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Sample records for 3d collagen scaffold

  1. Enhancement of neurite outgrowth in neuron cancer stem cells by growth on 3-D collagen scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Kuo, Shyh Ming; Liu, Guei-Sheung; Chen, Wan-Nan U.; Chuang, Chin-Wen; Liu, Li-Feng

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neuron cancer stem cells (NCSCs) behave high multiply of growth on collagen scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhancement of NCSCs neurite outgrowth on porous collagen scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3-D collagen culture of NCSCs shows an advance differentiation than 2-D culture. -- Abstract: Collagen is one component of the extracellular matrix that has been widely used for constructive remodeling to facilitate cell growth and differentiation. The 3-D distribution and growth of cells within the porous scaffold suggest a clinical significance for nerve tissue engineering. In the current study, we investigated proliferation and differentiation of neuron cancer stem cells (NCSCs) on a 3-D porous collagen scaffold that mimics the natural extracellular matrix. We first generated green fluorescence protein (GFP) expressing NCSCs using a lentiviral system to instantly monitor the transitions of morphological changes during growth on the 3-D scaffold. We found that proliferation of GFP-NCSCs increased, and a single cell mass rapidly grew with unrestricted expansion between days 3 and 9 in culture. Moreover, immunostaining with neuronal nuclei (NeuN) revealed that NCSCs grown on the 3-D collagen scaffold significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth. Our findings confirmed that the 80 {mu}m porous collagen scaffold could enhance attachment, viability and differentiation of the cancer neural stem cells. This result could provide a new application for nerve tissue engineering and nerve regeneration.

  2. Cell Proliferation on Macro/Nano Surface Structure and Collagen Immobilization of 3D Polycaprolactone Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Ouk; Myung, Sung-Woon; Kook, Min-Suk; Jung, Sang-Chul; Kim, Byung-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    In this study, 3D polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technique. The macro/nano morphology of, 3D PCL scaffolds surface was etched with oxygen plasma. Acrylic acid (AA) plasma-polymerization was performed to functionalize the macro/nano surface with carboxyl groups and then collagen was immobilized with plasma-polymerized 3D PCL scaffolds. After O2 plasma and AA plasma-polymerization, contact angles were decreased. The FE-SEM and AFM results showed that O2 plasma is increased the surface roughness. The MTT assay results showed that proliferation of the M3CT3-E1 cells increased on the oxygen plasma treated and collagen immobilized 3D PCL scaffolds. PMID:27433597

  3. 3D Printing of Composite Calcium Phosphate and Collagen Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Inzana, Jason A.; Olvera, Diana; Fuller, Seth M.; Kelly, James P.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Schwarz, Edward M.; Kates, Stephen L.; Awad, Hani A.

    2014-01-01

    Low temperature 3D printing of calcium phosphate scaffolds holds great promise for fabricating synthetic bone graft substitutes with enhanced performance over traditional techniques. Many design parameters, such as the binder solution properties, have yet to be optimized to ensure maximal biocompatibility and osteoconductivity with sufficient mechanical properties. This study tailored the phosphoric acid-based binder solution concentration to 8.75 wt% to maximize cytocompatibility and mechanical strength, with a supplementation of Tween 80 to improve printing. To further enhance the formulation, collagen was dissolved into the binder solution to fabricate collagen-calcium phosphate composites. Reducing the viscosity and surface tension through a physiologic heat treatment and Tween 80, respectively, enabled reliable thermal inkjet printing of the collagen solutions. Supplementing the binder solution with 1–2 wt% collagen significantly improved maximum flexural strength and cell viability. To assess the bone healing performance, we implanted 3D printed scaffolds into a critically sized murine femoral defect for 9 weeks. The implants were confirmed to be osteoconductive, with new bone growth incorporating the degrading scaffold materials. In conclusion, this study demonstrates optimization of material parameters for 3D printed calcium phosphate scaffolds and enhancement of material properties by volumetric collagen incorporation via inkjet printing. PMID:24529628

  4. 3D printing of composite calcium phosphate and collagen scaffolds for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Inzana, Jason A; Olvera, Diana; Fuller, Seth M; Kelly, James P; Graeve, Olivia A; Schwarz, Edward M; Kates, Stephen L; Awad, Hani A

    2014-04-01

    Low temperature 3D printing of calcium phosphate scaffolds holds great promise for fabricating synthetic bone graft substitutes with enhanced performance over traditional techniques. Many design parameters, such as the binder solution properties, have yet to be optimized to ensure maximal biocompatibility and osteoconductivity with sufficient mechanical properties. This study tailored the phosphoric acid-based binder solution concentration to 8.75 wt% to maximize cytocompatibility and mechanical strength, with a supplementation of Tween 80 to improve printing. To further enhance the formulation, collagen was dissolved into the binder solution to fabricate collagen-calcium phosphate composites. Reducing the viscosity and surface tension through a physiologic heat treatment and Tween 80, respectively, enabled reliable thermal inkjet printing of the collagen solutions. Supplementing the binder solution with 1-2 wt% collagen significantly improved maximum flexural strength and cell viability. To assess the bone healing performance, we implanted 3D printed scaffolds into a critically sized murine femoral defect for 9 weeks. The implants were confirmed to be osteoconductive, with new bone growth incorporating the degrading scaffold materials. In conclusion, this study demonstrates optimization of material parameters for 3D printed calcium phosphate scaffolds and enhancement of material properties by volumetric collagen incorporation via inkjet printing.

  5. Engineering multi-layered skeletal muscle tissue by using 3D microgrooved collagen scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shangwu; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2015-12-01

    Preparation of three-dimensional (3D) micropatterned porous scaffolds remains a great challenge for engineering of highly organized tissues such as skeletal muscle tissue and cardiac tissue. Two-dimensional (2D) micropatterned surfaces with periodic features (several nanometers to less than 100 μm) are commonly used to guide the alignment of muscle myoblasts and myotubes and lead to formation of pre-patterned cell sheets. However, cell sheets from 2D patterned surfaces have limited thickness, and harvesting the cell sheets for implantation is inconvenient and can lead to less alignment of myotubes. 3D micropatterned scaffolds can promote cell alignment and muscle tissue formation. In this study, we developed a novel type of 3D porous collagen scaffolds with concave microgrooves that mimic muscle basement membrane to engineer skeletal muscle tissue. Highly aligned and multi-layered muscle bundle tissues were engineered by controlling the size of microgrooves and cell seeding concentration. Myoblasts in the engineered muscle tissue were well-aligned and had high expression of myosin heavy chain and synthesis of muscle extracellular matrix. The microgrooved collagen scaffolds could be used to engineer organized multi-layered muscle tissue for implantation to repair/restore the function of diseased tissues or be used to investigate the cell-cell interaction in 3D microscale topography.

  6. Physicochemical properties of 3D collagen-CS scaffolds for potential use in neural tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Pietrucha, Krystyna

    2015-09-01

    Collagen-based composite scaffolds have considerable potential due to their well-known ability to regenerate skin, bone and cartilage. However, the precise composition and structure of scaffolds that optimize their interaction with neural cells remains incompletely understood and yet to be explored. In the present study, a new family of bi-component 3D scaffolds consisting of collagen (Col) and chondroitin sulphate (CS) were synthesized using a two-stage process: multiple freeze-drying followed by carbodiimide modification. Col-CS matrices had an average pore diameter of 31 μm and a relatively high surface area to pore volume ratio. Importantly, the FTIR data indicated that the ratio between the intensity of amide III and 1452 cm(-1) for Col-CS scaffold was 0.87, which indicates that the Col triple helix was preserved during the formation of the bond between Col and CS. All experiments also clearly showed that the Col-CS matrices have a lower enzyme sensitivity and higher thermal resistance than Col alone. These differences are likely due to the relatively large amount of CS in the collagen sponges, which hinders access for attack at specific active sites of the Col triple helix. Improved binary composite scaffolds were designed for neural tissue engineering applications.

  7. Creation of a long-lifespan ciliated epithelial tissue structure using a 3D collagen scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuchi; Wong, Lid B.; Mao, Hua

    2009-01-01

    We describe a method of using a 3D collagen gel scaffold applied at the air-liquid interface to culture dissociated primary tracheal-bronchial ciliated cells into a ciliated epithelial tissue structure (CETS). This 3D collagen gel culture system enables the induction of ciliogenesis and continuously provides support, maintenance, development, differentiation and propagation for the growth of cilia into the CETS. The CETS developed by this system resembles the ciliary metachronal motility and morphological, histological and physiopharmacological characteristics of cells found in native and in vivo ciliated epithelia. The CETS can be sustained for months with a straightforward and simple maintenance protocol. The integrity of the functional ciliary activity of this CETS enables the evaluation of long-term effects of many pulmonary drug candidates without using animals. PMID:19836831

  8. Development of bioartificial myocardium by electrostimulation of 3D collagen scaffolds seeded with stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Haneef, Kanwal; Lila, Nermine; Benadda, Samira; Legrand, Fabien; Carpentier, Alain; Chachques, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Electrostimulation (ES) can be defined as a safe physical method to induce stem cell differentiation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of ES on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) seeded in collagen scaffolds in terms of proliferation and differentiation into cardiomyocytes. BMSCs were isolated from Wistar rats and seeded into 3D collagen type 1 templates measuring 25 × 25 × 6 mm. Bipolar in vitro ES was performed during 21 days. Electrical impedance and cell proliferation were measured. Expression of cardiac markers was assessed by immunocytochemistry. Viscoelasticity of collagen matrix was evaluated. Electrical impedance assessments showed a low resistance of 234±41 Ohms which indicates good electrical conductivity of collagen matrix. Cell proliferation at 570 nm as significantly increased in ES groups after seven day (ES 0.129±0.03 vs non-stimulated control matrix 0.06±0.01, P=0.002) and after 21 days, (ES 0.22±0.04 vs control 0.13±0.01, P=0.01). Immunocytoche mistry of BMSCs after 21 days ES showed positive staining of cardiac markers, troponin I, connexin 43, sarcomeric alpha-actinin, slow myosin, fast myosin and desmin. Staining for BMSCs marker CD29 after 21 days was negative. Electrostimulation of cell-seeded collagen matrix changed stem cell morphology and biochemical characteristics, increasing the expression of cardiac markers. Thus, MSC-derived differentiated cells by electrostimulation grafted in biological scaffolds might result in a convenient tissue engineering source for myocardial diseases. PMID:23185681

  9. Development of bioartificial myocardium by electrostimulation of 3D collagen scaffolds seeded with stem cells.

    PubMed

    Haneef, Kanwal; Lila, Nermine; Benadda, Samira; Legrand, Fabien; Carpentier, Alain; Chachques, Juan C

    2012-06-01

    Electrostimulation (ES) can be defined as a safe physical method to induce stem cell differentiation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of ES on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) seeded in collagen scaffolds in terms of proliferation and differentiation into cardiomyocytes. BMSCs were isolated from Wistar rats and seeded into 3D collagen type 1 templates measuring 25 × 25 × 6 mm. Bipolar in vitro ES was performed during 21 days. Electrical impedance and cell proliferation were measured. Expression of cardiac markers was assessed by immunocytochemistry. Viscoelasticity of collagen matrix was evaluated. Electrical impedance assessments showed a low resistance of 234±41 Ohms which indicates good electrical conductivity of collagen matrix. Cell proliferation at 570 nm as significantly increased in ES groups after seven day (ES 0.129±0.03 vs non-stimulated control matrix 0.06±0.01, P=0.002) and after 21 days, (ES 0.22±0.04 vs control 0.13±0.01, P=0.01). Immunocytoche mistry of BMSCs after 21 days ES showed positive staining of cardiac markers, troponin I, connexin 43, sarcomeric alpha-actinin, slow myosin, fast myosin and desmin. Staining for BMSCs marker CD29 after 21 days was negative. Electrostimulation of cell-seeded collagen matrix changed stem cell morphology and biochemical characteristics, increasing the expression of cardiac markers. Thus, MSC-derived differentiated cells by electrostimulation grafted in biological scaffolds might result in a convenient tissue engineering source for myocardial diseases.

  10. Electrical and Neurotrophin Enhancement of Neurite Outgrowth within a 3D Collagen Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Robert D.; Rendell, Sara R.; Counts, Lauren R.; Papke, Jason B.; Willits, Rebecca K.; Harkins, Amy B.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical and chemical stimulation have been studied as potent mechanisms of enhancing nerve regeneration and wound healing. However, it remains unclear how electrical stimuli affect nerve growth, particularly in the presence of neurotrophic factors. The objective of this study was to explore (1) the effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) supplementation to support neurite outgrowth in a 3D scaffold, and (2) the effect of brief, low voltage, electrical stimulation (ES) on neurite outgrowth prior to neurotrophin supplementation. Dissociated E11 chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were seeded within a 1.5 mg/mL type-I collagen scaffold. For neurotrophin treatments, scaffolds were incubated for 24 hrs in culture media containing nerve growth factor (NGF, 10 ng/mL) or BDNF (200 ng/mL), or both. For ES groups, scaffolds containing neurons were stimulated for 10 min at 8–10 V/m DC, then incubated for 24 hrs with neurotrophin. Fixed and labeled neurons were imaged to measure neurite growth and directionality. BDNF supplementation was not as effective as NGF at supporting DRG neurite outgrowth. ES prior to NGF supplementation improved DRG neurite outgrowth compared to NGF alone. This combination of brief ES with NGF treatment was the most effective treatment compared to NGF or BDNF alone. Brief ES had no impact on neurite directionality in the 3D scaffolds. These results demonstrate that ES improves neurite outgrowth in the presence of neurotrophins, and could provide a potential therapeutic approach to improve nerve regeneration when coupled with neurotrophin treatment. PMID:24710795

  11. 3D bioprinting of BMSC-laden methacrylamide gelatin scaffolds with CBD-BMP2-collagen microfibers.

    PubMed

    Du, Mingchun; Chen, Bing; Meng, Qingyuan; Liu, Sumei; Zheng, Xiongfei; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Heran; Li, Hongyi; Wang, Nuo; Dai, Jianwu

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting combines biomaterials, cells and functional components into complex living tissues. Herein, we assembled function-control modules into cell-laden scaffolds using 3D bioprinting. A customized 3D printer was able to tune the microstructure of printed bone mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC)-laden methacrylamide gelatin scaffolds at the micrometer scale. For example, the pore size was adjusted to 282 ± 32 μm and 363 ± 60 μm. To match the requirements of the printing nozzle, collagen microfibers with a length of 22 ± 13 μm were prepared with a high-speed crusher. Collagen microfibers bound bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) with a collagen binding domain (CBD) as differentiation-control module, from which BMP2 was able to be controllably released. The differentiation behaviors of BMSCs in the printed scaffolds were compared in three microenvironments: samples without CBD-BMP2-collagen microfibers in the growth medium, samples without microfibers in the osteogenic medium and samples with microfibers in the growth medium. The results indicated that BMSCs showed high cell viability (>90%) during printing; CBD-BMP2-collagen microfibers induced BMSC differentiation into osteocytes within 14 days more efficiently than the osteogenic medium. Our studies suggest that these function-control modules are attractive biomaterials and have potential applications in 3D bioprinting. PMID:26684899

  12. 3D bioprinting of BMSC-laden methacrylamide gelatin scaffolds with CBD-BMP2-collagen microfibers.

    PubMed

    Du, Mingchun; Chen, Bing; Meng, Qingyuan; Liu, Sumei; Zheng, Xiongfei; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Heran; Li, Hongyi; Wang, Nuo; Dai, Jianwu

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting combines biomaterials, cells and functional components into complex living tissues. Herein, we assembled function-control modules into cell-laden scaffolds using 3D bioprinting. A customized 3D printer was able to tune the microstructure of printed bone mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC)-laden methacrylamide gelatin scaffolds at the micrometer scale. For example, the pore size was adjusted to 282 ± 32 μm and 363 ± 60 μm. To match the requirements of the printing nozzle, collagen microfibers with a length of 22 ± 13 μm were prepared with a high-speed crusher. Collagen microfibers bound bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) with a collagen binding domain (CBD) as differentiation-control module, from which BMP2 was able to be controllably released. The differentiation behaviors of BMSCs in the printed scaffolds were compared in three microenvironments: samples without CBD-BMP2-collagen microfibers in the growth medium, samples without microfibers in the osteogenic medium and samples with microfibers in the growth medium. The results indicated that BMSCs showed high cell viability (>90%) during printing; CBD-BMP2-collagen microfibers induced BMSC differentiation into osteocytes within 14 days more efficiently than the osteogenic medium. Our studies suggest that these function-control modules are attractive biomaterials and have potential applications in 3D bioprinting.

  13. Synthesis of highly interconnected 3D scaffold from Arothron stellatus skin collagen for tissue engineering application.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Giriprasath; Singaravelu, Sivakumar; Raja, M D; Sivagnanam, Uma Tiruchirapalli

    2015-11-01

    The substrate which is avidly used for tissue engineering applications should have good mechanical and biocompatible properties, and all these parameters are often considered as essential for dermal reformation. Highly interconnected three dimensional (3D) wound dressing material with enhanced structural integrity was synthesized from Arothron stellatus fish skin (AsFS) collagen for tissue engineering applications. The synthesized 3D collagen sponge (COL-SPG) was further characterized by different physicochemical methods. The scanning electron microscopy analysis of the material demonstrated that well interconnected pores with homogeneous microstructure on the surface aids higher swelling index and that the material also possessed good mechanical properties with a Young's modulus of 0.89±0.2 MPa. Biocompatibility of the 3D COL-SPG showed 92% growth for both NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Overall, the study revealed that synthesized 3D COL-SPG from fish skin will act as a promising wound dressing in skin tissue engineering.

  14. Editorial on the original article entitled "3D printing of composite calcium phosphate and collagen scaffolds for bone regeneration" published in the Biomaterials on February 14, 2014.

    PubMed

    Li, Lan; Jiang, Qing

    2015-05-01

    The paper entitled "3D printing of composite calcium phosphate and collagen scaffolds for bone regeneration" published in the Biomaterials recently illuminated the way to make particular scaffolds with calcium phosphate (CaP) powder, phosphoric acid, type I collagen and Tween 80 in low temperature. After the optimal concentration of each component was determined, the scaffolds were evaluated in a critically sized murine femoral defect model and exhibited good material properties. We made some related introduction of materials applied in 3D printing for bone tissue engineering based on this article to demonstrate the current progress in this field of study.

  15. Editorial on the original article entitled “3D printing of composite calcium phosphate and collagen scaffolds for bone regeneration” published in the Biomaterials on February 14, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lan

    2015-01-01

    The paper entitled “3D printing of composite calcium phosphate and collagen scaffolds for bone regeneration” published in the Biomaterials recently illuminated the way to make particular scaffolds with calcium phosphate (CaP) powder, phosphoric acid, type I collagen and Tween 80 in low temperature. After the optimal concentration of each component was determined, the scaffolds were evaluated in a critically sized murine femoral defect model and exhibited good material properties. We made some related introduction of materials applied in 3D printing for bone tissue engineering based on this article to demonstrate the current progress in this field of study. PMID:26046065

  16. Integration of 3D Printed and Micropatterned Polycaprolactone Scaffolds for Guidance of Oriented Collagenous Tissue Formation In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Pilipchuk, Sophia P; Monje, Alberto; Jiao, Yizu; Hao, Jie; Kruger, Laura; Flanagan, Colleen L; Hollister, Scott J; Giannobile, William V

    2016-03-01

    Scaffold design incorporating multiscale cues for clinically relevant, aligned tissue regeneration has potential to improve structural and functional integrity of multitissue interfaces. The objective of this preclinical study is to develop poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds with mesoscale and microscale architectural cues specific to human ligament progenitor cells and assess their ability to form aligned bone-ligament-cementum complexes in vivo. PCL scaffolds are designed to integrate a 3D printed bone region with a micropatterned PCL thin film consisting of grooved pillars. The patterned film region is seeded with human ligament cells, fibroblasts transduced with bone morphogenetic protein-7 genes seeded within the bone region, and a tooth dentin segment positioned on the ligament region prior to subcutaneous implantation into a murine model. Results indicate increased tissue alignment in vivo using micropatterned PCL films, compared to random-porous PCL. At week 6, 30 μm groove depth significantly enhances oriented collagen fiber thickness, overall cell alignment, and nuclear elongation relative to 10 μm groove depth. This study demonstrates for the first time that scaffolds with combined hierarchical mesoscale and microscale features can align cells in vivo for oral tissue repair with potential for improving the regenerative response of other bone-ligament complexes.

  17. The use of flow perfusion culture and subcutaneous implantation with fibroblast-seeded PLLA-collagen 3D scaffolds for abdominal wall repair.

    PubMed

    Pu, Fanrong; Rhodes, Nicholas P; Bayon, Yves; Chen, Rui; Brans, Gerben; Benne, Remco; Hunt, John A

    2010-05-01

    Highly cellularised 3D-tissue constructs designed to repair large, complex abdominal wall defects were prepared using poly (lactic acid) (PLLA)-collagen scaffolds in vitro using a flow perfusion bioreactor. The PLLA-collagen scaffolds had a unique structure consisting of a collagen sponge formed within the pores of a mechanically stable knitted mesh of PLLA. The effect of the flow perfusion bioreactor culturing conditions was investigated in vitro for 0, 7, 14 and 28 days on scaffolds seeded with dermal fibroblasts. The cultured constructs were subsequently studied subcutaneously (SC) in an in vivo animal model. The results of in vitro studies demonstrated that the perfusion system facilitated increased cell proliferation and homogenous distribution in the PLLA-collagen scaffolds compared to static conditions. A highly cellularised 3D-tissue construct was formed by 7 days incubation under perfusion conditions, with increased cellularity by the 28 day time point. The in vivo model demonstrated that implanting constructs with high cellularity resulted in exceptional cell stabilisation, with the survival of implanted cells and expression of the phenotypically-relevant extracellular matrix proteins collagen types I and III, studied by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and immunohistochemistry. The implantation of this porous PPLA-collagen scaffold seeded with dermal fibroblasts following in vitro maturation using a flow perfusion bioreactor system suggests a significant advance over current state-of-the-art procedures for the reconstruction of large, complex abdominal wall tissue defects. PMID:20219244

  18. Construction of a 3D rGO-collagen hybrid scaffold for enhancement of the neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Yu, Xin; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Jianhua; Tang, Wei; Li, Zhou; Mou, Xiaoning; Liu, Hong; Wang, Zhonglin

    2016-01-01

    The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold because the surface of the scaffold can determine the fate of stem cells. A conductive surface is required for a scaffold to direct stem cells toward neural differentiation. However, most conductive polymers are toxic and not amenable to biological degradation, which restricts the design of neural tissue engineering scaffolds. In this study, we used a bioactive three-dimensional (3D) porcine acellular dermal matrix (PADM), which is mainly composed of type I collagen, as a basic material and successfully assembled a layer of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets on the surface of the PADM channels to obtain a porous 3D, biodegradable, conductive and biocompatible PADM-rGO hybrid neural tissue engineering scaffold. Compared with the PADM scaffold, assembling the rGO into the scaffold did not induce a significant change in the microstructure but endowed the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold with good conductivity. A comparison of the neural differentiation of rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was performed by culturing the MSCs on PADM and PADM-rGO scaffolds in neuronal culture medium, followed by the determination of gene expression and immunofluorescence staining. The results of both the gene expression and protein level assessments suggest that the rGO-assembled PADM scaffold may promote the differentiation of MSCs into neuronal cells with higher protein and gene expression levels after 7 days under neural differentiation conditions. This study demonstrated that the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold is a promising scaffold for neural tissue engineering; this scaffold can not only support the growth of MSCs at a high proliferation rate but also enhance the differentiation of MSCs into neural cells.The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold

  19. Construction of a 3D rGO-collagen hybrid scaffold for enhancement of the neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Yu, Xin; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Jianhua; Tang, Wei; Li, Zhou; Mou, Xiaoning; Liu, Hong; Wang, Zhonglin

    2016-01-28

    The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold because the surface of the scaffold can determine the fate of stem cells. A conductive surface is required for a scaffold to direct stem cells toward neural differentiation. However, most conductive polymers are toxic and not amenable to biological degradation, which restricts the design of neural tissue engineering scaffolds. In this study, we used a bioactive three-dimensional (3D) porcine acellular dermal matrix (PADM), which is mainly composed of type I collagen, as a basic material and successfully assembled a layer of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets on the surface of the PADM channels to obtain a porous 3D, biodegradable, conductive and biocompatible PADM-rGO hybrid neural tissue engineering scaffold. Compared with the PADM scaffold, assembling the rGO into the scaffold did not induce a significant change in the microstructure but endowed the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold with good conductivity. A comparison of the neural differentiation of rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was performed by culturing the MSCs on PADM and PADM-rGO scaffolds in neuronal culture medium, followed by the determination of gene expression and immunofluorescence staining. The results of both the gene expression and protein level assessments suggest that the rGO-assembled PADM scaffold may promote the differentiation of MSCs into neuronal cells with higher protein and gene expression levels after 7 days under neural differentiation conditions. This study demonstrated that the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold is a promising scaffold for neural tissue engineering; this scaffold can not only support the growth of MSCs at a high proliferation rate but also enhance the differentiation of MSCs into neural cells. PMID:26750302

  20. Construction of a 3D rGO-collagen hybrid scaffold for enhancement of the neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Yu, Xin; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Jianhua; Tang, Wei; Li, Zhou; Mou, Xiaoning; Liu, Hong; Wang, Zhonglin

    2016-01-28

    The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold because the surface of the scaffold can determine the fate of stem cells. A conductive surface is required for a scaffold to direct stem cells toward neural differentiation. However, most conductive polymers are toxic and not amenable to biological degradation, which restricts the design of neural tissue engineering scaffolds. In this study, we used a bioactive three-dimensional (3D) porcine acellular dermal matrix (PADM), which is mainly composed of type I collagen, as a basic material and successfully assembled a layer of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets on the surface of the PADM channels to obtain a porous 3D, biodegradable, conductive and biocompatible PADM-rGO hybrid neural tissue engineering scaffold. Compared with the PADM scaffold, assembling the rGO into the scaffold did not induce a significant change in the microstructure but endowed the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold with good conductivity. A comparison of the neural differentiation of rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was performed by culturing the MSCs on PADM and PADM-rGO scaffolds in neuronal culture medium, followed by the determination of gene expression and immunofluorescence staining. The results of both the gene expression and protein level assessments suggest that the rGO-assembled PADM scaffold may promote the differentiation of MSCs into neuronal cells with higher protein and gene expression levels after 7 days under neural differentiation conditions. This study demonstrated that the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold is a promising scaffold for neural tissue engineering; this scaffold can not only support the growth of MSCs at a high proliferation rate but also enhance the differentiation of MSCs into neural cells.

  1. Tuning 3D Collagen Matrix Stiffness Independently of Collagen Concentration Modulates Endothelial Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Brooke N.; Starchenko, Alina; Williams, Rebecca M.; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have described the effects of matrix stiffening on cell behavior using two dimensional (2D) synthetic surfaces; however less is known about the effects of matrix stiffening on cells embedded in three dimensional (3D) in vivo-like matrices. A primary limitation in investigating the effects of matrix stiffness in 3D is the lack of materials that can be tuned to control stiffness independently of matrix density. Here, we use collagen-based scaffolds where the mechanical properties are tuned using non-enzymatic glycation of the collagen in solution, prior to polymerization. Collagen solutions glycated prior to polymerization result in collagen gels with a 3-fold increase in compressive modulus without significant changes to the collagen architecture. Using these scaffolds, we show that endothelial cell spreading increases with matrix stiffness, as does the number and length of angiogenic sprouts and the overall spheroid outgrowth. Differences in sprout length are maintained even when the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts is inhibited. Our results demonstrate the ability to de-couple matrix stiffness from matrix density and structure in collagen gels, and that increased matrix stiffness results in increased sprouting and outgrowth. PMID:22902816

  2. 3D printing facilitated scaffold-free tissue unit fabrication.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yu; Richards, Dylan J; Trusk, Thomas C; Visconti, Richard P; Yost, Michael J; Kindy, Mark S; Drake, Christopher J; Argraves, William Scott; Markwald, Roger R; Mei, Ying

    2014-06-01

    Tissue spheroids hold great potential in tissue engineering as building blocks to assemble into functional tissues. To date, agarose molds have been extensively used to facilitate fusion process of tissue spheroids. As a molding material, agarose typically requires low temperature plates for gelation and/or heated dispenser units. Here, we proposed and developed an alginate-based, direct 3D mold-printing technology: 3D printing microdroplets of alginate solution into biocompatible, bio-inert alginate hydrogel molds for the fabrication of scaffold-free tissue engineering constructs. Specifically, we developed a 3D printing technology to deposit microdroplets of alginate solution on calcium containing substrates in a layer-by-layer fashion to prepare ring-shaped 3D hydrogel molds. Tissue spheroids composed of 50% endothelial cells and 50% smooth muscle cells were robotically placed into the 3D printed alginate molds using a 3D printer, and were found to rapidly fuse into toroid-shaped tissue units. Histological and immunofluorescence analysis indicated that the cells secreted collagen type I playing a critical role in promoting cell-cell adhesion, tissue formation and maturation.

  3. 3D Printing Facilitated Scaffold-free Tissue Unit Fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yu; Richards, Dylan J.; Trusk, Thomas C.; Visconti, Richard P.; Yost, Michael J.; Kindy, Mark S.; Drake, Christopher J.; Argraves, William Scott; Markwald, Roger R.; Mei, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Tissue spheroids hold great potential in tissue engineering as building blocks to assemble into functional tissues. To date, agarose molds have been extensively used to facilitate fusion process of tissue spheroids. As a molding material, agarose typically requires low temperature plates for gelation and/or heated dispenser units. Here, we proposed and developed an alginate-based, direct 3D mold-printing technology: 3D printing micro-droplets of alginate solution into biocompatible, bio-inert alginate hydrogel molds for the fabrication of scaffold-free tissue engineering constructs. Specifically, we developed a 3D printing technology to deposit micro-droplets of alginate solution on calcium containing substrates in a layer-by-layer fashion to prepare ring-shaped 3D hydrogel molds. Tissue spheroids composed of 50% endothelial cells and 50% smooth muscle cells were robotically placed into the 3D printed alginate molds using a 3D printer, and were found to rapidly fuse into toroid-shaped tissue units. Histological and immunofluorescence analysis indicated that the cells secreted collagen type I playing a critical role in promoting cell-cell adhesion, tissue formation and maturation. PMID:24717646

  4. Multiphoton crosslinking for biocompatible 3D printing of type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Bell, Alex; Kofron, Matthew; Nistor, Vasile

    2015-09-01

    Multiphoton fabrication is a powerful technique for three-dimensional (3D) printing of structures at the microscale. Many polymers and proteins have been successfully structured and patterned using this method. Type I collagen comprises a large part of the extracellular matrix for most tissue types and is a widely used cellular scaffold material for tissue engineering. Current methods for creating collagen tissue scaffolds do not allow control of local geometry on a cellular scale. This means the environment experienced by cells may be made up of the native material but unrelated to native cellular-scale structure. In this study, we present a novel method to allow multiphoton crosslinking of type I collagen with flavin mononucleotide photosensitizer. The method detailed allows full 3D printing of crosslinked structures made from unmodified type I collagen and uses only demonstrated biocompatible materials. Resolution of 1 μm for both standing lines and high-aspect ratio gaps between structures is demonstrated and complex 3D structures are fabricated. This study demonstrates a means for 3D printing with one of the most widely used tissue scaffold materials. High-resolution, 3D control of the fabrication of collagen scaffolds will facilitate higher fidelity recreation of the native extracellular environment for engineered tissues.

  5. Hydroxyapatite-reinforced collagen tissue engineering scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Robert J.

    Scaffolds have been fabricated from a wide variety of materials and most have showed some success, either as bone graft substitutes or as tissue engineering scaffolds. However, all current scaffold compositions and architectures suffer from one or more flaws including poor mechanical properties, lack of biological response, nondegradability, or a scaffold architecture not conducive to osteointegration. Biomimetic approaches to scaffold design using the two main components of bone tissue, collagen and hydroxyapatite, resulted in scaffolds with superior biological properties but relatively poor mechanical properties and scaffold architecture. It was hypothesized that by optimizing scaffold composition and architecture, HA-collagen bone tissue engineering scaffolds could provide both an excellent biological response along with improved structural properties. The mechanical properties of freeze-dried HA-collagen scaffolds, the most common type of porous HA-collagen material, were first shown to be increased by the addition of HA reinforcements, but scaffold stiffness still fell far short of the desired range. Based on limitations inherent in the freeze-dried process, a new type of leached-porogen scaffold fabrication process was developed. Proof-of-concept scaffolds demonstrated the feasibility of producing leached-porogen HA-collagen materials, and the scaffold architecture was optimized though careful selection of porogen particle size and shape along with an improved crosslinking technique. The final scaffolds exhibited substantially increased compressive modulus compared to previous types HA-collagen scaffolds, while the porosity, pore size, and scaffold permeability were tailored to be suitable for bone tissue ingrowth. An in vitro study demonstrated the capacity of the leached-porogen scaffolds to serve as a substrate for the differentiation of osteoblasts and subsequent production of new bone tissue. The new leached-porogen scaffold HA-collagen scaffolds were

  6. Superelastic, superabsorbent and 3D nanofiber-assembled scaffold for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiming; Ma, Jun; Zhu, Lei; Morsi, Yosry; Ei-Hamshary, Hany; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Mo, Xiumei

    2016-06-01

    Fabrication of 3D scaffold to mimic the nanofibrous structure of the nature extracellular matrix (ECM) with appropriate mechanical properties and excellent biocompatibility, remain an important technical challenge in tissue engineering. The present study reports the strategy to fabricate a 3D nanofibrous scaffold with similar structure to collagen in ECM by combining electrospinning and freeze-drying technique. With the technique reported here, a nanofibrous structure scaffold with hydrophilic and superabsorbent properties can be readily prepared by Gelatin and Polylactic acid (PLA). In wet state the scaffold also shows a super-elastic property, which could bear a compressive strain as high as 80% and recovers its original shape afterwards. Moreover, after 6 days of culture, L-929 cells grow, proliferate and infiltrated into the scaffold. The results suggest that this 3D nanofibrous scaffold would be promising for varied field of tissue engineering application.

  7. The impact of laminin on 3D neurite extension in collagen gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindle-Reilly, Katelyn E.; Papke, Jason B.; Kutosky, Hannah P.; Throm, Allison; Hammer, Joshua A.; Harkins, Amy B.; Kuntz Willits, Rebecca

    2012-08-01

    The primary goal of this research was to characterize the effect of laminin on three-dimensional (3D) neurite growth. Gels were formed using type I collagen at concentrations of 0.4-2.0 mg mL-1 supplemented with laminin at concentrations of 0, 1, 10, or 100 µg mL-1. When imaged with confocal microscopy, laminin was shown to follow the collagen fibers; however, the addition of laminin had minimal effect on the stiffness of the scaffolds at any concentration of collagen. Individual neurons dissociated from E9 chick dorsal root ganglia were cultured in the gels for 24 h, and neurite lengths were measured. For collagen gels without laminin, a typical bimodal response of neurite outgrowth was observed, with increased growth at lower concentrations of collagen gel. However, alteration of the chemical nature of the collagen gel by the laminin additive shifted, or completely mitigated, the bimodal neurite growth response seen in gels without laminin. Expression of integrin subunits, α1, α3, α6 and β1, were confirmed by PCR and immunolabeling in the 3D scaffolds. These results provide insight into the interplay between mechanical and chemical environment to support neurite outgrowth in 3D. Understanding the relative impact of environmental factors on 3D nerve growth may improve biomaterial design for nerve cell regeneration.

  8. Generation of 3D Collagen Gels with Controlled Diverse Architectures.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Rat tail collagen solutions have been used as polymerizable in vitro three dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) gels for single and collective cell migration assays as well as spheroid formation. Factors such as ECM concentration, pH, ionic concentration, and temperature can alter collagen polymerization and ECM architecture. This unit describes how to generate 3D collagen gels that have distinct architectures ranging from a highly reticular meshwork of short thin fibrils with small pores to a loose matrix consisting of stiff, parallel-bundled long fibrils by changing collagen polymerization temperature. This permits analysis of 3D cell migration in different ECM architectures found in vivo while maintaining a similar ECM concentration. Also included are collagen labeling techniques helpful for ECM visualization during live fluorescence imaging. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27580704

  9. Ionic solutes impact collagen scaffold bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Pawelec, K M; Husmann, A; Wardale, R J; Best, S M; Cameron, R E

    2015-02-01

    The structure of ice-templated collagen scaffolds is sensitive to many factors. By adding 0.5 wt% of sodium chloride or sucrose to collagen slurries, scaffold structure could be tuned through changes in ice growth kinetics and interactions of the solute and collagen. With ionic solutes (sodium chloride) the entanglements of the collagen molecule decreased, leading to fibrous scaffolds with increased pore size and decreased attachment of chondrocytes. With non-ionic solutes (sucrose) ice growth was slowed, leading to significantly reduced pore size and up-regulated cell attachment. This highlights the large changes in structure and biological function stimulated by solutes in ice-templating systems. PMID:25649518

  10. 3D braid scaffolds for regeneration of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyunchul; Kim, Kyoung Ju; Park, Sook Young; Huh, Jeong Eun; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Yu, Woong-Ryeol

    2014-06-01

    Regenerating articular cartilage in vivo from cultured chondrocytes requires that the cells be cultured and implanted within a biocompatible, biodegradable scaffold. Such scaffolds must be mechanically stable; otherwise chondrocytes would not be supported and patients would experience severe pain. Here we report a new 3D braid scaffold that matches the anisotropic (gradient) mechanical properties of natural articular cartilage and is permissive to cell cultivation. To design an optimal structure, the scaffold unit cell was mathematically modeled and imported into finite element analysis. Based on this analysis, a 3D braid structure with gradient axial yarn distribution was designed and manufactured using a custom-built braiding machine. The mechanical properties of the 3D braid scaffold were evaluated and compared with simulated results, demonstrating that a multi-scale approach consisting of unit cell modeling and continuum analysis facilitates design of scaffolds that meet the requirements for mechanical compatibility with tissues. PMID:24556323

  11. Apple Derived Cellulose Scaffolds for 3D Mammalian Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Modulevsky, Daniel J.; Lefebvre, Cory; Haase, Kristina; Al-Rekabi, Zeinab; Pelling, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    There are numerous approaches for producing natural and synthetic 3D scaffolds that support the proliferation of mammalian cells. 3D scaffolds better represent the natural cellular microenvironment and have many potential applications in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that 3D cellulose scaffolds produced by decellularizing apple hypanthium tissue can be employed for in vitro 3D culture of NIH3T3 fibroblasts, mouse C2C12 muscle myoblasts and human HeLa epithelial cells. We show that these cells can adhere, invade and proliferate in the cellulose scaffolds. In addition, biochemical functionalization or chemical cross-linking can be employed to control the surface biochemistry and/or mechanical properties of the scaffold. The cells retain high viability even after 12 continuous weeks of culture and can achieve cell densities comparable with other natural and synthetic scaffold materials. Apple derived cellulose scaffolds are easily produced, inexpensive and originate from a renewable source. Taken together, these results demonstrate that naturally derived cellulose scaffolds offer a complementary approach to existing techniques for the in vitro culture of mammalian cells in a 3D environment. PMID:24842603

  12. 3D Microperiodic Hydrogel Scaffolds for Robust Neuronal Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Hanson Shepherd, Jennifer N.; Parker, Sara T.; Shepherd, Robert F.; Gillette, Martha U.; Lewis, Jennifer A.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) microperiodic scaffolds of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) have been fabricated by direct-write assembly of a photopolymerizable hydrogel ink. The ink is initially composed of physically entangled pHEMA chains dissolved in a solution of HEMA monomer, comonomer, photoinitiator and water. Upon printing 3D scaffolds of varying architecture, the ink filaments are exposed to UV light, where they are transformed into an interpenetrating hydrogel network of chemically cross-linked and physically entangled pHEMA chains. These 3D microperiodic scaffolds are rendered growth compliant for primary rat hippocampal neurons by absorption of polylysine. Neuronal cells thrive on these scaffolds, forming differentiated, intricately branched networks. Confocal laser scanning microscopy reveals that both cell distribution and extent of neuronal process alignment depend upon scaffold architecture. This work provides an important step forward in the creation of suitable platforms for in vitro study of sensitive cell types. PMID:21709750

  13. Preparation and characterization of collagen/PLA, chitosan/PLA, and collagen/chitosan/PLA hybrid scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Haaparanta, Anne-Marie; Järvinen, Elina; Cengiz, Ibrahim Fatih; Ellä, Ville; Kokkonen, Harri T; Kiviranta, Ilkka; Kellomäki, Minna

    2014-04-01

    In this study, three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds were developed for the repair of articular cartilage defects. Novel collagen/polylactide (PLA), chitosan/PLA, and collagen/chitosan/PLA hybrid scaffolds were fabricated by combining freeze-dried natural components and synthetic PLA mesh, where the 3D PLA mesh gives mechanical strength, and the natural polymers, collagen and/or chitosan, mimic the natural cartilage tissue environment of chondrocytes. In total, eight scaffold types were studied: four hybrid structures containing collagen and/or chitosan with PLA, and four parallel plain scaffolds with only collagen and/or chitosan. The potential of these types of scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering applications were determined by the analysis of the microstructure, water uptake, mechanical strength, and the viability and attachment of adult bovine chondrocytes to the scaffolds. The manufacturing method used was found to be applicable for the manufacturing of hybrid scaffolds with highly porous 3D structures. All the hybrid scaffolds showed a highly porous structure with open pores throughout the scaffold. Collagen was found to bind water inside the structure in all collagen-containing scaffolds better than the chitosan-containing scaffolds, and the plain collagen scaffolds had the highest water absorption. The stiffness of the scaffold was improved by the hybrid structure compared to plain scaffolds. The cell viability and attachment was good in all scaffolds, however, the collagen hybrid scaffolds showed the best penetration of cells into the scaffold. Our results show that from the studied scaffolds the collagen/PLA hybrids are the most promising scaffolds from this group for cartilage tissue engineering.

  14. Toward single cell traction microscopy within 3D collagen matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Matthew S.; Long, Rong; Feng, Xinzeng; Huang, YuLing; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Wu, Mingming

    2013-10-01

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Cells require the three-dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, current understanding of cell–ECM and cell–cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D cell traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. 3D cell traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single animal cells embedded in either synthetic or natively derived fibrous gels. We discuss here the development of 3D cell traction microscopy, its current limitations, and perspectives on the future of this technology. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying 3D cell traction microscopy to individual tumor cell migration within collagen gels. - Highlights: • Review of the current state of the art in 3D cell traction force microscopy. • Bulk and micro-characterization of remodelable fibrous collagen gels. • Strategies for performing 3D cell traction microscopy within collagen gels.

  15. Imaging and 3D morphological analysis of collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Altendorf, H; Decencière, E; Jeulin, D; De sa Peixoto, P; Deniset-Besseau, A; Angelini, E; Mosser, G; Schanne-Klein, M-C

    2012-08-01

    The recent booming of multiphoton imaging of collagen fibrils by means of second harmonic generation microscopy generates the need for the development and automation of quantitative methods for image analysis. Standard approaches sequentially analyse two-dimensional (2D) slices to gain knowledge on the spatial arrangement and dimension of the fibrils, whereas the reconstructed three-dimensional (3D) image yields better information about these characteristics. In this work, a 3D analysis method is proposed for second harmonic generation images of collagen fibrils, based on a recently developed 3D fibre quantification method. This analysis uses operators from mathematical morphology. The fibril structure is scanned with a directional distance transform. Inertia moments of the directional distances yield the main fibre orientation, corresponding to the main inertia axis. The collaboration of directional distances and fibre orientation delivers a geometrical estimate of the fibre radius. The results include local maps as well as global distribution of orientation and radius of the fibrils over the 3D image. They also bring a segmentation of the image into foreground and background, as well as a classification of the foreground pixels into the preferred orientations. This accurate determination of the spatial arrangement of the fibrils within a 3D data set will be most relevant in biomedical applications. It brings the possibility to monitor remodelling of collagen tissues upon a variety of injuries and to guide tissues engineering because biomimetic 3D organizations and density are requested for better integration of implants.

  16. 3D-Printed ABS and PLA Scaffolds for Cartilage and Nucleus Pulposus Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, Derek H; Carelli, Eric; Steffen, Thomas; Jarzem, Peter; Haglund, Lisbet

    2015-07-03

    Painful degeneration of soft tissues accounts for high socioeconomic costs. Tissue engineering aims to provide biomimetics recapitulating native tissues. Biocompatible thermoplastics for 3D printing can generate high-resolution structures resembling tissue extracellular matrix. Large-pore 3D-printed acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polylactic acid (PLA) scaffolds were compared for cell ingrowth, viability, and tissue generation. Primary articular chondrocytes and nucleus pulposus (NP) cells were cultured on ABS and PLA scaffolds for three weeks. Both cell types proliferated well, showed high viability, and produced ample amounts of proteoglycan and collagen type II on both scaffolds. NP generated more matrix than chondrocytes; however, no difference was observed between scaffold types. Mechanical testing revealed sustained scaffold stability. This study demonstrates that chondrocytes and NP cells can proliferate on both ABS and PLA scaffolds printed with a simplistic, inexpensive desktop 3D printer. Moreover, NP cells produced more proteoglycan than chondrocytes, irrespective of thermoplastic type, indicating that cells maintain individual phenotype over the three-week culture period. Future scaffold designs covering larger pore sizes and better mimicking native tissue structure combined with more flexible or resorbable materials may provide implantable constructs with the proper structure, function, and cellularity necessary for potential cartilage and disc tissue repair in vivo.

  17. 3D-Printed ABS and PLA Scaffolds for Cartilage and Nucleus Pulposus Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, Derek H.; Carelli, Eric; Steffen, Thomas; Jarzem, Peter; Haglund, Lisbet

    2015-01-01

    Painful degeneration of soft tissues accounts for high socioeconomic costs. Tissue engineering aims to provide biomimetics recapitulating native tissues. Biocompatible thermoplastics for 3D printing can generate high-resolution structures resembling tissue extracellular matrix. Large-pore 3D-printed acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polylactic acid (PLA) scaffolds were compared for cell ingrowth, viability, and tissue generation. Primary articular chondrocytes and nucleus pulposus (NP) cells were cultured on ABS and PLA scaffolds for three weeks. Both cell types proliferated well, showed high viability, and produced ample amounts of proteoglycan and collagen type II on both scaffolds. NP generated more matrix than chondrocytes; however, no difference was observed between scaffold types. Mechanical testing revealed sustained scaffold stability. This study demonstrates that chondrocytes and NP cells can proliferate on both ABS and PLA scaffolds printed with a simplistic, inexpensive desktop 3D printer. Moreover, NP cells produced more proteoglycan than chondrocytes, irrespective of thermoplastic type, indicating that cells maintain individual phenotype over the three-week culture period. Future scaffold designs covering larger pore sizes and better mimicking native tissue structure combined with more flexible or resorbable materials may provide implantable constructs with the proper structure, function, and cellularity necessary for potential cartilage and disc tissue repair in vivo. PMID:26151846

  18. 3D Printing of Scaffolds for Tissue Regeneration Applications

    PubMed Central

    Do, Anh-Vu; Khorsand, Behnoush; Geary, Sean M.; Salem, Aliasger K.

    2015-01-01

    The current need for organ and tissue replacement, repair and regeneration for patients is continually growing such that supply is not meeting the high demand primarily due to a paucity of donors as well as biocompatibility issues that lead to immune rejection of the transplant. In an effort to overcome these drawbacks, scientists working in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have investigated the use of scaffolds as an alternative to transplantation. These scaffolds are designed to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) by providing structural support as well as promoting attachment, proliferation, and differentiation with the ultimate goal of yielding functional tissues or organs. Initial attempts at developing scaffolds were problematic and subsequently inspired a growing interest in 3D printing as a mode for generating scaffolds. Utilizing three-dimensional printing (3DP) technologies, ECM-like scaffolds can be produced with a high degree of complexity and precision, where fine details can be included at a micron level. In this review, we discuss the criteria for printing viable and functional scaffolds, scaffolding materials, and 3DP technologies used to print scaffolds for tissue engineering. A hybrid approach, employing both natural and synthetic materials, as well as multiple printing processes may be the key to yielding an ECM-like scaffold with high mechanical strength, porosity, interconnectivity, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and high processability. Creating such biofunctional scaffolds could potentially help to meet the demand by patients for tissues and organs without having to wait or rely on donors for transplantation. PMID:26097108

  19. Polycaprolactone nanofiber interspersed collagen type-I scaffold for bone regeneration: a unique injectable osteogenic scaffold.

    PubMed

    Baylan, Nuray; Bhat, Samerna; Ditto, Maggie; Lawrence, Joseph G; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda

    2013-08-01

    There is an increasing demand for an injectable cell coupled three-dimensional (3D) scaffold to be used as bone fracture augmentation material. To address this demand, a novel injectable osteogenic scaffold called PN-COL was developed using cells, a natural polymer (collagen type-I), and a synthetic polymer (polycaprolactone (PCL)). The injectable nanofibrous PN-COL is created by interspersing PCL nanofibers within pre-osteoblast cell embedded collagen type-I. This simple yet novel and powerful approach provides a great benefit as an injectable bone scaffold over other non-living bone fracture stabilization polymers, such as polymethylmethacrylate and calcium content resin-based materials. The advantages of injectability and the biomimicry of collagen was coupled with the structural support of PCL nanofibers, to create cell encapsulated injectable 3D bone scaffolds with intricate porous internal architecture and high osteoconductivity. The effects of PCL nanofiber inclusion within the cell encapsulated collagen matrix has been evaluated for scaffold size retention and osteocompatibility, as well as for MC3T3-E1 cells osteogenic activity. The structural analysis of novel bioactive material proved that the material is chemically stable enough in an aqueous solution for an extended period of time without using crosslinking reagents, but it is also viscous enough to be injected through a syringe needle. Data from long-term in vitro proliferation and differentiation data suggests that novel PN-COL scaffolds promote the osteoblast proliferation, phenotype expression, and formation of mineralized matrix. This study demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of creating a structurally competent, injectable, cell embedded bone tissue scaffold. Furthermore, the results demonstrate the advantages of mimicking the hierarchical architecture of native bone with nano- and micro-size formation through introducing PCL nanofibers within macron-size collagen fibers and in

  20. Nanostructured thick 3D nanofibrous scaffold can induce bone.

    PubMed

    Eap, Sandy; Morand, David; Clauss, François; Huck, Olivier; Stoltz, Jean-François; Lutz, Jean-Christophe; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Benkirane-Jessel, Nadia; Keller, Laetitia; Fioretti, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Designing unique nanostructured biomimetic materials is a new challenge in modern regenerative medicine. In order to develop functional substitutes for damaged organs or tissues, several methods have been used to create implants able to regenerate robust and durable bone. Electrospinning produces nonwoven scaffolds based on polymer nanofibers mimicking the fibrillar organization of bone extracellular matrix. Here, we describe a biomimetic 3D thick nanofibrous scaffold obtained by electrospinning of the biodegradable, bioresorbable and FDA-approved polymer, poly(ε-caprolactone). Such scaffold presents a thickness reaching one centimeter. We report here the demonstration that the designed nanostructured implant is able to induce in vivo bone regeneration. PMID:25538059

  1. 3D Printing of Scaffolds for Tissue Regeneration Applications.

    PubMed

    Do, Anh-Vu; Khorsand, Behnoush; Geary, Sean M; Salem, Aliasger K

    2015-08-26

    The current need for organ and tissue replacement, repair, and regeneration for patients is continually growing such that supply is not meeting demand primarily due to a paucity of donors as well as biocompatibility issues leading to immune rejection of the transplant. In order to overcome these drawbacks, scientists have investigated the use of scaffolds as an alternative to transplantation. These scaffolds are designed to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) by providing structural support as well as promoting attachment, proliferation, and differentiation with the ultimate goal of yielding functional tissues or organs. Initial attempts at developing scaffolds were problematic and subsequently inspired an interest in 3D printing as a mode for generating scaffolds. Utilizing three-dimensional printing (3DP) technologies, ECM-like scaffolds can be produced with a high degree of complexity, where fine details can be included at a micrometer level. In this Review, the criteria for printing viable and functional scaffolds, scaffolding materials, and 3DP technologies used to print scaffolds for tissue engineering are discussed. Creating biofunctional scaffolds could potentially help to meet the demand by patients for tissues and organs without having to wait or rely on donors for transplantation. PMID:26097108

  2. 3D Printing of Scaffolds for Tissue Regeneration Applications.

    PubMed

    Do, Anh-Vu; Khorsand, Behnoush; Geary, Sean M; Salem, Aliasger K

    2015-08-26

    The current need for organ and tissue replacement, repair, and regeneration for patients is continually growing such that supply is not meeting demand primarily due to a paucity of donors as well as biocompatibility issues leading to immune rejection of the transplant. In order to overcome these drawbacks, scientists have investigated the use of scaffolds as an alternative to transplantation. These scaffolds are designed to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) by providing structural support as well as promoting attachment, proliferation, and differentiation with the ultimate goal of yielding functional tissues or organs. Initial attempts at developing scaffolds were problematic and subsequently inspired an interest in 3D printing as a mode for generating scaffolds. Utilizing three-dimensional printing (3DP) technologies, ECM-like scaffolds can be produced with a high degree of complexity, where fine details can be included at a micrometer level. In this Review, the criteria for printing viable and functional scaffolds, scaffolding materials, and 3DP technologies used to print scaffolds for tissue engineering are discussed. Creating biofunctional scaffolds could potentially help to meet the demand by patients for tissues and organs without having to wait or rely on donors for transplantation.

  3. Metabolic alteration of HepG2 in scaffold-based 3-D culture: proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Pruksakorn, Dumnoensun; Lirdprapamongkol, Kriengsak; Chokchaichamnankit, Daranee; Subhasitanont, Pantipa; Chiablaem, Khajeelak; Svasti, Jisnuson; Srisomsap, Chantragan

    2010-11-01

    3-D cell culture models are important in cancer biology since they provide improved understanding of tumor microenvironment. We have established a 3-D culture model using HepG2 in natural collagen-based scaffold to mimic the development of small avascular tumor in vivo. Morphological characterization showed that HepG2 colonies grew within the interior of the scaffold and showed enhanced extracellular matrix deposition. High levels of cell proliferation in the outermost regions of the scaffold created a hypoxic microenvironment in the 3-D culture system, as indicated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α stabilization, detectable by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Proteomic studies showed decreased expression of several mitochondrial proteins and increased expression of proteins in anaerobic glycolysis under 3-D culture compared to monolayer culture. Creatine kinase was also upregulated in 3-D culture, indicating its possible role as an important energy buffer system under hypoxic microenvironment. Increased levels of proteins in nucleotide metabolism may relate to cellular energy. Thus, our results suggest that HepG2 cells under 3-D culture adapt their energy metabolism in response to hypoxic conditions. Metabolic alterations in the 3-D culture model may relate to physiological changes relevant to development of small avascular tumor in vivo and their study may improve future therapeutic strategies.

  4. 3D conductive nanocomposite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Shahini, Aref; Yazdimamaghani, Mostafa; Walker, Kenneth J; Eastman, Margaret A; Hatami-Marbini, Hamed; Smith, Brenda J; Ricci, John L; Madihally, Sundar V; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tayebi, Lobat

    2014-01-01

    Bone healing can be significantly expedited by applying electrical stimuli in the injured region. Therefore, a three-dimensional (3D) ceramic conductive tissue engineering scaffold for large bone defects that can locally deliver the electrical stimuli is highly desired. In the present study, 3D conductive scaffolds were prepared by employing a biocompatible conductive polymer, ie, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(4-styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), in the optimized nanocomposite of gelatin and bioactive glass. For in vitro analysis, adult human mesenchymal stem cells were seeded in the scaffolds. Material characterizations using hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance, in vitro degradation, as well as thermal and mechanical analysis showed that incorporation of PEDOT:PSS increased the physiochemical stability of the composite, resulting in improved mechanical properties and biodegradation resistance. The outcomes indicate that PEDOT:PSS and polypeptide chains have close interaction, most likely by forming salt bridges between arginine side chains and sulfonate groups. The morphology of the scaffolds and cultured human mesenchymal stem cells were observed and analyzed via scanning electron microscope, micro-computed tomography, and confocal fluorescent microscope. Increasing the concentration of the conductive polymer in the scaffold enhanced the cell viability, indicating the improved microstructure of the scaffolds or boosted electrical signaling among cells. These results show that these conductive scaffolds are not only structurally more favorable for bone tissue engineering, but also can be a step forward in combining the tissue engineering techniques with the method of enhancing the bone healing by electrical stimuli. PMID:24399874

  5. Chitosan-based hydrogel tissue scaffolds made by 3D plotting promotes osteoblast proliferation and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Liu, I-Hsin; Chang, Shih-Hsin; Lin, Hsin-Yi

    2015-05-13

    A 3D plotting system was used to make chitosan-based tissue scaffolds with interconnected pores using pure chitosan (C) and chitosan cross-linked with pectin (CP) and genipin (CG). A freeze-dried chitosan scaffold (CF/D) was made to compare with C, to observe the effects of structural differences. The fiber size, pore size, porosity, compression strength, swelling ratio, drug release efficacy, and cumulative weight loss of the scaffolds were measured. Osteoblasts were cultured on the scaffolds and their proliferation, type I collagen production, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition, and morphology were observed. C had a lower swelling ratio, degradation, porosity and drug release efficacy and a higher compressional stiffness and cell proliferation compared to CF/D (p < 0.05). Of the 3D-plotted samples, cells on CP exhibited the highest degree of mineralization after 21 d (p < 0.05). CP also had the highest swelling ratio and fastest drug release, followed by C and CG (p < 0.05). Both CP and CG were stiffer and degraded more slowly in saline solution than C (p < 0.05). In summary, 3D-plotted scaffolds were stronger, less likely to degrade and better promoted osteoblast cell proliferation in vitro compared to the freeze-dried scaffolds. C, CP and CG were structurally similar, and the different crosslinking caused significant changes in their physical and biological performances.

  6. Chitosan-based hydrogel tissue scaffolds made by 3D plotting promotes osteoblast proliferation and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Liu, I-Hsin; Chang, Shih-Hsin; Lin, Hsin-Yi

    2015-06-01

    A 3D plotting system was used to make chitosan-based tissue scaffolds with interconnected pores using pure chitosan (C) and chitosan cross-linked with pectin (CP) and genipin (CG). A freeze-dried chitosan scaffold (CF/D) was made to compare with C, to observe the effects of structural differences. The fiber size, pore size, porosity, compression strength, swelling ratio, drug release efficacy, and cumulative weight loss of the scaffolds were measured. Osteoblasts were cultured on the scaffolds and their proliferation, type I collagen production, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition, and morphology were observed. C had a lower swelling ratio, degradation, porosity and drug release efficacy and a higher compressional stiffness and cell proliferation compared to CF/D (p < 0.05). Of the 3D-plotted samples, cells on CP exhibited the highest degree of mineralization after 21 d (p < 0.05). CP also had the highest swelling ratio and fastest drug release, followed by C and CG (p < 0.05). Both CP and CG were stiffer and degraded more slowly in saline solution than C (p < 0.05). In summary, 3D-plotted scaffolds were stronger, less likely to degrade and better promoted osteoblast cell proliferation in vitro compared to the freeze-dried scaffolds. C, CP and CG were structurally similar, and the different crosslinking caused significant changes in their physical and biological performances. PMID:25970802

  7. Towards Single Cell Traction Microscopy within 3D Collagen Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Matthew S.; Long, Rong; Feng, Xinzeng; Huang, YuLing; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Wu, Mingming

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Cells require the three dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, current understanding of cell-ECM and cell-cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D cell traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. 3D cell traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single animal cells embedded in either synthetic or natively derived fibrous gels. We discuss here the development of 3D cell traction microscopy, its current limitations, and perspectives on the future of this technology. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying 3D cell traction microscopy to individual tumor cells migration within collagen gels. PMID:23806281

  8. Osteogenic effect of controlled released rhBMP-2 in 3D printed porous hydroxyapatite scaffold.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai; Wu, Gui; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Kui; Yin, Bo; Su, Xinlin; Qiu, Guixing; Yang, Guang; Zhang, Xianglin; Zhou, Gang; Wu, Zhihong

    2016-05-01

    Recently, 3D printing as effective technology has been highlighted in the biomedical field. Previously, a porous hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffold with the biocompatibility and osteoconductivity has been developed by this method. However, its osteoinductivity is limited. The main purpose of this study was to improve it by the introduction of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). This scaffold was developed by coating rhBMP-2-delivery microspheres with collagen. These synthesized scaffolds were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), a delivery test in vitro, cell culture, and the experiments in vivo by a Micro-computed tomography (μCT) scan and histological evaluation of VanGieson staining. SEM results indicated the surface of scaffolds were more fit for the adhesion of hMSCs to coat collagen/rhBMP-2 microspheres. Biphasic release of rhBMP-2 could continue for more than 21 days, and keep its osteoinductivity to induce osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs in vitro. In addition, the experiments in vivo showed that the scaffold had a good bone regeneration capacity. These findings demonstrate that the HA/Collagen/Chitosan Microspheres system can simultaneously achieve localized long-term controlled release of rhBMP-2 and bone regeneration, which provides a promising route for improving the treatment of bone defects.

  9. Fabricating gradient hydrogel scaffolds for 3D cell culture.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Kaushik; Young, Marian F; Simon, Carl G

    2011-05-01

    Optimizing cell-material interactions is critical for maximizing regeneration in tissue engineering. Combinatorial and high-throughput (CHT) methods can be used to systematically screen tissue scaffolds to identify optimal biomaterial properties. Previous CHT platforms in tissue engineering have involved a two-dimensional (2D) cell culture format where cells were cultured on material surfaces. However, these platforms are inadequate to predict cellular response in a three-dimensional (3D) tissue scaffold. We have developed a simple CHT platform to screen cell-material interactions in 3D culture format that can be applied to screen hydrogel scaffolds. Herein we provide detailed instructions on a method to prepare gradients in elastic modulus of photopolymerizable hydrogels.

  10. The medial scaffold of 3D unorganized point clouds.

    PubMed

    Leymarie, Frederic F; Kimia, Benjamin B

    2007-02-01

    We introduce the notion of the medial scaffold, a hierarchical organization of the medial axis of a 3D shape in the form of a graph constructed from special medial curves connecting special medial points. A key advantage of the scaffold is that it captures the qualitative aspects of shape in a hierarchical and tightly condensed representation. We propose an efficient and exact method for computing the medial scaffold based on a notion of propagation along the scaffold itself, starting from initial sources of the flow and constructing the scaffold during the propagation. We examine this method specifically in the context of an unorganized cloud of points in 3D, e.g., as obtained from laser range finders, which typically involve hundreds of thousands of points, but the ideas are generalizable to data arising from geometrically described surface patches. The computational bottleneck in the propagation-based scheme is in finding the initial sources of the flow. We thus present several ideas to avoid the unnecessary consideration of pairs of points which cannot possibly form a medial point source, such as the "visibility" of a point from another given a third point and the interaction of clusters of points. An application of using the medial scaffold for the representation of point samplings of real-life objects is also illustrated.

  11. 3D printing of novel osteochondral scaffolds with graded microstructure.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Margaret A; Castro, Nathan J; Plesniak, Michael W; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-10-14

    Osteochondral tissue has a complex graded structure where biological, physiological, and mechanical properties vary significantly over the full thickness spanning from the subchondral bone region beneath the joint surface to the hyaline cartilage region at the joint surface. This presents a significant challenge for tissue-engineered structures addressing osteochondral defects. Fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D bioprinters present a unique solution to this problem. The objective of this study is to use FDM-based 3D bioprinting and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite for improved bone marrow human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) adhesion, growth, and osteochondral differentiation. FDM printing parameters can be tuned through computer aided design and computer numerical control software to manipulate scaffold geometries in ways that are beneficial to mechanical performance without hindering cellular behavior. Additionally, the ability to fine-tune 3D printed scaffolds increases further through our investment casting procedure which facilitates the inclusion of nanoparticles with biochemical factors to further elicit desired hMSC differentiation. For this study, FDM was used to print investment-casting molds innovatively designed with varied pore distribution over the full thickness of the scaffold. The mechanical and biological impacts of the varied pore distributions were compared and evaluated to determine the benefits of this physical manipulation. The results indicate that both mechanical properties and cell performance improve in the graded pore structures when compared to homogeneously distributed porous and non-porous structures. Differentiation results indicated successful osteogenic and chondrogenic manipulation in engineered scaffolds. PMID:27606933

  12. 3D printing of novel osteochondral scaffolds with graded microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowicki, Margaret A.; Castro, Nathan J.; Plesniak, Michael W.; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-10-01

    Osteochondral tissue has a complex graded structure where biological, physiological, and mechanical properties vary significantly over the full thickness spanning from the subchondral bone region beneath the joint surface to the hyaline cartilage region at the joint surface. This presents a significant challenge for tissue-engineered structures addressing osteochondral defects. Fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D bioprinters present a unique solution to this problem. The objective of this study is to use FDM-based 3D bioprinting and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite for improved bone marrow human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) adhesion, growth, and osteochondral differentiation. FDM printing parameters can be tuned through computer aided design and computer numerical control software to manipulate scaffold geometries in ways that are beneficial to mechanical performance without hindering cellular behavior. Additionally, the ability to fine-tune 3D printed scaffolds increases further through our investment casting procedure which facilitates the inclusion of nanoparticles with biochemical factors to further elicit desired hMSC differentiation. For this study, FDM was used to print investment-casting molds innovatively designed with varied pore distribution over the full thickness of the scaffold. The mechanical and biological impacts of the varied pore distributions were compared and evaluated to determine the benefits of this physical manipulation. The results indicate that both mechanical properties and cell performance improve in the graded pore structures when compared to homogeneously distributed porous and non-porous structures. Differentiation results indicated successful osteogenic and chondrogenic manipulation in engineered scaffolds.

  13. 3D printing of novel osteochondral scaffolds with graded microstructure.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Margaret A; Castro, Nathan J; Plesniak, Michael W; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-10-14

    Osteochondral tissue has a complex graded structure where biological, physiological, and mechanical properties vary significantly over the full thickness spanning from the subchondral bone region beneath the joint surface to the hyaline cartilage region at the joint surface. This presents a significant challenge for tissue-engineered structures addressing osteochondral defects. Fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D bioprinters present a unique solution to this problem. The objective of this study is to use FDM-based 3D bioprinting and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite for improved bone marrow human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) adhesion, growth, and osteochondral differentiation. FDM printing parameters can be tuned through computer aided design and computer numerical control software to manipulate scaffold geometries in ways that are beneficial to mechanical performance without hindering cellular behavior. Additionally, the ability to fine-tune 3D printed scaffolds increases further through our investment casting procedure which facilitates the inclusion of nanoparticles with biochemical factors to further elicit desired hMSC differentiation. For this study, FDM was used to print investment-casting molds innovatively designed with varied pore distribution over the full thickness of the scaffold. The mechanical and biological impacts of the varied pore distributions were compared and evaluated to determine the benefits of this physical manipulation. The results indicate that both mechanical properties and cell performance improve in the graded pore structures when compared to homogeneously distributed porous and non-porous structures. Differentiation results indicated successful osteogenic and chondrogenic manipulation in engineered scaffolds.

  14. The Potential of Encapsulating “Raw Materials” in 3D Osteochondral Gradient Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Neethu; Gupta, Vineet; Sridharan, BanuPriya; Sutherland, Amanda; Detamore, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Scaffolds with continuous gradients in material composition and bioactive signals enable a smooth transition of properties at the interface. Components like chondroitin sulfate (CS) and bioactive glass (BG) in 3D scaffolds may serve as “raw materials” for synthesis of new extracellular matrix (ECM), and may have the potential to completely or partially replace expensive growth factors. We hypothesized that scaffolds with gradients of ECM components would enable superior performance of engineered constructs. Raw material encapsulation altered the appearance, structure, porosity, and degradation of the scaffolds. They allowed the scaffolds to better retain their 3D structure during culture and provided a buffering effect to the cells in culture. Following seeding of rat mesenchymal stem cells, there were several instances where glycosaminoglycan (GAG), collagen, or calcium contents were higher with the scaffolds containing raw materials (CS or BG) than with those containing transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3 or bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2. It was also noteworthy that a combination of both CS and TGF-β3 increased the secretion of collagen type II. Moreover, cells seeded in scaffolds containing opposing gradients of CS/TGF-β3 and BG/BMP-2 produced clear regional variations in the secretion of tissue-specific ECM. The study demonstrated raw materials have the potential to create a favorable microenvironment for cells; they can significantly enhance the synthesis of certain extracellular matrix (ECM) components when compared to expensive growth factors; either alone or in combination with growth factors they can enhance the secretion of tissue specific matrix proteins. Raw materials are promising candidates that can be used to either replace or be used in combination with growth factors. Success with raw materials in lieu of growth factors could have profound implications in terms of lower cost and faster regulatory approval for more rapid translation of

  15. Enhanced cell colonization of collagen scaffold by ultraviolet/ozone surface processing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaozong; McKenna, Fiona-Mairead; Liang, He; Johnstone, Alan; Abel, Eric W

    2010-12-01

    Both physical and chemical crosslinking methods have been shown to be effective in improving the biological stability and mechanical properties of porous collagen scaffolds. However, the wetting of the collagen fibril surface by a culture medium is reduced and it is difficult for the medium to diffuse into the 3D structure of a porous collagen scaffold. This article reports a strategy for the surface processing of crosslinked collagen scaffolds by an integrated ultraviolet/ozone perfuse processing technique. Ultraviolet/ozone perfuse processing improved surface wettability for both the exterior and interior surfaces of the porous 3D collagen scaffold. This leads to a significant improvement in the scaffolds ability to take up water without compromising the bulk biological stability and mechanical properties. In vitro evaluation using mesenchymal stem cell demonstrated that surface processing enhanced cell colonization of the scaffolds, cells could migrate deep into the structure of the scaffolds, and significantly higher levels of cell proliferation were achieved. In contrast, the cells were unable to migrate deep into the scaffolds, and most of the cells that survived were observed only in the top seeding layer resulting in a low level of cell activity in the unprocessed scaffolds.

  16. Low intensity pulse ultrasound stimulate chondrocytes growth in a 3-D alginate scaffold through improved porosity and permeability.

    PubMed

    Guo, Gepu; Lu, Lu; Ji, Hongfei; Ma, Yong; Dong, Rui; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Junru; Zhang, Dong

    2015-04-01

    A 3-D scaffold culture system has been used to promote in producing functional chondrocytes for repairing damaged cartilage. In the present study, the low intensity pulse ultrasound (LIPUS) (P(-)=0, 0.055, 0.085 and 0.11 MPa) was applied to improve the porosity and permeability of a 3-D alginate scaffold which was beneficial for the nutrition supply and metabolism during cell growth in 3-D alginate scaffold. The porosity and permeability of the scaffold was quantitatively analyzed based on scanning electron microscopy examination and fluorescence image observation. The results suggest that, for the scaffold exposed to LIPUS, its porosity and permeability could be significantly enhanced by the increasing LIPUS amplitude, which might be induced by the microstreaming shear stress generated by ultrasound-driven microbubble oscillations. Furthermore, the assessments of cell proliferation and collagen II expression confirmed that chondrocytes growth could be effectively promoted in 3-D alginate scaffolds treated by LIPUS, because of the improved scaffold porosity and permeability might benefit cell growth space and nutrition supply. It should also be noticed that appropriate LIPUS driving parameters should be adapted to achieve optimized chondrocytes culture effect in 3-D alginate scaffold. PMID:25543661

  17. Low intensity pulse ultrasound stimulate chondrocytes growth in a 3-D alginate scaffold through improved porosity and permeability.

    PubMed

    Guo, Gepu; Lu, Lu; Ji, Hongfei; Ma, Yong; Dong, Rui; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Junru; Zhang, Dong

    2015-04-01

    A 3-D scaffold culture system has been used to promote in producing functional chondrocytes for repairing damaged cartilage. In the present study, the low intensity pulse ultrasound (LIPUS) (P(-)=0, 0.055, 0.085 and 0.11 MPa) was applied to improve the porosity and permeability of a 3-D alginate scaffold which was beneficial for the nutrition supply and metabolism during cell growth in 3-D alginate scaffold. The porosity and permeability of the scaffold was quantitatively analyzed based on scanning electron microscopy examination and fluorescence image observation. The results suggest that, for the scaffold exposed to LIPUS, its porosity and permeability could be significantly enhanced by the increasing LIPUS amplitude, which might be induced by the microstreaming shear stress generated by ultrasound-driven microbubble oscillations. Furthermore, the assessments of cell proliferation and collagen II expression confirmed that chondrocytes growth could be effectively promoted in 3-D alginate scaffolds treated by LIPUS, because of the improved scaffold porosity and permeability might benefit cell growth space and nutrition supply. It should also be noticed that appropriate LIPUS driving parameters should be adapted to achieve optimized chondrocytes culture effect in 3-D alginate scaffold.

  18. Engineering Human TMJ Discs with Protein-Releasing 3D-Printed Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Legemate, K; Tarafder, S; Jun, Y; Lee, C H

    2016-07-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc is a heterogeneous fibrocartilaginous tissue positioned between the mandibular condyle and glenoid fossa of the temporal bone, with important roles in TMJ functions. Tissue engineering TMJ discs has emerged as an alternative approach to overcoming limitations of current treatments for TMJ disorders. However, the anisotropic collagen orientation and inhomogeneous fibrocartilaginous matrix distribution present challenges in the tissue engineering of functional TMJ discs. Here, we developed 3-dimensional (3D)-printed anatomically correct scaffolds with region-variant microstrand alignment, mimicking anisotropic collagen alignment in the TMJ disc and corresponding mechanical properties. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGFβ3) were then delivered in the scaffolds by spatially embedding CTGF- or TGFβ3-encapsulated microspheres (µS) to reconstruct the regionally variant fibrocartilaginous matrix in the native TMJ disc. When cultured with human mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs) for 6 wk, 3D-printed scaffolds with CTGF/TGFβ3-µS resulted in a heterogeneous fibrocartilaginous matrix with overall distribution of collagen-rich fibrous structure in the anterior/posterior (AP) bands and fibrocartilaginous matrix in the intermediate zone, reminiscent of the native TMJ disc. High dose of CTGF/TGFβ3-µS (100 mg µS/g of scaffold) showed significantly more collagen II and aggrecan in the intermediate zone than a low dose (50 mg µS/g of scaffold). Similarly, a high dose of CTGF/TGFβ3-µS yielded significantly higher collagen I expression in the AP bands compared with the low-dose and empty µS. From stress relaxation tests, the ratio of relaxation modulus to instantaneous modulus was significantly smaller with CTGF/TGFβ3-µS than empty µS. Similarly, a significantly higher coefficient of viscosity was achieved with the high dose of CTGF/TGFβ3-µS compared with the low-dose and empty

  19. Evaluation of 3D nano-macro porous bioactive glass scaffold for hard tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Falk, M M; Rashad, A; Saad, M M; Marques, A C; Almeida, R M; Marei, M K; Jain, H

    2011-05-01

    Recently, nano-macro dual-porous, three-dimensional (3D) glass structures were developed for use as bioscaffolds for hard tissue regeneration, but there have been concerns regarding the interconnectivity and homogeneity of nanopores in the scaffolds, as well as the cytotoxicity of the environment deep inside due to limited fluid access. Therefore, mercury porosimetry, nitrogen absorption, and TEM have been used to characterize nanopore network of the scaffolds. In parallel, viability of MG 63 human osteosarcoma cells seeded on scaffold surface was investigated by fluorescence, confocal and electron microscopy methods. The results show that cells attach, migrate and penetrate inside the glass scaffold with high proliferation and viability rate. Additionally, scaffolds were implanted under the skin of a male New Zealand rabbit for in vivo animal test. Initial observations show the formation of new tissue with blood vessels and collagen fibers deep inside the implanted scaffolds with no obvious inflammatory reaction. Thus, the new nano-macro dual-porous glass structure could be a promising bioscaffold for use in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering for bone regeneration. PMID:21445655

  20. 3D Scaffolds with Different Stiffness but the Same Microstructure for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guobao; Dong, Chanjuan; Yang, Li; Lv, Yonggang

    2015-07-29

    A growing body of evidence has shown that extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness can modulate stem cell adhesion, proliferation, migration, differentiation, and signaling. Stem cells can feel and respond sensitively to the mechanical microenvironment of the ECM. However, most studies have focused on classical two-dimensional (2D) or quasi-three-dimensional environments, which cannot represent the real situation in vivo. Furthermore, most of the current methods used to generate different mechanical properties invariably change the fundamental structural properties of the scaffolds (such as morphology, porosity, pore size, and pore interconnectivity). In this study, we have developed novel three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds with different degrees of stiffness but the same 3D microstructure that was maintained by using decellularized cancellous bone. Mixtures of collagen and hydroxyapatite [HA: Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2] with different proportions were coated on decellularized cancellous bone to vary the stiffness (local stiffness, 13.00 ± 5.55 kPa, 13.87 ± 1.51 kPa, and 37.7 ± 19.6 kPa; bulk stiffness, 6.74 ± 1.16 kPa, 8.82 ± 2.12 kPa, and 23.61 ± 8.06 kPa). Microcomputed tomography (μ-CT) assay proved that there was no statistically significant difference in the architecture of the scaffolds before or after coating. Cell viability, osteogenic differentiation, cell recruitment, and angiogenesis were determined to characterize the scaffolds and evaluate their biological responses in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro results indicate that the scaffolds developed in this study could sustain adhesion and growth of rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and promote their osteogenic differentiation. The in vivo results further demonstrated that these scaffolds could help to recruit MSCs from subcutaneous tissue, induce them to differentiate into osteoblasts, and provide the 3D environment for angiogenesis. These findings showed that the method we developed can build scaffolds with

  1. 3D culture model of fibroblast-mediated collagen creep to identify abnormal cell behaviour.

    PubMed

    Kureshi, A K; Afoke, A; Wohlert, S; Barker, S; Brown, R A

    2015-11-01

    Native collagen gels are important biomimetic cell support scaffolds, and a plastic compression process can now be used to rapidly remove fluid to any required collagen density, producing strong 3D tissue-like models. This study aimed to measure the mechanical creep properties of such scaffolds and to quantify any enhanced creep occurring in the presence of cells (cell-mediated creep). The test rig developed applies constant creep tension during culture and measures real-time extension due to cell action. This was used to model extracellular matrix creep, implicated in the transversalis fascia (TF) in inguinal hernia. Experiments showed that at an applied tension equivalent to 15% break strength, cell-mediated creep over 24-h culture periods was identified at creep rates of 0.46 and 0.38%/h for normal TF and human dermal fibroblasts, respectively. However, hernia TF fibroblasts produced negligible cell-mediated creep levels under the same conditions. Raising the cell culture temperature from 4 to 37 °C was used to demonstrate live cell dependence of this creep. This represents the first in vitro demonstration of TF cell-mediated collagen creep and to our knowledge the first demonstration of a functional, hernia-related cell abnormality. PMID:25862069

  2. hiPS-MSCs differentiation towards fibroblasts on a 3D ECM mimicking scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ruodan; Taskin, Mehmet Berat; Rubert, Marina; Seliktar, Dror; Besenbacher, Flemming; Chen, Menglin

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblasts are ubiquitous cells that constitute the stroma of virtually all tissues and play vital roles in homeostasis. The poor innate healing capacity of fibroblastic tissues is attributed to the scarcity of fibroblasts as collagen-producing cells. In this study, we have developed a functional ECM mimicking scaffold that is capable to supply spatial allocation of stem cells as well as anchorage and storage of growth factors (GFs) to direct stem cells differentiate towards fibroblasts. Electrospun PCL fibers were embedded in a PEG-fibrinogen (PF) hydrogel, which was infiltrated with connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) to form the 3D nanocomposite PFP-C. The human induced pluripotent stem cells derived mesenchymal stem cells (hiPS-MSCs) with an advance in growth over adult MSCs were applied to validate the fibrogenic capacity of the 3D nanocomposite scaffold. The PFP-C scaffold was found not only biocompatible with the hiPS-MSCs, but also presented intriguingly strong fibroblastic commitments, to an extent comparable to the positive control, tissue culture plastic surfaces (TCP) timely refreshed with 100% CTGF. The novel scaffold presented not only biomimetic ECM nanostructures for homing stem cells, but also sufficient cell-approachable bio-signaling cues, which may synergistically facilitate the control of stem cell fates for regenerative therapies. PMID:25684543

  3. Design and characterization of microcapsules-integrated collagen matrixes as multifunctional three-dimensional scaffolds for soft tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Del Mercato, Loretta L; Passione, Laura Gioia; Izzo, Daniela; Rinaldi, Rosaria; Sannino, Alessandro; Gervaso, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds based on collagen are promising candidates for soft tissue engineering applications. The addition of stimuli-responsive carriers (nano- and microparticles) in the current approaches to tissue reconstruction and repair brings about novel challenges in the design and conception of carrier-integrated polymer scaffolds. In this study, a facile method was developed to functionalize 3D collagen porous scaffolds with biodegradable multilayer microcapsules. The effects of the capsule charge as well as the influence of the functionalization methods on the binding efficiency to the scaffolds were studied. It was found that the binding of cationic microcapsules was higher than that of anionic ones, and application of vacuum during scaffolds functionalization significantly hindered the attachment of the microcapsules to the collagen matrix. The physical properties of microcapsules-integrated scaffolds were compared to pristine scaffolds. The modified scaffolds showed swelling ratios, weight losses and mechanical properties similar to those of unmodified scaffolds. Finally, in vitro diffusional tests proved that the collagen scaffolds could stably retain the microcapsules over long incubation time in Tris-HCl buffer at 37°C without undergoing morphological changes, thus confirming their suitability for tissue engineering applications. The obtained results indicate that by tuning the charge of the microcapsules and by varying the fabrication conditions, collagen scaffolds patterned with high or low number of microcapsules can be obtained, and that the microcapsules-integrated scaffolds fully retain their original physical properties.

  4. Design and characterization of microcapsules-integrated collagen matrixes as multifunctional three-dimensional scaffolds for soft tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Del Mercato, Loretta L; Passione, Laura Gioia; Izzo, Daniela; Rinaldi, Rosaria; Sannino, Alessandro; Gervaso, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds based on collagen are promising candidates for soft tissue engineering applications. The addition of stimuli-responsive carriers (nano- and microparticles) in the current approaches to tissue reconstruction and repair brings about novel challenges in the design and conception of carrier-integrated polymer scaffolds. In this study, a facile method was developed to functionalize 3D collagen porous scaffolds with biodegradable multilayer microcapsules. The effects of the capsule charge as well as the influence of the functionalization methods on the binding efficiency to the scaffolds were studied. It was found that the binding of cationic microcapsules was higher than that of anionic ones, and application of vacuum during scaffolds functionalization significantly hindered the attachment of the microcapsules to the collagen matrix. The physical properties of microcapsules-integrated scaffolds were compared to pristine scaffolds. The modified scaffolds showed swelling ratios, weight losses and mechanical properties similar to those of unmodified scaffolds. Finally, in vitro diffusional tests proved that the collagen scaffolds could stably retain the microcapsules over long incubation time in Tris-HCl buffer at 37°C without undergoing morphological changes, thus confirming their suitability for tissue engineering applications. The obtained results indicate that by tuning the charge of the microcapsules and by varying the fabrication conditions, collagen scaffolds patterned with high or low number of microcapsules can be obtained, and that the microcapsules-integrated scaffolds fully retain their original physical properties. PMID:27219851

  5. Hydroxyapatite reinforced collagen scaffolds with improved architecture and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Kane, Robert J; Weiss-Bilka, Holly E; Meagher, Matthew J; Liu, Yongxing; Gargac, Joshua A; Niebur, Glen L; Wagner, Diane R; Roeder, Ryan K

    2015-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) reinforced collagen scaffolds have shown promise for synthetic bone graft substitutes and tissue engineering scaffolds. Freeze-dried HA-collagen scaffolds are readily fabricated and have exhibited osteogenicity in vivo, but are limited by an inherent scaffold architecture that results in a relatively small pore size and weak mechanical properties. In order to overcome these limitations, HA-collagen scaffolds were prepared by compression molding HA reinforcements and paraffin microspheres within a suspension of concentrated collagen fibrils (∼ 180 mg/mL), cross-linking the collagen matrix, and leaching the paraffin porogen. HA-collagen scaffolds exhibited an architecture with high porosity (85-90%), interconnected pores ∼ 300-400 μm in size, and struts ∼ 3-100 μm in thickness containing 0-80 vol% HA whisker or powder reinforcements. HA reinforcement enabled a compressive modulus of up to ∼ 1 MPa, which was an order of magnitude greater than unreinforced collagen scaffolds. The compressive modulus was also at least one order of magnitude greater than comparable freeze-dried HA-collagen scaffolds and two orders of magnitude greater than absorbable collagen sponges used clinically. Moreover, scaffolds reinforced with up to 60 vol% HA exhibited fully recoverable elastic deformation upon loading to 50% compressive strain for at least 100,000 cycles. Thus, the scaffold mechanical properties were well-suited for surgical handling, fixation, and bearing osteogenic loads during bone regeneration. The scaffold architecture, permeability, and composition were shown to be conducive to the infiltration and differentiation of adipose-derive stromal cells in vitro. Acellular scaffolds were demonstrated to induce angiogenesis and osteogenesis after subcutaneous ectopic implantation by recruiting endogenous cell populations, suggesting that the scaffolds were osteoinductive.

  6. The generation of biomolecular patterns in highly porous collagen-GAG scaffolds using direct photolithography.

    PubMed

    Martin, Teresa A; Caliari, Steven R; Williford, Paul D; Harley, Brendan A; Bailey, Ryan C

    2011-06-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex organization of structural proteins found within tissues and organs. Heterogeneous tissues with spatially and temporally modulated properties play an important role in organism physiology. Here we present a benzophenone (BP) based direct, photolithographic approach to spatially pattern solution phase biomolecules within collagen-GAG (CG) scaffolds and demonstrate creation of a wide range of patterns composed of multiple biomolecular species in a manner independent from scaffold fabrication steps. We demonstrate the ability to immobilize biomolecules at surface densities of up to 1000 ligands per square micron on the scaffold strut surface and to depths limited by the penetration depth of the excitation source into the scaffold structure. Importantly, while BP photopatterning does further crosslink the CG scaffold, evidenced by increased mechanical properties and collagen crystallinity, it does not affect scaffold microstructural or compositional properties or negatively influence cell adhesion, viability, or proliferation. We show that covalently photoimmobilized fibronectin within a CG scaffold significantly increases the speed of MC3T3-E1 cell attachment relative to the bare CG scaffold or non-specifically adsorbed fibronectin, suggesting that this approach can be used to improve scaffold bioactivity. Our findings, on the whole, establish the use of direct, BP photolithography as a methodology for covalently incorporating activity-improving biochemical cues within 3D collagen biomaterial scaffolds with spatial control over biomolecular deposition.

  7. Additive manufacturing of collagen scaffolds by three-dimensional plotting of highly viscous dispersions.

    PubMed

    Lode, Anja; Meyer, Michael; Brüggemeier, Sophie; Paul, Birgit; Baltzer, Hagen; Schröpfer, Michaela; Winkelmann, Claudia; Sonntag, Frank; Gelinsky, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) allows the free form fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) structures with distinct external geometry, fitting into a patient-specific defect, and defined internal pore architecture. However, fabrication of predesigned collagen scaffolds using AM-based technologies is challenging due to the low viscosity of collagen solutions, gels or dispersions commonly used for scaffold preparation. In the present study, we have developed a straightforward method which is based on 3D plotting of a highly viscous, high density collagen dispersion. The swollen state of the collagen fibrils at pH 4 enabled the homogenous extrusion of the material, the deposition of uniform strands and finally the construction of 3D scaffolds. Stabilization of the plotted structures was achieved by freeze-drying and chemical crosslinking with the carbodiimide EDC. The scaffolds exhibited high shape and dimensional fidelity and a hierarchical porosity consisting of macropores generated by strand deposition as well as an interconnected microporosity within the strands as result of the freeze-drying process. Cultivation of human mesenchymal stromal cells on the scaffolds, with and without adipogenic or osteogenic stimulation, revealed their cytocompatibility and potential applicability for adipose and bone tissue engineering.

  8. Collagen Scaffolds Incorporating Coincident Gradations of Instructive Structural and Biochemical Cues for Osteotendinous Junction Engineering.

    PubMed

    Caliari, Steven R; Weisgerber, Daniel W; Grier, William K; Mahmassani, Ziad; Boppart, Marni D; Harley, Brendan A C

    2015-04-22

    A fully 3D biomaterial containing overlapping gradations of structural, compositional, and biomolecular cues as seen in native orthopedic interfaces is described for the first time. A multi-compartment collagen scaffold is created for engineering tendon-bone junctions connected by a continuous interface that can induce spatially specific MSC differentiation down tenogenic and osteogenic lineages without the use of differentiation media.

  9. Nanorod mediated collagen scaffolds as extra cellular matrix mimics.

    PubMed

    Vedhanayagam, Mohan; Mohan, Ranganathan; Nair, Balachandran Unni; Sreeram, Kalarical Janardhanan

    2015-12-01

    Creating collagen scaffolds that mimic extracellular matrices without using toxic exogenous materials remains a big challenge. A new strategy to create scaffolds through end-to-end crosslinking through functionalized nanorods leading to well-designed architecture is presented here. Self-assembled scaffolds with a denaturation temperature of 110 °C, porosity of 70%, pore size of 0.32 μm and Young's modulus of 231 MPa were developed largely driven by imine bonding between 3-mercapto-1-propanal (MPA) functionalized ZnO nanorods and collagen. The mechanical properties obtained were much higher than that of native collagen, collagen-MPA, collagen-3-mercapto-1-propanol (3MPOH) or collagen- 3-MPOH-ZnO, clearly bringing out the relevance of nanorod mediated assembly of fibrous networks. This new strategy has led to scaffolds with mechanical properties much higher than earlier reports and can provide support for cell growth and facilitation of cell attachment. PMID:26586667

  10. Rapid prototyping for tissue-engineered bone scaffold by 3D printing and biocompatibility study

    PubMed Central

    He, Hui-Yu; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Mi, Xue; Hu, Yang; Gu, Xiao-Yu

    2015-01-01

    The prototyping of tissue-engineered bone scaffold (calcined goat spongy bone-biphasic ceramic composite/PVA gel) by 3D printing was performed, and the biocompatibility of the fabricated bone scaffold was studied. Pre-designed STL file was imported into the GXYZ303010-XYLE 3D printing system, and the tissue-engineered bone scaffold was fabricated by 3D printing using gel extrusion. Rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were cultured in vitro and then inoculated to the sterilized bone scaffold obtained by 3D printing. The growth of rabbit BMSCs on the bone scaffold was observed under the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The effect of the tissue-engineered bone scaffold on the proliferation and differentiation of rabbit BMSCs using MTT assay. Universal testing machine was adopted to test the tensile strength of the bone scaffold. The leachate of the bone scaffold was prepared and injected into the New Zealand rabbits. Cytotoxicity test, acute toxicity test, pyrogenic test and intracutaneous stimulation test were performed to assess the biocompatibility of the bone scaffold. Bone scaffold manufactured by 3D printing had uniform pore size with the porosity of about 68.3%. The pores were well interconnected, and the bone scaffold showed excellent mechanical property. Rabbit BMSCs grew and proliferated on the surface of the bone scaffold after adherence. MTT assay indicated that the proliferation and differentiation of rabbit BMSCs on the bone scaffold did not differ significantly from that of the cells in the control. In vivo experiments proved that the bone scaffold fabricated by 3D printing had no acute toxicity, pyrogenic reaction or stimulation. Bone scaffold manufactured by 3D printing allows the rabbit BMSCs to adhere, grow and proliferate and exhibits excellent biomechanical property and high biocompatibility. 3D printing has a good application prospect in the prototyping of tissue-engineered bone scaffold. PMID:26380018

  11. Rapid prototyping for tissue-engineered bone scaffold by 3D printing and biocompatibility study.

    PubMed

    He, Hui-Yu; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Mi, Xue; Hu, Yang; Gu, Xiao-Yu

    2015-01-01

    The prototyping of tissue-engineered bone scaffold (calcined goat spongy bone-biphasic ceramic composite/PVA gel) by 3D printing was performed, and the biocompatibility of the fabricated bone scaffold was studied. Pre-designed STL file was imported into the GXYZ303010-XYLE 3D printing system, and the tissue-engineered bone scaffold was fabricated by 3D printing using gel extrusion. Rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were cultured in vitro and then inoculated to the sterilized bone scaffold obtained by 3D printing. The growth of rabbit BMSCs on the bone scaffold was observed under the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The effect of the tissue-engineered bone scaffold on the proliferation and differentiation of rabbit BMSCs using MTT assay. Universal testing machine was adopted to test the tensile strength of the bone scaffold. The leachate of the bone scaffold was prepared and injected into the New Zealand rabbits. Cytotoxicity test, acute toxicity test, pyrogenic test and intracutaneous stimulation test were performed to assess the biocompatibility of the bone scaffold. Bone scaffold manufactured by 3D printing had uniform pore size with the porosity of about 68.3%. The pores were well interconnected, and the bone scaffold showed excellent mechanical property. Rabbit BMSCs grew and proliferated on the surface of the bone scaffold after adherence. MTT assay indicated that the proliferation and differentiation of rabbit BMSCs on the bone scaffold did not differ significantly from that of the cells in the control. In vivo experiments proved that the bone scaffold fabricated by 3D printing had no acute toxicity, pyrogenic reaction or stimulation. Bone scaffold manufactured by 3D printing allows the rabbit BMSCs to adhere, grow and proliferate and exhibits excellent biomechanical property and high biocompatibility. 3D printing has a good application prospect in the prototyping of tissue-engineered bone scaffold.

  12. Direct electrospinning of 3D auricle-shaped scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Walser, Jochen; Stok, Kathryn S; Caversaccio, Marco D; Ferguson, Stephen J

    2016-05-12

    Thirty-two poly(ε)caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds have been produced by electrospinning directly into an auricle-shaped mould and seeded with articular chondrocytes harvested from bovine ankle joints. After seeding, the auricle shaped constructs were cultured in vitro and analysed at days 1, 7, 14 and 21 for regional differences in total DNA, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen (COL) content as well as the expression of aggrecan (AGG), collagen type I and type II (COL1/2) and matrix metalloproteinase 3 and 13 (MMP3/13). Stress-relaxation indentation testing was performed to investigate regional mechanical properties of the electrospun constructs. Electrospinning into a conductive mould yielded stable 3D constructs both initially and for the whole in vitro culture period, with an equilibrium modulus in the MPa range. Rapid cell proliferation and COL accumulation was observed until week 3. Quantitative real time PCR analysis showed an initial increase in AGG, no change in COL2, a persistent increase in COL1, and only a slight decrease initially for MMP3. Electrospinning of fibrous scaffolds directly into an auricle-shape represents a promising option for auricular tissue engineering, as it can reduce the steps needed to achieve an implantable structure.

  13. Formation of Neural Networks in 3D Scaffolds Fabricated by Means of Laser Microstereolithography.

    PubMed

    Vedunova, M V; Timashev, P S; Mishchenko, T A; Mitroshina, E V; Koroleva, A V; Chichkov, B N; Panchenko, V Ya; Bagratashvili, V N; Mukhina, I V

    2016-08-01

    We developed and tested new 3D scaffolds for neurotransplantation. Scaffolds of predetermined architectonic were prepared using microstereolithography technique. Scaffolds were highly biocompatible with the nervous tissue cells. In vitro studies showed that the material of fabricated scaffolds is not toxic for dissociated brain cells and promotes the formation of functional neural networks in the matrix. These results demonstrate the possibility of fabrication of tissue-engineering constructs for neurotransplantation based on created scaffolds. PMID:27595153

  14. Potency of Fish Collagen as a Scaffold for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kohei; Yanagiguchi, Kajiro

    2014-01-01

    Cells, growth factors, and scaffold are the crucial factors for tissue engineering. Recently, scaffolds consisting of natural polymers, such as collagen and gelatin, bioabsorbable synthetic polymers, such as polylactic acid and polyglycolic acid, and inorganic materials, such as hydroxyapatite, as well as composite materials have been rapidly developed. In particular, collagen is the most promising material for tissue engineering due to its biocompatibility and biodegradability. Collagen contains specific cell adhesion domains, including the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif. After the integrin receptor on the cell surface binds to the RGD motif on the collagen molecule, cell adhesion is actively induced. This interaction contributes to the promotion of cell growth and differentiation and the regulation of various cell functions. However, it is difficult to use a pure collagen scaffold as a tissue engineering material due to its low mechanical strength. In order to make up for this disadvantage, collagen scaffolds are often modified using a cross-linker, such as gamma irradiation and carbodiimide. Taking into account the possibility of zoonosis, a variety of recent reports have been documented using fish collagen scaffolds. We herein review the potency of fish collagen scaffolds as well as associated problems to be addressed for use in regenerative medicine. PMID:24982861

  15. 3D cell culture and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells plated onto jet-sprayed or electrospun micro-fiber scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Meadhbh Á; Renaud, Audrey; Gamblin, Anne-Laure; D'Arros, Cyril; Nedellec, Steven; Trichet, Valerie; Layrolle, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    A major limitation of the 2D culture systems is that they fail to recapitulate the in vivo 3D cellular microenvironment whereby cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions occur. In this paper, a biomaterial scaffold that mimics the structure of collagen fibers was produced by jet-spraying. This micro-fiber polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold was evaluated for 3D culture of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in comparison with a commercially available electrospun scaffold. The jet-sprayed scaffolds had larger pore diameters, greater porosity, smaller diameter fibers, and more heterogeneous fiber diameter size distribution compared to the electrospun scaffolds. Cells on jet-sprayed constructs exhibited spread morphology with abundant cytoskeleton staining, whereas MSCs on electrospun scaffolds appeared less extended with fewer actin filaments. MSC proliferation and cell infiltration occurred at a faster rate on jet-sprayed compared to electrospun scaffolds. Osteogenic differentiation of MSCs and ECM production as measured by ALP, collagen and calcium deposition was superior on jet-sprayed compared to electrospun scaffolds. The jet-sprayed scaffold which mimics the native ECM and permits homogeneous cell infiltration is important for 3D in vitro applications such as bone cellular interaction studies or drug testing, as well as bone tissue engineering strategies. PMID:26238732

  16. Accurate micro-computed tomography imaging of pore spaces in collagen-based scaffold.

    PubMed

    Zidek, Jan; Vojtova, Lucy; Abdel-Mohsen, A M; Chmelik, Jiri; Zikmund, Tomas; Brtnikova, Jana; Jakubicek, Roman; Zubal, Lukas; Jan, Jiri; Kaiser, Jozef

    2016-06-01

    In this work we have used X-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT) as a method to observe the morphology of 3D porous pure collagen and collagen-composite scaffolds useful in tissue engineering. Two aspects of visualizations were taken into consideration: improvement of the scan and investigation of its sensitivity to the scan parameters. Due to the low material density some parts of collagen scaffolds are invisible in a μCT scan. Therefore, here we present different contrast agents, which increase the contrast of the scanned biopolymeric sample for μCT visualization. The increase of contrast of collagenous scaffolds was performed with ceramic hydroxyapatite microparticles (HAp), silver ions (Ag(+)) and silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs). Since a relatively small change in imaging parameters (e.g. in 3D volume rendering, threshold value and μCT acquisition conditions) leads to a completely different visualized pattern, we have optimized these parameters to obtain the most realistic picture for visual and qualitative evaluation of the biopolymeric scaffold. Moreover, scaffold images were stereoscopically visualized in order to better see the 3D biopolymer composite scaffold morphology. However, the optimized visualization has some discontinuities in zoomed view, which can be problematic for further analysis of interconnected pores by commonly used numerical methods. Therefore, we applied the locally adaptive method to solve discontinuities issue. The combination of contrast agent and imaging techniques presented in this paper help us to better understand the structure and morphology of the biopolymeric scaffold that is crucial in the design of new biomaterials useful in tissue engineering. PMID:27153826

  17. Micro/Nano Multilayered Scaffolds of PLGA and Collagen by Alternately Electrospinning for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Sanghwa; Haider, Adnan; Gupta, Kailash Chandra; Kim, Sukyoung; Kang, Inn-Kyu

    2016-12-01

    The dual extrusion electrospinning technique was used to fabricate multilayered 3D scaffolds by stacking microfibrous meshes of poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) in alternate fashion to micro/nano mixed fibrous meshes of PLGA and collagen. To fabricate the multilayered scaffold, 35 wt% solution of PLGA in THF-DMF binary solvent (3:1) and 5 wt% solution of collagen in hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) with and without hydroxyapatite nanorods (nHA) were used. The dual and individual electrospinning of PLGA and collagen were carried out at flow rates of 1.0 and 0.5 mL/h, respectively, at an applied voltage of 20 kV. The density of collagen fibers in multilayered scaffolds has controlled the adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. The homogeneous dispersion of glutamic acid-modified hydroxyapatite nanorods (nHA-GA) in collagen solution has improved the osteogenic properties of fabricated multilayered scaffolds. The fabricated multilayered scaffolds were characterized using FT-IR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was used to evaluate the adhesion and spreads of MC3T3-E1 cells on multilayered scaffolds. The activity of MC3T3-E1 cells on the multilayered scaffolds was evaluated by applying MTT, alkaline phosphatase, Alizarin Red, von Kossa, and cytoskeleton F-actin assaying protocols. The micro/nano fibrous PLGA-Col-HA scaffolds were found to be highly bioactive in comparison to pristine microfibrous PLGA and micro/nano mixed fibrous PLGA and Col scaffolds.

  18. Micro/Nano Multilayered Scaffolds of PLGA and Collagen by Alternately Electrospinning for Bone Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Sanghwa; Haider, Adnan; Gupta, Kailash Chandra; Kim, Sukyoung; Kang, Inn-Kyu

    2016-07-01

    The dual extrusion electrospinning technique was used to fabricate multilayered 3D scaffolds by stacking microfibrous meshes of poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) in alternate fashion to micro/nano mixed fibrous meshes of PLGA and collagen. To fabricate the multilayered scaffold, 35 wt% solution of PLGA in THF-DMF binary solvent (3:1) and 5 wt% solution of collagen in hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) with and without hydroxyapatite nanorods (nHA) were used. The dual and individual electrospinning of PLGA and collagen were carried out at flow rates of 1.0 and 0.5 mL/h, respectively, at an applied voltage of 20 kV. The density of collagen fibers in multilayered scaffolds has controlled the adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. The homogeneous dispersion of glutamic acid-modified hydroxyapatite nanorods (nHA-GA) in collagen solution has improved the osteogenic properties of fabricated multilayered scaffolds. The fabricated multilayered scaffolds were characterized using FT-IR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was used to evaluate the adhesion and spreads of MC3T3-E1 cells on multilayered scaffolds. The activity of MC3T3-E1 cells on the multilayered scaffolds was evaluated by applying MTT, alkaline phosphatase, Alizarin Red, von Kossa, and cytoskeleton F-actin assaying protocols. The micro/nano fibrous PLGA-Col-HA scaffolds were found to be highly bioactive in comparison to pristine microfibrous PLGA and micro/nano mixed fibrous PLGA and Col scaffolds.

  19. Micro/Nano Multilayered Scaffolds of PLGA and Collagen by Alternately Electrospinning for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Sanghwa; Haider, Adnan; Gupta, Kailash Chandra; Kim, Sukyoung; Kang, Inn-Kyu

    2016-12-01

    The dual extrusion electrospinning technique was used to fabricate multilayered 3D scaffolds by stacking microfibrous meshes of poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) in alternate fashion to micro/nano mixed fibrous meshes of PLGA and collagen. To fabricate the multilayered scaffold, 35 wt% solution of PLGA in THF-DMF binary solvent (3:1) and 5 wt% solution of collagen in hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) with and without hydroxyapatite nanorods (nHA) were used. The dual and individual electrospinning of PLGA and collagen were carried out at flow rates of 1.0 and 0.5 mL/h, respectively, at an applied voltage of 20 kV. The density of collagen fibers in multilayered scaffolds has controlled the adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. The homogeneous dispersion of glutamic acid-modified hydroxyapatite nanorods (nHA-GA) in collagen solution has improved the osteogenic properties of fabricated multilayered scaffolds. The fabricated multilayered scaffolds were characterized using FT-IR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was used to evaluate the adhesion and spreads of MC3T3-E1 cells on multilayered scaffolds. The activity of MC3T3-E1 cells on the multilayered scaffolds was evaluated by applying MTT, alkaline phosphatase, Alizarin Red, von Kossa, and cytoskeleton F-actin assaying protocols. The micro/nano fibrous PLGA-Col-HA scaffolds were found to be highly bioactive in comparison to pristine microfibrous PLGA and micro/nano mixed fibrous PLGA and Col scaffolds. PMID:27376895

  20. Development of a Bioreactor to Culture Tissue Engineered Ureters Based on the Application of Tubular OPTIMAIX 3D Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Seifarth, Volker; Gossmann, Matthias; Janke, Heinz Peter; Grosse, Joachim O; Becker, Christoph; Heschel, Ingo; Artmann, Gerhard M; Temiz Artmann, Aysegül

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and biomedical research give hope to many patients who need bio-implants. Tissue engineering applications have already been developed based on bioreactors. Physiological ureter implants, however, do not still function sufficiently, as they represent tubular hollow structures with very specific cellular structures and alignments consisting of several cell types. The aim of this study was to a develop a new bioreactor system based on seamless, collagenous, tubular OPTIMAIX 3D prototype sponge as scaffold material for ex-vivo culturing of a tissue engineered ureter replacement for future urological applications. Particular emphasis was given to a great extent to mimic the physiological environment similar to the in vivo situation of a ureter. NIH-3T3 fibroblasts, C2C12, Urotsa and primary genitourinary tract cells were applied as co-cultures on the scaffold and the penetration of cells into the collagenous material was followed. By the end of this study, the bioreactor was functioning, physiological parameter as temperature and pH and the newly developed BIOREACTOR system is applicable to tubular scaffold materials with different lengths and diameters. The automatized incubation system worked reliably. The tubular OPTIMAIX 3D sponge was a suitable scaffold material for tissue engineering purposes and co-cultivation procedures.

  1. Selective laser sintered poly-ε-caprolactone scaffold hybridized with collagen hydrogel for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Shyu, Victor Bong-Hang; Chen, Jyh-Ping; Lee, Ming-Yih

    2014-03-01

    Selective laser sintering (SLS), an additive manufacturing (AM) technology, can be used to produce tissue engineering scaffolds with pre-designed macro and micro features based on computer-aided design models. An in-house SLS machine was built and 3D poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds were manufactured using a layer-by-layer design of scaffold struts with varying orientations (0°/45°/0°/45°, 0°/90°/0°/90°, 0°/45°/90°/135°), producing scaffolds with pores of different shapes and distribution. To better enhance the scaffold properties, chondrocytes were seeded in collagen gel and loaded in scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering. Gel uptake and dynamic mechanical analysis demonstrated the better suitability of the 0°/90°/0°/90° scaffolds for reconstructive cartilage tissue engineering purposes. Chondrocytes were then seeded onto the 0°/90°/0°/90° scaffolds in collagen I hydrogel (PCL/COL1) and compared to medium-suspended cells in terms of their cartilage-like tissue engineering parameters. PCL/COL1 allowed better cell proliferation when compared to PCL or two-dimensional tissue culture polystyrene. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy observations demonstrated a similar trend for extracellular matrix production and cell survival. Glycosaminoglycan and collagen II quantification also demonstrated the superior matrix secretion properties of PCL/COL1 hybrid scaffolds. Collagen-gel-suspended chondrocytes loaded in SLS-manufactured PCL scaffolds may provide a means of producing tissue-engineered cartilage with customized shapes and designs via AM technology.

  2. Characterisation of the surface structure of 3D printed scaffolds for cell infiltration and surgical suturing.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Cantu, Laura; Gleadall, Andrew; Faris, Callum; Segal, Joel; Shakesheff, Kevin; Yang, Jing

    2016-03-01

    3D printing is of great interest for tissue engineering scaffolds due to the ability to form complex geometries and control internal structures, including porosity and pore size. The porous structure of scaffolds plays an important role in cell ingrowth and nutrition infusion. Although the internal porosity and pore size of 3D printed scaffolds have been frequently studied, the surface porosity and pore size, which are critical for cell infiltration and mass transport, have not been investigated. The surface geometry can differ considerably from the internal scaffold structure depending on the 3D printing process. It is vital to be able to control the surface geometry of scaffolds as well as the internal structure to fabricate optimal architectures. This work presents a method to control the surface porosity and pore size of 3D printed scaffolds. Six scaffold designs have been printed with surface porosities ranging from 3% to 21%. We have characterised the overall scaffold porosity and surface porosity using optical microscopy and microCT. It has been found that surface porosity has a significant impact on cell infiltration and proliferation. In addition, the porosity of the surface has been found to have an effect on mechanical properties and on the forces required to penetrate the scaffold with a surgical suturing needle. To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the surface geometry of extrusion-based 3D printed scaffolds and demonstrates the importance of surface geometry in cell infiltration and clinical manipulation. PMID:26930179

  3. Characterisation of the surface structure of 3D printed scaffolds for cell infiltration and surgical suturing.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Cantu, Laura; Gleadall, Andrew; Faris, Callum; Segal, Joel; Shakesheff, Kevin; Yang, Jing

    2016-03-01

    3D printing is of great interest for tissue engineering scaffolds due to the ability to form complex geometries and control internal structures, including porosity and pore size. The porous structure of scaffolds plays an important role in cell ingrowth and nutrition infusion. Although the internal porosity and pore size of 3D printed scaffolds have been frequently studied, the surface porosity and pore size, which are critical for cell infiltration and mass transport, have not been investigated. The surface geometry can differ considerably from the internal scaffold structure depending on the 3D printing process. It is vital to be able to control the surface geometry of scaffolds as well as the internal structure to fabricate optimal architectures. This work presents a method to control the surface porosity and pore size of 3D printed scaffolds. Six scaffold designs have been printed with surface porosities ranging from 3% to 21%. We have characterised the overall scaffold porosity and surface porosity using optical microscopy and microCT. It has been found that surface porosity has a significant impact on cell infiltration and proliferation. In addition, the porosity of the surface has been found to have an effect on mechanical properties and on the forces required to penetrate the scaffold with a surgical suturing needle. To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the surface geometry of extrusion-based 3D printed scaffolds and demonstrates the importance of surface geometry in cell infiltration and clinical manipulation.

  4. 3D-printed scaffolds based on PLA/HA nanocomposites for trabecular bone reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niaza, K. V.; Senatov, F. S.; Kaloshkin, S. D.; Maksimkin, A. V.; Chukov, D. I.

    2016-08-01

    In the present work porous PLA scaffolds filled with micro- and nano- HA were studied. Both composites with micro- and nano-HA were obtained by extrusion in the same conditions. Scaffolds were obtained by 3D-printing by fused filament fabrication method. Structure of porous scaffolds was pre-modeled by computer software. Compression and three - point flexural tests were used to study mechanical properties of the scaffolds.

  5. Spinal cord organotypic slice cultures for the study of regenerating motor axon interactions with 3D scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Gerardo-Nava, Jose; Hodde, Dorothee; Katona, Istvan; Bozkurt, Ahmet; Grehl, Torsten; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Weis, Joachim; Brook, Gary A

    2014-05-01

    Numerous in-vitro techniques exist for investigating the influence of 3D substrate topography on sensory axon growth. However, simple and cost-effective methods for studying post-natal motor axon interactions with such substrates are lacking. Here, spinal cord organotypic slice cultures (OSC) from post-natal day 7-9 rat pups were presented with spinal nerve roots, or blocks of fibrin hydrogel or 3D microporous collagen scaffolds to investigate motor axon-substrate interactions. By 7-14 days, axons from motor neuronal pools extended into the explanted nerve roots, growing along Schwann cell processes and demonstrating a full range of axon-Schwann cell interactions, from simple ensheathment to concentric wrapping by Schwann cell processes and the formation of compact myelin within a basal lamina sheath. Extensive motor axon regeneration and all stages of axon-Schwann interactions were also supported within the longitudinally orientated microporous framework of the 3D collagen scaffold. In stark contrast, the simple fibrin hydrogel only supported axon growth and cell migration over its surface. The relative ease of demonstrating such motor axon regeneration through the microporous 3D framework by immunofluorescence, two-photon microscopy and transmission electron microscopy strongly supports the adoption of this technique for assaying the influence of substrate topography and functionalization in regenerative bioengineering.

  6. Poly(dopamine) coating of 3D printed poly(lactic acid) scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chia-Tze; Lin, Chi-Chang; Chen, Yi-Wen; Yeh, Chia-Hung; Fang, Hsin-Yuan; Shie, Ming-You

    2015-11-01

    3D printing is a versatile technique to generate large quantities of a wide variety of shapes and sizes of polymer. The aim of this study is to develop functionalized 3D printed poly(lactic acid) (PLA) scaffolds and use a mussel-inspired surface coating to regulate cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). We prepared PLA 3D scaffolds coated with polydopamine (PDA). The chemical composition and surface properties of PDA/PLA were characterized by XPS. PDA/PLA modulated hADSCs' responses in several ways. Firstly, adhesion and proliferation, and cell cycle of hADSCs cultured on PDA/PLA were significantly enhanced relative to those on PLA. In addition, the collagen I secreted from cells was increased and promoted cell attachment and cell cycle progression were depended on the PDA content. In osteogenesis assay, the ALP activity and osteocalcin of hADSCs cultured on PDA/PLA were significantly higher than seen in those cultured on pure PLA scaffolds. Moreover, hADSCs cultured on PDA/PLA showed up-regulation of the ang-1 and vWF proteins associated with angiogenic differentiation. Our results demonstrate that the bio-inspired coating synthetic PLA polymer can be used as a simple technique to render the surfaces of synthetic scaffolds active, thus enabling them to direct the specific responses of hADSCs.

  7. Superabsorbent 3D Scaffold Based on Electrospun Nanofibers for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiming; Chen, Shuai; Morsi, Yosry; El-Hamshary, Hany; El-Newhy, Mohamed; Fan, Cunyi; Mo, Xiumei

    2016-09-21

    Electrospun nanofibers have been used for various biomedical applications. However, electrospinning commonly produces two-dimensional (2D) membranes, which limits the application of nanofibers for the 3D tissue engineering scaffold. In the present study, a porous 3D scaffold (3DS-1) based on electrospun gelatin/PLA nanofibers has been prepared for cartilage tissue regeneration. To further improve the repairing effect of cartilage, a modified scaffold (3DS-2) cross-linked with hyaluronic acid (HA) was also successfully fabricated. The nanofibrous structure, water absorption, and compressive mechanical properties of 3D scaffold were studied. Chondrocytes were cultured on 3D scaffold, and their viability and morphology were examined. 3D scaffolds were also subjected to an in vivo cartilage regeneration study on rabbits using an articular cartilage injury model. The results indicated that 3DS-1 and 3DS-2 exhibited superabsorbent property and excellent cytocompatibility. Both these scaffolds present elastic property in the wet state. An in vivo study showed that 3DS-2 could enhance the repair of cartilage. The present 3D nanofibrous scaffold (3DS-2) would be promising for cartilage tissue engineering application. PMID:27559926

  8. Superabsorbent 3D Scaffold Based on Electrospun Nanofibers for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiming; Chen, Shuai; Morsi, Yosry; El-Hamshary, Hany; El-Newhy, Mohamed; Fan, Cunyi; Mo, Xiumei

    2016-09-21

    Electrospun nanofibers have been used for various biomedical applications. However, electrospinning commonly produces two-dimensional (2D) membranes, which limits the application of nanofibers for the 3D tissue engineering scaffold. In the present study, a porous 3D scaffold (3DS-1) based on electrospun gelatin/PLA nanofibers has been prepared for cartilage tissue regeneration. To further improve the repairing effect of cartilage, a modified scaffold (3DS-2) cross-linked with hyaluronic acid (HA) was also successfully fabricated. The nanofibrous structure, water absorption, and compressive mechanical properties of 3D scaffold were studied. Chondrocytes were cultured on 3D scaffold, and their viability and morphology were examined. 3D scaffolds were also subjected to an in vivo cartilage regeneration study on rabbits using an articular cartilage injury model. The results indicated that 3DS-1 and 3DS-2 exhibited superabsorbent property and excellent cytocompatibility. Both these scaffolds present elastic property in the wet state. An in vivo study showed that 3DS-2 could enhance the repair of cartilage. The present 3D nanofibrous scaffold (3DS-2) would be promising for cartilage tissue engineering application.

  9. Cell Invasion in Collagen Scaffold Architectures Characterized by Percolation Theory.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Jennifer C; Mehr, Marco; Buxton, Paul G; Best, Serena M; Cameron, Ruth E

    2015-06-24

    The relationship between biological scaffold interconnectivity and cell migration is an important but poorly understood factor in tissue regeneration. Here a scale-independent technique for characterization of collagen scaffold interconnectivity is presented, using a combination of X-ray microcomputed tomography and percolation theory. Confocal microscopy of connective tissue cells reveals this technique as highly relevant for determining the extent of cell invasion.

  10. Microfabrication of complex porous tissue engineering scaffolds using 3D projection stereolithography

    PubMed Central

    Gauvin, Robert; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Lee, Jin Woo; Soman, Pranav; Zorlutuna, Pinar; Nichol, Jason W.; Bae, Hojae; Chen, Shaochen; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The success of tissue engineering will rely on the ability to generate complex, cell seeded three-dimensional (3D) structures. Therefore, methods that can be used to precisely engineer the architecture and topography of scaffolding materials will represent a critical aspect of functional tissue engineering. Previous approaches for 3D scaffold fabrication based on top-down and process driven methods are often not adequate to produce complex structures due to the lack of control on scaffold architecture, porosity, and cellular interactions. The proposed projection stereolithography (PSL) platform can be used to design intricate 3D tissue scaffolds that can be engineered to mimic the microarchitecture of tissues, based on computer aided design (CAD). The PSL system was developed, programmed and optimized to fabricate 3D scaffolds using gelatin methacrylate (GelMA). Variation of the structure and prepolymer concentration enabled tailoring the mechanical properties of the scaffolds. A dynamic cell seeding method was utilized to improve the coverage of the scaffold throughout its thickness. The results demonstrated that the interconnectivity of pores allowed for uniform human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) distribution and proliferation in the scaffolds, leading to high cell density and confluency at the end of the culture period. Moreover, immunohistochemistry results showed that cells seeded on the scaffold maintained their endothelial phenotype, demonstrating the biological functionality of the microfabricated GelMA scaffolds. PMID:22365811

  11. Microfabrication of complex porous tissue engineering scaffolds using 3D projection stereolithography.

    PubMed

    Gauvin, Robert; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Lee, Jin Woo; Soman, Pranav; Zorlutuna, Pinar; Nichol, Jason W; Bae, Hojae; Chen, Shaochen; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2012-05-01

    The success of tissue engineering will rely on the ability to generate complex, cell seeded three-dimensional (3D) structures. Therefore, methods that can be used to precisely engineer the architecture and topography of scaffolding materials will represent a critical aspect of functional tissue engineering. Previous approaches for 3D scaffold fabrication based on top-down and process driven methods are often not adequate to produce complex structures due to the lack of control on scaffold architecture, porosity, and cellular interactions. The proposed projection stereolithography (PSL) platform can be used to design intricate 3D tissue scaffolds that can be engineered to mimic the microarchitecture of tissues, based on computer aided design (CAD). The PSL system was developed, programmed and optimized to fabricate 3D scaffolds using gelatin methacrylate (GelMA). Variation of the structure and prepolymer concentration enabled tailoring the mechanical properties of the scaffolds. A dynamic cell seeding method was utilized to improve the coverage of the scaffold throughout its thickness. The results demonstrated that the interconnectivity of pores allowed for uniform human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) distribution and proliferation in the scaffolds, leading to high cell density and confluency at the end of the culture period. Moreover, immunohistochemistry results showed that cells seeded on the scaffold maintained their endothelial phenotype, demonstrating the biological functionality of the microfabricated GelMA scaffolds.

  12. Collagen a natural scaffold for biology and engineering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Collagen, the most abundant protein in mammals, constitutes a quarter of the animal's total weight. The unique structure of fibrous collagens, a long triple helix that further associates into fibers, provides an insoluble scaffold that gives strength and form to the skin, tendons, bones, cornea and...

  13. In vitro cartilage tissue engineering with 3D porous aqueous-derived silk scaffolds and mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongzhong; Kim, Ung-Jin; Blasioli, Dominick J; Kim, Hyeon-Joo; Kaplan, David L

    2005-12-01

    Adult cartilage tissue has limited self-repair capacity, especially in the case of severe damages caused by developmental abnormalities, trauma, or aging-related degeneration like osteoarthritis. Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the potential to differentiate into cells of different lineages including bone, cartilage, and fat. In vitro cartilage tissue engineering using autologous MSCs and three-dimensional (3-D) porous scaffolds has the potential for the successful repair of severe cartilage damage. Ideally, scaffolds designed for cartilage tissue engineering should have optimal structural and mechanical properties, excellent biocompatibility, controlled degradation rate, and good handling characteristics. In the present work, a novel, highly porous silk scaffold was developed by an aqueous process according to these criteria and subsequently combined with MSCs for in vitro cartilage tissue engineering. Chondrogenesis of MSCs in the silk scaffold was evident by real-time RT-PCR analysis for cartilage-specific ECM gene markers, histological and immunohistochemical evaluations of cartilage-specific ECM components. Dexamethasone and TGF-beta3 were essential for the survival, proliferation and chondrogenesis of MSCs in the silk scaffolds. The attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of MSCs in the silk scaffold showed unique characteristics. After 3 weeks of cultivation, the spatial cell arrangement and the collagen type-II distribution in the MSCs-silk scaffold constructs resembles those in native articular cartilage tissue, suggesting promise for these novel 3-D degradable silk-based scaffolds in MSC-based cartilage repair. Further in vivo evaluation is necessary to fully recognize the clinical relevance of these observations.

  14. Electrospinning of small diameter 3-D nanofibrous tubular scaffolds with controllable nanofiber orientations for vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huijun; Fan, Jintu; Chu, Chih-Chang; Wu, Jun

    2010-12-01

    The control of nanofiber orientation in nanofibrous tubular scaffolds can benefit the cell responses along specific directions. For small diameter tubular scaffolds, however, it becomes difficult to engineer nanofiber orientation. This paper reports a novel electrospinning technique for the fabrication of 3-D nanofibrous tubular scaffolds with controllable nanofiber orientations. Synthetic absorbable poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) was used as the model biomaterial to demonstrate this new electrospinning technique. Electrospun 3-D PCL nanofibrous tubular scaffolds of 4.5 mm in diameter with different nanofiber orientations (viz. circumferential, axial, and combinations of circumferential and axial directions) were successfully fabricated. The degree of nanofiber alignment in the electrospun 3-D tubular scaffolds was quantified by using the fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis. The results indicated that excellent circumferential nanofiber alignment could be achieved in the 3-D nanofibrous PCL tubular scaffolds. The nanofibrous tubular scaffolds with oriented nanofibers had not only directional mechanical property but also could facilitate the orientation of the endothelial cell attachment on the fibers. Multiple layers of aligned nanofibers in different orientations can produce 3-D nanofibrous tubular scaffolds of different macroscopic properties. PMID:20890639

  15. Ornamenting 3D printed scaffolds with cell-laid extracellular matrix for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pati, Falguni; Song, Tae-Ha; Rijal, Girdhari; Jang, Jinah; Kim, Sung Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    3D printing technique is the most sophisticated technique to produce scaffolds with tailorable physical properties. But, these scaffolds often suffer from limited biological functionality as they are typically made from synthetic materials. Cell-laid mineralized ECM was shown to be potential for improving the cellular responses and drive osteogenesis of stem cells. Here, we intend to improve the biological functionality of 3D-printed synthetic scaffolds by ornamenting them with cell-laid mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM) that mimics a bony microenvironment. We developed bone graft substitutes by using 3D printed scaffolds made from a composite of polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and mineralized ECM laid by human nasal inferior turbinate tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hTMSCs). A rotary flask bioreactor was used to culture hTMSCs on the scaffolds to foster formation of mineralized ECM. A freeze/thaw cycle in hypotonic buffer was used to efficiently decellularize (97% DNA reduction) the ECM-ornamented scaffolds while preserving its main organic and inorganic components. The ECM-ornamented 3D printed scaffolds supported osteoblastic differentiation of newly-seeded hTMSCs by upregulating four typical osteoblastic genes (4-fold higher RUNX2; 3-fold higher ALP; 4-fold higher osteocalcin; and 4-fold higher osteopontin) and increasing calcium deposition compared to bare 3D printed scaffolds. In vivo, in ectopic and orthotopic models in rats, ECM-ornamented scaffolds induced greater bone formation than that of bare scaffolds. These results suggest a valuable method to produce ECM-ornamented 3D printed scaffolds as off-the-shelf bone graft substitutes that combine tunable physical properties with physiological presentation of biological signals.

  16. Stabilized Collagen Scaffolds for Heart Valve Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tedder, Mary E.; Liao, Jun; Weed, Benjamin; Stabler, Christopher; Zhang, Henry; Simionescu, Agneta

    2009-01-01

    Scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering must function immediately after implantation but also need to tolerate cell infiltration and gradual remodeling. We hypothesized that moderately cross-linked collagen scaffolds would fulfill these requirements. To test our hypothesis, scaffolds prepared from decellularized porcine pericardium were treated with penta-galloyl glucose (PGG), a collagen-binding polyphenol, and tested for biodegradation, biaxial mechanical properties, and in vivo biocompatibility. For controls, we used un-cross-linked scaffolds and glutaraldehyde-treated scaffolds. Results confirmed complete pericardium decellularization and the ability of scaffolds to encourage fibroblast chemotaxis and to aid in creation of anatomically correct valve-shaped constructs. Glutaraldehyde cross-linking fully stabilized collagen but did not allow for tissue remodeling and calcified when implanted subdermally in rats. PGG-treated collagen was initially resistant to collagenase and then degraded gradually, indicating partial stabilization. Moreover, PGG-treated pericardium exhibited excellent biaxial mechanical properties, did not calcify in vivo, and supported infiltration by host fibroblasts and subsequent matrix remodeling. In conclusion, PGG-treated acellular pericardium is a promising scaffold for heart valve tissue engineering. PMID:18928400

  17. Stabilized collagen scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tedder, Mary E; Liao, Jun; Weed, Benjamin; Stabler, Christopher; Zhang, Henry; Simionescu, Agneta; Simionescu, Dan T

    2009-06-01

    Scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering must function immediately after implantation but also need to tolerate cell infiltration and gradual remodeling. We hypothesized that moderately cross-linked collagen scaffolds would fulfill these requirements. To test our hypothesis, scaffolds prepared from decellularized porcine pericardium were treated with penta-galloyl glucose (PGG), a collagen-binding polyphenol, and tested for biodegradation, biaxial mechanical properties, and in vivo biocompatibility. For controls, we used un-cross-linked scaffolds and glutaraldehyde-treated scaffolds. Results confirmed complete pericardium decellularization and the ability of scaffolds to encourage fibroblast chemotaxis and to aid in creation of anatomically correct valve-shaped constructs. Glutaraldehyde cross-linking fully stabilized collagen but did not allow for tissue remodeling and calcified when implanted subdermally in rats. PGG-treated collagen was initially resistant to collagenase and then degraded gradually, indicating partial stabilization. Moreover, PGG-treated pericardium exhibited excellent biaxial mechanical properties, did not calcify in vivo, and supported infiltration by host fibroblasts and subsequent matrix remodeling. In conclusion, PGG-treated acellular pericardium is a promising scaffold for heart valve tissue engineering. PMID:18928400

  18. Vinculin is required for cell polarization, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling in 3D collagen.

    PubMed

    Thievessen, Ingo; Fakhri, Nikta; Steinwachs, Julian; Kraus, Viola; McIsaac, R Scott; Gao, Liang; Chen, Bi-Chang; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Betzig, Eric; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Waterman, Clare M; Fabry, Ben

    2015-11-01

    Vinculin is filamentous (F)-actin-binding protein enriched in integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Whereas studies in 2-dimensional (2D) tissue culture models have suggested that vinculin negatively regulates cell migration by promoting cytoskeleton-ECM coupling to strengthen and stabilize adhesions, its role in regulating cell migration in more physiologic, 3-dimensional (3D) environments is unclear. To address the role of vinculin in 3D cell migration, we analyzed the morphodynamics, migration, and ECM remodeling of primary murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with cre/loxP-mediated vinculin gene disruption in 3D collagen I cultures. We found that vinculin promoted 3D cell migration by increasing directional persistence. Vinculin was necessary for persistent cell protrusion, cell elongation, and stable cell orientation in 3D collagen, but was dispensable for lamellipodia formation, suggesting that vinculin-mediated cell adhesion to the ECM is needed to convert actin-based cell protrusion into persistent cell shape change and migration. Consistent with this finding, vinculin was necessary for efficient traction force generation in 3D collagen without affecting myosin II activity and promoted 3D collagen fiber alignment and macroscopical gel contraction. Our results suggest that vinculin promotes directionally persistent cell migration and tension-dependent ECM remodeling in complex 3D environments by increasing cell-ECM adhesion and traction force generation.

  19. Balancing mechanical strength with bioactivity in chitosan-calcium phosphate 3D microsphere scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: air- vs. freeze-drying processes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D T; McCanless, J D; Mecwan, M M; Noblett, A P; Haggard, W O; Smith, R A; Bumgardner, J D

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential benefit of 3D composite scaffolds composed of chitosan and calcium phosphate for bone tissue engineering. Additionally, incorporation of mechanically weak lyophilized microspheres within those air-dried (AD) was considered for enhanced bioactivity. AD microsphere, alone, and air- and freeze-dried microsphere (FDAD) 3D scaffolds were evaluated in vitro using a 28-day osteogenic culture model with the Saos-2 cell line. Mechanical testing, quantitative microscopy, and lysozyme-driven enzymatic degradation of the scaffolds were also studied. FDAD scaffold showed a higher concentration (p < 0.01) in cells per scaffold mass vs. AD constructs. Collagen was ∼31% greater (p < 0.01) on FDAD compared to AD scaffolds not evident in microscopy of microsphere surfaces. Alternatively, AD scaffolds demonstrated a superior threefold increase in compressive strength over FDAD (12 vs. 4 MPa) with minimal degradation. Inclusion of FD spheres within the FDAD scaffolds allowed increased cellular activity through improved seeding, proliferation, and extracellular matrix production (as collagen), although mechanical strength was sacrificed through introduction of the less stiff, porous FD spheres.

  20. Low-Temperature Additive Manufacturing of Biomimic Three-Dimensional Hydroxyapatite/Collagen Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kai-Feng; He, Shu; Song, Yue; Wang, Chun-Mei; Gao, Yi; Li, Jun-Qin; Tang, Peng; Wang, Zheng; Bi, Long; Pei, Guo-Xian

    2016-03-23

    Low-temperature additive manufacturing (AM) holds promise for fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds containing bioactive molecules and/or drugs. Due to the strict technical limitations of current approaches, few materials are suitable for printing at low temperature. Here, a low-temperature robocasting method was employed to print biomimic 3D scaffolds for bone regeneration using a routine collagen-hydroxyapatite (CHA) composite material, which is too viscous to be printed via normal 3D printing methods at low temperature. The CHA scaffolds had excellent 3D structure and maintained most raw material properties after printing. Compared to nonprinted scaffolds, printed scaffolds promoted bone marrow stromal cell proliferation and improved osteogenic outcome in vitro. In a rabbit femoral condyle defect model, the interconnecting pores within the printed scaffolds facilitated cell penetration and mineralization before the scaffolds degraded and enhanced repair, compared to nonprinted CHA scaffolds. Additionally, the optimal printing parameters for 3D CHA scaffolds were investigated; 600-μm-diameter rods were optimal in terms of moderate mechanical strength and better repair outcome in vivo. This low-temperature robocasting method could enable a variety of bioactive molecules to be incorporated into printed CHA materials and provides a method of bioprinting biomaterials without compromising their natural properties.

  1. 3D fibre deposition and stereolithography techniques for the design of multifunctional nanocomposite magnetic scaffolds.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Roberto; D'Amora, Ugo; Russo, Teresa; Ronca, Alfredo; Gloria, Antonio; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds based on poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) were fabricated by 3D fibre deposition modelling (FDM) and stereolithography techniques. In addition, hybrid coaxial and bilayer magnetic scaffolds were produced by combining such techniques. The aim of the current research was to analyse some structural and functional features of 3D magnetic scaffolds obtained by the 3D fibre deposition technique and by stereolithography as well as features of multimaterial scaffolds in the form of coaxial and bilayer structures obtained by the proper integration of such methods. The compressive mechanical behaviour of these scaffolds was investigated in a wet environment at 37 °C, and the morphological features were analysed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray micro-computed tomography. The capability of a magnetic scaffold to absorb magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in water solution was also assessed. confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to assess the in vitro biological behaviour of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) seeded on 3D structures. Results showed that a wide range of mechanical properties, covering those spanning hard and soft tissues, can be obtained by 3D FDM and stereolithography techniques. 3D virtual reconstruction and SEM showed the precision with which the scaffolds were fabricated, and a good-quality interface between poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) based scaffolds was observed for bilayer and coaxial scaffolds. Magnetised scaffolds are capable of absorbing water solution of MNPs, and a preliminary information on cell adhesion and spreading of hMSCs was obtained without the application of an external magnetic field.

  2. 3D fibre deposition and stereolithography techniques for the design of multifunctional nanocomposite magnetic scaffolds.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Roberto; D'Amora, Ugo; Russo, Teresa; Ronca, Alfredo; Gloria, Antonio; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds based on poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) were fabricated by 3D fibre deposition modelling (FDM) and stereolithography techniques. In addition, hybrid coaxial and bilayer magnetic scaffolds were produced by combining such techniques. The aim of the current research was to analyse some structural and functional features of 3D magnetic scaffolds obtained by the 3D fibre deposition technique and by stereolithography as well as features of multimaterial scaffolds in the form of coaxial and bilayer structures obtained by the proper integration of such methods. The compressive mechanical behaviour of these scaffolds was investigated in a wet environment at 37 °C, and the morphological features were analysed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray micro-computed tomography. The capability of a magnetic scaffold to absorb magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in water solution was also assessed. confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to assess the in vitro biological behaviour of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) seeded on 3D structures. Results showed that a wide range of mechanical properties, covering those spanning hard and soft tissues, can be obtained by 3D FDM and stereolithography techniques. 3D virtual reconstruction and SEM showed the precision with which the scaffolds were fabricated, and a good-quality interface between poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) based scaffolds was observed for bilayer and coaxial scaffolds. Magnetised scaffolds are capable of absorbing water solution of MNPs, and a preliminary information on cell adhesion and spreading of hMSCs was obtained without the application of an external magnetic field. PMID:26420041

  3. Improved angiogenic cell penetration in vitro and in vivo in collagen scaffolds with internal channels.

    PubMed

    Yahyouche, Asma; Zhidao, Xia; Triffitt, James T; Czernuszka, Jan T; Clover, A J P

    2013-06-01

    Porous scaffolds are limited in volume due to diffusion constraint and delay of vascular network formation. Channels have the potential to speed up cellular penetration. Their effectiveness in improving angiogenic cell penetration was assessed in vitro and in vivo in 3-D collagen scaffolds. In vitro, channelled and non-channelled scaffolds were seeded with vascular smooth muscle cells. Results demonstrated that the scaffolds supported angiogenic cell ingrowth in culture and the channels improved the depth of cell penetration into the scaffold (P < 0.05). The cells reside mainly around and migrate along the channels. In vivo, channels increased cell migration into the scaffolds (P < 0.05) particularly angiogenic cells (P < 0.05) resulting in a clear branched vascular network of microvessels after 2 weeks in the channelled samples which was not apparent in the non-channelled samples. Channels could aid production of tissue engineered constructs by offering the possibility of rapid blood vessel infiltration into collagen scaffolds.

  4. Development of 3D PPF/DEF scaffolds using micro-stereolithography and surface modification.

    PubMed

    Lan, Phung Xuan; Lee, Jin Woo; Seol, Young-Joon; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2009-01-01

    Poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) is an ultraviolet-curable and biodegradable polymer with potential applications for bone regeneration. In this study, we designed and fabricated three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds based on a PPF polymer network using micro-stereolithography (MSTL). The 3D scaffold was well fabricated with a highly interconnected porous structure and porosity of 65%. These results provide a new scaffold fabrication method for tissue engineering. Surface modification is a commonly used and effective method for improving the surface characteristics of biomaterials without altering their bulk properties that avoids the expense and long time associated with the development of new biomaterials. Therefore, we examined surface modification of 3D scaffolds by applying accelerated biomimetic apatite and arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide coating to promote cell behavior. The apatite coating uniformly covered the scaffold surface after immersion for 24 h in 5-fold simulated body fluid (5SBF) and then the RGD peptide was applied. Finally, the coated 3D scaffolds were seeded with MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts and their biologic properties were evaluated using an MTS assay and histologic staining. We found that 3D PPF/diethyl fumarate (DEF) scaffolds fabricated with MSTL and biomimetic apatite coating can be potentially used in bone tissue engineering.

  5. An approach in developing 3D fiber-deposited magnetic scaffolds for tissue engineering

    SciTech Connect

    De Santis, R.; Gloria, A.; D'Amora, U.; Zeppetelli, S.; Ambrosio, L.; Russo, T.

    2010-06-02

    Scaffolds should possess suitable properties to play their specific role. In this work, the potential of 3D fiber deposition technique to develop multifunctional and well-defined magnetic poly(epsilon-caprolactone)/iron oxide scaffolds has been highlighted, and the effect of iron oxide nanoparticles on the biological and mechanical performances has been assessed.

  6. Pore size effect of collagen scaffolds on cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Lu, Hongxu; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2014-05-01

    Scaffold pore size is an important factor affecting tissue regeneration efficiency. The effect of pore size on cartilage tissue regeneration was compared by using four types of collagen porous scaffolds with different pore sizes. The collagen porous scaffolds were prepared by using pre-prepared ice particulates that had diameters of 150-250, 250-355, 355-425 and 425-500μm. All the scaffolds had spherical large pores with good interconnectivity and high porosity that facilitated cell seeding and spatial cell distribution. Chondrocytes adhered to the walls of the spherical pores and showed a homogeneous distribution throughout the scaffolds. The in vivo implantation results indicated that the pore size did not exhibit any obvious effect on cell proliferation but exhibited different effects on cartilage regeneration. The collagen porous scaffolds prepared with ice particulates 150-250μm in size best promoted the expression and production of type II collagen and aggrecan, increasing the formation and the mechanical properties of the cartilage.

  7. A three-dimensional hierarchical collagen scaffold fabricated by a combined solid freeform fabrication (SFF) and electrospinning process to enhance mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, SeungHyun; Koh, Young Ho; Kim, GeunHyung

    2010-06-01

    Collagen has the advantage of being very similar to macromolecular substances that can be recognized and metabolized in the biological environment. Although the natural material has superior property for this purpose, its use to fabricate reproducible and pore-structure-controlled 3D structures, which are designed to allow the entry of sufficient cells and the easy diffusion of nutrients, has been limited due to its low processability. Here, we propose a hybrid technology that combines a cryogenic plotting system with an electrospinning process. Using this technique, an easily pore-size-controllable hierarchical 3D scaffold consisting of micro-sized highly porous collagen strands and micro/nano-sized collagen fibers was fabricated. The pore structure of the collagen scaffold was controlled by the collagen micro/nanofibers, which were layered in the scaffold. The hierarchical scaffolds were characterized with respect to initial cell attachment and proliferation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells within the scaffolds. The hierarchical scaffold exhibited incredibly enhanced initial cell attachment and cell compactness between pores of the plotted scaffold relative to the normally designed 3D collagen scaffold.

  8. Evaluating 3D-printed biomaterials as scaffolds for vascularized bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Martha O; Vorwald, Charlotte E; Dreher, Maureen L; Mott, Eric J; Cheng, Ming-Huei; Cinar, Ali; Mehdizadeh, Hamidreza; Somo, Sami; Dean, David; Brey, Eric M; Fisher, John P

    2015-01-01

    There is an unmet need for a consistent set of tools for the evaluation of 3D-printed constructs. A toolbox developed to design, characterize, and evaluate 3D-printed poly(propylene fumarate) scaffolds is proposed for vascularized engineered tissues. This toolbox combines modular design and non-destructive fabricated design evaluation, evaluates biocompatibility and mechanical properties, and models angiogenesis.

  9. 3D Printed Silicone-Hydrogel Scaffold with Enhanced Physicochemical Properties.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Alm, Martin; Hemmingsen, Mette; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza; Trifol, Jon; Thomsen, Peter; Dufva, Martin; Wolff, Anders; Emnéus, Jenny

    2016-04-11

    Scaffolds with multiple functionalities have attracted widespread attention in the field of tissue engineering due to their ability to control cell behavior through various cues, including mechanical, chemical, and electrical. Fabrication of such scaffolds from clinically approved materials is currently a huge challenge. The goal of this work was to fabricate a tissue engineering scaffold from clinically approved materials with the capability of delivering biomolecules and direct cell fate. We have used a simple 3D printing approach, that combines polymer casting with supercritical fluid technology to produce 3D interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) scaffold of silicone-poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)-co-poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate (pHEMA-co-PEGMEA). The pHEMA-co-PEGMEA IPN materials were employed to support growth of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC), resulting in high cell viability and metabolic activity over a 3 weeks period. In addition, the IPN scaffolds support 3D tissue formation inside the porous scaffold with well spread cell morphology on the surface of the scaffold. As a proof of concept, sustained doxycycline (DOX) release from pHEMA-co-PEGMEA IPN was demonstrated and the biological activity of released drug from IPN was confirmed using a DOX regulated green fluorescent reporter (GFP) gene expression assay with HeLa cells. Given its unique mechanical and drug releasing characteristics, IPN scaffolds may be used for directing stem cell differentiation by releasing various chemicals from its hydrogel network.

  10. 3D Printed Silicone-Hydrogel Scaffold with Enhanced Physicochemical Properties.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Alm, Martin; Hemmingsen, Mette; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza; Trifol, Jon; Thomsen, Peter; Dufva, Martin; Wolff, Anders; Emnéus, Jenny

    2016-04-11

    Scaffolds with multiple functionalities have attracted widespread attention in the field of tissue engineering due to their ability to control cell behavior through various cues, including mechanical, chemical, and electrical. Fabrication of such scaffolds from clinically approved materials is currently a huge challenge. The goal of this work was to fabricate a tissue engineering scaffold from clinically approved materials with the capability of delivering biomolecules and direct cell fate. We have used a simple 3D printing approach, that combines polymer casting with supercritical fluid technology to produce 3D interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) scaffold of silicone-poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)-co-poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate (pHEMA-co-PEGMEA). The pHEMA-co-PEGMEA IPN materials were employed to support growth of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC), resulting in high cell viability and metabolic activity over a 3 weeks period. In addition, the IPN scaffolds support 3D tissue formation inside the porous scaffold with well spread cell morphology on the surface of the scaffold. As a proof of concept, sustained doxycycline (DOX) release from pHEMA-co-PEGMEA IPN was demonstrated and the biological activity of released drug from IPN was confirmed using a DOX regulated green fluorescent reporter (GFP) gene expression assay with HeLa cells. Given its unique mechanical and drug releasing characteristics, IPN scaffolds may be used for directing stem cell differentiation by releasing various chemicals from its hydrogel network. PMID:26902925

  11. Cell Invasion in Collagen Scaffold Architectures Characterized by Percolation Theory.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Jennifer C; Mehr, Marco; Buxton, Paul G; Best, Serena M; Cameron, Ruth E

    2015-06-24

    The relationship between biological scaffold interconnectivity and cell migration is an important but poorly understood factor in tissue regeneration. Here a scale-independent technique for characterization of collagen scaffold interconnectivity is presented, using a combination of X-ray microcomputed tomography and percolation theory. Confocal microscopy of connective tissue cells reveals this technique as highly relevant for determining the extent of cell invasion. PMID:25881025

  12. Bioengineered silk scaffolds in 3D tissue modeling with focus on mammary tissues.

    PubMed

    Maghdouri-White, Yas; Bowlin, Gary L; Lemmon, Christopher A; Dréau, Didier

    2016-02-01

    In vitro generation of three-dimensional (3D) biological tissues and organ-like structures is a promising strategy to study and closely model complex aspects of the molecular, cellular, and physiological interactions of tissue. In particular, in vitro 3D tissue modeling holds promises to further our understanding of breast development. Indeed, biologically relevant 3D structures that combine mammary cells and engineered matrices have improved our knowledge of mammary tissue growth, organization, and differentiation. Several polymeric biomaterials have been used as scaffolds to engineer 3D mammary tissues. Among those, silk fibroin-based biomaterials have many biologically relevant properties and have been successfully used in multiple medical applications. Here, we review the recent advances in engineered scaffolds with an emphasis on breast-like tissue generation and the benefits of modified silk-based scaffolds.

  13. Plant-Derived Human Collagen Scaffolds for Skin Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Willard, James J.; Drexler, Jason W.; Das, Amitava; Roy, Sashwati; Shilo, Shani; Shoseyov, Oded

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds are commonly formed using proteins extracted from animal tissues, such as bovine hide. Risks associated with the use of these materials include hypersensitivity and pathogenic contamination. Human-derived proteins lower the risk of hypersensitivity, but possess the risk of disease transmission. Methods engineering recombinant human proteins using plant material provide an alternate source of these materials without the risk of disease transmission or concerns regarding variability. To investigate the utility of plant-derived human collagen (PDHC) in the development of engineered skin (ES), PDHC and bovine hide collagen were formed into tissue engineering scaffolds using electrospinning or freeze-drying. Both raw materials were easily formed into two common scaffold types, electrospun nonwoven scaffolds and lyophilized sponges, with similar architectures. The processing time, however, was significantly lower with PDHC. PDHC scaffolds supported primary human cell attachment and proliferation at an equivalent or higher level than the bovine material. Interleukin-1 beta production was significantly lower when activated THP-1 macrophages where exposed to PDHC electrospun scaffolds compared to bovine collagen. Both materials promoted proper maturation and differentiation of ES. These data suggest that PDHC may provide a novel source of raw material for tissue engineering with low risk of allergic response or disease transmission. PMID:23298216

  14. Fabrication of a customized bone scaffold using a homemade medical 3D printer for comminuted fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Shin, Han-Back; Kim, Moo-Sub; Choe, Bo-Young; Kim, Sunmi; Suh, Tae Suk; Lee, Keum Sil; Xing, Lei

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to show a 3D printed reconstruction model of a bone destroyed by a comminuted fracture. After a thoracic limb of a cow with a comminuted fracture was scanned by using computed tomography, a scaffold was designed by using a 3D modeling tool for its reconstruction and fabricated by using a homemade medical 3D printer. The homemade medical 3D printer was designed for medical use. In order to reconstruct the geometry of the destroyed bone, we use the geometry of a similar section (reference geometry) of normal bone in the 3D modeling process. The missing part between the destroyed ridge and the reference geometry was filled with an effective space by using a manual interpolation. Inexpensive materials and free software were used to construct the medical 3D printer system. The fabrication of the scaffold progressed according to the design of reconstructed bone by using this medical 3D printer. The material of the scaffold was biodegradable material, and could be transplanted into the human body. The fabricated scaffold was correctly inserted into the fractured bone in place of the destroyed portion, with good agreement. According to physical stress test results, the performance of printing resolution was 0.1 mm. The average geometrical error of the scaffold was below 0.3 mm. The reconstructed bone by using the fabricated scaffold was able to support the weight of the human body. No process used to obtain the result was complex or required many resources. The methods and results in this study show several possible clinical applications in fields such as orthopedics or oncology without a need to purchase high-price instruments for 3D printing.

  15. Mechanical properties and shape memory effect of 3D-printed PLA-based porous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Senatov, F S; Niaza, K V; Zadorozhnyy, M Yu; Maksimkin, A V; Kaloshkin, S D; Estrin, Y Z

    2016-04-01

    In the present work polylactide (PLA)/15wt% hydroxyapatite (HA) porous scaffolds with pre-modeled structure were obtained by 3D-printing by fused filament fabrication. Composite filament was obtained by extrusion. Mechanical properties, structural characteristics and shape memory effect (SME) were studied. Direct heating was used for activation of SME. The average pore size and porosity of the scaffolds were 700μm and 30vol%, respectively. Dispersed particles of HA acted as nucleation centers during the ordering of PLA molecular chains and formed an additional rigid fixed phase that reduced molecular mobility, which led to a shift of the onset of recovery stress growth from 53 to 57°C. A more rapid development of stresses was observed for PLA/HA composites with the maximum recovery stress of 3.0MPa at 70°C. Ceramic particles inhibited the growth of cracks during compression-heating-compression cycles when porous PLA/HA 3D-scaffolds recovered their initial shape. Shape recovery at the last cycle was about 96%. SME during heating may have resulted in "self-healing" of scaffold by narrowing the cracks. PLA/HA 3D-scaffolds were found to withstand up to three compression-heating-compression cycles without delamination. It was shown that PLA/15%HA porous scaffolds obtained by 3D-printing with shape recovery of 98% may be used as self-fitting implant for small bone defect replacement owing to SME.

  16. In vitro generation of mechanically functional cartilage grafts based on adult human stem cells and 3D-woven poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Valonen, P.K.; Moutos, F.T.; Kusanagi, A.; Moretti, M.; Diekman, B.O.; Welter, J.F.; Caplan, A.I.; Guilak, F.

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensionally woven poly(ε-caprolactone)(PCL) scaffolds were combined with adult human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) to engineer mechanically functional cartilage constructs in vitro. The specific objectives were to: (i) produce PCL scaffolds with cartilage-like mechanical properties, (ii) demonstrate that hMSCs formed cartilage after 21-days of culture on PCL scaffolds, and (iii) study effects of scaffold structure (loosely vs. tightly woven), culture vessel (static dish vs. oscillating bioreactor), and medium composition (chondrogenic additives with or without serum). Aggregate moduli of 21-day constructs approached normal articular cartilage for tightly woven PCL cultured in bioreactors, were lower for tightly woven PCL cultured statically, and lowest for loosely woven PCL cultured statically (p<0.05). Construct DNA, total collagen, and glyocosaminoglycans (GAG) increased in a manner dependent on time, culture vessel, and medium composition. Chondrogenesis was verified histologically by rounded cells within a hyaline-like matrix that immunostained for collagen type II but not type I. Bioreactors yielded constructs with higher collagen content (p<0.05) and more homogenous matrix than static controls. Chondrogenic additives yielded constructs with higher GAG (p<0.05) and earlier expression of collagen II mRNA if serum was not present in medium. These results show feasibility of functional cartilage tissue engineering from hMSC and 3D woven PCL scaffolds. PMID:20034665

  17. Design of a Novel 3D Printed Bioactive Nanocomposite Scaffold for Improved Osteochondral Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Nathan J.; Patel, Romil; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-01-01

    Chronic and acute osteochondral defects as a result of osteoarthritis and trauma present a common and serious clinical problem due to the tissue's inherent complexity and poor regenerative capacity. In addition, cells within the osteochondral tissue are in intimate contact with a 3D nanostructured extracellular matrix composed of numerous bioactive organic and inorganic components. As an emerging manufacturing technique, 3D printing offers great precision and control over the microarchitecture, shape and composition of tissue scaffolds. Therefore, the objective of this study is to develop a biomimetic 3D printed nanocomposite scaffold with integrated differentiation cues for improved osteochondral tissue regeneration. Through the combination of novel nano-inks composed of organic and inorganic bioactive factors and advanced 3D printing, we have successfully fabricated a series of novel constructs which closely mimic the native 3D extracellular environment with hierarchical nanoroughness, microstructure and spatiotemporal bioactive cues. Our results illustrate several key characteristics of the 3D printed nanocomposite scaffold to include improved mechanical properties as well as excellent cytocompatibility for enhanced human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteochondral differentiation in vitro. The present work further illustrates the effectiveness of the scaffolds developed here as a promising and highly tunable platform for osteochondral tissue regeneration. PMID:26366231

  18. Mechanical evaluation of gradient electrospun scaffolds with 3D printed ring reinforcements for tracheal defect repair.

    PubMed

    Ott, Lindsey M; Zabel, Taylor A; Walker, Natalie K; Farris, Ashley L; Chakroff, Jason T; Ohst, Devan G; Johnson, Jed K; Gehrke, Steven H; Weatherly, Robert A; Detamore, Michael S

    2016-04-01

    Tracheal stenosis can become a fatal condition, and current treatments include augmentation of the airway with autologous tissue. A tissue-engineered approach would not require a donor source, while providing an implant that meets both surgeons' and patients' needs. A fibrous, polymeric scaffold organized in gradient bilayers of polycaprolactone (PCL) and poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) with 3D printed structural ring supports, inspired by the native trachea rings, could meet this need. The purpose of the current study was to characterize the tracheal scaffolds with mechanical testing models to determine the design most suitable for maintaining a patent airway. Degradation over 12 weeks revealed that scaffolds with the 3D printed rings had superior properties in tensile and radial compression, with at least a three fold improvement and 8.5-fold improvement, respectively, relative to the other scaffold groups. The ringed scaffolds produced tensile moduli, radial compressive forces, and burst pressures similar to or exceeding physiological forces and native tissue data. Scaffolds with a thicker PCL component had better suture retention and tube flattening recovery properties, with the monolayer of PCL (PCL-only group) exhibiting a 2.3-fold increase in suture retention strength (SRS). Tracheal scaffolds with ring reinforcements have improved mechanical properties, while the fibrous component increased porosity and cell infiltration potential. These scaffolds may be used to treat various trachea defects (patch or circumferential) and have the potential to be employed in other tissue engineering applications. PMID:27097554

  19. In-vivo behavior of Si-hydroxyapatite/polycaprolactone/DMB scaffolds fabricated by 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Meseguer-Olmo, Luis; Vicente-Ortega, Vicente; Alcaraz-Baños, Miguel; Calvo-Guirado, José Luis; Vallet-Regí, María; Arcos, Daniel; Baeza, Alejandro

    2013-07-01

    Scaffolds made of polycaprolactone and nanocrystalline silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite have been fabricated by 3D printing rapid prototyping technique. To asses that the scaffolds fulfill the requirements to be considered for bone grafting applications, they were implanted in New Zealand rabbits. Histological and radiological studies have demonstrated that the scaffolds implanted in bone exhibited an excellent osteointegration without the interposition of fibrous tissue between bone and implants and without immune response after 4 months of implantation. In addition, we have evaluated the possibility of improving the scaffolds efficiency by incorporating demineralized bone matrix during the preparation by 3D printing. When demineralized bone matrix (DBM) is incorporated, the efficacy of the scaffolds is enhanced, as new bone formation occurs not only in the peripheral portions of the scaffolds but also within its pores after 4 months of implantation. This enhanced performance can be explained in terms of the osteoinductive properties of the DBM in the scaffolds, which have been assessed through the new bone tissue formation when the scaffolds are ectopically implanted.

  20. Preparation and Evaluation of Gelatin-Chitosan-Nanobioglass 3D Porous Scaffold for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Maji, Kanchan; Dasgupta, Sudip; Pramanik, Krishna; Bissoyi, Akalabya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare and characterize bioglass-natural biopolymer based composite scaffold and evaluate its bone regeneration ability. Bioactive glass nanoparticles (58S) in the size range of 20–30 nm were synthesized using sol-gel method. Porous scaffolds with varying bioglass composition from 10 to 30 wt% in chitosan, gelatin matrix were fabricated using the method of freeze drying of its slurry at 40 wt% solids loading. Samples were cross-linked with glutaraldehyde to obtain interconnected porous 3D microstructure with improved mechanical strength. The prepared scaffolds exhibited >80% porosity with a mean pore size range between 100 and 300 microns. Scaffold containing 30 wt% bioglass (GCB 30) showed a maximum compressive strength of 2.2 ± 0.1 MPa. Swelling and degradation studies showed that the scaffold had excellent properties of hydrophilicity and biodegradability. GCB 30 scaffold was shown to be noncytotoxic and supported mesenchymal stem cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation as indicated by MTT assay and RUNX-2 expression. Higher cellular activity was observed in GCB 30 scaffold as compared to GCB 0 scaffold suggesting the fact that 58S bioglass nanoparticles addition into the scaffold promoted better cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Thus, the study showed that the developed composite scaffolds are potential candidates for regenerating damaged bone tissue. PMID:26884764

  1. Immunomodulatory effects of amniotic membrane matrix incorporated into collagen scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hortensius, Rebecca A; Ebens, Jill H; Harley, Brendan A C

    2016-06-01

    Adult tendon wound repair is characterized by the formation of disorganized collagen matrix which leads to decreases in mechanical properties and scar formation. Studies have linked this scar formation to the inflammatory phase of wound healing. Instructive biomaterials designed for tendon regeneration are often designed to provide both structural and cellular support. In order to facilitate regeneration, success may be found by tempering the body's inflammatory response. This work combines collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds, previously developed for tissue regeneration, with matrix materials (hyaluronic acid and amniotic membrane) that have been shown to promote healing and decreased scar formation in skin studies. The results presented show that scaffolds containing amniotic membrane matrix have significantly increased mechanical properties and that tendon cells within these scaffolds have increased metabolic activity even when the media is supplemented with the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta. Collagen scaffolds containing hyaluronic acid or amniotic membrane also temper the expression of genes associated with the inflammatory response in normal tendon healing (TNF-α, COLI, MMP-3). These results suggest that alterations to scaffold composition, to include matrix known to decrease scar formation in vivo, can modify the inflammatory response in tenocytes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1332-1342, 2016.

  2. Preparation and mechanical property of a novel 3D porous magnesium scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue; Li, Xiao-Wu; Li, Ji-Guang; Sun, Xu-Dong

    2014-09-01

    Porous magnesium has been recently recognized as a biodegradable metal for bone substitute applications. A novel porous Mg scaffold with three-dimensional (3D) interconnected pores and with a porosity of 33-54% was produced by the fiber deposition hot pressing (FDHP) technology. The microstructure and morphologies of the porous Mg scaffold were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the effects of porosities on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the porous Mg were investigated. Experimental results indicate that the measured Young's modulus and compressive strength of the Mg scaffold are ranged in 0.10-0.37 GPa, and 11.1-30.3 MPa, respectively, which are fairly comparable to those of cancellous bone. Such a porous Mg scaffold having a 3D interconnected network structure has the potential to be used in bone tissue engineering.

  3. Finite Element Analysis of Meniscal Anatomical 3D Scaffolds: Implications for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, L; Lambers, F.M; Wilson, W; van Donkelaar, C.C; de Wijn, JR; Huiskesb, R; van Blitterswijk, C.A

    2007-01-01

    Solid Free-Form Fabrication (SFF) technologies allow the fabrication of anatomical 3D scaffolds from computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patients’ dataset. These structures can be designed and fabricated with a variable, interconnected and accessible porous network, resulting in modulable mechanical properties, permeability, and architecture that can be tailored to mimic a specific tissue to replace or regenerate. In this study, we evaluated whether anatomical meniscal 3D scaffolds with matching mechanical properties and architecture are beneficial for meniscus replacement as compared to meniscectomy. After acquiring CT and MRI of porcine menisci, 3D fiber-deposited (3DF) scaffolds were fabricated with different architectures by varying the deposition pattern of the fibers comprising the final structure. The mechanical behaviour of 3DF scaffolds with different architectures and of porcine menisci was measured by static and dynamic mechanical analysis and the effect of these tissue engineering templates on articular cartilage was assessed by finite element analysis (FEA) and compared to healthy conditions or to meniscectomy. Results show that 3DF anatomical menisci scaffolds can be fabricated with pore different architectures and with mechanical properties matching those of natural menisci. FEA predicted a beneficial effect of meniscus replacement with 3D scaffolds in different mechanical loading conditions as compared to meniscectomy. No influence of the internal scaffold architecture was found on articular cartilage damage. Although FEA predictions should be further confirmed by in vitro and in vivo experiments, this study highlights meniscus replacement by SFF anatomical scaffolds as a potential alternative to meniscectomy. PMID:19662124

  4. MMP Regulation of Corneal Keratocyte Motility and Mechanics in 3-D Collagen Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chengxin; Petroll, W. Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) can stimulate corneal keratocyte spreading and migration within 3-D collagen matrices, without inducing transformation to a contractile, fibroblastic phenotype. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in regulating PDGF-induced changes in keratocyte motility and mechanical differentiation. Rabbit corneal keratocytes were isolated and cultured in serum-free media (S-) to maintain their quiescent phenotype. A nested collagen matrix construct was used to assess 3-D cell migration, and a standard collagen matrix model was used to assess cell morphology and cell-mediated matrix contraction. In both cases constructs were cultured in S- supplemented with PDGF, with or without the broad spectrum MMP inhibitors GM6001 or BB-94. After 4 days, f-actin, nuclei and collagen fibrils were imaged using confocal microscopy. To assess sub-cellular mechanical activity (extension and retraction of cell processes), time-lapse DIC imaging was also performed. MT1-MMP expression and MMP-mediated collagen degradation by were also examined. Results demonstrated that neither GM6001 nor BB-94 affected corneal keratocyte viability or proliferation in 3-D culture. PDGF stimulated elongation and migration of corneal keratocytes within type I collagen matrices, without causing a loss of their dendritic morphology or inducing formation of intracellular stress fibers. Treatment with GM6001 and BB-94 inhibited PDGF-induced keratocyte spreading and migration. Relatively low levels of keratocyte-induced matrix contraction were also maintained in PDGF, and the amount of PDGF-induced collagen degradation was similar to that observed in S- controls. The collagen degradation pattern was consistent with membrane-associated MMP activity, and keratocytes showed positive staining for MT1-MMP, albeit weak. Both matrix contraction and collagen degradation were reduced by MMP inhibition. For most

  5. Neocartilage formation from mesenchymal stem cells grown in type II collagen-hyaluronan composite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Hsi-Yi; Lin, Ting-Yu; Lin, Chen-Huan; Yen, B Linju; Tsai, Ching-Lin; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) collagen type II-hyaluronan (HA) composite scaffolds (CII-HA) which mimics the extracellular environment of natural cartilage were fabricated in this study. Rheological measurements demonstrated that the incorporation of HA increased the compression modulus of the scaffolds. An initial in vitro evaluation showed that scaffolds seeded with porcine chondrocytes formed cartilaginous-like tissue after 8 weeks, and HA functioned to promote the growth of chondrocytes into scaffolds. Placenta-derived multipotent cells (PDMC) and gingival fibroblasts (GF) were seeded on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), CII-HA films, and small intestinal submucosa (SIS) sheets for comparing their chondrogenesis differentiation potentials with those of adipose-derived adult stem cells (ADAS) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC). Among different cells, PDMC showed the greatest chondrogenic differentiation potential on both CII-HA films and SIS sheets upon TGF-β3 induction, followed by GF. This was evidenced by the up-regulation of chondrogenic genes (Sox9, aggrecan, and collagen type II), which was not observed for cells grown on TCPS. This finding suggested the essential role of substrate materials in the chondrogenic differentiation of PDMC and GF. Neocartilage formation was more obvious in both PDMC and GF cells plated on CII-HA composite scaffolds vs. 8-layer SIS at 28 days in vitro. Finally, implantation of PDMC/CII-HA constructs into NOD-SCID mice confirmed the formation of tissue-engineered cartilage in vivo.

  6. 3D printed PLA-based scaffolds: a versatile tool in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Serra, Tiziano; Mateos-Timoneda, Miguel A; Planell, Josep A; Navarro, Melba

    2013-10-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP), also known as additive manufacturing (AM), has been well received and adopted in the biomedical field. The capacity of this family of techniques to fabricate customized 3D structures with complex geometries and excellent reproducibility has revolutionized implantology and regenerative medicine. In particular, nozzle-based systems allow the fabrication of high-resolution polylactic acid (PLA) structures that are of interest in regenerative medicine. These 3D structures find interesting applications in the regenerative medicine field where promising applications including biodegradable templates for tissue regeneration purposes, 3D in vitro platforms for studying cell response to different scaffolds conditions and for drug screening are considered among others. Scaffolds functionality depends not only on the fabrication technique, but also on the material used to build the 3D structure, the geometry and inner architecture of the structure, and the final surface properties. All being crucial parameters affecting scaffolds success. This Commentary emphasizes the importance of these parameters in scaffolds' fabrication and also draws the attention toward the versatility of these PLA scaffolds as a potential tool in regenerative medicine and other medical fields.

  7. Development of melt electrohydrodynamic 3D printing for complex microscale poly (ε-caprolactone) scaffolds.

    PubMed

    He, Jiankang; Xia, Peng; Li, Dichen

    2016-01-01

    The replication of native hierarchical structures into synthetic scaffolds is important to direct cell growth and tissue regeneration. However, most of the existing scaffold strategies lack the capability to simultaneously realize the controlled fabrication of macroscopic geometries as well as microscale architectures with the scale similar to living cells. Here we developed a melt electrohydrodynamic printing platform and verified its feasibility to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) tissue-engineered scaffolds with complex curved geometries and microscale fibrous structures. Melting temperature was studied to stably print poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) filaments with the size of about 10 μm, which was precisely stacked into 3D straight walls with fine surface quality. By adjusting stage moving speed and directions, 3D PCL scaffolds with curved contours and predefined fiber orientations or spacing were successfully printed. Biological experiments showed that the printed microscale scaffolds had good biocompatibility and facilitated cellular proliferation and alignment in vitro. It is envisioned that the melt electrohydrodynamic printing can potentially provide an innovative tool to fabricate hierarchical scaffolds that mimic the native tissue architectures in a multiscale level. PMID:27490377

  8. Development of melt electrohydrodynamic 3D printing for complex microscale poly (ε-caprolactone) scaffolds.

    PubMed

    He, Jiankang; Xia, Peng; Li, Dichen

    2016-01-01

    The replication of native hierarchical structures into synthetic scaffolds is important to direct cell growth and tissue regeneration. However, most of the existing scaffold strategies lack the capability to simultaneously realize the controlled fabrication of macroscopic geometries as well as microscale architectures with the scale similar to living cells. Here we developed a melt electrohydrodynamic printing platform and verified its feasibility to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) tissue-engineered scaffolds with complex curved geometries and microscale fibrous structures. Melting temperature was studied to stably print poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) filaments with the size of about 10 μm, which was precisely stacked into 3D straight walls with fine surface quality. By adjusting stage moving speed and directions, 3D PCL scaffolds with curved contours and predefined fiber orientations or spacing were successfully printed. Biological experiments showed that the printed microscale scaffolds had good biocompatibility and facilitated cellular proliferation and alignment in vitro. It is envisioned that the melt electrohydrodynamic printing can potentially provide an innovative tool to fabricate hierarchical scaffolds that mimic the native tissue architectures in a multiscale level.

  9. Development of a 3D polymer reinforced calcium phosphate cement scaffold for cranial bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alge, Daniel L.

    The repair of critical-sized cranial bone defects represents an important clinical challenge. The limitations of autografts and alloplastic materials make a bone tissue engineering strategy desirable, but success depends on the development of an appropriate scaffold. Key scaffold properties include biocompatibility, osteoconductivity, sufficient strength to maintain its structure, and resorbability. Furthermore, amenability to rapid prototyping fabrication methods is desirable, as these approaches offer precise control over scaffold architecture and have the potential for customization. While calcium phosphate cements meet many of these criteria due to their composition and their injectability, which can be leveraged for scaffold fabrication via indirect casting, their mechanical properties are a major limitation. Thus, the overall goal of this work was to develop a 3D polymer reinforced calcium phosphate cement scaffold for use in cranial bone tissue engineering. Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) setting cements are of particular interest because of their excellent resorbability. We demonstrated for the first time that DCPD cement can be prepared from monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM)/hydroxyapatite (HA) mixtures. However, subsequent characterization revealed that MCPM/HA cements rapidly convert to HA during degradation, which is undesirable and led us to choose a more conventional formulation for scaffold fabrication. In addition, we developed a novel method for calcium phosphate cement reinforcement that is based on infiltrating a pre-set cement structure with a polymer, and then crosslinking the polymer in situ. Unlike prior methods of cement reinforcement, this method can be applied to the reinforcement of 3D scaffolds fabricated by indirect casting. Using our novel method, composites of poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) reinforced DCPD were prepared and demonstrated as excellent candidate scaffold materials, as they had increased strength and ductility

  10. Urethral tissue regeneration using collagen scaffold modified with collagen binding VEGF in a beagle model.

    PubMed

    Jia, Weisheng; Tang, He; Wu, Jianjian; Hou, Xianglin; Chen, Bing; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Yannan; Shi, Chunying; Zhou, Feng; Yu, Wei; Huang, Shengquan; Ye, Gang; Dai, Jianwu

    2015-11-01

    Extensive urethral defects have a serious impact on quality of life, and treatment is challenging. A shortage of material for reconstruction is a key limitation. Improving the properties of biomaterials and making them suitable for urethral reconstruction will be helpful. Previously, we constructed a fusion protein, collagen-binding VEGF (CBD-VEGF), which can bind to collagen scaffold, stimulate cell proliferation, and promote angiogenesis and tissue regeneration. We proposed that CBD-VEGF could improve the performance of collagen in reconstruction of extensive urethral defects. Our results showed that collagen scaffolds modified with CBD-VEGF could promote urethral tissue regeneration and improve the function of the neo-urethra in a beagle extensive urethral defect model. Thus, modifying biomaterials with bioactive factors provides an alternative strategy for the production of suitable biomaterials for urethral reconstruction.

  11. Bottom-up topography assembly into 3D porous scaffold to mediate cell activities.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Delin; Hou, Jie; Hao, Lijing; Cao, Xiaodong; Gao, Huichang; Fu, Xiaoling; Wang, Yingjun

    2016-08-01

    Native cells live in a three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) capable of regulating cell activities through various physical and chemical factors. Designed topographies have been well proven to trigger significant difference in cell behaviours. However, present topographies are almost all constructed on two-dimensional (2D) substrates like discs and films, which are far from features like 3D and porosity required in application like bone repair. Here we bottom-up assembled poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/calcium carbonate (PLGA/CC) microspheres with superficial porous topography intactly into a 3D porous scaffold. Because the scaffold was obtained through a mild technique, the bioactivity of released BMP-2 was well retained. Mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (mMSCs) were cultured on produced scaffolds having different 3D topographies. It turned out that osteogenic differentiation of mMSCs did respond to the 3D topographies, while proliferation didn't. Gene expression of αv and β1 integrins revealed that adhesion was supposed to be the underlying mechanism for osteogenic response. The study provides insight into enhancing function of practical scaffolds by elaborate topography design. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1056-1063, 2016.

  12. A multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold prepared by 3D printing and NFES technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Feifei; Liu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Haiping; Zhang, Fuhua; Zheng, Lulu; Hu, Qingxi

    2014-03-01

    The current focus in the field of life science is the use of tissue engineering scaffolds to repair human organs, which has shown great potential in clinical applications. Extracellular matrix morphology and the performance and internal structure of natural organs are required to meet certain requirements. Therefore, integrating multiple processes can effectively overcome the limitations of the individual processes and can take into account the needs of scaffolds for the material, structure, mechanical properties and many other aspects. This study combined the biological 3D printing technology and the near-field electro-spinning (NFES) process to prepare a multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold. While using 3D printing technology to directly prepare the macro-scaffold, the compositing NFES process to build tissue micro-morphology ultimately formed a tissue engineering scaffold which has the specific extracellular matrix structure. This scaffold not only takes into account the material, structure, performance and many other requirements, but also focuses on resolving the controllability problems in macro- and micro-forming which further aim to induce cell directed differentiation, reproduction and, ultimately, the formation of target tissue organs. It has in-depth immeasurable significance to build ideal scaffolds and further promote the application of tissue engineering.

  13. Effect of sterilization on structural and material properties of 3-D silk fibroin scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Sandra; Stok, Kathryn S; Kohler, Thomas; Meinel, Anne J; Müller, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    The development of porous scaffolds for tissue engineering applications requires the careful choice of properties, as these influence cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Sterilization of scaffolds is a prerequisite for in vitro culture as well as for subsequent in vivo implantation. The variety of methods used to provide sterility is as diverse as the possible effects they can have on the structural and material properties of the three-dimensional (3-D) porous structure, especially in polymeric or proteinous scaffold materials. Silk fibroin (SF) has previously been demonstrated to offer exceptional benefits over conventional synthetic and natural biomaterials in generating scaffolds for tissue replacements. This study sought to determine the effect of sterilization methods, such as autoclaving, heat-, ethylene oxide-, ethanol- or antibiotic-antimycotic treatment, on porous 3-D SF scaffolds. In terms of scaffold morphology, topography, crystallinity and short-term cell viability, the different sterilization methods showed only few effects. Nevertheless, mechanical properties were significantly decreased by a factor of two by all methods except for dry autoclaving, which seemed not to affect mechanical properties compared to the native control group. These data suggest that SF scaffolds are in general highly resistant to various sterilization treatments. Nevertheless, care should be taken if initial mechanical properties are of interest.

  14. Chitosan-collagen/organomontmorillonite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xianshuo; Wang, Jun; Liu, Min; Chen, Yong; Cao, Yang; Yu, Xiaolong

    2015-12-01

    A novel composite scaffold based on chitosan-collagen/organomontmorillonite (CS-COL/OMMT) was prepared to improve swelling ratio, biodegradation ratio, biomineralization and mechanical properties for use in tissue engineering applications. In order to expend the basal spacing, montmorillonite (MMT) was modified with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and was characterized by XRD, TGA and FTIR. The results indicated that the anionic surfactants entered into interlayer of MMT and the basal spacing of MMT was expanded to 3.85 nm. The prepared composite scaffolds were characterized by FTIR, XRD and SEM. The swelling ratio, biodegradation ratio and mechanical properties of composite scaffolds were also studied. The results demonstrated that the scaffold decreased swelling ratio, degradation ratio and improved mechanical and biomineralization properties because of OMMT.

  15. Evaluating 3D Printed Biomaterials as Scaffolds for Vascularized Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Martha O.; Vorwald, Charlotte E.; Dreher, Maureen L.; Mott, Eric J.; Cheng, Ming-Huei; Cinar, Ali; Mehdizadeh, Hamidreza; Somo, Sami; Dean, David; Brey, Eric M.; Fisher, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The recent proliferation of three dimensional (3D) printing technologies has allowed the exploration of increasing complex designs, and, furthermore, the consideration of 3D printed constructs for biological applications. However, there is an unmet need for a consistent set of tools for the design and evaluation of these biological 3D printed constructs, particularly as they relate to engineered tissues. For example, identifying the most advantageous construct parameters for the rapid vascularization of an engineered tissue - a critical parameter in regenerative medicine - is difficult without a common group of measures. We demonstrate here a toolbox to design, characterize, and evaluate 3D printed scaffolds for vascularized tissue regenerative medicine. Our toolbox (1) identifies the range of design specifications using a modular design, (2) nondestructively compares the 3D printed scaffolds to the design, (3) evaluates biocompatibility and mechanical properties, and (4) predicts host vessel integration. As a case study, we designed, fabricated, and evaluated polymer scaffolds using a poly(propylene fumarate) based resin. Our work highlights the potential for these tools to be combined as a consistent methodology for the evaluation of porous 3D printed constructs for regenerative medicine. PMID:25387454

  16. Micro-CT studies on 3-D bioactive glass-ceramic scaffolds for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Renghini, Chiara; Komlev, Vladimir; Fiori, Fabrizio; Verné, Enrica; Baino, Francesco; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was the preparation and characterization of bioactive glass-ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. For this purpose, a glass belonging to the system SiO2-P2O5-CaO-MgO-Na2O-K2O (CEL2) was used. The sponge-replication method was adopted to prepare the scaffolds; specifically, a polymeric skeleton was impregnated with a slurry containing CEL2 powder, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as a binding agent and distilled water. The impregnated sponge was then thermally treated to remove the polymeric phase and to sinter the inorganic one. The obtained scaffolds possessed an open and interconnected porosity, analogous to cancellous bone texture, and with a mechanical strength above 2 MPa. Moreover, the scaffolds underwent partial bioresorption due to ion-leaching phenomena. This feature was investigated by X-ray computed microcomputed tomography (micro-CT). Micro-CT is a three-dimensional (3-D) radiographic imaging technique, able to achieve a spatial resolution close to 1 microm(3). The use of synchrotron radiation allows the selected photon energy to be tuned to optimize the contrast among the different phases in the investigated samples. The 3-D scaffolds were soaked in a simulated body fluid (SBF) to study the formation of hydroxyapatite microcrystals on the scaffold struts and on the internal pore walls. The 3-D scaffolds were also soaked in a buffer solution (Tris-HCl) for different times to assess the scaffold bioresorption according to the ISO standard. A gradual resorption of the pores walls was observed during the soakings both in SBF and in Tris-HCl.

  17. 3D in vitro bioengineered tumors based on collagen I hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Szot, Christopher S.; Buchanan, Cara F.; Freeman, Joseph W.; Rylander, Marissa N.

    2011-01-01

    Cells cultured within a three-dimensional (3D) in vitro environment have the ability to acquire phenotypes and respond to stimuli analogous to in vivo biological systems. This approach has been utilized in tissue engineering and can also be applied to the development of a physiologically relevant in vitro tumor model. In this study, collagen I hydrogels cultured with MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells were bioengineered as a platform for in vitro solid tumor development. The cell–cell and cell-matrix interactions present during in vivo tissue progression were encouraged within the 3D hydrogel architecture, and the biocompatibility of collagen I supported unconfined cellular proliferation. The development of necrosis beyond a depth of ~150–200 μm and the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α were demonstrated in the in vitro bioengineered tumors. Oxygen and nutrient diffusion limitations through the collagen I matrix as well as competition for available nutrients resulted in growing levels of intra-cellular hypoxia, quantified by a statistically significant (p < 0.01) upregulation of HIF-1α gene expression. The bioengineered tumors also demonstrated promising angiogenic potential with a statistically significant (p < 0.001) upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A gene expression. In addition, comparable gene expression analysis demonstrated a statistically significant increase of HIF-1α (p < 0.05) and VEGF-A (p < 0.001) by MDA-MB-231 cells cultured in the 3D collagen I hydrogels compared to cells cultured in a monolayer on two-dimensional tissue culture polystyrene. The results presented in this study demonstrate the capacity of collagen I hydrogels to facilitate the development of 3D in vitro bioengineered tumors that are representative of the pre-vascularized stages of in vivo solid tumor progression. PMID:21782234

  18. Mesoporous bioactive glass nanolayer-functionalized 3D-printed scaffolds for accelerating osteogenesis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yali; Xia, Lunguo; Zhai, Dong; Shi, Mengchao; Luo, Yongxiang; Feng, Chun; Fang, Bing; Yin, Jingbo; Chang, Jiang; Wu, Chengtie

    2015-12-01

    The hierarchical microstructure, surface and interface of biomaterials are important factors influencing their bioactivity. Porous bioceramic scaffolds have been widely used for bone tissue engineering by optimizing their chemical composition and large-pore structure. However, the surface and interface of struts in bioceramic scaffolds are often ignored. The aim of this study is to incorporate hierarchical pores and bioactive components into the bioceramic scaffolds by constructing nanopores and bioactive elements on the struts of scaffolds and further improve their bone-forming activity. Mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG) modified β-tricalcium phosphate (MBG-β-TCP) scaffolds with a hierarchical pore structure and a functional strut surface (∼100 nm of MBG nanolayer) were successfully prepared via 3D printing and spin coating. The compressive strength and apatite-mineralization ability of MBG-β-TCP scaffolds were significantly enhanced as compared to β-TCP scaffolds without the MBG nanolayer. The attachment, viability, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, osteogenic gene expression (Runx2, BMP2, OPN and Col I) and protein expression (OPN, Col I, VEGF, HIF-1α) of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) as well as the attachment, viability and angiogenic gene expression (VEGF and HIF-1α) of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in MBG-β-TCP scaffolds were significantly upregulated compared with conventional bioactive glass (BG)-modified β-TCP (BG-β-TCP) and pure β-TCP scaffolds. Furthermore, MBG-β-TCP scaffolds significantly enhanced the formation of new bone in vivo as compared to BG-β-TCP and β-TCP scaffolds. The results suggest that application of the MBG nanolayer to modify 3D-printed bioceramic scaffolds offers a new strategy to construct hierarchically porous scaffolds with significantly improved physicochemical and biological properties, such as mechanical properties, osteogenesis, angiogenesis and protein expression for bone tissue

  19. Mesoporous bioactive glass nanolayer-functionalized 3D-printed scaffolds for accelerating osteogenesis and angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yali; Xia, Lunguo; Zhai, Dong; Shi, Mengchao; Luo, Yongxiang; Feng, Chun; Fang, Bing; Yin, Jingbo; Chang, Jiang; Wu, Chengtie

    2015-11-01

    The hierarchical microstructure, surface and interface of biomaterials are important factors influencing their bioactivity. Porous bioceramic scaffolds have been widely used for bone tissue engineering by optimizing their chemical composition and large-pore structure. However, the surface and interface of struts in bioceramic scaffolds are often ignored. The aim of this study is to incorporate hierarchical pores and bioactive components into the bioceramic scaffolds by constructing nanopores and bioactive elements on the struts of scaffolds and further improve their bone-forming activity. Mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG) modified β-tricalcium phosphate (MBG-β-TCP) scaffolds with a hierarchical pore structure and a functional strut surface (~100 nm of MBG nanolayer) were successfully prepared via 3D printing and spin coating. The compressive strength and apatite-mineralization ability of MBG-β-TCP scaffolds were significantly enhanced as compared to β-TCP scaffolds without the MBG nanolayer. The attachment, viability, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, osteogenic gene expression (Runx2, BMP2, OPN and Col I) and protein expression (OPN, Col I, VEGF, HIF-1α) of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) as well as the attachment, viability and angiogenic gene expression (VEGF and HIF-1α) of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in MBG-β-TCP scaffolds were significantly upregulated compared with conventional bioactive glass (BG)-modified β-TCP (BG-β-TCP) and pure β-TCP scaffolds. Furthermore, MBG-β-TCP scaffolds significantly enhanced the formation of new bone in vivo as compared to BG-β-TCP and β-TCP scaffolds. The results suggest that application of the MBG nanolayer to modify 3D-printed bioceramic scaffolds offers a new strategy to construct hierarchically porous scaffolds with significantly improved physicochemical and biological properties, such as mechanical properties, osteogenesis, angiogenesis and protein expression for bone tissue

  20. Mesoporous bioactive glass nanolayer-functionalized 3D-printed scaffolds for accelerating osteogenesis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yali; Xia, Lunguo; Zhai, Dong; Shi, Mengchao; Luo, Yongxiang; Feng, Chun; Fang, Bing; Yin, Jingbo; Chang, Jiang; Wu, Chengtie

    2015-12-01

    The hierarchical microstructure, surface and interface of biomaterials are important factors influencing their bioactivity. Porous bioceramic scaffolds have been widely used for bone tissue engineering by optimizing their chemical composition and large-pore structure. However, the surface and interface of struts in bioceramic scaffolds are often ignored. The aim of this study is to incorporate hierarchical pores and bioactive components into the bioceramic scaffolds by constructing nanopores and bioactive elements on the struts of scaffolds and further improve their bone-forming activity. Mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG) modified β-tricalcium phosphate (MBG-β-TCP) scaffolds with a hierarchical pore structure and a functional strut surface (∼100 nm of MBG nanolayer) were successfully prepared via 3D printing and spin coating. The compressive strength and apatite-mineralization ability of MBG-β-TCP scaffolds were significantly enhanced as compared to β-TCP scaffolds without the MBG nanolayer. The attachment, viability, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, osteogenic gene expression (Runx2, BMP2, OPN and Col I) and protein expression (OPN, Col I, VEGF, HIF-1α) of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) as well as the attachment, viability and angiogenic gene expression (VEGF and HIF-1α) of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in MBG-β-TCP scaffolds were significantly upregulated compared with conventional bioactive glass (BG)-modified β-TCP (BG-β-TCP) and pure β-TCP scaffolds. Furthermore, MBG-β-TCP scaffolds significantly enhanced the formation of new bone in vivo as compared to BG-β-TCP and β-TCP scaffolds. The results suggest that application of the MBG nanolayer to modify 3D-printed bioceramic scaffolds offers a new strategy to construct hierarchically porous scaffolds with significantly improved physicochemical and biological properties, such as mechanical properties, osteogenesis, angiogenesis and protein expression for bone tissue

  1. Electroactive biomimetic collagen-silver nanowire composite scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickham, Abeni; Vagin, Mikhail; Khalaf, Hazem; Bertazzo, Sergio; Hodder, Peter; Dånmark, Staffan; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Altimiras, Jordi; Aili, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Electroactive biomaterials are widely explored as bioelectrodes and as scaffolds for neural and cardiac regeneration. Most electrodes and conductive scaffolds for tissue regeneration are based on synthetic materials that have limited biocompatibility and often display large discrepancies in mechanical properties with the surrounding tissue causing problems during tissue integration and regeneration. This work shows the development of a biomimetic nanocomposite material prepared from self-assembled collagen fibrils and silver nanowires (AgNW). Despite consisting of mostly type I collagen fibrils, the homogeneously embedded AgNWs provide these materials with a charge storage capacity of about 2.3 mC cm-2 and a charge injection capacity of 0.3 mC cm-2, which is on par with bioelectrodes used in the clinic. The mechanical properties of the materials are similar to soft tissues with a dynamic elastic modulus within the lower kPa range. The nanocomposites also support proliferation of embryonic cardiomyocytes while inhibiting the growth of both Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis. The developed collagen/AgNW composites thus represent a highly attractive bioelectrode and scaffold material for a wide range of biomedical applications.Electroactive biomaterials are widely explored as bioelectrodes and as scaffolds for neural and cardiac regeneration. Most electrodes and conductive scaffolds for tissue regeneration are based on synthetic materials that have limited biocompatibility and often display large discrepancies in mechanical properties with the surrounding tissue causing problems during tissue integration and regeneration. This work shows the development of a biomimetic nanocomposite material prepared from self-assembled collagen fibrils and silver nanowires (AgNW). Despite consisting of mostly type I collagen fibrils, the homogeneously embedded AgNWs provide these materials with a charge storage capacity of about 2.3 mC cm-2

  2. Collagen scaffolds reinforced with biomimetic composite nano-sized carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite crystals and shaped by rapid prototyping to contain internal microchannels.

    PubMed

    Sachlos, Eleftherios; Gotora, Duce; Czernuszka, Jan T

    2006-09-01

    The next generation of tissue engineering scaffolds will be made to accommodate blood vessels and nutrient channels to support cell survival deep in the interior of the scaffolds. To this end, we have developed a method that incorporates microchannels to permit the flow of nutrient-rich media through collagen-based scaffolds. The scaffold matrix comprises nano-sized carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals internally precipitated in collagen fibers. The scaffold therefore mimics many of the features found in bone. A biomimetic precipitation technique is used whereby a collagen membrane separates reservoirs of calcium and phosphate solutions. The collision of calcium and phosphate ions diffusing from opposite directions results in the precipitation of mineral within the collagen membrane. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed the dimension of the mineral crystals to be approximately 180 x 80 x 20 nm, indicating that the crystals reside in the intermicrofibril gaps. Electron diffraction indicated that the mineral was in the HA phase, and infrared spectroscopy confirmed type A carbonate substitution. The collagen-HA membrane is then used to make 3-dimensional (3D) scaffolds: the membrane is shredded and mixed in an aqueous-based collagen dispersion and processed using the critical point drying method. Adjusting the pH of the dispersion to 5.0 before mixing the composite component preserved the nano-sized carbonate-substituted HA crystals. Branching and interconnecting microchannels in the interior of the scaffolds are made with a sacrificial mold manufactured by using a 3D wax printer. The 3D wax printer has been modified to print the mold from biocompatible materials. Appropriately sized microchannels within collagen-HA scaffolds brings us closer to fulfilling the mass transport requirements for osteogenic cells living deep within the scaffold.

  3. Fabrication of computationally designed scaffolds by low temperature 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Castilho, Miguel; Dias, Marta; Gbureck, Uwe; Groll, Jürgen; Fernandes, Paulo; Pires, Inês; Gouveia, Barbara; Rodrigues, Jorge; Vorndran, Elke

    2013-09-01

    The development of artificial bone substitutes that mimic the properties of bone and simultaneously promote the desired tissue regeneration is a current issue in bone tissue engineering research. An approach to create scaffolds with such characteristics is based on the combination of novel design and additive manufacturing processes. The objective of this work is to characterize the microstructural and the mechanical properties of scaffolds developed by coupling both topology optimization and a low temperature 3D printing process. The scaffold design was obtained using a topology optimization approach to maximize the permeability with constraints on the mechanical properties. This procedure was studied to be suitable for the fabrication of a cage prototype for tibial tuberosity advancement application, which is one of the most recent and promising techniques to treat cruciate ligament rupture in dogs. The microstructural and mechanical properties of the scaffolds manufactured by reacting α/β-tricalcium phosphate with diluted phosphoric acid were then assessed experimentally and the scaffolds strength reliability was determined. The results demonstrate that the low temperature 3D printing process is a reliable option to create synthetic scaffolds with tailored properties, and when coupled with topology optimization design it can be a powerful tool for the fabrication of patient-specific bone implants. PMID:23887064

  4. Engineering EMT using 3D micro-scaffold to promote hepatic functions for drug hepatotoxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyu; Chen, Fengling; Liu, Longwei; Qi, Chunxiao; Wang, Bingjie; Yan, Xiaojun; Huang, Chenyu; Hou, Wei; Zhang, Michael Q; Chen, Yang; Du, Yanan

    2016-06-01

    Accompanied by decreased hepatic functions, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) was observed in two dimensional (2D) cultured hepatocytes with elongated morphology, loss of polarity and weakened cell-cell interaction, while upgrading to 3D culture has been considered as significant improvement of its 2D counterpart for hepatocyte maintenance. Here we hypothesize that 3D culture enhances hepatic functions through regulating the EMT status. Biomaterial-engineered EMT was achieved by culturing HepaRG as 3D spheroids (SP-3D) or 3D stretched cells (ST-3D) in non-adherent and adherent micro-scaffold respectively. In SP-3D, constrained EMT of HepaRG, a hepatic stem cell line, as represented by increased epithelial markers and decreased mesenchymal markers, was echoed by improved hepatic functions. To investigate the relationship between EMT status and hepatic functions, time-series RNA-Seq and gene network analysis were used for comparing different cell culture models, which identified histone deacetylases (HDACs) as key mediating factors. Protein analysis confirmed that high HDAC activity was correlated with high expression of Cadherin-1 (CDH1) and hepatic function genes, which were decreased upon HDAC inhibitor treatment in SP-3D, suggesting HDACs may play positive role in regulating EMT and hepatic functions. To illustrate the application of 3D micro-scaffold culture in drug safety evaluation, hepatotoxicity and metabolism assays of two hepatotoxins (i.e. N-acetyl-p-aminophenol and Doxorubicin) were performed and SP-3D showed more biomimetic toxicity response, indicating regulation of EMT as a vital consideration in designing 3D hepatocyte culture configuration.

  5. Fabrication of electrospun poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone)/collagen nanoyarn network as a novel, three-dimensional, macroporous, aligned scaffold for tendon tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuan; Wu, Jinglei; Wang, Haoming; Li, Hanqin; Di, Ning; Song, Lei; Li, Sontao; Li, Dianwei; Xiang, Yang; Liu, Wei; Mo, Xiumei; Zhou, Qiang

    2013-12-01

    Tissue engineering techniques using novel scaffolding materials offer potential alternatives for managing tendon disorders. An ideal tendon tissue engineered scaffold should mimic the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) of the native tendon. Here, we propose a novel electrospun nanoyarn network that is morphologically and structurally similar to the ECM of native tendon tissues. The nanoyarn, random nanofiber, and aligned nanofiber scaffolds of a synthetic biodegradable polymer, poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) [P(LLA-CL)], and natural collagen I complex were fabricated using electrospinning. These scaffolds were characterized in terms of fiber morphology, pore size, porosity, and chemical and mechanical properties for the purpose of culturing tendon cells (TCs) for tendon tissue engineering. The results indicated a fiber diameter of 632 ± 81 nm for the random nanofiber scaffold, 643 ± 97 nm for the aligned nanofiber scaffold, and 641 ± 68 nm for the nanoyarn scaffold. The yarn in the nanoyarn scaffold was twisted by many nanofibers similar to the structure and inherent nanoscale organization of tendons, indicating an increase in the diameter of 9.51 ± 3.62 μm. The nanoyarn scaffold also contained 3D aligned microstructures with large interconnected pores and high porosity. Fourier transform infrared analyses revealed the presence of collagen in the three scaffolds. The mechanical properties of the sample scaffolds indicated that the scaffolds had desirable mechanical properties for tissue regeneration. Further, the results revealed that TC proliferation and infiltration, and the expression of tendon-related ECM genes, were significantly enhanced on the nanoyarn scaffold compared with that on the random nanofiber and aligned nanofiber scaffolds. This study demonstrates that electrospun P(LLA-CL)/collagen nanoyarn is a novel, 3D, macroporous, aligned scaffold that has potential application in tendon tissue engineering.

  6. Fabrication of Electrospun Poly(L-Lactide-co-ɛ-Caprolactone)/Collagen Nanoyarn Network as a Novel, Three-Dimensional, Macroporous, Aligned Scaffold for Tendon Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuan; Wu, Jinglei; Wang, Haoming; Li, Hanqin; Di, Ning; Song, Lei; Li, Sontao; Li, Dianwei; Xiang, Yang; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering techniques using novel scaffolding materials offer potential alternatives for managing tendon disorders. An ideal tendon tissue engineered scaffold should mimic the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) of the native tendon. Here, we propose a novel electrospun nanoyarn network that is morphologically and structurally similar to the ECM of native tendon tissues. The nanoyarn, random nanofiber, and aligned nanofiber scaffolds of a synthetic biodegradable polymer, poly(l-lactide-co-ɛ-caprolactone) [P(LLA-CL)], and natural collagen I complex were fabricated using electrospinning. These scaffolds were characterized in terms of fiber morphology, pore size, porosity, and chemical and mechanical properties for the purpose of culturing tendon cells (TCs) for tendon tissue engineering. The results indicated a fiber diameter of 632±81 nm for the random nanofiber scaffold, 643±97 nm for the aligned nanofiber scaffold, and 641±68 nm for the nanoyarn scaffold. The yarn in the nanoyarn scaffold was twisted by many nanofibers similar to the structure and inherent nanoscale organization of tendons, indicating an increase in the diameter of 9.51±3.62 μm. The nanoyarn scaffold also contained 3D aligned microstructures with large interconnected pores and high porosity. Fourier transform infrared analyses revealed the presence of collagen in the three scaffolds. The mechanical properties of the sample scaffolds indicated that the scaffolds had desirable mechanical properties for tissue regeneration. Further, the results revealed that TC proliferation and infiltration, and the expression of tendon-related ECM genes, were significantly enhanced on the nanoyarn scaffold compared with that on the random nanofiber and aligned nanofiber scaffolds. This study demonstrates that electrospun P(LLA-CL)/collagen nanoyarn is a novel, 3D, macroporous, aligned scaffold that has potential application in tendon tissue engineering

  7. Preparation of 3D fibrin scaffolds for stem cell culture applications.

    PubMed

    Kolehmainen, Kathleen; Willerth, Stephanie M

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are found in naturally occurring 3D microenvironments in vivo, which are often referred to as the stem cell niche. Culturing stem cells inside of 3D biomaterial scaffolds provides a way to accurately mimic these microenvironments, providing an advantage over traditional 2D culture methods using polystyrene as well as a method for engineering replacement tissues. While 2D tissue culture polystrene has been used for the majority of cell culture experiments, 3D biomaterial scaffolds can more closely replicate the microenvironments found in vivo by enabling more accurate establishment of cell polarity in the environment and possessing biochemical and mechanical properties similar to soft tissue. A variety of naturally derived and synthetic biomaterial scaffolds have been investigated as 3D environments for supporting stem cell growth. While synthetic scaffolds can be synthesized to have a greater range of mechanical and chemical properties and often have greater reproducibility, natural biomaterials are often composed of proteins and polysaccharides found in the extracelluar matrix and as a result contain binding sites for cell adhesion and readily support cell culture. Fibrin scaffolds, produced by polymerizing the protein fibrinogen obtained from plasma, have been widely investigated for a variety of tissue engineering applications both in vitro and in vivo. Such scaffolds can be modified using a variety of methods to incorporate controlled release systems for delivering therapeutic factors. Previous work has shown that such scaffolds can be used to successfully culture embryonic stem cells and this scaffold-based culture system can be used to screen the effects of various growth factors on the differentiation of the stem cells seeded inside. This protocol details the process of polymerizing fibrin scaffolds from fibrinogen solutions using the enzymatic activity of thrombin. The process takes 2 days to complete, including an overnight dialysis step for the

  8. Preparation of 3D Fibrin Scaffolds for Stem Cell Culture Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kolehmainen, Kathleen; Willerth, Stephanie M.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are found in naturally occurring 3D microenvironments in vivo, which are often referred to as the stem cell niche 1. Culturing stem cells inside of 3D biomaterial scaffolds provides a way to accurately mimic these microenvironments, providing an advantage over traditional 2D culture methods using polystyrene as well as a method for engineering replacement tissues 2. While 2D tissue culture polystrene has been used for the majority of cell culture experiments, 3D biomaterial scaffolds can more closely replicate the microenvironments found in vivo by enabling more accurate establishment of cell polarity in the environment and possessing biochemical and mechanical properties similar to soft tissue.3 A variety of naturally derived and synthetic biomaterial scaffolds have been investigated as 3D environments for supporting stem cell growth. While synthetic scaffolds can be synthesized to have a greater range of mechanical and chemical properties and often have greater reproducibility, natural biomaterials are often composed of proteins and polysaccharides found in the extracelluar matrix and as a result contain binding sites for cell adhesion and readily support cell culture. Fibrin scaffolds, produced by polymerizing the protein fibrinogen obtained from plasma, have been widely investigated for a variety of tissue engineering applications both in vitro and in vivo4. Such scaffolds can be modified using a variety of methods to incorporate controlled release systems for delivering therapeutic factors 5. Previous work has shown that such scaffolds can be used to successfully culture embryonic stem cells and this scaffold-based culture system can be used to screen the effects of various growth factors on the differentiation of the stem cells seeded inside 6,7. This protocol details the process of polymerizing fibrin scaffolds from fibrinogen solutions using the enzymatic activity of thrombin. The process takes 2 days to complete, including an overnight dialysis

  9. Modeling and Reconstruction of Micro-structured 3D Chitosan/Gelatin Porous Scaffolds Using Micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Haibo; Li, Dichen; He, Jiankang; Liu, Yaxiong; Lian, Qin; Zhao, Jinna

    2008-09-01

    Three dimensional (3D) channel networks are the key to promise the uniform distribution of nutrients inside 3D hepatic tissue engineering scaffolds and prompt elimination of metabolic products out of the scaffolds. 3D chitosan/gelatin porous scaffolds with predefined internal channels were fabricated and a combination of light microscope, laser confocal microscopy and micro-CT were employed to characterize the structure of porous scaffolds. In order to evaluate the flow field distribution inside the micro-structured 3D scaffolds, a computer reconstructing method based on Micro-CT was proposed. According to this evaluating method, a contrast between 3D porous scaffolds with and without predefined internal channels was also performed to assess scaffolds' fluid characters. Results showed that the internal channel of the 3D scaffolds formed the 3D fluid channel network; the uniformity of flow field distribution of the scaffolds fabricated in this paper was better than the simple porous scaffold without micro-fluid channels.

  10. Microscale 3D collagen cell culture assays in conventional flat-bottom 384-well plates.

    PubMed

    Leung, Brendan M; Moraes, Christopher; Cavnar, Stephen P; Luker, Kathryn E; Luker, Gary D; Takayama, Shuichi

    2015-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture systems such as cell-laden hydrogels are superior to standard two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures for many drug-screening applications. However, their adoption into high-throughput screening (HTS) has been lagging, in part because of the difficulty of incorporating these culture formats into existing robotic liquid handling and imaging infrastructures. Dispensing cell-laden prepolymer solutions into 2D well plates is a potential solution but typically requires large volumes of reagents to avoid evaporation during polymerization, which (1) increases costs, (2) makes drug penetration variable and (3) complicates imaging. Here we describe a technique to efficiently produce 3D microgels using automated liquid-handling systems and standard, nonpatterned, flat-bottomed, 384-well plates. Sub-millimeter-diameter, cell-laden collagen gels are deposited on the bottom of a ~2.5 mm diameter microwell with no concerns about evaporation or meniscus effects at the edges of wells, using aqueous two-phase system patterning. The microscale cell-laden collagen-gel constructs are readily imaged and readily penetrated by drugs. The cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutics was monitored by bioluminescence and demonstrated that 3D cultures confer chemoresistance as compared with similar 2D cultures. Hence, these data demonstrate the importance of culturing cells in 3D to obtain realistic cellular responses. Overall, this system provides a simple and inexpensive method for integrating 3D culture capability into existing HTS infrastructure. PMID:25510473

  11. 3D-Printed Scaffolds and Biomaterials: Review of Alveolar Bone Augmentation and Periodontal Regeneration Applications

    PubMed Central

    Asa'ad, Farah; Giannì, Aldo Bruno; Giannobile, William V.; Rasperini, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    To ensure a successful dental implant therapy, the presence of adequate vertical and horizontal alveolar bone is fundamental. However, an insufficient amount of alveolar ridge in both dimensions is often encountered in dental practice due to the consequences of oral diseases and tooth loss. Although postextraction socket preservation has been adopted to lessen the need for such invasive approaches, it utilizes bone grafting materials, which have limitations that could negatively affect the quality of bone formation. To overcome the drawbacks of routinely employed grafting materials, bone graft substitutes such as 3D scaffolds have been recently investigated in the dental field. In this review, we highlight different biomaterials suitable for 3D scaffold fabrication, with a focus on “3D-printed” ones as bone graft substitutes that might be convenient for various applications related to implant therapy. We also briefly discuss their possible adoption for periodontal regeneration. PMID:27366149

  12. 3D-Printed Scaffolds and Biomaterials: Review of Alveolar Bone Augmentation and Periodontal Regeneration Applications.

    PubMed

    Asa'ad, Farah; Pagni, Giorgio; Pilipchuk, Sophia P; Giannì, Aldo Bruno; Giannobile, William V; Rasperini, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    To ensure a successful dental implant therapy, the presence of adequate vertical and horizontal alveolar bone is fundamental. However, an insufficient amount of alveolar ridge in both dimensions is often encountered in dental practice due to the consequences of oral diseases and tooth loss. Although postextraction socket preservation has been adopted to lessen the need for such invasive approaches, it utilizes bone grafting materials, which have limitations that could negatively affect the quality of bone formation. To overcome the drawbacks of routinely employed grafting materials, bone graft substitutes such as 3D scaffolds have been recently investigated in the dental field. In this review, we highlight different biomaterials suitable for 3D scaffold fabrication, with a focus on "3D-printed" ones as bone graft substitutes that might be convenient for various applications related to implant therapy. We also briefly discuss their possible adoption for periodontal regeneration. PMID:27366149

  13. Investigation of structural collapse in unidirectionally freeze cast collagen scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Clearfield, Drew; Wei, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Though unidirectional freeze casting is a facile method for the production of structurally anisotropic biomedical scaffolds, challenges exist in optimizing the drying process that are often overlooked. In particular, structural collapse may occur if the material's frozen-state glass transition temperature (Tg') is exceeded. It was discovered that unidirectionally freeze cast collagen matrices were highly deformed following lyophilization, rendering them incapable of further use. In this study, modulated differential scanning calorimetry was performed to identify Tg's of unidirectionally freeze cast collagen scaffolds, and product temperatures during sublimation were recorded. It was observed that cast matrices from 0.5 to 0.05 M acetic acid (HAc) sublimed at a lyophilizer shelf temperature of -25 °C underwent structural collapse and exceeded their Tg's for the majority of the drying cycle. The use of a low pH suspension (0.5 M HAc) promoted the formation of a non-porous surface, which in turn contributed to the increase of the product temperature above its Tg' during drying. This study has revealed that use of a low shelf temperature (-40 °C) and a low HAc concentration (0.05 M) is effective in maintaining product temperatures under Tg' thereby preventing collapse in unidirectionally freeze cast collagen scaffolds.

  14. Investigation of structural collapse in unidirectionally freeze cast collagen scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Clearfield, Drew; Wei, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Though unidirectional freeze casting is a facile method for the production of structurally anisotropic biomedical scaffolds, challenges exist in optimizing the drying process that are often overlooked. In particular, structural collapse may occur if the material's frozen-state glass transition temperature (Tg') is exceeded. It was discovered that unidirectionally freeze cast collagen matrices were highly deformed following lyophilization, rendering them incapable of further use. In this study, modulated differential scanning calorimetry was performed to identify Tg's of unidirectionally freeze cast collagen scaffolds, and product temperatures during sublimation were recorded. It was observed that cast matrices from 0.5 to 0.05 M acetic acid (HAc) sublimed at a lyophilizer shelf temperature of -25 °C underwent structural collapse and exceeded their Tg's for the majority of the drying cycle. The use of a low pH suspension (0.5 M HAc) promoted the formation of a non-porous surface, which in turn contributed to the increase of the product temperature above its Tg' during drying. This study has revealed that use of a low shelf temperature (-40 °C) and a low HAc concentration (0.05 M) is effective in maintaining product temperatures under Tg' thereby preventing collapse in unidirectionally freeze cast collagen scaffolds. PMID:26676861

  15. Electroactive biomimetic collagen-silver nanowire composite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wickham, Abeni; Vagin, Mikhail; Khalaf, Hazem; Bertazzo, Sergio; Hodder, Peter; Dånmark, Staffan; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Altimiras, Jordi; Aili, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Electroactive biomaterials are widely explored as bioelectrodes and as scaffolds for neural and cardiac regeneration. Most electrodes and conductive scaffolds for tissue regeneration are based on synthetic materials that have limited biocompatibility and often display large discrepancies in mechanical properties with the surrounding tissue causing problems during tissue integration and regeneration. This work shows the development of a biomimetic nanocomposite material prepared from self-assembled collagen fibrils and silver nanowires (AgNW). Despite consisting of mostly type I collagen fibrils, the homogeneously embedded AgNWs provide these materials with a charge storage capacity of about 2.3 mC cm(-2) and a charge injection capacity of 0.3 mC cm(-2), which is on par with bioelectrodes used in the clinic. The mechanical properties of the materials are similar to soft tissues with a dynamic elastic modulus within the lower kPa range. The nanocomposites also support proliferation of embryonic cardiomyocytes while inhibiting the growth of both Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis. The developed collagen/AgNW composites thus represent a highly attractive bioelectrode and scaffold material for a wide range of biomedical applications. PMID:27385421

  16. Design, construction and mechanical testing of digital 3D anatomical data-based PCL-HA bone tissue engineering scaffold.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingqiang; Wei, Bo; Guo, Yang; Jin, Chengzhe; Du, Xiaotao; Yan, Chao; Yan, Junwei; Hu, Wenhao; Xu, Yan; Zhou, Zhi; Wang, Yijin; Wang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to investigate the techniques of design and construction of CT 3D reconstructional data-based polycaprolactone (PCL)-hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffold. Femoral and lumbar spinal specimens of eight male New Zealand white rabbits were performed CT and laser scanning data-based 3D printing scaffold processing using PCL-HA powder. Each group was performed eight scaffolds. The CAD-based 3D printed porous cylindrical stents were 16 piece × 3 groups, including the orthogonal scaffold, the Pozi-hole scaffold and the triangular hole scaffold. The gross forms, fiber scaffold diameters and porosities of the scaffolds were measured, and the mechanical testing was performed towards eight pieces of the three kinds of cylindrical scaffolds, respectively. The loading force, deformation, maximum-affordable pressure and deformation value were recorded. The pore-connection rate of each scaffold was 100 % within each group, there was no significant difference in the gross parameters and micro-structural parameters of each scaffold when compared with the design values (P > 0.05). There was no significant difference in the loading force, deformation and deformation value under the maximum-affordable pressure of the three different cylinder scaffolds when the load was above 320 N. The combination of CT and CAD reverse technology could accomplish the design and manufacturing of complex bone tissue engineering scaffolds, with no significant difference in the impacts of the microstructures towards the physical properties of different porous scaffolds under large load.

  17. 3D printing of porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds intended for use in bone tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Cox, Sophie C; Thornby, John A; Gibbons, Gregory J; Williams, Mark A; Mallick, Kajal K

    2015-02-01

    A systematic characterisation of bone tissue scaffolds fabricated via 3D printing from hydroxyapatite (HA) and poly(vinyl)alcohol (PVOH) composite powders is presented. Flowability of HA:PVOH precursor materials was observed to affect mechanical stability, microstructure and porosity of 3D printed scaffolds. Anisotropic behaviour of constructs and part failure at the boundaries of interlayer bonds was highlighted by compressive strength testing. A trade-off between the ability to facilitate removal of PVOH thermal degradation products during sintering and the compressive strength of green parts was revealed. The ultimate compressive strength of 55% porous green scaffolds printed along the Y-axis and dried in a vacuum oven for 6h was 0.88 ± 0.02 MPa. Critically, the pores of 3D printed constructs could be user designed, ensuring bulk interconnectivity, and the imperfect packing of powder particles created an inherent surface roughness and non-designed porosity within the scaffold. These features are considered promising since they are known to facilitate osteoconduction and osteointegration in-vivo. Characterisation techniques utilised in this study include two funnel flow tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), compressive strength testing and computed tomography (CT).

  18. Functionalization of 3D scaffolds with protein-releasing biomaterials for intracellular delivery.

    PubMed

    Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Steurer, Christoph; Roldán, Mònica; Vendrell, Meritxell; Vidaurre-Agut, Carla; Tarruella, Anna; Saldaña, Laura; Vilaboa, Nuria; Parera, Marc; Elizondo, Elisa; Ratera, Imma; Ventosa, Nora; Veciana, Jaume; Campillo-Fernández, Alberto J; García-Fruitós, Elena; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio

    2013-10-10

    Appropriate combinations of mechanical and biological stimuli are required to promote proper colonization of substrate materials in regenerative medicine. In this context, 3D scaffolds formed by compatible and biodegradable materials are under continuous development in an attempt to mimic the extracellular environment of mammalian cells. We have here explored how novel 3D porous scaffolds constructed by polylactic acid, polycaprolactone or chitosan can be decorated with bacterial inclusion bodies, submicron protein particles formed by releasable functional proteins. A simple dipping-based decoration method tested here specifically favors the penetration of the functional particles deeper than 300μm from the materials' surface. The functionalized surfaces support the intracellular delivery of biologically active proteins to up to more than 80% of the colonizing cells, a process that is slightly influenced by the chemical nature of the scaffold. The combination of 3D soft scaffolds and protein-based sustained release systems (Bioscaffolds) offers promise in the fabrication of bio-inspired hybrid matrices for multifactorial control of cell proliferation in tissue engineering under complex architectonic setting-ups.

  19. 3D printing of porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds intended for use in bone tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Cox, Sophie C; Thornby, John A; Gibbons, Gregory J; Williams, Mark A; Mallick, Kajal K

    2015-02-01

    A systematic characterisation of bone tissue scaffolds fabricated via 3D printing from hydroxyapatite (HA) and poly(vinyl)alcohol (PVOH) composite powders is presented. Flowability of HA:PVOH precursor materials was observed to affect mechanical stability, microstructure and porosity of 3D printed scaffolds. Anisotropic behaviour of constructs and part failure at the boundaries of interlayer bonds was highlighted by compressive strength testing. A trade-off between the ability to facilitate removal of PVOH thermal degradation products during sintering and the compressive strength of green parts was revealed. The ultimate compressive strength of 55% porous green scaffolds printed along the Y-axis and dried in a vacuum oven for 6h was 0.88 ± 0.02 MPa. Critically, the pores of 3D printed constructs could be user designed, ensuring bulk interconnectivity, and the imperfect packing of powder particles created an inherent surface roughness and non-designed porosity within the scaffold. These features are considered promising since they are known to facilitate osteoconduction and osteointegration in-vivo. Characterisation techniques utilised in this study include two funnel flow tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), compressive strength testing and computed tomography (CT). PMID:25492194

  20. Adopting the principles of collagen biomineralization for intrafibrillar infiltration of yttria-stabilized zirconia into three-dimensional collagen scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bin; Niu, Li-na; Shi, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Arola, Dwayne D.; Breschi, Lorenzo; Mao, Jing; Pashley, David H.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report a process for generating collagen-yttria-stabilized amorphous zirconia hybrid scaffolds by introducing acetylacetone-inhibited zirconia precursor nanodroplets into a poly(allylamine)-coated collagen matrix. This polyelectrolyte coating triggers intrafibrillar condensation of the precursors into amorphous zirconia, which is subsequently transformed into tetragonal yttria-stabilized zirconia after calcination. Our findings represent a new paradigm in the synthesis of non-naturally occurring collagen-based hybrid scaffolds under alcoholic mineralizing conditions. PMID:25477773

  1. 3-D intestinal scaffolds for evaluating the therapeutic potential of probiotics.

    PubMed

    Costello, Cait M; Sorna, Rachel M; Goh, Yih-Lin; Cengic, Ivana; Jain, Nina K; March, John C

    2014-07-01

    Biomimetic in vitro intestinal models are becoming useful tools for studying host-microbial interactions. In the past, these models have typically been limited to simple cultures on 2-D scaffolds or Transwell inserts, but it is widely understood that epithelial cells cultured in 3-D environments exhibit different phenotypes that are more reflective of native tissue, and that different microbial species will preferentially adhere to select locations along the intestinal villi. We used a synthetic 3-D tissue scaffold with villous features that could support the coculture of epithelial cell types with select bacterial populations. Our end goal was to establish microbial niches along the crypt-villus axis in order to mimic the natural microenvironment of the small intestine, which could potentially provide new insights into microbe-induced intestinal disorders, as well as enabling targeted probiotic therapies. We recreated the surface topography of the small intestine by fabricating a biodegradable and biocompatible villous scaffold using poly lactic-glycolic acid to enable the culture of Caco-2 with differentiation along the crypt-villus axis in a similar manner to native intestines. This was then used as a platform to mimic the adhesion and invasion profiles of both Salmonella and Pseudomonas, and assess the therapeutic potential of Lactobacillus and commensal Escherichia coli in a 3-D setting. We found that, in a 3-D environment, Lactobacillus is more successful at displacing pathogens, whereas Nissle is more effective at inhibiting pathogen adhesion. PMID:24798584

  2. The effect of anisotropic collagen-GAG scaffolds and growth factor supplementation on tendon cell recruitment, alignment, and metabolic activity

    PubMed Central

    Caliari, Steven R.; Harley, Brendan A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Current surgical and tissue engineering approaches for treating tendon injuries have shown limited success, suggesting the need for new biomaterial strategies. Here we describe the development of an anisotropic collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) scaffold and use of growth factor supplementation strategies to create a 3D platform for tendon tissue engineering. We fabricated cylindrical CG scaffolds with aligned tracks of ellipsoidal pores that mimic the native physiology of tendon by incorporating a directional solidification step into a conventional lyophilization strategy. By modifying the freezing temperature, we created a homologous series of aligned CG scaffolds with constant relative density and degree of anisotropy but a range of pore sizes (55–243 μm). Equine tendon cells showed greater levels of attachment, metabolic activity, and alignment as well as less cell-mediated scaffold contraction, when cultured in anisotropic scaffolds compared to an isotropic CG scaffold control. The anisotropic CG scaffolds also provided critical contact guidance cues for cell alignment. While tendon cells were randomly oriented in the isotropic control scaffold and the transverse (unaligned) plane of the anisotropic scaffolds, significant cell alignment was observed in the direction of the contact guidance cues in the longitudinal plane of the anisotropic scaffolds. Scaffold pore size was found to significantly influence tendon cell viability, proliferation, penetration into the scaffold, and metabolic activity in a manner predicted by cellular solids arguments. Finally, the addition of the growth factors PDGF-BB and IGF-1 to aligned CG scaffolds was found to enhance tendon cell motility, viability, and metabolic activity in dose-dependent manners. This work suggests a composite strategy for developing bioactive, 3D material systems for tendon tissue engineering. PMID:21550653

  3. Three Dimensional Collagen Scaffold Promotes Intrinsic Vascularisation for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Elsa C.; Kuo, Shyh-Ming; Kong, Anne M.; Morrison, Wayne A.; Dusting, Gregory J.; Mitchell, Geraldine M.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a porous 3-dimensional collagen scaffold material that supports capillary formation in vitro, and promotes vascularization when implanted in vivo. Collagen scaffolds were synthesized from type I bovine collagen and have a uniform pore size of 80 μm. In vitro, scaffolds seeded with primary human microvascular endothelial cells suspended in human fibrin gel formed CD31 positive capillary-like structures with clear lumens. In vivo, after subcutaneous implantation in mice, cell-free collagen scaffolds were vascularized by host neovessels, whilst a gradual degradation of the scaffold material occurred over 8 weeks. Collagen scaffolds, impregnated with human fibrinogen gel, were implanted subcutaneously inside a chamber enclosing the femoral vessels in rats. Angiogenic sprouts from the femoral vessels invaded throughout the scaffolds and these degraded completely after 4 weeks. Vascular volume of the resulting constructs was greater than the vascular volume of constructs from chambers implanted with fibrinogen gel alone (42.7±5.0 μL in collagen scaffold vs 22.5±2.3 μL in fibrinogen gel alone; p<0.05, n = 7). In the same model, collagen scaffolds seeded with human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) produced greater increases in vascular volume than did cell-free collagen scaffolds (42.9±4.0 μL in collagen scaffold with human ASCs vs 25.7±1.9 μL in collagen scaffold alone; p<0.05, n = 4). In summary, these collagen scaffolds are biocompatible and could be used to grow more robust vascularized tissue engineering grafts with improved the survival of implanted cells. Such scaffolds could also be used as an assay model for studies on angiogenesis, 3-dimensional cell culture, and delivery of growth factors and cells in vivo. PMID:26900837

  4. Three Dimensional Collagen Scaffold Promotes Intrinsic Vascularisation for Tissue Engineering Applications.

    PubMed

    Chan, Elsa C; Kuo, Shyh-Ming; Kong, Anne M; Morrison, Wayne A; Dusting, Gregory J; Mitchell, Geraldine M; Lim, Shiang Y; Liu, Guei-Sheung

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a porous 3-dimensional collagen scaffold material that supports capillary formation in vitro, and promotes vascularization when implanted in vivo. Collagen scaffolds were synthesized from type I bovine collagen and have a uniform pore size of 80 μm. In vitro, scaffolds seeded with primary human microvascular endothelial cells suspended in human fibrin gel formed CD31 positive capillary-like structures with clear lumens. In vivo, after subcutaneous implantation in mice, cell-free collagen scaffolds were vascularized by host neovessels, whilst a gradual degradation of the scaffold material occurred over 8 weeks. Collagen scaffolds, impregnated with human fibrinogen gel, were implanted subcutaneously inside a chamber enclosing the femoral vessels in rats. Angiogenic sprouts from the femoral vessels invaded throughout the scaffolds and these degraded completely after 4 weeks. Vascular volume of the resulting constructs was greater than the vascular volume of constructs from chambers implanted with fibrinogen gel alone (42.7±5.0 μL in collagen scaffold vs 22.5±2.3 μL in fibrinogen gel alone; p<0.05, n = 7). In the same model, collagen scaffolds seeded with human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) produced greater increases in vascular volume than did cell-free collagen scaffolds (42.9±4.0 μL in collagen scaffold with human ASCs vs 25.7±1.9 μL in collagen scaffold alone; p<0.05, n = 4). In summary, these collagen scaffolds are biocompatible and could be used to grow more robust vascularized tissue engineering grafts with improved the survival of implanted cells. Such scaffolds could also be used as an assay model for studies on angiogenesis, 3-dimensional cell culture, and delivery of growth factors and cells in vivo.

  5. Surface biology of collagen scaffold explains blocking of wound contraction and regeneration of skin and peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Yannas, I V; Tzeranis, D; So, P T

    2015-12-23

    We review the details of preparation and of the recently elucidated mechanism of biological (regenerative) activity of a collagen scaffold (dermis regeneration template, DRT) that has induced regeneration of skin and peripheral nerves (PN) in a variety of animal models and in the clinic. DRT is a 3D protein network with optimized pore size in the range 20-125 µm, degradation half-life 14 ± 7 d and ligand densities that exceed 200 µM α1β1 or α2β1 ligands. The pore has been optimized to allow migration of contractile cells (myofibroblasts, MFB) into the scaffold and to provide sufficient specific surface for cell-scaffold interaction; the degradation half-life provides the required time window for satisfactory binding interaction of MFB with the scaffold surface; and the ligand density supplies the appropriate ligands for specific binding of MFB on the scaffold surface. A dramatic change in MFB phenotype takes place following MFB-scaffold binding which has been shown to result in blocking of wound contraction. In both skin wounds and PN wounds the evidence has shown clearly that contraction blocking by DRT is followed by induction of regeneration of nearly perfect organs. The biologically active structure of DRT is required for contraction blocking; well-matched collagen scaffold controls of DRT, with structures that varied from that of DRT, have failed to induce regeneration. Careful processing of collagen scaffolds is required for adequate biological activity of the scaffold surface. The newly understood mechanism provides a relatively complete paradigm of regenerative medicine that can be used to prepare scaffolds that may induce regeneration of other organs in future studies.

  6. Fabrication of scalable and structured tissue engineering scaffolds using water dissolvable sacrificial 3D printed moulds.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Larsen, Layla Bashir; Trifol, Jon; Szabo, Peter; Burri, Harsha Vardhan Reddy; Canali, Chiara; Dufva, Marin; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders

    2015-10-01

    One of the major challenges in producing large scale engineered tissue is the lack of ability to create large highly perfused scaffolds in which cells can grow at a high cell density and viability. Here, we explore 3D printed polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as a sacrificial mould in a polymer casting process. The PVA mould network defines the channels and is dissolved after curing the polymer casted around it. The printing parameters determined the PVA filament density in the sacrificial structure and this density resulted in different stiffness of the corresponding elastomer replica. It was possible to achieve 80% porosity corresponding to about 150 cm(2)/cm(3) surface to volume ratio. The process is easily scalable as demonstrated by fabricating a 75 cm(3) scaffold with about 16,000 interconnected channels (about 1m(2) surface area) and with a channel to channel distance of only 78 μm. To our knowledge this is the largest scaffold ever to be produced with such small feature sizes and with so many structured channels. The fabricated scaffolds were applied for in-vitro culturing of hepatocytes over a 12-day culture period. Smaller scaffolds (6×4 mm) were tested for cell culturing and could support homogeneous cell growth throughout the scaffold. Presumably, the diffusion of oxygen and nutrient throughout the channel network is rapid enough to support cell growth. In conclusion, the described process is scalable, compatible with cell culture, rapid, and inexpensive. PMID:26117791

  7. 3D Chemical Similarity Networks for Structure-Based Target Prediction and Scaffold Hopping.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yu-Chen; Senese, Silvia; Damoiseaux, Robert; Torres, Jorge Z

    2016-08-19

    Target identification remains a major challenge for modern drug discovery programs aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms of drugs. Computational target prediction approaches like 2D chemical similarity searches have been widely used but are limited to structures sharing high chemical similarity. Here, we present a new computational approach called chemical similarity network analysis pull-down 3D (CSNAP3D) that combines 3D chemical similarity metrics and network algorithms for structure-based drug target profiling, ligand deorphanization, and automated identification of scaffold hopping compounds. In conjunction with 2D chemical similarity fingerprints, CSNAP3D achieved a >95% success rate in correctly predicting the drug targets of 206 known drugs. Significant improvement in target prediction was observed for HIV reverse transcriptase (HIVRT) compounds, which consist of diverse scaffold hopping compounds targeting the nucleotidyltransferase binding site. CSNAP3D was further applied to a set of antimitotic compounds identified in a cell-based chemical screen and identified novel small molecules that share a pharmacophore with Taxol and display a Taxol-like mechanism of action, which were validated experimentally using in vitro microtubule polymerization assays and cell-based assays.

  8. Impact of 3-D printed PLA- and chitosan-based scaffolds on human monocyte/macrophage responses: unraveling the effect of 3-D structures on inflammation.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Catarina R; Serra, Tiziano; Oliveira, Marta I; Planell, Josep A; Barbosa, Mário A; Navarro, Melba

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies have pointed towards a decisive role of inflammation in triggering tissue repair and regeneration, while at the same time it is accepted that an exacerbated inflammatory response may lead to rejection of an implant. Within this context, understanding and having the capacity to regulate the inflammatory response elicited by 3-D scaffolds aimed for tissue regeneration is crucial. This work reports on the analysis of the cytokine profile of human monocytes/macrophages in contact with biodegradable 3-D scaffolds with different surface properties, architecture and controlled pore geometry, fabricated by 3-D printing technology. Fabrication processes were optimized to create four different 3-D platforms based on polylactic acid (PLA), PLA/calcium phosphate glass or chitosan. Cytokine secretion and cell morphology of human peripheral blood monocytes allowed to differentiate on the different matrices were analyzed. While all scaffolds supported monocyte/macrophage adhesion and stimulated cytokine production, striking differences between PLA-based and chitosan scaffolds were found, with chitosan eliciting increased secretion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, while PLA-based scaffolds induced higher production of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-12/23 and IL-10. Even though the material itself induced the biggest differences, the scaffold geometry also impacted on TNF-α and IL-12/23 production, with chitosan scaffolds having larger pores and wider angles leading to a higher secretion of these pro-inflammatory cytokines. These findings strengthen the appropriateness of these 3-D platforms to study modulation of macrophage responses by specific parameters (chemistry, topography, scaffold architecture). PMID:24211731

  9. Bone formation ability of carbonate apatite-collagen scaffolds with different carbonate contents.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Ayumu; Kubo, Takayasu; Doi, Kazuya; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Morita, Kouji; Yokota, Rie; Hayashi, Hidetaka; Hirata, Isao; Okazaki, Masayuki; Akagawa, Yasumasa

    2009-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite and carbonate apatites with different carbonate contents were synthesized, mixed with atelocollagen, and made into sponge scaffolds. The scaffolds were implanted into the bone sockets of the femurs of male New Zealand white rabbits for 2, 3, 12 and 24 weeks. carbonate apatite-collagen scaffold with 4.8 wt% carbonate content appeared to have similar crystallinity and chemical composition to human bone. When the scaffolds were implanted into the rabbit femurs, histological observation indicated that the carbonate apatites-collagen scaffolds with relatively higher carbonate contents were gradually deformed throughout the implantation period, and showed uniform surrounding bone after 24 weeks and could not be distinguished. The carbonate apatite-collagen scaffold with 4.8 wt% carbonate content showed the highest bone area ratio of all of the scaffolds. It is suggested that a carbonate apatite-collagen scaffold with carbonate content similar to that of human bone may have optimal bone formation ability.

  10. Non-bioengineered silk fibroin protein 3D scaffolds for potential biotechnological and tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Biman B; Kundu, Subhas C

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes a new source for fabricating high-strength, non-bioengineered silk gland fibroin 3D scaffolds from Indian tropical tasar silkworm, Antheraea mylitta using SDS for dissolution. The scaffolds were fabricated by freeze drying at different prefreezing temperatures for pore size and porosity optimization. Superior mechanical properties with compressive strength in the range of 972 kPa were observed. The matrices were degraded by proteases within 28 d of incubation. Biocompatibility was assessed by feline fibroblast culture in vitro and confocal microscopy further confirmed adherence, spreading, and proliferation of primary dermal fibroblasts. Results indicate nonmulberry 3D silk gland fibroin protein as an inexpensive, high-strength, slow biodegradable, biocompatible, and alternative natural biomaterial. [Figure: see text]. PMID:18702171

  11. Chitosan-g-lactide copolymers for fabrication of 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demina, T. S.; Zaytseva-Zotova, D. S.; Timashev, P. S.; Bagratashvili, V. N.; Bardakova, K. N.; Sevrin, Ch; Svidchenko, E. A.; Surin, N. M.; Markvicheva, E. A.; Grandfils, Ch; Akopova, T. A.

    2015-07-01

    Chitosan-g-oligo (L, D-lactide) copolymers were synthesized and assessed to fabricate a number of 3D scaffolds using a variety of technologies such as oil/water emulsion evaporation technique, freeze-drying and two-photon photopolymerization. Solid-state copolymerization method allowed us to graft up to 160 wt-% of oligolactide onto chitosan backbone via chitosan amino group acetylation with substitution degree reaching up to 0.41. Grafting of hydrophobic oligolactide side chains with polymerization degree up to 10 results in chitosan amphiphilic properties. The synthesized chitosan-g-lactide copolymers were used to design 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering such as spherical microparticles and macroporous hydrogels.

  12. Modulating mechanical behaviour of 3D-printed cartilage-mimetic PCL scaffolds: influence of molecular weight and pore geometry.

    PubMed

    Olubamiji, Adeola D; Izadifar, Zohreh; Si, Jennifer L; Cooper, David M L; Eames, B Frank; Chen, Daniel X B

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D)-printed poly(ε)-caprolactone (PCL)-based scaffolds are increasingly being explored for cartilage tissue engineering (CTE) applications. However, ensuring that the mechanical properties of these PCL-based constructs are comparable to that of articular cartilage that they are meant to regenerate is an area that has been under-explored. This paper presents the effects of PCL's molecular weight (MW) and scaffold's pore geometric configurations; strand size (SZ), strand spacing (SS), and strand orientation (SO), on mechanical properties of 3D-printed PCL scaffolds. The results illustrate that MW has significant effect on compressive moduli and yield strength of 3D-printed PCL scaffolds. Specifically, PCL with MW of 45 K was a more feasible choice for fabrication of visco-elastic, flexible and load-bearing PCL scaffolds. Furthermore, pore geometric configurations; SZ, SS, and SO, all significantly affect on tensile moduli of scaffolds. However, only SZ and SS have statistically significant effects on compressive moduli and porosity of these scaffolds. That said, inverse linear relationship was observed between porosity and mechanical properties of 3D-printed PCL scaffolds in Pearson's correlation test. Altogether, this study illustrates that modulating MW of PCL and pore geometrical configurations of the scaffolds enabled design and fabrication of PCL scaffolds with mechanical and biomimetic properties that better mimic mechanical behaviour of human articular cartilage. Thus, the modulated PCL scaffold proposed in this study is a framework that offers great potentials for CTE applications. PMID:27328736

  13. Mastoid obliteration using 3D PCL scaffold in combination with alginate and rhBMP-2.

    PubMed

    Jang, Chul Ho; Kim, Min Seong; Cho, Yong Beom; Jang, Yoon Seok; Kim, Geun Hyung

    2013-11-01

    Various materials, both biological and alloplastic, have been used for mastoid obliteration after canal wall-down mastoidectomy in chronic otitis media. The purpose of this study is to investigate the osteoinductive potential of PCL scaffolds in mastoid obliteration, and to test that osteoinductivity can be enhanced by coating PCL with alginate and rhBMP-2. The in vitro biocompatibilities of the scaffolds were examined using osteoblast-like cells (MG63). Cell-morphology and calcium deposition were assessed. Based on scanning electron microscope (SEM) images, the cells grew sporadically on the surfaces of the struts in the PCL scaffold, while the entire struts of the PCL/alginate/BMP-2 scaffold was covered with the cells. Furthermore, the PCL/alginate/BMP-2 scaffold showed significantly higher calcium deposition than the PCL/alginate scaffold. Micro-CT showed osteogenesis in the pores of the 3D PCL scaffold in the experimental group, compared to the control group. Confocal microscopic findings showed that the honeycomb appearance of the PCL structure remained in the control group (pure PCL), but significant amount of bone remodeling in the experimental group (PCL/alginate/BMP-2). Histomorphometric analysis showed that the experimental group demonstrated a significantly higher amount (p=0.014) of new bone formation with 50.2 ± 6.5% (mean ± SD), compared to 10.2 ± 3.5% for the control group. Based on these in vitro and in vivo results, the use of the PCL/alginate/BMP-2 scaffold seemed to be a promising technique for the mastoid obliteration.

  14. Production of new 3D scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration by rapid prototyping.

    PubMed

    Fradique, R; Correia, T R; Miguel, S P; de Sá, K D; Figueira, D R; Mendonça, A G; Correia, I J

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of bone disorders, whether due to trauma or pathology, has been trending upward with the aging of the worldwide population. The currently available treatments for bone injuries are rather limited, involving mainly bone grafts and implants. A particularly promising approach for bone regeneration uses rapid prototyping (RP) technologies to produce 3D scaffolds with highly controlled structure and orientation, based on computer-aided design models or medical data. Herein, tricalcium phosphate (TCP)/alginate scaffolds were produced using RP and subsequently their physicochemical, mechanical and biological properties were characterized. The results showed that 60/40 of TCP and alginate formulation was able to match the compression and present a similar Young modulus to that of trabecular bone while presenting an adequate biocompatibility. Moreover, the biomineralization ability, roughness and macro and microporosity of scaffolds allowed cell anchoring and proliferation at their surface, as well as cell migration to its interior, processes that are fundamental for osteointegration and bone regeneration.

  15. Design of novel 3D gene activated PEG scaffolds with ordered pore structure.

    PubMed

    Orsi, Silvia; Guarnieri, Daniela; Netti, Paolo A

    2010-03-01

    The ability to genetically modify cells seeded inside synthetic hydrogel scaffolds offers a suitable approach to induce and control tissue repair and regeneration guiding cell fate. In fact the transfected cells can act as local in vivo bioreactor, secreting plasmid encoded proteins that augment tissue regeneration processes. We have realized a DNA bioactivated high porous poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) matrix by polyethyleneimine (PEI)/DNA complexes adsorption. As the design of the microarchitectural features of a scaffold also contributes to promote and influence cell fate, we appropriately designed the inner structure of gene activated PEG hydrogels by gelatine microparticles templating. Microarchitectural properties of the scaffold were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. 3D cell migration and transfection were monitored through time-lapse videomicroscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  16. Effect of HDAC Inhibitors on Corneal Keratocyte Mechanical Phenotypes in 3-D Collagen Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Koppaka, Vindhya; Lakshman, Neema

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDAC) have been shown to inhibit the TGFβ-induced myofibroblast transformation of corneal fibroblasts in 2-D culture. However, the effect of HDAC inhibitors on keratocyte spreading, contraction, and matrix remodeling in 3-D culture has not been directly assessed. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of the HDAC inhibitors Trichostatin A (TSA) and Vorinostat (SAHA) on corneal keratocyte mechanical phenotypes in 3-D culture using defined serum-free culture conditions. Methods: Rabbit corneal keratocytes were plated within standard rat tail type I collagen matrices (2.5 mg/ml) or compressed collagen matrices (~100 mg/ml) and cultured for up to 4 days in serum-free media, PDGF BB, TGFβ1, and either 50 nM TSA, 10 μM SAHA, or vehicle (DMSO). F-actin, α-SM-actin, and collagen fibrils were imaged using confocal microscopy. Cell morphology and global matrix contraction were quantified digitally. The expression of α-SM-actin was assessed using western blotting. Results: Corneal keratocytes in 3-D matrices had a quiescent mechanical phenotype, as indicated by a dendritic morphology, a lack of stress fibers, and minimal cell-induced matrix remodeling. This phenotype was generally maintained following the addition of TSA or SAHA. TGFβ1 induced a contractile phenotype, as indicated by a loss of dendritic cell processes, the development of stress fibers, and significant matrix compaction. In contrast, cells cultured in TGFβ1 plus TSA or SAHA remained dendritic and did not form stress fibers or induce ECM compaction. Western blotting showed that the expression of α-SM actin after treatment with TGFβ1 was inhibited by TSA and SAHA. PDGF BB stimulated the elongation of keratocytes and the extension of dendritic processes within 3-D matrices without inducing stress fiber formation or collagen reorganization. This spreading response was maintained in the presence of TSA or SAHA. Conclusions: Overall, HDAC inhibitors

  17. Integrating biologically inspired nanomaterials and table-top stereolithography for 3D printed biomimetic osteochondral scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Nathan J.; O'Brien, Joseph; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-08-01

    The osteochondral interface of an arthritic joint is notoriously difficult to regenerate due to its extremely poor regenerative capacity and complex stratified architecture. Native osteochondral tissue extracellular matrix is composed of numerous nanoscale organic and inorganic constituents. Although various tissue engineering strategies exist in addressing osteochondral defects, limitations persist with regards to tissue scaffolding which exhibit biomimetic cues at the nano to micro scale. In an effort to address this, the current work focused on 3D printing biomimetic nanocomposite scaffolds for improved osteochondral tissue regeneration. For this purpose, two biologically-inspired nanomaterials have been synthesized consisting of (1) osteoconductive nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) (primary inorganic component of bone) and (2) core-shell poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanospheres encapsulated with chondrogenic transforming growth-factor β1 (TGF-β1) for sustained delivery. Then, a novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer and the nano-ink (i.e., nHA + nanosphere + hydrogel) were employed to fabricate a porous and highly interconnected osteochondral scaffold with hierarchical nano-to-micro structure and spatiotemporal bioactive factor gradients. Our results showed that human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteochondral differentiation were greatly improved in the biomimetic graded 3D printed osteochondral construct in vitro. The current work served to illustrate the efficacy of the nano-ink and current 3D printing technology for efficient fabrication of a novel nanocomposite hydrogel scaffold. In addition, tissue-specific growth factors illustrated a synergistic effect leading to increased cell adhesion and directed stem cell differentiation.

  18. Integrating biologically inspired nanomaterials and table-top stereolithography for 3D printed biomimetic osteochondral scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Castro, Nathan J; O'Brien, Joseph; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-09-01

    The osteochondral interface of an arthritic joint is notoriously difficult to regenerate due to its extremely poor regenerative capacity and complex stratified architecture. Native osteochondral tissue extracellular matrix is composed of numerous nanoscale organic and inorganic constituents. Although various tissue engineering strategies exist in addressing osteochondral defects, limitations persist with regards to tissue scaffolding which exhibit biomimetic cues at the nano to micro scale. In an effort to address this, the current work focused on 3D printing biomimetic nanocomposite scaffolds for improved osteochondral tissue regeneration. For this purpose, two biologically-inspired nanomaterials have been synthesized consisting of (1) osteoconductive nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) (primary inorganic component of bone) and (2) core-shell poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanospheres encapsulated with chondrogenic transforming growth-factor β1 (TGF-β1) for sustained delivery. Then, a novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer and the nano-ink (i.e., nHA + nanosphere + hydrogel) were employed to fabricate a porous and highly interconnected osteochondral scaffold with hierarchical nano-to-micro structure and spatiotemporal bioactive factor gradients. Our results showed that human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteochondral differentiation were greatly improved in the biomimetic graded 3D printed osteochondral construct in vitro. The current work served to illustrate the efficacy of the nano-ink and current 3D printing technology for efficient fabrication of a novel nanocomposite hydrogel scaffold. In addition, tissue-specific growth factors illustrated a synergistic effect leading to increased cell adhesion and directed stem cell differentiation.

  19. Phage nanofibers induce vascularized osteogenesis in 3D printed bone scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianglin; Yang, Mingying; Zhu, Ye; Wang, Lin; Tomsia, Antoni P; Mao, Chuanbin

    2014-08-01

    A virus-activated matrix is developed to overcome the challenge of forming vascularized bone tissue. It is generated by filling a 3D printed bioceramic scaffold with phage nanofibers displaying high-density RGD peptide. After it is seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and implanted into a bone defect, the phage nanofibers induce osteogenesis and angiogenesis by activating endothelialization and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs.

  20. Rheological, biocompatibility and osteogenesis assessment of fish collagen scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Elango, Jeevithan; Zhang, Jingyi; Bao, Bin; Palaniyandi, Krishnamoorthy; Wang, Shujun; Wenhui, Wu; Robinson, Jeya Shakila

    2016-10-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt was made to find an alternative to mammalian collagen with better osteogenesis ability. Three types of collagen scaffolds - collagen, collagen-chitosan (CCH), and collagen-hydroxyapatite (CHA) - were prepared from the cartilage of Blue shark and investigated for their physico-functional and mechanical properties in relation to biocompatibility and osteogenesis. CCH scaffold was superior with pH 4.5-4.9 and viscosity 9.7-10.9cP. Notably, addition of chitosan and HA (hydroxyapatite) improved the stiffness (11-23MPa) and degradation rate but lowered the water binding capacity and porosity of the scaffold. Interestingly, CCH scaffolds remained for 3days before complete in-vitro biodegradation. The decreased amount of viable T-cells and higher level of FAS/APO-1 were substantiated the biocompatibility properties of prepared collagen scaffolds. Osteogenesis study revealed that the addition of CH and HA in both fish and mammalian collagen scaffolds could efficiently promote osteoblast cell formation. The ALP activity was significantly high in CHA scaffold-treated osteoblast cells, which suggests an enhanced bone-healing process. Therefore, the present study concludes that the composite scaffolds prepared from fish collagen with higher stiffness, lower biodegradation rate, better biocompatible, and osteogenesis properties were suitable biomaterial for a bone tissue engineering application as an alternative to mammalian collagen scaffolds. PMID:27211297

  1. 3D Printing Bioceramic Porous Scaffolds with Good Mechanical Property and Cell Affinity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Lin, Chih-Yang; Liu, Fwu-Hsing; Chen, Mark Hung-Chih; Lin, Chun-Pin; Ho, Hong-Nerng; Liao, Yunn-Shiuan

    2015-01-01

    Artificial bone grafting is widely used in current orthopedic surgery for bone defect problems. Unfortunately, surgeons remain unsatisfied with the current commercially available products. One of the major complaints is that these products cannot provide sufficient mechanical strength to support the human skeletal structure. In this study, we aimed to develop a bone scaffold with better mechanical property and good cell affinity by 3D printing (3DP) techniques. A self-developed 3D printer with laser-aided gelling (LAG) process was used to fabricate bioceramic scaffolds with inter-porous structures. To improve the mechanical property of the bioceramic parts after heating, CaCO3 was added to the silica ceramic slurry. CaCO3 was blended into a homogenous SiO2-sol dispersion at weight ratios varying from 0/100 to 5/95 to 9/91 (w/w). Bi-component CaCO3/SiO2-sol was prepared as a biocomposite for the 3DP scaffold. The well-mixed biocomposite was used to fabricate the bioceramic green part using the LAG method. The varied scaffolds were sintered at different temperatures ranging from 900 to 1500°C, and the mechanical property was subsequently analyzed. The scaffolds showed good property with the composite ratio of 5:95 CaCO3:SiO2 at a sintering temperature of 1300°C. The compressive strength was 47 MPa, and the porosity was 34%. The topography of the sintered 3DP bioceramic scaffold was examined by SEM, EDS and XRD. The silica bioceramic presented no cytotoxicity and good MG-63 osteoblast-like cell affinity, demonstrating good biocompatibility. Therefore, the new silica biocomposite is viable for fabricating 3DP bone bioceramics with improved mechanical property and good cell affinity. PMID:26618362

  2. 3D Printing Bioceramic Porous Scaffolds with Good Mechanical Property and Cell Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Lin, Chih-Yang; Liu, Fwu-Hsing; Chen, Mark Hung-Chih; Lin, Chun-Pin; Ho, Hong-Nerng; Liao, Yunn-Shiuan

    2015-01-01

    Artificial bone grafting is widely used in current orthopedic surgery for bone defect problems. Unfortunately, surgeons remain unsatisfied with the current commercially available products. One of the major complaints is that these products cannot provide sufficient mechanical strength to support the human skeletal structure. In this study, we aimed to develop a bone scaffold with better mechanical property and good cell affinity by 3D printing (3DP) techniques. A self-developed 3D printer with laser-aided gelling (LAG) process was used to fabricate bioceramic scaffolds with inter-porous structures. To improve the mechanical property of the bioceramic parts after heating, CaCO3 was added to the silica ceramic slurry. CaCO3 was blended into a homogenous SiO2-sol dispersion at weight ratios varying from 0/100 to 5/95 to 9/91 (w/w). Bi-component CaCO3/SiO2-sol was prepared as a biocomposite for the 3DP scaffold. The well-mixed biocomposite was used to fabricate the bioceramic green part using the LAG method. The varied scaffolds were sintered at different temperatures ranging from 900 to 1500°C, and the mechanical property was subsequently analyzed. The scaffolds showed good property with the composite ratio of 5:95 CaCO3:SiO2 at a sintering temperature of 1300°C. The compressive strength was 47 MPa, and the porosity was 34%. The topography of the sintered 3DP bioceramic scaffold was examined by SEM, EDS and XRD. The silica bioceramic presented no cytotoxicity and good MG-63 osteoblast-like cell affinity, demonstrating good biocompatibility. Therefore, the new silica biocomposite is viable for fabricating 3DP bone bioceramics with improved mechanical property and good cell affinity. PMID:26618362

  3. 3D Printing Bioceramic Porous Scaffolds with Good Mechanical Property and Cell Affinity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Lin, Chih-Yang; Liu, Fwu-Hsing; Chen, Mark Hung-Chih; Lin, Chun-Pin; Ho, Hong-Nerng; Liao, Yunn-Shiuan

    2015-01-01

    Artificial bone grafting is widely used in current orthopedic surgery for bone defect problems. Unfortunately, surgeons remain unsatisfied with the current commercially available products. One of the major complaints is that these products cannot provide sufficient mechanical strength to support the human skeletal structure. In this study, we aimed to develop a bone scaffold with better mechanical property and good cell affinity by 3D printing (3DP) techniques. A self-developed 3D printer with laser-aided gelling (LAG) process was used to fabricate bioceramic scaffolds with inter-porous structures. To improve the mechanical property of the bioceramic parts after heating, CaCO3 was added to the silica ceramic slurry. CaCO3 was blended into a homogenous SiO2-sol dispersion at weight ratios varying from 0/100 to 5/95 to 9/91 (w/w). Bi-component CaCO3/SiO2-sol was prepared as a biocomposite for the 3DP scaffold. The well-mixed biocomposite was used to fabricate the bioceramic green part using the LAG method. The varied scaffolds were sintered at different temperatures ranging from 900 to 1500°C, and the mechanical property was subsequently analyzed. The scaffolds showed good property with the composite ratio of 5:95 CaCO3:SiO2 at a sintering temperature of 1300°C. The compressive strength was 47 MPa, and the porosity was 34%. The topography of the sintered 3DP bioceramic scaffold was examined by SEM, EDS and XRD. The silica bioceramic presented no cytotoxicity and good MG-63 osteoblast-like cell affinity, demonstrating good biocompatibility. Therefore, the new silica biocomposite is viable for fabricating 3DP bone bioceramics with improved mechanical property and good cell affinity.

  4. Planar Gradient Diffusion System to Investigate Chemotaxis in a 3D Collagen Matrix.

    PubMed

    Stout, David A; Toyjanova, Jennet; Franck, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The importance of cell migration can be seen through the development of human life. When cells migrate, they generate forces and transfer these forces to their surrounding area, leading to cell movement and migration. In order to understand the mechanisms that can alter and/or affect cell migration, one can study these forces. In theory, understanding the fundamental mechanisms and forces underlying cell migration holds the promise of effective approaches for treating diseases and promoting cellular transplantation. Unfortunately, modern chemotaxis chambers that have been developed are usually restricted to two dimensions (2D) and have complex diffusion gradients that make the experiment difficult to interpret. To this end, we have developed, and describe in this paper, a direct-viewing chamber for chemotaxis studies, which allows one to overcome modern chemotaxis chamber obstacles able to measure cell forces and specific concentration within the chamber in a 3D environment to study cell 3D migration. More compelling, this approach allows one to successfully model diffusion through 3D collagen matrices and calculate the coefficient of diffusion of a chemoattractant through multiple different concentrations of collagen, while keeping the system simple and user friendly for traction force microscopy (TFM) and digital volume correlation (DVC) analysis. PMID:26131645

  5. Engineered 3D Silk-collagen-based Model of Polarized Neural Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Chwalek, Karolina; Sood, Disha; Cantley, William L.; White, James D.; Tang-Schomer, Min; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite huge efforts to decipher the anatomy, composition and function of the brain, it remains the least understood organ of the human body. To gain a deeper comprehension of the neural system scientists aim to simplistically reconstruct the tissue by assembling it in vitro from basic building blocks using a tissue engineering approach. Our group developed a tissue-engineered silk and collagen-based 3D brain-like model resembling the white and gray matter of the cortex. The model consists of silk porous sponge, which is pre-seeded with rat brain-derived neurons, immersed in soft collagen matrix. Polarized neuronal outgrowth and network formation is observed with separate axonal and cell body localization. This compartmental architecture allows for the unique development of niches mimicking native neural tissue, thus enabling research on neuronal network assembly, axonal guidance, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and electrical functions. PMID:26555926

  6. An Experimental Model for Assessing Fibroblast Migration in 3-D Collagen Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Karamichos, Dimitris; Lakshman, Neema; Petroll, W. Matthew

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and test a novel culture model for studying fibroblast migration in 3-D collagen matrices. Human corneal fibroblasts were seeded within dense, randomly oriented compressed collagen matrices. A 6 mm diameter button of this cell-seeded matrix was placed in the middle of an acellular, less dense outer collagen matrix. These constructs were cultured for 1, 3, 5 or 7 days in serum-free media, 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), or 50 ng/ml PDGF. Constructs were then fixed and labeled with AlexaFluor 546 phalloidin (for f-actin) and TOTO-3 (for nuclei). Cell-matrix interactions were assessed using a combination of fluorescent and reflected light confocal imaging. Human corneal fibroblasts in serum-free media showed minimal migration into the outer (non-compressed) matrix. In contrast, culture in serum or PDGF stimulated cell migration. Cell-induced collagen matrix reorganization in the outer matrix could be directly visualized using reflected light imaging, and was highest following culture in 10% FBS. Cellular contraction in 10% FBS often led to alignment of cells parallel to the outer edge of the inner matrix, similar to the pattern observed during corneal wound healing following incisional surgery. Overall, this 3-D model allows the effects of different culture conditions on cell migration and matrix remodeling to be assessed simultaneously. In addition, the design allows for ECM density, geometry and mechanical constraints to be varied in a controlled fashion. These initial results demonstrate differences in cell and matrix patterning during migration in response to serum and PDGF. PMID:19061246

  7. Laser 3D printing with sub-microscale resolution of porous elastomeric scaffolds for supporting human bone stem cells.

    PubMed

    Petrochenko, Peter E; Torgersen, Jan; Gruber, Peter; Hicks, Lucas A; Zheng, Jiwen; Kumar, Girish; Narayan, Roger J; Goering, Peter L; Liska, Robert; Stampfl, Jürgen; Ovsianikov, Aleksandr

    2015-04-01

    A reproducible method is needed to fabricate 3D scaffold constructs that results in periodic and uniform structures with precise control at sub-micrometer and micrometer length scales. In this study, fabrication of scaffolds by two-photon polymerization (2PP) of a biodegradable urethane and acrylate-based photoelastomer is demonstrated. This material supports 2PP processing with sub-micrometer spatial resolution. The high photoreactivity of the biophotoelastomer permits 2PP processing at a scanning speed of 1000 mm s(-1), facilitating rapid fabrication of relatively large structures (>5 mm(3)). These structures are custom printed for in vitro assay screening in 96-well plates and are sufficiently flexible to enable facile handling and transplantation. These results indicate that stable scaffolds with porosities of greater than 60% can be produced using 2PP. Human bone marrow stromal cells grown on 3D scaffolds exhibit increased growth and proliferation compared to smooth 2D scaffold controls. 3D scaffolds adsorb larger amounts of protein than smooth 2D scaffolds due to their larger surface area; the scaffolds also allow cells to attach in multiple planes and to completely infiltrate the porous scaffolds. The flexible photoelastomer material is biocompatible in vitro and is associated with facile handling, making it a viable candidate for further study of complex 3D-printed scaffolds.

  8. Carboxy-Methyl-Cellulose (CMC) hydrogel-filled 3-D scaffold: Preliminary study through a 3-D antiproliferative activity of Centella asiatica extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizad, Syazwan; Yahaya, Badrul Hisham; Zubairi, Saiful Irwan

    2015-09-01

    This study focuses on the effects of using the water extract from Centella asiatica on the mortality of human lung cancer cells (A549) with the use of novel 3-D scaffolds infused with CMC hydrogel. A biodegradable polymer, poly (hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) was used in this study as 3-D scaffolds, with some modifications made by introducing the gel structure on its pore, which provides a great biomimetic microenvironment for cells to grow apart from increasing the interaction between the cells and cell-bioactive extracts. The CMC showed a good hydrophilic characteristic with mean contact angle of 24.30 ± 22.03°. To ensure the CMC gel had good attachments with the scaffolds, a surface treatment was made before the CMC gel was infused into the scaffolds. The results showed that these modified scaffolds contained 42.41 ± 0.14% w/w of CMC gel, which indicated that the gel had already filled up the entire pore of 3-D scaffolds. Besides, the infused hydrogel scaffolds took only 24 hours to be saturated when absorbing the water. The viability of cancer cells by MTS assay after being treated with Centella asiatica showed that the scaffolds infused with CMC hydrogel had the cell viability of 46.89 ± 1.20% followed by porous 3-D model with 57.30 ± 1.60% of cell viability, and the 2-D model with 67.10 ± 1.10% of cell viability. The inhibitory activity in cell viability between 2-D and 3-D models did not differ significantly (p>0.05) due to the limitation of time in incubating the extract with the cell in the 3-D model microenvironment. In conclusion, with the application of 3-D scaffolds infused with CMC hydrogel, the extracts of Centella asiatica has been proven to have the ability to kill cancer cells and have a great potential to become one of the alternative methods in treating cancer patients.

  9. Interfacing polymeric scaffolds with primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells to develop 3D cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Claudio; Mota, Carlos; Moscato, Stefania; D’Alessandro, Delfo; Ugel, Stefano; Sartoris, Silvia; Bronte, Vincenzo; Boggi, Ugo; Campani, Daniela; Funel, Niccola; Moroni, Lorenzo; Danti, Serena

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the interactions between human primary cells from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and polymeric scaffolds to develop 3D cancer models useful for mimicking the biology of this tumor. Three scaffold types based on two biocompatible polymeric formulations, such as poly(vinyl alcohol)/gelatin (PVA/G) mixture and poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT) copolymer, were obtained via different techniques, namely, emulsion and freeze-drying, compression molding followed by salt leaching, and electrospinning. In this way, primary PDAC cells interfaced with different pore topographies, such as sponge-like pores of different shape and size or nanofiber interspaces. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence played by the scaffold architecture over cancerous cell growth and function. In all scaffolds, primary PDAC cells showed good viability and synthesized tumor-specific metalloproteinases (MMPs) such as MMP-2, and MMP-9. However, only sponge-like pores, obtained via emulsion-based and salt leaching-based techniques allowed for an organized cellular aggregation very similar to the native PDAC morphological structure. Differently, these cell clusters were not observed on PEOT/PBT electrospun scaffolds. MMP-2 and MMP-9, as active enzymes, resulted to be increased in PVA/G and PEOT/PBT sponges, respectively. These findings suggested that spongy scaffolds supported the generation of pancreatic tumor models with enhanced aggressiveness. In conclusion, primary PDAC cells showed diverse behaviors while interacting with different scaffold types that can be potentially exploited to create stage-specific pancreatic cancer models likely to provide new knowledge on the modulation and drug susceptibility of MMPs. PMID:25482337

  10. Interfacing polymeric scaffolds with primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells to develop 3D cancer models.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Claudio; Mota, Carlos; Moscato, Stefania; D'Alessandro, Delfo; Ugel, Stefano; Sartoris, Silvia; Bronte, Vincenzo; Boggi, Ugo; Campani, Daniela; Funel, Niccola; Moroni, Lorenzo; Danti, Serena

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the interactions between human primary cells from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and polymeric scaffolds to develop 3D cancer models useful for mimicking the biology of this tumor. Three scaffold types based on two biocompatible polymeric formulations, such as poly(vinyl alcohol)/gelatin (PVA/G) mixture and poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT) copolymer, were obtained via different techniques, namely, emulsion and freeze-drying, compression molding followed by salt leaching, and electrospinning. In this way, primary PDAC cells interfaced with different pore topographies, such as sponge-like pores of different shape and size or nanofiber interspaces. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence played by the scaffold architecture over cancerous cell growth and function. In all scaffolds, primary PDAC cells showed good viability and synthesized tumor-specific metalloproteinases (MMPs) such as MMP-2, and MMP-9. However, only sponge-like pores, obtained via emulsion-based and salt leaching-based techniques allowed for an organized cellular aggregation very similar to the native PDAC morphological structure. Differently, these cell clusters were not observed on PEOT/PBT electrospun scaffolds. MMP-2 and MMP-9, as active enzymes, resulted to be increased in PVA/G and PEOT/PBT sponges, respectively. These findings suggested that spongy scaffolds supported the generation of pancreatic tumor models with enhanced aggressiveness. In conclusion, primary PDAC cells showed diverse behaviors while interacting with different scaffold types that can be potentially exploited to create stage-specific pancreatic cancer models likely to provide new knowledge on the modulation and drug susceptibility of MMPs.

  11. Hierarchical bioceramic scaffolds with 3D-plotted macropores and mussel-inspired surface nanolayers for stimulating osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mengchi; Zhai, Dong; Xia, Lunguo; Li, Hong; Chen, Shiyi; Fang, Bing; Chang, Jiang; Wu, Chengtie

    2016-07-14

    The hierarchical structure of biomaterials plays an important role in the process of tissue reconstruction and regeneration. 3D-plotted scaffolds have been widely used for bone tissue engineering due to their controlled macropore structure and mechanical properties. However, the lack of micro- or nano-structures on the strut surface of 3D-plotted scaffolds, especially for bioceramic scaffolds, limits their biological activity. Inspired by the adhesive versatility of mussels and the active ion-chelating capacity of polydopamine, we set out to prepare a hierarchical bioceramic scaffold with controlled macropores and mussel-inspired surface nanolayers by combining the 3D-plotting technique with the polydopamine/apatite hybrid strategy in order to synergistically accelerate the osteogenesis and angiogenesis. β-Tricalcium phosphate (TCP) scaffolds were firstly 3D-plotted and then treated in dopamine-Tris/HCl and dopamine-SBF solutions to obtain TCP-DOPA-Tris and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds, respectively. It was found that polydopamine/apatite hybrid nanolayers were formed on the surface of both TCP-DOPA-Tris and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds induced apatite mineralization for the second time during the cell culture. As compared to TCP scaffolds, both TCP-DOPA-Tris and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds significantly promoted the osteogenesis of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) as well as the angiogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and the TCP-DOPA-SBF group presented the highest in vitro osteogenic/angiogenic activity among the three groups. Furthermore, both TCP-DOPA-Tris and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds significantly improved the formation of new bone in vivo as compared to TCP scaffolds without a nanostructured surface. Our results suggest that the utilization of a mussel-inspired Ca, P-chelated polydopamine nanolayer on 3D-plotted bioceramic scaffolds is a viable and effective strategy to construct a hierarchical structure for synergistically

  12. Digital micromirror device (DMD)-based 3D printing of poly(propylene fumarate) scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Mott, Eric J; Busso, Mallory; Luo, Xinyi; Dolder, Courtney; Wang, Martha O; Fisher, John P; Dean, David

    2016-04-01

    Our recent investigations into the 3D printing of poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF), a linear polyester, using a DMD-based system brought us to a resin that used titanium dioxide (TiO2) as an ultraviolet (UV) filter for controlling cure depth. However, this material hindered the 3D printing process due to undesirable lateral or "dark" curing (i.e., in areas not exposed to light from the DMD chip). Well known from its use in sunscreen, another UV filter, oxybenzone, has previously been used in conjunction with TiO2. In this study we hypothesize that combining these two UV filters will result in a synergistic effect that controls cure depth and avoids dark cure. A resin mixture (i.e., polymer, initiator, UV filters) was identified that worked well. The resin was then further characterized through mechanical testing, cure testing, and cytotoxicity testing to investigate its use as a material for bone tissue engineering scaffolds. Results show that the final resin eliminated dark cure as shown through image analysis. Mechanically the new scaffolds proved to be far weaker than those printed from previous resins, with compressive strengths of 7.8 ± 0.5 MPa vs. 36.5 ± 1.6 MPa, respectively. The new scaffolds showed a 90% reduction in elastic modulus and a 74% increase in max strain. These properties may be useful in tissue engineering applications where resorption is required. Initial cytotoxicity evaluation was negative. As hypothesized, the use of TiO2 and oxybenzone showed synergistic effects in the 3D printing of PPF tissue engineering scaffolds. PMID:26838854

  13. Digital micromirror device (DMD)-based 3D printing of poly(propylene fumarate) scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Mott, Eric J; Busso, Mallory; Luo, Xinyi; Dolder, Courtney; Wang, Martha O; Fisher, John P; Dean, David

    2016-04-01

    Our recent investigations into the 3D printing of poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF), a linear polyester, using a DMD-based system brought us to a resin that used titanium dioxide (TiO2) as an ultraviolet (UV) filter for controlling cure depth. However, this material hindered the 3D printing process due to undesirable lateral or "dark" curing (i.e., in areas not exposed to light from the DMD chip). Well known from its use in sunscreen, another UV filter, oxybenzone, has previously been used in conjunction with TiO2. In this study we hypothesize that combining these two UV filters will result in a synergistic effect that controls cure depth and avoids dark cure. A resin mixture (i.e., polymer, initiator, UV filters) was identified that worked well. The resin was then further characterized through mechanical testing, cure testing, and cytotoxicity testing to investigate its use as a material for bone tissue engineering scaffolds. Results show that the final resin eliminated dark cure as shown through image analysis. Mechanically the new scaffolds proved to be far weaker than those printed from previous resins, with compressive strengths of 7.8 ± 0.5 MPa vs. 36.5 ± 1.6 MPa, respectively. The new scaffolds showed a 90% reduction in elastic modulus and a 74% increase in max strain. These properties may be useful in tissue engineering applications where resorption is required. Initial cytotoxicity evaluation was negative. As hypothesized, the use of TiO2 and oxybenzone showed synergistic effects in the 3D printing of PPF tissue engineering scaffolds.

  14. Collagen and chondrocyte concentrations control ultrasound scattering in agarose scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Inkinen, S; Liukkonen, J; Ylärinne, J H; Puhakka, P H; Lammi, M J; Virén, T; Jurvelin, J S; Töyräs, J

    2014-09-01

    Ultrasound imaging has been proposed for diagnostics of osteoarthritis and cartilage injuries in vivo. However, the specific contribution of chondrocytes and collagen to ultrasound scattering in articular cartilage has not been systematically studied. We investigated the role of these tissue structures by measuring ultrasound scattering in agarose scaffolds with varying collagen and chondrocyte concentrations. Ultrasound catheters with center frequencies of 9 MHz (7.1-11.0 MHz, -6 dB) and 40 MHz (30.1-45.3 MHz, -6 dB) were applied using an intravascular ultrasound device. Ultrasound backscattering quantified in a region of interest starting right below sample surface differed significantly (p < 0.05) with the concentrations of collagen and chondrocytes. An ultrasound frequency of 40 MHz, as compared with 9 MHz, was more sensitive to variations in collagen and chondrocyte concentrations. The present findings may improve diagnostic interpretation of arthroscopic ultrasound imaging and provide information necessary for development of models describing ultrasound propagation within cartilage. PMID:24972499

  15. Fabrication of 3D Scaffolds with Nano-Hydroxyapatite for Improving the Preosteoblast Cell-Biological Performance.

    PubMed

    Roh, Hee-Sang; Myung, Sung-Woon; Jung, Sang-Chul; Kim, Byung-Hoon

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds fabricated by rapid prototyping techniques have many merits for tissue engineering applications, due to its controllable properties such as porosity, pore size and structural shape. Nonetheless, low cell seeding efficiency remains drawback. In this study, poly-caprolactone (PCL) composite 3D extruded scaffolds were modified with nano hydroxyapatite (n-HAp). PCL/n-HAp 3D scaffold surface was treated with oxygen plasma to improve the preosteoblast cell seeding efficiency and proliferation. The results indicate that oxygen plasma is useful technique to improve the cell affinity.

  16. Electrospun bio-composite P(LLA-CL)/collagen I/collagen III scaffolds for nerve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kijeńska, Ewa; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Swieszkowski, Wojciech; Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof J; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2012-05-01

    One of the biggest challenges in peripheral nerve tissue engineering is to create an artificial nerve graft that could mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) and assist in nerve regeneration. Bio-composite nanofibrous scaffolds made from synthetic and natural polymeric blends provide suitable substrate for tissue engineering and it can be used as nerve guides eliminating the need of autologous nerve grafts. Nanotopography or orientation of the fibers within the scaffolds greatly influences the nerve cell morphology and outgrowth, and the alignment of the fibers ensures better contact guidance of the cells. In this study, poly (L-lactic acid)-co-poly(ε-caprolactone) or P(LLA-CL), collagen I and collagen III are utilized for the fabrication of nanofibers of different compositions and orientations (random and aligned) by electrospinning. The morphology, mechanical, physical, and chemical properties of the electrospun scaffolds along with their biocompatibility using C17.2 nerve stem cells are studied to identify the suitable material compositions and topography of the electrospun scaffolds required for peripheral nerve regeneration. Aligned P(LLA-CL)/collagen I/collagen III nanofibrous scaffolds with average diameter of 253 ± 102 nm were fabricated and characterized with a tensile strength of 11.59 ± 1.68 MPa. Cell proliferation studies showed 22% increase in cell proliferation on aligned P(LLA-CL)/collagen I/collagen III scaffolds compared with aligned pure P(LLA-CL) scaffolds. Results of our in vitro cell proliferation, cell-scaffold interaction, and neurofilament protein expression studies demonstrated that the electrospun aligned P(LLA-CL)/collagen I/collagen III nanofibrous scaffolds mimic more closely towards the ECM of nerve and have great potential as a substrate for accelerated regeneration of the nerve.

  17. Additive manufactured polymeric 3D scaffolds with tailored surface topography influence mesenchymal stromal cells activity.

    PubMed

    Neves, Sara C; Mota, Carlos; Longoni, Alessia; Barrias, Cristina C; Granja, Pedro L; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-06-01

    Additive manufactured three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds with tailored surface topography constitute a clear advantage in tissue regeneration strategies to steer cell behavior. 3D fibrous scaffolds of poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) block copolymer presenting different fiber surface features were successfully fabricated by additive manufacturing combined with wet-spinning, in a single step, without any post-processing. The optimization of the processing parameters, mainly driven by different solvent/non-solvent combinations, led to four distinct scaffold types, with average surface roughness values ranging from 0.071 ± 0.012 μm to 1.950 ± 0.553 μm, average pore sizes in the x- and y-axis between 351.1 ± 33.6 μm and 396.1 ± 32.3 μm, in the z-axis between 36.5 ± 5.3 μm and 70.7 ± 8.8 μm, average fiber diameters between 69.4 ± 6.1 μm and 99.0 ± 9.4 μm, and porosity values ranging from 60.2 ± 0.8% to 71.7 ± 2.6%. Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) cultured on these scaffolds adhered, proliferated, and produced endogenous extracellular matrix. The effect of surface roughness and topography on hMSCs differentiation was more evident for cells seeded at lower density, where the percentage of cells in direct contact with the surface was higher compared to more densely seeded scaffolds. Under osteogenic conditions, lower surface roughness values (0.227 ± 0.035 μm) had a synergistic effect on hMSCs behavior, while chondrogenesis was favored on rougher surfaces (1.950 ± 0.553 μm). PMID:27219645

  18. Direct 3D powder printing of biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds for substitution of complex bone defects.

    PubMed

    Castilho, Miguel; Moseke, Claus; Ewald, Andrea; Gbureck, Uwe; Groll, Jürgen; Pires, Inês; Teßmar, Jörg; Vorndran, Elke

    2014-03-01

    The 3D printing technique based on cement powders is an excellent method for the fabrication of individual and complex bone substitutes even in the case of large defects. The outstanding bone remodeling capacity of biphasic calcium phosphates (BCPs) containing hydroxyapatite (HA) as well as tricalcium phosphate (TCP) in varying ratios makes the adaption of powder systems resulting in BCP materials to this fabrication technique a desirable aim. This study presents the synthesis and characterization of a novel powder system for the 3D printing process, intended for the production of complexly shaped BCP scaffolds by a hydraulic setting reaction of calcium carbonate and TCP with phosphoric acid. The HA/TCP ratio in the specimens could be tailored by the calcium/phosphate ratio of the starting powder. The scaffolds could be fabricated with a dimensional accuracy of >96.5% and a minimal macro pore size of 300 µm. Independent of the phase composition the printed specimens showed a microporosity of approximately 68%, while the compressive strength strongly depended on the chemical composition and increased with rising TCP content in the scaffolds to a maximum of 1.81 MPa. Post-treatment of the scaffolds with a polylactic-co-glycolic acid-solution enhanced the mechanical properties by a factor of 8. In vitro studies showed that all BCP scaffolds were cytocompatible and enhanced the cell viability as well as the cell proliferation, as compared with pure TCP. Cell proliferation is even better on BCP when compared to HA and cell viability is in a similar range on these materials.

  19. Generation and transplantation of reprogrammed human neurons in the brain using 3D microtopographic scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Aaron L; Bennett, Neal K; Francis, Nicola L; Halikere, Apoorva; Clarke, Stephen; Moore, Jennifer C; Hart, Ronald P; Paradiso, Kenneth; Wernig, Marius; Kohn, Joachim; Pang, Zhiping P; Moghe, Prabhas V

    2016-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy with human pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons has the potential to ameliorate neurodegenerative dysfunction and central nervous system injuries, but reprogrammed neurons are dissociated and spatially disorganized during transplantation, rendering poor cell survival, functionality and engraftment in vivo. Here, we present the design of three-dimensional (3D) microtopographic scaffolds, using tunable electrospun microfibrous polymeric substrates that promote in situ stem cell neuronal reprogramming, neural network establishment and support neuronal engraftment into the brain. Scaffold-supported, reprogrammed neuronal networks were successfully grafted into organotypic hippocampal brain slices, showing an ∼ 3.5-fold improvement in neurite outgrowth and increased action potential firing relative to injected isolated cells. Transplantation of scaffold-supported neuronal networks into mouse brain striatum improved survival ∼ 38-fold at the injection site relative to injected isolated cells, and allowed delivery of multiple neuronal subtypes. Thus, 3D microscale biomaterials represent a promising platform for the transplantation of therapeutic human neurons with broad neuro-regenerative relevance. PMID:26983594

  20. Generation and transplantation of reprogrammed human neurons in the brain using 3D microtopographic scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Aaron L.; Bennett, Neal K.; Francis, Nicola L.; Halikere, Apoorva; Clarke, Stephen; Moore, Jennifer C.; Hart, Ronald P.; Paradiso, Kenneth; Wernig, Marius; Kohn, Joachim; Pang, Zhiping P.; Moghe, Prabhas V.

    2016-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy with human pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons has the potential to ameliorate neurodegenerative dysfunction and central nervous system injuries, but reprogrammed neurons are dissociated and spatially disorganized during transplantation, rendering poor cell survival, functionality and engraftment in vivo. Here, we present the design of three-dimensional (3D) microtopographic scaffolds, using tunable electrospun microfibrous polymeric substrates that promote in situ stem cell neuronal reprogramming, neural network establishment and support neuronal engraftment into the brain. Scaffold-supported, reprogrammed neuronal networks were successfully grafted into organotypic hippocampal brain slices, showing an ∼3.5-fold improvement in neurite outgrowth and increased action potential firing relative to injected isolated cells. Transplantation of scaffold-supported neuronal networks into mouse brain striatum improved survival ∼38-fold at the injection site relative to injected isolated cells, and allowed delivery of multiple neuronal subtypes. Thus, 3D microscale biomaterials represent a promising platform for the transplantation of therapeutic human neurons with broad neuro-regenerative relevance. PMID:26983594

  1. Nonlinear Optical Macroscopic Assessment of 3-D Corneal Collagen Organization and Axial Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Moritz; Chai, Dongyul; Kriling, Shelsea; Nien, Chyong Jy; Brown, Donald J.; Jester, Bryan; Juhasz, Tibor

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To characterize and quantify the collagen fiber (lamellar) organization of human corneas in three dimensions by using nonlinear optical high-resolution macroscopy (NLO-HRMac) and to correlate these findings with mechanical data obtained by indentation testing of corneal flaps. Methods. Twelve corneas from 10 donors were studied. Vibratome sections, 200 μm thick, from five donor eyes were cut along the vertical meridian from limbus to limbus (arc length, 12 mm). Backscattered second harmonic–generated (SHG) NLO signals from these sections were collected as a series of overlapping 3-D images, which were concatenated to form a single 3-D mosaic (pixel resolution: 0.44 μm lateral, 2 μm axial). Collagen fiber intertwining was quantified by determining branching point density as a function of stromal depth. Mechanical testing was performed on corneal flaps from seven additional eyes. Corneas were cut into three layers (anterior, middle, and posterior) using a femtosecond surgical laser system and underwent indentation testing to determine the elastic modulus for each layer. Results. The 3-D reconstructions revealed complex collagen fiber branching patterns in the anterior cornea, with fibers extending from the anterior limiting lamina (ALL, Bowman's layer), intertwining with deeper fibers and reinserting back to the ALL, forming bow spring–like structures. Measured branching-point density was four times higher in the anterior third of the cornea than in the posterior third and decreased logarithmically with increasing distance from the ALL. Indentation testing showed an eightfold increase in elastic modulus in the anterior stroma. Conclusions. The axial gradient in lamellar intertwining appears to be associated with an axial gradient in the effective elastic modulus of the cornea, suggesting that collagen fiber intertwining and formation of bow spring–like structures provide structural support similar to cross-beams in bridges and large-scale structures

  2. Fibroblast cluster formation on 3D collagen matrices requires cell contraction dependent fibronectin matrix organization.

    PubMed

    da Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno; Ho, Chin-Han; Grinnell, Frederick

    2013-02-15

    Fibroblasts incubated on 3D collagen matrices in serum or lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-containing medium self-organize into clusters through a mechanism that requires cell contraction. However, in platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-containing medium, cells migrate as individuals and do not form clusters even though they constantly encounter each other. Here, we present evidence that a required function of cell contraction in clustering is formation of fibronectin (FN) fibrillar matrix. We found that in serum or LPA but not in PDGF or basal medium, cells organized FN (both serum and cellular) into a fibrillar, detergent-insoluble matrix. Cell clusters developed concomitant with FN matrix formation. FN fibrils accumulated beneath cells and along the borders of cell clusters in regions of cell-matrix tension. Blocking Rho kinase or myosin II activity prevented FN matrix assembly and cell clustering. Using siRNA silencing and function-blocking antibodies and peptides, we found that cell clustering and FN matrix assembly required α5β1 integrins and fibronectin. Cells were still able to exert contractile force and compact the collagen matrix under the latter conditions, which showed that contraction was not sufficient for cell clustering to occur. Our findings provide new insights into how procontractile (serum/LPA) and promigratory (PDGF) growth factor environments can differentially regulate FN matrix assembly by fibroblasts interacting with collagen matrices and thereby influence mesenchymal cell morphogenetic behavior under physiologic circumstances such as wound repair, morphogenesis and malignancy. PMID:23117111

  3. Electrospun synthetic human elastin:collagen composite scaffolds for dermal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Wise, Steven G; Li, Zhe; Maitz, Peter K M; Young, Cara J; Wang, Yiwei; Weiss, Anthony S

    2012-10-01

    We present an electrospun synthetic human elastin:collagen composite scaffold aimed at dermal tissue engineering. The panel of electrospun human tropoelastin and ovine type I collagen blends comprised 80% tropoelastin+20% collagen, 60% tropoelastin+40% collagen and 50% tropoelastin+50% collagen. Electrospinning efficiency decreased with increasing collagen content under the conditions used. Physical and mechanical characterization encompassed fiber morphology, porosity, pore size and modulus, which were prioritized to identify the optimal candidate for dermal tissue regeneration. Scaffolds containing 80% tropoelastin and 20% collagen (80T20C) were selected on this basis for further cell interaction and animal implantation studies. 80T20C enhanced proliferation and migration rates of dermal fibroblasts in vitro and were well tolerated in a mouse subcutaneous implantation study where they persisted over 6 weeks. The 80T20C scaffolds supported fibroblast infiltration, de novo collagen deposition and new capillary formation.

  4. Tracking immune-related cell responses to drug delivery microparticles in 3D dense collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Obarzanek-Fojt, Magdalena; Curdy, Catherine; Loggia, Nicoletta; Di Lena, Fabio; Grieder, Kathrin; Bitar, Malak; Wick, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Beyond the therapeutic purpose, the impact of drug delivery microparticles on the local tissue and inflammatory responses remains to be further elucidated specifically for reactions mediated by the host immune cells. Such immediate and prolonged reactions may adversely influence the release efficacy and intended therapeutic pathway. The lack of suitable in vitro platforms limits our ability to gain insight into the nature of immune responses at a single cell level. In order to establish an in vitro 3D system mimicking the connective host tissue counterpart, we utilized reproducible, compressed, rat-tail collagen polymerized matrices. THP1 cells (human acute monocytic leukaemia cells) differentiated into macrophage-like cells were chosen as cell model and their functionality was retained in the dense rat-tail collagen matrix. Placebo microparticles were later combined in the immune cell seeded system during collagen polymerization and secreted pro-inflammatory factors: TNFα and IL-8 were used as immune response readout (ELISA). Our data showed an elevated TNFα and IL-8 secretion by macrophage THP1 cells indicating that Placebo microparticles trigger certain immune cell responses under 3D in vivo like conditions. Furthermore, we have shown that the system is sensitive to measure the differences in THP1 macrophage pro-inflammatory responses to Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) microparticles with different API release kinetics. We have successfully developed a tissue-like, advanced, in vitro system enabling selective "readouts" of specific responses of immune-related cells. Such system may provide the basis of an advanced toolbox enabling systemic evaluation and prediction of in vivo microparticle reactions on human immune-related cells.

  5. Periodontal regeneration with stem cells-seeded collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zeping; Yin, Xing; Ye, Qingsong; He, Wulin; Ge, Mengke; Zhou, Xiaofu; Hu, Jing; Zou, Shujuan

    2016-07-01

    Re-establishing compromised periodontium to its original structure, properties and function is demanding, but also challenging, for successful orthodontic treatment. In this study, the periodontal regeneration capability of collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffolds, seeded with bone marrow stem cells, was investigated in a canine labial alveolar bone defect model. Bone marrow stem cells were isolated, expanded and characterized. Porous collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold and cross-linked collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold were prepared. Attachment, migration, proliferation and morphology of bone marrow stem cells, co-cultured with porous collagen-hydroxyapatite or cross-linked collagen-hydroxyapatite, were evaluated in vitro. The periodontal regeneration capability of collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold with or without bone marrow stem cells was tested in six beagle dogs, with each dog carrying one sham-operated site as healthy control, and three labial alveolar bone defects untreated to allow natural healing, treated with bone marrow stem cells - collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold implant or collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold implant, respectively. Animals were euthanized at 3 and 6 months (3 animals per group) after implantation and the resected maxillary and mandibular segments were examined using micro-computed tomography scan, H&E staining, Masson's staining and histometric evaluation. Bone marrow stem cells were successfully isolated and demonstrated self-renewal and multi-potency in vitro. The porous collagen-hydroxyapatite and cross-linked collagen-hydroxyapatite had average pore sizes of 415 ± 20 µm and 203 ± 18 µm and porosity of 69 ± 0.5% and 50 ± 0.2%, respectively. The attachment, proliferation and migration of bone marrow stem cells were satisfactory on both porous collagen-hydroxyapatite and cross-linked collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffolds. Implantation of bone marrow stem cells - collagen-hydroxyapatite or collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold in

  6. Ligand scaffold hopping combining 3D maximal substructure search and molecular similarity

    PubMed Central

    Quintus, Flavien; Sperandio, Olivier; Grynberg, Julien; Petitjean, Michel; Tuffery, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Background Virtual screening methods are now well established as effective to identify hit and lead candidates and are fully integrated in most drug discovery programs. Ligand-based approaches make use of physico-chemical, structural and energetics properties of known active compounds to search large chemical libraries for related and novel chemotypes. While 2D-similarity search tools are known to be fast and efficient, the use of 3D-similarity search methods can be very valuable to many research projects as integration of "3D knowledge" can facilitate the identification of not only related molecules but also of chemicals possessing distant scaffolds as compared to the query and therefore be more inclined to scaffolds hopping. To date, very few methods performing this task are easily available to the scientific community. Results We introduce a new approach (LigCSRre) to the 3D ligand similarity search of drug candidates. It combines a 3D maximum common substructure search algorithm independent on atom order with a tunable description of atomic compatibilities to prune the search and increase its physico-chemical relevance. We show, on 47 experimentally validated active compounds across five protein targets having different specificities, that for single compound search, the approach is able to recover on average 52% of the co-actives in the top 1% of the ranked list which is better than gold standards of the field. Moreover, the combination of several runs on a single protein target using different query active compounds shows a remarkable improvement in enrichment. Such Results demonstrate LigCSRre as a valuable tool for ligand-based screening. Conclusion LigCSRre constitutes a new efficient and generic approach to the 3D similarity screening of small compounds, whose flexible design opens the door to many enhancements. The program is freely available to the academics for non-profit research at: . PMID:19671127

  7. Use of stereolithography to manufacture critical-sized 3D biodegradable scaffolds for bone ingrowth.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Malcolm N; Fisher, John P; Dean, David; Rimnac, Clare; Mikos, Antonios G

    2003-02-15

    A novel approach to the manufacture of biodegradable polymeric scaffolds for tissue-engineering utilizing stereolithography (SLA) is presented. SLA is a three-dimensional (3D) printing method that uses an ultraviolet laser to photo-crosslink a liquid polymer substrate. The current generation of SLA devices provide a 3D printing resolution of 0.1 mm. The experiments utilized a biodegradable resin mixture of diethyl fumarate (DEF), poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF), and a photoinitiator, bisacylphosphine oxide (BAPO). The PPF is crosslinked with the use of the SLA's UV laser (325-nm wavelength). An SLA device was retrofitted with a custom fixture build tank enclosing an elevator-driven build table. A 3D prototype model testing the manufacturing control this device provides was created in a computer-aided-design package. The resulting geometric data were used to drive the SLA process, and a DEF/PPF prototype part was successfully manufactured. These scaffolds have application in the tissue engineering of bony substrates.

  8. Use of stereolithography to manufacture critical-sized 3D biodegradable scaffolds for bone ingrowth.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Malcolm N; Fisher, John P; Dean, David; Rimnac, Clare; Mikos, Antonios G

    2003-02-15

    A novel approach to the manufacture of biodegradable polymeric scaffolds for tissue-engineering utilizing stereolithography (SLA) is presented. SLA is a three-dimensional (3D) printing method that uses an ultraviolet laser to photo-crosslink a liquid polymer substrate. The current generation of SLA devices provide a 3D printing resolution of 0.1 mm. The experiments utilized a biodegradable resin mixture of diethyl fumarate (DEF), poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF), and a photoinitiator, bisacylphosphine oxide (BAPO). The PPF is crosslinked with the use of the SLA's UV laser (325-nm wavelength). An SLA device was retrofitted with a custom fixture build tank enclosing an elevator-driven build table. A 3D prototype model testing the manufacturing control this device provides was created in a computer-aided-design package. The resulting geometric data were used to drive the SLA process, and a DEF/PPF prototype part was successfully manufactured. These scaffolds have application in the tissue engineering of bony substrates. PMID:12516080

  9. 3D Hydrogel Scaffolds for Articular Chondrocyte Culture and Cartilage Generation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Human articular cartilage is highly susceptible to damage and has limited self-repair and regeneration potential. Cell-based strategies to engineer cartilage tissue offer a promising solution to repair articular cartilage. To select the optimal cell source for tissue repair, it is important to develop an appropriate culture platform to systematically examine the biological and biomechanical differences in the tissue-engineered cartilage by different cell sources. Here we applied a three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic hydrogel culture platform to systematically examine cartilage regeneration potential of juvenile, adult, and osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes. The 3D biomimetic hydrogel consisted of synthetic component poly(ethylene glycol) and bioactive component chondroitin sulfate, which provides a physiologically relevant microenvironment for in vitro culture of chondrocytes. In addition, the scaffold may be potentially used for cell delivery for cartilage repair in vivo. Cartilage tissue engineered in the scaffold can be evaluated using quantitative gene expression, immunofluorescence staining, biochemical assays, and mechanical testing. Utilizing these outcomes, we were able to characterize the differential regenerative potential of chondrocytes of varying age, both at the gene expression level and in the biochemical and biomechanical properties of the engineered cartilage tissue. The 3D culture model could be applied to investigate the molecular and functional differences among chondrocytes and progenitor cells from different stages of normal or aberrant development. PMID:26484414

  10. Highly Porous Gelatin Reinforced 3D Scaffolds for Articular Cartilage Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Amadori, Sofia; Torricelli, Paola; Panzavolta, Silvia; Parrilli, Annapaola; Fini, Milena; Bigi, Adriana

    2015-07-01

    3D highly porous (93% total porosity) gelatin scaffolds were prepared according to a novel, simple method, which implies gelatin foaming, gelification, soaking into ethanol and successive freeze-drying. Reinforcement of the as-prepared scaffolds (GEL) was performed through immersion in aqueous solutions at different gelatin concentrations. Reinforcement solutions with and without genipin addition allowed to prepare two series of samples:cross-linked and uncross-linked samples, respectively. The amount of gelatin adsorbed onto the reinforced samples increases as a function of gelatin concentration in solution and provokes a drastic improvement of the compressive modulus and collapse strength up to values of about 30 and 4 MPa, respectively. The open and interconnected porosity, although slightly reduced, is still of the order of 80% in the samples reinforced with the highest concentration of gelatin. Water uptake ability evaluated after immersion in PBS for 20 s decreases with gelatin reinforcement. The presence of genipin in cross-linked samples reduces gelatin release and stabilizes the scaffolds in solution. Chondrocytes from human articular cartilage adhere, proliferate, and penetrate into the scaffolds. The evaluation of differentiation markers both on the supernatants of cell culture and by means of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) indicates a dose-dependent promotion of cell differentiation.

  11. Surface functionalization of 3D glass-ceramic porous scaffolds for enhanced mineralization in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraris, Sara; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Bretcanu, Oana; Cassinelli, Clara; Vernè, Enrica

    2013-04-01

    Bone reconstruction after tissue loosening due to traumatic, pathological or surgical causes is in increasing demand. 3D scaffolds are a widely studied solution for supporting new bone growth. Bioactive glass-ceramic porous materials can offer a three-dimensional structure that is able to chemically bond to bone. The ability to surface modify these devices by grafting biologically active molecules represents a challenge, with the aim of stimulating physiological bone regeneration with both inorganic and organic signals. In this research work glass ceramic scaffolds with very high mechanical properties and moderate bioactivity have been functionalized with the enzyme alkaline phosphatase (ALP). The material surface was activated in order to expose hydroxyl groups. The activated surface was further grafted with ALP both via silanization and also via direct grafting to the surface active hydroxyl groups. Enzymatic activity of grafted samples were measured by means of UV-vis spectroscopy before and after ultrasonic washing in TRIS-HCl buffer solution. In vitro inorganic bioactivity was investigated by soaking the scaffolds after the different steps of functionalization in a simulated body fluid (SBF). SEM observations allowed the monitoring of the scaffold morphology and surface chemical composition after soaking in SBF. The presence of ALP enhanced the in vitro inorganic bioactivity of the tested material.

  12. Two-photon polymerization of 3-D zirconium oxide hybrid scaffolds for long-term stem cell growth.

    PubMed

    Skoog, Shelby A; Nguyen, Alexander K; Kumar, Girish; Zheng, Jiwen; Goering, Peter L; Koroleva, Anastasia; Chichkov, Boris N; Narayan, Roger J

    2014-06-01

    Two-photon polymerization is a technique that involves simultaneous absorption of two photons from a femtosecond laser for selective polymerization of a photosensitive material. In this study, two-photon polymerization was used for layer-by-layer fabrication of 3-D scaffolds composed of an inorganic-organic zirconium oxide hybrid material. Four types of scaffold microarchitectures were created, which exhibit layers of parallel line features at various orientations as well as pores between the line features. Long-term cell culture studies involving human bone marrow stromal cells were conducted using these 3-D scaffolds. Cellular adhesion and proliferation were demonstrated on all of the scaffold types; tissuelike structure was shown to span the pores. This study indicates that two-photon polymerization may be used to create microstructured scaffolds out of an inorganic-organic zirconium oxide hybrid material for use in 3-D tissue culture systems.

  13. Combinatorial screening of osteoblast response to 3D calcium phosphate/poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds using gradients and arrays

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Kaushik; Sun, Limin; Chow, Laurence C.; Young, Marian F.; Simon, Carl G.

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for combinatorial and high-throughput methods for screening cell–biomaterial interactions to maximize tissue generation in scaffolds. Current methods employ a flat two-dimensional (2D) format even though three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds are more representative of the tissue environment in vivo and cells are responsive to topographical differences of 2D substrates and 3D scaffolds. Thus, combinatorial libraries of 3D porous scaffolds were developed and used to screen the effect of nano-amorphous calcium phosphate (nACP) particles on osteoblast response. Increasing nACP content in poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds promoted osteoblast adhesion and proliferation. The nACP-containing scaffolds released calcium and phosphate ions which are known to activate osteoblast function. Scaffold libraries were fabricated in two formats, gradients and arrays, and the magnitude of the effect of nACP on osteoblast proliferation was greater for arrays than gradients. The enhanced response in arrays can be explained by differences in cell culture designs, diffusional effects and differences in the ratio of “scaffold mass to culture medium”. These results introduce a gradient library approach for screening large pore 3D scaffolds and demonstrate that inclusion of the nACP particles enhances osteoblast proliferation in 3D scaffolds. Further, comparison of gradients and arrays suggests that gradients were more sensitive for detecting effects of scaffold composition on cell adhesion (short time points, 1 day) whereas arrays were more sensitive at detecting effects on cell proliferation (longer time points, 14 day). PMID:21074846

  14. Two-Photon Lithography of 3D Nanocomposite Piezoelectric Scaffolds for Cell Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Marino, Attilio; Barsotti, Jonathan; de Vito, Giuseppe; Filippeschi, Carlo; Mazzolai, Barbara; Piazza, Vincenzo; Labardi, Massimiliano; Mattoli, Virgilio; Ciofani, Gianni

    2015-11-25

    In this letter, we report on the fabrication, the characterization, and the in vitro testing of structures suitable for cell culturing, prepared through two-photon polymerization of a nanocomposite resist. More in details, commercially available Ormocomp has been doped with piezoelectric barium titanate nanoparticles, and bioinspired 3D structures resembling trabeculae of sponge bone have been fabricated. After an extensive characterization, preliminary in vitro testing demonstrated that both the topographical and the piezoelectric cues of these scaffolds are able to enhance the differentiation process of human SaOS-2 cells. PMID:26548588

  15. Two-Photon Lithography of 3D Nanocomposite Piezoelectric Scaffolds for Cell Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Marino, Attilio; Barsotti, Jonathan; de Vito, Giuseppe; Filippeschi, Carlo; Mazzolai, Barbara; Piazza, Vincenzo; Labardi, Massimiliano; Mattoli, Virgilio; Ciofani, Gianni

    2015-11-25

    In this letter, we report on the fabrication, the characterization, and the in vitro testing of structures suitable for cell culturing, prepared through two-photon polymerization of a nanocomposite resist. More in details, commercially available Ormocomp has been doped with piezoelectric barium titanate nanoparticles, and bioinspired 3D structures resembling trabeculae of sponge bone have been fabricated. After an extensive characterization, preliminary in vitro testing demonstrated that both the topographical and the piezoelectric cues of these scaffolds are able to enhance the differentiation process of human SaOS-2 cells.

  16. Control of vascular network location in millimeter-sized 3D-tissues by micrometer-sized collagen coated cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Yen; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2016-03-25

    Engineering three-dimensional (3D) vascularized constructs remains a central challenge because capillary network structures are important for sufficient oxygen and nutrient exchange to sustain the viability of engineered constructs. However, construction of 3D-tissues at single cell level has yet to be reported. Previously, we established a collagen coating method for fabricating a micrometer-sized collagen matrix on cell surfaces to control cell distance or cell densities inside tissues. In this study, a simple fabrication method is presented for constructing vascular networks in 3D-tissues over micrometer-sized or even millimeter-sized with controlled cell densities. From the results, well vascularized 3D network structures can be observed with a fluorescence label method mixing collagen coated cells and endothelia cells, indicating that constructed ECM rich tissues have the potential for vascularization, which opens up the possibility for various applications in pharmaceutical or tissue engineering fields.

  17. ECM Inspired Coating of Embroidered 3D Scaffolds Enhances Calvaria Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rentsch, C.; Rentsch, B.; Heinemann, S.; Bernhardt, R.; Bischoff, B.; Förster, Y.; Scharnweber, D.; Rammelt, S.

    2014-01-01

    Resorbable polymeric implants and surface coatings are an emerging technology to treat bone defects and increase bone formation. This approach is of special interest in anatomical regions like the calvaria since adults lose the capacity to heal large calvarial defects. The present study assesses the potential of extracellular matrix inspired, embroidered polycaprolactone-co-lactide (PCL) scaffolds for the treatment of 13 mm full thickness calvarial bone defects in rabbits. Moreover the influence of a collagen/chondroitin sulfate (coll I/cs) coating of PCL scaffolds was evaluated. Defect areas filled with autologous bone and empty defects served as reference. The healing process was monitored over 6 months by combining a novel ultrasonographic method, radiographic imaging, biomechanical testing, and histology. The PCL coll I/cs treated group reached 68% new bone volume compared to the autologous group (100%) and the biomechanical stability of the defect area was similar to that of the gold standard. Histological investigations revealed a significantly more homogenous bone distribution over the whole defect area in the PCL coll I/cs group compared to the noncoated group. The bioactive, coll I/cs coated, highly porous, 3-dimensional PCL scaffold acted as a guide rail for new skull bone formation along and into the implant. PMID:25013767

  18. A Tunable Scaffold of Microtubular Graphite for 3D Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Aerographite (AG) is a novel carbon-based material that exists as a self-supportive 3D network of interconnected hollow microtubules. It can be synthesized in a variety of architectures tailored by the growth conditions. This flexibility in creating structures presents interesting bioengineering possibilities such as the generation of an artificial extracellular matrix. Here we have explored the feasibility and potential of AG as a scaffold for 3D cell growth employing cyclic RGD (cRGD) peptides coupled to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) conjugated phospholipids for surface functionalization to promote specific adhesion of fibroblast cells. Successful growth and invasion of the bulk material was followed over a period of 4 days. PMID:27258400

  19. Anisotropic collagen fibrillogenesis within microfabricated scaffolds: implications for biomimetic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Jean, Aurélie; Engelmayr, George C

    2012-01-11

    Anisotropic collagen fibrillogenesis is demonstrated within the pores of an accordion-like honeycomb poly(glycerol sebacate) tissue engineering scaffold. Confocal reflectance microscopy and image analysis demonstrate increased fibril distribution order, fibril density, and alignment in accordion-like honeycomb pores compared with collagen gelled unconstrained. Finite element modeling predicts how collagen gel and scaffold mechanics couple in matching native heart muscle stiffness and anisotropy. PMID:23184695

  20. Improved Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Tissue Scaffolds with Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuan; Castro, Nathan J.; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Aliabouzar, Mitra; Sarkar, Kausik; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    3D printing and ultrasound techniques are showing great promise in the evolution of human musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration medicine. The uniqueness of the present study was to combine low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and advanced 3D printing techniques to synergistically improve growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Specifically, polyethylene glycol diacrylate bioinks containing cell adhesive Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serene (RGDS) peptide and/or nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to fabricate 3D scaffolds with different geometric patterns via novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer. The resultant scaffolds provide a highly porous and interconnected 3D environment to support cell proliferation. Scaffolds with small square pores were determined to be the optimal geometric pattern for MSC attachment and growth. The optimal LIPUS working parameters were determined to be 1.5 MHz, 20% duty cycle with 150 mW/cm2 intensity. Results demonstrated that RGDS peptide and nHA containing 3D printed scaffolds under LIPUS treatment can greatly promote MSC proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition and total protein content. These results illustrate the effectiveness of the combination of LIPUS and biomimetic 3D printing scaffolds as a valuable combinatorial tool for improved MSC function, thus make them promising for future clinical and various regenerative medicine application. PMID:27597635

  1. Improved Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Tissue Scaffolds with Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Castro, Nathan J; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Aliabouzar, Mitra; Sarkar, Kausik; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    3D printing and ultrasound techniques are showing great promise in the evolution of human musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration medicine. The uniqueness of the present study was to combine low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and advanced 3D printing techniques to synergistically improve growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Specifically, polyethylene glycol diacrylate bioinks containing cell adhesive Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serene (RGDS) peptide and/or nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to fabricate 3D scaffolds with different geometric patterns via novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer. The resultant scaffolds provide a highly porous and interconnected 3D environment to support cell proliferation. Scaffolds with small square pores were determined to be the optimal geometric pattern for MSC attachment and growth. The optimal LIPUS working parameters were determined to be 1.5 MHz, 20% duty cycle with 150 mW/cm(2) intensity. Results demonstrated that RGDS peptide and nHA containing 3D printed scaffolds under LIPUS treatment can greatly promote MSC proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition and total protein content. These results illustrate the effectiveness of the combination of LIPUS and biomimetic 3D printing scaffolds as a valuable combinatorial tool for improved MSC function, thus make them promising for future clinical and various regenerative medicine application. PMID:27597635

  2. Improved Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Tissue Scaffolds with Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Castro, Nathan J; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Aliabouzar, Mitra; Sarkar, Kausik; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-09-06

    3D printing and ultrasound techniques are showing great promise in the evolution of human musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration medicine. The uniqueness of the present study was to combine low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and advanced 3D printing techniques to synergistically improve growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Specifically, polyethylene glycol diacrylate bioinks containing cell adhesive Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serene (RGDS) peptide and/or nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to fabricate 3D scaffolds with different geometric patterns via novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer. The resultant scaffolds provide a highly porous and interconnected 3D environment to support cell proliferation. Scaffolds with small square pores were determined to be the optimal geometric pattern for MSC attachment and growth. The optimal LIPUS working parameters were determined to be 1.5 MHz, 20% duty cycle with 150 mW/cm(2) intensity. Results demonstrated that RGDS peptide and nHA containing 3D printed scaffolds under LIPUS treatment can greatly promote MSC proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition and total protein content. These results illustrate the effectiveness of the combination of LIPUS and biomimetic 3D printing scaffolds as a valuable combinatorial tool for improved MSC function, thus make them promising for future clinical and various regenerative medicine application.

  3. Repair of meniscal cartilage white zone tears using a stem cell/collagen-scaffold implant.

    PubMed

    Pabbruwe, Moreica B; Kafienah, Wael; Tarlton, John F; Mistry, Sanjay; Fox, Dennis J; Hollander, Anthony P

    2010-03-01

    Injuries to the avascular region of knee meniscal cartilage do not heal spontaneously. To address this problem we have developed a new stem cell/collagen-scaffold implant system in which human adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are seeded onto a biodegradable scaffold that allows controlled delivery of actively dividing cells to the meniscus surface. Sandwich constructs of two white zone ovine meniscus discs with stem cell/collagen-scaffold implant in between were cultured in vitro for 40 days. Histomorphometric analysis revealed superior integration in the stem cell/collagen-scaffold groups compared to the cell-free collagen membrane or untreated controls. The addition of TGF-beta1 to differentiate stem cells to chondrocytes inhibited integration. Biomechanical testing demonstrated a significant 2-fold increase in tensile strength in all constructs using the stem cell/collagen-scaffold compared to control groups after 40 days in culture. Integration was significantly higher when collagen membranes were used that had a more open/spongy structure adjacent to both meniscal cartilage surfaces, whereas a collagen scaffold designed for osteoinduction failed to induce any integration of meniscus. In conclusion, the stem cell/collagen-scaffold implant is a potential therapeutic treatment for the repair of white zone meniscal cartilage tears.

  4. Development of Composite Porous Scaffolds Based on Collagen and Biodegradable Poly(ester urethane)urea

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jianjun; Stankus, John J.; Wagner, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Our objective in this work was to develop a flexible, biodegradable scaffold for cell transplantation that would incorporate a synthetic component for strength and flexibility and type I collagen for enzymatic lability and cytocompatibility. A biodegradable poly(ester urethane)urea was synthesized from poly(caprolactone), 1,4-diisocyanatobutane, and putrescine. Using a thermally induced phase separation process, porous scaffolds were created from a mixture containing this polyurethane and 0%, 10%, 20%, or 30% type I collagen. The resulting scaffolds were found to have open, interconnected pores (from 7 to >100 um) and porosities from 58% to 86% depending on the polyurethane/collagen ratio. The scaffolds were also flexible with breaking strains of 82–443% and tensile strengths of 0.97–4.11 MPa depending on preparation conditions. Scaffold degradation was significantly increased when collagenase was introduced into an incubating buffer in a manner that was dependent on the mass fraction of collagen present in the scaffold. Mass losses could be varied from 15% to 59% over 8 weeks. When culturing umbilical artery smooth muscle cells on these scaffolds higher cell numbers were observed over a 4-week culture period in scaffolds containing collagen. In summary, a strong and flexible scaffold system has been developed that can degrade by both hydrolysis and collagenase degradation pathways, as well as support cell growth. This scaffold possesses properties that would make it attractive for future use in soft tissue applications where such mechanical and biological features would be advantageous. PMID:16826792

  5. Evaluation of cell binding to collagen and gelatin: a study of the effect of 2D and 3D architecture and surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Davidenko, Natalia; Schuster, Carlos F; Bax, Daniel V; Farndale, Richard W; Hamaia, Samir; Best, Serena M; Cameron, Ruth E

    2016-10-01

    Studies of cell attachment to collagen-based materials often ignore details of the binding mechanisms-be they integrin-mediated or non-specific. In this work, we have used collagen and gelatin-based substrates with different dimensional characteristics (monolayers, thin films and porous scaffolds) in order to establish the influence of composition, crosslinking (using carbodiimide) treatment and 2D or 3D architecture on integrin-mediated cell adhesion. By varying receptor expression, using cells with collagen-binding integrins (HT1080 and C2C12 L3 cell lines, expressing α2β1, and Rugli expressing α1β1) and a parent cell line C2C12 with gelatin-binding receptors (αvβ3 and α5β1), the nature of integrin binding sites was studied in order to explain the bioactivity of different protein formulations. We have shown that alteration of the chemical identity, conformation and availability of free binding motifs (GxOGER and RGD), resulting from addition of gelatin to collagen and crosslinking, have a profound effect on the ability of cells to adhere to these formulations. Carbodiimide crosslinking ablates integrin-dependent cell activity on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional architectures while the three-dimensional scaffold structure also leads to a high level of non-specific interactions remaining on three-dimensional samples even after a rigorous washing regime. This phenomenon, promoted by crosslinking, and attributed to cell entrapment, should be considered in any assessment of the biological activity of three-dimensional substrates. Spreading data confirm the importance of integrin-mediated cell engagement for further cell activity on collagen-based compositions. In this work, we provide a simple, but effective, means of deconvoluting the effects of chemistry and dimensional characteristics of a substrate, on the cell activity of protein-derived materials, which should assist in tailoring their biological properties for specific tissue engineering

  6. Evaluation of cell binding to collagen and gelatin: a study of the effect of 2D and 3D architecture and surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Davidenko, Natalia; Schuster, Carlos F; Bax, Daniel V; Farndale, Richard W; Hamaia, Samir; Best, Serena M; Cameron, Ruth E

    2016-10-01

    Studies of cell attachment to collagen-based materials often ignore details of the binding mechanisms-be they integrin-mediated or non-specific. In this work, we have used collagen and gelatin-based substrates with different dimensional characteristics (monolayers, thin films and porous scaffolds) in order to establish the influence of composition, crosslinking (using carbodiimide) treatment and 2D or 3D architecture on integrin-mediated cell adhesion. By varying receptor expression, using cells with collagen-binding integrins (HT1080 and C2C12 L3 cell lines, expressing α2β1, and Rugli expressing α1β1) and a parent cell line C2C12 with gelatin-binding receptors (αvβ3 and α5β1), the nature of integrin binding sites was studied in order to explain the bioactivity of different protein formulations. We have shown that alteration of the chemical identity, conformation and availability of free binding motifs (GxOGER and RGD), resulting from addition of gelatin to collagen and crosslinking, have a profound effect on the ability of cells to adhere to these formulations. Carbodiimide crosslinking ablates integrin-dependent cell activity on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional architectures while the three-dimensional scaffold structure also leads to a high level of non-specific interactions remaining on three-dimensional samples even after a rigorous washing regime. This phenomenon, promoted by crosslinking, and attributed to cell entrapment, should be considered in any assessment of the biological activity of three-dimensional substrates. Spreading data confirm the importance of integrin-mediated cell engagement for further cell activity on collagen-based compositions. In this work, we provide a simple, but effective, means of deconvoluting the effects of chemistry and dimensional characteristics of a substrate, on the cell activity of protein-derived materials, which should assist in tailoring their biological properties for specific tissue engineering

  7. In the beginning there were soft collagen-cell gels: towards better 3D connective tissue models?

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert A

    2013-10-01

    In the 40 years since Elsdale and Bard's analysis of fibroblast culture in collagen gels we have moved far beyond the concept that such 3D fibril network systems are better models than monolayer cultures. This review analyses key aspects of that progression of models, against a background of what exactly each model system tries to mimic. This story tracks our increasing understanding of fibroblast responses to soft collagen gels, in particularly their cytoskeletal contraction, migration and integrin attachment. The focus on fibroblast mechano-function has generated models designed to directly measure the overall force generated by fibroblast populations, their reaction to external loads and the role of the matrix structure. Key steps along this evolution of 3D collagen models have been designed to mimic normal skin, wound repair, tissue morphogenesis and remodelling, growth and contracture during scarring/fibrosis. As new models are developed to understand cell-mechanical function in connective tissues the collagen material has become progressively more important, now being engineered to mimic more complex aspects of native extracellular matrix structure. These have included collagen fibril density, alignment and hierarchical structure, controlling material stiffness and anisotropy. But of these, tissue-like collagen density is key in that it contributes to control of the others. It is concluded that across this 40 year window major progress has been made towards establishing a family of 3D experimental collagen tissue-models, suitable to investigate normal and pathological fibroblast mechano-functions.

  8. Tuning Cell Differentiation into a 3D Scaffold Presenting a Pore Shape Gradient for Osteochondral Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Di Luca, Andrea; Lorenzo-Moldero, Ivan; Mota, Carlos; Lepedda, Antonio; Auhl, Dietmar; Van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-07-01

    Osteochondral regeneration remains nowadays a major problem since the outcome of current techniques is not satisfactory in terms of functional tissue formation and development. A possible solution is the combination of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with additive manufacturing technologies to fabricate scaffolds with instructive properties. In this study, the differentiation of hMSCs within a scaffold presenting a gradient in pore shape is presented. The variation in pore shape is determined by varying the angle formed by the fibers of two consequent layers. The fiber deposition patterns are 0-90, which generate squared pores, 0-45, 0-30, and 0-15, that generate rhomboidal pores with an increasing major axis as the deposition angle decreases. Within the gradient construct, squared pores support a better chondrogenic differentiation whereas cells residing in the rhomboidal pores display a better osteogenic differentiation. When cultured under osteochondral conditions the trend in both osteogenic and chondrogenic markers is maintained. Engineering the pore shape, thus creating axial gradients in structural properties, seems to be an instructive strategy to fabricate functional 3D scaffolds that are able to influence hMSCs differentiation for osteochondral tissue regeneration. PMID:27109461

  9. Fibrillogenesis from nanosurfaces: multiphoton imaging and stereological analysis of collagen 3D self-assembly dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Decencière, Etienne; Machairas, Vaïa; Albert, Claire; Coradin, Thibaud; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Aimé, Carole

    2014-09-21

    The assembly of proteins into fibrillar structures is an important process that concerns different biological contexts, including molecular medicine and functional biomaterials. Engineering of hybrid biomaterials can advantageously provide synergetic interactions of the biopolymers with an inorganic component to ensure specific supramolecular organization and dynamics. To this aim, we designed hybrid systems associating collagen and surface-functionalized silica particles and we built a new strategy to investigate fibrillogenesis processes in such multicomponents systems, working at the crossroads of chemistry, physics and mathematics. The self-assembly process was investigated by bimodal multiphoton imaging coupling second harmonic generation (SHG) and 2 photon excited fluorescence (2PEF). The in-depth spatial characterization of the system was further achieved using the three-dimensional analysis of the SHG/2PEF data via mathematical morphology processing. Quantitation of collagen distribution around particles offers strong evidence that the chemically induced confinement of the protein on the silica nanosurfaces has a key influence on the spatial extension of fibrillogenesis. This new approach is unique in the information it can provide on 3D dynamic hybrid systems and may be extended to other associations of fibrillar molecules with optically responsive nano-objects. PMID:25058449

  10. Fabrication of Compositionally and Topographically Complex Robust Tissue Forms by 3D-Electrochemical Compaction of Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Younesi, Mousa; Islam, Anowarul; Kishore, Vipuil; Panit, Stefi; Akkus, Ozan

    2015-01-01

    Collagen solutions are phase-transformed to mechanically robust shell structures with curviplanar topographies using electrochemically induced pH gradients. The process enables rapid layer-by-layer deposition of collagen-rich mixtures over the entire field simultaneously to obtain compositionally diverse multilayered structures. In-plane tensile strength and modulus of the electrocompacted collagen sheet samples were 5200 -fold and 2300 -fold greater than that of uncompacted collagen samples. Out of plane compression tests showed 27 -fold and fold increase in compressive stress and 46 -fold increase in compressive modulus compared to uncompacted collagen sheets. Cells proliferated 4.9 times faster, and cellular area spread was 2.7 times greater on compacted collagen sheets. Electrocompaction also resulted in 2.9 times greater focal adhesion area than on regular collagen hydrogel. The reported improvements in the cell-matrix interactions with electrocompaction would serve to expedite the population of electrocompacted collagen scaffolds by cells. The capacity of the method to fabricate nonlinear curved topographies with compositional heterogeneous layers is demonstrated by sequential deposition of collagenhydroxyapatite layer over a collagen layer. The complex curved topography of the nasal structure is replicated by the electrochemical compaction method. The presented electrochemical compaction process is an enabling modality which holds significant promise for reconstruction of a wide spectrum of topographically complex systems such as joint surfaces, craniofacial defects, ears, nose or urogenital forms. PMID:26069162

  11. In situ cross-linked electrospun fiber scaffold of collagen for fabricating cell-dense muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Naoya; Tamura, Kenichi; Mineguchi, Ryo; Ishikawa, Yumiko; Haraguchi, Yuji; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Hara, Yusuke

    2016-06-01

    Engineered muscle tissues used as transplant tissues in regenerative medicine should have a three-dimensional and cell-dense structure like native tissue. For fabricating a 3D cell-dense muscle tissue from myoblasts, we proposed the electrospun type I collagen microfiber scaffold of the string-shape like a harp. The microfibers were oriented in the same direction to allow the myoblasts to align, and were strung at low density with micrometer intervals to create space for the cells to occupy. To realize this shape of the scaffold, we employed in situ cross-linking during electrospinning process for the first time to collagen fibers. The collagen microfibers in situ cross-linked with glutaraldehyde stably existed in the aqueous media and completely retained the original shape to save the spaces between the fibers for over 14 days. On the contrary, the conventional cross-linking method by exposure to a glutaraldehyde aqueous solution vapor partially dissolved and damaged the fiber to lose a low-density shape of the scaffold. Myoblasts could penetrate into the interior of the in situ cross-linked string-shaped scaffold and form the cell-dense muscle tissues. Histochemical analysis showed the total area occupied by the cells in the cross section of the tissue was approximately 73 %. Furthermore, the resulting muscle tissue fabricated from primary myoblasts showed typical sarcomeric cross-striations and the entire tissue continuously pulsated by autonomous contraction. Together with the in situ cross-linking, the string-shaped scaffold provides an efficient methodology to fabricate a cell-dense 3D muscle tissue, which could be applied in regenerative medicine in future. PMID:26472433

  12. Angiogenic Effects of Collagen/Mesoporous Nanoparticle Composite Scaffold Delivering VEGF165

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kang, Min Sil

    2016-01-01

    Vascularization is a key issue for the success of tissue engineering to repair damaged tissue. In this study, we report a composite scaffold delivering angiogenic factor for this purpose. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was loaded on mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN), which was then incorporated within a type I collagen sponge, to produce collagen/MSN/VEGF (CMV) scaffold. The CMV composite scaffold could release VEGF sustainably over the test period of 28 days. The release of VEGF improved the cell proliferation. Moreover, the in vivo angiogenesis of the scaffold, as studied by the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model, showed that the VEGF-releasing scaffold induced significantly increased number of blood vessel complexes when compared with VEGF-free scaffold. The composite scaffold showed good biocompatibility, as examined in rat subcutaneous tissue. These results demonstrate that the CMV scaffold with VEGF-releasing capacity can be potentially used to stimulate angiogenesis and tissue repair. PMID:27689093

  13. Angiogenic Effects of Collagen/Mesoporous Nanoparticle Composite Scaffold Delivering VEGF165

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kang, Min Sil

    2016-01-01

    Vascularization is a key issue for the success of tissue engineering to repair damaged tissue. In this study, we report a composite scaffold delivering angiogenic factor for this purpose. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was loaded on mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN), which was then incorporated within a type I collagen sponge, to produce collagen/MSN/VEGF (CMV) scaffold. The CMV composite scaffold could release VEGF sustainably over the test period of 28 days. The release of VEGF improved the cell proliferation. Moreover, the in vivo angiogenesis of the scaffold, as studied by the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model, showed that the VEGF-releasing scaffold induced significantly increased number of blood vessel complexes when compared with VEGF-free scaffold. The composite scaffold showed good biocompatibility, as examined in rat subcutaneous tissue. These results demonstrate that the CMV scaffold with VEGF-releasing capacity can be potentially used to stimulate angiogenesis and tissue repair.

  14. Time-Dependent Effects of Pre-Aging 3D Polymer Scaffolds in Cell Culture Medium on Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Kaushik; Hung, Stevephen; Kumar, Girish; Simon, Carl G

    2012-01-01

    Protein adsorption is known to direct biological response to biomaterials and is important in determining cellular response in tissue scaffolds. In this study we investigated the effect of the duration of protein adsorption to 3D polymer scaffolds on cell attachment and proliferation. 3D macro-porous polymer scaffolds were pre-aged in serum-containing culture medium for 5 min, 1 d or 7 d prior to seeding osteoblasts. The total amount of protein adsorbed was found to increase with pre-ageing time. Cell attachment and proliferation were measured 1 d and 14 d, respectively, after cell seeding. Osteoblast proliferation, but not attachment, increased with scaffold pre-ageing time and amount of adsorbed serum protein. These results demonstrate that the amount of time that scaffolds are exposed to serum-containing medium can affect cell proliferation and suggest that these effects are mediated by differences in the amount of protein adsorption.

  15. Design control for clinical translation of 3D printed modular scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hollister, Scott J; Flanagan, Colleen L; Zopf, David A; Morrison, Robert J; Nasser, Hassan; Patel, Janki J; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Sangiorgio, Sophia N; Wheeler, Matthew B; Green, Glenn E

    2015-03-01

    founded on 3D printing for developing tissue engineering therapies and (2) illustrate the design control process for modular implementation of two scaffold based tissue engineering therapies: airway reconstruction and bone tissue engineering based spine fusion. PMID:25666115

  16. Design Control for Clinical Translation of 3D Printed Modular Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Hollister, Scott J.; Flanagan, Colleen L.; Zopf, David A.; Morrison, Robert J.; Nasser, Hassan; Patel, Janki J.; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Sangiorgio, Sophia N.; Wheeler, Matthew B.; Green, Glenn E.

    2015-01-01

    founded on 3D printing for developing tissue engineering therapies and (2) illustrate the design control process for modular implementation of two scaffold based tissue engineering therapies: airway reconstruction and bone tissue engineering based spine fusion. PMID:25666115

  17. Design control for clinical translation of 3D printed modular scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hollister, Scott J; Flanagan, Colleen L; Zopf, David A; Morrison, Robert J; Nasser, Hassan; Patel, Janki J; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Sangiorgio, Sophia N; Wheeler, Matthew B; Green, Glenn E

    2015-03-01

    founded on 3D printing for developing tissue engineering therapies and (2) illustrate the design control process for modular implementation of two scaffold based tissue engineering therapies: airway reconstruction and bone tissue engineering based spine fusion.

  18. MCPIP1 regulates fibroblast migration in 3D collagen matrices downstream of MAP kinases and NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jie; Dai, Xiaoniu; Peña, Tiffany; Doyle, David A.; Guenther, Timothy M.; Carlson, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The fibroblast-populated 3D collagen matrix has been used to model matrix contraction, cell motility, and general fibroblast biology. MCPIP1 (monocyte chemotactic protein-induced protein 1) has been shown to regulate inflammation, angiogenesis, and cellular motility. In the present study, we demonstrated induction of MCPIP1 in human fibroblasts embedded in the stress-released 3D collagen matrix, which occurred through activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, and NF-κB. Furthermore, MCPIP1 induction was associated with inhibition of fibroblast migration out of the nested collagen matrix. MCPIP1 induction or ectopic expression also upregulated p53. RNA interference of p53 prevented the inhibition of migration produced by induction or ectopic expression of MCPIP1. Our findings suggest a new role for MCPIP1 as a molecular switch that regulates fibroblast migration in the nested collagen matrix model. PMID:26399696

  19. Collagen scaffolds derived from fresh water fish origin and their biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Pati, Falguni; Datta, Pallab; Adhikari, Basudam; Dhara, Santanu; Ghosh, Kuntal; Das Mohapatra, Pradeep Kumar

    2012-04-01

    Collagen, a major component of native extracellular matrix, has diverse biomedical applications. However, its application is limited due to lack of cost-effective production and risk of disease transmission from bovine sources currently utilized. This study describes fabrication and characterization of nano/micro fibrous scaffolds utilizing collagen extracted from fresh water fish origin. This is the first time collagen extracted from fresh water fish origin was studied for their biocompatibility and immunogenicity. The nano/micro fibrous collagen scaffolds were fabricated through self-assembly owing to its amphiphilic nature and were subsequently cross-linked. In vitro degradation study revealed higher stability of the cross-linked scaffolds with only ~50% reduction of mass in 30 days, while the uncross-linked one degraded completely in 4 days. Further, minimal inflammatory response was observed when collagen solution was injected in mice with or without adjuvant, without significant dilution of sera. The fish collagen scaffolds exhibited considerable cell viability and were comparable with that of bovine collagen. SEM and fluorescence microscopic analysis revealed significant proliferation rate of cells on the scaffolds and within 5 days the cells were fully confluent. These findings indicated that fish collagen scaffolds derived from fresh water origin were highly biocompatible in nature.

  20. Collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold incorporated with PLGA microsphere for cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhua; Yang, Qiu; Cheng, Niangmei; Tao, Xiaojun; Zhang, Zhihua; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Qiqing

    2016-04-01

    For cartilage repair, ideal scaffolds should mimic natural extracellular matrix (ECM) exhibiting excellent characteristics, such as biocompatibility, suitable porosity, and good cell affinity. This study aimed to prepare a collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold incorporated with poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microsphere that can be applied in repairing cartilage. To obtain optimum conditions for manufacturing a composite scaffold, a scaffold composed of different collagen-to-silk fibroin ratios was evaluated by determining porosity, water absorption, loss rate in hot water, and cell proliferation. Results suggested that the optimal ratio of collagen and silk fibroin composite scaffold was 7:3. The microstructure and morphological characteristics of the obtained scaffold were also examined through scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results of in vitro fluorescence staining of bone marrow stromal cells revealed that collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold enhanced cell proliferation without eliciting side effects. The prepared composite scaffold incorporated with PLGA microsphere was implanted in fully thick articular cartilage defects in rabbits. Collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold with PLGA microspheres could enhance articular cartilage regeneration and integration between the repaired cartilage and the surrounding cartilage. Therefore, this composite will be a promising material for cartilage repair and regeneration.

  1. Collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold incorporated with PLGA microsphere for cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhua; Yang, Qiu; Cheng, Niangmei; Tao, Xiaojun; Zhang, Zhihua; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Qiqing

    2016-04-01

    For cartilage repair, ideal scaffolds should mimic natural extracellular matrix (ECM) exhibiting excellent characteristics, such as biocompatibility, suitable porosity, and good cell affinity. This study aimed to prepare a collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold incorporated with poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microsphere that can be applied in repairing cartilage. To obtain optimum conditions for manufacturing a composite scaffold, a scaffold composed of different collagen-to-silk fibroin ratios was evaluated by determining porosity, water absorption, loss rate in hot water, and cell proliferation. Results suggested that the optimal ratio of collagen and silk fibroin composite scaffold was 7:3. The microstructure and morphological characteristics of the obtained scaffold were also examined through scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results of in vitro fluorescence staining of bone marrow stromal cells revealed that collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold enhanced cell proliferation without eliciting side effects. The prepared composite scaffold incorporated with PLGA microsphere was implanted in fully thick articular cartilage defects in rabbits. Collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold with PLGA microspheres could enhance articular cartilage regeneration and integration between the repaired cartilage and the surrounding cartilage. Therefore, this composite will be a promising material for cartilage repair and regeneration. PMID:26838900

  2. Control of crosslinking for tailoring collagen-based scaffolds stability and mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Davidenko, N.; Schuster, C.F.; Bax, D.V.; Raynal, N.; Farndale, R.W.; Best, S.M.; Cameron, R.E.

    2015-01-01

    We provide evidence to show that the standard reactant concentrations used in tissue engineering to cross-link collagen-based scaffolds are up to 100 times higher than required for mechanical integrity in service, and stability against degradation in an aqueous environment. We demonstrate this with a detailed and systematic study by comparing scaffolds made from (a) collagen from two different suppliers, (b) gelatin (a partially denatured collagen) and (c) 50% collagen–50% gelatin mixtures. The materials were processed, using lyophilisation, to produce homogeneous, highly porous scaffolds with isotropic architectures and pore diameters ranging from 130 to 260 μm. Scaffolds were cross-linked using a carbodiimide treatment, to establish the effect of the variations in crosslinking conditions (down to very low concentrations) on the morphology, swelling, degradation and mechanical properties of the scaffolds. Carbodiimide concentration of 11.5 mg/ml was defined as the standard (100%) and was progressively diluted down to 0.1%. It was found that 10-fold reduction in the carbodiimide content led to the significant increase (almost 4-fold) in the amount of free amine groups (primarily on collagen lysine residues) without compromising mechanics and stability in water of all resultant scaffolds. The importance of this finding is that, by reducing cross-linking, the corresponding cell-reactive carboxylate anions (collagen glutamate or aspartate residues) that are essential for integrin-mediated binding remain intact. Indeed, a 10-fold reduction in carbodiimide crosslinking resulted in near native-like cell attachment to collagen scaffolds. We have demonstrated that controlling the degree of cross-linking, and hence retaining native scaffold chemistry, offers a major step forward in the biological performance of collagen- and gelatin-based tissue engineering scaffolds. Statement of Significance This work developed collagen and gelatine-based scaffolds with structural

  3. High thick layer-by-layer 3D multiscale fibrous scaffolds for enhanced cell infiltration and it's potential in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Shalumon, K T; Chennazhi, K P; Nair, Shantikumar V; Jayakumar, R

    2013-12-01

    This work explains the fabrication and potential applicability of high thick three dimensional (3-D) electrospun multiscale fibrous scaffolds in tissue engineering by focusing on the possible fabrication techniques. Multiscale fibrous scaffold of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) was fabricated by combining nano and micro fibers in optimum concentrations. Finely chopped multiscale fibers were allowed to undergo compression, freeze-drying, resin embedding, cryo-grinding and layering techniques to make 3D scaffolds and the layer-by-layer method was found to be most suitable for 3-D scaffold fabrication. Cell studies in layered 3D scaffolds were performed using MG 63 cells and infiltration was observed using SEM and confocal microscope. Since the layered high thick 3D scaffold perfectly complies with the requirements, this could be proposed as one of the suitable methods for constructing 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. PMID:24266265

  4. The use of collagen-based scaffolds to simulate prostate cancer bone metastases with potential for evaluating delivery of nanoparticulate gene therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kathleen A; Guo, Jianfeng; Tierney, Erica G; Curtin, Caroline M; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Darcy, Raphael; O'Brien, Fergal J; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2015-10-01

    Prostate cancer bone metastases are a leading cause of cancer-related death in men with current treatments offering only marginally improved rates of survival. Advances in the understanding of the genetic basis of prostate cancer provide the opportunity to develop gene-based medicines capable of treating metastatic disease. The aim of this work was to establish a 3D cell culture model of prostate cancer bone metastasis using collagen-based scaffolds, to characterise this model, and to assess the potential of the model to evaluate delivery of gene therapeutics designed to target bone metastases. Two prostate cancer cell lines (PC3 and LNCaP) were cultured in 2D standard culture and compared to 3D cell growth on three different collagen-based scaffolds (collagen and composites of collagen containing either glycosaminoglycan or nanohydroxyapatite). The 3D model was characterised for cell proliferation, viability and for matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) enzyme and Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) secretion. Chemosensitivity to docetaxel treatment was assessed in 2D in comparison to 3D. Nanoparticles (NPs) containing siRNA formulated using a modified cyclodextrin were delivered to the cells on the scaffolds and gene silencing was quantified. Both prostate cancer cell lines actively infiltrated and proliferated on the scaffolds. Cell culture in 3D resulted in reduced levels of MMP1 and MMP9 secretion in PC3 cells. In contrast, LNCaP cells grown in 3D secreted elevated levels of PSA, particularly on the scaffold composed of collagen and glycosaminoglycans. Both cell lines grown in 3D displayed increased resistance to docetaxel treatment. The cyclodextrin.siRNA nanoparticles achieved cellular uptake and knocked down the endogenous GAPDH gene in the 3D model. In conclusion, development of a novel 3D cell culture model of prostate cancer bone metastasis has been initiated resulting, for the first time, in the successful delivery of gene therapeutics in a 3D in vitro model

  5. Fabrication and Characterization of Biomimetic Collagen-Apatite Scaffolds with Tunable Structures for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zengmin; Yu, Xiaohua; Jiang, Xi; Brody, Harold D; Rowe, David W; Wei, Mei

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the current study is to prepare a biomimetic collagen-apatite (Col-Ap) scaffold for improved bone repair and regeneration. A novel bottom-up approach has been developed, which combines a biomimetic self-assembly method with a controllable freeze casting technology. In this study, the mineralized collagen fibers were generated using a simple one-step co-precipitation method which involved collagen self-assembly and in situ apatite precipitation in a collagen-containing modified simulated body fluid (m-SBF). The precipitates were subjected to controllable freeze casting, forming scaffolds with either an isotropic equiaxed structure or a unidirectional lamellar structure. These scaffolds were comprised of collagen fibers and poorly crystalline bone-like carbonated apatite nanoparticles. The mineral content in the scaffold could be tailored in a range 0–54 wt% by simply adjusting the collagen content in the m-SBF. Further, the mechanisms of the formation of both the equiaxed and the lamellar scaffolds were investigated, and freezing regimes for equiaxed and lamellar solidification were established. Finally, bone forming capability of such prepared scaffolds was evaluated in vivo in a mouse calvarial defect model. It was confirmed that the scaffolds well support new bone formation. PMID:23567944

  6. Preliminary study of surface modification of 3D Poly (ɛ - caprolactone) scaffolds by ultrashort laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalova, A.; Bliznakova, I.; Iordanova, E.; Yankov, G.; Grozeva, M.; Ostrowska, B.

    2016-02-01

    Three - dimensional poly (e- caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds as suitable biocompatible material for manufacturing tissue replacements are utilized for tissue engineering purposes. The porous structures are fabricated by rapid prototyping method (Bioscaffolder) based on hypodermic dispensing process. The consecution of experiments demonstrated the possibility on creation of surface micro formations, applying different laser fluences, at 1 kHz repetition rate for fixed time of exposure 1 sec at 800 nm central wavelength. The combination of both methods offers possibilities for successful production of 3D matrices with modified surfaces. The obtained results of laser - induced surface modifications of PCL demonstrate the potential of the method to microprocess this kind of material for possible applications in regenerative medicine.

  7. Comparison of three types of chondrocytes in collagen scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Spector, Myron

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the chondrogenesis in type I and II collagen scaffolds seeded with chondrocytes from three types of cartilage, after four weeks of culture: auricular (AU), articular (AR) and meniscal (ME). Related aims were to investigate the expression of a contractile muscle actin isoform, alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA), in the cells in the scaffold and to determine the presence of a lubricating glycoprotein, lubricin, in the constructs. Adult goat AU, AR and ME chondrocytes were seeded into two types of collagen scaffolds: type II collagen and type I/III collagen. After four weeks of culture, the constructs were prepared for histochemical and immunohistochemical analysis of the distribution of glycosaminoglycan (GAG), types I and II collagen, elastin, SM and lubricin. AU constructs contained substantially more tissue than the AR and ME samples. The AU constructs exhibited neocartilage, but no elastin. There were no notable differences between the type I and II collagen scaffolds. Novel findings were the expression of SMA by the AU cells in the scaffolds and the presence of lubricin in the AR and AU constructs. AU cells have the capability to produce cartilage in collagen scaffolds under conditions in which there is little histogenesis by AR and ME cells.

  8. Fabrication of 3D tissue equivalent: an in vitro platform for understanding collagen evolution in healthy and diseased models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urciuolo, F.; Imparato, G.; Casale, C.; Scamardella, S.; Netti, P.

    2013-04-01

    In this study we realized a three-dimensional human dermis equivalent (3D-HDE) and, by exploiting multi-photon microscopy (MPM) we validated its use as an in vitro model to study collagen network re-arrangement under simulated solar exposure. The realization of 3D-HDE has been pursed by means of a bottom-up tissue engineering strategy that comprises firstly the fabrication of micron sized tissue building blocks and then their assembly in a 3D tissue construct. The building blocks injected in a maturation chamber, and cultured under optimized culture condition, were able to fuse due to the establishment of cell-cell and cell-extra cellular matrix (ECM) interactions that induced a biological sintering process resulting in 3D-HDE production. The final 3D tissue was made-up by fibroblasts embedded in their own ECM rich in endogenous collagen type I, resembling the composition and the architecture of native human dermis. Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (TPEF) imaging have been exploited to assess modification in collagen assembly before and after UV irradiation. Textural features and SHG to TPFE ratio of the endogenous ECM within 3D-HDE have been shown to vary after UVA irradiation, proving the hypothesis that the 3DHDE realized can be used as biological platform in vitro to study ECM modifications induced by photo-damage.

  9. Tuning the Mechanical Properties of Poly(Ethylene Glycol) Microgel-Based Scaffolds to Increase 3D Schwann Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenda; Stukel, Jessica M; Cebull, Hannah L; Willits, Rebecca Kuntz

    2016-04-01

    2D in vitro studies have demonstrated that Schwann cells prefer scaffolds with mechanical modulus approximately 10× higher than the modulus preferred by nerves, limiting the ability of many scaffolds to promote both neuron extension and Schwann cell proliferation. Therefore, the goals of this work are to develop and characterize microgel-based scaffolds that are tuned over the stiffness range relevant to neural tissue engineering and investigate Schwann cell morphology, viability, and proliferation within 3D scaffolds. Using thiol-ene reaction, microgels with surface thiols are produced and crosslinked into hydrogels using a multiarm vinylsulfone (VS). By varying the concentration of VS, scaffold stiffness ranges from 0.13 to 0.76 kPa. Cell morphology in all groups demonstrates that cells are able to spread and interact with the scaffold through day 5. Although the viability in all groups is high, proliferation of Schwann cells within the scaffold of G* = 0.53 kPa is significantly higher than other groups. This result is ≈ 5× lower than previously reported optimal stiffnesses on 2D surfaces, demonstrating the need for correlation of 3D cell response to mechanical modulus. As proliferation is the first step in Schwann cell integration into peripheral nerve conduits, these scaffolds demonstrate that the stiffness is a critical parameter to optimizing the regenerative process.

  10. Manipulation of in vitro collagen matrix architecture for scaffolds of improved physiological relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapach, Lauren A.; VanderBurgh, Jacob A.; Miller, Joseph P.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2015-12-01

    Type I collagen is a versatile biomaterial that is widely used in medical applications due to its weak antigenicity, robust biocompatibility, and its ability to be modified for a wide array of applications. As such, collagen has become a major component of many tissue engineering scaffolds, drug delivery platforms, and substrates for in vitro cell culture. In these applications, collagen constructs are fabricated to recapitulate a diverse set of conditions. Collagen fibrils can be aligned during or post-fabrication, cross-linked via numerous techniques, polymerized to create various fibril sizes and densities, and copolymerized into a wide array of composite scaffolds. Here, we review approaches that have been used to tune collagen to better recapitulate physiological environments for use in tissue engineering applications and studies of basic cell behavior. We discuss techniques to control fibril alignment, methods for cross-linking collagen constructs to modulate stiffness, and composite collagen constructs to better mimic physiological extracellular matrix.

  11. Manipulation of in vitro collagen matrix architecture for scaffolds of improved physiological relevance.

    PubMed

    Hapach, Lauren A; VanderBurgh, Jacob A; Miller, Joseph P; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen is a versatile biomaterial that is widely used in medical applications due to its weak antigenicity, robust biocompatibility, and its ability to be modified for a wide array of applications. As such, collagen has become a major component of many tissue engineering scaffolds, drug delivery platforms, and substrates for in vitro cell culture. In these applications, collagen constructs are fabricated to recapitulate a diverse set of conditions. Collagen fibrils can be aligned during or post-fabrication, cross-linked via numerous techniques, polymerized to create various fibril sizes and densities, and copolymerized into a wide array of composite scaffolds. Here, we review approaches that have been used to tune collagen to better recapitulate physiological environments for use in tissue engineering applications and studies of basic cell behavior. We discuss techniques to control fibril alignment, methods for cross-linking collagen constructs to modulate stiffness, and composite collagen constructs to better mimic physiological extracellular matrix. PMID:26689380

  12. Efficient neuronal differentiation and maturation of human pluripotent stem cells encapsulated in 3D microfibrous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong Fang; Lim, Sze-Xian; Leong, Meng Fatt; Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Toh, Rebecca P K; Gao, Shujun; Wan, Andrew C A

    2012-12-01

    Developing an efficient culture system for controlled human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) differentiation into selected lineages is a major challenge in realizing stem cell-based clinical applications. Here, we report the use of chitin-alginate 3D microfibrous scaffolds, previously developed for hPSC propagation, to support efficient neuronal differentiation and maturation under chemically defined culture conditions. When treated with neural induction medium containing Noggin/retinoic acid, the encapsulated cells expressed much higher levels of neural progenitor markers SOX1 and PAX6 than those in other treatment conditions. Immunocytochemisty analysis confirmed that the majority of the differentiated cells were nestin-positive cells. Subsequently transferring the scaffolds to neuronal differentiation medium efficiently directed these encapsulated neural progenitors into mature neurons, as detected by RT-PCR and positive immunostaining for neuron markers βIII tubulin and MAP2. Furthermore, flow cytometry confirmed that >90% βIII tubulin-positive neurons was achieved for three independent iPSC and hESC lines, a differentiation efficiency much higher than previously reported. Implantation of these terminally differentiated neurons into SCID mice yielded successful neural grafts comprising MAP2 positive neurons, without tumorigenesis, suggesting a potential safe cell source for regenerative medicine. These results bring us one step closer toward realizing large-scale production of stem cell derivatives for clinical and translational applications. PMID:22998816

  13. Direct laser writing of 3D scaffolds for neural tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Melissinaki, V; Gill, A A; Ortega, I; Vamvakaki, M; Ranella, A; Haycock, J W; Fotakis, C; Farsari, M; Claeyssens, F

    2011-12-01

    This study reports on the production of high-resolution 3D structures of polylactide-based materials via multi-photon polymerization and explores their use as neural tissue engineering scaffolds. To achieve this, a liquid polylactide resin was synthesized in house and rendered photocurable via attaching methacrylate groups to the hydroxyl end groups of the small molecular weight prepolymer. This resin cures easily under UV irradiation, using a mercury lamp, and under femtosecond IR irradiation. The results showed that the photocurable polylactide (PLA) resin can be readily structured via direct laser write (DLW) with a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser and submicrometer structures can be produced. The maximum resolution achieved is 800 nm. Neuroblastoma cells were grown on thin films of the cured PLA material, and cell viability and proliferation assays revealed good biocompatibility of the material. Additionally, PC12 and NG108-15 neuroblastoma growth on bespoke scaffolds was studied in more detail to assess potential applications for neuronal implants of this material.

  14. Collagen esterification enhances the function and survival of pancreatic β cells in 2D and 3D culture systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Jae Hyung; Kim, Yang Hee; Jeong, Seong Hee; Lee, Song; Park, Si-Nae; Shim, In Kyong; Kim, Song Cheol

    2015-08-07

    Collagen, one of the most important components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), may play a role in the survival of pancreatic islet cells. In addition, chemical modifications that change the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification have been shown to increase the adhesion and proliferation of various cell types. The purpose of this study was to characterize and compare the effects of native collagen (NC) and esterified collagen (EC) on β cell function and survival. After isolation by the collagenase digestion technique, rat islets were cultured with NC and EC in 2 dimensional (2D) and 3 dimensional (3D) environments for a long-term duration in vitro. The cells were assessed for islet adhesion, morphology, viability, glucose-induced insulin secretion, and mRNA expression of glucose metabolism-related genes, and visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Islet cells attached tightly in the NC group, but islet cell viability was similar in both the NC and EC groups. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was higher in the EC group than in the NC group in both 2D and 3D culture. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of glucokinase in the EC group were higher than those in the NC group and were associated with glucose metabolism and insulin secretion. Finally, SEM observation confirmed that islets had more intact component cells on EC sponges than on NC sponges. These results indicate that modification of collagen may offer opportunities to improve function and viability of islet cells. - Highlights: • We changed the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen improved survival in both 2D and 3D culture. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin release. • High levels of glucokinase mRNA may be associated with increased insulin release.

  15. The effect of 3D hydrogel scaffold modulus on osteoblast differentiation and mineralization revealed by combinatorial screening.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Kaushik; Lin-Gibson, Sheng; Wallace, William E; Parekh, Sapun H; Lee, Young Jong; Cicerone, Marcus T; Young, Marian F; Simon, Carl G

    2010-07-01

    Cells are known to sense and respond to the physical properties of their environment and those of tissue scaffolds. Optimizing these cell-material interactions is critical in tissue engineering. In this work, a simple and inexpensive combinatorial platform was developed to rapidly screen three-dimensional (3D) tissue scaffolds and was applied to screen the effect of scaffold properties for tissue engineering of bone. Differentiation of osteoblasts was examined in poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel gradients spanning a 30-fold range in compressive modulus ( approximately 10 kPa to approximately 300 kPa). Results demonstrate that material properties (gel stiffness) of scaffolds can be leveraged to induce cell differentiation in 3D culture as an alternative to biochemical cues such as soluble supplements, immobilized biomolecules and vectors, which are often expensive, labile and potentially carcinogenic. Gel moduli of approximately 225 kPa and higher enhanced osteogenesis. Furthermore, it is proposed that material-induced cell differentiation can be modulated to engineer seamless tissue interfaces between mineralized bone tissue and softer tissues such as ligaments and tendons. This work presents a combinatorial method to screen biological response to 3D hydrogel scaffolds that more closely mimics the 3D environment experienced by cells in vivo.

  16. Collagen IV-Modified Scaffolds Improve Islet Survival and Function and Reduce Time to Euglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Woon Teck; Salvay, David M.; Silliman, Michael A.; Zhang, Xiaomin; Bannon, Zachary G.; Kaufman, Dixon B.; Lowe, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Islet transplantation on extracellular matrix (ECM) protein-modified biodegradable microporous poly(lactide-co-glycolide) scaffolds is a potential curative treatment for type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Collagen IV-modified scaffolds, relative to control scaffolds, significantly decreased the time required to restore euglycemia from 17 to 3 days. We investigated the processes by which collagen IV-modified scaffolds enhanced islet function and mediated early restoration of euglycemia post-transplantation. We characterized the effect of collagen IV-modified scaffolds on islet survival, metabolism, and insulin secretion in vitro and early- and intermediate-term islet mass and vascular density post-transplantation and correlated these with early restoration of euglycemia in a syngeneic mouse model. Control scaffolds maintained native islet morphologies and architectures as well as collagen IV-modified scaffolds in vivo. The islet size and vascular density increased, while β-cell proliferation decreased from day 16 to 113 post-transplantation. Collagen IV-modified scaffolds promoted islet cell viability and decreased early-stage apoptosis in islet cells in vitro—phenomena that coincided with enhanced islet metabolic function and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These findings suggest that collagen IV-modified scaffolds promote the early restoration of euglycemia post-transplantation by enhancing islet metabolism and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These studies of ECM proteins, in particular collagen IV, and islet function provide key insights for the engineering of a microenvironment that would serve as a platform for enhancing islet transplantation as a viable clinical therapy for T1DM. PMID:23713524

  17. Bio-printing of collagen and VEGF-releasing fibrin gel scaffolds for neural stem cell culture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeong-Bae; Polio, Samuel; Lee, Wonhye; Dai, Guohao; Menon, Lata; Carroll, Rona S; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2010-06-01

    Time-released delivery of soluble growth factors (GFs) in engineered hydrogel tissue constructs promotes the migration and proliferation of embedded cells, which is an important factor for designing scaffolds that ultimately aim for neural tissue regeneration. We report a tissue engineering technique to print murine neural stem cells (C17.2), collagen hydrogel, and GF (vascular endothelial growth factor: VEGF)-releasing fibrin gel to construct an artificial neural tissue. We examined the morphological changes of the printed C17.2 cells embedded in the collagen and its migration toward the fibrin gel. The cells showed high viability (92.89+/-2.32%) after printing, which was equivalent to that of manually-plated cells. C17.2 cells printed within 1mm from the border of VEGF-releasing fibrin gel showed GF-induced changes in their morphology. The cells printed in this range also migrated toward the fibrin gel, with the total migration distance of 102.4+/-76.1microm over 3days. The cells in the control samples (fibrin without the VEGF or VEGF printed directly in collagen) neither proliferated nor migrated. The results demonstrated that bio-printing of VEGF-containing fibrin gel supported sustained release of the GF in the collagen scaffold. The presented method can be gainfully used in the development of three-dimensional (3D) artificial tissue assays and neural tissue regeneration applications. PMID:20211178

  18. Combination of thermal extrusion printing and ultrafast laser fabrication for the manufacturing of 3D composite scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balčiūnas, Evaldas; Lukoševičius, Laurynas; Mackevičiūtė, Dovilė; Rekštytė, Sima; Rutkūnas, Vygandas; Paipulas, Domas; Stankevičiūtė, Karolina; Baltriukienė, Daiva; Bukelskienė, Virginija; Piskarskas, Algis P.; Malinauskas, Mangirdas

    2014-03-01

    We present a novel approach to manufacturing 3D microstructured composite scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. A thermal extrusion 3D printer - a simple, low-cost tabletop device enabling rapid materialization of CAD models in plastics - was used to produce cm-scale microporous scaffolds out of polylactic acid (PLA). The fabricated objects were subsequently immersed in a photosensitive monomer solution and direct laser writing technique (DLW) was used to refine its inner structure by fabricating a fine mesh inside the previously produced scaffold. In addition, a composite material structure out of four different materials fabricated via DLW is presented. This technique, empowered by ultrafast lasers allows 3D structuring with high spatial resolution in a great variety of photosensitive materials. A composite scaffold made of distinct materials and periodicities is acquired after the development process used to wash out non-linked monomers. Another way to modify the 3D printed PLA surfaces was also demonstrated - ablation with femtosecond laser beam. Structure geometry on macro- to micro- scales could be finely tuned by combining these fabrication techniques. Such artificial 3D substrates could be used for cell growth or as biocompatible-biodegradable implants. To our best knowledge, this is the first experimental demonstration showing the creation of composite 3D scaffolds using convenient 3D printing combined with DLW. This combination of distinct material processing techniques enables rapid fabrication of diverse functional micro-featured and integrated devices. Hopefully, the proposed approach will find numerous applications in the field of tissue engineering, as well as in microelectromechanical systems, microfluidics, microoptics and others.

  19. Hierarchical bioceramic scaffolds with 3D-plotted macropores and mussel-inspired surface nanolayers for stimulating osteogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mengchi; Zhai, Dong; Xia, Lunguo; Li, Hong; Chen, Shiyi; Fang, Bing; Chang, Jiang; Wu, Chengtie

    2016-07-01

    The hierarchical structure of biomaterials plays an important role in the process of tissue reconstruction and regeneration. 3D-plotted scaffolds have been widely used for bone tissue engineering due to their controlled macropore structure and mechanical properties. However, the lack of micro- or nano-structures on the strut surface of 3D-plotted scaffolds, especially for bioceramic scaffolds, limits their biological activity. Inspired by the adhesive versatility of mussels and the active ion-chelating capacity of polydopamine, we set out to prepare a hierarchical bioceramic scaffold with controlled macropores and mussel-inspired surface nanolayers by combining the 3D-plotting technique with the polydopamine/apatite hybrid strategy in order to synergistically accelerate the osteogenesis and angiogenesis. β-Tricalcium phosphate (TCP) scaffolds were firstly 3D-plotted and then treated in dopamine-Tris/HCl and dopamine-SBF solutions to obtain TCP-DOPA-Tris and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds, respectively. It was found that polydopamine/apatite hybrid nanolayers were formed on the surface of both TCP-DOPA-Tris and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds induced apatite mineralization for the second time during the cell culture. As compared to TCP scaffolds, both TCP-DOPA-Tris and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds significantly promoted the osteogenesis of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) as well as the angiogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and the TCP-DOPA-SBF group presented the highest in vitro osteogenic/angiogenic activity among the three groups. Furthermore, both TCP-DOPA-Tris and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds significantly improved the formation of new bone in vivo as compared to TCP scaffolds without a nanostructured surface. Our results suggest that the utilization of a mussel-inspired Ca, P-chelated polydopamine nanolayer on 3D-plotted bioceramic scaffolds is a viable and effective strategy to construct a hierarchical structure for synergistically

  20. Hierarchical bioceramic scaffolds with 3D-plotted macropores and mussel-inspired surface nanolayers for stimulating osteogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mengchi; Zhai, Dong; Xia, Lunguo; Li, Hong; Chen, Shiyi; Fang, Bing; Chang, Jiang; Wu, Chengtie

    2016-07-01

    The hierarchical structure of biomaterials plays an important role in the process of tissue reconstruction and regeneration. 3D-plotted scaffolds have been widely used for bone tissue engineering due to their controlled macropore structure and mechanical properties. However, the lack of micro- or nano-structures on the strut surface of 3D-plotted scaffolds, especially for bioceramic scaffolds, limits their biological activity. Inspired by the adhesive versatility of mussels and the active ion-chelating capacity of polydopamine, we set out to prepare a hierarchical bioceramic scaffold with controlled macropores and mussel-inspired surface nanolayers by combining the 3D-plotting technique with the polydopamine/apatite hybrid strategy in order to synergistically accelerate the osteogenesis and angiogenesis. β-Tricalcium phosphate (TCP) scaffolds were firstly 3D-plotted and then treated in dopamine-Tris/HCl and dopamine-SBF solutions to obtain TCP-DOPA-Tris and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds, respectively. It was found that polydopamine/apatite hybrid nanolayers were formed on the surface of both TCP-DOPA-Tris and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds induced apatite mineralization for the second time during the cell culture. As compared to TCP scaffolds, both TCP-DOPA-Tris and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds significantly promoted the osteogenesis of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) as well as the angiogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and the TCP-DOPA-SBF group presented the highest in vitro osteogenic/angiogenic activity among the three groups. Furthermore, both TCP-DOPA-Tris and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds significantly improved the formation of new bone in vivo as compared to TCP scaffolds without a nanostructured surface. Our results suggest that the utilization of a mussel-inspired Ca, P-chelated polydopamine nanolayer on 3D-plotted bioceramic scaffolds is a viable and effective strategy to construct a hierarchical structure for synergistically

  1. A 3D similarity method for scaffold hopping from known drugs or natural ligands to new chemotypes.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Jeremy L; Glick, Meir; Davies, John W

    2004-12-01

    A primary goal of 3D similarity searching is to find compounds with similar bioactivity to a reference ligand but with different chemotypes, i.e., "scaffold hopping". However, an adequate description of chemical structures in 3D conformational space is difficult due to the high-dimensionality of the problem. We present an automated method that simplifies flexible 3D chemical descriptions in which clustering techniques traditionally used in data mining are exploited to create "fuzzy" molecular representations called FEPOPS (feature point pharmacophores). The representations can be used for flexible 3D similarity searching given one or more active compounds without a priori knowledge of bioactive conformations or pharmacophores. We demonstrate that similarity searching with FEPOPS significantly enriches for actives taken from in-house high-throughput screening datasets and from MDDR activity classes COX-2, 5-HT3A, and HIV-RT, while also scaffold or ring-system hopping to new chemical frameworks. Further, inhibitors of target proteins (dopamine 2 and retinoic acid receptor) are recalled by FEPOPS by scaffold hopping from their associated endogenous ligands (dopamine and retinoic acid). Importantly, the method excels in comparison to commonly used 2D similarity methods (DAYLIGHT, MACCS, Pipeline Pilot fingerprints) and a commercial 3D method (Pharmacophore Distance Triplets) at finding novel scaffold classes given a single query molecule.

  2. Novel Vanadium-Loaded Ordered Collagen Scaffold Promotes Osteochondral Differentiation of Bone Marrow Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cortizo, Ana M.; Ruderman, Graciela; Mazzini, Flavia N.; Molinuevo, M. Silvina; Mogilner, Ines G.

    2016-01-01

    Bone and cartilage regeneration can be improved by designing a functionalized biomaterial that includes bioactive drugs in a biocompatible and biodegradable scaffold. Based on our previous studies, we designed a vanadium-loaded collagen scaffold for osteochondral tissue engineering. Collagen-vanadium loaded scaffolds were characterized by SEM, FTIR, and permeability studies. Rat bone marrow progenitor cells were plated on collagen or vanadium-loaded membranes to evaluate differences in cell attachment, growth and osteogenic or chondrocytic differentiation. The potential cytotoxicity of the scaffolds was assessed by the MTT assay and by evaluation of morphological changes in cultured RAW 264.7 macrophages. Our results show that loading of VOAsc did not alter the grooved ordered structure of the collagen membrane although it increased membrane permeability, suggesting a more open structure. The VOAsc was released to the media, suggesting diffusion-controlled drug release. Vanadium-loaded membranes proved to be a better substratum than C0 for all evaluated aspects of BMPC biocompatibility (adhesion, growth, and osteoblastic and chondrocytic differentiation). In addition, there was no detectable effect of collagen or vanadium-loaded scaffolds on macrophage viability or cytotoxicity. Based on these findings, we have developed a new ordered collagen scaffold loaded with VOAsc that shows potential for osteochondral tissue engineering. PMID:27293438

  3. FTIR spectro-imaging of collagen scaffold formation during glioma tumor development.

    PubMed

    Noreen, Razia; Chien, Chia-Chi; Chen, Hsiang-Hsin; Bobroff, Vladimir; Moenner, Michel; Javerzat, Sophie; Hwu, Yeukuang; Petibois, Cyril

    2013-11-01

    Evidence has recently emerged that solid and diffuse tumors produce a specific extracellular matrix (ECM) for division and diffusion, also developing a specific interface with microvasculature. This ECM is mainly composed of collagens and their scaffolding appears to drive tumor growth. Although collagens are not easily analyzable by UV-fluorescence means, FTIR imaging has appeared as a valuable tool to characterize collagen contents in tissues, specially the brain, where ECM is normally devoid of collagen proteins. Here, we used FTIR imaging to characterize collagen content changes in growing glioma tumors. We could determine that C6-derived solid tumors presented high content of triple helix after 8-11 days of growth (typical of collagen fibrils formation; 8/8 tumor samples; 91 % of total variance), and further turned to larger α-helix (days 12-15; 9/10 of tumors; 94 % of variance) and β-turns (day 18-21; 7/8 tumors; 97 % of variance) contents, which suggest the incorporation of non-fibrillar collagen types in ECM, a sign of more and more organized collagen scaffold along tumor progression. The growth of tumors was also associated to the level of collagen produced (P < 0.05). This study thus confirms that collagen scaffolding is a major event accompanying the angiogenic shift and faster tumor growth in solid glioma phenotypes. PMID:24068168

  4. Strategies for Directing the Structure and Function of 3D Collagen Biomaterials across Length Scales

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Brandan D.; Stegemann, Jan P.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen type I is a widely used natural biomaterial that has found utility in a variety of biological and medical applications. Its well characterized structure and role as an extracellular matrix protein make it a highly relevant material for controlling cell function and mimicking tissue properties. Collagen type I is abundant in a number of tissues, and can be isolated as a purified protein. This review focuses on hydrogel biomaterials made by reconstituting collagen type I from a solubilized form, with an emphasis on in vitro studies in which collagen structure can be controlled. The hierarchical structure of collagen from the nanoscale to the macroscale is described, with an emphasis on how structure is related to function across scales. Methods of reconstituting collagen into hydrogel materials are presented, including molding of macroscopic constructs, creation of microscale modules, and electrospinning of nanoscale fibers. The modification of collagen biomaterials to achieve desired structures and functions is also addressed, with particular emphasis on mechanical control of collagen structure, creation of collagen composite materials, and crosslinking of collagenous matrices. Biomaterials scientists have made remarkable progress in rationally designing collagen-based biomaterials and in applying them to both the study of biology and for therapeutic benefit. This broad review illustrates recent examples of techniques used to control collagen structure, and to thereby direct its biological and mechanical functions. PMID:24012608

  5. Flexible Fabrication of Shape-Controlled Collagen Building Blocks for Self-Assembly of 3D Microtissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Meng, Zhaoxu; Ma, Jingyun; Shi, Yang; Xu, Hui; Lykkemark, Simon; Qin, Jianhua

    2015-08-12

    Creating artificial tissue-like structures that possess the functionality, specificity, and architecture of native tissues remains a big challenge. A new and straightforward strategy for generating shape-controlled collagen building blocks with a well-defined architecture is presented, which can be used for self-assembly of complex 3D microtissues. Collagen blocks with tunable geometries are controllably produced and released via a membrane-templated microdevice. The formation of functional microtissues by embedding tissue-specific cells into collagen blocks with expression of specific proteins is described. The spontaneous self-assembly of cell-laden collagen blocks into organized tissue constructs with predetermined configurations is demonstrated, which are largely driven by the synergistic effects of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. This new strategy would open up new avenues for the study of tissue/organ morphogenesis, and tissue engineering applications.

  6. Flexible Fabrication of Shape-Controlled Collagen Building Blocks for Self-Assembly of 3D Microtissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Meng, Zhaoxu; Ma, Jingyun; Shi, Yang; Xu, Hui; Lykkemark, Simon; Qin, Jianhua

    2015-08-12

    Creating artificial tissue-like structures that possess the functionality, specificity, and architecture of native tissues remains a big challenge. A new and straightforward strategy for generating shape-controlled collagen building blocks with a well-defined architecture is presented, which can be used for self-assembly of complex 3D microtissues. Collagen blocks with tunable geometries are controllably produced and released via a membrane-templated microdevice. The formation of functional microtissues by embedding tissue-specific cells into collagen blocks with expression of specific proteins is described. The spontaneous self-assembly of cell-laden collagen blocks into organized tissue constructs with predetermined configurations is demonstrated, which are largely driven by the synergistic effects of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. This new strategy would open up new avenues for the study of tissue/organ morphogenesis, and tissue engineering applications. PMID:25920010

  7. Electrospun PLGA-silk fibroin-collagen nanofibrous scaffolds for nerve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanglin; Hu, Xudong; Lin, Wei; Dong, Changchao; Wu, Hui

    2011-03-01

    Electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds varying different materials are fabricated for tissue engineering. PLGA, silk fibroin, and collagen-derived scaffolds have been proved on good biocompatibility with neurons. However, no systematic studies have been performed to examine the PLGA-silk fibroin-collagen (PLGA-SF-COL) biocomposite fiber matrices for nerve tissue engineering. In this study, different weight ratio PLGA-SF-COL (50:25:25, 30:35:35) scaffolds were produced via electrospinning. The physical and mechanical properties were tested. The average fiber diameter ranged from 280 + 26 to 168 + 21 nm with high porosity and hydrophilicity; the tensile strength was 1.76 ± 0.32 and 1.25 ± 0.20 Mpa, respectively. The results demonstrated that electrospinning polymer blending is a simple and effective approach for fabricating novel biocomposite nanofibrous scaffolds. The properties of the scaffolds can be strongly influenced by the concentration of collagen and silk fibroin in the biocomposite. To assay the cytocompatibility, Schwann cells were seeded on the scaffolds; cell attachment, growth morphology, and proliferation were studied. SEM and MTT results confirmed that PLGA-SF-COL scaffolds particularly the one that contains 50% PLGA, 25% silk fibroin, and 25% collagen is more suitable for nerve tissue engineering compared to PLGA nanofibrous scaffolds. PMID:21181450

  8. Differentiation of human endometrial stem cells into urothelial cells on a three-dimensional nanofibrous silk-collagen scaffold: an autologous cell resource for reconstruction of the urinary bladder wall.

    PubMed

    Shoae-Hassani, Alireza; Mortazavi-Tabatabaei, Seyed Abdolreza; Sharif, Shiva; Seifalian, Alexander Marcus; Azimi, Alireza; Samadikuchaksaraei, Ali; Verdi, Javad

    2015-11-01

    Reconstruction of the bladder wall via in vitro differentiated stem cells on an appropriate scaffold could be used in such conditions as cancer and neurogenic urinary bladder. This study aimed to examine the potential of human endometrial stem cells (EnSCs) to form urinary bladder epithelial cells (urothelium) on nanofibrous silk-collagen scaffolds, for construction of the urinary bladder wall. After passage 4, EnSCs were induced by keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) and seeded on electrospun collagen-V, silk and silk-collagen nanofibres. Later we tested urothelium-specific genes and proteins (uroplakin-Ia, uroplakin-Ib, uroplakin-II, uroplakin-III and cytokeratin 20) by immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR and western blot analyses. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and histology were used to detect cell-matrix interactions. DMEM/F12 supplemented by KGF and EGF induced EnSCs to express urothelial cell-specific genes and proteins. Either collagen, silk or silk-collagen scaffolds promoted cell proliferation. The nanofibrous silk-collagen scaffolds provided a three-dimensional (3D) structure to maximize cell-matrix penetration and increase differentiation of the EnSCs. Human EnSCs seeded on 3D nanofibrous silk-collagen scaffolds and differentiated to urothelial cells provide a suitable source for potential use in bladder wall reconstruction in women.

  9. The fabrication of double layer tubular vascular tissue engineering scaffold via coaxial electrospinning and its 3D cell coculture.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lin; Cao, Jie; Chen, Lamei; Geng, Xue; Zhang, Ai-Ying; Guo, Lian-Rui; Gu, Yong-Quan; Feng, Zeng-Guo

    2015-12-01

    A continuous electrospinning technique was applied to fabricate double layer tubular tissue engineering vascular graft (TEVG) scaffold. The luminal layer was made from poly(ɛ-caprolac-tone)(PCL) ultrafine fibers via common single axial electrospinning followed by the outer layer of core-shell structured nanofibers via coaxial electrospinning. For preparing the outer layernano-fibers, the PCL was electrospun into the shell and both bovine serum albumin (BSA) and tetrapeptide val-gal-pro-gly (VAPG) were encapsulated into the core. The core-shell structure in the outer layer fibers was observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM). The in vitro release tests exhibited the sustainable release behavior of BSA and VAPG so that they provided a better cell growth environment in the interior of tubular scaffold wall. The in vitro culture of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) demonstrated their potential to penetrate into the scaffold wall for the 3D cell culture. Subsequently, 3D cell coculture was conducted. First, SMCs were seeded on the luminal surface of the scaffold and cultured for 5 days, and then endothelial cells (ECs) were also seeded on the luminal surface and cocultured with SMCs for another 2 days. After stained with antibodies, 3D cell distribution on the scaffold was revealed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) where ECs were mainly located on the luminal surface whereas SMCs penetrated into the surface and distributed inside the scaffold wall. This double layer tubular scaffold with 3D cell distribution showed the promise to develop it into a novel TEVG for clinical trials in the near future.

  10. Long-term effects of knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and osteoarthritis prevention.

    PubMed

    Shen, Weiliang; Chen, Xiao; Hu, Yejun; Yin, Zi; Zhu, Ting; Hu, Jiajie; Chen, Jialin; Zheng, Zefeng; Zhang, Wei; Ran, Jisheng; Heng, Boon Chin; Ji, Junfeng; Chen, Weishan; Ouyang, Hong-Wei

    2014-09-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is difficult to heal after injury due to the dynamic fluid environment of joint. Previously, we have achieved satisfactory regeneration of subcutaneous tendon/ligament with knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold due to its specific "internal-space-preservation" property. This study aims to investigate the long-term effects of knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold on ACL regeneration and osteoarthritis prevention. The knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold was fabricated and implanted into a rabbit ACL injury model. The knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold was found to enhance migration and adhesion of spindle-shaped cells into the scaffold at 2 months post-surgery. After 6 months, ACL treated with the knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold exhibited increased expression of ligament genes and better microstructural morphology. After 18 months, the knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold-treated group had more mature ligament structure and direct ligament-to-bone healing. Implanted knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffolds degraded much more slowly compared to subcutaneous implantation. Furthermore, the knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold effectively protected joint surface cartilage and preserved joint space for up to 18 months post-surgery. These findings thus demonstrated that the knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold can regenerate functional ACL and prevent osteoarthritis in the long-term, suggesting its clinical use as a functional bioscaffold for ACL reconstruction.

  11. Engineering anatomically shaped vascularized bone grafts with hASCs and 3D-printed PCL scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Temple, Joshua P; Hutton, Daphne L; Hung, Ben P; Huri, Pinar Yilgor; Cook, Colin A; Kondragunta, Renu; Jia, Xiaofeng; Grayson, Warren L

    2014-12-01

    The treatment of large craniomaxillofacial bone defects is clinically challenging due to the limited availability of transplantable autologous bone grafts and the complex geometry of the bones. The ability to regenerate new bone tissues that faithfully replicate the anatomy would revolutionize treatment options. Advances in the field of bone tissue engineering over the past few decades offer promising new treatment alternatives using biocompatible scaffold materials and autologous cells. This approach combined with recent advances in three-dimensional (3D) printing technologies may soon allow the generation of large, bioartificial bone grafts with custom, patient-specific architecture. In this study, we use a custom-built 3D printer to develop anatomically shaped polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds with varying internal porosities. These scaffolds are assessed for their ability to support induction of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) to form vasculature and bone, two essential components of functional bone tissue. The development of functional tissues is assessed in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate the ability to print large mandibular and maxillary bone scaffolds that replicate fine details extracted from patient's computed tomography scans. The findings of this study illustrate the capabilities and potential of 3D printed scaffolds to be used for engineering autologous, anatomically shaped, vascularized bone grafts.

  12. Optimisation of UV irradiation as a binding site conserving method for crosslinking collagen-based scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Davidenko, Natalia; Bax, Daniel V; Schuster, Carlos F; Farndale, Richard W; Hamaia, Samir W; Best, Serena M; Cameron, Ruth E

    2016-01-01

    Short wavelength (λ = 254 nm) UV irradiation was evaluated over a range of intensities (0.06 to 0.96 J/cm(2)) as a means of cross-linking collagen- and gelatin-based scaffolds, to tailor their material characteristics whilst retaining biological functionality. Zero-link carbodiimide treatments are commonly applied to collagen-based materials, forming cross-links from carboxylate anions (for example the acidic E of GFOGER) that are an essential part of integrin binding sites on collagen. Cross-linking these amino acids therefore disrupts the bioactivity of collagen. In contrast, UV irradiation forms bonds from less important aromatic tyrosine and phenylalanine residues. We therefore hypothesised that UV cross-linking would not compromise collagen cell reactivity. Here, highly porous (~99 %) isotropic, collagen-based scaffolds were produced via ice-templating. A series of scaffolds (pore diameters ranging from 130-260 μm) with ascending stability in water was made from gelatin, two different sources of collagen I, or blends of these materials. Glucose, known to aid UV crosslinking of collagen, was added to some lower-stability formulations. These scaffolds were exposed to different doses of UV irradiation, and the scaffold morphology, dissolution stability in water, resistance to compression and cell reactivity was assessed. Stabilisation in aqueous media varied with both the nature of the collagen-based material employed and the UV intensity. Scaffolds made from the most stable materials showed the greatest stability after irradiation, although the levels of cross-linking in all cases were relatively low. Scaffolds made from pure collagen from the two different sources showed different optimum levels of irradiation, suggesting altered balance between stabilisation from cross-linking and destabilisation from denaturation. The introduction of glucose into the scaffold enhanced the efficacy of UV cross-linking. Finally, as hypothesized, cell attachment, spreading and

  13. Optimisation of UV irradiation as a binding site conserving method for crosslinking collagen-based scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Davidenko, Natalia; Bax, Daniel V; Schuster, Carlos F; Farndale, Richard W; Hamaia, Samir W; Best, Serena M; Cameron, Ruth E

    2016-01-01

    Short wavelength (λ = 254 nm) UV irradiation was evaluated over a range of intensities (0.06 to 0.96 J/cm(2)) as a means of cross-linking collagen- and gelatin-based scaffolds, to tailor their material characteristics whilst retaining biological functionality. Zero-link carbodiimide treatments are commonly applied to collagen-based materials, forming cross-links from carboxylate anions (for example the acidic E of GFOGER) that are an essential part of integrin binding sites on collagen. Cross-linking these amino acids therefore disrupts the bioactivity of collagen. In contrast, UV irradiation forms bonds from less important aromatic tyrosine and phenylalanine residues. We therefore hypothesised that UV cross-linking would not compromise collagen cell reactivity. Here, highly porous (~99 %) isotropic, collagen-based scaffolds were produced via ice-templating. A series of scaffolds (pore diameters ranging from 130-260 μm) with ascending stability in water was made from gelatin, two different sources of collagen I, or blends of these materials. Glucose, known to aid UV crosslinking of collagen, was added to some lower-stability formulations. These scaffolds were exposed to different doses of UV irradiation, and the scaffold morphology, dissolution stability in water, resistance to compression and cell reactivity was assessed. Stabilisation in aqueous media varied with both the nature of the collagen-based material employed and the UV intensity. Scaffolds made from the most stable materials showed the greatest stability after irradiation, although the levels of cross-linking in all cases were relatively low. Scaffolds made from pure collagen from the two different sources showed different optimum levels of irradiation, suggesting altered balance between stabilisation from cross-linking and destabilisation from denaturation. The introduction of glucose into the scaffold enhanced the efficacy of UV cross-linking. Finally, as hypothesized, cell attachment, spreading and

  14. Fabrication of scalable tissue engineering scaffolds with dual-pore microarchitecture by combining 3D printing and particle leaching.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Sanger, Kuldeep; Heiskanen, Arto; Trifol, Jon; Szabo, Peter; Dufva, Marin; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Limitations in controlling scaffold architecture using traditional fabrication techniques are a problem when constructing engineered tissues/organs. Recently, integration of two pore architectures to generate dual-pore scaffolds with tailored physical properties has attracted wide attention in tissue engineering community. Such scaffolds features primary structured pores which can efficiently enhance nutrient/oxygen supply to the surrounding, in combination with secondary random pores, which give high surface area for cell adhesion and proliferation. Here, we present a new technique to fabricate dual-pore scaffolds for various tissue engineering applications where 3D printing of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) mould is combined with salt leaching process. In this technique the sacrificial PVA mould, determining the structured pore architecture, was filled with salt crystals to define the random pore regions of the scaffold. After crosslinking the casted polymer the combined PVA-salt mould was dissolved in water. The technique has advantages over previously reported ones, such as automated assembly of the sacrificial mould, and precise control over pore architecture/dimensions by 3D printing parameters. In this study, polydimethylsiloxane and biodegradable poly(ϵ-caprolactone) were used for fabrication. However, we show that this technique is also suitable for other biocompatible/biodegradable polymers. Various physical and mechanical properties of the dual-pore scaffolds were compared with control scaffolds with either only structured or only random pores, fabricated using previously reported methods. The fabricated dual-pore scaffolds supported high cell density, due to the random pores, in combination with uniform cell distribution throughout the scaffold, and higher cell proliferation and viability due to efficient nutrient/oxygen transport through the structured pores. In conclusion, the described fabrication technique is rapid, inexpensive, scalable, and compatible

  15. Fabrication of scalable tissue engineering scaffolds with dual-pore microarchitecture by combining 3D printing and particle leaching.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Sanger, Kuldeep; Heiskanen, Arto; Trifol, Jon; Szabo, Peter; Dufva, Marin; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Limitations in controlling scaffold architecture using traditional fabrication techniques are a problem when constructing engineered tissues/organs. Recently, integration of two pore architectures to generate dual-pore scaffolds with tailored physical properties has attracted wide attention in tissue engineering community. Such scaffolds features primary structured pores which can efficiently enhance nutrient/oxygen supply to the surrounding, in combination with secondary random pores, which give high surface area for cell adhesion and proliferation. Here, we present a new technique to fabricate dual-pore scaffolds for various tissue engineering applications where 3D printing of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) mould is combined with salt leaching process. In this technique the sacrificial PVA mould, determining the structured pore architecture, was filled with salt crystals to define the random pore regions of the scaffold. After crosslinking the casted polymer the combined PVA-salt mould was dissolved in water. The technique has advantages over previously reported ones, such as automated assembly of the sacrificial mould, and precise control over pore architecture/dimensions by 3D printing parameters. In this study, polydimethylsiloxane and biodegradable poly(ϵ-caprolactone) were used for fabrication. However, we show that this technique is also suitable for other biocompatible/biodegradable polymers. Various physical and mechanical properties of the dual-pore scaffolds were compared with control scaffolds with either only structured or only random pores, fabricated using previously reported methods. The fabricated dual-pore scaffolds supported high cell density, due to the random pores, in combination with uniform cell distribution throughout the scaffold, and higher cell proliferation and viability due to efficient nutrient/oxygen transport through the structured pores. In conclusion, the described fabrication technique is rapid, inexpensive, scalable, and compatible

  16. Water-based polyurethane 3D printed scaffolds with controlled release function for customized cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hung, Kun-Che; Tseng, Ching-Shiow; Dai, Lien-Guo; Hsu, Shan-hui

    2016-03-01

    Conventional 3D printing may not readily incorporate bioactive ingredients for controlled release because the process often involves the use of heat, organic solvent, or crosslinkers that reduce the bioactivity of the ingredients. Water-based 3D printing materials with controlled bioactivity for customized cartilage tissue engineering is developed in this study. The printing ink contains the water dispersion of synthetic biodegradable polyurethane (PU) elastic nanoparticles, hyaluronan, and bioactive ingredients TGFβ3 or a small molecule drug Y27632 to replace TGFβ3. Compliant scaffolds are printed from the ink at low temperature. These scaffolds promote the self-aggregation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and, with timely release of the bioactive ingredients, induce the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs and produce matrix for cartilage repair. Moreover, the growth factor-free controlled release design may prevent cartilage hypertrophy. Rabbit knee implantation supports the potential of the novel 3D printing scaffolds in cartilage regeneration. We consider that the 3D printing composite scaffolds with controlled release bioactivity may have potential in customized tissue engineering. PMID:26774563

  17. Water-based polyurethane 3D printed scaffolds with controlled release function for customized cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hung, Kun-Che; Tseng, Ching-Shiow; Dai, Lien-Guo; Hsu, Shan-hui

    2016-03-01

    Conventional 3D printing may not readily incorporate bioactive ingredients for controlled release because the process often involves the use of heat, organic solvent, or crosslinkers that reduce the bioactivity of the ingredients. Water-based 3D printing materials with controlled bioactivity for customized cartilage tissue engineering is developed in this study. The printing ink contains the water dispersion of synthetic biodegradable polyurethane (PU) elastic nanoparticles, hyaluronan, and bioactive ingredients TGFβ3 or a small molecule drug Y27632 to replace TGFβ3. Compliant scaffolds are printed from the ink at low temperature. These scaffolds promote the self-aggregation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and, with timely release of the bioactive ingredients, induce the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs and produce matrix for cartilage repair. Moreover, the growth factor-free controlled release design may prevent cartilage hypertrophy. Rabbit knee implantation supports the potential of the novel 3D printing scaffolds in cartilage regeneration. We consider that the 3D printing composite scaffolds with controlled release bioactivity may have potential in customized tissue engineering.

  18. Reinforcement of Mono- and Bi-layer Poly(Ethylene Glycol) Hydrogels with a Fibrous Collagen Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Kinneberg, K R C; Nelson, A; Stender, M E; Aziz, A H; Mozdzen, L C; Harley, B A C; Bryant, S J; Ferguson, V L

    2015-11-01

    Biomaterial-based tissue engineering strategies hold great promise for osteochondral tissue repair. Yet significant challenges remain in joining highly dissimilar materials to achieve a biomimetic, mechanically robust design for repairing interfaces between soft tissue and bone. This study sought to improve interfacial properties and function in a bi-layer hydrogel interpenetrated with a fibrous collagen scaffold. 'Soft' 10% (w/w) and 'stiff' 30% (w/w) PEGDM was formed into mono- or bi-layer hydrogels possessing a sharp diffusional interface. Hydrogels were evaluated as single-(hydrogel only) or multi-phase (hydrogel + fibrous scaffold penetrating throughout the stiff layer and extending >500 μm into the soft layer). Including a fibrous scaffold into both soft and stiff mono-layer hydrogels significantly increased tangent modulus and toughness and decreased lateral expansion under compressive loading. Finite element simulations predicted substantially reduced stress and strain gradients across the soft-stiff hydrogel interface in multi-phase, bilayer hydrogels. When combining two low moduli constituent materials, composites theory poorly predicts the observed, large modulus increases. These results suggest material structure associated with the fibrous scaffold penetrating within the PEG hydrogel as the major contributor to improved properties and function-the hydrogel bore compressive loads and the 3D fibrous scaffold was loaded in tension thus resisting lateral expansion. PMID:26001970

  19. Reinforcement of Mono- and Bi-layer Poly(Ethylene Glycol) Hydrogels with a Fibrous Collagen Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Kinneberg, K R C; Nelson, A; Stender, M E; Aziz, A H; Mozdzen, L C; Harley, B A C; Bryant, S J; Ferguson, V L

    2015-11-01

    Biomaterial-based tissue engineering strategies hold great promise for osteochondral tissue repair. Yet significant challenges remain in joining highly dissimilar materials to achieve a biomimetic, mechanically robust design for repairing interfaces between soft tissue and bone. This study sought to improve interfacial properties and function in a bi-layer hydrogel interpenetrated with a fibrous collagen scaffold. 'Soft' 10% (w/w) and 'stiff' 30% (w/w) PEGDM was formed into mono- or bi-layer hydrogels possessing a sharp diffusional interface. Hydrogels were evaluated as single-(hydrogel only) or multi-phase (hydrogel + fibrous scaffold penetrating throughout the stiff layer and extending >500 μm into the soft layer). Including a fibrous scaffold into both soft and stiff mono-layer hydrogels significantly increased tangent modulus and toughness and decreased lateral expansion under compressive loading. Finite element simulations predicted substantially reduced stress and strain gradients across the soft-stiff hydrogel interface in multi-phase, bilayer hydrogels. When combining two low moduli constituent materials, composites theory poorly predicts the observed, large modulus increases. These results suggest material structure associated with the fibrous scaffold penetrating within the PEG hydrogel as the major contributor to improved properties and function-the hydrogel bore compressive loads and the 3D fibrous scaffold was loaded in tension thus resisting lateral expansion.

  20. Human collagen-based multilayer scaffolds for tendon-to-bone interface tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beob Soo; Kim, Eun Ji; Choi, Ji Suk; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Jo, Chris Hyunchul; Cho, Yong Woo

    2014-11-01

    The natural tendon-to-bone region has a gradient in structure and composition, which is translated into a spatial variation of chemical, physical, and biological properties. This unique transitional tissue between bone and tendon is not normally recreated during natural bone-to-tendon healing. In this study, we have developed a human collagen-based multilayer scaffold mimicking the tendon-to-bone region. The scaffold consists of four different layers with the following composition gradient: (a) a tendon layer composed of collagen; (b) an uncalcified fibrocartilage layer composed of collagen and chondroitin sulfate; (c) a calcified fibrocartilage layer composed of collagen and less apatite; (d) a bone layer composed of collagen and apatite. The chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of the scaffold were characterized by a scanning electron microscope, porosimeter, universal tensile machine, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, energy dispersive X-ray analysis apparatus, and thermogravimetric analysis apparatus. The multilayer scaffold provided a gradual transition of the physical, chemical, and mechanical environment and supported the adhesion and proliferation of human fibroblasts, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts toward each corresponding matrix. Overall, our results suggest the feasibility of a human collagen-based multilayer scaffold for regeneration of hard-to-soft interface tissues.

  1. The effect of porosity on cell ingrowth into accurately defined, laser-made, polylactide-based 3D scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilevicius, Paulius; Georgiadi, Leoni; Pateman, Christopher J.; Claeyssens, Frederik; Chatzinikolaidou, Maria; Farsari, Maria

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate the accuracy required for the investigation of the role of solid scaffolds' porosity in cell proliferation. We therefore present a qualitative investigation into the effect of porosity on MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cell ingrowth of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds fabricated by direct femtosecond laser writing. The material we used is a purpose made photosensitive pre-polymer based on polylactide. We designed and fabricated complex, geometry-controlled 3D scaffolds with pore sizes ranging from 25 to 110 μm, representing porosities 70%, 82%, 86%, and 90%. The 70% porosity scaffolds did not support cell growth initially and in the long term. For the other porosities, we found a strong adhesion of the pre-osteoblastic cells from the first hours after seeding and a remarkable proliferation increase after 3 weeks and up to 8 weeks. The 86% porosity scaffolds exhibited a higher efficiency compared to 82% and 90%. In addition, bulk material degradation studies showed that the employed, highly-acrylated polylactide is degradable. These findings support the potential use of the proposed material and the scaffold fabrication technique in bone tissue engineering.

  2. SiO2 and ZnO Dopants in 3D Printed TCP Scaffolds Enhances Osteogenesis and Angiogenesis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fielding, Gary; Bose, Susmita

    2013-01-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) scaffolds with three dimensionally (3D) interconnected pores play an important role in mechanical interlocking and biological fixation in bone implant applications. CaPs alone, however, are only osteoconductive (ability to guide bone growth). Much attention has been given to the incorporation of biologics and pharmacologics to add osteoinductive (ability to cause new bone growth) properties to CaP materials. Because biologics and pharmacologics are generally delicate compounds and also subject to increased regulatory scrutiny, there is a need to investigate alternative methods to introduce osteoinductivity to CaP materials. In this study silica (SiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) have been incorporated in to 3D printed β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) scaffolds to investigate their potential to trigger osteoinduction in vivo. Silicon and zinc are trace elements that are common to bone and have also been shown to have many beneficial properties from increased bone regeneration to angiogenesis. Implants were placed in bicortical femur defects introduced to a murine model for up to 16 weeks. Addition of dopants into TCP increased the capacity for new early bone formation by modulating collagen I production and osteocalcin production. Neovascularization was found to be up to three times more than the pure TCP control group. The findings from this study indicate that the combination of SiO2 and ZnO dopants in TCP may be a viable alternative to introduce osteoinductive properties to CaPs. PMID:23871941

  3. Using Polymer Confinement for Stem Cell Differentiation: 3D Printed vs Molded Scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafailovich, Miriam

    Additive manufacturing technologies are increasingly being used to replace standard extrusion or molding methods in engineering polymeric biomedical implants, which can be further seeded with cells for tissue regeneration. The principal advantage of this new technology is the ability to print directly from a scan and hence produce parts which are an ideal fit for an individual, eliminating much of the sizing and fitting associated with standard manufacturing methods. The question though arises whether devices which may be macroscopically similar, serve identical functions and are produced from the same material, interact in the same manner with cells and living tissue. Here we show that fundamental differences can exist between 3-D printed and extruded scaffolds which can impact stem cell differentiation and lineage selection. We will show how polymer confinement inherent in these methods affect the printed features on multiple length scales. We will also and how the differentiation of stem cells is affected by substrate heterogeneity in both morphological and mechanical features. NSF-Inspire award # 1344267.

  4. Subacute Tissue Response to 3D Graphene Oxide Scaffolds Implanted in the Injured Rat Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    López-Dolado, Elisa; González-Mayorga, Ankor; Portolés, María Teresa; Feito, María José; Ferrer, María Luisa; Del Monte, Francisco; Gutiérrez, María Concepción; Serrano, María Concepción

    2015-08-26

    The increasing prevalence and high sanitary costs of lesions affecting the central nervous system (CNS) at the spinal cord are encouraging experts in different fields to explore new avenues for neural repair. In this context, graphene and its derivatives are attracting significant attention, although their toxicity and performance in the CNS in vivo remains unclear. Here, the subacute tissue response to 3D flexible and porous scaffolds composed of partially reduced graphene oxide is investigated when implanted in the injured rat spinal cord. The interest of these structures as potentially useful platforms for CNS regeneration mainly relies on their mechanical compliance with neural tissues, adequate biocompatibility with neural cells in vitro and versatility to carry topographical and biological guidance cues. Early tissue responses are thoroughly investigated locally (spinal cord at C6 level) and in the major organs (i.e., kidney, liver, lung, and spleen). The absence of local and systemic toxic responses, along with the positive signs found at the lesion site (e.g., filler effect, soft interface for no additional scaring, preservation of cell populations at the perilesional area, presence of M2 macrophages), encourages further investigation of these materials as promising components of more efficient material-based platforms for CNS repair.

  5. Bone response to 3-D periodic hydroxyapatite scaffolds with and without tailored microporosity to deliver bone morphogenetic protein 2.

    SciTech Connect

    Eurell, Jo Ann; Dellinger, Jennifer Gwynne; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Jamison, Russell D.

    2005-06-01

    The in vivo bone response of 3D periodic hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds is investigated. Two groups of HA scaffolds (11 mm diameter x 3.5 mm thick) are fabricated by direct-write assembly of a concentrated HA ink. The scaffolds consist of cylindrical rods periodically arranged into four quadrants with varying separation distances between rods. In the first group, HA rods (250 {micro}m in diameter) are patterned to create pore channels, whose areal dimensions are 250 x 250 {micro}m{sup 2} in quadrant 1, 250 x 500 {micro}m{sup 2} in quadrants 2 and 4, and 500 x 500 {micro}m{sup 2} in quadrant 3. In the second group, HA rods (400 {micro}m in diameter) are patterned to create pore channels, whose areal dimensions of 500 x 500 {micro}m{sup 2} in quadrant 1, 500 x 750 {micro}m{sup 2} in quadrants 2 and 4, and 750 x 750 {micro}m{sup 2} in quadrant 3. Each group of scaffolds is partially densified by sintering at 1200 C prior to being implanted bilaterally in trephine defects of skeletally mature New Zealand White rabbits. Their tissue response is evaluated at 8 and 16 weeks using micro-computed tomography, histology, and scanning electron microscopy. New trabecular bone is conducted rapidly and efficiently across substantial distances within these patterned 3D HA scaffolds. Our observations suggest that HA rods are first coated with a layer of new bone followed by subsequent scaffold infilling via outward and inward radial growth of the coated regions. Direct-write assembly of 3D periodic scaffolds composed of micro-porous HA rods arrayed to produce macro-pores that are size-matched to trabecular bone may represent an optimal strategy for bone repair and replacement structures.

  6. Platelet lysate 3D scaffold supports mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenesis: an improved approach in cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Andrei; Bittencourt, Renata Aparecida Camargo; Almeida, Renan Padron; Felisbino, Sérgio Luis; Deffune, Elenice

    2013-01-01

    Articular lesions are still a major challenge in orthopedics because of cartilage's poor healing properties. A major improvement in therapeutics was the development of autologous chondrocytes implantation (ACI), a biotechnology-derived technique that delivers healthy autologous chondrocytes after in vitro expansion. To obtain cartilage-like tissue, 3D scaffolds are essential to maintain chondrocyte differentiated status. Currently, bioactive 3D scaffolds are promising as they can deliver growth factors, cytokines, and hormones to the cells, giving them a boost to attach, proliferate, induce protein synthesis, and differentiate. Using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiated into chondrocytes, one can avoid cartilage harvesting. Thus, we investigated the potential use of a platelet-lysate-based 3D bioactive scaffold to support chondrogenic differentiation and maintenance of MSCs. The MSCs from adult rabbit bone marrow (n = 5) were cultivated and characterized using three antibodies by flow cytometry. MSCs (1 × 10(5)) were than encapsulated inside 60 µl of a rabbit platelet-lysate clot scaffold and maintained in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium Nutrient Mixture F-12 supplemented with chondrogenic inductors. After 21 days, the MSCs-seeded scaffolds were processed for histological analysis and stained with toluidine blue. This scaffold was able to maintain round-shaped cells, typical chondrocyte metachromatic extracellular matrix deposition, and isogenous group formation. Cells accumulated inside lacunae and cytoplasm lipid droplets were other observed typical chondrocyte features. In conclusion, the usage of a platelet-lysate bioactive scaffold, associated with a suitable chondrogenic culture medium, supports MSCs chondrogenesis. As such, it offers an alternative tool for cartilage engineering research and ACI.

  7. A Novel 3D Fibril Force Assay Implicates Src in Tumor Cell Force Generation in Collagen Networks

    PubMed Central

    Polackwich, Robert J.; Koch, Daniel; Arevalo, Richard; Miermont, Anne M.; Jee, Kathleen J.; Lazar, John; Urbach, Jeffrey; Mueller, Susette C.; McAllister, Ryan G.

    2013-01-01

    New insight into the biomechanics of cancer cell motility in 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) environments would significantly enhance our understanding of aggressive cancers and help identify new targets for intervention. While several methods for measuring the forces involved in cell-matrix interactions have been developed, previous to this study none have been able to measure forces in a fibrillar environment. We have developed a novel assay for simultaneously measuring cell mechanotransduction and motility in 3D fibrillar environments. The assay consists of a controlled-density fibrillar collagen gel atop a controlled-stiffness polyacrylamide (PAA) surface. Forces generated by living cells and their migration in the 3D collagen gel were measured with the 3D motion of tracer beads within the PAA layer. Here, this 3D fibril force assay is used to study the role of the invasion-associated protein kinase Src in mechanotransduction and motility. Src expression and activation are linked with proliferation, invasion, and metastasis, and have been shown to be required in 2D for invadopodia membranes to direct and mediate invasion. Breast cancer cell line MDA-MD-231 was stably transfected with GFP-tagged constitutively active Src or wild-type Src. In 3D fibrillar collagen matrices we found that, relative to wild-type Src, constitutively active Src: 1) increased the strength of cell-induced forces on the ECM, 2) did not significantly change migration speed, and 3) increased both the duration and the length, but not the number, of long membrane protrusions. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that Src controls invasion by controlling the ability of the cell to form long lasting cellular protrusions to enable penetration through tissue barriers, in addition to its role in promoting invadopodia matrix-degrading activity. PMID:23536784

  8. Proliferation and enrichment of CD133+ glioblastoma cancer stem cells on 3D chitosan-alginate scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Kievit, Forrest M.; Florczyk, Stephen J.; Leung, Matthew C.; Wang, Kui; Wu, Jennifer D.; Silber, John R.; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Lee, Jerry S.H.; Zhang, Miqin

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence implicates cancer stem cells (CSCs) as primary determinants of the clinical behavior of human cancers, representing an ideal target for next-generation anticancer therapies. However CSCs are difficult to propagate in vitro, severely limiting the study of CSC biology and drug development. Here we report that growing cells from glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines on three dimensional (3D) porous chitosan-alginate (CA) scaffolds dramatically promotes the proliferation and enrichment of cells possessing the hallmarks of CSCs. CA scaffold-grown cells were found more tumorigenic in nude mouse xenografts than cells grown from monolayers. Growing in CA scaffolds rapidly promoted expression of genes involved in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition that has been implicated in the genesis of CSCs. Our results indicate that CA scaffolds have utility as a simple and inexpensive means to cultivate CSCs in vitro in support of studies to understand CSC biology and develop more effective anti-cancer therapies. PMID:25109438

  9. Poly (3-Hydroxybutyrate-co-3-Hydroxyhexanoate)/Collagen Hybrid Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lomas, Alex J.; Webb, William R.; Han, JianFeng; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Sun, Xun; Zhang, Zhirong; El Haj, Alicia J.

    2013-01-01

    The benefits associated with polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) in tissue engineering include high immunotolerance, low toxicity, and biodegradability. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx), a molecule from the PHA family of biopolymers, shares these features. In this study, the applicability of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), spontaneously differentiated hESCs (SDhESCs), and mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in conjunction with PHBHHx and collagen as a biocompatible replacement strategy for damaged tissues was exploited. Collagen gel contraction was monitored by seeding cells at controlled densities (0, 103, 104, and 105 cells/mL) and measuring length and diameter at regular time intervals thereafter when cultured in a complete medium. Cell viability was measured by trypan blue exclusion assay. Porous PHBHHx tube scaffolds were prepared using a dipping method followed by salt leaching. PHBHHx/collagen composites were generated via syringe injection of collagen/cell mixtures into sterile PHBHHx porous tubes. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the fate of cells within PHBHHx/collagen scaffolds with tendon, bone, cartilage, and fat-linked transcript expression being explored at days 0, 5 10, and 20. The capacity of PHBHHx/collagen scaffolds to support differentiation was explored using a medium specific for osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineage generation. Collagen gel tube contraction required initial seeding densities of ≥105 hMSCs or SDhESCs in 1.5 mg/mL collagen gel tubes. Gels with a collagen concentration of 3 mg/mL did not display contraction across the examined cell seeding densities. Cell viability was ∼50% for SDhESC and 90% for hMSCs at all cell densities tested in porous PHBHHx tube/3 mg/mL collagen hybrid scaffolds after 20 days in vitro culture. Undifferentiated hESCs did not contract collagen gel tubes and were unviable after 20 days culture. In the absence of additional stimuli, SOX9

  10. Biomimetic collagenous scaffold to tune inflammation by targeting macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Taraballi, Francesca; Corradetti, Bruna; Minardi, Silvia; Powel, Sebastian; Cabrera, Fernando; Van Eps, Jeff L.; Weiner, Bradley K; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    The inflammatory response following implantation of a biomaterial is one of the major regulatory aspects of the overall regenerative process. The progress of inflammation determines whether functional tissue is restored or if nonfunctional fibrotic tissue is formed. This delicate balance is directed by the activity of different cells. Among these, macrophages and their different phenotypes, the inflammatory M1 to anti-inflammatory M2, are considered key players in the process. Recent approaches exploit macrophage’s regenerative potential in tissue engineering. Here, we propose a collagen scaffold functionalized with chondroitin sulfate (CSCL), a glycosaminoglycan known to be able to tune inflammation. We studied CSCL effects on bone-marrow-derived macrophages in physiological, and lipopolysaccharides-inflamed, conditions in vitro. Our data demonstrate that CSCL is able to modulate macrophage phenotype by inhibiting the LPS/CD44/NF-kB cascade. As a consequence, an upregulation of anti-inflammatory markers (TGF-β, Arg, MRC1, and IL-10) was found concomitantly with a decrease in the expression of pro-inflammatory markers (iNOS, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12β). We then implanted CSCL subcutaneously in a rat model to test whether the same molecular mechanism could be maintained in an in vivo environment. In vivo data confirmed the in vitro studies. A significant reduction in the number of infiltrating cells around and within the implants was observed at 72 h, with a significant downregulation of pro-inflammatory genes expression. The present work provides indications regarding the immunomodulatory potential of molecules used for the development of biomimetic materials and suggests their use to direct macrophage immune modulation for tissue repair. PMID:26977285

  11. Robotic deposition and in vitro characterization of 3D gelatin-bioactive glass hybrid scaffolds for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunxia; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Gao, Qiang; Teramoto, Akira; Abe, Koji

    2013-07-01

    The development of inorganic-organic hybrid scaffolds with controllable degradation and bioactive properties is receiving considerable interest for bone and tissue regeneration. The objective of this study was to create hybrid scaffolds of gelatin and bioactive glass (BG) with a controlled, three-dimensional (3D) architecture by a combined sol-gel and robotic deposition (robocasting) method and evaluate their mechanical response, bioactivity, and response to cells in vitro. Inks for robotic deposition of the scaffolds were prepared by dissolving gelatin in a sol-gel precursor solution of the bioactive glass (70SiO2 -25CaO-5P2 O5 ; mol%) and aging the solution to form a gel with the requisite viscosity. After drying and crosslinking, the gelatin-BG scaffolds, with a grid-like architecture (filament diameter ∼350 µm; pore width ∼550 µm), showed an elasto-plastic response, with a compressive strength of 5.1 ± 0.6 MPa, in the range of values for human trabecular bone (2-12 MPa). When immersed in phosphate-buffered saline, the crosslinked scaffolds rapidly absorbed water (∼440% of its dry weight after 2 h) and showed an elastic response at deformations up to ∼60%. Immersion of the scaffolds in a simulated body fluid resulted in the formation of a hydroxyapatite-like surface layer within 5 days, indicating their bioactivity in vitro. The scaffolds supported the proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineralization of osteogenic MC3T3-E1 cells in vitro, showing their biocompatibility. Altogether, the results indicate that these gelatin-BG hybrid scaffolds with a controlled, 3D architecture of inter-connected pores have potential for use as implants for bone regeneration.

  12. Optimization of composition, structure and mechanical strength of bioactive 3-D glass-ceramic scaffolds for bone substitution.

    PubMed

    Baino, Francesco; Ferraris, Monica; Bretcanu, Oana; Verné, Enrica; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara

    2013-03-01

    Fabrication of 3-D highly porous, bioactive, and mechanically competent scaffolds represents a significant challenge of bone tissue engineering. In this work, Bioglass®-derived glass-ceramic scaffolds actually fulfilling this complex set of requirements were successfully produced through the sponge replication method. Scaffold processing parameters and sintering treatment were carefully designed in order to obtain final porous bodies with pore content (porosity above 70 %vol), trabecular architecture and mechanical properties (compressive strength up to 3 MPa) analogous to those of the cancellous bone. Influence of the Bioglass® particles size on the structural and mechanical features of the sintered scaffolds was considered and discussed. Relationship between porosity and mechanical strength was investigated and modeled. Three-dimensional architecture, porosity, mechanical strength and in vitro bioactivity of the optimized Bioglass®-derived scaffolds were also compared to those of CEL2-based glass-ceramic scaffolds (CEL2 is an experimental bioactive glass originally developed by the authors at Politecnico di Torino) fabricated by the same processing technique, in an attempt at understanding the role of different bioactive glass composition on the major features of scaffolds prepared by the same method.

  13. Evaluation of synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells and 3D printed nanocomposite scaffolds for tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jian-Feng; Li, Shuo; Guo, Chang-An; Xu, Du-Liang; Zhang, Feng; Yan, Zuo-Qin; Mo, Xiu-Mei

    2015-08-01

    Stem cells and scaffolds play a very important role in tissue engineering. Here, we isolated synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) from synovial membrane tissue and characterized stem-cell properties. Gelatin nanoparticles (NP) were prepared using a two-step desolvation method and then pre-mixed into different host matrix (silk fibroin (SF), gelatin (Gel), or SF-Gel mixture) to generate various 3D printed nanocomposite scaffolds (NP/SF, NP/SF-Gel, NP/Gel-1, and NP/Gel-2). The microstructure was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Biocompatibility assessment was performed through CCK-8 assay by coculturing with SMSCs at 1, 3, 7 and 14 days. According to the results, SMSCs are similar to other MSCs in their surface epitope expression, which are negative for CD45 and positive for CD44, CD90, and CD105. After incubation in lineage-specific medium, SMSCs could differentiate into chondrocytes, osteocytes and adipocytes. 3D printed nanocomposite scaffolds exhibited a good biocompatibility in the process of coculturing with SMSCs and had no negative effect on cell behavior. The study provides a strategy to obtain SMSCs and fabricate 3D printed nanocomposite scaffolds, the combination of which could be used for practical applications in tissue engineering.

  14. Biocompatibility assessment of novel collagen-sericin scaffolds improved with hyaluronic Acid and chondroitin sulfate for cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dinescu, Sorina; Gălăţeanu, Bianca; Albu, Mădălina; Lungu, Adriana; Radu, Eugen; Hermenean, Anca; Costache, Marieta

    2013-01-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering (CTE) applications are focused towards the use of implantable biohybrids consisting of biodegradable scaffolds combined with in vitro cultured cells. Hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) were identified as the most potent prochondrogenic factors used to design new biomaterials for CTE, while human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) were proved to display high chondrogenic potential. In this context, our aim was not only to build novel 3D porous scaffolds based on natural compounds but also to evaluate their in vitro biological performances. Therefore, for prospective CTE, collagen-sericin (Coll-SS) scaffolds improved with HA (5% or 10%) and CS (5% or 10%) were used as temporary physical supports for ASCs and were analyzed in terms of structural, thermal, morphological, and swelling properties and cytotoxic potential. To complete biocompatibility data, ASCs viability and proliferation potential were also assessed. Our studies revealed that Coll-SS hydrogels improved with 10% HA and 5% CS displayed the best biological performances in terms of cell viability, proliferation, morphology, and distribution. Thus, further work will address a novel 3D system including both HA 10% and CS 5% glycoproteins, which will probably be exposed to prochondrogenic conditions in order to assess its potential use in CTE applications. PMID:24308001

  15. Iron Oxide-labeled Collagen Scaffolds for Non-invasive MR Imaging in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Marianne E.; Hermann, Alina; Bühren, Anne; Olde-Damink, Leon; Möckel, Diana; Gremse, Felix; Ehling, Josef; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2013-01-01

    Non-invasive imaging holds significant potential for implementation in tissue engineering. It can e.g. be used to monitor the localization and function of tissue-engineered implants, as well as their resorption and remodelling. Thus far, however, the vast majority of efforts in this area of research have focused on the use of ultrasmall super-paramagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticle-labeled cells, colonizing the scaffolds, to indirectly image the implant material. Reasoning that directly labeling scaffold materials might be more beneficial (enabling imaging also in case of non-cellularized implants), more informative (enabling the non-invasive visualization and quantification of scaffold degradation) and more easy to translate into the clinic (since cell-free materials are less complex from a regulatory point-of-view), we here prepared three different types of USPIO nanoparticles, and incorporated them both passively and actively (via chemical conjugation; during collagen crosslinking) into collagen-based scaffold materials. We furthermore optimized the amount of USPIO incorporated into the scaffolds, correlated the amount of entrapped USPIO with MR signal intensity, showed that the labeled scaffolds are highly biocompatible, demonstrated that scaffold degradation can be visualized using MRI and provided initial proof-of-principle for the in vivo visualization of the scaffolds. Consequently, USPIO-labeled scaffold materials seem to be highly suitable for image-guided tissue engineering applications. PMID:24569840

  16. Collagen Hydrogel Scaffold and Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Accelerate Periodontal Healing of Class II Furcation Defects in Dog

    PubMed Central

    Momose, Takehito; Miyaji, Hirofumi; Kato, Akihito; Ogawa, Kosuke; Yoshida, Takashi; Nishida, Erika; Murakami, Syusuke; Kosen, Yuta; Sugaya, Tsutomu; Kawanami, Masamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Collagen hydrogel scaffold exhibits bio-safe properties and facilitates periodontal wound healing. However, regenerated tissue volume is insufficient. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) up-regulates cell behaviors and subsequent wound healing. We evaluated whether periodontal wound healing is promoted by application of collagen hydrogel scaffold in combination with FGF2 in furcation defects in beagle dogs. Methods: Collagen hydrogel was fabricated from bovine type I collagen with an ascorbate-copper ion cross-linking system. Collagen hydrogel was mingled with FGF2 and injected into sponge-form collagen. Subsequently, FGF2 (50 µg)/collagen hydrogel scaffold and collagen hydrogel scaffold alone were implanted into class II furcation defects in dogs. In addition, no implantation was performed as a control. Histometric parameters were assessed at 10 days and 4 weeks after surgery. Result: FGF2 application to scaffold promoted considerable cell and tissue ingrowth containing numerous cells and blood vessel-like structure at day 10. At 4 weeks, reconstruction of alveolar bone was stimulated by implantation of scaffold loaded with FGF2. Furthermore, periodontal attachment, consisting of cementum-like tissue, periodontal ligament-like tissue and Sharpey’s fibers, was also repaired, indicating that FGF2-loaded scaffold guided self-assembly and then re-established the function of periodontal organs. Aberrant healing, such as ankylosis and root resorption, was not observed. Conclusion: FGF2-loaded collagen hydrogel scaffold possessed excellent biocompatibility and strongly promoted periodontal tissue engineering, including periodontal attachment re-organization. PMID:27583044

  17. A hybrid PCL/collagen scaffold consisting of solid freeform-fabricated struts and EHD-direct-jet-processed fibrous threads for tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gi-Hoon; Kim, Minseong; Kim, GeunHyung

    2015-07-15

    Hybrid biomedical structures have been used widely in various tissue-regenerating materials because they effectively induce exceptional physical and cellular responses. In this study, a new hybrid process was used to design a three-dimensional (3D) biomedical hybrid scaffold with a controlled pore-structure and high mechanical strength. A melt-dispensing method was used to obtain mechanical properties and electrohydrodynamic direct-jet (EHD-DJ) printing was used to provide microsized fibrous structures for the scaffold. Furthermore, the poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) hybrid scaffolds were coated biomimetically with type-I collagen to increase bioactive interactions between cells and scaffolds. The fabricated scaffolds showed similar mechanical properties to the two control scaffolds; however, the results of culturing osteoblast-like (MG63) cells showed significant increases in in vitro cellular activities (cell viability>twofold and calcium deposition>sevenfold). Based on these results, we propose a newly designed hybrid scaffold that can support significant in vitro cellular activities at the interface between cells and the 3D micro-pore structure for soft and hard tissue regeneration.

  18. Pore size and LbL chitosan coating influence mesenchymal stem cell in vitro fibrosis and biomineralization in 3D porous poly(epsilon-caprolactone) scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Mehr, Nima Ghavidel; Li, Xian; Chen, Gaoping; Favis, Basil D; Hoemann, Caroline D

    2015-07-01

    Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) is a hydrophobic bioplastic under development for bone tissue engineering applications. Limited information is available on the role of internal geometry and cell-surface attachment on osseous integration potential. We tested the hypothesis that human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) deposit more mineral inside porous 3D PCL scaffolds with fully interconnected 84 or 141 µm pores, when the surfaces are coated with chitosan via Layer-by-Layer (LbL)-deposited polyelectrolytes. Freshly trypsinized MSCs were seeded on PCL 3D cylinders using a novel static cold seeding method in 2% serum to optimally populate all depths of the scaffold discs, followed by 10 days of culture in proliferation medium and 21 additional days in osteogenic medium. MSCs were observed by SEM and histology to spread faster and to proliferate more on chitosan-coated pore surfaces. Most pores, with or without chitosan, became filled by collagen networks sparsely populated with fibroblast-like cells. After 21 days of culture in osteogenic medium, sporadic matrix mineralization was detected histologically and by micro-CT in highly cellular surface layers that enveloped all scaffolds and in cell aggregates in 141 µm pores near the edges. LbL-chitosan promoted punctate mineral deposition on the surfaces of 84 µm pores (p < 0.05 vs. PCL-only) but not the 141 µm pores. This study revealed that LbL-chitosan coatings are sufficient to promote MSC attachment to PCL but only enhance mineral formation in 84 µm pores, suggesting a potential inhibitory role for MSC-derived fibroblasts in osteoblast terminal differentiation. PMID:25504184

  19. Osteogenic cell response to 3-D hydroxyapatite scaffolds developed via replication of natural marine sponges.

    PubMed

    Clarke, S A; Choi, S Y; McKechnie, Melanie; Burke, G; Dunne, N; Walker, G; Cunningham, E; Buchanan, F

    2016-02-01

    Bone tissue engineering may provide an alternative to autograft, however scaffold optimisation is required to maximize bone ingrowth. In designing scaffolds, pore architecture is important and there is evidence that cells prefer a degree of non-uniformity. The aim of this study was to compare scaffolds derived from a natural porous marine sponge (Spongia agaricina) with unique architecture to those derived from a synthetic polyurethane foam. Hydroxyapatite scaffolds of 1 cm(3) were prepared via ceramic infiltration of a marine sponge and a polyurethane (PU) foam. Human foetal osteoblasts (hFOB) were seeded at 1 × 10(5) cells/scaffold for up to 14 days. Cytotoxicity, cell number, morphology and differentiation were investigated. PU-derived scaffolds had 84-91% porosity and 99.99% pore interconnectivity. In comparison marine sponge-derived scaffolds had 56-61% porosity and 99.9% pore interconnectivity. hFOB studies showed that a greater number of cells were found on marine sponge-derived scaffolds at than on the PU scaffold but there was no significant difference in cell differentiation. X-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry showed that Si ions were released from the marine-derived scaffold. In summary, three dimensional porous constructs have been manufactured that support cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation but significantly more cells were seen on marine-derived scaffolds. This could be due both to the chemistry and pore architecture of the scaffolds with an additional biological stimulus from presence of Si ions. Further in vivo tests in orthotopic models are required but this marine-derived scaffold shows promise for applications in bone tissue engineering. PMID:26704539

  20. Fabrication of 3D porous SF/β-TCP hybrid scaffolds for bone tissue reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Jung; Min, Kyung Dan; Lee, Min Chae; Kim, Soo Hyeon; Lee, Ok Joo; Ju, Hyung Woo; Moon, Bo Mi; Lee, Jung Min; Park, Ye Ri; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Ju Yeon; Park, Chan Hum

    2016-07-01

    Bio-ceramic is a biomaterial actively studied in the field of bone tissue engineering. But, only certain ceramic materials can resolve the corrosion problem and possess the biological affinity of conventional metal biomaterials. Therefore, the recent development of composites of hybrid composites and polymers has been widely studied. In this study, we aimed to select the best scaffold of silk fibroin and β-TCP hybrid for bone tissue engineering. We fabricated three groups of scaffold such as SF (silk fibroin scaffold), GS (silk fibroin/small granule size of β-TCP scaffold) and GM (silk fibroin/medium granule size of β-TCP scaffold), and we compared the characteristics of each group. During characterization of the scaffold, we used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) for structural analysis. We compared the physiological properties of the scaffold regarding the swelling ratio, water uptake and porosity. To evaluate the mechanical properties, we examined the compressive strength of the scaffold. During in vitro testing, we evaluated cell attachment and cell proliferation (CCK-8). Finally, we confirmed in vivo new bone regeneration from the implanted scaffolds using histological staining and micro-CT. From these evaluations, the fabricated scaffold demonstrated high porosity with good inter-pore connectivity, showed good biocompatibility and high compressive strength and modulus. In particular, the present study indicates that the GM scaffold using β-TCP accelerates new bone regeneration of implanted scaffolds. Accordingly, our scaffold is expected to act a useful application in the field of bone tissue engineering. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1779-1787, 2016. PMID:26999521

  1. The effect of interface microstructure on interfacial shear strength for osteochondral scaffolds based on biomimetic design and 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijie; Lian, Qin; Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; Jin, Zhongmin

    2015-01-01

    Interface integration between chondral phase and osseous phase is crucial in engineered osteochondral scaffolds. However, the integration was poorly understood and commonly failed to meet the need of osteochondral scaffolds. In this paper, a biphasic polyethylene glycol (PEG)/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffold with enhanced interfacial integration was developed. The chondral phase was a PEG hydrogel. The osseous phase was a β-TCP ceramic scaffold. The PEG hydrogel was directly cured on the ceramic interface layer by layer to fabricate osteochondral scaffolds by 3D printing technology. Meanwhile, a series of interface structure were designed with different interface pore area percentages (0/10/20/30/40/50/60%), and interfacial shear test was applied for interface structure optimization (n=6 samples/group). The interfacial shear strength of 30% pore area group was nearly three folds improved compared with that of 0% pore area percentage group, and more than fifty folds improved compared with that of traditional integration (5.91±0.59 kPa). In conclusion, the biomimetic PEG/β-TCP scaffolds with interface structure enhanced integration show promising potential application for osteochondral tissue engineering.

  2. The effect of interface microstructure on interfacial shear strength for osteochondral scaffolds based on biomimetic design and 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijie; Lian, Qin; Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; Jin, Zhongmin

    2015-01-01

    Interface integration between chondral phase and osseous phase is crucial in engineered osteochondral scaffolds. However, the integration was poorly understood and commonly failed to meet the need of osteochondral scaffolds. In this paper, a biphasic polyethylene glycol (PEG)/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffold with enhanced interfacial integration was developed. The chondral phase was a PEG hydrogel. The osseous phase was a β-TCP ceramic scaffold. The PEG hydrogel was directly cured on the ceramic interface layer by layer to fabricate osteochondral scaffolds by 3D printing technology. Meanwhile, a series of interface structure were designed with different interface pore area percentages (0/10/20/30/40/50/60%), and interfacial shear test was applied for interface structure optimization (n=6 samples/group). The interfacial shear strength of 30% pore area group was nearly three folds improved compared with that of 0% pore area percentage group, and more than fifty folds improved compared with that of traditional integration (5.91±0.59 kPa). In conclusion, the biomimetic PEG/β-TCP scaffolds with interface structure enhanced integration show promising potential application for osteochondral tissue engineering. PMID:25491954

  3. Fabrication and characterization of strontium incorporated 3-D bioactive glass scaffolds for bone tissue from biosilica.

    PubMed

    Özarslan, Ali Can; Yücel, Sevil

    2016-11-01

    Bioactive glass scaffolds that contain silica are high viable biomaterials as bone supporters for bone tissue engineering due to their bioactive behaviour in simulated body fluid (SBF). In the human body, these materials help inorganic bone structure formation due to a combination of the particular ratio of elements such as silicon (Si), calcium (Ca), sodium (Na) and phosphorus (P), and the doping of strontium (Sr) into the scaffold structure increases their bioactive behaviour. In this study, bioactive glass scaffolds were produced by using rice hull ash (RHA) silica and commercial silica based bioactive glasses. The structural properties of scaffolds such as pore size, porosity and also the bioactive behaviour were investigated. The results showed that undoped and Sr-doped RHA silica-based bioactive glass scaffolds have better bioactivity than that of commercial silica based bioactive glass scaffolds. Moreover, undoped and Sr-doped RHA silica-based bioactive glass scaffolds will be able to be used instead of undoped and Sr-doped commercial silica based bioactive glass scaffolds for bone regeneration applications. Scaffolds that are produced from undoped or Sr-doped RHA silica have high potential to form new bone for bone defects in tissue engineering.

  4. Fabrication and characterization of strontium incorporated 3-D bioactive glass scaffolds for bone tissue from biosilica.

    PubMed

    Özarslan, Ali Can; Yücel, Sevil

    2016-11-01

    Bioactive glass scaffolds that contain silica are high viable biomaterials as bone supporters for bone tissue engineering due to their bioactive behaviour in simulated body fluid (SBF). In the human body, these materials help inorganic bone structure formation due to a combination of the particular ratio of elements such as silicon (Si), calcium (Ca), sodium (Na) and phosphorus (P), and the doping of strontium (Sr) into the scaffold structure increases their bioactive behaviour. In this study, bioactive glass scaffolds were produced by using rice hull ash (RHA) silica and commercial silica based bioactive glasses. The structural properties of scaffolds such as pore size, porosity and also the bioactive behaviour were investigated. The results showed that undoped and Sr-doped RHA silica-based bioactive glass scaffolds have better bioactivity than that of commercial silica based bioactive glass scaffolds. Moreover, undoped and Sr-doped RHA silica-based bioactive glass scaffolds will be able to be used instead of undoped and Sr-doped commercial silica based bioactive glass scaffolds for bone regeneration applications. Scaffolds that are produced from undoped or Sr-doped RHA silica have high potential to form new bone for bone defects in tissue engineering. PMID:27524030

  5. Effects of 3-dimensional culture conditions (collagen-chitosan nano-scaffolds) on maturation of dendritic cells and their capacity to interact with T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Daneshmandi, Saeed; Dibazar, Shaghayegh Pishkhan; Fateh, Shirin

    2016-01-01

    In the body, there is a natural three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment in which immune cells, including dendritic cells (DC), play their functions. This study evaluated the impact of using collagen-chitosan 3D nano-scaffolds in comparisons to routine 2D culture plates on DC phenotype and functions. Bone marrow-derived DC were cultured on scaffolds and plates and then stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or chitosan-based nanoparticles (NP) for 24 h. Thereafter, DC viability, expression of maturation markers and levels of cytokines secretion were evaluated. In another set of studies, the DC were co-cultured with allogenic T-lymphocytes in both the 2D and 3D systems and effects on DC-induction of T-lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine release were analyzed. The results indicated that CD40, CD86 and MHC II marker expression and interleukin (IL)-12, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α secretion by DC were enhanced in 3D cultures in comparison to by cells maintained in the 2D states. The data also showed that DNA/chitosan NP activated DC more than LPS in the 3D system. T-Lymphocyte proliferation was induced to a greater extent by DNA/NP-treated DC when both cell types were maintained on the scaffolds. Interestingly, while DC induction of T-lymphocyte interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-4 release was enhanced in the 3D system (relative to controls), there was a suppression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β production; effects on IL-10 secretion were variable. The results here suggested that collagen-chitosan scaffolds could provide a pro-inflammatory and activator environment to perform studies to analyze effects of exogenous agents on the induction of DC maturation, NP uptake and/or cytokines release, as well as for the ability of these cells to potentially interact with other immune system cells in vitro.

  6. Collagen esterification enhances the function and survival of pancreatic β cells in 2D and 3D culture systems.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jae Hyung; Kim, Yang Hee; Jeong, Seong Hee; Lee, Song; Park, Si-Nae; Shim, In Kyong; Kim, Song Cheol

    2015-08-01

    Collagen, one of the most important components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), may play a role in the survival of pancreatic islet cells. In addition, chemical modifications that change the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification have been shown to increase the adhesion and proliferation of various cell types. The purpose of this study was to characterize and compare the effects of native collagen (NC) and esterified collagen (EC) on β cell function and survival. After isolation by the collagenase digestion technique, rat islets were cultured with NC and EC in 2 dimensional (2D) and 3 dimensional (3D) environments for a long-term duration in vitro. The cells were assessed for islet adhesion, morphology, viability, glucose-induced insulin secretion, and mRNA expression of glucose metabolism-related genes, and visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Islet cells attached tightly in the NC group, but islet cell viability was similar in both the NC and EC groups. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was higher in the EC group than in the NC group in both 2D and 3D culture. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of glucokinase in the EC group were higher than those in the NC group and were associated with glucose metabolism and insulin secretion. Finally, SEM observation confirmed that islets had more intact component cells on EC sponges than on NC sponges. These results indicate that modification of collagen may offer opportunities to improve function and viability of islet cells.

  7. Substrate modulus of 3D-printed scaffolds regulates the regenerative response in subcutaneous implants through the macrophage phenotype and Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Guo, R; Merkel, A R; Sterling, J A; Davidson, J M; Guelcher, S A

    2015-12-01

    The growing need for therapies to treat large cutaneous defects has driven recent interest in the design of scaffolds that stimulate regenerative wound healing. While many studies have investigated local delivery of biologics as a restorative approach, an increasing body of evidence highlights the contribution of the mechanical properties of implanted scaffolds to wound healing. In the present study, we designed poly(ester urethane) scaffolds using a templated-Fused Deposition Modeling (t-FDM) process to test the hypothesis that scaffolds with substrate modulus comparable to that of collagen fibers enhance a regenerative versus a fibrotic response. We fabricated t-FDM scaffolds with substrate moduli varying from 5 to 266 MPa to investigate the effects of substrate modulus on healing in a rat subcutaneous implant model. Angiogenesis, cellular infiltration, collagen deposition, and directional variance of collagen fibers were maximized for wounds treated with scaffolds having a substrate modulus (Ks = 24 MPa) comparable to that of collagen fibers. The enhanced regenerative response in these scaffolds was correlated with down-regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in fibroblasts, as well as increased polarization of macrophages toward the restorative M2 phenotype. These observations highlight the substrate modulus of the scaffold as a key parameter regulating the regenerative versus scarring phenotype in wound healing. Our findings further point to the potential use of scaffolds with substrate moduli tuned to that of the native matrix as a therapeutic approach to improve cutaneous healing. PMID:26406449

  8. Biodegradable HA-PLA 3-D porous scaffolds: effect of nano-sized filler content on scaffold properties.

    PubMed

    Kothapalli, Chandrasekhar R; Shaw, Montgomery T; Wei, Mei

    2005-11-01

    Scaffolds comprising poly(lactic acid) and nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) were prepared using the solvent-casting/salt-leaching technique. NaCl was used as the leaching agent. Nano-sized HA was synthesized by a hydrothermal method at 170 degrees C and autogenous pressure. High-resolution TEM imaging revealed that the HA particles were ellipsoidal-shaped with needle-like morphologies. The particles had an average size of approximately 25 nm in width and 150 nm in length with aspect ratios ranging from 6 to 8. As the HA content increased in the scaffold from 0 to 50 wt%, the compression modulus of the scaffolds increased from 4.72+/-1.2 to 9.87+/-1.8 MPa, while the yield strength from 0.29+/-0.03 to 0.44+/-0.01 MPa. Such polymeric scaffolds should be suitable materials for non-load sharing tissue-engineering applications. PMID:16701846

  9. Use of magnetically oriented orthogonal collagen scaffolds for hemi-corneal reconstruction and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Builles, Nicolas; Janin-Manificat, Hélène; Malbouyres, Marilyne; Justin, Virginie; Rovère, Marie-Rose; Pellegrini, Graziella; Torbet, Jim; Hulmes, David J S; Burillon, Carole; Damour, Odile; Ruggiero, Florence

    2010-11-01

    We recently showed that the highly organized architecture of the corneal stroma could be reproduced using scaffolds consisting of orthogonally aligned multilayers of collagen fibrils prepared using a high magnetic field. Here we show that such scaffolds permit the reconstruction in vitro of human hemi-corneas (stroma + epithelium), using primary human keratocytes and limbal stem cell derived human keratinocytes. On the surface of these hemi-corneas, a well-differentiated epithelium was formed, as determined both histologically and ultrastructurally and by the expression of characteristic markers. Within the stroma, the keratocytes aligned with the directions of the fibrils in the scaffold and synthesized a new extracellular matrix with typical collagen markers and small, uniform diameter fibrils. Finally, in vivo experiments using a rabbit model showed that these orthogonally oriented multi-layer scaffolds could be used to repair the anterior region of the stroma, leading to re-epithelialization and recovery of both transparency and ultrastructural organization. PMID:20708260

  10. Effect of adipic dihydrazide modification on the performance of collagen/hyaluronic acid scaffold.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Xiao, Yumei; Jiang, Bo; Fan, Hongsong; Zhang, Xingdong

    2010-02-01

    Collagen and hydrazide-functionalized hyaluronic acid derivatives were hybridized by gelating and genipin crosslinking to form composite hydrogel. The study contributed to the understanding of the effects of adipic dihydrazide modification on the physicochemical and biological properties of the collagen/hyaluronic acid scaffold. The investigation included morphology observation, mechanical measurement, swelling evaluation, and collagenase degradation. The results revealed that the stability of composites was increased through adipic dihydrazide modification and genipin crosslinking. The improved biocompatibility and retention of hyaluronic acid made the composite material more favorable to chondrocytes growing, suggesting the prepared scaffold might be high potential for chondrogenesis. PMID:19810117

  11. Collagen-grafted porous HDPE/PEAA scaffolds for bone reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Shik; Jung, Kyung-Hye; Kim, Hun; Kim, Chan-Bong; Kang, Inn-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    After tumor resection, bone reconstruction such as skull base reconstruction using interconnected porous structure is absolutely necessary. In this study, porous scaffolds for bone reconstruction were prepared using heat-pressing and salt-leaching methods. High-density polyethylene (HDPE) and poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid) (PEAA) were chosen as the polymer composites for producing a porous scaffold of high mechanical strength and having high reactivity with biomaterials such as collagen, respectively. The porous structure was observed through surface images, and its intrusion volume and porosity were measured. Owing to the carboxylic acids on PEAA, collagen was successfully grafted onto the porous HDPE/PEAA scaffold, which was confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. Osteoblasts were cultured on the collagen-grafted porous scaffold, and their adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation were investigated. The high viability and growth of the osteoblasts suggest that the collagen-grafted porous HDPE/PEAA is a promising scaffold material for bone generation. PMID:27468356

  12. Collagen-grafted porous HDPE/PEAA scaffolds for bone reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Shik; Jung, Kyung-Hye; Kim, Hun; Kim, Chan-Bong; Kang, Inn-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    After tumor resection, bone reconstruction such as skull base reconstruction using interconnected porous structure is absolutely necessary. In this study, porous scaffolds for bone reconstruction were prepared using heat-pressing and salt-leaching methods. High-density polyethylene (HDPE) and poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid) (PEAA) were chosen as the polymer composites for producing a porous scaffold of high mechanical strength and having high reactivity with biomaterials such as collagen, respectively. The porous structure was observed through surface images, and its intrusion volume and porosity were measured. Owing to the carboxylic acids on PEAA, collagen was successfully grafted onto the porous HDPE/PEAA scaffold, which was confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. Osteoblasts were cultured on the collagen-grafted porous scaffold, and their adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation were investigated. The high viability and growth of the osteoblasts suggest that the collagen-grafted porous HDPE/PEAA is a promising scaffold material for bone generation.

  13. Collagen-chitosan scaffold modified with Au and Ag nanoparticles: Synthesis and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubina, M. S.; Kamitov, E. E.; Zubavichus, Ya. V.; Peters, G. S.; Naumkin, A. V.; Suzer, S.; Vasil'kov, A. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays, the dermal biomimetic scaffolds are widely used in regenerative medicine. Collagen-chitosan scaffold one of these materials possesses antibacterial activity, good compatibility with living tissues and has been already used as a wound-healing material. In this article, collagen-chitosan scaffolds modified with Ag and Au nanoparticles have been synthesized using novel method - the metal-vapor synthesis. The nanocomposite materials are characterized by XPS, TEM, SEM and synchrotron radiation-based X-ray techniques. According to XRD data, the mean size of the nanoparticles (NPs) is 10.5 nm and 20.2 nm in Au-Collagen-Chitosan (Au-CollCh) and Ag-Collagen-Chitosan (Ag-CollCh) scaffolds, respectively in fair agreement with the TEM data. SAXS analysis of the composites reveals an asymmetric size distribution peaked at 10 nm for Au-CollCh and 25 nm for Ag-CollCh indicative of particle's aggregation. According to SEM data, the metal-carrying scaffolds have layered structure and the nanoparticles are rather uniformly distributed on the surface material. XPS data indicate that the metallic nanoparticles are in their unoxidized/neutral states and dominantly stabilized within the chitosan-rich domains.

  14. Compositional and in Vitro Evaluation of Nonwoven Type I Collagen/Poly-dl-lactic Acid Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Xiangchen; Russell, Stephen J.; Yang, Xuebin; Tronci, Giuseppe; Wood, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Poly-dl-lactic acid (PDLLA) was blended with type I collagen to attempt to overcome the instantaneous gelation of electrospun collagen scaffolds in biological environments. Scaffolds based on blends of type I collagen and PDLLA were investigated for material stability in cell culture conditions (37 °C; 5% CO2) in which post-electrospinning glutaraldehyde crosslinking was also applied. The resulting wet-stable webs were cultured with bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSC) for five weeks. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) and biochemical assays were used to characterise the scaffolds and the consequent cell-scaffold constructs. To investigate any electrospinning-induced denaturation of collagen, identical PDLLA/collagen and PDLLA/gelatine blends were electrospun and their potential to promote osteogenic differentiation investigated. PDLLA/collagen blends with w/w ratios of 40/60, 60/40 and 80/20 resulted in satisfactory wet stabilities in a humid environment, although chemical crosslinking was essential to ensure long term material cell culture. Scaffolds of PDLLA/collagen at a 60:40 weight ratio provided the greatest stability over a five-week culture period. The PDLLA/collagen scaffolds promoted greater cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation compared to HMBSCs seeded on the corresponding PDLLA/gelatine scaffolds, suggesting that any electrospinning-induced collagen denaturation did not affect material biofunctionality within 5 weeks in vitro. PMID:26251924

  15. A Collagen-based Scaffold Delivering Exogenous MicroRNA-29B to Modulate Extracellular Matrix Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Michael; Browne, Shane; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Pandit, Abhay

    2014-01-01

    Directing appropriate extracellular matrix remodeling is a key aim of regenerative medicine strategies. Thus, antifibrotic interfering RNA (RNAi) therapy with exogenous microRNA (miR)-29B was proposed as a method to modulate extracellular matrix remodeling following cutaneous injury. It was hypothesized that delivery of miR-29B from a collagen scaffold will efficiently modulate the extracellular matrix remodeling response and reduce maladaptive remodeling such as aggressive deposition of collagen type I after injury. The release of RNA from the scaffold was assessed and its ability to silence collagen type I and collagen type III expression was evaluated in vitro. When primary fibroblasts were cultured with scaffolds doped with miR-29B, reduced levels of collagen type I and collagen type III mRNA expression were observed for up to 2 weeks of culture. When the scaffolds were applied to full thickness wounds in vivo, reduced wound contraction, improved collagen type III/I ratios and a significantly higher matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-8: tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 ratio were detected when the scaffolds were functionalized with miR-29B. Furthermore, these effects were significantly influenced by the dose of miR-29B in the collagen scaffold (0.5 versus 5 μg). This study shows a potential of combining exogenous miRs with collagen scaffolds to improve extracellular matrix remodeling following injury. PMID:24402185

  16. Incorporation of TGF-beta 3 within collagen-hyaluronic acid scaffolds improves their chondrogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Matsiko, Amos; Levingstone, Tanya J; Gleeson, John P; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2015-06-01

    Incorporation of therapeutics in the form of growth factors within biomaterials can enhance their biofunctionality. Two methods of incorporating transforming growth factor-beta 3 within collagen-hyaluronic acid scaffolds are described, markedly improving mesenchymal stem cell-mediated chondrogenic differentiation and matrix production. Such scaffolds offer control over the release of therapeutics, demonstrating their potential for repair of complex chondral defects requiring additional stimuli.

  17. PGA-incorporated collagen: Toward a biodegradable composite scaffold for bone-tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Toosi, Shirin; Naderi-Meshkin, Hojjat; Kalalinia, Fatemeh; Peivandi, Mohammad Taghi; HosseinKhani, Hossein; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Heirani-Tabasi, Asieh; Mirahmadi, Mahdi; Behravan, Javad

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays composite scaffolds based on synthetic and natural biomaterials have got attention to increase healing of non-union bone fractures. To this end, different aspects of collagen sponge incorporated with poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) fiber were investigated in this study. Collagen solution (6.33 mg/mL) with PGA fibers (collagen/fiber ratio [w/w]: 4.22, 2.11, 1.06, 0.52) was freeze-dried, followed by dehydrothermal cross-linking to obtain collagen sponge incorporating PGA fibers. Properties of scaffold for cell viability, proliferation, and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy showed that collagen sponge exhibited an interconnected pore structure with an average pore size of 190 μm, irrespective of PGA fiber incorporation. The collagen-PGA sponge was superior to the original collagen sponge in terms of the initial attachment, proliferation rate, and osteogenic differentiation of the bone marrow-MSCs (BM-MSC). The shrinkage of sponges during cell culture was significantly suppressed by fiber incorporation. Incorporation of PGA fiber is a simple and promising way to reinforce collagen sponge without impairing biocompatibility. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2020-2028, 2016. PMID:27059133

  18. Improved osteoblast cell affinity on plasma-modified 3-D extruded PCL scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Domingos, M; Intranuovo, F; Gloria, A; Gristina, R; Ambrosio, L; Bártolo, P J; Favia, P

    2013-04-01

    Cellular adhesion and proliferation inside three-dimensional synthetic scaffolds represent a major challenge in tissue engineering. Besides the surface chemistry of the polymers, it is well recognized that scaffold internal architecture, namely pore size/shape and interconnectivity, has a strong effect on the biological response of cells. This study reports for the first time how polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds with controlled micro-architecture can be effectively produced via bioextrusion and used to enhance the penetration of plasma deposited species. Low-pressure nitrogen-based coatings were employed to augment cell adhesion and proliferation without altering the mechanical properties of the structures. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy carried out on different sections of the scaffolds indicates a uniform distribution of nitrogen-containing groups throughout the entire porous structure. In vitro biological assays confirm that plasma deposition sensitively promotes the activity of Saos-2 osteoblast cells, leading to a homogeneous colonization of the PCL scaffolds.

  19. Urethral reconstruction with a 3D porous bacterial cellulose scaffold seeded with lingual keratinocytes in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian-Wen; Lv, Xiang-Guo; Li, Zhe; Song, Lu-Jie; Feng, Chao; Xie, Min-Kai; Li, Chao; Li, Hong-Bin; Wang, Ji-Hong; Zhu, Wei-Dong; Chen, Shi-Yan; Wang, Hua-Ping; Xu, Yue-Min

    2015-09-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of urethral reconstruction with a three-dimensional (3D) porous bacterial cellulose (BC) scaffold seeded with lingual keratinocytes in a rabbit model. A novel 3D porous BC scaffold was prepared by gelatin sponge interfering in the BC fermentation process. Rabbit lingual keratinocytes were isolated, expanded, and seeded onto 3D porous BC. BC alone (group 1, N  =  10), 3D porous BC alone (group 2, N  =  10), and 3D porous BC seeded with lingual keratinocytes (group 3, N  =  10) were used to repair rabbit ventral urethral defects (2.0   ×   0.8 cm). Scanning electron microscopy revealed that BC consisted of a compact laminate while 3D porous BC was composed of a porous sheet buttressed by a dense outer layer. The average pore diameter and porosity of the 3D porous BC were 4.23   ±   1.14 μm and 67.00   ±   6.80%, respectively. At 3 months postoperatively, macroscopic examinations and retrograde urethrograms of urethras revealed that all urethras maintained wide calibers in group 3. Strictures were found in all rabbits in groups 1 and 2. Histologically, at 1 month postoperatively, intact epithelium occurred in group 3, and discontinued epithelium was found in groups 1 and 2. However, groups 2 and 3 exhibited similar epithelial regeneration, which was superior to that of group 1 at 3 months (p  <  0.05). Comparisons of smooth muscle content and endothelia density among the three groups revealed a significant increase at each time point (p  <  0.05). Our results demonstrated that 3D porous BC seeded with lingual keratinocytes enhanced urethral tissue regeneration. 3D porous BC could potentially be used as an optimized scaffold for urethral reconstruction. PMID:26358641

  20. Urethral reconstruction with a 3D porous bacterial cellulose scaffold seeded with lingual keratinocytes in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian-Wen; Lv, Xiang-Guo; Li, Zhe; Song, Lu-Jie; Feng, Chao; Xie, Min-Kai; Li, Chao; Li, Hong-Bin; Wang, Ji-Hong; Zhu, Wei-Dong; Chen, Shi-Yan; Wang, Hua-Ping; Xu, Yue-Min

    2015-09-11

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of urethral reconstruction with a three-dimensional (3D) porous bacterial cellulose (BC) scaffold seeded with lingual keratinocytes in a rabbit model. A novel 3D porous BC scaffold was prepared by gelatin sponge interfering in the BC fermentation process. Rabbit lingual keratinocytes were isolated, expanded, and seeded onto 3D porous BC. BC alone (group 1, N  =  10), 3D porous BC alone (group 2, N  =  10), and 3D porous BC seeded with lingual keratinocytes (group 3, N  =  10) were used to repair rabbit ventral urethral defects (2.0   ×   0.8 cm). Scanning electron microscopy revealed that BC consisted of a compact laminate while 3D porous BC was composed of a porous sheet buttressed by a dense outer layer. The average pore diameter and porosity of the 3D porous BC were 4.23   ±   1.14 μm and 67.00   ±   6.80%, respectively. At 3 months postoperatively, macroscopic examinations and retrograde urethrograms of urethras revealed that all urethras maintained wide calibers in group 3. Strictures were found in all rabbits in groups 1 and 2. Histologically, at 1 month postoperatively, intact epithelium occurred in group 3, and discontinued epithelium was found in groups 1 and 2. However, groups 2 and 3 exhibited similar epithelial regeneration, which was superior to that of group 1 at 3 months (p  <  0.05). Comparisons of smooth muscle content and endothelia density among the three groups revealed a significant increase at each time point (p  <  0.05). Our results demonstrated that 3D porous BC seeded with lingual keratinocytes enhanced urethral tissue regeneration. 3D porous BC could potentially be used as an optimized scaffold for urethral reconstruction.

  1. 45S5-Bioglass®-Based 3D-Scaffolds Seeded with Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells Induce In Vivo Vascularization in the CAM Angiogenesis Assay

    PubMed Central

    Handel, Marina; Hammer, Timo R.; Nooeaid, Patcharakamon; Boccaccini, Aldo R.

    2013-01-01

    Poor vascularization is the key limitation for long-term acceptance of large three-dimensional (3D) tissue engineering constructs in regenerative medicine. 45S5 Bioglass® was investigated given its potential for applications in bone engineering. Since native Bioglass® shows insufficient angiogenic properties, we used a collagen coating, to seed human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASC) confluently onto 3D 45S5 Bioglass®-based scaffolds. To investigate vascularization by semiquantitative analyses, these biofunctionalized scaffolds were then subjected to in vitro human umbilical vein endothelial cells formation assays, and were also investigated in the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) angiogenesis model, an in vivo angiogenesis assay, which uses the CAM of the hen's egg. In their native, nonbiofunctionalized state, neither Bioglass®-based nor biologically inert fibrous polypropylene control scaffolds showed angiogenic properties. However, significant vascularization was induced by hASC-seeded scaffolds (Bioglass® and polypropylene) in the CAM angiogenesis assay. Biofunctionalized scaffolds also showed enhanced tube lengths, compared to unmodified scaffolds or constructs seeded with fibroblasts. In case of biologically inert hernia meshes, the quantification of vascular endothelial growth factor secretion as the key angiogenic stimulus strongly correlated to the tube lengths and vessel numbers in all models. This correlation proved the CAM angiogenesis assay to be a suitable semiquantitative tool to characterize angiogenic effects of larger 3D implants. In addition, our results suggest that combinations of suitable scaffold materials, such as 45S5 Bioglass®, with hASC could be a promising approach for future tissue engineering applications. PMID:23837884

  2. Cellulose and collagen derived micro-nano structured scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Aravamudhan, Aja; Ramos, Daisy M; Nip, Jonathan; Harmon, Matthew D; James, Roshan; Deng, Meng; Laurencin, Cato T; Yu, Xiaojun; Kumbar, Sangamesh G

    2013-04-01

    Scaffold based bone tissue engineering (BTE) has made great progress in regenerating lost bone tissue. Materials of natural and synthetic origin have been used for scaffold fabrication. Scaffolds derived from natural polymers offer greater bioactivity and biocompatibility with mammalian tissues to favor tissue healing, due to their similarity to native extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Often it is a challenge to fabricate natural polymer based scaffolds for BTE applications without compromising their bioactivity, while maintaining adequate mechanical properties. In this work, we report the fabrication and characterization of cellulose and collagen based micro-nano structured scaffolds using human osteoblasts (HOB) for BTE applications. These porous micro-nano structured scaffolds (average pore diameter 190 +/- 10 microm) exhibited mechanical properties in the mid range of human trabecular bone (compressive modulus 266.75 +/- 33.22 MPa and strength 12.15 3 +/- 2.23 MPa). These scaffolds supported the greater adhesion and phenotype maintenance of cultured HOB as reflected by higher levels of osteogenic enzyme alkaline phosphatase and mineral deposition compared to control polyester micro-nano structured scaffolds of identical pore properties. These natural polymer based micro-nano structured scaffolds may serve as alternatives to polyester based scaffolds for BTE applications.

  3. 3D-printed dimethyloxallyl glycine delivery scaffolds to improve angiogenesis and osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Min, Zhu; Shichang, Zhao; Chen, Xin; Yufang, Zhu; Changqing, Zhang

    2015-08-01

    Angiogenesis-osteogenesis coupling processes are vital in bone tissue engineering. Normal biomaterials implanted in bone defects have issues in the sufficient formation of blood vessels, especially in the central part. Single delivery of vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) to foci in previous studies did not show satisfactory results due to low loading doses, a short protein half-life and low efficiency. Development of a hypoxia-mimicking microenvironment for cells by local prolyl-4-hydroxylase inhibitor release, which can stabilize hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) expression, is an alternative method. The aim of this study was to design a dimethyloxallyl glycine (DMOG) delivering scaffold composed of mesoporous bioactive glasses and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) polymers (MPHS scaffolds), so as to investigate whether the sustained release of DMOG promotes local angiogenesis and bone healing. The morphology and microstructure of composite scaffolds were characterized. The DMOG release patterns from scaffolds loaded with different DMOG dosages were evaluated, and the effects of DMOG delivery on human bone marrow stromal cell (hBMSC) adhesion, viability, proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and angiogenic-relative gene expressions with scaffolds were also investigated. In vivo studies were carried out to observe vascular formations and new bone ingrowth with DMOG-loaded scaffolds. The results showed that DMOG could be released in a sustained manner over 4 weeks from MPHS scaffolds and obviously enhance the angiogenesis and osteogenesis in the defects. Microfil perfusion showed a significantly increased formation of vessels in the defects with DMOG delivery. Furthermore, micro-CT imaging and fluorescence labeling indicated larger areas of bone formation for DMOG-loaded scaffolds. It is concluded that MPHS-DMOG scaffolds are promising for enhancing bone healing of osseous defects. PMID:26222039

  4. Spatio-Temporal Modification of Collagen Scaffolds Mediated by Triple Helical Propensity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Allen Y.; Foss, Catherine A.; Leong, Shirley; Mo, Xiao; Pomper, Martin G.; Yu, Seungju M.

    2011-01-01

    Functionalized collagen that incorporates exogenous compounds may offer new and improved biomaterials applications, especially in drug-delivery, multifunctional implants, and tissue engineering. To that end, we developed a specific and reversible collagen modification technique utilizing associative chain interactions between synthetic collagen mimetic peptide (CMP) [(ProHypGly)x; Hyp = hydroxyproline] and type I collagen. Here we show temperature-dependent collagen binding and subsequent release of a series of CMPs with varying chain lengths indicating a triple helical propensity driven binding mechanism. The binding took place when melted, single-strand CMPs were allowed to fold while in contact with reconstituted type I collagens. The binding affinity is highly specific to collagen as labeled CMP bound to nanometer scale periodic positions on type I collagen fibers and could be used to selectively image collagens in ex vivo human liver tissue. When heated to physiological temperature, bound CMPs discharged from the collagen at a sustained rate that correlated with CMP’s triple helical propensity, suggesting that sustainability is mediated by dynamic collagen–CMP interactions. We also report on the spatially defined modification of collagen film with linear and multi-arm poly(ethylene glycol)-CMP conjugates; at 37 °C, these PEG-CMP conjugates exhibited temporary cell repelling activity lasting up to 9 days. These results demonstrate new opportunities for targeting pathologic collagens for diagnostic or therapeutic applications and for fabricating multifunctional collagen coatings and scaffolds that can temporally and spatially control the behavior of cells associated with the collagen matrices. PMID:18547103

  5. Human platelet lysate improves human cord blood derived ECFC survival and vasculogenesis in three dimensional (3D) collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyojin; Prasain, Nutan; Vemula, Sasidhar; Ferkowicz, Michael J; Yoshimoto, Momoko; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L; Yoder, Mervin C

    2015-09-01

    Human cord blood (CB) is enriched in circulating endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) that display high proliferative potential and in vivo vessel forming ability. Since diminished ECFC survival is known to dampen the vasculogenic response in vivo, we tested how long implanted ECFC survive and generate vessels in three-dimensional (3D) type I collagen matrices in vitro and in vivo. We hypothesized that human platelet lysate (HPL) would promote cell survival and enhance vasculogenesis in the 3D collagen matrices. We report that the percentage of ECFC co-cultured with HPL that were alive was significantly enhanced on days 1 and 3 post-matrix formation, compared to ECFC alone containing matrices. Also, co-culture of ECFC with HPL displayed significantly more vasculogenic activity compared to ECFC alone and expressed significantly more pro-survival molecules (pAkt, p-Bad and Bcl-xL) in the 3D collagen matrices in vitro. Treatment with Akt1 inhibitor (A-674563), Akt2 inhibitor (CCT128930) and Bcl-xL inhibitor (ABT-263/Navitoclax) significantly decreased the cell survival and vasculogenesis of ECFC co-cultured with or without HPL and implicated activation of the Akt1 pathway as the critical mediator of the HPL effect on ECFC in vitro. A significantly greater average vessel number and total vascular area of human CD31(+) vessels were present in implants containing ECFC and HPL, compared to the ECFC alone implants in vivo. We conclude that implantation of ECFC with HPL in vivo promotes vasculogenesis and augments blood vessel formation via diminishing apoptosis of the implanted ECFC. PMID:26122935

  6. Development and characterization of novel porous 3D alginate-cockle shell powder nanobiocomposite bone scaffold.

    PubMed

    Bharatham, B Hemabarathy; Abu Bakar, Md Zuki; Perimal, Enoch Kumar; Yusof, Loqman Mohamed; Hamid, Muhajir

    2014-01-01

    A novel porous three-dimensional bone scaffold was developed using a natural polymer (alginate/Alg) in combination with a naturally obtained biomineral (nano cockle shell powder/nCP) through lyophilization techniques. The scaffold was developed in varying composition mixture of Alg-nCP and characterized using various evaluation techniques as well as preliminary in vitro studies on MG63 human osteoblast cells. Morphological observations using SEM revealed variations in structures with the use of different Alg-nCP composition ratios. All the developed scaffolds showed a porous structure with pore sizes ideal for facilitating new bone growth; however, not all combination mixtures showed subsequent favorable characteristics to be used for biological applications. Scaffolds produced using the combination mixture of 40% Alg and 60% nCP produced significantly promising results in terms of mechanical strength, degradation rate, and increased cell proliferation rates making it potentially the optimum composition mixture of Alg-nCP with future application prospects.

  7. Development of nanocellulose scaffolds with tunable structures to support 3D cell culture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Cheng, Fang; Grénman, Henrik; Spoljaric, Steven; Seppälä, Jukka; E Eriksson, John; Willför, Stefan; Xu, Chunlin

    2016-09-01

    Swollen three-dimensional nanocellulose films and their resultant aerogels were prepared as scaffolds towards tissue engineering application. The nanocellulose hydrogels with various swelling degree (up to 500 times) and the resultant aerogels with desired porosity (porosity up to 99.7% and specific surface area up to 308m(2)/g) were prepared by tuning the nanocellulose charge density, the swelling media conditions, and the material processing approach. Representative cell-based assays were applied to assess the material biocompatibility and efficacy of the human extracellular matrix (ECM)-mimicking nanocellulose scaffolds. The effects of charge density and porosity of the scaffolds on the biological tests were investigated for the first time. The results reveal that the nanocellulose scaffolds could promote the survival and proliferation of tumor cells, and enhance the transfection of exogenous DNA into the cells. These results suggest the usefulness of the nanocellulose-based matrices in supporting crucial cellular processes during cell growth and proliferation. PMID:27185139

  8. Collagen/chitosan porous bone tissue engineering composite scaffold incorporated with Ginseng compound K.

    PubMed

    Muthukumar, Thangavelu; Aravinthan, Adithan; Sharmila, Judith; Kim, Nam Soo; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2016-11-01

    In this study, suitable scaffold materials for bone tissue engineering were successfully prepared using fish scale collagen, hydroxyapatite, chitosan, and beta-tricalcium phosphate. Porous composite scaffolds were prepared by freeze drying method. The Korean traditional medicinal ginseng compound K, a therapeutic agent for the treatment of osteoporosis that reduces inflammation and enhances production of bone morphogenetic protein-2, was incorporated into the composite scaffold. The scaffold was characterized for pore size, swelling, density, degradation, mineralization, cell viability and attachment, and its morphological features were examined using scanning electron microscopy. This characterization and in vitro analysis showed that the prepared scaffold was biocompatible and supported the growth of MG-63 cells, and therefore has potential as an alternative approach for bone regeneration. PMID:27516305

  9. Monitoring the effect of magnetically aligned collagen scaffolds on tendon tissue engineering by PSOCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Ahearne, Mark; Wimpenny, Ian; Torbet, Jim

    2009-02-01

    As the repair of injured or degenerated tendon is often compromised by the shortage of suitable donor tissue, other procedures need to be developed. The application of a functional tissue engineered tendon could prove to be a promising alternative therapy. Due to their good biocompatibility, collagen hydrogel based scaffolds have been considered to be potentially suitable for engineering tendon tissue in vitro. One of the major limitations of collagen hydrogels for engineering tissues is the difficulty in controlling their architecture and collagen concentration which results in poor mechanical strength. This study aims to overcome these limitations by creating a highly biocompatible scaffold that is both mechanically robust and aligned. Collagen fibers were pre-aligned under a high magnetic field then concentrated using plastic compression. Primary tenocytes cultured from rats were seeded on the aligned scaffolds. Following a protocol in public domain, thick cultured collagen constructs were rolled up into a spiral after undergoing plastic compressed. Both a light microscopy and a polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) with central beam at 1300 nm were used to monitor the birefringence in the constructs. Conventional light microscopy showed that the tenocytes aligned along the pre-organized collagen bundles in contrast to the random distributed observed on unaligned scaffolds. PSOCT only revealed weak birefringence from aligned but uncompressed constructs. However, PSOCT images showed contrast band structures in the spiral constructs which suggests that the birefringence signal depends on the density of aligned collagen fibers. The effect of aligned cells, neo-formed matrix and the plastic compression on the birefringence signals are discussed in this paper briefly.

  10. Novel chitosan/collagen scaffold containing transforming growth factor-{beta}1 DNA for periodontal tissue engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yufeng; Cheng Xiangrong . E-mail: Xiangrongcheng@hotmail.com; Wang Jiawei; Wang Yining; Shi Bin; Huang Cui; Yang Xuechao; Liu Tongjun

    2006-05-26

    The current rapid progression in tissue engineering and local gene delivery system has enhanced our applications to periodontal tissue engineering. In this study, porous chitosan/collagen scaffolds were prepared through a freeze-drying process, and loaded with plasmid and adenoviral vector encoding human transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1). These scaffolds were evaluated in vitro by analysis of microscopic structure, porosity, and cytocompatibility. Human periodontal ligament cells (HPLCs) were seeded in this scaffold, and gene transfection could be traced by green fluorescent protein (GFP). The expression of type I and type III collagen was detected with RT-PCR, and then these scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously into athymic mice. Results indicated that the pore diameter of the gene-combined scaffolds was lower than that of pure chitosan/collagen scaffold. The scaffold containing Ad-TGF-{beta}1 exhibited the highest proliferation rate, and the expression of type I and type III collagen up-regulated in Ad-TGF-{beta}1 scaffold. After implanted in vivo, EGFP-transfected HPLCs not only proliferated but also recruited surrounding tissue to grow in the scaffold. This study demonstrated the potential of chitosan/collagen scaffold combined Ad-TGF-{beta}1 as a good substrate candidate in periodontal tissue engineering.

  11. Improved cellular response of chemically crosslinked collagen incorporated hydroxyethyl cellulose/poly(vinyl) alcohol nanofibers scaffold.

    PubMed

    Zulkifli, Farah Hanani; Jahir Hussain, Fathima Shahitha; Abdull Rasad, Mohammad Syaiful Bahari; Mohd Yusoff, Mashitah

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this research is to develop biocompatible nanofibrous mats using hydroxyethyl cellulose with improved cellular adhesion profiles and stability and use these fibrous mats as potential scaffold for skin tissue engineering. Glutaraldehyde was used to treat the scaffolds water insoluble as well as improve their biostability for possible use in biomedical applications. Electrospinning of hydroxyethyl cellulose (5 wt%) with poly(vinyl alcohol) (15 wt%) incorporated with and without collagen was blended at (1:1:1) and (1:1) ratios, respectively, and was evaluated for optimal criteria as tissue engineering scaffolds. The nanofibrous mats were crosslinked and characterized by scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetric analysis. Scanning electron microscope images showed that the mean diameters of blend nanofibers were gradually increased after chemically crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was carried out to understand chemical interactions in the presence of aldehyde groups. Thermal characterization results showed that the stability of hydroxyethyl cellulose/poly(vinyl alcohol) and hydroxyethyl cellulose/poly(vinyl alcohol)/collagen nanofibers was increased with glutaraldehyde treatment. Studies on cell-scaffolds interaction were carried out by culturing human fibroblast (hFOB) cells on the nanofibers by assessing the growth, proliferation, and morphologies of cells. The scanning electron microscope results show that better cell proliferation and attachment appeared on hydroxyethyl cellulose/poly(vinyl alcohol)/collagen substrates after 7 days of culturing, thus, promoting the potential of electrospun scaffolds as a promising candidate for tissue engineering applications.

  12. Cell culture and characterization of cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol)-g-starch 3D scaffold for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Wen-Chuan; Liau, Jiun-Jia

    2013-10-15

    The research goal of this experiment is chemically to cross-link poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and starch to form a 3D scaffold that is effective water absorbent, has a stable structure, and supports cell growth. PVA and starch can be chemically cross-linked to form a PVA-g-starch 3D scaffold polymer, as observed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), with an absorbency of up to 800%. Tensile testing reveals that, as the amount of starch increases, the strength of the 3D scaffold strength reaches 4×10(-2) MPa. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations of the material reveal that the 3D scaffold is highly porous formed using a homogenizer at 500 rpm. In an enzymatic degradation, the 3D scaffold was degraded by various enzymes at a rate of up to approximately 30-60% in 28 days. In vitro tests revealed that cells proliferate and grow in the 3D scaffold material. Energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) analysis further verified that the bio-compatibility of this scaffold. PMID:23987384

  13. Dependence of light attenuation and backscattering on collagen concentration and chondrocyte density in agarose scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puhakka, P. H.; Ylärinne, J. H.; Lammi, M. J.; Saarakkala, S.; Tiitu, V.; Kröger, H.; Virén, T.; Jurvelin, J. S.; Töyräs, J.

    2014-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been applied for high resolution imaging of articular cartilage. However, the contribution of individual structural elements of cartilage on OCT signal has not been thoroughly studied. We hypothesize that both collagen and chondrocytes, essential structural components of cartilage, act as important light scatterers and that variation in their concentrations can be detected by OCT through changes in backscattering and attenuation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we established a controlled model system using agarose scaffolds embedded with variable collagen concentrations and chondrocyte densities. Using OCT, we measured the backscattering coefficient (µb) and total attenuation coefficient (µt) in these scaffolds. Along our hypothesis, light backscattering and attenuation in agarose were dependent on collagen concentration and chondrocyte density. Significant correlations were found between µt and chondrocyte density (ρ = 0.853, p < 0.001) and between µt and collagen concentration (ρ = 0.694, p < 0.001). µb correlated significantly with chondrocyte density (ρ = 0.504, p < 0.001) but not with collagen concentration (ρ = 0.103, p = 0.422) of the scaffold. Thus, quantitation of light backscattering and, especially, attenuation could be valuable when evaluating the integrity of soft tissues, such as articular cartilage with OCT.

  14. Dependence of light attenuation and backscattering on collagen concentration and chondrocyte density in agarose scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Puhakka, P H; Ylärinne, J H; Lammi, M J; Saarakkala, S; Tiitu, V; Kröger, H; Virén, T; Jurvelin, J S; Töyräs, J

    2014-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been applied for high resolution imaging of articular cartilage. However, the contribution of individual structural elements of cartilage on OCT signal has not been thoroughly studied. We hypothesize that both collagen and chondrocytes, essential structural components of cartilage, act as important light scatterers and that variation in their concentrations can be detected by OCT through changes in backscattering and attenuation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we established a controlled model system using agarose scaffolds embedded with variable collagen concentrations and chondrocyte densities. Using OCT, we measured the backscattering coefficient (µb) and total attenuation coefficient (µt) in these scaffolds. Along our hypothesis, light backscattering and attenuation in agarose were dependent on collagen concentration and chondrocyte density. Significant correlations were found between µt and chondrocyte density (ρ = 0.853, p < 0.001) and between µt and collagen concentration (ρ = 0.694, p < 0.001). µb correlated significantly with chondrocyte density (ρ = 0.504, p < 0.001) but not with collagen concentration (ρ = 0.103, p = 0.422) of the scaffold. Thus, quantitation of light backscattering and, especially, attenuation could be valuable when evaluating the integrity of soft tissues, such as articular cartilage with OCT. PMID:25310088

  15. Validation of an in vitro 3D bone culture model with perfused and mechanically stressed ceramic scaffold.

    PubMed

    Bouet, G; Cruel, M; Laurent, C; Vico, L; Malaval, L; Marchat, D

    2015-01-01

    An engineered three dimensional (3D) in vitro cell culture system was designed with the goal of inducing and controlling in vitro osteogenesis in a reproducible manner under conditions more similar to the in vivo bone microenvironment than traditional two-dimensional (2D) models. This bioreactor allows efficient mechanical loading and perfusion of an original cubic calcium phosphate bioceramic of highly controlled composition and structure. This bioceramic comprises an internal portion containing homogeneously interconnected macropores surrounded by a dense layer, which minimises fluid flow bypass around the scaffold. This dense and flat layer permits the application of a homogeneous loading on the bioceramic while also enhancing its mechanical strength. Numerical modelling of constraints shows that the system provides direct mechanical stimulation of cells within the scaffold. Experimental results establish that under perfusion at a steady flow of 2 µL/min, corresponding to 3 ≤ Medium velocity ≤ 23 µm/s, mouse calvarial cells grow and differentiate as osteoblasts in a reproducible manner, and lay down a mineralised matrix. Moreover, cells respond to mechanical loading by increasing C-fos expression, which demonstrates the effective mechanical stimulation of the culture within the scaffold. In summary, we provide a "proof-of-concept" for osteoblastic cell culture in a controlled 3D culture system under perfusion and mechanical loading. This model will be a tool to analyse bone cell functions in vivo, and will provide a bench testing system for the clinical assessment of bioactive bone-targeting molecules under load.

  16. The Use of Silk as a Scaffold for Mature, Sustainable Unilocular Adipose 3D Tissue Engineered Systems.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Rosalyn D; Wang, Rebecca Y; Reagan, Michaela R; Chen, Ying; Borowsky, Francis E; Zieba, Adam; Marra, Kacey G; Rubin, J Peter; Ghobrial, Irene M; Kaplan, David L

    2016-07-01

    There is a critical need for monitoring physiologically relevant, sustainable, human adipose tissues in vitro to gain new insights into metabolic diseases. To support long-term culture, a 3D silk scaffold assisted culture system is developed that maintains mature unilocular adipocytes ex vivo in coculture with preadipocytes, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells obtained from small volumes of liquefied adipose samples. Without the silk scaffold, adipose tissue explants cannot be sustained in long-term culture (3 months) due to their fragility. Adjustments to media components are used to tune lipid metabolism and proliferation, in addition to responsiveness to an inflammatory stimulus. Interestingly, patient specific responses to TNFα stimulation are observed, providing a proof-of-concept translational technique for patient specific disease modeling in the future. In summary, this novel 3D scaffold assisted approach is required for establishing physiologically relevant, sustainable, human adipose tissue systems from small volumes of lipoaspirate, making this methodology of great value to studies of metabolism, adipokine-driven diseases, and other diseases where the roles of adipocytes are only now becoming uncovered. PMID:27197588

  17. Highlighting the impact of aging on type I collagen: label-free investigation using confocal reflectance microscopy and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in 3D matrix model.

    PubMed

    Guilbert, Marie; Roig, Blandine; Terryn, Christine; Garnotel, Roselyne; Jeannesson, Pierre; Sockalingum, Ganesh D; Manfait, Michel; Perraut, François; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Koenig, Anne; Piot, Olivier

    2016-02-23

    During aging, alterations of extracellular matrix proteins contribute to various pathological phenotypes. Among these alterations, type I collagen cross-linking and associated glycation products accumulation over time detrimentally affects its physico-chemical properties, leading to alterations of tissue biomechanical stability. Here, different-age collagen 3D matrices using non-destructive and label-free biophotonic techniques were analysed to highlight the impact of collagen I aging on 3D constructs, at macroscopic and microscopic levels. Matrices were prepared with collagens extracted from tail tendons of rats (newborns, young and old adults) to be within the physiological aging process. The data of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy reveal that aging leads to an inhibition of fibril assembly and a resulting decrease of gel density. Investigations by confocal reflectance microscopy highlight poor-fibrillar structures in oldest collagen networks most likely related to the glycation products accumulation. Complementarily, an infrared analysis brings out marked spectral variations in the Amide I profile, specific of the peptidic bond conformation and for carbohydrates vibrations as function of collagen-age. Interestingly, we also highlight an unexpected behavior for newborn collagen, exhibiting poorly-organized networks and microscopic features close to the oldest collagen. These results demonstrate that changes in collagen optical properties are relevant for investigating the incidence of aging in 3D matrix models.

  18. Highlighting the impact of aging on type I collagen: label-free investigation using confocal reflectance microscopy and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in 3D matrix model

    PubMed Central

    Terryn, Christine; Garnotel, Roselyne; Jeannesson, Pierre; Sockalingum, Ganesh D.; Manfait, Michel; Perraut, François; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Koenig, Anne; Piot, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    During aging, alterations of extracellular matrix proteins contribute to various pathological phenotypes. Among these alterations, type I collagen cross-linking and associated glycation products accumulation over time detrimentally affects its physico-chemical properties, leading to alterations of tissue biomechanical stability. Here, different-age collagen 3D matrices using non-destructive and label-free biophotonic techniques were analysed to highlight the impact of collagen I aging on 3D constructs, at macroscopic and microscopic levels. Matrices were prepared with collagens extracted from tail tendons of rats (newborns, young and old adults) to be within the physiological aging process. The data of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy reveal that aging leads to an inhibition of fibril assembly and a resulting decrease of gel density. Investigations by confocal reflectance microscopy highlight poor-fibrillar structures in oldest collagen networks most likely related to the glycation products accumulation. Complementarily, an infrared analysis brings out marked spectral variations in the Amide I profile, specific of the peptidic bond conformation and for carbohydrates vibrations as function of collagen-age. Interestingly, we also highlight an unexpected behavior for newborn collagen, exhibiting poorly-organized networks and microscopic features close to the oldest collagen. These results demonstrate that changes in collagen optical properties are relevant for investigating the incidence of aging in 3D matrix models. PMID:26885896

  19. Strontium eluting graphene hybrid nanoparticles augment osteogenesis in a 3D tissue scaffold.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sachin; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this work was to prepare hybrid nanoparticles of graphene sheets decorated with strontium metallic nanoparticles and demonstrate their advantages in bone tissue engineering. Strontium-decorated reduced graphene oxide (RGO_Sr) hybrid nanoparticles were synthesized by the facile reduction of graphene oxide and strontium nitrate. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy revealed that the hybrid particles were composed of RGO sheets decorated with 200-300 nm metallic strontium particles. Thermal gravimetric analysis further confirmed the composition of the hybrid particles as 22 wt% of strontium. Macroporous tissue scaffolds were prepared by incorporating RGO_Sr particles in poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL). The PCL/RGO_Sr scaffolds were found to elute strontium ions in aqueous medium. Osteoblast proliferation and differentiation was significantly higher in the PCL scaffolds containing the RGO_Sr particles in contrast to neat PCL and PCL/RGO scaffolds. The increased biological activity can be attributed to the release of strontium ions from the hybrid nanoparticles. This study demonstrates that composites prepared using hybrid nanoparticles that elute strontium ions can be used to prepare multifunctional scaffolds with good mechanical and osteoinductive properties. These findings have important implications for designing the next generation of biomaterials for use in tissue regeneration. PMID:25553731

  20. Strontium eluting graphene hybrid nanoparticles augment osteogenesis in a 3D tissue scaffold.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sachin; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this work was to prepare hybrid nanoparticles of graphene sheets decorated with strontium metallic nanoparticles and demonstrate their advantages in bone tissue engineering. Strontium-decorated reduced graphene oxide (RGO_Sr) hybrid nanoparticles were synthesized by the facile reduction of graphene oxide and strontium nitrate. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy revealed that the hybrid particles were composed of RGO sheets decorated with 200-300 nm metallic strontium particles. Thermal gravimetric analysis further confirmed the composition of the hybrid particles as 22 wt% of strontium. Macroporous tissue scaffolds were prepared by incorporating RGO_Sr particles in poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL). The PCL/RGO_Sr scaffolds were found to elute strontium ions in aqueous medium. Osteoblast proliferation and differentiation was significantly higher in the PCL scaffolds containing the RGO_Sr particles in contrast to neat PCL and PCL/RGO scaffolds. The increased biological activity can be attributed to the release of strontium ions from the hybrid nanoparticles. This study demonstrates that composites prepared using hybrid nanoparticles that elute strontium ions can be used to prepare multifunctional scaffolds with good mechanical and osteoinductive properties. These findings have important implications for designing the next generation of biomaterials for use in tissue regeneration.

  1. 3D polylactide-based scaffolds for studying human hepatocarcinoma processes in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaffaro, Roberto; Lo Re, Giada; Rigogliuso, Salvatrice; Ghersi, Giulio

    2012-08-01

    We evaluated the combination of leaching techniques and melt blending of polymers and particles for the preparation of highly interconnected three-dimensional polymeric porous scaffolds for in vitro studies of human hepatocarcinoma processes. More specifically, sodium chloride and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) were used as water-soluble porogens to form porous and solvent-free poly(L,D-lactide) (PLA)-based scaffolds. Several characterization techniques, including porosimetry, image analysis and thermogravimetry, were combined to improve the reliability of measurements and mapping of the size, distribution and microarchitecture of pores. We also investigated the effect of processing, in PLA-based blends, on the simultaneous bulk/surface modifications and pore architectures in the scaffolds, and assessed the effects on human hepatocarcinoma viability and cell adhesion. The influence of PEG molecular weight on the scaffold morphology and cell viability and adhesion were also investigated. Morphological studies indicated that it was possible to obtain scaffolds with well-interconnected pores of assorted sizes. The analysis confirmed that SK-Hep1 cells adhered well to the polymeric support and emitted surface protrusions necessary to grow and differentiate three-dimensional systems. PEGs with higher molecular weight showed the best results in terms of cell adhesion and viability.

  2. Tissue engineering of the small intestine by acellular collagen sponge scaffold grafting.

    PubMed

    Hori, Y; Nakamura, T; Matsumoto, K; Kurokawa, Y; Satomi, S; Shimizu, Y

    2001-01-01

    Tissue engineering of the small intestine will prove a great benefit to patients suffering from short bowel disease. However cell seeding in tissue engineering, such as fetal cell use, is accompanied by problems of ethical issues, rejection, and short supply. To overcome these problems, we carried out an experimental study on tissue engineering of the small intestine by acellular collagen sponge scaffold grafting. We resected the 5 cm long jejunum from beagle dogs and reconstructed it by acellular collagen sponge grafting with a silicon tube stent. The graft was covered with the omentum. At 1 month after operation, the silicon stent was removed endoscopically. Animals were sacrificed 1 and 4 months after operation, and were examined microscopically. Neo-intestinal regeneration was observed and the intestinal mucosa covered the luminal side of the regenerated intestine across the anastomosis. Thus, the small intestine was regenerated by tissue engineering technology using an acellular collagen sponge scaffold.

  3. Photopatterning of hydrogel scaffolds coupled to filter materials using stereolithography for perfused 3D culture of hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Neiman, Jaclyn A Shepard; Raman, Ritu; Chan, Vincent; Rhoads, Mary G; Raredon, Micha Sam B; Velazquez, Jeremy J; Dyer, Rachel L; Bashir, Rashid; Hammond, Paula T; Griffith, Linda G

    2015-04-01

    In vitro models that recapitulate the liver's structural and functional complexity could prolong hepatocellular viability and function to improve platforms for drug toxicity studies and understanding liver pathophysiology. Here, stereolithography (SLA) was employed to fabricate hydrogel scaffolds with open channels designed for post-seeding and perfused culture of primary hepatocytes that form 3D structures in a bioreactor. Photopolymerizable polyethylene glycol-based hydrogels were fabricated coupled to chemically activated, commercially available filters (polycarbonate and polyvinylidene fluoride) using a chemistry that permitted cell viability, and was robust enough to withstand perfused culture of up to 1 µL/s for at least 7 days. SLA energy dose, photoinitiator concentrations, and pretreatment conditions were screened to determine conditions that maximized cell viability and hydrogel bonding to the filter. Multiple open channel geometries were readily achieved, and included ellipses and rectangles. Rectangular open channels employed for subsequent studies had final dimensions on the order of 350 µm by 850 µm. Cell seeding densities and flow rates that promoted cell viability were determined. Perfused culture of primary hepatocytes in hydrogel scaffolds in the presence of soluble epidermal growth factor (EGF) prolonged the maintenance of albumin production throughout the 7-day culture relative to 2D controls. This technique of bonding hydrogel scaffolds can be employed to fabricate soft scaffolds for a number of bioreactor configurations and applications.

  4. Proliferation and enrichment of CD133(+) glioblastoma cancer stem cells on 3D chitosan-alginate scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kievit, Forrest M; Florczyk, Stephen J; Leung, Matthew C; Wang, Kui; Wu, Jennifer D; Silber, John R; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Lee, Jerry S H; Zhang, Miqin

    2014-11-01

    Emerging evidence implicates cancer stem cells (CSCs) as primary determinants of the clinical behavior of human cancers, representing an ideal target for next-generation anti-cancer therapies. However CSCs are difficult to propagate in vitro, severely limiting the study of CSC biology and drug development. Here we report that growing cells from glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines on three dimensional (3D) porous chitosan-alginate (CA) scaffolds dramatically promotes the proliferation and enrichment of cells possessing the hallmarks of CSCs. CA scaffold-grown cells were found more tumorigenic in nude mouse xenografts than cells grown from monolayers. Growing in CA scaffolds rapidly promoted expression of genes involved in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition that has been implicated in the genesis of CSCs. Our results indicate that CA scaffolds have utility as a simple and inexpensive means to cultivate CSCs in vitro in support of studies to understand CSC biology and develop more effective anti-cancer therapies.

  5. Marrow-Derived Stem Cell Motility in 3D Synthetic Scaffold Is Governed by Geometry Along With Adhesivity and Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Peyton, Shelly R.; Kalcioglu, Z. Ilke; Cohen, Joshua C.; Runkle, Anne P.; Van Vliet, Krystyn J.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    Design of 3D scaffolds that can facilitate proper survival, proliferation, and differentiation of progenitor cells is a challenge for clinical applications involving large connective tissue defects. Cell migration within such scaffolds is a critical process governing tissue integration. Here, we examine effects of scaffold pore diameter, in concert with matrix stiffness and adhesivity, as independently tunable parameters that govern marrow-derived stem cell motility. We adopted an “inverse opal” processing technique to create synthetic scaffolds by crosslinking poly(ethylene glycol) at different densities (controlling matrix elastic moduli or stiffness) and small doses of a heterobifunctional monomer (controlling matrix adhesivity) around templating beads of different radii. As pore diameter was varied from 7 to 17 µm (i.e., from significantly smaller than the spherical cell diameter to approximately cell diameter), it displayed a profound effect on migration of these stem cells—including the degree to which motility was sensitive to changes in matrix stiffness and adhesivity. Surprisingly, the highest probability for substantive cell movement through pores was observed for an intermediate pore diameter, rather than the largest pore diameter, which exceeded cell diameter. The relationships between migration speed, displacement, and total path length were found to depend strongly on pore diameter. We attribute this dependence to convolution of pore diameter and void chamber diameter, yielding different geometric environments experienced by the cells within. PMID:21449030

  6. Systematical Evaluation of Mechanically Strong 3D Printed Diluted magnesium Doping Wollastonite Scaffolds on Osteogenic Capacity in Rabbit Calvarial Defects

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Miao; Liu, An; Shao, Huifeng; Yang, Xianyan; Ma, Chiyuan; Yan, Shigui; Liu, Yanming; He, Yong; Gou, Zhongru

    2016-01-01

    Wollastonite (CaSiO3; CSi) ceramic is a promising bioactive material for bone defect repair due to slightly fast degradation of its porous constructs in vivo. In our previous strategy some key features of CSi ceramic have been significantly improved by dilute magnesium doping for regulating mechanical properties and biodegradation. Here we demonstrate that 6 ~ 14% of Ca substituted by Mg in CSi (CSi-Mgx, x = 6, 10, 14) can enhance the mechanical strength (>40 MPa) but not compromise biological performances of the 3D printed porous scaffolds with open porosity of 60‒63%. The in vitro cell culture tests in vitro indicated that the dilute Mg doping into CSi was beneficial for ALP activity and high expression of osteogenic marker genes of MC3T3-E1 cells in the scaffolds. A good bone tissue regeneration response and elastoplastic response in mechanical strength in vivo were determined after implantation in rabbit calvarial defects for 6‒12 weeks. Particularly, the CSi-Mg10 and CSi-Mg14 scaffolds could enhance new bone regeneration with a significant increase of newly formed bone tissue (18 ~ 22%) compared to the pure CSi (~14%) at 12 weeks post-implantation. It is reasonable to consider that, therefore, such CSi-Mgx scaffolds possessing excellent strength and reasonable degradability are promising for bone reconstruction in thin-wall bone defects. PMID:27658481

  7. Fabrication of collagen scaffolds impregnated with sago starch capped silver nanoparticles suitable for biomedical applications and their physicochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Abhishek; Sekar, Santhanam; Seeni Meera, Kamal Mohamed; Mukherjee, Amitava; Sastry, Thotapalli P; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2014-10-01

    The present investigation attempts at fabricating collagen-based scaffolds impregnated with sago starch capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), useful for biomedical applications, and aims at studying their physicochemical aspects. AgNPs synthesized through a chemical reduction method, capped using different concentrations of sago starch, are incorporated into collagen derived from fish scales, and lyophilized to form scaffolds. FT-IR spectra confirm and validate the interaction of sago starch capped AgNPs with collagen in the scaffolds. TGA and DSC results indicate enhanced thermal stability of collagen scaffolds impregnated with sago capped AgNPs compared to collagen alone. All the collagen scaffolds containing sago starch capped AgNPs show high tensile strength values for their use as wound dressing materials. Moreover, lower minimum inhibitory concentration values are obtained for the above capped AgNP collagen scaffolds, which indicate higher antibacterial activities compared to uncapped AgNPs tested against both gram positive and negative bacterial strains. The novelty is that the developed scaffolds are biodegradable and in vitro studies reveal them as biocompatible and suitable for tissue regeneration applications. PMID:25138771

  8. Multi-scale mechanical response of freeze-dried collagen scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Offeddu, Giovanni S; Ashworth, Jennifer C; Cameron, Ruth E; Oyen, Michelle L

    2015-02-01

    Tissue engineering has grown in the past two decades as a promising solution to unresolved clinical problems such as osteoarthritis. The mechanical response of tissue engineering scaffolds is one of the factors determining their use in applications such as cartilage and bone repair. The relationship between the structural and intrinsic mechanical properties of the scaffolds was the object of this study, with the ultimate aim of understanding the stiffness of the substrate that adhered cells experience, and its link to the bulk mechanical properties. Freeze-dried type I collagen porous scaffolds made with varying slurry concentrations and pore sizes were tested in a viscoelastic framework by macroindentation. Membranes made up of stacks of pore walls were indented using colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. It was found that the bulk scaffold mechanical response varied with collagen concentration in the slurry consistent with previous studies on these materials. Hydration of the scaffolds resulted in a more compliant response, yet lesser viscoelastic relaxation. Indentation of the membranes suggested that the material making up the pore walls remains unchanged between conditions, so that the stiffness of the scaffolds at the scale of seeded cells is unchanged; rather, it is suggested that thicker pore walls or more of these result in the increased moduli for the greater slurry concentration conditions.

  9. Collagen-containing scaffolds enhance attachment and proliferation of non-cultured bone marrow multipotential stromal cells.

    PubMed

    El-Jawhari, Jehan J; Sanjurjo-Rodríguez, Clara; Jones, Elena; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2016-04-01

    Large bone defects are ideally treated with autografts, which have many limitations. Therefore, osteoconductive scaffolds loaded with autologous bone marrow (BM) aspirate are increasingly used as alternatives. The purpose of this study was to compare the growth of multipotential stromal cells (MSCs) from unprocessed BM on a collagen-containing bovine bone scaffold (Orthoss(®) Collagen) with a non-collagen-containing bovine bone scaffold, Orthoss(®) . Another collagen-containing synthetic scaffold, Vitoss(®) was included in the comparison. Colonization of scaffolds by BM MSCs (n = 23 donors) was evaluated using microscopy, colony forming unit-fibroblast assay and flow-cytometry. The number of BM MSCs initially attached to Orthoss(®) Collagen and Vitoss(®) was similar but greater than Orthoss(®) (p = 0.001 and p = 0.041, respectively). Furthermore, the number of MSCs released from Orthoss(®) Collagen and Vitoss(®) after 2-week culture was also higher compared to Orthoss(®) (p = 0.010 and p = 0.023, respectively). Interestingly, collagen-containing scaffolds accommodated larger numbers of lymphocytic and myelomonocytic cells. Additionally, the proliferation of culture-expanded MSCs on Orthoss(®) collagen and Vitoss(®) was greater compared to Orthoss(®) (p = 0.047 and p = 0.004, respectively). Collectively, collagen-containing scaffolds were superior in supporting the attachment and proliferation of MSCs when they were loaded with unprocessed BM aspirates. This highlights the benefit of collagen incorporation into bone scaffolds for use with autologous bone marrow aspirates as autograft substitutes.

  10. Characterization of Silk Fibroin/Chitosan 3D Porous Scaffold and In Vitro Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Shuguang; Liu, Lei; Shi, Yong; Qiu, Junqi; Fang, Wei; Rong, Mingdeng; Guo, Zehong; Gao, Wenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering is a powerful tool to treat bone defects caused by trauma, infection, tumors and other factors. Both silk fibroin (SF) and chitosan (CS) are non-toxic and have good biocompatibility, but are poor biological scaffolds when used alone. In this study, the microscopic structure and related properties of SF/CS composite scaffolds with different component ratios were examined. The scaffold material most suitable for osteoblast growth was determined, and these results offer an experimental basis for the future reconstruction of bone defects. First, via freeze-drying and chemical crosslinking methods, SF/CS composites with different component ratios were prepared and their structure was characterized. Changes in the internal structure of the SF and CS mixture were observed, confirming that the mutual modification between the two components was complete and stable. The internal structure of the composite material was porous and three-dimensional with a porosity above 90%. We next studied the pore size, swelling ratio, water absorption ratio, degradation and in vitro cell proliferation. For the 40% SF-60% CS group, the pore size of the scaffold was suitable for the growth of osteoblasts, and the rate of degradation was steady. This favors the early adhesion, growth and proliferation of MG-63 cells. In addition to good biocompatibility and satisfactory cell affinity, this material promotes the secretion of extracellular matrix materials by osteoblasts. Thus, 40% SF-60% CS is a good material for bone tissue engineering. PMID:26083846

  11. Development and characterization of novel porous 3D alginate-cockle shell powder nanobiocomposite bone scaffold.

    PubMed

    Bharatham, B Hemabarathy; Abu Bakar, Md Zuki; Perimal, Enoch Kumar; Yusof, Loqman Mohamed; Hamid, Muhajir

    2014-01-01

    A novel porous three-dimensional bone scaffold was developed using a natural polymer (alginate/Alg) in combination with a naturally obtained biomineral (nano cockle shell powder/nCP) through lyophilization techniques. The scaffold was developed in varying composition mixture of Alg-nCP and characterized using various evaluation techniques as well as preliminary in vitro studies on MG63 human osteoblast cells. Morphological observations using SEM revealed variations in structures with the use of different Alg-nCP composition ratios. All the developed scaffolds showed a porous structure with pore sizes ideal for facilitating new bone growth; however, not all combination mixtures showed subsequent favorable characteristics to be used for biological applications. Scaffolds produced using the combination mixture of 40% Alg and 60% nCP produced significantly promising results in terms of mechanical strength, degradation rate, and increased cell proliferation rates making it potentially the optimum composition mixture of Alg-nCP with future application prospects. PMID:25110655

  12. Far-infrared spectroscopy of salt penetration into a collagen fiber scaffold.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Maya; Yamada, Akira; Fukunaga, Kaori; Kojima, Hiroaki

    2015-06-01

    We employed far-infrared spectroscopy to observe the amount of salt that penetrates into collagen fiber masses. The absorption properties of collagen sheets prepared from tilapia skin, bovine skin, rat tail, and sea cucumber dermis were measured using a transmission Fourier transform spectrometer in a band from approximately 100 to 700 cm(-1). We confirmed that the absorbance spectra of the four types of dried collagen sheet show good agreement, even though the amino acid compositions differed. The absorbance peaks observed in the band corresponded to collective vibrations of plural functional groups such as methylene and imino groups in collagen. When salt solution was added to the collagen sheets and then dried, the spectral shapes of the sheets at approximately 166 cm(-1) were clearly different from those of the plain collagen sheets. The differential absorbance between wavenumbers 166 cm(-1) and 250 cm(-1) sensitively reflected the difference between higher-order structures, and the salt diffusion (crystallization) depended on the collagen fiber condition. From these results, we consider that spectral changes can be used for the numerical evaluation of salt penetration into a collagen fiber scaffold.

  13. Norfloxacin-loaded collagen/chitosan scaffolds for skin reconstruction: Preparation, evaluation and in-vivo wound healing assessment.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Azza A; Salama, Alaa H

    2016-02-15

    Biomaterial scaffolds are versatile tools as drug carrier for treatment of wounds. A series of norfloxacin-loaded scaffolds were synthesized for treatment of wounds by combining collagen with two different types of chitosan using freeze-drying technique. Subsequently, scaffolds were screened in terms of morphology, water absorption and retention capacity, biodegradation, ex-vivo bioadhesive strength, in-vitro drug release biological compatibility, X-ray diffractometry, differential scanning calorimetry as well as in-vivo evaluation. The results indicate that the scaffold mechanical strength is dependent on the type of used chitosan. The prepared scaffolds contained interconnected porous architecture. The scaffolds had high water uptake and retention capacity with extended biodegradation rate. Scaffolds prepared with chitosan HCl showed superior bioadhesive strength compared to those prepared with low molecular weight chitosan. All scaffolds showed almost 100% drug release within 24h. As identified by the terahertz pulsed imaging measurements, there is single scaffold area with the same concentration. After 28 days of wound dressing with selected norfoloxacin-loaded or unloaded collagen/chitosan scaffolds in Albino rats, it was found that the tissue regeneration time was fast compared to non-treated wounds. Furthermore, the drug-loaded scaffolds showed normal structure of an intact epidermal layer as well as the underlying dermis as revealed by histopathological studies. The obtained results suggest that the investigated norfloxacin-loaded collagen/chitosan scaffold is a potential candidate for skin regeneration application.

  14. Influence of electrospun fiber mesh size on hMSC oxygen metabolism in 3D collagen matrices: experimental and theoretical evidences.

    PubMed

    Guaccio, Angela; Guarino, Vincenzo; Perez, Marco A Alvarez-; Cirillo, Valentina; Netti, Paolo A; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2011-08-01

    The traditional paradigm of tissue engineering of regenerating in vitro tissue or organs, through the combination of an artificial matrix and a cellular population has progressively changed direction. The most recent concept is the realization of a fully functional biohybrid, where both, the artificial and the biotic phase, concur in the formation of the novel organic matter. In this direction, interest is growing in approaches taking advantage of the control at micro- and nano-scale of cell material interaction based on the realization of elementary tassels of cells and materials which constitute the beginning point for the expansion of 3D more complex structures. Since a spontaneous assembly of all these components is expected, however, it becomes more fundamental than ever to define the features influencing cellular behavior, either they were material functional properties, or material architecture. In this work, it has been investigated the direct effect of electrospun fiber sizes on oxygen metabolism of h-MSC cells, when any other culture parameter was kept constant. To this aim, thin PCL electrospun membranes, with micro- and nano-scale texturing, were layered between two collagen slices up to create a sandwich structure (µC-PCL-C and nC-PCL-C). Cells were seeded on membranes, and the oxygen consumption was determined by a phosphorescence quenching technique. Results indicate a strong effect of the architecture of scaffolds on cell metabolism, also revealed by the increasing of HIF1-α gene expression in nC-PCL-C. These findings offer new insights into the role of materials in specific cell activities, also implying the existence of very interesting criteria for the control of tissue growth through the tuning of scaffold architecture.

  15. Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in 3-D Zr-Si Organic-Inorganic Scaffolds Produced by Two-Photon Polymerization Technique

    PubMed Central

    Koroleva, Anastasia; Deiwick, Andrea; Nguyen, Alexander; Schlie-Wolter, Sabrina; Narayan, Roger; Timashev, Peter; Popov, Vladimir; Bagratashvili, Viktor; Chichkov, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Two-photon polymerization (2PP) is applied for the fabrication of 3-D Zr-Si scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Zr-Si scaffolds with 150, 200, and 250 μm pore sizes are seeded with human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs) and human adipose tissue derived stem cells (hASCs) and cultured in osteoinductive and control media for three weeks. Osteogenic differentiation of hASCs and hBMSCs and formation of bone matrix is comparatively analyzed via alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP), calcium quantification, osteocalcin staining and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It is observed that the 150 μm pore size Zr-Si scaffolds support the strongest matrix mineralization, as confirmed by calcium deposition. Analysis of ALP activity, osteocalcin staining and SEM observations of matrix mineralization reveal that mesenchymal stem cells cultured on 3-D scaffolds without osteogenic stimulation spontaneously differentiate towards osteogenic lineage. Nanoindentation measurements show that aging of the 2PP-produced Zr-Si scaffolds in aqueous or alcohol media results in an increase in the scaffold Young’s modulus and hardness. Moreover, accelerated formation of bone matrix by hASCs is noted, when cultured on the scaffolds with lower Young’s moduli and hardness values (non aged scaffolds) compared to the cells cultured on scaffolds with higher Young’s modulus and hardness values (aged scaffolds). Presented results support the potential application of Zr-Si scaffolds for autologous bone tissue engineering. PMID:25706270

  16. The influence of plasma technology coupled to chemical grafting on the cell growth compliance of 3D hydroxyapatite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Russo, Laura; Zanini, Stefano; Giannoni, Paolo; Landi, Elena; Villa, Anna; Sandri, Monica; Riccardi, Claudia; Quarto, Rodolfo; Doglia, Silvia M; Nicotra, Francesco; Cipolla, Laura

    2012-11-01

    The development of advanced materials with biomimetic features in order to elicit desired biological responses and to guarantee tissue biocompatibility is recently gaining attention for tissue engineering applications. Bioceramics, such as hydroxyapatite-based biomaterials are now used in a number of different applications throughout the body, covering all areas of the skeleton, due to their biological and chemical similarity to the inorganic phases of bones. When bioactive sintered hydroxyapatite (HA) is desired, biomolecular modification of these materials is needed. In the present work, we investigated the influence of plasma surface modification coupled to chemical grafting on the cell growth compliance of HA 3D scaffolds.

  17. Differentiation capacity and maintenance of differentiated phenotypes of human mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on two distinct types of 3D polymeric scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Leferink, A M; Santos, D; Karperien, M; Truckenmüller, R K; van Blitterswijk, C A; Moroni, L

    2015-12-01

    Many studies have shown the influence of soluble factors and material properties on the differentiation capacity of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) cultured as monolayers. These types of two-dimensional (2D) studies can be used as simplified models to understand cell processes related to stem cell sensing and mechano-transduction in a three-dimensional (3D) context. For several other mechanisms such as cell-cell signaling, cell proliferation and cell morphology, it is well-known that cells behave differently on a planar surface compared to cells in 3D environments. In classical tissue engineering approaches, a combination of cells, 3D scaffolds and soluble factors are considered as the key ingredients for the generation of mechanically stable 3D tissue constructs. However, when MSCs are used for tissue engineering strategies, little is known about the maintenance of their differentiation potential in 3D scaffolds after the removal of differentiation soluble factors. In this study, the differentiation potential of human MSCs (hMSCs) into the chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages on two distinct 3D scaffolds, additive manufactured electrospun scaffolds, was assessed and compared to conventional 2D culture. Human MSCs cultured in the presence of soluble factors in 3D showed to differentiate to the same extent as hMSCs cultured as 2D monolayers or as scaffold-free pellets, indicating that the two scaffolds do not play a consistent role in the differentiation process. In the case of phenotypic changes, the achieved differentiated phenotype was not maintained after the removal of soluble factors, suggesting that the plasticity of hMSCs is retained in 3D cell culture systems. This finding can have implications for future tissue engineering approaches in which the validation of hMSC differentiation on 3D scaffolds will not be sufficient to ensure the maintenance of the functionality of the cells in the absence of appropriate differentiation signals. PMID:26566169

  18. Topologically defined composites of collagen types I and V as in vitro cell culture scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Franke, Katja; Sapudom, Jiranuwat; Kalbitzer, Liv; Anderegg, Ulf; Pompe, Tilo

    2014-06-01

    Cell fate is known to be triggered by cues from the extracellular matrix, including its chemical, biological and physical characteristics. Specifically, mechanical and topological properties are increasingly recognized as important signals. The aim of this work was to provide an easily accessible biomimetic in vitro platform of topologically defined collagen I matrices to dissect cell behaviour under various conditions in vitro. We reconstituted covalently bound layers of three-dimensional (3-D) networks of collagen type I and collagen type V with a defined network topology. A new erosion algorithm enabled us to analyse the mean pore diameter and fibril content, while the mean fibril diameter was examined by an autocorrelation method. Different concentrations and ratios of collagen I and V resulted in pore diameters from 2.4 to 4.5μm and fibril diameters from 0.6 to 0.8μm. A comparison of telopeptide intact collagen I to telopeptide deficient collagen I revealed obvious differences in network structure. The good correlation of the topological data to measurements of network stiffness as well as invasion of human dermal fibroblasts proves that the topological analysis provides meaningful measures of the functional characteristics of the reconstituted 3-D collagen matrices.

  19. 2D and 3D collagen and fibrin biopolymers promote specific ECM and integrin gene expression by vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    HONG, HELEN; STEGEMANN, JAN P.

    2009-01-01

    Collagen Type I and fibrin are polymeric proteins commonly used in the field of regenerative medicine as the foundational matrix of engineered tissues. We examined the response of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) to both two-dimensional (2D) substrates as well as three-dimensional (3D) matrices of these biopolymers. Pure collagen Type I, pure fibrin and composite matrices consisting of 1:1 mixtures of collagen and fibrin were studied. Relative gene expression of three ECM molecules (collagen Type I and III, and tropoelastin) and three integrin subunits (integrins α1, β1 and β3) was determined over 7 days in culture using quantitative RT-PCR. Expression of all of these marker genes was up-regulated in 3D matrices, relative to 2D substrates. Tropoelastin, integrin α1 and integrin β1 were highest in collagen matrices, while collagen III and integrin β3 expression were highest in pure fibrin, and collagen I expression was highest in the collagen-fibrin composite materials. Both the compositional and temporal expression patterns of these specific ECM-related genes were suggestive of a wound healing response. These results illuminate the short-term responses of VSMC to 2D and 3D biopolymer matrices, and have relevance to tissue engineering and cardiovascular biology. PMID:18854122

  20. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in a Rabbit Model Using Silk-Collagen Scaffold and Comparison with Autograft

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Fanggang; Shi, Zhongli; Liu, An; Guo, Peng; Yan, Shigui

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to perform an in vivo assessment of a novel silk-collagen scaffold for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. First, a silk-collagen scaffold was fabricated by combining sericin-extracted knitted silk fibroin mesh and type I collagen to mimic the components of the ligament. Scaffolds were electron-beam sterilized and rolled up to replace the ACL in 20 rabbits in the scaffold group, and autologous semitendinosus tendons were used to reconstruct the ACL in the autograft control group. At 4 and 16 weeks after surgery, grafts were retrieved and analyzed for neoligament regeneration and tendon-bone healing. To evaluate neoligament regeneration, H&E and immunohistochemical staining was performed, and to assess tendon-bone healing, micro-CT, biomechanical test, H&E and Russell-Movat pentachrome staining were performed. Cell infiltration increased over time in the scaffold group, and abundant fibroblast-like cells were found in the core of the scaffold graft at 16 weeks postoperatively. Tenascin-C was strongly positive in newly regenerated tissue at 4 and 16 weeks postoperatively in the scaffold group, similar to observations in the autograft group. Compared with the autograft group, tendon-bone healing was better in the scaffold group with trabecular bone growth into the scaffold. The results indicate that the silk-collagen scaffold has considerable potential for clinical application. PMID:25938408

  1. Microencapsulation of Neuroblastoma Cells and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Collagen Microspheres: A 3D Model for Cancer Cell Niche Study

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Pan; Sin, Hoi Shun; Chan, Shing; Chan, Godfrey Chi Fung; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing trend for researchers to use in vitro 3D models in cancer studies, as they can better recapitulate the complex in vivo situation. And the fact that the progression and development of tumor are closely associated to its stromal microenvironment has been increasingly recognized. The establishment of such tumor supportive niche is vital in understanding tumor progress and metastasis. The mesenchymal origin of many cells residing in the cancer niche provides the rationale to include MSCs in mimicking the niche in neuroblastoma. Here we co-encapsulate and co-culture NBCs and MSCs in a 3D in vitro model and investigate the morphology, growth kinetics and matrix remodeling in the reconstituted stromal environment. Results showed that the incorporation of MSCs in the model lead to accelerated growth of cancer cells as well as recapitulation of at least partially the tumor microenvironment in vivo. The current study therefore demonstrates the feasibility for the collagen microsphere to act as a 3D in vitro cancer model for various topics in cancer studies. PMID:26657086

  2. Composite lithium metal anode by melt infusion of lithium into a 3D conducting scaffold with lithiophilic coating

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zheng; Lin, Dingchang; Zhao, Jie; Lu, Zhenda; Liu, Yayuan; Liu, Chong; Lu, Yingying; Wang, Haotian; Yan, Kai; Tao, Xinyong; Cui, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lithium metal-based battery is considered one of the best energy storage systems due to its high theoretical capacity and lowest anode potential of all. However, dendritic growth and virtually relative infinity volume change during long-term cycling often lead to severe safety hazards and catastrophic failure. Here, a stable lithium–scaffold composite electrode is developed by lithium melt infusion into a 3D porous carbon matrix with “lithiophilic” coating. Lithium is uniformly entrapped on the matrix surface and in the 3D structure. The resulting composite electrode possesses a high conductive surface area and excellent structural stability upon galvanostatic cycling. We showed stable cycling of this composite electrode with small Li plating/stripping overpotential (<90 mV) at a high current density of 3 mA/cm2 over 80 cycles. PMID:26929378

  3. Mathematical modeling of uniaxial mechanical properties of collagen gel scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Irastorza, Ramiro M; Drouin, Bernard; Blangino, Eugenia; Mantovani, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Small diameter tissue-engineered arteries improve their mechanical and functional properties when they are mechanically stimulated. Applying a suitable stress and/or strain with or without a cycle to the scaffolds and cells during the culturing process resides in our ability to generate a suitable mechanical model. Collagen gel is one of the most used scaffolds in vascular tissue engineering, mainly because it is the principal constituent of the extracellular matrix for vascular cells in human. The mechanical modeling of such a material is not a trivial task, mainly for its viscoelastic nature. Computational and experimental methods for developing a suitable model for collagen gels are of primary importance for the field. In this research, we focused on mechanical properties of collagen gels under unconfined compression. First, mechanical viscoelastic models are discussed and framed in the control system theory. Second, models are fitted using system identification. Several models are evaluated and two nonlinear models are proposed: Mooney-Rivlin inspired and Hammerstein models. The results suggest that Mooney-Rivlin and Hammerstein models succeed in describing the mechanical behavior of collagen gels for cyclic tests on scaffolds (with best fitting parameters 58.3% and 75.8%, resp.). When Akaike criterion is used, the best is the Mooney-Rivlin inspired model. PMID:25834840

  4. Bio-inspired in situ crosslinking and mineralization of electrospun collagen scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Dhand, Chetna; Ong, Seow Theng; Dwivedi, Neeraj; Diaz, Silvia Marrero; Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Navaneethan, Balchandar; Fazil, Mobashar H U T; Liu, Shouping; Seitz, Vera; Wintermantel, Erich; Beuerman, Roger W; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Verma, Navin K; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani

    2016-10-01

    Bone disorders are the most common cause of severe long term pain and physical disability, and affect millions of people around the world. In the present study, we report bio-inspired preparation of bone-like composite structures by electrospinning of collagen containing catecholamines and Ca(2+). The presence of divalent cation induces simultaneous partial oxidative polymerization of catecholamines and crosslinking of collagen nanofibers, thus producing mats that are mechanically robust and confer photoluminescence properties. Subsequent mineralization of the mats by ammonium carbonate leads to complete oxidative polymerization of catecholamines and precipitation of amorphous CaCO3. The collagen composite scaffolds display outstanding mechanical properties with Young's modulus approaching the limits of cancellous bone. Biological studies demonstrate that human fetal osteoblasts seeded on to the composite scaffolds display enhanced cell adhesion, penetration, proliferation, differentiation and osteogenic expression of osteocalcin, osteopontin and bone matrix protein when compared to pristine collagen or tissue culture plates. Among the two catecholamines, mats containing norepinephrine displayed superior mechanical, photoluminescence and biological properties than mats loaded with dopamine. These smart multifunctional scaffolds could potentially be utilized to repair and regenerate bone defects and injuries. PMID:27475728

  5. Mathematical modeling of uniaxial mechanical properties of collagen gel scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Irastorza, Ramiro M; Drouin, Bernard; Blangino, Eugenia; Mantovani, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Small diameter tissue-engineered arteries improve their mechanical and functional properties when they are mechanically stimulated. Applying a suitable stress and/or strain with or without a cycle to the scaffolds and cells during the culturing process resides in our ability to generate a suitable mechanical model. Collagen gel is one of the most used scaffolds in vascular tissue engineering, mainly because it is the principal constituent of the extracellular matrix for vascular cells in human. The mechanical modeling of such a material is not a trivial task, mainly for its viscoelastic nature. Computational and experimental methods for developing a suitable model for collagen gels are of primary importance for the field. In this research, we focused on mechanical properties of collagen gels under unconfined compression. First, mechanical viscoelastic models are discussed and framed in the control system theory. Second, models are fitted using system identification. Several models are evaluated and two nonlinear models are proposed: Mooney-Rivlin inspired and Hammerstein models. The results suggest that Mooney-Rivlin and Hammerstein models succeed in describing the mechanical behavior of collagen gels for cyclic tests on scaffolds (with best fitting parameters 58.3% and 75.8%, resp.). When Akaike criterion is used, the best is the Mooney-Rivlin inspired model.

  6. Mathematical Modeling of Uniaxial Mechanical Properties of Collagen Gel Scaffolds for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Irastorza, Ramiro M.; Drouin, Bernard; Blangino, Eugenia; Mantovani, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Small diameter tissue-engineered arteries improve their mechanical and functional properties when they are mechanically stimulated. Applying a suitable stress and/or strain with or without a cycle to the scaffolds and cells during the culturing process resides in our ability to generate a suitable mechanical model. Collagen gel is one of the most used scaffolds in vascular tissue engineering, mainly because it is the principal constituent of the extracellular matrix for vascular cells in human. The mechanical modeling of such a material is not a trivial task, mainly for its viscoelastic nature. Computational and experimental methods for developing a suitable model for collagen gels are of primary importance for the field. In this research, we focused on mechanical properties of collagen gels under unconfined compression. First, mechanical viscoelastic models are discussed and framed in the control system theory. Second, models are fitted using system identification. Several models are evaluated and two nonlinear models are proposed: Mooney-Rivlin inspired and Hammerstein models. The results suggest that Mooney-Rivlin and Hammerstein models succeed in describing the mechanical behavior of collagen gels for cyclic tests on scaffolds (with best fitting parameters 58.3% and 75.8%, resp.). When Akaike criterion is used, the best is the Mooney-Rivlin inspired model. PMID:25834840

  7. Colonization of collagen scaffolds by adipocytes derived from mesenchymal stem cells of the common marmoset monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Bernemann, Inga; Mueller, Thomas; Blasczyk, Rainer; Glasmacher, Birgit; Hofmann, Nicola

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Marmoset bone marrow-derived MSCs differentiate in suspension into adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages. {yields} Marmoset MSCs integrate in collagen type I scaffolds and differentiate excellently into adipogenic cells. {yields} Common marmoset monkey is a suitable model for soft tissue engineering in human regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: In regenerative medicine, human cell replacement therapy offers great potential, especially by cell types differentiated from immunologically and ethically unproblematic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In terms of an appropriate carrier material, collagen scaffolds with homogeneous pore size of 65 {mu}m were optimal for cell seeding and cultivating. However, before clinical application and transplantation of MSC-derived cells in scaffolds, the safety and efficiency, but also possible interference in differentiation due to the material must be preclinically tested. The common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) is a preferable non-human primate animal model for this aim due to its genetic and physiological similarities to the human. Marmoset bone marrow-derived MSCs were successfully isolated, cultured and differentiated in suspension into adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages by defined factors. The differentiation capability could be determined by FACS. Specific marker genes for all three cell types could be detected by RT-PCR. Furthermore, MSCs seeded on collagen I scaffolds differentiated in adipogenic lineage showed after 28 days of differentiation high cell viability and homogenous distribution on the material which was validated by calcein AM and EthD staining. As proof of adipogenic cells, the intracellular lipid vesicles in the cells were stained with Oil Red O. The generation of fat vacuoles was visibly extensive distinguishable and furthermore determined on the molecular level by expression of specific marker genes. The results of the study proved both the differential

  8. Effects of epicatechin, a crosslinking agent, on human dental pulp cells cultured in collagen scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Eun-su; Lim, Myung-Jin; Min, Kyung-San; Kwon, Young-Sun; Hwang, Yun-Chan; Yu, Mi-Kyung; Hong, Chan-Ui; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the biological effects of epicatechin (ECN), a crosslinking agent, on human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured in collagen scaffolds. Material and Method To evaluate the effects of ECN on the proliferation of hDPCs, cell counting was performed using optical and fluorescent microscopy. Measurements of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, alizarin red staining, and real-time polymerase chain reactions were performed to assess odontogenic differentiation. The compressive strength and setting time of collagen scaffolds containing ECN were measured. Differential scanning calorimetry was performed to analyze the thermal behavior of collagen in the presence of ECN. Results Epicatechin increased ALP activity, mineralized nodule formation, and the mRNA expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), a specific odontogenic-related marker. Furthermore, ECN upregulated the expression of DSPP in hDPCs cultured in collagen scaffolds. Epicatechin activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and the treatment with an ERK inhibitor (U0126) blocked the expression of DSPP. The compressive strength was increased and the setting time was shortened in a dose-dependent manner. The number of cells cultured in the ECN-treated collagen scaffolds was significantly increased compared to the cells in the untreated control group. Conclusions Our results revealed that ECN promoted the proliferation and differentiation of hDPCs. Furthermore, the differentiation was regulated by the ERK signaling pathway. Changes in mechanical properties are related to cell fate, including proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, our study suggests the ECN treatment might be desirable for dentin-pulp complex regeneration. PMID:27008260

  9. Rapid and low-cost prototyping of 3D nanostructures with multi-layer hydrogen silsesquioxane scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Leo T; Fan, Li; Wang, Jian; Xuan, Yi; Qi, Minghao

    2013-12-20

    A layer-by-layer (LBL) method can generate or approximate any three-dimensional (3D) structure, and has been the approach for the manufacturing of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices. However, its high cost precludes the fabrication of anything other than CMOS-compatible devices, and general 3D nanostructures have been difficult to prototype in academia and small businesses, due to the lack of expensive facility and state-of-the-art tools. It is proposed and demonstrated that a novel process that can rapidly fabricate high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures at low cost, without requiring specialized equipment. An individual layer is realized through electron-beam lithography patterning of hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) resist, followed by planarization via spinning SU-8 resist and etch-back. A 4-layer silicon inverse woodpile photonic crystal with a period of 650 nm and a 7-layer HSQ scaffold with a period of 300 nm are demonstrated. This process provides a versatile and accessible solution to the fabrication of highly complex 3D nanostructures.

  10. Effect of internal structure of collagen/hydroxyapatite scaffold on the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guobao; Lv, Yonggang; Dong, Chanjuan; Yang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Consisting of seed cells and scaffold, regenerative medicine provides a new way for the repair and regeneration of tissue and organ. Collagen/hydroxyapatite (HA) biocomposite scaffold is highlighted due to its advantageous features of two major components of bone matrix: collagen and HA. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of internal structure of collagen/HA scaffold on the fate of rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The internal structure of collagen/HA scaffold was characterized by micro-CT. It is found that the porosity decreased while average compressive modulus increased with the increase of collagen proportion. Within the collagen proportion of 0.35%, 0.5% and 0.7%, the porosities were 89.08%, 78.37% and 75.36%, the pore sizes were 140.6±75.5 μm, 133.9±48.4 μm and 160.7±119.6 μm, and the average compressive moduli were 6.74±1.16 kPa, 8.82±2.12 kPa and 23.61±8.06 kPa, respectively. Among these three kinds of scaffolds, MSCs on the Col 0.35/HA 22 scaffold have the highest viability and the best cell proliferation. On the contrary, the Col 0.7/HA 22 scaffold has the best ability to stimulate MSCs to differentiate into osteoblasts in a relatively short period of time. In vivo research also demonstrated that the internal structure of collagen/HA scaffold has significant effect on the cell infiltration. Therefore, precise control of the internal structure of collagen/HA scaffold can provide a more efficient carrier to the repair of bone defects.

  11. Investigating the morphological, mechanical and degradation properties of scaffolds comprising collagen, gelatin and elastin for use in soft tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Grover, Chloe N; Cameron, Ruth E; Best, Serena M

    2012-06-01

    Collagen-based scaffolds can be used to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) of soft tissues and provide support during tissue regeneration. To better match the native ECM composition and mechanical properties as well as tailor the degradation resistance and available cell binding motifs, other proteins or different collagen types may be added. The present study has explored the use of components such as gelatin or elastin and investigated their effect on the bulk physical properties of the resulting scaffolds compared to those made from pure collagen type I. The effect of altering the composition and crosslinking was evaluated in terms of the scaffold structure, mechanical properties, swelling, degradation and cell attachment. Results demonstrate that scaffolds based on gelatin had reduced tensile stiffness and degradation time compared with collagen. The addition of elastin reduced the overall strength and stiffness of the scaffolds, with electron microscopy results suggesting that insoluble elastin interacts best with collagen and soluble elastin interacts best with gelatin. Carbodiimide crosslinking was essential for structural stability, strength and degradation resistance for scaffolds of all compositions. In addition, preliminary cell adhesion studies showed these highly porous structures (pore size 130-160 μm) to be able to support HT1080 cell infiltration and growth. Therefore, this study suggests that the use of gelatin in place of collagen, with additions of elastin, can tailor the physical properties of scaffolds and could be a design strategy for reducing the overall material costs. PMID:22520419

  12. Linear Ordered Collagen Scaffolds Loaded with Collagen-Binding Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Facilitate Recovery of Sciatic Nerve Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Fukai; Xiao, Zhifeng; Chen, Bing; Hou, Xianglin

    2014-01-01

    Natural biological functional scaffolds, consisting of biological materials filled with promoting elements, provide a promising strategy for the regeneration of peripheral nerve defects. Collagen conduits have been used widely due to their excellent biological properties. Linear ordered collagen scaffold (LOCS) fibers are good lumen fillers that can guide nerve regeneration in an ordered direction. In addition, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is important in the recovery of nerve injury. However, the traditional method for delivering bFGF to the lesion site has no long-term effect because of its short half-life and rapid diffusion. Therefore, we fused a specific collagen-binding domain (CBD) peptide to the N-terminal of native basic fibroblast growth factor (NAT-bFGF) to retain bFGF on the collagen scaffolds. In this study, a natural biological functional scaffold was constructed using collagen tubes filled with collagen-binding bFGF (CBD-bFGF)-loaded LOCS to promote regeneration in a 5-mm rat sciatic nerve transection model. Functional evaluation, histological investigation, and morphometric analysis indicated that the natural biological functional scaffold retained more bFGF at the injury site, guided axon growth, and promoted nerve regeneration as well as functional restoration. PMID:24188561

  13. Hypoxia-mimicking bioactive glass/collagen glycosaminoglycan composite scaffolds to enhance angiogenesis and bone repair.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Elaine; Partap, Sonia; Azevedo, Maria M; Jell, Gavin; Stevens, Molly M; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2015-06-01

    One of the biggest challenges in regenerative medicine is promoting sufficient vascularisation of tissue-engineered constructs. One approach to overcome this challenge is to target the cellular hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α) pathway, which responds to low oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and results in the activation of numerous pro-angiogenic genes including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Cobalt ions are known to mimic hypoxia by artificially stabilising the HIF-1α transcription factor. Here, resorbable bioactive glass particles (38 μm and 100 μm) with cobalt ions incorporated into the glass network were used to create bioactive glass/collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds optimised for bone tissue engineering. Inclusion of the bioactive glass improved the compressive modulus of the resulting composite scaffolds while maintaining high degrees of porosity (>97%). Moreover, in vitro analysis demonstrated that the incorporation of cobalt bioactive glass with a mean particle size of 100 μm significantly enhanced the production and expression of VEGF in endothelial cells, and cobalt bioactive glass/collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffold conditioned media also promoted enhanced tubule formation. Furthermore, our results prove the ability of these scaffolds to support osteoblast cell proliferation and osteogenesis in all bioactive glass/collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds irrespective of the particle size. In summary, we have developed a hypoxia-mimicking tissue-engineered scaffold with pro-angiogenic and pro-osteogenic capabilities that may encourage bone tissue regeneration and overcome the problem of inadequate vascularisation of grafts commonly seen in the field of tissue engineering.

  14. A smart bilayer scaffold of elastin-like recombinamer and collagen for soft tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kinikoglu, Beste; Rodríguez-Cabello, José Carlos; Damour, Odile; Hasirci, Vasif

    2011-06-01

    Elastin-like recombinamers (ELRs) are smart, protein-based polymers designed with desired peptide sequences using recombinant DNA technology. The aim of the present study was to produce improved tissue engineering scaffolds from collagen and an elastin-like protein tailored to contain the cell adhesion peptide RGD, and to investigate the structural and mechanical capacities of the resulting scaffolds (foams, fibers and foam-fiber bilayer scaffolds). The results of the scanning electron microscopy, mercury porosimetry and mechanical testing indicated that incorporation of ELR into the scaffolds improved the uniformity and continuity of the pore network, decreased the pore size (from 200 to 20 μm) and the fiber diameter (from 1.179 μm to 306 nm), broadened the pore size distribution (from 70-200 to 4-200 μm) and increased their flexibility (from 0.007 to 0.011 kPa⁻¹). Culture of human fibroblasts and epithelial cells in ELR-collagen scaffolds showed the positive contribution of ELR on proliferation of both types of cells. PMID:21505829

  15. Comparative evaluation of a biomimic collagen/hydroxyapatite/β-tricaleium phosphate scaffold in alveolar ridge preservation with Bio-Oss Collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tong; Li, Qing; Zhang, Gui-feng; Zhou, Gang; Yu, Xin; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Xiu-mei; Tang, Zhi-hui

    2016-06-01

    Bone scaffolds are critical in current implant and periodontal regeneration approaches. In this study, we prepared a novel composite type-I collagen and hydroxyapatite (HA)/β-tricaleium phosphate (TCP) scaffold (CHTS) by incorporating type-I collagen and bovine calcined bone granules, prepared as a mixture of 50% HA and 50% TCP, by freeze drying. We then characterized the CHTS and determined its cytotoxic effects. Additionally, ridge preservation experiments were carried out to evaluate the clinical effects of the CHTS. The results demonstrated that the composite scaffolds had good surface morphology and no cytotoxicity. Additionally, an in vivo experiment in an animal model showed that the CHTS performed equally as well as Bio-Oss Collagen, a widely used bone graft in ridge preservation. These findings revealed that the CHTS, which contained natural constituents of bone, could be used as a scaffold for bone regeneration and clinical use.

  16. Tissue response of defined collagen-elastin scaffolds in young and adult rats with special attention to calcification.

    PubMed

    Daamen, W F; Nillesen, S T M; Hafmans, T; Veerkamp, J H; van Luyn, M J A; van Kuppevelt, T H

    2005-01-01

    Collagen-elastin scaffolds may be valuable biomaterials for tissue engineering because they combine tensile strength with elasticity. In this study, the tissue response to and the calcification of these scaffolds were evaluated. In particular, the hypothesis was tested that calcification, a common phenomenon in biomaterials, may be due to microfibrils within the elastic fibre, and that these microfibrils might generate a tissue response. Four scaffolds were subcutaneously implanted, viz. collagen, collagen + pure elastin, collagen+microfibril-containing, and collagen + pulverised elastic ligament (the source for elastin). Explants were evaluated at day 3, 7 and 21. In young Sprague Dawley rats, collagen + ligament calcified substantially, whereas collagen + elastin (with and without microfibrils) calcified less, and collagen did not. Calcification started at elastic fibres. In both Sprague Dawley and Wistar adult rats, however, none of the scaffolds calcified. Mononuclear cell infiltration was prominent in young and adult Sprague Dawley rats. In adult Wistar rats, this infiltration was associated with the presence of microfibrils. Degradation of scaffolds and new matrix formation were related with cellular influx and degree of vascularisation. In conclusion, absence of microfibrils from the elastic fibre does not prevent calcification in young Sprague Dawley rats, but does reduce the tissue response in adult Wistar rats. Cellular response and calcification differs with age and strain and therefore the choice of animal model is of key importance in biomaterial evaluation.

  17. Compression loading-induced stress responses in intervertebral disc cells encapsulated in 3D collagen constructs

    PubMed Central

    Chooi, Wai Hon; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Cells protect themselves from stresses through a cellular stress response. In the interverebral disc, such response was also demonstrated to be induced by various environmental stresses. However, whether compression loading will cause cellular stress response in the nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) is not well studied. By using an in vitro collagen microencapsulation model, we investigated the effect of compression loading on the stress response of NPCs. Cell viability tests, and gene and protein expression experiments were conducted, with primers for the heat shock response (HSR: HSP70, HSF1, HSP27 and HSP90), and unfolded protein response (UPR: GRP78, GRP94, ATF4 and CHOP) genes and an antibody to HSP72. Different gene expression patterns occurred due to loading type throughout experiments. Increasing the loading strain for a short duration did not increase the stress response genes significantly, but over longer durations, HSP70 and HSP27 were upregulated. Longer loading durations also resulted in a continuous upregulation of HSR genes and downregulation of UPR genes, even after load removal. The rate of apoptosis did not increase significantly after loading, suggesting that stress response genes might play a role in cell survival following mechanical stress. These results demonstrate how mechanical stress might induce and control the expression of HSR and UPR genes in NPCs. PMID:27197886

  18. Tubular Compressed Collagen Scaffolds for Ureteral Tissue Engineering in a Flow Bioreactor System.

    PubMed

    Vardar, Elif; Engelhardt, Eva-Maria; Larsson, Hans M; Mouloungui, Elodie; Pinnagoda, Kalitha; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Frey, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Ureteral replacement by tissue engineering might become necessary following tissue loss after excessive ureteral trauma, after retroperitoneal cancer, or even after failed reconstructive surgery. This need has driven innovation in the design of novel scaffolds and specific cell culture techniques for urinary tract reconstruction. In this study, compressed tubular collagen scaffolds were evaluated, addressing the physical and biological characterization of acellular and cellular collagen tubes in a new flow bioreactor system, imitating the physiological pressure, peristalsis, and flow conditions of the human ureter. Collagen tubes, containing primary human smooth muscle and urothelial cells, were evaluated regarding their change in gene and protein expression under dynamic culture conditions. A maximum intraluminal pressure of 22.43 ± 0.2 cm H2O was observed in acellular tubes, resulting in a mean wall shear stress of 4 dynes/cm(2) in the tubular constructs. Dynamic conditions directed the differentiation of both cell types into their mature forms. This was confirmed by their gene expression of smooth muscle alpha-actin, smoothelin, collagen type I and III, elastin, laminin type 1 and 5, cytokeratin 8, and uroplakin 2. In addition, smooth muscle cell alignment predominantly perpendicular to the flow direction was observed, comparable to the cell orientation in native ureteral tissue. These results revealed that coculturing human smooth muscle and urothelial cells in compressed collagen tubes under human ureteral flow-mimicking conditions could lead to cell-engineered biomaterials that might ultimately be translated into clinical applications.

  19. Study of the collagen structure in the superficial zone and physiological state of articular cartilage using a 3D confocal imaging technique

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian P; Kirk, Thomas B; Zheng, Ming H

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The collagen structure in the superficial zone of articular cartilage is critical to the tissue's durability. Early osteoarthritis is often characterized with fissures on the articular surface. This is closely related to the disruption of the collagen network. However, the traditional histology can not offer visualization of the collagen structure in articular cartilage because it uses conventional optical microscopy that does not have insufficient imaging resolution to resolve collagen from proteoglycans in hyaline articular cartilage. This study examines the 3D collagen network of articular cartilage scored from 0 to 2 in the scoring system of International Cartilage Repair Society, and aims to develop a 3D histology for assessing early osteoarthritis. Methods Articular cartilage was visually classified into five physiological groups: normal cartilage, aged cartilage, cartilage with artificial and natural surface disruption, and fibrillated. The 3D collagen matrix of the cartilage was acquired using a 3D imaging technique developed previously. Traditional histology was followed to grade the physiological status of the cartilage in the scoring system of International Cartilage Repair Society. Results Normal articular cartilage contains interwoven collagen bundles near the articular surface, approximately within the lamina splendens. However, its collagen fibres in the superficial zone orient predominantly in a direction spatially oblique to the articular surface. With age and disruption of the articular surface, the interwoven collagen bundles are gradually disappeared, and obliquely oriented collagen fibres change to align predominantly in a direction spatially perpendicular to the articular surface. Disruption of the articular surface is well related to the disappearance of the interwoven collagen bundles. Conclusion A 3D histology has been developed to supplement the traditional histology and study the subtle changes in the collagen network in the

  20. Nanofiber Yarn/Hydrogel Core-Shell Scaffolds Mimicking Native Skeletal Muscle Tissue for Guiding 3D Myoblast Alignment, Elongation, and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Wu, Yaobin; Guo, Baolin; Ma, Peter X

    2015-09-22

    Designing scaffolds that can mimic native skeletal muscle tissue and induce 3D cellular alignment and elongated myotube formation remains an ongoing challenge for skeletal muscle tissue engineering. Herein, we present a simple technique to generate core-shell composite scaffolds for mimicking native skeletal muscle structure, which comprise the aligned nanofiber yarn (NFY) core and the photocurable hydrogel shell. The aligned NFYs are prepared by the hybrid composition including poly(caprolactone), silk fibroin, and polyaniline via a developed dry-wet electrospinning method. A series of core-shell column and sheet composite scaffolds are ultimately obtained by encapsulating a piece and layers of aligned NFY cores within the hydrogel shell after photo-cross-linking. C2C12 myoblasts are seeded within the core-shell scaffolds, and the good biocompatibility of these scaffolds and their ability to induce 3D cellular alignment and elongation are successfully demonstrated. Furthermore, the 3D elongated myotube formation within core-shell scaffolds is also performed after long-term cultivation. These data suggest that these core-shell scaffolds combine the aligned NFY core that guides the myoblast alignment and differentiation and the hydrogel shell that provides a suitable 3D environment for nutrition exchange and mechanical protection to perform a great practical application for skeletal muscle regeneration.

  1. Towards the Design of 3D Fiber-Deposited Poly(ε-caprolactone)/lron-Doped Hydroxyapatite Nanocomposite Magnetic Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Roberta; Russo, Alessandro; Gloria, Antonio; D'Amora, Ugo; Russo, Teresa; Panseri, Silvia; Sandri, Monica; Tampieri, Anna; Marcacci, Maurilio; Dediu, Valentin A; Wilde, Colin J; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-07-01

    In the past few years, researchers have focused on the design and development of three-dimensional (3D) advanced scaffolds, which offer significant advantages in terms of cell performance. The introduction of magnetic features into scaffold technology could offer innovative opportunities to control cell populations within 3D microenvironments, with the potential to enhance their use in tissue regeneration or in cell-based analysis. In the present study, 3D fully biodegradable and magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering, consisting of a poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) matrix reinforced with iron-doped hydroxyapatite (FeHA) nanoparticles, were designed and manufactured using a rapid prototyping technique. The performances of these novel 3D PCL/FeHA scaffolds were assessed through a combination of theoretical evaluation, experimental in vitro analyses and in vivo testing in a rabbit animal model. The results from mechanical com- pression tests were consistent with FEM simulations. The in vitro results showed that the cell growth in the magnetized scaffolds was 2.2-fold greater than that in non-magnetized ones. In vivo experiments further suggested that, after only 4 weeks, the PCL/FeHA scaffolds were completely filled with newly formed bone, proving a good level of histocompatibility. All of the results suggest that the introduction of magnetic features into biocompatible materials may confer significant advantages in terms of 3D cell assembly. PMID:26307846

  2. Preparation and characterization of aloe vera blended collagen-chitosan composite scaffold for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Jithendra, Panneerselvam; Rajam, Abraham Merlin; Kalaivani, Thambiran; Mandal, Asit Baran; Rose, Chellan

    2013-08-14

    Collagen-Chitosan (COL-CS) scaffolds supplemented with different concentrations (0.1-0.5%) of aloe vera (AV) were prepared and tested in vitro for their possible application in tissue engineering. After studying the microstructure and mechanical properties of all the composite preparations, a 0.2% AV blended COL-CS scaffold was chosen for further studies. Scaffolds were examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) to understand the intermolecular interactions and their influence on the thermal property of the complex composite. Swelling property in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4) and in vitro biodegradability by collagenase digestion method were monitored to assess the stability of the scaffold in a physiological medium in a hydrated condition, and to assay its resistance against enzymatic forces. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) image of the scaffold samples showed porous architecture with gradual change in their morphology and reduced tensile properties with increasing aloe vera concentration. The FTIR spectrum revealed the overlap of the AV absorption peak with the absorption peak of COL-CS. The inclusion of AV to COL-CS increased the thermal stability as well as hydrophilicity of the scaffolds. Cell culture studies on the scaffold showed enhanced growth and proliferation of fibroblasts (3T3L1) without exhibiting any toxicity. Also, normal cell morphology and proliferation were observed by fluorescence microscopy and SEM. The rate of cell growth in the presence/absence of aloe vera in the scaffolds was in the order: COL-CS-AV > COL-CS > TCP (tissue culture polystyrene plate). These results suggested that the aloe vera gel-blended COL-CS scaffolds could be a promising candidate for tissue engineering applications.

  3. Structure, Properties, and In Vitro Behavior of Heat-Treated Calcium Sulfate Scaffolds Fabricated by 3D Printing.

    PubMed

    Asadi-Eydivand, Mitra; Solati-Hashjin, Mehran; Shafiei, Seyedeh Sara; Mohammadi, Sepideh; Hafezi, Masoud; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2016-01-01

    The ability of inkjet-based 3D printing (3DP) to fabricate biocompatible ceramics has made it one of the most favorable techniques to generate bone tissue engineering (BTE) scaffolds. Calcium sulfates exhibit various beneficial characteristics, and they can be used as a promising biomaterial in BTE. However, low mechanical performance caused by the brittle character of ceramic materials is the main weakness of 3DP calcium sulfate scaffolds. Moreover, the presence of certain organic matters in the starting powder and binder solution causes products to have high toxicity levels. A post-processing treatment is usually employed to improve the physical, chemical, and biological behaviors of the printed scaffolds. In this study, the effects of heat treatment on the structural, mechanical, and physical characteristics of 3DP calcium sulfate prototypes were investigated. Different microscopy and spectroscopy methods were employed to characterize the printed prototypes. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the specimens was also evaluated before and after heat treatment. Results showed that the as-printed scaffolds and specimens heat treated at 300°C exhibited severe toxicity in vitro but had almost adequate strength. By contrast, the specimens heat treated in the 500°C-1000°C temperature range, although non-toxic, had insufficient mechanical strength, which was mainly attributed to the exit of the organic binder before 500°C and the absence of sufficient densification below 1000°C. The sintering process was accelerated at temperatures higher than 1000°C, resulting in higher compressive strength and less cytotoxicity. An anhydrous form of calcium sulfate was the only crystalline phase existing in the samples heated at 500°C-1150°C. The formation of calcium oxide caused by partial decomposition of calcium sulfate was observed in the specimens heat treated at temperatures higher than 1200°C. Although considerable improvements in cell viability of heat-treated scaffolds were

  4. Structure, Properties, and In Vitro Behavior of Heat-Treated Calcium Sulfate Scaffolds Fabricated by 3D Printing.

    PubMed

    Asadi-Eydivand, Mitra; Solati-Hashjin, Mehran; Shafiei, Seyedeh Sara; Mohammadi, Sepideh; Hafezi, Masoud; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2016-01-01

    The ability of inkjet-based 3D printing (3DP) to fabricate biocompatible ceramics has made it one of the most favorable techniques to generate bone tissue engineering (BTE) scaffolds. Calcium sulfates exhibit various beneficial characteristics, and they can be used as a promising biomaterial in BTE. However, low mechanical performance caused by the brittle character of ceramic materials is the main weakness of 3DP calcium sulfate scaffolds. Moreover, the presence of certain organic matters in the starting powder and binder solution causes products to have high toxicity levels. A post-processing treatment is usually employed to improve the physical, chemical, and biological behaviors of the printed scaffolds. In this study, the effects of heat treatment on the structural, mechanical, and physical characteristics of 3DP calcium sulfate prototypes were investigated. Different microscopy and spectroscopy methods were employed to characterize the printed prototypes. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the specimens was also evaluated before and after heat treatment. Results showed that the as-printed scaffolds and specimens heat treated at 300°C exhibited severe toxicity in vitro but had almost adequate strength. By contrast, the specimens heat treated in the 500°C-1000°C temperature range, although non-toxic, had insufficient mechanical strength, which was mainly attributed to the exit of the organic binder before 500°C and the absence of sufficient densification below 1000°C. The sintering process was accelerated at temperatures higher than 1000°C, resulting in higher compressive strength and less cytotoxicity. An anhydrous form of calcium sulfate was the only crystalline phase existing in the samples heated at 500°C-1150°C. The formation of calcium oxide caused by partial decomposition of calcium sulfate was observed in the specimens heat treated at temperatures higher than 1200°C. Although considerable improvements in cell viability of heat-treated scaffolds were

  5. Structure, Properties, and In Vitro Behavior of Heat-Treated Calcium Sulfate Scaffolds Fabricated by 3D Printing

    PubMed Central

    Asadi-Eydivand, Mitra; Solati-Hashjin, Mehran; Shafiei, Seyedeh Sara; Mohammadi, Sepideh; Hafezi, Masoud; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2016-01-01

    The ability of inkjet-based 3D printing (3DP) to fabricate biocompatible ceramics has made it one of the most favorable techniques to generate bone tissue engineering (BTE) scaffolds. Calcium sulfates exhibit various beneficial characteristics, and they can be used as a promising biomaterial in BTE. However, low mechanical performance caused by the brittle character of ceramic materials is the main weakness of 3DP calcium sulfate scaffolds. Moreover, the presence of certain organic matters in the starting powder and binder solution causes products to have high toxicity levels. A post-processing treatment is usually employed to improve the physical, chemical, and biological behaviors of the printed scaffolds. In this study, the effects of heat treatment on the structural, mechanical, and physical characteristics of 3DP calcium sulfate prototypes were investigated. Different microscopy and spectroscopy methods were employed to characterize the printed prototypes. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the specimens was also evaluated before and after heat treatment. Results showed that the as-printed scaffolds and specimens heat treated at 300°C exhibited severe toxicity in vitro but had almost adequate strength. By contrast, the specimens heat treated in the 500°C–1000°C temperature range, although non-toxic, had insufficient mechanical strength, which was mainly attributed to the exit of the organic binder before 500°C and the absence of sufficient densification below 1000°C. The sintering process was accelerated at temperatures higher than 1000°C, resulting in higher compressive strength and less cytotoxicity. An anhydrous form of calcium sulfate was the only crystalline phase existing in the samples heated at 500°C–1150°C. The formation of calcium oxide caused by partial decomposition of calcium sulfate was observed in the specimens heat treated at temperatures higher than 1200°C. Although considerable improvements in cell viability of heat-treated scaffolds

  6. 3D-QSAR study of benzotriazol-1-yl carboxamide scaffold as monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Obaid; Kumar, Suresh; Kumar, Rajiv; Jaggi, Manu; Bawa, Sandhya

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to build up the 3D pharmacophore of Monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) inhibitor and to provide the basis to design the novel and potent MAGL inhibitors. Material and Method: A 3D-QSAR study on benztriazol-1-yl carboxamide derivatives as monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) inhibitors was successfully performed by means of pharmacophore mapping using PHASE 3.5 module of Schrφdinger-9.4. Result: The 3D-QSAR obtained from APRRR-105 hypothesis was found to be statistically good with r2 = 0.9228 and q2 = 0.871, taking PLS factor 4. The statistical significance of the model was also confirmed by a high value of Fisher's ratio of 82.8 and a very low value of root-mean-square error (RMSE) 0.2564. Another parameter which signifies the model predictivity is Pearson R. Its value of 0.9512 showed that the correlation between predicted and observed activities for the test set compounds is excellent. Conclusion: The study suggested that one H-bond acceptor, one positive center, and proper positioning of hydrophobic groups near the distal aromatic ring C are the crucial determinants for MAGL inhibition. Thus, it can be assumed that the present QSAR analysis is enough to demonstrate MAGL inhibition with the help of APRRR-105 hypothesis and will be helpful in designing novel and potent MAGL inhibitors. PMID:25400409

  7. Modified silk fibroin scaffolds with collagen/decellularized pulp for bone tissue engineering in cleft palate: Morphological structures and biofunctionalities.

    PubMed

    Sangkert, Supaporn; Meesane, Jirut; Kamonmattayakul, Suttatip; Chai, Wen Lin

    2016-01-01

    Cleft palate is a congenital malformation that generates a maxillofacial bone defect around the mouth area. The creation of performance scaffolds for bone tissue engineering in cleft palate is an issue that was proposed in this research. Because of its good biocompatibility, high stability, and non-toxicity, silk fibroin was selected as the scaffold of choice in this research. Silk fibroin scaffolds were prepared by freeze-drying before immerging in a solution of collagen, decellularized pulp, and collagen/decellularized pulp. Then, the immersed scaffolds were freeze-dried. Structural organization in solution was observed by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The molecular organization of the solutions and crystal structure of the scaffolds were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The weight increase of the modified scaffolds and the pore size were determined. The morphology was observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Mechanical properties were tested. Biofunctionalities were considered by seeding osteoblasts in silk fibroin scaffolds before analysis of the cell proliferation, viability, total protein assay, and histological analysis. The results demonstrated that dendrite structure of the fibrils occurred in those solutions. Molecular organization of the components in solution arranged themselves into an irregular structure. The fibrils were deposited in the pores of the modified silk fibroin scaffolds. The modified scaffolds showed a beta-sheet structure. The morphological structure affected the mechanical properties of the silk fibroin scaffolds with and without modification. Following assessment of the biofunctionalities, the modified silk fibroin scaffolds could induce cell proliferation, viability, and total protein particularly in modified silk fibroin with collagen/decellularized pulp. Furthermore, the histological analysis indicated that the cells could adhere in modified silk fibroin

  8. Intrafibrillar silicification of collagen scaffolds for sustained release of stem cell homing chemokine in hard tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Niu, Li-Na; Jiao, Kai; Qi, Yi-Pin; Nikonov, Sergey; Yiu, Cynthia K Y; Arola, Dwayne D; Gong, Shi-Qiang; El-Marakby, Ahmed; Carrilho, Marcela R O; Hamrick, Mark W; Hargreaves, Kenneth M; Diogenes, Anibal; Chen, Ji-Hua; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2012-11-01

    Traditional bone regeneration strategies relied on supplementation of biomaterials constructs with stem or progenitor cells or growth factors. By contrast, cell homing strategies employ chemokines to mobilize stem or progenitor cells from host bone marrow and tissue niches to injured sites. Although silica-based biomaterials exhibit osteogenic and angiogenic potentials, they lack cell homing capability. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) plays a pivotal role in mobilization and homing of stem cells to injured tissues. In this work, we demonstrated that 3-dimensional collagen scaffolds infiltrated with intrafibrillar silica are biodegradable and highly biocompatible. They exhibit improved compressive stress-strain responses and toughness over nonsilicified collagen scaffolds. They are osteoconductive and up-regulate expressions of osteogenesis- and angiogenesis-related genes more significantly than nonsilicified collagen scaffolds. In addition, these scaffolds reversibly bind SDF-1α for sustained release of this chemokine, which exhibits in vitro cell homing characteristics. When implanted subcutaneously in an in vivo mouse model, SDF-1α-loaded silicified collagen scaffolds stimulate the formation of ectopic bone and blood capillaries within the scaffold and abrogate the need for cell seeding or supplementation of osteogenic and angiogenic growth factors. Intrafibrillar-silicified collagen scaffolds with sustained SDF-1α release represent a less costly and complex alternative to contemporary cell seeding approaches and provide new therapeutic options for in situ hard tissue regeneration.

  9. Effect of different hydroxyapatite incorporation methods on the structural and biological properties of porous collagen scaffolds for bone repair.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Alan J; Gleeson, John P; Matsiko, Amos; Thompson, Emmet M; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2015-12-01

    Scaffolds which aim to provide an optimised environment to regenerate bone tissue require a balance between mechanical properties and architecture known to be conducive to enable tissue regeneration, such as a high porosity and a suitable pore size. Using freeze-dried collagen-based scaffolds as an analogue of native ECM, we sought to improve the mechanical properties by incorporating hydroxyapatite (HA) in different ways while maintaining a pore architecture sufficient to allow cell infiltration, vascularisation and effective bone regeneration. Specifically we sought to elucidate the effect of different hydroxyapatite incorporation methods on the mechanical, morphological, and cellular response of the resultant collagen-HA scaffolds. The results demonstrated that incorporating either micron-sized (CHA scaffolds) or nano-sized HA particles (CnHA scaffolds) prior to freeze-drying resulted in moderate increases in stiffness (2.2-fold and 6.2-fold, respectively, vs. collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds, P < 0.05, a scaffold known to support osteogenesis), while enabling good cell attachment, and moderate mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-mediated calcium production after 28 days' culture (2.1-fold, P < 0.05, and 1.3-fold, respectively, vs. CG scaffolds). However, coating of collagen scaffolds with a hydroxyapatite precipitate after freeze-drying (CpHA scaffolds) has been shown to be a highly effective method to increase the compressive modulus (26-fold vs. CG controls, P < 0.001) of scaffolds while maintaining a high porosity (~ 98%). The coating of the ligand-dense collagen structure results in a lower cell attachment level (P < 0.05), although it supported greater cell-mediated calcium production (P < 0.0001) compared with other scaffold variants after 28 days' culture. The comparatively good mechanical properties of these high porosity scaffolds is obtained partially through highly crosslinking the scaffolds with both a physical (DHT) and chemical (EDAC) crosslinking

  10. The development of collagen-GAG scaffold-membrane composites for tendon tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Caliari, Steven R.; Ramirez, Manuel A.; Harley, Brendan A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Current tissue engineering approaches for tendon defects require improved biomaterials to balance microstructural and mechanical design criteria. Collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) scaffolds have shown considerable success as in vivo regenerative templates and in vitro constructs to study cell behavior. While these scaffolds possess many advantageous qualities, their mechanical properties are typically orders of magnitude lower than orthopedic tissues such as tendon. Taking inspiration from mechanically efficient core–shell composites in nature such as plant stems and porcupine quills, we have created core–shell CG composites that display high bioactivity and improved mechanical integrity. These composites feature integration of a low density, anisotropic CG scaffold core with a high density, CG membrane shell. CG membranes were fabricated via an evaporative process that allowed separate tuning of membrane thickness and elastic moduli and were found to be isotropic in-plane. The membranes were then integrated with an anisotropic CG scaffold core via freeze-drying and subsequent crosslinking. Increasing the relative thickness of the CG membrane shell was shown to increase composite tensile elastic modulus by as much as a factor of 36 in a manner consistent with predictions from layered composites theory. CG scaffold-membrane composites were found to support tendon cell viability, proliferation, and metabolic activity in vitro, suggesting they maintain sufficient permeability while demonstrating improved mechanical strength. This work suggests an effective, biomimetic approach for balancing strength and bioactivity requirements of porous scaffolds for tissue engineering. PMID:21880362

  11. The development of collagen-GAG scaffold-membrane composites for tendon tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Caliari, Steven R; Ramirez, Manuel A; Harley, Brendan A C

    2011-12-01

    Current tissue engineering approaches for tendon defects require improved biomaterials to balance microstructural and mechanical design criteria. Collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) scaffolds have shown considerable success as in vivo regenerative templates and in vitro constructs to study cell behavior. While these scaffolds possess many advantageous qualities, their mechanical properties are typically orders of magnitude lower than orthopedic tissues such as tendon. Taking inspiration from mechanically efficient core-shell composites in nature such as plant stems and porcupine quills, we have created core-shell CG composites that display high bioactivity and improved mechanical integrity. These composites feature integration of a low density, anisotropic CG scaffold core with a high density, CG membrane shell. CG membranes were fabricated via an evaporative process that allowed separate tuning of membrane thickness and elastic moduli and were found to be isotropic in-plane. The membranes were then integrated with an anisotropic CG scaffold core via freeze-drying and subsequent crosslinking. Increasing the relative thickness of the CG membrane shell was shown to increase composite tensile elastic modulus by as much as a factor of 36 in a manner consistent with predictions from layered composites theory. CG scaffold-membrane composites were found to support tendon cell viability, proliferation, and metabolic activity in vitro, suggesting they maintain sufficient permeability while demonstrating improved mechanical strength. This work suggests an effective, biomimetic approach for balancing strength and bioactivity requirements of porous scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  12. Finite difference time domain model of ultrasound propagation in agarose scaffold containing collagen or chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Inkinen, Satu I; Liukkonen, Jukka; Malo, Markus K H; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2016-07-01

    Measurement of ultrasound backscattering is a promising diagnostic technique for arthroscopic evaluation of articular cartilage. However, contribution of collagen and chondrocytes on ultrasound backscattering and speed of sound in cartilage is not fully understood and is experimentally difficult to study. Agarose hydrogels have been used in tissue engineering applications of cartilage. Therefore, the aim of this study was to simulate the propagation of high frequency ultrasound (40 MHz) in agarose scaffolds with varying concentrations of chondrocytes (1 to 32 × 10(6) cells/ml) and collagen (1.56-200 mg/ml) using transversely isotropic two-dimensional finite difference time domain method (FDTD). Backscatter and speed of sound were evaluated from the simulated pulse-echo and through transmission measurements, respectively. Ultrasound backscatter increased with increasing collagen and chondrocyte concentrations. Furthermore, speed of sound increased with increasing collagen concentration. However, this was not observed with increasing chondrocyte concentrations. The present study suggests that the FDTD method may have some applicability in simulations of ultrasound scattering and propagation in constructs containing collagen and chondrocytes. Findings of this study indicate the significant role of collagen and chondrocytes as ultrasound scatterers and can aid in development of modeling approaches for understanding how cartilage architecture affects to the propagation of high frequency ultrasound. PMID:27475127

  13. Collagen/Wollastonite nanowire hybrid scaffolds promoting osteogenic differentiation and angiogenic factor expression of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Chen, Shangwu; Kawazoe, Naoki; Lin, Kaili; Chang, Jiang; Chen, Guoping

    2014-04-01

    Porous materials and scaffolds have wide applications in biomedical and biological fields. They can provide biological and physical cues to promote cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation and extracellular matrix secretion to guide new tissue formation. Hybrid scaffolds of collagen and wollastonite nanowires with well controlled pore structures were prepared by using ice particulates as a porogen material. The hybrid scaffolds had interconnected large spherical pores with wollastonite nanowires embedded in the walls of the pores. The wollastonite nanowires reinforced the hybrid scaffolds and showed some stimulatory effects on cell functions. Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells showed higher proliferation and osteogenic differentiation and expressed higher level of genes encoding angiogenesis-related genes in the hybrid scaffolds than did in the collagen scaf-. fold. The results suggest the hybrid scaffolds could facilitate osteogenic differentiation and induce angiogenesis and will be useful for bone tissue engineering. PMID:24734758

  14. High-resolution direct 3D printed PLGA scaffolds: print and shrink.

    PubMed

    Chia, Helena N; Wu, Benjamin M

    2014-12-17

    Direct three-dimensional printing (3DP) produces the final part composed of the powder and binder used in fabrication. An advantage of direct 3DP is control over both the microarchitecture and macroarchitecture. Prints which use porogen incorporated in the powder result in high pore interconnectivity, uniform porosity, and defined pore size after leaching. The main limitations of direct 3DP for synthetic polymers are the use of organic solvents which can dissolve polymers used in most printheads and limited resolution due to unavoidable spreading of the binder droplet after contact with the powder. This study describes a materials processing strategy to eliminate the use of organic solvent during the printing process and to improve 3DP resolution by shrinking with a non-solvent plasticizer. Briefly, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) powder was prepared by emulsion solvent evaporation to form polymer microparticles. The printing powder was composed of polymer microparticles dry mixed with sucrose particles. After printing with a water-based liquid binder, the polymer microparticles were fused together to form a network by solvent vapor in an enclosed vessel. The sucrose is removed by leaching and the resulting scaffold is placed in a solution of methanol. The methanol acts as a non-solvent plasticizer and allows for polymer chain rearrangement and efficient packing of polymer chains. The resulting volumetric shrinkage is ∼80% at 90% methanol. A complex shape (honey-comb) was designed, printed, and shrunken to demonstrate isotropic shrinking with the ability to reach a final resolution of ∼400 μm. The effect of type of alcohol (i.e. methanol or ethanol), concentration of alcohol, and temperature on volumetric shrinking was studied. This study presents a novel materials processing strategy to overcome the main limitations of direct 3DP to produce high resolution PLGA scaffolds.

  15. Collagen-Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds Induce Human Adipose Derived Stem Cells Osteogenic Differentiation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Fabbi, Claudia; Figallo, Elisa; Lo Furno, Debora; Gulino, Rosario; Colarossi, Cristina; Fullone, Francesco; Giuffrida, Rosario; Parenti, Rosalba; Memeo, Lorenzo; Forte, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play a crucial role in regulating normal skeletal homeostasis and, in case of injury, in bone healing and reestablishment of skeletal integrity. Recent scientific literature is focused on the development of bone regeneration models where MSCs are combined with biomimetic three-dimensional scaffolds able to direct MSC osteogenesis. In this work the osteogenic potential of human MSCs isolated from adipose tissue (hADSCs) has been evaluated in vitro in combination with collagen/Mg doped hydroxyapatite scaffolds. Results demonstrate the high osteogenic potential of hADSCs when cultured in specific differentiation induction medium, as revealed by the Alizarin Red S staining and gene expression profile analysis. In combination with collagen/hydroxyapatite scaffold, hADSCs differentiate into mature osteoblasts even in the absence of specific inducing factors; nevertheless, the supplement of the factors markedly accelerates the osteogenic process, as confirmed by the expression of specific markers of pre-osteoblast and mature osteoblast stages, such as osterix, osteopontin (also known as bone sialoprotein I), osteocalcin and specific markers of extracellular matrix maturation and mineralization stages, such as ALPL and osteonectin. Hence, the present work demonstrates that the scaffold per se is able to induce hADSCs differentiation, while the addition of osteo-inductive factors produces a significant acceleration of the osteogenic process. This observation makes the use of our model potentially interesting in the field of regenerative medicine for the treatment of bone defects. PMID:26982592

  16. Surface modification of electrospun PLGA scaffold with collagen for bioengineered skin substitutes.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, A R; Nokhasteh, S; Molavi, A M; Khorsand-Ghayeni, M; Naderi-Meshkin, H; Mahdizadeh, A

    2016-09-01

    In skin tissue engineering, surface feature of the scaffolds plays an important role in cell adhesion and proliferation. In this study, non-woven fibrous substrate based on poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) (75/25) were hydrolyzed in various concentrations of NaOH (0.05N, 0.1N, 0.3N) to increase carboxyl and hydroxyl groups on the fiber surfaces. These functional groups were activated by EDC/NHS to create chemical bonding with collagen. To improve bioactivity, the activated substrates were coated with a collagen solution (2mg/ml) and cross-linking was carried out using the EDC/NHS in MES buffer. The effectiveness of the method was evaluated by contact angle measurements, porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), tensile and degradation tests as well as in vitro cell attachment and cytotoxicity assays. Cell culture results of human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and keratinocytes cell line (HaCat) revealed that the cells could attach to the scaffold. Further investigation with MTT assay showed that the cell proliferation of HaCat significantly increases with collagen coating. It seems that sufficient stability of collagen on the surface due to proper chemical bonding and cross-linking has increased the bioactivity of surface remarkably which can be promising for bioengineered skin applications. PMID:27207046

  17. Synergistic intrafibrillar/extrafibrillar mineralization of collagen scaffolds based on a biomimetic strategy to promote the regeneration of bone defects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Van Manh, Ngo; Wang, Haorong; Zhong, Xue; Zhang, Xu; Li, Changyi

    2016-01-01

    The mineralization of collagen scaffolds can improve their mechanical properties and biocompatibility, thereby providing an appropriate microenvironment for bone regeneration. The primary purpose of the present study is to fabricate a synergistically intra- and extrafibrillar mineralized collagen scaffold, which has many advantages in terms of biocompatibility, biomechanical properties, and further osteogenic potential. In this study, mineralized collagen scaffolds were fabricated using a traditional mineralization method (ie, immersed in simulated body fluid) as a control group and using a biomimetic method based on the polymer-induced liquid precursor process as an experimental group. In the polymer-induced liquid precursor process, a negatively charged polymer, carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC), was used to stabilize amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) to form nanocomplexes of CMC/ACP. Collagen scaffolds mineralized based on the polymer-induced liquid precursor process were in gel form such that nanocomplexes of CMC/ACP can easily be drawn into the interstices of the collagen fibrils. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the porous micromorphology and synergistic mineralization pattern of the collagen scaffolds. Compared with simulated body fluid, nanocomplexes of CMC/ACP significantly increased the modulus of the collagen scaffolds. The results of in vitro experiments showed that the cell count and differentiated degrees in the experimental group were higher than those in the control group. Histological staining and micro-computed tomography showed that the amount of new bone regenerated in the experimental group was larger than that in the control group. The biomimetic mineralization will assist us in fabricating a novel collagen scaffold for clinical applications.

  18. Synergistic intrafibrillar/extrafibrillar mineralization of collagen scaffolds based on a biomimetic strategy to promote the regeneration of bone defects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Van Manh, Ngo; Wang, Haorong; Zhong, Xue; Zhang, Xu; Li, Changyi

    2016-01-01

    The mineralization of collagen scaffolds can improve their mechanical properties and biocompatibility, thereby providing an appropriate microenvironment for bone regeneration. The primary purpose of the present study is to fabricate a synergistically intra- and extrafibrillar mineralized collagen scaffold, which has many advantages in terms of biocompatibility, biomechanical properties, and further osteogenic potential. In this study, mineralized collagen scaffolds were fabricated using a traditional mineralization method (ie, immersed in simulated body fluid) as a control group and using a biomimetic method based on the polymer-induced liquid precursor process as an experimental group. In the polymer-induced liquid precursor process, a negatively charged polymer, carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC), was used to stabilize amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) to form nanocomplexes of CMC/ACP. Collagen scaffolds mineralized based on the polymer-induced liquid precursor process were in gel form such that nanocomplexes of CMC/ACP can easily be drawn into the interstices of the collagen fibrils. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the porous micromorphology and synergistic mineralization pattern of the collagen scaffolds. Compared with simulated body fluid, nanocomplexes of CMC/ACP significantly increased the modulus of the collagen scaffolds. The results of in vitro experiments showed that the cell count and differentiated degrees in the experimental group were higher than those in the control group. Histological staining and micro-computed tomography showed that the amount of new bone regenerated in the experimental group was larger than that in the control group. The biomimetic mineralization will assist us in fabricating a novel collagen scaffold for clinical applications. PMID:27274235

  19. Synergistic intrafibrillar/extrafibrillar mineralization of collagen scaffolds based on a biomimetic strategy to promote the regeneration of bone defects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yao; Van Manh, Ngo; Wang, Haorong; Zhong, Xue; Zhang, Xu; Li, Changyi

    2016-01-01

    The mineralization of collagen scaffolds can improve their mechanical properties and biocompatibility, thereby providing an appropriate microenvironment for bone regeneration. The primary purpose of the present study is to fabricate a synergistically intra- and extrafibrillar mineralized collagen scaffold, which has many advantages in terms of biocompatibility, biomechanical properties, and further osteogenic potential. In this study, mineralized collagen scaffolds were fabricated using a traditional mineralization method (ie, immersed in simulated body fluid) as a control group and using a biomimetic method based on the polymer-induced liquid precursor process as an experimental group. In the polymer-induced liquid precursor process, a negatively charged polymer, carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC), was used to stabilize amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) to form nanocomplexes of CMC/ACP. Collagen scaffolds mineralized based on the polymer-induced liquid precursor process were in gel form such that nanocomplexes of CMC/ACP can easily be drawn into the interstices of the collagen fibrils. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the porous micromorphology and synergistic mineralization pattern of the collagen scaffolds. Compared with simulated body fluid, nanocomplexes of CMC/ACP significantly increased the modulus of the collagen scaffolds. The results of in vitro experiments showed that the cell count and differentiated degrees in the experimental group were higher than those in the control group. Histological staining and micro-computed tomography showed that the amount of new bone regenerated in the experimental group was larger than that in the control group. The biomimetic mineralization will assist us in fabricating a novel collagen scaffold for clinical applications. PMID:27274235

  20. Using a decellularized splenic matrix as a 3D scaffold for hepatocyte cultivation in vitro: a preliminary trial.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xing-Long; Xiang, Jun-Xi; Wu, Wan-Quan; Wang, Bo; Liu, Wen-Yan; Gao, Rui; Dong, Ding-Hui; Lv, Yi

    2015-08-01

    Using a decellularized liver matrix (DLM) to reengineer liver tissue is a promising therapy for end-stage liver disease. However, the limited supply of donor organs still hampers its potential clinical application, while a xenogenic decellularized matrix may bring a risk of zoonosis and immunological rejection. Therefore, an appropriate alternative scaffold is needed. In this research, we established a decellularized splenic matrix (DSM) in a rodent model, which preserved the 3D ultrastructure, the components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the native vascular network. The DSM and DLM had similar components of ECM, and similar mechanical properties. Hepatocytes were seeded to the DSM and DLM for dynamic culturing up to 6 d, and distributed both in decellularized sinusoidal spaces and around the vessels. The TUNEL-positive cell percentage in a dynamic culturing decellularized splenic matrix (dDSM) was 10.7%  ±  3.6% at 3d and 25.8%  ±  5.6% at 5d, although 14.2%  ±  4.5% and 24.8%  ±  2.9%, respectively, in a dynamic culturing decellularized liver matrix (dDLM) at the same time point (p  >  0.05). Primary hepatocytes in the dDSM and dDLM expressed albumin, G6pc and Ugt1a1. The gene expression of Cyp2b1, Cyp1a2 and HNF1α in the gene transcription level revealed hepatocytes had lower gene expression levels in the dDSM compared with the dDLM at 3d, but better than those in a sandwich culture. The cumulative albumin production at 6 d of culture was 80.7   ±   9.6 μg per million cells in the dDSM and 89.6   ±   4.6 μg per million cells in the dDLM (p  >  0.05). In summary, the DSM is a promising 3D scaffold for hepatocyte cultivation in vitro. PMID:26290516

  1. PLLA-collagen and PLLA-gelatin hybrid scaffolds with funnel-like porous structure for skin tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hongxu; Oh, Hwan Hee; Kawazoe, Naoki; Yamagishi, Kozo; Chen, Guoping

    2012-12-01

    In skin tissue engineering, a three-dimensional porous scaffold is necessary to support cell adhesion and proliferation and to guide cells moving into the repair area in the wound healing process. Structurally, the porous scaffold should have an open and interconnected porous architecture to facilitate homogenous cell distribution. Moreover, the scaffolds should be mechanically strong to protect deformation during the formation of new skin. In this study, the hybrid scaffolds were prepared by forming funnel-like collagen or gelatin sponge on a woven poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) mesh. The hybrid scaffolds combined the advantages of both collagen or gelatin (good cell-interactions) and PLLA mesh (high mechanical strength). The hybrid scaffolds were used to culture dermal fibroblasts for dermal tissue engineering. The funnel-like porous structure promoted homogeneous cell distribution and extracellular matrix production. The PLLA mesh reinforced the scaffold to avoid deformation. Subcutaneous implantation showed that the PLLA-collagen and PLLA-gelatin scaffolds promoted the regeneration of dermal tissue and epidermis and reduced contraction during the formation of new tissue. These results indicate that funnel-like hybrid scaffolds can be used for skin tissue regeneration.

  2. Heat- and pH-induced BSA conformational changes, hydrogel formation and application as 3D cell scaffold.

    PubMed

    Navarra, Giovanna; Peres, Chiara; Contardi, Marco; Picone, Pasquale; San Biagio, Pier Luigi; Di Carlo, Marta; Giacomazza, Daniela; Militello, Valeria

    2016-09-15

    Aggregation and gelation of globular proteins can be an advantage to generate new forms of nanoscale biomaterials based on the fibrillar architecture. Here, we report results obtained by exploiting the proteins' natural tendency to self-organize in 3D network, for the production of new material based on BSA for medical application. In particular, at five different pH values the conformational and structural changes of the BSA during all the steps of the thermal aggregation and gelation have been analyzed by FTIR spectroscopy. The macroscopic mechanical properties of these hydrogels have been obtained by rheological measurements. The microscopic structure of the gels have been studied by AFM and SEM images to have a picture of their different spatial arrangement. Finally, the use of the BSA hydrogels as scaffold has been tested in two different cell cultures. PMID:27480606

  3. Heat- and pH-induced BSA conformational changes, hydrogel formation and application as 3D cell scaffold.

    PubMed

    Navarra, Giovanna; Peres, Chiara; Contardi, Marco; Picone, Pasquale; San Biagio, Pier Luigi; Di Carlo, Marta; Giacomazza, Daniela; Militello, Valeria

    2016-09-15

    Aggregation and gelation of globular proteins can be an advantage to generate new forms of nanoscale biomaterials based on the fibrillar architecture. Here, we report results obtained by exploiting the proteins' natural tendency to self-organize in 3D network, for the production of new material based on BSA for medical application. In particular, at five different pH values the conformational and structural changes of the BSA during all the steps of the thermal aggregation and gelation have been analyzed by FTIR spectroscopy. The macroscopic mechanical properties of these hydrogels have been obtained by rheological measurements. The microscopic structure of the gels have been studied by AFM and SEM images to have a picture of their different spatial arrangement. Finally, the use of the BSA hydrogels as scaffold has been tested in two different cell cultures.

  4. Fabrication and mechanical characterization of 3D electrospun scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wright, L D; Young, R T; Andric, T; Freeman, J W

    2010-10-01

    Electrospinning is a polymer processing technique that produces fibrous structures comparable to the extracellular matrix of many tissues. Electrospinning, however, has been severely limited in its tissue engineering capabilities because this technique has produced few three-dimensional structures. Sintering of electrospun materials provides a method to fabricate unique architectures and allow much larger structures to be made. Electrospun mats were sintered into strips and cylinders, and their tensile and compressive mechanical properties were measured. In addition, electrospun materials with salt pores (salt embedded within the material and then leached out) were fabricated to improve porosity of the electrospun materials for tissue engineering scaffolds. Sintered electrospun poly(D,L-lactide) and poly(L-lactide) (PDLA/PLLA) materials have higher tensile mechanical properties (modulus: 72.3 MPa, yield: 960 kPa) compared to unsintered PLLA (modulus: 40.36 MPa, yield: 675.5 kPa). Electrospun PDLA/PLLA cylinders with and without salt-leached pores had compressive moduli of 6.69 and 26.86 MPa, respectively, and compressive yields of 1.36 and 0.56 MPa, respectively. Sintering of electrospun materials is a novel technique that improves electrospinning application in tissue engineering by increasing the size and types of electrospun structures that can be fabricated.

  5. Tailoring chitosan/collagen scaffolds for tissue engineering: Effect of composition and different crosslinking agents on scaffold properties.

    PubMed

    Martínez, A; Blanco, M D; Davidenko, N; Cameron, R E

    2015-11-01

    Chitosan/collagen (Chit/Col) blends have demonstrated great potential for use in tissue engineering (TE) applications. However, there exists a lack of detailed study on the influence of important design parameters (i.e, component ratio or crosslinking methods) on the essential properties of the scaffolds (morphology, mechanical stiffness, swelling, degradation and cytotoxicity). This work entailed a systematic study of these essential properties of three Chit/Col compositions, covering a wide range of component ratios and using different crosslinking methods. Our results showed the possibility of tailoring these properties by changing component ratios, since different interactions occurred between Chit/Col: samples with Chit-enriched compositions showed a hydrogen-bonding type complex (HC), whereas a self-crosslinking phenomenon was induced in Col-enriched scaffolds. Additionally, material and biological properties of the resultant matrices were further adjusted and tuned by changing crosslinking conditions. In such way, we obtained a wide range of scaffolds whose properties were tailored to meet specific needs of TE applications.

  6. Tailoring chitosan/collagen scaffolds for tissue engineering: Effect of composition and different crosslinking agents on scaffold properties.

    PubMed

    Martínez, A; Blanco, M D; Davidenko, N; Cameron, R E

    2015-11-01

    Chitosan/collagen (Chit/Col) blends have demonstrated great potential for use in tissue engineering (TE) applications. However, there exists a lack of detailed study on the influence of important design parameters (i.e, component ratio or crosslinking methods) on the essential properties of the scaffolds (morphology, mechanical stiffness, swelling, degradation and cytotoxicity). This work entailed a systematic study of these essential properties of three Chit/Col compositions, covering a wide range of component ratios and using different crosslinking methods. Our results showed the possibility of tailoring these properties by changing component ratios, since different interactions occurred between Chit/Col: samples with Chit-enriched compositions showed a hydrogen-bonding type complex (HC), whereas a self-crosslinking phenomenon was induced in Col-enriched scaffolds. Additionally, material and biological properties of the resultant matrices were further adjusted and tuned by changing crosslinking conditions. In such way, we obtained a wide range of scaffolds whose properties were tailored to meet specific needs of TE applications. PMID:26256388

  7. Alginate/nanohydroxyapatite scaffolds with designed core/shell structures fabricated by 3D plotting and in situ mineralization for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongxiang; Lode, Anja; Wu, Chengtie; Chang, Jiang; Gelinsky, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Composite scaffolds, especially polymer/hydroxyapatite (HAP) composite scaffolds with predesigned structures, are promising materials for bone tissue engineering. Various methods including direct mixing of HAP powder with polymers or incubating polymer scaffolds in simulated body fluid for preparing polymer/HAP composite scaffolds are either uncontrolled or require long times of incubation. In this work, alginate/nano-HAP composite scaffolds with designed pore parameters and core/shell structures were fabricated using 3D plotting technique and in situ mineralization under mild conditions (at room temperature and without the use of any organic solvents). Light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, microcomputer tomography, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were applied to characterize the fabricated scaffolds. Mechanical properties and protein delivery of the scaffolds were evaluated, as well as the cell response to the scaffolds by culturing human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSC). The obtained data indicate that this method is suitable to fabricate alginate/nano-HAP composite scaffolds with a layer of nano-HAP, coating the surface of the alginate strands homogeneously and completely. The surface mineralization enhanced the mechanical properties and improved the cell attachment and spreading, as well as supported sustaining protein release, compared to pure alginate scaffolds without nano-HAP shell layer. The results demonstrated that the method provides an interesting option for bone tissue engineering application.

  8. Biofunctionalization of electrospun PCL-based scaffolds with perlecan domain IV peptide to create a 3-D pharmacokinetic cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Olga; Zhang, Chu; Adams, Elizabeth L.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Petrelli, Nicholas J.; Chase, Bruce D.; Rabolt, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Because prostate cancer cells metastasize to bone and exhibit osteoblastic features (osteomimicry), the interrelationships between bone-specific microenvironment and prostate cancer cells at sites of bone metastasis are critical to disease progression. In this work the bone marrow microenvironment in vitro was recreated both by tailoring scaffolds physical properties and by functionalizing electrospun polymer fibers with a bioactive peptide derived from domain IV of perlecan heparan sulfate proteoglycan. Electrospun poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) fibers and PCL/gelatin composite scaffolds were modified covalently with perlecan domain IV (PlnDIV) peptide. The expression of tight junction protein (E-cadherin) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation on tyrosine 397 also were investigated. The described bioactive motif significantly enhanced adherence and infiltration of the metastatic prostate cancer cells on all modified electrospun substrates by day 5 post-seeding. Cells cultured on PlnDIV-modified matrices organized stress fibers and increased proliferation at statistically significant rates. Additional findings suggest that presence of PlnDIV peptide in the matrix reduced expression of tight junction protein and binding to PlnDIV peptide was accompanied by increased focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation on tyrosine 397. We conclude that PlnDIV peptide supports key signaling events leading to proliferation, survival, and migration of C4-2B cancer cells; hence its incorporation into electrospun matrix is a key improvement to create a successful three-dimensional (3-D) pharmacokinetic cancer model. PMID:20417554

  9. Image-based analysis of the internal microstructure of bone replacement scaffolds fabricated by 3D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irsen, Stephan H.; Leukers, Barbara; Bruckschen, Björn; Tille, Carsten; Seitz, Hermann; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2006-08-01

    Rapid Prototyping and especially the 3D printing, allows generating complex porous ceramic scaffolds directly from powders. Furthermore, these technologies allow manufacturing patient-specific implants of centimeter size with an internal pore network to mimic bony structures including vascularization. Besides the biocompatibility properties of the base material, a high degree of open, interconnected porosity is crucial for the success of the synthetic bone graft. Pores with diameters between 100 and 500 μm are the prerequisite for vascularization to supply the cells with nutrients and oxygen, because simple diffusion transport is ineffective. The quantification of porosity on the macro-, micro-, and nanometer scale using well-established techniques such as Hg-porosimetry and electron microscopy is restricted. Alternatively, we have applied synchrotron-radiation-based micro computed tomography (SRμCT) to determine the porosity with high precision and to validate the macroscopic internal structure of the scaffold. We report on the difficulties in intensity-based segmentation for nanoporous materials but we also elucidate the power of SRμCT in the quantitative analysis of the pores at the different length scales.

  10. Versatile wedge-based system for the construction of unidirectional collagen scaffolds by directional freezing: practical and theoretical considerations.

    PubMed

    Pot, Michiel W; Faraj, Kaeuis A; Adawy, Alaa; van Enckevort, Willem J P; van Moerkerk, Herman T B; Vlieg, Elias; Daamen, Willeke F; van Kuppevelt, Toin H

    2015-04-29

    Aligned unidirectional collagen scaffolds may aid regeneration of those tissues where alignment of cells and extracellular matrix is essential, as for instance in cartilage, nerve bundles, and skeletal muscle. Pores can be introduced by ice crystal formation followed by freeze-drying, the pore architecture reflecting the ice crystal morphology. In this study we developed a wedge-based system allowing the production of a wide range of collagen scaffolds with unidirectional pores by directional freezing. Insoluble type I collagen suspensions were frozen using a custom-made wedge system, facilitating the formation of a horizontal as well as a vertical temperature gradient and providing a controlled solidification area for ice dendrites. The system permitted the growth of aligned unidirectional ice crystals over a large distance (>2.5 cm), an insulator prolonging the freezing process and facilitating the construction of crack-free scaffolds. Unidirectional collagen scaffolds with tunable pore sizes and pore morphologies were constructed by varying freezing rates and suspension media. The versatility of the system was indicated by the construction of unidirectional scaffolds from albumin, poly(vinyl alcohol) (a synthetic polymer), and collagen-polymer blends producing hybrid scaffolds. Macroscopic observations, temperature measurements, and scanning electron microscopy indicated that directed horizontal ice dendrite formation, vertical ice crystal nucleation, and evolutionary selection were the basis of the aligned unidirectional ice crystal growth and, hence, the aligned unidirectional pore structure. In conclusion, a simple, highly adjustable freezing system has been developed allowing the construction of large (hybrid) bioscaffolds with tunable unidirectional pore architecture.

  11. Novel 3D scaffold with enhanced physical and cell response properties for bone tissue regeneration, fabricated by patterned electrospinning/electrospraying.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Fatemeh; Mirzadeh, Hamid

    2016-09-01

    Developing three dimensional scaffolds mimicking the nanoscale structure of native extracellular matrix is a key parameter in tissue regeneration. In this study, we aimed to introduce a novel 3D structures composed of nanofibers (NF) and micro particles (MP) and compare their efficiency with 2D nanofibrous scaffold. The conventional nanofibrous PCL scaffolds are 2D mats fabricated by the electrospinning technique, whereas the NF/MP and patterned NF/MP PCL scaffolds are three dimensional structures fabricated by a modified electrospinning/electrospraying technique. The mentioned method was carried out by varying the electrospinning solution parameters and use of a metal mesh as the collector. Detailed fabrication process and morphological properties of the fabricated structures is discussed and porosity, pore size and PBS solution absorption value of the prepared structures are reported. Compared with the 2D structure, 3D scaffolds possessed enhanced porosity and pore size which led to the significant increase in their water uptake capacity. In vitro cell experiments were carried out on the prepared structures by the use of MG-63 osteosarcoma cell line. The fabricated 3D structures offered significantly increased cell attachment, spread and diffusion which were confirmed by SEM analysis. In vitro cytocompatibility assessed by MTT colorimetric assay indicated a continuous cell proliferation over 21 days on the innovative 3D structure, while on 2D mat cell proliferation stopped at early time points. Enhanced osteogenic differentiation of the seeded MG-63 cells on 3D scaffold was confirmed by the remarkable ALP activity together with increased and accelerated calcium deposition on this structure compared to 2D mat. Massive and well distributed bone minerals formed on patterned 3D structure were shown by EDX analysis. In comparison between NF/MP quasi-3D and Patterned NF/MP 3D scaffolds, patterned structures proceeded in all of the above properties. As such, the

  12. Novel 3D scaffold with enhanced physical and cell response properties for bone tissue regeneration, fabricated by patterned electrospinning/electrospraying.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Fatemeh; Mirzadeh, Hamid

    2016-09-01

    Developing three dimensional scaffolds mimicking the nanoscale structure of native extracellular matrix is a key parameter in tissue regeneration. In this study, we aimed to introduce a novel 3D structures composed of nanofibers (NF) and micro particles (MP) and compare their efficiency with 2D nanofibrous scaffold. The conventional nanofibrous PCL scaffolds are 2D mats fabricated by the electrospinning technique, whereas the NF/MP and patterned NF/MP PCL scaffolds are three dimensional structures fabricated by a modified electrospinning/electrospraying technique. The mentioned method was carried out by varying the electrospinning solution parameters and use of a metal mesh as the collector. Detailed fabrication process and morphological properties of the fabricated structures is discussed and porosity, pore size and PBS solution absorption value of the prepared structures are reported. Compared with the 2D structure, 3D scaffolds possessed enhanced porosity and pore size which led to the significant increase in their water uptake capacity. In vitro cell experiments were carried out on the prepared structures by the use of MG-63 osteosarcoma cell line. The fabricated 3D structures offered significantly increased cell attachment, spread and diffusion which were confirmed by SEM analysis. In vitro cytocompatibility assessed by MTT colorimetric assay indicated a continuous cell proliferation over 21 days on the innovative 3D structure, while on 2D mat cell proliferation stopped at early time points. Enhanced osteogenic differentiation of the seeded MG-63 cells on 3D scaffold was confirmed by the remarkable ALP activity together with increased and accelerated calcium deposition on this structure compared to 2D mat. Massive and well distributed bone minerals formed on patterned 3D structure were shown by EDX analysis. In comparison between NF/MP quasi-3D and Patterned NF/MP 3D scaffolds, patterned structures proceeded in all of the above properties. As such, the

  13. Fabrication of three-dimensional porous scaffold based on collagen fiber and bioglass for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Long, Teng; Yang, Jun; Shi, Shan-Shan; Guo, Ya-Ping; Ke, Qin-Fei; Zhu, Zhen-An

    2015-10-01

    An ideal scaffold for bone tissue engineering should have interconnected porous structure, good biocompatibility, and mechanical properties well-matched with natural bones. Collagen is the key component in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of natural bones, and plays an important role in bone regeneration. The biological activity of collagen has promoted it to be an advantageous biomaterial for bone tissue engineering; however, the mechanical properties of these scaffolds are insufficient and the porous structures are not stable in the wet state. An effective strategy to solve this problem is to fabricate a hybrid scaffold of biologically derived and synthetic material, which have the necessary bioactivity and mechanical stability needed for bone synthesis. In this work, a three-dimensional macroporous bone scaffold based on collagen (CO) fiber and bioglass (BG) is fabricated by a slurry-dipping technique, and its relevant mechanical and biological properties are evaluated. The CO/BG scaffold is interconnected with a porosity of 81 ± 4.6% and pore size of 40-200 μm. Compared with CO scaffold, water absorption value of CO/BG scaffold decreases greatly from 889% to 52%, which significantly alleviates the swelling behavior of collagen and improves the stability of scaffold structure. The CO/BG scaffold has a compression strength of 5.8 ± 1.6 MPa and an elastic modulus of 0.35 ± 0.01 Gpa, which are well-matched with the mechanical properties of trabecular bones. In vitro cell assays demonstrate that the CO/BG scaffold has good biocompatibility to facilitate the spreading and proliferation of human bone marrow stromal cells. Hence, the CO/BG scaffold is promising for bone tissue engineering application.

  14. Fish collagen/alginate/chitooligosaccharides integrated scaffold for skin tissue regeneration application.

    PubMed

    Chandika, Pathum; Ko, Seok-Chun; Oh, Gun-Woo; Heo, Seong-Yeong; Nguyen, Van-Tinh; Jeon, You-Jin; Lee, Bonggi; Jang, Chul Ho; Kim, GeunHyung; Park, Won Sun; Chang, Wonseok; Choi, Il-Whan; Jung, Won-Kyo

    2015-11-01

    An emerging paradigm in wound healing techniques is that a tissue-engineered skin substitute offers an alternative approach to create functional skin tissue. Here we developed a fish collagen/alginate (FCA) sponge scaffold that was functionalized by different molecular weights of chitooligosaccharides (COSs) with the use of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride as a cross-linking agent. The effects of cross-linking were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results indicate that the homogeneous materials blending and cross-linking intensity were dependent on the molecular weights of COSs. The highly interconnected porous architecture with 160-260μm pore size and over 90% porosity and COS's MW driven swelling and retention capacity, tensile property and in vitro biodegradation behavior guaranteed the FCA/COS scaffolds for skin tissue engineering application. Further improvement of these properties enhanced the cytocompatibility of all the scaffolds, especially the scaffolds containing COSs with MW in the range of 1-3kDa (FCA/COS1) showed the best cytocompatibility. These physicochemical, mechanical, and biological properties suggest that the FCA/COS1 scaffold is a superior candidate that can be used for skin tissue regeneration.

  15. Fish collagen/alginate/chitooligosaccharides integrated scaffold for skin tissue regeneration application.

    PubMed

    Chandika, Pathum; Ko, Seok-Chun; Oh, Gun-Woo; Heo, Seong-Yeong; Nguyen, Van-Tinh; Jeon, You-Jin; Lee, Bonggi; Jang, Chul Ho; Kim, GeunHyung; Park, Won Sun; Chang, Wonseok; Choi, Il-Whan; Jung, Won-Kyo

    2015-11-01

    An emerging paradigm in wound healing techniques is that a tissue-engineered skin substitute offers an alternative approach to create functional skin tissue. Here we developed a fish collagen/alginate (FCA) sponge scaffold that was functionalized by different molecular weights of chitooligosaccharides (COSs) with the use of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride as a cross-linking agent. The effects of cross-linking were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results indicate that the homogeneous materials blending and cross-linking intensity were dependent on the molecular weights of COSs. The highly interconnected porous architecture with 160-260μm pore size and over 90% porosity and COS's MW driven swelling and retention capacity, tensile property and in vitro biodegradation behavior guaranteed the FCA/COS scaffolds for skin tissue engineering application. Further improvement of these properties enhanced the cytocompatibility of all the scaffolds, especially the scaffolds containing COSs with MW in the range of 1-3kDa (FCA/COS1) showed the best cytocompatibility. These physicochemical, mechanical, and biological properties suggest that the FCA/COS1 scaffold is a superior candidate that can be used for skin tissue regeneration. PMID:26306410

  16. Aligned nanofibrillar collagen scaffolds - Guiding lymphangiogenesis for treatment of acquired lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Hadamitzky, Catarina; Zaitseva, Tatiana S; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Paukshto, Michael V; Hou, Luqia; Strassberg, Zachary; Ferguson, James; Matsuura, Yuka; Dash, Rajesh; Yang, Phillip C; Kretchetov, Shura; Vogt, Peter M; Rockson, Stanley G; Cooke, John P; Huang, Ngan F

    2016-09-01

    Secondary lymphedema is a common disorder associated with acquired functional impairment of the lymphatic system. The goal of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of aligned nanofibrillar collagen scaffolds (BioBridge) positioned across the area of lymphatic obstruction in guiding lymphatic regeneration. In a porcine model of acquired lymphedema, animals were treated with BioBridge scaffolds, alone or in conjunction with autologous lymph node transfer as a source of endogenous lymphatic growth factor. They were compared with a surgical control g