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Sample records for 3d colloidal crystals

  1. Holographically Defined Nanoparticle Placement in 3D Colloidal Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Yoonho; Yu, Dongguk; George, Matthew C.; Braun, Paul V.

    2010-06-30

    We demonstrate an optical interference-based photochemical method for the high-resolution localization of nanoparticles inside colloidal crystals or other porous structures. The method specifically relies on photoinduced inversion of the colloidal crystal surface charge to drive the localized deposition of charged gold nanoparticles. 4-Bromomethyl-3-nitrobenzoic acid (BNBA) was used as a photocleavable linker, and dansylamide was attached to BNBA to increase the absorption at 351 nm. Two-beam interference lithography was used for high-resolution optical patterning of the colloidal crystals; the resulting pattern was then decorated with functional nanoparticles. The periodicity of the pattern was 400 nm, and the width of the gold nanoparticle decorated region was ~200 nm. Our strategy of using photoswitching in a refractive-index-matched porous medium followed by the attachment of nanoparticles to the photoswitched region should be applicable to wide classes of charged nanoparticles.

  2. Direct fabrication of complex 3D hierarchical nanostructures by reactive ion etching of hollow sphere colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Kuo; Li, Jiaqi; Van Cleuvenbergen, Stijn; Clays, Koen

    2016-09-21

    Direct reactive ion etching (RIE) of hollow SiO2 sphere colloidal crystals (HSCCs) is employed as a facile, low-cost method to fabricate complex three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical nanostructures. These multilayered structures are gradually transformed into nanostructures of increasing complexity by controlling the etching time, without complicated procedures (no mask needed). The resulting 3D topologies are unique, and cannot be obtained through traditional approaches. The formation mechanism of these structures is explained in detail by geometrical modeling during the different etching stages, through shadow effects of the higher layers. SEM images confirm the modeled morphological changes. The nanostructures obtained by our approach show very fine features as small as ∼30 nm. Our approach opens new avenues to directly obtain complex 3D nanostructures from colloidal crystals and can find applications in sensing, templating, and catalysis where fine tuning the specific surface might be critical. PMID:27545098

  3. Light-spectrum modification of warm white-light-emitting diodes with 3D colloidal photonic crystals to approximate candlelight.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chun-Feng; Hsieh, Cheng-Liang; Wu, Chia-Jung

    2013-09-15

    This study presents the light-spectrum modification of warm white-light-emitting diodes (w-WLEDs) with 3D colloidal photonic crystals (3D CPhCs) to approximate candlelight. The study measures the angular-resolved transmission properties of the w-WLEDs with CPhCs, which exhibit photonic stop bands based on the CPhC photonic band structures. The w-WLEDs with 3D CPhCs produce a low correlated color temperature of 1963 K, a high color-rendering index of 85, and a luminous flux of 22.8 lm (four times that of a candle). This study presents the successful development of a novel low-cost technique to produce candlelight w-WLEDs for use as an indoor light source. PMID:24104827

  4. Fabrication of 3-D Photonic Band Gap Crystals Via Colloidal Self-Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramaniam, Girija; Blank, Shannon

    2005-01-01

    The behavior of photons in a Photonic Crystals, PCs, is like that of electrons in a semiconductor in that, it prohibits light propagation over a band of frequencies, called Photonic Band Gap, PBG. Photons cannot exist in these band gaps like the forbidden bands of electrons. Thus, PCs lend themselves as potential candidates for devices based on the gap phenomenon. The popular research on PCs stem from their ability to confine light with minimal losses. Large scale 3-D PCs with a PBG in the visible or near infra red region will make optical transistors and sharp bent optical fibers. Efforts are directed to use PCs for information processing and it is not long before we can have optical integrated circuits in the place of electronic ones.

  5. Large Area 2D and 3D Colloidal Photonic Crystals Fabricated by a Roll-to-Roll Langmuir-Blodgett Method.

    PubMed

    Parchine, Mikhail; McGrath, Joe; Bardosova, Maria; Pemble, Martyn E

    2016-06-14

    We present our results on the fabrication of large area colloidal photonic crystals on flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film using a roll-to-roll Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) colloidal photonic crystals from silica nanospheres (250 and 550 nm diameter) with a total area of up to 340 cm(2) have been fabricated in a continuous manner compatible with high volume manufacturing. In addition, the antireflective properties and structural integrity of the films have been enhanced via the use of a second roll-to-roll process, employing a slot-die coating of an optical adhesive over the photonic crystal films. Scanning electron microscopy images, atomic force microscopy images, and UV-vis optical transmission and reflection spectra of the fabricated photonic crystals are analyzed. This analysis confirms the high quality of the 2D and 3D photonic crystals fabricated by the roll-to-roll LB technique. Potential device applications of the large area 2D and 3D colloidal photonic crystals on flexible PET film are briefly reviewed. PMID:27218474

  6. Large Area 2D and 3D Colloidal Photonic Crystals Fabricated by a Roll-to-Roll Langmuir-Blodgett Method.

    PubMed

    Parchine, Mikhail; McGrath, Joe; Bardosova, Maria; Pemble, Martyn E

    2016-06-14

    We present our results on the fabrication of large area colloidal photonic crystals on flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film using a roll-to-roll Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) colloidal photonic crystals from silica nanospheres (250 and 550 nm diameter) with a total area of up to 340 cm(2) have been fabricated in a continuous manner compatible with high volume manufacturing. In addition, the antireflective properties and structural integrity of the films have been enhanced via the use of a second roll-to-roll process, employing a slot-die coating of an optical adhesive over the photonic crystal films. Scanning electron microscopy images, atomic force microscopy images, and UV-vis optical transmission and reflection spectra of the fabricated photonic crystals are analyzed. This analysis confirms the high quality of the 2D and 3D photonic crystals fabricated by the roll-to-roll LB technique. Potential device applications of the large area 2D and 3D colloidal photonic crystals on flexible PET film are briefly reviewed.

  7. Simulations of wave propagation and disorder in 3D non-close-packed colloidal photonic crystals with low refractive index contrast.

    PubMed

    Glushko, O; Meisels, R; Kuchar, F

    2010-03-29

    The plane-wave expansion method (PWEM), the multiple-scattering method (MSM) and the 3D finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD) are applied for simulations of propagation of electromagnetic waves through 3D colloidal photonic crystals. The system investigated is not a "usual" artificial opal with close-packed fcc lattice but a dilute bcc structure which occurs due to long-range repulsive interaction between electrically charged colloidal particles during the growth process. The basic optical properties of non-close-packed colloidal PhCs are explored by examining the band structure and reflection spectra for a bcc lattice of silica spheres in an aqueous medium. Finite size effects and correspondence between the Bragg model, band structure and reflection spectra are discussed. The effects of size, positional and missing-spheres disorder are investigated. In addition, by analyzing the results of experimental work we show that the fabricated structures have reduced plane-to-plane distance probably due to the effect of gravity during growth.

  8. Anomalous Fluorescence Enhancement from Double Heterostructure 3D Colloidal Photonic Crystals--A Multifunctional Fluorescence-Based Sensor Platform.

    PubMed

    Eftekhari, Ehsan; Li, Xiang; Kim, Tak H; Gan, Zongsong; Cole, Ivan S; Zhao, Dongyuan; Kielpinski, Dave; Gu, Min; Li, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Augmenting fluorescence intensity is of vital importance to the development of chemical and biochemical sensing, imaging and miniature light sources. Here we report an unprecedented fluorescence enhancement with a novel architecture of multilayer three-dimensional colloidal photonic crystals self-assembled from polystyrene spheres. The new technique uses a double heterostructure, which comprises a top and a bottom layer with a periodicity overlapping the excitation wavelength (E) of the emitters, and a middle layer with a periodicity matching the fluorescence wavelength (F) and a thickness that supports constructive interference for the excitation wavelength. This E-F-E double heterostructure displays direction-dependent light trapping for both excitation and fluorescence, coupling the modes of photonic crystal with multiple-beam interference. The E-F-E double heterostructure renders an additional 5-fold enhancement to the extraordinary FL amplification of Rhodamine B in monolithic E CPhCs, and 4.3-fold acceleration of emission dynamics. Such a self-assembled double heterostructure CPhCs may find significant applications in illumination, laser, chemical/biochemical sensing, and solar energy harvesting. We further demonstrate the multi-functionality of the E-F-E double heterostructure CPhCs in Hg (II) sensing. PMID:26400503

  9. Anomalous Fluorescence Enhancement from Double Heterostructure 3D Colloidal Photonic Crystals-A Multifunctional Fluorescence-Based Sensor Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftekhari, Ehsan; Li, Xiang; Kim, Tak H.; Gan, Zongsong; Cole, Ivan S.; Zhao, Dongyuan; Kielpinski, Dave; Gu, Min; Li, Qin

    2015-09-01

    Augmenting fluorescence intensity is of vital importance to the development of chemical and biochemical sensing, imaging and miniature light sources. Here we report an unprecedented fluorescence enhancement with a novel architecture of multilayer three-dimensional colloidal photonic crystals self-assembled from polystyrene spheres. The new technique uses a double heterostructure, which comprises a top and a bottom layer with a periodicity overlapping the excitation wavelength (E) of the emitters, and a middle layer with a periodicity matching the fluorescence wavelength (F) and a thickness that supports constructive interference for the excitation wavelength. This E-F-E double heterostructure displays direction-dependent light trapping for both excitation and fluorescence, coupling the modes of photonic crystal with multiple-beam interference. The E-F-E double heterostructure renders an additional 5-fold enhancement to the extraordinary FL amplification of Rhodamine B in monolithic E CPhCs, and 4.3-fold acceleration of emission dynamics. Such a self-assembled double heterostructue CPhCs may find significant applications in illumination, laser, chemical/biochemical sensing, and solar energy harvesting. We further demonstrate the multi-functionality of the E-F-E double heterostructure CPhCs in Hg (II) sensing.

  10. Electrohydrodynamically patterned colloidal crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayward, Ryan C. (Inventor); Poon, Hak F. (Inventor); Xiao, Yi (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method for assembling patterned crystalline arrays of colloidal particles using ultraviolet illumination of an optically-sensitive semiconducting anode while using the anode to apply an electronic field to the colloidal particles. The ultraviolet illumination increases current density, and consequently, the flow of the colloidal particles. As a result, colloidal particles can be caused to migrate from non-illuminated areas of the anode to illuminated areas of the anode. Selective illumination of the anode can also be used to permanently affix colloidal crystals to illuminated areas of the anode while not affixing them to non-illuminated areas of the anode.

  11. Nonspherical colloidal crystals fabricated by the thermal pressing of colloidal crystal chips.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z Q; Chen, X; Zhang, J H; Chen, Z M; Zhang, K; Yan, X; Wang, Y F; Yu, W Z; Yang, B

    2005-09-27

    Nonspherical colloids and their ordered arrays may be more attractive in applications such as photonic crystals than their spherical counterparts because of their lower symmetries, although such structures are difficult to achieve. In this letter, we describe the fabrication and characterization of colloidal crystals constructed from nonspherical polyhedrons. We fabricated such nonspherical colloidal crystals by pressing spherical polymer colloidal crystal chips at a temperature slightly lower than the glass-transition temperature (T(g)) of these polymer colloids. During this process, the polymer microspheres were distinctively transformed into polyhedrons according to their crystal structures, whereas the long-range order of the 3D lattice was essentially preserved. Because a working temperature lower than T(g) effectively prevented the colloidal crystals from fusing into films, the spherical colloidal crystals were transformed greatly under pressure, which lead to obvious change in the optical properties of colloidal crystals. Besides their special symmetry and optical properties, these nonspherical colloidal crystals can be used as templates for 2D or 3D structures of special symmetry, such as 2D nano-networks. We anticipate that this fabrication technique for nonspherical colloidal crystals can also be extended to nonspherical porous materials.

  12. Spherical colloidal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanjin; Shang, Luoran; Cheng, Yao; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Colloidal photonic crystals (PhCs), periodically arranged monodisperse nanoparticles, have emerged as one of the most promising materials for light manipulation because of their photonic band gaps (PBGs), which affect photons in a manner similar to the effect of semiconductor energy band gaps on electrons. The PBGs arise due to the periodic modulation of the refractive index between the building nanoparticles and the surrounding medium in space with subwavelength period. This leads to light with certain wavelengths or frequencies located in the PBG being prohibited from propagating. Because of this special property, the fabrication and application of colloidal PhCs have attracted increasing interest from researchers. The most simple and economical method for fabrication of colloidal PhCs is the bottom-up approach of nanoparticle self-assembly. Common colloidal PhCs from this approach in nature are gem opals, which are made from the ordered assembly and deposition of spherical silica nanoparticles after years of siliceous sedimentation and compression. Besides naturally occurring opals, a variety of manmade colloidal PhCs with thin film or bulk morphology have also been developed. In principle, because of the effect of Bragg diffraction, these PhC materials show different structural colors when observed from different angles, resulting in brilliant colors and important applications. However, this angle dependence is disadvantageous for the construction of some optical materials and devices in which wide viewing angles are desired. Recently, a series of colloidal PhC materials with spherical macroscopic morphology have been created. Because of their spherical symmetry, the PBGs of spherical colloidal PhCs are independent of rotation under illumination of the surface at a fixed incident angle of the light, broadening the perspective of their applications. Based on droplet templates containing colloidal nanoparticles, these spherical colloidal PhCs can be

  13. Equilibrium Shape of Colloidal Crystals.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Ray M; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2015-10-27

    Assembling colloidal particles into highly ordered configurations, such as photonic crystals, has significant potential for enabling a broad range of new technologies. Facilitating the nucleation of colloidal crystals and developing successful crystal growth strategies require a fundamental understanding of the equilibrium structure and morphology of small colloidal assemblies. Here, we report the results of a novel computational approach to determine the equilibrium shape of assemblies of colloidal particles that interact via an experimentally validated pair potential. While the well-known Wulff construction can accurately capture the equilibrium shape of large colloidal assemblies, containing O(10(4)) or more particles, determining the equilibrium shape of small colloidal assemblies of O(10) particles requires a generalized Wulff construction technique which we have developed for a proper description of equilibrium structure and morphology of small crystals. We identify and characterize fully several "magic" clusters which are significantly more stable than other similarly sized clusters.

  14. Template-Directed Directionally Solidified 3D Mesostructured AgCl-KCl Eutectic Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinwoo; Aagesen, Larry K; Choi, Jun Hee; Choi, Jaewon; Kim, Ha Seong; Liu, Jinyun; Cho, Chae-Ryong; Kang, Jin Gu; Ramazani, Ali; Thornton, Katsuyo; Braun, Paul V

    2015-08-19

    3D mesostructured AgCl-KCl photonic crystals emerge from colloidal templating of eutectic solidification. Solvent removal of the KCl phase results in a mesostructured AgCl inverse opal. The 3D-template-induced confinement leads to the emergence of a complex microstructure. The 3D mesostructured eutectic photonic crystals have a large stop band ranging from the near-infrared to the visible tuned by the processing.

  15. Three-dimensional colloidal crystals in liquid crystalline blue phases

    PubMed Central

    Ravnik, Miha; Alexander, Gareth P.; Yeomans, Julia M.; Žumer, Slobodan

    2011-01-01

    Applications for photonic crystals and metamaterials put stringent requirements on the characteristics of advanced optical materials, demanding tunability, high Q factors, applicability in visible range, and large-scale self-assembly. Exploiting the interplay between structural and optical properties, colloidal lattices embedded in liquid crystals (LCs) are promising candidates for such materials. Recently, stable two-dimensional colloidal configurations were demonstrated in nematic LCs. However, the question as to whether stable 3D colloidal structures can exist in an LC had remained unanswered. We show, by means of computer modeling, that colloidal particles can self-assemble into stable, 3D, periodic structures in blue phase LCs. The assembly is based on blue phases providing a 3D template of trapping sites for colloidal particles. The particle configuration is determined by the orientational order of the LC molecules: Specifically, face-centered cubic colloidal crystals form in type-I blue phases, whereas body-centered crystals form in type-II blue phases. For typical particle diameters (approximately 100 nm) the effective binding energy can reach up to a few 100 kBT, implying robustness against mechanical stress and temperature fluctuations. Moreover, the colloidal particles substantially increase the thermal stability range of the blue phases, for a factor of two and more. The LC-supported colloidal structure is one or two orders of magnitude stronger bound than, e.g., water-based colloidal crystals. PMID:21368186

  16. Two-dimensional dipolar nematic colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Skarabot, M; Ravnik, M; Zumer, S; Tkalec, U; Poberaj, I; Babic, D; Osterman, N; Musevic, I

    2007-11-01

    We study the interactions and directed assembly of dipolar nematic colloidal particles in planar nematic cells using laser tweezers. The binding energies for two stable configurations of a colloidal pair with homeotropic surface alignment are determined. It is shown that the orientation of the dipolar colloidal particle can efficiently be controlled and changed by locally quenching the nematic liquid crystal from the laser-induced isotropic phase. The interaction of a single colloidal particle with a single colloidal chain is determined and the interactions between pairs of colloidal chains are studied. We demonstrate that dipolar colloidal chains self-assemble into the two-dimensional (2D) dipolar nematic colloidal crystals. An odd-even effect is observed with increasing number of colloidal chains forming the 2D colloidal crystal. PMID:18233658

  17. Measuring heterogenous stress fields in a 3D colloidal glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Neil; Bierbaum, Matthew; Bi, Max; Sethna, James; Cohen, Itai

    Glass in our common experience is hard and fragile. But it still bends, yields, and flows slowly under loads. The yielding of glass, a well documented yet not fully understood flow behavior, is governed by the heterogenous local stresses in the material. While resolving stresses at the atomic scale is not feasible, measurements of stresses at the single particle level in colloidal glasses, a widely used model system for atomic glasses, has recently been made possible using Stress Assessment from Local Structural Anisotropy (SALSA). In this work, we use SALSA to visualize the three dimensional stress network in a hard-sphere glass during start-up shear. By measuring the evolution of this stress network we identify local-yielding. We find that these local-yielding events often require only minimal structural rearrangement and as such have most likely been ignored in previous analyses. We then relate these micro-scale yielding events to the macro-scale flow behavior observed using bulk measurements.

  18. Understanding Crystal Populations; Looking Towards 3D Quantitative Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerram, D. A.; Morgan, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    In order to understand volcanic systems, the potential record held within crystal populations needs to be revealed. It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that the crystal populations that arrive at the surface in volcanic eruptions are commonly mixtures of crystals, which may be representative of simple crystallization, recycling of crystals and incorporation of alien crystals. If we can quantify the true 3D population within a sample then we will be able to separate crystals with different histories and begin to interrogate the true and complex plumbing within the volcanic system. Modeling crystal populations is one area where we can investigate the best methodologies to use when dealing with sections through 3D populations. By producing known 3D shapes and sizes with virtual textures and looking at the statistics of shape and size when such populations are sectioned, we are able to gain confidence about what our 2D information is telling us about the population. We can also use this approach to test the size of population we need to analyze. 3D imaging through serial sectioning or x-ray CT, provides a complete 3D quantification of a rocks texture. Individual phases can be identified and in principle the true 3D statistics of the population can be interrogated. In practice we need to develop strategies (as with 2D-3D transformations), that enable a true characterization of the 3D data, and an understanding of the errors and pitfalls that exist. Ultimately, the reproduction of true 3D textures and the wealth of information they hold, is now within our reach.

  19. Reduction of thermal conductivity by nanoscale 3D phononic crystal.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lina; Yang, Nuo; Li, Baowen

    2013-01-01

    We studied how the period length and the mass ratio affect the thermal conductivity of isotopic nanoscale three-dimensional (3D) phononic crystal of Si. Simulation results by equilibrium molecular dynamics show isotopic nanoscale 3D phononic crystals can significantly reduce the thermal conductivity of bulk Si at high temperature (1000 K), which leads to a larger ZT than unity. The thermal conductivity decreases as the period length and mass ratio increases. The phonon dispersion curves show an obvious decrease of group velocities in 3D phononic crystals. The phonon's localization and band gap is also clearly observed in spectra of normalized inverse participation ratio in nanoscale 3D phononic crystal.

  20. Reduction of Thermal Conductivity by Nanoscale 3D Phononic Crystal

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lina; Yang, Nuo; Li, Baowen

    2013-01-01

    We studied how the period length and the mass ratio affect the thermal conductivity of isotopic nanoscale three-dimensional (3D) phononic crystal of Si. Simulation results by equilibrium molecular dynamics show isotopic nanoscale 3D phononic crystals can significantly reduce the thermal conductivity of bulk Si at high temperature (1000 K), which leads to a larger ZT than unity. The thermal conductivity decreases as the period length and mass ratio increases. The phonon dispersion curves show an obvious decrease of group velocities in 3D phononic crystals. The phonon's localization and band gap is also clearly observed in spectra of normalized inverse participation ratio in nanoscale 3D phononic crystal. PMID:23378898

  1. Nanostructured colloidal crystals from forced hydrolysis methods.

    PubMed

    Otal, Eugenio H; Granada, Mara; Troiani, Horacio E; Cánepa, Horacio; Walsöe de Reca, Noemí E

    2009-08-18

    In this work, an original route for ZnO nanostructured spherical colloids and their assembly into colloidal crystals are presented. The temporal evolution of crystal size and shape was followed by X-ray diffraction and the colloids size distribution by scanning electron microscopy. These spherical colloids showed a change in their size dispersion with aging time. Early stage suspensions, with a narrow size distribution, were settled to the bottom and dried with a slow evaporation rate to obtain colloidal crystals. This original route provides a new material for future applications in opalline photonic crystals, with a dielectric constant higher than that of classical materials (silica and latex). Moreover, this route means an improvement of previously reported data from the literature since it involves a one-pot strategy and room-temperature colloid assembly.

  2. Crystallization of DNA-coated colloids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Yufeng; Zheng, Xiaolong; Ducrot, Étienne; Yodh, Jeremy S.; Weck, Marcus; Pine, David J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-coated colloids hold great promise for self-assembly of programmed heterogeneous microstructures, provided they not only bind when cooled below their melting temperature, but also rearrange so that aggregated particles can anneal into the structure that minimizes the free energy. Unfortunately, DNA-coated colloids generally collide and stick forming kinetically arrested random aggregates when the thickness of the DNA coating is much smaller than the particles. Here we report DNA-coated colloids that can rearrange and anneal, thus enabling the growth of large colloidal crystals from a wide range of micrometre-sized DNA-coated colloids for the first time. The kinetics of aggregation, crystallization and defect formation are followed in real time. The crystallization rate exhibits the familiar maximum for intermediate temperature quenches observed in metallic alloys, but over a temperature range smaller by two orders of magnitude, owing to the highly temperature-sensitive diffusion between aggregated DNA-coated colloids. PMID:26078020

  3. Crystallization of DNA-coated colloids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Yufeng; Zheng, Xiaolong; Ducrot, Étienne; Yodh, Jeremy S; Weck, Marcus; Pine, David J

    2015-06-16

    DNA-coated colloids hold great promise for self-assembly of programmed heterogeneous microstructures, provided they not only bind when cooled below their melting temperature, but also rearrange so that aggregated particles can anneal into the structure that minimizes the free energy. Unfortunately, DNA-coated colloids generally collide and stick forming kinetically arrested random aggregates when the thickness of the DNA coating is much smaller than the particles. Here we report DNA-coated colloids that can rearrange and anneal, thus enabling the growth of large colloidal crystals from a wide range of micrometre-sized DNA-coated colloids for the first time. The kinetics of aggregation, crystallization and defect formation are followed in real time. The crystallization rate exhibits the familiar maximum for intermediate temperature quenches observed in metallic alloys, but over a temperature range smaller by two orders of magnitude, owing to the highly temperature-sensitive diffusion between aggregated DNA-coated colloids.

  4. A universal approach to fabricate ordered colloidal crystals arrays based on electrostatic self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xun; Zhang, Junhu; Zhu, Difu; Li, Xiao; Zhang, Xuemin; Wang, Tieqiang; Yang, Bai

    2010-12-01

    We present a novel and simple method to fabricate two-dimensional (2D) poly(styrene sulfate) (PSS, negatively charged) colloidal crystals on a positively charged substrate. Our strategy contains two separate steps: one is the three-dimensional (3D) assembly of PSS particles in ethanol, and the other is electrostatic adsorption in water. First, 3D assembly in ethanol phase eliminates electrostatic attractions between colloids and the substrate. As a result, high-quality colloidal crystals are easily generated, for electrostatic attractions are unfavorable for the movement of colloidal particles during convective self-assembly. Subsequently, top layers of colloidal spheres are washed away in the water phase, whereas well-packed PSS colloids that are in contact with the substrate are tightly linked due to electrostatic interactions, resulting in the formation of ordered arrays of 2D colloidal spheres. Cycling these processes leads to the layer-by-layer assembly of 3D colloidal crystals with controllable layers. In addition, this strategy can be extended to the fabrication of patterned 2D colloidal crystals on patterned polyelectrolyte surfaces, not only on planar substrates but also on nonplanar substrates. This straightforward method may open up new possibilities for practical use of colloidal crystals of excellent quality, various patterns, and controllable fashions.

  5. 3-D patterning of silicon by laser-initiated, liquid-assisted colloidal (LILAC) lithography.

    PubMed

    Ulmeanu, M; Grubb, M P; Jipa, F; Quignon, B; Ashfold, M N R

    2015-06-01

    We report a comprehensive study of laser-initiated, liquid-assisted colloidal (LILAC) lithography, and illustrate its utility in patterning silicon substrates. The method combines single shot laser irradiation (frequency doubled Ti-sapphire laser, 50fs pulse duration, 400nm wavelength) and medium-tuned optical near-field effects around arrays of silica colloidal particles to achieve 3-D surface patterning of silicon. A monolayer (or multilayers) of hexagonal close packed silica colloidal particles act as a mask and offer a route to liquid-tuned optical near field enhancement effects. The resulting patterns are shown to depend on the difference in refractive index of the colloidal particles (ncolloid) and the liquid (nliquid) in which they are immersed. Two different topographies are demonstrated experimentally: (a) arrays of bumps, centred beneath the original colloidal particles, when using liquids with nliquidcolloidal particles, and bumps when using liquids with nliquid>ncolloid - and explained with the aid of complementary Mie scattering simulations. The LILAC lithography technique has potential for rapid, large area, organized 3-D patterning of silicon (and related) substrates.

  6. 3D reconstruction of two-dimensional crystals.

    PubMed

    Stahlberg, Henning; Biyani, Nikhil; Engel, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    Electron crystallography of two-dimensional (2D) crystals determines the structure of membrane proteins in the lipid bilayer by imaging with cryo-electron microscopy and image processing. Membrane proteins can be packed in regular 2D arrays by their reconstitution in the presence of lipids at low lipid to protein weight-to-weight ratio. The crystal quality depends on the protein purity and homogeneity, its stability, and on the crystallization conditions. A 2D crystal presents the membrane protein in a functional and fully lipidated state. Electron crystallography determines the 3D structure even of small membrane proteins up to atomic resolution, but 3D density maps have a better resolution in the membrane plane than in the vertical direction. This problem can be partly eliminated by applying an iterative algorithm that exploits additional known constraints about the 2D crystal. 2D electron crystallography is particularly attractive for the structural analysis of membrane proteins that are too small for single particle analyses and too unstable to form 3D crystals. With the recent introduction of direct electron detector cameras, the routine determination of the atomic 3D structure of membrane-embedded membrane proteins is in reach. PMID:26093179

  7. 3D Reproduction of a Snow Crystal by Stereolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaki, Jun'ichi; Yanagi, Satoshi; Aoki, Yuya; Kubo, Akihiko; Kameda, Takao; Ullah, A. M. M. Sharif

    A new method was proposed for replicating snow crystals that uses light-curing resin containing no harmful substances, as the replicating material, and the 3D reproduction of a snow crystal by stereolithography was conducted. It was found that a UV light irradiation density of at least 0.6 mW/cm2 was required to complete the light-hardening reaction within 15 min when polyene/polythiol resin (NOA81) was used as the light-curing resin. When the atmospheric temperature was 0 °C, the maximum temperature rise due to the light-hardening reaction was 4.2 °C at an irradiation density of 1.0 mW/cm2. This suggests that the initial temperature of the light-curing resin must be approximately -5 °C to prevent the snow crystal from melting when an irradiation density of 1.0 mW/cm2 is applied at an atmospheric temperature of below 0 °C. This replication method has sufficient accuracy to reconstruct the 3D shape of a snow crystal. The 3D reproduction of a snow crystal by stereolithography was conducted by transforming the CSV-formatted 3D profile height data to STL-formatted CAD data.

  8. Patterning microsphere surfaces by templating colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang; Wang, Dayang; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2005-01-01

    By using the upper single or double layers in colloidal crystals as masks during Au vapor deposition, various Au patterns have been successfully constructed on the surfaces of the lower spheres. The dimension and geometry of the Au patterns obtained are dependent on the orientation of the colloidal crystal templates. Our patterning procedure is independent of the curvature and chemical composition of the surfaces, which definitely pave a promising way to pattern highly curved surfaces.

  9. Ionic colloidal crystals of oppositely charged particles.

    PubMed

    Leunissen, Mirjam E; Christova, Christina G; Hynninen, Antti-Pekka; Royall, C Patrick; Campbell, Andrew I; Imhof, Arnout; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Roij, René; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2005-09-01

    Colloidal suspensions are widely used to study processes such as melting, freezing and glass transitions. This is because they display the same phase behaviour as atoms or molecules, with the nano- to micrometre size of the colloidal particles making it possible to observe them directly in real space. Another attractive feature is that different types of colloidal interactions, such as long-range repulsive, short-range attractive, hard-sphere-like and dipolar, can be realized and give rise to equilibrium phases. However, spherically symmetric, long-range attractions (that is, ionic interactions) have so far always resulted in irreversible colloidal aggregation. Here we show that the electrostatic interaction between oppositely charged particles can be tuned such that large ionic colloidal crystals form readily, with our theory and simulations confirming the stability of these structures. We find that in contrast to atomic systems, the stoichiometry of our colloidal crystals is not dictated by charge neutrality; this allows us to obtain a remarkable diversity of new binary structures. An external electric field melts the crystals, confirming that the constituent particles are indeed oppositely charged. Colloidal model systems can thus be used to study the phase behaviour of ionic species. We also expect that our approach to controlling opposite-charge interactions will facilitate the production of binary crystals of micrometre-sized particles, which could find use as advanced materials for photonic applications.

  10. Ultrasonically assisted deposition of colloidal crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wollmann, Sabine; Patel, Raj B.; Wixforth, Achim; Krenner, Hubert J.

    2014-07-21

    Colloidal particles are a versatile physical system which have found uses across a range of applications such as the simulation of crystal kinetics, etch masks for fabrication, and the formation of photonic band-gap structures. Utilization of colloidal particles often requires a means to produce highly ordered, periodic structures. One approach is the use of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) to direct the self-assembly of colloidal particles. Previous demonstrations using standing SAWs were shown to be limited in terms of crystal size and dimensionality. Here, we report a technique to improve the spatial alignment of colloidal particles using traveling SAWs. Through control of the radio frequency power, which drives the SAW, we demonstrate enhanced quality and dimensionality of the crystal growth. We show that this technique can be applied to a range of particle sizes in the μm-regime and may hold potential for particles in the sub-μm-regime.

  11. Hybrid colloidal plasmonic-photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Sergei G; Korovin, Alexander V; Regensburger, Alois; Peschel, Ulf

    2011-06-17

    We review the recently emerged class of hybrid metal-dielectric colloidal photonic crystals. The hybrid approach is understood as the combination of a dielectric photonic crystal with a continuous metal film. It allows to achieve a strong modification of the optical properties of photonic crystals by involving the light scattering at electronic excitations in the metal component into moulding of the light flow in series to the diffraction resonances occurring in the body of the photonic crystal. We consider different realizations of hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystals based on two- and three-dimensional colloidal photonic crystals in association with flat and corrugated metal films. In agreement with model calculations, different resonance phenomena determine the optical response of hybrid crystals leading to a broadly tuneable functionality of these crystals. PMID:21594906

  12. 3D plasmonic crystal metamaterials for ultra-sensitive biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Aristov, Andrey I.; Manousidaki, Maria; Danilov, Artem; Terzaki, Konstantina; Fotakis, Costas; Farsari, Maria; Kabashin, Andrei V.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the excitation of plasmons in 3D plasmon crystal metamaterials and report the observation of a delocalized plasmon mode, which provides extremely high spectral sensitivity (>2600 nm per refractive index unit (RIU) change), outperforming all plasmonic counterparts excited in 2D nanoscale geometries, as well as a prominent phase-sensitive response (>3*104 deg. of phase per RIU). Combined with a large surface for bioimmobilization provided by the 3D matrix, the proposed sensor architecture promises a new important landmark in the advancement of plasmonic biosensing technology. PMID:27151104

  13. 3D holographic polymer photonic crystal for superprism application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiaqi; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Xiaonan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Sasa; Chen, Ray T.

    2007-02-01

    Photonic crystal based superprism offers a new way to design new optical components for beam steering and DWDM application. 3D photonic crystals are especially attractive as they could offer more control of the light beam based on the needs. A polygonal prism based holographic fabrication method has been demonstrated for a three-dimensional face-centered-cubic (FCC)-type submicron polymer photonic crystal using SU8 as the photo-sensitive material. Therefore antivibration equipment and complicated optical alignment system are not needed and the requirement for the coherence of the laser source is relaxed compared with the traditional holographic setup. By changing the top-cut prism structure, the polarization of the laser beam, the exposure and development conditions we can achieve different kinds of triclinic or orthorhombic photonic crystals on demand. Special fabrication treatments have been introduced to ensure the survivability of the fabricated large area (cm2) nano-structures. Scanning electron microscopy and diffraction results proved the good uniformity of the fabricated structures. With the proper design of the refraction prism we have achieved a partial bandgap for S+C band (1460-1565nm) in the [111] direction. The transmission and reflection spectra obtained by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are in good agreement with simulated band structure. The superprism effects around 1550nm wavelength for the fabricated 3D polymer photonic crystal have been theoretically calculated and such effects can be used for beam steering purpose.

  14. Three-dimensional ultrasonic colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleap, Mihai; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2016-05-01

    Colloidal assembly represents a powerful method for the fabrication of functional materials. In this article, we describe how acoustic radiation forces can guide the assembly of colloidal particles into structures that serve as microscopic elements in novel acoustic metadevices or act as phononic crystals. Using a simple three-dimensional orthogonal system, we show that a diversity of colloidal structures with orthorhombic symmetry can be assembled with megahertz-frequency (MHz) standing pressure waves. These structures allow rapid tuning of acoustic properties and provide a new platform for dynamic metamaterial applications. xml:lang="fr"

  15. Patterned when wet: environment-dependent multifunctional patterns within amphiphilic colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Brozell, Adrian M; Muha, Michelle A; Abed-Amoli, Arian; Bricarello, Daniel; Parikh, Atul N

    2007-12-01

    A simple integration of molecular and colloidal self-assembly approaches with photopatterning is shown to produce multifunctional patterns of amphiphilic colloidal crystals. These crystals display binary spatial patterns of wettability by water and a single photonic stop-band in air. Upon exposure to water, the uniform stop-band is replaced by a pattern of coexisting stop-bands that reflect the underlying pattern of surface wetting. These hydration-dependent photonic patterns within single colloidal crystals form because of near-complete water rejection from the three-dimensionally disposed nanoscale interstices in hydrophobic regions and its exclusive permeation within the hydrophilic regions. This water permeation pattern is further structured by the three-dimensional (3D) distribution and contiguity of the nanoscale interstices between individual colloids, allowing 3D patterned organization of functional units in secondary self-assembly processes, as illustrated using quantum dots, metal nanoparticles, and fluorescent probes.

  16. Acoustically trapped colloidal crystals that are reconfigurable in real time

    PubMed Central

    Caleap, Mihai; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2014-01-01

    Photonic and phononic crystals are metamaterials with repeating unit cells that result in internal resonances leading to a range of wave guiding and filtering properties and are opening up new applications such as hyperlenses and superabsorbers. Here we show the first, to our knowledge, 3D colloidal phononic crystal that is reconfigurable in real time and demonstrate its ability to rapidly alter its frequency filtering characteristics. Our reconfigurable material is assembled from microspheres in aqueous solution, trapped with acoustic radiation forces. The acoustic radiation force is governed by an energy landscape, determined by an applied high-amplitude acoustic standing wave field, in which particles move swiftly to energy minima. This creates a colloidal crystal of several milliliters in volume with spheres arranged in an orthorhombic lattice in which the acoustic wavelength is used to control the lattice spacing. Transmission acoustic spectroscopy shows that the new colloidal crystal behaves as a phononic metamaterial and exhibits clear band-pass and band-stop frequencies which are adjusted in real time. PMID:24706925

  17. Biaxial ferromagnetic liquid crystal colloids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingkun; Ackerman, Paul J; Lubensky, Tom C; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2016-09-20

    The design and practical realization of composite materials that combine fluidity and different forms of ordering at the mesoscopic scale are among the grand fundamental science challenges. These composites also hold a great potential for technological applications, ranging from information displays to metamaterials. Here we introduce a fluid with coexisting polar and biaxial ordering of organic molecular and magnetic colloidal building blocks exhibiting the lowest symmetry orientational order. Guided by interactions at different length scales, rod-like organic molecules of this fluid spontaneously orient along a direction dubbed "director," whereas magnetic colloidal nanoplates order with their dipole moments parallel to each other but pointing at an angle to the director, yielding macroscopic magnetization at no external fields. Facile magnetic switching of such fluids is consistent with predictions of a model based on competing actions of elastic and magnetic torques, enabling previously inaccessible control of light. PMID:27601668

  18. 3D Assembly of All-Inorganic Colloidal Nanocrystals into Gels and Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Sayevich, Vladimir; Cai, Bin; Benad, Albrecht; Haubold, Danny; Sonntag, Luisa; Gaponik, Nikolai; Lesnyak, Vladimir; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2016-05-17

    We report an efficient approach to assemble a variety of electrostatically stabilized all-inorganic semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) by their linking with appropriate ions into multibranched gel networks. These all-inorganic non-ordered 3D assemblies benefit from strong interparticle coupling, which facilitates charge transport between the NCs with diverse morphologies, compositions, sizes, and functional capping ligands. Moreover, the resulting dry gels (aerogels) are highly porous monolithic structures, which preserve the quantum confinement of their building blocks. The inorganic semiconductor aerogel made of 4.5 nm CdSe colloidal NCs capped with I(-) ions and bridged with Cd(2+) ions had a large surface area of 146 m(2)  g(-1) . PMID:27100131

  19. Highly uniform polyhedral colloids formed by colloidal crystal templating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifan; McGinley, James; Crocker, John; Crocker Research Group Team

    2015-03-01

    We seek to create polyhedral solid particles by trapping oil droplets in a colloidal crystal, and polymerizing them in situ, resulting in polyhedral particles containing spherical dimples in an ordered arrangement. Specifically, highly monodisperse, micron-sized droplets of 3-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane (TPM) were first prepared through a poly condensation reaction, following well established methods. The droplets were mixed with an excess of polystyrene(PS) particles (diameter in 2.58 μm), which formed close packed (FCC or HCP) colloidal crystals by natural sedimentation and compression under partial drying to an extent, with TPM oil droplets trapped into their tetrahedral and octahedral interstitial sites and wet PS particles. Depending on the initial particle volume fraction and extent of drying, a high yield of dimpled particles having different shapes including tetrahedra and cubes were obtained after oil initiated polymerization and dissolution of the host PS particles, as seen under SEM. The effects of TPM to PS particles size ratio, drying time, and other factors in relation to the yield of tetrahedral and cubic dimpled particles will be presented. Finally, fractionation techniques were used to obtain suspensions of uniform polyhedral particles of high purity.

  20. Controlled synthesis of monodispersed AgGaS{sub 2} 3D nanoflowers and the shape evolution from nanoflowers to colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Yanping; Zai, Jiantao; Su, Yuezeng; Qian, Xuefeng

    2011-05-15

    Monodispersed AgGaS{sub 2} three-dimensional (3D) nanoflowers have been successfully synthesized in a 'soft-chemical' system with the mixture of 1-octyl alcohol and cyclohexane as reaction medium and oleylamine as surfactant. The crystal phase, morphology and chemical composition of the as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and high-resolution TEM (HTEM), respectively. Results reveal that the as-synthesized AgGaS{sub 2} nanoflowers are in tetragonal structure with 3D flower-like shape. Controlled experiments demonstrated that the shape transformation of AgGaS{sub 2} nanocrystals from 3D nanoflowers (50 nm) to nanoparticles (10-20 nm) could be readily realized by tuning the reaction parameters, e.g., the ratio of octanol to cyclohexane, the length of carbon chain of fatty alcohol, the concentration of oleylamine, etc. The UV-vis and PL spectra of the obtained AgGaS{sub 2} nanoflowers and colloids were researched. In addition, the photoelectron energy conversion (SPV) of AgGaS{sub 2} nanoflowers was further researched by the surface photovoltage spectra. -- Graphical abstract: Various AgGaS{sub 2} nanocrystals with different morphologies and sizes including 3D nanoflowers (a) and colloids (b) were synthesized in mixed solvent reaction system and their PL spectra was researched (c). Display Omitted highlights: > Ternary chalcogenide AgGaS{sub 2} nanocrystals were synthesized in a simple mixed solvent system. > The shape and size transformation of AgGaS{sub 2} from 3D nanoflowers to colloids could be tuned effectively. > AgGaS{sub 2} nanoflowers was obtained with relatively insufficient ligands protection in reaction system, otherwise, AgGaS{sub 2} colloids was obtained. > Provide a new choice to prepare ternary nanomaterials and further understand the reaction mechanisms along with the growth kinetics of ternary nanocrystals.

  1. Equilibrium crystal phases of triblock Janus colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhart, Wesley F.; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2016-09-01

    Triblock Janus colloids, which are colloidal spheres decorated with attractive patches at each pole, have recently generated significant interest as potential building blocks for functional materials. Their inherent anisotropy is known to induce self-assembly into open structures at moderate temperatures and pressures, where they are stabilized over close-packed crystals by entropic effects. We present a numerical investigation of the equilibrium phases of triblock Janus particles with many different patch geometries in three dimensions, using Monte Carlo simulations combined with free energy calculations. In all cases, we find that the free energy difference between crystal polymorphs is less than 0.2 kBT per particle. By varying the patch fraction and interaction range, we show that large patches stabilize the formation of structures with four bonds per patch over those with three. This transition occurs abruptly above a patch fraction of 0.30 and has a strong dependence on the interaction range. Furthermore, we find that a short interaction range favors four bonds per patch, with longer range increasingly stabilizing structures with only three bonds per patch. By quantifying the effect of patch geometry on the stability of the equilibrium crystal structures, we provide insights into the fundamental design rules for constructing complex colloidal crystals.

  2. Equilibrium crystal phases of triblock Janus colloids.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Wesley F; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z

    2016-09-01

    Triblock Janus colloids, which are colloidal spheres decorated with attractive patches at each pole, have recently generated significant interest as potential building blocks for functional materials. Their inherent anisotropy is known to induce self-assembly into open structures at moderate temperatures and pressures, where they are stabilized over close-packed crystals by entropic effects. We present a numerical investigation of the equilibrium phases of triblock Janus particles with many different patch geometries in three dimensions, using Monte Carlo simulations combined with free energy calculations. In all cases, we find that the free energy difference between crystal polymorphs is less than 0.2 kBT per particle. By varying the patch fraction and interaction range, we show that large patches stabilize the formation of structures with four bonds per patch over those with three. This transition occurs abruptly above a patch fraction of 0.30 and has a strong dependence on the interaction range. Furthermore, we find that a short interaction range favors four bonds per patch, with longer range increasingly stabilizing structures with only three bonds per patch. By quantifying the effect of patch geometry on the stability of the equilibrium crystal structures, we provide insights into the fundamental design rules for constructing complex colloidal crystals. PMID:27609002

  3. Sculptured thin films as 3D photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Vijayakumar C.

    2012-10-01

    Sculptured thin films (STFs) are columnar thin films nano-engineered to have controllable porosity, structural chirality and periodicity in one, two or three dimensions. These characteristics of STFs have been exploited in developing optical elements such as thin film filters, polarizers, sensors, and waveguides for integrated optics. They can be fabricated by a simple two-stage (lithography and deposition) process. In this paper, we develop a grating theory-based modeling approach for STFs as fully 3D periodic structures. Input for this model consists of a structural parameter set that is easily accessible experimentally. This helps establish a common parameter set for evaluating STFs from a fabrication as well as modeling perspective, thus laying the base required for developing appropriate process monitoring and control methods necessary for successful commercial production. Using the proposed model, we develop a quantitative understanding of the limits of applicability of traditional modeling methods for STFs and develop guidelines for robust design of STF-based devices. We apply this knowledge gained to explore STFs in two illustrative examples: (i) as a notch filter, and (ii) as a 3D photonic crystal. The results demonstrate the potential for success and highlight the remaining challenges that need to be overcome.

  4. Preparation of iridescent colloidal crystal coatings with variable structural colors.

    PubMed

    Cong, Hailin; Yu, Bing; Wang, Shaopeng; Qi, Limin; Wang, Jilei; Ma, Yurong

    2013-07-29

    Iridescent colloidal crystal coatings with variable structural colors were fabricated by incorporating carbon black nanoparticles (CB-NPs) into the voids of polystyrene (PS) colloidal crystals. The structural color of the colloid crystal coatings was not only greatly enhanced after the composition but also varied with observation angles. By changing the diameter of monodisperse PS colloids in the composites, colloidal crystal coatings with three primary colors for additive or subtractive combination were obtained. After incorporation of the PS/CB-NPs hybrid coatings into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix, manmade opal jewelry with variable iridescent colors was made facilely. PMID:23938656

  5. Colloidal crystals by electrospraying polystyrene nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This work introduces the electrospray technique as a suitable option to fabricate large-scale colloidal nanostructures, including colloidal crystals, in just a few minutes. It is shown that by changing the deposition conditions, different metamaterials can be fabricated: from scattered monolayers of polystyrene nanospheres to self-assembled three-dimensional ordered nanolayers having colloidal crystal properties. The electrospray technique overcomes the main problems encountered by top-down fabrication approaches, largely simplifying the experimental setup. Polystyrene nanospheres, with 360-nm diameter, were typically electrosprayed using off-the-shelf nanofluids. Several parameters of the setup and deposition conditions were explored, namely the distance between electrodes, nanofluid conductivity, applied voltage, and deposition rate. Layers thicker than 20 μm and area of 1 cm2 were typically produced, showing several domains of tens of microns wide with dislocations in between, but no cracks. The applied voltage was in the range of 10 kV, and the conductivity of the colloidal solution was in the range of 3 to 4 mS. Besides the morphology of the layers, the quality was also assessed by means of optical reflectance measurements showing an 80% reflectivity peak in the vicinity of 950-nm wavelength. PMID:23311494

  6. Fractionalization of interstitials in curved colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, William T. M.; Bowick, Mark J.; Chaikin, Paul M.

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the effect of curvature and topological frustration in crystals yields insights into the fragility of the ordered state. For instance, a one-dimensional crystal of identical charged particles can accommodate an extra particle (interstitial) if all the particle positions are readjusted, yet in a planar hexagonal crystal interstitials remain trapped between lattice sites and diffuse by hopping. Using optical tweezers operated independently of three-dimensional imaging, we inserted interstitials in a lattice of similar colloidal particles sitting on flat or curved oil/glycerol interfaces, and imaged the ensuing dynamics. We find that, unlike in flat space, the curved crystals self-heal through a collective particle rearrangement that redistributes the increased density associated with the interstitial. This process can be interpreted in terms of the out-of-equilibrium interaction of topological defects with each other and with the underlying curvature. Our observations suggest the existence of particle fractionalization on curved surface crystals.

  7. Colloidal cholesteric liquid crystal in spherical confinement.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfeng; Jun-Yan Suen, Jeffrey; Prince, Elisabeth; Larin, Egor M; Klinkova, Anna; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Helmy, Amr S; Lavrentovich, Oleg D; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    The organization of nanoparticles in constrained geometries is an area of fundamental and practical importance. Spherical confinement of nanocolloids leads to new modes of packing, self-assembly, phase separation and relaxation of colloidal liquids; however, it remains an unexplored area of research for colloidal liquid crystals. Here we report the organization of cholesteric liquid crystal formed by nanorods in spherical droplets. For cholesteric suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals, with progressive confinement, we observe phase separation into a micrometer-size isotropic droplet core and a cholesteric shell formed by concentric nanocrystal layers. Further confinement results in a transition to a bipolar planar cholesteric morphology. The distribution of polymer, metal, carbon or metal oxide nanoparticles in the droplets is governed by the nanoparticle size and yields cholesteric droplets exhibiting fluorescence, plasmonic properties and magnetic actuation. This work advances our understanding of how the interplay of order, confinement and topological defects affects the morphology of soft matter. PMID:27561545

  8. Colloidal cholesteric liquid crystal in spherical confinement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunfeng; Jun-Yan Suen, Jeffrey; Prince, Elisabeth; Larin, Egor M.; Klinkova, Anna; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Helmy, Amr S.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    The organization of nanoparticles in constrained geometries is an area of fundamental and practical importance. Spherical confinement of nanocolloids leads to new modes of packing, self-assembly, phase separation and relaxation of colloidal liquids; however, it remains an unexplored area of research for colloidal liquid crystals. Here we report the organization of cholesteric liquid crystal formed by nanorods in spherical droplets. For cholesteric suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals, with progressive confinement, we observe phase separation into a micrometer-size isotropic droplet core and a cholesteric shell formed by concentric nanocrystal layers. Further confinement results in a transition to a bipolar planar cholesteric morphology. The distribution of polymer, metal, carbon or metal oxide nanoparticles in the droplets is governed by the nanoparticle size and yields cholesteric droplets exhibiting fluorescence, plasmonic properties and magnetic actuation. This work advances our understanding of how the interplay of order, confinement and topological defects affects the morphology of soft matter. PMID:27561545

  9. Colloidal cholesteric liquid crystal in spherical confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunfeng; Jun-Yan Suen, Jeffrey; Prince, Elisabeth; Larin, Egor M.; Klinkova, Anna; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Helmy, Amr S.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-08-01

    The organization of nanoparticles in constrained geometries is an area of fundamental and practical importance. Spherical confinement of nanocolloids leads to new modes of packing, self-assembly, phase separation and relaxation of colloidal liquids; however, it remains an unexplored area of research for colloidal liquid crystals. Here we report the organization of cholesteric liquid crystal formed by nanorods in spherical droplets. For cholesteric suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals, with progressive confinement, we observe phase separation into a micrometer-size isotropic droplet core and a cholesteric shell formed by concentric nanocrystal layers. Further confinement results in a transition to a bipolar planar cholesteric morphology. The distribution of polymer, metal, carbon or metal oxide nanoparticles in the droplets is governed by the nanoparticle size and yields cholesteric droplets exhibiting fluorescence, plasmonic properties and magnetic actuation. This work advances our understanding of how the interplay of order, confinement and topological defects affects the morphology of soft matter.

  10. Development of 3D photonic crystals using sol-gel process for high power laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, F.; Dieudonné, E.; Bertussi, B.; Vallé, K.; Belleville, P.; Mallejac, N.; Enoch, S.; Sanchez, C.

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional photonic crystals (PCs) are periodic materials with a modulated refractive index on a length scale close to the light wavelength. This optical property allows the preparation of specific optical components like highly reflective mirrors. Moreover, these structured materials are known to have a high laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) in the sub-nanosecond range compared to multi-layered dielectric mirrors. This property is obtained because only one high LIDT material (silica) is used. The second material used in the layer stack is replaced by air. In this work, we present the development of 3D PCs with narrow-sized colloidal silica particles, prepared by sol-gel process and deposited with Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Different syntheses routes have been investigated and compared regarding the optical properties of the PCs. Finally a numerical model based on an ideal opal network including defect influence is used to explain these experimental results.

  11. Formation of spatially patterned colloidal photonic crystals through the control of capillary forces and template recognition.

    PubMed

    Brozell, Adrian M; Muha, Michelle A; Parikh, Atul N

    2005-12-01

    We report the formation of microscopic patterns of substrate-supported, 3D planar colloidal crystals using physical confinement in conjunction with surfaces displaying predetermined binary patterns of hydropholicity. The formation process involves a primary self-assembly wherein nano- and microscale colloids order into a photonic fcc lattice via capillary interactions followed by a secondary template-induced crystal cleavage step. Following this method, arbitrary arrays of pattern elements, which preserve structural and orientational properties of the parent crystal, can be easily obtained.

  12. Phenomenology of colloidal crystal electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medebach, Martin; Palberg, Thomas

    2003-08-01

    We studied the motion of polycrystalline solids comprising of charged sub-micron latex spheres suspended in deionized water. These were subjected to a low frequency alternating square wave electric field in an optical cell of rectangular cross section. Velocity profiles in X and Y direction were determined by Laser Doppler Velocimetry. The observed complex flow profiles are time dependent due to the combined effects of electro-osmosis, electrophoresis, crystal elasticity, and friction of the crystals at the cell wall. On small time scales elastic deformation occurs. On long time scales channel formation is observed. At intermediate times steady state profiles are dominated by a solid plug of polycrystalline material moving in the cell center. At large field strengths the plug shear melts. Mobilities in the shear molten state are on the order of (6.5±0.5) 10-8 m2 V-1 s-1 and connect continuously with those of the equilibrium fluid. The apparent mobility of the plug is much larger than of the fluid and like the mobility of the fluid decreases with increasing particle number density. We qualitatively attribute the accelerated motion of the plug to an incomplete exposure to the electro-osmotic flow profile.

  13. Colloidal crystal grain boundary formation and motion.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Tara D; Yang, Yuguang; Beltran-Villegas, Daniel J; Bevan, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The ability to assemble nano- and micro- sized colloidal components into highly ordered configurations is often cited as the basis for developing advanced materials. However, the dynamics of stochastic grain boundary formation and motion have not been quantified, which limits the ability to control and anneal polycrystallinity in colloidal based materials. Here we use optical microscopy, Brownian Dynamic simulations, and a new dynamic analysis to study grain boundary motion in quasi-2D colloidal bicrystals formed within inhomogeneous AC electric fields. We introduce "low-dimensional" models using reaction coordinates for condensation and global order that capture first passage times between critical configurations at each applied voltage. The resulting models reveal that equal sized domains at a maximum misorientation angle show relaxation dominated by friction limited grain boundary diffusion; and in contrast, asymmetrically sized domains with less misorientation display much faster grain boundary migration due to significant thermodynamic driving forces. By quantifying such dynamics vs. compression (voltage), kinetic bottlenecks associated with slow grain boundary relaxation are understood, which can be used to guide the temporal assembly of defect-free single domain colloidal crystals.

  14. From crystal chemistry to colloid stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, B.; Burrows, N.; Penn, R. L.

    2008-12-01

    Aqueous suspensions of ferrihydrite nanoparticles form a colloid with properties that can be understood using classical theories but which additionally exhibit the distinctive phenomenon of nanocluster formation. While use of in situ light and x-ray scattering methods permit the quantitative determination of colloid stability, interparticle interactions, and cluster or aggregate geometry, there are currently few approaches to predict the colloidal behavior of mineral nanoparticles. A longstanding goal of aqueous geochemistry is the rationalization and prediction of the chemical properties of hydrated mineral interfaces from knowledge of interface structure at the molecular scale. Because interfacial acid-base reactions typically lead to the formation of a net electrostatic charge at the surfaces of oxide, hydroxide, and oxyhydroxide mineral surfaces, quantitative descriptions of this behavior have the potential to permit the prediction of long-range interactions between mineral particles. We will evaluate the feasibility of this effort by constructing a model for surface charge formation for ferrihydrite that combines recent insights into the crystal structure of this phase and proposed methods for estimating the pKa of acidic surface groups. We will test the ability of this model to predict the colloidal stability of ferrihydrite suspensions as a function of solution chemistry.

  15. Visualizing dislocation nucleation by indenting colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Schall, Peter; Cohen, Itai; Weitz, David A; Spaepen, Frans

    2006-03-16

    The formation of dislocations is central to our understanding of yield, work hardening, fracture, and fatigue of crystalline materials. While dislocations have been studied extensively in conventional materials, recent results have shown that colloidal crystals offer a potential model system for visualizing their structure and dynamics directly in real space. Although thermal fluctuations are thought to play a critical role in the nucleation of these defects, it is difficult to observe them directly. Nano-indentation, during which a small tip deforms a crystalline film, is a common tool for introducing dislocations into a small volume that is initially defect-free. Here, we show that an analogue of nano-indentation performed on a colloidal crystal provides direct images of defect formation in real time and on the single particle level, allowing us to probe the effects of thermal fluctuations. We implement a new method to determine the strain tensor of a distorted crystal lattice and we measure the critical dislocation loop size and the rate of dislocation nucleation directly. Using continuum models, we elucidate the relation between thermal fluctuations and the applied strain that governs defect nucleation. Moreover, we estimate that although bond energies between particles are about fifty times larger in atomic systems, the difference in attempt frequencies makes the effects of thermal fluctuations remarkably similar, so that our results are also relevant for atomic crystals.

  16. Slab photonic crystals with dimer colloid bases

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Erin K.; Liddell Watson, Chekesha M.

    2014-06-14

    The photonic band gap properties for centered rectangular monolayers of asymmetric dimers are reported. Colloids in suspension have been organized into the phase under confinement. The theoretical model is inspired by the range of asymmetric dimers synthesized via seeded emulsion polymerization and explores, in particular, the band structures as a function of degree of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion. These parameters are varied incrementally from spheres to lobe-tangent dimers over morphologies yielding physically realizable particles. The work addresses the relative scarcity of theoretical studies on photonic crystal slabs with vertical variation that is consistent with colloidal self-assembly. Odd, even and polarization independent gaps in the guided modes are determined for direct slab structures. A wide range of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion combinations having Brillouin zones with moderate to high isotropy support gaps between odd mode band indices 3-4 and even mode band indices 1-2 and 2-3.

  17. Nematic liquid crystal boojums with handles on colloidal handlebodies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingkun; Senyuk, Bohdan; Tasinkevych, Mykola; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2013-01-01

    Topological defects that form on surfaces of ordered media, dubbed boojums, are ubiquitous in superfluids, liquid crystals (LCs), Langmuir monolayers, and Bose–Einstein condensates. They determine supercurrents in superfluids, impinge on electrooptical switching in polymer-dispersed LCs, and mediate chemical response at nematic-isotropic fluid interfaces, but the role of surface topology in the appearance, stability, and core structure of these defects remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate robust generation of boojums by controlling surface topology of colloidal particles that impose tangential boundary conditions for the alignment of LC molecules. To do this, we design handlebody-shaped polymer particles with different genus g. When introduced into a nematic LC, these particles distort the nematic molecular alignment field while obeying topological constraints and induce at least 2g − 2 boojums that allow for topological charge conservation. We characterize 3D textures of boojums using polarized nonlinear optical imaging of molecular alignment and explain our findings by invoking symmetry considerations and numerical modeling of experiment-matching director fields, order parameter variations, and nontrivial handle-shaped core structure of defects. Finally, we discuss how this interplay between the topologies of colloidal surfaces and boojums may lead to controlled self-assembly of colloidal particles in nematic and paranematic hosts, which, in turn, may enable reconfigurable topological composites. PMID:23690605

  18. Polymorphism, crystal nucleation and growth in the phase-field crystal model in 2D and 3D.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gyula I; Tegze, György; Pusztai, Tamás; Tóth, Gergely; Gránásy, László

    2010-09-15

    We apply a simple dynamical density functional theory, the phase-field crystal (PFC) model of overdamped conservative dynamics, to address polymorphism, crystal nucleation, and crystal growth in the diffusion-controlled limit. We refine the phase diagram for 3D, and determine the line free energy in 2D and the height of the nucleation barrier in 2D and 3D for homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation by solving the respective Euler-Lagrange (EL) equations. We demonstrate that, in the PFC model, the body-centered cubic (bcc), the face-centered cubic (fcc), and the hexagonal close-packed structures (hcp) compete, while the simple cubic structure is unstable, and that phase preference can be tuned by changing the model parameters: close to the critical point the bcc structure is stable, while far from the critical point the fcc prevails, with an hcp stability domain in between. We note that with increasing distance from the critical point the equilibrium shapes vary from the sphere to specific faceted shapes: rhombic dodecahedron (bcc), truncated octahedron (fcc), and hexagonal prism (hcp). Solving the equation of motion of the PFC model supplied with conserved noise, solidification starts with the nucleation of an amorphous precursor phase, into which the stable crystalline phase nucleates. The growth rate is found to be time dependent and anisotropic; this anisotropy depends on the driving force. We show that due to the diffusion-controlled growth mechanism, which is especially relevant for crystal aggregation in colloidal systems, dendritic growth structures evolve in large-scale isothermal single-component PFC simulations. An oscillatory effective pair potential resembling those for model glass formers has been evaluated from structural data of the amorphous phase obtained by instantaneous quenching. Finally, we present results for eutectic solidification in a binary PFC model. PMID:21386517

  19. Fabrication and Characterization of Colloidal Crystal Thin Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, I.; Ramiro-Manzano, F.; Meseguer, F.; Bonet, E.

    2011-01-01

    We present a laboratory experiment that allows undergraduate or graduate students to get introduced to colloidal crystal research concepts in an interesting way. Moreover, such experiments and studies can also be useful in the field of crystallography or solid-state physics. The work concerns the growth of colloidal crystal thin films obtained…

  20. Hierarchical Self-Assembly of 3D-Printed Lock-and-Key Colloids through Shape Recognition.

    PubMed

    Tigges, Thomas; Walther, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Progress in colloid self-assembly crucially depends on finding preparation methods for anisotropic particles with recognition motifs to facilitate the formation of superstructures. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that direct 3D laser writing can be used to fabricate uniform populations of anisotropic cone-shaped particles that are suitable for self-assembly through shape recognition. The driving force for the self-assembly of the colloidal particles into linear supracolloidal polymers are depletion forces. The resulting supracolloidal fibrils undergo hierarchical ordering and form nematic liquid-crystalline domains. Such a behavior could so far not be observed in the absence of an electric field. The study opens possibilities for using direct laser writing to prepare designed colloids on demand, and to study their self-assembly.

  1. Virtual and Printed 3D Models for Teaching Crystal Symmetry and Point Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casas, Lluís; Estop, Euge`nia

    2015-01-01

    Both, virtual and printed 3D crystal models can help students and teachers deal with chemical education topics such as symmetry and point groups. In the present paper, two freely downloadable tools (interactive PDF files and a mobile app) are presented as examples of the application of 3D design to study point-symmetry. The use of 3D printing to…

  2. Spatially and temporally reconfigurable assembly of colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngri; Shah, Aayush A.; Solomon, Michael J.

    2014-04-01

    The self-assembly of colloidal crystals is important to the production of materials with functional optical, mechanical and conductive properties. Yet, self-assembly methods are limited by their slow kinetics and lack of structural control in space and time. Refinements such as templating and directed assembly partially address the problem, albeit by introducing fixed surface features such as templates or electrodes. A template-free method to reconfigure colloidal crystals simultaneously in three-dimensional space and time would better align work in colloidal assembly with materials applications. Here, we report a photo-induced assembly method that yields regions either filled with colloidal crystals or completely devoid of colloids. The origin of the effect is found to be electrophoresis of colloids generated by photochemistry at an indium tin oxide-coated substrate. Simple optical manipulations are applied to reconfigure these assembly and depletion regions. Thus, the method represents a new kind of template-free, reconfigurable three-dimensional photolithography.

  3. Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media: 3D Visualization Using Synchrotron X-Ray Microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueck, C. L.; Meisenheimer, D.; Wildenschild, D.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms controlling colloid transport and deposition in the vadose zone is an important step in protecting our water resources. Not only may these particles themselves be undesirable contaminants, but they can also aid in the transport of smaller, molecular-scale contaminants by chemical attachment. In this research, we examined the influence that air-water interfaces (AWI) and air-water-solid contact lines (AWS) have on colloid deposition and mobilization in three-dimensional systems. We used x-ray microtomography to visualize the transport of hydrophobic colloids as they move through a partially saturated glass bead pack. Drainage and imbibition experiments were conducted using syringe pumps to control the flow of a colloid suspension through the porous media at 0.6 mL/hr. The high ionic strength fluid was adjusted to a pH of 9.5 and a concentration of 1.0 mol/L KI. During the drainage and imbibition, the flow was periodically halted and allowed to equilibrate before collecting the microtomography scans. Dopants were used to enhance the contrast between the four phases (water, air, beads, and colloids), including potassium iodide dissolved in the fluid, and an outer layer of silver coating the colloids. We hypothesized that AWIs and AWSs will scour and mobilize a significant percentage of colloids, and therefore reduce the concentration of colloids along the vertical profile of the column. The concentration of potassium iodide, and thus the ionic strength, necessary for adequate image segmentation was also explored in separate experiments so that the influence of ionic strength on colloid deposition and mobilization can be studied.

  4. Revealing Three-Dimensional Structure of an Individual Colloidal Crystal Grain by Coherent X-Ray Diffractive Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabalin, A. G.; Meijer, J.-M.; Dronyak, R.; Yefanov, O. M.; Singer, A.; Kurta, R. P.; Lorenz, U.; Gorobtsov, O. Y.; Dzhigaev, D.; Kalbfleisch, S.; Gulden, J.; Zozulya, A. V.; Sprung, M.; Petukhov, A. V.; Vartanyants, I. A.

    2016-09-01

    We present results of a coherent x-ray diffractive imaging experiment performed on a single colloidal crystal grain. The full three-dimensional (3D) reciprocal space map measured by an azimuthal rotational scan contained several orders of Bragg reflections together with the coherent interference signal between them. Applying the iterative phase retrieval approach, the 3D structure of the crystal grain was reconstructed and positions of individual colloidal particles were resolved. As a result, an exact stacking sequence of hexagonal close-packed layers including planar and linear defects were identified.

  5. A full field, 3-D velocimeter for microgravity crystallization experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodkey, Robert S.; Russ, Keith M.

    1991-01-01

    The programming and algorithms needed for implementing a full-field, 3-D velocimeter for laminar flow systems and the appropriate hardware to fully implement this ultimate system are discussed. It appears that imaging using a synched pair of video cameras and digitizer boards with synched rails for camera motion will provide a viable solution to the laminar tracking problem. The algorithms given here are simple, which should speed processing. On a heavily loaded VAXstation 3100 the particle identification can take 15 to 30 seconds, with the tracking taking less than one second. It seeems reasonable to assume that four image pairs can thus be acquired and analyzed in under one minute.

  6. Boundary-Driven Colloidal Crystallization in Simple Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shereda, Laura T.; Larson, Ronald G.; Solomon, Michael J.

    2010-11-01

    Using confocal microscopy, we directly observe that simple shear flow induces transient crystallization of colloids by wall-normal propagation of crystallization fronts from each shearing surface. The initial rate of the front propagation was 1.75±0.07 colloidal layers per unit of applied strain. The rate slowed to 0.29±0.04 colloidal layers per unit of applied strain as the two fronts approached each other at the midplane. The retardation of the front propagation is caused by self-concentration of shear strain in the growing bands of the lower-viscosity crystal, an effect that leads to a progressive reduction of the shear rate in the remaining amorphous material. These findings differ significantly from previous hypotheses for flow-induced colloidal crystallization by homogeneous mechanisms.

  7. Contact-Free Templating of 3-D Colloidal Structures Using Spatially Nonuniform AC Electric Fields.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, Joshua; Wood, Jeffery A; Docoslis, Aristides

    2016-09-20

    The formation of ordered and regularly shaped structures of colloidal particles with the aid of spatially nonuniform electric fields is a modern research area of great interest. This work illustrates how alternating current (AC) electrokinetic effects (dielectrophoresis, electroosmosis) can serve as contact-free templates, inside which colloidal microspheres can assemble into a variety of shapes and sizes. We show how three-dimensional colloidal structures of square, circular, and diamond shape of many tens of micrometers in size can be reproducibly formed with a single set of quadrupolar microelectrodes. Numerical simulations performed help to explain the role of AC electroosmosis and AC dielectrophoresis on the shaping of these structures as a function of applied voltage and frequency. We also demonstrate how the templating repertoire is further enhanced with the simultaneous application of a second, individually controlled AC electric field, which enables a variety of asymmetric colloidal structures to be produced using the same set of quadrupolar microelectrodes. As the preservation of shape and size of such electric-field templated structures after medium evaporation still remains a big challenge, here we also report on a novel method that permits the stabilization and isolation of these particle assemblies through medium gelation and subsequent hydrogel removal with a UV/ozone treatment.

  8. Contact-Free Templating of 3-D Colloidal Structures Using Spatially Nonuniform AC Electric Fields.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, Joshua; Wood, Jeffery A; Docoslis, Aristides

    2016-09-20

    The formation of ordered and regularly shaped structures of colloidal particles with the aid of spatially nonuniform electric fields is a modern research area of great interest. This work illustrates how alternating current (AC) electrokinetic effects (dielectrophoresis, electroosmosis) can serve as contact-free templates, inside which colloidal microspheres can assemble into a variety of shapes and sizes. We show how three-dimensional colloidal structures of square, circular, and diamond shape of many tens of micrometers in size can be reproducibly formed with a single set of quadrupolar microelectrodes. Numerical simulations performed help to explain the role of AC electroosmosis and AC dielectrophoresis on the shaping of these structures as a function of applied voltage and frequency. We also demonstrate how the templating repertoire is further enhanced with the simultaneous application of a second, individually controlled AC electric field, which enables a variety of asymmetric colloidal structures to be produced using the same set of quadrupolar microelectrodes. As the preservation of shape and size of such electric-field templated structures after medium evaporation still remains a big challenge, here we also report on a novel method that permits the stabilization and isolation of these particle assemblies through medium gelation and subsequent hydrogel removal with a UV/ozone treatment. PMID:27541583

  9. Reentrant phase transitions from depletion: colloidal crystals to flocculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lang; Laderman, Bezia; Sacanna, Stefano; Chaikin, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Conventional depletion is supposed to be temperature independent. However, we find that many typical colloid-depletion systems show remarkable phenomena as temperature is varied. 1 μm polystyrene spheres in water are known to form colloidal crystals when PEO is added as a depletant. When this system is heated the crystal melts at a first critical temperature T1 ~ 60 C , and then at higher temperature T2 ~ 70 C the colloids flocculate. We argue that a weak temperature-dependent interaction between polymer and colloid is responsible for the observed phenomena: crystals form when the colloid-polymer interaction is repulsive, flocculation occurs when the interaction is attractive, and melting occurs in between when both phases are frustrated. The melted phase occurs due to an unexpected cancelation when combining both entropic and enthalpic attractions. We propose a simple statistical model to map out the observed transitions and fill the theoretical gap between the two established scenarios for colloid-polymer systems, namely depletion and flocculation. We have seen the same temperature dependent phenomena for TPM, PS and silica spheres with PEO and dextran as depletants. Our discovery provides a fundamental understanding of the polymer-colloid system and opens new possibilities for colloidal self-assembly and temperature-controlled viscoelastic materials.

  10. Fabrication of large binary colloidal crystals with a NaCl structure.

    PubMed

    Vermolen, E C M; Kuijk, A; Filion, L C; Hermes, M; Thijssen, J H J; Dijkstra, M; van Blaaderen, A

    2009-09-22

    Binary colloidal crystals offer great potential for tuning material properties for applications in, for example, photonics, semiconductors and spintronics, because they allow the positioning of particles with quite different characteristics on one lattice. For micrometer-sized colloids, it is believed that gravity and slow crystallization rates hinder the formation of high-quality binary crystals. Here, we present methods for growing binary colloidal crystals with a NaCl structure from relatively heavy, hard-sphere-like, micrometer-sized silica particles by exploring the following external fields: electric, gravitational, and dielectrophoretic fields and a structured surface (colloidal epitaxy). Our simulations show that the free-energy difference between the NaCl and NiAs structures, which differ in their stacking of the hexagonal planes of the larger spheres, is very small (approximately 0.002 k(B)T). However, we demonstrate that the fcc stacking of the large spheres, which is crucial for obtaining the pure NaCl structure, can be favored by using a combination of the above-mentioned external fields. In this way, we have successfully fabricated large, 3D, oriented single crystals having a NaCl structure without stacking disorder.

  11. Some implications of colloid stability theory for protein crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, C. C.; De Mattei, R. C.; Feigelson, R. S.; Tiller, W. A.

    1988-01-01

    Colloid stability theory has been applied to protein crystallization and predicts a narrow range of conditions under which crystals can be grown without the agglomeration of protein molecules (colloids) in the bulk solution. It also predicts a critical electrolyte concentration above which agglomeration will always occur. Using this theory, the rapid protein agglomeration occurring during Schlieren experiments as well as a terminal crystal size effect in a fixed container were explained. Following this concept, the supposed 'terminal' crystal size has been at least doubled.

  12. Micro-wires self-assembled and 3D-connected with the help of a nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Agha, H; Fleury, J-B; Galerne, Y

    2012-09-01

    We discuss a method for producing automatic 3D connections at right places between substrates in front of one another. The idea is based on the materialization of disclination lines working as templates. The lines are first created in the nematic liquid crystal (5CB) at the very place where microwires have to be synthesized. Due to their anchoring properties, colloids dispersed into the nematic phase produce orientational distortions around them. These distortions, which may be considered as due to topological charges, result in a nematic force, able to attract the colloids towards the disclinations. Ultimately, the particles get trapped onto them, forming micro- or nano-necklaces. Before being introduced in the nematic phase, the colloids are covered with an adhering and conducting polypyrrole film directly synthesized at the surface of the particles (heterogeneous polymerization). In this manner, the particles become conductive so that we may finally perform an electropolymerization of pyrrole monomers solved in 5CB, and definitely stick the whole necklace. The electric connection thus synthesized is analyzed by AFM, and its strength is checked by means of hydrodynamic tests. This wiring method could allow Moore's law to overcome the limitations that arise when down-sizing the electronic circuits to nanometer scale.

  13. 3-D Crystal Tectonics of Red Coral (Corallium Rubrum)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vielzeuf, D.; Garrabou, J.; Baronnet, A.; Grauby, O.; Marschal, C.

    2007-12-01

    A combination of analytical techniques (petrographic microscopy, SEM, TEM, and EMP) has been used to characterize the internal physico-chemical structure of the red coral (corallium rubrum) skeleton. A section normal to the skeleton axis shows an inner medullar zone with a bulbous-tip cross shape, surrounded by a large circular domain composed of concentric rings (width of each ring ca 150 microns). Growth rings are revealed by the cyclic variation of concentration of the organic matter (OM) and oscillations of the Mg/Ca ratio. Experiments carried out in natural environment show that the detected growth rings are annual. Thus, both oscillations of concentration of OM and Mg/Ca ratio can be used to determine the age of the red coral colonies, some of which can be as old as a few tens (or even a few hundreds) of years. Concentric ring are riddled and display a succession of wavelets (wavelength ca 300 microns). The internal structure of each wavelet is complex, both physically and chemically: it is formed by the accumulation of strata with locally tortuous interfaces due to the presence of micro protuberances (ca 30 microns). This interlocked structure confers an exceptional stiffness on the red coral skeleton. Interfaces between strata sometimes display sharp discontinuities indicating interruption of the mineralizing process. This fact has important consequences on the ability of the whole structure to register external forcings with accuracy. SEM and TEM studies show that each stratum is made of submicron crystalline units (ca 200 nm) organized or not in polycrystalline fibers or blades (ca 1 to 10 microns). Porosity can be observed at all scales between the various structural units. HRTEM studies show that in spite of displaying single crystal scattering behavior, the submicron crystalline units are made of 2-5 nm nanodomains with intercalated nanopores. We interpret the nanodomains as nanograins aggregated by a mechanism of oriented attachment. The red coral

  14. Towards true 3D textural analysis; using your crystal mush wisely.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerram, D. A.; Morgan, D. J.; Pankhurst, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The crystal cargo that is found in volcanic and plutonic rocks contains a wealth of information about magmatic mush processes, crystallisation history, crystal entrainment and recycling. Phenocryst populations predominantly record episodes of growth/nucleation and bulk geochemical changes within an evolving crystal-melt body. Ante- and xeno-crysts provide useful clues to the nature of mush interaction with wall rock and with principal magma(s). Furthermore, crystal evolutions (core to rim) record pathways through pressure, temperature and compositional space. These can often illustrate complex recycling within systems, describing the plumbing architecture. Understanding this architecture underpins our knowledge of how igneous systems can interact with the crust, grow, freeze, re-mobilise and prime for eruption. Initially, 2D studies produced corrected 3D crystal size distributions to help provide information about nucleation and residence times. It immediately became clear that crystal shape is an important factor in determining the confidence placed upon 3D reconstructions of 2D data. Additionally studies utilised serial sections of medium- to coarse-grain-size populations which allowed 3D reconstruction using modelling software to be improved, since size and shape etc. can be directly constrained. Finally the advent of textural studies using X-ray tomography has revolutionised the way in which we can inspect the crystal cargo in mushy systems, allowing us to image in great detail crystal packing arrangements, 3D CSDs, shapes and orientations etc. The latest most innovative studies use X-ray micro-computed tomography to rapidly characterise chemical populations within the crystal cargo, adding a further dimension to this approach, and implies the ability to untangle magmatic chemical components to better understand their individual and combined evolution. In this contribution key examples of the different types of textural analysis techniques in 2D and 3D

  15. Using depletion to control colloidal crystal assemblies of hard cuboctahedra.

    PubMed

    Karas, Andrew S; Glaser, Jens; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2016-06-21

    Depletion interactions arise from entropic forces, and their ability to induce aggregation and even ordering of colloidal particles through self-assembly is well established, especially for spherical colloids. We vary the size and concentration of penetrable hard sphere depletants in a system of cuboctahedra, and we show how depletion changes the preferential facet alignment of the colloids and thereby selects different crystal structures. Moreover, we explain the cuboctahedra phase behavior using perturbative free energy calculations. We find that cuboctahedra can form a stable simple cubic phase, and, remarkably, that the stability of this phase can be rationalized only by considering the effects of both the colloid and depletant entropy. We corroborate our results by analyzing how the depletant concentration and size affect the emergent directional entropic forces and hence the effective particle shape. We propose the use of depletants as a means of easily changing the effective shape of self-assembling anisotropic colloids. PMID:27194463

  16. Synthetic Strategies Toward DNA-Coated Colloids that Crystallize.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yufeng; Wang, Yu; Zheng, Xiaolong; Ducrot, Étienne; Lee, Myung-Goo; Yi, Gi-Ra; Weck, Marcus; Pine, David J

    2015-08-26

    We report on synthetic strategies to fabricate DNA-coated micrometer-sized colloids that, upon thermal annealing, self-assemble into various crystal structures. Colloids of a wide range of chemical compositions, including poly(styrene), poly(methyl methacrylate), titania, silica, and a silica-methacrylate hybrid material, are fabricated with smooth particle surfaces and a dense layer of surface functional anchors. Single-stranded oligonucleotides with a short sticky end are covalently grafted onto particle surfaces employing a strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition reaction resulting in DNA coatings with areal densities an order of magnitude higher than previously reported. Our approach allows the DNA-coated colloids not only to aggregate upon cooling but also to anneal and rearrange while still bound together, leading to the formation of colloidal crystal compounds when particles of different sizes or different materials are combined. PMID:26192470

  17. Synthetic Strategies Toward DNA-Coated Colloids that Crystallize.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yufeng; Wang, Yu; Zheng, Xiaolong; Ducrot, Étienne; Lee, Myung-Goo; Yi, Gi-Ra; Weck, Marcus; Pine, David J

    2015-08-26

    We report on synthetic strategies to fabricate DNA-coated micrometer-sized colloids that, upon thermal annealing, self-assemble into various crystal structures. Colloids of a wide range of chemical compositions, including poly(styrene), poly(methyl methacrylate), titania, silica, and a silica-methacrylate hybrid material, are fabricated with smooth particle surfaces and a dense layer of surface functional anchors. Single-stranded oligonucleotides with a short sticky end are covalently grafted onto particle surfaces employing a strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition reaction resulting in DNA coatings with areal densities an order of magnitude higher than previously reported. Our approach allows the DNA-coated colloids not only to aggregate upon cooling but also to anneal and rearrange while still bound together, leading to the formation of colloidal crystal compounds when particles of different sizes or different materials are combined.

  18. Multiple electrokinetic actuators for feedback control of colloidal crystal size.

    PubMed

    Juárez, Jaime J; Mathai, Pramod P; Liddle, J Alexander; Bevan, Michael A

    2012-10-21

    We report a feedback control method to precisely target the number of colloidal particles in quasi-2D ensembles and their subsequent assembly into crystals in a quadrupole electrode. Our approach relies on tracking the number of particles within a quadrupole electrode, which is used in a real-time feedback control algorithm to dynamically actuate competing electrokinetic transport mechanisms. Particles are removed from the quadrupole using DC-field mediated electrophoretic-electroosmotic transport, while high-frequency AC-field mediated dielectrophoretic transport is used to concentrate and assemble colloidal crystals. Our results show successful control of the size of crystals containing 20 to 250 colloidal particles with less than 10% error. Assembled crystals are characterized by their radius of gyration, crystallinity, and number of edge particles, and demonstrate the expected size-dependent properties. Our findings demonstrate successful ensemble feedback control of the assembly of different sized colloidal crystals using multiple actuators, which has broad implications for control over nano- and micro- scale assembly processes involving colloidal components.

  19. Crystal-Templated Colloidal Clusters Exhibit Directional DNA Interactions.

    PubMed

    McGinley, James T; Wang, Yifan; Jenkins, Ian C; Sinno, Talid; Crocker, John C

    2015-11-24

    Spherical colloids covered with grafted DNA have been used in the directed self-assembly of a number of distinct crystal and gel structures. Simulation suggests that the use of anisotropic building blocks greatly augments the variety of potential colloidal assemblies that can be formed. Here, we form five distinct symmetries of colloidal clusters from DNA-functionalized spheres using a single type of colloidal crystal as a template. The crystals are formed by simple sedimentation of a binary mixture containing a majority "host" species that forms close-packed crystals with the minority "impurity" species occupying substitutional or interstitial defect sites. After the DNA strands between the two species are hybridized and enzymatically ligated, the results are colloidal clusters, one for each impurity particle, with a symmetry determined by the nearest neighbors in the original crystal template. By adjusting the size ratio of the two spheres and the timing of the ligation, we are able to generate clusters having the symmetry of tetrahedra, octahedra, cuboctahedra, triangular orthobicupola, and icosahedra, which can be readily separated from defective clusters and leftover spheres by centrifugation. We further demonstrate that these clusters, which are uniformly covered in DNA strands, display directional binding with spheres bearing complementary DNA strands, acting in a manner similar to patchy particles or proteins having multiple binding sites. The scalable nature of the fabrication process, along with the reprogrammability and directional nature of their resulting DNA interactions, makes these clusters suitable building blocks for use in further rounds of directed self-assembly.

  20. Colloid-in-Liquid Crystal Gels Formed via Spinodal Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Santanu Kumar; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    We report that colloid-in-liquid crystal (CLC) gels can be formed via a two-step process that involves spinodal decomposition of a dispersion of colloidal particles in an isotropic phase of mesogens followed by nucleation of nematic domains within the colloidal network defined by the spinodal process. This pathway contrasts to previously reported routes leading to the formation of CLC gels, which have involved entanglement of defects or exclusion of particles from growing nematic domains. The new route provides the basis of simple design rules that enable control of the microstructure and dynamic mechanical properties of the gels. PMID:24651134

  1. Patterning symmetry in the rational design of colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Romano, Flavio; Sciortino, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Colloidal particles have the right size to form ordered structures with periodicities comparable to the wavelength of visible light. The tantalizing colours of precious opals and the colour of some species of birds are examples of polycrystalline colloidal structures found in nature. Driven by the demands of several emergent technologies, efforts have been made to develop efficient, self-assembly-based methodologies for generating colloidal single crystals with well-defined morphologies. Somewhat unfortunately, these efforts are often frustrated by the formation of structures lacking long-range order. Here we show that the rational design of patch shape and symmetry can drive patchy colloids to crystallize in a single, selected morphology by structurally eliminating undesired polymorphs. We provide a proof of this concept through the numerical investigation of triblock Janus colloids. One particular choice of patch symmetry yields, via spontaneous crystallization, a pure tetrastack lattice, a structure with attractive photonic properties, whereas another one results in a colloidal clathrate-like structure, in both cases without any interfering polymorphs. PMID:22828635

  2. Gelled colloidal crystals as tunable optical filters for spectrophotometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugao, Yukihiro; Onda, Sachiko; Toyotama, Akiko; Takiguchi, Yoshihiro; Sawada, Tsutomu; Hara, Shigeo; Nishikawa, Suguru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-08-01

    We examined the performance of charged colloidal crystals immobilized in a polymer gel as tunable optical filters. The colloidal crystals of charged silica particles (particle diameter = 121 nm; particle concentration = 3.5 vol %; and Bragg wavelength λB = 630–720 nm) were produced by unidirectional crystallization under a temperature gradient. Photocurable gelation reagents were dissolved in the sample beforehand; this enabled gel immobilization of the crystals under ultraviolet illumination. The crystals had dimensions of more than 25 mm2 in area and 1 mm in thickness, and spatial λB variations of less than 1%. Upon mechanical compression, λB values shifted linearly and reversibly over almost the entire visible spectrum. Using the gelled crystals as tunable optical filters, we measured the transmittance spectra of various samples and found them to be in close agreement with those determined using a spectrophotometer equipped with optical gratings.

  3. Gelled colloidal crystals as tunable optical filters for spectrophotometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugao, Yukihiro; Onda, Sachiko; Toyotama, Akiko; Takiguchi, Yoshihiro; Sawada, Tsutomu; Hara, Shigeo; Nishikawa, Suguru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-08-01

    We examined the performance of charged colloidal crystals immobilized in a polymer gel as tunable optical filters. The colloidal crystals of charged silica particles (particle diameter = 121 nm; particle concentration = 3.5 vol %; and Bragg wavelength λB = 630-720 nm) were produced by unidirectional crystallization under a temperature gradient. Photocurable gelation reagents were dissolved in the sample beforehand; this enabled gel immobilization of the crystals under ultraviolet illumination. The crystals had dimensions of more than 25 mm2 in area and 1 mm in thickness, and spatial λB variations of less than 1%. Upon mechanical compression, λB values shifted linearly and reversibly over almost the entire visible spectrum. Using the gelled crystals as tunable optical filters, we measured the transmittance spectra of various samples and found them to be in close agreement with those determined using a spectrophotometer equipped with optical gratings.

  4. Hotspot-engineered quasi-3D metallic network for surface-enhanced Raman scattering based on colloid monolayer templating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Wei; Liu, Long; Gu, Ping; Hu, Jingguo; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Fanxin; Wang, Zhenlin

    2016-09-01

    A hotspot-engineered quasi-3D metallic network with controllable nanogaps is purposed as a high-quality surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate, which is prepared by a combination of non-close-packed colloid monolayer templating and metal physical deposition. The significant SERS effect arises from a strongly enhanced local electric field originating from the ultra-small-gaps between neighboring metal-caps and tiny interstices and between the metal-caps and the metal-bumps on the base, which is recognized by the numerical simulation. A remarkable average SERS enhancement factor of up to 1.5 × 108 and a SERS intensity relative standard deviation (RSD) of 10.5% are achieved by optimizing the nanogap size to sub-10 nm scale, leading to an excellent capability for Raman detection, which is represented by the clearly identified SERS signal of the Rhodamine 6G solution with a fairly low concentration of 1 nM.

  5. The formation of Colloidal 2D/3D MoS2 Nanostructures in Organic Liquid Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durgun, Engin; Sen, H. Sener; Oztas, Tugba; Ortac, Bulend

    2015-03-01

    2D MoS2 nanosheets (2D MoS2 NS) and fullerene-like MoS2 nanostructures (3D MoS2 NS) with varying sizes are synthesized by nanosecond laser ablation of hexagonal crystalline 2H-MoS2 powder in methanol. Structural, chemical, and optical properties of MoS2 NS are characterized by optical microscopy, SEM, TEM, XRD, Raman and UV/VIS/NIR absorption spectroscopy techniques. Results of structural analysis show that the obtained MoS2 NS mainly present layered morphology from micron to nanometer surface area. Detailed analysis of the product also proves the existence of inorganic polyhedral fullerene-like 3D MoS2 NS generated by pulsed laser ablation in methanol. The possible factors which may lead to formation of both 2D and 3D MoS2 NS in methanol are examined by ab initio calculations and shown that it is correlated with vacancy formation. The hexagonal crystalline structure of MoS2 NS was determined by XRD analysis. The colloidal MoS2 NS solution presents broadband absorption edge tailoring from UV region to NIR region. Investigations of MoS2 NS show that the one step physical process of pulsed laser ablation-bulk MoS2 powder interaction in organic solution opens doors to the formation of ``two scales'' micron- and nanometer-sized layered and fullerene-like morphology MoS2 structures. This work was partially supported by TUBITAK under the Project No. 113T050 and Bilim Akademisi - The Science Academy, Turkey under the BAGEP program.

  6. Bottom-Up Colloidal Crystal Assembly with a Twist.

    PubMed

    Mahynski, Nathan A; Rovigatti, Lorenzo; Likos, Christos N; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z

    2016-05-24

    Globally ordered colloidal crystal lattices have broad utility in a wide range of optical and catalytic devices, for example, as photonic band gap materials. However, the self-assembly of stereospecific structures is often confounded by polymorphism. Small free-energy differences often characterize ensembles of different structures, making it difficult to produce a single morphology at will. Current techniques to handle this problem adopt one of two approaches: that of the "top-down" or "bottom-up" methodology, whereby structures are engineered starting from the largest or smallest relevant length scales, respectively. However, recently, a third approach for directing high fidelity assembly of colloidal crystals has been suggested which relies on the introduction of polymer cosolutes into the crystal phase [Mahynski, N.; Panagiotopoulos, A. Z.; Meng, D.; Kumar, S. K. Nat. Commun. 2014, 5, 4472]. By tuning the polymer's morphology to interact uniquely with the void symmetry of a single desired crystal, the entropy loss associated with polymer confinement has been shown to strongly bias the formation of that phase. However, previously, this approach has only been demonstrated in the limiting case of close-packed crystals. Here, we show how this approach may be generalized and extended to complex open crystals, illustrating the utility of this "structure-directing agent" paradigm in engineering the nanoscale structure of ordered colloidal materials. The high degree of transferability of this paradigm's basic principles between relatively simple crystals and more complex ones suggests that this represents a valuable addition to presently known self-assembly techniques.

  7. Quantitative Characterization of Mechanical Property of Annealed Monolayer Colloidal Crystal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijing; Wang, Weiqi; Zheng, Lu; Wang, Xiuyu; Yan, Qingfeng

    2016-01-19

    Quantitative characterization of the mechanical properties of a polystyrene (PS) monolayer colloidal crystal (MCC) annealed with solvent vapor has been performed for the first time by means of atomic force microscopy nanoindentation. The results showed that both the compressive and bending elastic modulus of PS MCC increased with the prolongation of annealing time from initial to 13 min. When the annealing time reached 15 min or even more, the PS MCC almost deformed to a planar film, and the elastic modulus of the PS MCC presented a drastic increase. These results provide a basis for tailoring the mechanical properties of a polymer colloidal monolayer via solvent vapor annealing. Such self-supported and high-mechanical-strength colloidal monolayers can be transferred to other surfaces for potential and promising applications in the bottom-up fabrication of highly ordered nanostructured materials such as nano dot arrays, photonic crystals, and many others.

  8. Quantitative Characterization of Mechanical Property of Annealed Monolayer Colloidal Crystal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijing; Wang, Weiqi; Zheng, Lu; Wang, Xiuyu; Yan, Qingfeng

    2016-01-19

    Quantitative characterization of the mechanical properties of a polystyrene (PS) monolayer colloidal crystal (MCC) annealed with solvent vapor has been performed for the first time by means of atomic force microscopy nanoindentation. The results showed that both the compressive and bending elastic modulus of PS MCC increased with the prolongation of annealing time from initial to 13 min. When the annealing time reached 15 min or even more, the PS MCC almost deformed to a planar film, and the elastic modulus of the PS MCC presented a drastic increase. These results provide a basis for tailoring the mechanical properties of a polymer colloidal monolayer via solvent vapor annealing. Such self-supported and high-mechanical-strength colloidal monolayers can be transferred to other surfaces for potential and promising applications in the bottom-up fabrication of highly ordered nanostructured materials such as nano dot arrays, photonic crystals, and many others. PMID:26700374

  9. CMOS compatible fabrication of 3D photonic crystals by nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibelhuber, M.; Uhrmann, T.; Glinsner, T.

    2015-03-01

    Nanoimprinting techniques are an attractive solution for next generation lithography methods for several areas including photonic devices. A variety of potential applications have been demonstrated using nanoimprint lithography (NIL) (e.g. SAW devices, vias and contact layers with dual damascene imprinting process, Bragg structures, patterned media) [1,2]. Nanoimprint lithography is considered for bridging the gap from R and D to high volume manufacturing. In addition, it is capable to adapt to the needs of the fragmented and less standardized photonic market easily. In this work UV-NIL has been selected for the fabrication process of 3D-photonic crystals. It has been shown that UVNIL using a multiple layer approach is well suited to fabricate a 3D woodpile photonic crystal. The necessary alignment accuracies below 100nm were achieved using a simple optical method. In order to obtain sufficient alignment of the stacks to each other, a two stage alignment process is performed: at first proximity alignment is done followed by the Moiré alignment in soft contact with the substrate. Multiple steps of imprinting, etching, Si deposition and chemical mechanical polishing were implemented to create high quality 3D photonic crystals with up to 5 layers. This work has proven the applicability of nanoimprint lithography in a CMOS compatible process on 3D photonic crystals with alignment accuracy down to 100nm. Optimizing the processes will allow scaling up these structures on full wafers while still meeting the requirements of the designated devices.

  10. Three-dimensional nanoscopy of colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Harke, Benjamin; Ullal, Chaitanya K; Keller, Jan; Hell, Stefan W

    2008-05-01

    We demonstrate the direct three-dimensional imaging of densely packed colloidal nanostructures using stimulated emission depletion microscopy. A combination of two de-excitation patterns yields a resolution of 43 nm in the lateral and 125 nm in the axial direction and an effective focal volume that is by 126-fold smaller than that of a corresponding confocal microscope. The mapping of a model system of spheres organized by confined convective assembly unambiguously identified face-centered cubic, hexagonal close-packed, random hexagonal close-packed, and body-centered cubic structures.

  11. Rapid fabrication of large area binary polystyrene colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chun-Li; Yang, Rui-Xia; Yan, Wei-Guo; Zhao, Jian; Yang, Guang-Wu; Jia, Guo-Zhi

    2016-07-01

    Binary colloidal crystals (BCCs) possess great potentials in tuning material and optical properties. In this paper, the combination of interface transferred method and spin-coating method is used to fabricate BCCs with different patterns via controlling the size ratio of small (S) to large (L) colloidal spheres and the spin speeds. It is found that BCCs formed LS2, LS4 and LS6 by changing the size ratio. In addition, there are some new and complicated structures, such as LS12, Janus arrays, formed at the low spin speed. This simple assembly method has potential to allow for the creation of optical metmaterials and the plasmonic structures with chiral optical properties.

  12. Observation of nano-dewetting in colloidal crystal drying.

    PubMed

    Muldarisnur, Mulda; Marlow, Frank

    2014-08-11

    The drying of colloidal crystals is connected with a continuous shrinkage process. However, several minutes after starting the drying, the system seems to take a breath before it shrinks monotonously until its final state after about one day. This short period we call "v"-event because of the shape of the curve characterizing the lattice constant: a decrease followed by a counter-intuitive increase which ends after one hour. This event is found in time-dependent optical spectra. It is assigned to the start of a nano-dewetting process occurring at the colloidal particles.

  13. Liquid crystal materials and structures for image processing and 3D shape acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbat, K.; Garbat, P.; Jaroszewicz, L.

    2012-03-01

    The image processing supported by liquid crystals device has been used in numerous imaging applications, including polarization imaging, digital holography and programmable imaging. Liquid crystals have been extensively studied and are massively used in display and optical processing technology. We present here the main relevant parameters of liquid crystal for image processing and 3D shape acquisition and we compare the main liquid crystal options which can be used with their respective advantages. We propose here to compare performance of several types of liquid crystal materials: nematic mixtures with high and medium optical and dielectrical anisotropies and relatively low rotational viscosities nematic materials which may operate in TN mode in mono and dual frequency addressing systems.

  14. Hierarchical microstructures formed by bidisperse colloidal suspensions within colloid-in-liquid crystal gels.

    PubMed

    Diestra-Cruz, Heberth; Bukusoglu, Emre; Abbott, Nicholas L; Acevedo, Aldo

    2015-04-01

    Past studies have reported that colloids of a single size dispersed in the isotropic phase of a mesogenic solvent can form colloid-rich networks (and gels) upon thermal quenching of the system across the isotropic-nematic phase boundary of the mesogens. Herein we report the observation and characterization of complex hierarchical microstructures that form when bidisperse colloidal suspensions of nanoparticles (NPs; iron oxide with diameters of 188 ± 20 nm or poly(methyl methacrylate) with diameters of 150 ± 15 nm) and microparticles (MPs; polystyrene with diameters of 2.77 ± 0.20 μm) are dispersed in the isotropic phase of 4-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) and thermally quenched. Specifically, we document microstructuring that results from three sequential phase separation processes that occur at distinct temperatures during stepwise cooling of the ternary mixture from its miscibility region. The first phase transition demixes the system into coexisting MP-rich and NP-rich phases; the second promotes formation of a particle network within the MP-rich phase; and the third, which coincides with the isotropic-to-nematic phase transition of 5CB, produces a second colloidal network within the NP-rich phase. We quantified the dynamics of each demixing process by using optical microscopy and Fourier transform image analysis to establish that the phase transitions occur through (i) surface-directed spinodal decomposition, (ii) spinodal decomposition, and (iii) nucleation and growth, respectively. Significantly, the observed series of phase transitions leads to a hierarchical organization of cellular microstructures not observed in colloid-in-liquid crystal gels formed from monodisperse colloids. The results of this study suggest new routes to the synthesis of colloidal materials with hierarchical microstructures that combine large surface areas and organized porosity with potential applications in catalysis, separations, chemical sensing, or tissue engineering. PMID

  15. Hierarchical microstructures formed by bidisperse colloidal suspensions within colloid-in-liquid crystal gels.

    PubMed

    Diestra-Cruz, Heberth; Bukusoglu, Emre; Abbott, Nicholas L; Acevedo, Aldo

    2015-04-01

    Past studies have reported that colloids of a single size dispersed in the isotropic phase of a mesogenic solvent can form colloid-rich networks (and gels) upon thermal quenching of the system across the isotropic-nematic phase boundary of the mesogens. Herein we report the observation and characterization of complex hierarchical microstructures that form when bidisperse colloidal suspensions of nanoparticles (NPs; iron oxide with diameters of 188 ± 20 nm or poly(methyl methacrylate) with diameters of 150 ± 15 nm) and microparticles (MPs; polystyrene with diameters of 2.77 ± 0.20 μm) are dispersed in the isotropic phase of 4-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) and thermally quenched. Specifically, we document microstructuring that results from three sequential phase separation processes that occur at distinct temperatures during stepwise cooling of the ternary mixture from its miscibility region. The first phase transition demixes the system into coexisting MP-rich and NP-rich phases; the second promotes formation of a particle network within the MP-rich phase; and the third, which coincides with the isotropic-to-nematic phase transition of 5CB, produces a second colloidal network within the NP-rich phase. We quantified the dynamics of each demixing process by using optical microscopy and Fourier transform image analysis to establish that the phase transitions occur through (i) surface-directed spinodal decomposition, (ii) spinodal decomposition, and (iii) nucleation and growth, respectively. Significantly, the observed series of phase transitions leads to a hierarchical organization of cellular microstructures not observed in colloid-in-liquid crystal gels formed from monodisperse colloids. The results of this study suggest new routes to the synthesis of colloidal materials with hierarchical microstructures that combine large surface areas and organized porosity with potential applications in catalysis, separations, chemical sensing, or tissue engineering.

  16. Colloid-probe AFM studies of the interaction forces of proteins adsorbed on colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurvinder; Bremmell, Kristen E; Griesser, Hans J; Kingshott, Peter

    2015-04-28

    In recent years, colloid-probe AFM has been used to measure the direct interaction forces between colloidal particles of different size or surface functionality in aqueous media, as one can study different forces in symmerical systems (i.e., sphere-sphere geometry). The present study investigates the interaction between protein coatings on colloid probes and hydrophilic surfaces decorated with hexagonally close packed single particle layers that are either uncoated or coated with proteins. Controlled solvent evaporation from aqueous suspensions of colloidal particles (coated with or without lysozyme and albumin) produces single layers of close-packed colloidal crystals over large areas on a solid support. The measurements have been carried out in an aqueous medium at different salt concentrations and pH values. The results show changes in the interaction forces as the surface charge of the unmodified or modified particles, and ionic strength or pH of the solution is altered. At high ionic strength or pH, electrostatic interactions are screened, and a strong repulsive force at short separation below 5 nm dominates, suggesting structural changes in the absorbed protein layer on the particles. We also study the force of adhesion, which decreases with an increment in the salt concentration, and the interaction between two different proteins indicating a repulsive interaction on approach and adhesion on retraction. PMID:25758979

  17. Single particle 3D reconstruction for 2D crystal images of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Sebastian; Arheit, Marcel; Kowal, Julia; Zeng, Xiangyan; Stahlberg, Henning

    2014-03-01

    In cases where ultra-flat cryo-preparations of well-ordered two-dimensional (2D) crystals are available, electron crystallography is a powerful method for the determination of the high-resolution structures of membrane and soluble proteins. However, crystal unbending and Fourier-filtering methods in electron crystallography three-dimensional (3D) image processing are generally limited in their performance for 2D crystals that are badly ordered or non-flat. Here we present a single particle image processing approach, which is implemented as an extension of the 2D crystallographic pipeline realized in the 2dx software package, for the determination of high-resolution 3D structures of membrane proteins. The algorithm presented, addresses the low single-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 2D crystal images by exploiting neighborhood correlation between adjacent proteins in the 2D crystal. Compared with conventional single particle processing for randomly oriented particles, the computational costs are greatly reduced due to the crystal-induced limited search space, which allows a much finer search space compared to classical single particle processing. To reduce the considerable computational costs, our software features a hybrid parallelization scheme for multi-CPU clusters and computer with high-end graphic processing units (GPUs). We successfully apply the new refinement method to the structure of the potassium channel MloK1. The calculated 3D reconstruction shows more structural details and contains less noise than the map obtained by conventional Fourier-filtering based processing of the same 2D crystal images.

  18. Optical manipulation and imaging of assemblies of topological defects and colloids in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Rahul P.

    Liquid Crystals (LCs) have proven to be important for electro-optic device applications such as displays, spatial light modulators, non-mechanical beam-steerers, etc. Owing to their unique mechanical, electrical, and optical properties, they are also being explored for wide array of advanced technological applications such as biosensors, tunable lenses, distributed feedback lasers, muscle-like actuators, etc. The thesis explores LC media from the standpoint of controlling their elastic and optical properties by generating and manipulating assemblies of defects and colloidal particles. To achieve the goal of optically manipulating these configurations comprising defects and particles at microscale with an unprecedented control, and then to visualize the resultant molecular director patterns, requires development of powerful optical system. The thesis discusses design and implementation of such an integrated system capable of 3D holographic optical manipulation and multi-modal 3D imaging (in nonlinear optical modes like multiphoton fluorescence, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, etc.) and how they are used to extensively study a vast number of LC based systems. Understanding of LCs and topological defects go hand in hand. Appreciation of defects leads to their precise control, which in turn can lead to applications. The thesis describes discovery of optically generated stable, quasiparticle-like, localized defect structures in a LC cell, that we call "Torons". Torons enable twist of molecules in three dimensions and resemble both Skyrmion-like and Hopf fibration features. Under different conditions of generation, we optically realize an intriguing variety of novel solitonic defect structures comprising rather complicated configurations of point and line topological defects. Introducing colloidal particles to LC systems imparts to these hybrid material system a fascinating degree of richness of properties on account of colloidal assemblies supported by networks

  19. Microscopic spin Hamiltonian approaches for 3d8 and 3d2 ions in a trigonal crystal field - perturbation theory methods versus complete diagonalization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudowicz, Czeslaw; Yeung, Yau-yuen; Yang, Zi-Yuan; Qin, Jian

    2002-06-01

    In this paper, we critically review the existing microscopic spin Hamiltonian (MSH) approaches, namely the complete diagonalization method (CDM) and the perturbation theory method (PTM), for 3d8(3d2) ions in a trigonal (C3v, D3, D3d) symmetry crystal field (CF). A new CDM is presented and a CFA/MSH computer package based on our crystal-field analysis (CFA) package for 3dN ions is developed for numerical calculations. Our method takes into account the contribution to the SH parameters (D, g∥ and g⊥) from all 45 CF states for 3d8(3d2) ions and is based on the complete diagonalization of the Hamiltonian including the electrostatic interactions, the CF terms (in the intermediate CF scheme) and the spin-orbit coupling. The CFA/MSH package enables us to study not only the CF energy levels and wavefunctions but also the SH parameters as functions of the CF parameters (B20, B40 and B43 or alternatively Dq, v and v') for 3d8(3d2) ions in trigonal symmetry. Extensive comparative studies of other MSH approaches are carried out using the CFA/MSH package. First, we check the accuracy of the approximate PTM based on the `quasi-fourth-order' perturbation formulae developed by Petrosyan and Mirzakhanyan (PM). The present investigations indicate that the PM formulae for the g-factors (g∥ and g⊥) indeed work well, especially for the cases of small v and v' and large Dq, whereas the PM formula for the zero-field splitting (ZFS) exhibits serious shortcomings. Earlier criticism of the PM approach by Zhou et al (Zhou K W, Zhao S B, Wu P F and Xie J K 1990 Phys. Status Solidi b 162 193) is then revisited. Second, we carry out an extensive comparison of the results of the present CFA/MSH package and those of other CDMs based on the strong- and weak-CF schemes. The CF energy levels and the SH parameters for 3d2 and 3d8 ions at C3v symmetry sites in several crystals are calculated and analysed. Our investigations reveal serious inconsistencies in the CDM results of Zhou et al and Li

  20. Observation and tuning of hypersonic bandgaps in colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Wang, Jianjun; Jonas, Ulrich; Fytas, George; Stefanou, Nikolaos

    2006-10-01

    Composite materials with periodic variations of density and/or sound velocities, so-called phononic crystals, can exhibit bandgaps where propagation of acoustic waves is forbidden. Phononic crystals are the elastic analogue of the well-established photonic crystals and show potential for manipulating the flow of elastic energy. So far, the experimental realization of phononic crystals has been restricted to macroscopic systems with sonic or ultrasonic bandgaps in the sub-MHz frequency range. In this work, using high-resolution Brillouin spectroscopy we report the first observation of a hypersonic bandgap in face-centred-cubic colloidal crystals formed by self-assembly of polystyrene nanoparticles with subsequent fluid infiltration. Depending on the particle size and the sound velocity in the infiltrated fluid, the frequency and the width of the gap can be tuned. Promising technological applications of hypersonic crystals, ranging from tunable filters and heat management to acousto-optical devices, are anticipated.

  1. Switching plastic crystals of colloidal rods with electric fields

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bing; Besseling, Thijs H.; Hermes, Michiel; Demirörs, Ahmet F.; Imhof, Arnout; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2014-01-01

    When a crystal melts into a liquid both long-ranged positional and orientational order are lost, and long-time translational and rotational self-diffusion appear. Sometimes, these properties do not change at once, but in stages, allowing states of matter such as liquid crystals or plastic crystals with unique combinations of properties. Plastic crystals/glasses are characterized by long-ranged positional order/frozen-in-disorder but short-ranged orientational order, which is dynamic. Here we show by quantitative three-dimensional studies that charged rod-like colloidal particles form three-dimensional plastic crystals and glasses if their repulsions extend significantly beyond their length. These plastic phases can be reversibly switched to full crystals by an electric field. These new phases provide insight into the role of rotations in phase behaviour and could be useful for photonic applications. PMID:24446033

  2. Particulate mobility in vertical deposition of attractive monolayer colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kwan Wee; Koh, Yaw Koon; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Wong, Chee Cheong

    2010-05-18

    In the colloidal self-assembly of charged particles on surfaces with opposite polarity, disorder often dominates. In this report, we show that ionic strength, volume fraction, and solvent evaporation temperature can be optimized in the vertical deposition method to yield hexagonal close-packed monolayer arrays with positively charged colloids on negatively charged bare glass. We further extend our study to form well-defined binary two-dimensional superlattices with oppositely charged monolayers grown layer-by-layer. Our results suggest that the lack of particulate mobility in oppositely charged systems is the main cause of disorder, and maximum mobility is attained when all three growth parameters are finely adjusted to increase the time scale for the particles to stabilize and order during crystal growth in these attractive systems. A clear understanding and control of the collective behavior of highly mobile colloids could lead to the creation of greater diversity of nanoarchitectures.

  3. Crystallization kinetics of binary colloidal monolayers.

    PubMed

    Pham, An T; Seto, Ryohei; Schönke, Johannes; Joh, Daniel Y; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Fried, Eliot; Yellen, Benjamin B

    2016-10-01

    Experiments and simulations are used to study the kinetics of crystal growth in a mixture of magnetic and nonmagnetic particles suspended in ferrofluid. The growth process is quantified using both a bond order parameter and a mean domain size parameter. The largest single crystals obtained in experiments consist of approximately 1000 particles and form if the area fraction is held between 65-70% and the field strength is kept in the range of 8.5-10.5 Oe. Simulations indicate that much larger single crystals containing as many as 5000 particles can be obtained under impurity-free conditions within a few hours. If our simulations are modified to include impurity concentrations as small as 1-2%, then the results agree quantitatively with the experiments. These findings provide an important step toward developing strategies for growing single crystals that are large enough to enable follow-on investigations across many subdisciplines in condensed matter physics. PMID:27477956

  4. Anomalous Fluorescence Enhancement from Double Heterostructure 3D Colloidal Photonic Crystals–A Multifunctional Fluorescence-Based Sensor Platform

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhari, Ehsan; Li, Xiang; Kim, Tak H.; Gan, Zongsong; Cole, Ivan S.; Zhao, Dongyuan; Kielpinski, Dave; Gu, Min; Li, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Augmenting fluorescence intensity is of vital importance to the development of chemical and biochemical sensing, imaging and miniature light sources. Here we report an unprecedented fluorescence enhancement with a novel architecture of multilayer three-dimensional colloidal photonic crystals self-assembled from polystyrene spheres. The new technique uses a double heterostructure, which comprises a top and a bottom layer with a periodicity overlapping the excitation wavelength (E) of the emitters, and a middle layer with a periodicity matching the fluorescence wavelength (F) and a thickness that supports constructive interference for the excitation wavelength. This E-F-E double heterostructure displays direction-dependent light trapping for both excitation and fluorescence, coupling the modes of photonic crystal with multiple-beam interference. The E-F-E double heterostructure renders an additional 5-fold enhancement to the extraordinary FL amplification of Rhodamine B in monolithic E CPhCs, and 4.3-fold acceleration of emission dynamics. Such a self-assembled double heterostructue CPhCs may find significant applications in illumination, laser, chemical/biochemical sensing, and solar energy harvesting. We further demonstrate the multi-functionality of the E-F-E double heterostructure CPhCs in Hg (II) sensing. PMID:26400503

  5. 3D equilibrium crystal shapes in the new light of STM and AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonzel, H. P.

    2003-10-01

    A systematic study of 3D equilibrium crystal shapes (ECS) can yield important surface energetic quantities, such as step, kink, surface and step-step interaction free energies. Observations of the ECS, especially of flat facets and adjacent vicinal regions, will provide primarily relative step and surface free energies. An advanced goal is to determine absolute step free energies, kink formation and step interaction energies. Absolute values of these energies are important in governing crystal growth morphologies, high temperature phase changes and kinetic processes associated with shape changes. Furthermore, absolute step and kink energies are the key to absolute surface free energies of well defined low-index orientations. We review new experiments where sections of the ECS are monitored as a function of temperature to extract characteristic morphological parameters, yielding absolute surface energetic quantities. Attention will be paid to the question of attaining true 3D equilibrium of an ensemble of crystallites. The special role of scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopies will be stressed. New ways of overcoming the problem of the activation barrier for facet growth (or shrinkage) through the study of dislocated crystallites will be demonstrated. In the general context of 3D crystallites, the study of 2D nano-crystals, in the form of adatom or vacancy islands on extended flat surfaces, will be discussed. In particular, the connection between the temperature dependent shape of 2D islands and the absolute step and kink formation energies of the bounding steps, complementary to facet shape changes of 3D crystallites, has emerged as an important topic of recent research. Finally, high temperature phase changes, such as surface roughening and surface melting, as they have been observed by scanning electron microscopy on 3D crystallites, will be briefly reviewed.

  6. Classical growth of hard-sphere colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerson, Bruce J.; Schätzel, Klaus

    1995-12-01

    The classical theory of nucleation and growth of crystals is examined for concentrated suspensions of hard-sphere colloidal particles. The work of Russel is modified, extended, and evaluated, explicitly. Specifically, the Wilson-Frenkel growth law is modified to include the Gibbs-Thomson effect and is evaluated numerically. The results demonstrate that there is a critical nucleus radius below which crystal nuclei will not grow. A kinetic coefficient determines the maximum growth velocity possible. For large values of this coefficient, quenches to densities above the melting density show interface limited growth with the crystal radius increasing linearly with time. For quenches into the coexistence region the growth is diffusion limited, with the crystal radius increasing as the square root of elapsed time. Smaller values of the kinetic coefficient produce long lived transients which evidence quasi-power-law growth behavior with exponents between one half and unity. The smaller kinetic coefficients also lead to larger crystal compression. Crystal compression and nonclassical exponents have been observed in recent experiments. The theory is compared to data from small angle scattering studies of nucleation and growth in suspensions of hard colloidal spheres. The experimental nucleation rate is much larger than the theoretically predicted value as the freezing point is approached but shows better agreement near the melting point. The crystal growth with time is described reasonably well by the theory and suggests that the experiments are observing long lived transient rather than asymptotic growth behavior. (c) 1995 The American Physical Society

  7. Locally stable diamond colloidal crystal formed in a cholesteric liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Mackay, F E; Denniston, C

    2014-07-01

    We use a Landau de Gennes free energy approach to model a diamond colloidal crystal immersed in a cholesteric liquid crystal. The pitch in our cholesteric is chosen in order to give rise to the most energetically favourable colloid-defect structure, commensurate with the diamond lattice. This structure corresponds to defect lines travelling along symmetry axes in the diamond crystal. By adding noise to the liquid crystal phase we are able to measure the phonon spectrum of our colloidal crystal, which we find to be consistent with a locally stable configuration. Therefore, although it may not correspond to the global minimum energy structure, once formed our diamond lattice should be stable against thermal fluctuations.

  8. Differences in crystal habitus of natural and synthetic colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieczorek, Arkadiusz K.; Händel, Matthias; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2014-05-01

    The formation of colloids from natural aqueous solutions is influenced by a multitude of biogeochemical and physicochemical processes and the presence of a large diversity of geogen and biogen, inorganic and organic solution phase components. A thereby frequently neglected class of components is the dissolved and colloidal phase organic matter (DOM). As DOM will interact with other solution phase components, we hypothesize that nanosized and colloidal particles formed in DOM bearing solutions may differ from synthetic precipitates either by size, shape, crystal habitus, crystallinity, composition or combinations of that. To investigate this, we analyzed natural colloidal particles collected from a limestone aquifer of the Upper Muschelkalk formation at Hainich National Park, Thuringia, Germany. Major groundwater components are Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, SO42-, Cl-, HCO3- , and about 1 ppm of total organic carbon (TOC) in dissolved and colloidal form. Synthetic nanoparticles were precipitated from a series of oversaturated solutions containing single or mixtures of the following salts CaSO4, MgSO4, Ca(HCO3)2 NaCl typical for limestone environments. The solutions were produced with both natural groundwater and pure water (milli-Q). Droplets of such produced colloidal suspension were pipetted on silicon wafers and subject to air drying. The wafers were then analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We found that particles from oversaturated CaSO4 solution in pure water precipitate as large needle shaped crystals, whereas precipitates from CaSO4 solution in natural water were much smaller and showed a rosette like shape - similar in size and shape to gypsum crystals collected from the limestone formation water. Similar differences we found for other aqueous solution compositions. From this pilot study we presume that even minute amounts of dissolved and colloidal phase organic matter in

  9. Fabrication of colloidal photonic crystal heterostructures free of interface imperfection based on solvent vapor annealing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaomiao; Zhao, Duobiao; Geng, Chong; Zhang, Lijing; Tan, Tianya; Hu, Mingzhe; Yan, Qingfeng

    2014-11-15

    We describe the transformation of a colloidal photonic crystal into a photonic crystal heterostructure. It was achieved by annealing a polystyrene multilayer colloidal photonic crystal partially immersed in water using a solvent vapor. The floating polystyrene colloidal photonic crystal was divided into two parts by the liquid level, which can be manipulated by the addition of ethanol into the water. The top part protruding out of the water experienced a uniform lattice stretching upon exposure to the solvent vapor. The bottom part that stayed immersed in the water remained unaffected due to the protection by the water. The inconsistent behaviors of the two parts resulted in the formation of a colloidal photonic crystal heterostructure. Such a heterostructure was free of interface imperfection since it was a direct descendant of the original colloidal crystal. Meanwhile, optical measurements demonstrated the presence of a wider photonic band gap along the crystallographic [111] direction in these photonic crystal heterostructures compared with the original colloidal photonic crystals.

  10. Bottom-Up Colloidal Crystal Assembly with a Twist

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Globally ordered colloidal crystal lattices have broad utility in a wide range of optical and catalytic devices, for example, as photonic band gap materials. However, the self-assembly of stereospecific structures is often confounded by polymorphism. Small free-energy differences often characterize ensembles of different structures, making it difficult to produce a single morphology at will. Current techniques to handle this problem adopt one of two approaches: that of the “top-down” or “bottom-up” methodology, whereby structures are engineered starting from the largest or smallest relevant length scales, respectively. However, recently, a third approach for directing high fidelity assembly of colloidal crystals has been suggested which relies on the introduction of polymer cosolutes into the crystal phase [Mahynski, N.; Panagiotopoulos, A. Z.; Meng, D.; Kumar, S. K. Nat. Commun.2014, 5, 4472]. By tuning the polymer’s morphology to interact uniquely with the void symmetry of a single desired crystal, the entropy loss associated with polymer confinement has been shown to strongly bias the formation of that phase. However, previously, this approach has only been demonstrated in the limiting case of close-packed crystals. Here, we show how this approach may be generalized and extended to complex open crystals, illustrating the utility of this “structure-directing agent” paradigm in engineering the nanoscale structure of ordered colloidal materials. The high degree of transferability of this paradigm’s basic principles between relatively simple crystals and more complex ones suggests that this represents a valuable addition to presently known self-assembly techniques. PMID:27124487

  11. Inverse colloidal crystal membranes for hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vu, Anh T; Wang, Xinying; Wickramasinghe, S Ranil; Yu, Bing; Yuan, Hua; Cong, Hailin; Luo, Yongli; Tang, Jianguo

    2015-08-01

    Hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography has gained interest due to its excellent performance in the purification of humanized monoclonal antibodies. The membrane material used in hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography has typically been commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride. In this contribution, newly developed inverse colloidal crystal membranes that have uniform pores, high porosity and, therefore, high surface area for protein binding are used as hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography membranes for humanized monoclonal antibody immunoglobulin G purification. The capacity of the inverse colloidal crystal membranes developed here is up to ten times greater than commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride membranes with a similar pore size. This work highlights the importance of developing uniform pore size high porosity membranes in order to maximize the capacity of hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography.

  12. Deformation and failure of curved colloidal crystal shells

    PubMed Central

    Negri, Carlotta; Sellerio, Alessandro L.; Zapperi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Designing and controlling particle self-assembly into robust and reliable high-performance smart materials often involves crystalline ordering in curved spaces. Examples include carbon allotropes like graphene, synthetic materials such as colloidosomes, or biological systems like lipid membranes, solid domains on vesicles, or viral capsids. Despite the relevance of these structures, the irreversible deformation and failure of curved crystals is still mostly unexplored. Here, we report simulation results of the mechanical deformation of colloidal crystalline shells that illustrate the subtle role played by geometrically necessary topological defects in controlling plastic yielding and failure. We observe plastic deformation attributable to the migration and reorientation of grain boundary scars, a collective process assisted by the intermittent proliferation of disclination pairs or abrupt structural failure induced by crack nucleating at defects. Our results provide general guiding principles to optimize the structural and mechanical stability of curved colloidal crystals. PMID:26553975

  13. Dynamic arrest of nematic liquid-crystal colloid networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Lu; Hwang, Jeoung-Yeon; Kim, Chanjoong

    2013-10-01

    We report interesting self-assembly structures of nematic liquid-crystal colloid (NLCC) networks, which are arrested during cooling from the isotropic temperature to room temperature. The NLCC is composed of sterically stabilized colloidal particles and a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) with nematic-isotropic transition temperature (TNI) that is much higher than those of previously studied 4-Cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl and N-(4-Methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline. We find that the structure of NLCCs depends on TNI, cooling rates, and boundary conditions, varying from cellular network to hierarchical fern structures in different length scales. Our time-lapse study shows that the transition from the cellular network to the fern structure directly corresponds to the transition from a spinodal demixing to a nucleation-and-growth mechanism.

  14. Two-dimensional freezing criteria for crystallizing colloidal monolayers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziren; Alsayed, Ahmed M; Yodh, Arjun G; Han, Yilong

    2010-04-21

    Video microscopy was employed to explore crystallization of colloidal monolayers composed of diameter-tunable microgel spheres. Two-dimensional (2D) colloidal liquids were frozen homogenously into polycrystalline solids, and four 2D criteria for freezing were experimentally tested in thermal systems for the first time: the Hansen-Verlet freezing rule, the Lowen-Palberg-Simon dynamical freezing criterion, and two other rules based, respectively, on the split shoulder of the radial distribution function and on the distribution of the shape factor of Voronoi polygons. Importantly, these freezing criteria, usually applied in the context of single crystals, were demonstrated to apply to the formation of polycrystalline solids. At the freezing point, we also observed a peak in the fluctuations of the orientational order parameter and a percolation transition associated with caged particles. Speculation about these percolated clusters of caged particles casts light on solidification mechanisms and dynamic heterogeneity in freezing. PMID:20423183

  15. Two-dimensional freezing criteria for crystallizing colloidal monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ziren; Han Yilong; Alsayed, Ahmed M.

    2010-04-21

    Video microscopy was employed to explore crystallization of colloidal monolayers composed of diameter-tunable microgel spheres. Two-dimensional (2D) colloidal liquids were frozen homogenously into polycrystalline solids, and four 2D criteria for freezing were experimentally tested in thermal systems for the first time: the Hansen-Verlet freezing rule, the Loewen-Palberg-Simon dynamical freezing criterion, and two other rules based, respectively, on the split shoulder of the radial distribution function and on the distribution of the shape factor of Voronoi polygons. Importantly, these freezing criteria, usually applied in the context of single crystals, were demonstrated to apply to the formation of polycrystalline solids. At the freezing point, we also observed a peak in the fluctuations of the orientational order parameter and a percolation transition associated with caged particles. Speculation about these percolated clusters of caged particles casts light on solidification mechanisms and dynamic heterogeneity in freezing.

  16. Orientation-dependent impurity partitioning of colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Jun; Uda, Satoshi; Hu, Sumeng; Fujiwara, Kozo; Koizumi, Haruhiko

    2016-04-01

    Impurity partitioning during colloidal crystallization was investigated for grains with different orientations. Particles of various sizes were doped as impurities during the growth of colloidal polycrystals. The effective partition coefficient, keff, which is the impurity concentration in the solid (CS) divided by that in initial solution (CL), was measured for grains oriented in the [111] and [100] directions normal to the growth direction. The [111]-oriented grains were found to have a larger keff than [100]-oriented grains. This was analyzed by using the Thurmond and Struthers model. Though both [111]- and [100]-oriented grains were face centered cubic (fcc) structures, within several layers of crystals, the volume fraction of [111]-oriented grains was larger than that of [100]-oriented grains, yielding a larger driving force for nucleation, ΔGTr, and thus a larger equilibrium partition coefficient, k0, for [111]-oriented grains.

  17. Preparation of multilayered trimodal colloid crystals and binary inverse opals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianjun; Li, Qin; Knoll, Wolfgang; Jonas, Ulrich

    2006-12-13

    We report for the first time the preparation of multilayered trimodal colloid crystals (tCC) and their corresponding binary inverse opals (bIO), which present complex hierarchical structures that may have significant potential in photonics, phononics, separations, and catalysis, among others. A trimodal colloidal mixture of 465 nm polystyrene (PS), 84 nm poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and 6 nm silica particles in suspension was transferred onto a glass substrate and self-assembled into highly ordered trimodal crystal structures during vertical lifting deposition. Pyrolysis of the organic particles in the tCC resulted in silica bIO with interconnected meso- and macropores. Vis-NIR spectra of all structures were analyzed to reveal the internal architecture with each PS sphere correlating to 21-23 PMMA particles (a LI21-23 stoichiometry), which corresponded well with computer models.

  18. Deformation and failure of curved colloidal crystal shells.

    PubMed

    Negri, Carlotta; Sellerio, Alessandro L; Zapperi, Stefano; Miguel, M Carmen

    2015-11-24

    Designing and controlling particle self-assembly into robust and reliable high-performance smart materials often involves crystalline ordering in curved spaces. Examples include carbon allotropes like graphene, synthetic materials such as colloidosomes, or biological systems like lipid membranes, solid domains on vesicles, or viral capsids. Despite the relevance of these structures, the irreversible deformation and failure of curved crystals is still mostly unexplored. Here, we report simulation results of the mechanical deformation of colloidal crystalline shells that illustrate the subtle role played by geometrically necessary topological defects in controlling plastic yielding and failure. We observe plastic deformation attributable to the migration and reorientation of grain boundary scars, a collective process assisted by the intermittent proliferation of disclination pairs or abrupt structural failure induced by crack nucleating at defects. Our results provide general guiding principles to optimize the structural and mechanical stability of curved colloidal crystals. PMID:26553975

  19. Colloidal crystal formation: nano-dewetting and the assembly process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlow, Frank; Muldarisnur, Mulda

    2016-04-01

    Self-assembly of colloidal particles is a promising approach for fabrication of three-dimensional periodic structures which are especially interesting for photonic crystals. This approach is simple and cheap, but it still suffers under the existence of many intrinsic defects. The efforts to improve the self-assembly process have led to many deposition methods with a different degree of controllability. One of the best fabrication techniques is the capillary deposition method leading to non-scattered photon propagation in the order of 80 μm. To improve understanding of the selfassembly process we investigate the stages of the process separately. The most important stage is likely the deposition of suspended particles into a dense arrangement forming a crystal. This is studied spectroscopically. Another crucial stage is the drying of colloidal crystal which is connected with a continuous shrinkage process. Several minutes after starting the drying, a surprise occurs: The system expands shortly before it shrinks monotonously until reaching its final state after about one day. We called this "v"-event because of the characteristic shape of the curve for the Bragg peak. The event is assigned to the start of a nano-dewetting process occurring at the colloidal particles.

  20. Viewing zone duplication of multi-projection 3D display system using uniaxial crystal.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Kun; Park, Soon-Gi; Moon, Seokil; Lee, Byoungho

    2016-04-18

    We propose a novel multiplexing technique for increasing the viewing zone of a multi-view based multi-projection 3D display system by employing double refraction in uniaxial crystal. When linearly polarized images from projector pass through the uniaxial crystal, two possible optical paths exist according to the polarization states of image. Therefore, the optical paths of the image could be changed, and the viewing zone is shifted in a lateral direction. The polarization modulation of the image from a single projection unit enables us to generate two viewing zones at different positions. For realizing full-color images at each viewing zone, a polarization-based temporal multiplexing technique is adopted with a conventional polarization switching device of liquid crystal (LC) display. Through experiments, a prototype of a ten-view multi-projection 3D display system presenting full-colored view images is implemented by combining five laser scanning projectors, an optically clear calcite (CaCO3) crystal, and an LC polarization rotator. For each time sequence of temporal multiplexing, the luminance distribution of the proposed system is measured and analyzed.

  1. Optically induced melting of colloidal crystals and their recrystallization.

    PubMed

    Harada, Masashi; Ishii, Masahiko; Nakamura, Hiroshi

    2007-04-15

    Colloidal crystals melt by applying focused light of optical tweezers and recrystallize after removing it. The disturbed zone by the light grows radially from the focus point and the ordering starts from the interface with the crystal. Although the larger disturbed zone is observed for the higher power optical tweezers, a master curve is extracted by normalization of the disturbed zone. The temporal changes of the normalized disturbed zone are well described with exponential functions, indicating that the melting and recrystallization process is governed by a simple relaxation mechanism.

  2. Phonons in two-dimensional soft colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke; Still, Tim; Schoenholz, Samuel; Aptowicz, Kevin B.; Schindler, Michael; Maggs, A. C.; Liu, Andrea J.; Yodh, A. G.

    2013-08-01

    The vibrational modes of pristine and polycrystalline monolayer colloidal crystals composed of thermosensitive microgel particles are measured using video microscopy and covariance matrix analysis. At low frequencies, the Debye relation for two-dimensional harmonic crystals is observed in both crystal types; at higher frequencies, evidence for van Hove singularities in the phonon density of states is significantly smeared out by experimental noise and measurement statistics. The effects of these errors are analyzed using numerical simulations. We introduce methods to correct for these limitations, which can be applied to disordered systems as well as crystalline ones, and we show that application of the error correction procedure to the experimental data leads to more pronounced van Hove singularities in the pristine crystal. Finally, quasilocalized low-frequency modes in polycrystalline two-dimensional colloidal crystals are identified and demonstrated to correlate with structural defects such as dislocations, suggesting that quasilocalized low-frequency phonon modes may be used to identify local regions vulnerable to rearrangements in crystalline as well as amorphous solids.

  3. Preliminary 3-D site-scale studies of radioactive colloid transport in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moridis, G. J.; Hu, Q.; Wu, Y.-S.; Bodvarsson, G. S.

    2003-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is actively investigating the technical feasibility of permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a repository to be situated in the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. In this study we investigate, by means of numerical simulation, the transport of radioactive colloids under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table. The site hydrology and the effects of the spatial distribution of hydraulic and transport properties in the Yucca Mountain subsurface are considered. The study of migration and retardation of colloids accounts for the complex processes in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, and includes advection, diffusion, hydrodynamic dispersion, kinetic colloid filtration, colloid straining, and radioactive decay. The results of the study indicate that the most important factors affecting colloid transport are the subsurface geology and site hydrology, i.e., the presence of faults (they dominate and control transport), fractures (the main migration pathways), and the relative distribution of zeolitic and vitric tuffs. The transport of colloids is strongly influenced by their size (as it affects diffusion into the matrix, straining at hydrogeologic unit interfaces, and transport velocity) and by the parameters of the kinetic-filtration model used for the simulations. Arrival times at the water table decrease with an increasing colloid size because of smaller diffusion, increased straining, and higher transport velocities. The importance of diffusion as a retardation mechanism increases with a decreasing colloid size, but appears to be minimal in large colloids.

  4. Preliminary 3-D site-scale studies of radioactive colloid transport in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Moridis, G J; Hu, Q; Wu, Y-S; Bodvarsson, G S

    2003-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is actively investigating the technical feasibility of permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a repository to be situated in the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. In this study we investigate, by means of numerical simulation, the transport of radioactive colloids under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table. The site hydrology and the effects of the spatial distribution of hydraulic and transport properties in the Yucca Mountain subsurface are considered. The study of migration and retardation of colloids accounts for the complex processes in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, and includes advection, diffusion, hydrodynamic dispersion, kinetic colloid filtration, colloid straining, and radioactive decay. The results of the study indicate that the most important factors affecting colloid transport are the subsurface geology and site hydrology, i.e., the presence of faults (they dominate and control transport), fractures (the main migration pathways), and the relative distribution of zeolitic and vitric tuffs. The transport of colloids is strongly influenced by their size (as it affects diffusion into the matrix, straining at hydrogeologic unit interfaces, and transport velocity) and by the parameters of the kinetic-filtration model used for the simulations. Arrival times at the water table decrease with an increasing colloid size because of smaller diffusion, increased straining, and higher transport velocities. The importance of diffusion as a retardation mechanism increases with a decreasing colloid size, but appears to be minimal in large colloids. PMID:12504362

  5. DNA-guided crystallization of colloidal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Maye, Mathew M.; van der Lelie, Daniel; Gang, Oleg

    2008-01-01

    Many nanometre-sized building blocks will readily assemble into macroscopic structures. If the process is accompanied by effective control over the interactions between the blocks and all entropic effects, then the resultant structures will be ordered with a precision hard to achieve with other fabrication methods. But it remains challenging to use self-assembly to design systems comprised of different types of building blocks-to realize novel magnetic, plasmonic and photonic metamaterials, for example. A conceptually simple idea for overcoming this problem is the use of `encodable' interactions between building blocks; this can in principle be straightforwardly implemented using biomolecules. Strategies that use DNA programmability to control the placement of nanoparticles in one and two dimensions have indeed been demonstrated. However, our theoretical understanding of how to extend this approach to three dimensions is limited, and most experiments have yielded amorphous aggregates and only occasionally crystallites of close-packed micrometre-sized particles. Here, we report the formation of three-dimensional crystalline assemblies of gold nanoparticles mediated by interactions between complementary DNA molecules attached to the nanoparticles' surface. We find that the nanoparticle crystals form reversibly during heating and cooling cycles. Moreover, the body-centred-cubic lattice structure is temperature-tuneable and structurally open, with particles occupying only ~4% of the unit cell volume. We expect that our DNA-mediated crystallization approach, and the insight into DNA design requirements it has provided, will facilitate both the creation of new classes of ordered multicomponent metamaterials and the exploration of the phase behaviour of hybrid systems with addressable interactions.

  6. Bottom-up Fabrication of Multilayer Stacks of 3D Photonic Crystals from Titanium Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Kubrin, Roman; Pasquarelli, Robert M; Waleczek, Martin; Lee, Hooi Sing; Zierold, Robert; do Rosário, Jefferson J; Dyachenko, Pavel N; Montero Moreno, Josep M; Petrov, Alexander Yu; Janssen, Rolf; Eich, Manfred; Nielsch, Kornelius; Schneider, Gerold A

    2016-04-27

    A strategy for stacking multiple ceramic 3D photonic crystals is developed. Periodically structured porous films are produced by vertical convective self-assembly of polystyrene (PS) microspheres. After infiltration of the opaline templates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of titania and thermal decomposition of the polystyrene matrix, a ceramic 3D photonic crystal is formed. Further layers with different sizes of pores are deposited subsequently by repetition of the process. The influence of process parameters on morphology and photonic properties of double and triple stacks is systematically studied. Prolonged contact of amorphous titania films with warm water during self-assembly of the successive templates is found to result in exaggerated roughness of the surfaces re-exposed to ALD. Random scattering on rough internal surfaces disrupts ballistic transport of incident photons into deeper layers of the multistacks. Substantially smoother interfaces are obtained by calcination of the structure after each infiltration, which converts amorphous titania into the crystalline anatase before resuming the ALD infiltration. High quality triple stacks consisting of anatase inverse opals with different pore sizes are demonstrated for the first time. The elaborated fabrication method shows promise for various applications demanding broadband dielectric reflectors or titania photonic crystals with a long mean free path of photons. PMID:27045887

  7. Bottom-up Fabrication of Multilayer Stacks of 3D Photonic Crystals from Titanium Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Kubrin, Roman; Pasquarelli, Robert M; Waleczek, Martin; Lee, Hooi Sing; Zierold, Robert; do Rosário, Jefferson J; Dyachenko, Pavel N; Montero Moreno, Josep M; Petrov, Alexander Yu; Janssen, Rolf; Eich, Manfred; Nielsch, Kornelius; Schneider, Gerold A

    2016-04-27

    A strategy for stacking multiple ceramic 3D photonic crystals is developed. Periodically structured porous films are produced by vertical convective self-assembly of polystyrene (PS) microspheres. After infiltration of the opaline templates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of titania and thermal decomposition of the polystyrene matrix, a ceramic 3D photonic crystal is formed. Further layers with different sizes of pores are deposited subsequently by repetition of the process. The influence of process parameters on morphology and photonic properties of double and triple stacks is systematically studied. Prolonged contact of amorphous titania films with warm water during self-assembly of the successive templates is found to result in exaggerated roughness of the surfaces re-exposed to ALD. Random scattering on rough internal surfaces disrupts ballistic transport of incident photons into deeper layers of the multistacks. Substantially smoother interfaces are obtained by calcination of the structure after each infiltration, which converts amorphous titania into the crystalline anatase before resuming the ALD infiltration. High quality triple stacks consisting of anatase inverse opals with different pore sizes are demonstrated for the first time. The elaborated fabrication method shows promise for various applications demanding broadband dielectric reflectors or titania photonic crystals with a long mean free path of photons.

  8. Colloidal particles embedded in liquid crystal droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchert, Drew; Sadati, Monirosadat; Zhou, Ye; de Pablo, Juan J.

    In this work, we encapsulate polystyrene and silica particles in nematic liquid crystal (LC) droplets dispersed in water using microfluidic glass capillary devices. While polystyrene particles induce planar anchoring on the surface, silica particles, treated with DMOAP, create homeotropic anchoring of the LC molecules at their surface. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is added to the aqueous phase to stabilize LC droplets and promote a radial configuration with point defect in the center of LC droplet. Our experimental and computational studies show that, when trapped inside the LC droplets, particles with both anchoring types become mostly localized at the defect point (at the center) and interact with the radial configuration. Interestingly, a twisting structure is observed for polystyrene particle with strong planar anchoring. Although localization of the particles at the droplet center is the most stable state and with the lowest free energy, off-center positions also emerge, displacing the defect point from the center to near the surface of a radial droplet. - Corresponding author - Second affiliation: Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, USA.

  9. Dielectric Anisotropy of Gold Nanoparticle Colloids in Nematic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visco, Angelo; Foust, Jon; Mahmood, Rizwan

    We present electrical and optical studies of hexanethiol-treated gold nanoparticle (GNPs) colloids in 4-cyano-4 '-pentyl-biphenyl (5CB) liquid crystals. Preliminary data analysis suggests an unusual behavior of sudden drop and then rise in the dielectric anisotropy at a critical concentration of 0.0862% by wt. GNPs and a sudden rise and then drop in the nematic to isotropic transition temperature. Above the critical concentration the data level off to within the uncertainty of the experimental errors. This colloidal system will help us to understand the interaction and the effects of nanoparticles on the self-assembly of LC molecules and the manner in which these particles organize in LC. This study is important for further developments in nanotechnology, sharp and fast display panels, and within the medical field.

  10. Electron crystallography of ultrathin 3D protein crystals: atomic model with charges.

    PubMed

    Yonekura, Koji; Kato, Kazuyuki; Ogasawara, Mitsuo; Tomita, Masahiro; Toyoshima, Chikashi

    2015-03-17

    Membrane proteins and macromolecular complexes often yield crystals too small or too thin for even the modern synchrotron X-ray beam. Electron crystallography could provide a powerful means for structure determination with such undersized crystals, as protein atoms diffract electrons four to five orders of magnitude more strongly than they do X-rays. Furthermore, as electron crystallography yields Coulomb potential maps rather than electron density maps, it could provide a unique method to visualize the charged states of amino acid residues and metals. Here we describe an attempt to develop a methodology for electron crystallography of ultrathin (only a few layers thick) 3D protein crystals and present the Coulomb potential maps at 3.4-Å and 3.2-Å resolution, respectively, obtained from Ca(2+)-ATPase and catalase crystals. These maps demonstrate that it is indeed possible to build atomic models from such crystals and even to determine the charged states of amino acid residues in the Ca(2+)-binding sites of Ca(2+)-ATPase and that of the iron atom in the heme in catalase.

  11. Electron crystallography of ultrathin 3D protein crystals: Atomic model with charges

    PubMed Central

    Yonekura, Koji; Kato, Kazuyuki; Ogasawara, Mitsuo; Tomita, Masahiro; Toyoshima, Chikashi

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins and macromolecular complexes often yield crystals too small or too thin for even the modern synchrotron X-ray beam. Electron crystallography could provide a powerful means for structure determination with such undersized crystals, as protein atoms diffract electrons four to five orders of magnitude more strongly than they do X-rays. Furthermore, as electron crystallography yields Coulomb potential maps rather than electron density maps, it could provide a unique method to visualize the charged states of amino acid residues and metals. Here we describe an attempt to develop a methodology for electron crystallography of ultrathin (only a few layers thick) 3D protein crystals and present the Coulomb potential maps at 3.4-Å and 3.2-Å resolution, respectively, obtained from Ca2+-ATPase and catalase crystals. These maps demonstrate that it is indeed possible to build atomic models from such crystals and even to determine the charged states of amino acid residues in the Ca2+-binding sites of Ca2+-ATPase and that of the iron atom in the heme in catalase. PMID:25730881

  12. Review on Chalcogenide 3D Nano-structured Crystals: Synthesis and Growth Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) nano-structured crystals have received extensive attention for their superior properties over zero dimensional (0D), one dimensional (1D), or two dimensional (2D) nanomaterials in many areas. This review is generalized for the group of chalcogenide nanoflowers (NFs) by the synthetic techniques, such as solvothermal, wet chemical, sol-gel, surface oxidation, microwave, coating, electrochemical, and several other methods. The formation mechanism was also described for the purpose of opening up new food for thoughts to bring up new functionality of materials by tuning the morphology of crystals. The pH value or the template plays fundamental role in forming the nano-flowered structure. Moreover, the correlations between the surface area (SA), contact angle (CA), and the NFs are also discussed within the context. Here, we also discussed some patents relevant to the topic.

  13. Colloidal Crystal Growth Monitored By Bragg Diffraction Interference Fringes

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Justin J.; Tikhonov, Alexander; Asher, Sanford A.

    2010-01-01

    We monitor the crystal growth kinetics of crystallization of a shear melted crystalline colloidal array (CCA). The fcc CCA heterogeneously nucleates at the flow cell wall surface. We examined the evolution of the (111) Bragg diffraction peak, and, for the first time, quantitatively monitored growth by measuring the temporal evolution of the Bragg diffraction interference fringes. Modeling of the evolution of the fringe patterns exposes the time dependence of the increasing crystal thickness. The initial diffusion driven linear growth is followed by ripening-driven growth. Between 80 to 90 μM NaCl concentrations the fcc crystals first linearly grow at rates between 1.9 and 4.2 μm/sec until they contact homogeneously nucleated crystals in the bulk. At lower salt concentrations interference fringes are not visible because the strong electrostatic interactions between particles result in high activation barriers, preventing defect annealing and leading to a lower crystal quality. The fcc crystals melt to a liquid phase at >90 μM NaCl concentrations. Increasing NaCl concentrations slows the fcc CCA growth rate consistent with the expectation of the classical Wilson-Frenkel growth theory. The final thickness of wall nucleated CCA is determined by the competition between growth of heterogeneously and homogenously nucleated CCA and increases with higher NaCl concentrations. PMID:20542277

  14. Fabrication of 3D polymer photonic crystals for near-IR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Peng; Qiu, Liang; Shi, Shouyuan; Schneider, Garrett J.; Prather, Dennis W.; Sharkawy, Ahmed; Kelmelis, Eric

    2008-02-01

    Photonic crystals[1, 2] have stirred enormous research interest and became a growing enterprise in the last 15 years. Generally, PhCs consist of periodic structures that possess periodicity comparable with the wavelength that the PhCs are designed to modulate. If material and periodic pattern are properly selected, PhCs can be applied to many applications based on their unique properties, including photonic band gaps (PBG)[3], self-collimation[4], super prism[5], etc. Strictly speaking, PhCs need to possess periodicity in three dimensions to maximize their advantageous capabilities. However, many current research is based on scaled two-dimensional PhCs, mainly due to the difficulty of fabrication such three-dimensional PhCs. Many approaches have been explored for the fabrication of 3D photonic crystals, including layer-by-layer surface micromachining[6], glancing angle deposition[7], 3D micro-sculpture method[8], self-assembly[9] and lithographical methods[10-12]. Among them, lithographic methods became increasingly accepted due to low costs and precise control over the photonic crystal structure. There are three mostly developed lithographical methods, namely X-ray lithography[10], holographic lithography[11] and two-photon polymerization[12]. Although significant progress has been made in developing these lithography-based technologies, these approaches still suffer from significant disadvantages. X-ray lithography relies on an expensive radiation source. Holographic lithography lacks the flexibility to create engineered defects, and multi-photon polymerization is not suitable for parallel fabrication. In our previous work, we developed a multi-layer photolithography processes[13, 14] that is based on multiple resist application and enhanced absorption upon exposure. Using a negative lift-off resist (LOR) and 254nm DUV source, we have demonstrated fabrication of 3D arbitrary structures with feature size of several microns. However, severe intermixing problem

  15. Fluorescence enhancement by heterostructure colloidal photonic crystals with dual stopbands.

    PubMed

    Li, Heng; Wang, Jingxia; Liu, Feng; Song, Yanlin; Wang, Rongming

    2011-04-01

    In this work, we present a facile approach on the remarkable enhancement of fluorescent signal by heterostructure colloidal photonic crystals (PCs) with dual stopbands. The intensity of fluorescent medium on heterostructure PCs with dual stopbands overlapping the excitation wavelength and the emission wavelength of fluorescent medium can be up to 162-fold enhancement in comparison to that on the control sample. Otherwise, parameters of heterostructure PC films such as film thickness or stacking order have important effects on fluorescent signals. The method will be of great significance for developing the highly sensitive fluorescence-based detection.

  16. Defect structure around two colloids in a liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, O; Kim, E B; Grollau, S; Abbott, N L; de Pablo, J J

    2003-12-01

    This Letter investigates the defect structures that arise between two colloidal spheres immersed in a nematic liquid crystal. Molecular simulations and a dynamic field theory are employed to arrive at molecular-level and mesoscopic descriptions of the systems of interest. At large separations, each sphere is surrounded by a Saturn ring defect. However, at short separations both theory and simulation predict that a third disclination ring appears in between the spheres, in a plane normal to the Saturn rings. This feature gives rise to an effective binding of the particles. The structures predicted by field theory and molecular simulations are consistent with each other.

  17. Fabrication of TiO2 Colloidal Crystal Films and Characterization of Their Photocatalytic Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wei; Wang, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    We have studied hydrolysis of organic alkyltitanate compounds and optimized reaction condition for synthesis of monodisperse titania (TiO2 colloidal particles with controlled size from nanometer to submicron. The synthesized TiO2 colloidal particles were further surface-modified with hydrophobic silane coupling agent. With the monodisperse hydrophobic particles, we fabricated TiO2 colloidal crystal thin films through transferring self-assembled colloidal crystal monolayer from water surface onto solid substrates. The TiO2 colloidal crystal films exhibit enhanced interaction with visible light. Consequently, in comparison with plain TiO2 particle thin film, the thin film with colloidal crystal structure shows enhanced photocatalytic activity, as evaluated through photodegradation of organic dye methyl orange in solution under simulated solar light.

  18. Spontaneous liquid crystal and ferromagnetic ordering of colloidal magnetic nanoplates

    DOE PAGES

    Shuai, M.; Klittnick, A.; Shen, Y.; Smith, G. P.; Tuchband, M. R.; Zhu, C.; Petschek, R. G.; Mertelj, A.; Lisjak, D.; Čopič, M.; et al

    2016-01-28

    Ferrofluids are familiar as colloidal suspensions of ferromagnetic nanoparticles in aqueous or organic solvents. The dispersed particles are randomly oriented but their moments become aligned if a magnetic field is applied, producing a variety of exotic and useful magnetomechanical effects. A longstanding interest and challenge has been to make such suspensions macroscopically ferromagnetic, that is having uniform magnetic alignment in the absence of a field. Here we report a fluid suspension of magnetic nanoplates that spontaneously aligns into an equilibrium nematic liquid crystal phase that is also macroscopically ferromagnetic. We find Its zero-field magnetization produces distinctive magnetic self-interaction effects, includingmore » liquid crystal textures of fluid block domains arranged in closed flux loops, and makes this phase highly sensitive, with it dramatically changing shape even in the Earth’s magnetic field.« less

  19. Faceting and commensurability in crystal structures of colloidal thin films.

    PubMed

    Ramiro-Manzano, F; Meseguer, F; Bonet, E; Rodriguez, I

    2006-07-14

    This Letter investigates the influence of finite size effects on the particle arrangement of thin film colloidal crystals. A rich variety of crystallographic faceting with large single domain microcrystallites is shown. Optical reflectance experiments together with scanning electron microscopy permit the identification of the crystal symmetry and the facet orientation, as well as the exact number of monolayers. When the cell thickness is not commensurable with a high symmetry layering, particles arrange themselves in a periodic distribution of (111)- and (100)-orientated face centered cubic (fcc) microcrystallites separated by planar defects. These structures can be described as a fcc ordering orientated along a vicinal surface, modified by a periodic distribution of fcc (111) stacking faults.

  20. Spontaneous liquid crystal and ferromagnetic ordering of colloidal magnetic nanoplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuai, M.; Klittnick, A.; Shen, Y.; Smith, G. P.; Tuchband, M. R.; Zhu, C.; Petschek, R. G.; Mertelj, A.; Lisjak, D.; Čopič, M.; Maclennan, J. E.; Glaser, M. A.; Clark, N. A.

    2016-01-01

    Ferrofluids are familiar as colloidal suspensions of ferromagnetic nanoparticles in aqueous or organic solvents. The dispersed particles are randomly oriented but their moments become aligned if a magnetic field is applied, producing a variety of exotic and useful magnetomechanical effects. A longstanding interest and challenge has been to make such suspensions macroscopically ferromagnetic, that is having uniform magnetic alignment in the absence of a field. Here we report a fluid suspension of magnetic nanoplates that spontaneously aligns into an equilibrium nematic liquid crystal phase that is also macroscopically ferromagnetic. Its zero-field magnetization produces distinctive magnetic self-interaction effects, including liquid crystal textures of fluid block domains arranged in closed flux loops, and makes this phase highly sensitive, with it dramatically changing shape even in the Earth's magnetic field.

  1. Spontaneous liquid crystal and ferromagnetic ordering of colloidal magnetic nanoplates.

    PubMed

    Shuai, M; Klittnick, A; Shen, Y; Smith, G P; Tuchband, M R; Zhu, C; Petschek, R G; Mertelj, A; Lisjak, D; Čopič, M; Maclennan, J E; Glaser, M A; Clark, N A

    2016-01-01

    Ferrofluids are familiar as colloidal suspensions of ferromagnetic nanoparticles in aqueous or organic solvents. The dispersed particles are randomly oriented but their moments become aligned if a magnetic field is applied, producing a variety of exotic and useful magnetomechanical effects. A longstanding interest and challenge has been to make such suspensions macroscopically ferromagnetic, that is having uniform magnetic alignment in the absence of a field. Here we report a fluid suspension of magnetic nanoplates that spontaneously aligns into an equilibrium nematic liquid crystal phase that is also macroscopically ferromagnetic. Its zero-field magnetization produces distinctive magnetic self-interaction effects, including liquid crystal textures of fluid block domains arranged in closed flux loops, and makes this phase highly sensitive, with it dramatically changing shape even in the Earth's magnetic field. PMID:26817823

  2. Spontaneous liquid crystal and ferromagnetic ordering of colloidal magnetic nanoplates

    PubMed Central

    Shuai, M.; Klittnick, A.; Shen, Y.; Smith, G. P.; Tuchband, M. R.; Zhu, C.; Petschek, R. G.; Mertelj, A.; Lisjak, D.; Čopič, M.; Maclennan, J. E.; Glaser, M. A.; Clark, N. A.

    2016-01-01

    Ferrofluids are familiar as colloidal suspensions of ferromagnetic nanoparticles in aqueous or organic solvents. The dispersed particles are randomly oriented but their moments become aligned if a magnetic field is applied, producing a variety of exotic and useful magnetomechanical effects. A longstanding interest and challenge has been to make such suspensions macroscopically ferromagnetic, that is having uniform magnetic alignment in the absence of a field. Here we report a fluid suspension of magnetic nanoplates that spontaneously aligns into an equilibrium nematic liquid crystal phase that is also macroscopically ferromagnetic. Its zero-field magnetization produces distinctive magnetic self-interaction effects, including liquid crystal textures of fluid block domains arranged in closed flux loops, and makes this phase highly sensitive, with it dramatically changing shape even in the Earth's magnetic field. PMID:26817823

  3. Faceting and commensurability in crystal structures of colloidal thin films.

    PubMed

    Ramiro-Manzano, F; Meseguer, F; Bonet, E; Rodriguez, I

    2006-07-14

    This Letter investigates the influence of finite size effects on the particle arrangement of thin film colloidal crystals. A rich variety of crystallographic faceting with large single domain microcrystallites is shown. Optical reflectance experiments together with scanning electron microscopy permit the identification of the crystal symmetry and the facet orientation, as well as the exact number of monolayers. When the cell thickness is not commensurable with a high symmetry layering, particles arrange themselves in a periodic distribution of (111)- and (100)-orientated face centered cubic (fcc) microcrystallites separated by planar defects. These structures can be described as a fcc ordering orientated along a vicinal surface, modified by a periodic distribution of fcc (111) stacking faults. PMID:16907485

  4. Tunable negative-index photonic crystals using colloidal magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Tao; Wang, Xin; Wang, Yan; Dong, Xiang-Mei

    2015-12-01

    The model of using colloidal magnetic fluid to build tunable negative-index photonic crystal is established. The effective permittivity ɛe and permeability μe of the two-dimensional photonic crystal are investigated in detail. For transverse magnetic polarization, both ɛe and μe exhibit a Lorentz-type anomalous dispersion, leading to a region where ɛe and μe are simultaneously negative. Then, considering a practical case, in which the thickness of photonic crystal is finite, the band structures for odd modes are calculated by the plane wave expansion method and the finite-difference time-domain method. The results suggest that reducing the external magnetic field strength or slab thickness will weaken the periodic modulation strength of the photonic crystal. Simulation results prove that the negative-index can be tuned by varying the external magnetic field strength or the slab thickness. The work presented in this paper gives a guideline for realizing the flat photonic crystal lens with tunable properties at optical frequencies, which may have potential applications in tunable near-field imaging systems. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB352001), the Shanghai Rising-Star Program, China (Grant No. 12QA1402300), the China Scholarship Council (CSC) Program, and the Basic Research Program of Shanghai, China (Grant No. 14ZR1428500).

  5. Slip flow through colloidal crystals of varying particle diameter.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Benjamin J; Wirth, Mary J

    2013-01-22

    Slip flow of water through silica colloidal crystals was investigated experimentally for eight different particle diameters, which have hydraulic channel radii ranging from 15 to 800 nm. The particle surfaces were silylated to be low in energy, with a water contact angle of 83°, as determined for a silylated flat surface. Flow rates through centimeter lengths of colloidal crystal were measured using a commercial liquid chromatograph for accurate comparisons of water and toluene flow rates using pressure gradients as high as 10(10) Pa/m. Toluene exhibited no-slip Hagen-Poiseuille flow for all hydraulic channel radii. For water, the slip flow enhancement as a function of hydraulic channel radius was described well by the expected slip flow correction for Hagen-Poiseuille flow, and the data revealed a constant slip length of 63 ± 3 nm. A flow enhancement of 20 ± 2 was observed for the smallest hydraulic channel radius of 15 nm. The amount of slip flow was found to be independent of shear rate over a range of fluid velocities from 0.7 to 5.8 mm/s. The results support the applicability of the slip flow correction for channel radii as small as 15 nm. The work demonstrates that packed beds of submicrometer particles enable slip flow to be employed for high-volume flow rates.

  6. Slip Flow through Colloidal Crystals of Varying Particle Diameter

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Benjamin J.; Wirth, Mary J.

    2012-01-01

    Slip flow of water through silica colloidal crystals was investigated experimentally for 8 different particle diameters, which have hydraulic channel radii ranging from 15 nm to 800 nm. The particle surfaces were silylated to be low in energy, with a water contact angle of 83°, as determined for a silylated flat surface. Flow rates through centimeter lengths of colloidal crystal were measured using a commercial liquid chromatograph for accurate comparisons of water and toluene flow rates using pressure gradients as high as 1010 Pa/m. Toluene exhibited no-slip Hagen-Poiseuille flow for all hydraulic channel radii. For water, the slip flow enhancement as a function of hydraulic channel radius was described well by the expected slip flow correction for Hagen-Poiseuille flow, and the data revealed a constant slip length of 63±3 nm. A flow enhancement of 20±2 was observed for the smallest hydraulic channel radius of 15 nm. The amount of slip flow was found to be independent of shear rate over a range of fluid velocities from 0.7 to 5.8 mm/s. The results support the applicability of the slip flow correction for channel radii as small as 15 nm. The work demonstrates that packed beds of submicrometer particles enable slip flow to be employed for high volume flow rates. PMID:23237590

  7. Photonic liquid crystal fibers tuning by four electrode system produced with 3D printing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertman, Slawomir; Bednarska, Karolina; Czapla, Aleksandra; Woliński, Tomasz R.

    2015-09-01

    Photonic liquid crystal fiber has been intensively investigated in last few years. It has been proved that guiding properties of such fibers could be tuned with an electric field. In particular efficient tuning could be obtained if multi-electrode system allowing for dynamic change of not only intensity of the electric field, but also its direction. In this work we report a simple to build four electrode system, which is based on a precisely aligned four cylindrical microelectrodes. As an electrodes we use enameled copper wire with diameter adequate to the diameter of the fiber to be tuned. To ensure uniform and parallel alignment of the wires a special micro-profiles has been designed and then produced with filament 3D printer. The possibility of the dynamic change of the electric field direction in such scalable and cost effective electrode assembly has been experimentally confirmed.

  8. Extreme low thermal conductivity in nanoscale 3D Si phononic crystal with spherical pores.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lina; Yang, Nuo; Li, Baowen

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we propose a nanoscale three-dimensional (3D) Si phononic crystal (PnC) with spherical pores, which can reduce the thermal conductivity of bulk Si by a factor up to 10,000 times at room temperature. Thermal conductivity of Si PnCs depends on the porosity, for example, the thermal conductivity of Si PnCs with porosity 50% is 300 times smaller than that of bulk Si. The phonon participation ratio spectra demonstrate that more phonons are localized as the porosity increases. The thermal conductivity is insensitive to the temperature changes from room temperature to 1100 K. The extreme-low thermal conductivity could lead to a larger value of ZT than unity as the periodic structure affects very little the electric conductivity.

  9. AFC3D: A 3D graphical tool to model assimilation and fractional crystallization with and without recharge in the R environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Silvina; Carniel, Roberto; Caffe, Pablo J.

    2014-03-01

    AFC3D is an original graphical free software developed in the framework of the R scientific environment and dedicated to the modelling of assimilation and fractional crystallization without (AFC) and with (AFC-r) recharge, facilitating the search for the solutions of the equations originally proposed by DePaolo (1981, 1985) and first solved in a graphical way by Aitcheson and Forrest (1994). The software presented here allows a graphical 3D representation of ρ (mass of assimilated crust/mass of original magma) as a function of r (rate of crustal assimilation/rate of fractional crystallization) and β (recharge rate of magma replenishment / rate of assimilation) for each element/isotope, finding a coherent set of (r, β, ρ) parameter triples in a mostly automated way. Mathematically optimized solutions are derived, which can and should then be discussed and evaluated from a geological and petrological point of view by the end user. The presented contribution presents the software and a series of models published in the literature, which are discussed as case studies of application and whose solutions are sometimes enhanced based on the results provided by the software.

  10. 3D integration of photonic crystal devices: vertical coupling with a silicon waveguide.

    PubMed

    Ferrier, L; Romeo, P Rojo; Letartre, X; Drouard, E; Viktorovitch, P

    2010-07-19

    Two integrated devices based on the vertical coupling between a photonic crystal microcavity and a silicon (Si) ridge waveguide are presented in this paper. When the resonator is coupled to a single waveguide, light can be spectrally extracted from the waveguide to free space through the far field emission of the resonator. When the resonator is vertically coupled to two waveguides, a vertical add-drop filter can be realized. The dropping efficiency of these devices relies on a careful design of the resonator. In this paper, we use a Fabry-Perot (FP) microcavity composed of two photonic crystal (PhC) slab mirrors. Thanks to the unique dispersion properties of slow Bloch modes (SBM) at the flat extreme of the dispersion curve, it is possible to design a FP cavity exhibiting two quasi-degenerate modes. This specific configuration allows for a coupling efficiency that can theoretically achieve 100%. Using 3D FDTD calculations, we discuss the design of such devices and show that high dropping efficiency can be achieved between the Si waveguides and the PhC microcavity.

  11. Switchable 3D liquid crystal grating generated by periodic photo-alignment on both substrates.

    PubMed

    Nys, I; Beeckman, J; Neyts, K

    2015-10-21

    A planar liquid crystal (LC) cell is developed in which two photo-alignment layers have been illuminated with respectively a horizontal and a vertical diffraction pattern of interfering left- and right-handed circularly polarized light. In the bulk of the cell, a complex LC configuration is obtained with periodicity in two dimensions. Remarkably, the period of the structure is larger than the period of the interference pattern, indicating that lowering of the symmetry allows a reduction in the elastic energy. The liquid crystal configuration depends on the periodicity of the alignment but also on the thickness of the cell. By applying a voltage over the electrodes, the power going into the different diffracted orders can be tuned. Finite element (FE) simulations based on Q-tensor theory are used to find the 3D equilibrium director distribution, which is used to simulate the near-field transmission profile based on the Jones calculus. A 2D Fourier transform is performed for both the x- and y-component of the transmitted wave to find the diffraction efficiency. PMID:26313442

  12. Straining soft colloids in aqueous nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Mushenheim, Peter C; Pendery, Joel S; Weibel, Douglas B; Spagnolie, Saverio E; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2016-05-17

    Liquid crystals (LCs), because of their long-range molecular ordering, are anisotropic, elastic fluids. Herein, we report that elastic stresses imparted by nematic LCs can dynamically shape soft colloids and tune their physical properties. Specifically, we use giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) as soft colloids and explore the interplay of mechanical strain when the GUVs are confined within aqueous chromonic LC phases. Accompanying thermal quenching from isotropic to LC phases, we observe the elasticity of the LC phases to transform initially spherical GUVs (diameters of 2-50 µm) into two distinct populations of GUVs with spindle-like shapes and aspect ratios as large as 10. Large GUVs are strained to a small extent (R/r < 1.54, where R and r are the major and minor radii, respectively), consistent with an LC elasticity-induced expansion of lipid membrane surface area of up to 3% and conservation of the internal GUV volume. Small GUVs, in contrast, form highly elongated spindles (1.54 < R/r < 10) that arise from an efflux of LCs from the GUVs during the shape transformation, consistent with LC-induced straining of the membrane leading to transient membrane pore formation. A thermodynamic analysis of both populations of GUVs reveals that the final shapes adopted by these soft colloids are dominated by a competition between the LC elasticity and an energy (∼0.01 mN/m) associated with the GUV-LC interface. Overall, these results provide insight into the coupling of strain in soft materials and suggest previously unidentified designs of LC-based responsive and reconfigurable materials.

  13. Straining soft colloids in aqueous nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushenheim, Peter C.; Pendery, Joel S.; Weibel, Douglas B.; Spagnolie, Saverio E.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2016-05-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs), because of their long-range molecular ordering, are anisotropic, elastic fluids. Herein, we report that elastic stresses imparted by nematic LCs can dynamically shape soft colloids and tune their physical properties. Specifically, we use giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) as soft colloids and explore the interplay of mechanical strain when the GUVs are confined within aqueous chromonic LC phases. Accompanying thermal quenching from isotropic to LC phases, we observe the elasticity of the LC phases to transform initially spherical GUVs (diameters of 2–50 µm) into two distinct populations of GUVs with spindle-like shapes and aspect ratios as large as 10. Large GUVs are strained to a small extent (R/r < 1.54, where R and r are the major and minor radii, respectively), consistent with an LC elasticity-induced expansion of lipid membrane surface area of up to 3% and conservation of the internal GUV volume. Small GUVs, in contrast, form highly elongated spindles (1.54 < R/r < 10) that arise from an efflux of LCs from the GUVs during the shape transformation, consistent with LC-induced straining of the membrane leading to transient membrane pore formation. A thermodynamic analysis of both populations of GUVs reveals that the final shapes adopted by these soft colloids are dominated by a competition between the LC elasticity and an energy (˜0.01 mN/m) associated with the GUV–LC interface. Overall, these results provide insight into the coupling of strain in soft materials and suggest previously unidentified designs of LC-based responsive and reconfigurable materials.

  14. Mapping the 3D distribution of CdSe nanocrystals in highly oriented and nanostructured hybrid P3HT-CdSe films grown by directional epitaxial crystallization.

    PubMed

    Roiban, L; Hartmann, L; Fiore, A; Djurado, D; Chandezon, F; Reiss, P; Legrand, J-F; Doyle, S; Brinkmann, M; Ersen, O

    2012-11-21

    Highly oriented and nanostructured hybrid thin films made of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) and colloidal CdSe nanocrystals are prepared by a zone melting method using epitaxial growth on 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene oriented crystals. The structure of the films has been analyzed by X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation, electron diffraction and 3D electron tomography to afford a multi-scale structural and morphological description of the highly structured hybrid films. A quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volumes based on electron tomography is used to establish a 3D map of the distribution of the CdSe nanocrystals in the bulk of the films. In particular, the influence of the P3HT-CdSe ratio on the 3D structure of the hybrid layers has been analyzed. In all cases, a bi-layer structure was observed. It is made of a first layer of pure oriented semi-crystalline P3HT grown epitaxially on the TCB substrate and a second P3HT layer containing CdSe nanocrystals uniformly distributed in the amorphous interlamellar zones of the polymer. The thickness of the P3HT layer containing CdSe nanoparticles increases gradually with increasing content of NCs in the films. A growth model is proposed to explain this original transversal organization of CdSe NCs in the oriented matrix of P3HT.

  15. Fabrication of colloidal crystals with defined and complex structures via layer-by-layer transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Yang, Bai; Wang, Dayang

    2008-12-01

    A new and versatile way--using poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) sheets to layer-by-layer (LbL) transfer hexagonal-close-packed particle monolayers from preformed colloidal crystals and stack them on substrates-has been demonstrated to create colloidal crystals. This approach allows LbL control of the thickness of the resulting crystals and especially of the size and the packing structure of the particles in each layer. Furthermore, it also allows fabrication of binary colloidal crystals over large areas by deformation of the PDMS sheets during LbL transfer. Two new binary crystals-one composed of identically sized particles but in different densities and the other of a nonclose-packed monolayer of large particles and a close-packed monolayer of small particles-were created, which are hard grown by other colloidal crystallization techniques developed thus far. PMID:18986179

  16. Thermoreversible crystallization of charged colloids due to adsorption/desorption of ionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Murakado, Ai; Toyotama, Akiko; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Nagano, Ryota; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-03-01

    We report that charged colloids exhibit thermoreversible crystallization via the adsorption of ionic surfactants onto particle surfaces. Due to the temperature dependence of the adsorption quantity, the colloids crystallized upon cooling and melted upon heating. To clarify the influences of surfactant adsorption on the crystallization, polystyrene (PS) particles dispersed in ethylene glycol (EG)/water mixtures were employed, enabling continuous tuning of the adsorption quantity by changing the EG concentration. The thermoreversible crystallization/melting behavior was found to be mainly attributable to changes in the ionic strength of the medium resulting from variation in the concentration of the non-adsorbed ionic surfactant molecules with temperature. We expect that the present findings will be useful for fine control of colloidal crystallization and the further study of colloidal crystallization in low permittivity media.

  17. Observation of superconductivity induced by a point contact on 3D Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 crystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, He; Wang, Huichao; Liu, Haiwen; Lu, Hong; Yang, Wuhao; Jia, Shuang; Liu, Xiong-Jun; Xie, X C; Wei, Jian; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetals, which possess 3D linear dispersion in the electronic structure as a bulk analogue of graphene, have lately generated widespread interest in both materials science and condensed matter physics. Recently, crystalline Cd3As2 has been proposed and proved to be a 3D Dirac semimetal that can survive in the atmosphere. Here, by using point contact spectroscopy measurements, we observe exotic superconductivity around the point contact region on the surface of Cd3As2 crystals. The zero-bias conductance peak (ZBCP) and double conductance peaks (DCPs) symmetric around zero bias suggest p-wave-like unconventional superconductivity. Considering the topological properties of 3D Dirac semimetals, our findings may indicate that Cd3As2 crystals under certain conditions could be topological superconductors, which are predicted to support Majorana zero modes or gapless Majorana edge/surface modes in the boundary depending on the dimensionality of the material.

  18. Observation of superconductivity induced by a point contact on 3D Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, He; Wang, Huichao; Liu, Haiwen; Lu, Hong; Yang, Wuhao; Jia, Shuang; Liu, Xiong-Jun; Xie, X. C.; Wei, Jian; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetals, which possess 3D linear dispersion in the electronic structure as a bulk analogue of graphene, have lately generated widespread interest in both materials science and condensed matter physics. Recently, crystalline Cd3As2 has been proposed and proved to be a 3D Dirac semimetal that can survive in the atmosphere. Here, by using point contact spectroscopy measurements, we observe exotic superconductivity around the point contact region on the surface of Cd3As2 crystals. The zero-bias conductance peak (ZBCP) and double conductance peaks (DCPs) symmetric around zero bias suggest p-wave-like unconventional superconductivity. Considering the topological properties of 3D Dirac semimetals, our findings may indicate that Cd3As2 crystals under certain conditions could be topological superconductors, which are predicted to support Majorana zero modes or gapless Majorana edge/surface modes in the boundary depending on the dimensionality of the material.

  19. Fullerene (C60) nano-colloids in nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visco, Angelo; Sobczak, Kevin; Mahmood, Rizwan

    2015-03-01

    We report high resolution homodyne light scattering studies to probe director fluctuations in bend/splay mode in bulk nematic liquid crystal and as a function of fullerene (C60) nanoparticles concentration. The preliminary analysis shows that the relaxation time of these fluctuations is fairly constant with in the experimental uncertainty despite the constraints imposed on the director fluctuations due to the insertion of nano colloids. The relaxation time extracted from the data found to be in nano seconds range and the diffusion constant (D) found to be, D = 4.29 x 106 cm/sec. The authors acknowledge the financial support from grants office, Dean, college of Health, Environment & Science and the physics department.

  20. Germanium FCC structure from a colloidal crystal template

    SciTech Connect

    Miguez, H.; Meseguer, F.; Lopez, C.; Holgado, M.; Andreasen, G.; Mifsud, A.; Fornes, V.

    2000-05-16

    Here, the authors show a method to fabricate a macroporous structure in which the pores, essentially identical, arrange regularly in a face-centered cubic (FCC) lattice. The result is a network of air spheres in a germanium medium. This structure presents the highest dielectric contrast ({epsilon}{sub Ge}/{epsilon}{sub air} = 16) ever achieved in the optical regime in such periodic structures, which could result in important applications in photonics. The authors employ solid silica colloidal crystals (opals) as templates within which a cyclic germanium growth process is carried out. Thus, the three-dimensional periodicity of the host is inherited by the guest. Afterward, the silica is removed and a germanium opal replica is obtained.

  1. Tunable assembly of colloidal crystal alloys using magnetic nanoparticle fluids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ye; Gao, Lu; Lopez, Gabriel P; Yellen, Benjamin B

    2013-03-26

    We demonstrate a magnetic technique for assembling bidisperse and tridisperse colloidal particle fluids into a variety of complex structures with dimensionality ranging from 0-D (rings) to 1-D (chains) to 2-D (tiles). Compared with prior work on bidisperse particles that are commensurate in size, here we explore the assembly of different sized particles, and we show that due to packing constraints, new particle structures can be realized experimentally. Extending these experiments to a tridisperse system, we demonstrate that at low concentrations the smallest particle does not change the underlying crystal structures of the bidisperse system; however, it can assist in the formation of crystallite structures that were not stable in a bidisperse system. Additionally, we discovered that the smallest particle mimics the role of the ferrofluid, by shifting the locations in phase space where the bidisperse crystal structures can be experimentally obtained. Finally, we demonstrate that 3-particle crystal structures can be tuned by varying the strength of the external field, which is not possible in a 2-particle system. PMID:23373586

  2. Combining 3-D plasmonic gold nanorod arrays with colloidal nanoparticles as a versatile concept for reliable, sensitive, and selective molecular detection by SERS.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Mehmet; Senlik, Erhan; Biskin, Erhan; Yavuz, Mustafa Selman; Tamer, Ugur; Demirel, Gokhan

    2014-03-28

    The detection of molecules at an ultralow level by Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) has recently attracted enormous interest for various applications especially in biological, medical, and environmental fields. Despite the significant progress, SERS systems are still facing challenges for practical applications related to their sensitivity, reliability, and selectivity. To overcome these limitations, in this study, we have proposed a simple yet facile concept by combining 3-D anisotropic gold nanorod arrays with colloidal gold nanoparticles having different shapes for highly reliable, selective, and sensitive detection of some hazardous chemical and biological warfare agents in trace amounts through SERS. The gold nanorod arrays were created on the BK7 glass slides or silicon wafer surfaces via the oblique angle deposition (OAD) technique without using any template material or lithography technique and their surface densities were adjusted by manipulating the deposition angle (α). It is found that gold nanorod arrays fabricated at α = 10° exhibited the highest SERS enhancement in the absence of colloidal gold nanoparticles. Synergetic enhancement was obviously observed in SERS signals when combining gold nanorod arrays with colloidal gold nanoparticles having different shapes (i.e., spherical, rod, and cage). Due to their ability to produce localized surface plasmons (LSPs) in transverse and longitudinal directions, utilization of colloidal gold nanorods as a synergetic agent led to an increase in the enhancement factor by about tenfold compared to plain gold nanorod arrays. Moreover, we have tested our approach to detect some chemical and biological toxins namely dipicolinic acid (DIP), methyl parathion (MP), and diethyl phosphoramidate (DP). For all toxins, Raman spectra with high signal-to-noise ratios and reproducibility were successfully obtained over a broad concentration range (5 ppm-10 ppb). Our results suggest that the slightly tangled and

  3. Recrystallization and zone melting of charged colloids by thermally induced crystallization.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Mariko; Toyotama, Akiko; Suzuki, Misaki; Sugao, Yukihiro; Okuzono, Tohru; Uchida, Fumio; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2013-08-01

    We examined the application of recrystallization and zone-melting crystallization methods, which have been used widely to fabricate large, high-purity crystals of atomic and molecular systems, to charged colloidal crystals. Our samples were aqueous dispersions of colloidal silica (with particle diameters of d = 108 or 121 nm and particle volume fractions of ϕ = 0.035-0.05) containing the weak base pyridine. The samples crystallized upon heating because of increases in the particle charge numbers, and they melted reversibly on cooling. During the recrystallization experiments, the polycrystalline colloids were partially melted in a Peltier cooling device and then were crystallized by stopping the cooling and allowing the system to return to ambient temperature. The zone-melting crystallization was carried out by melting a narrow zone (millimeter-sized in width) of the polycrystalline colloid samples and then moving the sample slowly over a cooling device to recrystallize the molten region. Using both methods, we fabricated a few centimeter-sized crystals, starting from millimeter-sized original polycrystals when the crystallization rates were sufficiently slow (33 μm/s). Furthermore, the optical quality of the colloidal crystals, such as the half-band widths of the diffraction peaks, was significantly improved. These methods were also useful for refining. Small amounts of impurity particles (fluorescent polystyrene particles, d = 333 nm, ϕ = 5 × 10(-5)), added to the colloidal crystals, were excluded from the crystals when the crystallization rates were sufficiently slow (∼0.1 μm/s). We expect that the present findings will be useful for fabricating large, high-purity colloidal crystals.

  4. Probing the intrinsic optical Bloch-mode emission from a 3D photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Mei-Li; Bur, James A.; Du, Qingguo; John, Sajeev; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2016-10-01

    We report experimental observation of intrinsic Bloch-mode emission from a 3D tungsten photonic crystal at low thermal excitation. After the successful removal of conventional metallic emission (normal emission), it is possible to make an accurate comparison of the Bloch-mode and the normal emission. For all biases, we found that the emission intensity of the Bloch-mode is higher than that of the normal emission. The Bloch-mode emission also exhibits a slower dependence on (\\hslash ω /{k}bT) than that of the normal emission. The observed higher emission intensity and a different T-dependence is attributed to Bloch-mode assisted emission where emitters have been located into a medium having local density of states different than the isotropic case. Furthermore, our finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation shows the presence of localized spots at metal-air boundaries and corners, having intense electric field. The enhanced plasmonic field and local non-equilibrium could induce a strong thermally stimulated emission and may be the cause of our unusual observation.

  5. 3D dependence of the dielectric dispersion in a BaTiO3 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novik, V. K.; Lotonov, A. M.; Gavrilova, N. D.

    2013-08-01

    The 3D dependences ɛ'(log f, T) and tanδ(log f, T) of a perfect BaTiO3 single crystal grown by the Remeika method have been studied in the ranges f = 1-2 × 107 Hz and T = -80-130°C. These dependences characterize a transition from the paraelectric phase (121.5°C) as a near-antiferroelectric transition followed by the transition to the tetragonal phase at ˜79.5°C. According to a number of signs, the range 121.5-79.5°C corresponds to a metastable phase typical of first-order phase transitions. The unexpected result of this work has been discussed with invoking the hypothesis on the BaTiO3 structure in the paraelectric phase, according to which it consists of three antiferroelectric states oriented along the crystallographic axes. Using the dielectric properties of BaTiO3 as an example, the method of direct correct determination of the temperatures of the structural transformations from the anomaly of tanδ(log f, T) has also been demonstrated.

  6. Probing the intrinsic optical Bloch-mode emission from a 3D photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Mei-Li; Bur, James A; Du, Qingguo; John, Sajeev; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2016-10-14

    We report experimental observation of intrinsic Bloch-mode emission from a 3D tungsten photonic crystal at low thermal excitation. After the successful removal of conventional metallic emission (normal emission), it is possible to make an accurate comparison of the Bloch-mode and the normal emission. For all biases, we found that the emission intensity of the Bloch-mode is higher than that of the normal emission. The Bloch-mode emission also exhibits a slower dependence on [Formula: see text] than that of the normal emission. The observed higher emission intensity and a different T-dependence is attributed to Bloch-mode assisted emission where emitters have been located into a medium having local density of states different than the isotropic case. Furthermore, our finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation shows the presence of localized spots at metal-air boundaries and corners, having intense electric field. The enhanced plasmonic field and local non-equilibrium could induce a strong thermally stimulated emission and may be the cause of our unusual observation. PMID:27606574

  7. Probing the intrinsic optical Bloch-mode emission from a 3D photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Mei-Li; Bur, James A; Du, Qingguo; John, Sajeev; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2016-10-14

    We report experimental observation of intrinsic Bloch-mode emission from a 3D tungsten photonic crystal at low thermal excitation. After the successful removal of conventional metallic emission (normal emission), it is possible to make an accurate comparison of the Bloch-mode and the normal emission. For all biases, we found that the emission intensity of the Bloch-mode is higher than that of the normal emission. The Bloch-mode emission also exhibits a slower dependence on [Formula: see text] than that of the normal emission. The observed higher emission intensity and a different T-dependence is attributed to Bloch-mode assisted emission where emitters have been located into a medium having local density of states different than the isotropic case. Furthermore, our finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation shows the presence of localized spots at metal-air boundaries and corners, having intense electric field. The enhanced plasmonic field and local non-equilibrium could induce a strong thermally stimulated emission and may be the cause of our unusual observation.

  8. Propagation of Electromagnetic Waves in 3D Opal-based Magnetophotonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardavi-Horvath, Martha; Makeeva, Galina S.; Golovanov, Oleg A.; Rinkevich, Anatolii B.

    2013-03-01

    Opals, a class of self-organized 3D nanostructures, are typical representatives of photonic bandgap structures. The voids inside of the opal structure of close packed SiO2 spheres can be infiltrated by a magnetic material, creating magnetically tunable magnetophotonic crystals with interesting and potentially useful properties at GHz and THz frequencies. The propagation of electromagnetic waves at microwave frequencies was investigated numerically in SiO2 opal based magnetic nanostructures, using rigorous mathematical models to solve Maxwell's equations complemented by the Landau-Lifshitz equation with electrodynamic boundary conditions. The numerical approach is based on Galerkin's projection method using the decomposition algorithm on autonomous blocks with Floquet channels. The opal structure consists of SiO2 nanospheres, with inter-sphere voids infiltrated with nanoparticles of Ni-Zn ferrites. Both the opal matrix and the ferrite are assumed to be lossy. A model, taking into account the real structure of the ferrite particles in the opal's voids was developed to simulate the measured FMR lineshape of the ferrite infiltrated opal. The numerical technique shows an excellent agreement when applied to model recent experimental data on similar ferrite opals.

  9. A Navier-Stokes phase-field crystal model for colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Praetorius, Simon Voigt, Axel

    2015-04-21

    We develop a fully continuous model for colloidal suspensions with hydrodynamic interactions. The Navier-Stokes Phase-Field Crystal model combines ideas of dynamic density functional theory with particulate flow approaches and is derived in detail and related to other dynamic density functional theory approaches with hydrodynamic interactions. The derived system is numerically solved using adaptive finite elements and is used to analyze colloidal crystallization in flowing environments demonstrating a strong coupling in both directions between the crystal shape and the flow field. We further validate the model against other computational approaches for particulate flow systems for various colloidal sedimentation problems.

  10. Colloidal crystal formation at the "Nafion-water" interface.

    PubMed

    Bunkin, Nikolay F; Gorelik, Vladimir S; Kozlov, Valeriy A; Shkirin, Alexey V; Suyazov, Nikolay V

    2014-03-27

    In our recent work [Bunkin et al. Water 2013, 4, 129-154] it was first obtained that the water layer, having a size of several tens of micrometers and being adjacent to the swollen Nafion interface, is characterized by enhanced optical density; the refractive index of water at the interface is 1.46. Furthermore, the birefringence effect was observed in this layer. To explain these results, it has been hypothesized that because of "disentangling" of charged polymer chains from the Nafion surface toward the bulk of water, a photonic crystal close to the surface is formed [Bunkin et al. Water 2013, 4, 129-154]. In this paper, we describe experiments with laser-stimulated luminescence from dry and swollen Nafion. It was shown in the experiment with dry Nafion that the apparatus function of our experimental setup (Green's function) is well-described by a Gaussian profile. It was obtained that a highly concentrated colloidal suspension of Nafion particles with a steep spatial boundary is formed in the water layer adjacent to the interface. The volume density of the Nafion particles as a function of the distance from the Nafion interface was found. These findings can be considered indirect confirmation of the previously formulated photonic crystal hypothesis [Bunkin et al. Water 2013, 4, 129-154]. PMID:24568638

  11. Colloidal crystal formation at the "Nafion-water" interface.

    PubMed

    Bunkin, Nikolay F; Gorelik, Vladimir S; Kozlov, Valeriy A; Shkirin, Alexey V; Suyazov, Nikolay V

    2014-03-27

    In our recent work [Bunkin et al. Water 2013, 4, 129-154] it was first obtained that the water layer, having a size of several tens of micrometers and being adjacent to the swollen Nafion interface, is characterized by enhanced optical density; the refractive index of water at the interface is 1.46. Furthermore, the birefringence effect was observed in this layer. To explain these results, it has been hypothesized that because of "disentangling" of charged polymer chains from the Nafion surface toward the bulk of water, a photonic crystal close to the surface is formed [Bunkin et al. Water 2013, 4, 129-154]. In this paper, we describe experiments with laser-stimulated luminescence from dry and swollen Nafion. It was shown in the experiment with dry Nafion that the apparatus function of our experimental setup (Green's function) is well-described by a Gaussian profile. It was obtained that a highly concentrated colloidal suspension of Nafion particles with a steep spatial boundary is formed in the water layer adjacent to the interface. The volume density of the Nafion particles as a function of the distance from the Nafion interface was found. These findings can be considered indirect confirmation of the previously formulated photonic crystal hypothesis [Bunkin et al. Water 2013, 4, 129-154].

  12. Use of 3D X-ray Computed Microtomography to Observe in situ Sediment Structure and Colloidal Zirconia Deposits at the Pore Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Packman, A. I.; Keane, D. T.; Gaillard, J.

    2006-12-01

    We are using X-ray Micro-Tomography (XMT) to study in situ sediment structure using the facilities of the DuPont-Northwestern-Dow Collaborative Access Team (DND-CAT), Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National Laboratory. Images of a sediment sample are taken at a number of different angles as the incident x- ray beam passes through it, and a three-dimensional view of the interior of the sample is then reconstructed from these maps using Computed Tomography (CT). These 3D images allow us to observe sediment structure with near-micron-scale resolution. We are also using difference tomography to resolve the distribution of zirconium in sediment cores. Column experiments were performed to observe the deposition of colloidal zirconia (Zr) particles in porous media composed of glass beads. Reconstructed 3D maps of Zr deposition demonstrate strong pore-scale heterogeneity. Most zirconia particles accumulated at the upstream sides of collector beads and in narrow pore throats. Statistical analysis of deposition clusters reveals the average, large-scale filtration behavior. Reconstructed 3D pore structure data were used to investigate scale dependency and the effects of local variation within the porous medium. Statistical representative elementary volumes were calculated for quantities such as porosity, specific surface area, and permeability. Finally, preliminary experiments in flume were conducted in order to investigate zirconia deposition in streambeds at the scale of characteristic topographic features (bedforms).

  13. Cross-correlation functions in two-dimensional and three-dimensional colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, Yuichi N.; Hatakeyam, Koushi E.; Satake, Motoi; Homma, Yumi; Washidzu, Ryosuke; Nishio, Izumi

    2001-12-01

    We have measured the mean square displacement of a particle (MSD) and mean product of displacement of a particle and that of another particle (x-MSD) in two-dimensional (2d) and three-dimensional (3d) colloidal crystals for the first time using digital video microscopy. These (x-)MSDs have been compared to an overdamped bead-spring lattice model with effective viscous drag γeff (the OBS-γeff model). The observed 3d system contained ordered structures created by sedimentation equilibrium adjacent to the internal cell wall and was regarded as the (1 1 1) surface of a face-centered cubic lattice. The observed 2d system was a single layer of hexagonal-like ordered structures which were generated in a certain region of the space between the flat surface of the internal cell wall and a convex lens. In the observed time region, the MSDs for 2d system and 3d system were in good agreement with the theoretical MSDs for 2d system and 3d system, which were predicted to logarithmically diverge and to converge, respectively. The observed x-MSDs for the 2d system were in disagreement with theoretical ones in short time behavior. For the 3d system, the disagreement between the theory and the experimental results were found in the amplitudes as well as in the short time behavior. It was assumed that these differences were caused by the hydrodynamic coupling which was not fully incorporated in the OBS-γeff, and an improved treatment, the OBS-cutoff model was introduced. The OBS-γeff elongates the relaxation time of each mode with the constant ratio of γeff/γ, while the OBS-cutoff assumes the relaxation time of the modes to be infinity if the wave number of a mode is larger than a certain cutoff wave number. For the 3d system, the MSD and x-MSD for nearest neighbors obtained from the OBS-cutoff were in excellent agreement with the observed ones. In addition, it was found that the hydrodynamic interaction was the dominant factor on the short time behavior of (x-)MSD.

  14. Electrical conduction mechanisms in PbSe and PbS nano crystals 3D matrix layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbell, Matan; Hechster, Elad; Sarusi, Gabby

    2016-02-01

    A simulation study and measurements of the electrical conductance in a PbSe and PbS spherical Nano-crystal 3D matrix layer was carried out focusing on its dependences of Nano-crystal size distribution and size gradient along the layer thickness (z-direction). The study suggests a new concept of conductance enhancement by utilizing a size gradient along the layer thickness from mono-layer to the next mono-layer of the Nano-crystals, in order to create a gradient of the energy levels and thus improve directional conductance in this direction. A Monte Carlo simulation of the charge carriers path along the layer thickness of the Nano-crystals 3D matrix using the Miller-Abrahams hopping model was performed. We then compared the conductance characteristics of the gradual size 3D matrix layer to a constant-sized 3D matrix layer that was used as a reference in the simulation. The numerical calculations provided us with insights into the actual conductance mechanism of the PbSe and PbS Nano-crystals 3D matrix and explained the discrepancies in actual conductance and the variability in measured mobilities published in the literature. It is found that the mobility and thus conductance are dependent on a critical electrical field generated between two adjacent nano-crystals. Our model explains the conductance dependents on the: Cathode-Anode distance, the distance between the adjacent nano-crystals in the 3D matrix layer and the size distribution along the current direction. Part of the model (current-voltage dependence) was validated using a current-voltage measurements taken on a constant size normal distribution nano-crystals PbS layer (330nm thick) compared with the predicted I-V curves. It is shown that under a threshold bias, the current is very low, while after above a threshold bias the conductance is significantly increased due to increase of hopping probability. Once reaching the maximum probability the current tend to level-off reaching the maximal conductance

  15. From molecular to macroscopic via the rational design of a self-assembled 3D DNA crystal.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jianping; Birktoft, Jens J; Chen, Yi; Wang, Tong; Sha, Ruojie; Constantinou, Pamela E; Ginell, Stephan L; Mao, Chengde; Seeman, Nadrian C

    2009-09-01

    We live in a macroscopic three-dimensional (3D) world, but our best description of the structure of matter is at the atomic and molecular scale. Understanding the relationship between the two scales requires a bridge from the molecular world to the macroscopic world. Connecting these two domains with atomic precision is a central goal of the natural sciences, but it requires high spatial control of the 3D structure of matter. The simplest practical route to producing precisely designed 3D macroscopic objects is to form a crystalline arrangement by self-assembly, because such a periodic array has only conceptually simple requirements: a motif that has a robust 3D structure, dominant affinity interactions between parts of the motif when it self-associates, and predictable structures for these affinity interactions. Fulfilling these three criteria to produce a 3D periodic system is not easy, but should readily be achieved with well-structured branched DNA motifs tailed by sticky ends. Complementary sticky ends associate with each other preferentially and assume the well-known B-DNA structure when they do so; the helically repeating nature of DNA facilitates the construction of a periodic array. It is essential that the directions of propagation associated with the sticky ends do not share the same plane, but extend to form a 3D arrangement of matter. Here we report the crystal structure at 4 A resolution of a designed, self-assembled, 3D crystal based on the DNA tensegrity triangle. The data demonstrate clearly that it is possible to design and self-assemble a well-ordered macromolecular 3D crystalline lattice with precise control. PMID:19727196

  16. Establishing the design rules for DNA-mediated programmable colloidal crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Macfarlane, R.J.; Jones, M.R.; Senesi, A.J.; Young, K.L.; Lee, B.; Wu, J.; Mirkin, C.A.

    2010-08-27

    DNA-programmable colloidal crystals are assembled with 5-80 nm nanoparticles, and the lattice parameters of the resulting crystals vary from 25 to 225 nm. A predictable and mathematically definable relationship between particle size and DNA length dictates the assembly and crystallization processes, creating a set of design rules for DNA-based nanoscale assembly.

  17. Determination of the positions and orientations of concentrated rod-like colloids from 3D microscopy data.

    PubMed

    Besseling, T H; Hermes, M; Kuijk, A; de Nijs, B; Deng, T-S; Dijkstra, M; Imhof, A; van Blaaderen, A

    2015-05-20

    Confocal microscopy in combination with real-space particle tracking has proven to be a powerful tool in scientific fields such as soft matter physics, materials science and cell biology. However, 3D tracking of anisotropic particles in concentrated phases remains not as optimized compared to algorithms for spherical particles. To address this problem, we developed a new particle-fitting algorithm that can extract the positions and orientations of fluorescent rod-like particles from three dimensional confocal microscopy data stacks. The algorithm is tailored to work even when the fluorescent signals of the particles overlap considerably and a threshold method and subsequent clusters analysis alone do not suffice. We demonstrate that our algorithm correctly identifies all five coordinates of uniaxial particles in both a concentrated disordered phase and a liquid-crystalline smectic-B phase. Apart from confocal microscopy images, we also demonstrate that the algorithm can be used to identify nanorods in 3D electron tomography reconstructions. Lastly, we determined the accuracy of the algorithm using both simulated and experimental confocal microscopy data-stacks of diffusing silica rods in a dilute suspension. This novel particle-fitting algorithm allows for the study of structure and dynamics in both dilute and dense liquid-crystalline phases (such as nematic, smectic and crystalline phases) as well as the study of the glass transition of rod-like particles in three dimensions on the single particle level. PMID:25922931

  18. Recent Advances in Colloidal and Interfacial Phenomena Involving Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yiqun; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes recent advances in several areas of research involving the interfacial ordering of liquid crystals (LCs). The first advance revolves around the ordering of LCs at bio/chemically functionalized surfaces. Whereas the majority of past studies of surface-induced ordering of LCs have involved surfaces of solids that present a limited diversity of chemical functional groups (surfaces at which van der Waals forces dominate surface-induced ordering), recent studies have moved to investigate the ordering of LCs on chemically complex surfaces. For example, surfaces decorated with biomolecules (e.g. oligopeptides and proteins) and transition metal ions have been investigated, leading to an understanding of the roles that metal-ligand coordination interactions, electrical double-layers, acid-base interactions, and hydrogen bonding can have on the interfacial ordering of LCs. The opportunity to create chemically-responsive LCs capable of undergoing ordering transitions in the presence of targeted molecular events (e.g., ligand exchange around a metal center) has emerged from these fundamental studies. A second advance has focused on investigations of the ordering of LCs at interfaces with immiscible isotropic fluids, particularly water. In contrast to prior studies of surface-induced ordering of LCs on solid surfaces, LC- aqueous interfaces are deformable and molecules at these interfaces exhibit high levels of mobility and thus can reorganize in response to changes in interfacial environment. A range of fundamental investigations involving these LC-aqueous interfaces have revealed that (i) the spatial and temporal characteristics of assemblies formed from biomolecular interactions can be reported by surface-driven ordering transitions in the LCs, (ii) the interfacial phase behaviour of molecules and colloids can be coupled to (and manipulated via) the ordering (and nematic elasticity) of LCs, and (iii) confinement of LCs leads to unanticipated size

  19. Bulk crystal growth and electronic characterization of the 3D Dirac semimetal Na{sub 3}Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Kushwaha, Satya K.; Krizan, Jason W.; Cava, R. J.; Feldman, Benjamin E.; Gyenis, András; Randeria, Mallika T.; Xiong, Jun; Xu, Su-Yang; Alidoust, Nasser; Belopolski, Ilya; Liang, Tian; Zahid Hasan, M.; Ong, N. P.; Yazdani, A.

    2015-04-01

    High quality hexagon plate-like Na{sub 3}Bi crystals with large (001) plane surfaces were grown from a molten Na flux. The freshly cleaved crystals were analyzed by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, allowing for the characterization of the three-dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetal (TDS) behavior and the observation of the topological surface states. Landau levels were observed, and the energy-momentum relations exhibited a linear dispersion relationship, characteristic of the 3D TDS nature of Na{sub 3}Bi. In transport measurements on Na{sub 3}Bi crystals, the linear magnetoresistance and Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillations are observed for the first time.

  20. A 3D hybrid praseodymium-antimony-oxochloride compound: single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation and photocatalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Zou, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Gui-Gang; Hu, Bing; Li, Jian-Rong; Feng, Mei-Ling; Wang, Xin-Chen; Huang, Xiao-Ying

    2013-11-01

    A 3D organic-inorganic hybrid compound, (2-MepyH)3[{Fe(1,10-phen)3}3][{Pr4Sb12O18(OH)Cl(11.5)}(TDC)(4.5)({Pr4Sb12O18(OH)Cl(9.5)} Cl)]·3(2-Mepy)·28H2O (1; 2-Mepy=2-methylpyridine, 1,10-phen=1,10-phenanthroline, H2TDC=thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid), was hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Unusually, two kinds of high-nuclearity clusters, namely [(Pr4Sb12O18(OH)Cl11)(COO)5](5-) and [(Pr4Sb12O18(OH)Cl9)Cl(COO)5](4-), coexist in the structure of compound 1; two of the latter clusters are doubly bridged by two μ2-Cl(-) moieties to form a new centrosymmetric dimeric cluster. An unprecedented spontaneous and reversible single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation was observed, which simultaneously involved a notable organic-ligand movement between the metal ions and an alteration of the bridging ion in the dimeric cluster, induced by guest-release/re-adsorption, thereby giving rise to the interconversion between compound 1 and the compound (2-MepyH)3[{Fe(1,10-phen)3}3][{Pr4Sb12O18(OH)Cl(11.5)}(TDC)4({Pr4Sb12O18Cl(10.5)(TDC)(0.5)(H2O)(1.5)}O(0.5))]·25H2O (1'). The mechanism of this transformation has also been discussed in great detail. Photocatalytic H2-evolution activity was observed for compound 1' under UV light with Pt as a co-catalyst and MeOH as a sacrificial electron donor.

  1. A 3D hybrid praseodymium-antimony-oxochloride compound: single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation and photocatalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Zou, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Gui-Gang; Hu, Bing; Li, Jian-Rong; Feng, Mei-Ling; Wang, Xin-Chen; Huang, Xiao-Ying

    2013-11-01

    A 3D organic-inorganic hybrid compound, (2-MepyH)3[{Fe(1,10-phen)3}3][{Pr4Sb12O18(OH)Cl(11.5)}(TDC)(4.5)({Pr4Sb12O18(OH)Cl(9.5)} Cl)]·3(2-Mepy)·28H2O (1; 2-Mepy=2-methylpyridine, 1,10-phen=1,10-phenanthroline, H2TDC=thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid), was hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Unusually, two kinds of high-nuclearity clusters, namely [(Pr4Sb12O18(OH)Cl11)(COO)5](5-) and [(Pr4Sb12O18(OH)Cl9)Cl(COO)5](4-), coexist in the structure of compound 1; two of the latter clusters are doubly bridged by two μ2-Cl(-) moieties to form a new centrosymmetric dimeric cluster. An unprecedented spontaneous and reversible single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation was observed, which simultaneously involved a notable organic-ligand movement between the metal ions and an alteration of the bridging ion in the dimeric cluster, induced by guest-release/re-adsorption, thereby giving rise to the interconversion between compound 1 and the compound (2-MepyH)3[{Fe(1,10-phen)3}3][{Pr4Sb12O18(OH)Cl(11.5)}(TDC)4({Pr4Sb12O18Cl(10.5)(TDC)(0.5)(H2O)(1.5)}O(0.5))]·25H2O (1'). The mechanism of this transformation has also been discussed in great detail. Photocatalytic H2-evolution activity was observed for compound 1' under UV light with Pt as a co-catalyst and MeOH as a sacrificial electron donor. PMID:24114981

  2. Breakup of Finite-Size Colloidal Aggregates in Turbulent Flow Investigated by Three-Dimensional (3D) Particle Tracking Velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Saha, Debashish; Babler, Matthaus U; Holzner, Markus; Soos, Miroslav; Lüthi, Beat; Liberzon, Alex; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2016-01-12

    Aggregates grown in mild shear flow are released, one at a time, into homogeneous isotropic turbulence, where their motion and intermittent breakup is recorded by three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV). The aggregates have an open structure with a fractal dimension of ∼2.2, and their size is 1.4 ± 0.4 mm, which is large, compared to the Kolmogorov length scale (η = 0.15 mm). 3D-PTV of flow tracers allows for the simultaneous measurement of aggregate trajectories and the full velocity gradient tensor along their pathlines, which enables us to access the Lagrangian stress history of individual breakup events. From this data, we found no consistent pattern that relates breakup to the local flow properties at the point of breakup. Also, the correlation between the aggregate size and both shear stress and normal stress at the location of breakage is found to be weaker, when compared with the correlation between size and drag stress. The analysis suggests that the aggregates are mostly broken due to the accumulation of the drag stress over a time lag on the order of the Kolmogorov time scale. This finding is explained by the fact that the aggregates are large, which gives their motion inertia and increases the time for stress propagation inside the aggregate. Furthermore, it is found that the scaling of the largest fragment and the accumulated stress at breakup follows an earlier established power law, i.e., dfrag ∼ σ(-0.6) obtained from laminar nozzle experiments. This indicates that, despite the large size and the different type of hydrodynamic stress, the microscopic mechanism causing breakup is consistent over a wide range of aggregate size and stress magnitude. PMID:26646289

  3. Breakup of Finite-Size Colloidal Aggregates in Turbulent Flow Investigated by Three-Dimensional (3D) Particle Tracking Velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Saha, Debashish; Babler, Matthaus U; Holzner, Markus; Soos, Miroslav; Lüthi, Beat; Liberzon, Alex; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2016-01-12

    Aggregates grown in mild shear flow are released, one at a time, into homogeneous isotropic turbulence, where their motion and intermittent breakup is recorded by three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV). The aggregates have an open structure with a fractal dimension of ∼2.2, and their size is 1.4 ± 0.4 mm, which is large, compared to the Kolmogorov length scale (η = 0.15 mm). 3D-PTV of flow tracers allows for the simultaneous measurement of aggregate trajectories and the full velocity gradient tensor along their pathlines, which enables us to access the Lagrangian stress history of individual breakup events. From this data, we found no consistent pattern that relates breakup to the local flow properties at the point of breakup. Also, the correlation between the aggregate size and both shear stress and normal stress at the location of breakage is found to be weaker, when compared with the correlation between size and drag stress. The analysis suggests that the aggregates are mostly broken due to the accumulation of the drag stress over a time lag on the order of the Kolmogorov time scale. This finding is explained by the fact that the aggregates are large, which gives their motion inertia and increases the time for stress propagation inside the aggregate. Furthermore, it is found that the scaling of the largest fragment and the accumulated stress at breakup follows an earlier established power law, i.e., dfrag ∼ σ(-0.6) obtained from laminar nozzle experiments. This indicates that, despite the large size and the different type of hydrodynamic stress, the microscopic mechanism causing breakup is consistent over a wide range of aggregate size and stress magnitude.

  4. Exploration and exploitation of water in colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Gómez, Francisco; Blanco, Alvaro; López, Cefe

    2015-05-01

    Water on solid surfaces is ubiquitously found in nature, in most cases due to mere adsorption from ambient moisture. Because porous structures have large surfaces, water may significantly affect their characteristics. This is particularly obvious in systems formed by separate particles, whose interactions are strongly influenced by small amounts of liquid. Water/solid phenomena, like adsorption, condensation, capillary forces, or interparticle cohesion, have typically been studied at relatively large scales down to the microscale, like in wet granular media. However, much less is known about how water is confined and acts at the nanoscale, for example, in the interstices of divided systems, something of utmost importance in many areas of materials science nowadays. With novel approaches, in-depth investigations as to where and how water is placed in the nanometer-sized pores of self-assembled colloidal crystals have been made, which are employed as a well-defined, versatile model system with useful optical properties. In this Progress Report, knowledge gained in the last few years about water distribution in such nanoconfinements is gathered, along with how it can be controlled and the consequences it brings about to extract new or enhance existing material functionalities. New methods developed and new capabilities of standard techniques are described, and the water interplay with the optical, chemical, and mechanical properties of the ensemble are discussed. Some lines for applicability are also highlighted and aspects to be addressed in the near future are critically summarized.

  5. Shape-sensitive crystallization in colloidal superball fluids

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Laura; Soni, Vishal; Ashton, Douglas J.; Pine, David J.; Philipse, Albert P.; Chaikin, Paul M.; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Sacanna, Stefano; Irvine, William T. M.

    2015-01-01

    Guiding the self-assembly of materials by controlling the shape of the individual particle constituents is a powerful approach to material design. We show that colloidal silica superballs crystallize into canted phases in the presence of depletants. Some of these phases are consistent with the so-called “Λ1” lattice that was recently predicted as the densest packing of superdisks. As the size of the depletant is reduced, however, we observe a transition to a square phase. The differences in these entropically stabilized phases result from an interplay between the size of the depletants and the fine structure of the superball shape. We find qualitative agreement of our experimental results both with a phase diagram computed on the basis of the volume accessible to the depletants and with simulations. By using a mixture of depletants, one of which is thermosensitive, we induce solid-to-solid phase transitions between square and canted structures. The use of depletant size to leverage fine features of the shape of particles in driving their self-assembly demonstrates a general and powerful mechanism for engineering novel materials. PMID:25870301

  6. Mineral crystal alignment in mineralized fracture callus determined by 3D small-angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yifei; Manjubala, Inderchand; Roschger, Paul; Schell, Hanna; Duda, Georg N.; Fratzl, Peter

    2010-10-01

    Callus tissue formed during bone fracture healing is a mixture of different tissue types as revealed by histological analysis. But the structural characteristics of mineral crystals within the healing callus are not well known. Since two-dimensional (2D) scanning small-angle X-ray scattering (sSAXS) patterns showed that the size and orientation of callus crystals vary both spatially and temporally [1] and 2D electron microscopic analysis implies an anisotropic property of the callus morphology, the mineral crystals within the callus are also expected to vary in size and orientation in 3D. Three-dimensional small-angle X-ray scattering (3D SAXS), which combines 2D SAXS patterns collected at different angles of sample tilting, has been previously applied to investigate bone minerals in horse radius [2] and oim/oim mouse femur/tibia [3]. We implement a similar 3D SAXS method but with a different way of data analysis to gather information on the mineral alignment in fracture callus. With the proposed accurate yet fast assessment of 3D SAXS information, it was shown that the plate shaped mineral particles in the healing callus were aligned in groups with their predominant orientations occurring as a fiber texture.

  7. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy as a novel tool to probe colloidal and photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    van Schooneveld, Matti M; Hilhorst, Jan; Petukhov, Andrei V; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Wang, Jian; Weckhuysen, Bert M; de Groot, Frank M F; de Smit, Emiel

    2011-03-21

    Photonic crystals consisting of nano- to micrometer-sized building blocks, such as multiple sorts of colloids, have recently received widespread attention. It remains a challenge, however, to adequately probe the internal crystal structure and the corresponding deformations that inhibit the proper functioning of such materials. It is shown that scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) can directly reveal the local structure, orientations, and even deformations in polystyrene and silica colloidal crystals with 30-nm spatial resolution. Moreover, STXM is capable of imaging a diverse range of crystals, including those that are dry and inverted, and provides novel insights complementary to information obtained by benchmark confocal fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy techniques.

  8. Local Stress Control of Spatiotemporal Ordering of Colloidal Crystals in Complex Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shereda, Laura T.; Larson, Ronald G.; Solomon, Michael J.

    2008-07-01

    We show that spin coating, an unsteady, nonuniform shear flow, produces spatiotemporal variation in the crystal order of concentrated colloidal dispersions that is a universal function of the local reduced critical stress and the macroscopic strain. The dependence of the crystal quality of model poly(methyl methacrylate) colloids on radial and axial position, spin speed, and particle size is quantified by confocal microscopy. The coupling of flow-induced crystallization with the centrifugally driven spin coating flow determines local crystal quality without a priori knowledge of the suspension rheology.

  9. Colloidal crystals and water: Perspectives on liquid-solid nanoscale phenomena in wet particulate media.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Gómez, Francisco; Morales-Flórez, Víctor; Morales, Miguel; Blanco, Alvaro; López, Cefe

    2016-08-01

    Solid colloidal ensembles inherently contain water adsorbed from the ambient moisture. This water, confined in the porous network formed by the building submicron spheres, greatly affects the ensemble properties. Inversely, one can benefit from such influence on collective features to explore the water behavior in such nanoconfinements. Recently, novel approaches have been developed to investigate in-depth where and how water is placed in the nanometric pores of self-assembled colloidal crystals. Here, we summarize these advances, along with new ones, that are linked to general interfacial water phenomena like adsorption, capillary forces, and flow. Water-dependent structural properties of the colloidal crystal give clues to the interplay between nanoconfined water and solid fine particles that determines the behavior of ensembles. We elaborate on how the knowledge gained on water in colloidal crystals provides new opportunities for multidisciplinary study of interfacial and nanoconfined liquids and their essential role in the physics of utmost important systems such as particulate media.

  10. Organized Assemblies of Colloids Formed at the Poles of Micrometer-Sized Droplets of Liquid Crystal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Miller, Daniel S.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the formation of organized assemblies of 1 μm-in-diameter colloids (polystyrene (PS)) at the poles of water-dispersed droplets (diameters 7 - 20 μm) of nematic liquid crystal (LC). For 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl droplets decorated with two to five PS colloids, we found 32 distinct arrangements of the colloids to form at the boojums of bipolar droplet configurations. Significantly, all but one of these configurations (a ring comprised of five PS colloids) could be mapped onto a local (non-close packed) hexagonal lattice. To provide insight into the origin of the hexagonal lattice, we investigated planar aqueous—LC interfaces, and found that organized assemblies of PS colloids did not form at these interfaces. Experiments involving the addition of salts revealed that a repulsive interaction of electrostatic origin prevented formation of assemblies at planar interfaces, and that regions of high splay near the poles of the LC droplets generated cohesive interactions between colloids that could overcome the repulsion. Support for this interpretation was obtained from a model that included (i) a long-range attraction between adsorbed colloids and the boojum due to the increasing rate of strain (splay) of LC near the boojum (splay attraction), (ii) an attractive inter-colloid interaction that reflects the quadrupolar symmetry of the strain in the LC around the colloids, and (iii) electrostatic repulsion between colloids. The model predicts that electrostatic repulsion between colloids can lead to a ∼1,000 kBT energy barrier at planar interfaces of LC films, and that the repulsive interaction can be overcome by splay attraction of the colloids to the boojums of the LC droplets. Overall, the results reported in this paper advance our understanding of the directed assembly of colloids at interfaces of LC droplets. PMID:25284139

  11. Growth of columnar hydrogel colloidal crystals in water-organic solvent mixture.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Cai, Tong; Tang, Shijun; Marquez, Manuel; Hu, Zhibing

    2006-01-31

    A novel emulsion method has been demonstrated to grow columnar hydrogel colloidal crystals by mixing an aqueous suspension of poly-N-isopropylacrylamide-co-allylamine microgels with organic solvent, driven by the coalescence of micelles consisting of organic oil droplets coated by many microgels. This method leads to microgel colloidal crystals of several centimeters growing from the top to the bottom along the gravity direction. Both temperature and polymer concentration play critical roles for the formation of columnar crystals. A phase diagram has been determined, and it can be used as a guide to selectively grow different crystals, including columnar crystals and randomly oriented crystals, and enable the coexistence of columnar crystals and randomly oriented crystals.

  12. Avalanches, plasticity, and ordering in colloidal crystals under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, D.; Reichhardt, C. J. Olson; Reichhardt, C.

    2016-06-01

    Using numerical simulations we examine colloids with a long-range Coulomb interaction confined in a two-dimensional trough potential undergoing dynamical compression. As the depth of the confining well is increased, the colloids move via elastic distortions interspersed with intermittent bursts or avalanches of plastic motion. In these avalanches, the colloids rearrange to minimize their colloid-colloid repulsive interaction energy by adopting an average lattice constant that is isotropic despite the anisotropic nature of the compression. The avalanches take the form of shear banding events that decrease or increase the structural order of the system. At larger compression, the avalanches are associated with a reduction of the number of rows of colloids that fit within the confining potential, and between avalanches the colloids can exhibit partially crystalline or anisotropic ordering. The colloid velocity distributions during the avalanches have a non-Gaussian form with power-law tails and exponents that are consistent with those found for the velocity distributions of gliding dislocations. We observe similar behavior when we subsequently decompress the system, and find a partially hysteretic response reflecting the irreversibility of the plastic events.

  13. Avalanches, plasticity, and ordering in colloidal crystals under compression.

    PubMed

    McDermott, D; Reichhardt, C J Olson; Reichhardt, C

    2016-06-01

    Using numerical simulations we examine colloids with a long-range Coulomb interaction confined in a two-dimensional trough potential undergoing dynamical compression. As the depth of the confining well is increased, the colloids move via elastic distortions interspersed with intermittent bursts or avalanches of plastic motion. In these avalanches, the colloids rearrange to minimize their colloid-colloid repulsive interaction energy by adopting an average lattice constant that is isotropic despite the anisotropic nature of the compression. The avalanches take the form of shear banding events that decrease or increase the structural order of the system. At larger compression, the avalanches are associated with a reduction of the number of rows of colloids that fit within the confining potential, and between avalanches the colloids can exhibit partially crystalline or anisotropic ordering. The colloid velocity distributions during the avalanches have a non-Gaussian form with power-law tails and exponents that are consistent with those found for the velocity distributions of gliding dislocations. We observe similar behavior when we subsequently decompress the system, and find a partially hysteretic response reflecting the irreversibility of the plastic events.

  14. Avalanches, plasticity, and ordering in colloidal crystals under compression.

    PubMed

    McDermott, D; Reichhardt, C J Olson; Reichhardt, C

    2016-06-01

    Using numerical simulations we examine colloids with a long-range Coulomb interaction confined in a two-dimensional trough potential undergoing dynamical compression. As the depth of the confining well is increased, the colloids move via elastic distortions interspersed with intermittent bursts or avalanches of plastic motion. In these avalanches, the colloids rearrange to minimize their colloid-colloid repulsive interaction energy by adopting an average lattice constant that is isotropic despite the anisotropic nature of the compression. The avalanches take the form of shear banding events that decrease or increase the structural order of the system. At larger compression, the avalanches are associated with a reduction of the number of rows of colloids that fit within the confining potential, and between avalanches the colloids can exhibit partially crystalline or anisotropic ordering. The colloid velocity distributions during the avalanches have a non-Gaussian form with power-law tails and exponents that are consistent with those found for the velocity distributions of gliding dislocations. We observe similar behavior when we subsequently decompress the system, and find a partially hysteretic response reflecting the irreversibility of the plastic events. PMID:27415320

  15. A common neighbor analysis of crystallization kinetics and excess entropy of charged spherical colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia Bañuelos, Efraín; Contreras Aburto, Claudio; Maldonado Arce, Amir

    2016-03-01

    The topological analysis tool known as the common neighbor analysis (CNA) is used for the first time in this work to analyze crystallization kinetics and excess entropy of charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions. For this purpose, Brownian dynamics computer simulations are implemented to investigate the crystallization kinetics of homogeneously melted colloidal crystals that are composed of hard-core-screened-Coulomb interacting particles. The results are in agreement with recent static structure factor measurements that could indicate the presence of icosahedral units in the metastable melt, and with the fact that weakly screened charged colloids crystallize into body-centered-cubic (bcc) ordering. A two-step crystallization pathway is found, in which the population of bcc-subunit CNA-pairs satisfactorily obeys a Verhulst model. Moreover, the CNA helped to unveil that the excess entropy obeys a quasi-universal functional form, relating the behavior of colloidal, molecular, and metallic liquid systems. The work contributes to the scientific understanding of the crystallization pathway of charged colloids, and to the development of new ways to assess the degree of crystalline order, starting from the excess entropy.

  16. Nanostructured TTT(TCNQ)2 Organic Crystals as Promising Thermoelectric n-Type Materials: 3D Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanduleac, Ionel; Casian, Anatolie

    2016-03-01

    The thermoelectric properties of quasi-one-dimensional TTT(TCNQ)2 organic crystals have been investigated to assess the prospect of using this type of compound as an n-type thermoelectric material. A three-dimensional (3D) physical model was elaborated. This takes into account two of the most important interactions of conduction electrons with longitudinal acoustic phonons—scattering of the electrons' by neighboring molecular chains and scattering by impurities and defects. Electrical conductivity, thermopower, power factor, electronic thermal conductivity, and thermoelectric figure of merit in the direction along the conducting molecular chains were calculated numerically for different crystal purity. It was shown that in stoichiometric compounds the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT remains small even after an increase of crystal perfection. The thermoelectric properties may be significantly enhanced by simultaneous increases of crystal perfection and electron concentration. The latter can be achieved by additional doping with donors. For less pure crystals, the interaction with impurities dominates the weak interchain interaction and the simpler one-dimensional (1D) physical model is applicable. When the impurity scattering is reduced, the interchain interaction begins to limit carrier mobility and use of the 3D physical model is required. The optimum properties enabling prediction of ZT ˜ 1 were determined.

  17. Pressure-Induced Oriented Attachment Growth of Large-Size Crystals for Constructing 3D Ordered Superstructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Lian, Gang; Si, Haibin; Wang, Qilong; Cui, Deliang; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2016-01-26

    Oriented attachment (OA), a nonclassical crystal growth mechanism, provides a powerful bottom-up approach to obtain ordered superstructures, which also demonstrate exciting charge transmission characteristic. However, there is little work observably pronouncing the achievement of 3D OA growth of crystallites with large size (e.g., submicrometer crystals). Here, we report that SnO2 3D ordered superstructures can be synthesized by means of a self-limited assembly assisted by OA in a designed high-pressure solvothermal system. The size of primary building blocks is 200-250 nm, which is significantly larger than that in previous results (normally <10 nm). High pressure plays the key role in the formation of 3D configuration and fusion of adjacent crystals. Furthermore, this high-pressure strategy can be readily expanded to additional materials. We anticipate that the welded structures will constitute an ideal system with relevance to applications in optical responses, lithium ion battery, solar cells, and chemical sensing.

  18. Direct laser-writing of ferroelectric single-crystal waveguide architectures in glass for 3D integrated optics.

    PubMed

    Stone, Adam; Jain, Himanshu; Dierolf, Volkmar; Sakakura, Masaaki; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Miura, Kiyotaka; Hirao, Kazuyuki; Lapointe, Jerome; Kashyap, Raman

    2015-01-01

    Direct three-dimensional laser writing of amorphous waveguides inside glass has been studied intensely as an attractive route for fabricating photonic integrated circuits. However, achieving essential nonlinear-optic functionality in such devices will also require the ability to create high-quality single-crystal waveguides. Femtosecond laser irradiation is capable of crystallizing glass in 3D, but producing optical-quality single-crystal structures suitable for waveguiding poses unique challenges that are unprecedented in the field of crystal growth. In this work, we use a high angular-resolution electron diffraction method to obtain the first conclusive confirmation that uniform single crystals can be grown inside glass by femtosecond laser writing under optimized conditions. We confirm waveguiding capability and present the first quantitative measurement of power transmission through a laser-written crystal-in-glass waveguide, yielding loss of 2.64 dB/cm at 1530 nm. We demonstrate uniformity of the crystal cross-section down the length of the waveguide and quantify its birefringence. Finally, as a proof-of-concept for patterning more complex device geometries, we demonstrate the use of dynamic phase modulation to grow symmetric crystal junctions with single-pass writing. PMID:25988599

  19. Direct laser-writing of ferroelectric single-crystal waveguide architectures in glass for 3D integrated optics

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Adam; Jain, Himanshu; Dierolf, Volkmar; Sakakura, Masaaki; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Miura, Kiyotaka; Hirao, Kazuyuki; Lapointe, Jerome; Kashyap, Raman

    2015-01-01

    Direct three-dimensional laser writing of amorphous waveguides inside glass has been studied intensely as an attractive route for fabricating photonic integrated circuits. However, achieving essential nonlinear-optic functionality in such devices will also require the ability to create high-quality single-crystal waveguides. Femtosecond laser irradiation is capable of crystallizing glass in 3D, but producing optical-quality single-crystal structures suitable for waveguiding poses unique challenges that are unprecedented in the field of crystal growth. In this work, we use a high angular-resolution electron diffraction method to obtain the first conclusive confirmation that uniform single crystals can be grown inside glass by femtosecond laser writing under optimized conditions. We confirm waveguiding capability and present the first quantitative measurement of power transmission through a laser-written crystal-in-glass waveguide, yielding loss of 2.64 dB/cm at 1530 nm. We demonstrate uniformity of the crystal cross-section down the length of the waveguide and quantify its birefringence. Finally, as a proof-of-concept for patterning more complex device geometries, we demonstrate the use of dynamic phase modulation to grow symmetric crystal junctions with single-pass writing. PMID:25988599

  20. Mechanistic principles of colloidal crystal growth by evaporation-induced convective steering.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Damien D; Allen, Joshua; Miller, Michael R; de Santos, Juan M; Kumar, Satish; Norris, David J; Tsapatsis, Michael; Scriven, L E

    2008-12-01

    We simulate evaporation-driven self-assembly of colloidal crystals using an equivalent network model. Relationships between a regular hexagonally close-packed array of hard, monodisperse spheres, the associated pore space, and selectivity mechanisms for face-centered cubic microstructure propagation are described. By accounting for contact line rearrangement and evaporation at a series of exposed menisci, the equivalent network model describes creeping flow of solvent into and through a rigid colloidal crystal. Observations concerning colloidal crystal growth are interpreted in terms of the convective steering hypothesis, which posits that solvent flow into and through the pore space of the crystal may play a major role in colloidal self-assembly. Aspects of the convective steering and deposition of high-Peclet-number rigid spherical particles at a crystal boundary are inferred from spatially resolved solvent flow into the crystal. Gradients in local flow through boundary channels were predicted due to the channels' spatial distribution relative to a pinned free surface contact line. On the basis of a uniform solvent and particle flux as the criterion for stability of a particular growth plane, these network simulations suggest the stability of a declining {311} crystal interface, a symmetry plane which exclusively propagates fcc microstructure. Network simulations of alternate crystal planes suggest preferential growth front evolution to the declining {311} interface, in consistent agreement with the proposed stability mechanism for preferential fcc microstructure propagation in convective assembly.

  1. Directed self-assembly of colloidal particles onto the chemically anchoring patterned surface in a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao; Armas-Pérez, Julio; Hernandez-Ortiz, Juan; de Pablo, Juan; Nealey, Paul

    The defects assisted assembly of colloidal particles works are more focused on the defects created in the bulk or the interface of nematic liquid crystal, which usually observe a group of particles spontaneously forming a chain or aggregating over the defects. The confining surface with specific 3D sculptured structures, such as pyramid or zig-zag grooves, offers the opportunity to isolate the trapped particles into certain position. Here, we explore a new method to direct self-assemble the colloidal particles through manipulating defects on the 2D geometry confined anchoring surface. Since the director of the preferred planar orientation of LCs could be manipulated by the pattern geometry and dimension, the topological defects could be engineered based on multi-stable orientation by designed 2D geometry pattern of different controllable direction at sub-micrometer dimension. We demonstrate that the designed one single middle straight stripe with disjoint two groups of straight stripe array on both side of the middle stripe as 45 angle of different orientation director could control the distortion of the disjoint gap space thus acting as defects template to trap the colloidal particles directed self-assembly at the designed positions. Through anchoring distribution on the pattern areas, geometry design of pattern, and also the external electric field applied on the system, those defects areas could be generate, erase, resume or even correct.

  2. Preparation and Optical Properties of Spherical Inverse Opals by Liquid Phase Deposition Using Spherical Colloidal Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoi, Y.; Tominaga, T.

    2013-03-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) inverse opals in spherical shape were prepared by liquid phase deposition (LPD) using spherical colloidal crystals as templates. Spherical colloidal crystals were produced by ink-jet drying technique. Aqueous emulsion droplets that contain polystyrene latex particles were ejected into air and dried. Closely packed colloidal crystals with spherical shape were obtained. The obtained spherical colloidal crystals were used as templates for the LPD. The templates were dispersed in the deposition solution of the LPD, i.e. a mixed solution of ammonium hexafluorotitanate and boric acid and reacted for 4 h at 30 °C. After the LPD process, the interstitial spaces of the spherical colloidal crystals were completely filled with titanium oxide. Subsequent heat treatment resulted in removal of templates and spherical titanium dioxide inverse opals. The spherical shape of the template was retained. SEM observations indicated that the periodic ordered voids were surrounded by titanium dioxide. The optical reflectance spectra indicated that the optical properties of the spherical titanium dioxide inverse opals were due to Bragg diffractions from the ordered structure. Filling in the voids of the inverse opals with different solvents caused remarkable changes in the reflectance peak.

  3. Modeling of protein electrophoresis in silica colloidal crystals having brush layers of polyacrylamide

    PubMed Central

    Birdsall, Robert E.; Koshel, Brooke M.; Hua, Yimin; Ratnayaka, Saliya N.; Wirth, Mary J.

    2013-01-01

    Sieving of proteins in silica colloidal crystals of mm dimensions is characterized for particle diameters of nominally 350 and 500 nm, where the colloidal crystals are chemically modified with a brush layer of polyacrylamide. A model is developed that relates the reduced electrophoretic mobility to the experimentally measurable porosity. The model fits the data with no adjustable parameters for the case of silica colloidal crystals packed in capillaries, for which independent measurements of the pore radii were made from flow data. The model also fits the data for electrophoresis in a highly ordered colloidal crystal formed in a channel, where the unknown pore radius was used as a fitting parameter. Plate heights as small as 0.4 μm point to the potential for miniaturized separations. Band broadening increases as the pore radius approaches the protein radius, indicating that the main contribution to broadening is the spatial heterogeneity of the pore radius. The results quantitatively support the notion that sieving occurs for proteins in silica colloidal crystals, and facilitate design of new separations that would benefit from miniaturization. PMID:23229163

  4. Colloidal nanoparticles trapped by liquid-crystal defect lines: A lattice Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Regina; Skačej, Gregor; Sastry, V. S. S.; Žumer, Slobodan

    2014-09-01

    Lattice-based Monte Carlo simulations are performed to study a confined liquid crystal system with a topological disclination line entangling a colloidal nanoparticle. In our microscopic study the disclination line is stretched by moving the colloid, as in laser tweezing experiments, which results in a restoring force attempting to minimize the disclination length. From constant-force simulations we extract the corresponding disclination line tension, estimated as ˜50 pN, and observe its decrease with increasing temperature.

  5. Photonic control of surface anchoring on solid colloids dispersed in liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Prathap Chandran, S; Mondiot, F; Mondain-Monval, O; Loudet, J C

    2011-12-20

    The anchoring of liquid-crystal (LC) mesogens to the surfaces of colloids is an important factor in determining intercolloidal interactions and the symmetry of the ensuing colloidal assembly in nematic colloids. The dynamic control of surface anchoring could therefore provide a handle to tune the colloidal organization and resulting properties in these systems. In this article, we report our results on the study of thermotropic nematic LC (E7) dispersions of silica and glass microcolloids bearing photosensitive surface azobenzene groups. By the photoinduced modulation of the colloidal-LC interfacial properties, due to the trans-cis isomerization of azobenzene units, we tune the anchoring on silica colloids from homeotropic (trans-azobenzene) to homogeneous planar (cis-azobenzene) reversibly. In tune with the change in surface anchoring, the interparticle interactions were also dictated by dipolar and quadrupolar symmetries for homeotropic and homogeneous planar anchoring, respectively. In our experiments, we find that, in addition to the isomerization state of the surface-bound azobenzene units, the nature of the colloid plays a crucial role in determining the anchoring state obtained on applying photostimuli. We also study the LC anchoring on colloids as a function of the azobenzene surface density and find that beyond a threshold value the anchoring properties remain invariant.

  6. Molding resonant energy transfer by colloidal crystal: Dexter transfer and electroluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Urbina, Luis; Kolaric, Branko; Libaers, Wim; Clays, Koen

    2010-05-01

    Building photonic crystals by combination of colloidal ordering and metal sputtering we were able to construct a system sensitive to an electrical field. In corresponding crystals we embedded the Dexter pair (Ir(ppy3) and BAlq) and investigated the influence of the band gap on the resonant energy transfer when the system is excited by light and by an electric field respectively. Our investigations extend applications of photonic crystals into the field of electroluminescence and LED technologies.

  7. Structural characterization of colloidal crystals and inverse opals using transmission X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo-Han; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Liao, Chen-Hong; Wu, Pu-Wei; Song, Yen-Fang

    2014-07-15

    A nondestructive tomographic technique was used to determine the crystallographic information of colloidal crystals comprising of polystyrene (PS) microspheres, as well as their silver inverse opals. The properties of the colloidal crystals, such as defects, grain size, grain boundaries, stacking sequence, and grain orientation, were determined using the full field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) with a spatial resolution of 50 nm. The PS microspheres (500-750 nm) which underwent a vertical electrophoresis process to form a face-centered cubic (fcc) close-packed structure with an ABCABC packing sequence. In addition, the colloidal crystal exhibited multiple grains, and an orientation variation of 6.1° in the stacking direction between two neighboring grains. PMID:24863783

  8. Structural characterization of colloidal crystals and inverse opals using transmission X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo-Han; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Liao, Chen-Hong; Wu, Pu-Wei; Song, Yen-Fang

    2014-07-15

    A nondestructive tomographic technique was used to determine the crystallographic information of colloidal crystals comprising of polystyrene (PS) microspheres, as well as their silver inverse opals. The properties of the colloidal crystals, such as defects, grain size, grain boundaries, stacking sequence, and grain orientation, were determined using the full field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) with a spatial resolution of 50 nm. The PS microspheres (500-750 nm) which underwent a vertical electrophoresis process to form a face-centered cubic (fcc) close-packed structure with an ABCABC packing sequence. In addition, the colloidal crystal exhibited multiple grains, and an orientation variation of 6.1° in the stacking direction between two neighboring grains.

  9. Spontaneous Formation of Eutectic Crystal Structures in Binary and Ternary Charged Colloids due to Depletion Attraction

    PubMed Central

    Toyotama, Akiko; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-01-01

    Crystallization of colloids has extensively been studied for past few decades as models to study phase transition in general. Recently, complex crystal structures in multi-component colloids, including alloy and eutectic structures, have attracted considerable attention. However, the fabrication of 2D area-filling colloidal eutectics has not been reported till date. Here, we report formation of eutectic structures in binary and ternary aqueous colloids due to depletion attraction. We used charged particles + linear polyelectrolyte systems, in which the interparticle interaction could be represented as a sum of the electrostatic, depletion, and van der Waals forces. The interaction was tunable at a lengthscale accessible to direct observation by optical microscopy. The eutectic structures were formed because of interplay of crystallization of constituent components and accompanying fractionation. An observed binary phase diagram, defined by a mixing ratio and inverse area fraction of the particles, was analogous to that for atomic and molecular eutectic systems. This new method also allows the adjustment of both the number and wavelengths of Bragg diffraction peaks. Furthermore, these eutectic structures could be immobilized in polymer gel to produce self-standing materials. The present findings will be useful in the design of the optical properties of colloidal crystals. PMID:26984298

  10. Spontaneous Formation of Eutectic Crystal Structures in Binary and Ternary Charged Colloids due to Depletion Attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyotama, Akiko; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-03-01

    Crystallization of colloids has extensively been studied for past few decades as models to study phase transition in general. Recently, complex crystal structures in multi-component colloids, including alloy and eutectic structures, have attracted considerable attention. However, the fabrication of 2D area-filling colloidal eutectics has not been reported till date. Here, we report formation of eutectic structures in binary and ternary aqueous colloids due to depletion attraction. We used charged particles + linear polyelectrolyte systems, in which the interparticle interaction could be represented as a sum of the electrostatic, depletion, and van der Waals forces. The interaction was tunable at a lengthscale accessible to direct observation by optical microscopy. The eutectic structures were formed because of interplay of crystallization of constituent components and accompanying fractionation. An observed binary phase diagram, defined by a mixing ratio and inverse area fraction of the particles, was analogous to that for atomic and molecular eutectic systems. This new method also allows the adjustment of both the number and wavelengths of Bragg diffraction peaks. Furthermore, these eutectic structures could be immobilized in polymer gel to produce self-standing materials. The present findings will be useful in the design of the optical properties of colloidal crystals.

  11. Direct growth of single-crystal Pt nanowires on Sn@CNT Nanocable: 3D electrodes for highly active electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuhui; Zhang, Gaixia; Geng, Dongsheng; Chen, Yougui; Banis, Mohammad Norouzi; Li, Ruying; Cai, Mei; Sun, Xueliang

    2010-01-18

    A newly designed and fabricated novel three dimensional (3D) nanocomposite composed of single-crystal Pt nanowires (PtNW) and a coaxial nanocable support consisting of a tin nanowire and a carbon nanotube (Sn@CNT) is reported. This nanocomposite is fabricated by the synthesis of Sn@CNT nanocables by means of a thermal evaporation method, followed by the direct growth with PtNWs through a facile aqueous solution approach at room temperature. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the PtNW--Sn@CNT 3D electrode exhibits enhanced electrocatalytic performance in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), methanol oxidation (MOR) for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), and CO tolerance compared with commercial ETEK Pt/C catalyst made of Pt nanoparticles. PMID:20024993

  12. Shear moduli in bcc-fcc structure transition of colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongwei; Xu, Shenghua; Sun, Zhiwei; Zhu, Ruzeng

    2015-10-14

    Shear moduli variation in the metastable-stable structure transition of charged colloidal crystals was investigated by the combination techniques of torsional resonance spectroscopy and reflection spectrometer. Modulus of the system increases with the proceeding of the transition process and it finally reaches the maximum value at the end of the transition. For colloidal crystals in stable state, the experimental moduli show good consistence with theoretical expectations. However, in the transition process, the moduli are much smaller than theoretical ones and this can be chalked up to crystalline imperfection in the transition state.

  13. Modeling induction heating and 3-D heat transfer for growth of rectangular crystals using FIDAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, L. J.; Martin, R. W.

    1988-09-01

    We are developing a process to grow large rectangular crystals for use as solid state lasers by a Bridgman-like method. The process is based on induction heating of two graphite susceptors which transfer energy to an ampoule containing the melt and crystal. The induction heating version of FIDAP developed by Gresho and Derby is applied to this system to determine the power deposition profile in electrically conducting regions. The calculated power is subsequently used as a source term in the heat equation to calculate the temperature profile. Results are presented which examine the sensitivity of the system to electrical and thermal conductivities, and design modifications are illustrated which could improve the temperature field for crystal growth applications.

  14. Dielectrophoretic and electrophoretic force analysis of colloidal fullerenes in a nematic liquid-crystal medium.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anoop Kumar; Kim, Miyoung; Kim, Sung Min; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Kyu; Lee, Young Hee; Lee, Myong-Hoon; Lee, Seung Hee

    2009-11-01

    This research focuses on the electrokinetic motion of fullerenes suspended in liquid crystal host medium, which are investigated in the homogeneously aligned nematic liquid crystal cells driven by in-plane field. We investigated the effect of electrophoretic and dielectrophoretic forces and related parameters of the colloidal fullerenes in liquid crystals. The electrophoretic mobility, zeta potential, and critical voltage have been evaluated. Fullerenes suspended in liquid crystal medium migrated toward the positive electrode, but were pulled back in the opposite direction when the polarity was reversed especially at low frequency range (<5 Hz) . At higher electric field and higher frequency ranges, the net displacement of fullerenes has been observed. We demonstrate that the dielectrophoretic force dominated the motion in the colloidal fullerenes by a proper analysis of different electrophoretic parameters. In addition, the electrodynamics of fullerenes was explained by applying the theory of the dielectrophoresis and Schwarz's formula. We propose a model to estimate the density of fullerenes suspended in liquid crystal medium.

  15. Image forces on 3d dislocation structures in crystals of finite volume

    SciTech Connect

    El-Azab, A.

    1999-07-01

    The present work aims at studying the image stress and image Peach-Koehler force fields for three-dimensional dislocation configurations in a single crystal of finite volume. It is shown that the image stress field is significant within the entire crystal volume, and that the image Peach-Koehler force can be of the same order of magnitude as the direct interaction force calculated from the infinite domain solution. The results demonstrate that image stress gives rise to long-range interaction forces that are important in meso-scale dynamics of dislocation structures.

  16. Image Forces on 3-D Dislocation Structures in Crystals of Finite Volume

    SciTech Connect

    El-Azab, Anter ); V.V. Bulatov

    1999-01-01

    The present work aims at studying the image stress and image Peach-Koehler force fields for three-dimensional dislocation configurations in a single crystal of finite volume. It is shown that the image stress field is significant within the entire crystal volume, and that the image Peach-Koehler force can be of the same order of magnitude as the direct interaction force calculated from the infinite domain solution. The results demonstrate that image stress gives rise to long-range interaction forces that are important in meso-scale dynamics of dislocation structures.

  17. Growth of highly ordered colloidal photonic crystals using a modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Yong, Virginia; Aagesen, Larry K; Chang, Robert P H

    2008-10-29

    Colloidal photonic crystals were grown using a vertical deposition method. The effect of colloidal concentration and deposition rate on crystalline quality and domain size was studied by means of response surface design. The crystalline quality was assessed using the optical reflectance. The results show that a strong negative correlation exists between the reflectance and the full width at half-maximum (FWHM), as illustrated by the close optimal region between maximizing reflectance and minimizing FWHM. For reflectance and FWHM, the quadratic effect of colloidal concentration is highly significant. For domain size, the colloidal concentration-lifting speed interaction effect was found to be significant. The observed colloidal concentration-lifting speed interaction effect explains the controversy that a low deposition rate is desirable at low colloidal concentrations, whereas a high deposition rate is favorable at high colloidal concentrations. Predictive models relating the important factors to the reflectance, FWHM, and domain size are proposed in the paper. The resulting optimal recipe shows a well-ordered structure with good optical reflectance, consistent with the prediction from modeling.

  18. Edge pinning and transformation of defect lines induced by faceted colloidal rings in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Liu, Qingkun; Yuan, Ye; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-06-01

    Nematic colloids exhibit a large diversity of topological defects and structures induced by colloidal particles in the orientationally ordered liquid crystal host fluids. These defects and field configurations define elastic interactions and medium-mediated self-assembly, as well as serve as model systems in exploiting the richness of interactions between topologies and geometries of colloidal surfaces, nematic fields, and topological singularities induced by particles in the nematic bulk and at nematic-colloidal interfaces. Here we demonstrate formation of quarter-strength surface-pinned disclinations, as well as a large variety of director field configurations with splitting and reconnections of singular defect lines, prompted by colloidal particles with sharp edges and size large enough to define strong boundary conditions. Using examples of faceted ring-shaped particles of genus g =1 , we explore transformation of defect lines as they migrate between locations in the bulk of the nematic host to edge-pinned locations at the surfaces of particles and vice versa, showing that this behavior is compliant with topological constraints defined by mathematical theorems. We discuss how transformation of bulk and surface defect lines induced by faceted colloids can enrich the diversity of elasticity-mediated colloidal interactions and how these findings may impinge on prospects of their controlled reconfigurable self-assembly in nematic hosts.

  19. Edge pinning and transformation of defect lines induced by faceted colloidal rings in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Liu, Qingkun; Yuan, Ye; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2016-06-01

    Nematic colloids exhibit a large diversity of topological defects and structures induced by colloidal particles in the orientationally ordered liquid crystal host fluids. These defects and field configurations define elastic interactions and medium-mediated self-assembly, as well as serve as model systems in exploiting the richness of interactions between topologies and geometries of colloidal surfaces, nematic fields, and topological singularities induced by particles in the nematic bulk and at nematic-colloidal interfaces. Here we demonstrate formation of quarter-strength surface-pinned disclinations, as well as a large variety of director field configurations with splitting and reconnections of singular defect lines, prompted by colloidal particles with sharp edges and size large enough to define strong boundary conditions. Using examples of faceted ring-shaped particles of genus g=1, we explore transformation of defect lines as they migrate between locations in the bulk of the nematic host to edge-pinned locations at the surfaces of particles and vice versa, showing that this behavior is compliant with topological constraints defined by mathematical theorems. We discuss how transformation of bulk and surface defect lines induced by faceted colloids can enrich the diversity of elasticity-mediated colloidal interactions and how these findings may impinge on prospects of their controlled reconfigurable self-assembly in nematic hosts. PMID:27415331

  20. Experimental studies of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles doped silica matrix 3D magneto-photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Diwan, E.; Royer, F.; Kekesi, R.; Jamon, D.; Blanc-Mignon, M. F.; Neveu, S.; Rousseau, J. J.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present the synthesis and the optical properties of 3D magneto-photonic structures. The elaboration process consists in firstly preparing then infiltrating polystyrene direct opals with a homogeneous solution of sol-gel silica precursors doped by cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, and finally dissolving the polystyrene spheres. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images of the prepared samples clearly evidence a periodic arrangement. Using a home-made polarimetric optical bench, the transmittance as a function of the wavelength, the Faraday rotation as a function of the applied magnetic field, and the Faraday ellipticity as a function of the wavelength and as a function of the applied magnetic field were measured. The existence of deep photonic band gaps (PBG), the unambiguous magnetic character of the samples and the qualitative modification of the Faraday ellipticity in the area of the PBG are evidenced.

  1. Polystyrene colloidal crystals: Interface controlled thermal conductivity in an open-porous mesoparticle superstructure.

    PubMed

    Nutz, Fabian A; Ruckdeschel, Pia; Retsch, Markus

    2015-11-01

    Colloidal crystals typically consist of sub-micron sized monodisperse particles, which are densely packed on a face centered cubic lattice. While many properties of this material class have been studied over the past decades, little is known about their thermal transport properties. The high amount of interfaces and their small interparticle contact area should result in efficient thermal insulation. Using laser flash analysis we report for the first time on the temperature dependent thermal conductivity of a freestanding 366 nm polystyrene (PS) colloidal crystal. Macroscopic monoliths of these samples were fabricated by colloidal self-assembly. We demonstrate a very low thermal conductivity κ of 51 mW K(-1) m(-1) (κ of bulk PS∼140 mW K(-1) m(-1)). Remarkably, this low thermal conductivity is reached at a comparatively high density of 750 kg m(-3). It can be further increased by almost 300% upon film formation and loss of the colloidal mesostructure. Additionally, this open porous structure is largely independent of the surrounding atmosphere. This can be rationalized by the small size (∼100 nm) of the pores present within this colloidal crystal.

  2. A generalized crystal-cutting method for modeling arbitrarily oriented crystals in 3D periodic simulation cells with applications to crystal-crystal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroonblawd, Matthew P.; Mathew, Nithin; Jiang, Shan; Sewell, Thomas D.

    2016-10-01

    A Generalized Crystal-Cutting Method (GCCM) is developed that automates construction of three-dimensionally periodic simulation cells containing arbitrarily oriented single crystals and thin films, two-dimensionally (2D) infinite crystal-crystal homophase and heterophase interfaces, and nanostructures with intrinsic N-fold interfaces. The GCCM is based on a simple mathematical formalism that facilitates easy definition of constraints on cut crystal geometries. The method preserves the translational symmetry of all Bravais lattices and thus can be applied to any crystal described by such a lattice including complicated, low-symmetry molecular crystals. Implementations are presented with carefully articulated combinations of loop searches and constraints that drastically reduce computational complexity compared to simple loop searches. Orthorhombic representations of monoclinic and triclinic crystals found using the GCCM overcome some limitations in standard distributions of popular molecular dynamics software packages. Stability of grain boundaries in β-HMX was investigated using molecular dynamics and molecular statics simulations with 2D infinite crystal-crystal homophase interfaces created using the GCCM. The order of stabilities for the four grain boundaries studied is predicted to correlate with the relative prominence of particular crystal faces in lab-grown β-HMX crystals. We demonstrate how nanostructures can be constructed through simple constraints applied in the GCCM framework. Example GCCM constructions are shown that are relevant to some current problems in materials science, including shock sensitivity of explosives, layered electronic devices, and pharmaceuticals.

  3. The dominant role of chalcogen bonding in the crystal packing of 2D/3D aromatics.

    PubMed

    Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Přáda, Adam; Padělková, Zdeňka; Pecina, Adam; Macháček, Jan; Lepšík, Martin; Holub, Josef; Růžička, Aleš; Hnyk, Drahomír; Hobza, Pavel

    2014-09-15

    The chalcogen bond is a nonclassical σ-hole-based noncovalent interaction with emerging applications in medicinal chemistry and material science. It is found in organic compounds, including 2D aromatics, but has so far never been observed in 3D aromatic inorganic boron hydrides. Thiaboranes, harboring a sulfur heteroatom in the icosahedral cage, are candidates for the formation of chalcogen bonds. The phenyl-substituted thiaborane, synthesized and crystalized in this study, forms sulfur⋅⋅⋅π type chalcogen bonds. Quantum chemical analysis revealed that these interactions are considerably stronger than both in their organic counterparts and in the known halogen bond. The reason is the existence of a highly positive σ-hole on the positively charged sulfur atom. This discovery expands the possibilities of applying substituted boron clusters in crystal engineering and drug design.

  4. Dehydration induced 2D-to-3D crystal-to-crystal network re-assembly and ferromagnetism tuning within two chiral copper(II)-tartrate coordination polymers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yen-Hsiang; Lee, Szu-Hsuan; Chiang, Jung-Chun; Chen, Po-Chen; Chien, Po-Hsiu; Yang, Chen-I

    2013-12-28

    The synthesis of two homochiral l-tartrate-copper(II) coordination polymers, [Cu2(C4H4O6)2(H2O)2·xH2O]n (1), and [Cu(C4H4O6)]n (2), under hydrothermal conditions, is reported. Compound 1 adopts a 2D layered network structure with a space group of P21, while compound 2 features a 3D network structure with a space group P21212. Interestingly, the 2D layered structure of compound 1 can undergo a crystal-to-crystal network reassembly, with the formation of the 3D network structure of compound 2 under dehydration conditions. Variable temperature and field magnetic studies reveal the existence of a distinct ferromagnetic interaction between Cu(2+) ions as the result of distinct syn-anti carboxylate bridging coordination modes.

  5. A 3D MOF showing unprecedented solvent-induced single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation and excellent CO2 adsorption selectivity at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Qin, Tao; Gong, Jun; Ma, Junhan; Wang, Xin; Wang, Yonghua; Xu, Yan; Shen, Xuan; Zhu, Dunru

    2014-12-28

    A water stable porous 3D metal-organic framework, [Cu3L2(μ3-OH)2(μ2-H2O)]·2DMA (1, mother crystal, H2L = 2,2'-dinitrobiphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid, DMA = N,N-dimethylacetamide), shows unprecedented irreversible solvent-induced substitutions of bridging aqua ligands and guest-exchanges in single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SCSC) transformations at room temperature (RT), producing quantitatively three daughter crystals, [Cu3L2(μ3-OH)2]·2S (2: 2A, S = acetone; 2B, S = 2-propanol; 2C, S = 2-butanol), which exhibit reversible interconversion by guest-exchanges at RT in SCSC transformations. MOF 1 shows excellent separation selectivity (128) of CO2/N2 at RT and is a better sorbent of micro-solid-phase extraction (μ-SPE) than currently known benchmark ZIF-8.

  6. Hierarchical self-assembly of hexagonal single-crystal nanosheets into 3D layered superlattices with high conductivity.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yulun; Shen, Yuhua; Yang, Liangbao; Han, Bin; Huang, Fangzhi; Li, Shikuo; Chu, Zhuwang; Xie, Anjian

    2012-06-21

    While the number of man-made nano superstructures realized by self-assembly is growing in recent years, assemblies of conductive polymer nanocrystals, especially for superlattices, are still a significant challenge, not only because of the simplicity of the shape of the nanocrystal building blocks and their interactions, but also because of the poor control over these parameters in the fabrication of more elaborate nanocrystals. Here, we firstly report a facile and general route to a new generation of 3D layered superlattices of polyaniline doped with CSA (PANI-CSA) and show how PANI crystallize and self-assemble, in a suitable single solution environment. In cyclohexane, 1D amorphous nanofibers transformed to 1D nanorods as building blocks, and then to 2D single-crystal nanosheets with a hexagonal phase, and lastly to 3D ordered layered superlattices with the narrowest polydispersity value (M(w)/M(n) = 1.47). Remarkably, all the instructions for the hierarchical self-assembly are encoded in the layered shape in other non-polar solvents (hexane, octane) and their conductivity in the π-π stacking direction is improved to about 50 S cm(-1), which is even higher than that of the highest previously reported value (16 S cm(-1)). The method used in this study is greatly expected to be readily scalable to produce superlattices of conductive polymers with high quality and low cost. PMID:22609947

  7. Hierarchical self-assembly of hexagonal single-crystal nanosheets into 3D layered superlattices with high conductivity.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yulun; Shen, Yuhua; Yang, Liangbao; Han, Bin; Huang, Fangzhi; Li, Shikuo; Chu, Zhuwang; Xie, Anjian

    2012-06-21

    While the number of man-made nano superstructures realized by self-assembly is growing in recent years, assemblies of conductive polymer nanocrystals, especially for superlattices, are still a significant challenge, not only because of the simplicity of the shape of the nanocrystal building blocks and their interactions, but also because of the poor control over these parameters in the fabrication of more elaborate nanocrystals. Here, we firstly report a facile and general route to a new generation of 3D layered superlattices of polyaniline doped with CSA (PANI-CSA) and show how PANI crystallize and self-assemble, in a suitable single solution environment. In cyclohexane, 1D amorphous nanofibers transformed to 1D nanorods as building blocks, and then to 2D single-crystal nanosheets with a hexagonal phase, and lastly to 3D ordered layered superlattices with the narrowest polydispersity value (M(w)/M(n) = 1.47). Remarkably, all the instructions for the hierarchical self-assembly are encoded in the layered shape in other non-polar solvents (hexane, octane) and their conductivity in the π-π stacking direction is improved to about 50 S cm(-1), which is even higher than that of the highest previously reported value (16 S cm(-1)). The method used in this study is greatly expected to be readily scalable to produce superlattices of conductive polymers with high quality and low cost.

  8. Finite particle size drives defect-mediated domain structures in strongly confined colloidal liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gârlea, Ioana C.; Mulder, Pieter; Alvarado, José; Dammone, Oliver; Aarts, Dirk G. A. L.; Lettinga, M. Pavlik; Koenderink, Gijsje H.; Mulder, Bela M.

    2016-06-01

    When liquid crystals are confined to finite volumes, the competition between the surface anchoring imposed by the boundaries and the intrinsic orientational symmetry-breaking of these materials gives rise to a host of intriguing phenomena involving topological defect structures. For synthetic molecular mesogens, like the ones used in liquid-crystal displays, these defect structures are independent of the size of the molecules and well described by continuum theories. In contrast, colloidal systems such as carbon nanotubes and biopolymers have micron-sized lengths, so continuum descriptions are expected to break down under strong confinement conditions. Here, we show, by a combination of computer simulations and experiments with virus particles in tailor-made disk- and annulus-shaped microchambers, that strong confinement of colloidal liquid crystals leads to novel defect-stabilized symmetrical domain structures. These finite-size effects point to a potential for designing optically active microstructures, exploiting the as yet unexplored regime of highly confined liquid crystals.

  9. Finite particle size drives defect-mediated domain structures in strongly confined colloidal liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Gârlea, Ioana C; Mulder, Pieter; Alvarado, José; Dammone, Oliver; Aarts, Dirk G A L; Lettinga, M Pavlik; Koenderink, Gijsje H; Mulder, Bela M

    2016-06-29

    When liquid crystals are confined to finite volumes, the competition between the surface anchoring imposed by the boundaries and the intrinsic orientational symmetry-breaking of these materials gives rise to a host of intriguing phenomena involving topological defect structures. For synthetic molecular mesogens, like the ones used in liquid-crystal displays, these defect structures are independent of the size of the molecules and well described by continuum theories. In contrast, colloidal systems such as carbon nanotubes and biopolymers have micron-sized lengths, so continuum descriptions are expected to break down under strong confinement conditions. Here, we show, by a combination of computer simulations and experiments with virus particles in tailor-made disk- and annulus-shaped microchambers, that strong confinement of colloidal liquid crystals leads to novel defect-stabilized symmetrical domain structures. These finite-size effects point to a potential for designing optically active microstructures, exploiting the as yet unexplored regime of highly confined liquid crystals.

  10. Clusters, molecular layers, and 3D crystals of water on Ni(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Thürmer, Konrad; Nie, Shu; Bartelt, Norman C.; Feibelman, Peter J.

    2014-11-14

    We examined the growth and stability of ice layers on Ni(111) up to ∼7 molecular layers (ML) thick using scanning tunneling microscopy. At low coverage, films were comprised of ∼1 nm wide two-dimensional (2D) clusters. Only above ∼0.5 ML did patches of continuous 2D layers emerge, coexisting with the clusters until the first ML was complete. The structure of the continuous layer is clearly different from that of the 2D clusters. Subsequently, a second molecular layer grew on top of the first. 3D crystallites started to form only after this 2nd ML was complete. 2D clusters re-appeared when thicker films were partially evaporated, implying that these clusters represent the equilibrium configuration at low coverage. Binding energies and image simulations computed with density functional theory suggest that the 2D clusters are partially dissociated and surrounded by H adatoms. The complete 2D layer contains only intact water molecules because of the lack of favorable binding sites for H atoms. We propose molecular structures for the 2D layer that are composed of the same pentagon-heptagon binding motif and water density observed on Pt(111). The similarity of the water structures on Pt and Ni suggests a general prescription for generating low-energy configurations on close-packed metal substrates.

  11. Crystal structure of human glyoxalase I--evidence for gene duplication and 3D domain swapping.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, A D; Olin, B; Ridderström, M; Mannervik, B; Jones, T A

    1997-01-01

    The zinc metalloenzyme glyoxalase I catalyses the glutathione-dependent inactivation of toxic methylglyoxal. The structure of the dimeric human enzyme in complex with S-benzyl-glutathione has been determined by multiple isomorphous replacement (MIR) and refined at 2.2 A resolution. Each monomer consists of two domains. Despite only low sequence homology between them, these domains are structurally equivalent and appear to have arisen by a gene duplication. On the other hand, there is no structural homology to the 'glutathione binding domain' found in other glutathione-linked proteins. 3D domain swapping of the N- and C-terminal domains has resulted in the active site being situated in the dimer interface, with the inhibitor and essential zinc ion interacting with side chains from both subunits. Two structurally equivalent residues from each domain contribute to a square pyramidal coordination of the zinc ion, rarely seen in zinc enzymes. Comparison of glyoxalase I with other known structures shows the enzyme to belong to a new structural family which includes the Fe2+-dependent dihydroxybiphenyl dioxygenase and the bleomycin resistance protein. This structural family appears to allow members to form with or without domain swapping. PMID:9218781

  12. Slow to superluminal light waves in thin 3D photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Galisteo-López, J F; Galli, M; Balestreri, A; Patrini, M; Andreani, L C; López, C

    2007-11-12

    Phase measurements on self-assembled three-dimensional photonic crystals show that the group velocity of light can flip from small positive (slow) to negative (superluminal) values in samples of a few mum size. This phenomenon takes place in a narrow spectral range around the second-order stop band and follows from coupling to weakly dispersive photonic bands associated with multiple Bragg diffraction. The observations are well accounted for by theoretical calculations of the phase delay and of photonic states in the finite-sized systems.

  13. The Influence of Gravity on Nucleation, Growth, Stability and Structure in Crystallizing Colloidal Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gast, Alice P.

    1996-01-01

    Our goal is to understand the dynamics of particles within colloidal crystals. In particular, we focus on the influence of the cell walls and gravity on the particle dynamics. In this study, we will use a novel light scattering experiment, known as diffusing wave spectroscopy, to probe particle motions in turbid suspensions. This is a noninvasive experimental probe of interparticle dynamics.

  14. Self-assembled coffee-ring colloidal crystals for structurally colored contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhuoying; Li, Linliang; Liu, Panmiao; Zheng, Fuyin; Guo, Liuyang; Zhao, Yuanjin; Jin, Lu; Li, Tingting; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-02-25

    A circlular structural-colored contact lens is reported, which is fabricated by replicating self-assembled colloidal photonic crystal templates. The structural-colored contact lenses not only display variable and brilliant color under light illumination, but also avoid the addition of any colorants to the hydrogel lenses and prevent the potential harm posed by traditional colored contact lenses. PMID:25331232

  15. Fabrication of fully undercut ZnO-based photonic crystal membranes with 3D optical confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Sandro Phil; Albert, Maximilian; Meier, Cedrik

    2016-09-01

    For studying nonlinear photonics, a highly controllable emission of photons with specific properties is essential. Two-dimensional photonic crystals (PhCs) have proven to be an excellent candidate for manipulating photon emission due to resonator-based effects. Additionally, zinc oxide (ZnO) has high susceptibility coefficients and therefore shows pronounced nonlinear effects. However, in order to fabricate such a cavity, a fully undercut ZnO membrane is required, which is a challenging problem due to poor selectivity of the known etching chemistry for typical substrates such as sapphire or ZnO. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate and characterize fully undercut photonic crystal membranes based on a thin ZnO film sandwiched between two layers of silicon dioxide (SiO2) on silicon substrates, from the initial growth of the heterostructure throughout the entire fabrication process. This process leads to a fully undercut ZnO-based membrane with adjustable optical confinement in all three dimensions. Finally, photonic resonances within the tailored photonic band gap are achieved due to optimized PhC-design (in-plane) and total internal reflection in the z-direction. The presented approach enables a variety of photon based resonator structures in the UV regime for studying nonlinear effects, including photon-exciton coupling and all-optical switching.

  16. Inverted Yablonovite-like 3D photonic crystals fabricated by laser nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkin, Ivan I.; Samusev, Kirill B.; Rybin, Mikhail V.; Limonov, Mikhail F.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Gaidukeviciute, Arune; Kiyan, Roman V.; Chichkov, Boris N.

    2012-06-01

    We report on the fabrication of inverted Yablonovite-like three-dimensional photonic crystals by nonlinear optical nanolithography based on two-photon polymerization of a zirconium propoxide hybrid organic-inorganic material with Irgacure 369 as photo-initiator. Advantage of this material is ultra-low shrinkage that guaranty high fabrication fidelity. Images of the fabricated structure are obtained with a scanning electron microscope. The photonic crystal consists of three sets of nearly cylindrical structural elements directed along the three lattice vectors of the fcc lattice and cross each other at certain angles to produce inverted Yablonovite geometry. To investigate photonic properties of the inverted Yablonovite structures, we calculate the photonic band structure for ten lowest-frequency electromagnetic modes. In contrast to the direct Yablonovite structure that has a complete photonic band gap between the second and third bands, we find no complete photonic band gaps in the inverted Yablonovite lattice. This situation is opposite to the case of fcc lattice of close-packed dielectric spheres in air that has a complete photonic band gap only for the inverted geometry.

  17. The Kinetics of Crystallization of Colloids and Proteins: A Light Scattering Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClymer, Jim

    2002-01-01

    Hard-sphere colloidal systems serve as model systems for aggregation, nucleation, crystallization and gelation as well as interesting systems in their own right.There is strong current interest in using colloidal systems to form photonic crystals. A major scientific thrust of NASA's microgravity research is the crystallization of proteins for structural determination. The crystallization of proteins is a complicated process that requires a great deal of trial and error experimentation. In spite of a great deal of work, "better" protein crystals cannot always be grown in microgravity and conditions for crystallization are not well understood. Crystallization of colloidal systems interacting as hard spheres and with an attractive potential induced by entropic forces have been studied in a series of static light scattering experiments. Additionally, aggregation of a protein as a function of pH has been studied using dynamic light scattering. For our experiments we used PMMA (polymethylacrylate) spherical particles interacting as hard spheres, with no attractive potential. These particles have a radius of 304 nanometers, a density of 1.22 gm/ml and an index of refraction of 1.52. A PMMA colloidal sample at a volume fraction of approximately 54% was index matched in a solution of cycloheptyl bromide (CHB) and cis-decalin. The sample is in a glass cylindrical vial that is placed in an ALV static and dynamic light scattering goniometer system. The vial is immersed in a toluene bath for index matching to minimize flair. Vigorous shaking melts any colloidal crystals initially present. The sample is illuminated with diverging laser light (632.8 nanometers) from a 4x microscope objective placed so that the beam is approximately 1 cm in diameter at the sample location. The sample is rotated about its long axis at approximately 3.5 revolutions per minute (highest speed) as the colloidal crystal system is non-ergodic. The scattered light is detected at various angles using the

  18. Direct current electric field assembly of colloidal crystals displaying reversible structural color.

    PubMed

    Shah, Aayush A; Ganesan, Mahesh; Jocz, Jennifer; Solomon, Michael J

    2014-08-26

    We report the application of low-voltage direct current (dc) electric fields to self-assemble close-packed colloidal crystals in nonaqueous solvents from colloidal spheres that vary in size from as large as 1.2 μm to as small as 0.1 μm. The assemblies are created rapidly (∼2 min) from an initially low volume fraction colloidal particle suspension using a simple capacitor-like electric field device that applies a steady dc electric voltage. Confocal microscopy is used to observe the ordering that is produced by the assembly method. This spatial evidence for ordering is consistent with the 6-fold diffraction patterns identified by light scattering. Red, green, and blue structural color is observed for the ordered assemblies of colloids with diameters of 0.50, 0.40, and 0.29 μm, respectively, consistent with spectroscopic measurements of reflectance. The diffraction and spectrophotometry results were found to be consistent with the theoretical Bragg's scattering expected for closed-packed crystals. By switching the dc electric field from on to off, we demonstrate reversibility of the structural color response on times scales ∼60 s. The dc electric field assembly method therefore represents a simple method to produce reversible structural color in colloidal soft matter.

  19. Two studies of colloidal interactions: electric polarizability and protein crystallization. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fraden, Seth; Hu, Yue

    2001-08-06

    (I)Electric polarizability. During this grant period, the focus was on five topics concerning electric field effects on colloids. The first topic focuses on electric interactions between charged colloids in the absence of external fields, and the remaining four deal with colloids in the presence of external fields. The topics are (1) calculation of the effect of confinement on the pair-potential between like-charged colloids, (2) experimental determination of the interparticle potential under the conditions of dielectric polarization, (3) measurement of the evolution of structure of ER fluids, (4) synthesis of novel colloids designed for ER studies, and (5) computer modeling of polarization of surface charge. (II) Protein crystallization. Studies of the phase behavior of mixtures of proteins and polymers were initiated. The motivation was to test recent theories that suggested that optimal conditions for protein crystallization could be obtained using such mixtures. Combined light scattering measurements of the virial coefficients and determination of the phase diagram of protein/polymer mixtures revealed that the theoretical picture needs to be substantially modified.

  20. Colloidal properties of biomacromolecular solutions: Towards urate oxidase crystal design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneté, Françoise

    2013-02-01

    Crystallization of biological macromolecules is governed by weak interaction forces, attractive and repulsive. Knowledge of solution properties, via second virial coefficient measurements, makes it possible to select physico-chemical parameters that govern and control phase diagrams and thus to grow crystals for specific applications (bio-crystallography or pharmaceutical processes). We highlight here with urate oxidase a salting-in effect that increases its solubility and the depletion effect of amphiphilic polymer, at a polymer concentration above its cmc, in order to grow diffracting crystals of urate oxidase. These two effects were used to grow crystals for high pressure crystallography and in a purification process.

  1. The Calculation of the Band Structure in 3D Phononic Crystal with Hexagonal Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryadoust, Mahrokh; Salehi, H.

    2015-12-01

    In this article, the propagation of acoustic waves in the phononic crystals (PCs) of three dimensions with the hexagonal (HEX) lattice is studied theoretically. The PCs are constituted of nickel (Ni) spheres embedded in epoxy. The calculations of the band structure and the density of states are performed using the plane wave expansion (PWE) method in the irreducible part of the Brillouin zone (BZ). In this study, we analyse the dependence of the band structures inside (the complete band gap width) on c/a and filling fraction in the irreducible part of the first BZ. Also, we have analysed the band structure of the ALHA and MLHKM planes. The results show that the maximum width of absolute elastic band gap (AEBG) (0.045) in the irreducible part of the BZ of HEX lattice is formed for c/a=6 and filling fraction equal to 0.01. In addition, the maximum of the first and second AEBG widths are 0.0884 and 0.0474, respectively, in the MLHKM plane, and the maximum of the first and second AEBG widths are 0.0851 and 0.0431, respectively, in the ALHA plane.

  2. 3D visualization of XFEL beam focusing properties using LiF crystal X-ray detector.

    PubMed

    Pikuz, Tatiana; Faenov, Anatoly; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Ozaki, Norimasa; Albertazzi, Bruno; Inubushi, Yuichi; Yabashi, Makina; Tono, Kensuke; Sato, Yuya; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Pikuz, Sergei; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N; Nishikino, Masaharu; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report, that by means of direct irradiation of lithium fluoride a (LiF) crystal, in situ 3D visualization of the SACLA XFEL focused beam profile along the propagation direction is realized, including propagation inside photoluminescence solid matter. High sensitivity and large dynamic range of the LiF crystal detector allowed measurements of the intensity distribution of the beam at distances far from the best focus as well as near the best focus and evaluation of XFEL source size and beam quality factor M(2). Our measurements also support the theoretical prediction that for X-ray photons with energies ~10 keV the radius of the generated photoelectron cloud within the LiF crystal reaches about 600 nm before thermalization. The proposed method has a spatial resolution ~0.4-2.0 μm for photons with energies 6-14 keV and potentially could be used in a single shot mode for optimization of different focusing systems developed at XFEL and synchrotron facilities. PMID:26634431

  3. 3D visualization of XFEL beam focusing properties using LiF crystal X-ray detector

    PubMed Central

    Pikuz, Tatiana; Faenov, Anatoly; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Ozaki, Norimasa; Albertazzi, Bruno; Inubushi, Yuichi; Yabashi, Makina; Tono, Kensuke; Sato, Yuya; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Pikuz, Sergei; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N.; Nishikino, Masaharu; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report, that by means of direct irradiation of lithium fluoride a (LiF) crystal, in situ 3D visualization of the SACLA XFEL focused beam profile along the propagation direction is realized, including propagation inside photoluminescence solid matter. High sensitivity and large dynamic range of the LiF crystal detector allowed measurements of the intensity distribution of the beam at distances far from the best focus as well as near the best focus and evaluation of XFEL source size and beam quality factor M2. Our measurements also support the theoretical prediction that for X-ray photons with energies ~10 keV the radius of the generated photoelectron cloud within the LiF crystal reaches about 600 nm before thermalization. The proposed method has a spatial resolution ~ 0.4–2.0 μm for photons with energies 6–14 keV and potentially could be used in a single shot mode for optimization of different focusing systems developed at XFEL and synchrotron facilities. PMID:26634431

  4. Direct observation of grain rotation-induced grain coalescence in two-dimensional colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lee J; Dear, Richard D; Summers, Michael D; Dullens, Roel P A; Ritchie, Grant A D

    2010-10-13

    A spatially modulated laser is used to produce multiple localized thermal gradients in a colloidal sample placed above a gold surface. We use an optical microscope to observe real time dynamics of the resulting two-dimensional colloidal crystal grains and find that grain rotation-induced grain coalescence (GRIGC) occurs with the rotation of both grains before coalescence. Control over the grain size shows that the time scale for grain boundary annealing in our system is in good agreement with theoretical expressions formulated for nanocrystal growth.

  5. Laser trapping of small colloidal particles in a nematic liquid crystal: clouds and ghosts.

    PubMed

    Musevic, I; Skarabot, M; Babic, D; Osterman, N; Poberaj, I; Nazarenko, V; Nych, A

    2004-10-29

    We show that, contrary to intuition, small (< or =1 microm) transparent particles can be trapped and manipulated in a nematic liquid crystal using an intense laser beam, although their index of refraction is lower than both refractive indices of the surrounding birefringent fluid. Two mechanisms are identified that are responsible for this anomalous trapping: (i) surface-induced distortion of the birefringent media around the particle, creating a high-index "cloud" around the colloid, and (ii) laser-induced distortion or (partial) melting of a nematic, creating a ghost colloid.

  6. Growth of mesoporous materials within colloidal crystal films by spin-coating.

    PubMed

    Villaescusa, Luis A; Mihi, Agustín; Rodríguez, Isabel; García-Bennett, Alfonso E; Míguez, Hernan

    2005-10-27

    A combination of colloidal crystal planarization, stabilization, and novel infiltration techniques is used to build a bimodal porous silica film showing order at both the micron and the nanometer length scale. An infiltration method based on the spin-coating of the mesophase precursor onto a three-dimensional polystyrene colloidal crystal film allows a nanometer control tuning of the filling fraction of the mesoporous phase while preserving the optical quality of the template. These materials combine a high specific surface arising from the nanopores with increased mass transport and photonic crystal properties provided by the order of the macropores. Optical Bragg diffraction from these type of hierarchically ordered oxides is observed, allowing performing of optical monitoring of the different processes involved in the formation of the bimodal silica structure.

  7. Growth of mesoporous materials within colloidal crystal films by spin-coating.

    PubMed

    Villaescusa, Luis A; Mihi, Agustín; Rodríguez, Isabel; García-Bennett, Alfonso E; Míguez, Hernan

    2005-10-27

    A combination of colloidal crystal planarization, stabilization, and novel infiltration techniques is used to build a bimodal porous silica film showing order at both the micron and the nanometer length scale. An infiltration method based on the spin-coating of the mesophase precursor onto a three-dimensional polystyrene colloidal crystal film allows a nanometer control tuning of the filling fraction of the mesoporous phase while preserving the optical quality of the template. These materials combine a high specific surface arising from the nanopores with increased mass transport and photonic crystal properties provided by the order of the macropores. Optical Bragg diffraction from these type of hierarchically ordered oxides is observed, allowing performing of optical monitoring of the different processes involved in the formation of the bimodal silica structure. PMID:16853540

  8. Modeling the crystal distribution of lead-sulfate in lead-acid batteries with 3D spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Moritz; Badeda, Julia; Sauer, Dirk Uwe

    2015-04-01

    For the reliability of lead-acid batteries it is important to have an accurate prediction of its response to load profiles. A model for the lead-sulfate growth is presented, which is embedded in a physical-chemical model with 3D spatial resolution is presented which is used for analyzing the different mechanism influencing the cell response. One import factor is the chemical dissolution and precipitation of lead-sulfate, since its dissolution speed limits the charging reaction and the accumulation of indissolvable of lead-sulfate leads to capacity degradation. The cell performance/behavior is not only determined by the amount of the sulfate but also by the radii and distribution of the crystals. The presented model can be used to for an improved understanding of the interaction of the different mechanisms.

  9. Hierarchical self-assembly of hexagonal single-crystal nanosheets into 3D layered superlattices with high conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yulun; Shen, Yuhua; Yang, Liangbao; Han, Bin; Huang, Fangzhi; Li, Shikuo; Chu, Zhuwang; Xie, Anjian

    2012-05-01

    While the number of man-made nano superstructures realized by self-assembly is growing in recent years, assemblies of conductive polymer nanocrystals, especially for superlattices, are still a significant challenge, not only because of the simplicity of the shape of the nanocrystal building blocks and their interactions, but also because of the poor control over these parameters in the fabrication of more elaborate nanocrystals. Here, we firstly report a facile and general route to a new generation of 3D layered superlattices of polyaniline doped with CSA (PANI-CSA) and show how PANI crystallize and self-assemble, in a suitable single solution environment. In cyclohexane, 1D amorphous nanofibers transformed to 1D nanorods as building blocks, and then to 2D single-crystal nanosheets with a hexagonal phase, and lastly to 3D ordered layered superlattices with the narrowest polydispersity value (Mw/Mn = 1.47). Remarkably, all the instructions for the hierarchical self-assembly are encoded in the layered shape in other non-polar solvents (hexane, octane) and their conductivity in the π-π stacking direction is improved to about 50 S cm-1, which is even higher than that of the highest previously reported value (16 S cm-1). The method used in this study is greatly expected to be readily scalable to produce superlattices of conductive polymers with high quality and low cost.While the number of man-made nano superstructures realized by self-assembly is growing in recent years, assemblies of conductive polymer nanocrystals, especially for superlattices, are still a significant challenge, not only because of the simplicity of the shape of the nanocrystal building blocks and their interactions, but also because of the poor control over these parameters in the fabrication of more elaborate nanocrystals. Here, we firstly report a facile and general route to a new generation of 3D layered superlattices of polyaniline doped with CSA (PANI-CSA) and show how PANI crystallize and

  10. Post-Synthetic Anisotropic Wet-Chemical Etching of Colloidal Sodalite ZIF Crystals.

    PubMed

    Avci, Civan; Ariñez-Soriano, Javier; Carné-Sánchez, Arnau; Guillerm, Vincent; Carbonell, Carlos; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2015-11-23

    Controlling the shape of metal-organic framework (MOF) crystals is important for understanding their crystallization and useful for myriad applications. However, despite the many advances in shaping of inorganic nanoparticles, post-synthetic shape control of MOFs and, in general, molecular crystals remains embryonic. Herein, we report using a simple wet-chemistry process at room temperature to control the anisotropic etching of colloidal ZIF-8 and ZIF-67 crystals. Our work enables uniform reshaping of these porous materials into unprecedented morphologies, including cubic and tetrahedral crystals, and even hollow boxes, by an acid-base reaction and subsequent sequestration of leached metal ions. Etching tests on these ZIFs reveal that etching occurs preferentially in the crystallographic directions richer in metal-ligand bonds; that, along these directions, the etching rate tends to be faster on the crystal surfaces of higher dimensionality; and that the etching can be modulated by adjusting the pH of the etchant solution.

  11. Orientational defects near colloidal particles in a nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Feng, James J; Zhou, Chixing

    2004-01-01

    We study the interaction between a surface-anchoring colloidal particle and a liquid-crystalline host, and in particular the formation of orientational defects near the particle. A mean-field theory based on the nonlocal Marrucci-Greco nematic potential is used to represent molecular interactions in an inhomogeneous orientational field. An evolution equation for the molecular configuration tensor is solved numerically whose steady state minimizes the total free energy of the system. With strong homeotropic anchoring on the particle surface, three types of solutions may appear depending on initial conditions and particle size: Saturn rings, satellite point defects, and polar rings. The Saturn ring remains stable on micrometer-sized particles, contrary to previous calculations but consistent with experiments. A phase diagram is constructed for the three regimes. Based on the free energy, the most stable state is the Saturn ring for smaller particles and the satellite defect for larger ones.

  12. Modes of surface premelting in colloidal crystals composed of attractive particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Di; Peng, Yi; Ni, Ran; Han, Yilong

    2016-03-24

    Crystal surfaces typically melt into a thin liquid layer at temperatures slightly below the melting point of the crystal. Such surface premelting is prevalent in all classes of solids and is important in a variety of metallurgical, geological and meteorological phenomena. Premelting has been studied using X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, but the lack of single-particle resolution makes it hard to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Colloids are good model systems for studying phase transitions because the thermal motions of individual micrometre-sized particles can be tracked directly using optical microscopy. Here we use colloidal spheres with tunable attractions to form equilibrium crystal-vapour interfaces, and study their surface premelting behaviour at the single-particle level. We find that monolayer colloidal crystals exhibit incomplete premelting at their perimeter, with a constant liquid-layer thickness. In contrast, two- and three-layer crystals exhibit conventional complete melting, with the thickness of the surface liquid diverging as the melting point is approached. The microstructures of the surface liquids differ in certain aspects from what would be predicted by conventional premelting theories. Incomplete premelting in the monolayer crystals is triggered by a bulk isostructural solid-solid transition and truncated by a mechanical instability that separately induces homogeneous melting within the bulk. This finding is in contrast to the conventional assumption that two-dimensional crystals melt heterogeneously from their free surfaces (that is, at the solid-vapour interface). The unexpected bulk melting that we observe for the monolayer crystals is accompanied by the formation of grain boundaries, which supports a previously proposed grain-boundary-mediated two-dimensional melting theory. The observed interplay between surface premelting, bulk melting and solid-solid transitions challenges existing theories of surface

  13. Crystals of Janus colloids at various interaction ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preisler, Z.; Vissers, T.; Smallenburg, F.; Sciortino, F.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the effect of interaction range on the phase behaviour of Janus particles with a Kern-Frenkel potential. Specifically, we study interaction ranges Δ = 0.1σ, 0.3σ, 0.4σ, 0.5σ with σ the particle diameter, and use variable box shape simulations to predict crystal structures. We found that changing the interaction range beyond 0.2σ drastically increases the variety of possible crystal structures. In addition to close-packed structures, we find body-centered tetragonal and AA-stacked hexagonal crystals, as well as several lamellar crystals. For long interaction ranges and low temperatures, we also observe an extremely large number of metastable structures which compete with the thermodynamically stable ones. These competing structures hinder the detection of the lowest-energy crystal structures, and are also likely to interfere with the spontaneous formation of the ground-state structure. Finally, we determine the gas-liquid coexistence curves for several interaction ranges, and observe that these are metastable with respect to crystallization.

  14. Colloidal membranes: The rich confluence of geometry and liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Cihan Nadir

    A simple and experimentally realizable model system of chiral symmetry breaking is liquid-crystalline monolayers of aligned, identical hard rods. In these materials, tuning the chirality at the molecular level affects the geometry at systems level, thereby inducing a myriad of morphological transitions. This thesis presents theoretical studies motivated by the rich phenomenology of these colloidal monolayers. High molecular chirality leads to assemblages of rods exhibiting macroscopic handedness. In the first part we consider one such geometry, twisted ribbons, which are minimal surfaces to a double helix. By employing a theoretical approach that combines liquid-crystalline order with the preferred shape, we focus on the phase transition from simple flat monolayers to these twisted structures. In these monolayers, regions of broken chiral symmetry nucleate at the interfaces, as in a chiral smectic A sample. The second part particularly focuses on the detailed structure and thermodynamic stability of two types of observed interfaces, the monolayer edge and domain walls in simple flat monolayers. Both the edge and "twist-walls" are quasi-one-dimensional bands of molecular twist deformations dictated by local chiral interactions and surface energy considerations. We develop a unified theory of these interfaces by utilizing the de Gennes framework accompanied by appropriate surface energy terms. The last part turns to colloidal "cookies", which form in mixtures of rods with opposite handedness. These elegant structures are essentially flat monolayers surrounded by an array of local, three dimensional cusp defects. We reveal the thermodynamic and structural characteristics of cookies. Furthermore, cookies provide us with a simple relation to determine the intrinsic curvature modulus of our model system, an important constant associated with topological properties of membranes. Our results may have impacts on a broader class of soft thin films.

  15. Entropically Driven Self-Assembly of Colloidal Crystals on Templates in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yodh, Arjun G.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    These experiments aim to create new colloidal crystalline materials, to study the assembly and thermodynamics of these materials, to measure the optical properties of these materials. and to fix the resulting structures so that they can be brought back and studied on earth. In microgravity, the elimination of particle sedimentation effects creates a purely "thermodynamic" environment for colloidal suspensions wherein particle size, volume fraction, and interparticle interactions are the primary determinants of the assembled structures. We will control the colloidal assembly process using attractive, entropic particle interactions brought about by the depletion effect. By using attractive interactions for colloidal assembly we create conditions for growth that resemble those associated with "conventional" microscopic systems such as atoms and molecules. This approach differs qualitatively from the more common "space-filling" mode of colloidal crystal growth that is driven purely by packing constraints. It is anticipated that at least some of the solidified structures will survive reentry to earth's gravitational field, and that their optical, magnetic, and electrical properties can then be studied in detail upon return.

  16. Colloidal photonic crystals with narrow stopbands assembled from low-adhesive superhydrophobic substrates.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Zhou, Jinming; Su, Bin; Shi, Lei; Wang, Jingxia; Chen, Shuoran; Wang, Libin; Zi, Jian; Song, Yanlin; Jiang, Lei

    2012-10-17

    This article presents a facile approach to centimeter-scale colloidal photonic crystals (PCs) with narrow stopbands assembled on low-adhesive superhydrophobic substrates. The full-width-at-half-maxima of the stopbands are just 12 nm. The narrow stopbands of colloidal PCs are ascribed to the combined effects of perfectly ordered assembly structure, large-scale crack elimination, decreased void fraction, and sufficient thickness of the colloidal PCs. These properties result from a self-assembly process on a low-adhesive superhydrophobic substrate. Latex suspension on this substrate displays a receding three-phase contact line during evaporation, which releases tensile stress induced by latex shrinkage and results in complete elimination of cracks in the colloidal PCs. Furthermore, the simultaneous assembly of latex particles on the outermost layer of a spread liquid film contributes to the perfectly ordered assembly structure. This facile fabrication of centimeter-scale colloidal PCs with narrow stopbands will offer significant insights into the design and creation of novel optical devices. PMID:23006005

  17. Symmetry breaking and interaction of colloidal particles in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Lev, B I; Chernyshuk, S B; Tomchuk, P M; Yokoyama, H

    2002-02-01

    We propose a general approach to the description of the long-ranged elastic interaction in the nematic colloids, based on the symmetry breaking of the director field. The type of the far-field interaction between particles immersed in a nematic host is determined by the way the symmetry is broken in the near-field region around the colloidal particle. This is caused both by the particle's shape and the anchoring at the surface. If the director field near the particle has a set of three symmetry planes, the far-field interaction falls off as d(-5) with d being the distance between particles. If one symmetry plane is absent, a dipolar moment perpendicular to it is allowed and yields dipole-dipole interactions, which decays as d(-3). If both the horizontal and vertical mirror symmetries are broken (it is equivalent to the case when the nonzero torque moment is applied to the particle by the nematic liquid crystal), the particles are shown to attract each other following the Coulomb law. We propose a simple method for the experimental observation of this Coulomb attraction. The behavior of colloid particles in curved director fields is analyzed. Quadrupolar particles with planar anchoring are shown to be attracted toward the regions with high splay deformations, while quadrupoles with homeotropic anchoring are depleted from such regions. When there are many colloidal particles in the nematic solvent, the distortions of the director from all of them are overlapped and lead to the exponential screening in the elastic pair interaction potential. This is a many-body interaction effect. This screening is essential in the real dense colloid systems, such as ferronematics--suspensions of magnetic cylindrical grains in the nematic liquid crystal. External magnetic field induces an elastic Yukawa attraction between them. We apply this attraction to the explanation of the cellular texture in magnetically doped liquid crystals.

  18. 3D ToF-SIMS Analysis of Peptide Incorporation into MALDI Matrix Crystals with Sub-micrometer Resolution.

    PubMed

    Körsgen, Martin; Pelster, Andreas; Dreisewerd, Klaus; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F

    2016-02-01

    The analytical sensitivity in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is largely affected by the specific analyte-matrix interaction, in particular by the possible incorporation of the analytes into crystalline MALDI matrices. Here we used time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to visualize the incorporation of three peptides with different hydrophobicities, bradykinin, Substance P, and vasopressin, into two classic MALDI matrices, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCCA). For depth profiling, an Ar cluster ion beam was used to gradually sputter through the matrix crystals without causing significant degradation of matrix or biomolecules. A pulsed Bi3 ion cluster beam was used to image the lateral analyte distribution in the center of the sputter crater. Using this dual beam technique, the 3D distribution of the analytes and spatial segregation effects within the matrix crystals were imaged with sub-μm resolution. The technique could in the future enable matrix-enhanced (ME)-ToF-SIMS imaging of peptides in tissue slices at ultra-high resolution. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26419771

  19. 3D ToF-SIMS Analysis of Peptide Incorporation into MALDI Matrix Crystals with Sub-micrometer Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körsgen, Martin; Pelster, Andreas; Dreisewerd, Klaus; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F.

    2016-02-01

    The analytical sensitivity in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is largely affected by the specific analyte-matrix interaction, in particular by the possible incorporation of the analytes into crystalline MALDI matrices. Here we used time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to visualize the incorporation of three peptides with different hydrophobicities, bradykinin, Substance P, and vasopressin, into two classic MALDI matrices, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCCA). For depth profiling, an Ar cluster ion beam was used to gradually sputter through the matrix crystals without causing significant degradation of matrix or biomolecules. A pulsed Bi3 ion cluster beam was used to image the lateral analyte distribution in the center of the sputter crater. Using this dual beam technique, the 3D distribution of the analytes and spatial segregation effects within the matrix crystals were imaged with sub-μm resolution. The technique could in the future enable matrix-enhanced (ME)-ToF-SIMS imaging of peptides in tissue slices at ultra-high resolution.

  20. Theory of the zero-field splitting of 6S(3d5)-state ions in cubic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan-Lun, Yu; Tao, Tan

    1994-02-01

    A study is made of the zero-field splitting (ZFS) of 6S(3d5) ions in cubic crystals, based on an extended crystal-field (CF) model which assumes two constants ζte and ζtt in the description of the spin-orbit (SO) interaction. In addition to the recognized origin for the ZFS, namely, the combined effect of the CF and the SO couplings, a second source is found to arise from the SO interaction alone through a difference between ζte and ζtt caused by covalency. To understand this second effect, we have investigated the SO coupling processes which contribute to the ZFS, using the Macfarlane-Zdansky perturbation procedure. Processes in which the couplings are all between states of different configurations tm2e5-m are found to make a positive contribution proportional to ζ4te. Other processes contribute negatively through a term in ζ2teζ2tt. The ZFS is thus determined by the relative magnitudes of these two parts, and a small difference between ζte and ζtt will cause a great change in its value. Application of this new theory is successfully made to Mn2+ ions in tetrahedral II-VI compounds and in fluoroperovskites.

  1. Magnetically responsive gourd-shaped colloidal particles in cholesteric liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Varney, Michael C M; Lopez, Javier A; Wang, Sijia; Wu, Ning; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2014-08-28

    Particle shape and medium chirality are two key features recently used to control anisotropic colloidal self-assembly and dynamics in liquid crystals. Here, we study magnetically responsive gourd-shaped colloidal particles dispersed in cholesteric liquid crystals with periodicity comparable or smaller than the particle's dimensions. Using magnetic manipulation and optical tweezers, which allow one to position colloids near the confining walls, we measured the elastic repulsive interactions of these particles with confining surfaces and found that separation-dependent particle-wall interaction force is a non-monotonic function of separation and shows oscillatory behavior. We show that gourd-shaped particles in cholesterics reside not on a single sedimentation level, but on multiple long-lived metastable levels separated by a distance comparable to cholesteric periodicity. Finally, we demonstrate three-dimensional laser tweezers assisted assembly of gourd-shaped particles taking advantage of both orientational order and twist periodicity of cholesterics, potentially allowing new forms of orientationally and positionally ordered colloidal organization in these media. PMID:24994521

  2. Flow-induced alignment of (100) fcc thin film colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Joy, Midhun; Muangnapoh, Tanyakorn; Snyder, Mark A; Gilchrist, James F

    2015-09-28

    The realization of structural diversity in colloidal crystals obtained by self-assembly techniques remains constrained by thermodynamic considerations and current limits on our ability to alter structure over large scales using imposed fields and confinement. In this work, a convective-based procedure to fabricate multi-layer colloidal crystal films with extensive square-like symmetry is enabled by periodic substrate motion imposed during the continuous assembly. The formation of film-spanning domains of (100) fcc symmetry as a result of added vibration is robust across a range of micron-scale monosized spherical colloidal suspensions (e.g., polystyrene, silica) as well as substrate surface chemistries (e.g., hydrophobic, hydrophilic). The generation of extensive single crystalline (100) fcc domains as large as 15 mm(2) and covering nearly 40% of the colloidal crystalline film is possible by simply tuning coating conditions and multi-layer film thickness. Preferential orientation of the square-packed domains with respect to the direction of deposition is attributed to domain generation based upon a shear-related mechanism. Visualization during assembly gives clues toward the mechanism of this flow-driven self-assembly method.

  3. Numerical investigation of liquid crystal colloids using a continuum description.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Jun-ichi; Yoneya, Makoto; Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Stark, Holger

    2004-11-15

    We investigate numerically the configuration of a nematic liquid crystal around two spherical particles. For the description of the orientational order of a nematic liquid crystal, we adopt a Landau-de Gennes continuum theory in terms of a second-rank tensor order parameter Q(ij) together with the use of bispherical coordinates to describe the geometry of the system with two spherical particles. Above but close to the nematic-isotropic transition point, we observe capillary condensation of a nematic liquid crystal between the two particles under appropriate conditions. Below the transition point where liquid crystals possess nematic order, a point-like defect called a hyperbolic hedgehog appears close to a particle when strong normal anchoring is imposed. With the aid of an adaptive mesh refinement scheme to achieve sufficient numerical resolution to describe topological defects, we present our numerical results showing how the orientation profile of a nematic liquid crystal is distorted when the distance between two particles is small enough.

  4. Modes of surface premelting in colloidal crystals composed of attractive particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Di; Peng, Yi; Ni, Ran; Han, Yilong

    2016-03-01

    Crystal surfaces typically melt into a thin liquid layer at temperatures slightly below the melting point of the crystal. Such surface premelting is prevalent in all classes of solids and is important in a variety of metallurgical, geological and meteorological phenomena. Premelting has been studied using X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, but the lack of single-particle resolution makes it hard to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Colloids are good model systems for studying phase transitions because the thermal motions of individual micrometre-sized particles can be tracked directly using optical microscopy. Here we use colloidal spheres with tunable attractions to form equilibrium crystal–vapour interfaces, and study their surface premelting behaviour at the single-particle level. We find that monolayer colloidal crystals exhibit incomplete premelting at their perimeter, with a constant liquid-layer thickness. In contrast, two- and three-layer crystals exhibit conventional complete melting, with the thickness of the surface liquid diverging as the melting point is approached. The microstructures of the surface liquids differ in certain aspects from what would be predicted by conventional premelting theories. Incomplete premelting in the monolayer crystals is triggered by a bulk isostructural solid–solid transition and truncated by a mechanical instability that separately induces homogeneous melting within the bulk. This finding is in contrast to the conventional assumption that two-dimensional crystals melt heterogeneously from their free surfaces (that is, at the solid–vapour interface). The unexpected bulk melting that we observe for the monolayer crystals is accompanied by the formation of grain boundaries, which supports a previously proposed grain-boundary-mediated two-dimensional melting theory. The observed interplay between surface premelting, bulk melting and solid–solid transitions challenges existing theories of

  5. The interaction of colloidal particles with weak homeotropic anchoring energy in homogeneous nematic liquid crystal cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jo; Kim, Jong-Hyun

    2014-04-21

    We have investigated interactions of colloidal particles with weak homeotropic anchoring energy in homogeneous nematic liquid crystal cells. Particle-wall and inter-particle interactions were observed experimentally and analyzed using typical dipole-dipole and quadrupole-quadrupole interactions, including substrate effects as the image charges. Both experimental results matched well with the calculated results for the effective particle radius reflecting the weak anchoring. The effective radius is reduced by the amount of extrapolation length than the actual particle radius. The effective radii of polyethylene micro-particles were reduced to a coefficient ζ (0.78 ≥ ζ ≥ 0.52) times the actual radius with anchoring coefficients in the range of 3.8 × 10(-6) to 1.4 × 10(-6) J m(-2). The anchoring energy of the particles is, therefore, a key component for explaining liquid crystal colloidal systems.

  6. Liquid-crystal enabled electrophoresis: Scenarios for driving and reconfigurable assembling of colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernàndez-Navarro, S.; Tierno, P.; Ignés-Mullol, J.; Sagués, F.

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate several examples of driving and steering of colloids when dispersed in nematic liquid crystals. The driving mechanism is based on the principle of nonlinear electrophoresis which is mediated by the asymmetry in the structure of the defects that the inclusions generate in the host elastic matrix. The steering mechanism originates in the photoactivation of the anchoring conditions of the nematic liquid crystal on one of the enclosing plates. As experimental realizations we first review a scenario of water microdroplets being phoretically transported for cargo release and chemical reaction. Steering is illustrated in terms of the reconfigurable assembly of colloidal particles, either in the form of asters or rotating-mills, commanded by predesigned patterns of illumination.

  7. Liquid crystals and their interactions with colloidal particles and phospholipid membranes: Molecular simulation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Evelina B.

    Experimentally, liquid crystals (LC) can be used as the basis for optical biomolecular sensors that rely on LC ordering. Recently, the use of LC as a reporting medium has been extended to investigations of molecular scale processes at lipid laden aqueous-LC interfaces and at biological cell membranes. In this thesis, we present two related studies where liquid crystals are modelled at different length scales. We examine (a) the behavior of nanoscopic colloidal particles in LC systems, using Monte Carlo (MC) molecular simulations and a mesoscopic dynamic field theory (DyFT); and (b) specific interactions of two types of mesogens with a model phospholipid bilayer, using atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) at the A-nm scale. In (a), we consider colloidal particles suspended in a LC, confined between two walls. We calculate the colloid-substrate and colloid-colloid potentials of mean force (PMF). For the MC simulations, we developed a new technique (ExEDOS or Expanded Ensemble Density Of States) that ensures good sampling of phase space without prior knowledge of the energy landscape of the system. Both results, simulation and DyFT, indicate a repulsive force acting between a colloid and a wall. In contrast, both techniques indicate an overall colloid-colloid attraction and predict a new topology of the disclination lines that arises when the particles approach each other. In (b), we find that mesogens (pentylcyanobiphenyl [5CB] or difluorophenyl-pentylbicyclohexyl [5CF]) preferentially partition from the aqueous phase into a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer. We find highly favorable free energy differences for partitioning (-18kBT for 5CB, -26k BT for 5CF). We also simulated fully hydrated bilayers with embedded 5CB or 5CF at concentrations used in recent experiments (6 mol% and 20 mol%). The presence of mesogens in the bilayer enhances the order of lipid acyl tails and changes the spatial and orientational arrangement of lipid headgroup atoms. A stronger

  8. Highly cooperative stress relaxation in two-dimensional soft colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Berend; Qi, Weikai; Fokkink, Remco G; van der Gucht, Jasper; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Sprakel, Joris

    2014-10-28

    Stress relaxation in crystalline solids is mediated by the formation and diffusion of defects. Although it is well established how externally generated stresses relax, through the proliferation and motion of dislocations in the lattice, it remains relatively unknown how crystals cope with internal stresses. We investigate, both experimentally and in simulations, how highly localized stresses relax in 2D soft colloidal crystals. When a single particle is actively excited, by means of optical tweezing, a rich variety of highly collective stress relaxation mechanisms results. These relaxation processes manifest in the form of open strings of cooperatively moving particles through the motion of dissociated vacancy-interstitial pairs, and closed loops of mobile particles, which either result from cooperative rotations in transiently generated circular grain boundaries or through the closure of an open string by annihilation of a vacancy-interstitial pair. Surprisingly, we find that the same collective events occur in crystals that are excited by thermal fluctuations alone; a large thermal agitation inside the crystal lattice can trigger the irreversible displacements of hundreds of particles. Our results illustrate how local stresses can induce large-scale cooperative dynamics in 2D soft colloidal crystals and shed light on the stabilization mechanisms in ultrasoft crystals.

  9. Colloidal graphenes as heterogeneous additives to enhance protein crystal yield.

    PubMed

    Gully, Benjamin S; Zou, Jianli; Cadby, Gemma; Passon, Daniel M; Iyer, K Swaminathan; Bond, Charles S

    2012-09-01

    In the structural analysis of proteins via X-ray diffraction, a rate-limiting step is in favourable nucleation, a problematic obstacle in successful generation of protein crystals. Here graphene and graphene oxide were applied to protein crystallisation trials, offering improvements in crystalline output and nucleation.

  10. Using Two-Dimensional Colloidal Crystals to Understand Crystallography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosse, Stephanie A.; Loening, Nikolaus M.

    2008-01-01

    X-ray crystallography is an essential technique for modern chemistry and biochemistry, but it is infrequently encountered by undergraduate students owing to lack of access to equipment, the time-scale for generating diffraction-quality molecular crystals, and the level of mathematics involved in analyzing the resulting diffraction patterns.…

  11. Design and functionality of colloidal-crystal-templated materials--chemical applications of inverse opals.

    PubMed

    Stein, Andreas; Wilson, Benjamin E; Rudisill, Stephen G

    2013-04-01

    Templating with colloidal crystals composed of monodisperse spheres is a convenient chemical method to obtain porous materials with well-ordered periodicity and interconnected pore systems. The three-dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM) products or inverse opals are of interest for numerous applications, both for the optical properties related to structural color of these photonic crystal materials and because of their bicontinuous nanostructure, i.e., a continuous nanostructured skeleton with large interfacial area and a three-dimensionally interconnected pore system with low tortuosity. This review outlines various synthetic methods used to control the morphology of 3DOM materials with different compositions. It highlights aspects of the choice of colloidal particles, assembly of the colloidal crystal template, infiltration and processing, template removal, and other necessary modifications to enhance the functionality of the materials. It also considers syntheses within the confinement of 3DOM materials and summarizes characterization methods that are particularly useful in the analysis of 3DOM materials. The review then discusses chemical applications of 3DOM materials, namely sorption and controlled release, optical and electrochemical sensors, solar cells, lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, fuel cells, and environmental and chemical fuel catalysis. A focus is on structural features and materials properties that enable these applications. PMID:23079696

  12. Design and functionality of colloidal-crystal-templated materials--chemical applications of inverse opals.

    PubMed

    Stein, Andreas; Wilson, Benjamin E; Rudisill, Stephen G

    2013-04-01

    Templating with colloidal crystals composed of monodisperse spheres is a convenient chemical method to obtain porous materials with well-ordered periodicity and interconnected pore systems. The three-dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM) products or inverse opals are of interest for numerous applications, both for the optical properties related to structural color of these photonic crystal materials and because of their bicontinuous nanostructure, i.e., a continuous nanostructured skeleton with large interfacial area and a three-dimensionally interconnected pore system with low tortuosity. This review outlines various synthetic methods used to control the morphology of 3DOM materials with different compositions. It highlights aspects of the choice of colloidal particles, assembly of the colloidal crystal template, infiltration and processing, template removal, and other necessary modifications to enhance the functionality of the materials. It also considers syntheses within the confinement of 3DOM materials and summarizes characterization methods that are particularly useful in the analysis of 3DOM materials. The review then discusses chemical applications of 3DOM materials, namely sorption and controlled release, optical and electrochemical sensors, solar cells, lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, fuel cells, and environmental and chemical fuel catalysis. A focus is on structural features and materials properties that enable these applications.

  13. From colloidal nanoparticles to a single crystal: new insights into the formation of nacre's aragonite tablets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gangsheng; Xu, Jun

    2013-04-01

    Nacre has long served as a model for understanding the biomineralization mechanism and designing bio-inspired materials. However, its basic building blocks, the aragonite tablets, are still under debate in terms of their fine structure at the nanoscale and corresponding formation mechanism. Here, using a field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), and X-ray diffractometer, we comparatively investigate the immature and mature tablet from the green mussel's nacre. We find that: (1) the early immature tablet consists of closely-packed colloidal nanoparticles, which contain nanocrystals surrounded by the amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) phase. Moreover, these nanocrystals are generally different in shape, size, and orientation; (2) the immature tablet can grow via oriented attachment besides via transformation of the ACC phase; and (3) with growth, the colloidal nanoparticles gradually increase in crystallinity and size until fully crystallized and fused together, leading to a mature tablet that is a monolithic single crystal of aragonite. Based on these findings, we propose a new model showing how the mature tablet evolves from the primary colloidal ACC nanoparticles. We expect this work will provide new insights into the formation of single crystal biominerals via the amorphous precursor route. PMID:23396130

  14. Hypersonic acoustic excitations in binary colloidal crystals: big versus small hard sphere control.

    PubMed

    Tommaseo, G; Petekidis, G; Steffen, W; Fytas, G; Schofield, A B; Stefanou, N

    2007-01-01

    The phononic band structure of two binary colloidal crystals, at hypersonic frequencies, is studied by means of Brillouin light scattering and analyzed in conjunction with corresponding dispersion diagrams of the single colloidal crystals of the constituent particles. Besides the acoustic band of the average medium, the authors' results show the existence of narrow bands originating from resonant multipole modes of the individual particles as well as Bragg-type modes due to the (short-range) periodicity. Strong interaction, leading to the occurrence of hybridization gaps, is observed between the acoustic band and the band of quadrupole modes of the particles that occupy the largest fractional volume of the mixed crystal; the effective radius is either that of the large (in the symmetric NaCl-type crystalline phase) or the small (in the asymmetric NaZn(13)-type crystalline phase) particles. The possibility to reveal a universal behavior of the phononic band structure for different single and binary colloidal crystalline suspensions, by representing in the dispersion diagrams reduced quantities using an appropriate length scale, is discussed.

  15. Single-Crystal to Single-Crystal Phase Transition and Segmented Thermochromic Luminescence in a Dynamic 3D Interpenetrated Ag(I) Coordination Network.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhi-Hao; Li, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Li-Wei; Yu, Si-Qi; Wang, Xing-Po; Sun, Di

    2016-02-01

    A new 3D Ag(I)-based coordination network, [Ag2(pz)(bdc)·H2O]n (1; pz = pyrazine and H2bdc = benzene-1,3-dicarboxylic acid), was constructed by one-pot assembly and structurally established by single-crystal X-ray diffraction at different temperatures. Upon cooling from 298 to 93 K, 1 undergo an interesting single-crystal to single-crystal phase transition from orthorhombic Ibca (Z = 16) to Pccn (Z = 32) at around 148 K. Both phases show a rare 2-fold-interpenetrated 4-connected lvt network but incorporate different [Ag2(COO)2] dimeric secondary building units. It is worth mentioning that complex 1 shows red- and blue-shifted luminescences in the 290-170 and 140-80 K temperature ranges, respectively. The variable-temperature single-crystal X-ray crystallographic studies suggest that the argentophilic interactions and rigidity of the structure dominated the luminescence chromism trends at the respective temperature ranges. Upon being mechanically ground, 1 exhibits a slight mechanoluminescence red shift from 589 to 604 nm at 298 K.

  16. Modulating two-dimensional non-close-packed colloidal crystal arrays by deformable soft lithography.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Wang, Tieqiang; Zhang, Junhu; Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xuemin; Zhu, Difu; Li, Wei; Zhang, Xun; Yang, Bai

    2010-02-16

    We report a simple method to fabricate two-dimensional (2D) periodic non-close-packed (ncp) arrays of colloidal microspheres with controllable lattice spacing, lattice structure, and pattern arrangement. This method combines soft lithography technique with controlled deformation of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer to convert 2D hexagonal close-packed (hcp) silica microsphere arrays into ncp ones. Self-assembled 2D hcp microsphere arrays were transferred onto the surface of PDMS stamps using the lift-up technique, and then their lattice spacing and lattice structure could be adjusted by solvent swelling or mechanical stretching of the PDMS stamps. Followed by a modified microcontact printing (microcp) technique, the as-prepared 2D ncp microsphere arrays were transferred onto a flat substrate coated with a thin film of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). After removing the PVA film by calcination, the ncp arrays that fell on the substrate without being disturbed could be lifted up, deformed, and transferred again by another PDMS stamp; therefore, the lattice feature could be changed step by step. Combining isotropic solvent swelling and anisotropic mechanical stretching, it is possible to change hcp colloidal arrays into full dimensional ncp ones in all five 2D Bravais lattices. This deformable soft lithography-based lift-up process can also generate patterned ncp arrays of colloidal crystals, including one-dimensional (1D) microsphere arrays with designed structures. This method affords opportunities and spaces for fabrication of novel and complex structures of 1D and 2D ncp colloidal crystal arrays, and these as-prepared structures can be used as molds for colloidal lithography or prototype models for optical materials. PMID:19715332

  17. Modulating two-dimensional non-close-packed colloidal crystal arrays by deformable soft lithography.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Wang, Tieqiang; Zhang, Junhu; Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xuemin; Zhu, Difu; Li, Wei; Zhang, Xun; Yang, Bai

    2010-02-16

    We report a simple method to fabricate two-dimensional (2D) periodic non-close-packed (ncp) arrays of colloidal microspheres with controllable lattice spacing, lattice structure, and pattern arrangement. This method combines soft lithography technique with controlled deformation of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer to convert 2D hexagonal close-packed (hcp) silica microsphere arrays into ncp ones. Self-assembled 2D hcp microsphere arrays were transferred onto the surface of PDMS stamps using the lift-up technique, and then their lattice spacing and lattice structure could be adjusted by solvent swelling or mechanical stretching of the PDMS stamps. Followed by a modified microcontact printing (microcp) technique, the as-prepared 2D ncp microsphere arrays were transferred onto a flat substrate coated with a thin film of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). After removing the PVA film by calcination, the ncp arrays that fell on the substrate without being disturbed could be lifted up, deformed, and transferred again by another PDMS stamp; therefore, the lattice feature could be changed step by step. Combining isotropic solvent swelling and anisotropic mechanical stretching, it is possible to change hcp colloidal arrays into full dimensional ncp ones in all five 2D Bravais lattices. This deformable soft lithography-based lift-up process can also generate patterned ncp arrays of colloidal crystals, including one-dimensional (1D) microsphere arrays with designed structures. This method affords opportunities and spaces for fabrication of novel and complex structures of 1D and 2D ncp colloidal crystal arrays, and these as-prepared structures can be used as molds for colloidal lithography or prototype models for optical materials.

  18. Dielectrophoretic and electrophoretic force analysis of colloidal fullerenes in a nematic liquid-crystal medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Anoop Kumar; Kim, Miyoung; Kim, Sung Min; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Kyu; Lee, Young Hee; Lee, Myong-Hoon; Lee, Seung Hee

    2009-11-01

    This research focuses on the electrokinetic motion of fullerenes suspended in liquid crystal host medium, which are investigated in the homogeneously aligned nematic liquid crystal cells driven by in-plane field. We investigated the effect of electrophoretic and dielectrophoretic forces and related parameters of the colloidal fullerenes in liquid crystals. The electrophoretic mobility, zeta potential, and critical voltage have been evaluated. Fullerenes suspended in liquid crystal medium migrated toward the positive electrode, but were pulled back in the opposite direction when the polarity was reversed especially at low frequency range (<5Hz) . At higher electric field and higher frequency ranges, the net displacement of fullerenes has been observed. We demonstrate that the dielectrophoretic force dominated the motion in the colloidal fullerenes by a proper analysis of different electrophoretic parameters. In addition, the electrodynamics of fullerenes was explained by applying the theory of the dielectrophoresis and Schwarz’s formula. We propose a model to estimate the density of fullerenes suspended in liquid crystal medium.

  19. Colloidal crystals of core-shell type spheres with poly(styrene) core and poly(ethylene oxide) shell.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Junichi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Tsuchida, Akira; Okubo, Tsuneo; Ito, Koichi

    2007-04-15

    Elastic modulus and crystal growth kinetics have been studied for colloidal crystals of core-shell type colloidal spheres (diameter=160-200 nm) in aqueous suspension. Crystallization properties of three kinds of spheres, which have poly(styrene) core and poly(ethylene oxide) shell with different oxyethylene chain length (n=50, 80 and 150), were examined by reflection spectroscopy. The suspensions were deionized exhaustively for more than 1 year using mixed bed of ion-exchange resins. The rigidities of the crystals range from 0.11 to 120 Pa and from 0.56 to 76 Pa for the spheres of n=50 and 80, respectively, and increase sharply as the sphere volume fraction increase. The g factor, parameter for crystal stability, range from 0.029 to 0.13 and from 0.040 to 0.11 for the spheres of n=50 and 80, respectively. These g values indicate the formation of stable crystals, and the values were decreased as the sphere volume fraction increased. Two components of crystal growth rate coefficients, fast and slow, were observed in the order from 10(-3) to 10(1)s(-1). This is due to the secondary process in the colloidal crystallization mechanism, corresponding to reorientation from metastable crystals formed in the primary process and/or Ostwald-ripening process. There are no distinct differences in the structural, kinetic and elastic properties among the colloidal crystals of the different core-shell size spheres, nor difference between those of core-shell spheres and silica or poly(styrene) spheres. The results are very reasonably interpreted by the fact that colloidal crystals are formed in a closed container owing to long-range repulsive forces and the Brownian movement of colloidal spheres surrounded by extended electrical double layers, and their formation is not influenced by the rigidity and internal structure of the spheres.

  20. Seven 3d-4f coordination polymers of macrocyclic oxamide with polycarboxylates: Syntheses, crystal structures and magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Na; Sun, Ya-Qiu; Zheng, Yan-Feng; Xu, Yan-Yan; Gao, Dong-Zhao; Zhang, Guo-Ying

    2016-11-01

    Seven new 3d-4f heterometallic coordination polymers, [Ln(CuL)2(Hbtca)(btca)(H2O)]·2H2O (Ln = TbIII1, PrIII2, SmIII3, EuIII4, YbIII5), [Nd(NiL)(nip)(Rnip)]·0·25H2O·0.25CH3OH (R= 0.6CH3, 0.4H) 6 and [Nd2(NiL)(nip)3(H2O)]·2H2O 7(CuL or NiL, H2L = 2, 3-dioxo-5, 6, 14, 15-dibenzo-1, 4, 8, 12-tetraazacyclo-pentadeca-7, 13-dien; H2btca = benzotriazole-5-carboxylic acid; H2nip = 5-nitroisophthalic acid) have been synthesized by a solvothermal method and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Complexes 1-5 exhibit a double-strand meso-helical chain structures formed by [LnIIICuII2] units via the oxamide and benzotriazole-5-carboxylate bridges, while complex 6 exhibits a four-strand meso-helical chain formed by NdNi unit via the oxamide and 5-nitroisophthalate bridges. Complex 7 consists of a 2D layer framework formed by four-strand meso-helical chain via the nip2- bridges. Moreover, the magnetic properties of them were investigated, and the best-fit analysis of χMT versus T show that the anisotropic contribution of Ln(III) ions (arising from the spin-orbit coupling or the crystal field perturbation) dominates (weak exchange limit) in these complexes(for 3, λ = 214.6 cm-1, zj' = -0.33 cm-1, gav = 1.94; for 5, Δ = 6.98 cm-1, zj' = 1.53 cm-1, gav = 1.85).

  1. Fabrication of FCC-SiO{sub 2} colloidal crystals using the vertical convective self-assemble method

    SciTech Connect

    Castañeda-Uribe, O. A.; Salcedo-Reyes, J. C.; Méndez-Pinzón, H. A.; Pedroza-Rodríguez, A. M.

    2014-05-15

    In order to determine the optimal conditions for the growth of high-quality 250 nm-SiO{sub 2} colloidal crystals by the vertical convective self-assemble method, the Design of Experiments (DoE) methodology is applied. The influence of the evaporation temperature, the volume fraction, and the pH of the colloidal suspension is studied by means of an analysis of variance (ANOVA) in a 3{sup 3} factorial design. Characteristics of the stacking lattice of the resulting colloidal crystals are determined by scanning electron microscopy and angle-resolved transmittance spectroscopy. Quantitative results from the statistical test show that the temperature is the most critical factor influencing the quality of the colloidal crystal, obtaining highly ordered structures with FCC stacking lattice at a growth temperature of 40°C.

  2. Symmetry considerations for the targeted assembly of entropically stabilized colloidal crystals via Voronoi particles.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Benjamin A; Damasceno, Pablo F; Engel, Michael; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2015-03-24

    The relationship between colloidal building blocks and their assemblies is an active field of research. As a strategy for targeting novel crystal structures, we examine the use of Voronoi particles, which are hard, space-filling particles in the shape of Voronoi cells of a target structure. Although Voronoi particles stabilize their target structure in the limit of high pressure by construction, the thermodynamic assembly of the same structure at moderate pressure, close to the onset of crystallization, is not guaranteed. Indeed, we find that a more symmetric crystal is often preferred due to additional entropic contributions arising from configurational or occupational degeneracy. We characterize the assembly behavior of the Voronoi particles in terms of the symmetries of the building blocks as well as the symmetries of crystal structures and demonstrate how controlling the degeneracies through a modification of particle shape and field-directed assembly can significantly improve the assembly propensity.

  3. Symmetry considerations for the targeted assembly of entropically stabilized colloidal crystals via Voronoi particles.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Benjamin A; Damasceno, Pablo F; Engel, Michael; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2015-03-24

    The relationship between colloidal building blocks and their assemblies is an active field of research. As a strategy for targeting novel crystal structures, we examine the use of Voronoi particles, which are hard, space-filling particles in the shape of Voronoi cells of a target structure. Although Voronoi particles stabilize their target structure in the limit of high pressure by construction, the thermodynamic assembly of the same structure at moderate pressure, close to the onset of crystallization, is not guaranteed. Indeed, we find that a more symmetric crystal is often preferred due to additional entropic contributions arising from configurational or occupational degeneracy. We characterize the assembly behavior of the Voronoi particles in terms of the symmetries of the building blocks as well as the symmetries of crystal structures and demonstrate how controlling the degeneracies through a modification of particle shape and field-directed assembly can significantly improve the assembly propensity. PMID:25692863

  4. Large-area optoelastic manipulation of colloidal particles in liquid crystals using photoresponsive molecular surface monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Angel; Mireles, Hector C.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2011-01-01

    Noncontact optical trapping and manipulation of micrometer- and nanometer-sized particles are typically achieved by use of forces and torques exerted by tightly focused high-intensity laser beams. Although they were instrumental for many scientific breakthroughs, these approaches find few technological applications mainly because of the small-area manipulation capabilities, the need for using high laser powers, limited application to anisotropic fluids and low-refractive-index particles, as well as complexity of implementation. To overcome these limitations, recent research efforts have been directed toward extending the scope of noncontact optical control through the use of optically-guided electrokinetic forces, vortex laser beams, plasmonics, and optofluidics. Here we demonstrate manipulation of colloidal particles and self-assembled structures in nematic liquid crystals by means of single-molecule-thick, light-controlled surface monolayers. Using polarized light of intensity from 1,000 to 100,000 times smaller than that in conventional optical tweezers, we rotate, translate, localize, and assemble spherical and complex-shaped particles of various sizes and compositions. By controlling boundary conditions through the monolayer, we manipulate the liquid crystal director field and the landscape of ensuing elastic forces exerted on colloids by the host medium. This permits the centimeter-scale, massively parallel manipulation of particles and complex colloidal structures that can be dynamically controlled by changing illumination or assembled into stationary stable configurations dictated by the “memorized” optoelastic potential landscape due to the last illumination pattern. We characterize the strength of optically guided elastic forces and discuss the potential uses of this noncontact manipulation in fabrication of novel optically- and electrically-tunable composites from liquid crystals and colloids. PMID:22160673

  5. Investigation the effect of lattice angle on the band structure in 3D phononic crystals with rhombohedral(II) lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryadoust, M.; Salehi, H.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the propagation of acoustic waves in the phononic crystals (PC) of 3D with rhombohedral(II) lattice is studied theoretically. The PC are constituted of nickel spheres embedded in epoxy. The calculations of the band structure and density of states are performed with the plane wave expansion method in the irreducible part of the Brillouin zone (BZ). In this study, we analyze the dependence of the band structures inside (the complete band gap width) and outside the complete band gap (negative refraction of acoustic wave) on the lattice angle in the irreducible part of the first BZ. Also the effect of lattice angle has been analyzed on the band structure of the () and (122) planes. Then, the equifrequency surface is calculated for the high symmetry point in the [111] and [100] directions. The results show that the maximum width of AEBG (0.022) in the irreducible part of the BZ of RHL2 is formed for (105∘) and no AEBG is found for γ > 150∘. Also, the maximum of the first and second AEBG width are 0.1076 and 0.0523 for γ = 133∘ in the () plane and the maximum of the first and second AEBG width are 0.1446 and 0.0998 for γ = 113∘ in the (122) plane. In addition, we have found that frequencies in which negative refraction occurs is constant for all lattice angles.

  6. Preliminary studies of 3D magnetophotonic crystals designed from a template stuffed by sol-gel process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekesi, R.; Royer, F.; Blanc Mignon, M. F.; Goutaland, F.; Chatelon, J. P.; Tombacz, E.; Jamon, D.

    2010-05-01

    Based on the previous work of Nishijima [1], the aim of this work is to realize 3D magnetophotonic crystals (MPC) by a sol-gel approach, in order to obtain a magneto-optical material with a large merit factor. These MPC are made by immersion of an opal template of polystyrene spheres in a sol-gel TEOS preparation doped by magnetic nanoparticles. The template can be realized using centrifugation or sedimentation, and it is removed after the solidification of the doped matrix by an immersion in ethyl acetate. Calculations made on 1D structures confirm that a periodic arrangement of a magneto-optical material is a way to increase the Faraday Rotation and the merite factor. The characterization of the samples is made by SEM and UV-VIS spectrophotometry. In virtue of the SEM pictures we can establish that the template is well-structured, what is confirmed by a Photonic Band Gap (PBG) in the spectrophotometry spectral. The central wavelength of the PBG depends on the size of the polystyrene spheres. The final MPC obtained with a silica matrix doped by maghemite nanoparticles has also well-structured areas. Ongoing works concern the study of the Farady rotation as a function of the wavelength.

  7. Rapid electrostatics-assisted layer-by-layer assembly of near-infrared-active colloidal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Askar, Khalid; Leo, Sin-Yen; Xu, Can; Liu, Danielle; Jiang, Peng

    2016-11-15

    Here we report a rapid and scalable bottom-up technique for layer-by-layer (LBL) assembling near-infrared-active colloidal photonic crystals consisting of large (⩾1μm) silica microspheres. By combining a new electrostatics-assisted colloidal transferring approach with spontaneous colloidal crystallization at an air/water interface, we have demonstrated that the crystal transfer speed of traditional Langmuir-Blodgett-based colloidal assembly technologies can be enhanced by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. Importantly, the crystalline quality of the resultant photonic crystals is not compromised by this rapid colloidal assembly approach. They exhibit thickness-dependent near-infrared stop bands and well-defined Fabry-Perot fringes in the specular transmission and reflection spectra, which match well with the theoretical calculations using a scalar-wave approximation model and Fabry-Perot analysis. This simple yet scalable bottom-up technology can significantly improve the throughput in assembling large-area, multilayer colloidal crystals, which are of great technological importance in a variety of optical and non-optical applications ranging from all-optical integrated circuits to tissue engineering. PMID:27494632

  8. Rapid electrostatics-assisted layer-by-layer assembly of near-infrared-active colloidal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Askar, Khalid; Leo, Sin-Yen; Xu, Can; Liu, Danielle; Jiang, Peng

    2016-11-15

    Here we report a rapid and scalable bottom-up technique for layer-by-layer (LBL) assembling near-infrared-active colloidal photonic crystals consisting of large (⩾1μm) silica microspheres. By combining a new electrostatics-assisted colloidal transferring approach with spontaneous colloidal crystallization at an air/water interface, we have demonstrated that the crystal transfer speed of traditional Langmuir-Blodgett-based colloidal assembly technologies can be enhanced by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. Importantly, the crystalline quality of the resultant photonic crystals is not compromised by this rapid colloidal assembly approach. They exhibit thickness-dependent near-infrared stop bands and well-defined Fabry-Perot fringes in the specular transmission and reflection spectra, which match well with the theoretical calculations using a scalar-wave approximation model and Fabry-Perot analysis. This simple yet scalable bottom-up technology can significantly improve the throughput in assembling large-area, multilayer colloidal crystals, which are of great technological importance in a variety of optical and non-optical applications ranging from all-optical integrated circuits to tissue engineering.

  9. Thermo-responsive cross-linked liquid crystal bowl-shaped colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei-Shao; Xia, Yu; Yang, Shu; Yodh, A. G.

    In this work we create and investigate cross-linked bowl-shaped nematic liquid crystal (NLC) colloidal particles. Janus colloids are first formed via solvent-induced phase separation in emulsions consisting of NLC monomers and isotropic polymers. This scheme enables us to realize different particle morphologies such as bowl-shape by fine-tuning the confinement of NLCs within the droplets, e.g. by varying the size of droplets, the volume ratio between NLC and polymer, and the type/concentration of surfactants in aqueous background phase. The NLC compartment is composed of RM82 (1,4-Bis-[4-(6-acryloyloxyhexyloxy)benzoyloxy]-2-methylbenzene) monomers, which are then photocrosslinked by dithiol groups to form nematic liquid crystal elastomer. Finally, we remove the polymer parts of Janus colloids to obtain the target structures, which are temperature sensitive due to change of elasticity and molecular alignment of NLC near the isotropic to nematic phase transition temperature. We will explore novel mechanical and optical properties from the thermo-responsive structures as well as their applications, such as biomimic swimming behaviors and adjustable lensing effects. This work is supported by the foundation through NSF Grant DMR12-05463, NSF-MRSEC Grant DMR11-20901, and NASA Grant NNX08AO0G.

  10. Motion, relaxation dynamics, and diffusion processes in two-dimensional colloidal crystals confined between walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilms, Dorothea; Virnau, Peter; Snook, Ian K.; Binder, Kurt

    2012-11-01

    The dynamical behavior of single-component two-dimensional colloidal crystals confined in a slit geometry is studied by Langevin dynamics simulation of a simple model. The colloids are modeled as pointlike particles, interacting with the repulsive part of the Lennard-Jones potential, and the fluid molecules in the colloidal suspension are not explicitly considered. Considering a crystalline strip of triangular lattice structure with n=30 rows, the (one-dimensional) walls confining the strip are chosen as two rigidly fixed crystalline rows at each side, commensurate with the lattice structure and, thus, stabilizing long-range order. The case when the spacing between the walls is incommensurate with the ideal triangular lattice is also studied, where (due to a transition in the number of rows, n→n-1) the confined crystal is incommensurate with the confining boundaries, and a soliton staircase forms along the walls. It is shown that mean-square displacements (MSDs) of particles as a function of time show an overshoot and then saturate at a horizontal plateau in the commensurate case, the value of the plateau being largest in the center of the strip. Conversely, when solitons are present, MSDs are largest in the rows containing the solitons, and all MSDs do not settle down at well-defined plateaus in the direction parallel to the boundaries, due to the lack of positional long-range order in ideal two-dimensional crystals. The MSDs of the solitons (which can be treated like quasiparticles at very low temperature) have also been studied and their dynamics are found to be about an order of magnitude slower than that of the colloidal particles themselves. Finally, transport of individual colloidal particles by diffusion processes is studied: both standard vacancy-interstitial pair formation and cooperative ring rotation processes are identified. These processes require thermal activation, with activation energies of the order of 10Tm (Tm being the melting temperature of

  11. Linear viscoelasticity of hard sphere colloidal crystals from resonance detected with dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, See-Eng; Li, Min; Russel, William B.; Zhu, Jixiang; Chaikin, Paul M.; Lant, Chris T.

    1999-08-01

    We present measurements of the high-frequency shear modulus and dynamic viscosity for nonaqueous hard sphere colloidal crystals both in normal and microgravity environments. All experiments were performed on a multipurpose PHaSE instrument. For the rheological measurements, we detect the resonant response to oscillatory forcing with a dynamic light scattering scheme. The resonant response for colloidal crystals formed in normal and microgravity environments was similar, indicating that the bulk rheological properties are unaffected by differing crystal structure and crystallite size within the experimental error. Our high-frequency shear modulus seems reasonable, lying close to Frenkel and Ladd's predictions [Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 1169 (1987)] for the static modulus of hard sphere crystals. Our high-frequency dynamic viscosity, on the other hand, seems high, exceeding Shikata and Pearson [J. Rheol. 38, 601 (1994)] and van der Werff et al.'s measurements [Phys. Rev. A 39, 795 (1989)] on the high-frequency dynamic viscosity for metastable fluids. The measurements are in the linear regime for the shear modulus but may not be for the dynamic viscosity as Frith et al. [Powder Technol. 51, 27 (1987)] report that the dynamic viscosity passes through a maximum with strain amplitude.

  12. Finite particle size drives defect-mediated domain structures in strongly confined colloidal liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Gârlea, Ioana C.; Mulder, Pieter; Alvarado, José; Dammone, Oliver; Aarts, Dirk G. A. L.; Lettinga, M. Pavlik; Koenderink, Gijsje H.; Mulder, Bela M.

    2016-01-01

    When liquid crystals are confined to finite volumes, the competition between the surface anchoring imposed by the boundaries and the intrinsic orientational symmetry-breaking of these materials gives rise to a host of intriguing phenomena involving topological defect structures. For synthetic molecular mesogens, like the ones used in liquid-crystal displays, these defect structures are independent of the size of the molecules and well described by continuum theories. In contrast, colloidal systems such as carbon nanotubes and biopolymers have micron-sized lengths, so continuum descriptions are expected to break down under strong confinement conditions. Here, we show, by a combination of computer simulations and experiments with virus particles in tailor-made disk- and annulus-shaped microchambers, that strong confinement of colloidal liquid crystals leads to novel defect-stabilized symmetrical domain structures. These finite-size effects point to a potential for designing optically active microstructures, exploiting the as yet unexplored regime of highly confined liquid crystals. PMID:27353002

  13. A comparative study of inverted-opal titania photonic crystals made from polymer and silica colloidal crystal templates

    SciTech Connect

    Kuai, S.-L.; Truong, V.-V.; Hache, Alain; Hu, X.-F.

    2004-12-01

    Photonic crystals with an inverted-opal structure using polymer and silica colloidal crystal templates were prepared and compared. We show that the behaviors of the template during the removal process and heat treatment are determinant factors on the crystal formation. While both templates result in ordered macroporous structures, the optical quality in each case is quite different. The removal of the polymer template by sintering causes a large shrinkage of the inverted framework and produces a high density of cracks in the sample. With a silica template, sintering actually improves the quality of the inverted structure by enhancing the template's mechanical stability, helping increase the filling fraction, and consolidating the titania framework. The role of the other important factors such as preheating and multiple infiltrations is also investigated.

  14. Bio-inspired vapor-responsive colloidal photonic crystal patterns by inkjet printing.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ling; Xie, Zhuoying; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Chunwei; Zhao, Yuanjin; Mu, Zhongde; Zhong, Qifeng; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-11-25

    Facile, fast, and cost-effective technology for patterning of responsive colloidal photonic crystals (CPCs) is of great importance for their practical applications. In this report, we develop a kind of responsive CPC patterns with multicolor shifting properties by inkjet printing mesoporous colloidal nanoparticle ink on both rigid and soft substrates. By adjusting the size and mesopores' proportion of nanoparticles, we can precisely control the original color and vapor-responsive color shift extent of mesoporous CPC. As a consequence, multicolor mesoporous CPCs patterns with complex vapor responsive color shifts or vapor-revealed implicit images are subsequently achieved. The complicated and reversible multicolor shifts of mesoporous CPC patterns are favorable for immediate recognition by naked eyes but hard to copy. This approach is favorable for integration of responsive CPCs with controllable responsive optical properties. Therefore, it is of great promise for developing advanced responsive CPC devices such as anticounterfeiting devices, multifunctional microchips, sensor arrays, or dynamic displays.

  15. Bio-inspired vapor-responsive colloidal photonic crystal patterns by inkjet printing.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ling; Xie, Zhuoying; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Chunwei; Zhao, Yuanjin; Mu, Zhongde; Zhong, Qifeng; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-11-25

    Facile, fast, and cost-effective technology for patterning of responsive colloidal photonic crystals (CPCs) is of great importance for their practical applications. In this report, we develop a kind of responsive CPC patterns with multicolor shifting properties by inkjet printing mesoporous colloidal nanoparticle ink on both rigid and soft substrates. By adjusting the size and mesopores' proportion of nanoparticles, we can precisely control the original color and vapor-responsive color shift extent of mesoporous CPC. As a consequence, multicolor mesoporous CPCs patterns with complex vapor responsive color shifts or vapor-revealed implicit images are subsequently achieved. The complicated and reversible multicolor shifts of mesoporous CPC patterns are favorable for immediate recognition by naked eyes but hard to copy. This approach is favorable for integration of responsive CPCs with controllable responsive optical properties. Therefore, it is of great promise for developing advanced responsive CPC devices such as anticounterfeiting devices, multifunctional microchips, sensor arrays, or dynamic displays. PMID:25300045

  16. Holographic fabrication of 3D photonic crystal templates with 4, 5, and 6-fold rotational symmetry using a single beam and single exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowell, David; George, David; Lutkenhaus, Jeffery; Philipose, Usha; Zhang, Hualiang; Lin, Yuankun

    2016-03-01

    A method of fabricating large-volume three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystal and quasicrystal templates using holographic lithography is presented. Fabrication is accomplished using a single-beam and single exposure by a reflective optical element (ROE). The ROE is 3D printed support structure which holds reflecting surfaces composed of silicon or gallium arsenide. Large-volume 3D photonic crystal and quasicrystal templates with 4-fold, 5-fold, and 6-fold symmetry were fabricated and found to be in good agreement with simulation. Although the reflective surfaces were setup away from the Brewster's angle, the interference among the reflected s and p-polarizations still generated bicontinuous structures, demonstrating the flexibility of the ROE. The ROE, being a compact and inexpensive alternative to diffractive optical elements and top-cut prisms, facilitates the large-scale integration of holographically fabricated photonic structures into on-chip applications.

  17. Colloidal interactions and self-assembly of plasmonic metal pyramids in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sungoh; Smalyukh, Ivan

    Combining ordered structure of soft matter systems, such as liquid crystals, with the unique optical properties of metal nano- and micro-particles is a promising approach of designing and realizing mesostructured composites with pre-engineered properties. In this work, we disperse nanofabricated pyramid-shaped plasmonic particles in a nematic host fluid and demonstrate that the particles spontaneously align with respect to the uniform far-field liquid crystal director. This alignment is driven by minimization of the surface anchoring and bulk elastic free energies of the nematic host. Interestingly, multiple stable and metastable orientations of these particles can be controllably observed. Using laser tweezers and video microscopy, we explore inter-particle pair interaction forces as well as the ensuing colloidal self-assembly. We analyze this experimentally observed rich physical behavior of our soft matter composite by invoking electrostatic multipole analogy of elastic distortions induced by the particles in a nematic liquid crystal host and discuss potential practical uses.

  18. Kinetics study of crystallization with the disorder-bcc-fcc phase transition of charged colloidal dispersions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongwei; Xu, Shenghua; Sun, Zhiwei; Du, Xuan; Liu, Lixia

    2011-06-21

    Structure transformation (disorder-bcc-fcc) in charged colloidal dispersions, as a manifestation of the Ostwald's step rule, was confirmed by means of reflection spectrum (RS) measurements in our previous study. By taking advantage of a reflection spectrum containing plenty of information about the crystallization behaviors, time-dependent changes of parameters associated with the crystal structure and composition during the disorder-bcc-fcc transition are reported by treating the data from RS in this article. In addition, Avrami's model is adopted to analyze the transition process and investigate the transition rate. On the basis of the above investigations, associated kinetic features of crystallization with the disorder-bcc-fcc transition are described.

  19. Dynamics of ordered colloidal particle monolayers at nematic liquid crystal interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei-Shao; Gharbi, Mohamed Amine; Lohr, Matthew A; Still, Tim; Gratale, Matthew D; Lubensky, T C; Stebe, Kathleen J; Yodh, A G

    2016-05-25

    We prepare two-dimensional crystalline packings of colloidal particles on surfaces of the nematic liquid crystal (NLC) 5CB, and we investigate the diffusion and vibrational phonon modes of these particles using video microscopy. Short-time particle diffusion at the air-NLC interface is well described by a Stokes-Einstein model with viscosity similar to that of 5CB. Crystal phonon modes, measured by particle displacement covariance techniques, are demonstrated to depend on the elastic constants of 5CB through interparticle forces produced by LC defects that extend from the interface into the underlying bulk material. The displacement correlations permit characterization of transverse and longitudinal sound velocities of the crystal packings, as well as the particle interactions produced by the LC defects. All behaviors are studied in the nematic phase as a function of increasing temperature up to the nematic-isotropic transition. PMID:27109759

  20. Melting and crystallization of colloidal hard-sphere suspensions under shear.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu Ling; Derks, Didi; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Imhof, Arnout

    2009-06-30

    Shear-induced melting and crystallization were investigated by confocal microscopy in concentrated colloidal suspensions of hard-sphere-like particles. Both silica and polymethylmethacrylate suspensions were sheared with a constant rate in either a countertranslating parallel plate shear cell or a counterrotating cone-plate shear cell. These instruments make it possible to track particles undergoing shear for extended periods of time in a plane of zero velocity. Although on large scales, the flow profile deviated from linearity, the crystal flowed in an aligned sliding layer structure at low shear rates. Higher shear rates caused the crystal to shear melt, but, contrary to expectations, the transition was not sudden. Instead, although the overall order decreased with shear rate, this was due to an increase in the nucleation of localized domains that temporarily lost and regained their ordered structure. Even at shear rates that were considered to have melted the crystal as a whole, ordered regions kept showing up at times, giving rise to very large fluctuations in 2D bond-orientational order parameters. Low shear rates induced initially disordered suspensions to crystallize. This time, the order parameter increased gradually in time without large fluctuations, indicating that shear-induced crystallization of hard spheres does not proceed via a nucleation and growth mechanism. We conclude that the dynamics of melting and crystallization under shear differ dramatically from their counterparts in quiescent suspensions.

  1. A transparent silica colloidal crystal/PDMS composite and its application for crack suppression of metallic coatings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shaofan; Pan, Zihe; Yang, Fut K; Huang, Yudong; Zhao, Boxin

    2016-01-01

    A silica colloidal crystal (SCC)-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite with a heterogeneous surface of silica and PDMS was prepared by spreading a premixed PDMS solution on the 3D structured SCCs and curing the solution in-situ. Although the SCCs had a light blue color, the obtained composite of SCC and PDMS, due to the close effective refractive indexes of the materials, was colorless and transparent; the UV-vis spectra indicated a negligible effect of the added SCC on the transmittance of the PDMS sheet (1% reduction). Interestingly, the transparent composite sheet became translucent under stress and became clear again when relaxed. It was found that the wrinkles formed on the surface under stress were responsible for the optical change; and, the formation of the wrinkles was ascribed to the rigid nature of the SCC layer embedded in PDMS. We had applied this SCC/PDMS composite as a substrate to support a thin gold film of nanoscale thickness and found that the embedded SCC layer worked well as a transitional interface for bonding materials of mismatched mechanical properties. The incorporation of SCC layer significantly suppressed the crack generation and propagation of the gold film. The results demonstrated a potential approach for fabricating compliant and crackfree metallic films on polymeric substrates.

  2. Crystallization of Hard Sphere Colloids in Microgravity: Results of the Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition, CDOT on USML-2. Experiment 33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Ji-Xiang; Chaikin, P. M.; Li, Min; Russel, W. B.; Ottewill, R. H.; Rogers, R.; Meyer, W. V.

    1998-01-01

    Classical hard spheres have long served as a paradigm for our understanding of the structure of liquids, crystals, and glasses and the transitions between these phases. Ground-based experiments have demonstrated that suspensions of uniform polymer colloids are near-ideal physical realizations of hard spheres. However, gravity appears to play a significant and unexpected role in the formation and structure of these colloidal crystals. In the microgravity environment of the Space Shuttle, crystals grow purely via random stacking of hexagonal close-packed planes, lacking any of the face-centered cubic (FCC) component evident in crystals grown in 1 g beyond melting and allowed some time to settle. Gravity also masks 33-539 the natural growth instabilities of the hard sphere crystals which exhibit striking dendritic arms when grown in microgravity. Finally, high volume fraction "glass" samples which fail to crystallize after more than a year in 1 g begin nucleation after several days and fully crystallize in less than 2 weeks on the Space Shuttle.

  3. Preparation of Highly Crystallized Yttrium Oxysulfide Suspension via a Novel Colloidal Processing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Jiang, Tao; Xing, Ming-Ming; Fu, Yao; Peng, Yong; Luo, Xi-Xian

    2016-04-01

    High-crystallized Y2O2S suspension was synthesized by a novel two-step method of high temperature solid-state reaction and subsequent colloidal processing. The synthesis method proposed in this study retains all advantages of the high temperature solid-state reaction method. The obtained data agrees with that of the PDF card, which indicates the product is pure Y2O2S crystals. The results show that the prepared Y2O2S particles are highly crystallized without any significant defects. The fine smooth particles were almost regular, exhibiting an approximately subspherical shape. Quantitative image analysis of particles suggests a mean particle size of 120±34 nm. That is to say, the yttrium oxysulfide colloid prepared by this method have a very narrow size distribution. The obtained ethanol suspension shows Tyndall effect when irradiated with laser of wavelength 532 nm. In addition, the particles exhibit excellent dispersibility in ethanol solution. This is rarely observed for the covalent compounds, which generally present poor dispersibility in solution. As is known to all, the state of the dispersion depends on the acid leaching process. The acid leaching process facilitates the adsorption of ethanol molecules on the surface of the particles. The electrostatic repulsive force among colloidal particles will improve their rheological properties and dispersibility in solution. In this study, the particles can be dispersed well in ethanol after acid leaching. The method'proposed in this study can be extended for the preparation of mono-dispersed oxysulfide nanophosphors and may provide an efficient way for the preparation of stable covalent compound dispersions. PMID:27451744

  4. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test-5: Three-Dimensional Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yodh, Arjun G.

    2008-01-01

    Binary Colloidal Alloy Test - 5: Three-Dimensional Melt (BCAT-5-3DMelt) photographs initially randomized colloidal samples in microgravity to determine their resulting structure over time. BCAT-5-3D-Melt will allow the scientists to capture the kinetics (evolution) of their samples, as well as the final equilibrium state of each sample. BCAT-5-3D-Melt will look at the mechanisms of melting using three-dimensional temperature sensitive colloidal crystals. Results will help scientists develop fundamental physics concepts previously shadowed by the effects of gravity.

  5. Light-Induced Resistance Effect Observed in Nano Au Films Covered Two-Dimensional Colloidal Crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuai; Huang, Meizhen; Yao, Yanjie; Wang, Hui; Jin, Kui-juan; Zhan, Peng; Wang, Zhenlin

    2015-09-01

    Tailoring resistance response using periodic nanostructures is one of the key issues in the current research. Two-dimensional colloidal crystals (CCs) structure is one of popular periodic nanospheres' structures and most of reports are focused on anomalous transmission of light or biomedical applications. In this work, a light-induced resistance effect is observed on silicon-based Au films covered CCs, featuring a remarkable resistance change as much as 56% and resistance switching characteristic. The diffusion and recombination of photocarriers is the crucial factor for this effect. This finding will expand photoelectricity functionality and be useful for future development of CC-based photoelectric devices.

  6. Magnetic actuation of a thermodynamically stable colloid of ferromagnetic nanoparticles in a liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Prodanov, Maksym F; Buluy, Oleksandr G; Popova, Ekaterina V; Gamzaeva, Saniyat A; Reznikov, Yuriy O; Vashchenko, Valerii V

    2016-08-21

    We report the development of a highly stable nanomaterial based on ferromagnetic nanoparticles dispersed in a thermotropic liquid crystal. The long-term colloidal stability and homogeneity were achieved through surface modification of the nanoparticles with a mixture of a dendritic oligomesogenic surfactant and hexylphosphonic acid and confirmed by optical and electron microscopy. The nanomaterial has an increased sensitivity to the magnetic field possessing collective and non-collective magneto-optical responses in contrast to the undoped LC. The effective coupling of the spherical particles with the LC director is due to the arrangement of the nanoparticles in chains. PMID:27439890

  7. Light-Induced Resistance Effect Observed in Nano Au Films Covered Two-Dimensional Colloidal Crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuai; Huang, Meizhen; Yao, Yanjie; Wang, Hui; Jin, Kui-juan; Zhan, Peng; Wang, Zhenlin

    2015-09-01

    Tailoring resistance response using periodic nanostructures is one of the key issues in the current research. Two-dimensional colloidal crystals (CCs) structure is one of popular periodic nanospheres' structures and most of reports are focused on anomalous transmission of light or biomedical applications. In this work, a light-induced resistance effect is observed on silicon-based Au films covered CCs, featuring a remarkable resistance change as much as 56% and resistance switching characteristic. The diffusion and recombination of photocarriers is the crucial factor for this effect. This finding will expand photoelectricity functionality and be useful for future development of CC-based photoelectric devices. PMID:26314930

  8. Imaging the Homogeneous Nucleation During the Melting of Superheated Colloidal Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ziren; Wang, Feng; Peng, Yi; Zheng, Zhongyu; Han, Yilong

    2012-10-01

    The nucleation process is crucial to many phase transitions, but its kinetics are difficult to predict and measure. We superheated and melted the interior of thermal-sensitive colloidal crystals and investigated by means of video microscopy the homogeneous melting at single-particle resolution. The observed nucleation precursor was local particle-exchange loops surrounded by particles with large displacement amplitudes rather than any defects. The critical size, incubation time, and shape and size evolutions of the nucleus were measured. They deviate from the classical nucleation theory under strong superheating, mainly because of the coalescence of nuclei. The superheat limit agrees with the measured Born and Lindemann instabilities.

  9. Protective colloids and polylactic acid co-affecting the polymorphic crystal forms and crystallinity of indomethacin encapsulated in microspheres.

    PubMed

    Lin, S Y; Chen, K S; Teng, H H

    1999-01-01

    The co-effect of protective colloids and polylactic acid (PLA) on the polymorphic crystal forms and crystallinity of indomethacin (IMC) in IMC-loaded PLA microspheres was investigated with differential scanning calorimetry, infrared spectroscopy and x-ray diffractometry, to evaluate the polymorphic crystal forms and crystallinity of IMC encapsulated in PLA microspheres. The surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), was also used as a dispersing agent. The results indicate that the polymorphism and crystallinity of IMC encapsulated in IMC-loaded PLA microspheres was dependent on the type of protective colloid and PLA used. The amorphous state and alpha-form of IMC were found in the IMC-loaded PLA microspheres prepared using polysaccharide (pectin or beta-cyclodextrin) as a protective colloid or SDS as a dispersing agent. However, the amorphous and methylene chloride solvate of IMC seemed to exist in the IMC-loaded PLA microspheres prepared with the proteins (gelatin or albumin), synthetic cellulose derivative (methyl cellulose or hydroxylpropyl methylcellulose) or the synthetic nonionic polymer (polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinyl pyrrolidone or biosoluble polymer) as a protective colloid. PLA was found to express a certain crystallinity in microspheres and not be affected by the protective colloids, but it played a more important role in influencing the crystallization of IMC during microencapsulation than the protective colloids. No interaction occurred in the physical mixture of IMC and PLA, nor in the IMC-loaded PLA microspheres.

  10. Development and evaluation of a LOR-based image reconstruction with 3D system response modeling for a PET insert with dual-layer offset crystal design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuezhu; Stortz, Greg; Sossi, Vesna; Thompson, Christopher J.; Retière, Fabrice; Kozlowski, Piotr; Thiessen, Jonathan D.; Goertzen, Andrew L.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we present a method of 3D system response calculation for analytical computer simulation and statistical image reconstruction for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatible positron emission tomography (PET) insert system that uses a dual-layer offset (DLO) crystal design. The general analytical system response functions (SRFs) for detector geometric and inter-crystal penetration of coincident crystal pairs are derived first. We implemented a 3D ray-tracing algorithm with 4π sampling for calculating the SRFs of coincident pairs of individual DLO crystals. The determination of which detector blocks are intersected by a gamma ray is made by calculating the intersection of the ray with virtual cylinders with radii just inside the inner surface and just outside the outer-edge of each crystal layer of the detector ring. For efficient ray-tracing computation, the detector block and ray to be traced are then rotated so that the crystals are aligned along the X-axis, facilitating calculation of ray/crystal boundary intersection points. This algorithm can be applied to any system geometry using either single-layer (SL) or multi-layer array design with or without offset crystals. For effective data organization, a direct lines of response (LOR)-based indexed histogram-mode method is also presented in this work. SRF calculation is performed on-the-fly in both forward and back projection procedures during each iteration of image reconstruction, with acceleration through use of eight-fold geometric symmetry and multi-threaded parallel computation. To validate the proposed methods, we performed a series of analytical and Monte Carlo computer simulations for different system geometry and detector designs. The full-width-at-half-maximum of the numerical SRFs in both radial and tangential directions are calculated and compared for various system designs. By inspecting the sinograms obtained for different detector geometries, it can be seen that the DLO crystal

  11. Introducing high-quality planar defects into colloidal crystals via self-assembly at the air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Kuo; Demeyer, Pieter-Jan; Zhou, Xingping; Kruglova, Olga; Verellen, Niels; Moshchalkov, Victor V.; Song, Kai; Clays, Koen

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate a facile method for fabrication of colloidal crystals containing a planar defect by using PS@SiO2 core-shell spheres as building blocks. A monolayer of solid spheres was embedded in core-shell colloidal crystals serving as the defect layer, which formed by means of self-assembly at the air/water interface. Compared with previous methods, this fabrication method results in pronounced passbands in the band gaps of the colloidal photonic crystal. The FWHM of the obtained passband is only ~16nm, which is narrower than the previously reported results. The influence of the defect layer thickness on the optical properties of these sandwiched structures was also investigated. No high-cost processes or specific equipment is needed in our approach. Inverse opals with planar defects can be obtained via calcination of the PS cores, without the need of infiltration. The experimental results are in good agreement with simulations performed using the FDTD method.

  12. Optical trapping of colloidal particles and measurement of the defect line tension and colloidal forces in a thermotropic nematic liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyukh, I.I.; Kuzmin, A.N.; Kachynski, A.V.; Prasad, P.N.; Lavrentovich, O.D.

    2005-01-10

    We demonstrate optical trapping and manipulation of transparent microparticles suspended in a thermotropic nematic liquid crystal with low birefringence. We employ the particle manipulation to measure line tension of a topologically stable disclination line and to determine colloidal interaction of particles with perpendicular surface anchoring of the director. The three-dimensional director fields and positions of the particles manipulated by laser tweezers are visualized by fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy.

  13. Water-dependent micromechanical and rheological properties of silica colloidal crystals studied by nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Gómez, Francisco; Morales-Flórez, Víctor; Blanco, Alvaro; de la Rosa-Fox, Nicolás; López, Cefe

    2012-09-12

    Here we show the suitability of nanoindentation to study in detail the micromechanical response of silica colloidal crystals (CCs). The sensitivity to displacements smaller than the submicrometer spheres size, even resolving discrete events and superficial features, revealed particulate features with analogies to atomic crystals. Significant robustness, long-range structural deformation, and large energy dissipation were found. Easily implemented temperature/rate-dependent nanoindentation quantified the paramount role of adsorbed water endowing silica CCs with properties of wet granular materials like viscoplasticity. A novel "nongranular" CC was fabricated by substituting capillary bridges with silica necks to directly test water-independent mechanical response. Silica CCs, as specific (nanometric, ordered) wet granular assemblies with well-defined configuration, may be useful model systems for granular science and capillary cohesion at the nanoscale.

  14. Living Clusters and Crystals from Low-Density Suspensions of Active Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mognetti, B. M.; Šarić, A.; Angioletti-Uberti, S.; Cacciuto, A.; Valeriani, C.; Frenkel, D.

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies aimed at investigating artificial analogs of bacterial colonies have shown that low-density suspensions of self-propelled particles confined in two dimensions can assemble into finite aggregates that merge and split, but have a typical size that remains constant (living clusters). In this Letter, we address the problem of the formation of living clusters and crystals of active particles in three dimensions. We study two systems: self-propelled particles interacting via a generic attractive potential and colloids that can move toward each other as a result of active agents (e.g., by molecular motors). In both cases, fluidlike “living” clusters form. We explain this general feature in terms of the balance between active forces and regression to thermodynamic equilibrium. This balance can be quantified in terms of a dimensionless number that allows us to collapse the observed clustering behavior onto a universal curve. We also discuss how active motion affects the kinetics of crystal formation.

  15. Active Shape-Morphing Elastomeric Colloids in Short-Pitch Cholesteric Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Julian S.; Sun, Yaoran; Senyuk, Bohdan; Keller, Patrick; Pergamenshchik, Victor M.; Lee, Taewoo; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2013-05-01

    Active elastomeric liquid crystal particles with initial cylindrical shapes are obtained by means of soft lithography and polymerization in a strong magnetic field. Gold nanocrystals infiltrated into these particles mediate energy transfer from laser light to heat, so that the inherent coupling between the temperature-dependent order and shape allows for dynamic morphing of these particles and well-controlled stable shapes. Continuous changes of particle shapes are followed by their spontaneous realignment and transformations of director structures in the surrounding cholesteric host, as well as locomotion in the case of a nonreciprocal shape morphing. These findings bridge the fields of liquid crystal solids and active colloids, may enable shape-controlled self-assembly of adaptive composites and light-driven micromachines, and can be understood by employing simple symmetry considerations along with electrostatic analogies.

  16. Colloidal crystal based plasma polymer patterning to control Pseudomonas aeruginosa attachment to surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pingle, Hitesh; Wang, Peng-Yuan; Thissen, Helmut; McArthur, Sally; Kingshott, Peter

    2015-12-02

    Biofilm formation on medical implants and subsequent infections are a global problem. A great deal of effort has focused on developing chemical contrasts based on micro- and nanopatterning for studying and controlling cells and bacteria at surfaces. It has been known that micro- and nanopatterns on surfaces can influence biomolecule adsorption, and subsequent cell and bacterial adhesion. However, less focus has been on precisely controlling patterns to study the initial bacterial attachment mechanisms and subsequently how the patterning influences the role played by biomolecular adsorption on biofilm formation. In this work, the authors have used colloidal self-assembly in a confined area to pattern surfaces with colloidal crystals and used them as masks during allylamine plasma polymer (AAMpp) deposition to generate highly ordered patterns from the micro- to the nanoscale. Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-aldehyde was grafted to the plasma regions via "cloud point" grafting to prevent the attachment of bacteria on the plasma patterned surface regions, thereby controlling the adhesive sites by choice of the colloidal crystal morphology. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was chosen to study the bacterial interactions with these chemically patterned surfaces. Scanning electron microscope, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy, and epifluorescence microscopy were used for pattern characterization, surface chemical analysis, and imaging of attached bacteria. The AAMpp influenced bacterial attachment because of the amine groups displaying a positive charge. XPS results confirm the successful grafting of PEG on the AAMpp surfaces. The results showed that PEG patterns can be used as a surface for bacterial patterning including investigating the role of biomolecular patterning on bacterial attachment. These types of patterns are easy to fabricate and could be useful in further applications in biomedical research.

  17. Optimization of structural parameters of colloidal photonic crystals for wide pseudo-bandgaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas Reddy, M.; Vijaya, R.

    2016-05-01

    The stopband characteristics of colloidal photonic crystals (PhCs) with a non-close-packed arrangement have not been fully analyzed and reported in the literature for deducing the optimum values of the dielectric constant and packing fraction of the colloids suitable for applications. We study these aspects here specifically in the Γ-{{L}} and Γ-{{X}} directions which are the most accessible directions in the experimental studies on self-assembled crystals. It is observed that in both these directions, the packing fraction that gives the maximum and minimum stopband widths will decrease with increase in the dielectric constant of the colloidal spheres relative to that of the background material. In the Γ-{{L}} direction, the width of the stopband approaches zero twice while varying the packing fraction of PhCs with large values of relative dielectric constant. The PhC with a relative dielectric constant of 4 will possess a comparatively wide pseudo bandgap in both Γ-{{L}} and Γ-{{X}} directions at its optimum packing fraction. The influence of the packing fraction on the stopband characteristics of finite thickness PhCs is also studied by calculating the reflection spectrum. Optimizing the packing fraction is crucial for further applications. As an example, the effect of the packing fraction on the group velocity and thus on the emission enhancement for the modes near the first order band edge in active PhCs is discussed in order to highlight its relevance in designing devices based on optical amplification, low-threshold band edge lasing and non-linear optical effects.

  18. Two-stage crystallization of charged colloids under low supersaturation conditions.

    PubMed

    Kratzer, Kai; Arnold, Axel

    2015-03-21

    We report simulations on the homogeneous liquid-fcc nucleation of charged colloids for both low and high contact energy values. As a precursor for crystal formation, we observe increased local order at the position where the crystal will form, but no correlations with the local density. Thus, the nucleation is driven by order fluctuations rather than density fluctuations. Our results also show that the transition involves two stages in both cases, first a transition of liquid → bcc, followed by a bcc → hcp/fcc transition. Both transitions have to overcome free energy barriers, so that a spherical bcc-like cluster is formed first, in which the final fcc structure is nucleated mainly at the surface of the crystallite. This means that the second stage bcc-fcc phase transition is a heterogeneous nucleation in the partially grown solid phase, even though we start from a homogeneous bulk liquid. The height of the bcc → hcp/fcc free energy barrier strongly depends on the contact energies of the colloids. For low contact energy this barrier is low, so that the bcc → hcp/fcc transition occurs spontaneously. For the higher contact energy, the second barrier is too high to be crossed spontaneously by the colloidal system. However, it was possible to ratchet the system over the second barrier and to transform the bcc nuclei into the stable hcp/fcc phase. The transitions are dominated by the first liquid-bcc transition and can be described by classical nucleation theory using an effective surface tension.

  19. Crystals, colloids, or molecules?: Early controversies about the origin of life and synthetic life.

    PubMed

    Deichmann, Ute

    2012-01-01

    Crystals, colloids, and (macro-)molecules have played major roles in theoretical concepts and experimental approaches concerning the generation of life from the mid-19th century on. The notion of the crystallization of life out of a nonliving fluid, a special case of the doctrine of spontaneous generation, was most prominently incorporated into Schleiden's and Schwann's version of cell theory. Refutation at the end of the 19th century of spontaneous generation of life and cells, in particular by Pasteur, Remak, and Virchow, not only gave rise to the flourishing fields of microbiology and cytology, but it also opened up research on synthetic life. These approaches focused on growth and form and colloidal chemistry on the one hand, and on the specificity of organisms' macromolecules and chemical reactions on the other. This article analyzes the contribution of these approaches to synthetic life research and argues that researchers' philosophical predilections and basic beliefs have played important roles in the choice of experimental and theoretical approaches towards synthetic life.

  20. Colloid-in-Liquid Crystal Gels that Respond to Biomolecular Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Ankit; Sidiq, Sumyra; Setia, Shilpa; Bukusoglu, Emre; de Pablo, Juan J.; Pal, Santanu Kumar; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper advances the design of stimuli-responsive materials based on colloidal particles dispersed in liquid crystals (LCs). Specifically, we report that thin films of colloid-in-liquid crystal (CLC) gels can undergo easily visualized ordering transitions in response to reversible and irreversible (enzymatic) biomolecular interactions occurring at aqueous interfaces of the gels. In particular, we demonstrate that LC ordering transitions can propagate across the entire thickness of the gels. We observe, however, that confinement of the LC to small domains with lateral sizes of ~10 µm does change the nature of the anchoring transitions, as compared to films of pure LC, due to the effects of confinement on the elastic energy stored in the LC. The effects of confinement are also observed to cause the response of individual domains of the LC within the CLC gel to vary significantly from one another, indicating that manipulation of LC domain size and shape can provide the basis of a general and facile method to tune the response of these LC-basedphysical gels to interfacial phenomena. Overall, the results presented in this paper establish that CLC gels offer a promising approach to the preparation of self-supporting, LC-based stimuli-responsive materials. PMID:23554243

  1. Colloidal quantum dot lasers built on a passive two-dimensional photonic crystal backbone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hojun; Min, Kyungtaek; Lee, Myungjae; Kang, Minsu; Park, Yeonsang; Cho, Kyung-Sang; Roh, Young-Geun; Woo Hwang, Sung; Jeon, Heonsu

    2016-03-01

    We report the room-temperature lasing action from two-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) structures composed of a passive Si3N4 backbone with an over-coat of CdSe/CdS/ZnS colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) for optical gain. When optically excited, devices lased in dual PC band-edge modes, with the modal dominance governed by the thickness of the CQD over-layer. The demonstrated laser platform should have an impact on future photonic integrated circuits as the on-chip coupling between active and passive components is readily achievable.We report the room-temperature lasing action from two-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) structures composed of a passive Si3N4 backbone with an over-coat of CdSe/CdS/ZnS colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) for optical gain. When optically excited, devices lased in dual PC band-edge modes, with the modal dominance governed by the thickness of the CQD over-layer. The demonstrated laser platform should have an impact on future photonic integrated circuits as the on-chip coupling between active and passive components is readily achievable. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08544f

  2. Crystals, colloids, or molecules?: Early controversies about the origin of life and synthetic life.

    PubMed

    Deichmann, Ute

    2012-01-01

    Crystals, colloids, and (macro-)molecules have played major roles in theoretical concepts and experimental approaches concerning the generation of life from the mid-19th century on. The notion of the crystallization of life out of a nonliving fluid, a special case of the doctrine of spontaneous generation, was most prominently incorporated into Schleiden's and Schwann's version of cell theory. Refutation at the end of the 19th century of spontaneous generation of life and cells, in particular by Pasteur, Remak, and Virchow, not only gave rise to the flourishing fields of microbiology and cytology, but it also opened up research on synthetic life. These approaches focused on growth and form and colloidal chemistry on the one hand, and on the specificity of organisms' macromolecules and chemical reactions on the other. This article analyzes the contribution of these approaches to synthetic life research and argues that researchers' philosophical predilections and basic beliefs have played important roles in the choice of experimental and theoretical approaches towards synthetic life. PMID:23502562

  3. 3D Micro-topography of Transferred Laboratory and Natural Ice Crystal Surfaces Imaged by Cryo and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, N. B.; Boaggio, K.; Bancroft, L.; Bandamede, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent work has highlighted micro-scale roughness on the surfaces of ice crystals grown and imaged in-situ within the chambers of environmental scanning electron microscopes (ESEM). These observations appear to align with theoretical and satellite observations that suggest a prevalence of rough ice in cirrus clouds. However, the atmospheric application of the lab observations are indeterminate because the observations have been based only on crystals grown on substrates and in pure-water vapor environments. In this work, we present details and results from the development of a transfer technique which allows natural and lab-grown ice and snow crystals to be captured, preserved, and transferred into the ESEM for 3D imaging. Ice crystals were gathered from 1) natural snow, 2) a balloon-borne cirrus particle capture device, and 3) lab-grown ice crystals from a diffusion chamber. Ice crystals were captured in a pre-conditioned small-volume (~1 cm3) cryo-containment cell. The cell was then sealed closed and transferred to a specially-designed cryogenic dewer (filled with liquid nitrogen or crushed dry ice) for transport to a new Hitachi Field Emission, Variable Pressure SEM (SU-5000). The cryo-cell was then removed from the dewer and quickly placed onto the pre-conditioned cryo transfer stage attached to the ESEM (Quorum 3010T). Quantitative 3D topographical digital elevation models of ice surfaces are reported from SEM for the first time, including a variety of objective measures of statistical surface roughness. The surfaces of the transported crystals clearly exhibit signatures of mesoscopic roughening that are similar to examples of roughness seen in ESEM-grown crystals. For most transported crystals, the habits and crystal edges are more intricate that those observed for ice grown directly on substrates within the ESEM chamber. Portions of some crystals do appear smooth even at magnification greater than 1000x, a rare observation in our ESEM-grown crystals. The

  4. A SiPM-based isotropic-3D PET detector X'tal cube with a three-dimensional array of 1 mm3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaya, Taiga; Mitsuhashi, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Inadama, Naoko; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Eiji; Murayama, Hideo; Kawai, Hideyuki; Suga, Mikio; Watanabe, Mitsuo

    2011-11-01

    We are developing a novel, general purpose isotropic-3D PET detector X'tal cube which has high spatial resolution in all three dimensions. The research challenge for this detector is implementing effective detection of scintillation photons by covering six faces of a segmented crystal block with silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). In this paper, we developed the second prototype of the X'tal cube for a proof-of-concept. We aimed at realizing an ultimate detector with 1.0 mm3 cubic crystals, in contrast to our previous development using 3.0 mm3 cubic crystals. The crystal block was composed of a 16 × 16 × 16 array of lutetium gadolinium oxyorthosilicate (LGSO) crystals 0.993 × 0.993 × 0.993 mm3 in size. The crystals were optically glued together without inserting any reflector inside and 96 multi-pixel photon counters (MPPCs, S10931-50P, i.e. six faces each with a 4 × 4 array of MPPCs), each having a sensitive area of 3.0 × 3.0 mm2, were optically coupled to the surfaces of the crystal block. Almost all 4096 crystals were identified through Anger-type calculation due to the finely adjusted reflector sheets inserted between the crystal block and light guides. The reflector sheets, which formed a belt of 0.5 mm width, were placed to cover half of the crystals of the second rows from the edges in order to improve identification performance of the crystals near the edges. Energy resolution of 12.7% was obtained at 511 keV with almost uniform light output for all crystal segments thanks to the effective detection of the scintillation photons.

  5. Negative refraction and focusing analysis in a left-handed material slab and realization with a 3D photonic crystal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadlou, Majid; Kamarei, Mahmoud; Sheikhi, Mohammad Hossein

    2006-02-01

    The increasing interest in metamaterials and structures with negative refraction index requires a formulation capable of a full analysis of wave propagation in such materials and structures. Since two-dimensional (2D) problems have been largely explored in the literature, the natural step is a three-dimensional (3D) formulation of these structures. In this paper, (3D) formulation and simulation of a left-handed metamaterial slab using the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method in conjunction with perfectly matched layers (PMLs) is presented, and also a (3D) photonic crystal (PC) based structure is presented as a candidate for replacing the left-handed medium slab to realize the negative index of refraction on natural dielectric substrates. The results of these simulations are compared with each other, and the resulting outputs of the developed model are in good agreement. The results demonstrate numerically the focusing of the field emitted from an omnidirectional line source placed in front of the slab and crystal. Both the source and the focus pattern are away from the slab interfaces at two sides of the slab to have a real, negative perfect image. The dimensions of the simulation domain are set to have both source and image in the resulted plots. The focus pattern shows the ability of a photonic crystal structure in making a true flat lens.

  6. Enhanced trion emission from colloidal quantum dots with photonic crystals by two-photon excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xingsheng

    2013-11-01

    For colloidal quantum dots, the ongoing biggest problem is their fluorescence blinking. Until now, there is no generally accepted model for this fluorescence blinking. Here, two-photon excited fluorescence from CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals on silicon nitride photonic crystals is studied using a femtosecond laser. From analysis of the spectra and decay processes, most of the relative trion efficiency is larger than 10%, and the largest relative trion efficiency reaches 46.7%. The photonic crystals enhance the trion emission of CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals, where the enhancement is due to the coupling of the trion emission to the leaky mode of the photonic crystal slab. Moreover, the photonic crystals enhance the Auger-assisted trapping efficiency of electrons/holes to surface states, and then enhance the efficiency of the generations of charge separation and DC electric field, which modifies the trion spectrum. Therefore, a model is present for explaining the mechanism of fluorescence blinking including the effect of the environment.

  7. Charge Stabilized Crystalline Colloidal Arrays As Templates For Fabrication of Non-Close-Packed Inverted Photonic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Justin J.; Ben-Moshe, Matti; Tikhonov, Alexander; Qu, Dan; Lamont, Daniel N.

    2010-01-01

    We developed a straightforward method to form non close-packed highly ordered fcc direct and inverse opal silica photonic crystals. We utilize an electrostatically self assembled crystalline colloidal array (CCA) template formed by monodisperse, highly charged polystyrene particles. We then polymerize a hydrogel around the CCA (PCCA) and condense the silica to form a highly ordered silica impregnated (siPCCA) photonic crystal. Heating at 450 °C removes the organic polymer leaving a silica inverse opal structure. By altering the colloidal particle concentration we independently control the particle spacing and the wall thickness of the inverse opal photonic crystals. This allows us to control the optical dielectric constant modulation in order to optimize the diffraction; the dielectric constant modulation is controlled independently of the photonic crystal periodicity. These fcc photonic crystals are better ordered than typical close-packed photonic crystals because their self assembly utilizes soft electrostatic repulsive potentials. We show that colloidal particle size and charge polydispersity has modest impact on ordering, in contrast to that for close-packed crystals. PMID:20163800

  8. Precise characterization of grain structures, stacking disorders, and lattice disorders of a close-packed colloidal crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Mori, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Takahisa; Tamura, Katsuhiro

    2011-05-01

    The perpendicular fracture surface of a dried colloidal crystal with pillar-like grains, obtained by centrifugation of a dispersion of polystyrene particles, was observed using a scanning electron microscope. Many grain boundaries on the fracture surface were observed at the particle level. Most of the particles on the surface showed a face-centered cubic (FCC) array. Although some grains were single FCC ones, other FCC grains contained some stacking disorders. Most of the surface was covered with such grains, and the grain boundaries formed a mosaic-like pattern. From these results, we confirmed that the colloidal crystals obtained by centrifugation formed a bundle structure of pillar-like FCC grains. A fracture surface adjacent to the side wall of the growth cell was also observed. The surface was composed of several layers. In the uppermost layer closest to the wall, numerous point defects and mismatches of triangular lattices between the neighboring two-dimensional islands were observed. These mismatches and point defects probably generated several lattice defects in the crystal. Similar generation of lattice defects probably occurred at the bottom of the container or the growth front of the crystals. Screw dislocations were also found in the layers, although they were not observed frequently. From these results, it was concluded that two-dimensional nucleation growth and spiral growth probably occurred on the crystal-dispersion interfaces of colloidal crystals as well as on the surface of atomic crystals.

  9. Engineering the structures and shapes of colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yu

    Well-defined colloidal particles have wide applications in optics, electronics, catalysis and diagnostics. Considerable effort has recently been devoted to the design and controlled fabrication of colloidal particles with various functionalities. Effective strategies to build tailored colloidal particles reliably and predictably are required in order to meet the ever-increasing demands placed on colloidal materials science. The properties of colloidal particles strongly depend on their size, composition, shape, and spatial organization. This research will develop a few strategies to modify these parameters in producing new types of colloidal particles for a number of applications. The first goal is to coat colloidal particles of metals, metal oxides, and polymers with thin shells of different materials, such as oxides and polymers. The obtained core-shell materials generally have enhanced or specific performance due to the combined properties and/or structuring effects of the components. They will be used as new building blocks in constructing plasmonic waveguides and three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals. The second goal of this research is to fabricate nonspherical colloidal particles with uniform sizes and shapes. Both direct and indirect methods will be used in producing monodispersed nonspherical colloidal samples. Self-assembly approaches will be explored to organize the nonspherical building blocks into 3D highly ordered lattices. The optical properties of the crystals with nonspherical lattice points will be also studied.

  10. Peculiarities of electro-optic properties of the ferroelectric particles-liquid crystal colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibragimov, T. D.; Imamaliyev, A. R.; Bayramov, G. M.

    2016-04-01

    Influence of ferroelectric barium titanate particles on electro-optic properties of the liquid crystal (LC) 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) with positive dielectric anisotropy and the LC mixture (H37) consisting of 4-methoxybezylidene-4'-butylaniline and 4-ethoxybezylidene-4'-butylaniline with negative dielectric anisotropy was investigated. It was shown that a presence of particles (1 wt%) in 5CB and H37 decreased the clearing temperature from 35.2 °C to 32.4°C and from 61.2°C to 60.1°C, respectively. The threshold voltage of the Freedericksz effect became 0.3 V for the BaTiO3-5CB colloid while the beginning of this effect for the pure 5CB was observed at 2.1 V. The threshold voltage of the Freedericksz effect increased from 2.8 V to up 3.1 V at additive of particles in H37. A rise time of the BaTiO3-5CB colloid improved while a decay time worsened in comparison with the pure 5CB at all applied voltages. The inverse trends were observed for the H37 matrix, namely, a rise time worsened and a decay time improved. Among other things, the pecularities of Williams' domain formation (WDF) were also investigated in the colloid based on the H37 matrix. It was established that the WDF voltage decreased, a rise time increased and a decay time decreased in comparison with the pure H37. Experimental results are explained by appearance of local electric fields near the polarized ferroelectric particles at application of external electric field and an existence of the additional obstacles (particles) for movement of ions.

  11. Self-assembly patterning of colloidal crystals constructed from opal structure or NaCl structure.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Yoshitake; Itoh, Tetsuya; Itoh, Minoru; Koumoto, Kunihito

    2004-06-22

    We developed a novel self-assembly process to fabricate an orderly array of particle wires constructed from a close-packed colloidal crystal without preparation of patterned templates. A substrate was immersed vertically into a SiO2 colloidal solution, and the liquid surface moved downward upon evaporation of solution. Particles formed a mono-/multiparticle layer, which was cut by the periodic drop-off of solution. The orderly array of particle wires was successfully fabricated, showing the suitability of the self-assembly process for the fabrication of nano-/microstructures constructed from nano-/microparticles or blocks. The mechanism of the assembly process and control of thickness, width, and interval of particle wires were further discussed. Moreover, an array of particle wires constructed not from close-packed face-centered cubic (or hexagonal close packed) structure but from two kinds of particles was realized to fabricate an array of particle wires with NaCl structure by this self-assembly process.

  12. Recent advancement on micro-/nano-spherical lens photolithography based on monolayer colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziming; Geng, Chong; Hao, Zhibiao; Wei, Tongbo; Yan, Qingfeng

    2016-02-01

    Highly ordered nanostructures have gained substantial interest in the research community due to their fascinating properties and wide applications.Micro-/nano-spherical lens photolithography (SLPL) has been recognized as an inexpensive, inherently parallel, and high-throughput approach to the creation of highly ordered nanostructures. SLPL based on monolayer colloidal crystals (MCCs) of self-assembled colloidal micro-/nano-spheres have recently made remarkable progress in overcoming the constraints of conventional photolithography in terms of cost, feature size, tunability, and pattern complexity. In this review, we highlight the current state-of-the-art in this field with an emphasis on the fabrication of a variety of highly ordered nanostructures based on this technique and their demonstrated applications in light emitting diodes, nano-patterning semiconductors, and localized surface plasmon resonance devices. Finally, we present a perspective on the future development of MCC-based SLPL technique, including a discussion on the improvement of the quality of MCCs and the compatibility of this technique with other semiconductor micromachining process for nanofabrication.

  13. Visual detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotolune by molecularly imprinted colloidal array photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Asher, Sanford A; Meng, Zihui; Yan, Zequn; Xue, Min; Qiu, Lili; Yi, Da

    2016-10-01

    We developed a photonic crystal (PhC) sensor for the quantification of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in solution. Monodisperse (210nm in diameter) molecularly imprinted colloidal particles (MICs) for TNT were prepared by the emulsion polymerization of methyl methacrylate and acrylamide in the presence of TNT as a template. The MICs were then self-assembled into close-packed opal PhC films. The adsorption capacity of the MICs for TNT was 64mg TNT/g. The diffraction from the PhC depended on the TNT concentration in a methanol/water (3/2, v/v) potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer solution (pH=7.0, 30mM). The limit of detection (LOD) of the sensor was 1.03μg. The color of the molecularly imprinted colloidal array (MICA) changed from green to red with an 84nm diffraction red shift when the TNT concentration increased to 20mM. The sensor response time was 3min. The PhC sensor was selective for TNT compared to similar compounds such as 2,4,6-trinitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, 2,6-dinitrotoluene, 2-nitromesitylene, 4-nitrotoluene, 2-nitrotoluene, 1,3-dinitrobenzene, methylbenzene, 4-nitrophenol, 2-nitroaniline, 3-aminophenol and 3-nitroaniline. The sensor showed high stability with little response change after three years storage. This sensor technology might be useful for the visual determination of TNT. PMID:27214001

  14. Novel phases and reentrant melting of two-dimensional colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Radzihovsky, L; Frey, E; Nelson, D R

    2001-03-01

    We investigate two-dimensional (2D) melting in the presence of a one-dimensional (1D) periodic potential as, for example, realized in recent experiments on 2D colloids subjected to two interfering laser beams. The topology of the phase diagram is found to depend primarily on two factors: the relative orientation of the 2D crystal and the periodic potential troughs, which selects a set of Bragg planes running parallel to the troughs, and the commensurability ratio p=a(')/d of the spacing a(') between these Bragg planes to the period d of the periodic potential. The complexity of the phase diagram increases with the magnitude of the commensurabilty ratio p. Rich phase diagrams, with "modulated liquid," "floating," and "locked floating" solid and smectic phases are found. Phase transitions between these phases fall into two broad universality classes, roughening and melting, driven by the proliferation of discommensuration walls and dislocations, respectively. We discuss correlation functions and the static structure factor in these phases, and make detailed predictions about the universal features close to the phase boundaries. We predict that for charged systems with highly screened short-range interactions, these melting transitions are generically reentrant as a function of the strength of the periodic potential, a prediction that is in accord with recent 2D colloid experiments. Implications of our results for future experiments are also discussed. PMID:11308653

  15. A new 3D nickel(II) framework composed of large rings: Ionothermal synthesis and crystal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Ling; Choi, Eun-Young; Kwon, Young-Uk

    2008-11-15

    Ionothermal reaction between Ni{sup 2+} and 1,3,5-benzentricarboxylic acid (H{sub 3}BTC) with [AMI]Cl (AMI=1-amyl-3-methylimidazolium) as the reaction medium produced a novel 3D mixed-ligand metal-organic framework [AMI][Ni{sub 3}(BTC){sub 2}(OAc)(MI){sub 3}] (1) (MI=1-methylimidazole) with [AMI]{sup +} incorporated in the framework. The framework is formed by connecting 2D planes, made up of 32- and 48-membered rings, through 1D chains composed of 32-membered rings. The two BTC{sup 3-} ligands in 1 show the same connectivity mode with two bidentate and one {mu}{sub 2} bridging carboxylic groups. This is a new connectivity mode to the already existing 17 in the Ni-BTC system. The role of MI and [AMI]Cl in the structure formation is discussed. - Graphical Abstract: A novel 3D framework [AMI][Ni{sub 3}(BTC){sub 2}(OAc)(MI){sub 3}] is obtained in ionothermal system with [AMI]{sup +} incorporating in the cavities as structure directing template and BTC{sup 3-} showing a new coordination fashion. The 3D framework is constructed by 2D layers linked with 1D double chains. The title compound has the middle thermal stability at ca. 280 deg. C.

  16. Crystal fields of porphyrins and phthalocyanines from polarization-dependent 2p-to-3d multiplets

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Phillip S.; Boukahil, Idris; Himpsel, F. J.; García-Lastra, J. M.; Kennedy, Colton K.; Jersett, Nathan J.; Cook, Peter L.

    2014-03-21

    Polarization-dependent X-ray absorption spectroscopy is combined with density functional calculations and atomic multiplet calculations to determine the crystal field parameters 10Dq, Ds, and Dt of transition metal phthalocyanines and octaethylporphyrins (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni). The polarization dependence facilitates the assignment of the multiplets in terms of in-plane and out-of-plane orbitals and avoids ambiguities. Crystal field values from density functional calculations provide starting values close to the optimum fit of the data. The resulting systematics of the crystal field can be used for optimizing electron-hole separation in dye-sensitized solar cells.

  17. Stamping colloidal photonic crystals: a facile way towards complex pixel colour patterns for sensing and displays.

    PubMed

    Ding, Tao; Smoukov, Stoyan K; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2015-02-01

    Patterning of colloidal photonic crystals (CPCs) has been strongly investigated in recent years for sensing and image displays. Rather than using traditional template-directed approaches, here microimprint lithography along with convective self-assembly is applied to generate complex CPC patterns that can be adjusted to show single- or dual-colour patterns or composite CPC patterns possessing two different colours. These composite CPC patterns show different wettability with water because of the surface chemistry of the polymers and silica used. This dramatically transforms the structural colours upon liquid infiltration. By mixing different ethanol concentrations with water, the infiltration efficiency can be further improved and easily read out from changes in reflection intensity and spectral peak shifts. Integrating these nano-architectures into devices can thus yield function as image displays and as sensors for solvents.

  18. Partial clustering prevents global crystallization in a binary 2D colloidal glass former.

    PubMed

    Ebert, F; Maret, G; Keim, P

    2009-07-01

    A mixture of two types of super-paramagnetic colloidal particles with long-range dipolar interaction is confined by gravity to the flat interface of a hanging water droplet. The particles are observed by video microscopy and the dipolar interaction strength is controlled via an external magnetic field. The system is a model system to study the glass transition in 2D, and it exhibits partial clustering of the small particles (N. Hoffmann et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 078301 (2006)). This clustering is strongly dependent on the relative concentration [Formula: see text] of big and small particles. However, changing the interaction strength [Formula: see text] reveals that the clustering does not depend on the interaction strength. The partial clustering scenario is quantified using Minkowski functionals and partial structure factors. Evidence that partial clustering prevents global crystallization is discussed.

  19. Gold binary-structured arrays based on monolayer colloidal crystals and their optical properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangqiang; Li, Xinhua; Wang, Wenbo; Zhou, Fei; Duan, Guotao; Li, Yue; Xu, Zongke; Cai, Weiping

    2014-06-25

    A simple and flexible route is presented to fabricate a gold binary-structured ordered array by one step based on non-shadow deposition on a plasma etching-induced dualistic monolayer colloidal crystal. Such a Au binary-structure array is built of hexagonally arranged nanoshells and nanorings which stand between two adjacent nanoshells. Six gold nanorings surround each nanoshell. The obtained arrays exhibit both the controllable surface-plasmon-resonance (SPR) properties of Au nanoshells and the strong electromagnetic-field-enhancement effects of Au nanorings, with the high structural stability of ordered arrays, and show promising potential as the substrate of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based devices. The method could also be suitable for fabrication of other material binary-structured arrays. This study is important in designing and fabricating basal materials for the next generation of multifunctional nanostructured devices. PMID:24599634

  20. Topological defects and self-assembly of cuboidal colloidal particles with sharp edges in a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pablo, Juan J.; Sadati, Monirosadat; Armas-Perez, Julio C.; Soni, Vishal; Irvine, William T. M.

    The geometry of colloidal particles defines the topology and self-assembly of colloidal superstructures in nematic liquid crystals. Past research has largely focused on the defects that arise around spherical colloids, and the defect-induced aggregation between them. In this work, we examine experimentally and theoretically, the effect of edge curvature of colloidal particles on their defect configurations and self-assembly in a nematic liquid crystal (5CB). The polarized images of the particles with homeotropic surface anchoring in 5CB show that the presence of sharp edges can reshape completely the defect ring. The defect makes sharp turns and follows the edge of the cube particles, which significantly affects the interaction between particles and their eventual self-assembly. In agreement with our experimental results, our computational studies indicate that the gradual increase of the edges sharpness that occurs as we transition from spheres to cubes, changes the defect structure from a Saturn ring to a twisted ring, which is pinned to the edges of the cube particle. The wide variety of topological defects achievable by changing the curvature could provide new tools to tune colloidal self-assembly.

  1. In situ 3D topographic and shape analysis by synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography for crystal form identification in polymorphic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xian-Zhen; Xiao, Ti-Qiao; Nangia, Ashwini; Yang, Shuo; Lu, Xiao-Long; Li, Hai-Yan; Shao, Qun; He, You; York, Peter; Zhang, Ji-Wen

    2016-04-01

    Polymorphism denotes the existence of more than one crystal structure of a substance, and great practical and theoretical interest for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. In many cases, it is challenging to produce a pure crystal form and establish a sensitive detection method for the identification of crystal form in a mixture of polymorphs. In this study, an accurate and sensitive method based on synchrotron radiation X-ray computed microtomography (SR-μCT) was devised to identify the polymorphs of clopidogrel bisulphate (CLP). After 3D reconstruction, crystal particles were extracted and dozens of structural parameters were calculated. Whilst, the particle shapes of the two crystal forms were all irregular, the surface of CLP II was found to be rougher than CLP I. In order to classify the crystal form based on the quantitative morphological property of particles, Volume Bias Percentage based on Surface Smoothing (VBP) was defined and a new method based on VBP was successfully developed, with a total matching rate of 99.91% for 4544 particles and a lowest detectable limit of 1%. More important for the mixtures in solid pharmaceutical formulations, the interference of excipients can be avoided, a feature cannot achieved by other available analytical methods.

  2. In situ 3D topographic and shape analysis by synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography for crystal form identification in polymorphic mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xian-Zhen; Xiao, Ti-Qiao; Nangia, Ashwini; Yang, Shuo; Lu, Xiao-Long; Li, Hai-Yan; Shao, Qun; He, You; York, Peter; Zhang, Ji-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphism denotes the existence of more than one crystal structure of a substance, and great practical and theoretical interest for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. In many cases, it is challenging to produce a pure crystal form and establish a sensitive detection method for the identification of crystal form in a mixture of polymorphs. In this study, an accurate and sensitive method based on synchrotron radiation X-ray computed microtomography (SR-μCT) was devised to identify the polymorphs of clopidogrel bisulphate (CLP). After 3D reconstruction, crystal particles were extracted and dozens of structural parameters were calculated. Whilst, the particle shapes of the two crystal forms were all irregular, the surface of CLP II was found to be rougher than CLP I. In order to classify the crystal form based on the quantitative morphological property of particles, Volume Bias Percentage based on Surface Smoothing (VBP) was defined and a new method based on VBP was successfully developed, with a total matching rate of 99.91% for 4544 particles and a lowest detectable limit of 1%. More important for the mixtures in solid pharmaceutical formulations, the interference of excipients can be avoided, a feature cannot achieved by other available analytical methods. PMID:27097672

  3. Stability enhancement of an electrically tunable colloidal photonic crystal using modified electrodes with a large electrochemical potential window

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, HongShik; Gyun Shin, Chang; Heo, Chul-Joon; Jeon, Seog-Jin; Jin, Haishun; Woo Kim, Jung; Jin, YongWan; Lee, SangYoon; Gyu Han, Moon E-mail: jinklee@snu.ac.kr; Lim, Joohyun; Lee, Jin-Kyu E-mail: jinklee@snu.ac.kr

    2014-02-03

    The color tuning behavior and switching stability of an electrically tunable colloidal photonic crystal system were studied with particular focus on the electrochemical aspects. Photonic color tuning of the colloidal arrays composed of monodisperse particles dispersed in water was achieved using external electric field through lattice constant manipulation. However, the number of effective color tuning cycle was limited due to generation of unwanted ions by electrolysis of the water medium during electrical switching. By introducing larger electrochemical potential window electrodes, such as conductive diamond-like carbon or boron-doped diamond, the switching stability was appreciably enhanced through reducing the number of ions generated.

  4. Final LDRD report : enhanced spontaneous emission rate in visible III-nitride LEDs using 3D photonic crystal cavities.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Arthur Joseph; Subramania, Ganapathi S.; Coley, Anthony J.; Lee, Yun-Ju; Li, Qiming; Wang, George T.; Luk, Ting Shan; Koleske, Daniel David; Fullmer, Kristine Wanta

    2009-09-01

    The fundamental spontaneous emission rate for a photon source can be modified by placing the emitter inside a periodic dielectric structure allowing the emission to be dramatically enhanced or suppressed depending on the intended application. We have investigated the relatively unexplored realm of interaction between semiconductor emitters and three dimensional photonic crystals in the visible spectrum. Although this interaction has been investigated at longer wavelengths, very little work has been done in the visible spectrum. During the course of this LDRD, we have fabricated TiO{sub 2} logpile photonic crystal structures with the shortest wavelength band gap ever demonstrated. A variety of different emitters with emission between 365 nm and 700 nm were incorporated into photonic crystal structures. Time-integrated and time-resolved photoluminescence measurements were performed to measure changes to the spontaneous emission rate. Both enhanced and suppressed emission were demonstrated and attributed to changes to the photonic density of states.

  5. 3D-Modeling of deformed halite hopper crystals: Object based image analysis and support vector machine, a first evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Christoph; Hofmann, Peter; Marschallinger, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Halite hopper crystals are thought to develop by displacive growth in unconsolidated mud (Gornitz & Schreiber, 1984). The Alpine Haselgebirge, but also e.g. the salt deposits of the Rhine graben (mined at the beginning of the 20th century), comprise hopper crystals with shapes of cuboids, parallelepipeds and rhombohedrons (Görgey, 1912). Obviously, they deformed under oriented stress, which had been tried to reconstruct with respect to the sedimentary layering (Leitner et al., 2013). In the present work, deformed halite hopper crystals embedded in mudrock were automated reconstructed. Object based image analysis (OBIA) has been used successfully in remote sensing for 2D images before. The present study represents the first time that the method was used for reconstruction of three dimensional geological objects. First, manually a reference (gold standard) was created by redrawing contours of the halite crystals on each HRXCT scanning slice. Then, for OBIA, the computer program eCognition was used. For the automated reconstruction a rule set was developed. Thereby, the strength of OBIA was to recognize all objects similar to halite hopper crystals and in particular to eliminate cracks. In a second step, all the objects unsuitable for a structural deformation analysis were dismissed using a support vector machine (SVM) (clusters, polyhalite-coated crystals and spherical halites) The SVM simultaneously drastically reduced the number of halites. From 184 OBIA-objects 67 well shaped remained, which comes close to the number of pre-selected 52 objects. To assess the accuracy of the automated reconstruction, the result before and after SVM was compared to the reference, i.e. the gold standard. State-of the art per-scene statistics were extended to a per-object statistics. Görgey R (1912) Zur Kenntnis der Kalisalzlager von Wittelsheim im Ober-Elsaß. Tschermaks Mineral Petrogr Mitt 31:339-468 Gornitz VM, Schreiber BC (1981) Displacive halite hoppers from the dead sea

  6. Monodisperse colloidal gallium nanoparticles: synthesis, low temperature crystallization, surface plasmon resonance and Li-ion storage.

    PubMed

    Yarema, Maksym; Wörle, Michael; Rossell, Marta D; Erni, Rolf; Caputo, Riccarda; Protesescu, Loredana; Kravchyk, Kostiantyn V; Dirin, Dmitry N; Lienau, Karla; von Rohr, Fabian; Schilling, Andreas; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Kovalenko, Maksym V

    2014-09-01

    We report a facile colloidal synthesis of gallium (Ga) nanoparticles with the mean size tunable in the range of 12-46 nm and with excellent size distribution as small as 7-8%. When stored under ambient conditions, Ga nanoparticles remain stable for months due to the formation of native and passivating Ga-oxide layer (2-3 nm). The mechanism of Ga nanoparticles formation is elucidated using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and with molecular dynamics simulations. Size-dependent crystallization and melting of Ga nanoparticles in the temperature range of 98-298 K are studied with X-ray powder diffraction, specific heat measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results point to delta (δ)-Ga polymorph as a single low-temperature phase, while phase transition is characterized by the large hysteresis and by the large undercooling of crystallization and melting points down to 140-145 and 240-250 K, respectively. We have observed size-tunable plasmon resonance in the ultraviolet and visible spectral regions. We also report stable operation of Ga nanoparticles as anode material for Li-ion batteries with storage capacities of 600 mAh g(-1), 50% higher than those achieved for bulk Ga under identical testing conditions.

  7. Panoscopic organization of anisotropic colloidal structures from photofunctional inorganic nanosheet liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Nakato, Teruyuki; Nono, Yoshihiro; Mouri, Emiko; Nakata, Munetaka

    2014-01-21

    Colloidal liquid crystals of inorganic nanosheets with thickness of around 1 nm and lateral dimensions of several micrometers prepared by exfoliation of a layered niobate are converted to hierarchically organized arrays whose structures are controlled from the nano to macroscopic length scale through the growth of liquid crystalline domains called tactoids as the secondary building blocks followed by controlled application of external fields. Growth of the tactoids is attained by incubation of the liquid crystals at room temperature. The tactoids are then assembled into higher-order structures with characteristic lengths of sub-mm to mm under the simultaneous application of an ac electric field and gravity, whose directions determine the final textural motif of the arrays. Whereas a net-like texture is observed when applying the electric and gravitational forces in the same direction, a striped texture where the nanosheets are unidirectionally aligned is observed when the electric field is applied in the direction perpendicular to gravity. The use of well-grown tactoids is key to the macroscopic structural control. Since the niobate nanosheets have wide band-gap semiconducting nature, the nanosheet stripe arrays exhibit photocatalysis that reflected the alignment of the nanosheets with respect to the polarized direction of impinging light.

  8. Duality between the dynamics of line-like brushes of point defects in 2D and strings in 3D in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digal, Sanatan; Ray, Rajarshi; Saumia, P. S.; Srivastava, Ajit M.

    2013-10-01

    We analyze the dynamics of dark brushes connecting point vortices of strength ±1 formed in the isotropic-nematic phase transition of a thin layer of nematic liquid crystals, using a crossed polarizer set up. The evolution of the brushes is seen to be remarkably similar to the evolution of line defects in a three-dimensional nematic liquid crystal system. Even phenomena like the intercommutativity of strings are routinely observed in the dynamics of brushes. We test the hypothesis of a duality between the two systems by determining exponents for the coarsening of total brush length with time as well as shrinking of the size of an isolated loop. Our results show scaling behavior for the brush length as well as the loop size with corresponding exponents in good agreement with the 3D case of string defects.

  9. Quantitative 3D Fluorescence Imaging of Single Catalytic Turnovers Reveals Spatiotemporal Gradients in Reactivity of Zeolite H-ZSM-5 Crystals upon Steaming

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Optimizing the number, distribution, and accessibility of Brønsted acid sites in zeolite-based catalysts is of a paramount importance to further improve their catalytic performance. However, it remains challenging to measure real-time changes in reactivity of single zeolite catalyst particles by ensemble-averaging characterization methods. In this work, a detailed 3D single molecule, single turnover sensitive fluorescence microscopy study is presented to quantify the reactivity of Brønsted acid sites in zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals upon steaming. This approach, in combination with the oligomerization of furfuryl alcohol as a probe reaction, allowed the stochastic behavior of single catalytic turnovers and temporally resolved turnover frequencies of zeolite domains smaller than the diffraction limited resolution to be investigated with great precision. It was found that the single turnover kinetics of the parent zeolite crystal proceeds with significant spatial differences in turnover frequencies on the nanoscale and noncorrelated temporal fluctuations. Mild steaming of zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals at 500 °C led to an enhanced surface reactivity, with up to 4 times higher local turnover rates than those of the parent H-ZSM-5 crystals, and revealed remarkable heterogeneities in surface reactivity. In strong contrast, severe steaming at 700 °C significantly dealuminated the zeolite H-ZSM-5 material, leading to a 460 times lower turnover rate. The differences in measured turnover activities are explained by changes in the 3D aluminum distribution due to migration of extraframework Al-species and their subsequent effect on pore accessibility, as corroborated by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) sputter depth profiling data. PMID:25867455

  10. Syntheses, crystal structures, and characterization of three 1D, 2D and 3D complexes based on mixed multidentate N- and O-donor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huai-Xia; Liang, Zhen; Hao, Bao-Lian; Meng, Xiang-Ru

    2014-10-01

    Three new 1D to 3D complexes, namely, {[Ni(btec)(Himb)2(H2O)2]·6H2O}n (1), {[Cd(btec)0.5(imb)(H2O)]·1.5H2O}n (2), and {[Zn(btec)0.5(imb)]·H2O}n (3) (H4btec=1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid, imb=2-(1H-imidazol-1-methyl)-1H-benzimidazole) have been synthesized by adjusting the central metal ions. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that complex 1 possesses a 1D chain structure which is further extended into the 3D supramolecular architecture via hydrogen bonds. Complex 2 features a 2D network with Schla¨fli symbol (53·62·7)(52·64). Complex 3 presents a 3D framework with a point symbol of (4·64·8)(42·62·82). Moreover, their IR spectra, PXRD patterns, thermogravimetric curves, and luminescent emissions were studied at room temperature.

  11. Dielectric and infrared properties of SrTiO3 single crystal doped by 3d (V, Mn, Fe, Ni) and 4f (Nd, Sm, Er) ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maletic, S.; Maletic, D.; Petronijevic, I.; Dojcilovic, J.; M. Popovic, D.

    2014-02-01

    In this study, the effects of doping by 3d (V, Mn, Fe, Ni) and 4f (Nd, Sm, Er) ions on dielectric and infrared properties of SrTiO3 (STO) single crystals are investigated. It is well known that doping of the SrTiO3 can change the dielectric properties of the STO from an insulator to an n-type semiconductor, and even to a metallic conductor. Dielectric and infrared (IR) properties of the undoped STO and doped STO single crystals are analyzed using dielectric spectroscopy (80 kHz-5 MHz), transmission (200 cm-1-4000 cm-1), and reflection spectroscopy (50 cm-1-2000 cm-1). It is found that doping by the 3d ions reduces the value of dielectric permittivity, but the trend of temperature dependence of the dielectric permittivity remains almost unchanged. On the other hand, dielectric spectroscopy measurements for samples doped by 4f ions show the anomalous behaviors of the dielectric permittivity at temperatures around the temperature of the structural phase transition. There are two fractures of temperature dependences of inverse dielectric permittivity ɛr-1(T). Transmittance spectroscopy measurements show that there are differences in the shape of the spectrum in the mid-IR region between the undoped STO and the one doped by 4f ions. The differences in the reflectance spectrum between the STO:Nd and STO are analyzed in detail.

  12. Six-membered metalla-coronands. synthesis and crystal packing: columns, compartments, and 3D-networks.

    PubMed

    Saalfrank, Rolf W; Deutscher, Christian; Sperner, Stefan; Nakajima, Takayuki; Ako, Ayuk M; Uller, Eveline; Hampel, Frank; Heinemann, Frank W

    2004-07-12

    Reaction of various N-substituted diethanolamines H(2)L(3) (4) with calcium hydride and iron(III) chloride leads to the self-assembly of six-membered ferric wheels [Fe(6)X(6)(L(3))(6)] (5). Principally, all the iron coronands are isostructural; however, they differ fundamentally with respect to their crystal packing. Exemplarily, this is discussed for selected members of the space groups R, P, P2(1)/c, P2(1)/n, C2/c, and P. Depending on the nature of their sidearms, the ferric wheels create various substructures. For instance, the ferric wheels 5a-i of space group R or P are piled in parallel in cylindrical columns, which are surrounded by six parallel columns alternately dislocated by (1)/(3)c and (2)/(3)c against the central one. Pronounced van der Waals interactions give rise to compartmentation and incarceration of guest molecules as seen for 5e,g. However, in 5h strong pi-pi interactions create a three-dimensional scaffold. The most significant difference of the ferric wheels 5j-p of space groups P2(1)/c, P2(1)/n, and C2/c is that these ferric wheels are arranged in parallel in two orientations. They differ mainly only by the included angle of the two groups of parallel wheels. In the case of 5l, molecular chains are formed in the crystal due to pi-pi interactions. The ferric wheels 5q-y of space group P are packed in the crystal most simply, with all the ferric wheels piled in parallel.

  13. Syntheses, crystal structures, and characterization of three 1D, 2D and 3D complexes based on mixed multidentate N- and O-donor ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Huai-Xia; Liang, Zhen; Hao, Bao-Lian; Meng, Xiang-Ru

    2014-10-15

    Three new 1D to 3D complexes, namely, ([Ni(btec)(Himb){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·6H{sub 2}O){sub n} (1), ([Cd(btec){sub 0.5}(imb)(H{sub 2}O)]·1.5H{sub 2}O){sub n} (2), and ([Zn(btec){sub 0.5}(imb)]·H{sub 2}O){sub n} (3) (H{sub 4}btec=1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid, imb=2-(1H-imidazol-1-methyl)-1H-benzimidazole) have been synthesized by adjusting the central metal ions. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that complex 1 possesses a 1D chain structure which is further extended into the 3D supramolecular architecture via hydrogen bonds. Complex 2 features a 2D network with Schla¨fli symbol (5{sup 3}·6{sup 2}·7)(5{sup 2}·6{sup 4}). Complex 3 presents a 3D framework with a point symbol of (4·6{sup 4}·8)(4{sup 2}·6{sup 2}·8{sup 2}). Moreover, their IR spectra, PXRD patterns, thermogravimetric curves, and luminescent emissions were studied at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Three new 1D to 3D complexes with different structural and topological motifs have been obtained by modifying the central metal ions. Additionally, their IR, TG analyses and fluorescent properties are also investigated. - Highlights: • Three complexes based on mixed multidentate N- and O-donor ligands. • The complexes are characterized by IR, luminescence and TGA techniques. • Benzenetetracarboxylates display different coordination modes in complexes 1–3. • Changing the metal ions can result in complexes with completely different structures.

  14. Topological defect transformation and structural transition of two-dimensional colloidal crystals across the nematic to smectic-A phase transition.

    PubMed

    Zuhail, K P; Sathyanarayana, P; Seč, D; Čopar, S; Škarabot, M; Muševič, I; Dhara, S

    2015-03-01

    We observe that topological defects in nematic colloids are strongly influenced by the elasticity and onset of smectic layering across the nematic (N) to smectic-A (SmA) phase transition. When approaching the SmA phase from above, the nematic hyperbolic hedgehog defect that accompanies a spherical colloidal inclusion is transformed into a focal conic line in the SmA phase. This phase transformation has a strong influence on the pairwise colloidal interaction and is responsible for a structural transition of two-dimensional colloidal crystals. The pretransitional behavior of the point defect is supported by Landau-de Gennes Q-tensor modeling accounting for the increasing elastic anisotropy.

  15. Monitoring the formation of carbide crystal phases during the thermal decomposition of 3d transition metal dicarboxylate complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Huba, ZJ; Carpenter, EE

    2014-06-06

    Single molecule precursors can help to simplify the synthesis of complex alloys by minimizing the amount of necessary starting reagents. However, single molecule precursors are time consuming to prepare with very few being commercially available. In this study, a simple precipitation method is used to prepare Fe, Co, and Ni fumarate and succinate complexes. These complexes were then thermally decomposed in an inert atmosphere to test their efficiency as single molecule precursors for the formation of metal carbide phases. Elevated temperature X-ray diffraction was used to identify the crystal phases produced upon decomposition of the metal dicarboxylate complexes. Thermogravimetric analysis coupled with an infrared detector was used to identify the developed gaseous decomposition products. All complexes tested showed a reduction from the starting M2+ oxidation state to the M oxidation state, upon decomposition. Also, each complex tested showed CO2 and H2O as gaseous decomposition products. Nickel succinate, iron succinate, and iron fumarate complexes were found to form carbide phases upon decomposition. This proves that transition metal dicarboxylate salts can be employed as efficient single molecule precursors for the formation of metal carbide crystal phases.

  16. Anisotropic lattice expansion of three-dimensional colloidal crystals and its impact on hypersonic phonon band gaps.

    PubMed

    Wu, Songtao; Zhu, Gaohua; Zhang, Jin S; Banerjee, Debasish; Bass, Jay D; Ling, Chen; Yano, Kazuhisa

    2014-05-21

    We report anisotropic expansion of self-assembled colloidal polystyrene-poly(dimethylsiloxane) crystals and its impact on the phonon band structure at hypersonic frequencies. The structural expansion was achieved by a multistep infiltration-polymerization process. Such a process expands the interplanar lattice distance 17% after 8 cycles whereas the in-plane distance remains unaffected. The variation of hypersonic phonon band structure induced by the anisotropic lattice expansion was recorded by Brillouin measurements. In the sample before expansion, a phononic band gap between 3.7 and 4.4 GHz is observed; after 17% structural expansion, the gap is shifted to a lower frequency between 3.5 and 4.0 GHz. This study offers a facile approach to control the macroscopic structure of colloidal crystals with great potential in designing tunable phononic devices.

  17. Self-Connected 3D Architecture of Microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Jean-Baptiste; Pires, David; Galerne, Yves

    2009-12-01

    A defect or disclination line, prepared at a designed place in a nematic liquid crystal, is used as a template for realizing a microwire directly connected to the electrodes with an accuracy of a few μm. The line attracts and traps silica particles, until self-assembling a complete micronecklace. We then fix the colloids in the necklace by means of pyrrole electropolymerization. The process may be extended to connect many microwires simultaneously. This provides a new route for manufacturing automatic 3D connections, which could be important for electronic applications as Moore’s law now seems to reach some limit in 2D.

  18. Self-connected 3D architecture of microwires.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Jean-Baptiste; Pires, David; Galerne, Yves

    2009-12-31

    A defect or disclination line, prepared at a designed place in a nematic liquid crystal, is used as a template for realizing a microwire directly connected to the electrodes with an accuracy of a few microm. The line attracts and traps silica particles, until self-assembling a complete micronecklace. We then fix the colloids in the necklace by means of pyrrole electropolymerization. The process may be extended to connect many microwires simultaneously. This provides a new route for manufacturing automatic 3D connections, which could be important for electronic applications as Moore's law now seems to reach some limit in 2D.

  19. Probing the 3D structure of cornea-like collagen liquid crystals with polarization-resolved SHG microscopy.

    PubMed

    Teulon, Claire; Tidu, Aurélien; Portier, François; Mosser, Gervaise; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2016-07-11

    This work aims at characterizing the three-dimensional organization of liquid crystals composed of collagen, in order to determine the physico-chemical conditions leading to highly organized structures found in biological tissues such as cornea. To that end, we use second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy, since aligned collagen structures have been shown to exhibit intrinsic SHG signals. We combine polarization-resolved SHG experiments (P-SHG) with the theoretical derivation of the SHG signal of collagen molecules tilted with respect to the focal plane. Our P-SHG images exhibit striated patterns with variable contrast, as expected from our analytical and numerical calculations for plywood-like nematic structures similar to the ones found in the cornea. This study demonstrates the benefits of P-SHG microscopy for in situ characterization of highly organized biopolymers at micrometer scale, and the unique sensitivity of this nonlinear optical technique to the orientation of collagen molecules. PMID:27410876

  20. Selective imaging of 3D director fields and study of defects in biaxial smectic A liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Smalyukh, I I; Pratibha, R; Madhusudana, N V; Lavrentovich, O D

    2005-02-01

    We report on the selective imaging of different director fields in a biaxial smectic A (SmAb) liquid crystal using Fluorescence Confocal Polarizing Microscopy (FCPM) and Polarizing Microscopy (PM). The patterns of two directors, namely the director n(a) perpendicular to the lamellae and the director n(b) in their planes are visualized by doping the liquid crystal with two fluorescent dyes with different orientation of the transition dipoles with respect to the lamellar matrix. The properties of defects such as disclinations and focal conic domains (FCDs) are consistent with the non-polar D2h-symmetry of the SmA(b) mesophase in the studied mixture of bent-core and rod-like molecules: (1) majority of defects in the director n(b) are half-integer "+/-1/2" disclinations; (2) the integer-strength "+/-1" defects tend to split into the "+/-1/2" disclinations. We compare the vertical cross-sections of the "+/-1" disclinations in the field in SmA(b) and uniaxial nematic samples. In SmA(b), the "+/-1" disclinations do not escape into the third dimension, while in the nematic samples with Schlieren textures they do despite the surface anchoring at the plates; the experimentally determined director field around the escaped disclination capped by a pair of surface point defects--boojums matches the one predicted recently [C. Chiccoli et al., Phys. Rev. E 66, 030701 (2002)]. The FCD structure in SmA(b) is similar to that in SmA and SmC in terms of the normal to the layers but differs significantly in terms of the director n(b) field parallel to the smectic layers. The FCDs in SmA(b) can be associated with topologically non-trivial configurations of n(b) in the surrounding matrix that are equivalent to the disclination lines.

  1. Shape-dependent oriented trapping and scaffolding of plasmonic nanoparticles by topological defects for self-assembly of colloidal dimers in liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Evans, Julian S; Ackerman, Paul J; Lee, Taewoo; Manna, Pramit; Vigderman, Leonid; Zubarev, Eugene R; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate scaffolding of plasmonic nanoparticles by topological defects induced by colloidal microspheres to match their surface boundary conditions with a uniform far-field alignment in a liquid crystal host. Displacing energetically costly liquid crystal regions of reduced order, anisotropic nanoparticles with concave or convex shapes not only stably localize in defects but also self-orient with respect to the microsphere surface. Using laser tweezers, we manipulate the ensuing nanoparticle-microsphere colloidal dimers, probing the strength of elastic binding and demonstrating self-assembly of hierarchical colloidal superstructures such as chains and arrays.

  2. Shape-dependent oriented trapping and scaffolding of plasmonic nanoparticles by topological defects for self-assembly of colloidal dimers in liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Evans, Julian S; Ackerman, Paul J; Lee, Taewoo; Manna, Pramit; Vigderman, Leonid; Zubarev, Eugene R; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate scaffolding of plasmonic nanoparticles by topological defects induced by colloidal microspheres to match their surface boundary conditions with a uniform far-field alignment in a liquid crystal host. Displacing energetically costly liquid crystal regions of reduced order, anisotropic nanoparticles with concave or convex shapes not only stably localize in defects but also self-orient with respect to the microsphere surface. Using laser tweezers, we manipulate the ensuing nanoparticle-microsphere colloidal dimers, probing the strength of elastic binding and demonstrating self-assembly of hierarchical colloidal superstructures such as chains and arrays. PMID:22233163

  3. Crystal symmetry breaking and vacancies in colloidal lead chalcogenide quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Bertolotti, Federica; Dirin, Dmitry N; Ibáñez, Maria; Krumeich, Frank; Cervellino, Antonio; Frison, Ruggero; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Sargent, Edward H; Kovalenko, Maksym V; Guagliardi, Antonietta; Masciocchi, Norberto

    2016-09-01

    Size and shape tunability and low-cost solution processability make colloidal lead chalcogenide quantum dots (QDs) an emerging class of building blocks for innovative photovoltaic, thermoelectric and optoelectronic devices. Lead chalcogenide QDs are known to crystallize in the rock-salt structure, although with very different atomic order and stoichiometry in the core and surface regions; however, there exists no convincing prior identification of how extreme downsizing and surface-induced ligand effects influence structural distortion. Using forefront X-ray scattering techniques and density functional theory calculations, here we have identified that, at sizes below 8 nm, PbS and PbSe QDs undergo a lattice distortion with displacement of the Pb sublattice, driven by ligand-induced tensile strain. The resulting permanent electric dipoles may have implications on the oriented attachment of these QDs. Evidence is found for a Pb-deficient core and, in the as-synthesized QDs, for a rhombic dodecahedral shape with nonpolar {110} facets. On varying the nature of the surface ligands, differences in lattice strains are found. PMID:27295101

  4. Crystal symmetry breaking and vacancies in colloidal lead chalcogenide quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolotti, Federica; Dirin, Dmitry N.; Ibáñez, Maria; Krumeich, Frank; Cervellino, Antonio; Frison, Ruggero; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Sargent, Edward H.; Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Guagliardi, Antonietta; Masciocchi, Norberto

    2016-09-01

    Size and shape tunability and low-cost solution processability make colloidal lead chalcogenide quantum dots (QDs) an emerging class of building blocks for innovative photovoltaic, thermoelectric and optoelectronic devices. Lead chalcogenide QDs are known to crystallize in the rock-salt structure, although with very different atomic order and stoichiometry in the core and surface regions; however, there exists no convincing prior identification of how extreme downsizing and surface-induced ligand effects influence structural distortion. Using forefront X-ray scattering techniques and density functional theory calculations, here we have identified that, at sizes below 8 nm, PbS and PbSe QDs undergo a lattice distortion with displacement of the Pb sublattice, driven by ligand-induced tensile strain. The resulting permanent electric dipoles may have implications on the oriented attachment of these QDs. Evidence is found for a Pb-deficient core and, in the as-synthesized QDs, for a rhombic dodecahedral shape with nonpolar {110} facets. On varying the nature of the surface ligands, differences in lattice strains are found.

  5. Crystal symmetry breaking and vacancies in colloidal lead chalcogenide quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Bertolotti, Federica; Dirin, Dmitry N; Ibáñez, Maria; Krumeich, Frank; Cervellino, Antonio; Frison, Ruggero; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Sargent, Edward H; Kovalenko, Maksym V; Guagliardi, Antonietta; Masciocchi, Norberto

    2016-09-01

    Size and shape tunability and low-cost solution processability make colloidal lead chalcogenide quantum dots (QDs) an emerging class of building blocks for innovative photovoltaic, thermoelectric and optoelectronic devices. Lead chalcogenide QDs are known to crystallize in the rock-salt structure, although with very different atomic order and stoichiometry in the core and surface regions; however, there exists no convincing prior identification of how extreme downsizing and surface-induced ligand effects influence structural distortion. Using forefront X-ray scattering techniques and density functional theory calculations, here we have identified that, at sizes below 8 nm, PbS and PbSe QDs undergo a lattice distortion with displacement of the Pb sublattice, driven by ligand-induced tensile strain. The resulting permanent electric dipoles may have implications on the oriented attachment of these QDs. Evidence is found for a Pb-deficient core and, in the as-synthesized QDs, for a rhombic dodecahedral shape with nonpolar {110} facets. On varying the nature of the surface ligands, differences in lattice strains are found.

  6. Spherical porphyrin sensor array based on encoded colloidal crystal beads for VOC vapor detection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hua; Cao, Kai-Di; Ding, Hai-Bo; Zhong, Qi-Feng; Gu, Hong-Cheng; Xie, Zhuo-Ying; Zhao, Yuan-Jin; Gu, Zhong-Ze

    2012-12-01

    A spherical porphyrin sensor array using colloidal crystal beads (CCBs) as the encoding microcarriers has been developed for VOC vapor detection. Six different porphyrins were coated onto the CCBs with distinctive encoded reflection peaks via physical adsorption and the sensor array was fabricated by placing the prepared porphyrin-modified CCBs together. The change in fluorescence color of the porphyrin-modified CCBs array serves as the detection signal for discriminating between different VOC vapors and the reflection peak of the CCBs serves as the encoding signal to distinguish between different sensors. It was demonstrated that the VOC vapors detection using the prepared sensor array showed excellent discrimination: not only could the compounds from the different chemical classes be easily differentiated (e.g., alcohol vs acids vs ketones) but similar compounds from the same chemical family (e.g., methanol vs ethanol) and the same compound with different concentration ((e.g., Sat. ethanol vs 60 ppm ethanol vs 10 ppm ethanol) could also be distinguished. The detection reproducibility and the humidity effect were also investigated. The present spherical sensor array, with its simple preparation, rapid response, high sensitivity, reproducibility, and humidity insensitivity, and especially with stable and high-throughput encoding, is promising for real applications in artificial olfactory systems. PMID:23163575

  7. Combining the Masking and Scaffolding Modalities of Colloidal Crystal Templates: Plasmonic Nanoparticle Arrays with Multiple Periodicities

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Surface patterns with prescribed structures and properties are highly desirable for a variety of applications. Increasing the heterogeneity of surface patterns is frequently required. This work opens a new avenue toward creating nanoparticle arrays with multiple periodicities by combining two generally separately applied modalities (i.e., scaffolding and masking) of a monolayer colloidal crystal (MCC) template. Highly ordered, loosely packed binary and ternary surface patterns are realized by a single-step thermal treatment of a gold thin-film-coated MCC and a nonclose-packed MCC template. Our approach enables control of the parameters defining these nanoscale binary and ternary surface patterns, such as particle size, shape, and composition, as well as the interparticle spacing. This technique enables preparation of well-defined binary and ternary surface patterns to achieve customized plasmonic properties. Moreover, with their easy programmability and excellent scalability, the binary and ternary surface patterns presented here could have valuable applications in nanophotonics and biomedicine. Specific examples include biosensing via surface-enhanced Raman scattering, fabrication of plasmonic-enhanced solar cells, and water splitting. PMID:25620849

  8. Elastic and hydrodynamic torques on a colloidal disk within a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovner, Joel B.; Borgnia, Dan S.; Reich, Daniel H.; Leheny, Robert L.

    2012-10-01

    The orientationally dependent elastic energy and hydrodynamic behavior of colloidal disks with homeotropic surface anchoring suspended in the nematic liquid crystal 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) have been investigated. In the absence of external torques, the disks align with the normal of the disk face â parallel to the nematic director n̂. When a magnetic field is applied, the disks rotate â by an angle θ so that the magnetic torque and the elastic torque caused by distortion of the nematic director field are balanced. Over a broad range of angles, the elastic torque increases linearly with θ in quantitative agreement with a theoretical prediction based on an electrostatic analogy. When the disks are rotated to angles θ>(π)/(2), the resulting large elastic distortion makes the disk orientation unstable, and the director undergoes a topological transition in which θπ-θ. In the transition, a defect loop is shed from the disk surface, and the disks spin so that â sweeps through π radians as the loop collapses back onto the disk. Additional measurements of the angular relaxation of disks to θ=0 following removal of the external torque show a quasi-exponential time dependence from which an effective drag viscosity for the nematic can be extracted. The scaling of the angular time dependence with disk radius and observations of disks rotating about â indicate that the disk motion affects the director field at surprisingly modest Ericksen numbers.

  9. Dynamics of colloidal particles in electrohydrodynamic convection of nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kentaro; Kimura, Yasuyuki

    2014-07-01

    We have studied the dynamics of micrometer-sized colloidal particles in electrohydrodynamic convection of nematic liquid crystal. Above the onset voltage of electroconvection, the parallel array of convection rolls appears to be perpendicular to the nematic field at first. The particles are forced to rotate by convection flow and are trapped within a single roll in this voltage regime. A slow glide motion along the roll axis is also observed. The frequency of rotational motion and the glide velocity increase with the applied voltage. Under a much larger voltage where the roll axis temporally fluctuates, the particles occasionally hop to the neighbor rolls. In this voltage regime, the motion of the particles becomes two-dimensional. The motion perpendicular to the roll axis exhibits diffusion behavior at a long time period. The effective diffusion constant is 10(3)-10(4) times larger than the molecular one. The observed behavior is compared with the result obtained by a simple stochastic model for the transport of the particles in convection. The enhancement of diffusion can be quantitatively described well by the rotation frequency in a roll, the width of the roll, and the hopping probability to the neighbor rolls.

  10. Biomimetic Submicroarrayed Cross-Linked Liquid Crystal Polymer Films with Different Wettability via Colloidal Lithography.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Jianqiang; Liu, Wendong; Yang, Bai; Wei, Jia; Yu, Yanlei

    2015-11-18

    Photoresponsive cross-linked liquid crystal polymer (CLCP) films with different surface topographies, submicropillar arrays, and submicrocone arrays were fabricated through colloidal lithography technique by modulating different types of etching masks. The prepared submicropillar arrays were uniform with an average pillar diameter of 250 nm and the cone bottom diameter of the submicrocone arrays was about 400 nm, which are much smaller than previously reported CLCP micropillars. More interestingly, these two species of films with the same chemical structure represented completely different wetting behavior of water adhesion and mimicked rose petal and lotus leaf, respectively. Both the submicropillar arrayed film and the submicrocone arrayed film exhibited superhyrophobicity with a water contact angle (CA) value of 144.0 ± 1.7° and 156.4 ± 1.2°, respectively. Meanwhile, the former demonstrated a very high sliding angle (SA) greater than 90°, and thus, the water droplet was pinned on the surface as rose petal. On the contrary, the SA of the submicrocone arrayed CLCP film consisting of micro- and nanostructure was only 3.1 ± 2.0°, which is as low as that of lotus leaf. Furthermore, the change on the wettability of the films was also investigated under alternating irradiation of visible light with two different wavelengths, blue light and green light.

  11. Simple thermal treatment for the size control of pore arrays in a polystyrene colloidal crystal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamiolkowski, Ryan M.; Fiorenza, Shane A.; Chen, Kevin; Tate, Alyssa M.; Pfeil, Shawn H.; Goldman, Yale E.

    Nanosphere Lithography (NSL) offers an attractive route to fabricating periodic structures with nanoscale features, without e-beam or deep UV lithography. In particular, it is uniquely suited to the low cost fabrication of large repeated arrays pores or pillars created by taking advantage of the interstitial spaces in close-packed monolayers of nano to micro-scale beads. However pore size, shape, and spacing cannot be controlled independently. We present both a robust method for producing large, approximately 1 cm2, hexagonally close packed monolayer films of 1 micron diameter polystyrene beads on glass substrates, and thermal treatment of these films near the glass temperature, Tg, of polystyrene to modify the pore size. This builds on earlier work showing that pore size can be modified for colloidal crystals formed at a liquid gas interface [2]. These processes promise a simple, reproducible, and low cost route to periodic pore arrays for nano-photonic applications such as zero mode waveguides (ZMWs) Funding: F30 AI114187 (RMJ), R01-GM080376 (YEG).

  12. Dynamical heterogeneities and defects in two-dimensional soft colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, B; Qi, W; Sprakel, J; Filion, L; Dijkstra, M

    2015-12-28

    In this paper we study a two-dimensional system of charged colloidal particles using Brownian dynamics simulations. We determine the phase diagram and investigate the dynamics of this system in the density regime where hexatic and solid phases are stable. We find that the dynamics in these phases is heterogeneous by means of the spontaneous formation and diffusion of highly mobile defects. We identify two key mechanisms associated with the areas of high mobility. The first mechanism involves the highly cooperative motion of a closed loop of particles which shift coherently along the loop until each particle has replaced the position of its predecessor in the chain. The second mechanism involves the spontaneous creation of vacancy-interstitial pairs which diffuse within the hexatic and solid phases. We further explore quantitatively the properties of the open-ended and closed rearrangement strings and find that in the crystal phase the string-size distribution can be approximately matched with a simple, random walk description of vacancies and interstitials on a lattice. PMID:26435265

  13. Investigation the effect of lattice angle on the band gap width in 3D phononic crystals with rhombohedral(I) lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, H.; Aryadoust, M.; Shoushtari, M. Zargar

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, the propagation of acoustic waves in the phononic crystal of 3D with rhombohedral(I) lattice is studied theoretically. The crystal composite constituted of nickel spheres embedded in epoxy. The calculations of the band structure and density of states are performed with the plane wave expansion method in the irreducible part of Brillouin zone. In the present work, we have investigated the effect of lattice angle on the band structure and width of the band gap rhombohedral(I) lattice in the irreducible part of the first Brillouin zone and its planes separately. The results show that more than one complete band gape are formed in the four planes of the irreducible part. The most complete band gaps are formed in the (111) plane and the widest complete band gap in (443) with an angle greater than 80. So, if the sound passes through the (111) and (443) planes for the lattice angle close to 90, the crystal phononic displays the excellent insulation behavior. Moreover, in the other planes, the lattice angle does not affect on the width and the number of band gaps. Also, for the filling fraction 5 %, the widest complete band gap is formed. These results are consistent with the effect of symmetry on the band gap width, because the (111) plane has the most symmetry.

  14. A new 3D Co(II)–organic framework with acylamide-containing tetracarboxylate ligand: Solvothermal synthesis, crystal structure, gas adsorption and magnetic property

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qingfu Zhang, Haina; Geng, Aijing; Wang, Suna; Zhang, Chong

    2014-04-01

    A new cobalt(II)–organic framework, [Co{sub 2}(L)(py){sub 2}(DMSO)]{sub n}• 0.5nDMF• 2nDMSO (1) [H{sub 4}L=5,5'-((naphthalene-2,6-dicarbonyl)bis(azanediyl))diisophthalic acid, py=pyridine, DMSO=dimethyl sulfoxide, DMF=N,N-dimethylformamide], has been solvothermally synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, TGA, PXRD and single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The structural analysis reveals that complex 1 is a 3D framework built from nanosized acylamide-containing tetracarboxylate ligands (L{sup 4−}) and dinuclear [Co{sub 2}(CO{sub 2}){sub 4}] secondary building units (SBUs), exhibiting a uninodal (4,4)-connected crb topology with the Schläfli symbol of (4• 6{sup 5}). The desolvated complex (1a) displays higher adsorption capability for CO{sub 2} than N{sub 2}, which may be due to the relatively strong binding affinity between the CO{sub 2} molecules and acylamide groups in the framework. The magnetic investigation shows that the dominant antiferromagnetic interaction is observed in complex 1. - Graphical abstract: A new 3D Co(II)–organic framework with nanosized acylamide-containing tetracarboxylate ligand was solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized, its thermal stability, gas adsorption and magnetic property were studied. - Highlights: • A new 3D Co(II)–organic framework with nanosized acylamide-containing tetracarboxylate ligand has been solvothermally synthesized and characterized. • Complex 1 exhibits a uninodal (4,4)-connected crb topology. • The thermal stability, gas adsorption and magnetic property were studied.

  15. Encapsulation of Polymer Colloids in a Sol-Gel Matrix. Direct-Writing of Coassembling Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Mikosch, Annabel; Kuehne, Alexander J C

    2016-03-22

    The spontaneous self-assembly of polymer colloids into ordered arrangements provides a facile strategy for the creation of photonic crystals. However, these structures often suffer from defects and insufficient cohesion, which result in flaking and delamination from the substrate. A coassembly process has been developed for convective assembly, resulting in large-area encapsulated colloidal crystals. However, to generate patterns or discrete deposits in designated places, convective assembly is not suitable. Here we experimentally develop conditions for direct-writing of coassembling monodisperse dye-doped polystyrene particles with a sol-gel precursor to form solid encapsulated photonic crystals. In a simple procedure the colloids are formulated in a sol-gel precursor solution, drop-cast on a flat substrate, and dried. We here establish the optimal parameters to form reproducible highly ordered photonic crystals with good optical performance. The obtained photonic crystals interact with light in the visible spectrum with a narrow optical stop-gap.

  16. 3D {ital XY} Scaling of the Irreversibility Line of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.R.; Loram, J.W.; Johnson, J.D.; Hodby, J.W.; Changkang, C.

    1997-09-01

    We find experimentally that the irreversibility line, H{sub irr}(T) , and the reversible magnetization of twinned YBa{sub 2}Cu {sub 3}O{sub 7} crystals both show 3D XY scaling, which suggests a common origin for both quantities. Analysis of this result and of a correlation between the condensation energy and H{sub irr}(T) of oxygen deficient YBa{sub 2}Cu {sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} for 0{lt}{delta}{lt}0.6 , implies that H{sub irr}(T) is strongly influenced by critical fluctuations. It is possible that these values of H{sub irr}(T) and the recently discovered vortex melting line, H{sub m}(T) , both correspond to an upper critical field line which has been suppressed by thermodynamic fluctuations. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Role of surfactant during microemulsion photopolymerization for the creation of three-dimensional (3D) liquid crystal elastomer microsphere spatial cell scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegmann, Elda; Bera, Tanmay; Malcuit, Christopher; Clements, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell scaffolds based on connected nematic liquid crystal elastomer microsphere architectures support the attachment and proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts, neuroblastomas (SHSY5Y) and human dermal fibroblasts (hDF). The microsphere spatial cell scaffolds were prepared by an oil-in-water microemulsion photopolymerization of reactive nematic mesogens in the presence of various surfactants, and the as-prepared scaffold constructs are composed of smooth surface microspheres with diameter ranging from 10 to 30 μm. We here investigate how the nature and type of surfactant used during the microemulsion photopolymerization impacts both the size and size distribution of the resulting microspheres as well as their surface morphology, i.e. the surface roughness.

  18. Photonic bandgap extension of surface-disordered 3D photonic crystals based on the TiO2 inverse opal architecture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aijun; Liu, Wenfang; Tang, Junjie; Chen, Sheng-Li; Dong, Peng

    2014-04-15

    A photonic bandgap (PBG) extension of surface-disordered 3D photonic crystals (PCs) based on the TiO2 inverse opal (TiO2-IO) architecture has been demonstrated. By using a liquid phase deposition (LPD) process based on the controlled hydrolysis of ammonium hexafluorotitanate and boric acid, an extra layer of TiO2 nanoparticles were deposited onto the internal surface of the air voids in the TiO2-IOs to increase their surface roughness, thereby introducing surface disorder in the 3D order structures. The PBG relative width of surface-disordered TiO2-IOs has been broadened significantly, and, compared to the original TiO2-IO, its largest rate of increase (27%) has been obtained. It was found that the PBG relative width increased rapidly at first and then to a much slower rate of change with increase of the duration of the LPD time. A possible cause for this finding is discussed in this Letter. PMID:24978999

  19. Equation of State and Structure of Electrostatic Colloidal Crystals: Osmotic Pressure and Scattering Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reus, V.; Belloni, L.; Zemb, T.; Lutterbach, N.; Versmold, H.

    1997-04-01

    Electrostatically stabilized aqueous suspensions of bromopolystyrene particles have been studied by scattering and osmotic pressure measurements. We investigated their structure and the interparticle interactions as a function of the volume fraction at very low salinity of the order of micromole/l. At slow crystallization speed we observe perfect crystals, body centrered cubic crystals by light scattering for volume fractions between 0.04 and 0.7% and face centrered cubic crystals by Ultra Small Angle X ray Scattering (USAXS) for higher volume fractions (2 12%). After shear the crystal displays other structures. At low volume fractions (0.1 0.3%), some reflexions disappear by light scattering whereas a strong diffuse “prepeak" appears before the first Bragg peak for higher concentrations (2 12%) evidenced by USAXS. This “prepeak" can be attributed to defects in the crystal. Osmotic pressures have been measured by difference between the hydrostatic pressure in the solution and in the reservoir separated by an hemipermeable membrane. The experimental data are very well reproduced by the Poisson Boltzmann Cell (PBC) theory which shows that the interaction between particles is purely repulsive. No attractive contribution has been experimentally detected. By calculating the mean square displacement of a particle inside its cage from the eccentric PBC model, we have verified that the Lindemann criterion for the existence of crystals (against melting) is satisfied. This study has allowed to determine the equation of state of an electrostatical colloidal crystal and is equivalent to an ultraprecise force/distance measurement between latex particles since the measured forces are of the order of 10^{-12} N for distances of the order of 4000 Å. Des suspensions aqueuses de particules de bromopolystyrène ont été caractérisées par diffusion de lumière, diffusion de rayons X aux petits angles et par des mesures de pression osmotique. Nous avons ainsi étudié leur

  20. Nanoparticle films and photonic crystal multilayers from colloidally stable, size-controllable zinc and iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Redel, Engelbert; Mirtchev, Peter; Huai, Chen; Petrov, Srebri; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2011-04-26

    We report a facile sol-gel synthesis of colloidally stable Fe(2)O(3) and ZnO nanoparticles in alcoholic solvents, ROH, where R = methyl, ethyl, n-propyl, isopropyl, and tert-butyl. We show that nanoparticles of ZnO (4-42) nm and Fe(2)O(3) (4-38 nm) monotonically increase in size upon increasing the alkyl chain length and branching of the alcohol solvent. These colloidally stable and size-controllable metal oxide nanoparticles enable the formation of high optical quality films and photonic crystal multilayers whose component layer thickness, refractive index, porosity, and surface area are found to scale with the nature of the alcohol. Utility of these colloidally stable nanoparticles is demonstrated by preparation of one-dimensional porous photonic crystals comprising ncZnO/ncWO(3) and ncFe(2)O(3)/ncWO(3) multilayers whose photonic stop band can be tuned by tailoring nanoparticle size. Myriad applications can be envisaged for these nanoparticle films in, for example, heterogeneous catalysis, photocatalysis, electrocatalysis, chemical sensors, and solar cells.

  1. Monodispersed spherical colloids of Se@CdSe: synthesis and use as building blocks in fabricating photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Unyong; Kim, Jong-Uk; Xia, Younan; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2005-05-01

    Monodispersed spherical core-shell colloids of Se@Ag(2)Se have been exploited as a chemical template to synthesize Se@CdSe core-shell particles using a cation-exchange reaction. A small amount of tributylphosphine could facilitate the replacement of Ag(+) by Cd(2+) in methanol at 50 degrees C to complete the conversion within 150 min. The orthorhombic structure of beta-Ag(2)Se changed to a well-defined wurtzite lattice for CdSe. The CdSe shells could be converted back to beta-Ag(2)Se by reacting with AgNO(3) in methanol at room temperature. Because of the uniformity in size and high refractive index associated with the Se@CdSe core-shell colloids, they could serve as a new class of building blocks to fabricate photonic crystals with wide and strong stop bands.

  2. Self-assembly of silica colloidal crystal thin films with tuneable structural colours over a wide visible spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Weihong; Rigout, Muriel; Owens, Huw

    2016-09-01

    Colloidal crystal (CC) thin films that produce structural colours over a wide visible spectrum have been self-assembled from silica nanoparticles (SNPs) using a natural sedimentation method. A series of colloidal suspensions containing uniform SNPs (207-350 nm) were prepared using the Stöber method. The prepared silica suspensions were directly subjected to natural sedimentation at an elevated temperature. The SNPs were deposited under the force of gravity and self-assembled into an ordered array. The solid CC thin films produced structural colours over a wide visible spectrum from red to violet. Visual inspection and colorimetric measurements indicated that the structural colour of the CC thin film is tuneable by varying the SNPs diameters and the viewing angles. The closely packed face-centred cubic (fcc) structure of the CC thin film was confirmed using SEM imaging and was in agreement with the intense colour observed from the film surface.

  3. Phase diagram of dipolar hard and soft spheres: manipulation of colloidal crystal structures by an external field.

    PubMed

    Hynninen, Antti-Pekka; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2005-04-01

    Phase diagrams of hard and soft spheres with a fixed dipole moment are determined by calculating the Helmholtz free energy using simulations. The pair potential is given by a dipole-dipole interaction plus a hard-core and a repulsive Yukawa potential for soft spheres. Our system models colloids in an external electric or magnetic field, with hard spheres corresponding to uncharged and soft spheres to charged colloids. The phase diagram of dipolar hard spheres shows fluid, face-centered-cubic (fcc), hexagonal-close-packed (hcp), and body-centered-tetragonal (bct) phases. The phase diagram of dipolar soft spheres exhibits, in addition to the above mentioned phases, a body-centered-orthorhombic (bco) phase, and it agrees well with the experimental phase diagram [Nature (London) 421, 513 (2003)]. Our results show that bulk hcp, bct, and bco crystals can be realized experimentally by applying an external field. PMID:15904046

  4. Hexadecapolar Colloids

    DOE PAGES

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Puls, Owen; Tovkach, Oleh M.; Chernyshuk, Stanislav B.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-02-11

    Outermost occupied electron shells of chemical elements can have symmetries resembling that of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octupoles corresponding to filled s-, p-, d- and forbitals. Theoretically, elements with hexadecapolar outer shells could also exist, but none of the known elements have filled g-orbitals. On the other hand, the research paradigm of ‘colloidal atoms’ displays complexity of particle behaviour exceeding that of atomic counterparts, which is driven by DNA functionalization, geometric shape and topology and weak external stimuli. We describe elastic hexadecapoles formed by polymer microspheres dispersed in a liquid crystal, a nematic fluid of orientationally ordered molecular rods. Becausemore » of conically degenerate boundary conditions, the solid microspheres locally perturb the alignment of the nematic host, inducing hexadecapolar distortions that drive anisotropic colloidal interactions. We uncover physical underpinnings of formation of colloidal elastic hexadecapoles and report the ensuing bonding inaccessible to elastic dipoles, quadrupoles and other nematic colloids studied previously.« less

  5. Hexadecapolar colloids

    PubMed Central

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Puls, Owen; Tovkach, Oleh M.; Chernyshuk, Stanislav B.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-01-01

    Outermost occupied electron shells of chemical elements can have symmetries resembling that of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octupoles corresponding to filled s-, p-, d- and f-orbitals. Theoretically, elements with hexadecapolar outer shells could also exist, but none of the known elements have filled g-orbitals. On the other hand, the research paradigm of ‘colloidal atoms' displays complexity of particle behaviour exceeding that of atomic counterparts, which is driven by DNA functionalization, geometric shape and topology and weak external stimuli. Here we describe elastic hexadecapoles formed by polymer microspheres dispersed in a liquid crystal, a nematic fluid of orientationally ordered molecular rods. Because of conically degenerate boundary conditions, the solid microspheres locally perturb the alignment of the nematic host, inducing hexadecapolar distortions that drive anisotropic colloidal interactions. We uncover physical underpinnings of formation of colloidal elastic hexadecapoles and describe the ensuing bonding inaccessible to elastic dipoles, quadrupoles and other nematic colloids studied previously. PMID:26864184

  6. Magnetic and optical holonomic manipulation of colloids, structures and topological defects in liquid crystals for characterization of mesoscale self-assembly and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varney, Michael C. M.

    Colloidal systems find important applications ranging from fabrication of photonic crystals to direct probing of phenomena encountered in atomic crystals and glasses; topics of great interest for physicists exploring a broad range of scientific, industrial and biomedical fields. The ability to accurately control particles of mesoscale size in various liquid host media is usually accomplished through optical trapping methods, which suffer limitations intrinsic to trap laser intensity and force generation. Other limitations are due to colloid properties, such as optical absorptivity, and host properties, such as viscosity, opacity and structure. Therefore, alternative and/or novel methods of colloidal manipulation are of utmost importance in order to advance the state of the art in technical applications and fundamental science. In this thesis, I demonstrate a magnetic-optical holonomic control system to manipulate magnetic and optical colloids in liquid crystals and show that the elastic structure inherent to nematic and cholesteric liquid crystals may be used to assist in tweezing of particles in a manner impossible in other media. Furthermore, I demonstrate the utility of this manipulation in characterizing the structure and microrheology of liquid crystals, and elucidating the energetics and dynamics of colloids interacting with these structures. I also demonstrate the utility of liquid crystal systems as a table top model system to probe topological defects in a manner that may lead to insights into topologically related phenomena in other fields, such as early universe cosmology, sub-atomic and high energy systems, or Skrymionic structures. I explore the interaction of colloid surface anchoring with the structure inherent in cholesteric liquid crystals, and how this affects the periodic dynamics and localization metastability of spherical colloids undergoing a "falling" motion within the sample. These so called "metastable states" cause colloidal dynamics to

  7. Colloidal Defect-Free Silicalite-1 Single Crystals: Preparation, Structure Characterization, Adsorption, and Separation Properties for Alcohol/Water Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Han; Mouzon, Johanne; Farzaneh, Amirfarrokh; Antzutkin, Oleg N; Grahn, Mattias; Hedlund, Jonas

    2015-08-01

    In this work, colloidal silicalite-1 single crystals are for the first time synthesized using fluoride as mineralizing agent at near neutral pH. SEM, TEM, DLS, XRD, solid-state (29)Si MAS NMR, and adsorption/desorption experiments using nitrogen, water, n-butanol, and ethanol as adsorbates were used to characterize the crystals. The single crystals have a platelike habit with a length of less than 170 nm and an aspect ratio (length/width) of about 1.2, and the thickness of the crystals is less than 40 nm. Compared with silicalite-1 crystals grown using hydroxide as mineralizing agent, the amount of structural defects in the lattice is significantly reduced and the hydrophobicity is increased. Membrane separation and adsorption results show that the synthesized defect-free crystals present high selectivity to alcohols from alcohol/water mixtures. The n-butanol/water adsorption selectivities were ca. 165 and 14 for the defect-free crystals and a reference sample containing defects, respectively, illustrating the improvement in n-butanol/water selectivity by eliminating the polar silanol defects.

  8. Anisotropic Model Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Kats, C. M.

    2008-10-01

    femtosecond laserpulses of variable wavelengths. We show that we can grow a silica layer on the gold rods with controllable thickness. In future this can be used to control the alignment of the gold rods a 3D crystal in an electric field. The silica coated gold rods can be used in optical switches. In chapter 4 we show to have a very local control of changing the aspect ratio of gold rods by irradiation with femtosecond laserpulses of 82 MHz with a threshold of ~ 2 picojoules to deform the particles. In chapter 5 and 6 we show how, starting from spherical particles, dimers (dumbbells), trimers and multimers can be formed by controlled aggregation. Chapter 7 finally shows an overview of syntheses where the pores of (mainly) silica particles is decreased. We show that the pores of the given particles could be decreased from macroporous to (ultra)microporous. Through a full control of pore size particles can selectively be filled with materials (for instance a drug) and be controllably closed. This opens a route for synthesis of particles that can be used as molecular filters or in biomedical applications such as smart drug delivery.

  9. 3D visualization of polymer nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, James H

    2009-01-01

    Soft materials and structured polymers are extremely useful nanotechnology building blocks. Block copolymers, in particular, have served as 2D masks for nanolithography and 3D scaffolds for photonic crystals, nanoparticle fabrication, and solar cells. F or many of these applications, the precise 3 dimensional structure and the number and type of defects in the polymer is important for ultimate function. However, directly visualizing the 3D structure of a soft material from the nanometer to millimeter length scales is a significant technical challenge. Here, we propose to develop the instrumentation needed for direct 3D structure determination at near nanometer resolution throughout a nearly millimeter-cubed volume of a soft, potentially heterogeneous, material. This new capability will be a valuable research tool for LANL missions in chemistry, materials science, and nanoscience. Our approach to soft materials visualization builds upon exciting developments in super-resolution optical microscopy that have occurred over the past two years. To date, these new, truly revolutionary, imaging methods have been developed and almost exclusively used for biological applications. However, in addition to biological cells, these super-resolution imaging techniques hold extreme promise for direct visualization of many important nanostructured polymers and other heterogeneous chemical systems. Los Alamos has a unique opportunity to lead the development of these super-resolution imaging methods for problems of chemical rather than biological significance. While these optical methods are limited to systems transparent to visible wavelengths, we stress that many important functional chemicals such as polymers, glasses, sol-gels, aerogels, or colloidal assemblies meet this requirement, with specific examples including materials designed for optical communication, manipulation, or light-harvesting Our Research Goals are: (1) Develop the instrumentation necessary for imaging materials

  10. Pseudo single crystal, direct-band-gap Ge{sub 0.89}Sn{sub 0.11} on amorphous dielectric layers towards monolithic 3D photonic integration

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Haofeng; Brouillet, Jeremy; Wang, Xiaoxin; Liu, Jifeng

    2014-11-17

    We demonstrate pseudo single crystal, direct-band-gap Ge{sub 0.89}Sn{sub 0.11} crystallized on amorphous layers at <450 °C towards 3D Si photonic integration. We developed two approaches to seed the lateral single crystal growth: (1) utilize the Gibbs-Thomson eutectic temperature depression at the tip of an amorphous GeSn nanotaper for selective nucleation; (2) laser-induced nucleation at one end of a GeSn strip. Either way, the crystallized Ge{sub 0.89}Sn{sub 0.11} is dominated by a single grain >18 μm long that forms optoelectronically benign twin boundaries with others grains. These pseudo single crystal, direct-band-gap Ge{sub 0.89}Sn{sub 0.11} patterns are suitable for monolithic 3D integration of active photonic devices on Si.

  11. Effect of direction of an external force on crystallization of colloidal particles in a V-shaped groove by sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masahide

    2016-09-01

    We carried out Langevin dynamics simulations to study the effect of the direction of a uniform external force on the crystallization of colloidal particles in a V-shaped groove. When the inclination of the side walls of a groove was set to a suitable value and the external force bisected the angle, the face-centered-cubic (fcc) structure grew with a {100} growth interface. When the external force was inclined, the number of solidified particles decreased with increasing inclination, which is different from the growth in an inverted pyramidal container.

  12. Guided mode extraction in monolayer colloidal crystals based on the phase variation of reflection and transmission coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekuee, Seyed Amir Hossein; Akbari, Mahmood; Khavasi, Amin

    2016-04-01

    An accurate and fast method for guided modes extraction in monolayer colloidal crystals and their inverse replicas is presented. These three-dimensional structures are composed of a monolayer of spherical particles that can easily and simply be prepared by self-assembly method in close packed hexagonal lattices. In this work, we describe how the guided modes, even or odd modes and light cone boundary can be easily determined using phase variations of reflection and transmission coefficients. These coefficients are quickly calculated by Fourier modal method. The band structures are obtained for a monolayer of polystyrene particles and two-dimensional TiO2 inverse opal by this proposed method.

  13. 3-D supramolecular architectures in the three new complexes constructed from mixed ligands: Syntheses, crystal structures, spectroscopic properties, XRPD and thermal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guo-Ping; Wang, Yao-Yu; Wang, Hong; Wang, Cui-Juan; Wen, Gui-Lin; Shi, Qi-Zhen; Peng, Shie-Ming

    2008-10-01

    Three new coordination polymers [Cu 2(bptc) (bpdap) 2]·4H 2O ( 1), {Zn 2(bptc)(bpe)(H 2O) 6} n ( 2) and {Co 2(bptc)(bpe)(H 2O) 8} n ( 3) [H 4bptc = 3,3',4,4'-biphenyltetracarboxylate acid, bpdap = N, N'-bis(2-pyridyl)-2,6-diaminopyridine, bpe = trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethene] have been hydrothermally synthesized in different pH values and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The non-covalent interactions of hydrogen bond extend complexes 1, 2 and 3 into supramolecular architectures, where 1 exhibits a 3-D framework with 1-D open channels where the guest water molecules are located. Importantly, two kinds of chiral helical H-bonded chains appear in 1, and some types of H-bonded patterns exist in 1, 2 and 3. It is more remarkable that the building block bptc anion adopts versatile coordination modes in these complexes. The elemental analysis, IR spectra, XRPD and TG analysis are discussed for 1, 2 and 3. In addition, the fluorescence is also studied for 2 here.

  14. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    N W 2002 Nature 416 811 [9] Borsboom M et al 1998 J. Synchrotron Radiat. 5 518 [10] Zernike F and Prins J A 1927 Z. Phys. 41 184 Colloidal suspensions contents How much does the core structure of a three-phase contact line contribute to the line tension near a wetting transition? J O Indekeu, K Koga and B Widom A systematic coarse-graining strategy for semi-dilute copolymer solutions: from monomers to micelles Barbara Capone, Ivan Coluzza and Jean-Pierre Hansen Structural searches using isopointal sets as generators: densest packings for binary hard sphere mixtures Toby S Hudson and Peter Harrowell The theory of delamination during drying of confined colloidal suspensions K J Wallenstein and W B Russel Electrostatics Modeling of equilibrium hollow objects stabilized by electrostatics Ethayaraja Mani, Jan Groenewold and Willem K Kegel The Donnan equilibrium: I. On the thermodynamic foundation of the Donnan equation of state A Philipse and A Vrij Colloidal rods and platelets Cholesteric order in systems of helical Yukawa rods H H Wensink and G Jackson Magnetic-field-induced nematic-nematic phase separation and droplet formation in colloidal goethite E van den Pol, A A Verhoeff, A Lupascu, M A Diaconeasa, P Davidson, I Dozov, B W M Kuipers, D M E Thies-Weesie and G J Vroege Structure of colloidal sphere-plate mixtures N Doshi, G Cinacchi, J S van Duijneveldt, T Cosgrove, S W Prescott, I Grillo, J Phipps and D I Gittins 3D structure of nematic and columnar phases of hard colloidal platelets A B G M Leferink op Reinink, J M Meijer, D Kleshchanok, D V Byelov, G J Vroege, A V Petukhov and H N W Lekkerkerker Phase behaviour of binary mixtures of diamagnetic colloidal platelets in an external magnetic field Jonathan Phillips and Matthias Schmidt Rheo-SAXS investigation of shear-thinning behaviour of very anisometric repulsive disc-like clay suspensions A M Philippe, C Baravian, M Imperor-Clerc, J De Silva, E Paineau, I Bihannic, P Davidson, F Meneau, P Levitz and L J Michot

  15. Ga, Ca, and 3d transition element (Cr through Zn) partitioning among spinel-lherzolite phases from the Lanzo massif, Italy: Analytical results and crystal chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Wogelius, R.A.; Fraser, D.G.

    1994-06-01

    Ultramafic rocks exposed in Lanzo massif, Italy is a record of mantle geochemistry, melting, sub-solidus re-equilibration. Plagioclase(+ spinel)-lherzolite samples were analyzed by Scanning Proton Microscopy, other techniques. Previous work postulated partial melting events and a two-stage sub-solidus cooling history; this paper notes Ga enrichment on spinel-clinopyroxene grain boundaries, high Ga and transition element content of spinel, and pyroxene zonation in Ca and Al. Trace element levels in olivine and orthopyroxene are also presented. Zoning trends are interpreted as due to diffusion during cooling. Olivine-clinopyroxene Cr and Ca exchange as well as clinopyroxene and spinel zonation trends indicate that the massif experienced at least two sub-solidus cooling episodes, one at 20 kbar to 1000 C and one at 8 kbar <750C. Ga levels in cores of Lanzo high-Cr spinels are high (82-66 ppM) relative to other mantle spinels (66-40 ppM), indicating enrichment. Ga content of ultramafic spinels apparently increases with Cr content; this may be due to: increased Ga solubility stemming from crystal chemical effects and/or higher Ga activities in associated silicate melts. Thus, during melting, high-Cr residual spinel may tend to buffer solid-phase Ga level. These spinels are not only rich in Ga and Cr (max 26.37 el. wt %), but also in Fe (max 21.07 el. wt %), Mn (max 3400 ppM), and Zn (max 2430 ppM). These enrichments are again due to melt extraction and partitioning into spinel structure. Low Ni (min 1050 ppM) levels are due to unsuccessful competition of Ni with Cr for octahedral structural sites caused by crystal field. Comparisons of change in partitioning vs Cr content among several 3d transition elements for spinels from Lanzo, other localities allow us to separate crystal field effects from bulk chemical effects and to show that in typical assemblages, inversion of olivine-spinel partition coefficient for Ni from <1 to >1 should occur at 11% el. wt. Cr in spinel.

  16. Levitation, Lift, and Bidirectional Motion of Colloidal Particles in an Electrically Driven Nematic Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishnyak, O. P.; Tang, S.; Kelly, J. R.; Shiyanovskii, S. V.; Lavrentovich, O. D.

    2007-09-01

    We study electric-field-induced dynamics of colloids in a nematic cell, experimentally and by computer simulations. Solid particles in the nematic bulk create director distortions of dipolar type. Elastic repulsion from the walls keeps the particles in the middle of cell. The ac electric field reorients the dipoles and lifts them to top or bottom, depending on dipole orientation. Once near the walls, the colloids are carried along two antiparallel horizontal directions by nematic backflow. Computer simulations of the backflow agree with the experiment.

  17. Thermally-induced single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations from a 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer to a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Fan, Rui Qing; Wang, Xin Ming; Wei, Li Guo; Song, Yang; Du, Xi; Xing, Kai; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yu Lin

    2016-07-28

    In this work, a rare 2D → 3D single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation (SCSC) is observed in metal-organic coordination complexes, which is triggered by thermal treatment. The 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer [Cd(IBA)2]n (1) is irreversibly converted into a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework {[Cd(IBA)2(H2O)]·2.5H2O}n (2) (HIBA = 4-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)benzoic acid). Consideration is given to these two complexes with different interpenetrating structures and dimensionality, and their influence on photovoltaic properties are studied. Encouraged by the UV-visible absorption and HOMO-LUMO energy states matched for sensitizing TiO2, the two complexes are employed in combination with N719 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) to compensate absorption in the ultraviolet and blue-violet region, offset competitive visible light absorption of I3(-) and reducing charge the recombination of injected electrons. After co-sensitization with 1 and 2, the device co-sensitized by 1/N719 and 2/N719 to yield overall efficiencies of 7.82% and 8.39%, which are 19.94% and 28.68% higher than that of the device sensitized only by N719 (6.52%). Consequently, high dimensional interpenetrating complexes could serve as excellent co-sensitizers and have application in DSSCs. PMID:27356177

  18. Thermally-induced single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations from a 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer to a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Fan, Rui Qing; Wang, Xin Ming; Wei, Li Guo; Song, Yang; Du, Xi; Xing, Kai; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yu Lin

    2016-07-28

    In this work, a rare 2D → 3D single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation (SCSC) is observed in metal-organic coordination complexes, which is triggered by thermal treatment. The 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer [Cd(IBA)2]n (1) is irreversibly converted into a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework {[Cd(IBA)2(H2O)]·2.5H2O}n (2) (HIBA = 4-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)benzoic acid). Consideration is given to these two complexes with different interpenetrating structures and dimensionality, and their influence on photovoltaic properties are studied. Encouraged by the UV-visible absorption and HOMO-LUMO energy states matched for sensitizing TiO2, the two complexes are employed in combination with N719 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) to compensate absorption in the ultraviolet and blue-violet region, offset competitive visible light absorption of I3(-) and reducing charge the recombination of injected electrons. After co-sensitization with 1 and 2, the device co-sensitized by 1/N719 and 2/N719 to yield overall efficiencies of 7.82% and 8.39%, which are 19.94% and 28.68% higher than that of the device sensitized only by N719 (6.52%). Consequently, high dimensional interpenetrating complexes could serve as excellent co-sensitizers and have application in DSSCs.

  19. Effective refractive index of face-centered-cubic and hexagonal close-packed 250 nm-SiO2 based colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcedo-Reyes, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative kinematic analysis, of the refraction properties of face-centered-cubic and hexagonal close-packed 250 nm-SiO2-based colloidal crystals, was performed using the plane wave expansion method. The angle-dependent effective refractive index, for different frequencies, was calculated taking into account the continuity of the tangential component of the wave vector across the interface and the energy conservation principle as well. The results demonstrate that the unusual optical properties, of the close packed SiO2-based colloidal crystals, depend strongly on the sphere-packing symmetry rather than from the material itself.

  20. 3D cone-sheet and crystal-settling models reveal magma-reservoir structure of the Carlingford central complex, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauroth, Jenny; Burchardt, Steffi; Meade, Fiona; Troll, Valentin R.

    2014-05-01

    The Palaeogene Carlingford central complex, northeast Ireland, hosts a swarm of mostly basaltic cone-sheets with several lithological subsets (Halsall, 1974). The two most abundant sets are aphyric and highly porphyritic cone-sheets with up to 80% of cm-sized plagioclase phenocrysts. The abundance of highly porphyritic cone-sheets seems to systematically increase with altitude compared to the aphyric type (Meade, 2008). We hypothesised that this observation might be explained by the zonation of the source magma reservoir. In order to test this hypothesis, we modelled the 3D cone-sheet structure at depth and the settling of plagioclase phenocrysts. The 3D model of the Carlingford cone-sheet swarm reveals that lithological types of Carlingford cone-sheets are not systematically distributed in space. Using the method proposed by Burchardt et al. (2013), we constructed the likely source reservoir of the cone-sheets, which is saucer-shaped, elongated in NW direction, 7 km long and 3 km wide, and located at a depth of 1 km below the present-day land surface. Our calculation of the terminal velocity of the plagioclase phenocrysts shows that the large phenocrysts in the porphyritic cone-sheets were too big to float at the conditions present in the Carlingford magma reservoir. We can therefore exclude vertical magma-chamber stratification as an explanation for the formation and distribution of porphyritic and aphyric cone-sheets. Instead, we envisage the formation of a crystal mush at the base and sides of the Carlingford magma reservoir. Cone-sheet injection and magma-cha,ber replenishments have remobilised plagioclase cumulates, which may explain the occurrence and distribution of aphyric and highly porphyritic cone-sheets. REFERENCES Burchardt, S., Troll, V. R., Mathieu, L., Emeleus, H. C., Donaldson, C., 2013, Scientific Reports 3, 2891. Halsall, T.J., 1974, The minor intrusions and structure of the Carlingford complex, Eire (PhD thesis): University of Leicester. Meade

  1. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  2. Optical studies of random disorder of colloidal photonic crystals and its evolution in evaporation induced self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinze; Yang, Lei; Lin, Dongfeng; Luo, Yanhong; Li, Dongmei; Meng, Qingbo

    2012-12-21

    Self-assembled photonic structures have been under theoretical and experimental study for decades, whereas previous theories on optical properties were mainly concerned with perfect structure or some certain limited kinds of disordered photonic crystals (PCs), making them unsuitable for characterizing the real self-assembled PCs. In order to improve our understanding of the mechanism of self-assembly and provide more crucial clues to further grow perfect crystals, we extended previous widely used scalar wave approximation (SWA), making it be able to characterize long-range disorder (β) and short-range disorder (α) in PCs synthetically in a simple and effective way. Excellent agreement with in situ observed reflectance of evaporation induced self-assembled colloidal photonic crystals (CPCs) was obtained, demonstrating that the introduction of the parameters α and β in SWA can successfully characterize the disorder in self-assembled CPCs. Furthermore, extended SWA was further used to study the disorder formation in self-assembly, and it was found that during growing stage both β and α drop down, whereas in drying stage β stays nearly unchanged while α increases significantly. It turned out that the growing stage of self-assembly is a stage when the structure transforms from disordered to ordered one, and growth induced disorder mainly arises in drying stage. The results obtained provide an insight into the growth mechanisms of self-assembly and theoretical basis for characterizing optical properties of disordered PCs.

  3. Optical studies of random disorder of colloidal photonic crystals and its evolution in evaporation induced self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinze; Yang, Lei; Lin, Dongfeng; Luo, Yanhong; Li, Dongmei; Meng, Qingbo

    2012-12-01

    Self-assembled photonic structures have been under theoretical and experimental study for decades, whereas previous theories on optical properties were mainly concerned with perfect structure or some certain limited kinds of disordered photonic crystals (PCs), making them unsuitable for characterizing the real self-assembled PCs. In order to improve our understanding of the mechanism of self-assembly and provide more crucial clues to further grow perfect crystals, we extended previous widely used scalar wave approximation (SWA), making it be able to characterize long-range disorder (β) and short-range disorder (α) in PCs synthetically in a simple and effective way. Excellent agreement with in situ observed reflectance of evaporation induced self-assembled colloidal photonic crystals (CPCs) was obtained, demonstrating that the introduction of the parameters α and β in SWA can successfully characterize the disorder in self-assembled CPCs. Furthermore, extended SWA was further used to study the disorder formation in self-assembly, and it was found that during growing stage both β and α drop down, whereas in drying stage β stays nearly unchanged while α increases significantly. It turned out that the growing stage of self-assembly is a stage when the structure transforms from disordered to ordered one, and growth induced disorder mainly arises in drying stage. The results obtained provide an insight into the growth mechanisms of self-assembly and theoretical basis for characterizing optical properties of disordered PCs.

  4. Phase diagram, design of monolayer binary colloidal crystals, and their fabrication based on ethanol-assisted self-assembly at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhengfei; Li, Yue; Duan, Guotao; Jia, Lichao; Cai, Weiping

    2012-08-28

    Flexible structural design and accurate controlled fabrication with structural tunability according to need for binary or multicomponent colloidal crystals have been expected. However, it is still a challenge. In this work, the phase diagram of monolayer binary colloidal crystals (bCCs) is established on the assumption that both large and small polystyrene (PS) colloidal spheres can stay at the air/water interface, and the range diagram for the size ratio and number ratio of small to large colloidal spheres is presented. From this phase diagram, combining the range diagram, we can design and relatively accurately control fabrication of the bCCs with specific structures (or patterns) according to need, including single or mixed patterns with the given relative content. Further, a simple and facile approach is presented to fabricate large-area (more than 10 cm(2)) monolayer bCCs without any surfactants, using differently sized PS spheres, based on ethanol-assisted self-assembly at the air/water interface. bCCs with different patterns and stoichiometries are thus designed from the established phase diagram and then successfully fabricated based on the volume ratios (V(S/L)) of the small to large PS suspensions using the presented colloidal self-assembling method. Interestingly, these monolayer bCCs can be transferred to any desired substrates using water as the medium. This study allows us to design desired patterns of monolayer bCCs and to more accurately control their structures with the used V(S/L).

  5. Out-of-equilibrium processes in suspensions of oppositely charged colloids: liquid-to-crystal nucleation and gel formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, Eduardo

    2009-03-01

    We study the kinetics of the liquid-to-crystal transformation and of gel formation in colloidal suspensions of oppositely charged particles. We analyse, by means of both computer simulations and experiments, the evolution of a fluid quenched to a state point of the phase diagram where the most stable state is either a homogeneous crystalline solid or a solid phase in contact with a dilute gas. On the one hand, at high temperatures and high packing fractions, close to an ordered-solid/disordered-solid coexistence line, we find that the fluid-to-crystal pathway does not follow the minimum free energy route. On the other hand, a quench to a state point far from the ordered-crystal/disordered-crystal coexistence border is followed by a fluid-to-solid transition through the minimum free energy pathway. At low temperatures and packing fractions we observe that the system undergoes a gas-liquid spinodal decomposition that, at some point, arrests giving rise to a gel-like structure. Both our simulations and experiments suggest that increasing the interaction range favors crystallization over vitrification in gel-like structures. [4pt] In collaboration with Chantal Valeriani, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC Utrecht, The Netherlands and SUPA, School of Physics, University of Edinburgh, JCMB King's Buildings, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, UK; Teun Vissers, Andrea Fortini, Mirjam E. Leunissen, and Alfons van Blaaderen, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University; Daan Frenke, FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam, The Netherlands and Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, CB2 1EW, Cambridge, UK; and Marjolein Dijkstra, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University.

  6. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  7. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  8. Microfluidic colloid filtration

    PubMed Central

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today’s water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a “cake layer” – often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level. PMID:26927706

  9. Microfluidic colloid filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today’s water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a “cake layer” – often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level.

  10. Microfluidic colloid filtration.

    PubMed

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J C; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today's water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a "cake layer"--often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level. PMID:26927706

  11. Lattice Dynamics of Colloidal Crystals During Photopolymerization of Acrylic Monomer Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunkara, Hari B.; Benjamin, Penn G.; Donald, Frazier O.; Ramachandran, N.

    1997-01-01

    Polymerization process are the major contributors for observed lattice compression and lattice disorder of the Crystalline Colloidal Arrays (CCA) of silica spheres in polymerized acrylic/methacrylic ester films. The effect of orientation of photocell with respect to the readiation source on Bragg diffraction of CCA indicated the presence of convective stirring in thin fluid system during the photopolymerization that deleteriously affect the periodic array structures. To devise reproducible and more efficient optical filters, experimental methods to minimize or eliminate convective instabilities in monomeric dispersions during polymerization are suggested.

  12. Vacancy diffusion in colloidal crystals as determined by dynamical density-functional theory and the phase-field-crystal model.

    PubMed

    van Teeffelen, Sven; Achim, Cristian Vasile; Löwen, Hartmut

    2013-02-01

    A two-dimensional crystal of repulsive dipolar particles is studied in the vicinity of its melting transition by using Brownian dynamics computer simulation, dynamical density-functional theory, and phase-field-crystal modeling. A vacancy is created by taking out a particle from an equilibrated crystal, and the relaxation dynamics of the vacancy is followed by monitoring the time-dependent one-particle density. We find that the vacancy is quickly filled up by diffusive hopping of neighboring particles towards the vacancy center. We examine the temperature dependence of the diffusion constant and find that it decreases with decreasing temperature in the simulations. This trend is reproduced by the dynamical density-functional theory. Conversely, the phase-field-crystal calculations predict the opposite trend. Therefore, the phase-field model needs a temperature-dependent expression for the mobility to predict trends correctly.

  13. Preparation and 3D Tracking of Catalytic Swimming Devices

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Andrew; Archer, Richard; Ebbens, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    We report a method to prepare catalytically active Janus colloids that "swim" in fluids and describe how to determine their 3D motion using fluorescence microscopy. One commonly deployed method for catalytically active colloids to produce enhanced motion is via an asymmetrical distribution of catalyst. Here this is achieved by spin coating a dispersed layer of fluorescent polymeric colloids onto a flat planar substrate, and then using directional platinum vapor deposition to half coat the exposed colloid surface, making a two faced "Janus" structure. The Janus colloids are then re-suspended from the planar substrate into an aqueous solution containing hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide serves as a fuel for the platinum catalyst, which is decomposed into water and oxygen, but only on one side of the colloid. The asymmetry results in gradients that produce enhanced motion, or "swimming". A fluorescence microscope, together with a video camera is used to record the motion of individual colloids. The center of the fluorescent emission is found using image analysis to provide an x and y coordinate for each frame of the video. While keeping the microscope focal position fixed, the fluorescence emission from the colloid produces a characteristic concentric ring pattern which is subject to image analysis to determine the particles relative z position. In this way 3D trajectories for the swimming colloid are obtained, allowing swimming velocity to be accurately measured, and physical phenomena such as gravitaxis, which may bias the colloids motion to be detected. PMID:27404327

  14. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  15. Synthesis and Exfoliation of Discotic Zirconium Phosphates to Obtain Colloidal Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi-Hsien; Wang, Xuezhen; Shinde, Abhijeet; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2016-05-25

    Due to their abundance in natural clay and potential applications in advanced materials, discotic nanoparticles are of interest to scientists and engineers. Growth of such anisotropic nanocrystals through a simple chemical method is a challenging task. In this study, we fabricate discotic nanodisks of zirconium phosphate [Zr(HPO4)2·H2O] as a model material using hydrothermal, reflux and microwave-assisted methods. Growth of crystals is controlled by duration time, temperature, and concentration of reacting species. The novelty of the adopted methods is that discotic crystals of size ranging from hundred nanometers to few micrometers can be obtained while keeping the polydispersity well within control. The layered discotic crystals are converted to monolayers by exfoliation with tetra-(n)-butyl ammonium hydroxide [(C4H9)4NOH, TBAOH]. Exfoliated disks show isotropic and nematic liquid crystal phases. Size and polydispersity of disk suspensions is highly important in deciding their phase behavior.

  16. Synthesis and Exfoliation of Discotic Zirconium Phosphates to Obtain Colloidal Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi-Hsien; Wang, Xuezhen; Shinde, Abhijeet; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2016-01-01

    Due to their abundance in natural clay and potential applications in advanced materials, discotic nanoparticles are of interest to scientists and engineers. Growth of such anisotropic nanocrystals through a simple chemical method is a challenging task. In this study, we fabricate discotic nanodisks of zirconium phosphate [Zr(HPO4)2·H2O] as a model material using hydrothermal, reflux and microwave-assisted methods. Growth of crystals is controlled by duration time, temperature, and concentration of reacting species. The novelty of the adopted methods is that discotic crystals of size ranging from hundred nanometers to few micrometers can be obtained while keeping the polydispersity well within control. The layered discotic crystals are converted to monolayers by exfoliation with tetra-(n)-butyl ammonium hydroxide [(C4H9)4NOH, TBAOH]. Exfoliated disks show isotropic and nematic liquid crystal phases. Size and polydispersity of disk suspensions is highly important in deciding their phase behavior. PMID:27284765

  17. A new class of tunable hypersonic phononic crystals based on polymer-tethered colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Redondo, E.; Schmitt, M.; Urbach, Z.; Hui, C. M.; Sainidou, R.; Rembert, P.; Matyjaszewski, K.; Bockstaller, M. R.; Fytas, G.

    2015-09-01

    The design and engineering of hybrid materials exhibiting tailored phononic band gaps are fundamentally relevant to innovative material technologies in areas ranging from acoustics to thermo-optic devices. Phononic hybridization gaps, originating from the anti-crossing between local resonant and propagating modes, have attracted particular interest because of their relative robustness to structural disorder and the associated benefit to `manufacturability'. Although hybridization gap materials are well known, their economic fabrication and efficient control of the gap frequency have remained elusive because of the limited property variability and expensive fabrication methodologies. Here we report a new strategy to realize hybridization gap materials by harnessing the `anisotropic elasticity' across the particle-polymer interface in densely polymer-tethered colloidal particles. Theoretical and Brillouin scattering analysis confirm both the robustness to disorder and the tunability of the resulting hybridization gap and provide guidelines for the economic synthesis of new materials with deliberately controlled gap position and width frequencies.

  18. Lattice Dynamics of Colloidal Crystals During Photopolymerization of Acrylic Monomer Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunkara, H. B,; Penn, B. G.; Frazier, D. O.; Ramachandran, N.

    1998-01-01

    The photoinitiated bulk polymerization process, which has been used recently in the manufacture of solid optical diffraction filters, is examined to understand the dynamics of both the crystalline colloidal arrays (CCA) and the host monomer species. Our analysis indicates that volume shrinkage of the monomer, changes in the dielectric properties of the monomer, and inhomogeneities of polymerization reaction rate across the dispersion during the polymerization process, are the major contributors for observed lattice compression and lattice disorder of the CCA of silica spheres in polymerized acrylic/methacrylic ester films. The effect of orientation of photocell with respect to the radiation source on Bragg diffraction of CCA indicated the presence of convective stirring in the thin fluid system during the photopolymerization that deleteriously affects the periodic array structures. To devise reproducible and more efficient optical filters, experimental methods to minimize or eliminate convective instabilities in monomeric dispersions during polymerization are suggested.

  19. A new class of tunable hypersonic phononic crystals based on polymer-tethered colloids.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Redondo, E; Schmitt, M; Urbach, Z; Hui, C M; Sainidou, R; Rembert, P; Matyjaszewski, K; Bockstaller, M R; Fytas, G

    2015-09-22

    The design and engineering of hybrid materials exhibiting tailored phononic band gaps are fundamentally relevant to innovative material technologies in areas ranging from acoustics to thermo-optic devices. Phononic hybridization gaps, originating from the anti-crossing between local resonant and propagating modes, have attracted particular interest because of their relative robustness to structural disorder and the associated benefit to 'manufacturability'. Although hybridization gap materials are well known, their economic fabrication and efficient control of the gap frequency have remained elusive because of the limited property variability and expensive fabrication methodologies. Here we report a new strategy to realize hybridization gap materials by harnessing the 'anisotropic elasticity' across the particle-polymer interface in densely polymer-tethered colloidal particles. Theoretical and Brillouin scattering analysis confirm both the robustness to disorder and the tunability of the resulting hybridization gap and provide guidelines for the economic synthesis of new materials with deliberately controlled gap position and width frequencies.

  20. Imaging a Sustainable Future in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuhr, W.; Lee, J. D.; Kanngieser, E.

    2012-07-01

    It is the intention of this paper, to contribute to a sustainable future by providing objective object information based on 3D photography as well as promoting 3D photography not only for scientists, but also for amateurs. Due to the presentation of this article by CIPA Task Group 3 on "3D Photographs in Cultural Heritage", the presented samples are masterpieces of historic as well as of current 3D photography concentrating on cultural heritage. In addition to a report on exemplarily access to international archives of 3D photographs, samples for new 3D photographs taken with modern 3D cameras, as well as by means of a ground based high resolution XLITE staff camera and also 3D photographs taken from a captive balloon and the use of civil drone platforms are dealt with. To advise on optimum suited 3D methodology, as well as to catch new trends in 3D, an updated synoptic overview of the 3D visualization technology, even claiming completeness, has been carried out as a result of a systematic survey. In this respect, e.g., today's lasered crystals might be "early bird" products in 3D, which, due to lack in resolution, contrast and color, remember to the stage of the invention of photography.

  1. Micro-CT observations of the 3D distribution of calcium oxalate crystals in cotyledons during maturation and germination in Lotus miyakojimae seeds.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Tamaoki, Daisuke; Hayami, Masato; Takeuchi, Miyuki; Karahara, Ichirou; Sato, Mayuko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Terada, Yasuko; Uesugi, Kentaro; Takano, Hidekazu; Kagoshima, Yasushi; Mineyuki, Yoshinobu

    2013-06-01

    The cotyledon of legume seeds is a storage organ that provides nutrients for seed germination and seedling growth. The spatial and temporal control of the degradation processes within cotyledons has not been elucidated. Calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals, a common calcium deposit in plants, have often been reported to be present in legume seeds. In this study, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) was employed at the SPring-8 facility to examine the three-dimensional distribution of crystals inside cotyledons during seed maturation and germination of Lotus miyakojimae (previously Lotus japonicus accession Miyakojima MG-20). Using this technique, we could detect the outline of the embryo, void spaces in seeds and the cotyledon venation pattern. We found several sites that strongly inhibited X-ray transmission within the cotyledons. Light and polarizing microscopy confirmed that these areas corresponded to CaOx crystals. Three-dimensional observations of dry seeds indicated that the CaOx crystals in the L. miyakojimae cotyledons were distributed along lateral veins; however, their distribution was limited to the abaxial side of the procambium. The CaOx crystals appeared at stage II (seed-filling stage) of seed development, and their number increased in dry seeds. The number of crystals in cotyledons was high during germination, suggesting that CaOx crystals are not degraded for their calcium supply. Evidence for the conservation of CaOx crystals in cotyledons during the L. miyakojimae germination process was also supported by the biochemical measurement of oxalic acid levels.

  2. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  3. Plasmon-induced charge separation at two-dimensional gold semishell arrays on SiO{sub 2}@TiO{sub 2} colloidal crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ling; Nishi, Hiroyasu; Tatsuma, Tetsu

    2015-10-01

    Photoelectrodes based on plasmonic Au semishell (or halfshell) arrays are developed. A colloidal crystal consisting of SiO{sub 2}@TiO{sub 2} core-shell particles is prepared on a TiO{sub 2}-coated transparent electrode. A Au semishell (or halfshell) array is deposited by sputtering or evaporation on the colloidal crystal. An electrode with the semishell (or halfshell) array exhibits negative photopotential shifts and anodic photocurrents under visible light at 500-800 nm wavelengths in an aqueous electrolyte containing an electron donor. In particular, hydroquinone and ethanol are good electron donors. The photocurrents can be explained in terms of plasmon-induced charge separation at the Au-TiO{sub 2} interface.

  4. Giant colloidal silver crystals for low-loss linear and nonlinear plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Hung-Ying; Sun, Liuyang; Chen, Wei-Liang; Chang, Yu-Ming; Ahn, Hyeyoung; Li, Xiaoqin; Gwo, Shangjr

    2015-07-01

    The development of ultrasmooth, macroscopic-sized silver (Ag) crystals exhibiting reduced losses is critical to fully characterize the ultimate performance of Ag as a plasmonic material, and to enable cascaded and integrated plasmonic devices. Here we demonstrate the growth of single-crystal Ag plates with millimetre lateral sizes for linear and nonlinear plasmonic applications. Using these Ag crystals, surface plasmon polariton propagation lengths beyond 100 μm in the red wavelength region are measured. These lengths exceed the predicted values using the widely cited Johnson and Christy data. Furthermore, they allow the fabrication of highly reproducible plasmonic nanostructures by focused ion beam milling. We have designed and fabricated double-resonant nanogroove arrays using these crystals for spatially uniform and spectrally tunable second-harmonic generation. In conventional `hot-spot'-based nonlinear processes such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering and second-harmonic generation, strong enhancement can only occur in random, localized regions. In contrast, our approach enables uniform nonlinear signal generation over a large area.

  5. Giant colloidal silver crystals for low-loss linear and nonlinear plasmonics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Hung-Ying; Sun, Liuyang; Chen, Wei-Liang; Chang, Yu-Ming; Ahn, Hyeyoung; Li, Xiaoqin; Gwo, Shangjr

    2015-01-01

    The development of ultrasmooth, macroscopic-sized silver (Ag) crystals exhibiting reduced losses is critical to fully characterize the ultimate performance of Ag as a plasmonic material, and to enable cascaded and integrated plasmonic devices. Here we demonstrate the growth of single-crystal Ag plates with millimetre lateral sizes for linear and nonlinear plasmonic applications. Using these Ag crystals, surface plasmon polariton propagation lengths beyond 100 μm in the red wavelength region are measured. These lengths exceed the predicted values using the widely cited Johnson and Christy data. Furthermore, they allow the fabrication of highly reproducible plasmonic nanostructures by focused ion beam milling. We have designed and fabricated double-resonant nanogroove arrays using these crystals for spatially uniform and spectrally tunable second-harmonic generation. In conventional ‘hot-spot'-based nonlinear processes such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering and second-harmonic generation, strong enhancement can only occur in random, localized regions. In contrast, our approach enables uniform nonlinear signal generation over a large area. PMID:26174058

  6. Giant colloidal silver crystals for low-loss linear and nonlinear plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Hung-Ying; Sun, Liuyang; Chen, Wei-Liang; Chang, Yu-Ming; Ahn, Hyeyoung; Li, Xiaoqin; Gwo, Shangjr

    2015-07-15

    The development of ultrasmooth, macroscopic-sized silver (Ag) crystals exhibiting reduced losses is critical to fully characterize the ultimate performance of Ag as a plasmonic material, and to enable cascaded and integrated plasmonic devices. Here we demonstrate the growth of single-crystal Ag plates with millimetre lateral sizes for linear and nonlinear plasmonic applications. Using these Ag crystals, surface plasmon polariton propagation lengths beyond 100 μm in the red wavelength region are measured. These lengths exceed the predicted values using the widely cited Johnson and Christy data. Furthermore, they allow the fabrication of highly reproducible plasmonic nanostructures by focused ion beam milling. We have designed and fabricated double-resonant nanogroove arrays using these crystals for spatially uniform and spectrally tunable second-harmonic generation. In conventional 'hot-spot'-based nonlinear processes such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering and second-harmonic generation, strong enhancement can only occur in random, localized regions. In contrast, our approach enables uniform nonlinear signal generation over a large area.

  7. A new class of tunable hypersonic phononic crystals based on polymer-tethered colloids

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Redondo, E.; Schmitt, M.; Urbach, Z.; Hui, C. M.; Sainidou, R.; Rembert, P.; Matyjaszewski, K.; Bockstaller, M. R.; Fytas, G.

    2015-01-01

    The design and engineering of hybrid materials exhibiting tailored phononic band gaps are fundamentally relevant to innovative material technologies in areas ranging from acoustics to thermo-optic devices. Phononic hybridization gaps, originating from the anti-crossing between local resonant and propagating modes, have attracted particular interest because of their relative robustness to structural disorder and the associated benefit to ‘manufacturability'. Although hybridization gap materials are well known, their economic fabrication and efficient control of the gap frequency have remained elusive because of the limited property variability and expensive fabrication methodologies. Here we report a new strategy to realize hybridization gap materials by harnessing the ‘anisotropic elasticity' across the particle–polymer interface in densely polymer-tethered colloidal particles. Theoretical and Brillouin scattering analysis confirm both the robustness to disorder and the tunability of the resulting hybridization gap and provide guidelines for the economic synthesis of new materials with deliberately controlled gap position and width frequencies. PMID:26390851

  8. Fabrication of large scale two-dimensional colloidal crystal of polystyrene particles by an interfacial self-ordering process.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhicheng; Zhou, Ming

    2011-09-15

    Monolayer films of hexagonal close-packed polystyrene (PS) spheres were formed at the air-water interface through a self-ordering process without using Langmuir trough. The contact angle of PS particles on the surface of water was determined by an interfacial swelling method. It was found that the concentration and the nature of surfactant had an obvious influence on the arrangement of PS particles. PS suspension containing Triton X 100 (TX 100) of an appropriate concentration self-assembled into a closely packed monolayer on the surface of water. Sodium dodecyl sulfonate, an anionic surfactant, had a relative weak influence on the arrangement of pre-dried PS particles, in contrast, had an obvious effect on newly synthesized PS particles. Quantitative ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectrometry indicated that about 3% of the added TX 100 was adsorbed on the PS particle surface. Laser diffraction patterns on the monolayer film were used to investigate the lattice orientation. Ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-vis-NIR) spectra of monolayer films of different sized PS particles displayed that the method presented here was universal for preparation of two-dimensional (2D) colloidal crystals.

  9. Two-dimensional colloid-based photonic crystals for distributed feedback polymer lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mafouana, Rodrigue; Rehspringer, Jean-Luc; Hirlimann, Charles; Estournes, Claude; Dorkenoo, Kokou D.

    2004-11-08

    We report on a process to design highly ordered monolayers of two-dimensional photonic crystals, made of silica nanoparticules, that can be used for the development of organic optical devices. We have used a photopolymerization process to incorporate a dye gain medium into the nanoparticle layers in order to achieve a laser cavity. The high spatial coherence of the deposits allows for single-mode laser emission in the plane of the layer when the light excitation is perpendicular to the plane. Such periodic films should help in reducing the number of layers needed for future electrically pumped distributed feedback lasers.

  10. 3D interconnected ionic nano-channels formed in polymer films: self-organization and polymerization of thermotropic bicontinuous cubic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Takahiro; Yoshio, Masafumi; Hamasaki, Atsushi; Kagimoto, Junko; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Kato, Takashi

    2011-02-23

    Thermotropic bicontinuous cubic (Cub(bi)) liquid-crystalline (LC) compounds based on a polymerizable ammonium moiety complexed with a lithium salt have been designed to obtain lithium ion-conductive all solid polymeric films having 3D interconnected ionic channels. The monomer shows a Cub(bi) phase from -5 to 19 °C on heating. The complexes retain the ability to form the Cub(bi) LC phase. They also form hexagonal columnar (Col(h)) LC phases at temperatures higher than those of the Cub(bi) phases. The complex of the monomer and LiBF(4) at the molar ratio of 4:1 exhibits the Cub(bi) and Col(h) phases between -6 to 19 °C and 19 to 56 °C, respectively, on heating. The Cub(bi) LC structure formed by the complex has been successfully preserved by in situ photopolymerization through UV irradiation in the presence of a photoinitiator. The resultant nanostructured film is optically transparent and free-standing. The X-ray analysis of the film confirms the preservation of the self-assembled nanostructure. The polymer film with the Cub(bi) LC nanostructure exhibits higher ionic conductivities than the polymer films obtained by photopolymerization of the complex in the Col(h) and isotropic phases. It is found that the 3D interconnected ionic channels derived from the Cub(bi) phase function as efficient ion-conductive pathways.

  11. Utilizing advanced polymerization techniques for simplifying polymer grafting from silica colloidal crystal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerneni, Charu K.

    polyacrylamide of varying thickness can be produced by varying the reaction time. Linear polymerization kinetics was studied using IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, ellipsometry, GPC etc. All of them closely agree with each other. Attempts were made to expand the applicability of this novel way of material synthesis. HILIC is known as a premium separation mode for polar analytes. Glycoproteins form an important class of analytes which need better separation columns. Polyacrylamide coated nonporous colloidal silica is shown here to be a better column packing material. Combined results show that AGET ATRP can be a better and simpler alternative to ATRP for grafting polyacrylamide onto silica based substrates. Future efforts can possibly lead to the expansion of the applicability of this method for making materials for many other separation methods.

  12. Facile construction of dual bandgap optical encoding materials with PS@P(HEMA-co-AA)/SiO2-TMPTA colloidal photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yu; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Si-Si; Yang, Shengyang; Yin, Su-Na; Wang, Cai-Feng; Chen, Li; Chen, Su

    2016-07-01

    An operable strategy for the construction of dual-reflex optical code materials from bilayer or Janus-structure colloidal photonic crystals (CPCs) has been established in this work. In this process, monodispersed submicrometer polystryene@poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-acrylic acid) hydrogel microspheres with soft-shell/hard-core structure and monodispersed colloidal silica spheres were fabricated. These two kinds of colloidal units can be facilely integrated into a single material without optical signal interference because they are well isolated for the immiscibility between water and ethoxylated trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA) and the upper layer of SiO2-TMPTA is a kind of transparent. Moreover, diverse optical code series with different dual photonic bandgaps can be obtained via tuning the colloid sizes. Compared to the conventional single-reflex CPCs, the as-prepared dual-reflex optical code materials represented high information capacity in encoding process. More interesting, delicate code pattern has been also achieved on the optical film via the silk-screen printing technique, which will greatly extend the dual-reflex optical code materials to practical uses in areas containing bio-encoding, anti-counterfeiting, and flexible displays.

  13. Crystal structure of (E)-9-(4-nitro-benzyl-idene)-8,9-di-hydro-pyrido[2,3-d]pyrrolo-[1,2-a]pyrimidin-5(7H)-one.

    PubMed

    Khodjaniyazov, Khamid U; Ashurov, Jamshid M

    2016-04-01

    The title compound, C17H12N4O3, a pyrido-pyrrolo-pyrimidine derivative, is almost planar. The nitro-benzene ring is inclined to the mean plane of the 8,9-di-hydro-pyrido[2,3-d]pyrrolo-[1,2-a]pyrimidin-5(7H)-one moiety (r.m.s. deviation = 0.023 Å) by 6.8 (1)°. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked via C-H⋯O and C-H⋯N hydrogen bonds, forming layers parallel to (101). PMID:27375862

  14. 3D Rare earth porous coordination frameworks with formamide generated in situ syntheses: Crystal structure and down- and up-conversion luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Xue; Tian, Jing; Yang, Hong-Y.; Zhao, Kai; Li, Xia

    2013-05-01

    The reaction of RE(NO)₃·6H₂O and formamide yielded the coordination polymers, [RE(HCOO)₄]⁻[NH₂CHNH₂]⁺ (RE=Y 1, Eu 2, Gd 3, Tb 4, Dy 5, Er 6, and Yb 7). They possess 3D porous frameworks with the 1D rhombic channels occupied by [NH₂CHNH₂]⁺ cations. Complexes 2 and 4 display the characteristic down-conversion emissions corresponding to ⁵D₀→⁷FJ (J=1–4) transitions of Eu(III) ion and ⁵D₄→⁷FJ (J=6–3) transitions of Tb(III) ion, respectively. Longer lifetime values of 2.128±0.002 ms (⁵D₀) for 2 and 2.132±0.002 ms (⁵D₄) for 4 have been observed. The up-conversion spectra of the Y:Yb,Er and Gd:Yb,Er codoped complexes exhibit three emission bands around 410 (⁴H9/2→⁴I15/2, blue), 518–570 (⁴S3/2, ²H11/2→⁴I15/2, green), and 655 nm (⁴F9/2→⁴I15/2, red). - Graphical Abstract: The complexes [RE(HCOO)₄]⁻[NH₂CHNH₂]⁺ possess 3D porous frameworks. Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexes show characteristic emission of Ln(III) ions. The up-conversion emission of the Y:Yb,Er and Gd:Yb,Er codoped complexes was observed. Highlights: •The reaction of RE(NO)₃·6H₂O and formamide produced complexes [RE(HCOO)₄]⁻[NH₂CHNH₂]⁺. • The complexes possess 3D frameworks with the 1D channels occupied by [NH₂CHNH₂]+ cations. • Eu(III)/Tb(III) complexes display the characteristic down-conversion emission of Ln(III) ions. • The Y:Yb,Er and Gd:Yb,Er doped complexes exhibit the up-conversion emission.

  15. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  16. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  17. Metal-organic frameworks: 3D frameworks from 3D printers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ian D.

    2014-11-01

    High-throughput screening of solvothermal crystallization conditions for MOFs and other solids may receive a boost from the application of 3D printing techniques to low-cost, disposable pressure vessels.

  18. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  19. Design, synthesis, biological evaluation and X-ray crystal structure of novel classical 6,5,6-tricyclic benzo[4,5]thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidines as dual thymidylate synthase and dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Zhou, Xilin; L.Kisliuk, Roy; Piraino, Jennifer; Cody, Vivian

    2011-01-01

    Classical antifolates (4-7) with a tricyclic benzo[4,5]thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidine scaffold and a flexible and rigid benzoylglutamate were synthesized as dual thymidylate synthase (TS) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibitors. Oxidative aromatization of ethyl 2-amino-4-methyl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1-benzothiophene-3-carboxylate (±)-9 to ethyl 2-amino-4-methyl-1-benzothiophene-3-carboxylate 10 with 10% Pd/C was a key synthetic step. Compounds with 2-CH3 substituents inhibited human (h) TS (IC50 = 0.26-0.8 μM), but not hDHFR. Substitution of the 2-CH3 with a 2-NH2 increases hTS inhibition by more than 10-fold and also affords excellent hDHFR inhibition (IC50 = 0.09-0.1 μM). This study shows that the tricyclic benzo[4,5]thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidine scaffold is highly conducive to single hTS or dual hTS-hDHFR inhibition depending on the 2-position substituents. The X-ray crystal structures of 6 and 7 with hDHFR reveal, for the first time, that tricyclics 6 and 7 bind with the benzo[4,5]thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidine ring in the folate binding mode with the thieno S mimicking the 4-amino of methotrexate. PMID:21550809

  20. Modeling of DNA-Directed Colloidal Self-Assembly and Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ting; Sknepnek, Rastko; Macfarlane, Robert J.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2012-02-01

    A series of design rules have recently been developed for using gold nanoparticles conjugated with a dense layer of double stranded DNA chains to assemble a wide variety of nanoparticle superlattice structures [1]. Key design parameters for obtaining different structures in a binary system were shown to be the ratio of the hydrodynamic radii of the DNA-conjugated particles, the ratio of the number of DNA strands per particle, and the self- or non-self-complementary nature of the DNA sequences guiding the assembly process. Guided by those experiments, we have built a coarse grained model that faithfully mimics relative design parameters in the experimental system. Working with nanoparticles in the size range from 8nm to 15nm, overall DNA-nanoparticle hydrodynamic radii of 10nm to 30nm, and the number of DNA strands per particle between 30 and 100, we have developed a simulation method that confirms that these design rules can be used to assemble a variety of different crystal structures. In particular, we have identified FCC, BCC, CsCl, AlB2 and Cr3Si structures. With these data, we have constructed a detailed phase diagram that closely corresponds to the experimentally obtained phase diagram developed in ref. [1]. [1] R. J. Macfarlane, B. Lee, M. R. Jones, N. Harris, G.

  1. Venus in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, J. J.

    1993-08-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  2. 3D reservoir visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Van, B.T.; Pajon, J.L.; Joseph, P. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper shows how some simple 3D computer graphics tools can be combined to provide efficient software for visualizing and analyzing data obtained from reservoir simulators and geological simulations. The animation and interactive capabilities of the software quickly provide a deep understanding of the fluid-flow behavior and an accurate idea of the internal architecture of a reservoir.

  3. High-Pressure Single-Crystal Structures of 3D Lead-Halide Hybrid Perovskites and Pressure Effects on their Electronic and Optical Properties.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Adam; Lin, Yu; Beavers, Christine M; Voss, Johannes; Mao, Wendy L; Karunadasa, Hemamala I

    2016-04-27

    We report the first high-pressure single-crystal structures of hybrid perovskites. The crystalline semiconductors (MA)PbX3 (MA = CH3NH3 (+), X = Br(-) or I(-)) afford us the rare opportunity of understanding how compression modulates their structures and thereby their optoelectronic properties. Using atomic coordinates obtained from high-pressure single-crystal X-ray diffraction we track the perovskites' precise structural evolution upon compression. These structural changes correlate well with pressure-dependent single-crystal photoluminescence (PL) spectra and high-pressure bandgaps derived from density functional theory. We further observe dramatic piezochromism where the solids become lighter in color and then transition to opaque black with compression. Indeed, electronic conductivity measurements of (MA)PbI3 obtained within a diamond-anvil cell show that the material's resistivity decreases by 3 orders of magnitude between 0 and 51 GPa. The activation energy for conduction at 51 GPa is only 13.2(3) meV, suggesting that the perovskite is approaching a metallic state. Furthermore, the pressure response of mixed-halide perovskites shows new luminescent states that emerge at elevated pressures. We recently reported that the perovskites (MA)Pb(Br x I1-x )3 (0.2 < x < 1) reversibly form light-induced trap states, which pin their PL to a low energy. This may explain the low voltages obtained from solar cells employing these absorbers. Our high-pressure PL data indicate that compression can mitigate this PL redshift and may afford higher steady-state voltages from these absorbers. These studies show that pressure can significantly alter the transport and thermodynamic properties of these technologically important semiconductors. PMID:27163050

  4. High-Pressure Single-Crystal Structures of 3D Lead-Halide Hybrid Perovskites and Pressure Effects on their Electronic and Optical Properties

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report the first high-pressure single-crystal structures of hybrid perovskites. The crystalline semiconductors (MA)PbX3 (MA = CH3NH3+, X = Br– or I–) afford us the rare opportunity of understanding how compression modulates their structures and thereby their optoelectronic properties. Using atomic coordinates obtained from high-pressure single-crystal X-ray diffraction we track the perovskites’ precise structural evolution upon compression. These structural changes correlate well with pressure-dependent single-crystal photoluminescence (PL) spectra and high-pressure bandgaps derived from density functional theory. We further observe dramatic piezochromism where the solids become lighter in color and then transition to opaque black with compression. Indeed, electronic conductivity measurements of (MA)PbI3 obtained within a diamond-anvil cell show that the material’s resistivity decreases by 3 orders of magnitude between 0 and 51 GPa. The activation energy for conduction at 51 GPa is only 13.2(3) meV, suggesting that the perovskite is approaching a metallic state. Furthermore, the pressure response of mixed-halide perovskites shows new luminescent states that emerge at elevated pressures. We recently reported that the perovskites (MA)Pb(BrxI1–x)3 (0.2 < x < 1) reversibly form light-induced trap states, which pin their PL to a low energy. This may explain the low voltages obtained from solar cells employing these absorbers. Our high-pressure PL data indicate that compression can mitigate this PL redshift and may afford higher steady-state voltages from these absorbers. These studies show that pressure can significantly alter the transport and thermodynamic properties of these technologically important semiconductors. PMID:27163050

  5. High-Pressure Single-Crystal Structures of 3D Lead-Halide Hybrid Perovskites and Pressure Effects on their Electronic and Optical Properties.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Adam; Lin, Yu; Beavers, Christine M; Voss, Johannes; Mao, Wendy L; Karunadasa, Hemamala I

    2016-04-27

    We report the first high-pressure single-crystal structures of hybrid perovskites. The crystalline semiconductors (MA)PbX3 (MA = CH3NH3 (+), X = Br(-) or I(-)) afford us the rare opportunity of understanding how compression modulates their structures and thereby their optoelectronic properties. Using atomic coordinates obtained from high-pressure single-crystal X-ray diffraction we track the perovskites' precise structural evolution upon compression. These structural changes correlate well with pressure-dependent single-crystal photoluminescence (PL) spectra and high-pressure bandgaps derived from density functional theory. We further observe dramatic piezochromism where the solids become lighter in color and then transition to opaque black with compression. Indeed, electronic conductivity measurements of (MA)PbI3 obtained within a diamond-anvil cell show that the material's resistivity decreases by 3 orders of magnitude between 0 and 51 GPa. The activation energy for conduction at 51 GPa is only 13.2(3) meV, suggesting that the perovskite is approaching a metallic state. Furthermore, the pressure response of mixed-halide perovskites shows new luminescent states that emerge at elevated pressures. We recently reported that the perovskites (MA)Pb(Br x I1-x )3 (0.2 < x < 1) reversibly form light-induced trap states, which pin their PL to a low energy. This may explain the low voltages obtained from solar cells employing these absorbers. Our high-pressure PL data indicate that compression can mitigate this PL redshift and may afford higher steady-state voltages from these absorbers. These studies show that pressure can significantly alter the transport and thermodynamic properties of these technologically important semiconductors.

  6. Organic solvent-based graphene oxide liquid crystals: a facile route toward the next generation of self-assembled layer-by-layer multifunctional 3D architectures.

    PubMed

    Jalili, Rouhollah; Aboutalebi, Seyed Hamed; Esrafilzadeh, Dorna; Konstantinov, Konstantin; Moulton, Simon E; Razal, Joselito M; Wallace, Gordon G

    2013-05-28

    We introduce soft self-assembly of ultralarge liquid crystalline (LC) graphene oxide (GO) sheets in a wide range of organic solvents overcoming the practical limitations imposed on LC GO processing in water. This expands the number of known solvents which can support amphiphilic self-assembly to ethanol, acetone, tetrahydrofuran, N-dimethylformamide, N-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidone, and a number of other organic solvents, many of which were not known to afford solvophobic self-assembly prior to this report. The LC behavior of the as-prepared GO sheets in organic solvents has enabled us to disperse and organize substantial amounts of aggregate-free single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs, up to 10 wt %) without compromise in LC properties. The as-prepared LC GO-SWNT dispersions were employed to achieve self-assembled layer-by-layer multifunctional 3D hybrid architectures comprising SWNTs and GO with unrivalled superior mechanical properties (Young's modulus in excess of 50 GPa and tensile strength of more than 500 MPa).

  7. Synthesis, crystal structure and properties of a new 3D supramolecular unsymmetrical tetradentate Schiff bases copper (II) framework with stable tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Noaimi, Mousa; Awwadi, Firas F.; Al-Razagg, Raiid; Esmadi, Fatima T.

    2016-12-01

    Flexible unsymmetrical Schiff base ligand (L) which is derived from the half unit Y = C6H5COCH2C(Ndbnd CH2C6H4NH2)CH3 (obtained from the reaction of benzoylacetone and 2-aminobenzylamine) and 2- quinolinecarboxaldehyde have been successfully co-assembled with Cu(ClO4)2 to give out the [Cu(L)]ClO4 complex. The complex crystallizes in two different space groups; P21/n and P-1. The crystal structure of the P-1 phase indicates the presence of tunnels; the volume of these tunnels is 157 Å3 which is big enough to accommodate solvent molecules. The X-ray data indicates that these tunnels are most probably filled by highly disordered solvent molecules or solvent molecules with partial occupancy. The tunneled structure is stabilized via π-π stacking interactions to give a supramolecular MOF with 1D rhomboidal tunnels array. The copper(II) atom assumes a distorted-square pyrimidal coordination geometry where the perchlorate is located on the apex of the pyramide. In addition, this work presents and discusses the spectroscopic (IR, UV/vis), electro-chemical (cyclic voltammetry) behavior of the Cu(II) complexes. The Cu(II) oxidation state is stabilized by the novel tetradentate ligands, showing Cu(I/II) couple around 0.1 vs. Cp2Fe/Cp2Fe+.

  8. 3D Printing with Nucleic Acid Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    By relying on specific DNA:DNA interactions as a “smart glue”, we have assembled microparticles into a colloidal gel that can hold its shape. This gel can be extruded with a 3D printer to generate centimeter size objects. We show four aspects of this material: (1) The colloidal gel material holds its shape after extrusion. (2) The connectivity among the particles is controlled by the binding behavior between the surface DNA and this mediates some control over the microscale structure. (3) The use of DNA-coated microparticles dramatically reduces the cost of DNA-mediated assembly relative to conventional DNA nanotechnologies and makes this material accessible for macroscale applications. (4) This material can be assembled under biofriendly conditions and can host growing cells within its matrix. The DNA-based control over organization should provide a new means of engineering bioprinted tissues. PMID:25984570

  9. Two-dimensional 3d-4f heterometallic coordination polymers: syntheses, crystal structures, and magnetic properties of six new Co(II)-Ln(III) compounds.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Gallifa, Pau; Fabelo, Oscar; Pasán, Jorge; Cañadillas-Delgado, Laura; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel; Ruiz-Pérez, Catalina

    2014-06-16

    Six new heterometallic cobalt(II)-lanthanide(III) complexes of formulas [Ln(bta)(H2O)2]2[Co(H2O)6]·10H2O [Ln = Nd(III) (1) and Eu(III) (2)] and [Ln2Co(bta)2(H2O)8]n·6nH2O [Ln = Eu(III) (3), Sm(III) (4), Gd(III) (5), and Tb(III) (6)] (H4bta = 1,2,4,5-benzenetretracaboxylic acid) have been synthesized and characterized via single-crystal X-ray diffraction. 1 and 2 are isostructural compounds with a structure composed of anionic layers of [Ln(bta)(H2O)2]n(n-) sandwiching mononuclear [Co(H2O)6](2+) cations plus crystallization water molecules, which are interlinked by electrostatic forces and hydrogen bonds, leading to a supramolecular three-dimensional network. 3-6 are also isostructural compounds, and their structure consists of neutral layers of formula [Ln2Co(bta)2(H2O)8]n and crystallization water molecules, which are connected through hydrogen bonds to afford a supramolecular three-dimensional network. Heterometallic chains formed by the regular alternation of two nine-coordinate lanthanide(III) polyhedra [Ln(III)O9] and one compressed cobalt(II) octahedron [Co(II)O6] along the crystallographic c-axis are cross-linked by bta ligands within each layer of 3-6. Magnetic susceptibility measurements on polycrystalline samples for 3-6 have been carried out in the temperature range of 2.0-300 K. The magnetic behavior of these types of Ln(III)-Co(II) complexes, which have been modeled by using matrix dagonalization techniques, reveals the lack of magnetic coupling for 3 and 4, and the occurrence of weak antiferromagnetic interactions within the Gd(III)-Gd(III) (5) and Tb(III)-Tb(III) (6) dinuclear units through the exchange pathway provided by the double oxo(carboxylate) and double syn-syn carboxylate bridges. PMID:24901707

  10. Two-dimensional 3d-4f heterometallic coordination polymers: syntheses, crystal structures, and magnetic properties of six new Co(II)-Ln(III) compounds.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Gallifa, Pau; Fabelo, Oscar; Pasán, Jorge; Cañadillas-Delgado, Laura; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel; Ruiz-Pérez, Catalina

    2014-06-16

    Six new heterometallic cobalt(II)-lanthanide(III) complexes of formulas [Ln(bta)(H2O)2]2[Co(H2O)6]·10H2O [Ln = Nd(III) (1) and Eu(III) (2)] and [Ln2Co(bta)2(H2O)8]n·6nH2O [Ln = Eu(III) (3), Sm(III) (4), Gd(III) (5), and Tb(III) (6)] (H4bta = 1,2,4,5-benzenetretracaboxylic acid) have been synthesized and characterized via single-crystal X-ray diffraction. 1 and 2 are isostructural compounds with a structure composed of anionic layers of [Ln(bta)(H2O)2]n(n-) sandwiching mononuclear [Co(H2O)6](2+) cations plus crystallization water molecules, which are interlinked by electrostatic forces and hydrogen bonds, leading to a supramolecular three-dimensional network. 3-6 are also isostructural compounds, and their structure consists of neutral layers of formula [Ln2Co(bta)2(H2O)8]n and crystallization water molecules, which are connected through hydrogen bonds to afford a supramolecular three-dimensional network. Heterometallic chains formed by the regular alternation of two nine-coordinate lanthanide(III) polyhedra [Ln(III)O9] and one compressed cobalt(II) octahedron [Co(II)O6] along the crystallographic c-axis are cross-linked by bta ligands within each layer of 3-6. Magnetic susceptibility measurements on polycrystalline samples for 3-6 have been carried out in the temperature range of 2.0-300 K. The magnetic behavior of these types of Ln(III)-Co(II) complexes, which have been modeled by using matrix dagonalization techniques, reveals the lack of magnetic coupling for 3 and 4, and the occurrence of weak antiferromagnetic interactions within the Gd(III)-Gd(III) (5) and Tb(III)-Tb(III) (6) dinuclear units through the exchange pathway provided by the double oxo(carboxylate) and double syn-syn carboxylate bridges.

  11. Specific features of insulator-metal transitions under high pressure in crystals with spin crossovers of 3d ions in tetrahedral environment

    SciTech Connect

    Lobach, K. A. Ovchinnikov, S. G.; Ovchinnikova, T. M.

    2015-01-15

    For Mott insulators with tetrahedral environment, the effective Hubbard parameter U{sub eff} is obtained as a function of pressure. This function is not universal. For crystals with d{sup 5} configuration, the spin crossover suppresses electron correlations, while for d{sup 4} configurations, the parameter U{sub eff} increases after a spin crossover. For d{sup 2} and d{sup 7} configurations, U{sub eff} increases with pressure in the high-spin (HS) state and is saturated after the spin crossover. Characteristic features of the insulator-metal transition are considered as pressure increases; it is shown that there may exist cascades of several transitions for various configurations.

  12. Three-Dimensional (3D) Bicontinuous Hierarchically Porous Mn2O3 Single Crystals for High Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shao-Zhuan; Jin, Jun; Cai, Yi; Li, Yu; Deng, Zhao; Zeng, Jun-Yang; Liu, Jing; Wang, Chao; Hasan, Tawfique; Su, Bao-Lian

    2015-10-01

    Bicontinuous hierarchically porous Mn2O3 single crystals (BHP-Mn2O3-SCs) with uniform parallelepiped geometry and tunable sizes have been synthesized and used as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). The monodispersed BHP-Mn2O3-SCs exhibit high specific surface area and three dimensional interconnected bimodal mesoporosity throughout the entire crystal. Such hierarchical interpenetrating porous framework can not only provide a large number of active sites for Li ion insertion, but also good conductivity and short diffusion length for Li ions, leading to a high lithium storage capacity and enhanced rate capability. Furthermore, owing to their specific porosity, these BHP-Mn2O3-SCs as anode materials can accommodate the volume expansion/contraction that occurs with lithium insertion/extraction during discharge/charge processes, resulting in their good cycling performance. Our synthesized BHP-Mn2O3-SCs with a size of ~700 nm display the best electrochemical performance, with a large reversible capacity (845 mA h g-1 at 100 mA g-1 after 50 cycles), high coulombic efficiency (>95%), excellent cycling stability and superior rate capability (410 mA h g-1 at 1 Ag-1). These values are among the highest reported for Mn2O3-based bulk solids and nanostructures. Also, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy study demonstrates that the BHP-Mn2O3-SCs are suitable for charge transfer at the electrode/electrolyte interface.

  13. 3D rapid mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaksson, Folke; Borg, Johan; Haglund, Leif

    2008-04-01

    In this paper the performance of passive range measurement imaging using stereo technique in real time applications is described. Stereo vision uses multiple images to get depth resolution in a similar way as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) uses multiple measurements to obtain better spatial resolution. This technique has been used in photogrammetry for a long time but it will be shown that it is now possible to do the calculations, with carefully designed image processing algorithms, in e.g. a PC in real time. In order to get high resolution and quantitative data in the stereo estimation a mathematical camera model is used. The parameters to the camera model are settled in a calibration rig or in the case of a moving camera the scene itself can be used for calibration of most of the parameters. After calibration an ordinary TV camera has an angular resolution like a theodolite, but to a much lower price. The paper will present results from high resolution 3D imagery from air to ground. The 3D-results from stereo calculation of image pairs are stitched together into a large database to form a 3D-model of the area covered.

  14. Recent developments in DFD (depth-fused 3D) display and arc 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suyama, Shiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu

    2015-05-01

    We will report our recent developments in DFD (Depth-fused 3D) display and arc 3D display, both of which have smooth movement parallax. Firstly, fatigueless DFD display, composed of only two layered displays with a gap, has continuous perceived depth by changing luminance ratio between two images. Two new methods, called "Edge-based DFD display" and "Deep DFD display", have been proposed in order to solve two severe problems of viewing angle and perceived depth limitations. Edge-based DFD display, layered by original 2D image and its edge part with a gap, can expand the DFD viewing angle limitation both in 2D and 3D perception. Deep DFD display can enlarge the DFD image depth by modulating spatial frequencies of front and rear images. Secondly, Arc 3D display can provide floating 3D images behind or in front of the display by illuminating many arc-shaped directional scattering sources, for example, arcshaped scratches on a flat board. Curved Arc 3D display, composed of many directional scattering sources on a curved surface, can provide a peculiar 3D image, for example, a floating image in the cylindrical bottle. The new active device has been proposed for switching arc 3D images by using the tips of dual-frequency liquid-crystal prisms as directional scattering sources. Directional scattering can be switched on/off by changing liquid-crystal refractive index, resulting in switching of arc 3D image.

  15. Holographic Interferometry based on photorefractive crystal to measure 3D thermo-elastic distortion of composite structures and comparison with finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thizy, C.; Eliot, F.; Ballhause, D.; Olympio, K. R.; Kluge, R.; Shannon, A.; Laduree, G.; Logut, D.; Georges, M. P.

    2013-04-01

    Thermo-elastic distortions of composite structures have been measured by a holographic camera using a BSO photorefractive crystal as the recording medium. The first test campaign (Phase 1) was performed on CFRP struts with titanium end-fittings glued to the tips of the strut. The samples were placed in a vacuum chamber. The holographic camera was located outside the chamber and configured with two illuminations to measure the relative out-of-plane and in-plane (in one direction) displacements. The second test campaign (Phase 2) was performed on a structure composed of a large Silicon Carbide base plate supported by 3 GFRP struts with glued Titanium end-fittings. Thermo-elastic distortions have been measured with the same holographic camera used in phase 1, but four illuminations, instead of two, have been used to provide the three components of displacement. This technique was specially developed and validated during the phase 2 in CSL laboratory. The system has been designed to measure an object size of typically 250x250 mm2; the measurement range is such that the sum of the largest relative displacements in the three measurement directions is maximum 20 μm. The validation of the four-illuminations technique led to measurement uncertainties of 120 nm for the relative in-plane and out-of-plane displacements, 230 nm for the absolute in-plane displacement and 400 nm for the absolute out-of-plane displacement. For both campaigns, the test results have been compared to the predictions obtained by finite element analyses and the correlation of these results was good.

  16. Taming supersymmetric defects in 3d-3d correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Dongmin; Kim, Nakwoo; Romo, Mauricio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-07-01

    We study knots in 3d Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group {SL}(N,{{C}}), in the context of its relation with 3d { N }=2 theory (the so-called 3d-3d correspondence). The defect has either co-dimension 2 or co-dimension 4 inside the 6d (2,0) theory, which is compactified on a 3-manifold \\hat{M}. We identify such defects in various corners of the 3d-3d correspondence, namely in 3d {SL}(N,{{C}}) CS theory, in 3d { N }=2 theory, in 5d { N }=2 super Yang-Mills theory, and in the M-theory holographic dual. We can make quantitative checks of the 3d-3d correspondence by computing partition functions at each of these theories. This Letter is a companion to a longer paper [1], which contains more details and more results.

  17. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  18. Colloidal Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russel, William B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Described is a graduate level engineering course offered at Princeton University in colloidal phenomena stressing the physical and dynamical side of colloid science. The course outline, reading list, and requirements are presented. (BT)

  19. Patterning hierarchy in direct and inverse opal crystals.

    PubMed

    Mishchenko, Lidiya; Hatton, Benjamin; Kolle, Mathias; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2012-06-25

    Biological strategies for bottom-up synthesis of inorganic crystalline and amorphous materials within topographic templates have recently become an attractive approach for fabricating complex synthetic structures. Inspired by these strategies, herein the synthesis of multi-layered, hierarchical inverse colloidal crystal films formed directly on topographically patterned substrates via evaporative deposition, or "co-assembly", of polymeric spheres with a silicate sol-gel precursor solution and subsequent removal of the colloidal template, is described. The response of this growing composite colloid-silica system to artificially imposed 3D spatial constraints of various geometries is systematically studied, and compared with that of direct colloidal crystal assembly on the same template. Substrates designed with arrays of rectangular, triangular, and hexagonal prisms and cylinders are shown to control crystallographic domain nucleation and orientation of the direct and inverse opals. With this bottom-up topographical approach, it is demonstrated that the system can be manipulated to either form large patterned single crystals, or crystals with a fine-tuned extent of disorder, and to nucleate distinct colloidal domains of a defined size, location, and orientation in a wide range of length-scales. The resulting ordered, quasi-ordered, and disordered colloidal crystal films show distinct optical properties. Therefore, this method provides a means of controlling bottom-up synthesis of complex, hierarchical direct and inverse opal structures designed for altering optical properties and increased functionality. PMID:22461328

  20. Patterning hierarchy in direct and inverse opal crystals.

    PubMed

    Mishchenko, Lidiya; Hatton, Benjamin; Kolle, Mathias; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2012-06-25

    Biological strategies for bottom-up synthesis of inorganic crystalline and amorphous materials within topographic templates have recently become an attractive approach for fabricating complex synthetic structures. Inspired by these strategies, herein the synthesis of multi-layered, hierarchical inverse colloidal crystal films formed directly on topographically patterned substrates via evaporative deposition, or "co-assembly", of polymeric spheres with a silicate sol-gel precursor solution and subsequent removal of the colloidal template, is described. The response of this growing composite colloid-silica system to artificially imposed 3D spatial constraints of various geometries is systematically studied, and compared with that of direct colloidal crystal assembly on the same template. Substrates designed with arrays of rectangular, triangular, and hexagonal prisms and cylinders are shown to control crystallographic domain nucleation and orientation of the direct and inverse opals. With this bottom-up topographical approach, it is demonstrated that the system can be manipulated to either form large patterned single crystals, or crystals with a fine-tuned extent of disorder, and to nucleate distinct colloidal domains of a defined size, location, and orientation in a wide range of length-scales. The resulting ordered, quasi-ordered, and disordered colloidal crystal films show distinct optical properties. Therefore, this method provides a means of controlling bottom-up synthesis of complex, hierarchical direct and inverse opal structures designed for altering optical properties and increased functionality.

  1. Hydrogen in polar intermetallics: Syntheses and structures of the ternary Ca5Bi3D0.93, Yb5Bi3Hx, and Sm5Bi3H~1 by powder neutron or single crystal X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Leon-Escamilla, E. Alejandro; Dervenagas, Panagiotis; Stasis, Constantine; Corbett, John D.

    2010-01-01

    The syntheses of the title compounds are described in detail. Structural characterizations from refinements of single crystal X-ray diffraction data for Yb{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}H{sub x} and Sm{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}H{sub 1} and of powder neutron diffraction data for Ca{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}D{sub 0.93(3)} are reported. These confirm that all three crystallize with the heavy atom structure type of {beta}-Yb{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}, and the third gives the first proof that the deuterium lies in the center of nominal calcium tetrahedra, isostructural with the Ca{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}F-type structure. These Ca and Yb phases are particularly stable with respect to dissociation to Mn{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-type product plus H{sub 2}. Some contradictions in the literature regarding Yb{sub 5}Sb{sub 3} and Yb{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}H{sub x} phases are considered in terms of adventitious hydrogen impurities that are generated during reactions in fused silica containers at elevated temperatures.

  2. Concentrating colloids with electric field gradients. I. Particle transport and growth mechanism of hard-sphere-like crystals in an electric bottle.

    PubMed

    Leunissen, Mirjam E; Sullivan, Matthew T; Chaikin, Paul M; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2008-04-28

    This work concerns the use of electric field gradients to manipulate the local particle concentration in a hard-sphere-like suspension. Inside a specially designed "electric bottle," we observed our colloids to collect in the regions of lowest field strength ("negative dielectrophoresis"). This allows for the use of larger field gradients and stronger dielectrophoretic forces than in the original electric bottle design, which was based on positive dielectrophoresis [M. T. Sullivan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 015703 (2006)]. We used confocal scanning laser microscopy to quantitatively follow the time-dependent change in the particle density and the suspension structure. Within a few days, the dielectrophoretic compression was seen to initiate a heterogeneouslike growth of large single crystals, which took place far out-of-equilibrium. The crystals had a random hexagonal close-packed structure and displayed an intriguing growth mechanism, during which the entire crystal was continuously transported, while growing both on the "high-field" and the "low-field" sides, although at different rates. After switching off the electric field, the compressed crystals were found to relax to a lower packing fraction and melt, at a much slower rate than the crystal growth. Besides revealing the particular (far out-of-equilibrium) crystal growth mechanism in these electric bottles, our observations also shed light on the role of the different particle transport processes in the cell and some of the relevant tuning parameters. This is useful for different types of experiments, for instance, focusing more on melting, homogeneous crystallization, or the glass transition.

  3. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  4. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  5. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This area of terrain near the Sagan Memorial Station was taken on Sol 3 by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.' It stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  6. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    fluid-fluid interface [2]. Together with Remco Tuinier, Henk has recently completed a book in this area which is to appear later this year. A major theme in Henk's research is that of phase transitions in lyotropic liquid crystals. Henk, together with Daan Frenkel and Alain Stroobants, realized in the 1980s that a smectic phase in dispersions of rod-like particles can be stable without the presence of attractive interactions, similar to nematic ordering as predicted earlier by Onsager [3]. Together with Gert-Jan Vroege he wrote a seminal review in this area [4]. Henk once said that 'one can only truly develop one colloidal model system in one's career' and in his case this must be that of gibbsite platelets. Initially Henk's group pursued another polymorph of aluminium hydroxide, boehmite, which forms rod-like particles [5], which already displayed nematic liquid crystal phases. The real breakthrough came when the same precursors treated the produced gibbsite platelets slightly differently. These reliably form a discotic nematic phase [6] and, despite the polydispersity in their diameter, a columnar phase [7]. A theme encompassing a wide range of soft matter systems is that of colloidal dynamics and phase transition kinetics. Many colloidal systems have a tendency to get stuck in metastable states, such as gels or glasses. This is a nuisance if one wishes to study phase transitions, but it is of great practical significance. Such issues feature in many of Henk's publications, and with Valerie Anderson he wrote a highly cited review in this area [8]. Henk Lekkerkerker has also invested significant effort into the promotion of synchrotron radiation studies of colloidal suspensions. He was one of the great supporters of the Dutch-Belgian beamline 'DUBBLE' project at the ESRF [9]. He attended one of the very first experiments in Grenoble in 1999, which led to a Nature publication [7]. He was strongly involved in many other experiments which followed and also has been a

  7. Transparent colloid containing upconverting nanocrystals: an alternative medium for three-dimensional volumetric display.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Dong, Guoping; Qiao, Yanbo; Qiu, Jianrong

    2008-12-01

    We report an alternative medium of transparent upconverting colloid containing lanthanide ion doped NaYF(4) nanocrystals for three-dimensional (3D) volumetric display. The colloids exhibit tunable upconversion luminescence with a wide spectrum of colors by adjusting the doping concentrations of the nanocrystals and the compositions of the colloids. Our preliminary experimental result indicates that an upconverting colloid-based 3D volumetric display using a convergent near infrared laser beam to induce a localized luminescent spot near the focus is technically feasible. Therefore arbitrary 3D objects can be created inside the upconverting colloid by use of computer controlled 3D scanning systems.

  8. Engineering novel mesoscopic structures using DNA-programmed colloidal self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Anthony Ji

    Controlling interactions between colloidal suspensions has been a fascinating challenge both experimentally and theoretically. Three-dimensional colloidal crystals assembled from monodisperse colloidal particles have generated a significant interest because of their potential application as photonic band gap materials (PBG), chemical sensors, optical filters, and switches. DNA-mediated colloidal assembly offers a unique tool for controlling the range and magnitude of interparticle interaction to promote novel crystal formation. We try to delimit those conditions under which the DNA-mediated interaction gives rise to well-ordered 3-D colloidal crystals, as well as to discuss the applications, optimization, and ultimate limitations of such DNA-mediated particle self-assembly. There are many unknowns regarding the expected colloidal phase diagram and the strength and kinetics of the DNA-mediated interaction, as well as the nonspecific interactions between colloids with different surface chemistries. We start with the simplest case of one-component system, where every colloid has a DNA-mediated attraction to every other, since the phase behavior and kinetics of one-component dispersions is well understood from previous studies. We determine and model the temperature and DNA-density dependence of the self-assembly phase diagram and kinetics. We find that crystals only form with the sterically stabilized DNA-particles in a rather narrow range of temperatures and have acceptably fast nucleation and growth in a small range of grafted-DNA density. In addition, the phase behavior of binary alloy solid solutions is studied using the same sterically stabilized colloidal particles. A competition between DNA single-base mismatches is used to create energy penalties for the substitution of a few KBTs'. The minority species substitute into the crystal lattice when the pair interaction difference is a fraction of a K BT, however, they exclude from the growing crystal when the pair

  9. Untraditional approach to complex hierarchical periodic arrays with trinary stepwise architectures of micro-, submicro-, and nanosized structures based on binary colloidal crystals and their fine structure enhanced properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Koshizaki, Naoto; Wang, Hongqiang; Shimizu, Yoshiki

    2011-12-27

    A unique approach for fabricating complex hierarchical periodic arrays with trinary stepwise architectures of micro- and submicro- as well as nanosized structures by combining a novel double-layered binary colloidal crystal with pulsed laser deposition techniques is developed. The present strategy is universal and nanostructures with different materials can be easily prepared in the complex hierarchical periodic arrays. This approach offers the advantage of low costs compared to conventional lithographic techniques. These as-prepared unique structures cannot be directly fabricated by conventional lithography. These special hierarchically structured arrays demonstrate fine structure-enhanced performances, including superhydrophilicity without UV irradiation and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), which is highly valuable for designing micro/nanodevices, such as biosensors or microfluidic devices.

  10. Colloidal Synthesis of Quantum Confined Single Crystal CsPbBr3 Nanosheets with Lateral Size Control up to the Micrometer Range

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report the nontemplated colloidal synthesis of single crystal CsPbBr3 perovskite nanosheets with lateral sizes up to a few micrometers and with thickness of just a few unit cells (i.e., below 5 nm), hence in the strong quantum confinement regime, by introducing short ligands (octanoic acid and octylamine) in the synthesis together with longer ones (oleic acid and oleylamine). The lateral size is tunable by varying the ratio of shorter ligands over longer ligands, while the thickness is mainly unaffected by this parameter and stays practically constant at 3 nm in all the syntheses conducted at short-to-long ligands volumetric ratio below 0.67. Beyond this ratio, control over the thickness is lost and a multimodal thickness distribution is observed. PMID:27228475

  11. Colloidal Synthesis of Quantum Confined Single Crystal CsPbBr3 Nanosheets with Lateral Size Control up to the Micrometer Range.

    PubMed

    Shamsi, Javad; Dang, Zhiya; Bianchini, Paolo; Canale, Claudio; Stasio, Francesco Di; Brescia, Rosaria; Prato, Mirko; Manna, Liberato

    2016-06-15

    We report the nontemplated colloidal synthesis of single crystal CsPbBr3 perovskite nanosheets with lateral sizes up to a few micrometers and with thickness of just a few unit cells (i.e., below 5 nm), hence in the strong quantum confinement regime, by introducing short ligands (octanoic acid and octylamine) in the synthesis together with longer ones (oleic acid and oleylamine). The lateral size is tunable by varying the ratio of shorter ligands over longer ligands, while the thickness is mainly unaffected by this parameter and stays practically constant at 3 nm in all the syntheses conducted at short-to-long ligands volumetric ratio below 0.67. Beyond this ratio, control over the thickness is lost and a multimodal thickness distribution is observed.

  12. Collaborative annotation of 3D crystallographic models.

    PubMed

    Hunter, J; Henderson, M; Khan, I

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the AnnoCryst system-a tool that was designed to enable authenticated collaborators to share online discussions about 3D crystallographic structures through the asynchronous attachment, storage, and retrieval of annotations. Annotations are personal comments, interpretations, questions, assessments, or references that can be attached to files, data, digital objects, or Web pages. The AnnoCryst system enables annotations to be attached to 3D crystallographic models retrieved from either private local repositories (e.g., Fedora) or public online databases (e.g., Protein Data Bank or Inorganic Crystal Structure Database) via a Web browser. The system uses the Jmol plugin for viewing and manipulating the 3D crystal structures but extends Jmol by providing an additional interface through which annotations can be created, attached, stored, searched, browsed, and retrieved. The annotations are stored on a standardized Web annotation server (Annotea), which has been extended to support 3D macromolecular structures. Finally, the system is embedded within a security framework that is capable of authenticating users and restricting access only to trusted colleagues.

  13. Full-color holographic 3D printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Masami; Shigeta, Hiroaki; Nishihara, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Takahashi, Susumu; Ohyama, Nagaaki; Kobayashi, Akihiko; Iwata, Fujio

    2003-05-01

    A holographic 3D printer is a system that produces a direct hologram with full-parallax information using the 3-dimensional data of a subject from a computer. In this paper, we present a proposal for the reproduction of full-color images with the holographic 3D printer. In order to realize the 3-dimensional color image, we selected the 3 laser wavelength colors of red (λ=633nm), green (λ=533nm), and blue (λ=442nm), and we built a one-step optical system using a projection system and a liquid crystal display. The 3-dimensional color image is obtained by synthesizing in a 2D array the multiple exposure with these 3 wavelengths made on each 250mm elementary hologram, and moving recording medium on a x-y stage. For the natural color reproduction in the holographic 3D printer, we take the approach of the digital processing technique based on the color management technology. The matching between the input and output colors is performed by investigating first, the relation between the gray level transmittance of the LCD and the diffraction efficiency of the hologram and second, by measuring the color displayed by the hologram to establish a correlation. In our first experimental results a non-linear functional relation for single and multiple exposure of the three components were found. These results are the first step in the realization of a natural color 3D image produced by the holographic color 3D printer.

  14. Timescales of quartz crystallization estimated from glass inclusion faceting using 3D propagation phase-contrast x-ray tomography: examples from the Bishop (California, USA) and Oruanui (Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand) Tuffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamukcu, A.; Gualda, G. A.; Anderson, A. T.

    2012-12-01

    Compositions of glass inclusions have long been studied for the information they provide on the evolution of magma bodies. Textures - sizes, shapes, positions - of glass inclusions have received less attention, but they can also provide important insight into magmatic processes, including the timescales over which magma bodies develop and erupt. At magmatic temperatures, initially round glass inclusions will become faceted (attain a negative crystal shape) through the process of dissolution and re-precipitation, such that the extent to which glass inclusions are faceted can be used to estimate timescales. The size and position of the inclusion within a crystal will influence how much faceting occurs: a larger inclusion will facet more slowly; an inclusion closer to the rim will have less time to facet. As a result, it is critical to properly document the size, shape, and position of glass inclusions to assess faceting timescales. Quartz is an ideal mineral to study glass inclusion faceting, as Si is the only diffusing species of concern, and Si diffusion rates are relatively well-constrained. Faceting time calculations to date (Gualda et al., 2012) relied on optical microscopy to document glass inclusions. Here we use 3D propagation phase-contrast x-ray tomography to image glass inclusions in quartz. This technique enhances inclusion edges such that images can be processed more successfully than with conventional tomography. We have developed a set of image processing tools to isolate inclusions and more accurately obtain information on the size, shape, and position of glass inclusions than with optical microscopy. We are studying glass inclusions from two giant tuffs. The Bishop Tuff is ~1000 km3 of high-silica rhyolite ash fall, ignimbrite, and intracaldera deposits erupted ~760 ka in eastern California (USA). Glass inclusions in early-erupted Bishop Tuff range from non-faceted to faceted, and faceting times determined using both optical microscopy and x

  15. SiO2@Au core-shell nanospheres self-assemble to form colloidal crystals that can be sintered and surface modified to produce pH-controlled membranes.

    PubMed

    Ignacio-de Leon, Patricia Anne A; Zharov, Ilya

    2013-03-19

    We prepared colloidal crystals by self-assembly of gold-coated silica nanospheres, and free-standing nanoporous membranes by sintering these colloidal crystals. We modified the nanopore surface with ionizable functional groups, by forming a monolayer of L-cysteine or by surface-initiated polymerization of methacrylic acid. Diffusion experiments for the cationic dye Rhodamine B through L-cysteine-modified membranes showed a decrease in flux upon addition of an acid due to the nanopore surface becoming positively charged. Diffusion experiments for the neutral dye, ferrocenecarboxaldehyde, through the PMAA-modified membranes showed a 13-fold increase in flux upon addition of an acid resulting from the protonated polymer collapsing onto the nanopore surface leading to larger pore size. Our results demonstrate that SiO2@Au core-shell nanospheres can self-assemble into colloidal crystals and that transport through the corresponding surface-modified Au-coated colloidal membranes can be controlled by pH.

  16. AGGRESCAN3D (A3D): server for prediction of aggregation properties of protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano, Rafael; Jamroz, Michal; Szczasiuk, Agata; Pujols, Jordi; Kmiecik, Sebastian; Ventura, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation underlies an increasing number of disorders and constitutes a major bottleneck in the development of therapeutic proteins. Our present understanding on the molecular determinants of protein aggregation has crystalized in a series of predictive algorithms to identify aggregation-prone sites. A majority of these methods rely only on sequence. Therefore, they find difficulties to predict the aggregation properties of folded globular proteins, where aggregation-prone sites are often not contiguous in sequence or buried inside the native structure. The AGGRESCAN3D (A3D) server overcomes these limitations by taking into account the protein structure and the experimental aggregation propensity scale from the well-established AGGRESCAN method. Using the A3D server, the identified aggregation-prone residues can be virtually mutated to design variants with increased solubility, or to test the impact of pathogenic mutations. Additionally, A3D server enables to take into account the dynamic fluctuations of protein structure in solution, which may influence aggregation propensity. This is possible in A3D Dynamic Mode that exploits the CABS-flex approach for the fast simulations of flexibility of globular proteins. The A3D server can be accessed at http://biocomp.chem.uw.edu.pl/A3D/. PMID:25883144

  17. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  18. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  19. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test Conducted on Mir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, Monica I.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1999-01-01

    Colloids are tiny (submicron) particles suspended in fluid. Paint, ink, and milk are examples of colloids found in everyday life. The Binary Colloidal Alloy Test (BCAT) is part of an extensive series of experiments planned to investigate the fundamental properties of colloids so that scientists can make colloids more useful for technological applications. Some of the colloids studied in BCAT are made of two different sized particles (binary colloidal alloys) that are very tiny, uniform plastic spheres. Under the proper conditions, these colloids can arrange themselves in a pattern to form crystals. These crystals may form the basis of new classes of light switches, displays, and optical devices. Windows made of liquid crystals are already in the marketplace. These windows change their appearance from transparent to opaque when a weak electric current is applied. In the future, if the colloidal crystals can be made to control the passage of light through them, such products could be made much more cheaply. These experiments require the microgravity environment of space because good quality crystals are difficult to produce on Earth because of sedimentation and convection in the fluid. The BCAT experiment hardware included two separate modules for two different experiments. The "Slow Growth" hardware consisted of a 35-mm camera with a 250- exposure photo film cartridge. The camera was aimed toward the sample module, which contained 10 separate colloid samples. A rack of small lights provided backlighting for the photographs. The BCAT hardware was launched on the shuttle and was operated aboard the Russian space station Mir by American astronauts John Blaha and David Wolf (launched September 1996 and returned January 1997; reflown September 1997 and returned January 1998). To begin the experiment, one of these astronauts would mix the samples to disperse the colloidal particles and break up any crystals that might have already formed. Once the samples were mixed and

  20. Synthesis of submicrometer-sized titania spherical particles with a sol-gel method and their application to colloidal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Mine, Eiichi; Hirose, Mitsuaki; Nagao, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Konno, Mikio

    2005-11-01

    A synthetic method for preparing submicrometer-sized titania particles is proposed, which is based on hydrolysis of titanium alkoxide with the use of a cosolvent and an amine catalyst for alkoxide hydrolysis. The preparation was performed with different amines of ammonia, methylamine (MA), and dimethylamine (DMA) in different solvents of ethanol/acetonitrile, ethanol/methanol, ethanol/acetone, ethanol/acetonitrile, and ethanol/formamide for 0.1-0.3 M water and 0.03 M titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) at temperatures of 10-50 degrees C. The use of the ethanol/acetonitrile solvent with MA was required for preparing monodispersed, spherical particles. The number average of the titania particle sizes and their coefficient of variation were varied from 143 to 551 nm and from 5.7 to 20.6%, respectively, with reaction temperature and concentrations of water and MA. Colloidal crystals of titania particles fabricated with a sedimentation method revealed reflection peaks attributed to Bragg's diffraction. Annealing at 100-1000 degrees C led to shrinkage and crystallization of titania particles followed by an increase in the refractive index of titania particles. PMID:15949809

  1. Ordered array of Ag semishells on different diameter monolayer polystyrene colloidal crystals: An ultrasensitive and reproducible SERS substrate.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zao; Niu, Gao; Luo, Jiangshan; Kang, Xiaoli; Yao, Weitang; Zhang, Weibin; Yi, Yougen; Yi, Yong; Ye, Xin; Duan, Tao; Tang, Yongjian

    2016-09-02

    Ag semishells (AgSS) ordered arrays for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy have been prepared by depositing Ag film onto polystyrene colloidal particle (PSCP) monolayer templates array. The diversified activity for SERS activity with the ordered AgSS arrays mainly depends on the PSCP diameter and Ag film thickness. The high SERS sensitivity and reproducibility are proved by the detection of rhodamine 6G (R6G) and 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) molecules. The prominent enhancements of SERS are mainly from the "V"-shaped or "U"-shaped nanogaps on AgSS, which are experimentally and theoretically investigated. The higher SERS activity, stability and reproducibility make the ordered AgSS a promising choice for practical SERS low concentration detection applications.

  2. Ordered array of Ag semishells on different diameter monolayer polystyrene colloidal crystals: An ultrasensitive and reproducible SERS substrate

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Zao; Niu, Gao; Luo, Jiangshan; Kang, Xiaoli; Yao, Weitang; Zhang, Weibin; Yi, Yougen; Yi, Yong; Ye, Xin; Duan, Tao; Tang, Yongjian

    2016-01-01

    Ag semishells (AgSS) ordered arrays for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy have been prepared by depositing Ag film onto polystyrene colloidal particle (PSCP) monolayer templates array. The diversified activity for SERS activity with the ordered AgSS arrays mainly depends on the PSCP diameter and Ag film thickness. The high SERS sensitivity and reproducibility are proved by the detection of rhodamine 6G (R6G) and 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) molecules. The prominent enhancements of SERS are mainly from the “V”-shaped or “U”-shaped nanogaps on AgSS, which are experimentally and theoretically investigated. The higher SERS activity, stability and reproducibility make the ordered AgSS a promising choice for practical SERS low concentration detection applications. PMID:27586562

  3. Ordered array of Ag semishells on different diameter monolayer polystyrene colloidal crystals: An ultrasensitive and reproducible SERS substrate.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zao; Niu, Gao; Luo, Jiangshan; Kang, Xiaoli; Yao, Weitang; Zhang, Weibin; Yi, Yougen; Yi, Yong; Ye, Xin; Duan, Tao; Tang, Yongjian

    2016-01-01

    Ag semishells (AgSS) ordered arrays for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy have been prepared by depositing Ag film onto polystyrene colloidal particle (PSCP) monolayer templates array. The diversified activity for SERS activity with the ordered AgSS arrays mainly depends on the PSCP diameter and Ag film thickness. The high SERS sensitivity and reproducibility are proved by the detection of rhodamine 6G (R6G) and 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) molecules. The prominent enhancements of SERS are mainly from the "V"-shaped or "U"-shaped nanogaps on AgSS, which are experimentally and theoretically investigated. The higher SERS activity, stability and reproducibility make the ordered AgSS a promising choice for practical SERS low concentration detection applications. PMID:27586562

  4. Ordered array of Ag semishells on different diameter monolayer polystyrene colloidal crystals: An ultrasensitive and reproducible SERS substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zao; Niu, Gao; Luo, Jiangshan; Kang, Xiaoli; Yao, Weitang; Zhang, Weibin; Yi, Yougen; Yi, Yong; Ye, Xin; Duan, Tao; Tang, Yongjian

    2016-09-01

    Ag semishells (AgSS) ordered arrays for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy have been prepared by depositing Ag film onto polystyrene colloidal particle (PSCP) monolayer templates array. The diversified activity for SERS activity with the ordered AgSS arrays mainly depends on the PSCP diameter and Ag film thickness. The high SERS sensitivity and reproducibility are proved by the detection of rhodamine 6G (R6G) and 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) molecules. The prominent enhancements of SERS are mainly from the “V”-shaped or “U”-shaped nanogaps on AgSS, which are experimentally and theoretically investigated. The higher SERS activity, stability and reproducibility make the ordered AgSS a promising choice for practical SERS low concentration detection applications.

  5. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  6. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  7. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  8. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  9. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible.

  10. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  11. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery. PMID:26657435

  12. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  13. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  14. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  15. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  16. The New Realm of 3-D Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Dimension Technologies Inc., developed a line of 2-D/3-D Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) screens, including a 15-inch model priced at consumer levels. DTI's family of flat panel LCD displays, called the Virtual Window(TM), provide real-time 3-D images without the use of glasses, head trackers, helmets, or other viewing aids. Most of the company initial 3-D display research was funded through NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The images on DTI's displays appear to leap off the screen and hang in space. The display accepts input from computers or stereo video sources, and can be switched from 3-D to full-resolution 2-D viewing with the push of a button. The Virtual Window displays have applications in data visualization, medicine, architecture, business, real estate, entertainment, and other research, design, military, and consumer applications. Displays are currently used for computer games, protein analysis, and surgical imaging. The technology greatly benefits the medical field, as surgical simulators are helping to increase the skills of surgical residents. Virtual Window(TM) is a trademark of Dimension Technologies Inc.

  17. Colloid update.

    PubMed

    Argalious, Maged Y

    2012-01-01

    This update aims to provide an evidence based review of natural and synthetic colloids with a special emphasis on the various generations of the synthetic colloid hydroxyethyl starch. The effect of 1(st), 2(nd) and 3(rd) generation hetastarches on bleeding, coagulopathy, acute kidney injury and mortality will be discussed. The results of randomised controlled trials addressing morbidity and mortality outcomes of colloid versus crystalloid resuscitation in critically ill patients will be described. In addition, the rationale and evidence behind early goal directed fluid therapy (EGDFT) including a practical approach to assessment of dynamic measures of fluid responsiveness will be presented.

  18. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  19. Template-assisted growth of nominally cubic (100)-oriented three-dimensional crack-free photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chongjun; McLachlan, Martyn A; McComb, David W; De La Rue, Richard M; Johnson, Nigel P

    2005-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals (PhCs) are now beginning to acquire functionality via the use of dopants and heterostructures. However, the self-organized fabrication of large-area single crystals that are free of cracks and stacking faults has remained a challenge. We demonstrate a technology for the fabrication of (100)-oriented thin film 3D opal PhCs that exhibit no cracks over areas having no intrinsic size limit via a modified template-assisted colloidal self-assembly approach onto a patterned substrate. This technology potentially makes available large area regions of single photonic crystal, which can be used for optoelectronic devices.

  20. From nuclei to micro-structure in colloidal crystallization: Investigating intermediate length scales by small angle laser light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Richard; Franke, Markus; Schöpe, Hans Joachim; Bartsch, Eckhard; Palberg, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Hard sphere suspensions are well recognized model systems of statistical physics and soft condensed matter. We here investigate the temporal evolution of the immediate environment of nucleating and growing crystals and/or their global scale distribution using time resolved Small Angle Light Scattering (SALS). Simultaneously performed Bragg scattering measurements provide an accurate temporal gauging of the sequence of events. We apply this approach to studies of re-crystallization in several different shear molten hard sphere and attractive hard sphere samples with the focus being on the diversity of observable signal shapes and their change in time. We demonstrate that depending on the preparation conditions different processes occur on length scales larger than the structural scale, which significantly influence both the crystallization kinetics and the final micro-structure. By careful analysis of the SALS signal evolution and by comparing different suggestions for small angle signal shapes to our data, we can for most cases identify the processes leading to the observed signals. These include form factor scattering from crystals surrounded by depletion zones and structure factor scattering from late stage inter-crystallite ordering. The large variety of different small angle signals thus in principle contains valuable information complementary to that gained from Bragg scattering or microscopy. Our comparison, however, also shows that further refinement and adaptation of the theoretical expressions to the sample specific boundary conditions is desired for a quantitative kinetic analysis of micro-structural evolution.