through a series of binding studies on collagen and gelatin substrates. Circular dichroism experiments show that the peptide retains the triple helical structure vital for collagen binding, and surface plasmon resonance study confirms the molecular interaction between the peptide and collagen strands. Cell culture studies demonstrate QKCMP's ability to induce endothelial cell morphogenesis and network formation as a matrix-bound factor in 2D and 3D collagen scaffolds. We also show that the peptide can be used to spatially modify collagen-based substrates to promote localized endothelial cell activation and network formation. To probe the biological events that govern these angiogenic cellular responses, we investigated the cell signaling pathways activated by collagen-bound QKCMP and determined short and long-term endothelial cell response profiles for p38, ERK1/2, and Akt signal transduction cascades. Finally, we present our efforts to translate the peptide's in vitro bioactivity to an in vivo burn injury animal model. When implanted at the wound site, QKCMP functionalized biodegradable hydrogels induce enhanced neovascularization in the granulation tissue. The results show QKCMP

  13. Microrheology and ROCK signaling of human endothelial cells embedded in a 3D matrix.

    PubMed

    Panorchan, Porntula; Lee, Jerry S H; Kole, Thomas P; Tseng, Yiider; Wirtz, Denis

    2006-11-01

    Cell function is profoundly affected by the geometry of the extracellular environment confining the cell. Whether and how cells plated on a two-dimensional matrix or embedded in a three-dimensional (3D) matrix mechanically sense the dimensionality of their environment is mostly unknown, partly because individual cells in an extended matrix are inaccessible to conventional cell-mechanics probes. Here we develop a functional assay based on multiple particle tracking microrheology coupled with ballistic injection of nanoparticles to measure the local intracellular micromechanical properties of individual cells embedded inside a matrix. With our novel assay, we probe the mechanical properties of the cytoplasm of individual human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) embedded in a 3D peptide hydrogel in the presence or absence of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We found that VEGF treatment, which enhances endothelial migration, increases the compliance and reduces the elasticity of the cytoplasm of HUVECs in a matrix. This VEGF-induced softening response of the cytoplasm is abrogated by specific Rho-kinase (ROCK) inhibition. These results establish combined particle-tracking microrheology and ballistic injection as the first method able to probe the micromechanical properties and mechanical response to agonists and/or drug treatments of individual cells inside a matrix. These results suggest that ROCK plays an essential role in the regulation of the intracellular mechanical response to VEGF of endothelial cells in a 3D matrix.

  14. 3D printed nanocomposite matrix for the study of breast cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Holmes, Benjamin; Glazer, Robert I; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    Bone is one of the most common metastatic sites of breast cancer, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, in part due to an absence of advanced platforms for cancer culture and study that mimic the bone microenvironment. In the present study, we integrated a novel stereolithography-based 3D printer and a unique 3D printed nano-ink consisting of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles suspended in hydrogel to create a biomimetic bone-specific environment for evaluating breast cancer bone invasion. Breast cancer cells cultured in a geometrically optimized matrix exhibited spheroid morphology and migratory characteristics. Co-culture of tumor cells with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells increased the formation of spheroid clusters. The 3D matrix also allowed for higher drug resistance of breast cancer cells than 2D culture. These results validate that our 3D bone matrix can mimic tumor bone microenvironments, suggesting that it can serve as a tool for studying metastasis and assessing drug sensitivity. From the Clinical Editor: Cancer remains a major cause of mortality for patients in the clinical setting. For breast cancer, bone is one of the most common metastatic sites. In this intriguing article, the authors developed a bone-like environment using 3D printing technology to investigate the underlying biology of bone metastasis. Their results would also allow a new model for other researchers who work on cancer to use.

  15. Increased extracellular matrix density decreases MCF10A breast cell acinus formation in 3D culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Lance, Amanda; Yang, Chih-Chao; Swamydas, Muthulekha; Dean, Delphine; Deitch, Sandy; Burg, Karen J L; Dréau, Didier

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) contributes to the generation and dynamic of normal breast tissue, in particular to the generation of polarized acinar and ductal structures. In vitro 3D culture conditions, including variations in the composition of the ECM, have been shown to directly influence the formation and organization of acinus-like and duct-like structures. Furthermore, the density of the ECM appears to also play a role in the normal mammary tissue and tumour formation. Here we show that the density of the ECM directly influences the number, organization and function of breast acini. Briefly, non-malignant human breast MCF10A cells were incubated in increasing densities of a Matrigel®-collagen I matrix. Elastic moduli near and distant to the acinus structures were measured by atomic force microscopy, and the number of acinus structures was determined. Immunochemistry was used to investigate the expression levels of E-cadherin, laminin, matrix metalloproteinase-14 and ß-casein in MCF10A cells. The modulus of the ECM was significantly increased near the acinus structures and the number of acinus structures decreased with the increase in Matrigel-collagen I density. As evaluated by the expression of laminin, the organization of the acinus structures present was altered as the density of the ECM increased. Increases in both E-cadherin and MMP14 expression by MCF10A cells as ECM density increased were also observed. In contrast, MCF10A cells expressed lower ß-casein levels as the ECM density increased. Taken together, these observations highlight the key role of ECM density in modulating the number, organization and function of breast acini.

  16. Extracellular matrix composition and rigidity regulate invasive behavior and response to PDT in 3D pancreatic tumor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Gwendolyn; El-Hamidi, Hamid; Jafari, Seyedehrojin; Jones, Dustin P.; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2016-03-01

    The composition and mechanical compliance of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to serve as regulators of tumor growth and invasive behavior. These effects may be particularly relevant in tumors of the pancreas, noted for a profound desmoplastic reaction and an abundance of stroma rich in ECM. In view of recent progress in the clinical implementation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for pancreatic tumors, in this report we examine how ECM composition and rheological properties impact upon invasive behavior and response to PDT in 3D multicellular pancreatic tumor spheroids in ECM environments with characterized rheological properties. Tumor spheroids were cultured initially in attachment-free conditions to form millimeter-sized spheroids that were transplanted into reconstituted ECM microenvironments (Matrigel and Type I Collagen) that were characterized using bulk oscillatory shear rheology. Analysis of growth behavior shows that the soft collagen ECM promoted growth and extensive invasion and this microenvironment was used in subsequent assessment of PDT and chemotherapy response. Evaluation of treatment response revealed that primary tumor nodule growth is inhibited more effectively with PDT, while verteporfin PDT response is significantly enhanced in the ECM-infiltrating populations that are non-responsive to oxaliplatin chemotherapy. This finding is potentially significant, suggesting the potential for PDT to target these clinically problematic invasive populations that are associated with aggressive metastatic progression and chemoresistance. Experiments to further validate and identify the mechanistic basis of this observation are ongoing.

  17. The Synergistic Effects of Matrix Stiffness and Composition on the Response of Chondroprogenitor Cells in a 3D Precondensation Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Carrion, Bita; Souzanchi, Mohammad F; Wang, Victor T; Tiruchinapally, Gopinath; Shikanov, Ariella; Putnam, Andrew J; Coleman, Rhima M

    2016-05-01

    Improve functional quality of cartilage tissue engineered from stem cells requires a better understanding of the functional evolution of native cartilage tissue. Therefore, a biosynthetic hydrogel was developed containing RGD, hyaluronic acid and/or type-I collagen conjugated to poly(ethylene glycol) acrylate to recapitulate the precondensation microenvironment of the developing limb. Conjugation of any combination of the three ligands did not alter the shear moduli or diffusion properties of the PEG hydrogels; thus, the influence of ligand composition on chondrogenesis could be investigated in the context of varying matrix stiffness. Gene expression of ligand receptors (CD44 and the b1-integrin) as well as markers of condensation (cell clustering and N-cadherin gene expression) and chondrogenesis (Col2a1 gene expression and sGAG production) by chondroprogenitor cells in this system were modulated by both matrix stiffness and ligand composition, with the highest gene expression occurring in softer hydrogels containing all three ligands. Cell proliferation in these 3D matrices for 7 d prior to chondrogenic induction increased the rate of sGAG production in a stiffness-dependent manner. This biosynthetic hydrogel supports the features of early limb-bud condensation and chondrogenesis and is a novel platform in which the influence of the matrix physicochemical properties on these processes can be elucidated.

  18. Immunomodulatory effects of amniotic membrane matrix incorporated into collagen scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hortensius, Rebecca A; Ebens, Jill H; Harley, Brendan A C

    2016-06-01

    Adult tendon wound repair is characterized by the formation of disorganized collagen matrix which leads to decreases in mechanical properties and scar formation. Studies have linked this scar formation to the inflammatory phase of wound healing. Instructive biomaterials designed for tendon regeneration are often designed to provide both structural and cellular support. In order to facilitate regeneration, success may be found by tempering the body's inflammatory response. This work combines collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds, previously developed for tissue regeneration, with matrix materials (hyaluronic acid and amniotic membrane) that have been shown to promote healing and decreased scar formation in skin studies. The results presented show that scaffolds containing amniotic membrane matrix have significantly increased mechanical properties and that tendon cells within these scaffolds have increased metabolic activity even when the media is supplemented with the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta. Collagen scaffolds containing hyaluronic acid or amniotic membrane also temper the expression of genes associated with the inflammatory response in normal tendon healing (TNF-α, COLI, MMP-3). These results suggest that alterations to scaffold composition, to include matrix known to decrease scar formation in vivo, can modify the inflammatory response in tenocytes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1332-1342, 2016.

  19. Implementation of parallel matrix decomposition for NIKE3D on the KSR1 system

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Philip S.; Fulton, R.E.; Zacharia, T.

    1995-06-01

    New massively parallel computer architecture has revolutionized the design of computer algorithms and promises to have significant influence on algorithms for engineering computations. Realistic engineering problems using finite element analysis typically imply excessively large computational requirements. Parallel supercomputers that have the potential for significantly increasing calculation speeds can meet these computational requirements. This report explores the potential for the parallel Cholesky (U{sup T}DU) matrix decomposition algorithm on NIKE3D through actual computations. The examples of two- and three-dimensional nonlinear dynamic finite element problems are presented on the Kendall Square Research (KSR1) multiprocessor system, with 64 processors, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The numerical results indicate that the parallel Cholesky (U{sup T}DU) matrix decomposition algorithm is attractive for NIKE3D under multi-processor system environments.

  20. Measurement Matrix Optimization and Mismatch Problem Compensation for DLSLA 3-D SAR Cross-Track Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Qian; Jiang, Chenglong; Lin, Yun; Tan, Weixian; Wang, Zhirui; Hong, Wen

    2016-01-01

    With a short linear array configured in the cross-track direction, downward looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (DLSLA 3-D SAR) can obtain the 3-D image of an imaging scene. To improve the cross-track resolution, sparse recovery methods have been investigated in recent years. In the compressive sensing (CS) framework, the reconstruction performance depends on the property of measurement matrix. This paper concerns the technique to optimize the measurement matrix and deal with the mismatch problem of measurement matrix caused by the off-grid scatterers. In the model of cross-track reconstruction, the measurement matrix is mainly affected by the configuration of antenna phase centers (APC), thus, two mutual coherence based criteria are proposed to optimize the configuration of APCs. On the other hand, to compensate the mismatch problem of the measurement matrix, the sparse Bayesian inference based method is introduced into the cross-track reconstruction by jointly estimate the scatterers and the off-grid error. Experiments demonstrate the performance of the proposed APCs’ configuration schemes and the proposed cross-track reconstruction method. PMID:27556471

  1. Measurement Matrix Optimization and Mismatch Problem Compensation for DLSLA 3-D SAR Cross-Track Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bao, Qian; Jiang, Chenglong; Lin, Yun; Tan, Weixian; Wang, Zhirui; Hong, Wen

    2016-01-01

    With a short linear array configured in the cross-track direction, downward looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (DLSLA 3-D SAR) can obtain the 3-D image of an imaging scene. To improve the cross-track resolution, sparse recovery methods have been investigated in recent years. In the compressive sensing (CS) framework, the reconstruction performance depends on the property of measurement matrix. This paper concerns the technique to optimize the measurement matrix and deal with the mismatch problem of measurement matrix caused by the off-grid scatterers. In the model of cross-track reconstruction, the measurement matrix is mainly affected by the configuration of antenna phase centers (APC), thus, two mutual coherence based criteria are proposed to optimize the configuration of APCs. On the other hand, to compensate the mismatch problem of the measurement matrix, the sparse Bayesian inference based method is introduced into the cross-track reconstruction by jointly estimate the scatterers and the off-grid error. Experiments demonstrate the performance of the proposed APCs' configuration schemes and the proposed cross-track reconstruction method. PMID:27556471

  2. Measurement Matrix Optimization and Mismatch Problem Compensation for DLSLA 3-D SAR Cross-Track Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bao, Qian; Jiang, Chenglong; Lin, Yun; Tan, Weixian; Wang, Zhirui; Hong, Wen

    2016-08-22

    With a short linear array configured in the cross-track direction, downward looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (DLSLA 3-D SAR) can obtain the 3-D image of an imaging scene. To improve the cross-track resolution, sparse recovery methods have been investigated in recent years. In the compressive sensing (CS) framework, the reconstruction performance depends on the property of measurement matrix. This paper concerns the technique to optimize the measurement matrix and deal with the mismatch problem of measurement matrix caused by the off-grid scatterers. In the model of cross-track reconstruction, the measurement matrix is mainly affected by the configuration of antenna phase centers (APC), thus, two mutual coherence based criteria are proposed to optimize the configuration of APCs. On the other hand, to compensate the mismatch problem of the measurement matrix, the sparse Bayesian inference based method is introduced into the cross-track reconstruction by jointly estimate the scatterers and the off-grid error. Experiments demonstrate the performance of the proposed APCs' configuration schemes and the proposed cross-track reconstruction method.

  3. SEM evaluation of nanoparticulate silver penetration into dentine collagen matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessudnova, Nadezda O.; Bilenko, David I.; Venig, Sergey B.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study a novel approach to caries management based on the application of nanoparticles of different nature to increase the mineral phase of demineralized dentin has been developed. Silver nanoparticles have been tested as a material for dentine matrix infiltration. Research findings clearly show that collagen fibers of demineralized dentine could be considered as a scaffold for mineral component delivery and the place where mineral growth can occur.

  4. A 3D printed nano bone matrix for characterization of breast cancer cell and osteoblast interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Castro, Nathan J.; Cui, Haitao; Zhou, Xuan; Boualam, Benchaa; McGrane, Robert; Glazer, Robert I.; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-08-01

    Bone metastasis is one of the most prevalent complications of late-stage breast cancer, in which the native bone matrix components, including osteoblasts, are intimately involved in tumor progression. The development of a successful in vitro model would greatly facilitate understanding the underlying mechanism of breast cancer bone invasion as well as provide a tool for effective discovery of novel therapeutic strategies. In the current study, we fabricated a series of in vitro bone matrices composed of a polyethylene glycol hydrogel and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite of varying concentrations to mimic the native bone microenvironment for the investigation of breast cancer bone metastasis. A stereolithography-based three-dimensional (3D) printer was used to fabricate the bone matrices with precisely controlled architecture. The interaction between breast cancer cells and osteoblasts was investigated in the optimized bone matrix. Using a Transwell® system to separate the two cell lines, breast cancer cells inhibited osteoblast proliferation, while osteoblasts stimulated breast cancer cell growth, whereas, both cell lines increased IL-8 secretion. Breast cancer cells co-cultured with osteoblasts within the 3D bone matrix formed multi-cellular spheroids in comparison to two-dimensional monolayers. These findings validate the use of our 3D printed bone matrices as an in vitro metastasis model, and highlights their potential for investigating breast cancer bone metastasis.

  5. Ornamenting 3D printed scaffolds with cell-laid extracellular matrix for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pati, Falguni; Song, Tae-Ha; Rijal, Girdhari; Jang, Jinah; Kim, Sung Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    3D printing technique is the most sophisticated technique to produce scaffolds with tailorable physical properties. But, these scaffolds often suffer from limited biological functionality as they are typically made from synthetic materials. Cell-laid mineralized ECM was shown to be potential for improving the cellular responses and drive osteogenesis of stem cells. Here, we intend to improve the biological functionality of 3D-printed synthetic scaffolds by ornamenting them with cell-laid mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM) that mimics a bony microenvironment. We developed bone graft substitutes by using 3D printed scaffolds made from a composite of polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and mineralized ECM laid by human nasal inferior turbinate tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hTMSCs). A rotary flask bioreactor was used to culture hTMSCs on the scaffolds to foster formation of mineralized ECM. A freeze/thaw cycle in hypotonic buffer was used to efficiently decellularize (97% DNA reduction) the ECM-ornamented scaffolds while preserving its main organic and inorganic components. The ECM-ornamented 3D printed scaffolds supported osteoblastic differentiation of newly-seeded hTMSCs by upregulating four typical osteoblastic genes (4-fold higher RUNX2; 3-fold higher ALP; 4-fold higher osteocalcin; and 4-fold higher osteopontin) and increasing calcium deposition compared to bare 3D printed scaffolds. In vivo, in ectopic and orthotopic models in rats, ECM-ornamented scaffolds induced greater bone formation than that of bare scaffolds. These results suggest a valuable method to produce ECM-ornamented 3D printed scaffolds as off-the-shelf bone graft substitutes that combine tunable physical properties with physiological presentation of biological signals.

  6. Compression loading-induced stress responses in intervertebral disc cells encapsulated in 3D collagen constructs

    PubMed Central

    Chooi, Wai Hon; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Cells protect themselves from stresses through a cellular stress response. In the interverebral disc, such response was also demonstrated to be induced by various environmental stresses. However, whether compression loading will cause cellular stress response in the nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) is not well studied. By using an in vitro collagen microencapsulation model, we investigated the effect of compression loading on the stress response of NPCs. Cell viability tests, and gene and protein expression experiments were conducted, with primers for the heat shock response (HSR: HSP70, HSF1, HSP27 and HSP90), and unfolded protein response (UPR: GRP78, GRP94, ATF4 and CHOP) genes and an antibody to HSP72. Different gene expression patterns occurred due to loading type throughout experiments. Increasing the loading strain for a short duration did not increase the stress response genes significantly, but over longer durations, HSP70 and HSP27 were upregulated. Longer loading durations also resulted in a continuous upregulation of HSR genes and downregulation of UPR genes, even after load removal. The rate of apoptosis did not increase significantly after loading, suggesting that stress response genes might play a role in cell survival following mechanical stress. These results demonstrate how mechanical stress might induce and control the expression of HSR and UPR genes in NPCs. PMID:27197886

  7. Method to evaluate the proliferation of activated lymphocytes in a three-dimensional collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Davidova, Natalya V; Gorlina, Natalia K; Sharova, Svetlana V; Cheredeev, Anatoly N; Kozlov, Ivan G

    2002-12-01

    It is well known that the enhancement of the cell-matrix interactions represents one of the early steps in the process of lymphocyte activation. However, the information regarding the role of these interactions in the late stages of lymphocyte activation (in particular, the proliferation) is still controversial. This is basically due to the absence of adequate experimental models. In the present work we carried out a step-by-step modification of a well-studied model of mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte activation, adjusting it to the conditions of a three-dimensional collagen matrix (3D-CM). All the changes added to the standard procedure in the process of this modification were rigorously controlled using various experimental models. The final version of the method includes the following steps: (i) 24-h lymphocyte (lymphocyte fraction from mouse spleen) preincubation with mitogens (Con A or LPS) with a subsequent cell wash (parameters being controlled: irreversible lymphocyte activation, independence of the proliferation from cell-cell interactions); (ii) transfer of the activated lymphocytes to (3)H-thymidine containing 3D-CM and incubation for 48 h (controlled parameters: distribution of the radioactive label within the 3D-CM and its biological accessibility to lymphocytes); (iii) degradation of the 3D-CM with bacterial collagenase and cell transfer onto glass fiber filters (controlled parameters: cell viability after cultivation in the 3D-CM and treatment with the collagenase). With this method we found that the proliferation of the Con A- and LPS-stimulated lymphocytes in 3D-CM was dramatically inhibited (by 66.5 +/- 14.9% and by 88.1 +/- 10.2%, respectively). The discovered inhibition of the lymphocyte proliferation was not a consequence of either the ineffectiveness of the mitogens, the disruption of the cell-cell interactions, an insufficient inclusion of the radioactive label into cells, or of a decreased cell viability.

  8. Dense collagen matrix accelerates osteogenic differentiation and rescues the apoptotic response to MMP inhibition.

    PubMed

    Buxton, P G; Bitar, M; Gellynck, K; Parkar, M; Brown, R A; Young, A M; Knowles, J C; Nazhat, S N

    2008-08-01

    Bone is distinguished from other tissues by its mechanical properties, in particular stiffness. However, we know little of how osteoblasts react to the stiffness of their microenvironment; in this study we describe their response to a dense (>10 wt.%) collagenous 3D environment. Primary pre-osteoblasts were seeded within a novel form of native collagen, dense collagen, and cultured for up to 14 days in the presence and absence of osteogenic supplements: analysis was via Q-PCR, histology, fluorescent in situ zymography, MMP loss-of-function and tensile testing. Differentiation as measured through the up-regulation of Bsp (247-fold), Alp (14.2-fold), Col1A1 (4.5-fold), Mmp-13 (8.0-fold) and Runx2 (1.2-fold) transcripts was greatly accelerated compared to 2D plastic at 7 and 14 days in the same medium. The scale of this enhancement was confirmed through the use of growth factor stimulation on 2D via the addition of BMP-6 and the Hedgehog agonist purmorphamine. In concert, these molecules were capable of the same level of osteo-induction (measured by Bsp and Alp expression) as the dense collagen alone. Mineralisation was initially localised to remodelled pericellular regions, but by 14 days embedded cells were discernible within regions of apatite (confirmed by MicroRaman). Tensile testing of the matrices showed that this had resulted in a significant increase in Young's modulus at low strain values, consistent with a stiffening of the matrix. To determine the need for matrix remodelling in the mineralisation event the broad spectrum MMP Inhibitor Ilomastat was used. It was found that in its presence mineralisation could still occur (though serum-specific) and the apoptosis associated with MMP inhibition in hydrated collagen gels was abrogated. Analysis of gene expression indicated that this was due to the up-regulation of Mmp-13 in the presence of Ilomastat in dense collagen (400-fold), demonstrating a powerful feedback loop and a potential mechanism for the rescue

  9. Dense collagen matrix accelerates osteogenic differentiation and rescues the apoptotic response to MMP inhibition.

    PubMed

    Buxton, P G; Bitar, M; Gellynck, K; Parkar, M; Brown, R A; Young, A M; Knowles, J C; Nazhat, S N

    2008-08-01

    Bone is distinguished from other tissues by its mechanical properties, in particular stiffness. However, we know little of how osteoblasts react to the stiffness of their microenvironment; in this study we describe their response to a dense (>10 wt.%) collagenous 3D environment. Primary pre-osteoblasts were seeded within a novel form of native collagen, dense collagen, and cultured for up to 14 days in the presence and absence of osteogenic supplements: analysis was via Q-PCR, histology, fluorescent in situ zymography, MMP loss-of-function and tensile testing. Differentiation as measured through the up-regulation of Bsp (247-fold), Alp (14.2-fold), Col1A1 (4.5-fold), Mmp-13 (8.0-fold) and Runx2 (1.2-fold) transcripts was greatly accelerated compared to 2D plastic at 7 and 14 days in the same medium. The scale of this enhancement was confirmed through the use of growth factor stimulation on 2D via the addition of BMP-6 and the Hedgehog agonist purmorphamine. In concert, these molecules were capable of the same level of osteo-induction (measured by Bsp and Alp expression) as the dense collagen alone. Mineralisation was initially localised to remodelled pericellular regions, but by 14 days embedded cells were discernible within regions of apatite (confirmed by MicroRaman). Tensile testing of the matrices showed that this had resulted in a significant increase in Young's modulus at low strain values, consistent with a stiffening of the matrix. To determine the need for matrix remodelling in the mineralisation event the broad spectrum MMP Inhibitor Ilomastat was used. It was found that in its presence mineralisation could still occur (though serum-specific) and the apoptosis associated with MMP inhibition in hydrated collagen gels was abrogated. Analysis of gene expression indicated that this was due to the up-regulation of Mmp-13 in the presence of Ilomastat in dense collagen (400-fold), demonstrating a powerful feedback loop and a potential mechanism for the rescue

  10. 3-D FEM Modeling of fiber/matrix interface debonding in UD composites including surface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pupurs, A.; Varna, J.

    2012-02-01

    Fiber/matrix interface debond growth is one of the main mechanisms of damage evolution in unidirectional (UD) polymer composites. Because for polymer composites the fiber strain to failure is smaller than for the matrix multiple fiber breaks occur at random positions when high mechanical stress is applied to the composite. The energy released due to each fiber break is usually larger than necessary for the creation of a fiber break therefore a partial debonding of fiber/matrix interface is typically observed. Thus the stiffness reduction of UD composite is contributed both from the fiber breaks and from the interface debonds. The aim of this paper is to analyze the debond growth in carbon fiber/epoxy and glass fiber/epoxy UD composites using fracture mechanics principles by calculation of energy release rate GII. A 3-D FEM model is developed for calculation of energy release rate for fiber/matrix interface debonds at different locations in the composite including the composite surface region where the stress state differs from the one in the bulk composite. In the model individual partially debonded fiber is surrounded by matrix region and embedded in a homogenized composite.

  11. 3-D shear lag model for the analysis of interface damage in ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Dharani, L.R.; Ji, F.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper a micromechanics analytical model is presented for characterizing the behavior of a unidirectional brittle matrix composite containing initial matrix flaws, specifically, as they approach a fiber-matrix interface. It is contemplated that when a matrix crack impinges on the interface it may go around the fiber or go through the fiber by breaking it or debond the fiber/matrix interface. It has been experimentally observed that the crack front does not remain straight, rather it bows once it impinges on a row of fibers. If a unit cell approach is used, the problem is clearly non-axisymmetric and three-dimensional. Since most of the previous analyses dealing with self-similar cracking and interface debonding have considered axisymmetric cracking or two-dimensional planar geometries, the development of an analytical micromechanics model using a 3-D (non-axisymmetric) formulation is needed. The model is based on the consistent shear lag constitutive relations and does account for the large stiffness of the ceramic matrix. Since the present consistent shear lag model is for Cartesian coordinates, we have first derived the consistent shear lag constitutive relations in cylindrical coordinates. The governing equations are obtained by minimizing the potential energy in which the three displacements are represented by means of finite exponential series. Since the full field stresses and displacements are known, the strain energy release rates for self-similar extension of the matrix crack (Gp) and the interface debonding (Gd) are calculated using the Compliance method. The competition between various failure modes will be assessed based on the above strain energy release rates and the corresponding critical (toughness) values. The type of interfaces addressed include fictional, elastic, and gradient with varying properties (interphase). An extensive parametric study will be presented involving different constitutive properties and interface conditions.

  12. Tumor Cell Invasion Can Be Blocked by Modulators of Collagen Fibril Alignment That Control Assembly of the Extracellular Matrix.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Moran; Ben-Chetrit, Nir; Zhuravlev, Alina; Afik, Ran; Bassat, Elad; Solomonov, Inna; Yarden, Yosef; Sagi, Irit

    2016-07-15

    Abnormal architectures of collagen fibers in the extracellular matrix (ECM) are hallmarks of many invasive diseases, including cancer. Targeting specific stages of collagen assembly in vivo presents a great challenge due to the involvement of various crosslinking enzymes in the multistep, hierarchical process of ECM build-up. Using advanced microscopic tools, we monitored stages of fibrillary collagen assembly in a native fibroblast-derived 3D matrix system and identified anti-lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) antibodies that alter the natural alignment and width of endogenic fibrillary collagens without affecting ECM composition. The disrupted collagen morphologies interfered with the adhesion and invasion properties of human breast cancer cells. Treatment of mice bearing breast cancer xenografts with the inhibitory antibodies resulted in disruption of the tumorigenic collagen superstructure and in reduction of primary tumor growth. Our approach could serve as a general methodology to identify novel therapeutics targeting fibrillary protein organization to treat ECM-associated pathologies. Cancer Res; 76(14); 4249-58. ©2016 AACR.

  13. Front-end receiver electronics for a matrix transducer for 3-D transesophageal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zili; Blaak, Sandra; Chang, Zu-yao; Yao, Jiajian; Bosch, Johan G; Prins, Christian; Lancée, Charles T; de Jong, Nico; Pertijs, Michiel A P; Meijer, Gerard C M

    2012-07-01

    There is a clear clinical need for creating 3-D images of the heart. One promising technique is the use of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). To enable 3-D TEE, we are developing a miniature ultrasound probe containing a matrix piezoelectric transducer with more than 2000 elements. Because a gastroscopic tube cannot accommodate the cables needed to connect all transducer elements directly to an imaging system, a major challenge is to locally reduce the number of channels, while maintaining a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. This can be achieved by using front-end receiver electronics bonded to the transducers to provide appropriate signal conditioning in the tip of the probe. This paper presents the design of such electronics, realizing time-gain compensation (TGC) and micro-beamforming using simple, low-power circuits. Prototypes of TGC amplifiers and micro-beamforming cells have been fabricated in 0.35-μm CMOS technology. These prototype chips have been combined on a printed circuit board (PCB) to form an ultrasound-receiver system capable of reading and combining the signals of three transducer elements. Experimental results show that this design is a suitable candidate for 3-D TEE.

  14. Editorial on the original article entitled "3D printing of composite calcium phosphate and collagen scaffolds for bone regeneration" published in the Biomaterials on February 14, 2014.

    PubMed

    Li, Lan; Jiang, Qing

    2015-05-01

    The paper entitled "3D printing of composite calcium phosphate and collagen scaffolds for bone regeneration" published in the Biomaterials recently illuminated the way to make particular scaffolds with calcium phosphate (CaP) powder, phosphoric acid, type I collagen and Tween 80 in low temperature. After the optimal concentration of each component was determined, the scaffolds were evaluated in a critically sized murine femoral defect model and exhibited good material properties. We made some related introduction of materials applied in 3D printing for bone tissue engineering based on this article to demonstrate the current progress in this field of study.

  15. Editorial on the original article entitled “3D printing of composite calcium phosphate and collagen scaffolds for bone regeneration” published in the Biomaterials on February 14, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lan

    2015-01-01

    The paper entitled “3D printing of composite calcium phosphate and collagen scaffolds for bone regeneration” published in the Biomaterials recently illuminated the way to make particular scaffolds with calcium phosphate (CaP) powder, phosphoric acid, type I collagen and Tween 80 in low temperature. After the optimal concentration of each component was determined, the scaffolds were evaluated in a critically sized murine femoral defect model and exhibited good material properties. We made some related introduction of materials applied in 3D printing for bone tissue engineering based on this article to demonstrate the current progress in this field of study. PMID:26046065

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of the collagen matrix in tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnosselskaia, Lada Vadimovna

    Understanding of complex interactions of water with macromolecules is a prerequisite for quantitative musculoskeletal imaging and this dissertation presents a study on NMR characteristics of water in anisotropic environment of the collagen extracellular matrix of tendon. The first chapter of the dissertation analyzes a "magic angle" effect, a well known in clinical practice artifact of a sudden signal increase in normal tendons and ligaments at the orientation of 55° with respect to the static magnetic field of an MRI scanner. The physical basis of the orientation dependence of the free induction decay is studied in ex-vivo mammalian tissue at the field strength of 2 Tesla. Obtained quantitative measures are related to the model of heterogeneous water phases in the collagen extracellular matrix of tendon. A novel effect of central frequency shift of the water signal is reported and hypothesis on the origin of the effect is put forward. Clinical applications of NMR and MRI constantly benefit from adopting methods and techniques from the field of NMR of liquids, solids and liquid crystals. In the second chapter, a pseudo solid echo technique is evaluated for the purpose of detecting slow motions in the collagen matrix at different hydration and temperatures, at the field strength of 11.74 Tesla (500 MHz). The pseudo solid echo is shown capable in detecting motions on the scale of 10-3-10-6 seconds. 1H spin-lattice relaxation study at different levels of hydration and temperatures is presented in the third chapter. Predictions of the molecular model of collagen hydration are verified at the field strength of 11.74 Tesla (500 MHz) and temperature of 6°C, 26°C and 37°C. In the fourth chapter, an efficient adaptive mesh numerical code is developed on the basis of the octal tree data structure for assessment of the bulk magnetic susceptibility effects. The code allows calculation of the microscopic magnetic field as "seen by the nucleus" for uniformly magnetized

  17. Design and characterization of microcapsules-integrated collagen matrixes as multifunctional three-dimensional scaffolds for soft tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Del Mercato, Loretta L; Passione, Laura Gioia; Izzo, Daniela; Rinaldi, Rosaria; Sannino, Alessandro; Gervaso, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds based on collagen are promising candidates for soft tissue engineering applications. The addition of stimuli-responsive carriers (nano- and microparticles) in the current approaches to tissue reconstruction and repair brings about novel challenges in the design and conception of carrier-integrated polymer scaffolds. In this study, a facile method was developed to functionalize 3D collagen porous scaffolds with biodegradable multilayer microcapsules. The effects of the capsule charge as well as the influence of the functionalization methods on the binding efficiency to the scaffolds were studied. It was found that the binding of cationic microcapsules was higher than that of anionic ones, and application of vacuum during scaffolds functionalization significantly hindered the attachment of the microcapsules to the collagen matrix. The physical properties of microcapsules-integrated scaffolds were compared to pristine scaffolds. The modified scaffolds showed swelling ratios, weight losses and mechanical properties similar to those of unmodified scaffolds. Finally, in vitro diffusional tests proved that the collagen scaffolds could stably retain the microcapsules over long incubation time in Tris-HCl buffer at 37°C without undergoing morphological changes, thus confirming their suitability for tissue engineering applications. The obtained results indicate that by tuning the charge of the microcapsules and by varying the fabrication conditions, collagen scaffolds patterned with high or low number of microcapsules can be obtained, and that the microcapsules-integrated scaffolds fully retain their original physical properties.

  18. Design and characterization of microcapsules-integrated collagen matrixes as multifunctional three-dimensional scaffolds for soft tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Del Mercato, Loretta L; Passione, Laura Gioia; Izzo, Daniela; Rinaldi, Rosaria; Sannino, Alessandro; Gervaso, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds based on collagen are promising candidates for soft tissue engineering applications. The addition of stimuli-responsive carriers (nano- and microparticles) in the current approaches to tissue reconstruction and repair brings about novel challenges in the design and conception of carrier-integrated polymer scaffolds. In this study, a facile method was developed to functionalize 3D collagen porous scaffolds with biodegradable multilayer microcapsules. The effects of the capsule charge as well as the influence of the functionalization methods on the binding efficiency to the scaffolds were studied. It was found that the binding of cationic microcapsules was higher than that of anionic ones, and application of vacuum during scaffolds functionalization significantly hindered the attachment of the microcapsules to the collagen matrix. The physical properties of microcapsules-integrated scaffolds were compared to pristine scaffolds. The modified scaffolds showed swelling ratios, weight losses and mechanical properties similar to those of unmodified scaffolds. Finally, in vitro diffusional tests proved that the collagen scaffolds could stably retain the microcapsules over long incubation time in Tris-HCl buffer at 37°C without undergoing morphological changes, thus confirming their suitability for tissue engineering applications. The obtained results indicate that by tuning the charge of the microcapsules and by varying the fabrication conditions, collagen scaffolds patterned with high or low number of microcapsules can be obtained, and that the microcapsules-integrated scaffolds fully retain their original physical properties. PMID:27219851

  19. Modulation of hematopoietic progenitor cell fate in vitro by varying collagen oligomer matrix stiffness in the presence or absence of osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Chitteti, Brahmananda Reddy; Kacena, Melissa A; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L; Srour, Edward F

    2015-10-01

    To recreate the in vivo hematopoietic cell microenvironment or niche and to study the impact of extracellular matrix (ECM) biophysical properties on hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) proliferation and function, mouse bone-marrow derived HPC (Lin-Sca1+cKit+/(LSK) were cultured within three-dimensional (3D) type I collagen oligomer matrices. To generate a more physiologic milieu, 3D cultures were established in both the presence and absence of calvariae-derived osteoblasts (OB). Collagen oligomers were polymerized at varying concentration to give rise to matrices of different fibril densities and therefore matrix stiffness (shear storage modulus, 50-800 Pa). Decreased proliferation and increased clonogenicity of LSK cells was associated with increase of matrix stiffness regardless of whether OB were present or absent from the 3D culture system. Also, regardless of whether OB were or were not added to the 3D co-culture system, LSK within 800 Pa collagen oligomer matrices maintained the highest percentage of Lin-Sca1+ cells as well as higher percentage of cells in quiescent state (G0/G1) compared to 50 Pa or 200Pa matrices. Collectively, these data illustrate that biophysical features of collagen oligomer matrices, specifically fibril density-induced modulation of matrix stiffness, provide important guidance cues in terms of LSK expansion and differentiation and therefore maintenance of progenitor cell function.

  20. Response of microscale cell/matrix constructs to successive force application in a 3D environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Alan; Chen, Christopher; Reich, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical dilation of arteries by pulsatile blood flow is directly opposed by coordinated contraction of a band of smooth muscle tissue that envelops the vessels. This mechanical adaptation of smooth muscle cells to external loading is a critical feature of normal blood vessel function. While most previous studies on biomechanical systems have focused on single cells or large excised tissue, we utilize a device to apply forces to engineered smooth muscle microtissues. This device consists of arrayed pairs of elastomeric micro-cantilevers capable of magnetic actuation. Tissues are formed through self-assembly following the introduction of cell-infused collagen gel to the array. With this system, we are able to dynamically stretch and relax these sub-millimeter sized tissues. The timing and magnitude of the force application can be precisely controlled and thus can be used to mimic a wide range of physiological behavior. In particular, we will discuss results that show that the interval between successive force applications mediates the both the subsequent mechanical and active dynamics of the cell/matrix composite system. Understanding this process will lead to better understanding of the interplay between cell and extracellular matrix responses to mechanical stimulus at a novel length scale.

  1. Integration of 3D Printed and Micropatterned Polycaprolactone Scaffolds for Guidance of Oriented Collagenous Tissue Formation In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Pilipchuk, Sophia P; Monje, Alberto; Jiao, Yizu; Hao, Jie; Kruger, Laura; Flanagan, Colleen L; Hollister, Scott J; Giannobile, William V

    2016-03-01

    Scaffold design incorporating multiscale cues for clinically relevant, aligned tissue regeneration has potential to improve structural and functional integrity of multitissue interfaces. The objective of this preclinical study is to develop poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds with mesoscale and microscale architectural cues specific to human ligament progenitor cells and assess their ability to form aligned bone-ligament-cementum complexes in vivo. PCL scaffolds are designed to integrate a 3D printed bone region with a micropatterned PCL thin film consisting of grooved pillars. The patterned film region is seeded with human ligament cells, fibroblasts transduced with bone morphogenetic protein-7 genes seeded within the bone region, and a tooth dentin segment positioned on the ligament region prior to subcutaneous implantation into a murine model. Results indicate increased tissue alignment in vivo using micropatterned PCL films, compared to random-porous PCL. At week 6, 30 μm groove depth significantly enhances oriented collagen fiber thickness, overall cell alignment, and nuclear elongation relative to 10 μm groove depth. This study demonstrates for the first time that scaffolds with combined hierarchical mesoscale and microscale features can align cells in vivo for oral tissue repair with potential for improving the regenerative response of other bone-ligament complexes.

  2. Construction of a 3D rGO-collagen hybrid scaffold for enhancement of the neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Yu, Xin; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Jianhua; Tang, Wei; Li, Zhou; Mou, Xiaoning; Liu, Hong; Wang, Zhonglin

    2016-01-01

    The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold because the surface of the scaffold can determine the fate of stem cells. A conductive surface is required for a scaffold to direct stem cells toward neural differentiation. However, most conductive polymers are toxic and not amenable to biological degradation, which restricts the design of neural tissue engineering scaffolds. In this study, we used a bioactive three-dimensional (3D) porcine acellular dermal matrix (PADM), which is mainly composed of type I collagen, as a basic material and successfully assembled a layer of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets on the surface of the PADM channels to obtain a porous 3D, biodegradable, conductive and biocompatible PADM-rGO hybrid neural tissue engineering scaffold. Compared with the PADM scaffold, assembling the rGO into the scaffold did not induce a significant change in the microstructure but endowed the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold with good conductivity. A comparison of the neural differentiation of rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was performed by culturing the MSCs on PADM and PADM-rGO scaffolds in neuronal culture medium, followed by the determination of gene expression and immunofluorescence staining. The results of both the gene expression and protein level assessments suggest that the rGO-assembled PADM scaffold may promote the differentiation of MSCs into neuronal cells with higher protein and gene expression levels after 7 days under neural differentiation conditions. This study demonstrated that the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold is a promising scaffold for neural tissue engineering; this scaffold can not only support the growth of MSCs at a high proliferation rate but also enhance the differentiation of MSCs into neural cells.The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold

  3. Construction of a 3D rGO-collagen hybrid scaffold for enhancement of the neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Yu, Xin; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Jianhua; Tang, Wei; Li, Zhou; Mou, Xiaoning; Liu, Hong; Wang, Zhonglin

    2016-01-28

    The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold because the surface of the scaffold can determine the fate of stem cells. A conductive surface is required for a scaffold to direct stem cells toward neural differentiation. However, most conductive polymers are toxic and not amenable to biological degradation, which restricts the design of neural tissue engineering scaffolds. In this study, we used a bioactive three-dimensional (3D) porcine acellular dermal matrix (PADM), which is mainly composed of type I collagen, as a basic material and successfully assembled a layer of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets on the surface of the PADM channels to obtain a porous 3D, biodegradable, conductive and biocompatible PADM-rGO hybrid neural tissue engineering scaffold. Compared with the PADM scaffold, assembling the rGO into the scaffold did not induce a significant change in the microstructure but endowed the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold with good conductivity. A comparison of the neural differentiation of rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was performed by culturing the MSCs on PADM and PADM-rGO scaffolds in neuronal culture medium, followed by the determination of gene expression and immunofluorescence staining. The results of both the gene expression and protein level assessments suggest that the rGO-assembled PADM scaffold may promote the differentiation of MSCs into neuronal cells with higher protein and gene expression levels after 7 days under neural differentiation conditions. This study demonstrated that the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold is a promising scaffold for neural tissue engineering; this scaffold can not only support the growth of MSCs at a high proliferation rate but also enhance the differentiation of MSCs into neural cells. PMID:26750302

  4. Construction of a 3D rGO-collagen hybrid scaffold for enhancement of the neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Yu, Xin; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Jianhua; Tang, Wei; Li, Zhou; Mou, Xiaoning; Liu, Hong; Wang, Zhonglin

    2016-01-28

    The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold because the surface of the scaffold can determine the fate of stem cells. A conductive surface is required for a scaffold to direct stem cells toward neural differentiation. However, most conductive polymers are toxic and not amenable to biological degradation, which restricts the design of neural tissue engineering scaffolds. In this study, we used a bioactive three-dimensional (3D) porcine acellular dermal matrix (PADM), which is mainly composed of type I collagen, as a basic material and successfully assembled a layer of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets on the surface of the PADM channels to obtain a porous 3D, biodegradable, conductive and biocompatible PADM-rGO hybrid neural tissue engineering scaffold. Compared with the PADM scaffold, assembling the rGO into the scaffold did not induce a significant change in the microstructure but endowed the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold with good conductivity. A comparison of the neural differentiation of rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was performed by culturing the MSCs on PADM and PADM-rGO scaffolds in neuronal culture medium, followed by the determination of gene expression and immunofluorescence staining. The results of both the gene expression and protein level assessments suggest that the rGO-assembled PADM scaffold may promote the differentiation of MSCs into neuronal cells with higher protein and gene expression levels after 7 days under neural differentiation conditions. This study demonstrated that the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold is a promising scaffold for neural tissue engineering; this scaffold can not only support the growth of MSCs at a high proliferation rate but also enhance the differentiation of MSCs into neural cells.

  5. Inelastic behaviour of collagen networks in cell–matrix interactions and mechanosensation

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Hamid; Arora, Pamma D.; Simmons, Craig A.; Janmey, Paul A.; McCulloch, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of extracellular matrix proteins strongly influence cell-induced tension in the matrix, which in turn influences cell function. Despite progress on the impact of elastic behaviour of matrix proteins on cell–matrix interactions, little is known about the influence of inelastic behaviour, especially at the large and slow deformations that characterize cell-induced matrix remodelling. We found that collagen matrices exhibit deformation rate-dependent behaviour, which leads to a transition from pronounced elastic behaviour at fast deformations to substantially inelastic behaviour at slow deformations (1 μm min−1, similar to cell-mediated deformation). With slow deformations, the inelastic behaviour of floating gels was sensitive to collagen concentration, whereas attached gels exhibited similar inelastic behaviour independent of collagen concentration. The presence of an underlying rigid support had a similar effect on cell–matrix interactions: cell-induced deformation and remodelling were similar on 1 or 3 mg ml−1 attached collagen gels while deformations were two- to fourfold smaller in floating gels of high compared with low collagen concentration. In cross-linked collagen matrices, which did not exhibit inelastic behaviour, cells did not respond to the presence of the underlying rigid foundation. These data indicate that at the slow rates of collagen compaction generated by fibroblasts, the inelastic responses of collagen gels, which are influenced by collagen concentration and the presence of an underlying rigid foundation, are important determinants of cell–matrix interactions and mechanosensation. PMID:25392399

  6. Inelastic behaviour of collagen networks in cell-matrix interactions and mechanosensation.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Hamid; Arora, Pamma D; Simmons, Craig A; Janmey, Paul A; McCulloch, Christopher A

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of extracellular matrix proteins strongly influence cell-induced tension in the matrix, which in turn influences cell function. Despite progress on the impact of elastic behaviour of matrix proteins on cell-matrix interactions, little is known about the influence of inelastic behaviour, especially at the large and slow deformations that characterize cell-induced matrix remodelling. We found that collagen matrices exhibit deformation rate-dependent behaviour, which leads to a transition from pronounced elastic behaviour at fast deformations to substantially inelastic behaviour at slow deformations (1 μm min(-1), similar to cell-mediated deformation). With slow deformations, the inelastic behaviour of floating gels was sensitive to collagen concentration, whereas attached gels exhibited similar inelastic behaviour independent of collagen concentration. The presence of an underlying rigid support had a similar effect on cell-matrix interactions: cell-induced deformation and remodelling were similar on 1 or 3 mg ml(-1) attached collagen gels while deformations were two- to fourfold smaller in floating gels of high compared with low collagen concentration. In cross-linked collagen matrices, which did not exhibit inelastic behaviour, cells did not respond to the presence of the underlying rigid foundation. These data indicate that at the slow rates of collagen compaction generated by fibroblasts, the inelastic responses of collagen gels, which are influenced by collagen concentration and the presence of an underlying rigid foundation, are important determinants of cell-matrix interactions and mechanosensation.

  7. Collagen in the spicule organic matrix of the gorgonian Leptogorgia virgulata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsley, R. J.; Tsuzaki, M.; Watabe, N.; Mechanic, G. L.

    1990-01-01

    Decalcification of the calcareous spicules from the gorgonian Leptogorgia virgulata reveals an organic matrix that may be divided into water insoluble and soluble fractions. The insoluble fraction displays characteristics typical of collagen, which is an unusual component of an invertebrate calcium carbonate structure. This matrix fraction exhibits a collagenous amino acid profile and behavior upon SDS-PAGE. Furthermore, the reducible crosslink, dihydroxylysinonorleucine (DHLNL), is detected in this fraction. The composition of the matrix varies seasonally; i.e., the collagenous composition is most prevalent in the summer. These results indicate that the insoluble matrix is a dynamic structure. Potential roles of this matrix in spicule calcification are discussed.

  8. Angiogenic Type I Collagen Extracellular Matrix Integrated with Recombinant Bacteriophages Displaying Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Junghyo; Korkmaz Zirpel, Nuriye; Park, Hyun-Ji; Han, Sewoon; Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Shin, Jisoo; Cho, Seung-Woo; Nam, Chang-Hoon; Chung, Seok

    2016-01-21

    Here, a growth-factor-integrated natural extracellular matrix of type I collagen is presented that induces angiogenesis. The developed matrix adapts type I collagen nanofibers integrated with synthetic colloidal particles of recombinant bacteriophages that display vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The integration is achieved during or after gelation of the type I collagen and the matrix enables spatial delivery of VEGF into a desired region. Endothelial cells that contact the VEGF are found to invade into the matrix to form tube-like structures both in vitro and in vivo, proving the angiogenic potential of the matrix.

  9. Blueberry consumption prevents loss of collagen in bone matrix and inhibits senescence pathways in osteoblastic cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ovariectomy (OVX)-induced bone loss has been linked to increased bone turnover and higher bone matrix collagen degradation as the result of osteoclast activation. However, the role of degraded collagen matrix in the fate of resident bone-forming cells is unclear. In this report, we show that OVX-i...

  10. Probing cell-matrix interactions in RGD-decorated macroporous poly (ethylene glycol) hydrogels for 3D chondrocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Mujeeb, Ayeesha; Du, Yanan; Lin, Jianhao; Ge, Zigang

    2015-06-01

    Macroporous hydrogels have shown great promise as scaffolds for cartilage engineering by facilitating nutrition transport and tissue in growth. Cell-matrix adhesion-a fundamental process in tissue engineering-has shown a profound effect on subsequent cell phenotype, extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation, and tissue reorganization. In this study, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) was introduced to macroporous hydrogels of poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) to fabricate PEG-G400 (with 0.4mM RGD) and PEG-G2000 (2mM RGD) to probe the cell-matrix interactions within hydrogels. Primary chondrocytes demonstrated a slightly stretched morphology with increasing RGD concentration and PEG-G2000 hydrogels boosted cell viability, proliferation, and deposition of collagen II and GAG, in comparison to the PEG-G400 and PEG-RED groups. Results also revealed chondrocytes within the cell aggregates underwent dedifferentiation and hypertrophy within RGD incorporated hydrogels, as evidenced by the high level of gene expression of collagen I on day 14 and strong immunohistological staining of collagen X and collagen I on day 35. Evidently, a high concentration of RGD (2mM RGD) enhanced cell-matrix interactions through elevating the expression of integrin β1 and vinculin. Thus, the integration of RGD in macroporous hydrogels with a concentration of 2 mM may be sufficient for improving cell functionality, with a slight probability of dedifferentiation and hypertrophy of chondrocytes. PMID:26107534

  11. Assessment of angiogenesis in osseointegration of a silica-collagen biomaterial using 3D-nano-CT.

    PubMed

    Alt, Volker; Kögelmaier, Daniela Vera; Lips, Katrin S; Witt, Vera; Pacholke, Sabine; Heiss, Christian; Kampschulte, Marian; Heinemann, Sascha; Hanke, Thomas; Thormann, Ulrich; Schnettler, Reinhard; Langheinrich, Alexander C

    2011-10-01

    Bony integration of biomaterials is a complex process in which angiogenesis plays a crucial role. We evaluated micro- and nano-CT imaging to demonstrate and quantify neovascularization in bony integration of a biomaterial and to give an image based estimation for the needed resolution for imaging angiogenesis in an animal model of femora defect healing. In 8 rats 5mm full-size defects were created at the left femur that was filled with silica-collagen bone substitute material and internally fixed with plate osteosynthesis. After 6 weeks the femora were infused in situ with Microfil, harvested and scanned for micro-CT (9 μm)(3) and nano-CT (3 μm)(3) imaging. Using those 3D images, the newly formed blood vessels in the area of the biomaterial were assessed and the total vascular volume fraction, the volume of the bone substitute material and the volume of the bone defect were quantitatively characterized. Results were complemented by histology. Differences were statistically assessed using (ANOVA). High-resolution nano-CT demonstrated new blood vessel formation surrounding the biomaterial in all animals at capillary level. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the newly formed blood vessels surrounding the bone substitute material. The mean vascular volume fraction (VVF) around the implant was calculated to be 3.01 ± 0.4%. The VVF was inversely correlated with the volume of the bone substitute material (r=0.8) but not with the dimension of the fracture zone (r=0.3). Nano-CT imaging is feasible for quantitative analysis of angiogenesis during bony integration of biomaterials and a promising tool in this context for the future. PMID:21723963

  12. BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF A SYNTHETIC EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX ON IMMORTALIZED VOCAL FOLD FIBROBLASTS IN 3D CULTURE

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xia

    2010-01-01

    In order to promote wound repair and induce tissue regeneration, an engineered hyaluronan (HA) hydrogel – Carbylan GSX, which contains di(thiopropionyl) bishydrazide-modified hyaluronic acid (HA-DTPH), di(thiopropionyl) bishydrazide-modified gelatin (Gtn-DTPH) and polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA), has been developed for extracellular matrix (ECM) defects of the superficial and middle layers of the lamina propria. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of Carbylan GSX in a previously established immortalized human vocal fold fibroblast (hVFF) cell line prior to human clinical trials. Immortalized hVFF proliferation, viability, apoptosis and transcript analysis for both ECM constituents and inflammatory markers were measured for two-dimensional and three-dimensional culture conditions. There were no significant differences in morphology, cell marker protein expression, proliferation, viability and apoptosis of hVFF cultured with Carbylan GSX compared to Matrigel, a commercial 3D control, after one week. Gene expression levels for fibromodulin, TGF-β1, and TNF-α were similar between Carbylan GSX and Matrigel. Fibronectin, hyaluronidase 1 and COX2 expression levels were induced by Carbylan GSX; whereas IL6, IL8. COL1 and hyaluronic acid synthase 3 expression levels were decreased by Carbylan GSX. This investigation demonstrates that Carbylan GSX may serve as a natural biomaterial for tissue engineering of human vocal folds. PMID:20109588

  13. 3D matrix-based cell cultures: Automated analysis of tumor cell survival and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    EKE, IRIS; HEHLGANS, STEPHANIE; SANDFORT, VEIT; CORDES, NILS

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional ex vivo cell cultures mimic physiological in vivo growth conditions thereby significantly contributing to our understanding of tumor cell growth and survival, therapy resistance and identification of novel potent cancer targets. In the present study, we describe advanced three-dimensional cell culture methodology for investigating cellular survival and proliferation in human carcinoma cells after cancer therapy including molecular therapeutics. Single cells are embedded into laminin-rich extracellular matrix and can be treated with cytotoxic drugs, ionizing or UV radiation or any other substance of interest when consolidated and approximating in vivo morphology. Subsequently, cells are allowed to grow for automated determination of clonogenic survival (colony number) or proliferation (colony size). The entire protocol of 3D cell plating takes ~1 h working time and pursues for ~7 days before evaluation. This newly developed method broadens the spectrum of exploration of malignant tumors and other diseases and enables the obtainment of more reliable data on cancer treatment efficacy. PMID:26549537

  14. A Membrane-Type-1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) – Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Axis Regulates Collagen-Induced Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Assent, Delphine; Bourgot, Isabelle; Hennuy, Benoît; Geurts, Pierre; Noël, Agnès; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Maquoi, Erik

    2015-01-01

    During tumour dissemination, invading breast carcinoma cells become confronted with a reactive stroma, a type I collagen-rich environment endowed with anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. To develop metastatic capabilities, tumour cells must acquire the capacity to cope with this novel microenvironment. How cells interact with and respond to their microenvironment during cancer dissemination remains poorly understood. To address the impact of type I collagen on the fate of tumour cells, human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells were cultured within three-dimensional type I collagen gels (3D COL1). Using this experimental model, we have previously demonstrated that membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), a proteinase overexpressed in many aggressive tumours, promotes tumour progression by circumventing the collagen-induced up-regulation of BIK, a pro-apoptotic tumour suppressor, and hence apoptosis. Here we performed a transcriptomic analysis to decipher the molecular mechanisms regulating 3D COL1-induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. Control and MT1-MMP expressing MCF-7 cells were cultured on two-dimensional plastic plates or within 3D COL1 and a global transcriptional time-course analysis was performed. Shifting the cells from plastic plates to 3D COL1 activated a complex reprogramming of genes implicated in various biological processes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a 3D COL1-mediated alteration of key cellular functions including apoptosis, cell proliferation, RNA processing and cytoskeleton remodelling. By using a panel of pharmacological inhibitors, we identified discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a receptor tyrosine kinase specifically activated by collagen, as the initiator of 3D COL1-induced apoptosis. Our data support the concept that MT1-MMP contributes to the inactivation of the DDR1-BIK signalling axis through the cleavage of collagen fibres and/or the alteration of DDR1 receptor signalling unit, without triggering a

  15. In vitro 3D angiogenesis assay in egg white matrix: comparison to Matrigel, compatibility to various species, and suitability for drug testing.

    PubMed

    Mousseau, Yoanne; Mollard, Séverine; Qiu, Hao; Richard, Laurence; Cazal, Raphael; Nizou, Angélique; Vedrenne, Nicolas; Rémi, Séverine; Baaj, Yasser; Fourcade, Laurent; Funalot, Benoit; Sturtz, Franck G

    2014-03-01

    In vitro angiogenesis assays are commonly used to assess pro- or anti-angiogenic drug properties. Extracellular matrix (ECM) substitutes such as Matrigel and collagen gel became very popular in in vitro 3D angiogenesis assays as they enable tubule formation by endothelial cells from culture or aortic rings. However, these assays are usually used with a single cell type, lacking the complex cellular interactions occurring during angiogenesis. Here, we report a novel angiogenesis assay using egg white as ECM substitute. We found that, similar to Matrigel, egg white elicited prevascular network formation by endothelial and/or smooth muscle cell coculture. This matrix was suitable for various cells from human, mouse, and rat origin. It is compatible with aortic ring assay and also enables vascular and tumor cell coculture. Through simple labeling (DAPI, Hoechst 33258), cell location and resulting prevascular network formation can easily be quantified. Cell transfection with green fluorescent protein improved whole cell visualization and 3D structure characterization. Finally, egg-based assay dedicated to angiogenesis studies represents a reliable and cost-effective way to produce and analyze data regarding drug effects on vascular cells. PMID:24395110

  16. Nanorod mediated collagen scaffolds as extra cellular matrix mimics.

    PubMed

    Vedhanayagam, Mohan; Mohan, Ranganathan; Nair, Balachandran Unni; Sreeram, Kalarical Janardhanan

    2015-12-01

    Creating collagen scaffolds that mimic extracellular matrices without using toxic exogenous materials remains a big challenge. A new strategy to create scaffolds through end-to-end crosslinking through functionalized nanorods leading to well-designed architecture is presented here. Self-assembled scaffolds with a denaturation temperature of 110 °C, porosity of 70%, pore size of 0.32 μm and Young's modulus of 231 MPa were developed largely driven by imine bonding between 3-mercapto-1-propanal (MPA) functionalized ZnO nanorods and collagen. The mechanical properties obtained were much higher than that of native collagen, collagen-MPA, collagen-3-mercapto-1-propanol (3MPOH) or collagen- 3-MPOH-ZnO, clearly bringing out the relevance of nanorod mediated assembly of fibrous networks. This new strategy has led to scaffolds with mechanical properties much higher than earlier reports and can provide support for cell growth and facilitation of cell attachment. PMID:26586667

  17. Influence of electrospun fiber mesh size on hMSC oxygen metabolism in 3D collagen matrices: experimental and theoretical evidences.

    PubMed

    Guaccio, Angela; Guarino, Vincenzo; Perez, Marco A Alvarez-; Cirillo, Valentina; Netti, Paolo A; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2011-08-01

    The traditional paradigm of tissue engineering of regenerating in vitro tissue or organs, through the combination of an artificial matrix and a cellular population has progressively changed direction. The most recent concept is the realization of a fully functional biohybrid, where both, the artificial and the biotic phase, concur in the formation of the novel organic matter. In this direction, interest is growing in approaches taking advantage of the control at micro- and nano-scale of cell material interaction based on the realization of elementary tassels of cells and materials which constitute the beginning point for the expansion of 3D more complex structures. Since a spontaneous assembly of all these components is expected, however, it becomes more fundamental than ever to define the features influencing cellular behavior, either they were material functional properties, or material architecture. In this work, it has been investigated the direct effect of electrospun fiber sizes on oxygen metabolism of h-MSC cells, when any other culture parameter was kept constant. To this aim, thin PCL electrospun membranes, with micro- and nano-scale texturing, were layered between two collagen slices up to create a sandwich structure (µC-PCL-C and nC-PCL-C). Cells were seeded on membranes, and the oxygen consumption was determined by a phosphorescence quenching technique. Results indicate a strong effect of the architecture of scaffolds on cell metabolism, also revealed by the increasing of HIF1-α gene expression in nC-PCL-C. These findings offer new insights into the role of materials in specific cell activities, also implying the existence of very interesting criteria for the control of tissue growth through the tuning of scaffold architecture.

  18. Manipulation of in vitro collagen matrix architecture for scaffolds of improved physiological relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapach, Lauren A.; VanderBurgh, Jacob A.; Miller, Joseph P.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2015-12-01

    Type I collagen is a versatile biomaterial that is widely used in medical applications due to its weak antigenicity, robust biocompatibility, and its ability to be modified for a wide array of applications. As such, collagen has become a major component of many tissue engineering scaffolds, drug delivery platforms, and substrates for in vitro cell culture. In these applications, collagen constructs are fabricated to recapitulate a diverse set of conditions. Collagen fibrils can be aligned during or post-fabrication, cross-linked via numerous techniques, polymerized to create various fibril sizes and densities, and copolymerized into a wide array of composite scaffolds. Here, we review approaches that have been used to tune collagen to better recapitulate physiological environments for use in tissue engineering applications and studies of basic cell behavior. We discuss techniques to control fibril alignment, methods for cross-linking collagen constructs to modulate stiffness, and composite collagen constructs to better mimic physiological extracellular matrix.

  19. Manipulation of in vitro collagen matrix architecture for scaffolds of improved physiological relevance.

    PubMed

    Hapach, Lauren A; VanderBurgh, Jacob A; Miller, Joseph P; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen is a versatile biomaterial that is widely used in medical applications due to its weak antigenicity, robust biocompatibility, and its ability to be modified for a wide array of applications. As such, collagen has become a major component of many tissue engineering scaffolds, drug delivery platforms, and substrates for in vitro cell culture. In these applications, collagen constructs are fabricated to recapitulate a diverse set of conditions. Collagen fibrils can be aligned during or post-fabrication, cross-linked via numerous techniques, polymerized to create various fibril sizes and densities, and copolymerized into a wide array of composite scaffolds. Here, we review approaches that have been used to tune collagen to better recapitulate physiological environments for use in tissue engineering applications and studies of basic cell behavior. We discuss techniques to control fibril alignment, methods for cross-linking collagen constructs to modulate stiffness, and composite collagen constructs to better mimic physiological extracellular matrix. PMID:26689380

  20. Improving nanoparticle diffusion through tumor collagen matrix by photo-thermal gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeesi, Vahid; Chan, Warren C. W.

    2016-06-01

    Collagen (I) impairs the targeting of nanoparticles to tumor cells by obstructing their diffusion inside dense tumor interstitial matrix. This potentially makes large nanoparticles (>50 nm) reside near the tumor vessels and thereby compromises their functionality. Here we propose a strategy to locally improve nanoparticle transport inside collagen (I) component of the tumor tissue. We first used heat generating gold nanorods to alter collagen (I) matrix by local temperature elevation. We then explored this impact on the transport of 50 nm and 120 nm inorganic nanoparticles inside collagen (I). We demonstrated an increase in average diffusivity of 50 nm and 120 nm in the denatured collagen (I) by ~14 and ~21 fold, respectively, compared to intact untreated collagen (I) matrix. This study shows how nanoparticle-mediated hyperthermia inside tumor tissue can improve the transport of large nanoparticles through collagen (I) matrix. The ability to increase nanoparticles diffusion inside tumor stroma allows their targeting or other functionalities to take effect, thereby significantly improving cancer therapeutic or diagnostic outcome.Collagen (I) impairs the targeting of nanoparticles to tumor cells by obstructing their diffusion inside dense tumor interstitial matrix. This potentially makes large nanoparticles (>50 nm) reside near the tumor vessels and thereby compromises their functionality. Here we propose a strategy to locally improve nanoparticle transport inside collagen (I) component of the tumor tissue. We first used heat generating gold nanorods to alter collagen (I) matrix by local temperature elevation. We then explored this impact on the transport of 50 nm and 120 nm inorganic nanoparticles inside collagen (I). We demonstrated an increase in average diffusivity of 50 nm and 120 nm in the denatured collagen (I) by ~14 and ~21 fold, respectively, compared to intact untreated collagen (I) matrix. This study shows how nanoparticle-mediated hyperthermia inside

  1. Probing the 3D structure of cornea-like collagen liquid crystals with polarization-resolved SHG microscopy.

    PubMed

    Teulon, Claire; Tidu, Aurélien; Portier, François; Mosser, Gervaise; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2016-07-11

    This work aims at characterizing the three-dimensional organization of liquid crystals composed of collagen, in order to determine the physico-chemical conditions leading to highly organized structures found in biological tissues such as cornea. To that end, we use second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy, since aligned collagen structures have been shown to exhibit intrinsic SHG signals. We combine polarization-resolved SHG experiments (P-SHG) with the theoretical derivation of the SHG signal of collagen molecules tilted with respect to the focal plane. Our P-SHG images exhibit striated patterns with variable contrast, as expected from our analytical and numerical calculations for plywood-like nematic structures similar to the ones found in the cornea. This study demonstrates the benefits of P-SHG microscopy for in situ characterization of highly organized biopolymers at micrometer scale, and the unique sensitivity of this nonlinear optical technique to the orientation of collagen molecules. PMID:27410876

  2. Biotinylated GHK peptide incorporated collagenous matrix: A novel biomaterial for dermal wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Arul, V; Gopinath, D; Gomathi, K; Jayakumar, R

    2005-05-01

    Matrikines are small peptide fragments of extracellular matrix proteins that display potent tissue repair activities. Difficulties in achieving sustained delivery of bioactive concentration of matrikines in the affected area limits their therapeutic use. The present study evaluates the effects biotinylated matrikine peptide (bio-glycyl-histidyl-lysine) incorporated collagen membrane for dermal wound healing processes in rats. Biotinylated peptide incorporated collagen matrix (PIC) showed better healing when compared to wounds treated with collagen matrix [CF (collagen film)] and without collagen [CR (control)]. Binding studies indicate that biotinylated GHK (Bio-GHK) binds effectively to the collagen matrix and red blood cell (RBC) membrane when compared with t-butyloxycarbonyl substituted GHK (Boc-GHK). Wound contraction, increased cell proliferation, and high expression of antioxidant enzymes in PIC treated group indicate enhanced wound healing activity when compared to CF and CR groups. Interestingly Bio-GHK incorporated collagen increases the copper concentration by ninefold at the wound site indicating the wound healing property of Bio-GHK can also be linked with both copper localization and matrikine activities. These results demonstrate the possibility of using Bio-GHK incorporated collagen film as a therapeutic agent in the wound healing process. PMID:15803494

  3. Cross-Linking in Collagen by Nonenzymatic Glycation Increases the Matrix Stiffness in Rabbit Achilles Tendon

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of connective tissue matrix proteins is a major contributor to the pathology of diabetes and aging. Previously the author and colleagues have shown that nonenzymatic glycation significantly enhances the matrix stability in the Achilles tendon (Reddy et al., 2002, Arch. Biochem. Biophys., 399, 174–180). The present study was designed to gain further insight into glycation-induced collagen cross-linking and its relationship to matrix stiffness in the rabbit Achilles tendon. The glycation process was initiated by incubating the Achilles tendons (n = 6) in phosphate-buffered saline containing ribose, whereas control tendons (n = 6) were incubated in phosphate-buffered saline without ribose. Eight weeks following glycation, the biomechanical attributes as well as the degree of collagen cross-linking were determined to examine the potential associations between matrix stiffness and molecular properties of collagen. Compared to nonglycated tendons, the glycated tendons showed increased maximum load, stress, strain, Young's modulus of elasticity, and toughness indicating that glycation increases the matrix stiffness in the tendons. Glycation of tendons resulted in a considerable decrease in soluble collagen content and a significant increase in insoluble collagen and pentosidine. Analysis of potential associations between the matrix stiffness and degree of collagen cross-linking showed that both insoluble collagen and pentosidine exhibited a significant positive correlation with the maximum load, stress, and strain, Young's modulus of elasticity, and toughness (r values ranging from .61 to .94) in the Achilles tendons. However, the soluble collagen content present in neutral salt buffer, acetate buffer, and acetate buffer containing pepsin showed an inverse relation with the various biomechanical attributes tested (r values ranging from .22 to .84) in the Achilles tendons. The results of the study demonstrate that glycation-induced collagen cross

  4. Collagen XII and XIV, New Partners of Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein in the Skin Extracellular Matrix Suprastructure*

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Pallavi; Zwolanek, Daniela; Keene, Douglas R.; Schulz, Jan-Niklas; Blumbach, Katrin; Heinegård, Dick; Zaucke, Frank; Paulsson, Mats; Krieg, Thomas; Koch, Manuel; Eckes, Beate

    2012-01-01

    The tensile and scaffolding properties of skin rely on the complex extracellular matrix (ECM) that surrounds cells, vasculature, nerves, and adnexus structures and supports the epidermis. In the skin, collagen I fibrils are the major structural component of the dermal ECM, decorated by proteoglycans and by fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices such as collagens XII and XIV. Here we show that the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), an abundant component of cartilage ECM, is expressed in healthy human skin. COMP expression is detected in the dermal compartment of skin and in cultured fibroblasts, whereas epidermis and HaCaT cells are negative. In addition to binding collagen I, COMP binds to collagens XII and XIV via their C-terminal collagenous domains. All three proteins codistribute in a characteristic narrow zone in the superficial papillary dermis of healthy human skin. Ultrastructural analysis by immunogold labeling confirmed colocalization and further revealed the presence of COMP along with collagens XII and XIV in anchoring plaques. On the basis of these observations, we postulate that COMP functions as an adapter protein in human skin, similar to its function in cartilage ECM, by organizing collagen I fibrils into a suprastructure, mainly in the vicinity of anchoring plaques that stabilize the cohesion between the upper dermis and the basement membrane zone. PMID:22573329

  5. The exopolysaccharide matrix modulates the interaction between 3D architecture and virulence of a mixed-species oral biofilm.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jin; Klein, Marlise I; Falsetta, Megan L; Lu, Bingwen; Delahunty, Claire M; Yates, John R; Heydorn, Arne; Koo, Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Virulent biofilms are responsible for a range of infections, including oral diseases. All biofilms harbor a microbial-derived extracellular-matrix. The exopolysaccharides (EPS) formed on tooth-pellicle and bacterial surfaces provide binding sites for microorganisms; eventually the accumulated EPS enmeshes microbial cells. The metabolic activity of the bacteria within this matrix leads to acidification of the milieu. We explored the mechanisms through which the Streptococcus mutans-produced EPS-matrix modulates the three-dimensional (3D) architecture and the population shifts during morphogenesis of biofilms on a saliva-coated-apatitic surface using a mixed-bacterial species system. Concomitantly, we examined whether the matrix influences the development of pH-microenvironments within intact-biofilms using a novel 3D in situ pH-mapping technique. Data reveal that the production of the EPS-matrix helps to create spatial heterogeneities by forming an intricate network of exopolysaccharide-enmeshed bacterial-islets (microcolonies) through localized cell-to-matrix interactions. This complex 3D architecture creates compartmentalized acidic and EPS-rich microenvironments throughout the biofilm, which triggers the dominance of pathogenic S. mutans within a mixed-species system. The establishment of a 3D-matrix and EPS-enmeshed microcolonies were largely mediated by the S. mutans gtfB/gtfC genes, expression of which was enhanced in the presence of Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus oralis. Acidic pockets were found only in the interiors of bacterial-islets that are protected by EPS, which impedes rapid neutralization by buffer (pH 7.0). As a result, regions of low pH (<5.5) were detected at specific locations along the surface of attachment. Resistance to chlorhexidine was enhanced in cells within EPS-microcolony complexes compared to those outside such structures within the biofilm. Our results illustrate the critical interaction between matrix architecture and p

  6. Migration of tumor cells in 3D matrices is governed by matrix stiffness along with cell-matrix adhesion and proteolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Muhammad H.; Trapani, Linda M.; Sieminski, Alisha L.; MacKellar, Drew; Gong, Haiyan; Kamm, Roger D.; Wells, Alan; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-07-01

    Cell migration on 2D surfaces is governed by a balance between counteracting tractile and adhesion forces. Although biochemical factors such as adhesion receptor and ligand concentration and binding, signaling through cell adhesion complexes, and cytoskeletal structure assembly/disassembly have been studied in detail in a 2D context, the critical biochemical and biophysical parameters that affect cell migration in 3D matrices have not been quantitatively investigated. We demonstrate that, in addition to adhesion and tractile forces, matrix stiffness is a key factor that influences cell movement in 3D. Cell migration assays in which Matrigel density, fibronectin concentration, and 1 integrin binding are systematically varied show that at a specific Matrigel density the migration speed of DU-145 human prostate carcinoma cells is a balance between tractile and adhesion forces. However, when biochemical parameters such as matrix ligand and cell integrin receptor levels are held constant, maximal cell movement shifts to matrices exhibiting lesser stiffness. This behavior contradicts current 2D models but is predicted by a recent force-based computational model of cell movement in a 3D matrix. As expected, this 3D motility through an extracellular environment of pore size much smaller than cellular dimensions does depend on proteolytic activity as broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors limit the migration of DU-145 cells and also HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. Our experimental findings here represent, to our knowledge, discovery of a previously undescribed set of balances of cell and matrix properties that govern the ability of tumor cells to migration in 3D environments. cell motility | EGF receptor | extracellular matrix | matrix metalloproteinase

  7. Electrical conduction mechanisms in PbSe and PbS nano crystals 3D matrix layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbell, Matan; Hechster, Elad; Sarusi, Gabby

    2016-02-01

    A simulation study and measurements of the electrical conductance in a PbSe and PbS spherical Nano-crystal 3D matrix layer was carried out focusing on its dependences of Nano-crystal size distribution and size gradient along the layer thickness (z-direction). The study suggests a new concept of conductance enhancement by utilizing a size gradient along the layer thickness from mono-layer to the next mono-layer of the Nano-crystals, in order to create a gradient of the energy levels and thus improve directional conductance in this direction. A Monte Carlo simulation of the charge carriers path along the layer thickness of the Nano-crystals 3D matrix using the Miller-Abrahams hopping model was performed. We then compared the conductance characteristics of the gradual size 3D matrix layer to a constant-sized 3D matrix layer that was used as a reference in the simulation. The numerical calculations provided us with insights into the actual conductance mechanism of the PbSe and PbS Nano-crystals 3D matrix and explained the discrepancies in actual conductance and the variability in measured mobilities published in the literature. It is found that the mobility and thus conductance are dependent on a critical electrical field generated between two adjacent nano-crystals. Our model explains the conductance dependents on the: Cathode-Anode distance, the distance between the adjacent nano-crystals in the 3D matrix layer and the size distribution along the current direction. Part of the model (current-voltage dependence) was validated using a current-voltage measurements taken on a constant size normal distribution nano-crystals PbS layer (330nm thick) compared with the predicted I-V curves. It is shown that under a threshold bias, the current is very low, while after above a threshold bias the conductance is significantly increased due to increase of hopping probability. Once reaching the maximum probability the current tend to level-off reaching the maximal conductance

  8. Laser nanostructuring 3-D bioconstruction based on carbon nanotubes in a water matrix of albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimenko, Alexander Y.; Ichkitidze, Levan P.; Podgaetsky, Vitaly M.; Savelyev, Mikhail S.; Selishchev, Sergey V.

    2016-04-01

    3-D bioconstructions were created using the evaporation method of the water-albumin solution with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by the continuous and pulsed femtosecond laser radiation. It is determined that the volume structure of the samples created by the femtosecond radiation has more cavities than the one created by the continuous radiation. The average diameter for multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) samples was almost two times higher (35-40 nm) than for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) samples (20-30 nm). The most homogenous 3-D bioconstruction was formed from MWCNTs by the continuous laser radiation. The hardness of such samples totaled up to 370 MPa at the nanoscale. High strength properties and the resistance of the 3-D bioconstructions produced by the laser irradiation depend on the volume nanotubes scaffold forming inside them. The scaffold was formed by the electric field of the directed laser irradiation. The covalent bond energy between the nanotube carbon molecule and the oxygen of the bovine serum albumin aminoacid residue amounts 580 kJ/mol. The 3-D bioconstructions based on MWCNTs and SWCNTs becomes overgrown with the cells (fibroblasts) over the course of 72 hours. The samples based on the both types of CNTs are not toxic for the cells and don't change its normal composition and structure. Thus the 3-D bioconstructions that are nanostructured by the pulsed and continuous laser radiation can be applied as implant materials for the recovery of the connecting tissues of the living body.

  9. Collagen Matrix Remodeling in Stented Pulmonary Arteries after Transapical Heart Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Ghazanfari, Samaneh; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Baaijens, Frank P T; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2016-01-01

    The use of valved stents for minimally invasive replacement of semilunar heart valves is expected to change the extracellular matrix and mechanical function of the native artery and may thus impair long-term functionality of the implant. Here we investigate the impact of the stent on matrix remodeling of the pulmonary artery in a sheep model, focusing on matrix composition and collagen (re)orientation of the host tissue. Ovine native pulmonary arteries were harvested 8 (n = 2), 16 (n = 4) and 24 (n = 2) weeks after transapical implantation of self-expandable stented heart valves. Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy was used to assess the collagen (re)orientation of fresh tissue samples. The collagen and elastin content was quantified using biochemical assays. SHG microscopy revealed regional differences in collagen organization in all explants. In the adventitial layer of the arterial wall far distal to the stent (considered as the control tissue), we observed wavy collagen fibers oriented in the circumferential direction. These circumferential fibers were more straightened in the adventitial layer located behind the stent. On the luminal side of the wall behind the stent, collagen fibers were aligned along the stent struts and randomly oriented between the struts. Immediately distal to the stent, however, fibers on both the luminal and the adventitial side of the wall were oriented in the axial direction, demonstrating the stent impact on the collagen structure of surrounding arterial tissues. Collagen orientation patterns did not change with implantation time, and biochemical analyses showed no changes in the trend of collagen and elastin content with implantation time or location of the vascular wall. We hypothesize that the collagen fibers on the adventitial side of the arterial wall and behind the stent straighten in response to the arterial stretch caused by oversizing of the stent. However, the collagen organization on the luminal side suggests that

  10. Role of collagen membrane in lateral onlay grafting with bovine hydroxyapatite incorporated with collagen matrix in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ui-Won; Lee, Jung-Seok; Lee, Geun; Lee, In-Kyeong; Hwang, Ji-Wan; Kim, Min-Soo; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to elucidate the role of collagen membranes (CMs) when used in conjunction with bovine hydroxyapatite particles incorporated with collagen matrix (BHC) for lateral onlay grafts in dogs. Methods The first, second, and third premolars in the right maxilla of mongrel dogs (n=5) were extracted. After 2 months of healing, two BHC blocks (4 mm×4 mm×5 mm) were placed on the buccal ridge, one with and one without the coverage by a CM. The animals were sacrificed after 8 weeks for histometric analysis. Results The collagen network of the membranes remained and served as a barrier. The quantity and quality of bone regeneration were all significantly greater in the membrane group than in the no-membrane group (P<0.05). Conclusions The use of barrier membranes in lateral onlay grafts leads to superior new bone formation and bone quality compared with bone graft alone. PMID:23678389

  11. A 3D matrix platform for the rapid generation of therapeutic anti-human carcinoma monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, David T.; Li, Xiao-Yan; Hu, Casey Y.; Kleer, Celina G.; Willis, Amanda L.; Weiss, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to develop unbiased screens for identifying novel function-blocking monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in human carcinomatous states have been hampered by the limited ability to design in vitro models that recapitulate tumor cell behavior in vivo. Given that only invasive carcinoma cells gain permanent access to type I collagen-rich interstitial tissues, an experimental platform was established in which human breast cancer cells were embedded in 3D aldimine cross-linked collagen matrices and used as an immunogen to generate mAb libraries. In turn, cancer-cell–reactive antibodies were screened for their ability to block carcinoma cell proliferation within collagen hydrogels that mimic the in vivo environment. As a proof of principle, a single function-blocking mAb out of 15 identified was selected for further analysis and found to be capable of halting carcinoma cell proliferation, inducing apoptosis, and exerting global changes in gene expression in vitro. The ability of this mAb to block carcinoma cell proliferation and metastatic activity was confirmed in vivo, and the target antigen was identified by mass spectroscopy as the α2 subunit of the α2β1 integrin, one of the major type I collagen-binding receptors in mammalian cells. Validating the ability of the in vitro model to predict patterns of antigen expression in the disease setting, immunohistochemical analyses of tissues from patients with breast cancer verified markedly increased expression of the α2 subunit in vivo. These results not only highlight the utility of this discovery platform for rapidly selecting and characterizing function-blocking, anticancer mAbs in an unbiased fashion, but also identify α2β1 as a potential target in human carcinomatous states. PMID:25267635

  12. The 3-D collagen structure of equine articular cartilage, characterized using variable-angle-of-incidence polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Gangnus, Sergei V.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2005-08-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography has been used to spatially map the birefringence of equine articular cartilage. Images obtained in the vicinity of visible osteoarthritic lesions display a characteristic disruption of the regular birefringence bands shown by normal cartilage. We also note that significant (e.g. ×2) variations in the apparent birefringence of samples taken from young (18 month) animals that otherwise appear visually homogeneous are found over spatial scales of a few millimeters. We suggest that whilst some of this variation may be due to changes in the intrinsic birefringence of the tissue, the 3-D orientation of the collagen fibers relative to the plane of the joint surface should also be taken into account. We propose a method based on multiple angles of illumination to determine the polar angle of the collagen fibers.

  13. Monte Carlo - Metropolis Investigations of Shape and Matrix Effects in 2D and 3D Spin-Crossover Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerroudj, Salim; Caballero, Rafael; De Zela, Francisco; Jureschi, Catalin; Linares, Jorge; Boukheddaden, Kamel

    2016-08-01

    The Ising like model, taking into account short-, long-range interaction as well as surface effects is used to investigate size and shape effects on the thermal behaviour of 2D and 3D spin crossover (SCO) nanoparticles embedded in a matrix. We analyze the role of the parametert, representing the ratio between the number of surface and volume molecules, on the unusual thermal hysteresis behaviour (appearance of the hysteresis and a re-entrance phase transition) at small scales.

  14. THE DIFFERENTIAL REGULATION OF CELL MOTILE ACTIVITY THROUGH MATRIX STIFFNESS AND POROSITY IN THREE DIMENSIONAL COLLAGEN MATRICES

    PubMed Central

    Miron-Mendoza, Miguel; Seemann, Joachim; Grinnell, Frederick

    2010-01-01

    In three dimensional collagen matrices, cell motile activity results in collagen translocation, cell spreading and cell migration. Cells can penetrate into the matrix as well as spread and migrate along its surface. In the current studies, we quantitatively characterize collagen translocation, cell spreading and cell migration in relationship to collagen matrix stiffness and porosity. Collagen matrices prepared with 1 to 4 mg/ml collagen exhibited matrix stiffness (storage modulus measured by oscillating rheometry) increasing from 4 to 60 Pa and matrix porosity (measured by scanning electron microscopy) decreasing from 4 to 1 μm2. Over this collagen concentration range, the consequences of cell motile activity changed markedly. As collagen concentration increased, cells no longer were able to cause translocation of collagen fibrils. Cell migration increased and cell spreading changed from dendritic to more flattened and polarized morphology depending on location of cells within or on the surface of the matrix. Collagen translocation appeared to depend primarily on matrix stiffness, whereas cell spreading and migration were less dependent on matrix stiffness and more dependent on collagen matrix porosity. PMID:20537378

  15. Migration of tumor cells in 3D matrices is governed by matrix stiffness along with cell-matrix adhesion and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Muhammad H.; Trapani, Linda M.; Sieminski, Alisha; MacKellar, Drew; Gong, Haiyan; Kamm, Roger D.; Wells, Alan; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Cell migration on 2D surfaces is governed by a balance between counteracting tractile and adhesion forces. Although biochemical factors such as adhesion receptor and ligand concentration and binding, signaling through cell adhesion complexes, and cytoskeletal structure assembly/disassembly have been studied in detail in a 2D context, the critical biochemical and biophysical parameters that affect cell migration in 3D matrices have not been quantitatively investigated. We demonstrate that, in addition to adhesion and tractile forces, matrix stiffness is a key factor that influences cell movement in 3D. Cell migration assays in which Matrigel density, fibronectin concentration, and β1 integrin binding are systematically varied show that at a specific Matrigel density the migration speed of DU-145 human prostate carcinoma cells is a balance between tractile and adhesion forces. However, when biochemical parameters such as matrix ligand and cell integrin receptor levels are held constant, maximal cell movement shifts to matrices exhibiting lesser stiffness. This behavior contradicts current 2D models but is predicted by a recent force-based computational model of cell movement in a 3D matrix. As expected, this 3D motility through an extracellular environment of pore size much smaller than cellular dimensions does depend on proteolytic activity as broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors limit the migration of DU-145 cells and also HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. Our experimental findings here represent, to our knowledge, discovery of a previously undescribed set of balances of cell and matrix properties that govern the ability of tumor cells to migration in 3D environments. PMID:16832052

  16. Matrix metalloproteinase-11/stromelysin-3 exhibits collagenolytic function against collagen VI under normal and malignant conditions.

    PubMed

    Motrescu, E R; Blaise, S; Etique, N; Messaddeq, N; Chenard, M-P; Stoll, I; Tomasetto, C; Rio, M-C

    2008-10-23

    The substrate of matrix metalloproteinase 11 (MMP11) remains unknown. We have recently shown that MMP11 is a negative regulator of adipogenesis, able to reduce and even to revert mature adipocyte differentiation. Here, we have used mouse 3T3L1 cells and human U87MG and SaOS cells to show that MMP11 cleaves the native alpha3 chain of collagen VI, which is an adipocyte-related extracellular matrix component. It is known that extracellular proteolytic processing of this chain is required for correct collagen VI folding. Interestingly, MMP11-deficient fat tissue is less cohesive and exhibits collagen VI alteration, dramatic adipocyte plasma and basement membrane abnormalities and lipid leakage. MMP11 is thus required for correct collagen VI folding and therefore for fat tissue cohesion and adipocyte function. Both MMP11 and collagen VI favor tumor progression. Similar spatio-temporal overexpression at the adipocyte-cancer cell interface has been reported for the two proteins. MMP11-dependent collagen VI processing might therefore be expected to occur during malignancy. Accordingly, collagen VI no longer delineates adipocytes located at the invasive front of breast carcinomas. In conclusion, the native alpha3 chain of collagen VI constitutes a specific MMP11 substrate. This MMP11 collagenolytic activity is functional in fat tissue ontogenesis as well as during cancer invasive steps.

  17. Propolis Modifies Collagen Types I and III Accumulation in the Matrix of Burnt Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Olczyk, Pawel; Wisowski, Grzegorz; Komosinska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Stojko, Jerzy; Klimek, Katarzyna; Olczyk, Monika; Kozma, Ewa M.

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing represents an interactive process which requires highly organized activity of various cells, synthesizing cytokines, growth factors, and collagen. Collagen types I and III, serving as structural and regulatory molecules, play pivotal roles during wound healing. The aim of this study was to compare the propolis and silver sulfadiazine therapeutic efficacy throughout the quantitative and qualitative assessment of collagen types I and III accumulation in the matrix of burnt tissues. Burn wounds were inflicted on pigs, chosen for the evaluation of wound repair because of many similarities between pig and human skin. Isolated collagen types I and III were estimated by the surface plasmon resonance method with a subsequent collagenous quantification using electrophoretic and densitometric analyses. Propolis burn treatment led to enhanced collagens and its components expression, especially during the initial stage of the study. Less expressed changes were observed after silver sulfadiazine (AgSD) application. AgSD and, with a smaller intensity, propolis stimulated accumulation of collagenous degradation products. The assessed propolis therapeutic efficacy, throughout quantitatively and qualitatively analyses of collagen types I and III expression and degradation in wounds matrix, may indicate that apitherapeutic agent can generate favorable biochemical environment supporting reepithelization. PMID:23781260

  18. Propolis Modifies Collagen Types I and III Accumulation in the Matrix of Burnt Tissue.

    PubMed

    Olczyk, Pawel; Wisowski, Grzegorz; Komosinska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Stojko, Jerzy; Klimek, Katarzyna; Olczyk, Monika; Kozma, Ewa M

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing represents an interactive process which requires highly organized activity of various cells, synthesizing cytokines, growth factors, and collagen. Collagen types I and III, serving as structural and regulatory molecules, play pivotal roles during wound healing. The aim of this study was to compare the propolis and silver sulfadiazine therapeutic efficacy throughout the quantitative and qualitative assessment of collagen types I and III accumulation in the matrix of burnt tissues. Burn wounds were inflicted on pigs, chosen for the evaluation of wound repair because of many similarities between pig and human skin. Isolated collagen types I and III were estimated by the surface plasmon resonance method with a subsequent collagenous quantification using electrophoretic and densitometric analyses. Propolis burn treatment led to enhanced collagens and its components expression, especially during the initial stage of the study. Less expressed changes were observed after silver sulfadiazine (AgSD) application. AgSD and, with a smaller intensity, propolis stimulated accumulation of collagenous degradation products. The assessed propolis therapeutic efficacy, throughout quantitatively and qualitatively analyses of collagen types I and III expression and degradation in wounds matrix, may indicate that apitherapeutic agent can generate favorable biochemical environment supporting reepithelization.

  19. The 3D structure of the collagen fibril network in human trabecular bone: relation to trabecular organization.

    PubMed

    Reznikov, Natalie; Chase, Hila; Brumfeld, Vlad; Shahar, Ron; Weiner, Steve

    2015-02-01

    Trabecular bone is morphologically and functionally different from compact bone at the tissue level, but both are composed of lamellae at the micrometer-scale level. We present a three-dimensional study of the collagenous network of human trabecular lamellar bone from the proximal femur using the FIB-SEM serial surface view method. The results are compared to human compact lamellar bone of the femoral shaft, studied by the same method. Both demineralized trabecular and compact lamellar bone display the same overall structural organization, namely the presence of ordered and disordered materials and the confinement of the canalicular network to the disordered material. However, in trabecular bone lamellae a significant proportion of the ordered collagen fibril arrays is aligned with the long axis of the trabecula and, unlike in compact bone, is not related to the anatomical axis of the whole femur. The remaining ordered collagen fibrils are offset from the axis of a trabecula either by about 30° or 70°. Interestingly, at the tissue scale of millimeters, the most abundant angles between any two connected trabeculae - the inter-trabecular angles - center around 30° and 70°. This implies that within a framework of interconnected trabeculae the same lamellar structure will always have a significant component of the fibrils aligned with the long axes of connected trabeculae. This structural complementarity at different hierarchical levels presumably reflects an adaptation of trabecular bone to function.

  20. Evaluation of cell binding to collagen and gelatin: a study of the effect of 2D and 3D architecture and surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Davidenko, Natalia; Schuster, Carlos F; Bax, Daniel V; Farndale, Richard W; Hamaia, Samir; Best, Serena M; Cameron, Ruth E

    2016-10-01

    Studies of cell attachment to collagen-based materials often ignore details of the binding mechanisms-be they integrin-mediated or non-specific. In this work, we have used collagen and gelatin-based substrates with different dimensional characteristics (monolayers, thin films and porous scaffolds) in order to establish the influence of composition, crosslinking (using carbodiimide) treatment and 2D or 3D architecture on integrin-mediated cell adhesion. By varying receptor expression, using cells with collagen-binding integrins (HT1080 and C2C12 L3 cell lines, expressing α2β1, and Rugli expressing α1β1) and a parent cell line C2C12 with gelatin-binding receptors (αvβ3 and α5β1), the nature of integrin binding sites was studied in order to explain the bioactivity of different protein formulations. We have shown that alteration of the chemical identity, conformation and availability of free binding motifs (GxOGER and RGD), resulting from addition of gelatin to collagen and crosslinking, have a profound effect on the ability of cells to adhere to these formulations. Carbodiimide crosslinking ablates integrin-dependent cell activity on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional architectures while the three-dimensional scaffold structure also leads to a high level of non-specific interactions remaining on three-dimensional samples even after a rigorous washing regime. This phenomenon, promoted by crosslinking, and attributed to cell entrapment, should be considered in any assessment of the biological activity of three-dimensional substrates. Spreading data confirm the importance of integrin-mediated cell engagement for further cell activity on collagen-based compositions. In this work, we provide a simple, but effective, means of deconvoluting the effects of chemistry and dimensional characteristics of a substrate, on the cell activity of protein-derived materials, which should assist in tailoring their biological properties for specific tissue engineering

  1. Evaluation of cell binding to collagen and gelatin: a study of the effect of 2D and 3D architecture and surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Davidenko, Natalia; Schuster, Carlos F; Bax, Daniel V; Farndale, Richard W; Hamaia, Samir; Best, Serena M; Cameron, Ruth E

    2016-10-01

    Studies of cell attachment to collagen-based materials often ignore details of the binding mechanisms-be they integrin-mediated or non-specific. In this work, we have used collagen and gelatin-based substrates with different dimensional characteristics (monolayers, thin films and porous scaffolds) in order to establish the influence of composition, crosslinking (using carbodiimide) treatment and 2D or 3D architecture on integrin-mediated cell adhesion. By varying receptor expression, using cells with collagen-binding integrins (HT1080 and C2C12 L3 cell lines, expressing α2β1, and Rugli expressing α1β1) and a parent cell line C2C12 with gelatin-binding receptors (αvβ3 and α5β1), the nature of integrin binding sites was studied in order to explain the bioactivity of different protein formulations. We have shown that alteration of the chemical identity, conformation and availability of free binding motifs (GxOGER and RGD), resulting from addition of gelatin to collagen and crosslinking, have a profound effect on the ability of cells to adhere to these formulations. Carbodiimide crosslinking ablates integrin-dependent cell activity on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional architectures while the three-dimensional scaffold structure also leads to a high level of non-specific interactions remaining on three-dimensional samples even after a rigorous washing regime. This phenomenon, promoted by crosslinking, and attributed to cell entrapment, should be considered in any assessment of the biological activity of three-dimensional substrates. Spreading data confirm the importance of integrin-mediated cell engagement for further cell activity on collagen-based compositions. In this work, we provide a simple, but effective, means of deconvoluting the effects of chemistry and dimensional characteristics of a substrate, on the cell activity of protein-derived materials, which should assist in tailoring their biological properties for specific tissue engineering

  2. Elucidating the Role of Matrix Stiffness in 3D Cell Migration and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ehrbar, M.; Sala, A.; Lienemann, P.; Ranga, A.; Mosiewicz, K.; Bittermann, A.; Rizzi, S.C.; Weber, F.E.; Lutolf, M.P.

    2011-01-01

    Reductionist in vitro model systems which mimic specific extracellular matrix functions in a highly controlled manner, termed artificial extracellular matrices (aECM), have increasingly been used to elucidate the role of cell-ECM interactions in regulating cell fate. To better understand the interplay of biophysical and biochemical effectors in controlling three-dimensional cell migration, a poly(ethylene glycol)-based aECM platform was used in this study to explore the influence of matrix cross-linking density, represented here by stiffness, on cell migration in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, the migration behavior of single preosteoblastic cells within hydrogels of varying stiffness and susceptibilities to degradation by matrix metalloproteases was assessed by time-lapse microscopy. Migration behavior was seen to be strongly dependent on matrix stiffness, with two regimes identified: a nonproteolytic migration mode dominating at relatively low matrix stiffness and proteolytic migration at higher stiffness. Subsequent in vivo experiments revealed a similar stiffness dependence of matrix remodeling, albeit less sensitive to the matrix metalloprotease sensitivity. Therefore, our aECM model system is well suited to unveil the role of biophysical and biochemical determinants of physiologically relevant cell migration phenomena. PMID:21244824

  3. Collective epithelial cell invasion overcomes mechanical barriers of collagenous extracellular matrix by a narrow tube-like geometry and MMP14-dependent local softening†

    PubMed Central

    Alcaraz, Jordi; Mori, Hidetoshi; Ghajar, Cyrus M.; Brownfield, Doug; Galgoczy, Roland; Bissell, Mina J.

    2013-01-01

    Collective cell invasion (CCI) through interstitial collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucial to the initial stages of branching morphogenesis, and a hallmark of tissue repair and dissemination of certain tumors. The collagenous ECM acts as a mechanical barrier against CCI. However, the physical nature of this barrier and how it is overcome by cells remains incompletely understood. To address these questions, we performed theoretical and experimental analysis of mammary epithelial branching morphogenesis in 3D type I collagen (collagen-I) gels. We found that the mechanical resistance of collagen-I is largely due to its elastic rather than its viscous properties. We also identified two strategies utilized by mammary epithelial cells that can independently minimize ECM mechanical resistance during CCI. First, cells adopt a narrow tube-like geometry during invasion, which minimizes the elastic opposition from the ECM as revealed by theoretical modeling of the most frequent invasive shapes and sizes. Second, the stiffness of the collagenous ECM is reduced at invasive fronts due to its degradation by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), as indicated by direct measurements of collagen-I microelasticity by atomic force microscopy. Molecular techniques further specified that the membrane-bound MMP14 mediates degradation of collagen-I at invasive fronts. Thus, our findings reveal that MMP14 is necessary to efficiently reduce the physical restraints imposed by collagen-I during branching morphogenesis, and help our overall understanding of how forces are balanced between cells and their surrounding ECM to maintain collective geometry and mechanical stability during CCI. PMID:21993836

  4. 3D self-consistent modeling of a matrix source of negative hydrogen ions.

    PubMed

    Tarnev, Kh; Demerdjiev, A; Shivarova, A; Lishev, St

    2016-02-01

    The paper is in the scope of studies on the rf driving of a matrix source of negative hydrogen ions: a matrix of small radius discharges with planar-coil inductive driving and single aperture extraction from each discharge. The results from a three-dimensional model, in which plasma description is coupled to electrodynamics, confirm former conclusion that a single coil driving of the whole matrix by a zigzag coil with an omega-shaped conductor on the bottom of each discharge tube ensures efficient rf power deposition to the plasma. The latter is due to similarities with the rf driving of a single discharge by a single planar coil, shown by the obtained induced current and spatial distribution of the plasma parameters. Distinctions associated with the coil configuration as a single coil for the whole matrix are also discussed. PMID:26932005

  5. Using a decellularized splenic matrix as a 3D scaffold for hepatocyte cultivation in vitro: a preliminary trial.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xing-Long; Xiang, Jun-Xi; Wu, Wan-Quan; Wang, Bo; Liu, Wen-Yan; Gao, Rui; Dong, Ding-Hui; Lv, Yi

    2015-08-01

    Using a decellularized liver matrix (DLM) to reengineer liver tissue is a promising therapy for end-stage liver disease. However, the limited supply of donor organs still hampers its potential clinical application, while a xenogenic decellularized matrix may bring a risk of zoonosis and immunological rejection. Therefore, an appropriate alternative scaffold is needed. In this research, we established a decellularized splenic matrix (DSM) in a rodent model, which preserved the 3D ultrastructure, the components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the native vascular network. The DSM and DLM had similar components of ECM, and similar mechanical properties. Hepatocytes were seeded to the DSM and DLM for dynamic culturing up to 6 d, and distributed both in decellularized sinusoidal spaces and around the vessels. The TUNEL-positive cell percentage in a dynamic culturing decellularized splenic matrix (dDSM) was 10.7%  ±  3.6% at 3d and 25.8%  ±  5.6% at 5d, although 14.2%  ±  4.5% and 24.8%  ±  2.9%, respectively, in a dynamic culturing decellularized liver matrix (dDLM) at the same time point (p  >  0.05). Primary hepatocytes in the dDSM and dDLM expressed albumin, G6pc and Ugt1a1. The gene expression of Cyp2b1, Cyp1a2 and HNF1α in the gene transcription level revealed hepatocytes had lower gene expression levels in the dDSM compared with the dDLM at 3d, but better than those in a sandwich culture. The cumulative albumin production at 6 d of culture was 80.7   ±   9.6 μg per million cells in the dDSM and 89.6   ±   4.6 μg per million cells in the dDLM (p  >  0.05). In summary, the DSM is a promising 3D scaffold for hepatocyte cultivation in vitro. PMID:26290516

  6. Magnetic properties of 3D nanocomposites consisting of an opal matrix with embedded spinel ferrite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinkevich, A. B.; Korolev, A. V.; Samoylovich, M. I.; Kleshcheva, S. M.; Perov, D. V.

    2016-02-01

    The magnetic properties of 3D nanocomposites representing Mn-Zn, Ni-Zn, Co-Zn, La-Co-Zn, and Nd-Co-Zn spinel ferrite particles embedded in the interspherical spaces of opal matrices are studied. Experimental data are obtained in the temperature interval 2-300 K by measuring the magnetization at a static magnetic field strength of up to 50 kOe and the ac magnetic susceptibility at an alternating magnetic field amplitude of 4 kOe and a frequency of 80 Hz.

  7. Longitudinal, 3D Imaging of Collagen Remodeling in Murine Hypertrophic Scars In Vivo using Polarization-sensitive Optical Frequency Domain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lo, William C. Y.; Villiger, Martin; Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G. Felix; Khan, Saiqa; Lian, Christine G.; Austen, William G.; Yarmush, Martin; Bouma, Brett E.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS), frequently seen after traumatic injuries and surgery, remain a major clinical challenge due to the limited success of existing therapies. A significant obstacle to understanding HTS etiology is the lack of tools to monitor scar remodeling longitudinally and non-invasively. We present an in vivo, label-free technique using polarization-sensitive optical frequency domain imaging (PS-OFDI) for the 3D, longitudinal assessment of collagen remodeling in murine HTS. In this study, HTS was induced with a mechanical tension device for 4 to 10 days on incisional wounds and imaged up to one month after device removal; an excisional HTS model was also imaged at 6 months after injury to investigate deeper and more mature scars. We showed that local retardation (LR) and degree of polarization (DOP) provide a robust signature for HTS. Compared to normal skin with heterogeneous LR and low DOP, HTS was characterized by an initially low LR, which increased as collagen fibers remodeled, and a persistently high DOP. This study demonstrates that PS-OFDI offers a powerful tool to gain significant biological insights into HTS remodeling by enabling longitudinal assessment of collagen in vivo, which is critical to elucidating HTS etiology and developing more effective HTS therapies. PMID:26763427

  8. Modulation of 3D Fibrin Matrix Stiffness by Intrinsic Fibrinogen–Thrombin Compositions and by Extrinsic Cellular Activity

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Haison; Wu, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Fibrin is a substance formed through catalytic conversion of coagulation constituents: fibrinogen and thrombin. The kinetics of the two constituents determines the structural properties of the fibrin architecture. We have shown previously that changing the fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations in the final three-dimensional (3D) fibrin matrix influenced cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we further examined the effect of changing fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations in the absence or presence of fibroblasts on the structural modulus or stiffness of 3D fibrin matrices. We have prepared fibroblast-free and fibroblast-embedded 3D fibrin matrices of different fibrinogen and thrombin formulations, and tested the stiffness of these constructs using standard mechanical testing assays. Results showed that there was a corresponding increase in stiffness with increasing thrombin and fibrinogen concentrations; the increase was more notable with fibrinogen and to a lesser degree with thrombin. The effect of fibroblasts on the stiffness of the fibrin construct was also examined. We have observed a small increase in the stiffness of the fibroblast-incorporated fibrin construct as they proliferated and exhibited spreading morphology. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive report detailing the relationship between fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations, cell proliferation, and stiffness in 3D fibrin matrices. The data obtained may lead to optimally design suitable bioscaffolds where we can control both cell proliferation and structural integrity for a variety of tissue engineering applications. PMID:19309239

  9. 3D ToF-SIMS Analysis of Peptide Incorporation into MALDI Matrix Crystals with Sub-micrometer Resolution.

    PubMed

    Körsgen, Martin; Pelster, Andreas; Dreisewerd, Klaus; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F

    2016-02-01

    The analytical sensitivity in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is largely affected by the specific analyte-matrix interaction, in particular by the possible incorporation of the analytes into crystalline MALDI matrices. Here we used time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to visualize the incorporation of three peptides with different hydrophobicities, bradykinin, Substance P, and vasopressin, into two classic MALDI matrices, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCCA). For depth profiling, an Ar cluster ion beam was used to gradually sputter through the matrix crystals without causing significant degradation of matrix or biomolecules. A pulsed Bi3 ion cluster beam was used to image the lateral analyte distribution in the center of the sputter crater. Using this dual beam technique, the 3D distribution of the analytes and spatial segregation effects within the matrix crystals were imaged with sub-μm resolution. The technique could in the future enable matrix-enhanced (ME)-ToF-SIMS imaging of peptides in tissue slices at ultra-high resolution. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26419771

  10. 3D ToF-SIMS Analysis of Peptide Incorporation into MALDI Matrix Crystals with Sub-micrometer Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körsgen, Martin; Pelster, Andreas; Dreisewerd, Klaus; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F.

    2016-02-01

    The analytical sensitivity in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is largely affected by the specific analyte-matrix interaction, in particular by the possible incorporation of the analytes into crystalline MALDI matrices. Here we used time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to visualize the incorporation of three peptides with different hydrophobicities, bradykinin, Substance P, and vasopressin, into two classic MALDI matrices, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCCA). For depth profiling, an Ar cluster ion beam was used to gradually sputter through the matrix crystals without causing significant degradation of matrix or biomolecules. A pulsed Bi3 ion cluster beam was used to image the lateral analyte distribution in the center of the sputter crater. Using this dual beam technique, the 3D distribution of the analytes and spatial segregation effects within the matrix crystals were imaged with sub-μm resolution. The technique could in the future enable matrix-enhanced (ME)-ToF-SIMS imaging of peptides in tissue slices at ultra-high resolution.

  11. The role of the non-collagenous matrix in tendon function

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Birch, Helen L; Clegg, Peter D; Screen, Hazel RC

    2013-01-01

    Tendon consists of highly ordered type I collagen molecules that are grouped together to form subunits of increasing diameter. At each hierarchical level, the type I collagen is interspersed with a predominantly non-collagenous matrix (NCM) (Connect. Tissue Res., 6, 1978, 11). Whilst many studies have investigated the structure, organization and function of the collagenous matrix within tendon, relatively few have studied the non-collagenous components. However, there is a growing body of research suggesting the NCM plays an important role within tendon; adaptations to this matrix may confer the specific properties required by tendons with different functions. Furthermore, age-related alterations to non-collagenous proteins have been identified, which may affect tendon resistance to injury. This review focuses on the NCM within the tensional region of developing and mature tendon, discussing the current knowledge and identifying areas that require further study to fully understand structure–function relationships within tendon. This information will aid in the development of appropriate techniques for tendon injury prevention and treatment. PMID:23718692

  12. Extracellular matrix of smooth muscle cells: interaction of collagen type V with heparan sulfate proteoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, S.; Hoeoek, M.; Gay, R.E.; Magargal, W.W.; Reynertson, R.H.

    1986-03-05

    Alteration in the extracellular matrix produced by smooth muscle cells may play a role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. Consequently the authors have initiated studies on the structural organization of the extracellular matrix produced by cultured smooth muscle cells. Immunohisotological examination of this matrix using well-characterized mono- and polyclonal antibodies showed a partial codistribution of heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans with a number of different matrix components including collagen types I, III, IV, V and VI, laminin and fibronectin. Subsequent binding studies between isolated matrix proteins and HS showed that the polysaccharide interacts strongly with type V collagen and to a lesser extent with fibronectin as well as collagen types III and VI. The interaction between type V and HS was readily inhibited by heparin and highly sulfated HS but not be dermatan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate or HS with a low sulfate content. Furthermore, (/sup 35/S)-HS proteoglycans isolated from cultured smooth muscle cells could be adsorbed on a column of sepharose conjugated with native type V collagen and eluted in a salt gradient. Hence, the interaction between type V and HS may play a major part in stabilizing the extracellular matrix of the vessel wall.

  13. Experimental studies of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles doped silica matrix 3D magneto-photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Diwan, E.; Royer, F.; Kekesi, R.; Jamon, D.; Blanc-Mignon, M. F.; Neveu, S.; Rousseau, J. J.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present the synthesis and the optical properties of 3D magneto-photonic structures. The elaboration process consists in firstly preparing then infiltrating polystyrene direct opals with a homogeneous solution of sol-gel silica precursors doped by cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, and finally dissolving the polystyrene spheres. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images of the prepared samples clearly evidence a periodic arrangement. Using a home-made polarimetric optical bench, the transmittance as a function of the wavelength, the Faraday rotation as a function of the applied magnetic field, and the Faraday ellipticity as a function of the wavelength and as a function of the applied magnetic field were measured. The existence of deep photonic band gaps (PBG), the unambiguous magnetic character of the samples and the qualitative modification of the Faraday ellipticity in the area of the PBG are evidenced.

  14. Variable angle-of-incidence polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography: its use to study the 3D collagen structure of equine articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Gangnus, Sergei V.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2006-02-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography has been used to spatially map the birefringence of equine articular cartilage. The polar orientation of the collagen fibers relative to the plane of the joint surface must be taken into account if a quantitative measurement of true birefringence is required. Using a series of images taken at different angles of illumination, we determine the fiber polar angle and true birefringence at one site on a sample of equine cartilage, on the assumption that the fibers lie within the plane of imaging. We propose a more general method based on the extended Jones matrix formalism to determine both the polar and azimuthal orientation of the collagen fibers as well as the true birefringence as functions of depth.

  15. Fibroblast-derived 3D matrix differentially regulates the growth and drug-responsiveness of human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Acacia; Golemis, Erica A.; Cukierman, Edna

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the importance of cellular microenvironment in modulating cell growth and signaling. In vitro, collagen matrices, Matrigel, and other synthetic support systems have been used to simulate in vivo microenvironments, and epithelial cells grown in these matrices manifest significant differences in proliferation, differentiation, response to drugs, and other parameters. However, these substrates do not closely resemble the mesenchymal microenvironment that is typically associated with advanced carcinomas in vivo, which is produced to a large extent by fibroblasts. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of a fibroblast-derived three-dimensional matrix to regulate the growth of a panel of 11 human tumor epithelial cell lines. Although proliferative and morphological responses to three-dimensional cues segregated independently, general responsiveness to the matrix correlated with the ability of matrix to influence drug responses. Fibroblast-derived three-dimensional matrix increased β1-integrin-dependent survival of a subset of human cancer cell lines during taxol treatment, while it sensitized or minimally influenced survival of other cells. β1-integrin-dependent changes in cell resistance to taxol did not correlate with degree of modulation of FAK and Akt, implying additional signaling factors are involved. Based on these results, we propose these matrices potentially have value as in vitro drug screening platforms. PMID:18411046

  16. Multi-ray-based system matrix generation for 3D PET reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Moehrs, Sascha; Defrise, Michel; Belcari, Nicola; Guerra, Alberto Del; Bartoli, Antonietta; Fabbri, Serena; Zanetti, Gianluigi

    2008-12-01

    Iterative image reconstruction algorithms for positron emission tomography (PET) require a sophisticated system matrix (model) of the scanner. Our aim is to set up such a model offline for the YAP-(S)PET II small animal imaging tomograph in order to use it subsequently with standard ML-EM (maximum-likelihood expectation maximization) and OSEM (ordered subset expectation maximization) for fully three-dimensional image reconstruction. In general, the system model can be obtained analytically, via measurements or via Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper, we present the multi-ray method, which can be considered as a hybrid method to set up the system model offline. It incorporates accurate analytical (geometric) considerations as well as crystal depth and crystal scatter effects. At the same time, it has the potential to model seamlessly other physical aspects such as the positron range. The proposed method is based on multiple rays which are traced from/to the detector crystals through the image volume. Such a ray-tracing approach itself is not new; however, we derive a novel mathematical formulation of the approach and investigate the positioning of the integration (ray-end) points. First, we study single system matrix entries and show that the positioning and weighting of the ray-end points according to Gaussian integration give better results compared to equally spaced integration points (trapezoidal integration), especially if only a small number of integration points (rays) are used. Additionally, we show that, for a given variance of the single matrix entries, the number of rays (events) required to calculate the whole matrix is a factor of 20 larger when using a pure Monte-Carlo-based method. Finally, we analyse the quality of the model by reconstructing phantom data from the YAP-(S)PET II scanner. PMID:19001696

  17. Multi-ray-based system matrix generation for 3D PET reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehrs, Sascha; Defrise, Michel; Belcari, Nicola; DelGuerra, Alberto; Bartoli, Antonietta; Fabbri, Serena; Zanetti, Gianluigi

    2008-12-01

    Iterative image reconstruction algorithms for positron emission tomography (PET) require a sophisticated system matrix (model) of the scanner. Our aim is to set up such a model offline for the YAP-(S)PET II small animal imaging tomograph in order to use it subsequently with standard ML-EM (maximum-likelihood expectation maximization) and OSEM (ordered subset expectation maximization) for fully three-dimensional image reconstruction. In general, the system model can be obtained analytically, via measurements or via Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper, we present the multi-ray method, which can be considered as a hybrid method to set up the system model offline. It incorporates accurate analytical (geometric) considerations as well as crystal depth and crystal scatter effects. At the same time, it has the potential to model seamlessly other physical aspects such as the positron range. The proposed method is based on multiple rays which are traced from/to the detector crystals through the image volume. Such a ray-tracing approach itself is not new; however, we derive a novel mathematical formulation of the approach and investigate the positioning of the integration (ray-end) points. First, we study single system matrix entries and show that the positioning and weighting of the ray-end points according to Gaussian integration give better results compared to equally spaced integration points (trapezoidal integration), especially if only a small number of integration points (rays) are used. Additionally, we show that, for a given variance of the single matrix entries, the number of rays (events) required to calculate the whole matrix is a factor of 20 larger when using a pure Monte-Carlo-based method. Finally, we analyse the quality of the model by reconstructing phantom data from the YAP-(S)PET II scanner.

  18. Lysophosphatidic acid enhances collagen deposition and matrix thickening in engineered tissue.

    PubMed

    Chabaud, Stéphane; Marcoux, Thomas-Louis; Deschênes-Rompré, Marie-Pier; Rousseau, Alexandre; Morissette, Amélie; Bouhout, Sara; Bernard, Geneviève; Bolduc, Stéphane

    2015-11-01

    The time needed to produce engineered tissue is critical. A self-assembly approach provided excellent results regarding biological functions and cell differentiation because it closely respected the microenvironment of cells. Nevertheless, the technique was time consuming for producing tissue equivalents with enough extracellular matrix to allow manipulations. Unlike L-arginine supplementation that only increased accumulation of collagen in cell culture supernatant in our model, addition of lysophosphatidic acid, a natural bioactive lipid, did not modify the amount of accumulated collagen in the cell culture supernatant; however, it enhanced the matrix deposition rate without inducing fibroblast hyperproliferation and tissue fibrosis.

  19. FERM3D: A finite element R-matrix electron molecule scattering code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonzani, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    FERM3D is a three-dimensional finite element program, for the elastic scattering of a low energy electron from a general polyatomic molecule, which is converted to a potential scattering problem. The code is based on tricubic polynomials in spherical coordinates. The electron-molecule interaction is treated as a sum of three terms: electrostatic, exchange, and polarization. The electrostatic term can be extracted directly from ab initio codes ( GAUSSIAN 98 in the work described here), while the exchange term is approximated using a local density functional. A local polarization potential based on density functional theory [C. Lee, W. Yang, R.G. Parr, Phys. Rev. B 37 (1988) 785] describes the long range attraction to the molecular target induced by the scattering electron. Photoionization calculations are also possible and illustrated in the present work. The generality and simplicity of the approach is important in extending electron-scattering calculations to more complex targets than it is possible with other methods. Program summaryTitle of program:FERM3D Catalogue identifier:ADYL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYL_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested:Intel Xeon, AMD Opteron 64 bit, Compaq Alpha Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested:HP Tru64 Unix v5.1, Red Hat Linux Enterprise 3 Programming language used:Fortran 90 Memory required to execute with typical data:900 MB (neutral CO 2), 2.3 GB (ionic CO 2), 1.4 GB (benzene) No. of bits in a word:32 No. of processors used:1 Has the code been vectorized?:No No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:58 383 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:561 653 Distribution format:tar.gzip file CPC Program library subprograms used:ADDA, ACDP Nature of physical problem:Scattering of an

  20. Direct measurement of matrix metalloproteinase activity in 3D cellular microenvironments using a fluorogenic peptide substrate

    PubMed Central

    Leight, Jennifer L.; Alge, Daniel L.; Maier, Andrew J.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2014-01-01

    Incorporation of degradable moieties into synthetic hydrogels has greatly increased the utility of these three-dimensional matrices for in vitro cell culture as well as tissue engineering applications. A common method for introducing degradability is the inclusion of oligopeptides sensitive to cleavage by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), enabling cell-mediated remodeling and migration within the material. While this strategy has been effective, characterization and measurement of cell-mediated degradation in these materials has remained challenging. There are 20+ MMP family members whose activity is regulated in space and time by a number of biochemical and biophysical cues. Thus, the typical approach of characterizing cleavage of degradable moieties in solution with recombinant enzymes does not easily translate to three dimensional cell-mediated matrix remodeling. To address this challenge, we report here the synthesis of a cell-laden hydrogel matrix functionalized with a fluorogenic peptide substrate to provide real-time, quantitative monitoring of global MMP activity. Using this system, stimulation of MMP activity was observed with growth factor treatment in mammary epithelial cells and compared to classical zymography results. Further, the effect of biophysical cues on MMP activity of human mesenchymal stem cells was also investigated where more rigid hydrogels were observed to increase MMP activity. The regulation of MMP activity by these biochemical and biophysical cues highlights the need for in situ, real time measurement of hydrogel degradation, and use of these functionalized hydrogels will aid in future rational design of degradable synthetic hydrogels for in vitro cell studies and tissue engineering applications. PMID:23830581

  1. Candidate Cell and Matrix Interaction Domains on the Collagen Fibril, the Predominant Protein of Vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Shawn M.; Orgel, Joseph P.; Fertala, Andrzej; McAuliffe, Jon D.; Turner, Kevin R.; Di Lullo, Gloria A.; Chen, Steven; Antipova, Olga; Perumal, Shiamalee; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Forlinoi, Antonella; Cabral, Wayne A.; Barnes, Aileen M.; Marini, Joan C.; San Antonio, James D.

    2008-07-18

    Type I collagen, the predominant protein of vertebrates, polymerizes with type III and V collagens and non-collagenous molecules into large cable-like fibrils, yet how the fibril interacts with cells and other binding partners remains poorly understood. To help reveal insights into the collagen structure-function relationship, a data base was assembled including hundreds of type I collagen ligand binding sites and mutations on a two-dimensional model of the fibril. Visual examination of the distribution of functional sites, and statistical analysis of mutation distributions on the fibril suggest it is organized into two domains. The 'cell interaction domain' is proposed to regulate dynamic aspects of collagen biology, including integrin-mediated cell interactions and fibril remodeling. The 'matrix interaction domain' may assume a structural role, mediating collagen cross-linking, proteoglycan interactions, and tissue mineralization. Molecular modeling was used to superimpose the positions of functional sites and mutations from the two-dimensional fibril map onto a three-dimensional x-ray diffraction structure of the collagen microfibril in situ, indicating the existence of domains in the native fibril. Sequence searches revealed that major fibril domain elements are conserved in type I collagens through evolution and in the type II/XI collagen fibril predominant in cartilage. Moreover, the fibril domain model provides potential insights into the genotype-phenotype relationship for several classes of human connective tissue diseases, mechanisms of integrin clustering by fibrils, the polarity of fibril assembly, heterotypic fibril function, and connective tissue pathology in diabetes and aging.

  2. Shear resonance mode decoupling to determine the characteristic matrix of piezoceramics for 3-D modeling.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Lorena; García, Alvaro; de Espinosa, Francisco Montero; Brebøl, Klaus

    2011-03-01

    The determination of the characteristic frequencies of an electromechanical resonance does not provide enough data to obtain the material properties of piezoceramics, including all losses, from complex impedance measurements. Values of impedance around resonance and antiresonance frequencies are also required to calculate the material losses. Uncoupled resonances are needed for this purpose. The shear plates used for the material characterization present unavoidable mode coupling of the shear mode and other modes of the plate. A study of the evolution of the complex material coefficients as the coupling of modes evolves with the change in the aspect ratio (lateral dimension/thickness) of the plate is presented here. These are obtained using software. A soft commercial PZT ceramic was used in this study and several shear plates amenable to material characterization were obtained in the range of aspect ratios below 15. The validity of the material properties for 3-D modeling of piezoceramics is assessed by means of finite element analysis, which shows that uncoupled resonances are virtually pure thickness-driven shear modes.

  3. Multi-scale Characterisation of the 3D Microstructure of a Thermally-Shocked Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Bodey, Andrew J; Sui, Tan; Kockelmann, Winfried; Rau, Christoph; Korsunsky, Alexander M; Mi, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    Bulk metallic glass matrix composites (BMGMCs) are a new class of metal alloys which have significantly increased ductility and impact toughness, resulting from the ductile crystalline phases distributed uniformly within the amorphous matrix. However, the 3D structures and their morphologies of such composite at nano and micrometre scale have never been reported before. We have used high density electric currents to thermally shock a Zr-Ti based BMGMC to different temperatures, and used X-ray microtomography, FIB-SEM nanotomography and neutron diffraction to reveal the morphologies, compositions, volume fractions and thermal stabilities of the nano and microstructures. Understanding of these is essential for optimizing the design of BMGMCs and developing viable manufacturing methods. PMID:26725519

  4. Multi-scale Characterisation of the 3D Microstructure of a Thermally-Shocked Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Bodey, Andrew J.; Sui, Tan; Kockelmann, Winfried; Rau, Christoph; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Mi, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    Bulk metallic glass matrix composites (BMGMCs) are a new class of metal alloys which have significantly increased ductility and impact toughness, resulting from the ductile crystalline phases distributed uniformly within the amorphous matrix. However, the 3D structures and their morphologies of such composite at nano and micrometre scale have never been reported before. We have used high density electric currents to thermally shock a Zr-Ti based BMGMC to different temperatures, and used X-ray microtomography, FIB-SEM nanotomography and neutron diffraction to reveal the morphologies, compositions, volume fractions and thermal stabilities of the nano and microstructures. Understanding of these is essential for optimizing the design of BMGMCs and developing viable manufacturing methods.

  5. Multi-scale Characterisation of the 3D Microstructure of a Thermally-Shocked Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composite

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Bodey, Andrew J.; Sui, Tan; Kockelmann, Winfried; Rau, Christoph; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Mi, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    Bulk metallic glass matrix composites (BMGMCs) are a new class of metal alloys which have significantly increased ductility and impact toughness, resulting from the ductile crystalline phases distributed uniformly within the amorphous matrix. However, the 3D structures and their morphologies of such composite at nano and micrometre scale have never been reported before. We have used high density electric currents to thermally shock a Zr-Ti based BMGMC to different temperatures, and used X-ray microtomography, FIB-SEM nanotomography and neutron diffraction to reveal the morphologies, compositions, volume fractions and thermal stabilities of the nano and microstructures. Understanding of these is essential for optimizing the design of BMGMCs and developing viable manufacturing methods. PMID:26725519

  6. Cervical collagen imaging for determining preterm labor risks using a colposcope with full Mueller matrix capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoff, Susan; Chue-Sang, Joseph; Holness, Nola A.; Gandjbakhche, Amir; Chernomordik, Viktor; Ramella-Roman, Jessica

    2016-02-01

    Preterm birth is a worldwide health issue, as the number one cause of infant mortality and neurological disorders. Although affecting nearly 10% of all births, an accurate, reliable diagnostic method for preterm birth has, yet, to be developed. The primary constituent of the cervix, collagen, provides the structural support and mechanical strength to maintain cervical closure, through specific organization, during fetal gestation. As pregnancy progresses, the disorganization of the cervical collagen occurs to allow eventual cervical pliability so the baby can be birthed through the cervical opening. This disorganization of collagen affects the mechanical properties of the cervix and, if the changes occur prematurely, may be a significant factor leading to preterm birth. The organization of collagen can be analyzed through the use of Mueller Matrix Polarimetric imaging of the characteristic birefringence of collagen. In this research, we have built a full Mueller Matrix Polarimetry attachment to a standard colposcope to enable imaging of human cervixes during standard prenatal exams at various stages of fetal gestation. Analysis of the polarimetric images provides information of quantity and organization of cervical collagen at specific gestational stages of pregnancy. This quantitative information may provide an indication of risk of preterm birth.

  7. Microscale Diffusion Properties of the Cartilage Pericellular Matrix Measured Using 3D Scanning Microphotolysis

    PubMed Central

    Leddy, Holly A.; Christensen, Susan E.; Guilak, Farshid

    2009-01-01

    Chondrocytes (cartilage cells) are enclosed within a pericellular matrix (PCM) whose composition and structure differ from those of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Since the PCM surrounds each cell, molecules that interact with the chondrocyte must pass through the pericellular environment. A quantitative understanding of the diffusional properties of the PCM will help elucidate the PCM’s regulatory role in controlling transport to and from the chondrocyte. The diffusivity of a fluorescently-labeled 70 kDa dextran was quantified within the PCM of porcine articular cartilage using a newly-developed mathematical model of scanning microphotolysis (SCAMP). SCAMP is a rapid, line photobleaching method that accounts for out-of-plane bleaching attributable to high magnification. Data were analyzed by best-fit comparison to simulations generated using a discretization of the diffusion-reaction equation in conjunction with the microscope-specific three-dimensional excitation and detection profiles. The diffusion coefficient of dextran was significantly lower in the PCM than in the ECM in normal cartilage. In early-stage arthritic tissue, however, no significant differences in diffusivity were detectable. These results support the hypothesis that the diffusivity of the PCM is lower than that of the ECM, presumably due to differences in proteoglycan content, and that osteoarthritic changes in tissue affect the transport properties of the PCM. PMID:19045531

  8. Electrospun polyvinyl alcohol-collagen-hydroxyapatite nanofibers: a biomimetic extracellular matrix for osteoblastic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Markel, David C.; Wang, Sunxi; Shi, Tong; Mao, Guangzhao; Ren, Weiping

    2012-03-01

    The failure of prosthesis after total joint replacement is due to the lack of early implant osseointegration. In this study polyvinyl alcohol-collagen-hydroxyapatite (PVA-Col-HA) electrospun nanofibrous meshes were fabricated as a biomimetic bone-like extracellular matrix for the modification of orthopedic prosthetic surfaces. In order to reinforce the PVA nanofibers, HA nanorods and Type I collagen were incorporated into the nanofibers. We investigated the morphology, biodegradability, mechanical properties and biocompatibility of the prepared nanofibers. Our results showed these inorganic-organic blended nanofibers to be degradable in vitro. The encapsulated nano-HA and collagen interacted with the PVA content, reinforcing the hydrolytic resistance and mechanical properties of nanofibers that provided longer lasting stability. The encapsulated nano-HA and collagen also enhanced the adhesion and proliferation of murine bone cells (MC3T3) in vitro. We propose the PVA-Col-HA nanofibers might be promising modifying materials on implant surfaces for orthopedic applications.

  9. Role of fibronectin in collagen deposition: Fab' to the gelatin-binding domain of fibronectin inhibits both fibronectin and collagen organization in fibroblast extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    We report the effect of Fab' (anti-60k) to a 60,000 mol wt gelatin binding domain of fibronectin (1981, J. Biol. Chem. 256:5583) on diploid fibroblast (IMR-90) extracellular fibronectin and collagen organization. Anti-60k Fab' did not inhibit IMR-90 attachment or proliferation in fibronectin-depleted medium. Fibroblasts cultured with preimmune Fab' deposited a dense extracellular network of fibronectin and collagen detectable by immunofluorescence, while anti-60k Fab' prevented extracellular collagen and fibronectin fibril deposition. Matrix fibronectin and collagen deposition remained decreased in cultures containing anti-60k Fab' until cells became bilayered or more dense, when fibronectin and collagen began to appear in lower cell layers. Anti-60k Fab' added to confluent cultures 24 h before fixation and staining had no effect on matrix fibronectin or collagen, so anti- 60k Fab' did not simply block immunostaining. Confluent cultures grown in anti-60k Fab' and labeled for 24 h with [3H]proline incorporated identical amounts of [3H]proline and [3H]hydroxyproline, but [3H]hydroxyproline deposition in the cell layer was significantly decreased by anti-60k Fab' (P less than 0.01). Extracellular matrix collagen does not appear to form a scaffold for fibronectin deposition, as neither gelatin nor a gelatin-binding fragment of plasma fibronectin inhibited deposition of matrix fibronectin. Our results suggest that interstitial collagens and fibronectin interact to form a fibrillar component of the extracellular matrix, and that fibronectin is required for normal collagen organization and deposition by fibroblasts in vitro. Domain-specific antibodies to fibronectin are powerful tools to study the biological role of fibronectin in extracellular matrix organization and other processes. PMID:7061591

  10. Binding of gelatinases A and B to type-I collagen and other matrix components.

    PubMed Central

    Allan, J A; Docherty, A J; Barker, P J; Huskisson, N S; Reynolds, J J; Murphy, G

    1995-01-01

    Matrix sequestration of matrix metalloproteinases may be important for the facilitation of remodelling events and the migration of cells through the extracellular matrix. Using an ELISA technique we studied the ability of pro and active forms of gelatinases A and B (GLA and GLB) to bind to matrix components and the contribution made by the different enzyme domains. Pro and active forms of GLA and GLB bound to type-I and type-IV collagens, gelatin and laminin films. Binding to collagens occurred exclusively via the N-terminal portion of the molecule in both of the gelatinases; deletion of the fibronectin-like domain in GLA abolished binding. Fibronectin was shown to compete with GLA, confirming that binding occurs through this domain. GLA and GLB competed for binding to collagen type I, whereas collagenase and stromelysin bound to different sites and could be co-localized with the gelatinases. We conclude that gelatinases have different binding specificities from those previously documented for stromelysin and collagenase, which bind through their C-terminal domains to collagen fibrils. Images Figure 1 PMID:7619071

  11. Comparison of basis functions for 3D PET reconstruction using a Monte Carlo system matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabello, Jorge; Rafecas, Magdalena

    2012-04-01

    In emission tomography, iterative statistical methods are accepted as the reconstruction algorithms that achieve the best image quality. The accuracy of these methods relies partly on the quality of the system response matrix (SRM) that characterizes the scanner. The more physical phenomena included in the SRM, the higher the SRM quality, and therefore higher image quality is obtained from the reconstruction process. High-resolution small animal scanners contain as many as 103-104 small crystal pairs, while the field of view (FOV) is divided into hundreds of thousands of small voxels. These two characteristics have a significant impact on the number of elements to be calculated in the SRM. Monte Carlo (MC) methods have gained popularity as a way of calculating the SRM, due to the increased accuracy achievable, at the cost of introducing some statistical noise and long simulation times. In the work presented here the SRM is calculated using MC methods exploiting the cylindrical symmetries of the scanner, significantly reducing the simulation time necessary to calculate a high statistical quality SRM and the storage space necessary. The use of cylindrical symmetries makes polar voxels a convenient basis function. Alternatively, spherically symmetric basis functions result in improved noise properties compared to cubic and polar basis functions. The quality of reconstructed images using polar voxels, spherically symmetric basis functions on a polar grid, cubic voxels and post-reconstruction filtered polar and cubic voxels is compared from a noise and spatial resolution perspective. This study demonstrates that polar voxels perform as well as cubic voxels, reducing the simulation time necessary to calculate the SRM and the disk space necessary to store it. Results showed that spherically symmetric functions outperform polar and cubic basis functions in terms of noise properties, at the cost of slightly degraded spatial resolution, larger SRM file size and longer

  12. Enhanced osteoprogenitor elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by bioactive glass ionic silicon dependent on Sp7 (osterix) transcription.

    PubMed

    Varanasi, Venu G; Odatsu, Tetsurou; Bishop, Timothy; Chang, Joyce; Owyoung, Jeremy; Loomer, Peter M

    2016-10-01

    Bioactive glasses release ions, those enhance osteoblast collagen matrix synthesis and osteogenic marker expression during bone healing. Collagen matrix density and osteogenic marker expression depend on osteogenic transcription factors, (e.g., Osterix (OSX)). We hypothesize that enhanced expression and formation of collagen by Si(4+) depends on enhanced expression of OSX transcription. Experimental bioactive glass (6P53-b) and commercial Bioglass(TM) (45S5) were dissolved in basal medium to make glass conditioned medium (GCM). ICP-MS analysis was used to measure bioactive glass ion release rates. MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured for 20 days, and gene expression and extracellular matrix collagen formation was analyzed. In a separate study, siRNA was used to determine the effect of OSX knockdown on impacting the effect of Si(4+) on osteogenic markers and matrix collagen formation. Each bioactive glass exhibited similar ion release rates for all ions, except Mg(2+) released by 6P53-b. Gene expression results showed that GCM markedly enhanced many osteogenic markers, and 45S5 GCM showed higher levels of expression and collagen matrix fiber bundle density than 6P53-b GCM. Upon knockdown of OSX transcription, collagen type 5, alkaline phosphatase, and matrix density were not enhanced as compared to wild type cells. This study illustrates that the enhancement of elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by Si(±) depends on OSX transcription. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2604-2615, 2016.

  13. The skin autofluorescence reflects the posttranslational glycation grade of the matrix protein collagen.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Kathleen; Navarrete Santos, Alexander; Simm, Andreas; Silber, Rolf-Edgar; Hofmann, Britt

    2014-10-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) seem to be involved in ageing as well as in the development of cardiovascular diseases. Accumulation of AGEs contribute to tissue stiffness and organ dysfunction by crosslinking extracellular matrix proteins like collagen. We aimed to assess whether AGE-modified cardiac tissue collagen and AGE related skin autofluorescence may reflect the cardiac function and have a prognostic value for the outcome of coronary artery bypass surgery patients. Therefore, AGE-modifications in collagen from 72 male patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery were analyzed. Collagen fractions were isolated from the right atrial auricle and the residual bypass graft material (saphenous vein) of these patients and quantified by 4-hydroxyproline assay. AGE modifications were determined by the AGE intrinsic fluorescence (excitation 360nm/emission 440nm). The skin autofluorescence (sAF) as a non-invasive parameter was measured using the AGE reader. The non-extractable collagen contained the highest amounts of AGEs and positively correlates with the patients age (p=0.0001), blood glucose level (p=0.002), HbA1c level (p=0.01) and sAF (p=0.008). The right atrial auricle collagen showed significantly more modifications compared to vein graft material of the same patient (p=0,001). Skin autofluorescence positively correlates with AGE content in cardiac tissue (p=0.01) and therefore could be used as a predictor of tissue stiffness in patients with coronary heart disease.

  14. The skin autofluorescence reflects the posttranslational glycation grade of the matrix protein collagen.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Kathleen; Navarrete Santos, Alexander; Simm, Andreas; Silber, Rolf-Edgar; Hofmann, Britt

    2014-10-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) seem to be involved in ageing as well as in the development of cardiovascular diseases. Accumulation of AGEs contribute to tissue stiffness and organ dysfunction by crosslinking extracellular matrix proteins like collagen. We aimed to assess whether AGE-modified cardiac tissue collagen and AGE related skin autofluorescence may reflect the cardiac function and have a prognostic value for the outcome of coronary artery bypass surgery patients. Therefore, AGE-modifications in collagen from 72 male patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery were analyzed. Collagen fractions were isolated from the right atrial auricle and the residual bypass graft material (saphenous vein) of these patients and quantified by 4-hydroxyproline assay. AGE modifications were determined by the AGE intrinsic fluorescence (excitation 360nm/emission 440nm). The skin autofluorescence (sAF) as a non-invasive parameter was measured using the AGE reader. The non-extractable collagen contained the highest amounts of AGEs and positively correlates with the patients age (p=0.0001), blood glucose level (p=0.002), HbA1c level (p=0.01) and sAF (p=0.008). The right atrial auricle collagen showed significantly more modifications compared to vein graft material of the same patient (p=0,001). Skin autofluorescence positively correlates with AGE content in cardiac tissue (p=0.01) and therefore could be used as a predictor of tissue stiffness in patients with coronary heart disease. PMID:26461346

  15. A Collagen-based Scaffold Delivering Exogenous MicroRNA-29B to Modulate Extracellular Matrix Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Michael; Browne, Shane; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Pandit, Abhay

    2014-01-01

    Directing appropriate extracellular matrix remodeling is a key aim of regenerative medicine strategies. Thus, antifibrotic interfering RNA (RNAi) therapy with exogenous microRNA (miR)-29B was proposed as a method to modulate extracellular matrix remodeling following cutaneous injury. It was hypothesized that delivery of miR-29B from a collagen scaffold will efficiently modulate the extracellular matrix remodeling response and reduce maladaptive remodeling such as aggressive deposition of collagen type I after injury. The release of RNA from the scaffold was assessed and its ability to silence collagen type I and collagen type III expression was evaluated in vitro. When primary fibroblasts were cultured with scaffolds doped with miR-29B, reduced levels of collagen type I and collagen type III mRNA expression were observed for up to 2 weeks of culture. When the scaffolds were applied to full thickness wounds in vivo, reduced wound contraction, improved collagen type III/I ratios and a significantly higher matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-8: tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 ratio were detected when the scaffolds were functionalized with miR-29B. Furthermore, these effects were significantly influenced by the dose of miR-29B in the collagen scaffold (0.5 versus 5 μg). This study shows a potential of combining exogenous miRs with collagen scaffolds to improve extracellular matrix remodeling following injury. PMID:24402185

  16. Biosynthesis of collagen and other matrix proteins by articular cartilage in experimental osteoarthrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, D R; McDevitt, C A; Billingham, M E; Muir, H

    1980-01-01

    Osteoarthrosis was induced in one knee joint of dogs by an established surgical procedure. Changes in the articular cartilage in the biosynthesis of collagen and other proteins were sought by radiochemical labelling in vivo, with the following findings. (1) Collagen synthesis was stimulated in all cartilage surfaces of the experimental joints at 2, 8 and 24 weeks after surgery. Systemic labelling with [3H]proline showed that over 10 times more collagen was being deposited per dry weight of experimental cartilage compared with control cartilage in the unoperated knee. (2) Type-II collagen was the radiolabelled product in all samples of experimental cartilage ranging in quality from undamaged to overtly fibrillated, and was the only collagen detected chemically in the matrix of osteoarthrotic cartilage from either dog or human joints. (3) Hydroxylysine glycosylation was examined in the newly synthesized cartilage collagen by labelling dog joints in vivo with [3H]lysine. In experimental knees the new collagen was less glycosylated than in controls. However, no difference in glycosylation of the total collagen in the tissues was observed by chemical analysis. (4) Over half the protein-bound tritium was extracted by 4 M-guanidinium chloride from control cartilage labelled with [3H]proline, compared with one-quarter or less from experimental cartilage. Two-thirds of the extracted tritium separated in the upper fraction on density-gradient centrifugation in CsCl under associative conditions. Much of this ran with a single protein band on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions. The identity of this protein was unknown, although it resembled serum albumin in mobility afte disulphide-bond cleavage. Images Fig. 3. PMID:7470037

  17. Bioprinting 3D cell-laden hydrogel microarray for screening human periodontal ligament stem cell response to extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yufei; Ji, Yuan; Huang, Guoyou; Ling, Kai; Zhang, Xiaohui; Xu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease negatively affecting up to 15% of adults worldwide. Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) hold great promises for periodontal tissue regeneration, where it is necessary to find proper extracellular matrix (ECM) materials (e.g., composition, concentration). In this study, we proposed a bioprinting-based approach to generate nano-liter sized three-dimensional (3D) cell-laden hydrogel array with gradient of ECM components, through controlling the volume ratio of two hydrogels, such as gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) dimethacrylate. The resulting cell-laden array with a gradient of GelMA/PEG composition was used to screen human PDLSC response to ECM. The behavior (e.g., cell viability, spreading) of human PDLSCs in GelMA/PEG array were found to be depended on the volume ratios of GelMA/PEG, with cell viability and spreading area decreased along with increasing the ratio of PEG. The developed approach would be useful for screening cell-biomaterial interaction in 3D and promoting regeneration of functional tissue.

  18. Bioprinting 3D cell-laden hydrogel microarray for screening human periodontal ligament stem cell response to extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yufei; Ji, Yuan; Huang, Guoyou; Ling, Kai; Zhang, Xiaohui; Xu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease negatively affecting up to 15% of adults worldwide. Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) hold great promises for periodontal tissue regeneration, where it is necessary to find proper extracellular matrix (ECM) materials (e.g., composition, concentration). In this study, we proposed a bioprinting-based approach to generate nano-liter sized three-dimensional (3D) cell-laden hydrogel array with gradient of ECM components, through controlling the volume ratio of two hydrogels, such as gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) dimethacrylate. The resulting cell-laden array with a gradient of GelMA/PEG composition was used to screen human PDLSC response to ECM. The behavior (e.g., cell viability, spreading) of human PDLSCs in GelMA/PEG array were found to be depended on the volume ratios of GelMA/PEG, with cell viability and spreading area decreased along with increasing the ratio of PEG. The developed approach would be useful for screening cell-biomaterial interaction in 3D and promoting regeneration of functional tissue. PMID:26696269

  19. Co-Culture of Tumor Spheroids and Fibroblasts in a Collagen Matrix-Incorporated Microfluidic Chip Mimics Reciprocal Activation in Solid Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Su-Yeong; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Yoojin; Chung, Seok; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular 3D culture and interaction with stromal components are considered essential elements in establishing a ‘more clinically relevant’ tumor model. Matrix-embedded 3D cultures using a microfluidic chip platform can recapitulate the microscale interaction within tumor microenvironments. As a major component of tumor microenvironment, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a role in cancer progression and drug resistance. Here, we present a microfluidic chip-based tumor tissue culture model that integrates 3D tumor spheroids (TSs) with CAF in proximity within a hydrogel scaffold. HT-29 human colorectal carcinoma cells grew into 3D TSs and the growth was stimulated when co-cultured with fibroblasts as shown by 1.5-folds increase of % changes in diameter over 5 days. TS cultured for 6 days showed a reduced expression of Ki-67 along with increased expression of fibronectin when co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to mono-cultured TSs. Fibroblasts were activated under co-culture conditions, as demonstrated by increases in α-SMA expression and migratory activity. When exposed to paclitaxel, a survival advantage was observed in TSs co-cultured with activated fibroblasts. Overall, we demonstrated the reciprocal interaction between TSs and fibroblasts in our 7-channel microfluidic chip. The co-culture of 3D TS-CAF in a collagen matrix-incorporated microfluidic chip may be useful to study the tumor microenvironment and for evaluation of drug screening and evaluation. PMID:27391808

  20. Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis (AMIC): Combining Microfracturing and a Collagen I/III Matrix for Articular Cartilage Resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Benthien, J P; Behrens, P

    2010-01-01

    Options for the treatment of cartilage defects include chondral resurfacing with abrasion, debridement, autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT), matrix-induced chondrocyte transplantation (MACI), or osteochondral autologous transplantation (OATS). This article describes the new method of autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC), a 1-step procedure combining subchondral microfracture with the fixation of a collagen I/III membrane by a partially autologous fibrin glue. Indications and contraindications are provided; a technical note is given. This method is primarily applied in osteochondral lesions of the knee and ankle joints; other joints may qualify.

  1. Fabrication of type I collagen microcarrier using a microfluidic 3D T-junction device and its application for the quantitative analysis of cell-ECM interactions.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Junghyo; Kim, Jaehoon; Jeong, Hyo Eun; Sudo, Ryo; Park, Myung-Jin; Chung, Seok

    2016-01-01

    We presented a new quantitative analysis for cell and extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions, using cell-coated ECM hydrogel microbeads (hydrobeads) made of type I collagen. The hydrobeads can carry cells as three-dimensional spheroidal forms with an ECM inside, facilitating a direct interaction between the cells and ECM. The cells on hydrobeads do not have a hypoxic core, which opens the possibility for using as a cell microcarrier for bottom-up tissue reconstitution. This technique can utilize various types of cells, even MDA-MB-231 cells, which have weak cell-cell interactions and do not form spheroids in conventional spheroid culture methods. Morphological indices of the cell-coated hydrobead visually present cell-ECM interactions in a quantitative manner. PMID:27563029

  2. Comparison of uncultured marrow mononuclear cells and culture-expanded mesenchymal stem cells in 3D collagen-chitosan microbeads for orthopedic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wise, Joel K; Alford, Andrea I; Goldstein, Steven A; Stegemann, Jan P

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies have shown promise in enhancing repair of bone and cartilage. Marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are typically expanded in vitro to increase cell number, but this process is lengthy, costly, and there is a risk of contamination and altered cellular properties. Potential advantages of using fresh uncultured bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) include heterotypic cell and paracrine interactions between MSC and other marrow-derived cells including hematopoietic, endothelial, and other progenitor cells. In the present study, we compared the osteogenic and chondrogenic potential of freshly isolated BMMC to that of cultured-expanded MSC, when encapsulated in three-dimensional (3D) collagen-chitosan microbeads. The effect of low and high oxygen tension on cell function and differentiation into orthopedic lineages was also examined. Freshly isolated rat BMMC (25 × 10(6) cells/mL, containing an estimated 5 × 10(4) MSC/mL) or purified and culture-expanded rat bone marrow-derived MSC (2 × 10(5) cells/mL) were added to a 65-35 wt% collagen-chitosan hydrogel mixture and fabricated into 3D microbeads by emulsification and thermal gelation. Microbeads were cultured in control MSC growth media in either 20% O2 (normoxia) or 5% O2 (hypoxia) for an initial 3 days, and then in control, osteogenic, or chondrogenic media for an additional 21 days. Microbead preparations were evaluated for viability, total DNA content, calcium deposition, and osteocalcin and sulfated glycosaminoglycan expression, and they were examined histologically. Hypoxia enhanced initial progenitor cell survival in fresh BMMC-microbeads, but it did not enhance osteogenic potential. Fresh uncultured BMMC-microbeads showed a similar degree of osteogenesis as culture-expanded MSC-microbeads, even though they initially contained only 1/10th the number of MSC. Chondrogenic differentiation was not strongly supported in any of the microbead formulations. This study demonstrates the

  3. Comparison of Uncultured Marrow Mononuclear Cells and Culture-Expanded Mesenchymal Stem Cells in 3D Collagen-Chitosan Microbeads for Orthopedic Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Joel K.; Alford, Andrea I.; Goldstein, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies have shown promise in enhancing repair of bone and cartilage. Marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are typically expanded in vitro to increase cell number, but this process is lengthy, costly, and there is a risk of contamination and altered cellular properties. Potential advantages of using fresh uncultured bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) include heterotypic cell and paracrine interactions between MSC and other marrow-derived cells including hematopoietic, endothelial, and other progenitor cells. In the present study, we compared the osteogenic and chondrogenic potential of freshly isolated BMMC to that of cultured-expanded MSC, when encapsulated in three-dimensional (3D) collagen-chitosan microbeads. The effect of low and high oxygen tension on cell function and differentiation into orthopedic lineages was also examined. Freshly isolated rat BMMC (25×106 cells/mL, containing an estimated 5×104 MSC/mL) or purified and culture-expanded rat bone marrow-derived MSC (2×105 cells/mL) were added to a 65–35 wt% collagen-chitosan hydrogel mixture and fabricated into 3D microbeads by emulsification and thermal gelation. Microbeads were cultured in control MSC growth media in either 20% O2 (normoxia) or 5% O2 (hypoxia) for an initial 3 days, and then in control, osteogenic, or chondrogenic media for an additional 21 days. Microbead preparations were evaluated for viability, total DNA content, calcium deposition, and osteocalcin and sulfated glycosaminoglycan expression, and they were examined histologically. Hypoxia enhanced initial progenitor cell survival in fresh BMMC-microbeads, but it did not enhance osteogenic potential. Fresh uncultured BMMC-microbeads showed a similar degree of osteogenesis as culture-expanded MSC-microbeads, even though they initially contained only 1/10th the number of MSC. Chondrogenic differentiation was not strongly supported in any of the microbead formulations. This study demonstrates the microbead

  4. Collagen and matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 in the ewe cervix during the estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Piñón, M; Tasende, C; Casuriaga, D; Bielli, A; Genovese, P; Garófalo, E G

    2015-09-15

    The cervical collagen remodeling during the estrous cycle of the ewe was examined. The collagen concentration determined by a hydroxyproline assay and the area occupied by collagen fibers (%C), determined by van Gieson staining, were assessed in the cranial and caudal cervix of Corriedale ewes on Days 1 (n = 6), 6 (n = 5), or 13 (n = 6) after estrous detection (defined as Day 0). In addition, the gelatinase activity by in situ and SDS-PAGE gelatin zymographies and matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (MMP-2 and MMP-9, respectively) expression by immunohistochemistry were determined. The collagen concentration and %C were lowest on Day 1 of the estrous cycle (P < 0.04), when MMP-2 activity was highest (P < 0.006) and the ratio of activated to latent MMP-2 trend to be highest (P = 0.0819). The MMP-2 activity was detected in 73% of the homogenized cervical samples, and its expression was mainly detected in active fibroblasts. By contrast, the MMP-9 activity was detected in 9% of the samples, and its scarce expression was associated with plasmocytes, macrophages, and lymphocytes. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression was maximal on Day 1 in the cranial cervix and on Day 13 in the caudal cervix and was lower in the cranial than in the caudal cervix (P < 0.0001). This time-dependent increase in MMP-2 expression that differed between the cranial and caudal cervix may reflect their different physiological roles. The decrease in the collagen content and increase in fibroblast MMP-2 activity in sheep cervix on Day 1 of the estrous cycle suggests that cervical dilation at estrus is due to the occurrence of collagen fiber degradation modulated by changes in periovulatory hormone levels.

  5. Extracellular compartments in matrix morphogenesis: collagen fibril, bundle, and lamellar formation by corneal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The regulation of collagen fibril, bundle, and lamella formation by the corneal fibroblasts, as well as the organization of these elements into an orthogonal stroma, was studied by transmission electron microscopy and high voltage electron microscopy. Transmission and high voltage electron microscopy of chick embryo corneas each demonstrated a series of unique extracellular compartments. Collagen fibrillogenesis occurred within small surface recesses. These small recesses usually contained between 5 and 12 collagen fibrils with typically mature diameters and constant intrafibrillar spacing. The lateral fusion of the recesses resulted in larger recesses and consequent formation of prominent cell surface foldings. Within these surface foldings, bundles that contained 50-100 collagen fibrils were formed. The surface foldings continued to fuse and the cell surface retracted, forming large surface-associated compartments in which bundles coalesced to form lamellae. High voltage electron microscopy of 0.5 micron sections cut parallel to the corneal surface revealed that the corneal fibroblasts and their processes had two major axes at approximately right angles to one another. The surface compartments involved in the production of the corneal stroma were aligned along the fibroblast axes and the orthogonality of the cell was in register with that of the extracellular matrix. In this manner, corneal fibroblasts formed collagen fibrils, bundles, and lamellae within a controlled environment and thereby determined the architecture of the corneal stroma by the configuration of the cell and its associated compartments. PMID:6542105

  6. Preparation and characterization of an advanced collagen aggregate from porcine acellular dermal matrix.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhua; Dan, Nianhua; Dan, Weihua

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to extract and characterize an advanced collagen aggregate (Ag-col) from porcine acellular dermal matrix (pADM). Based on histological examination, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM), Ag-col was composed of the D-periodic cross-striated collagen fibrils and thick collagen fiber bundles with uneven diameters and non-orientated arrangement. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of pADM, Ag-col and Col were similar and revealed the presence of the triple helix. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis exhibited a slightly higher content of α-helix but inappreciably less amount of random coil structure in Ag-col compared to Col. Moreover, imino acid contents of pADM, Ag-col and Col were 222.43, 218.30 and 190.01 residues/1000 residues, respectively. From zeta potential analysis, a net charge of zero was found at pH 6.45 and 6.11 for Ag-col and Col, respectively. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study suggested that the Td of Ag-col was 20°C higher than that of Col as expected, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) indicated that Ag-col possessed a higher storage modulus but similar loss factor compared to Col. Therefore, the collagen aggregate from pADM could serve as a better alternative source of collagens for further applications in food and biological industries. PMID:27039117

  7. Peroxidase Enzymes Regulate Collagen Biosynthesis and Matrix Mineralization by Cultured Human Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Shoubridge, Alexandra J; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Liapis, Vasilios; Zysk, Aneta; Zinonos, Irene; Hay, Shelley; Atkins, Gerald J; Findlay, David M; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The early recruitment of inflammatory cells to sites of bone fracture and trauma is a critical determinant in successful fracture healing. Released by infiltrating inflammatory cells, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) are heme-containing enzymes, whose functional involvement in bone repair has mainly been studied in the context of providing a mechanism for oxidative defense against invading microorganisms. We report here novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes have the capacity to stimulate osteoblastic cells to secrete collagen I protein and generate a mineralized extracellular matrix in vitro. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured osteoblasts show that peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl hydroxylase-dependent manner, which does not require ascorbic acid. Our studies demonstrate that osteoblasts rapidly bind and internalize both MPO and EPO, and the catalytic activity of these peroxidase enzymes is essential to support collagen I biosynthesis and subsequent release of collagen by osteoblasts. We show that EPO is capable of regulating osteogenic gene expression and matrix mineralization in culture, suggesting that peroxidase enzymes may play an important role not only in normal bone repair, but also in the progression of pathological states where infiltrating inflammatory cells are known to deposit peroxidases.

  8. Modeling and Analysis of Granite Matrix Pore Structure and Hydraulic Characteristics in 2D and 3D Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdik, L.; Polak, M.; Zaruba, J.; Vanecek, M.

    2010-12-01

    A geological environment labeled as a Granite massif represents in terms of groundwater flow and transport a distinct hydrogeological environment from that of sedimentary basins, the characterisation of which is generally more complex and uncertain. Massifs are composed of hard crystalline rocks with the very low effective porosity. Due to their rheological properties such rocks are predisposed to brittle deformation resulting from changes in stress conditions. Our specific research project (Research on the influence of intergrangular porosity on deep geological disposal: geological formations, methodology and the development of measurement apparatus) is focussed on the problem of permeable zones within apparently undisturbed granitic rock matrix. The project including the both laboratory and in-situ tracer tests study migration along and through mineral grains in fresh and altered granite. The objective of the project is to assess whether intergranular porosity is a general characteristic of the granitic rock matrix or subject to significant evolution resulting from geochemical and/or hydrogeochemical processes, geotechnical and/or mechanical processes. Moreover, the research is focussed on evaluating methods quantifying intergranular porosity by both physical testing and mathematical modelling using verified standard hydrological software tools. Groundwater flow in microfractures and intergranular pores in granite rock matrix were simulated in three standard hydrogeological modeling programs with completely different conceptual approaches: MODFLOW (Equivalent Continuum concept), FEFLOW (Discrete Fracture and Equivalent Continuum concepts) and NAPSAC (Discrete Fracture Network concept). Specialized random fracture generators were used for creation of several 2D and 3D models in each of the chosen program. Percolation characteristics of these models were tested and analyzed. Several scenarios of laboratory tests of the rock samples permeability made in triaxial

  9. Electrochemical Time-of-Flight in crosslinked collagen matrix solution: implications of structural changes for drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Ky, Darline; Liu, Chi Kin; Marumoto, Christopher; Castaneda, Luciano; Slowinska, Katarzyna

    2006-05-15

    Electrochemical Time-of-Flight (ETOF) method was used for the first time to measure the diffusion coefficient of 4-hydroxy-TEMPO, a molecular probe in collagen I matrix solution as a function of its concentration and the extent of crosslinking with glutaraldehyde (GA). The values of the diffusion coefficient were correlated with Circular Dichroism (CD) and viscosity data to assess the changes of the structure of a collagen matrix. The low value of probe diffusion coefficient indicates that the molecular collagen contributes to large diffusion hindrance of the medium. The combined Brinkman or effective medium model and the Carman-Kozeny model were used to estimate the average diameter of a matrix pore as a function of collagen solution composition. We show that 0.5% and 1% (w/w) collagen matrix crosslinked with the addition of GA above 0.1% (v/w) forms matrix with pores larger than in native collagen. This result suggests the existence of a micro-phase separation in the crosslinked collagen matrix. The implications of these findings for the design of small molecule drug delivery systems are discussed.

  10. A volume of intersection approach for on-the-fly system matrix calculation in 3D PET image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lougovski, A.; Hofheinz, F.; Maus, J.; Schramm, G.; Will, E.; van den Hoff, J.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is the evaluation of on-the-fly volume of intersection computation for system’s geometry modelling in 3D PET image reconstruction. For this purpose we propose a simple geometrical model in which the cubic image voxels on the given Cartesian grid are approximated with spheres and the rectangular tubes of response (ToRs) are approximated with cylinders. The model was integrated into a fully 3D list-mode PET reconstruction for performance evaluation. In our model the volume of intersection between a voxel and the ToR is only a function of the impact parameter (the distance between voxel centre to ToR axis) but is independent of the relative orientation of voxel and ToR. This substantially reduces the computational complexity of the system matrix calculation. Based on phantom measurements it was determined that adjusting the diameters of the spherical voxel size and the ToR in such a way that the actual voxel and ToR volumes are conserved leads to the best compromise between high spatial resolution, low noise, and suppression of Gibbs artefacts in the reconstructed images. Phantom as well as clinical datasets from two different PET systems (Siemens ECAT HR+ and Philips Ingenuity-TF PET/MR) were processed using the developed and the respective vendor-provided (line of intersection related) reconstruction algorithms. A comparison of the reconstructed images demonstrated very good performance of the new approach. The evaluation showed the respective vendor-provided reconstruction algorithms to possess 34-41% lower resolution compared to the developed one while exhibiting comparable noise levels. Contrary to explicit point spread function modelling our model has a simple straight-forward implementation and it should be easy to integrate into existing reconstruction software, making it competitive to other existing resolution recovery techniques.

  11. Comparison of 3D Reconstructive Technologies Used for Morphometric Research and the Translation of Knowledge Using a Decision Matrix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Charys M.; Roach, Victoria A.; Nguyen, Ngan; Rice, Charles L.; Wilson, Timothy D.

    2013-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) models for education, pre-operative assessment, presurgical planning, and measurement have become more prevalent. With the increase in prevalence of 3D models there has also been an increase in 3D reconstructive software programs that are used to create these models. These software programs differ in…

  12. Spinal fusion with recombinant human growth and differentiation factor-5 combined with a mineralized collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Spiro, R C; Thompson, A Y; Poser, J W

    2001-08-01

    The availability of recombinant osteoinductive growth factors and new osteoconductive matrices offers an alternative to the use of autogenous bone (autograft) for grafting indications. This study evaluates the bone-forming activity of a mineralized collagen matrix combined with recombinant human growth and differentiation factor-5 in a rabbit posterolateral spinal fusion model. The activity of three distinct matrix-growth factor formulations is assessed by radiographic, histologic, and mechanical strength methods. Results show that the radiographic density, histologic quality, and mechanical strength of fusion at 12 weeks post-treatment rank consistently within the treatment groups. Optimal formulations are shown to perform similar to autograft in both the rate and strength of fusion. Fusion rates as high as 80% are observed within specific matrix/growth factor formulations. The average biomechanical strength of treated motion segments in the most efficacious formulation is 82% higher than that obtained with autograft, although this difference is not statistically significant. The fusion mass formed in response to matrix/growth factor formulations is composed of normal trabecular bone with a thin outer cortical plate and modest hematopoietic bone marrow. These results demonstrate that the combination of a mineralized collagen matrix with recombinant human growth and differentiation factor-5 maximizes the inherent conductive and inductive properties of each component, respectively, to provide an effective alternative to autograft for bone grafting procedures.

  13. The Effects of Matrix Stiffness and RhoA on the Phenotypic Plasticity of Smooth Muscle Cells in a 3-D Biosynthetic Hydrogel System

    PubMed Central

    Peyton, Shelly R.; Kim, Peter D.; Ghajar, Cyrus M.; Seliktar, Dror; Putnam, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    Studies using 2-D cultures have shown that the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) influence cell migration, spreading, proliferation, and differentiation; however, cellular mechanosensing in 3-D remains under-explored. To investigate this topic, a unique biomaterial system based on poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated fibrinogen was adapted to study phenotypic plasticity in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) as a function of ECM mechanics in 3-D. Tuning compressive modulus between 448–5804 Pa modestly regulated SMC cytoskeletal assembly in 3-D, with spread cells in stiff matrices having a slightly higher degree of F-actin bundling after prolonged culture. However, vinculin expression in all 3-D conditions was qualitatively low and was not assembled into the classic focal adhesions typically seen in 2-D cultures. Given the evidence that RhoA-mediated cytoskeletal contractility represents a critical node in mechanosensing, we molecularly upregulated contractility by inducing SMCs to express constitutively active RhoA. In these cells, F-actin bundling and total vinculin expression increased, and focal adhesion-like structures began to emerge, consistent with RhoA’s mechanism of action cells cultured on 2-D substrates. Furthermore, SMC proliferation in 3-D did not depend significantly on matrix stiffness, and was reduced by constitutive activation of RhoA irrespective of ECM mechanical properties. Conversely, the expression of contractile markers globally increased with constitutive RhoA activation and depended on 3-D matrix stiffness only in cells with heightened RhoA activity. Combined, these data suggest the synergistic effects of ECM mechanics and RhoA activity on SMC phenotype in 3-D are distinct from those in 2-D, and highlight the importance of studying the mechanical role of cell-matrix interactions in tunable 3-D environments. PMID:18342366

  14. Bioengineered 3D brain tumor model to elucidate the effects of matrix stiffness on glioblastoma cell behavior using PEG-based hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Christine; Tong, Xinming; Yang, Fan

    2014-07-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive form of primary brain tumor with a median survival of 12-15 months, and the mechanisms underlying GBM tumor progression remain largely elusive. Given the importance of tumor niche signaling in driving GBM progression, there is a strong need to develop in vitro models to facilitate analysis of brain tumor cell-niche interactions in a physiologically relevant and controllable manner. Here we report the development of a bioengineered 3D brain tumor model to help elucidate the effects of matrix stiffness on GBM cell fate using poly(ethylene-glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels with brain-mimicking biochemical and mechanical properties. We have chosen PEG given its bioinert nature and tunable physical property, and the resulting hydrogels allow tunable matrix stiffness without changing the biochemical contents. To facilitate cell proliferation and migration, CRGDS and a MMP-cleavable peptide were chemically incorporated. Hyaluronic acid (HA) was also incorporated to mimic the concentration in the brain extracellular matrix. Using U87 cells as a model GBM cell line, we demonstrate that such biomimetic hydrogels support U87 cell growth, spreading, and migration in 3D over the course of 3 weeks in culture. Gene expression analyses showed U87 cells actively deposited extracellular matrix and continued to upregulate matrix remodeling genes. To examine the effects of matrix stiffness on GBM cell fate in 3D, we encapsulated U87 cells in soft (1 kPa) or stiff (26 kPa) hydrogels, which respectively mimics the matrix stiffness of normal brain or GBM tumor tissues. Our results suggest that changes in matrix stiffness induce differential GBM cell proliferation, morphology, and migration modes in 3D. Increasing matrix stiffness led to delayed U87 cell proliferation inside hydrogels, but cells formed denser spheroids with extended cell protrusions. Cells cultured in stiff hydrogels also showed upregulation of HA synthase 1 and matrix

  15. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 cleavage site recognition and binding in full-length human type III collagen.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kim E; Olsen, David R

    2009-07-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are essential for normal collagen turnover, recovery from fibrosis, and vascular permeability. In fibrillar collagens, MMP-1, MMP-8, and MMP-13 cleave a specific glycine-isoleucine or glycine-leucine bond, despite the presence of this sequence in other parts of the protein. This cut site specificity has been hypothesized to arise from a unique, relaxed super-secondary structure in this area due to local hydroxyproline poor character. In this study we examined the mechanism of interaction and cleavage of human type III collagen by fibroblast MMP-1 by using a panel of recombinant human type III collagens (rhCIIIs) containing engineered sequences in the vicinity of the cleavage site. Native and recombinant type III collagens had similar biochemical and structural characteristics, as indicated by transmission electron microscopy, circular dichroism spectropolarimetry, melting temperature and hydroxyproline analysis. A single amino acid change at the I785 cleavage site to proline resulted in partial MMP-1 resistance, but cuts were found in novel sites in the original cleavage region. However, the replacement of five Y-position residues by proline in this region, regardless of I785 variation, conferred complete resistance to MMP-1, MMP-8, MMP-13, trypsin, and elastase. MMP-1 had a decreased specific activity towards and reduced cleavage rate of rhCIII I785P but a K(m) similar to wild-type. Despite the reductions in protease sensitivity, MMP-1 bound to all of the engineered rhCIIIs with comparable affinity, indicating that MMP-1 binding is not sufficient for cleavage. The relaxed tertiary structure in the MMP cleavage region may permit local collagen unwinding by MMP-1 that enables site-specific proteolysis.

  16. Fluid flow increases mineralized matrix deposition in 3D perfusion culture of marrow stromal osteoblasts in a dose-dependent manner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bancroft, Gregory N.; Sikavitsas, Vassilios I.; van den Dolder, Juliette; Sheffield, Tiffany L.; Ambrose, Catherine G.; Jansen, John A.; Mikos, Antonios G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Bone is a complex highly structured mechanically active 3D tissue composed of cellular and matrix elements. The true biological environment of a bone cell is thus derived from a dynamic interaction between responsively active cells experiencing mechanical forces and a continuously changing 3D matrix architecture. To investigate this phenomenon in vitro, marrow stromal osteoblasts were cultured on 3D scaffolds under flow perfusion with different rates of flow for an extended period to permit osteoblast differentiation and significant matrix production and mineralization. With all flow conditions, mineralized matrix production was dramatically increased over statically cultured constructs with the total calcium content of the cultured scaffolds increasing with increasing flow rate. Flow perfusion induced de novo tissue modeling with the formation of pore-like structures in the scaffolds and enhanced the distribution of cells and matrix throughout the scaffolds. These results represent reporting of the long-term effects of fluid flow on primary differentiating osteoblasts and indicate that fluid flow has far-reaching effects on osteoblast differentiation and phenotypic expression in vitro. Flow perfusion culture permits the generation and study of a 3D, actively modeled, mineralized matrix and can therefore be a valuable tool for both bone biology and tissue engineering.

  17. Rapid Fabrication of Living Tissue Models by Collagen Plastic Compression: Understanding Three-Dimensional Cell Matrix Repair In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cheema, Umber; Brown, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To produce biomimetic collagen scaffolds for tissue modeling and as tissue-engineered implants. Approach Control of collagen fibril material parameters in collagen hydrogel scaffolds by using plastic compression (PC), resulting in direct control of cell proliferation, cell migration, and cell–cell interaction. Results We were able to control the density of collagen in such scaffolds from between 0.2% and 30%, and controllably layer the fibrils in the Z-plane. Cell migration was observed in gels where a gradient of collagen density was present. In these gels, cells preferentially migrated toward the collagen-dense areas. Cell proliferation rates were measurably higher in dense collagen gels. Innovation The use of PC to control material properties of collagen hydrogels results in collagen scaffolds that are biomimetic. These collagen gels reproduce the relevant matrix-mechanical environment in which behavior is more representative of that found in vivo. Conclusion The material properties of native collagen type I gels can be engineered to match those found in tissues in vivo to elicit more biomimetic cell behavior. PMID:24527341

  18. A Prototype PZT Matrix Transducer With Low-Power Integrated Receive ASIC for 3-D Transesophageal Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Raghunathan, Shreyas B; Yu, Zili; Shabanimotlagh, Maysam; Chen, Zhao; Chang, Zu-yao; Blaak, Sandra; Prins, Christian; Ponte, Jacco; Noothout, Emile; Vos, Hendrik J; Bosch, Johan G; Verweij, Martin D; de Jong, Nico; Pertijs, Michiel A P

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, and experimental evaluation of a prototype lead zirconium titanate (PZT) matrix transducer with an integrated receive ASIC, as a proof of concept for a miniature three-dimensional (3-D) transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) probe. It consists of an array of 9 ×12 piezoelectric elements mounted on the ASIC via an integration scheme that involves direct electrical connections between a bond-pad array on the ASIC and the transducer elements. The ASIC addresses the critical challenge of reducing cable count, and includes front-end amplifiers with adjustable gains and micro-beamformer circuits that locally process and combine echo signals received by the elements of each 3 ×3 subarray. Thus, an order-of-magnitude reduction in the number of receive channels is achieved. Dedicated circuit techniques are employed to meet the strict space and power constraints of TEE probes. The ASIC has been fabricated in a standard 0.18-μm CMOS process and consumes only 0.44 mW/channel. The prototype has been acoustically characterized in a water tank. The ASIC allows the array to be presteered across ±37° while achieving an overall dynamic range of 77 dB. Both the measured characteristics of the individual transducer elements and the performance of the ASIC are in good agreement with expectations, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed techniques.

  19. Intracellular nanomanipulation by a photonic-force microscope with real-time acquisition of a 3D stiffness matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertseva, E.; Singh, A. S. G.; Lekki, J.; Thévenaz, P.; Lekka, M.; Jeney, S.; Gremaud, G.; Puttini, S.; Nowak, W.; Dietler, G.; Forró, L.; Unser, M.; Kulik, A. J.

    2009-07-01

    A traditional photonic-force microscope (PFM) results in huge sets of data, which requires tedious numerical analysis. In this paper, we propose instead an analog signal processor to attain real-time capabilities while retaining the richness of the traditional PFM data. Our system is devoted to intracellular measurements and is fully interactive through the use of a haptic joystick. Using our specialized analog hardware along with a dedicated algorithm, we can extract the full 3D stiffness matrix of the optical trap in real time, including the off-diagonal cross-terms. Our system is also capable of simultaneously recording data for subsequent offline analysis. This allows us to check that a good correlation exists between the classical analysis of stiffness and our real-time measurements. We monitor the PFM beads using an optical microscope. The force-feedback mechanism of the haptic joystick helps us in interactively guiding the bead inside living cells and collecting information from its (possibly anisotropic) environment. The instantaneous stiffness measurements are also displayed in real time on a graphical user interface. The whole system has been built and is operational; here we present early results that confirm the consistency of the real-time measurements with offline computations.

  20. Viscosity and elasticity during collagen assembly in vitro: relevance to matrix-driven translocation.

    PubMed

    Newman, S; Cloître, M; Allain, C; Forgacs, G; Beysens, D

    1997-03-01

    In order to better understand the gelation process associated with collagen assembly, and the mechanism of the in vitro morphogenetic phenomenon of "matrix-driven translocation" [S.A. Newman et al. (1985) Science, 228, 885-889], the viscosity and elastic modulus of assembling collagen matrices in the presence and absence of polystyrene latex beads was investigated. Viscosity measurements at very low shear rates (0.016-0.0549 s(-1)) were performed over a range of temperatures (6.9-11.5 degrees C) in a Couette viscometer. A magnetic levitation sphere rheometer was used to measure the shear elastic modulus of the assembling matrices during the late phase of the gelation process. Gelation was detected by the rapid increase in viscosity that occurred after a lag time tL that varied between O and approximately 500 s. After a rise in viscosity that occurred over an additional approximately 500 s, the collagen matrix was characterized by an elastic modulus of the order of several Pa. The lag time of the assembly process was relatively insensitive to differences in shear rate within the variability of the sample preparation, but was inversely proportional to the time the sample spent on ice before being raised to the test temperature, for test temperatures > 9 degrees C. This suggests that structures important for fibrillogenesis are capable of forming at 0 degrees C. The time dependence of the gelation process is well-described by an exponential law with a rate constant K approximately 0.1 s(-1). Significantly, K was consistently larger in collagen preparations that contained cell-sized polystyrene beads. From these results, along with prior information on effective surface tension differences of bead-containing and bead-lacking collagen matrices, we conclude that changes in matrix organization contributing to matrix-driven translocation are initiated during the lag phase of fibrillogenesis when the viscosity is < or = 0.1 Poise. The phenomenon may make use of small

  1. Implementing a Matrix-free Analytical Jacobian to Handle Nonlinearities in Models of 3D Lithospheric Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaus, B.; Popov, A.

    2015-12-01

    The analytical expression for the Jacobian is a key component to achieve fast and robust convergence of the nonlinear Newton-Raphson iterative solver. Accomplishing this task in practice often requires a significant algebraic effort. Therefore it is quite common to use a cheap alternative instead, for example by approximating the Jacobian with a finite difference estimation. Despite its simplicity it is a relatively fragile and unreliable technique that is sensitive to the scaling of the residual and unknowns, as well as to the perturbation parameter selection. Unfortunately no universal rule can be applied to provide both a robust scaling and a perturbation. The approach we use here is to derive the analytical Jacobian for the coupled set of momentum, mass, and energy conservation equations together with the elasto-visco-plastic rheology and a marker in cell/staggered finite difference method. The software project LaMEM (Lithosphere and Mantle Evolution Model) is primarily developed for the thermo-mechanically coupled modeling of the 3D lithospheric deformation. The code is based on a staggered grid finite difference discretization in space, and uses customized scalable solvers form PETSc library to efficiently run on the massively parallel machines (such as IBM Blue Gene/Q). Currently LaMEM relies on the Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) nonlinear solver, which approximates the Jacobian-vector product using a simple finite difference formula. This approach never requires an assembled Jacobian matrix and uses only the residual computation routine. We use an approximate Jacobian (Picard) matrix to precondition the Krylov solver with the Galerkin geometric multigrid. Because of the inherent problems of the finite difference Jacobian estimation, this approach doesn't always result in stable convergence. In this work we present and discuss a matrix-free technique in which the Jacobian-vector product is replaced by analytically-derived expressions and compare results

  2. Host-derived Loss of Dentin Matrix Stiffness Associated with Solubilization of Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Carrilho, Marcela R.; Tay, Franklin R.; Donnelly, Adam M.; Agee, Kelli A.; Tjäderhane, Leo; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Breschi, Lorenzo; Foulger, Stephen; Pashley, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) bound to dentin matrices are activated during adhesive bonding procedures and are thought to contribute to the progressive degradation of resin-dentin bonds over time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in mechanical, biochemical and structural properties of demineralized dentin treated with or without chlorhexidine (CHX), a known MMP-inhibitor. After demineralizing dentin beams in EDTA or phosphoric acid (PA), the baseline modulus of elasticity (E) of each beam was measured by 3-point flexure. Specimens were pretreated with water (control) or with 2% CHX (experimental) and then incubated in artificial saliva (AS) at 37°C for 4 weeks. The E of each specimen was remeasured weekly and, the media was analyzed for solubilized dentin collagen at first and fourth week of incubation. Some specimens were processed for electron microscopy (TEM) immediately after demineralization and after 4 weeks of incubation. In EDTA and PA-demineralized specimens, the E of the control specimens fell (p<0.05) after incubation in AS, while there were no changes in E in the CHX-pretreated specimens over time. More collagen was solubilized from PA-demineralized controls (p<0.05) than from EDTA-demineralized matrices after 1 or 4 weeks. Less collagen (p<0.05) was solubilized from CHX-pretreated specimens demineralized in EDTA compared to PA. TEM examination of control beams revealed that prolonged demineralization of dentin in 10% PA (12 h) did not denature the collagen fibrils. PMID:19090493

  3. The shed ectodomain of type XIII collagen affects cell behaviour in a matrix-dependent manner.

    PubMed Central

    Väisänen, Marja-Riitta; Väisänen, Timo; Pihlajaniemi, Taina

    2004-01-01

    Transmembrane type XIII collagen resides in adhesive structures of cells and tissues, and has therefore been implicated in cell adhesion and in adhesion-dependent cell functions. This collagen also exists as a soluble protein in the pericellular matrix, as the ectodomain is released from the plasma membrane by proteolytic cleavage. Analysis with various protease inhibitors led to confirmation of the furin family of proprotein convertases as the protease group responsible for the shedding of the ectodomain, cleaving at a site conforming to the consensus sequence for the proprotein convertases at the stem of the ectodomain. Both the trans -Golgi network and the plasma membrane were used as cleavage locations. Mammalian cells employed various intracellular mechanisms to modulate shedding of the ectodomain, all resulting in a similar cleavage event. Cell detachment from the underlying substratum was also found to augment the excision. The released ectodomain rendered the pericellular surroundings less supportive of cell adhesion, migration and proliferation, as seen specifically on a vitronectin substratum. Type XIII collagen ectodomain shedding thus resulted in the formation of a soluble, biologically active molecule, which eventually modulated cell behaviour in a reciprocal and substratum-specific manner. The dual existence of membrane-bound and soluble variants widens our biological understanding of type XIII collagen. PMID:15005656

  4. Osteoblasts extracellular matrix induces vessel like structures through glycosylated collagen I

    SciTech Connect

    Palmieri, D.; Valli, M.; Viglio, S.; Ferrari, N.; Ledda, B.; Volta, C.; Manduca, P.

    2010-03-10

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a fundamental role in angiogenesis affecting endothelial cells proliferation, migration and differentiation. Vessels-like network formation in vitro is a reliable test to study the inductive effects of ECM on angiogenesis. Here we utilized matrix deposed by osteoblasts as substrate where the molecular and structural complexity of the endogenous ECM is preserved, to test if it induces vessel-like network formation by endothelial cells in vitro. ECM is more similar to the physiological substrate in vivo than other substrates previously utilized for these studies in vitro. Osteogenic ECM, prepared in vitro from mature osteoblasts at the phase of maximal deposition and glycosylation of collagen I, induces EAhy926, HUVEC, and HDMEC endothelial cells to form vessels-like structures and promotes the activation of metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2); the functionality of the p-38/MAPK signaling pathway is required. Osteogenic ECM also induces a transient increase of CXCL12 and a decrease of the receptor CXCR4. The induction of vessel-like networks is dependent from proper glycosylation of collagens and does not occur on osteogenic ECMs if deglycosylated by -galactosidase or on less glycosylated ECMs derived from preosteoblasts and normal fibroblasts, while is sustained on ECM from osteogenesis imperfecta fibroblasts only when their mutation is associated with over-glycosylation of collagen type I. These data support that post-translational glycosylation has a role in the induction in endothelial cells in vitro of molecules conductive to self-organization in vessels-like structures.

  5. The endogenous fluorescence of fibroblast in collagen gels as indicator of stiffness of the extracellular matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Martinez, J. P.; Ortega-Martinez, A.; Franco, W.

    2016-03-01

    The stiffness or rigidity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cell response. Established mechanical tests to measure stiffness, such as indentation and tensile tests, are invasive and destructive to the sample. Endogenous or native molecules to cells and ECM components, like tryptophan and cross-links of collagen, display fluorescence upon irradiation with ultraviolet light. Most likely, the concentration of these endogenous fluorophores changes as the stiffness of the ECM changes. In this work we investigate the endogenous fluorescence of collagen gels containing fibroblasts as a non-invasive non-destructive method to measure stiffness of the ECM. Human fibroblast cells were cultured in three-dimensional gels of type I collagen (50,000 cells/ml). This construct is a simple model of tissue contraction. During contraction, changes in the excitation-emission matrix (a fluorescence map in the 240-520/290-530 nm range) of constructs were measured with a spectrofluoremeter, and changes in stiffness were measured with a standard indentation test over 16 days. Results show that a progressive increase in fluorescence of the 290/340 nm excitation-emission pair correlates with a progressive increase in stiffness (r=0.9, α=0.5). The fluorescence of this excitation-emission pair is ascribed to tryptophan and variations in the fluorescence of this pair correlate with cellular proliferation. In this tissue model, the endogenous functional fluorescence of proliferating fibroblast cells is a biomechanical marker of stiffness of the ECM.

  6. Enhanced osteoprogenitor elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by bioactive glass ionic silicon dependent on Sp7 (osterix) transcription.

    PubMed

    Varanasi, Venu G; Odatsu, Tetsurou; Bishop, Timothy; Chang, Joyce; Owyoung, Jeremy; Loomer, Peter M

    2016-10-01

    Bioactive glasses release ions, those enhance osteoblast collagen matrix synthesis and osteogenic marker expression during bone healing. Collagen matrix density and osteogenic marker expression depend on osteogenic transcription factors, (e.g., Osterix (OSX)). We hypothesize that enhanced expression and formation of collagen by Si(4+) depends on enhanced expression of OSX transcription. Experimental bioactive glass (6P53-b) and commercial Bioglass(TM) (45S5) were dissolved in basal medium to make glass conditioned medium (GCM). ICP-MS analysis was used to measure bioactive glass ion release rates. MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured for 20 days, and gene expression and extracellular matrix collagen formation was analyzed. In a separate study, siRNA was used to determine the effect of OSX knockdown on impacting the effect of Si(4+) on osteogenic markers and matrix collagen formation. Each bioactive glass exhibited similar ion release rates for all ions, except Mg(2+) released by 6P53-b. Gene expression results showed that GCM markedly enhanced many osteogenic markers, and 45S5 GCM showed higher levels of expression and collagen matrix fiber bundle density than 6P53-b GCM. Upon knockdown of OSX transcription, collagen type 5, alkaline phosphatase, and matrix density were not enhanced as compared to wild type cells. This study illustrates that the enhancement of elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by Si(±) depends on OSX transcription. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2604-2615, 2016. PMID:27279631

  7. Immobilization of a phosphonated analog of matrix phosphoproteins within cross-linked collagen as a templating mechanism for biomimetic mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Li-sha; Kim, Young Kyung; Liu, Yan; Takahashi, Kei; Arun, Senthil; Wimmer, Courtney E.; Osorio, Raquel; Ling, Jun-qi; Looney, Stephen W.; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2010-01-01

    Immobilization of phosphoproteins on a collagen matrix is important for induction of intrafibrillar apatite mineralization. Unlike phosphate esters, polyphosphonic acid has no reactive sites for covalent binding to collagen amine groups. Binding of polyvinylphosphonic acid (PVPA), a biomimetic templating analog of matrix phosphoproteins, to collagen was found to be electrostatic in nature. Thus, an alternative retention mechanism was designed for immobilization of PVPA to collagen by cross-linking the latter with carbodiimide (EDC). This mechanism is based on the principle of size exclusion entrapment of PVPA molecules within the internal water compartments of collagen. By cross-linking collagen with EDC, a zero-length cross-linking agent, the sieving property of collagen is increased, enabling the PVPA to be immobilized within the collagen. Absence of covalent cross-linking between PVPA and collagen was confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy. Based on these results, a concentration range for immobilized PVPA to template intrafibrillar apatite deposition was established and validated using a single-layer reconstituted type I collagen mineralization model. In the presence of a polyacrylic acid-containing mineralization medium, optimal intrafibrillar mineralization of the EDC-cross-linked collagen was achieved using 500 and 1,000 μg/mL PVPA. The mineralized fibrils exhibited a hierarchical order of intrafibrillar mineral infiltration, as manifested by the appearance of electron-dense periodicity within unstained fibrils. Understanding the basic processes in intrafibrillar mineralization of reconstituted collagen creates opportunities for the design of tissue engineering materials for hard tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:20688200

  8. Mutations in the collagen XII gene define a new form of extracellular matrix-related myopathy.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Debbie; Farsani, Golara Torabi; Laval, Steven; Collins, James; Sarkozy, Anna; Martoni, Elena; Shah, Ashoke; Zou, Yaqun; Koch, Manuel; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Roberts, Mark; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker

    2014-05-01

    Bethlem myopathy (BM) [MIM 158810] is a slowly progressive muscle disease characterized by contractures and proximal weakness, which can be caused by mutations in one of the collagen VI genes (COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3). However, there may be additional causal genes to identify as in ∼50% of BM cases no mutations in the COL6 genes are identified. In a cohort of -24 patients with a BM-like phenotype, we first sequenced 12 candidate genes based on their function, including genes for known binding partners of collagen VI, and those enzymes involved in its correct post-translational modification, assembly and secretion. Proceeding to whole-exome sequencing (WES), we identified mutations in the COL12A1 gene, a member of the FACIT collagens (fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices) in five individuals from two families. Both families showed dominant inheritance with a clinical phenotype resembling classical BM. Family 1 had a single-base substitution that led to the replacement of one glycine residue in the triple-helical domain, breaking the Gly-X-Y repeating pattern, and Family 2 had a missense mutation, which created a mutant protein with an unpaired cysteine residue. Abnormality at the protein level was confirmed in both families by the intracellular retention of collagen XII in patient dermal fibroblasts. The mutation in Family 2 leads to the up-regulation of genes associated with the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway and swollen, dysmorphic rough-ER. We conclude that the spectrum of causative genes in extracellular matrix (ECM)-related myopathies be extended to include COL12A1. PMID:24334769

  9. Collagen VI regulates pericellular matrix properties, chondrocyte swelling, and mechanotransduction in articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Zelenski, Nicole A.; Leddy, Holly A.; Sanchez-Adams, Johannah; Zhang, Jinzi; Bonaldo, Paolo; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Guilak, Farshid

    2015-01-01

    Objective Mechanical factors play a critical role in the physiology and pathology of articular cartilage, although the mechanisms of mechanical signal transduction are not fully understood. We examined the hypothesis that type VI collagen is necessary for mechanotransduction in articular cartilage, by determining the effects of type VI collagen knockout on the activation of the mechano-osmosensitive calcium-permeable channel, transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), osmotically-induced chondrocyte swelling, and pericellular matrix (PCM) mechanical properties. Methods Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to image TRPV4-mediated calcium signaling and osmotically-induced cell swelling in intact femora from 2 and 9 month old wild type (WT) and type VI collagen deficient (Col6a1−/−) mice. Immunofluorescence-guided atomic force microscopy was used to map PCM mechanical properties based on the presence of perlecan. Results Hypo-osmotic stress induced TRPV4-mediated calcium signaling was increased in Col6a1−/− mice relative to WT controls at 2 months. Col6a1−/− mice exhibited significantly increased osmotically-induced cell swelling and decreased PCM moduli relative to WT controls at both ages. Conclusion In contrast to our original hypothesis, type VI collagen was not required for TRPV4-mediated Ca2+ signaling; however, knockout of type VI collagen altered the mechanical properties of the PCM, which in turn increased the extent of cell swelling and osmotically-induced TRPV4 signaling in an age-dependent manner. These findings emphasize the role of the PCM as a transducer of mechanical and physicochemical signals, and suggest that alterations in PCM properties, as may occur with aging or osteoarthritis, can influence mechanotransduction via TRPV4 or other ion channels. PMID:25604429

  10. Fabrication of fibrillized collagen microspheres with the microstructure resembling an extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Matsuhashi, Aki; Nam, Kwangwoo; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Kishida, Akio

    2015-04-14

    Microspheres using artificial or natural materials have been widely applied in the field of tissue engineering and drug delivery systems. Collagen is being widely used for microspheres because of its abundancy in the extracellular matrix (ECM), and its good biocompatibility. The purpose of this study is to establish the appropriate condition for preparing collagen microspheres (CMS) and fibrillized collagen microspheres (fCMS) using water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion. Collagen can be tailored to mimic the native cell environment possessing a similar microstructure to that of the ECM by conditioning the aqueous solution. We focused on the preparation of stable and injectable CMS and fCMS which is stable and would promote the healing response. Controlling the interfacial properties of hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB), we obtained CMS and fCMS with various sizes and various morphologies. The microsphere prepared with wetting agents showed good microsphere formation, but too low or too high HLB value caused low yield and uncontrollable size distribution. The change in the surfactant amount and the rotor speed also affected the formation of the CMS and fCMS, where the low surfactant amount and fast rotor speed produced smaller CMS and fCMS. In the case of fCMS, the presence of NaCl made it possible to prepare stable fCMS without using any cross-linker due to fibrillogenesis and gelling of collagen molecules. The microstructure of fCMS was similar to that of the native tissue indicating that the fCMS would replicate its function in vivo.

  11. Schur-decomposition for 3D matrix equations and its application in solving radiative discrete ordinates equations discretized by Chebyshev collocation spectral method

    SciTech Connect

    Li Benwen Tian Shuai; Sun Yasong; Hu, Zhang-Mao

    2010-02-20

    The Schur-decomposition for three-dimensional matrix equations is developed and used to directly solve the radiative discrete ordinates equations which are discretized by Chebyshev collocation spectral method. Three methods, say, the spectral methods based on 2D and 3D matrix equation solvers individually, and the standard discrete ordinates method, are presented. The numerical results show the good accuracy of spectral method based on direct solvers. The CPU time cost comparisons against the resolutions between these three methods are made using MATLAB and FORTRAN 95 computer languages separately. The results show that the CPU time cost of Chebyshev collocation spectral method with 3D Schur-decomposition solver is the least, and almost only one thirtieth to one fiftieth CPU time is needed when using the spectral method with 3D Schur-decomposition solver compared with the standard discrete ordinates method.

  12. Elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with collagen microfibers for soft tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Caves, Jeffrey M; Cui, Wanxing; Wen, Jing; Kumar, Vivek A; Haller, Carolyn A; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2011-08-01

    Artificial composites designed to mimic the structure and properties of native extracellular matrix may lead to acellular materials for soft tissue repair and replacement, which display mechanical strength, stiffness, and resilience resembling native tissue. We describe the fabrication of thin lamellae consisting of continuous collagen microfiber embedded at controlled orientations and densities in a recombinant elastin-like protein polymer matrix. Multilamellar stacking affords flexible, protein-based composite sheets whose properties are dependent upon both the elastomeric matrix and collagen content and organization. Sheets are produced with properties that range over 13-fold in elongation to break (23-314%), six-fold in Young's modulus (5.3-33.1 MPa), and more than two-fold in tensile strength (1.85-4.08 MPa), exceeding that of a number of native human tissues, including urinary bladder, pulmonary artery, and aorta. A sheet approximating the mechanical response of human abdominal wall fascia is investigated as a fascial substitute for ventral hernia repair. Protein-based composite patches prevent hernia recurrence in Wistar rats over an 8-week period with new tissue formation and sustained structural integrity. PMID:21550111

  13. Elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with collagen microfibers for soft tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Caves, Jeffrey M.; Cui, Wanxing; Wen, Jing; Kumar, Vivek A.; Haller, Carolyn A.; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2011-01-01

    Artificial composites designed to mimic the structure and properties of native extracellular matrix may lead to acellular materials for soft tissue repair and replacement, which display mechanical strength, stiffness, and resilience resembling native tissue. We describe the fabrication of thin lamellae consisting of continuous collagen microfiber embedded at controlled orientations and densities in a recombinant elastin-like protein polymer matrix. Multilamellar stacking affords flexible, protein-based composite sheets whose properties are dependent upon both the elastomeric matrix and collagen content and organization. Sheets are produced with properties that range over 13-fold in elongation to break (23 – 314%), six-fold in Young’s modulus (5.3 to 33.1 MPa), and more than two-fold in tensile strength (1.85 to 4.08 MPa), exceeding that of a number of native human tissues, including urinary bladder, pulmonary artery, and aorta. A sheet approximating the mechanical response of human abdominal wall fascia is investigated as a fascial substitute for ventral hernia repair. Protein-based composite patches prevent hernia recurrence in Wistar rats over an 8-week period with new tissue formation and sustained structural integrity. PMID:21550111

  14. A microfluidic device for 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D cell navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamloo, Amir; Amirifar, Leyla

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices have received wide attention and shown great potential in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Investigating cell response to various stimulations is much more accurate and comprehensive with the aid of microfluidic devices. In this study, we introduced a microfluidic device by which the matrix density as a mechanical property and the concentration profile of a biochemical factor as a chemical property could be altered. Our microfluidic device has a cell tank and a cell culture chamber to mimic both 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D migration of three types of cells. Fluid shear stress is negligible on the cells and a stable concentration gradient can be obtained by diffusion. The device was designed by a numerical simulation so that the uniformity of the concentration gradients throughout the cell culture chamber was obtained. Adult neural cells were cultured within this device and they showed different branching and axonal navigation phenotypes within varying nerve growth factor (NGF) concentration profiles. Neural stem cells were also cultured within varying collagen matrix densities while exposed to NGF concentrations and they experienced 3D to 3D collective migration. By generating vascular endothelial growth factor concentration gradients, adult human dermal microvascular endothelial cells also migrated in a 2D to 3D manner and formed a stable lumen within a specific collagen matrix density. It was observed that a minimum absolute concentration and concentration gradient were required to stimulate migration of all types of the cells. This device has the advantage of changing multiple parameters simultaneously and is expected to have wide applicability in cell studies.

  15. Freeze-thaw induced biomechanical changes in arteries: role of collagen matrix and smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Venkatasubramanian, Ramji T; Wolkers, Wim F; Shenoi, Mithun M; Barocas, Victor H; Lafontaine, Daniel; Soule, Charles L; Iaizzo, Paul A; Bischof, John C

    2010-03-01

    Applications involving freeze-thaw, such as cryoplasty or cryopreservation can significantly alter artery biomechanics including an increase in physiological elastic modulus. Since artery biomechanics plays a significant role in hemodynamics, it is important to understand the mechanisms underlying these changes to be able to help control the biomechanical outcome post-treatments. Understanding of these mechanisms requires investigation of the freeze-thaw effect on arterial components (collagen, smooth muscle cells or SMCs), as well as the components' contribution to the overall artery biomechanics. To do this, isolated fresh swine arteries were subjected to thermal (freeze-thaw to -20 degrees C for 2 min or hyperthermia to 43 degrees C for 2 h) and osmotic (0.1-0.2 M mannitol) treatments; these treatments preferentially altered either the collagen matrix (hydration/stability) or smooth muscle cells (SMCs), respectively. Tissue dehydration, thermal stability and SMC functional changes were assessed from bulk weight measurements, analyses of the thermal denaturation profiles using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and in vitro arterial contraction/relaxation responses to norepinephrine (NE) and acetylcholine (AC), respectively. Additionally, Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy was performed on fresh and frozen-thawed arteries to directly visualize the changes in collagen matrix following freeze-thaw. Finally, the overall artery biomechanics was studied by assessing responses to uniaxial tensile testing. Freeze-thaw of arteries caused: (a) tissue dehydration (15% weight reduction), (b) increase in thermal stability (approximately 6.4 degrees C increase in denaturation onset temperature), (c) altered matrix arrangement observed using SHG and d) complete SMC destruction. While hyperthermia treatment also caused complete SMC destruction, no tissue dehydration was observed. On the other hand, while 0.2 M mannitol treatment significantly increased the

  16. Influence of fibril taper on the function of collagen to reinforce extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Goh, K L; Meakin, J R; Aspden, R M; Hukins, D W L

    2005-09-22

    Collagen fibrils provide tensile reinforcement for extracellular matrix. In at least some tissues, the fibrils have a paraboloidal taper at their ends. The purpose of this paper is to determine the implications of this taper for the function of collagen fibrils. When a tissue is subjected to low mechanical forces, stress will be transferred to the fibrils elastically. This process was modelled using finite element analysis because there is no analytical theory for elastic stress transfer to a non-cylindrical fibril. When the tissue is subjected to higher mechanical forces, stress will be transferred plastically. This process was modelled analytically. For both elastic and plastic stress transfer, a paraboloidal taper leads to a more uniform distribution of axial tensile stress along the fibril than would be generated if it were cylindrical. The tapered fibril requires half the volume of collagen than a cylindrical fibril of the same length and the stress is shared more evenly along its length. It is also less likely to fracture than a cylindrical fibril of the same length in a tissue subjected to the same mechanical force.

  17. Libby amphibole-induced mesothelial cell autoantibodies bind to surface plasminogen and alter collagen matrix remodeling.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Robert; Evilia, Caryn; Gilmer, John; Woods, Linda; Black, Brad; Flores, Raja; Pfau, Jean C

    2016-08-01

    Lamellar pleural thickening (LPT) is a fibrotic disease induced by exposure to Libby amphibole (LA) asbestos that causes widespread scarring around the lung, resulting in deterioration of pulmonary function. Investigating the effects of autoantibodies to mesothelial cells (MCAA) present in the study populations has been a major part of the effort to understand the mechanism of pathogenesis. It has been shown in vitro that human mesothelial cells (Met5a) exposed to MCAA increase collagen deposition into the extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we sought to further elucidate how MCAA drive increased collagen deposition by identifying the protein targets bound by MCAA on the cellular surface using biotinylation to label and isolate surface proteins. Isolated surface protein fractions were identified as containing MCAA targets using ELISA The fractions that demonstrated binding by MCAA were then analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and MASCOT analysis. The most promising result from the MASCOT analysis, plasminogen (PLG), was tested for MCAA binding using purified human PLG in an ELISA We report that serum containing MCAA bound at an optical density (OD) 3 times greater than that of controls, and LA-exposed subjects had a high frequency of positive tests for anti-PLG autoantibodies. This work implicates the involvement of the plasminogen/plasmin system in the mechanism of excess collagen deposition in Met5a cells exposed to MCAA Elucidating this mechanism could contribute to the understanding of LPT. PMID:27519611

  18. Probing the 3-D Structure, Dynamics, and Stability of Bacterial Collagenase Collagen Binding Domain (apo- versus holo-) by Limited Proteolysis MALDI-TOF MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sides, Cynthia R.; Liyanage, Rohana; Lay, Jackson O.; Philominathan, Sagaya Theresa Leena; Matsushita, Osamu; Sakon, Joshua

    2012-03-01

    Pairing limited proteolysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to probe clostridial collagenase collagen binding domain (CBD) reveals the solution dynamics and stability of the protein, as these factors are crucial to CBD effectiveness as a drug-delivery vehicle. MS analysis of proteolytic digests indicates initial cleavage sites, thereby specifying the less stable and highly accessible regions of CBD. Modulation of protein structure and stability upon metal binding is shown through MS analysis of calcium-bound and cobalt-bound CBD proteolytic digests. Previously determined X-ray crystal structures illustrate that calcium binding induces secondary structure transformation in the highly mobile N-terminal arm and increases protein stability. MS-based detection of exposed residues confirms protein flexibility, accentuates N-terminal dynamics, and demonstrates increased global protein stability exported by calcium binding. Additionally, apo- and calcium-bound CBD proteolysis sites correlate well with crystallographic B-factors, accessibility, and enzyme specificity. MS-observed cleavage sites with no clear correlations are explained either by crystal contacts of the X-ray crystal structures or by observed differences between Molecules A and B in the X-ray crystal structures. The study newly reveals the absence of the βA strand and thus the very dynamic N-terminal linker, as corroborated by the solution X-ray scattering results. Cobalt binding has a regional effect on the solution phase stability of CBD, as limited proteolysis data implies the capture of an intermediate-CBD solution structure when cobalt is bound.

  19. Matrix Cracking in 3D Orthogonal Melt-Infiltrated SiC/SiC Composites with Various Z-Fiber Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Yun, Hee Mann; DiCarlo, James A.

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of matrix cracks in melt-infiltrated SiC/SiC composites with a 3D orthogonal architecture was determined at room temperature for specimens tested in tension oriented in the X-direction (parallel to Z-bundle weave direction) and Y-direction (perpendicular to Z-bundle weave direction) and Y-direction (perpendicular to Z-bundle weave direction). The fiber-types were Sylramic and Sylramic-IBN in the X and Y-directions and lower modulus ZMI, T300, and rayon in the Z-direction. Acoustic emission (AE) was used to monitor the matrix cracking activity. For Y-direction composites, the AE data was used to determine the exact (+/- 0.25 mm) location where matrix cracks occurred in the 3D orthogonal architecture. This enabled the determination of the stress-dependent matrix crack distributions for small but repeatable matrix rich 'unidirectional' and the matrix poor 'cross-ply' regions within the architecture. It was found that matrix cracking initiated at very low stresses (approx. 40 MPa) in the 'unidirectional' regions for the largest z-direction fiber tow composites. Decreasing the size of the z-fiber bundle, increased the stress for matrix cracking in the 'unidirectional' regions. Matrix cracking in the 'cross-ply' regions always occurred at higher stresses than in 'unidirectional' regions, and the stress-dependent matrix crack distribution of the 'cross-ply' regions was always over a wider stress-range than the 'unidirectional' regions. For composites tested in the X-direction, a lower elastic modulus and a narrower and lower stress-range for matrix cracking were observed compared to composites tested in the Y-direction.

  20. Objective Assessment and Design Improvement of a Staring, Sparse Transducer Array by the Spatial Crosstalk Matrix for 3D Photoacoustic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kosik, Ivan; Raess, Avery

    2015-01-01

    Accurate reconstruction of 3D photoacoustic (PA) images requires detection of photoacoustic signals from many angles. Several groups have adopted staring ultrasound arrays, but assessment of array performance has been limited. We previously reported on a method to calibrate a 3D PA tomography (PAT) staring array system and analyze system performance using singular value decomposition (SVD). The developed SVD metric, however, was impractical for large system matrices, which are typical of 3D PAT problems. The present study consisted of two main objectives. The first objective aimed to introduce the crosstalk matrix concept to the field of PAT for system design. Figures-of-merit utilized in this study were root mean square error, peak signal-to-noise ratio, mean absolute error, and a three dimensional structural similarity index, which were derived between the normalized spatial crosstalk matrix and the identity matrix. The applicability of this approach for 3D PAT was validated by observing the response of the figures-of-merit in relation to well-understood PAT sampling characteristics (i.e. spatial and temporal sampling rate). The second objective aimed to utilize the figures-of-merit to characterize and improve the performance of a near-spherical staring array design. Transducer arrangement, array radius, and array angular coverage were the design parameters examined. We observed that the performance of a 129-element staring transducer array for 3D PAT could be improved by selection of optimal values of the design parameters. The results suggested that this formulation could be used to objectively characterize 3D PAT system performance and would enable the development of efficient strategies for system design optimization. PMID:25875177

  1. Endothelial Cell Culture on Fibrillar Collagen: Model to Study Platelet Adhesion and Liposome Targeting to Intercellular Collagen Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazov, E. I.; Alexeev, A. V.; Antonov, A. S.; Koteliansky, V. E.; Leytin, V. L.; Lyubimova, E. V.; Repin, V. S.; Sviridov, D. D.; Torchilin, V. P.; Smirnov, V. N.

    1981-09-01

    Human umbilical endothelial cells (ECs) were grown on fibrillar type I collagen in 16.4-mm multiwell tissue culture plates. Human platelets were added to the wells, and platelet adhesion to collagen was examined by scanning electron microscopy and radioisotopic technique in the absence of ECs and in preconfluent and confluent EC cultures. Single adherent platelets of different shapes as well as small aggregates were seen on collagen surface. Human plasma fibronectin added to the system stimulated platelet adhesion and their spreading on collagen. ECs had no effect on the percentage of platelets adherent to collagen-coated gaps in preconfluent culture but decreased the number of spread platelets. It is demonstrated that collagen-coated gaps can bind 14C-labeled liposome-antibody and 14C-labeled liposome-fibronectin conjugates. ECs grown on fibrillar collagen are suggested as useful models for screening of antiplatelet drugs and for the study of drug targeting to the areas of vascular injury for prevention of thrombosis.

  2. Human Lung Cancer Cells Grown in an Ex Vivo 3D Lung Model Produce Matrix Metalloproteinases Not Produced in 2D Culture

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Dhruva K.; Sakamoto, Jason H.; Thrall, Michael J.; Baird, Brandi N.; Blackmon, Shanda H.; Ferrari, Mauro; Kurie, Jonathan M.; Kim, Min P.

    2012-01-01

    We compared the growth of human lung cancer cells in an ex vivo three-dimensional (3D) lung model and 2D culture to determine which better mimics lung cancer growth in patients. A549 cells were grown in an ex vivo 3D lung model and in 2D culture for 15 days. We measured the size and formation of tumor nodules and counted the cells after 15 days. We also stained the tissue/cells for Ki-67, and Caspase-3. We measured matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) levels in the conditioned media and in blood plasma from patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung. Organized tumor nodules with intact vascular space formed in the ex vivo 3D lung model but not in 2D culture. Proliferation and apoptosis were greater in the ex vivo 3D lung model compared to the 2D culture. After 15 days, there were significantly more cells in the 2D culture than the 3D model. MMP-1, MMP-9, and MMP-10 production were significantly greater in the ex vivo 3D lung model. There was no production of MMP-9 in the 2D culture. The patient samples contained MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, and MMP-10. The human lung cancer cells grown on ex vivo 3D model form perfusable nodules that grow over time. It also produced MMPs that were not produced in 2D culture but seen in human lung cancer patients. The ex vivo 3D lung model may more closely mimic the biology of human lung cancer development than the 2D culture. PMID:23028922

  3. Fast and efficient fully 3D PET image reconstruction using sparse system matrix factorization with GPU acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian; Qi, Jinyi

    2011-10-01

    Statistically based iterative image reconstruction has been widely used in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The quality of reconstructed images depends on the accuracy of the system matrix that defines the mapping from the image space to the data space. However, an accurate system matrix is often associated with high computation cost and huge storage requirement. In this paper, we present a method to address this problem using sparse matrix factorization and graphics processor unit (GPU) acceleration. We factor the accurate system matrix into three highly sparse matrices: a sinogram blurring matrix, a geometric projection matrix and an image blurring matrix. The geometrical projection matrix is precomputed based on a simple line integral model, while the sinogram and image blurring matrices are estimated from point-source measurements. The resulting factored system matrix has far less nonzero elements than the original system matrix, which substantially reduces the storage and computation cost. The smaller matrix size also allows an efficient implementation of the forward and backward projectors on a GPU, which often has a limited memory space. Our experimental studies show that the proposed method can dramatically reduce the computation cost of high-resolution iterative image reconstruction, while achieving better performance than existing factorization methods.

  4. Type VII collagen regulates expression of OATP1B3, promotes front-to-rear polarity and increases structural organisation in 3D spheroid cultures of RDEB tumour keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Dayal, Jasbani H S; Cole, Clare L; Pourreyron, Celine; Watt, Stephen A; Lim, Yok Zuan; Salas-Alanis, Julio C; Murrell, Dedee F; McGrath, John A; Stieger, Bruno; Jahoda, Colin; Leigh, Irene M; South, Andrew P

    2014-02-15

    Type VII collagen is the main component of anchoring fibrils, structures that are integral to basement membrane homeostasis in skin. Mutations in the gene encoding type VII collagen COL7A1 cause recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) an inherited skin blistering condition complicated by frequent aggressive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). OATP1B3, which is encoded by the gene SLCO1B3, is a member of the OATP (organic anion transporting polypeptide) superfamily responsible for transporting a wide range of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds. OATP1B3 expression is limited to the liver in healthy tissues, but is frequently detected in multiple cancer types and is reported to be associated with differing clinical outcome. The mechanism and functional significance of tumour-specific expression of OATP1B3 has yet to be determined. Here, we identify SLCO1B3 expression in tumour keratinocytes isolated from RDEB and UV-induced cSCC and demonstrate that SLCO1B3 expression and promoter activity are modulated by type VII collagen. We show that reduction of SLCO1B3 expression upon expression of full-length type VII collagen in RDEB cSCC coincides with acquisition of front-to-rear polarity and increased organisation of 3D spheroid cultures. In addition, we show that type VII collagen positively regulates the abundance of markers implicated in cellular polarity, namely ELMO2, PAR3, E-cadherin, B-catenin, ITGA6 and Ln332. PMID:24357722

  5. Raman microspectroscopy: a noninvasive analysis tool for monitoring of collagen-containing extracellular matrix formation in a medium-throughput culture system.

    PubMed

    Kunstar, Aliz; Otto, Cees; Karperien, Marcel; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; van Apeldoorn, Aart

    2011-07-01

    The three-dimensional environment is known to play an important role in promoting cell-matrix interactions. We have investigated the possibility of using Raman microspectroscopy--which has the great advantage of noninvasive sensing--for in vitro monitoring of extracellular matrix (ECM) formation in a medium-throughput pellet (3D) culture system with soft-litography, agarose-microwell arrays. Chondrocytes were seeded in the agarose microwells in basic or chondrocyte medium. After 3, 7, and 14 days of culture, samples were analyzed for ECM formation by Raman microspectroscopy, histology, and immunofluorescence. ECM formation in the chondrocyte medium-cultured samples was detected by histology and immunofluorescence, and also noninvasively by Raman microspectroscopy. The Raman band of collagen found at 937 cm(-1) can be used as a Raman marker for collagen-containing ECM formation over time in the chondrocyte pellets. This culture system can be implemented as a medium-throughput platform for Raman applications and screening microtissue formation, since with these agarose-microwell arrays relatively large numbers of cell pellets could be screened in a short time in situ, without having to transfer the pellets onto microscopic slides. Moreover, in this manner the culture system is suitable for long-term, real-time live-cell measurements. PMID:21410304

  6. Non-enzymatic glycosylation of a type I collagen matrix: effects on osteoblastic development and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Antonio D; Etcheverry, Susana B; Bruzzone, Liliana; Lettieri, Gabriela; Barrio, Daniel A; Cortizo, Ana M

    2001-01-01

    Background The tissue accumulation of protein-bound advanced glycation endproducts (AGE) may be involved in the etiology of diabetic chronic complications, including osteopenia. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an AGE-modified type I collagen substratum on the adhesion, spreading, proliferation and differentiation of rat osteosarcoma UMR106 and mouse non-transformed MC3T3E1 osteoblastic cells. We also studied the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression on these AGE-collagen mediated effects. Results AGE-collagen decreased the adhesion of UMR106 cells, but had no effect on the attachment of MC3T3E1 cells. In the UMR106 cell line, AGE-collagen also inhibited cellular proliferation, spreading and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. In preosteoblastic MC3T3E1 cells (24-hour culture), proliferation and spreading were significantly increased by AGE-collagen. After one week of culture (differentiated MC3T3E1 osteoblasts) AGE-collagen inhibited ALP activity, but had no effect on cell number. In mineralizing MC3T3E1 cells (3-week culture) AGE-collagen induced a decrease in the number of surviving cells and of extracellular nodules of mineralization, without modifying their ALP activity. Intracellular ROS production, measured after a 48-hour culture, was decreased by AGE-collagen in MC3T3E1 cells, but was increased by AGE-collagen in UMR106 cells. After a 24-hour culture, AGE-collagen increased the expression of endothelial and inducible NOS, in both osteoblastic cell lines. Conclusions These results suggest that the accumulation of AGE on bone extracellular matrix could regulate the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic cells. These effects appear to depend on the stage of osteoblastic development, and possibly involve the modulation of NOS expression and intracellular ROS pathways. PMID:11518540

  7. Location of type XV collagen in human tissues and its accumulation in the interstitial matrix of the fibrotic kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Hägg, P. M.; Hägg, P. O.; Peltonen, S.; Autio-Harmainen, H.; Pihlajaniemi, T.

    1997-01-01

    An antipeptide antibody was produced against the carboxyl-terminal noncollagenous domain of human type XV collagen and used to localize this recently described collagen in a number of human tissues. The most conspicuous findings were powerful staining of most of the capillaries and staining of the basement membrane (BM) zones of muscle cells. Not all of the BM zones were positive, however, as shown by the lack of staining in the developing fetal alveoli and some of the tubules in developing kidney. Nor was type XV collagen staining restricted to the BM zones, as some could be observed in the fibrillar collagen matrix of the papillary dermis and placental villi, for example. Interestingly, differences in the expression of type XV collagen could be observed during kidney development, and staining of fetal lung tissue suggested that changes in its expression may also occur during the formation of vascular structures. Another intriguing finding was pronounced renal interstitial type XV collagen staining in patients with kidney fibrosis due to different pathological processes. This suggests that the accumulation of type XV collagen may accompany fibrotic processes. Full-length human type XV collagen chains with an apparent molecular mass of approximately 200 kd were produced in insect cells using a baculovirus expression system. The fact that these had a markedly higher molecular mass than the 100- to 110-kd type XV collagen chains found in homogenates of heart and kidney tissue suggests either proteolytic processing during the synthesis of type XV collagen or an inability to solubilize complete molecules from tissues. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9176399

  8. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy to Quantify Collagen and Elastin in an In Vitro Model of Extracellular Matrix Degradation in Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Cheheltani, Rabee; McGoverin, Cushla M.; Rao, Jayashree; Vorp, David A.; Kiani, Mohammad F.; Pleshko, N.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key component and regulator of many biological tissues including aorta. Several aortic pathologies are associated with significant changes in the composition of the matrix, especially in the content, quality and type of aortic structural proteins, collagen and elastin. The purpose of this study was to develop an infrared spectroscopic methodology that is comparable to biochemical assays to quantify collagen and elastin in aorta. Enzymatically degraded porcine aorta samples were used as a model of ECM degradation in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). After enzymatic treatment, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of the aortic tissue were acquired by an infrared fiber optic probe (IFOP) and FTIR imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS). Collagen and elastin content were quantified biochemically and partial least squares (PLS) models were developed to predict collagen and elastin content in aorta based on FTIR spectra. PLS models developed from FT-IRIS spectra were able to predict elastin and collagen content of the samples with strong correlations (RMSE of validation = 8.4% and 11.1% of the range respectively), and IFOP spectra were successfully used to predict elastin content (RMSE = 11.3% of the range). The PLS regression coefficients from the FT-IRIS models were used to map collagen and elastin in tissue sections of degraded porcine aortic tissue as well as a human AAA biopsy tissue, creating a similar map of each component compared to histology. These results support further application of FTIR spectroscopic techniques for evaluation of AAA tissues. PMID:24761431

  9. In situ cell-matrix mechanics in tendon fascicles and seeded collagen gels: implications for the multiscale design of biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Neil A; Bruehlmann, Sabina B; Hunter, Christopher J; Shao, Xinxin; Kelly, Elizabeth J

    2014-01-01

    Designing biomaterials to mimic and function within the complex mechanobiological conditions of connective tissues requires a detailed understanding of the micromechanical environment of the cell. The objective of our study was to measure the in situ cell-matrix strains from applied tension in both tendon fascicles and cell-seeded type I collagen scaffolds using laser scanning confocal microscopy techniques. Tendon fascicles and collagen gels were fluorescently labelled to simultaneously visualise the extracellular matrix and cell nuclei under applied tensile strains of 5%. There were significant differences observed in the micromechanics at the cell-matrix scale suggesting that the type I collagen scaffold did not replicate the pattern of native tendon strains. In particular, although the overall in situ tensile strains in the matrix were quite similar (∼2.5%) between the tendon fascicles and the collagen scaffolds, there were significant differences at the cell-matrix boundary with visible shear across cell nuclei of >1 μm measured in native tendon which was not observed at all in the collagen scaffolds. Similarly, there was significant non-uniformity of intercellular strains with relative sliding observed between cell rows in tendon which again was not observed in the collagen scaffolds where the strain environment was much more uniform. If the native micromechanical environment is not replicated in biomaterial scaffolds, then the cells may receive incorrect or mixed mechanical signals which could affect their biosynthetic response to mechanical load in tissue engineering applications. This study highlights the importance of considering the microscale mechanics in the design of biomaterial scaffolds and the need to incorporate such features in computational models of connective tissues.

  10. Inorganic-Organic Nanocomposite Assembly Using Collagen as Template and Sodium Tripolyphosphate as A Biomimetic Analog of Matrix Phosphoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Lin; Qi, Yi-Pin; Niu, Li-Na; Liu, Yan; Pucci, Cesar R.; Looney, Stephen W.; Ling, Jun-Qi; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2011-01-01

    Nanocomposites created with polycarboxylic acid alone as a stabilization agent for prenucleation clusters-derived amorphous calcium phosphate exhibit non-periodic apatite deposition. In the present study, we report the use of inorganic polyphosphate as a biomimetic analog of matrix phosphoprotein for directing polyacrylic acid-stabilized amorphous nanoprecursor phases to assemble into periodic apatite-collagen nanocomposites. The sorption and desorption characteristics of sodium tripolyphosphate to type I collagen was examined. Periodic nanocomposite assembly with collagen as a template was demonstrated with TEM and SEM using a Portland cement-based resin composite and a phosphate-containing simulated body fluid. Apatite was detected within the collagen at 24 hours and became more distinct at 48 hours, with prenucleation clusters attaching to the collagen fibril surface during the initial infiltration stage. Apatite-collagen nanocomposites at 72 hours were heavily mineralized with periodically-arranged intrafibrillar apatite platelets. Defect-containing nanocomposites caused by desorption of TPP from collagen fibrils were observed in regions lacking the inorganic phase. PMID:21857797

  11. Microenvironment complexity and matrix stiffness regulate breast cancer cell activity in a 3D in vitro model

    PubMed Central

    Cavo, Marta; Fato, Marco; Peñuela, Leonardo; Beltrame, Francesco; Raiteri, Roberto; Scaglione, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures represent fundamental tools for the comprehension of cellular phenomena both in normal and in pathological conditions. In particular, mechanical and chemical stimuli play a relevant role on cell fate, cancer onset and malignant evolution. Here, we use mechanically-tuned alginate hydrogels to study the role of substrate elasticity on breast adenocarcinoma cell activity. The hydrogel elastic modulus (E) was measured via atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a remarkable range (150–4000 kPa) was obtained. A breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, was seeded within the 3D gels, on standard Petri and alginate-coated dishes (2D controls). Cells showed dramatic morphological differences when cultured in 3D versus 2D, exhibiting a flat shape in both 2D conditions, while maintaining a circular, spheroid-organized (cluster) conformation within the gels, similar to those in vivo. Moreover, we observed a strict correlation between cell viability and substrate elasticity; in particular, the number of MCF-7 cells decreased constantly with increasing hydrogel elasticity. Remarkably, the highest cellular proliferation rate, associated with the formation of cell clusters, occurred at two weeks only in the softest hydrogels (E = 150–200 kPa), highlighting the need to adopt more realistic and a priori defined models for in vitro cancer studies. PMID:27734939

  12. ¹³C NMR-distance matrix descriptors: optimal abstract 3D space granularity for predicting estrogen binding.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Svetoslav H; Geesaman, Elizabeth L; Pearce, Bruce A; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Buzatu, Dan A; Wilkes, Jon G; Beger, Richard D

    2012-07-23

    An improved three-dimensional quantitative spectral data-activity relationship (3D-QSDAR) methodology was used to build and validate models relating the activity of 130 estrogen receptor binders to specific structural features. In 3D-QSDAR, each compound is represented by a unique fingerprint constructed from (13)C chemical shift pairs and associated interatomic distances. Grids of different granularity can be used to partition the abstract fingerprint space into congruent "bins" for which the optimal size was previously unexplored. For this purpose, the endocrine disruptor knowledge base data were used to generate 50 3D-QSDAR models with bins ranging in size from 2 ppm × 2 ppm × 0.5 Å to 20 ppm × 20 ppm × 2.5 Å, each of which was validated using 100 training/test set partitions. Best average predictivity in terms of R(2)test was achieved at 10 ppm ×10 ppm × Z Å (Z = 0.5, ..., 2.5 Å). It was hypothesized that this optimum depends on the chemical shifts' estimation error (±4.13 ppm) and the precision of the calculated interatomic distances. The highest ranked bins from partial least-squares weights were found to be associated with structural features known to be essential for binding to the estrogen receptor.

  13. Modification of collagen-chitosan matrix by the natural crosslinker alginate dialdehyde.

    PubMed

    Du, Tianming; Chen, Zihao; Li, Hao; Tang, Xiangyu; Li, Zhihong; Guan, Jing; Liu, Changjun; Du, Zhenjie; Wu, Jimin

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, collagen (Coll) was mixed with the natural crosslinker chitosan (CTS), and then, alginate dialdehyde (ADA) was added to crosslink the mixtures. The properties of these Coll matrix sponges were investigated afterwards. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis and in vitro fiber formation analysis showed the intact retention of the classical triple-helical structure after crosslinking. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that microfibril structural interactions between Coll structures became more compact. Significant improvement in the thermostability of the crosslinked mixtures was observed with the pure mixtures of Coll and CTS. Antibacterial activity measurements indicated no affect of ADA on Coll/CTS sponges. In conclusion, the modification of the Coll/CTS mixtures with ADA preserves the classical triple-helical structure, enhances stabilization, maintains good biocompatibility and may pave the way for new medical applications.

  14. Development and Characterization of a Collagen-Based Matrix for Vascularization and Cell Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Cara E.; Ellis, Laura K.; Korbutt, Ryan S.; Suuronen, Erik J.; Korbutt, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Since the development of the Edmonton protocol, islet transplantation is increasingly encouraging as a treatment for type 1 diabetes. Strategies to ameliorate problems with the intraportal site include macroencapsulating the islets in diverse biomaterials. Characterization of these biomaterials is important to optimally tune the properties to support islets and promote vascularization. In this study, we characterize the cross-linker-dependent properties of collagen-based matrices containing chondroitin-6-sulfate, chitosan, and laminin, cross-linked with 7.5, 30, or 120 mM of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide. The swelling ratio was found to be significantly negatively correlated with increasing cross-linker concentrations (p<0.0001; R2=0.718). The matrix released insulin in a reproducible logarithmic manner (R2 of 0.99 for all concentrations), demonstrating cross-linker-dependent control of drug release. The matrices with the highest cross-linker concentrations resisted degradation by collagenase for longer than the lowest concentrations (58.13%±2.22% vs. 13.69%±7.67%; p<0.05). Scanning electron microscopy images of the matrices revealed that the matrices had uniform topography and porosity, indicating efficient cross-linking and incorporation of the polymer components. Matrices were transplanted subcutaneously in naive BALB/c mice, and the number and size of vessels were quantified using von Willebrand factor staining; matrices with higher cross-linking concentrations had significantly larger capillaries at every time point up to 4 weeks after transplantation compared to the lowest cross-linker concentration group. CD31 staining visualized the capillaries at each time point. Taken together, these data show that this collagen-based matrix is reproducible with cross-linking-dependent properties that can be optimized to support vascularization and islet function. PMID:26309795

  15. An in vitro force measurement assay to study the early mechanical interaction between corneal fibroblasts and collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Roy, P; Petroll, W M; Cavanagh, H D; Chuong, C J; Jester, J V

    1997-04-10

    An in vitro force measurement assay has been developed to quantify the forces exerted by single corneal fibroblasts during the early interaction with a collagen matrix. Corneal fibroblasts were sparsely seeded on top of collagen matrices whose stiffness was predetermined by micromanipulation with calibrated fine glass microneedles. The forces exerted by individual cells were calculated from time-lapse videomicroscopic recordings of the 2-D elastic distortion of the matrix. In additional experiments, the degree of permanent reorganization of the collagen matrices was assessed by lysing the cells with 1% Triton X-100 solution at the end of a 2-hour incubation and recording the subsequent relaxation. The data suggest that a cell can exert comparable centripetal force during either extension of a cell process or partial retraction of an extended pseudopodia. The rates of force associated with pseudopodial extension and partial retraction were 0.180 +/- 0.091 (x 10(-8)) N/min (n = 8 experiments) and 0.213 +/- 0.063 (x 10(-8)) N/min (n = 8 experiments), respectively. Rupture of pseudopodial adhesion associated with cell locomotion causes a release of force on the matrix and a complete recoil of the pseudopodia concerned; a simultaneous release of force on the matrix was also observed at the opposite end of the cell. Lysis of cells resulted in 84 +/- 18% relaxation of the matrix, suggesting that little permanent remodeling of matrix is produced by the actions of isolated migrating cells. PMID:9141627

  16. Adhesive properties of Clostridium perfringens to extracellular matrix proteins collagens and fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Hitsumoto, Yasuo; Morita, Naomi; Yamazoe, Ryosuke; Tagomori, Mika; Yamasaki, Tsutomu; Katayama, Seiichi

    2014-02-01

    The adhesive properties of Clostridium perfringens to collagens, gelatin, fibronectin (Fn), Fn-prebound collagens, and Fn-prebound gelatin were investigated. C. perfringens could bind to Fn-prebound collagen type II, type III, and gelatin, but not to gelatin or collagens except for collagen type I directly. Recombinant Fn-binding proteins of C. perfringens, rFbpA and rFbpB, were used to examine Fn-mediated bacterial adherence to collagen type I. In the presence of rFbps, C. perfringens adherence to Fn-prebound collagen type I was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Fn was not released from the coated collagen type I by the presence of rFbps, and rFbps did not bind to collagen type I. Thus, the inhibition of C. perfringens binding to Fn-prebound collagen type I by rFbps could not be explained by the removal of Fn from collagen or by the competitive binding of rFbps to collagen. Instead, both rFbps were found to bind to C. perfringens. These results suggest the possibility that rFbps may bind to the putative Fn receptor expressed on C. perfringens and competitively inhibit Fn binding to C. perfringens.

  17. A matrix projection method for on line stable estimation of 1D and 3D shear building models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel García-Illescas, Miguel; Alvarez-Icaza, Luis

    2016-12-01

    An estimation method is presented that combines the use of recursive least squares, a matrix parameterized model, Gershgorin circles and tridiagonal matrices properties to allow the identification of stable shear building models in the presence of low excitation or low damping. The resultant scheme yields a significant reduction on the number of calculations involved, when compared with the standard vector parameterization based schemes. As real buildings are always open loop stable, the use of an stable shear building model for vibration control purposes allows the design of more robust control laws. Extensive simulation results are presented for cases of low excitation comparing the results of using or not this matrix projection method with different sets of initial conditions. Results indicate that the use of this projection method does not have an influence in the recovery of natural frequencies, however, it significantly improves the recovery of mode shapes.

  18. Effect of Ultraviolet A-induced Crosslinking on Dentin Collagen Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Seseogullari-Dirihan, Roda; Tjäderhane, Leo; Pashley, David H; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of using UVA-induced crosslinking with or without riboflavin as photosensitizers on degradation of dentin matrix by dentin proteases. Methods Demineralized dentin specimens (0.4×3×6mm, n=10/group) were subjected to: (RP1), 0.1% riboflavin-5 phosphate/UVA for 1 min; (RP5), 0.1% riboflavin-5 phosphate/UVA for 5 min; (R1), 0.1% riboflavin/UVA for 1 min; (R5), 0.1% riboflavin-UVA for 5 min; (UV1), UVA for 1 min; (UV5), UVA for 5 min. Specimens were incubated in 1 mL zinc and calcium containing media for 1 day and 1 week. An untreated group served as control (CM). After incubation, the loss of dry mass of samples was measured and aliquots of media were analyzed for the release of C-terminal fragment telopeptide (ICTP vs CTX) of collagen to evaluate for cathepsin K (CA-K) and total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-mediated degradation. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA at α=0.05. Results Although UVA radiation alone reduced dentin degradation, UVA-activated riboflavin or riboflavin-5 phosphate inhibited MMP and CA-K activities more than UVA alone. The effects of crosslinking were more pronounced in 7-day samples; only with CA-K were the effects of crosslinking with or without photosensitizer significantly different from controls in 1-day samples. Significance The use of bioactive forms (RP) or longer treatment time did not result with better effect. The use of UVA crosslinking reduces dentin matrix degradation, especially with photosensitizers. PMID:26314255

  19. Granule size-dependent bone regenerative capacity of octacalcium phosphate in collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Tanuma, Yuji; Anada, Takahisa; Honda, Yoshitomo; Kawai, Tadashi; Kamakura, Shinji; Echigo, Seishi; Suzuki, Osamu

    2012-03-01

    The present study was designed to determine whether the osteoconductivity of octacalcium phosphate-collagen (OCP/Col) composite can be improved by controlling the granule size of OCP. The granules of synthetic OCP, with diameters in the range of 53 to 300, 300 to 500, and 500 to 1000 μm, were used as an inorganic source of composite materials mixed with atelo-Col. After vacuum dehydrothemal treatment, OCP/Col disks were implanted into critical-sized calvaria defects in Wistar rats for 4, 8, and 12 weeks and examined radiographically, histologically, histomorphometrically, and histochemically. The materials were characterized according to mercury intrusion porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction was performed before and after implantation. The dissolution of OCP crystals in a Col matrix was determined by immersing OCP/Col disks in a culture medium. OCP/Col had a constant pore size (~30 μm) regardless of OCP granule size. OCP in the Col matrix tended to convert to hydroxyapatite (HA) during the implantation. OCP/Col with the smallest granules of OCP enhances both bone regeneration and biodegradation the most through tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclastic cellular resorption of OCP granules. The smallest OCP granules in the Col matrix showed the highest dissolution and had the greatest potential to form HA. The results indicated that the size of the included OCP granules can controll the osteoconductivity of OCP/Col. The overall results suggest that the physicochemical property of OCP crystals is a factor that determines the bone regenerative capacity of OCP/Col in critical-sized calvaria large bone defects in rats.

  20. Laser-Deposited In Situ TiC-Reinforced Nickel Matrix Composites: 3D Microstructure and Tribological Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkar, Tushar; Sosa, John; Hwang, Jun Yeon; Scharf, Thomas W.; Tiley, Jaimie; Fraser, Hamish; Banerjee, Rajarshi

    2014-06-01

    A new class of Ni-Ti-C-based metal-matrix composites has been developed using the laser-engineered net shaping™ process. These composites consist of an in situ formed and homogeneously distributed titanium carbide (TiC) phase reinforcing the nickel matrix. Additionally, by tailoring the Ti/C ratio in these composites, an additional graphitic phase can also be engineered into the microstructure. Serial-sectioning, followed by three-dimensional reconstruction of the microstructure in these composites, reveals homogeneously distributed primary and eutectic titanium carbide precipitates as well as a graphitic phase encompassing the primary carbides within the nickel matrix. The morphology and spatial distribution of these phases in three dimensions reveals that the eutectic carbides form a network linked by primary carbides or graphitic nodules at the nodes, which suggests interesting insights into the sequence of phase evolution. These three-phase Ni-TiC-C composites exhibit excellent tribological properties, in terms of an extremely low coefficient of friction while maintaining a relatively high hardness.

  1. Investigation on mineralization behaviour of Type I collagen and noncollageneous extracellular matrix protein immobilized on polymer thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ba, Xiaolan; Kristal, Ariella; Dimisi, Elaine; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2009-03-01

    The effects of the components of extracellular matrix on the bone formation and the kinetics of crystal growth of calcium phosphate have remained unknown. Here we reported a method to investigate the role of Type I collagen and the interactions with other ECM proteins such as fibronectin and elastin during biomineralization process. The early stage of mineralization was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and shear modulation force microscopy (SMFM). The late stage of mineralization was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), grazing incident x-ray diffraction (GIXD). The results showed the calcium phosphate biomineralization only occurred when the collagen interacted with fibronectin or elastin.

  2. Comparison of Matrix Cracking in Melt-Infiltrated SiC/SiC Composites with 3D and 2D-Woven Orthogonal Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic emission techniques combined with microstructural observations were used to determine the dependence of through thickness matrix cracking (TTMC) on in-plane tensile stress for melt infiltrated Sylramic fiber-based SIC/SiC composite panels with various 3D-woven orthogonal fiber architectures. Results were compared with prior TTMC results from similar panels with 2D woven orthogonal architectures.Both data sets were analysed on the basis that the source for TTMC originated in the 90 degree or Z-fiber tows.

  3. Efficient fully 3D list-mode TOF PET image reconstruction using a factorized system matrix with an image domain resolution model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian; Qi, Jinyi

    2014-01-01

    A factorized system matrix utilizing an image domain resolution model is attractive in fully 3D TOF PET image reconstruction using list-mode data. In this paper, we study a factored model based on sparse matrix factorization that is comprised primarily of a simplified geometrical projection matrix and an image blurring matrix. Beside the commonly-used Siddon's raytracer, we propose another more simplified geometrical projector based on the Bresenham's raytracer which further reduces the computational cost. We discuss in general how to obtain an image blurring matrix associated with a geometrical projector, and provide theoretical analysis that can be used to inspect the efficiency in model factorization. In simulation studies, we investigate the performance of the proposed sparse factorization model in terms of spatial resolution, noise properties and computational cost. The quantitative results reveal that the factorization model can be as efficient as a nonfactored model such as the analytical model while its computational cost can be much lower. In addition we conduct Monte Carlo simulations to identify the conditions under which the image resolution model can become more efficient in terms of image contrast recovery. We verify our observations using the provided theoretical analysis. The result offers a general guide to achieve optimal reconstruction performance based on a sparse factorization model with an only image domain resolution model. PMID:24434568

  4. Efficient fully 3D list-mode TOF PET image reconstruction using a factorized system matrix with an image domain resolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian; Qi, Jinyi

    2014-02-01

    A factorized system matrix utilizing an image domain resolution model is attractive in fully 3D time-of-flight PET image reconstruction using list-mode data. In this paper, we study a factored model based on sparse matrix factorization that is comprised primarily of a simplified geometrical projection matrix and an image blurring matrix. Beside the commonly-used Siddon’s ray-tracer, we propose another more simplified geometrical projector based on the Bresenham’s ray-tracer which further reduces the computational cost. We discuss in general how to obtain an image blurring matrix associated with a geometrical projector, and provide theoretical analysis that can be used to inspect the efficiency in model factorization. In simulation studies, we investigate the performance of the proposed sparse factorization model in terms of spatial resolution, noise properties and computational cost. The quantitative results reveal that the factorization model can be as efficient as a non-factored model, while its computational cost can be much lower. In addition we conduct Monte Carlo simulations to identify the conditions under which the image resolution model can become more efficient in terms of image contrast recovery. We verify our observations using the provided theoretical analysis. The result offers a general guide to achieve the optimal reconstruction performance based on a sparse factorization model with an image domain resolution model.

  5. Mechanical, Electromagnetic, and X-ray Shielding Characterization of a 3D Printable Tungsten-Polycarbonate Polymer Matrix Composite for Space-Based Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemelya, Corey M.; Rivera, Armando; Perez, Angel Torrado; Rocha, Carmen; Liang, Min; Yu, Xiaoju; Kief, Craig; Alexander, David; Stegeman, James; Xin, Hao; Wicker, Ryan B.; MacDonald, Eric; Roberson, David A.

    2015-08-01

    Material-extrusion three-dimensional (3D) printing has recently attracted much interest because of its process flexibility, rapid response to design alterations, and ability to create structures "on-the-go". For this reason, 3D printing has possible applications in rapid creation of space-based devices, for example cube satellites (CubeSat). This work focused on fabrication and characterization of tungsten-doped polycarbonate polymer matrix composites specifically designed for x-ray radiation-shielding applications. The polycarbonate-tungsten polymer composite obtained intentionally utilizes low loading levels to provide x-ray shielding while limiting effects on other properties of the material, for example weight, electromagnetic functionality, and mechanical strength. The fabrication process, from tungsten functionalization to filament extrusion and material characterization, is described, including printability, determination of x-ray attenuation, tensile strength, impact resistance, and gigahertz permittivity, and failure analysis. The proposed materials are uniquely advantageous when implemented in 3D printed structures, because even a small volume fraction of tungsten has been shown to substantially alter the properties of the resulting composite.

  6. A Novel Matrix Protein Hic31 from the Prismatic Layer of Hyriopsis Cumingii Displays a Collagen-Like Structure

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shaojian; Jin, Can; Li, Jiale

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we clone and characterize a novel matrix protein, hic31, from the mantle of Hyriopsis cumingii. The amino acid composition of hic31 consists of a high proportion of Glycine residues (26.67%). Tissue expression detection by RT-PCR indicates that hic31 is expressed specifically at the mantle edge. In situ hybridization results reveals strong signals from the dorsal epithelial cells of the outer fold at the mantle edge, and weak signals from inner epithelial cells of the same fold, indicating that hic31 is a prismatic-layer matrix protein. Although BLASTP results identify no shared homology with other shell-matrix proteins or any other known proteins, the hic31 tertiary structure is similar to that of collagen I, alpha 1 and alpha 2. It has been well proved that collagen forms the basic organic frameworks in way of collagen fibrils and minerals present within or outside of these fibrils. Therefore, hic31 might be a framework-matrix protein involved in the prismatic-layer biomineralization. Besides, the gene expression of hic31 increase in the early stages of pearl sac development, indicating that hic31 may play important roles in biomineralization of the pearl prismatic layer. PMID:26262686

  7. Tunability of collagen matrix mechanical properties via multiple modes of mineralization.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lester J; Deymier, Alix C; Boyle, John J; Li, Zhen; Linderman, Stephen W; Pasteris, Jill D; Xia, Younan; Genin, Guy M; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2016-02-01

    Functionally graded, mineralized collagen tissues exist at soft-to-hard material attachments throughout the body. However, the details of how collagen and hydroxyapatite mineral (HA) interact are not fully understood, hampering efforts to develop tissue-engineered constructs that can assist with repair of injuries at the attachments of soft tissues to bone. In this study, spatial control of mineralization was achieved in collagen matrices using simulated body fluids (SBFs). Based upon previous observations of poor bonding between reconstituted collagen and HA deposited using SBF, we hypothesized that mineralizing collagen in the presence of fetuin (which inhibits surface mineralization) would lead to more mineral deposition within the scaffold and therefore a greater increase in stiffness and toughness compared with collagen mineralized without fetuin. We tested this hypothesis through integrated synthesis, mechanical testing and modelling of graded, mineralized reconstituted collagen constructs. Results supported the hypothesis, and further suggested that mineralization on the interior of reconstituted collagen constructs, as promoted by fetuin, led to superior bonding between HA and collagen. The results provide us guidance for the development of mineralized collagen scaffolds, with implications for bone and tendon-to-bone tissue engineering.

  8. Transient 3D heat flow analysis for integrated circuit devices using the transmission line matrix method on a quad tree mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smy, T.; Walkey, D.; Dew, S. K.

    2001-07-01

    This paper presents a 3D transmission line matrix (TLM) implementation for the solution of transient heat flow in integrated semiconductor devices. The implementation uses a rectangular discontinuous mesh to allow for local mesh refinement. This approach is based on a quad tree meshing technique which can have a complex geometry using blocks of varying sizes. Each such block can have a maximum of two adjacent blocks on any vertical side and a maximum of four blocks on the top or bottom. The TLM implementation is based on a physical extraction of a resistance and capacitance network and then the creation of the appropriate TLM matrix. The formulation allows for temperature-dependent material parameters and a non-uniform time stepping. The simulator is first tested using a 2D example of a heat source in a rectangular region. Using this example the numerical error is determined and found to be less than 0.4%. Next, non-linearities are included, and a number of non-uniform time stepping algorithms are tested. Then, a 3D problem is also compared to an analytical solution and again the error is very small. Finally, an example of a full solution of heat flow in a realistic Si trench device is presented.

  9. In vitro adipogenesis of adipose-derived stem cells in 3D fibrin matrix of low component concentration.

    PubMed

    Peterbauer-Scherb, A; Danzer, M; Gabriel, C; van Griensven, M; Redl, H; Wolbank, S

    2012-06-01

    This study evaluated the suitability of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) combined with fibrin matrix of variable composition for adipose tissue-equivalent formation in vitro. Therefore, undifferentiated ASCs were embedded in fibrin clots composed of 2 IU/ml thrombin and fibrinogen of varying concentrations (6.25, 12.5 and 25 mg/ml) and kept under control or adipogenic conditions. Fibrin-cell composites were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, live/dead staining, lactate-dehydrogenase (LDH) assay, quantitative PCR for the adipogenic markers fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), peroxisome proliferative activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) and leptin, leptin ELISA and oil red O staining. Cells were found homogeneously distributed throughout the clot. Their number increased to day 7 (up to 3.62-fold median) and decreased thereafter until day 28. The proliferation was unaffected by fibrinogen concentration in the control. Adipogenic conditions generally yielded higher cell numbers, which were in addition increasing with increasing fibrinogen concentrations. FABP4, PPARγ and leptin mRNA expression was strongly upregulated by adipogenic medium, which was confirmed by the levels of leptin secretion and lipid vesicles formation demonstrated by oil red O staining. When embedded in 25 mg/ml fibrinogen clots, ASCs showed the highest expression levels of FABP4 (up to 629.0-fold), PPARγ (up to 1.6-fold) and leptin (up to 57.9-fold), corroborated by significantly elevated leptin secretion (median 33.29 ng/ml) on day 14. Constructs composed of fibrin matrix of low component concentrations-allowing homogeneous cell distribution-with ASCs should represent a suitable strategy for adipose tissue formation in vivo. PMID:21815273

  10. Optimum 3D Matrix Stiffness for Maintenance of Cancer Stem Cells Is Dependent on Tissue Origin of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Esmaiel; Sarvestani, Samaneh K.; Daneshian, Leily; Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The growth and expression of cancer stem cells (CSCs) depend on many factors in the tumor microenvironment. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of cancer cells’ tissue origin on the optimum matrix stiffness for CSC growth and marker expression in a model polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel without the interference of other factors in the microenvironment. Methods Human MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma, HCT116 colorectal and AGS gastric carcinoma, and U2OS osteosarcoma cells were used. The cells were encapsulated in PEGDA gels with compressive moduli in the 2-70 kPa range and optimized cell seeding density of 0.6x106 cells/mL. Micropatterning was used to optimize the growth of encapsulated cells with respect to average tumorsphere size. The CSC sub-population of the encapsulated cells was characterized by cell number, tumorsphere size and number density, and mRNA expression of CSC markers. Results The optimum matrix stiffness for growth and marker expression of CSC sub-population of cancer cells was 5 kPa for breast MCF7 and MDA231, 25 kPa for colorectal HCT116 and gastric AGS, and 50 kPa for bone U2OS cells. Conjugation of a CD44 binding peptide to the gel stopped tumorsphere formation by cancer cells from different tissue origin. The expression of YAP/TAZ transcription factors by the encapsulated cancer cells was highest at the optimum stiffness indicating a link between the Hippo transducers and CSC growth. The optimum average tumorsphere size for CSC growth and marker expression was 50 μm. Conclusion The marker expression results suggest that the CSC sub-population of cancer cells resides within a niche with optimum stiffness which depends on the cancer cells’ tissue origin. PMID:26168187

  11. A Comparative Study of Collagen Matrix Density Effect on Endothelial Sprout Formation Using Experimental and Computational Approaches.

    PubMed

    Shamloo, Amir; Mohammadaliha, Negar; Heilshorn, Sarah C; Bauer, Amy L

    2016-04-01

    A thorough understanding of determining factors in angiogenesis is a necessary step to control the development of new blood vessels. Extracellular matrix density is known to have a significant influence on cellular behaviors and consequently can regulate vessel formation. The utilization of experimental platforms in combination with numerical models can be a powerful method to explore the mechanisms of new capillary sprout formation. In this study, using an integrative method, the interplay between the matrix density and angiogenesis was investigated. Owing the fact that the extracellular matrix density is a global parameter that can affect other parameters such as pore size, stiffness, cell-matrix adhesion and cross-linking, deeper understanding of the most important biomechanical or biochemical properties of the ECM causing changes in sprout morphogenesis is crucial. Here, we implemented both computational and experimental methods to analyze the mechanisms responsible for the influence of ECM density on the sprout formation that is difficult to be investigated comprehensively using each of these single methods. For this purpose, we first utilized an innovative approach to quantify the correspondence of the simulated collagen fibril density to the collagen density in the experimental part. Comparing the results of the experimental study and computational model led to some considerable achievements. First, we verified the results of the computational model using the experimental results. Then, we reported parameters such as the ratio of proliferating cells to migrating cells that was difficult to obtain from experimental study. Finally, this integrative system led to gain an understanding of the possible mechanisms responsible for the effect of ECM density on angiogenesis. The results showed that stable and long sprouts were observed at an intermediate collagen matrix density of 1.2 and 1.9 mg/ml due to a balance between the number of migrating and proliferating

  12. Computational Characterization of Type I collagen-based Extra-cellular Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Long; Jones, Christopher Allen Rucksack; Lin, Daniel; Jiao, Yang; Sun, Bo

    2015-03-01

    A model of extracellular matrix (ECM) of collagen fibers has been built, in which cells could communicate with distant partners via fiber-mediated long-range-transmitted stress states. The ECM is modeled as a spring-like fiber network derived from skeletonized confocal microscopy data. Different local and global perturbations have been performed on the network, each followed by an optimized global Monte-Carlo (MC) energy minimization leading to the deformed network in response to the perturbations. In the optimization, a highly efficient local energy update procedure is employed and force-directed MC moves are used, which results in a convergence to the energy minimum state 20 times faster than the commonly used random displacement trial moves in MC. Further analysis and visualization of the distribution and correlation of the resulting force network reveal that local perturbations can give rise to global impacts: the force chains formed with a linear extent much further than the characteristic length scale associated with the perturbation sites and average fiber length. This behavior provides a strong evidence for our hypothesis of fiber-mediated long-range force transmission in ECM networks and the resulting long-range cell-cell mechanical signaling. ASU Seed Grant.

  13. Keratocytes are induced to produce collagen type II: A new strategy for in vivo corneal matrix regeneration.

    PubMed

    Greene, Carol Ann; Green, Colin R; Dickinson, Michelle E; Johnson, Virginia; Sherwin, Trevor

    2016-09-10

    The stroma, the middle layer of the cornea, is a connective tissue making up most of the corneal thickness. The stromal extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of highly organised lamellae which are made up of tightly packed fibrils primarily composed of collagens type I and V. This layer is interspersed with keratocytes, mesenchymal cells of neural crest origin. We have previously shown that adult corneal keratocytes exhibit phenotypic plasticity and can be induced into a neuronal phenotype. In the current study we evaluated the potential of keratocytes to produce collagen type II via phenotypic reprogramming with exogenous chondrogenic factors. The cornea presents a challenge to tissue engineers owing to its high level of organisation and the phenotypic instability of keratocytes. Traditional approaches based on a scar model do not support the engineering of functional stromal tissue. Type II collagen is not found in the adult cornea but is reported to be expressed during corneal development, raising the possibility of using such an approach to regenerate the corneal ECM. Keratocytes in culture and within intact normal and diseased tissue were induced to produce collagen type II upon treatment with transforming growth factor Beta3 (TGFβ3) and dexamethasone. In vivo treatment of rat corneas also resulted in collagen type II deposition and a threefold increase in corneal hardness and elasticity. Furthermore, the treatment of corneas and subsequent deposition of collagen type II did not cause opacity, fibrosis or scarring. The induction of keratocytes with specific exogenous factors and resulting deposition of type II collagen in the stroma can potentially be controlled by withdrawal of the factors. This might be a promising new approach for in vivo corneal regeneration strategies aimed at increasing corneal integrity in diseases associated with weakened ectatic corneal tissue such as keratoconus.

  14. Keratocytes are induced to produce collagen type II: A new strategy for in vivo corneal matrix regeneration.

    PubMed

    Greene, Carol Ann; Green, Colin R; Dickinson, Michelle E; Johnson, Virginia; Sherwin, Trevor

    2016-09-10

    The stroma, the middle layer of the cornea, is a connective tissue making up most of the corneal thickness. The stromal extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of highly organised lamellae which are made up of tightly packed fibrils primarily composed of collagens type I and V. This layer is interspersed with keratocytes, mesenchymal cells of neural crest origin. We have previously shown that adult corneal keratocytes exhibit phenotypic plasticity and can be induced into a neuronal phenotype. In the current study we evaluated the potential of keratocytes to produce collagen type II via phenotypic reprogramming with exogenous chondrogenic factors. The cornea presents a challenge to tissue engineers owing to its high level of organisation and the phenotypic instability of keratocytes. Traditional approaches based on a scar model do not support the engineering of functional stromal tissue. Type II collagen is not found in the adult cornea but is reported to be expressed during corneal development, raising the possibility of using such an approach to regenerate the corneal ECM. Keratocytes in culture and within intact normal and diseased tissue were induced to produce collagen type II upon treatment with transforming growth factor Beta3 (TGFβ3) and dexamethasone. In vivo treatment of rat corneas also resulted in collagen type II deposition and a threefold increase in corneal hardness and elasticity. Furthermore, the treatment of corneas and subsequent deposition of collagen type II did not cause opacity, fibrosis or scarring. The induction of keratocytes with specific exogenous factors and resulting deposition of type II collagen in the stroma can potentially be controlled by withdrawal of the factors. This might be a promising new approach for in vivo corneal regeneration strategies aimed at increasing corneal integrity in diseases associated with weakened ectatic corneal tissue such as keratoconus. PMID:27539660

  15. In vitro carcinogenesis of mammary epithelial cells by N-nitroso-N-methylurea using a collagen gel matrix culture.

    PubMed

    Laduca, J R; Sinha, D K

    1993-10-01

    Carcinogenesis is a lengthy process which eventually culminates in the transformed phenotype, cancer. However, much remains to be defined about the process of transformation. In vivo models for the study of the carcinogenic process present limitations because it is not possible to detect the premalignant stages in the animals. An in vitro model, on the other hand, facilitates the study of the carcinogenic process because it enables one to dissect out the crucial events required for carcinogenesis to occur. As carcinogenesis is believed to be a multistep process; initiation, promotion, and progression, a multistep, in vitro system has been devised in our laboratory to mimic each of these stages. We have previously shown the formation of "microtumors" in collagen gels, induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a) anthracene. In the present study the direct acting water soluble, mammary carcinogen, N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU) was used for tumorigenesis of mammary epithelial cells in culture. Mammary epithelial cells from virgin Sprague-Dawley rats were propagated and exposed to single or multiple doses of NMU while growing as a monolayer in glass petri dishes (initiation). Initiation cells were then plated into a collagen gel matrix culture. Prolonged growth in the collagen gels afforded for the progression of the transformed cells into discernable microtumors in the three-dimensional matrix of the collagen. The morphology of these "tumors" was determined by histologic sections of the gels. Fewer, if any, such structures existed in the untreated gels.

  16. Biophysical properties of dermal building-blocks affects extra cellular matrix assembly in 3D endogenous macrotissue.

    PubMed

    Urciuolo, F; Garziano, A; Imparato, G; Panzetta, V; Fusco, S; Casale, C; Netti, P A

    2016-01-29

    The fabrication of functional tissue units is one of the major challenges in tissue engineering due to their in vitro use in tissue-on-chip systems, as well as in modular tissue engineering for the construction of macrotissue analogs. In this work, we aim to engineer dermal tissue micromodules obtained by culturing human dermal fibroblasts into porous gelatine microscaffold. We proved that such stromal cells coupled with gelatine microscaffolds are able to synthesize and to assemble an endogenous extracellular matrix (ECM) resulting in tissue micromodules, which evolve their biophysical features over the time. In particular, we found a time-dependent variation of oxygen consumption kinetic parameters, of newly formed ECM stiffness and of micromodules self-aggregation properties. As consequence when used as building blocks to fabricate larger tissues, the initial tissue micromodules state strongly affects the ECM organization and maturation in the final macrotissue. Such results highlight the role of the micromodules properties in controlling the formation of three-dimensional macrotissue in vitro, defining an innovative design criterion for selecting tissue-building blocks for modular tissue engineering.

  17. Analytical finite element matrix elements and global matrix assembly for hierarchical 3-D vector basis functions within the hybrid finite element boundary integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Wang, K.; Li, H.; Eibert, T. F.

    2014-11-01

    A hybrid higher-order finite element boundary integral (FE-BI) technique is discussed where the higher-order FE matrix elements are computed by a fully analytical procedure and where the gobal matrix assembly is organized by a self-identifying procedure of the local to global transformation. This assembly procedure applys to both, the FE part as well as the BI part of the algorithm. The geometry is meshed into three-dimensional tetrahedra as finite elements and nearly orthogonal hierarchical basis functions are employed. The boundary conditions are implemented in a strong sense such that the boundary values of the volume basis functions are directly utilized within the BI, either for the tangential electric and magnetic fields or for the asssociated equivalent surface current densities by applying a cross product with the unit surface normals. The self-identified method for the global matrix assembly automatically discerns the global order of the basis functions for generating the matrix elements. Higher order basis functions do need more unknowns for each single FE, however, fewer FEs are needed to achieve the same satisfiable accuracy. This improvement provides a lot more flexibility for meshing and allows the mesh size to raise up to λ/3. The performance of the implemented system is evaluated in terms of computation time, accuracy and memory occupation, where excellent results with respect to precision and computation times of large scale simulations are found.

  18. Disentangling the multifactorial contributions of fibronectin, collagen and cyclic strain on MMP expression and extracellular matrix remodeling by fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Lin, Zhe; Foolen, Jasper; Schoen, Ingmar; Santoro, Alberto; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy; Vogel, Viola

    2014-11-01

    Early wound healing is associated with fibroblasts assembling a provisional fibronectin-rich extracellular matrix (ECM), which is subsequently remodeled and interlaced by type I collagen. This exposes fibroblasts to time-variant sets of matrices during different stages of wound healing. Our goal was thus to gain insight into the ECM-driven functional regulation of human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) being either anchored to a fibronectin (Fn) or to a collagen-decorated matrix, in the absence or presence of cyclic mechanical strain. While the cells reoriented in response to the onset of uniaxial cyclic strain, cells assembled exogenously added Fn with a preferential Fn-fiber alignment along their new orientation. Exposure of HFFs to exogenous Fn resulted in an increase in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression levels, i.e. MMP-15 (RT-qPCR), and MMP-9 activity (zymography), while subsequent exposure to collagen slightly reduced MMP-15 expression and MMP-9 activity compared to Fn-exposure alone. Cyclic strain upregulated Fn fibrillogenesis and actin stress fiber formation, but had comparatively little effect on MMP activity. We thus propose that the appearance of collagen might start to steer HFFs towards homeostasis, as it decreased both MMP secretion and the tension of Fn matrix fibrils as assessed by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer. These results suggest that HFFs might have a high ECM remodeling or repair capacity in contact with Fn alone (early event), which is reduced in the presence of Col1 (later event), thereby down-tuning HFF activity, a processes which would be required in a tissue repair process to finally reach tissue homeostasis.

  19. Mineralisation of reconstituted collagen using polyvinylphosphonic acid/polyacrylic acid templating matrix protein analogues in the presence of calcium, phosphate and hydroxyl ions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Kyung; Gu, Li-sha; Bryan, Thomas E.; Kim, Jong Ryul; Chen, Liang; Liu, Yan; Yoon, James C.; Breschi, Lorenzo; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2010-01-01

    The complex morphologies of mineralised collagen fibrils are regulated through interactions between the collagen matrix and non-collagenous extracellular proteins. In the present study, polyvinylphosphonic acid, a biomimetic analogue of matrix phosphoproteins, was synthesised and confirmed with FTIR and NMR. Biomimetic mineralisation of reconstituted collagen fibrils devoid of natural non-collagenous proteins was demonstrated with TEM using a Portland cement-containing resin composite and a phosphate-containing fluid in the presence of polyacrylic acid as sequestration, and polyvinylphosphonic acid as templating matrix protein analogues. In the presence of these dual biomimetic analogues in the mineralisation medium, intrafibrillar and extrafibrillar mineralisation via bottom-up nanoparticle assembly based on the nonclassical crystallisation pathway could be identified. Conversely, only large mineral spheres with no preferred association with collagen fibrils were observed in the absence of biomimetic analogues in the medium. Mineral phases were evident within the collagen fibrils as early as 4 hours after the initially-formed amorphous calcium phosphate nanoprecursors were transformed into apatite nanocrystals. Selected area electron diffraction patterns of highly mineralised collagen fibrils were nearly identical to those of natural bone, with apatite crystallites preferentially aligned along the collagen fibril axes. PMID:20621767

  20. D-Glucose as a modifying agent in gelatin/collagen matrix and reservoir nanoparticles for Calendula officinalis delivery.

    PubMed

    Lam, P-L; Kok, S H-L; Bian, Z-X; Lam, K-H; Tang, J C-O; Lee, K K-H; Gambari, R; Chui, C-H

    2014-05-01

    Gelatin/Collagen-based matrix and reservoir nanoparticles require crosslinkers to stabilize the formed nanosuspensions, considering that physical instability is the main challenge of nanoparticulate systems. The use of crosslinkers improves the physical integrity of nanoformulations under the-host environment. Aldehyde-based fixatives, such as formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde, have been widely applied to the crosslinking process of polymeric nanoparticles. However, their potential toxicity towards human beings has been demonstrated in many previous studies. In order to tackle this problem, D-glucose was used during nanoparticle formation to stabilize the gelatin/collagen-based matrix wall and reservoir wall for the deliveries of Calendula officinalis powder and oil, respectively. In addition, therapeutic selectivity between malignant and normal cells could be observed. The C. officinalis powder loaded nanoparticles significantly strengthened the anti-cancer effect towards human breast adenocarcinoma MCF7 cells and human hepatoma SKHep1 cells when compared with the free powder. On the contrary, the nanoparticles did not show significant cytotoxicity towards normal esophageal epithelial NE3 cells and human skin keratinocyte HaCaT cells. On the basis of these evidences, D-glucose modified gelatin/collagen matrix nanoparticles containing C. officinalis powder might be proposed as a safer alternative vehicle for anti-cancer treatments.

  1. A composite SWNT-collagen matrix: characterization and preliminary assessment as a conductive peripheral nerve regeneration matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosun, Z.; McFetridge, P. S.

    2010-12-01

    Unique in their structure and function, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have received significant attention due to their potential to create unique conductive materials. For neural applications, these conductive materials hold promise as they may enhance regenerative processes. However, like other nano-scaled biomaterials it is important to have a comprehensive understanding how these materials interact with cell systems and how the biological system responds to their presence. These investigations aim to further our understanding of SWNT-cell interactions by assessing the effect SWNT/collagen hydrogels have on PC12 neuronal-like cells seeded within and (independently) on top of the composite material. Two types of collagen hydrogels were prepared: (1) SWNTs dispersed directly within the collagen (SWNT/COL) and (2) albumin-coated SWNTs prepared using the surfactant 'sodium cholate' to improve dispersion (AL-SWNT/COL) and collagen alone serving as a control (COL). SWNT dispersion was significantly improved when using surfactant-assisted dispersion. The enhanced dispersion resulted in a stiffer, more conductive material with an increased collagen fiber diameter. Short-term cell interactions with PC12 cells and SWNT composites have shown a stimulatory effect on cell proliferation relative to plain collagen controls. In parallel to these results, p53 gene displayed normal expression levels, which indicates the absence of nanoparticle-induced DNA damage. In summary, these mechanically tunable SWNT-collagen scaffolds show the potential for enhanced electrical activity and have shown positive in vitro biocompatibility results offering further evidence that SWNT-based materials have an important role in promoting neuronal regeneration.

  2. Mussel adhesive protein provides cohesive matrix for collagen type-1α

    PubMed Central

    Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R.; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Wei, Wei; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the interactions between collagen and adhesive mussel foot proteins (mfps) can lead to improved medical and dental adhesives, particularly for collagen-rich tissues. Here we investigated interactions between collagen type-1, the most abundant loadbearing animal protein, and mussel foot protein-3 (mfp-3) using a quartz crystal microbalance and surface forces apparatus (SFA). Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic variants of mfp-3 were exploited to probe the nature of the interaction between the protein and collagen. Our chief findings are: 1) mfp-3 is an effective chaperone for tropocollagen adsorption to TiO2 and mica surfaces; 2) at pH 3, collagen addition between two mfp-3 films (Wc = 5.4 ± 0.2 mJ/m2) increased their cohesion by nearly 35%; 3) oxidation of Dopa in mfp-3 by periodate did not abolish the adhesion between collagen and mfp-3 films, and 4) collagen bridging between both hydrophilic and hydrophobic mfp-3 variant films is equally robust, suggesting that hydrophobic interactions play a minor role. Extensive H-bonding, π-cation and electrostatic interactions are more plausible to explain the reversible bridging of mfp-3 films by collagen. PMID:25770997

  3. Inhibitory effect of quercetin on epithelial to mesenchymal transition in SK-MEL-28 human melanoma cells defined by in vitro analysis on 3D collagen gels

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dhairya H; Sharma, Neeti

    2016-01-01

    Considering the emerging concept of complementary and alternative medicine under the paucity of effective treatment for melanoma, we aimed to understand the effect of quercetin (Qu) on collagen I-induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) in melanoma cells. To investigate the effect of Qu in melanoma cells, we used multiple methods, including real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, migration assay, and wound healing assay. We found that EMT was altered by Qu in melanoma cells. Qu-treated cells exhibited decreased migration and invasion activities. Mechanistically, a high expression of epithelial markers and a decrease in the expression of mesenchymal markers were found to be associated with reversal of EMT in melanoma cells. Time-dependent apoptosis was observed in Qu-treated melanoma cells, which was further confirmed by the upregulation in the protein levels of Caspase 3, a proapoptotic marker. Thus, our findings suggest Qu as a promising dietary compound under the new complementary and alternative medicine category of therapeutic drugs in the chemoprevention of melanoma. PMID:27799792

  4. Activated hepatic stellate cells are dependent on self-collagen, cleaved by membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase for their growth.

    PubMed

    Birukawa, Naoko Kubo; Murase, Kazuyuki; Sato, Yasushi; Kosaka, Akemi; Yoneda, Akihiro; Nishita, Hiroki; Fujita, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Miyuki; Ninomiya, Takafumi; Kajiwara, Keiko; Miyazaki, Miyono; Nakashima, Yusuke; Ota, Sigenori; Murakami, Yuya; Tanaka, Yasunobu; Minomi, Kenjiro; Tamura, Yasuaki; Niitsu, Yoshiro

    2014-07-18

    Stellate cells are distributed throughout organs, where, upon chronic damage, they become activated and proliferate to secrete collagen, which results in organ fibrosis. An intriguing property of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is that they undergo apoptosis when collagen is resolved by stopping tissue damage or by treatment, even though the mechanisms are unknown. Here we disclose the fact that HSCs, normal diploid cells, acquired dependence on collagen for their growth during the transition from quiescent to active states. The intramolecular RGD motifs of collagen were exposed by cleavage with their own membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP). The following evidence supports this conclusion. When rat activated HSCs (aHSCs) were transduced with siRNA against the collagen-specific chaperone gp46 to inhibit collagen secretion, the cells underwent autophagy followed by apoptosis. Concomitantly, the growth of aHSCs was suppressed, whereas that of quiescent HSCs was not. These in vitro results are compatible with the in vivo observation that apoptosis of aHSCs was induced in cirrhotic livers of rats treated with siRNAgp46. siRNA against MT1-MMP and addition of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2), which mainly inhibits MT1-MMP, also significantly suppressed the growth of aHSCs in vitro. The RGD inhibitors echistatin and GRGDS peptide and siRNA against the RGD receptor αVβ1 resulted in the inhibition of aHSCs growth. Transduction of siRNAs against gp46, αVβ1, and MT1-MMP to aHSCs inhibited the survival signal of PI3K/AKT/IκB. These results could provide novel antifibrosis strategies.

  5. Type VII collagen is enriched in the enamel organic matrix associated with the dentin-enamel junction of mature human teeth.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Jacob D; Walker, Mary P; Mousa, Ahmad; Wang, Yong; Gorski, Jeff P

    2014-06-01

    The inner enamel region of erupted teeth is known to exhibit higher fracture toughness and crack growth resistance than bulk phase enamel. However, an explanation for this behavior has been hampered by the lack of compositional information for the residual enamel organic matrix. Since enamel-forming ameloblasts are known to express type VII collagen and type VII collagen null mice display abnormal amelogenesis, the aim of this study was to determine whether type VII collagen is a component of the enamel organic matrix at the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) of mature human teeth. Immunofluorescent confocal microscopy of demineralized tooth sections localized type VII collagen to the organic matrix surrounding individual enamel rods near the DEJ. Morphologically, immunoreactive type VII collagen helical-bundles resembled the gnarled-pattern of enamel rods detected by Coomassie Blue staining. Western blotting of whole crown or enamel matrix extracts also identified characteristic Mr=280 and 230 kDa type VII dimeric forms, which resolved into 75 and 25 kDa bands upon reduction. As expected, the collagenous domain of type VII collagen was resistant to pepsin digestion, but was susceptible to purified bacterial collagenase. These results demonstrate the inner enamel organic matrix in mature teeth contains macromolecular type VII collagen. Based on its physical association with the DEJ and its well-appreciated capacity to complex with other collagens, we hypothesize that enamel embedded type VII collagen fibrils may contribute not only to the structural resilience of enamel, but may also play a role in bonding enamel to dentin.

  6. Thermal Destabilization of Collagen Matrix Hierarchical Structure by Freeze/Thaw

    PubMed Central

    Ozcelikkale, Altug; Han, Bumsoo

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to characterize and understand the effects of freezing on collagen structures and functionality. Specifically, thermodynamic destabilization of collagen at molecular- and fibril-levels by combination of low temperatures and freezing were experimentally characterized using modulated differential scanning calorimetry. In order to delineate the effects of sub-zero temperature and water-ice phase change, we hypothesized that the extent of destabilization can be determined based on post-thaw heat induced thermal denaturation of collagen. It is found that thermal denaturation temperature of collagen in hydrogel decreases by 1.4–1.6°C after freeze/thaw while no such decrease is observed in the case of molecular solution. The destabilization is predominantly due to ice formation. Exposure to low temperatures in the absence of ice has only minimal effect. Calorimetry measurements combined with morphological examination of collagen matrices by scanning electron microscopy suggest that freezing results in destabilization of collagen fibrils due to expansion of intrafibrillar space by ice formation. This fibril-level damage can be alleviated by use of cryoprotectant DMSO at concentrations as low as 0.5 M. A theoretical model explaining the change in collagen post-thaw thermal stability by freezing-induced fibril expansion is also proposed. PMID:26765741

  7. MicroRNA-96 inhibits FoxO3a function in IPF fibroblasts on type I collagen matrix

    PubMed Central

    Im, Jintaek; Ho, Yen-Yi; Hergert, Polla

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a lethal and progressive lung disease characterized by persistent (myo)fibroblasts and the relentless accumulation of collagen matrix. Unlike normal lung fibroblasts, IPF lung fibroblasts have suppressed forkhead box O3a (FoxO3a) activity, which allows them to expand in this diseased environment. microRNA-96 (miR-96) has recently been found to directly bind to the 3′-untranslated region of FoxO3a mRNA, which subsequently inhibits its function. We examined whether aberrantly low FoxO3a expression is in part due to increased miR-96 levels in IPF fibroblasts on polymerized collagen, thereby causing IPF fibroblasts to maintain their pathological properties. miR-96 expression was upregulated in IPF fibroblasts compared with control fibroblasts when cultured on collagen. In contrast, FoxO3a mRNA levels were reduced in most IPF fibroblasts. However, when miR-96 function was inhibited, FoxO3a mRNA and protein expression were increased, suppressing IPF fibroblast proliferation and promoting their cell death in a dose-dependent fashion. Likewise, FoxO3a and its target proteins p21, p27, and Bim expression was also increased in the presence of a miR-96 inhibitor in IPF fibroblasts. However, when control fibroblasts were treated with miR-96 mimic, FoxO3a, p27, p21, and Bim mRNA and protein levels were decreased. In situ hybridization analysis further revealed the presence of enhanced miR-96 expression in cells within the fibroblastic foci of IPF lung tissue. Our results suggest that when IPF fibroblasts interact with collagen-rich matrix, pathologically altered miR-96 expression inhibits FoxO3a function, causing IPF fibroblasts to maintain their pathological phenotype, which may contribute to the progression of IPF. PMID:25172912

  8. Temporal relationships of F-actin bundle formation, collagen and fibronectin matrix assembly, and fibronectin receptor expression to wound contraction

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Wound contraction can substantially reduce the amount of new tissue needed to reestablish organ integrity after tissue loss. Fibroblasts, rich in F-actin bundles, generate the force of wound contraction. Fibronectin-containing microfibrils link fibroblasts to each other and to collagen bundles and thereby provide transduction cables across the wound for contraction. The temporal relationships of F-actin bundle formation, collagen and fibronectin matrix assembly, and fibronectin receptor expression to wound contraction have not been determined. To establish these relationships, we used a cutaneous gaping wound model in outbred Yorkshire pigs. Granulation tissue filled approximately 80% of the wound space by day 5 after injury while wound contraction was first apparent at day 10. Neither actin bundles nor fibronectin receptors were observed in 5-d wound fibroblasts. Although fibronectin fibrils were assembled on the surfaces of 5-d fibroblasts, few fibrils coursed between cells. Day-7 fibroblasts stained strongly for nonmuscle- type F-actin bundles consistent with a contractile fibroblast phenotype. These cells expressed fibronectin receptors, were embedded in a fibronectin matrix that appeared to connect fibroblasts to the matrix and to each other, and were coaligned across the wound. Transmission EM confirmed the presence of microfilament bundles, cell- cell and cell-matrix linkages at day 7. Fibroblast coalignment, matrix interconnections, and actin bundles became more pronounced at days 10 and 14 coinciding with tissue contraction. These findings demonstrate that granulation tissue formation, F-actin bundle and fibronectin receptor expression in wound fibroblasts, and fibroblast-matrix linkage precede wound contraction. PMID:2136860

  9. Nonpolarized signaling reveals two distinct modes of 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Ryan J; Gavara, Núria; Chadwick, Richard S; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2012-04-30

    We search in this paper for context-specific modes of three-dimensional (3D) cell migration using imaging for phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) and active Rac1 and Cdc42 in primary fibroblasts migrating within different 3D environments. In 3D collagen, PIP3 and active Rac1 and Cdc42 were targeted to the leading edge, consistent with lamellipodia-based migration. In contrast, elongated cells migrating inside dermal explants and the cell-derived matrix (CDM) formed blunt, cylindrical protrusions, termed lobopodia, and Rac1, Cdc42, and PIP3 signaling was nonpolarized. Reducing RhoA, Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), or myosin II activity switched the cells to lamellipodia-based 3D migration. These modes of 3D migration were regulated by matrix physical properties. Specifically, experimentally modifying the elasticity of the CDM or collagen gels established that nonlinear elasticity supported lamellipodia-based migration, whereas linear elasticity switched cells to lobopodia-based migration. Thus, the relative polarization of intracellular signaling identifies two distinct modes of 3D cell migration governed intrinsically by RhoA, ROCK, and myosin II and extrinsically by the elastic behavior of the 3D extracellular matrix.

  10. Nonpolarized signaling reveals two distinct modes of 3D cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Gavara, Núria; Chadwick, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    We search in this paper for context-specific modes of three-dimensional (3D) cell migration using imaging for phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) and active Rac1 and Cdc42 in primary fibroblasts migrating within different 3D environments. In 3D collagen, PIP3 and active Rac1 and Cdc42 were targeted to the leading edge, consistent with lamellipodia-based migration. In contrast, elongated cells migrating inside dermal explants and the cell-derived matrix (CDM) formed blunt, cylindrical protrusions, termed lobopodia, and Rac1, Cdc42, and PIP3 signaling was nonpolarized. Reducing RhoA, Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), or myosin II activity switched the cells to lamellipodia-based 3D migration. These modes of 3D migration were regulated by matrix physical properties. Specifically, experimentally modifying the elasticity of the CDM or collagen gels established that nonlinear elasticity supported lamellipodia-based migration, whereas linear elasticity switched cells to lobopodia-based migration. Thus, the relative polarization of intracellular signaling identifies two distinct modes of 3D cell migration governed intrinsically by RhoA, ROCK, and myosin II and extrinsically by the elastic behavior of the 3D extracellular matrix. PMID:22547408

  11. Integrating focal adhesion dynamics, cytoskeleton remodeling, and actin motor activity for predicting cell migration on 3D curved surfaces of the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Cheol; Kim, Choong; Wood, Levi; Neal, Devin; Kamm, Roger D; Asada, H Harry

    2012-11-01

    An integrative cell migration model incorporating focal adhesion (FA) dynamics, cytoskeleton and nucleus remodeling and actin motor activity is developed for predicting cell migration behaviors on 3-dimensional curved surfaces, such as cylindrical lumens in the 3-D extracellular matrix (ECM). The work is motivated by 3-D microfluidic migration experiments suggesting that the migration speed and direction may vary depending on the cross sectional shape of the lumen along which the cell migrates. In this paper, the mechanical structure of the cell is modeled as double elastic membranes of cell and nucleus. The two elastic membranes are connected by stress fibers, which are extended from focal adhesions on the cell surface to the nuclear membrane. The cell deforms and gains traction as transmembrane integrins distributed over the outer cell membrane bind to ligands on the ECM, form focal adhesions, and activate stress fibers. Probabilities at which integrin ligand-receptor bonds are formed as well as ruptures are affected by the surface geometry, resulting in diverse migration behaviors that depend on the curvature of the surface. Monte Carlo simulations of the integrative model reveal that (a) the cell migration speed is dependent on the cross sectional area of the lumen with a maximum speed at a particular diameter or width, (b) as the lumen diameter increases, the cell tends to spread and migrate around the circumference of the lumen, while it moves in the longitudinal direction as the lumen diameter narrows, (c) once the cell moves in one direction, it tends to stay migrating in the same direction despite the stochastic nature of migration. The relationship between the cell migration speed and the lumen width agrees with microfluidic experimental data for cancer cell migration.

  12. High-density collagen gel tubes as a matrix for primary human bladder smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Micol, Lionel A; Ananta, Michael; Engelhardt, Eva-Maria; Mudera, Vivek C; Brown, Robert A; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Frey, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Tissue-engineered grafts for the urinary tract are being investigated for the potential treatment of several urologic diseases. These grafts, predominantly tubular-shaped, usually require in vitro culture prior to implantation to allow cell engraftment on initially cell-free scaffolds. We have developed a method to produce tubular-shaped collagen scaffolds based on plastic compression. Our approach produces a ready cell-seeded graft that does not need further in vitro culture prior to implantation. The tubular collagen scaffolds were in particular investigated for their structural, mechanical and biological properties. The resulting construct showed an especially high collagen density, and was characterized by favorable mechanical properties assessed by axial extension and radial dilation. Young modulus in particular was greater than non-compressed collagen tubes. Seeding densities affected proliferation rate of primary human bladder smooth muscle cells. An optimal seeding density of 10(6) cells per construct resulted in a 25-fold increase in Alamar blue-based fluorescence after 2 wk in culture. These high-density collagen gel tubes, ready seeded with smooth muscle cells could be further seeded with urothelial cells, drastically shortening the production time of graft for urinary tract regeneration.

  13. Generation of biologically active endostatin fragments from human collagen XVIII by distinct matrix metalloproteases

    SciTech Connect

    Heljasvaara, Ritva; Nyberg, Pia; Luostarinen, Jani; Parikka, Mataleena; Heikkilae, Pia; Rehn, Marko; Sorsa, Timo; Salo, Tuula; Pihlajaniemi, Taina . E-mail: taina.pihlajaniemi@oulu.fi

    2005-07-15

    Endostatin, a potent inhibitor of endothelial cell proliferation, migration, angiogenesis and tumor growth, is proteolytically cleaved from the C-terminal noncollagenous NC1 domain of type XVIII collagen. We investigated the endostatin formation from human collagen XVIII by several MMPs in vitro. The generation of endostatin fragments differing in molecular size (24-30 kDa) and in N-terminal sequences was identified in the cases of MMP-3, -7, -9, -13 and -20. The cleavage sites were located in the protease-sensitive hinge region between the trimerization and endostatin domains of NC1. MMP-1, -2, -8 and -12 did not show any significant activity against the C-terminus of collagen XVIII. The anti-proliferative effect of the 20-kDa endostatin, three longer endostatin-containing fragments generated in vitro by distinct MMPs and the entire NC1 domain, on bFGF-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells was established. The anti-migratory potential of some of these fragments was also studied. In addition, production of endostatin fragments between 24-30 kDa by human hepatoblastoma cells was shown to be due to MMP action on type XVIII collagen. Our results indicate that certain, especially cancer-related, MMP family members can generate biologically active endostatin-containing polypeptides from collagen XVIII and thus, by releasing endostatin fragments, may participate in the inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, migration and angiogenesis.

  14. Nonlinear optical microscopy reveals invading endothelial cells anisotropically alter three-dimensional collagen matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, P.-F.; Yeh, Alvin T.; Bayless, Kayla J.

    2009-02-01

    The interactions between endothelial cells (ECs) and the extracellular matrix (ECM) are fundamental in mediating various steps of angiogenesis, including cell adhesion, migration and sprout formation. Here, we used a noninvasive and non-destructive nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) technique to optically image endothelial sprouting morphogenesis in three-dimensional (3D) collagen matrices. We simultaneously captured signals from collagen fibers and endothelial cells using second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF), respectively. Dynamic 3D imaging revealed EC interactions with collagen fibers along with quantifiable alterations in collagen matrix density elicited by EC movement through and morphogenesis within the matrix. Specifically, we observed increased collagen density in the area between bifurcation points of sprouting structures and anisotropic increases in collagen density around the perimeter of lumenal structures, but not advancing sprout tips. Proteinase inhibition studies revealed membrane-associated matrix metalloproteinase were utilized for sprout advancement and lumen expansion. Rho-associated kinase (p160ROCK) inhibition demonstrated that the generation of cell tension increased collagen matrix alterations. This study followed sprouting ECs within a 3D matrix and revealed that the advancing structures recognize and significantly alter their extracellular environment at the periphery of lumens as they progress.

  15. Silibinin regulates matrix metalloproteinase 3 (stromelysine1) gene expression, hexoseamines and collagen production during rat skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Tabandeh, Mohammad Reza; Oryan, Ahamd; Mohhammad-Alipour, Adel; Tabatabaei-Naieni, Abotorab

    2013-08-01

    Silibinin (SB), a flavonoid isolated from the milk thistle, Silybum marianum, has been shown to exhibit protective effects against skin damage. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of topical application of SB on levels of stromelysine 1 (STM1) gene expression, acetyl hexoseamines and collagen production during skin wound healing. Full-thickness skin wounds were topically treated with 10% and 20% SB extract in acetonitril:olive oil (AOO) (4:1) for 30 days, and expression level of STM1 transcript, n-acetyl glucoseamine (NAGLA), n-acetyl galactoseamine (NAGAA) and collagen contents were analyzed on the 10th, 20th and 30th days post wounding. SB in dose- and time-dependent manner accelerated wound closure time and increased levels of STM1 mRNA, hydroxyproline, NAGLA and NAGAA compared to the untreated and vehicle (AOO)-treated rats. The current study provides evidence that SB, by increasing STM1 gene expression and extracellular matrix constituents including glycosaminoglycans and collagen contents, promotes a faster wound healing process and can be used as a healing agent in future.

  16. Automated scheme for measuring polyp volume in CT colonography using Hessian matrix-based shape extraction and 3D volume growing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kenji; Epstein, Mark L.; Xu, Jianwu; Obara, Piotr; Rockey, Don C.; Dachman, Abraham H.

    2010-03-01

    Current measurement of the single longest dimension of a polyp is subjective and has variations among radiologists. Our purpose was to develop an automated measurement of polyp volume in CT colonography (CTC). We developed a computerized segmentation scheme for measuring polyp volume in CTC, which consisted of extraction of a highly polyp-like seed region based on the Hessian matrix, segmentation of polyps by use of a 3D volume-growing technique, and sub-voxel refinement to reduce a bias of segmentation. Our database consisted of 30 polyp views (15 polyps) in CTC scans from 13 patients. To obtain "gold standard," a radiologist outlined polyps in each slice and calculated volumes by summation of areas. The measurement study was repeated three times at least one week apart for minimizing a memory effect bias. We used the mean volume of the three studies as "gold standard." Our measurement scheme yielded a mean polyp volume of 0.38 cc (range: 0.15-1.24 cc), whereas a mean "gold standard" manual volume was 0.40 cc (range: 0.15-1.08 cc). The mean absolute difference between automated and manual volumes was 0.11 cc with standard deviation of 0.14 cc. The two volumetrics reached excellent agreement (intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.80) with no statistically significant difference (p(F<=f) = 0.42). Thus, our automated scheme efficiently provides accurate polyp volumes for radiologists.

  17. Suppression of α Smooth Muscle Actin Accumulation by Bovine Fetal Dermal Collagen Matrix in Full Thickness Skin Wounds.

    PubMed

    Lineaweaver, William; Bush, Katie; James, Kenneth

    2015-06-01

    The suppression of elements associated with wound contracture and unfavorable scarring is a potentially important strategy in clinical wound management. In this study, the presence of α smooth muscle actin (αSMA), a protein involved in wound contraction, was analyzed in a series of wounds in which bovine fetal collagen (BFC) acellular dermal matrix (PriMatrix) was used in staged split thickness skin graft procedures. The results obtained through histological and quantitative image analyses of incidental biopsies from these wounds demonstrated a suppression of αSMA in the wound regions occupied by assimilated BFC relative to increased levels of αSMA found in other areas of the wound. The αSMA levels found in assimilated BFC were similar to αSMA levels in uninjured human dermis. These findings suggest a mechanism by which application of BFC could decrease contraction of full thickness skin wounds.

  18. Suppression of α Smooth Muscle Actin Accumulation by Bovine Fetal Dermal Collagen Matrix in Full Thickness Skin Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Lineaweaver, William; Bush, Katie; James, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The suppression of elements associated with wound contracture and unfavorable scarring is a potentially important strategy in clinical wound management. In this study, the presence of α smooth muscle actin (αSMA), a protein involved in wound contraction, was analyzed in a series of wounds in which bovine fetal collagen (BFC) acellular dermal matrix (PriMatrix) was used in staged split thickness skin graft procedures. The results obtained through histological and quantitative image analyses of incidental biopsies from these wounds demonstrated a suppression of αSMA in the wound regions occupied by assimilated BFC relative to increased levels of αSMA found in other areas of the wound. The αSMA levels found in assimilated BFC were similar to αSMA levels in uninjured human dermis. These findings suggest a mechanism by which application of BFC could decrease contraction of full thickness skin wounds. PMID:25695450

  19. Endothelial Matrix Assembly during Capillary Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Fumin; Lemmon, Christopher A.; Nilaratanakul, Voraphoj; Rotter, Varda

    2014-01-01

    Biologically relevant, three-dimensional extracellular matrix is an essential component of in vitro vasculogenesis models. WI-38 fibroblasts assemble a 3D matrix that induces endothelial tubulogenesis, but this model is challenged by fibroblast senescence and the inability to distinguish endothelial cell-derived matrix from matrix made by WI-38 fibroblasts. Matrices produced by hTERT-immortalized WI-38 recapitulated those produced by wild type fibroblasts. ECM fibrils were heavily populated by tenascin-C, fibronectin, and type VI collagen. Nearly half of the total type I collagen, but only a small fraction of the type IV collagen, were incorporated into ECM. Stable hTERT-WI-38 transfectants expressing TagRFP-fibronectin incorporated TagRFP into ~90% of the fibronectin in 3D matrices. TagRFP-fibronectin colocalized with tenascin-C and with type I collagen in a pattern that was similar to that seen in matrices from wild type WI-38. Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC) formed 3D adhesions and tubes on WI38-hTERT-TagRFP-FN-derived matrices, and the TagRFP-fibronectin component of this new 3D human fibroblast matrix model facilitated the demonstration of concentrated membrane type 1 metalloprotease and new HUVEC FN and collagen type IV fibrils during EC tubulogenesis. These findings indicate that WI-38-hTERT- and WI-38-hTERT-TagRFP-FN-derived matrices provide platforms for the definition of new matrix assembly and remodeling events during vasculogenesis. PMID:25063001

  20. The Methoxyflavonoid Isosakuranetin Suppresses UV-B-Induced Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Expression and Collagen Degradation Relevant for Skin Photoaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hana; Lee, Eunjoo H; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cho, Man-Ho

    2016-09-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a main extrinsic factor for skin aging. Chronic exposure of the skin to UV radiation causes the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), such as MMP-1, and consequently results in alterations of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and skin photoaging. Flavonoids are considered as potent anti-photoaging agents due to their UV-absorbing and antioxidant properties and inhibitory activity against UV-mediated MMP induction. To identify anti-photoaging agents, in the present study we examined the preventative effect of methoxyflavonoids, such as sakuranetin, isosakuranetin, homoeriodictyol, genkwanin, chrysoeriol and syringetin, on UV-B-induced skin photo-damage. Of the examined methoxyflavonoids, pretreatment with isosakuranetin strongly suppressed the UV-B-mediated induction of MMP-1 in human keratinocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Isosakuranetin inhibited UV-B-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling components, ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and p38 proteins. This result suggests that the ERK1/2 kinase pathways likely contribute to the inhibitory effects of isosakuranetin on UV-induced MMP-1 production in human keratinocytes. Isosakuranetin also prevented UV-B-induced degradation of type-1 collagen in human dermal fibroblast cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that isosakuranetin has the potential for development as a protective agent for skin photoaging through the inhibition of UV-induced MMP-1 production and collagen degradation.

  1. The Methoxyflavonoid Isosakuranetin Suppresses UV-B-Induced Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Expression and Collagen Degradation Relevant for Skin Photoaging

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hana; Lee, Eunjoo H.; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cho, Man-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a main extrinsic factor for skin aging. Chronic exposure of the skin to UV radiation causes the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), such as MMP-1, and consequently results in alterations of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and skin photoaging. Flavonoids are considered as potent anti-photoaging agents due to their UV-absorbing and antioxidant properties and inhibitory activity against UV-mediated MMP induction. To identify anti-photoaging agents, in the present study we examined the preventative effect of methoxyflavonoids, such as sakuranetin, isosakuranetin, homoeriodictyol, genkwanin, chrysoeriol and syringetin, on UV-B-induced skin photo-damage. Of the examined methoxyflavonoids, pretreatment with isosakuranetin strongly suppressed the UV-B-mediated induction of MMP-1 in human keratinocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Isosakuranetin inhibited UV-B-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling components, ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and p38 proteins. This result suggests that the ERK1/2 kinase pathways likely contribute to the inhibitory effects of isosakuranetin on UV-induced MMP-1 production in human keratinocytes. Isosakuranetin also prevented UV-B-induced degradation of type-1 collagen in human dermal fibroblast cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that isosakuranetin has the potential for development as a protective agent for skin photoaging through the inhibition of UV-induced MMP-1 production and collagen degradation. PMID:27598131

  2. The Methoxyflavonoid Isosakuranetin Suppresses UV-B-Induced Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Expression and Collagen Degradation Relevant for Skin Photoaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hana; Lee, Eunjoo H; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cho, Man-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a main extrinsic factor for skin aging. Chronic exposure of the skin to UV radiation causes the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), such as MMP-1, and consequently results in alterations of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and skin photoaging. Flavonoids are considered as potent anti-photoaging agents due to their UV-absorbing and antioxidant properties and inhibitory activity against UV-mediated MMP induction. To identify anti-photoaging agents, in the present study we examined the preventative effect of methoxyflavonoids, such as sakuranetin, isosakuranetin, homoeriodictyol, genkwanin, chrysoeriol and syringetin, on UV-B-induced skin photo-damage. Of the examined methoxyflavonoids, pretreatment with isosakuranetin strongly suppressed the UV-B-mediated induction of MMP-1 in human keratinocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Isosakuranetin inhibited UV-B-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling components, ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and p38 proteins. This result suggests that the ERK1/2 kinase pathways likely contribute to the inhibitory effects of isosakuranetin on UV-induced MMP-1 production in human keratinocytes. Isosakuranetin also prevented UV-B-induced degradation of type-1 collagen in human dermal fibroblast cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that isosakuranetin has the potential for development as a protective agent for skin photoaging through the inhibition of UV-induced MMP-1 production and collagen degradation. PMID:27598131

  3. Targeted deletion of matrix metalloproteinase-9 attenuates left ventricular enlargement and collagen accumulation after experimental myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ducharme, Anique; Frantz, Stefan; Aikawa, Masanori; Rabkin, Elena; Lindsey, Merry; Rohde, Luis E.; Schoen, Frederick J.; Kelly, Ralph A.; Werb, Zena; Libby, Peter; Lee, Richard T.

    2000-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is prominently overexpressed after myocardial infarction (MI). We tested the hypothesis that mice with targeted deletion of MMP9 have less left ventricular (LV) dilation after experimental MI than do sibling wild-type (WT) mice. Animals that survived ligation of the left coronary artery underwent echocardiographic studies after MI; all analyses were performed without knowledge of mouse genotype. By day 8, MMP9 knockout (KO) mice had significantly smaller increases in end-diastolic and end-systolic ventricular dimensions at both midpapillary and apical levels, compared with infarcted WT mice; these differences persisted at 15 days after MI. MMP-9 KO mice had less collagen accumulation in the infarcted area than did WT mice, and they showed enhanced expression of MMP-2, MMP-13, and TIMP-1 and a reduced number of macrophages. We conclude that targeted deletion of the MMP9 gene attenuates LV dilation after experimental MI in mice. The decrease in collagen accumulation and the enhanced expression of other MMPs suggest that MMP-9 plays a prominent role in extracellular matrix remodeling after MI. PMID:10880048

  4. Characterization of collagen fibers by means of texture analysis of second harmonic generation images using orientation-dependent gray level co-occurrence matrix method.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenyan; Li, Hui; Wang, Chunyou; Gou, Shanmiao; Fu, Ling

    2012-02-01

    Collagen is the most prominent protein in the human body, making up 30% of the total protein content. Quantitative studies have shown structural differences between collagen fibers of the normal and diseased tissues, due to the remodeling of the extracellular matrix during the pathological process. The dominant orientation, which is an important characteristic of collagen fibers, has not been taken into consideration for quantitative collagen analysis. Based on the conventional gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) method, the authors proposed the orientation-dependent GLCM (OD-GLCM) method by estimating the dominant orientation of collagen fibers. The authors validated the utility of the OD-GLCM method on second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopic images of tendons from rats with different ages. Compared with conventional GLCM method, the authors' method has not only improved the discrimination between different tissues but also provided additional texture information of the orderliness of collagen fibers and the fiber size. The OD-GLCM method was further applied to the differentiation of the preliminary SHG images of normal and cancerous human pancreatic tissues. The combination of SHG microscopy and the OD-GLCM method might be helpful for the evaluation of diseases marked with abnormal collagen morphology. PMID:22463039

  5. Characterization of collagen fibers by means of texture analysis of second harmonic generation images using orientation-dependent gray level co-occurrence matrix method.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenyan; Li, Hui; Wang, Chunyou; Gou, Shanmiao; Fu, Ling

    2012-02-01

    Collagen is the most prominent protein in the human body, making up 30% of the total protein content. Quantitative studies have shown structural differences between collagen fibers of the normal and diseased tissues, due to the remodeling of the extracellular matrix during the pathological process. The dominant orientation, which is an important characteristic of collagen fibers, has not been taken into consideration for quantitative collagen analysis. Based on the conventional gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) method, the authors proposed the orientation-dependent GLCM (OD-GLCM) method by estimating the dominant orientation of collagen fibers. The authors validated the utility of the OD-GLCM method on second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopic images of tendons from rats with different ages. Compared with conventional GLCM method, the authors' method has not only improved the discrimination between different tissues but also provided additional texture information of the orderliness of collagen fibers and the fiber size. The OD-GLCM method was further applied to the differentiation of the preliminary SHG images of normal and cancerous human pancreatic tissues. The combination of SHG microscopy and the OD-GLCM method might be helpful for the evaluation of diseases marked with abnormal collagen morphology.

  6. Characterization of collagen fibers by means of texture analysis of second harmonic generation images using orientation-dependent gray level co-occurrence matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wenyan; Li, Hui; Wang, Chunyou; Gou, Shanmiao; Fu, Ling

    2012-02-01

    Collagen is the most prominent protein in the human body, making up 30% of the total protein content. Quantitative studies have shown structural differences between collagen fibers of the normal and diseased tissues, due to the remodeling of the extracellular matrix during the pathological process. The dominant orientation, which is an important characteristic of collagen fibers, has not been taken into consideration for quantitative collagen analysis. Based on the conventional gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) method, the authors proposed the orientation-dependent GLCM (OD-GLCM) method by estimating the dominant orientation of collagen fibers. The authors validated the utility of the OD-GLCM method on second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopic images of tendons from rats with different ages. Compared with conventional GLCM method, the authors' method has not only improved the discrimination between different tissues but also provided additional texture information of the orderliness of collagen fibers and the fiber size. The OD-GLCM method was further applied to the differentiation of the preliminary SHG images of normal and cancerous human pancreatic tissues. The combination of SHG microscopy and the OD-GLCM method might be helpful for the evaluation of diseases marked with abnormal collagen morphology.

  7. Alterations of collagen matrix in weight-bearing bones during skeletal unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiiba, M.; Arnaud, S. B.; Tanzawa, H.; Uzawa, K.; Yamauchi, M.

    2001-01-01

    Skeletal unloading induces loss of bone mineral density in weight-bearing bones. The objectives of this study were to characterize the post-translational modifications of collagen of weight-bearing bones subjected to hindlimb unloading for 8 weeks. In unloaded bones, tibiae and femurs, while the overall amino acid composition was essentially identical in the unloaded and control tibiae and femurs, the collagen cross-link profile showed significant differences. Two major reducible cross-links (analyzed as dihydroxylysinonorleucine and hydroxylysinonorleucine) were increased in the unloaded bones. In addition, the ratios of the former to the latter as well as pyridinoline to deoxypyridinoline were significantly decreased in the unloaded bones indicating a difference in the extent of lysine hydroxylation at the cross-linking sites between these two groups. These results indicate that upon skeletal unloading the relative pool of newly synthesized collagen is increased and it is post-translationally altered. The alteration could be associated with impaired osteoblastic differentiation induced by skeletal unloading that results in a mineralization defect.

  8. Real-time analysis of integrin-mediated chemotactic migration of T lymphocytes within 3-D extracellular matrix-like gels.

    PubMed

    Franitza, S; Alon, R; Lider, O

    1999-05-27

    We have developed a novel 3-D gel reconstituted with major extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins to follow the dynamics of migration of human T cells locomoting, in real-time, on gradients formed by representative chemoattractants: the C-C chemokine RANTES, and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-2. In the absence of chemoattractants, none of the T cells migrated directionally and the levels of random migration or cell polarization were low. However, major fractions of T cells placed in IL-2 and RANTES gradients in the gels polarized immediately after exposure to the chemoattractants. Shortly after polarization, 25% of the T cells migrated, in either a random or directional fashion, towards the sources of the chemoattractants; additional 5-10% of the cells remained polarized but stationary. The number of T cells migrating directionally towards RANTES or IL-2 peaked along with the formation of the chemotactic gradients. The directional migration of T cells was increased by a short pre-exposure to low doses of IL-2, which did not alter the level of expression of the beta1 integrins. The directional migration of T cells towards IL-2 and RANTES was mediated by IL-2R and pertussis toxin-sensitive receptors, respectively, and the directional, and to a lesser degree, the random locomotion of T cells induced by both chemoattractants required intact tyrosine kinase signaling and activities of the alpha4, alpha5, and, to a lesser degree, the alpha2 and alpha6 members the beta1 integrins. Our system enables the real-time tracking of individual locomoting lymphocytes and the analysis of their dynamic interactions with ECM components and cytokines. PMID:10365778

  9. A Novel 2D Image Compression Algorithm Based on Two Levels DWT and DCT Transforms with Enhanced Minimize-Matrix-Size Algorithm for High Resolution Structured Light 3D Surface Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddeq, M. M.; Rodrigues, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    Image compression techniques are widely used on 2D image 2D video 3D images and 3D video. There are many types of compression techniques and among the most popular are JPEG and JPEG2000. In this research, we introduce a new compression method based on applying a two level discrete cosine transform (DCT) and a two level discrete wavelet transform (DWT) in connection with novel compression steps for high-resolution images. The proposed image compression algorithm consists of four steps. (1) Transform an image by a two level DWT followed by a DCT to produce two matrices: DC- and AC-Matrix, or low and high frequency matrix, respectively, (2) apply a second level DCT on the DC-Matrix to generate two arrays, namely nonzero-array and zero-array, (3) apply the Minimize-Matrix-Size algorithm to the AC-Matrix and to the other high-frequencies generated by the second level DWT, (4) apply arithmetic coding to the output of previous steps. A novel decompression algorithm, Fast-Match-Search algorithm (FMS), is used to reconstruct all high-frequency matrices. The FMS-algorithm computes all compressed data probabilities by using a table of data, and then using a binary search algorithm for finding decompressed data inside the table. Thereafter, all decoded DC-values with the decoded AC-coefficients are combined in one matrix followed by inverse two levels DCT with two levels DWT. The technique is tested by compression and reconstruction of 3D surface patches. Additionally, this technique is compared with JPEG and JPEG2000 algorithm through 2D and 3D root-mean-square-error following reconstruction. The results demonstrate that the proposed compression method has better visual properties than JPEG and JPEG2000 and is able to more accurately reconstruct surface patches in 3D.

  10. Extracellular matrix of adipogenically differentiated mesenchymal stem cells reveals a network of collagen filaments, mostly interwoven by hexagonal structural units.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Mujib; Sittinger, Michael; Ringe, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is the non-cellular component of tissues, which not only provides biological shelter but also takes part in the cellular decisions for diverse functions. Every tissue has an ECM with unique composition and topology that governs the process of determination, differentiation, proliferation, migration and regeneration of cells. Little is known about the structural organization of matrix especially of MSC-derived adipogenic ECM. Here, we particularly focus on the composition and architecture of the fat ECM to understand the cellular behavior on functional bases. Thus, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were adipogenically differentiated, then, were transferred to adipogenic propagation medium, whereas they started the release of lipid droplets leaving bare network of ECM. Microarray analysis was performed, to indentify the molecular machinery of matrix. Adipogenesis was verified by Oil Red O staining of lipid droplets and by qPCR of adipogenic marker genes PPARG and FABP4. Antibody staining demonstrated the presence of collagen type I, II and IV filaments, while alkaline phosphatase activity verified the ossified nature of these filaments. In the adipogenic matrix, the hexagonal structures were abundant followed by octagonal structures, whereas they interwoven in a crisscross manner. Regarding molecular machinery of adipogenic ECM, the bioinformatics analysis revealed the upregulated expression of COL4A1, ITGA7, ITGA7, SDC2, ICAM3, ADAMTS9, TIMP4, GPC1, GPC4 and downregulated expression of COL14A1, ADAMTS5, TIMP2, TIMP3, BGN, LAMA3, ITGA2, ITGA4, ITGB1, ITGB8, CLDN11. Moreover, genes associated with integrins, glycoproteins, laminins, fibronectins, cadherins, selectins and linked signaling pathways were found. Knowledge of the interactive-language between cells and matrix could be beneficial for the artificial designing of biomaterials and bioscaffolds. PMID:23851162

  11. Characterization of a pseudoachondroplasia-associated mutation (His587-->Arg) in the C-terminal, collagen-binding domain of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP).

    PubMed Central

    Spitznagel, Luitgard; Nitsche, D Patric; Paulsson, Mats; Maurer, Patrik; Zaucke, Frank

    2004-01-01

    We have introduced a pseudoachondroplasia-associated mutation (His(587)-->Arg) into the C-terminal collagen-binding domain of COMP (cartilage oligomeric matrix protein) and recombinantly expressed the full-length protein as well as truncated fragments in HEK-293 cells. CD spectroscopy revealed only subtle differences in the overall secondary structure of full-length proteins. Interestingly, the mutant COMP did not aggregate in the presence of calcium, as does the wild-type protein. The binding site for collagens was recently mapped to amino acids 579-595 and it was assumed that the His(587)-->Arg mutation influences collagen binding. However full-length mutant COMP bound to collagens I, II and IX, and the binding was not significantly different from that of wild-type COMP. Also a COMP His(587)-->Arg fragment encompassing the calcium-binding repeats and the C-terminal collagen-binding domain bound collagens equally well as the corresponding wild-type protein. The recombinant fragments encompassing the C-terminal domain alone showed multiple bands following SDS/PAGE, although their theoretical molecular masses could be verified by MS. A temperature-induced conformational change was observed in CD spectroscopy, and negative-staining electron microscopy demonstrated that both wild-type and mutant proteins formed defined elongated aggregates after heating to 60 degrees C. Our results suggest that the His(587)-->Arg mutation is not itself deleterious to the structure and collagen-binding of COMP. PMID:14580238

  12. Quantifying the surface chemistry of 3D matrices in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeranis, Dimitrios S.; So, Peter T. C.; Yannas, Ioannis V.

    2014-03-01

    Despite the major role of the matrix (the insoluble environment around cells) in physiology and pathology, there are very few and limited methods that can quantify the surface chemistry of a 3D matrix such as a biomaterial or tissue ECM. This study describes a novel optical-based methodology that can quantify the surface chemistry (density of adhesion ligands for particular cell adhesion receptors) of a matrix in situ. The methodology utilizes fluorescent analogs (markers) of the receptor of interest and a series of binding assays, where the amount of bound markers on the matrix is quantified via spectral multi-photon imaging. The study provides preliminary results for the quantification of the ligands for the two major collagen-binding integrins (α1β1, α2β1) in porous collagen scaffolds that have been shown to be able to induce maximum regeneration in transected peripheral nerves. The developed methodology opens the way for quantitative descriptions of the insoluble microenvironment of cells in physiology and pathology, and for integrating the matrix in quantitative models of cell signaling. α

  13. Endogenous presenilin 1 redistributes to the surface of lamellipodia upon adhesion of Jurkat cells to a collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Schwarzman, A L; Singh, N; Tsiper, M; Gregori, L; Dranovsky, A; Vitek, M P; Glabe, C G; St George-Hyslop, P H; Goldgaber, D

    1999-07-01

    Most familial early-onset Alzheimer's disease cases are caused by mutations in the presenilin 1 (PS1) gene. Subcellular localization of the endogenous PS1 is essential for understanding its function, interactions with proteins, and role in Alzheimer's disease. Although numerous studies revealed predominant localization of PS1 to endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi, there are conflicting reports on the localization of PS1 to the cell surface. We found that endogenous PS1 is highly expressed in T lymphocytes (Jurkat cells). Using a variety of methods, we present evidence that endogenous PS1 is localized to the cell surface in addition to intracellular membrane compartments. Moreover, PS1 appeared in high levels on the surface of lamellipodia upon adhesion of the cells to a collagen matrix. The redistribution of PS1 in adhered cells was strikingly similar to that of the well characterized adhesion protein CD44. Cell surface PS1 formed complexes in vivo with actin-binding protein filamin (ABP-280), which is known to form bridges between cell surface receptors and cytoskeleton and mediate cell adhesion and cell motility. Taken together, our results suggest a role of PS1 in cell adhesion and/or cell-matrix interaction.

  14. Transcript-activated collagen matrix as sustained mRNA delivery system for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Badieyan, Zohreh Sadat; Berezhanskyy, Taras; Utzinger, Maximilian; Aneja, Manish Kumar; Emrich, Daniela; Erben, Reinhold; Schüler, Christiane; Altpeter, Philipp; Ferizi, Mehrije; Hasenpusch, Günther; Rudolph, Carsten; Plank, Christian

    2016-10-10

    Transcript therapies using chemically modified messenger RNAs (cmRNAs) are emerging as safe and promising alternatives for gene and recombinant protein therapies. However, their applications have been limited due to transient translation and relatively low stability of cmRNAs compared to DNA. Here we show that vacuum-dried cmRNA-loaded collagen sponges, termed transcript activated matrices (TAMs), can serve as depots for sustained delivery of cmRNA. TAMs provide steady state protein production for up to six days, and substantial residual expression until 11days post transfection. Another advantage of this technology was nearly 100% transfection efficiency as well as low toxicity in vitro. TAMs were stable for at least 6months at room temperature. Human BMP-2-encoding TAMs induced osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells in vitro and bone regeneration in a non-critical rat femoral bone defect model in vivo. In summary, TAMs are a promising tool for bone regeneration and potentially also for other applications in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. PMID:27586186

  15. Ibuprofen upregulates expressions of matrix metalloproteinase-1, -8, -9, and -13 without affecting expressions of types I and III collagen in tendon cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Chung; Hsu, Chih-Chin; Chang, Hsiang-Ning; Lin, Yu-Chun; Lin, Miao-Sui; Pang, Jong-Hwei S

    2010-04-01

    Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs are widely used to treat sports-related tendon injuries or tendinopathy. This study was designed to investigate the effect of ibuprofen on expressions of types I and III collagen, as well as collagen-degrading enzymes including matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, -2, -8, -9, and -13. Rat Achilles tendon cells were treated with ibuprofen and then underwent MTT [3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate mRNA expressions of types I and III collagen, MMP-1, -2, -8, -9, and -13. Protein expressions of types I and III collagen, MMP-1, -8, and -13 were determined by Western blot analysis. Gelatin zymography was used to evaluate the enzymatic activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9. The results revealed that ibuprofen upregulated expressions of MMP-1, -8, -9, and -13, both at mRNA and protein levels. There was no effect of ibuprofen on mRNA and protein expressions of types I and III collagen. Gelatin zymography revealed that the enzymatic activity of MMP-9 was upregulated after ibuprofen treatment. In conclusion, ibuprofen upregulates the expressions of collagenases including MMP-1, -8, -9, and -13 without affecting the expressions of types I and III collagen. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism potentially accounting for the inhibition of tendon healing by ibuprofen.

  16. Effect of collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffold pore size on matrix mineralization and cellular behavior in different cell types.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Ciara M; Duffy, Garry P; Schindeler, Aaron; O'brien, Fergal J

    2016-01-01

    We have previously examined osteoblast behavior on porous collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) scaffolds with a range of mean pore sizes demonstrating superior cell attachment and migration in scaffolds with the largest pores (325 μm). Scaffolds provide a framework for construct development; therefore, it is crucial to identify the optimal pore size for augmented tissue formation. Utilizing the same range of scaffolds (85 μm - 325 μm), this study aimed to examine the effects of mean pore size on subsequent osteoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization, and to understand the mechanism by which pore size influences behavior of different cell types. Consequently, primary mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were assessed and their behavior compared to osteoblasts. Results demonstrated that scaffolds with the largest pore size (325 μm) facilitated improved osteoblast infiltration, earlier expression of mature bone markers osteopontin (OPN) and osteocalcin (OCN), and increased mineralization. MSCs responded similarly to osteoblasts whereby cell attachment and scaffold infiltration improved with increasing pore size. However, MSCs showed reduced cell motility, proliferation, and scaffold infiltration compared to osteoblasts. This was associated with differences in the profile of integrin subunits (α2) and collagen receptors (CD44), indicating that osteoblasts have a stronger affinity for CG scaffolds compared to MSCs. In summary, these results reveal how larger pores promote improved cell infiltration, essential for construct development, however the optimal scaffold pore size can be cell type specific. As such, this study highlights a necessity to tailor both scaffold micro-architecture and cell-type when designing constructs for successful bone tissue engineering applications.

  17. Spatially resolved 3D noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefner, David P.; Preece, Bradley L.; Doe, Joshua M.; Burks, Stephen D.

    2016-05-01

    When evaluated with a spatially uniform irradiance, an imaging sensor exhibits both spatial and temporal variations, which can be described as a three-dimensional (3D) random process considered as noise. In the 1990s, NVESD engineers developed an approximation to the 3D power spectral density (PSD) for noise in imaging systems known as 3D noise. In this correspondence, we describe how the confidence intervals for the 3D noise measurement allows for determination of the sampling necessary to reach a desired precision. We then apply that knowledge to create a smaller cube that can be evaluated spatially across the 2D image giving the noise as a function of position. The method presented here allows for both defective pixel identification and implements the finite sampling correction matrix. In support of the reproducible research effort, the Matlab functions associated with this work can be found on the Mathworks file exchange [1].

  18. Probabilistic models and numerical calculation of system matrix and sensitivity in list-mode MLEM 3D reconstruction of Compton camera images.

    PubMed

    Maxim, Voichita; Lojacono, Xavier; Hilaire, Estelle; Krimmer, Jochen; Testa, Etienne; Dauvergne, Denis; Magnin, Isabelle; Prost, Rémy

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of evaluating the system matrix and the sensitivity for iterative reconstruction in Compton camera imaging. Proposed models and numerical calculation strategies are compared through the influence they have on the three-dimensional reconstructed images. The study attempts to address four questions. First, it proposes an analytic model for the system matrix. Second, it suggests a method for its numerical validation with Monte Carlo simulated data. Third, it compares analytical models of the sensitivity factors with Monte Carlo simulated values. Finally, it shows how the system matrix and the sensitivity calculation strategies influence the quality of the reconstructed images.

  19. Use of a Collagen Matrix as a Substitute for Free Mucosal Grafts in Pre-Prosthetic Surgery: 1 Year Results From a Clinical Prospective Study on 15 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Maiorana, Carlo; Beretta, Mario; Pivetti, Luca; Stoffella, Enrico; Grossi, Giovanni B.; Herford, Alan S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The presence of keratinized tissue around dental implants is more than desirable either from a functional and aesthetic point of view, making soft tissue grafting a common practice in implant rehabilitation. Autogenous soft tissue grafting procedures are usually associated with high morbidity. Aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a xenogeneic collagen matrix as a substitute for soft tissue grafting around dental implants. Methods: 15 consecutive patients underwent a vestibuloplasty and grafting, both in the mandible and the maxilla, with a collagen matrix. Results: The primary endpoint was to evaluate the resorption of the graft along with the re-epithelization grafted area. The percentage of the resorption was 44,4%, with a mean gain in vestibular height of 3 mm. Secondary endpoints evaluated the clinical appearance, the hemostatic effect and the post-operative pain. All subjects referred minimal pain with no bleeding. No adverse reaction nor infection were noted. Conclusion: This study showed that the used collagen matrix can find major interest in those patients who need a greater aesthetic outcome as the matrix has a perfect integration with the surrounding tissues. Furthermore it is strongly recommended for those patients who can bear little pain. Clinical Significance: Post-operative morbidity of autologous grafts is the biggest concern of this type of surgery. The possibility to use a soft tissue substitute is a great achievement as morbidity decreases and bigger areas can be treated in a single surgery. The present study showed the efficacy of a collagen matrix as this kind of substitute. PMID:27583050

  20. Biosynthesis of alpha2(IV) and alpha1(IV) chains of collagen IV and interactions with matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    PubMed

    Toth, M; Sado, Y; Ninomiya, Y; Fridman, R

    1999-07-01

    In vitro binding studies with latent matrix metalloproteinase-9 (pro-MMP-9) have revealed the existence of nondisulfide-bonded alpha2(IV) chains on the cell surface capable of forming a high-affinity complex with the enzyme. Here we investigated the biosynthesis and cellular distribution of alpha2(IV) and alpha1(IV) chains in breast epithelial (MCF10A and MDA-MB-231) and fibrosarcoma (HT1080) cells by pulse-chase analysis followed by immunoprecipitation with chain-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb). These studies showed that whereas the alpha1(IV) chain remained in the intracellular compartment, nondisulfide-bonded alpha2(IV) chains were secreted into the media in a stable form. Consistently, only alpha2(IV) was detected on the cell surface by surface biotinylation or indirect immunofluorescence. In agreement with the pulse-chase analysis, media subjected to co-precipitation experiments with pro-MMP-9 or pro-MMP-9-affinity chromatography followed by immunoblotting with chain-specific mAbs resulted in the detection of alpha2(IV). A preferential secretion of nondisulfide-bonded alpha2(IV) chains was also observed in CHO-K1 cells transiently transfected with full-length mouse alpha2(IV) or alpha (IV) cDNAs. However, a complex of mouse alpha1(IV) with pro-MMP-9 was coprecipitated with exogenous enzyme from lysates of CHO-K1 cells transfected with mouse alpha1(IV), suggesting that under overexpression conditions the enzyme can also interact with the alpha1 (IV) chain. Collectively, these studies further demonstrate the interactions of pro-MMP-9 with collagen IV chains and a unique processing and targeting of nondisulfide-bonded alpha2(IV) chains that may play a role in the surface/matrix association of pro-MMP-9.

  1. Tamibarotene-loaded citric acid-crosslinked alkali-treated collagen matrix as a coating material for a drug-eluting stent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Motoki; Takayanagi, Mariko; Fujiu, Katsuhito; Manabe, Ichiro; Nagai, Ryozo; Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2012-12-01

    Tamibarotene-loaded biodegradable matrices with antithrombogenic and drug-releasing properties were prepared in a crosslinking reaction between amino groups of alkali-treated collagen (AlCol) and active ester groups of trisuccinimidyl citrate. The resulting matrices were characterized by their residual amino group concentrations, swelling ratios and thermal, antithrombogenic and drug-releasing properties. It was clarified that the addition of tamibarotene does not inhibit matrix formation. After immersion in water, the swelling ratio of a matrix became lower than that prior to immersion. Thermal analysis indicated that AlCol interacted with tamibarotene. The addition of tamibarotene to the matrix did not influence the antithrombogenic property of the resulting matrix. A matrix with a high crosslinking density had a prolonged tamibarotene elution time. These results demonstrate that tamibarotene-loaded matrices have great potential as a coating material for drug-eluting stents.

  2. Artesunate modulates expression of matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors as well as collagen-IV to attenuate pulmonary fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Huang, G; Mo, B; Wang, C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of artesunate on extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation and the expression of collagen-IV, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP) to understand the pharmacological role of artesunate in pulmonary fibrosis. Eighty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four groups that were administered saline alone, bleomycin (BLM) alone, BLM + artesunate, or artesunate alone for 28 days. Lung tissues from 10 rats in each group were used to obtain lung fibroblast (LF) primary cells, and the rest were used to analyze protein expression. The mRNA expression of collagen-IV, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 in lung fibroblasts was detected by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The protein levels of collagen-IV, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 protein in lung tissues were analyzed by western blotting. Artesunate treatment alleviated alveolitis and pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin in rats, as indicated by a decreased lung coefficient and improvement of lung tissue morphology. Artesunate treatment also led to decreased collagen-IV protein levels, which might be a result of its downregulated expression and increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein and mRNA levels. Increased TIMP-1 and TIMP- 2 protein and mRNA levels were detected after artesunate treatment in lung tissues and primary lung fibroblast cells and may contribute to enhanced activity of MMP-2 and -9. These findings suggested that artesunate attenuates alveolitis and pulmonary fibrosis by regulating expression of collagen-IV, TIMP-1 and 2, as well as MMP-2 and -9, to reduce ECM accumulation. PMID:27323108

  3. A three-dimensional collagen construct to model lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of BV2 microglia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We report a novel method of culturing microglia in three dimension (3D) using collagen as a substrate. By culturing microglia within a matrix, we aim to emulate the physical state of microglia embedded within parenchyma. Methods BV2 microglia cell suspensions were prepared with type I collagen and cast into culture plates. To characterise the BV2 microglia cultured in 3D, the cultures were evaluated for their viability, cell morphology and response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation. Conventional monolayer cultures (grown on uncoated and collagen-coated polystyrene) were set up concurrently for comparison. Results BV2 microglia in 3D collagen matrices were viable at 48 hrs of culture and exhibit a ramified morphology with multiplanar cytoplasmic projections. Following stimulation with 1 μg/ml LPS, microglia cultured in 3D collagen gels increase their expression of nitric oxide (NO) and CD40, indicating their capacity to become activated within the matrix. Up to 97.8% of BV2 microglia grown in 3D cultures gained CD40 positivity in response to LPS, compared to approximately 60% of cells grown in a monolayer (P < .05). BV2 microglia in 3D collagen gels also showed increased mRNA and protein expression of inflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-α and the chemoattractant MCP-1 following LPS stimulation. Conclusions In summary, BV2 microglia cultured in 3D collagen hydrogels exhibit multiplanar cytoplasmic projections and undergo a characteristic and robust activation response to LPS. This culture system is accessible to a wide range of analyses and provides a useful new in vitro tool for research into microglial activation. PMID:25074682

  4. Quantification of collagen contraction in three-dimensional cell culture.

    PubMed

    Kopanska, Katarzyna S; Bussonnier, Matthias; Geraldo, Sara; Simon, Anthony; Vignjevic, Danijela; Betz, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Many different cell types including fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and cancer cells exert traction forces on the fibrous components of the extracellular matrix. This can be observed as matrix contraction both macro- and microscopically in three-dimensional (3D) tissues models such as collagen type I gels. The quantification of local contraction at the micron scale, including its directionality and speed, in correlation with other parameters such as cell invasion, local protein or gene expression, can provide useful information to study wound healing, organism development, and cancer metastasis. In this article, we present a set of tools to quantify the flow dynamics of collagen contraction, induced by cells migrating out of a multicellular cancer spheroid into a three-dimensional (3D) collagen matrix. We adapted a pseudo-speckle technique that can be applied to bright-field and fluorescent microscopy time series. The image analysis presented here is based on an in-house written software developed in the Matlab (Mathworks) programming environment. The analysis program is freely available from GitHub following the link: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.10116. This tool provides an automatized technique to measure collagen contraction that can be utilized in different 3D cellular systems.

  5. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  6. A quasi steady state method for solving transient Darcy flow in complex 3D fractured networks accounting for matrix to fracture flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nœtinger, B.

    2015-02-01

    Modeling natural Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN) receives more and more attention in applied geosciences, from oil and gas industry, to geothermal recovery and aquifer management. The fractures may be either natural, or artificial in case of well stimulation. Accounting for the flow inside the fracture network, and accounting for the transfers between the matrix and the fractures, with the same level of accuracy is an important issue for calibrating the well architecture and for setting up optimal resources recovery strategies. Recently, we proposed an original method allowing to model transient pressure diffusion in the fracture network only [1]. The matrix was assumed to be impervious. A systematic approximation scheme was built, allowing to model the initial DFN by a set of N unknowns located at each identified intersection between fractures. The higher N, the higher the accuracy of the model. The main assumption was using a quasi steady state hypothesis, that states that the characteristic diffusion time over one single fracture is negligible compared with the characteristic time of the macroscopic problem, e.g. change of boundary conditions. In that context, the lowest order approximation N = 1 has the form of solving a transient problem in a resistor/capacitor network, a so-called pipe network. Its topology is the same as the network of geometrical intersections between fractures. In this paper, we generalize this approach in order to account for fluxes from matrix to fractures. The quasi steady state hypothesis at the fracture level is still kept. Then, we show that in the case of well separated time scales between matrix and fractures, the preceding model needs only to be slightly modified in order to incorporate these fluxes. The additional knowledge of the so-called matrix to fracture transfer function allows to modify the mass matrix that becomes a time convolution operator. This is reminiscent of existing space averaged transient dual porosity models.

  7. Solid-state 3D imaging using a 1nJ/100ps laser diode transmitter and a single photon receiver matrix.

    PubMed

    Jahromi, Sahba; Jansson, Jussi-Pekka; Kostamovaara, Juha

    2016-09-19

    A 3D imaging concept based on pulsed time-of-flight focal plane imaging is presented which can be tailored flexibly in terms of performance parameters such as range, image update rate, field-of-view, 2D resolution, depth accuracy, etc. according to the needs of different applications. The transmitter is based on a laser diode operating in enhanced gain-switching mode with a simple MOS/CMOS-switch current driver and capable of producing short (~100ps FWHM) high energy (up to nJ) pulses at a high pulsing rate. The receiver consists of 2D SPAD and TDC arrays placed on the same die, but in separate arrays. Paraxial optics can be used to illuminate the target field-of-view with the receiver placed at the focal plane of the receiver lens. To validate the concept, a prototype system is presented with a bulk laser diode/MOS driver operating at a wavelength of 870nm with a pulsing rate of 100kHz as the transmitter and a single-chip 9x9 SPAD array with 10-channel TDC as the receiver. The possibility of using this method as a solid-state solution to the task of 3D imaging is discussed in the light of the results derived from this prototype.

  8. Solid-state 3D imaging using a 1nJ/100ps laser diode transmitter and a single photon receiver matrix.

    PubMed

    Jahromi, Sahba; Jansson, Jussi-Pekka; Kostamovaara, Juha

    2016-09-19

    A 3D imaging concept based on pulsed time-of-flight focal plane imaging is presented which can be tailored flexibly in terms of performance parameters such as range, image update rate, field-of-view, 2D resolution, depth accuracy, etc. according to the needs of different applications. The transmitter is based on a laser diode operating in enhanced gain-switching mode with a simple MOS/CMOS-switch current driver and capable of producing short (~100ps FWHM) high energy (up to nJ) pulses at a high pulsing rate. The receiver consists of 2D SPAD and TDC arrays placed on the same die, but in separate arrays. Paraxial optics can be used to illuminate the target field-of-view with the receiver placed at the focal plane of the receiver lens. To validate the concept, a prototype system is presented with a bulk laser diode/MOS driver operating at a wavelength of 870nm with a pulsing rate of 100kHz as the transmitter and a single-chip 9x9 SPAD array with 10-channel TDC as the receiver. The possibility of using this method as a solid-state solution to the task of 3D imaging is discussed in the light of the results derived from this prototype. PMID:27661900

  9. Use of collagen gel as an alternative extracellular matrix for the in vitro and in vivo growth of murine small intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Jabaji, Ziyad; Sears, Connie M; Brinkley, Garrett J; Lei, Nan Ye; Joshi, Vaidehi S; Wang, Jiafang; Lewis, Michael; Stelzner, Matthias; Martín, Martín G; Dunn, James C Y

    2013-12-01

    Methods for the in vitro culture of primary small intestinal epithelium have improved greatly in recent years. A critical barrier for the translation of this methodology to the patient's bedside is the ability to grow intestinal stem cells using a well-defined extracellular matrix. Current methods rely on the use of Matrigel(™), a proprietary basement membrane-enriched extracellular matrix gel produced in mice that is not approved for clinical use. We demonstrate for the first time the capacity to support the long-term in vitro growth of murine intestinal epithelium in monoculture, using type I collagen. We further demonstrate successful in vivo engraftment of enteroids co-cultured with intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts in collagen gel. Small intestinal crypts were isolated from 6 to 10 week old transgenic enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP+) mice and suspended within either Matrigel or collagen gel; cultures were supported using previously reported media and growth factors. After 1 week, cultures were either lysed for DNA or RNA extraction or were implanted subcutaneously in syngeneic host mice. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to determine expansion of the transgenic eGFP-DNA and to determine the mRNA gene expression profile. Immunohistochemistry was performed on in vitro cultures and recovered in vivo explants. Small intestinal crypts reliably expanded to form enteroids in either Matrigel or collagen in both mono- and co-cultures as confirmed by microscopy and eGFP-DNA qPCR quantification. Collagen-based cultures yielded a distinct morphology with smooth enteroids and epithelial monolayer growth at the gel surface; both enteroid and monolayer cells demonstrated reactivity to Cdx2, E-cadherin, CD10, Periodic Acid-Schiff, and lysozyme. Collagen-based enteroids were successfully subcultured in vitro, whereas pure monolayer epithelial sheets did not survive passaging. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction

  10. Biosynthesis of collagen I, II, RUNX2 and lubricin at different time points of chondrogenic differentiation in a 3D in vitro model of human mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Mobasheri, Ali; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Graziano, Adriana Carol Eleonora; Lo Furno, Debora; Avola, Rosanna; Mangano, Sebastiano; Giuffrida, Rosario; Cardile, Venera

    2014-10-01

    The first aim of the study was to identify the most appropriate time for differentiation of adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to chondrocytes, through the self-assembly process. For this purpose, the expression of some chondrocyte markers, such as collagen type I, collagen type II, RUNX2 and lubricin was investigated at different times (7, 14, 21 and 28 days) of chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs, by using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. The second aim of the study was to demonstrate that the expression of lubricin, such as the expression of collagen type II, could be a possible biomarker for the detection of chondrocytes well-being and viability in the natural self-assembling constructs, called 'cell pellets'. Histology (hematoxylin and eosin) and histochemistry (alcian blue staining) methods were used to assess the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs. The results showed that after 21 days the differentiated chondrocytes, when compared with MSCs cultured without chondrogenic medium (CD44, CD90 and CD105 positive; CD45, CD14 and CD34 negative), were able to produce significant quantities of collagen type I, collagen type II, and lubricin, suggesting hyaline cartilage formation. During the differentiation phase, the cells showed a reduced expression of RUNX2, a protein expressed by osteoblasts. Our studies demonstrated that 21 days is the optimum time for the implantation of chondrocytes differentiated from adipose tissue-derived MSCs. This information could be useful for the future development of cell-based repair therapies for degenerative diseases of articular cartilage.

  11. Microstructural and Mechanical Differences Between Digested Collagen-Fibrin Co-Gels and Pure Collagen and Fibrin Gels

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Victor K.; Frey, Christina R.; Kerandi, Allan M.; Lake, Spencer P.; Tranquillo, Robert T.; Barocas, Victor H.

    2012-01-01

    Collagen and fibrin are important extra-cellular matrix (ECM) components in the body, providing structural integrity to various tissues. These biopolymers are also common scaffolds used in tissue engineering. This study investigated how co-gelation of collagen and fibrin affected the properties of each individual protein network. Collagen-fibrin co-gels were cast and subsequently digested using either plasmin or collagenase; the microstructure and mechanical behavior of the resulting networks were then compared with respective pure collagen or fibrin gels of the same protein concentration. The morphologies of the collagen networks were further analyzed via 3-D network reconstruction from confocal image z-stacks. Both collagen and fibrin exhibited a decrease in mean fiber diameter when formed in the co-gels compared to the pure gels; this microstructural change was accompanied by increased failure strain and decreased tangent modulus for both collagen and fibrin following selected digestion of the co-gels. In addition, analysis of the reconstructed collagen networks indicated presence of very long fibers and clustering of fibrils, resulting in very high connectivities for collagen networks formed in co-gels. PMID:22828381

  12. Design of nano- and microfiber combined scaffolds by electrospinning of collagen onto starch-based fiber meshes: a man-made equivalent of natural extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Tuzlakoglu, Kadriye; Santos, Marina I; Neves, Nuno; Reis, Rui L

    2011-02-01

    Mimicking the structural organization and biologic function of natural extracellular matrix has been one of the main goals of tissue engineering. Nevertheless, the majority of scaffolding materials for bone regeneration highlights biochemical functionality in detriment of mechanical properties. In this work we present a rather innovative construct that combines in the same structure electrospun type I collagen nanofibers with starch-based microfibers. These combined structures were obtained by a two-step methodology and structurally consist in a type I collagen nano-network incorporated on a macro starch-based support. The morphology of the developed structures was assessed by several microscopy techniques and the collagenous nature of the nano-network was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. In addition, and especially regarding the requirements of large bone defects, we also successfully introduced the concept of layer by layer, as a way to produce thicker structures. In an attempt to recreate bone microenvironment, the design and biochemical composition of the combined structures also envisioned bone-forming cells and endothelial cells (ECs). The inclusion of a type I collagen nano-network induced a stretched morphology and improved the metabolic activity of osteoblasts. Regarding ECs, the presence of type I collagen on the combined structures provided adhesive support and obviated the need of precoating with fibronectin. It was also importantly observed that ECs on the nano-network organized into circular structures, a three-dimensional arrangement distinct from that observed for osteoblasts and resembling the microcappillary-like organizations formed during angiogenesis. By providing simultaneously physical and chemical cues for cells, the herein-proposed combined structures hold a great potential in bone regeneration as a man-made equivalent of extracellular matrix.

  13. Degradation of connective tissue matrices by macrophages. II. Influence of matrix composition on proteolysis of glycoproteins, elastin, and collagen by macrophages in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.A.; Werb, Z.

    1980-12-01

    Thioglycollate-elicited mouse peritoneal macrophages were cultured in contact with the mixture of extracellular matrix proteins produced by rat smooth muscle cells in culture. Both live macrophages and their conditioned media hydrolyzed glycoproteins, elastin, and collagen. Live macrophages also degraded extracellular connective tissue proteins secreted by endothelial cells and fibroblasts. The glycoproteins in the matrix markedly inhibited the rate of digestion of the other macromolecules, particularly elastin. When plasminogen was added to the matrix, activation of plasminogen to plasmin resulted in the hydrolysis of the glycoprotein components, which then allowed the macrophage elastase easier access to its substrate, elastin. Thus, although plasmin has no direct elastinolytic activity, its presence accelerated the rate of hydrolysis of elastin and therefore the rate of matrix degradation. These findings may be important in an understanding of disease states, such as emphysema and atherosclerosis, that are characterized by the destruction of connective tissue.

  14. The effect of stromelysin-1 (MMP-3) on non-collagenous extracellular matrix proteins of demineralized dentin and the adhesive properties of restorative resins.

    PubMed

    Boukpessi, T; Menashi, S; Camoin, L; Tencate, J M; Goldberg, M; Chaussain-Miller, C

    2008-11-01

    Dentin non-collagenous matrix components (NCPs) are structural proteins involved in the formation, the architecture and the mineralization of the extracellular matrix (ECM). We investigated here how recombinant metalloproteinase stromelysin-1, also termed MMP-3, initiates the release of ECM molecules from artificially demineralized human dentin. Analysis of the supernatants by Western blotting reveals that MMP-3 extracts PGs (decorin, biglycan), and also a series of phosphorylated proteins: dentin sialoprotein (DSP), osteopontin (OPN), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and MEPE, but neither dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP1), another member of the SIBLING family, nor osteocalcin (OC), a non-phosphorylated matrix molecule. After treatment of dentin surfaces by MMP-3, scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination of resin replica shows an increased penetration of the resin into the dentin tubules when compared to surfaces only treated by demineralizing solutions. This preclinical investigation suggests that MMP-3 may be used to improve the adhesive properties of restorative materials.

  15. Decoupling diffusional from dimensional control of signaling in 3D culture reveals a role for myosin in tubulogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Srivatsan; Shen, Colette J.; Desai, Ravi A.; Sniadecki, Nathan J.; Nelson, Celeste M.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel microfabricated platform to culture cells within arrays of micrometer-scale three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix scaffolds (microgels). These microscale cultures eliminate diffusion barriers that are intrinsic to traditional 3D culture systems (macrogels) and enable uniform cytokine stimulation of the entire culture population, as well as allow immunolabeling, imaging and population-based biochemical assays across the relatively coplanar microgels. Examining early signaling associated with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-mediated scattering and tubulogenesis of MDCK cells revealed that 3D culture modulates cellular responses both through dimensionality and altered stimulation rates. Comparing responses in 2D culture, microgels and macrogels demonstrated that HGF-induced ERK signaling was driven by the dynamics of stimulation and not by whether cells were in a 2D or 3D environment, and that this ERK signaling was equally important for HGF-induced cell scattering on 2D substrates and tubulogenesis in 3D. By contrast, we discovered a specific HGF-induced increase in myosin expression leading to sustained downregulation of myosin activity that occurred only within 3D contexts and was required for 3D tubulogenesis but not 2D scattering. Interestingly, although absent in cells on collagen-coated plates, downregulation of myosin activity also occurred for cells on collagen gels, but was transient and mediated by a combination of myosin dephosphorylation and enhanced myosin expression. Furthermore, upregulating myosin activity via siRNA targeted to a myosin phosphatase did not attenuate scattering in 2D but did inhibit tubulogenesis in 3D. Together, these results demonstrate that cellular responses to soluble cues in 3D culture are regulated by both rates of stimulation and by matrix dimensionality, and highlight the importance of decoupling these effects to identify early signals relevant to cellular function in 3D environments. PMID:20682635

  16. Sustained PDGF-BB release from PHBHHx loaded nanoparticles in 3D hydrogel/stem cell model.

    PubMed

    Dong, Cui-Ling; Webb, William R; Peng, Qiang; Tang, James Z; Forsyth, Nicholas R; Chen, Guo-Qiang; El Haj, Alicia J

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to design a growth factor loaded copolyester of 3-hydroxybutyrate and 3-hydroxyhexanoate (PHBHHx) nanoparticles containing 3D collagen matrix to achieve growth factor sustained release for long-term stimulation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) proliferation/differentiation for tissue engineer application. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), which is known to enhance hMSCs proliferation in human serum, was selected as a model growth factor, and biodegradable copolyester of PHBHHx was chosen to be the sustained release vehicle. PDGF-BB phospholipid complex encapsulated PHBHHx nanoparticles were fabricated, and their effect on hMSCs proliferation was investigated via assays of CCK-8 and live-dead staining to cells inoculated in 2D tissue culture plates and 3D collagen gel scaffolds, respectively. The resulting spherical PHBHHx nanoparticles were stable in terms of their mean particle size, polydispersity index and zeta potential before and after lyophilization. In vitro study revealed a sustained release of PDGF-BB with a low burst release. Furthermore, sustained released PDGF-BB was revealed to significantly promote hMSCs proliferation in both cell monolayer and cell seeded 3D collagen scaffolds inoculated in serum-free media. Therefore, the 3D collagen matrices with locally sustained release growth factor nanoparticles hold promise to be used for stem cell tissue engineering.

  17. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  18. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  19. Collagen matrix-induced expression of integrin αVβ3 in circulating angiogenic cells can be targeted by matricellular protein CCN1 to enhance their function.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Brian; Vulesevic, Branka; Ostojic, Aleksandra; Ruel, Marc; Suuronen, Erik J

    2015-04-01

    Circulating angiogenic cells (CACs) play an important role in vascular homeostasis and hold therapeutic promise for treating a variety of cardiovascular diseases. However, further improvements are needed because the effects of CAC therapy remain minimal or transient. The regenerative potential of these cells can be improved by culture on a collagen-based matrix through the up-regulation of key integrin proteins. We found that human CAC function was enhanced by using the matricellular protein CCN1 (CYR61/CTGF/NOV family member 1) to target integrin αV and β3, which are up-regulated on matrix. Compared to matrix-cultured CACs, CCN1-matrix CACs exhibited a 2.2-fold increase in cell proliferation, 1.8-fold greater migration toward VEGF, and 1.7-fold more incorporation into capillary-like structures in an angiogenesis assay. In vivo, intramuscular injection of CCN1-matrix-cultured CACs into ischemic hind limbs of CD-1 nude mice resulted in blood flow recovery to 80% of baseline, which was greater than matrix-cultured CACs (66%) and PBS (35%) treatment groups. Furthermore, transplanted CCN1-matrix CACs exhibited greater engraftment (11-fold) and stimulated the up-regulation of survival and angiogenic genes (>3-fold). These findings reveal the importance of cell-matrix interactions in regulating CAC function and also reveal a mechanism by which these may be exploited to enhance cell therapies for ischemic disease.

  20. Adamts1 is highly induced in rachitic bones of FGF23 transgenic mice and participates in degradation of non-mineralized bone matrix collagen.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lijuan; Andersson, Göran; Jonsson, Kenneth B; Melhus, Håkan; Lind, Thomas

    2013-01-18

    Transgenic mice overexpressing fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) in osteoblasts have a rachitic bone phenotype. These mice display hypomineralized bones, increased expression of osteoblast markers, but osteoclast numbers are unaltered or slightly reduced. Paradoxically, they show increased serum levels of the bone resorption marker CTX, a type I collagen degradation fragment. Here we analyzed a matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP-) like secreted protease, Adamts1, that has previously been associated with osteoblastic type I collagen breakdown in vitro. Bones from FGF23 transgenic (tg) mice displayed increased Adamts1 protein upon both immunohistological staining and Western blotting. We further found Adamts1 protein together with excessively degraded type I collagen in the non-mineralized bone fraction of FGF23 tg mice. A similar degradation pattern of type I collagen was noticed upon forced expression of Adamts1 in osteoblastic cells in vitro. Importantly, these Adamts1-expressing osteoblastic cells exhibited increased release of CTX fragments when cultured on demineralized bone discs. Together, these results demonstrate for the first time that Adamts1 can be highly induced in bone tissue and that this MMP-like protease can increase osteoblastic release of CTX fragments from non-mineralized bone. Thus, Adamts1 potentially contributes to the increased serum levels of CTX in rickets/osteomalacia.

  1. Adamts1 is highly induced in rachitic bones of FGF23 transgenic mice and participates in degradation of non-mineralized bone matrix collagen.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lijuan; Andersson, Göran; Jonsson, Kenneth B; Melhus, Håkan; Lind, Thomas

    2013-01-18

    Transgenic mice overexpressing fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) in osteoblasts have a rachitic bone phenotype. These mice display hypomineralized bones, increased expression of osteoblast markers, but osteoclast numbers are unaltered or slightly reduced. Paradoxically, they show increased serum levels of the bone resorption marker CTX, a type I collagen degradation fragment. Here we analyzed a matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP-) like secreted protease, Adamts1, that has previously been associated with osteoblastic type I collagen breakdown in vitro. Bones from FGF23 transgenic (tg) mice displayed increased Adamts1 protein upon both immunohistological staining and Western blotting. We further found Adamts1 protein together with excessively degraded type I collagen in the non-mineralized bone fraction of FGF23 tg mice. A similar degradation pattern of type I collagen was noticed upon forced expression of Adamts1 in osteoblastic cells in vitro. Importantly, these Adamts1-expressing osteoblastic cells exhibited increased release of CTX fragments when cultured on demineralized bone discs. Together, these results demonstrate for the first time that Adamts1 can be highly induced in bone tissue and that this MMP-like protease can increase osteoblastic release of CTX fragments from non-mineralized bone. Thus, Adamts1 potentially contributes to the increased serum levels of CTX in rickets/osteomalacia. PMID:23261447

  2. Biphasic response of cell invasion to matrix stiffness in three-dimensional biopolymer networks.

    PubMed

    Lang, Nadine R; Skodzek, Kai; Hurst, Sebastian; Mainka, Astrid; Steinwachs, Julian; Schneider, Julia; Aifantis, Katerina E; Fabry, Ben

    2015-02-01

    When cells come in contact with an adhesive matrix, they begin to spread and migrate with a speed that depends on the stiffness of the extracellular matrix. On a flat surface, migration speed decreases with matrix stiffness mainly due to an increased stability of focal adhesions. In a three-dimensional (3-D) environment, cell migration is thought to be additionally impaired by the steric hindrance imposed by the surrounding matrix. For porous 3-D biopolymer networks such as collagen gels, however, the effect of matrix stiffness on cell migration is difficult to separate from effects of matrix pore size and adhesive ligand density, and is therefore unknown. Here we used glutaraldehyde as a crosslinker to increase the stiffness of self-assembled collagen biopolymer networks independently of collagen concentration or pore size. Breast carcinoma cells were seeded onto the surface of 3-D collagen gels, and the invasion depth was measured after 3 days of culture. Cell invasion in gels with pore sizes >5 μm increased with higher gel stiffness, whereas invasion in gels with smaller pores decreased with higher gel stiffness. These data show that 3-D cell invasion is enhanced by higher matrix stiffness, opposite to cell behavior in two dimensions, as long as the pore size does not fall below a critical value where it causes excessive steric hindrance. These findings may be important for optimizing the recellularization of soft tissue implants or for the design of 3-D invasion models in cancer research.

  3. Biphasic response of cell invasion to matrix stiffness in 3-dimensional biopolymer networks

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Nadine R.; Skodzek, Kai; Hurst, Sebastian; Mainka, Astrid; Steinwachs, Julian; Schneider, Julia; Aifantis, Katerina E.; Fabry, Ben

    2015-01-01

    When cells come in contact with an adhesive matrix, they begin to spread and migrate with a speed that depends on the stiffness of the extracellular matrix. On a flat surface, migration speed decreases with matrix stiffness mainly due to an increased stability of focal adhesions. In a 3-dimensional (3D) environment, cell migration is thought to be additionally impaired by the steric hindrance imposed by the surrounding matrix. For porous 3D biopolymer networks such as collagen gels, however, the effect of matrix stiffness on cell migration is difficult to separate from effects of matrix pore size and adhesive ligand density, and is therefore unknown. Here we used glutaraldehyde as a crosslinker to increase the stiffness of self-assembled collagen biopolymer networks independently of collagen concentration or pore size. Breast carcinoma cells were seeded onto the surface of 3D collagen gels, and the invasion depth was measured after 3 days of culture. Cell invasion in gels with pore sizes larger than 5 μm increased with higher gel stiffness, whereas invasion in gels with smaller pores decreased with higher gel stiffness. These data show that 3D cell invasion is enhanced by higher matrix stiffness, opposite to cell behavior in 2D, as long as the pore size does not fall below a critical value where it causes excessive steric hindrance. These findings may be important for optimizing the recellularization of soft tissue implants or for the design of 3D invasion models in cancer research. PMID:25462839

  4. Accelerated fracture healing in the geriatric, osteoporotic rat with recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB and an injectable beta-tricalcium phosphate/collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Hollinger, Jeffrey O; Onikepe, Andrew O; MacKrell, Jim; Einhorn, Thomas; Bradica, Gino; Lynch, Samuel; Hart, Charles E

    2008-01-01

    Aging and osteoporosis contribute to decreased bone mass and bone mineral density as well as compromised fracture healing rates and bone repair quality. Consequently, the purpose of this study was to determine if recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB (rhPDGF-BB) delivered in an injectable beta-tricalcium phosphate/collagen matrix would enhance tibial fracture healing in geriatric (>2 years of age), osteoporotic rats. A total of 80 rats were divided equally among four groups: Fracture alone; Fracture plus matrix; Fracture plus matrix and either 0.3 mg/mL or 1.0 mg/mL rhPDGF-BB. At 3 and 5 weeks, rats were euthanized and treatment outcome was assessed histologically, radiographically, biomechanically, and by micro-CT. Results indicated rhPDGF-BB-treated fractures in osteoporotic, geriatric rats caused a statistically significant time-dependent increase in torsional strength 5 weeks after treatment. The healed fractures were equivalent in torsional strength to the contralateral, unoperated tibiae. Data from the study are the first, to our knowledge, to underscore rhPDGF-BB efficacy in an injectable beta-tricalcium phosphate/collagen matrix accelerated fracture repair in a geriatric, osteoporotic rat model.

  5. Abnormal arrangement of a collagen/apatite extracellular matrix orthogonal to osteoblast alignment is constructed by a nanoscale periodic surface structure.

    PubMed

    Matsugaki, Aira; Aramoto, Gento; Ninomiya, Takafumi; Sawada, Hiroshi; Hata, Satoshi; Nakano, Takayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Morphological and directional alteration of cells is essential for structurally appropriate construction of tissues and organs. In particular, osteoblast alignment is crucial for the realization of anisotropic bone tissue microstructure. In this article, the orientation of a collagen/apatite extracellular matrix (ECM) was established by controlling osteoblast alignment using a surface geometry with nanometer-sized periodicity induced by laser ablation. Laser irradiation induced self-organized periodic structures (laser-induced periodic surface structures; LIPSS) with a spatial period equal to the wavelength of the incident laser on the surface of biomedical alloys of Ti-6Al-4V and Co-Cr-Mo. Osteoblast orientation was successfully induced parallel to the grating structure. Notably, both the fibrous orientation of the secreted collagen matrix and the c-axis of the produced apatite crystals were orientated orthogonal to the cell direction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that bone tissue anisotropy is controllable, including the characteristic organization of a collagen/apatite composite orthogonal to the osteoblast orientation, by controlling the cell alignment using periodic surface geometry.

  6. MT1-MMP promotes cell growth and ERK activation through c-Src and paxillin in three-dimensional collagen matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Takino, Takahisa; Tsuge, Hisashi; Ozawa, Terumasa; Sato, Hiroshi

    2010-06-11

    Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is essential for tumor invasion and growth. We show here that MT1-MMP induces extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in cancer cells cultured in collagen gel, which is indispensable for their proliferation. Inhibition of MT1-MMP by MMP inhibitor or small interfering RNA suppressed activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and ERK in MT1-MMP-expressing cancer cells, which resulted in up-regulation of p21{sup WAF1} and suppression of cell growth in collagen gel. Cell proliferation was also abrogated by the inhibitor against ERK pathway without affecting FAK phosphorylation. MT1-MMP and integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} were shown to be involved in c-Src activation, which induced FAK and ERK activation in collagen gel. These MT1-MMP-mediated signal transductions were paxillin dependent, as knockdown of paxillin reduced cell growth and ERK activation, and co-expression of MT1-MMP with paxillin induced ERK activation. The results suggest that MT1-MMP contributes to proliferation of cancer cells in the extracellular matrix by activating ERK through c-Src and paxillin.

  7. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  8. Distribution of non-collagenous dentin matrix proteins and proteoglycans, and their relation to calcium accumulation in bisphosphonate-affected rat incisors.

    PubMed

    Ohma, N; Takagi, Y; Takano, Y

    2000-06-01

    It has been reported that multiple injections of 1-hydroxyethylidene- 1,1-bisphosphonate (HEBP) to rats prevent mineralization of incisor dentin, thereby revealing high concentrations of calcium in the non-mineralized matrix of circumpulpal dentin. To identify the molecules responsible for calcium accumulation in circumpulpal dentin matrix, rats were injected daily with HEBP (8 mg P/kg) for 7 d, and the incisors processed for various histochemical and immunohistochemical staining of non-collagenous matrices of dentin. Cuprolinic blue reactions for proteoglycans (PGs) were equally distributed in non-mineralized matrix of mantle and circumpulpal dentin layers. Dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and osteopontin (OPN) immunoreactions were found in non-mineralized circumpulpal dentin matrix, but not in mantle dentin. In normal incisors, however, predentin matrix showing significant DSP immunoreactivity was negative for Ca-GBHA reactions. HEBP-affected, non-mineralized OPN immunopositive bone matrix was also non-reactive for calcium. From these observations, neither PGs, OPN nor DSP appear to be responsible for calcium accumulation in HEBP-affected circumpulpal dentin. Stains-all reactive component, possibly dentin phosphoprotein (DPP), only showed the same distribution as that of Ca-GBHA in both HEBP-affected and normal dentin matrix, implicating a possible contribution of DPP to calcium accumulation in circumpulpal dentin and, hence, to appositional mineralization of dentin. PMID:10872993

  9. Metabolic alteration of HepG2 in scaffold-based 3-D culture: proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Pruksakorn, Dumnoensun; Lirdprapamongkol, Kriengsak; Chokchaichamnankit, Daranee; Subhasitanont, Pantipa; Chiablaem, Khajeelak; Svasti, Jisnuson; Srisomsap, Chantragan

    2010-11-01

    3-D cell culture models are important in cancer biology since they provide improved understanding of tumor microenvironment. We have established a 3-D culture model using HepG2 in natural collagen-based scaffold to mimic the development of small avascular tumor in vivo. Morphological characterization showed that HepG2 colonies grew within the interior of the scaffold and showed enhanced extracellular matrix deposition. High levels of cell proliferation in the outermost regions of the scaffold created a hypoxic microenvironment in the 3-D culture system, as indicated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α stabilization, detectable by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Proteomic studies showed decreased expression of several mitochondrial proteins and increased expression of proteins in anaerobic glycolysis under 3-D culture compared to monolayer culture. Creatine kinase was also upregulated in 3-D culture, indicating its possible role as an important energy buffer system under hypoxic microenvironment. Increased levels of proteins in nucleotide metabolism may relate to cellular energy. Thus, our results suggest that HepG2 cells under 3-D culture adapt their energy metabolism in response to hypoxic conditions. Metabolic alterations in the 3-D culture model may relate to physiological changes relevant to development of small avascular tumor in vivo and their study may improve future therapeutic strategies.

  10. Scanning electron microscopy subsequent to a combined treatment of NaOCl and EDTA in some non-collagenous calcified matrixes.

    PubMed

    Kodaka, T; Sano, T; Mori, R

    2000-01-01

    Using backscattered electron (BSE) imaging and scanning electron microscopy, subsequent to a combined treatment of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) or only with EDTA etching, we observed some structures of non-collagenous calcified matrixes with the aim of revealing the correlation of deposition between calcification degree and organic amount. In human tooth enamel, the NaOCl-EDTA method eroded more intensively the hypocalcified prisms of enamel tufts containing a relatively large amount of EDTA-insoluble organic matter than the hypercalcified normal prismatic enamel containing a small amount of the organic matter. Afibrillar cementum, one of the non-collagenous calcified tissues similar to the enamel, has been reported to consist of organic-rich and poor incremental lamellae. The BSE imaging showed an alternation pattern of hypocalcification and hypercalcification. The hypocalcified lamellae were retained by EDTA etching, while the hypercalcified lamellae showed a resistance against the NaOCl-EDTA method. In the non-collagenous calcareous concretions of human pineal body, organic-rich and poor, and hyper- and hypocalcified incremental lamellae have been reported. The deposition pattern of calcification degree and organic amount was similar to that in afibrillar cementum, and the hypercalcified lamellae showed a resistance against the NaOCl-EDTA method. In conclusion, the high and the lower calcified regions of non-collagenous calcified matrixes contained smaller and larger amounts of EDTA-insoluble organic matter respectively. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy subsequent to the NaOCl-EDTA method corresponding to the BSE imaging clearly showed fine calcified structures compared with the BSE imaging. PMID:10791437

  11. Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) Plays a Critical Role in the Softening of Common Carp Muscle during Chilled Storage by Degradation of Type I and V Collagens.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Wang, Cheng; Cai, Qiu-Feng; Zhang, Qian; Weng, Ling; Liu, Guang-Ming; Su, Wen-Jin; Cao, Min-Jie

    2015-12-30

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are proposed to play important roles in the degradation of collagens, thus causing the post-mortem softening of fish muscle, although the specific mechanism remains largely unresolved. Previously, we reported the existence of gelatinase-like proteinases in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) muscle. The primary structures of these proteinases, however, have never been investigated. In the present study, two MMPs with molecular masses of 66 and 65 kDa were purified to homogeneity from common carp muscle by ammonium sulfate fractionation and a series of column chromatographies. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS) analysis indicated that they are completely identical to MMP-2 from common carp. During chilled storage of common carp at 4 °C, the enzymatic activity of MMP-2 increased to 212% in 12 h while the texture profile increased over the first 2 h and gradually decreased. On the other hand, type V collagen was purified to homogeneity and a specific polyclonal antibody against this protein was prepared. Both type I and V collagens were effectively hydrolyzed by MMP-2 at 30 °C and even at 4 °C. Furthermore, injection of metalloproteinase proteinase inhibitor EDTA into the blood vessel of live common carp suppressed post-mortem tenderization significantly. All of these results confirmed that MMP-2 is a major proteinase responsible for the degradation of collagens, resulting in the softening of fish muscle during chilled storage. PMID:26653826

  12. Superelastic, superabsorbent and 3D nanofiber-assembled scaffold for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiming; Ma, Jun; Zhu, Lei; Morsi, Yosry; Ei-Hamshary, Hany; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Mo, Xiumei

    2016-06-01

    Fabrication of 3D scaffold to mimic the nanofibrous structure of the nature extracellular matrix (ECM) with appropriate mechanical properties and excellent biocompatibility, remain an important technical challenge in tissue engineering. The present study reports the strategy to fabricate a 3D nanofibrous scaffold with similar structure to collagen in ECM by combining electrospinning and freeze-drying technique. With the technique reported here, a nanofibrous structure scaffold with hydrophilic and superabsorbent properties can be readily prepared by Gelatin and Polylactic acid (PLA). In wet state the scaffold also shows a super-elastic property, which could bear a compressive strain as high as 80% and recovers its original shape afterwards. Moreover, after 6 days of culture, L-929 cells grow, proliferate and infiltrated into the scaffold. The results suggest that this 3D nanofibrous scaffold would be promising for varied field of tissue engineering application.

  13. Tissuelike 3D Assemblies of Human Broncho-Epithelial Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissuelike assemblies (TLAs) of human broncho-epithelial (HBE) cells have been developed for use in in vitro research on infection of humans by respiratory viruses. The 2D monolayer HBE cell cultures heretofore used in such research lack the complex cell structures and interactions characteristic of in vivo tissues and, consequently, do not adequately emulate the infection dynamics of in-vivo microbial adhesion and invasion. In contrast, the 3D HBE TLAs are characterized by more-realistic reproductions of the geometrical and functional complexity, differentiation of cells, cell-to-cell interactions, and cell-to-matrix interactions characteristic of human respiratory epithelia. Hence, the 3D HBE TLAs are expected to make it possible to perform at least some of the research in vitro under more-realistic conditions, without need to infect human subjects. The TLAs are grown on collagen-coated cyclodextran microbeads under controlled conditions in a nutrient liquid in the simulated microgravitational environment of a bioreactor of the rotating- wall-vessel type. Primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells are used as a foundation matrix, while adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cells are used as the overlying component. The beads become coated with cells, and cells on adjacent beads coalesce into 3D masses. The resulting TLAs have been found to share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelia including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The differentiation of the cells in these TLAs into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues is confirmed by the presence of compounds, including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium marker compounds, and by the production of tissue mucin. In a series of initial infection tests, TLA cultures were inoculated with human respiratory syncytial viruses and parainfluenza type 3 viruses. Infection was confirmed by photomicrographs that

  14. Ascorbate Enhances Elastin Synthesis in 3D Tissue-Engineered Pulmonary Fibroblasts Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Derricks, Kelsey E.; Rich, Celeste B.; Buczek-Thomas, Jo Ann; Nugent, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrix remodeling is a continuous process that is critical to maintaining tissue homeostasis, and alterations in this process have been implicated in chronic diseases such as atherosclerosis, lung fibrosis, and emphysema. Collagen and elastin are subject to ascorbate-dependent hydroxylation. While this post-translational modification in collagen is critical for function, the role of hydroxylation of elastin is not well understood. A number of studies have indicated that ascorbate leads to reduced elastin synthesis. However, these studies were limited to analysis of cells grown under traditional 2D tissue culture conditions. To investigate this process we evaluated elastin and collagen synthesis in primary rat neonatal pulmonary fibroblasts in response to ascorbate treatment in traditional 2D culture and within 3D cross-linked gelatin matrices (Gelfoam). We observed little change in elastin or collagen biosynthesis in standard 2D cultures treated with ascorbate, yet observed a dramatic increase in elastin protein and mRNA levels in response to ascorbate in 3D cell-Gelfoam constructs. These data suggest that the cell-ECM architecture dictates pulmonary cell response to ascorbate, and that approaches aimed toward stimulating ECM repair or engineering functional cell-derived matrices should consider all aspects of the cellular environment. PMID:23648172

  15. Mechanisms of lamellar collagen formation in connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Ghazanfari, Samaneh; Khademhosseini, Ali; Smit, Theodoor H

    2016-08-01

    The objective of tissue engineering is to regenerate functional tissues. Engineering functional tissues requires an understanding of the mechanisms that guide the formation and evolution of structure in the extracellular matrix (ECM). In particular, the three-dimensional (3D) collagen fiber arrangement is important as it is the key structural determinant that provides mechanical integrity and biological function. In this review, we survey the current knowledge on collagen organization mechanisms that can be applied to create well-structured functional lamellar tissues and in particular intervertebral disc and cornea. Thus far, the mechanisms behind the formation of cross-aligned collagen fibers in the lamellar structures is not fully understood. We start with cell-induced collagen alignment and strain-stabilization behavior mechanisms which can explain a single anisotropically aligned collagen fiber layer. These mechanisms may explain why there is anisotropy in a single layer in the first place. However, they cannot explain why a consecutive collagen layer is laid down with an alternating alignment. Therefore, we explored another mechanism, called liquid crystal phasing. While dense concentrations of collagen show such behavior, there is little evidence that the conditions for liquid crystal phasing are actually met in vivo. Instead, lysyl aldehyde-derived collagen cross-links have been found essential for correct lamellar matrix deposition. Furthermore, we suggest that supra-cellular (tissue-level) shear stress may be instrumental in the alignment of collagen fibers. Understanding the potential mechanisms behind the lamellar collagen structure in connective tissues will lead to further improvement of the regeneration strategies of functional complex lamellar tissues.

  16. Matrix production and collagen structure are enhanced in two types of osteogenic progenitor cells by a simple fluid shear stress stimulus.

    PubMed

    Delaine-Smith, R M; MacNeil, S; Reilly, G C

    2012-08-03

    Mesenchymal progenitor cells play a vital role in bone regenerative medicine and tissue engineering strategies. To be clinically useful osteoprogenitors should be readily available with the potential to form bone matrix. While mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow have shown promise for tissue engineering, they are obtained in small numbers and there is risk of donor site morbidity. Osteogenic progenitor cells derived from dermal tissue may provide a more abundant and easily expandable source of cells. Bone turnover in vivo is regulated by mechanical forces, particularly oscillatory fluid shear stresses (FSS), and in vitro osteogenic progenitors have been shown to be regulated by mechanical stimuli. The aim of this study was to assess what effect osteogenic media and FSS, generated by a simple rocking platform, had on cell behaviour and matrix production in human progenitor dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) and the embryonic stem cell-derived mesenchymal progenitor cell line (hES-MP). Osteogenic media stimulated alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) and calcium deposition in HDFs. The addition of FSS further enhanced ALP activity and mineralised matrix deposition in both progenitor cells cultured in osteogenic media. Both types of progenitor cell subjected to FSS showed increases in collagen secretion and apparent collagen organisation as imaged by second harmonic generation.

  17. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Sense Three Dimensional Type I Collagen through Discoidin Domain Receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Lund, A W; Stegemann, J P; Plopper, G E

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix provides structural and organizational cues for tissue development and defines and maintains cellular phenotype during cell fate determination. Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells use this matrix to tightly regulate the balance between their differentiation potential and self-renewal in the native niche. When understood, the mechanisms that govern cell-matrix crosstalk during differentiation will allow for efficient engineering of natural and synthetic matrices to specifically direct and maintain stem cell phenotype. This work identifies the discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a collagen activated receptor tyrosine kinase, as a potential link through which stem cells sense and respond to the 3D organization of their extracellular matrix microenvironment. DDR1 is dependent upon both the structure and proteolytic state of its collagen ligand and is specifically expressed and localized in three dimensional type I collagen culture. Inhibition of DDR1 expression results in decreased osteogenic potential, increased cell spreading, stress fiber formation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Additionally, loss of DDR1 activity alters the cell-mediated organization of the naïve type I collagen matrix. Taken together, these results demonstrate a role for DDR1 in the stem cell response to and interaction with three dimensional type I collagen. Dynamic changes in cell shape in 3D culture and the tuning of the local ECM microstructure, directs crosstalk between DDR1 and two dimensional mechanisms of osteogenesis that can alter their traditional roles.

  18. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  19. Boundary Stiffness Regulates Fibroblast Behavior in Collagen Gels

    PubMed Central

    John, Jeffrey; Quinlan, Angela Throm; Silvestri, Chiara; Billiar, Kristen

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have illustrated the profound dependence of cellular behavior on the stiffness of 2D culture substrates. The goal of this study was to develop a method to alter the stiffness cells experience in a standard 3D collagen gel model without affecting the physiochemical properties of the extracellular matrix. A device was developed utilizing compliant anchors (0.048–0.64 N m−1) to tune the boundary stiffness of suspended collagen gels in between the commonly utilized free and fixed conditions (zero and infinite stiffness boundary stiffness). We demonstrate the principle of operation with finite element analyses and a wide range of experimental studies. In all cases, boundary stiffness has a strong influence on cell behavior, most notably eliciting higher basal tension and activated force (in response to KCl) and more pronounced remodeling of the collagen matrix at higher boundary stiffness levels. Measured equibiaxial forces for gels seeded with 3 million human foreskin fibroblasts range from 0.05 to 1 mN increasing monotonically with boundary stiffness. Estimated force per cell ranges from 17 to 100 nN utilizing representative volume element analysis. This device provides a valuable tool to independently study the effect of the mechanical environment of the cell in a 3D collagen matrix. PMID:20012205

  20. Dinitrosyl iron complexes with glutathione incorporated into a collagen matrix as a base for the design of drugs accelerating skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Shekhter, Anatoly B; Rudenko, Tatyana G; Istranov, Leonid P; Guller, Anna E; Borodulin, Rostislav R; Vanin, Anatoly F

    2015-10-12

    Composites of a collagen matrix and dinitrosyl iron complexes with glutathione (DNIC-GS) (in a dose of 4.0 μmoles per item) in the form of spongy sheets (DNIC-Col) were prepared and then topically applied in rat excisional full-thickness skin wound model. The effects of DNIC-Col were studied in comparison with spontaneously healing wounds (SpWH) and wounds treated with collagen sponges (Col) without DNIC-GS. The composites induced statistically and clinically significant acceleration of complete wound closure (21±1 day versus 23±1 day and 26±1 day for DNIC-Col, Col and SpWH, respectively). Histological examination of wound tissues on days 4, 14, 18 and 21 after surgery demonstrated that this improvement was supported by enhanced growth, maturation and fibrous transformation of granulation tissue and earlier epithelization of the injured area in rats treated with DNIC-Col composites benchmarked against Col and SpWH. It is suggested that the positive effect of the new pharmaceutical material on wound healing is based on the release of NO from decomposing DNIC. This effect is believed to be potentiated by the synergy of DNIC and collagen.

  1. Age-dependent increase of discoidin domain receptor 2 and matrix metalloproteinase 13 expression in temporomandibular joint cartilage of type IX and type XI collagen-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Lam, N. P.; Li, Y.; Waldman, A. B.; Brussiau, J.; Lee, P. L.; Olsen, B. R.; Xu, L.

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that mutations in type IX and type XI collagens in mice caused osteoarthritis (OA)-like changes in knee and temporomandibular (TM) joints. We also found that the overexpression of matrix metalloproteinase 13 (Mmp-13) was probably due to the up-regulation of a collagen receptor, discoidin domain receptor 2 (Ddr2), which was responsible for knee cartilage degeneration in mutant mice. The objective of our study was to determine whether the expression of Mmp-3, Mmp-13 and Ddr2 was increased in OA-like TM joints in mutant mice using immunohistochemistry. We found that the staining for Ddr2, Mmp-13 and Mmp-derived type II collagen fragments in tissue sections from 6 month-old mice was increased in TM joints of the mutant mice. In contrast, we found no difference in the staining for Mmp-3 amongst the two mutant mice and their wild-type littermates. We conclude that, similar to previous observations in knee joints, the overexpression of Ddr2 and Mmp-13 may be responsible for the OA-like change in TM joints in mutant mice. PMID:17125729

  2. Age-dependent increase of discoidin domain receptor 2 and matrix metalloproteinase 13 expression in temporomandibular joint cartilage of type IX and type XI collagen-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Lam, N P; Li, Y; Waldman, A B; Brussiau, J; Lee, P L; Olsen, B R; Xu, L

    2007-06-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that mutations in type IX and type XI collagens in mice caused osteoarthritis (OA)-like changes in knee and temporomandibular (TM) joints. We also found that the overexpression of matrix metalloproteinase 13 (Mmp-13) was probably due to the up-regulation of a collagen receptor, discoidin domain receptor 2 (Ddr2), which was responsible for knee cartilage degeneration in mutant mice. The objective of our study was to determine whether the expression of Mmp-3, Mmp-13 and Ddr2 was increased in OA-like TM joints in mutant mice using immunohistochemistry. We found that the staining for Ddr2, Mmp-13 and Mmp-derived type II collagen fragments in tissue sections from 6-month-old mice was increased in TM joints of the mutant mice. In contrast, we found no difference in the staining for Mmp-3 amongst the two mutant mice and their wild-type littermates. We conclude that, similar to previous observations in knee joints, the overexpression of Ddr2 and Mmp-13 may be responsible for the OA-like change in TM joints in mutant mice. PMID:17125729

  3. Long-term voluntary exercise of male mice induces more beneficial effects on cancellous and cortical bone than on the collagenous matrix.

    PubMed

    Isaksson, Hanna; Tolvanen, Viivi; Finnilä, Mikko A J; Iivarinen, Jarkko; Turunen, Antti; Silvast, Tuomo S; Tuukkanen, Juha; Seppänen, Kari; Arokoski, Jari P A; Brama, Pieter A; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Helminen, Heikki J

    2009-11-01

    The effects of lifelong physical exercise on the composition, structure and mechanical properties of bone are not well understood. Earlier, we found that voluntary physical exercise improved various properties of bone in maturing male mice up to 6 months of age. In this study, we extended the previous study to 18 months. Half of the mice (total N=144) had access to running wheels while half were kept sedentary. The collagen network was assessed biochemically and by tensile testing of decalcified bone. The mineralized femur was analyzed with pQCT and three-point-bending of the diaphysis and neck-strength-test. The proximal tibia was analyzed with microCT. The bone collagen revealed inferior tensional properties with aging and the mineralized femur demonstrated decreased stiffness with age. In the running mice, tensile properties and the BMD were reduced at 18 months of age compared to the sedentary mice. In contrast, the stiffness of both the diaphysis and femoral neck was higher, and trabecular architecture and structure were improved in the running mice. In summary, the results suggest that lifelong exercise training of male mice results in more beneficial effects on intact mineralized bone in both the diaphysis and epiphysis than on bone collagenous matrix.

  4. Distinct functions of the laminin β LN domain and collagen IV during cardiac extracellular matrix formation and stabilization of alary muscle attachments revealed by EMS mutagenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Drosophila heart (dorsal vessel) is a relatively simple tubular organ that serves as a model for several aspects of cardiogenesis. Cardiac morphogenesis, proper heart function and stability require structural components whose identity and ways of assembly are only partially understood. Structural components are also needed to connect the myocardial tube with neighboring cells such as pericardial cells and specialized muscle fibers, the so-called alary muscles. Results Using an EMS mutagenesis screen for cardiac and muscular abnormalities in Drosophila embryos we obtained multiple mutants for two genetically interacting complementation groups that showed similar alary muscle and pericardial cell detachment phenotypes. The molecular lesions underlying these defects were identified as domain-specific point mutations in LamininB1 and Cg25C, encoding the extracellular matrix (ECM) components laminin β and collagen IV α1, respectively. Of particular interest within the LamininB1 group are certain hypomorphic mutants that feature prominent defects in cardiac morphogenesis and cardiac ECM layer formation, but in contrast to amorphic mutants, only mild defects in other tissues. All of these alleles carry clustered missense mutations in the laminin LN domain. The identified Cg25C mutants display weaker and largely temperature-sensitive phenotypes that result from glycine substitutions in different Gly-X-Y repeats of the triple helix-forming domain. While initial basement membrane assembly is not abolished in Cg25C mutants, incorporation of perlecan is impaired and intracellular accumulation of perlecan as well as the collagen IV α2 chain is detected during late embryogenesis. Conclusions Assembly of the cardiac ECM depends primarily on laminin, whereas collagen IV is needed for stabilization. Our data underscore the importance of a correctly assembled ECM particularly for the development of cardiac tissues and their lateral connections. The mutational

  5. Platelet-derived growth factor type BB and collagen matrix for soft tissue reconstruction after muco-epidermoid carcinoma removal: a possible therapeutic option.

    PubMed

    Cicciù, Marco; Herford, Alan Scott; Maria, Vecchio Giada; Bramanti, Ennio

    2015-01-01

    Muco-epidermoid carcinoma (MEC) is a rare malignant tumor occurring in major and minor salivary glands. The described case shows a patient undergoing tumor resection without neck dissection. A quick diagnosis performed through clinical investigation and incisional biopsy revealed the nature of the tumor. A porcine collagen matrix was applied after the surgery in order to improve soft tissue healing. The matrix was saturated with platelet-derived growth factor type BB in order to favorite healing process and then fixed on the palate with a dental support device. Follow-up visit performed at first, second, and third weeks highlighted a quick healing of oral mucosa. Here reported is a case of a 34-year-old man who developed a muco-epidermoid oral carcinoma localized in the left upper jaw palatal side. The clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic findings, plus differential diagnoses of the case and reconstructive treatment options are also presented.

  6. Type I collagen aging impairs discoidin domain receptor 2-mediated tumor cell growth suppression

    PubMed Central

    Saby, Charles; Buache, Emilie; Brassart-Pasco, Sylvie; El Btaouri, Hassan; Courageot, Marie-Pierre; Van Gulick, Laurence; Garnotel, Roselyne; Jeannesson, Pierre; Morjani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells are confronted to a type I collagen rich environment which regulates cell proliferation and invasion. Biological aging has been associated with structural changes of type I collagen. Here, we address the effect of collagen aging on cell proliferation in a three-dimensional context (3D). We provide evidence for an inhibitory effect of adult collagen, but not of the old one, on proliferation of human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells. This effect involves both the activation of the tyrosine kinase Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) and the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2. DDR2 and SHP-2 were less activated in old collagen. DDR2 inhibition decreased SHP-2 phosphorylation in adult collagen and increased cell proliferation to a level similar to that observed in old collagen. In the presence of old collagen, a high level of JAK2 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation was observed while expression of the cell cycle negative regulator p21CIP1 was decreased. Inhibition of DDR2 kinase function also led to an increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation and a decrease in p21CIP1 expression. Similar signaling profile was observed when DDR2 was inhibited in adult collagen. Altogether, these data suggest that biological collagen aging could increase tumor cell proliferation by reducingthe activation of the key matrix sensor DDR2. PMID:27121132

  7. Type I collagen aging impairs discoidin domain receptor 2-mediated tumor cell growth suppression.

    PubMed

    Saby, Charles; Buache, Emilie; Brassart-Pasco, Sylvie; El Btaouri, Hassan; Courageot, Marie-Pierre; Van Gulick, Laurence; Garnotel, Roselyne; Jeannesson, Pierre; Morjani, Hamid

    2016-05-01

    Tumor cells are confronted to a type I collagen rich environment which regulates cell proliferation and invasion. Biological aging has been associated with structural changes of type I collagen. Here, we address the effect of collagen aging on cell proliferation in a three-dimensional context (3D).We provide evidence for an inhibitory effect of adult collagen, but not of the old one, on proliferation of human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells. This effect involves both the activation of the tyrosine kinase Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) and the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2. DDR2 and SHP-2 were less activated in old collagen. DDR2 inhibition decreased SHP-2 phosphorylation in adult collagen and increased cell proliferation to a level similar to that observed in old collagen.In the presence of old collagen, a high level of JAK2 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation was observed while expression of the cell cycle negative regulator p21CIP1 was decreased. Inhibition of DDR2 kinase function also led to an increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation and a decrease in p21CIP1 expression. Similar signaling profile was observed when DDR2 was inhibited in adult collagen. Altogether, these data suggest that biological collagen aging could increase tumor cell proliferation by reducingthe activation of the key matrix sensor DDR2. PMID:27121132

  8. Type V collagen controls the initiation of collagen fibril assembly.

    PubMed

    Wenstrup, Richard J; Florer, Jane B; Brunskill, Eric W; Bell, Sheila M; Chervoneva, Inna; Birk, David E

    2004-12-17

    Vertebrate collagen fibrils are heterotypically composed of a quantitatively major and minor fibril collagen. In non-cartilaginous tissues, type I collagen accounts for the majority of the collagen mass, and collagen type V, the functions of which are poorly understood, is a minor component. Type V collagen has been implicated in the regulation of fibril diameter, and we reported recently preliminary evidence that type V collagen is required for collagen fibril nucleation (Wenstrup, R. J., Florer, J. B., Cole, W. G., Willing, M. C., and Birk, D. E. (2004) J. Cell. Biochem. 92, 113-124). The purpose of this study was to define the roles of type V collagen in the regulation of collagen fibrillogenesis and matrix assembly. Mouse embryos completely deficient in pro-alpha1(V) chains were created by homologous recombination. The col5a1-/- animals die in early embryogenesis, at approximately embryonic day 10. The type V collagen-deficient mice demonstrate a virtual lack of collagen fibril formation. In contrast, the col5a1+/- animals are viable. The reduced type V collagen content is associated with a 50% reduction in fibril number and dermal collagen content. In addition, relatively normal, cylindrical fibrils are assembled with a second population of large, structurally abnormal collagen fibrils. The structural properties of the abnormal matrix are decreased relative to the wild type control animals. These data indicate a central role for the evolutionary, ancient type V collagen in the regulation of fibrillogenesis. The complete dependence of fibril formation on type V collagen is indicative of the critical role of the latter in early fibril initiation. In addition, this fibril collagen is important in the determination of fibril structure and matrix organization. PMID:15383546

  9. Chemotherapeutic efficiency of drugs in vitro: Comparison of doxorubicin exposure in 3D and 2D culture matrices.

    PubMed

    Casey, A; Gargotti, M; Bonnier, F; Byrne, H J

    2016-06-01

    The interest in the use of 3D matrices for in vitro analysis, with a view to increasing the relevance of in vitro studies and reducing the dependence on in vivo studies, has been growing in recent years. Cells grown in a 3D in vitro matrix environment have been reported to exhibit significantly different properties to those in a conventional 2D culture environment. However, comparison of 2D and 3D cell culture models have recently been noted to result in differing responses of cytotoxic assays, without any associated change in viability. The effect was attributed to differing conversion rates and effective concentrations of the resazurin assay in 2D and 3D environments, rather than differences in cellular metabolism. In this study, the efficacy of a chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin, is monitored and compared in conventional 2D and 3D collagen gel exposures of immortalized human cervical cells. Viability was monitored with the aid of the Alamar Blue assay and drug internalisation was verified using confocal microscopy. Drug uptake and retention within the collagen matrix was monitored by absorption spectroscopy. The viability studies showed apparent differences between the 2D and 3D culture systems, the differences attributed in part to the physical transition from 2D to a 3D environment causing alterations to dye resazurin uptake and conversion rates. The use of 3D culture matrices has widely been interpreted to result in "reduced" toxicity or cellular "resistance" to the chemotherapeutic agent. The results of this study show that the reduced efficiency of the drug to cells grown in the 3D environment can be accounted for by a sequential reduction of the effective concentration of the test compound and assay. This is due to absorption within the collagen gel inducing a higher uptake of both drug and assay thereby influencing the toxic impact of the drug and conversion rate of resazurin, and. The increased effective surface area of the cell exposed to the drug

  10. Treatment of life-threatening wounds with a combination of allogenic platelet-rich plasma, fibrin glue and collagen matrix, and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Mehdi; Alamdari, Daryoush Hamidi; Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Aliakbarian, Mohsen; Jangjoo, Ali; Abdollahi, Abbas; Bahar, Mostafa Mehrabi; Azadmand, Ali; Forghani, Naser; Sadegh, Mohammad Nori; Khayamy, Mohammad Esmail; Seifalian, Alexander

    2014-08-01

    Currently there is no ideal procedure for the treatment of recalcitrant ulcers that are unresponsive to the majority of common treatments. However, several novel approaches have been proposed, including bone marrow stem cells, platelets, fibrin glue and collagen matrix. For the first approach treatment of a chronic wound, a non-invasive method is highly desirable. The present study was undertaken with the aim of evaluating the effect of a combination of platelets, fibrin glue and collagen matrix (PFC) in one treatment. A total of ten patients with aggressive, refractory, life-threatening wounds were recruited for the study and their treatment effects were evaluated. Initially, the ulcers were extensively debrided, measured and photographed at weekly intervals. The PFC combination was applied topically to the wound every two days. Following treatment, the wound was completely closed in nine patients and was markedly reduced in the other patient. The mean 100% healing time for the nine patients was 11.3±5.22 weeks. There was no evidence of local or systemic complications or any abnormal tissue formation, keloid or hypertrophic scarring. Therefore, the results of the present study indicate that in the first approach, the combination of PFC components may be used safely in order to synergize the effect of chronic wound healing.

  11. Treatment of life-threatening wounds with a combination of allogenic platelet-rich plasma, fibrin glue and collagen matrix, and a literature review

    PubMed Central

    ASADI, MEHDI; ALAMDARI, DARYOUSH HAMIDI; RAHIMI, HAMID REZA; ALIAKBARIAN, MOHSEN; JANGJOO, ALI; ABDOLLAHI, ABBAS; BAHAR, MOSTAFA MEHRABI; AZADMAND, ALI; FORGHANI, NASER; SADEGH, MOHAMMAD NORI; KHAYAMY, MOHAMMAD ESMAIL; SEIFALIAN, ALEXANDER

    2014-01-01

    Currently there is no ideal procedure for the treatment of recalcitrant ulcers that are unresponsive to the majority of common treatments. However, several novel approaches have been proposed, including bone marrow stem cells, platelets, fibrin glue and collagen matrix. For the first approach treatment of a chronic wound, a non-invasive method is highly desirable. The present study was undertaken with the aim of evaluating the effect of a combination of platelets, fibrin glue and collagen matrix (PFC) in one treatment. A total of ten patients with aggressive, refractory, life-threatening wounds were recruited for the study and their treatment effects were evaluated. Initially, the ulcers were extensively debrided, measured and photographed at weekly intervals. The PFC combination was applied topically to the wound every two days. Following treatment, the wound was completely closed in nine patients and was markedly reduced in the other patient. The mean 100% healing time for the nine patients was 11.3±5.22 weeks. There was no evidence of local or systemic complications or any abnormal tissue formation, keloid or hypertrophic scarring. Therefore, the results of the present study indicate that in the first approach, the combination of PFC components may be used safely in order to synergize the effect of chronic wound healing. PMID:25009595

  12. Evaluation and Comparison of the Biopathology of Collagen and Inflammation in the Extracellular Matrix of Oral Epithelial Dysplasias and Inflammatory Fibrous Hyperplasia Using Picrosirius Red Stain and Polarising Microscopy: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Soma Susan; Sarojini, Sreenivasan Bargavan; George, Giju Baby; Vinod, Sankar; Mathew, Philips; Babu, Anulekh; Sebastian, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background: The role of tumour inflammation and the dysplastic epithelial-stromal interactions on the nature of collagen fibres in the extracellular matrix of dysplastic epithelium is not fully understood. The present study was aimed to evaluate and compare the inflammation and pathological stromal collagen (loosely packed thin disorganized collagen) present in mild, moderate and severe epithelial dysplasias with that of inflammatory fibrous hyperplasias. The basement membrane intactness of epithelial dysplasias was also evaluated to determine if dysplastic epithelial mesenchymal interaction has any role in the integrity of stromal collagen in epithelial dysplasia. Methods: Oral epithelial dysplasias, inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia and normal oral mucosal samples were used for the study. Packing, thickness and orientation of collagen fibres in mild, moderate and severe grades of oral epithelial dysplasias (n = 24), inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia (n = 8) and normal oral mucosal samples (n = 8) were analysed based on the polarisation of collagen fibres in picrosirius red polarising stain under polarising microscope. Results: All the grades of epithelial dysplasias showed greenish yellow birefringence confirming the presence of loosely arranged pathological collagen in the presence of moderate inflammation. All the cases of inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia showed red polarisation hue and moderate inflammation. A statistically significant difference was found in the packing and orientation of collagen when epithelial dysplasias and inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia were compared (P < 0.01). When the intactness of basement membrane integrity was compared in all the groups of epithelial dysplasia, a statistically significant result was obtained (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Presence of significant amount of loosely packed thin disoriented collagen even in mild epithelial dysplasia suggests that tumourigenic factors are released to connective tissue stroma much earlier than

  13. Age-associated reduction of cellular spreading/mechanical force up-regulates matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression and collagen fibril fragmentation via c-Jun/AP-1 in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhaoping; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J; Quan, Taihao

    2014-12-01

    The dermal compartment of human skin is largely composed of dense collagen-rich fibrils, which provide structural and mechanical support. Skin dermal fibroblasts, the major collagen-producing cells, are interact with collagen fibrils to maintain cell spreading and mechanical force for function. A characteristic feature of aged human skin is fragmentation of collagen fibrils, which is initiated by matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1). Fragmentation impairs fibroblast attachment and thereby reduces spreading. Here, we investigated the relationship among fibroblast spreading, mechanical force, MMP-1 expression, and collagen fibril fragmentation. Reduced fibroblast spreading due to cytoskeletal disruption was associated with reduced cellular mechanical force, as determined by atomic force microscopy. These reductions substantially induced MMP-1 expression, which led to collagen fibril fragmentation and disorganization in three-dimensional collagen lattices. Constraining fibroblast size by culturing on slides coated with collagen micropatterns also significantly induced MMP-1 expression. Reduced spreading/mechanical force induced transcription factor c-Jun and its binding to a canonical AP-1 binding site in the MMP-1 proximal promoter. Blocking c-Jun function with dominant negative mutant c-Jun significantly reduced induction of MMP-1 expression in response to reduced spreading/mechanical force. Furthermore, restoration of fibroblast spreading/mechanical force led to decline of c-Jun and MMP-1 levels and eliminated collagen fibril fragmentation and disorganization. These data reveal a novel mechanism by which alteration of fibroblast shape/mechanical force regulates c-Jun/AP-1-dependent expression of MMP-1 and consequent collagen fibril fragmentation. This mechanism provides a foundation for understanding the cellular and molecular basis of age-related collagen fragmentation in human skin.

  14. 3D in vitro technology for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein

    2012-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro systems that can mimic organ and tissue structure and function in vivo, will be of great benefit for a variety of biological applications from basic biology to toxicity testing and drug discovery. There have been several attempts to generate 3D tissue models but most of these models require costly equipment, and the most serious disadvantage in them is that they are too far from the mature human organs in vivo. Because of these problems, research and development in drug discovery, toxicity testing and biotech industries are highly expensive, and involve sacrifice of countless animals and it takes several years to bring a single drug/product to the market or to find the toxicity or otherwise of chemical entities. Our group has been actively working on several alternative models by merging biomaterials science, nanotechnology and biological principles to generate 3D in vitro living organs, to be called "Human Organs-on-Chip", to mimic natural organ/tissues, in order to reduce animal testing and clinical trials. We have fabricated a novel type of mechanically and biologically bio-mimicking collagen-based hydrogel that would provide for interconnected mini-wells in which 3D cell/organ culture of human samples in a manner similar to human organs with extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules would be possible. These products mimic the physical, chemical, and biological properties of natural organs and tissues at different scales. This paper will review the outcome of our several experiments so far in this direction and the future perspectives.

  15. Enigmatic insight into collagen.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  16. Enigmatic insight into collagen

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen.

  17. Enigmatic insight into collagen

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  18. The 45 kDa collagen-binding fragment of fibronectin induces matrix metalloproteinase-13 synthesis by chondrocytes and aggrecan degradation by aggrecanases.

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Heather; Ung, Linh; Fosang, Amanda J

    2002-01-01

    Fragments of fibronectin occur naturally in vivo and are increased in the synovial fluid of arthritis patients. We have studied the 45 kDa fragment (Fn-f 45), representing the N-terminal collagen-binding domain of fibronectin, for its ability to modulate the expression of metalloproteinases by porcine articular chondrocytes in vitro. We report that stimulation of cultured chondrocytes, or cartilage explants, with Fn-f 45 increased the levels of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13; collagenase-3) released into the conditioned medium in a dose-dependent manner. Increased levels of MMP-13 were due to stimulation of MMP-13 synthesis, rather than release of MMP-13 from accumulated matrix stores. Fn-f 45 also stimulated the synthesis of MMP-3 (stromelysin-1) from cultured chondrocytes and cartilage cultures. The Fn-f 45-induced increase in MMP-3 and MMP-13 synthesis occurred via an interleukin 1-independent mechanism, since the receptor antagonist of interleukin-1 was unable to block the increased synthesis. The gelatinases, MMP-2 and MMP-9, were not modulated by Fn-f 45 in these culture systems. Fn-f 45 also stimulated the release of aggrecan from cartilage explants into conditioned medium. Neoepitope antibodies specific for aggrecan fragments generated by MMPs or aggrecanases showed that the Fn-f 45-induced aggrecan loss was mediated by aggrecanases, and not by MMPs. Extracts of cultured cartilage contained elevated levels of the aggrecanase-derived ITEGE(373)-G1 domain, whereas levels of the matrix metalloproteinase-derived DIPEN(341)-G1 domain were unchanged. These studies show that Fn-f 45 can induce a catabolic phenotype in articular chondrocytes by up-regulating the expression of metalloproteinases specific for the degradation of collagen and aggrecan. PMID:11988091

  19. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  20. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  1. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  2. Engineering Human TMJ Discs with Protein-Releasing 3D-Printed Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Legemate, K; Tarafder, S; Jun, Y; Lee, C H

    2016-07-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc is a heterogeneous fibrocartilaginous tissue positioned between the mandibular condyle and glenoid fossa of the temporal bone, with important roles in TMJ functions. Tissue engineering TMJ discs has emerged as an alternative approach to overcoming limitations of current treatments for TMJ disorders. However, the anisotropic collagen orientation and inhomogeneous fibrocartilaginous matrix distribution present challenges in the tissue engineering of functional TMJ discs. Here, we developed 3-dimensional (3D)-printed anatomically correct scaffolds with region-variant microstrand alignment, mimicking anisotropic collagen alignment in the TMJ disc and corresponding mechanical properties. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGFβ3) were then delivered in the scaffolds by spatially embedding CTGF- or TGFβ3-encapsulated microspheres (µS) to reconstruct the regionally variant fibrocartilaginous matrix in the native TMJ disc. When cultured with human mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs) for 6 wk, 3D-printed scaffolds with CTGF/TGFβ3-µS resulted in a heterogeneous fibrocartilaginous matrix with overall distribution of collagen-rich fibrous structure in the anterior/posterior (AP) bands and fibrocartilaginous matrix in the intermediate zone, reminiscent of the native TMJ disc. High dose of CTGF/TGFβ3-µS (100 mg µS/g of scaffold) showed significantly more collagen II and aggrecan in the intermediate zone than a low dose (50 mg µS/g of scaffold). Similarly, a high dose of CTGF/TGFβ3-µS yielded significantly higher collagen I expression in the AP bands compared with the low-dose and empty µS. From stress relaxation tests, the ratio of relaxation modulus to instantaneous modulus was significantly smaller with CTGF/TGFβ3-µS than empty µS. Similarly, a significantly higher coefficient of viscosity was achieved with the high dose of CTGF/TGFβ3-µS compared with the low-dose and empty

  3. Peptide Hydrogels – Versatile Matrices for 3D Cell Culture in Cancer Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Worthington, Peter; Pochan, Darrin J.; Langhans, Sigrid A.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional two-dimensional (2D) cell culture systems have contributed tremendously to our understanding of cancer biology but have significant limitations in mimicking in vivo conditions such as the tumor microenvironment. In vitro, three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models represent a more accurate, intermediate platform between simplified 2D culture models and complex and expensive in vivo models. 3D in vitro models can overcome 2D in vitro limitations caused by the oversupply of nutrients, and unphysiological cell–cell and cell–material interactions, and allow for dynamic interactions between cells, stroma, and extracellular matrix. In addition, 3D cultures allow for the development of concentration gradients, including oxygen, metabolites, and growth factors, with chemical gradients playing an integral role in many cellular functions ranging from development to signaling in normal epithelia and cancer environments in vivo. Currently, the most common matrices used for 3D culture are biologically derived materials such as matrigel and collagen. However, in recent years, more defined, synthetic materials have become available as scaffolds for 3D culture with the advantage of forming well-defined, designed, tunable materials to control matrix charge, stiffness, porosity, nanostructure, degradability, and adhesion properties, in addition to other material and biological properties. One important area of synthetic materials currently available for 3D cell culture is short sequence, self-assembling peptide hydrogels. In addition to the review of recent work toward the control of material, structure, and mechanical properties, we will also discuss the biochemical functionalization of peptide hydrogels and how this functionalization, coupled with desired hydrogel material characteristics, affects tumor cell behavior in 3D culture. PMID:25941663

  4. Histomorphometric and 3D Cone-Beam Computerized Tomographic Evaluation of Socket Preservation in Molar Extraction Sites Using Human Particulate Mineralized Cancellous Allograft Bone With a Porcine Collagen Xenograft Barrier: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of socket preservation after extraction using human particulate mineralized cancellous allograft bone (MCAB) and type I porcine collagen membranes (PCM) as a guided bone regeneration barrier. Fourteen patients, 12 women and 2 men, were selected who had a diagnosis of one or more unsalvageable teeth with a treatment plan to replace them with implant-supported single crown restorations. Extractions were preformed atraumatically by sectioning teeth for removal to avoid damaging the socket walls and by immediately placing MCAB graft to fill the sockets. The sockets were occluded with a new PCM. The membranes were cut to overlap the facial and lingual (or palatal) socket rim by at least 5 mm (or more if necessary) to cover bony wall fenestration or dehiscence defects. Implants were then placed 16 weeks after the extractions and augmentation. The results were evaluated clinically, histomorphometrically, and with cone-beam computerized tomographic scanning. The formation of new bone in the treated sites averaged 11.2%, with a range of 1.8% to 43%, in bone biopsies trephined from the center of the grafted socket sites. Density, calculated with proprietary software and measured in Hounsfield units (HUs), was 543 HU with a range of 420 to 822 HU. The resulting new bone regeneration varied widely, but the barrier membranes showed potential for promoting significant bone regeneration. A larger sample of treated cases is needed. Wall defects did not appear to influence the histologic results, but the number of sites was too small to determine their significance.

  5. Venus in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, J. J.

    1993-08-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  6. 3D reservoir visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Van, B.T.; Pajon, J.L.; Joseph, P. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper shows how some simple 3D computer graphics tools can be combined to provide efficient software for visualizing and analyzing data obtained from reservoir simulators and geological simulations. The animation and interactive capabilities of the software quickly provide a deep understanding of the fluid-flow behavior and an accurate idea of the internal architecture of a reservoir.

  7. Surgical Therapy by Sandwich Transplantation using a Dermal Collagen-Elastin Matrix and Full Thickness Split Grafts and Gait Rehabilitation with Individualized Orthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Heinig, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    Painful callosities of the feet (PCOF) are a rare complaint in children with severe impairment of mobility and quality of life. There is no medical treatment available. We investigated the usefulness of a recently developed combined transplant technique-the sandwich transplantation with dermal collagen-elastin template in this rare condition. A 14-year-old boy suffered from PCOF for several years without any improvement by topical therapy, dermabrasion, and oral retinoids. He was unable to walk normally and suffered from severe pain. We performed a complete deep excision of the hyperkeratotic plantar tissue in general anaesthesia in combination with sandwich transplantation in the same setting. Dry sheets of collagen-elastin matrix (1 mm thickness) were placed on the soft tissue defects and covered by full-thickness mesh graft transplants from the upper leg. An individualized orthosis was produced for gait rehabilitation. Two weeks after surgery the gait-related pain was reduced remarkably. Using the orthosis, the boy was able to walk pain-free even on staircase. Surgery of PCOF with sandwich transplantation and gait rehabilitation appears to be a promising strategy for this rare condition. PMID:23378711

  8. Cotransfected human chondrocytes: over-expression of IGF-I and SOX9 enhances the synthesis of cartilage matrix components collagen-II and glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Simental-Mendía, M; Lara-Arias, J; Álvarez-Lozano, E; Said-Fernández, S; Soto-Domínguez, A; Padilla-Rivas, G R; Martínez-Rodríguez, H G

    2015-12-01

    Damage to cartilage causes a loss of type II collagen (Col-II) and glycosaminoglycans (GAG). To restore the original cartilage architecture, cell factors that stimulate Col-II and GAG production are needed. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and transcription factor SOX9are essential for the synthesis of cartilage matrix, chondrocyte proliferation, and phenotype maintenance. We evaluated the combined effect of IGF-I and SOX9 transgene expression on Col-II and GAG production by cultured human articular chondrocytes. Transient transfection and cotransfection were performed using two mammalian expression plasmids (pCMV-SPORT6), one for each transgene. At day 9 post-transfection, the chondrocytes that were over-expressing IGF-I/SOX9 showed 2-fold increased mRNA expression of the Col-II gene, as well as a 57% increase in Col-II protein, whereas type I collagen expression (Col-I) was decreased by 59.3% compared with controls. The production of GAG by these cells increased significantly compared with the controls at day 9 (3.3- vs 1.8-times, an increase of almost 83%). Thus, IGF-I/SOX9 cotransfected chondrocytes may be useful for cell-based articular cartilage therapies.

  9. Topologically defined composites of collagen types I and V as in vitro cell culture scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Franke, Katja; Sapudom, Jiranuwat; Kalbitzer, Liv; Anderegg, Ulf; Pompe, Tilo

    2014-06-01

    Cell fate is known to be triggered by cues from the extracellular matrix, including its chemical, biological and physical characteristics. Specifically, mechanical and topological properties are increasingly recognized as important signals. The aim of this work was to provide an easily accessible biomimetic in vitro platform of topologically defined collagen I matrices to dissect cell behaviour under various conditions in vitro. We reconstituted covalently bound layers of three-dimensional (3-D) networks of collagen type I and collagen type V with a defined network topology. A new erosion algorithm enabled us to analyse the mean pore diameter and fibril content, while the mean fibril diameter was examined by an autocorrelation method. Different concentrations and ratios of collagen I and V resulted in pore diameters from 2.4 to 4.5μm and fibril diameters from 0.6 to 0.8μm. A comparison of telopeptide intact collagen I to telopeptide deficient collagen I revealed obvious differences in network structure. The good correlation of the topological data to measurements of network stiffness as well as invasion of human dermal fibroblasts proves that the topological analysis provides meaningful measures of the functional characteristics of the reconstituted 3-D collagen matrices.

  10. 3D texture analysis for classification of second harmonic generation images of human ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Bruce; Campbell, Kirby R.; Tilbury, Karissa; Nadiarnykh, Oleg; Brewer, Molly A.; Patankar, Manish; Singh, Vikas; Eliceiri, Kevin. W.; Campagnola, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Remodeling of the collagen architecture in the extracellular matrix (ECM) has been implicated in ovarian cancer. To quantify these alterations we implemented a form of 3D texture analysis to delineate the fibrillar morphology observed in 3D Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy image data of normal (1) and high risk (2) ovarian stroma, benign ovarian tumors (3), low grade (4) and high grade (5) serous tumors, and endometrioid tumors (6). We developed a tailored set of 3D filters which extract textural features in the 3D image sets to build (or learn) statistical models of each tissue class. By applying k-nearest neighbor classification using these learned models, we achieved 83–91% accuracies for the six classes. The 3D method outperformed the analogous 2D classification on the same tissues, where we suggest this is due the increased information content. This classification based on ECM structural changes will complement conventional classification based on genetic profiles and can serve as an additional biomarker. Moreover, the texture analysis algorithm is quite general, as it does not rely on single morphological metrics such as fiber alignment, length, and width but their combined convolution with a customizable basis set. PMID:27767180

  11. Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells Collectively Invade Collagen by Following a Glucose Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Austin, Robert; Liu, Liyu; Duclos, Guillaume; Lee, Jeongseog; Wu, Amy; Kam, Yooseok; Sontag, Eduardo; Stone, Howard; Sturm, James; Gatenby, Robert

    2013-03-01

    We show that MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast cancer cells collectively invade a three dimensional collagen matrix by following a glucose gradient. We observe that due to the 3D physical deformation of the matrix, as measured by the displacement of reporter beads within the matrix, there exists a long range deformation mechanical field inside the matrix which serves to couple the motions of the invading metastatic cell. The invasion front of the cells is a dynamic one, with different cells assuming the lead on a time scale of 24 hours due to certain cells having higher speeds of penetration, which are not sustained. The front cell leadership is dynamic presumably due to metabolic costs associated with the long range strain field which proceeds the invading cell front, which we have imaged using confocal imaging and marker beads imbedded in the collagen matrix. Sponsored by the NCI/NIH Physical Sciences Oncology Centers

  12. The Mechanics of Angiogenesis in Collagen Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breaux, Jolie; de La Pena, Abigail; Suaris, Melanie; Zehnder, Steven; Angelini, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Cells in all types of tissue are sensitive to their mechanical environment. Understanding cell mechanics in tissue growth can lead to advancements in important medical applications, like technologies that enhance angiogenesis during wound healing. Great progress has been made in understanding the mechanics of angiogenesis with assays performed in flat bottomed culture dishes. Here we present results from an in vitro study of collective endothelial cell mechanics in a 3D culture system that mimics the geometry of a real endothelium. Human Aortic Endothelial Cells were grown inside of a collagen tube supported by a rigid cylindrical scaffold. We developed a time-lapse small angle light scattering method to directly measure the radial distribution of cells in the 3D matrix over time. Accompanying live-cell time-lapse microscopy was performed to monitor the cells' collective movement and organization. We find that the cells generate sufficient contractile force to detach the collagen matrix from the support scaffold while maintaining a macroscopic cylindrical arrangement, creating a fiber. Cell sensitivity to scaffold material properties, curvature, and symmetry will be discussed.

  13. Rapid onset of perfused blood vessels after implantation of ECFCs and MPCs in collagen, PuraMatrix and fibrin provisional matrices.

    PubMed

    Allen, Patrick; Kang, Kyu-Tae; Bischoff, Joyce

    2015-05-01

    We developed an in vivo vascularization model in which human endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and human mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) form blood vessel networks when co-injected (ECFC + MPC) into nude mice in rat tail type I collagen, bovine fibrin or synthetic peptide PuraMatrix matrices. We used three approaches to determine the onset of functional vascularization when ECFC + MPC suspended in these matrices were implanted in vivo. The first was immunohistochemistry to detect vessels lined by human endothelial cells and filled with red blood cells. The second was in vivo vascular staining by tail vein injection of a mixture of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), a lectin specific for human endothelium, and Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B4 (GS-IB4 ), a lectin specific for rodent endothelium. The third approach employed contrast-enhanced ultrasound to measure the perfusion volumes of implants in individual animals over time. Human endothelial-lined tubular structures were detected in vivo on days 1 and 2 after implantation, with perfused human vessels detected on days 3 and 4. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound revealed significant perfusion of ECFC + MPC/collagen implants on days 1-4, at up to 14% perfused vascular volume. ECFC + MPC implanted in fibrin and PuraMatrix matrices also supported perfusion at day 1, as assessed by ultrasound (at 12% and 23% perfused vascular volume, respectively). This model demonstrates that ECFC + MPC suspended in any of the three matrices initiated a rapid onset of vascularization. We propose that ECFC + MPC delivered in vivo provide a means to achieve rapid perfusion of tissue-engineered organs or for in situ tissue repair.

  14. 3D rapid mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaksson, Folke; Borg, Johan; Haglund, Leif

    2008-04-01

    In this paper the performance of passive range measurement imaging using stereo technique in real time applications is described. Stereo vision uses multiple images to get depth resolution in a similar way as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) uses multiple measurements to obtain better spatial resolution. This technique has been used in photogrammetry for a long time but it will be shown that it is now possible to do the calculations, with carefully designed image processing algorithms, in e.g. a PC in real time. In order to get high resolution and quantitative data in the stereo estimation a mathematical camera model is used. The parameters to the camera model are settled in a calibration rig or in the case of a moving camera the scene itself can be used for calibration of most of the parameters. After calibration an ordinary TV camera has an angular resolution like a theodolite, but to a much lower price. The paper will present results from high resolution 3D imagery from air to ground. The 3D-results from stereo calculation of image pairs are stitched together into a large database to form a 3D-model of the area covered.

  15. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability.

  16. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Esteban Arango, Juan; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability.

  17. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  18. Severe Extracellular Matrix Abnormalities and Chondrodysplasia in Mice Lacking Collagen Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase Isoenzyme II in Combination with a Reduced Amount of Isoenzyme I*

    PubMed Central

    Aro, Ellinoora; Salo, Antti M.; Khatri, Richa; Finnilä, Mikko; Miinalainen, Ilkka; Sormunen, Raija; Pakkanen, Outi; Holster, Tiina; Soininen, Raija; Prein, Carina; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke; Aszódi, Attila; Tuukkanen, Juha; Kivirikko, Kari I.; Schipani, Ernestina; Myllyharju, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylases (C-P4H-I, C-P4H-II, and C-P4H-III) catalyze formation of 4-hydroxyproline residues required to form triple-helical collagen molecules. Vertebrate C-P4Hs are α2β2 tetramers differing in their catalytic α subunits. C-P4H-I is the major isoenzyme in most cells, and inactivation of its catalytic subunit (P4ha1−/−) leads to embryonic lethality in mouse, whereas P4ha1+/− mice have no abnormalities. To study the role of C-P4H-II, which predominates in chondrocytes, we generated P4ha2−/− mice. Surprisingly, they had no apparent phenotypic abnormalities. To assess possible functional complementarity, we established P4ha1+/−;P4ha2−/− mice. They were smaller than their littermates, had moderate chondrodysplasia, and developed kyphosis. A transient inner cell death phenotype was detected in their developing growth plates. The columnar arrangement of proliferative chondrocytes was impaired, the amount of 4-hydroxyproline and the Tm of collagen II were reduced, and the extracellular matrix was softer in the growth plates of newborn P4ha1+/−;P4ha2−/− mice. No signs of uncompensated ER stress were detected in the mutant growth plate chondrocytes. Some of these defects were also found in P4ha2−/− mice, although in a much milder form. Our data show that C-P4H-I can to a large extent compensate for the lack of C-P4H-II in proper endochondral bone development, but their combined partial and complete inactivation, respectively, leads to biomechanically impaired extracellular matrix, moderate chondrodysplasia, and kyphosis. Our mouse data suggest that inactivating mutations in human P4HA2 are not likely to lead to skeletal disorders, and a simultaneous decrease in P4HA1 function would most probably be required to generate such a disease phenotype. PMID:26001784

  19. Improving 2D and 3D Skin In Vitro Models Using Macromolecular Crowding.

    PubMed

    Benny, Paula; Badowski, Cedric; Lane, E Birgitte; Raghunath, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The glycoprotein family of collagens represents the main structural proteins in the human body, and are key components of biomaterials used in modern tissue engineering. A technical bottleneck is the deposition of collagen in vitro, as it is notoriously slow, resulting in sub-optimal formation of connective tissue and subsequent tissue cohesion, particularly in skin models. Here, we describe a method which involves the addition of differentially-sized sucrose co-polymers to skin cultures to generate macromolecular crowding (MMC), which results in a dramatic enhancement of collagen deposition. Particularly, dermal fibroblasts deposited a significant amount of collagen I/IV/VII and fibronectin under MMC in comparison to controls. The protocol also describes a method to decellularize crowded cell layers, exposing significant amounts of extracellular matrix (ECM) which were retained on the culture surface as evidenced by immunocytochemistry. Total matrix mass and distribution pattern was studied using interference reflection microscopy. Interestingly, fibroblasts, keratinocytes and co-cultures produced cell-derived matrices (CDM) of varying composition and morphology. CDM could be used as "bio-scaffolds" for secondary cell seeding, where the current use of coatings or scaffolds, typically from xenogenic animal sources, can be avoided, thus moving towards more clinically relevant applications. In addition, this protocol describes the application of MMC during the submerged phase of a 3D-organotypic skin co-culture model which was sufficient to enhance ECM deposition in the dermo-epidermal junction (DEJ), in particular, collagen VII, the major component of anchoring fibrils. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of anchoring fibrils in cultures developed with MMC, as compared to controls. This is significant as anchoring fibrils tether the dermis to the epidermis, hence, having a pre-formed mature DEJ may benefit skin graft recipients in terms of graft stability and

  20. Stromal matrix metalloprotease-13 knockout alters Collagen I structure at the tumor-host interface and increases lung metastasis of C57BL/6 syngeneic E0771 mammary tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteases and collagen are key participants in breast cancer, but their precise roles in cancer etiology and progression remain unclear. MMP13 helps regulate collagen structure and has been ascribed largely harmful roles in cancer, but some studies demonstrate that MMP13 may also protect against tumor pathology. Other studies indicate that collagen’s organizational patterns at the breast tumor-host interface influence metastatic potential. Therefore we investigated how MMP13 modulates collagen I, a principal collagen subtype in breast tissue, and affects tumor pathology and metastasis in a mouse model of breast cancer. Methods Tumors were implanted into murine mammary tissues, and their growth analyzed in Wildtype and MMP13 KO mice. Following extraction, tumors were analyzed for collagen I levels and collagen I macro- and micro-structural properties at the tumor-host boundary using immunocytochemistry and two-photon and second harmonic generation microscopy. Lungs were analyzed for metastases counts, to correlate collagen I changes with a clinically significant functional parameter. Statistical analyses were performed by t-test, analysis of variance, or Wilcoxon-Mann–Whitney tests as appropriate. Results We found that genetic ablation of host stromal MMP13 led to: 1. Increased mammary tumor collagen I content, 2. Marked changes in collagen I spatial organization, and 3. Altered collagen I microstructure at the tumor-host boundary, as well as 4. Increased metastasis from the primary mammary tumor to lungs. Conclusions These results implicate host MMP13 as a key regulator of collagen I structure and metastasis in mammary tumors, thus making it an attractive potential therapeutic target by which we might alter metastatic potential, one of the chief determinants of clinical outcome in breast cancer. In addition to identifying stromal MMP13 is an important regulator of the tumor microenvironment and metastasis, these results also suggest

  1. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  2. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  3. Taming supersymmetric defects in 3d-3d correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Dongmin; Kim, Nakwoo; Romo, Mauricio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-07-01

    We study knots in 3d Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group {SL}(N,{{C}}), in the context of its relation with 3d { N }=2 theory (the so-called 3d-3d correspondence). The defect has either co-dimension 2 or co-dimension 4 inside the 6d (2,0) theory, which is compactified on a 3-manifold \\hat{M}. We identify such defects in various corners of the 3d-3d correspondence, namely in 3d {SL}(N,{{C}}) CS theory, in 3d { N }=2 theory, in 5d { N }=2 super Yang-Mills theory, and in the M-theory holographic dual. We can make quantitative checks of the 3d-3d correspondence by computing partition functions at each of these theories. This Letter is a companion to a longer paper [1], which contains more details and more results.

  4. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  5. Fetal Bovine Collagen Matrix in the Treatment of a Full Thickness Burn Wound: A Case Report With Long-Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Amy L.; Bennett, Danielle K.; Spreen, Elizabeth B.; Adhvaryu, Dhaval V.; Littleton, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of full thickness skin wounds commonly associated with large burns continues to represent a challenging clinical entity. The current treatment for large TBSA burns is split thickness autologous skin grafting; however, this treatment often results in poor textural durability, hypertrophic scarring, and fibrotic contractures. In this case report, we describe our experience and long-term follow-up results after the application of fetal bovine collagen (FBC) matrix (PriMatrix, TEI Biosciences, Boston, MA) to burn wounds clinically assessed as full thickness that healed without the need for subsequent skin grafting. The patient presented with 25% TBSA burns and was debrided and covered with FBC on postburn day 7. By postoperative day 12, the patient had large areas of reepithelialization distributed throughout the wound bed. By postoperative day 26, the patient had significantly more areas of wound closure and was discharged. Reepithelialization and repigmentation continued, and long-term follow-up after 26 months demonstrated complete reepithelialization and nearly complete repigmentation, without the appearance of contractures or hypertrophic scarring. This case report highlights the use of FBC as a scaffold capable of dermal regeneration and spontaneous reepithelialization with an excellent long-term functional and cosmetic outcome. PMID:25494213

  6. Altered bone material properties in HLA-B27 rats include reduced mineral to matrix ratio and altered collagen cross-links.

    PubMed

    Gamsjaeger, Sonja; Srivastava, Apurva K; Wergedal, Jon E; Zwerina, Jochen; Klaushofer, Klaus; Paschalis, Eleftherios P; Tatakis, Dimitris N

    2014-11-01

    Spondyloarthropathy and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, are often associated with severe osteopenia/osteoporosis in both children and adults. HLA-B27 transgenic rats present a phenotype that includes severe colitis and severely accelerated alveolar bone loss. The purpose of this study was to evaluate long bone density status, systemic bone metabolic markers, and intrinsic bone material properties in HLA-B27 transgenic (TG) rats, and compare them with those of age- and sex-matched wild-type (WT) animals. The results indicate that in the HLA-B27 rat, an animal susceptible to both alveolar bone loss (ABL) and long bone osteopenia, there is a statistically significant negative correlation between ABL and long bone bone mineral density (BMD), as well as mineral/matrix ratio at active bone-forming trabecular surfaces. The TG animals had a lower mineral/matrix ratio and higher relative proteoglycan and advanced glycation end product (ϵ-N-Carboxymethyl-L-lysine) content and pyridinoline/divalent collagen cross-link ratio compared with WT. These results may provide better understanding of the interrelationship between osteoporosis and oral bone loss, the underlying causes of the inferior bone strength in the HLA-B27 transgenic animals, and could prove to be a useful model in the elucidation of the pathophysiology of spondyloarthropathy and IBD-associated osteopenia/osteoporosis and in the evaluation of pharmacological intervention(s) against such conditions. PMID:24771481

  7. Integrins alpha4 and alpha M, collagen1A1, and matrix metalloproteinase 7 are upregulated in acute Kawasaki disease vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Reindel, Rebecca; Baker, Susan C.; Kim, Kwang-Youn; Rowley, Carol A.; Shulman, Stanford T.; Orenstein, Jan M.; Perlman, Elizabeth J.; Lingen, Mark W.; Rowley, Anne H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Kawasaki Disease (KD) can result in fatal coronary artery aneurysms especially in untreated patients. Our recent studies of KD vascular pathology revealed subacute/chronic vasculitis that began early in the illness with proliferation of smooth muscle cell derived-myofibroblasts in a complex extracellular matrix (ECM). We hypothesized that there is dysregulation of specific ECM and adhesion molecules in KD coronary arteries. Methods Gene expression profiling for ECM and adhesion molecules was performed on 6 acute KD and 8 control coronary arteries using a targeted real-time PCR array approach. Results Integrins alpha4 and alphaM (ITGA4, ITGAM), collagen 1A1 (COL1A1), and matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP-7) were significantly upregulated in KD coronary arteries compared with controls. Immunohistochemistry with anti- ITGAM antibodies revealed expression on inflammatory cells within the coronary artery wall in KD patients but not controls. Conclusion Integrins ITGA4 and ITGAM are upregulated in KD vasculopathy, likely promoting inflammatory recruitment that stimulates smooth muscle cell transition to myofibroblasts and their proliferation. MMP-7 likely enhances myofibroblast proliferation and luminal lesion expansion, and overexpression of COL1A1 may lead to coronary artery stenosis. Identification of the molecular pathogenesis of KD vasculopathy may lead to the development of circulating biomarkers and to directed therapeutic interventions. PMID:23344661

  8. 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative real-time imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in three dimensions based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32×32 matrix-array probe. Its capability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3-D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging and finally 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3-D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, for the first time, the complex 3-D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, and the 3-D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3-D real-time mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra- and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  9. Bio-inspired microstructures in collagen type I hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Yahya; Verbridge, Scott S; Agah, Masoud

    2015-06-01

    This article presents a novel technique to fabricate complex type I collagen hydrogel structures, with varying depth and width defined by a single fabrication step. This technique takes advantage of reactive ion etching lag to fabricate three-dimensional (3-D) structures in silicon. Then, a polydimethylsiloxane replica was fabricated utilizing soft lithography and used as a stamp on collagen hydrogel to transfer these patterns. Endothelial cells were seeded on the hydrogel devices to measure their interaction with these more physiologically relevant cell culture surfaces. Confocal imaging was utilized to image the hydrogel devices to demonstrate the robustness of the fabrication technique, and to study the cell-extracellular matrix interaction after cell seeding. In this study, we observed that endothelial cells remodeled the sharp scallops of collagen hydrogel structures and compressed the structures with low degree of slope. Such patterning techniques will enhance the physiological relevance of existing 3-D cell culture platforms by providing a technical bridge between the high resolution yet planar techniques of standard lithography with more complex yet low resolution 3-D printing methods.

  10. Bio-inspired microstructures in collagen type I hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Yahya; Verbridge, Scott S; Agah, Masoud

    2015-06-01

    This article presents a novel technique to fabricate complex type I collagen hydrogel structures, with varying depth and width defined by a single fabrication step. This technique takes advantage of reactive ion etching lag to fabricate three-dimensional (3-D) structures in silicon. Then, a polydimethylsiloxane replica was fabricated utilizing soft lithography and used as a stamp on collagen hydrogel to transfer these patterns. Endothelial cells were seeded on the hydrogel devices to measure their interaction with these more physiologically relevant cell culture surfaces. Confocal imaging was utilized to image the hydrogel devices to demonstrate the robustness of the fabrication technique, and to study the cell-extracellular matrix interaction after cell seeding. In this study, we observed that endothelial cells remodeled the sharp scallops of collagen hydrogel structures and compressed the structures with low degree of slope. Such patterning techniques will enhance the physiological relevance of existing 3-D cell culture platforms by providing a technical bridge between the high resolution yet planar techniques of standard lithography with more complex yet low resolution 3-D printing methods. PMID:25346472

  11. A titanium surface with nano-ordered spikes and pores enhances human dermal fibroblastic extracellular matrix production and integration of collagen fibers.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masahiro; Kato, Eiji; Yamamoto, Akiko; Sakurai, Kaoru

    2016-02-02

    The acquisition of substantial dermal sealing determines the prognosis of percutaneous titanium-based medical devices or prostheses. A nano-topographic titanium surface with ordered nano-spikes and pores has been shown to induce periodontal-like connective tissue attachment and activate gingival fibroblastic functions. This in vitro study aimed to determine whether an alkali-heat (AH) treatment-created nano-topographic titanium surface could enhance human dermal fibroblastic functions and binding strength to the deposited collagen on the titanium surface. The surface topographies of commercially pure titanium machined discs exposed to two different AH treatments were evaluated. Human dermal fibroblastic cultures grown on the discs were evaluated in terms of cellular morphology, proliferation, extracellular matrix (ECM) and proinflammatory cytokine synthesis, and physicochemical binding strength of surface-deposited collagen. An isotropically-patterned, shaggy nano-topography with a sponge-like inner network and numerous well-organized, anisotropically-patterned fine nano-spikes and pores were observed on each nano-topographic surface type via scanning electron microscopy. In contrast to the typical spindle-shaped cells on the machined surfaces, the isotropically- and anisotropically-patterned nano-topographic titanium surfaces had small circular/angular cells containing contractile ring-like structures and elongated, multi-shaped cells with a developed cytoskeletal network and multiple filopodia and lamellipodia, respectively. These nano-topographic surfaces enhanced dermal-related ECM synthesis at both the protein and gene levels, without proinflammatory cytokine synthesis or reduced proliferative activity. Deposited collagen fibers were included in these surfaces and sufficiently bound to the nano-topographies to resist the physical, enzymatic and chemical detachment treatments, in contrast to machined surfaces. Well-organized, isotropically

  12. Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells on Hydrogel Scaffolds Derived from Decellularized Bone Extracellular Matrix and Collagen Type I

    PubMed Central

    White, Lisa J.; Shakesheff, Kevin M.; Tatullo, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) on hydrogel scaffolds derived from bone extracellular matrix (bECM) in comparison to those seeded on collagen I (Col-I), one of the main components of dental pulp ECM. Methods DPSCs isolated from human third molars were characterized for surface marker expression and odontogenic potential prior to seeding into bECM or Col-I hydrogel scaffolds. The cells were then seeded onto bECM and Col-I hydrogel scaffolds and cultured under basal conditions or with odontogenic and growth factor (GF) supplements. DPSCs cultivated on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) with and without supplements were used as controls. Gene expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP-1) and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and mineral deposition was observed by Von Kossa staining. Results When DPSCs were cultured on bECM hydrogels, the mRNA expression levels of DSPP, DMP-1 and MEPE genes were significantly upregulated with respect to those cultured on Col-I scaffolds or TCPS in the absence of extra odontogenic inducers. In addition, more mineral deposition was observed on bECM hydrogel scaffolds as demonstrated by Von Kossa staining. Moreover, DSPP, DMP-1 and MEPE mRNA expressions of DPSCs cultured on bECM hydrogels were further upregulated by the addition of GFs or osteo/odontogenic medium compared to Col-I treated cells in the same culture conditions. Significance These results demonstrate the potential of the bECM hydrogel scaffolds to stimulate odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs. PMID:26882351

  13. Measurements of the constituent contributions to the physical properties of fibroblast populated collagen microtissues with magnetic micro-tissue stretchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ruogang; Liu, Alan; Boudou, Thomas; Chen, Christopher; Reich, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical properties of fibroblast populated collagen matrix (FPCM) provide important physical cues to regulate physiological and pathological processes of encapsulated cells. The mechanical strength of FPCM is arises from both of its constituents: the collagen matrix and the fibroblasts. Existing methods to separate the contribution of individual constituents by treating cm-scale tissue samples with decellularization drugs for prolonged periods have been shown to adversely affect the properties of the collagen matrix. To minimize such matrix damage, we have developed a magnetic microtissue stretching system that allows us to grow arrays of sub-mm scale microtissues that can be rapidly decellularized. This consists of arrays of paired micro-cantilevers that support the 3D FPCM and can be driven by incorporated magnetic material via externally applied magnetic fields. By measuring the tensile force applied to the FPCM and the tissue strain, we found the stiffness of the matured FPCM is 28.1 +- 1.8 kPa and that of the decellularized collagen matrix is 23.1 +- 3.1 kPa. These measurements of the stiffness of the intact collagen matrix in a remodeled FPCM can provide important clues on the mechanical environment that regulates the biological function of encapsulated cells.

  14. 3D-Printed ABS and PLA Scaffolds for Cartilage and Nucleus Pulposus Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, Derek H; Carelli, Eric; Steffen, Thomas; Jarzem, Peter; Haglund, Lisbet

    2015-07-03

    Painful degeneration of soft tissues accounts for high socioeconomic costs. Tissue engineering aims to provide biomimetics recapitulating native tissues. Biocompatible thermoplastics for 3D printing can generate high-resolution structures resembling tissue extracellular matrix. Large-pore 3D-printed acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polylactic acid (PLA) scaffolds were compared for cell ingrowth, viability, and tissue generation. Primary articular chondrocytes and nucleus pulposus (NP) cells were cultured on ABS and PLA scaffolds for three weeks. Both cell types proliferated well, showed high viability, and produced ample amounts of proteoglycan and collagen type II on both scaffolds. NP generated more matrix than chondrocytes; however, no difference was observed between scaffold types. Mechanical testing revealed sustained scaffold stability. This study demonstrates that chondrocytes and NP cells can proliferate on both ABS and PLA scaffolds printed with a simplistic, inexpensive desktop 3D printer. Moreover, NP cells produced more proteoglycan than chondrocytes, irrespective of thermoplastic type, indicating that cells maintain individual phenotype over the three-week culture period. Future scaffold designs covering larger pore sizes and better mimicking native tissue structure combined with more flexible or resorbable materials may provide implantable constructs with the proper structure, function, and cellularity necessary for potential cartilage and disc tissue repair in vivo.

  15. 3D-Printed ABS and PLA Scaffolds for Cartilage and Nucleus Pulposus Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, Derek H.; Carelli, Eric; Steffen, Thomas; Jarzem, Peter; Haglund, Lisbet

    2015-01-01

    Painful degeneration of soft tissues accounts for high socioeconomic costs. Tissue engineering aims to provide biomimetics recapitulating native tissues. Biocompatible thermoplastics for 3D printing can generate high-resolution structures resembling tissue extracellular matrix. Large-pore 3D-printed acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polylactic acid (PLA) scaffolds were compared for cell ingrowth, viability, and tissue generation. Primary articular chondrocytes and nucleus pulposus (NP) cells were cultured on ABS and PLA scaffolds for three weeks. Both cell types proliferated well, showed high viability, and produced ample amounts of proteoglycan and collagen type II on both scaffolds. NP generated more matrix than chondrocytes; however, no difference was observed between scaffold types. Mechanical testing revealed sustained scaffold stability. This study demonstrates that chondrocytes and NP cells can proliferate on both ABS and PLA scaffolds printed with a simplistic, inexpensive desktop 3D printer. Moreover, NP cells produced more proteoglycan than chondrocytes, irrespective of thermoplastic type, indicating that cells maintain individual phenotype over the three-week culture period. Future scaffold designs covering larger pore sizes and better mimicking native tissue structure combined with more flexible or resorbable materials may provide implantable constructs with the proper structure, function, and cellularity necessary for potential cartilage and disc tissue repair in vivo. PMID:26151846

  16. Collagen macromolecular drug delivery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine collagen for use as a macromolecular drug delivery system by determining the mechanism of release through a matrix. Collagen membranes varying in porosity, crosslinking density, structure and crosslinker were fabricated. Collagen characterized by infrared spectroscopy and solution viscosity was determined to be pure and native. The collagen membranes were determined to possess native vs. non-native quaternary structure and porous vs. dense aggregate membranes by electron microscopy. Collagen monolithic devices containing a model macromolecule (inulin) were fabricated. In vitro release rates were found to be linear with respect to t{sup {1/2}} and were affected by crosslinking density, crosslinker and structure. The biodegradation of the collagen matrix was also examined. In vivo biocompatibility, degradation and {sup 14}C-inulin release rates were evaluated subcutaneously in rats.

  17. Collagenous gastroduodenitis.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rai, Mridula; Scholes, John V

    2011-10-01

    Collagenous gastroduodenitis is a rare histopathologic entity characterized by marked subepithelial collagen deposition with associated mucosal inflammatory infiltrate. Only 4 cases have been reported, of which 3 had associated collagenous colitis. Collagenous gastroduodenitis without colonic involvement is exceptionally rare with only 1 case reported so far in the literature. We present a case of a 68-year-old woman with dyspepsia and mild anemia, who was found to have nodular gastric and duodenal mucosa on endoscopic examination. Histopathology showed collagenous gastroduodenitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second (and first in English literature) reported case of isolated collagenous gastroduodenitis.

  18. Collagenous gastroduodenitis.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rai, Mridula; Scholes, John V

    2011-10-01

    Collagenous gastroduodenitis is a rare histopathologic entity characterized by marked subepithelial collagen deposition with associated mucosal inflammatory infiltrate. Only 4 cases have been reported, of which 3 had associated collagenous colitis. Collagenous gastroduodenitis without colonic involvement is exceptionally rare with only 1 case reported so far in the literature. We present a case of a 68-year-old woman with dyspepsia and mild anemia, who was found to have nodular gastric and duodenal mucosa on endoscopic examination. Histopathology showed collagenous gastroduodenitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second (and first in English literature) reported case of isolated collagenous gastroduodenitis. PMID:21346601

  19. Shim3d Helmholtz Solution Package

    2009-01-29

    This suite of codes solves the Helmholtz Equation for the steady-state propagation of single-frequency electromagnetic radiation in an arbitrary 2D or 3D dielectric medium. Materials can be either transparent or absorptive (including metals) and are described entirely by their shape and complex dielectric constant. Dielectric boundaries are assumed to always fall on grid boundaries and the material within a single grid cell is considered to be uniform. Input to the problem is in the formmore » of a Dirichlet boundary condition on a single boundary, and may be either analytic (Gaussian) in shape, or a mode shape computed using a separate code (such as the included eigenmode solver vwave20), and written to a file. Solution is via the finite difference method using Jacobi iteration for 3D problems or direct matrix inversion for 2D problems. Note that 3D problems that include metals will require different iteration parameters than described in the above reference. For structures with curved boundaries not easily modeled on a rectangular grid, the auxillary codes helmholtz11(2D), helm3d (semivectoral), and helmv3d (full vectoral) are provided. For these codes the finite difference equations are specified on a topological regular triangular grid and solved using Jacobi iteration or direct matrix inversion as before. An automatic grid generator is supplied.« less

  20. Reprogramming cellular phenotype by soft collagen gels.

    PubMed

    Ali, M Yakut; Chuang, Chih-Yuan; Saif, M Taher A

    2014-11-28

    A variety of cell types exhibit phenotype changes in response to the mechanical stiffness of the substrate. Many cells excluding neurons display an increase in the spread area, actin stress fiber formation and larger focal adhesion complexes as substrate stiffness increases in a sparsely populated culture. Cell proliferation is also known to directly correlate with these phenotype changes/changes in substrate stiffness. Augmented spreading and proliferation on stiffer substrates require nuclear transcriptional regulator YAP (Yes associated protein) localization in the cell nucleus and is tightly coupled to larger traction force generation. In this study, we show that different types of fibroblasts can exhibit spread morphology, well defined actin stress fibers, and larger focal adhesions even on very soft collagen gels (modulus in hundreds of Pascals) as if they are on hard glass substrates (modulus in GPa, several orders of magnitude higher). Strikingly, we show, for the first time, that augmented spreading and other hard substrate cytoskeleton architectures on soft collagen gels are not correlated with the cell proliferation pattern and do not require YAP localization in the cell nucleus. Finally, we examine the response of human colon carcinoma (HCT-8) cells on soft collagen gels. Recent studies show that human colon carcinoma (HCT-8) cells form multicellular clusters by 2-3 days when cultured on soft polyacrylamide (PA) gels with a wide range of stiffness (0.5-50 kPa) and coated with an extracellular matrix, ECM (collagen monomer/fibronectin). These clusters show limited spreading/wetting on PA gels, form 3D structures at the edges, and eventually display a remarkable, dissociative metastasis like phenotype (MLP), i.e., epithelial to rounded morphological transition after a week of culture on PA gels only, but not on collagen monomer coated stiff polystyrene/glass where they exhibit enhanced wetting and form confluent monolayers. Here, we show that HCT-8 cell

  1. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  2. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  3. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This area of terrain near the Sagan Memorial Station was taken on Sol 3 by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.' It stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  4. Natural assembly of platelet lysate-loaded nanocarriers into enriched 3D hydrogels for cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Santo, Vítor E; Popa, Elena G; Mano, João F; Gomes, Manuela E; Reis, Rui L

    2015-06-01

    The role of Platelet Lysates (PLs) as a source of growth factors (GFs) and as main element of three-dimensional (3D) hydrogels has been previously described. However, the resulting hydrogels usually suffer from high degree of contraction, limiting their usefulness. This work describes the development of a stable biomimetic 3D hydrogel structure based on PLs, through the spontaneous assembling of a high concentration of chitosan-chondroitin sulfate nanoparticles (CH/CS NPs) with PLs loaded by adsorption. The interactions between the NPs and the lysates resemble the ones observed in the extracellular matrix (ECM) native environment between glycosaminoglycans and ECM proteins. In vitro release studies were carried out focusing on the quantification of PDGF-BB and TGF-β1 GFs. Human adipose derived stem cells (hASCs) were entrapped in these 3D hydrogels and cultured in vitro under chondrogenic stimulus, in order to assess their potential use for cartilage regeneration. Histological, immunohistological and gene expression analysis demonstrated that the PL-assembled constructs entrapping hASCs exhibited results similar to the positive control (hASCS cultured in pellets), concerning the levels of collagen II expression and immunolocalization of collagen type I and II and aggrecan. Moreover, the deposition of new cartilage ECM was detected by alcian blue and safranin-O positive stainings. This work demonstrates the potential of PLs to act simultaneously as a source/carrier of GFs and as a 3D structure of support, through the application of a "bottom-up" approach involving the assembly of NPs, resulting in an enriched construct for cartilage regeneration applications. PMID:25795623

  5. Collagen fillers.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Leslie; Kaufman, Joely; Saghari, Sogol

    2006-01-01

    Collagen implants, both animal and human derived, have been used for soft tissue augmentation for many years. Bovine collagen fillers were the most popular injectable implants for nearly two decades in the United States. Since then, human bioengineered collagen products have been available in addition to hyaluronic acid-containing fillers. This article outlines the different types of injectable collagen implants, injection techniques, preferred methods of treatment, and possible adverse reactions to the injectable materials.

  6. Proteomics reveals drastic increase of extracellular matrix proteins collagen and dermatopontin in the aged mdx diaphragm model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Carberry, Steven; Zweyer, Margit; Swandulla, Dieter; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2012-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal genetic disease of childhood caused by primary abnormalities in the gene coding for the membrane cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. The mdx mouse is an established animal model of various aspects of X-linked muscular dystrophy and is widely used for studying fundamental mechanisms of dystrophinopathy and testing novel therapeutic approaches to treat one of the most frequent gender-specific diseases in humans. In order to determine global changes in the muscle proteome with the progressive deterioration of mdx tissue with age, we have characterized diaphragm muscle from mdx mice at three ages (8-weeks, 12-months and 22-months) using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Altered expression levels in diaphragm of 8-week vs. 22-month mice were shown to occur in 11 muscle-associated proteins. Aging in the mdx diaphragm seems to be associated with a drastic increase in the extracellular matrix proteins, collagen and dermatopontin, the molecular chaperone αB-crystallin, and the intermediate filament protein vimentin, suggesting increased accumulation of connective tissue, an enhanced cellular stress response and compensatory stabilization of the weakened membrane cytoskeleton. These proteomic findings establish the aged mdx diaphragm as an excellent model system for studying secondary effects of dystrophin deficiency in skeletal muscle tissue.

  7. The Effector Protein BPE005 from Brucella abortus Induces Collagen Deposition and Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Downmodulation via Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Rey Serantes, Diego; Herrmann, Claudia Karina; Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Vanzulli, Silvia; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Comerci, Diego José; Delpino, María Victoria

    2015-12-14

    The liver is frequently affected in patients with active brucellosis. In the present study, we identified a virulence factor involved in the modulation of hepatic stellate cell function and consequent fibrosis during Brucella abortus infection. This study assessed the role of BPE005 protein from B. abortus in the fibrotic phenotype induced on hepatic stellate cells during B. abortus infection in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that the fibrotic phenotype induced by B. abortus on hepatic stellate (LX-2) cells was dependent on BPE005, a protein associated with the type IV secretion system (T4SS) VirB from B. abortus. Our results indicated that B. abortus inhibits matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) secretion through the activity of the BPE005-secreted protein and induces concomitant collagen deposition by LX-2 cells. BPE005 is a small protein containing a cyclic nucleotide monophosphate binding domain (cNMP) that modulates the LX-2 cell phenotype through a mechanism that is dependent on the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. Altogether, these results indicate that B. abortus tilts LX-2 cells to a profibrogenic phenotype employing a functional T4SS and the secreted BPE005 protein through a mechanism that involves the cAMP and PKA signaling pathway.

  8. The Effector Protein BPE005 from Brucella abortus Induces Collagen Deposition and Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Downmodulation via Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Rey Serantes, Diego; Herrmann, Claudia Karina; Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Vanzulli, Silvia; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Comerci, Diego José

    2015-01-01

    The liver is frequently affected in patients with active brucellosis. In the present study, we identified a virulence factor involved in the modulation of hepatic stellate cell function and consequent fibrosis during Brucella abortus infection. This study assessed the role of BPE005 protein from B. abortus in the fibrotic phenotype induced on hepatic stellate cells during B. abortus infection in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that the fibrotic phenotype induced by B. abortus on hepatic stellate (LX-2) cells was dependent on BPE005, a protein associated with the type IV secretion system (T4SS) VirB from B. abortus. Our results indicated that B. abortus inhibits matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) secretion through the activity of the BPE005-secreted protein and induces concomitant collagen deposition by LX-2 cells. BPE005 is a small protein containing a cyclic nucleotide monophosphate binding domain (cNMP) that modulates the LX-2 cell phenotype through a mechanism that is dependent on the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. Altogether, these results indicate that B. abortus tilts LX-2 cells to a profibrogenic phenotype employing a functional T4SS and the secreted BPE005 protein through a mechanism that involves the cAMP and PKA signaling pathway. PMID:26667834

  9. Non-collagenous protein screening in the human chondrodysplasias: link proteins, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), and fibromodulin.

    PubMed

    Stanescu, V; Do, T P; Chaminade, F; Maroteaux, P; Stanescu, R

    1994-05-15

    A gel-electrophoretic screening for link proteins, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), and fibromodulin abnormalities was performed in fetuses, newborn infants, and children with various types of chondrodysplasia. Microdissected freeze-dried sections of upper tibial growth cartilage were extracted with 4M guanidinium chloride in the presence of proteolysis inhibitors. After dialysis against 8M urea, the extracts were submitted to stepwise ion-exchange chromatography to separate the large proteoglycans (aggrecans) from the other components. The latter were analyzed by gel electrophoresis, electrotransferred onto nitrocellulose membranes, and reacted with specific antibodies. Control samples from individuals with apparently normal growth were analyzed in the same runs. Two link protein bands with abnormal electrophoretic migration were found in a sporadic case of spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, Kozlowski type. Three link protein bands with the same migration as in the control samples were found in thanatophoric dysplasia, homozygous achondroplasia, achondrogenesis type II, hypochondrogenesis, Goldblatt syndrome, Desbuquois dysplasia, pseudoachondroplasia, and diastrophic dysplasia. In several pathologic cases with normal electrophoretic pattern of the link proteins, small link protein fragments appeared after reduction. The gel electrophoretic pattern of COMP was studied in thanatophoric dysplasia, diastrophic dysplasia, homozygous achondroplasia, fibrochondrogenesis, hypochondrogenesis, Goldblatt syndrome, and Kniest dysplasia. In all these cases the pattern was the same as in the control samples. The main band of fibromodulin had a normal migration rate in fibrochondrogenesis, Desbuquois dysplasia, Kniest dysplasia, and pseudoachondroplasia. It was delayed in diastrophic dysplasia. PMID:8030664

  10. Uncovering cancer cell behavioral phenotype in 3-D in vitro metastatic landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Sun, Bo; Duclos, Guillaume; Kam, Yoonseok; Gatenby, Robert; Stone, Howard; Austin, Robert

    2012-02-01

    One well-known fact is that cancer cell genetics determines cell metastatic potentials. However, from a physics point of view, genetics as cell properties cannot directly act on metastasis. An agent is needed to unscramble the genetics first before generating dynamics for metastasis. Exactly this agent is cell behavioral phenotype, which is rarely studied due to the difficulties of real-time cell tracking in in vivo tissue. Here we have successfully constructed a micro in vitro environment with collagen based Extracellular Matrix (ECM) structures for cell 3-D metastasis. With stable nutrition (glucose) gradient inside, breast cancer cell MDA-MB-231 is able to invade inside the collagen from the nutrition poor site towards the nutrition rich site. Continuous confocal microscopy captures images of the cells every 12 hours and tracks their positions in 3-D space. The micro fluorescent beads pre-mixed inside the ECM demonstrate that invasive cells have altered the structures through mechanics. With the observation and the analysis of cell collective behaviors, we argue that game theory may exist between the pioneering cells and their followers in the metastatic cell group. The cell collaboration may explain the high efficiency of metastasis.

  11. Sequential assembly of 3D perfusable microfluidic hydrogels.

    PubMed

    He, Jiankang; Zhu, Lin; Liu, Yaxiong; Li, Dichen; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-11-01

    Bottom-up tissue engineering provides a promising way to recreate complex structural organizations of native organs in artificial constructs by assembling functional repeating modules. However, it is challenging for current bottom-up strategies to simultaneously produce a controllable and immediately perfusable microfluidic network in modularly assembled 3D constructs. Here we presented a bottom-up strategy to produce perfusable microchannels in 3D hydrogels by sequentially assembling microfluidic modules. The effects of agarose-collagen composition on microchannel replication and 3D assembly of hydrogel modules were investigated. The unique property of predefined microchannels in transporting fluids within 3D assemblies was evaluated. Endothelial cells were incorporated into the microfluidic network of 3D hydrogels for dynamic culture in a house-made bioreactor system. The results indicated that the sequential assembly method could produce interconnected 3D predefined microfluidic networks in optimized agarose-collagen hydrogels, which were fully perfusable and successfully functioned as fluid pathways to facilitate the spreading of endothelial cells. We envision that the presented method could be potentially used to engineer 3D vascularized parenchymal constructs by encapsulating primary cells in bulk hydrogels and incorporating endothelial cells in predefined microchannels. PMID:25027302

  12. Encapsulation of adult human mesenchymal stem cells within collagen-agarose microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Batorsky, Anna; Liao, Jiehong; Lund, Amanda W; Plopper, George E; Stegemann, Jan P

    2005-11-20

    Reliable control over the process of cell differentiation is a major challenge in moving stem cell-based therapies forward. The composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is known to play an important role in modulating differentiation. We have developed a system to encapsulate adult human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) within spherical three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments consisting of a defined mixture of collagen Type I and agarose polymers. These protein-based beads were produced by emulsification of liquid hMSC-matrix suspensions in a silicone fluid phase and subsequent gelation to form hydrogel beads, which were collected by centrifugation and placed in culture. Bead size and size distribution could be varied by changing the encapsulation parameters (impeller speed and blade separation), and beads in the range of 30-150 microns in diameter were reliably produced. Collagen concentrations up to 40% (wt/wt) could be incorporated into the bead matrix. Visible light and fluorescence microscopy confirmed that the collagen matrix was uniformly distributed throughout the beads. Cell viability post-encapsulation was in the range of 75-90% for all bead formulations (similar to control slab gels) and remained at this level for 8 days in culture. Fluorescent staining of the actin cytoskeleton revealed that hMSC spreading increased with increasing collagen concentration. This system of producing 3D microenvironments of defined matrix composition therefore offers a way to control cell-matrix interactions and thereby guide hMSC differentiation. The bead format allows the use of small amounts of matrix proteins, and such beads can potentially be used as a cell delivery vehicle in tissue repair applications.

  13. The Potential of Encapsulating “Raw Materials” in 3D Osteochondral Gradient Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Neethu; Gupta, Vineet; Sridharan, BanuPriya; Sutherland, Amanda; Detamore, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Scaffolds with continuous gradients in material composition and bioactive signals enable a smooth transition of properties at the interface. Components like chondroitin sulfate (CS) and bioactive glass (BG) in 3D scaffolds may serve as “raw materials” for synthesis of new extracellular matrix (ECM), and may have the potential to completely or partially replace expensive growth factors. We hypothesized that scaffolds with gradients of ECM components would enable superior performance of engineered constructs. Raw material encapsulation altered the appearance, structure, porosity, and degradation of the scaffolds. They allowed the