Science.gov

Sample records for 3d compton scatter

  1. Evaluation of a Compton scattering camera using 3-D position sensitive CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Y. F.; He, Z.; Knoll, G. F.; Wehe, D. K.; Li, W.

    2001-01-01

    A CZT Compton Camera (CCC) is being built using two three-dimensional (3-D) position-sensitive CZT detectors. Expected system performance was analyzed by analytical and Monte Carlo approaches. Based on the measurement of detector energy and position resolution, the expected angular resolution is ˜3° and ˜2° for a ±30° FOV for 511 keV and 1 MeV γ-rays, respectively. The intrinsic efficiency for a point source 10 cm from the first detector surface ranges from 1.5×10 -4 to 8.8×10 -6 for 500 keV-3 MeV.

  2. Evaluation of a Compton scattering camera using 3D position-sensitive CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yanfeng; He, Zhong; Knoll, Glenn F.; Wehe, David K.; Li, Weiqi

    1999-10-01

    A CZT Compton Camera (CCC) is being built using two 3D position sensitive CZT detectors. Expected system performance was analyzed by analytical and Monte Carlo approaches. Based on the measurement of detector energy and position resolution, the expected angular resolution is approximately 3 degree and approximately 2 degrees for a +/- 30 degrees FOV for 511 keV and 1 MeV (gamma) -rays, respectively. The intrinsic efficiency for a point source 10 cm from the first detector surface ranges from 1.5 X 10-4 to 8.8 X 10-6 for 500 keV to 3 MeV.

  3. The role of 3d electrons in the appearance of ferromagnetism in the antiferromagnetic Ru2MnGe Heusler compound: a magnetic Compton scattering study.

    PubMed

    Mizusaki, S; Ohnishi, T; Douzono, A; Hirose, M; Nagata, Y; Itou, M; Sakurai, Y; Ozawa, T C; Samata, H; Noro, Y

    2012-06-27

    The antiferromagnetism in Ru(2)MnGe can be suppressed by the substitution of V by Mn and ferromagnetism appears. Synchrotron-based magnetic Compton scattering experiments are used in order to investigates the role of 3d electrons in the indirect/direct exchange interactions for the appearance of ferromagnetism. A small spin moment for the itinerant electron part on the magnetic Compton profile indicates that the metallic ferromagnet Ru(2)Mn(0.5)V(0.5)Ge has a weak indirect exchange interaction between the d-like and sp-like (itinerant) electrons. This suggests that the appearance of ferromagnetism is caused by the enhancement of the direct exchange interactions between d-d electrons in the Ru(2)MnGe Heusler compound. These findings indicate that the indirect exchange interaction between itinerant electrons and localized electrons is a significant key point for the appearance of ferromagnetism in this system.

  4. Timelike Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkrtchyan, Arthur; Albayrak, Ibrahim; Horn, Tanja; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel

    2015-04-01

    Deeply Virtual Comtpon Scattering (DVCS) is deemed the simplest and cleanest way to access the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) of the nucleon. The DVCS process interferes with the Bethe-Heitler process allowing one to access the DVCS amplitudes. The imaginary part of the Compton amplitude is now relatively well understood, primarily through measurements of DVCS. However, much less is known about the real part of the amplitude. Time-like Compton Scattering (TCS) is the inverse process of DVCS and provides a new and promising way for probing the real part of the amplitude, and so constraining GPDs. Comparing data from Time-like Compton Scattering and the space-like DVCS process will also allow for testing the universality of GPDs. First studies of TCS using real tagged and quasi-real untagged photons were carried out at Jefferson Lab 6 GeV. In this talk, preliminary results on asymmetries and extraction of the real part of the CFF using photoproduction data and a comparison to electroproduction data will be presented. We will also discuss future plans for dilepton production at Jefferson Lab 12 GeV. Supported in part by NSF Grant PHY-1306227.

  5. Measurements of Polarization Transfers in Real Compton Scattering by a proton target at JLAB. A new source of information on the 3D shape of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Cristiano V.

    2015-03-01

    In this thesis work, results of the analysis of the polarization transfers measured in real Compton scattering (RCS) by the Collaboration E07-002 at the Je fferson Lab Hall-C are presented. The data were collected at large scattering angle (theta_cm = 70deg) and with a polarized incident photon beam at an average energy of 3.8 GeV. Such a kind of experiments allows one to understand more deeply the reaction mechanism, that involves a real photon, by extracting both Compton form factors and Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) (also relevant for possibly shedding light on the total angular momentum of the nucleon). The obtained results for the longitudinal and transverse polarization transfers K_LL and K_LT, are of crucial importance, since they confirm unambiguously the disagreement between experimental data and pQCD prediction, as it was found in E99-114 experiment, and favor the Handbag mechanism. The E99-114 and E07-002 results can contribute to attract new interest on the great yield of the Compton scattering by a nucleon target, as demonstrated by the recent approval of an experimental proposal submitted to the Jefferson Lab PAC 42 for a Wide-angle Compton Scattering experiment, at 8 and 10 GeV Photon Energies. The new experiments approved to run with the updated 12 GeV electron beam at JLab, are characterized by much higher luminosities, and a new GEM tracker is under development to tackle the challenging backgrounds. Within this context, we present a new multistep tracking algorithm, based on (i) a Neural Network (NN) designed for a fast and efficient association of the hits measured by the GEM detector which allows the track identification, and (ii) the application of both a Kalman filter and Rauch-Tung-Striebel smoother to further improve the track reconstruction. The full procedure, i.e. NN and filtering, appears very promising, with high performances in terms of both association effciency and reconstruction accuracy, and these preliminary results will

  6. Timelike Compton Scattering at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Paremuzyan, Rafayel G.

    2014-01-01

    It is demonstrated, that with exclusive final state, data from electron scattering experiments that are recorded with loose trigger requirements can be used to analyze photoproduction reactions. A preliminary results on Timelike Compton Scattering using the electroproduction data from the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab are presented. In particular, using final state (pe{sup -}e{sup +}) photoproduction of vector mesons and timelike photon is studied. Angular asymmetries in Timelike Compton Scattering region is compared with model predictions in the framework of Generalized Parton Distribution.

  7. Compton scattering and generalized polarizabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, S.

    2005-05-06

    In recent years, real and virtual Compton scattering off the nucleon have attracted considerable interest from both the experimental and theoretical sides. Real Compton scattering gives access to the so-called electromagnetic polarizabilities containing the structure information beyond the global properties of the nucleon such as its charge, mass, and magnetic moment. These polarizabilities have an intuitive interpretation in terms of induced dipole moments and thus characterize the response of the constituents of the nucleon to a soft external stimulus. The virtual Compton scattering reaction e- p {yields} e- p{gamma} allows one to map out the local response to external fields and can be described in terms of generalized electromagnetic polarizabilities. A simple classical interpretation in terms of the induced electric and magnetic polarization densities is proposed. We will discuss experimental results for the polarizabilities of the proton and compare them with theoretical predictions.

  8. Compton scattering with low intensity radioactive sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarles, Carroll

    2012-03-01

    Compton scattering experiments with gamma rays typically require a ``hot'' source (˜5mCi of Cs137) to observe the scattering as a function of angle. (See Ortec AN34 Experiment #10 Compton Scattering) Here a way is described to investigate Compton scattering with micro Curie level radioactive sources that are more commonly available in the undergraduate laboratory. A vertical-looking 2 inch coaxial hpGe detector, collimated with a 2 inch thick lead shield, was used. Cylindrical Al targets of various thicknesses were placed over the collimator and several available sources were placed around the target so that the average Compton scattering angle into the collimator was 90 deg. A peak could be observed at the expected energy for 90 deg. Compton scattering by doing 24 hour target-in minus target-out runs. The peak was broadened by the spread in the scattering angle due to the variation in the angle of the incoming gamma ray and the angular acceptance of the collimator. A rough analysis can be done by modeling the angular spread due to the geometry and correcting for the gamma ray absorption from the target center. Various target materials and sources can be used and some variation in average Compton scattering angle can be obtained by adjusting the geometry of the source and target.

  9. HEROIC: 3D general relativistic radiative post-processor with comptonization for black hole accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Ramesh; Zhu, Yucong; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Saḑowski, Aleksander

    2016-03-01

    We describe Hybrid Evaluator for Radiative Objects Including Comptonization (HEROIC), an upgraded version of the relativistic radiative post-processor code HERO described in a previous paper, but which now Includes Comptonization. HEROIC models Comptonization via the Kompaneets equation, using a quadratic approximation for the source function in a short characteristics radiation solver. It employs a simple form of accelerated lambda iteration to handle regions of high scattering opacity. In addition to solving for the radiation field, HEROIC also solves for the gas temperature by applying the condition of radiative equilibrium. We present benchmarks and tests of the Comptonization module in HEROIC with simple 1D and 3D scattering problems. We also test the ability of the code to handle various relativistic effects using model atmospheres and accretion flows in a black hole space-time. We present two applications of HEROIC to general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics simulations of accretion discs. One application is to a thin accretion disc around a black hole. We find that the gas below the photosphere in the multidimensional HEROIC solution is nearly isothermal, quite different from previous solutions based on 1D plane parallel atmospheres. The second application is to a geometrically thick radiation-dominated accretion disc accreting at 11 times the Eddington rate. Here, the multidimensional HEROIC solution shows that, for observers who are on axis and look down the polar funnel, the isotropic equivalent luminosity could be more than 10 times the Eddington limit, even though the spectrum might still look thermal and show no signs of relativistic beaming.

  10. A Compton scatter attenuation gamma ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    A Compton scatter attenuation gamma ray spectrometer conceptual design is discussed for performing gamma spectral measurements in monodirectional gamma fields from 100 R per hour to 1,000,000 R per hour. Selectable Compton targets are used to scatter gamma photons onto an otherwise heavily shielded detector with changeable scattering efficiencies such that the count rate is maintained between 500 and 10,000 per second. Use of two sum-Compton coincident detectors, one for energies up to 1.5 MeV and the other for 600 keV to 10 MeV, will allow good peak to tail pulse height ratios to be obtained over the entire spectrum and reduces the neutron recoil background rate.

  11. Neutron Compton scattering from selectively deuterated acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanderlingh, U. N.; Fielding, A. L.; Middendorf, H. D.

    With the aim of developing the application of neutron Compton scattering (NCS) to molecular systems of biophysical interest, we are using the Compton spectrometer EVS at ISIS to characterize the momentum distribution of protons in peptide groups. In this contribution we present NCS measurements of the recoil peak (Compton profile) due to the amide proton in otherwise fully deuterated acetanilide (ACN), a widely studied model system for H-bonding and energy transfer in biomolecules. We obtain values for the average width of the potential well of the amide proton and its mean kinetic energy. Deviations from the Gaussian form of the Compton profile, analyzed on the basis of an expansion due to Sears, provide data relating to the Laplacian of the proton potential.

  12. Timelike Compton Scattering - A First Look (CLAS)

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel Nadel-Turonski

    2009-12-01

    A major goal of the 12 GeV upgrade at Jefferson Lab is to map out the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) in the valence region. This is primarily done through Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS), which provides the simplest and cleanest way of accessing the GPDs. However, the “inverse” process, Timelike Compton Scattering (TCS), can provide an important complement, in particular formeasuring the real part of the amplitude and understanding corrections at finite Q2. The first measurements of TCS have recently been carried out in Hall B at Jefferson Lab, using both tagged and untagged photon beams.

  13. Compton Scattering Sources and Applications at LLNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Felicie; Anderson, S. G.; Anderson, G.; Bayramian, A.; Betts, S. M.; Cross, R. R.; Ebbers, C. A.; Gibson, D. J.; Marsh, R. A.; Messerly, M.; Shverdin, M. Y.; Wu, S. S.; Hartemann, F. V.; Scarpetti, R.; Siders, C. W.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2010-11-01

    We report the design and current status of a monoenergetic laser-based Compton scattering 0.5-2.5 MeV γ-ray source. Previous nuclear resonance fluorescence results and future linac and laser developments for the source are presented.

  14. Compton scattering tomography in soil compaction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogun, F. A.; Cruvinel, P. E.

    2003-06-01

    Compton scattering imaging technique is investigated as a possible tool in soil density distribution mapping for agricultural purposes. In Compton scattering tomography, the number of photons that had been inelastically scattered from a well-defined volume of a sample is employed as a non-destructive technique to display soil density distribution. Images are also shown, of soil samples, at two closely related densities. Good contrast is recorded between the various inserts and their host matrix. Line scans through the images showed good contrast resolution, shape and edge definition. Spatial resolution could be enhanced by the use of a focussing collimator on the detector. This will also serve to increase the solid angle subtended at the detector by the scattering volume, with a possible reduction in counting time at the same precision level.

  15. Nonlinear Brightness Optimization in Compton Scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Hartemann, Fred V.; Wu, Sheldon S. Q.

    2013-07-26

    In Compton scattering light sources, a laser pulse is scattered by a relativistic electron beam to generate tunable x and gamma rays. Because of the inhomogeneous nature of the incident radiation, the relativistic Lorentz boost of the electrons is modulated by the ponderomotive force during the interaction, leading to intrinsic spectral broadening and brightness limitations. We discuss these effects, along with an optimization strategy to properly balance the laser bandwidth, diffraction, and nonlinear ponderomotive force.

  16. Experimental confirmation of neoclassical Compton scattering theory

    SciTech Connect

    Aristov, V. V.; Yakunin, S. N.; Despotuli, A. A.

    2013-12-15

    Incoherent X-ray scattering spectra of diamond and silicon crystals recorded on the BESSY-2 electron storage ring have been analyzed. All spectral features are described well in terms of the neoclassical scattering theory without consideration for the hypotheses accepted in quantum electrodynamics. It is noted that the accepted tabular data on the intensity ratio between the Compton and Rayleigh spectral components may significantly differ from the experimental values. It is concluded that the development of the general theory (considering coherent scattering, incoherent scattering, and Bragg diffraction) must be continued.

  17. Induced Compton-scattering effects in radiation-transport approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, D.R. Jr.

    1982-02-01

    The method of characteristics is used to solve radiation transport problems with induced Compton scattering effects included. The methods used to date have only addressed problems in which either induced Compton scattering is ignored, or problems in which linear scattering is ignored. Also, problems which include both induced Compton scattering and spatial effects have not been considered previously. The introduction of induced scattering into the radiation transport equation results in a quadratic nonlinearity. Methods are developed to solve problems in which both linear and nonlinear Compton scattering are important. Solutions to scattering problems are found for a variety of initial photon energy distributions.

  18. Monte Carlo study of a 3D Compton imaging device with GEANT4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenti, M.; Veltri, M.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper we investigate, with a detailed Monte Carlo simulation based on Geant4, the novel approach of Lenti (2008) [1] to 3D imaging with photon scattering. A monochromatic and well collimated gamma beam is used to illuminate the object to be imaged and the photons Compton scattered are detected by means of a surrounding germanium strip detector. The impact position and the energy of the photons are measured with high precision and the scattering position along the beam axis is calculated. We study as an application of this technique the case of brain imaging but the results can be applied as well to situations where a lighter object, with localized variations of density, is embedded in a denser container. We report here the attainable sensitivity in the detection of density variations as a function of the beam energy, the depth inside the object and size and density of the inclusions. Using a 600 keV gamma beam, for an inclusion with a density increase of 30% with respect to the surrounding tissue and thickness along the beam of 5 mm, we obtain at midbrain position a resolution of about 2 mm and a contrast of 12%. In addition the simulation indicates that for the same gamma beam energy a complete brain scan would result in an effective dose of about 1 mSv.

  19. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    F.X. Girod

    2007-12-17

    The beam spin asymmetries of the reaction ep -> epg in the Bjorken regime were measured over a wide kinematical domain using the CLAS detector and a new lead-tungstate calorimeter. Through the interference of the Bethe-Heitler process with Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering, those asymmetries provide constraints for the nucleon Generalized Parton Distributions models. The observed shapes are in agreement with twist-2 dominance predictions.

  20. Deeply virtual Compton scattering off nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Voutier, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) is the golden exclusive channel for the study of the partonic structure of hadrons, within the universal framework of generalized parton distributions (GPDs). This paper presents the aim and general ideas of the DVCS experimental program off nuclei at the Jefferson Laboratory. The benefits of the study of the coherent and incoherent channels to the understanding of the EMC (European Muon Collaboration) effect are discussed, along with the case of nuclear targets to access neutron GPDs.

  1. Compton scattering gamma-ray source optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartemann, Frederic; Wu, Sheldon; Albert, Félicie; Barty, Chris

    2012-10-01

    The interaction of a bright relativistic electron beam with an intense laser pulse via Compton scattering can generate tunable gamma-rays for precision nuclear photonics applications. The properties of the gamma-ray phase space will be outlined, in relation with the 6D electron bunch and 6D laser pulse phase space, along with collimation, nonlinear effects and other sources of spectral broadening. Optimization strategies will be outlines within the context of nuclear photonics applications.

  2. Non-linear Compton Scattering in Short Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajewska, Katarzyna; Kamiński, Jerzy

    2012-06-01

    The generation of short X-ray laser pulses attracts a great deal of attention. One of mechanisms to achieve this goal is the non-linear Compton scattering at very high laser powers. The majority of previous works on the non-linear Compton scattering have been devoted to the case when the incident laser field is treated as a monochromatic plane wave. There is, however, recent interest in analyzing the effect of a pulsed laser field on the non-linear Compton scattering [1-4]. We study the process for different durations of the incident laser pulse and compare it with the results for both a plane wave laser field and a laser pulse train. [4pt] [1] M. Boca and V. Florescu, Phys. Rev. A 80, 053403 (2009).[0pt] [2] M. Boca and V. Florescu, Eur. Phys. J. D 61, 446 (2011).[0pt] [3] D. Seipt and B. Kämpfer, Phys. Rev. A 83, 022101 (2011).[0pt] [4] F. Mackenroth and A. Di Piazza, Phys. Rev. A 83, 032106 (2011).

  3. Compton scattering in ignited thermonuclear plasmas.

    PubMed

    Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2008-03-28

    Inertially confined, ignited thermonuclear D-T plasmas will produce intense blackbody radiation at temperatures T greater, similar20 keV; it is shown that the injection of GeV electrons into the burning core can efficiently generate high-energy Compton scattering photons. Moreover, the spectrum scattered in a small solid angle can be remarkably monochromatic, due to kinematic pileup; a peak brightness in excess of 10;{30} photons/(mm(2) mrad(2) s 0.1% bandwidth) is predicted. These results are discussed within the context of the Schwinger field and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect.

  4. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off the neutron

    SciTech Connect

    M. Mazouz; A. Camsonne; C. Munoz Camacho; C. Ferdi; G. Gavalian; E. Kuchina; M. Amarian; K. A. Aniol; M. Beaumel; H. Benaoum; P. Bertin; M. Brossard; J.-P. Chen; E. Chudakov; B. Craver; F. Cusanno; C.W. de Jager; A. Deur; R. Feuerbach; J.-M. Fieschi; S. Frullani; M. Garcon; F. Garibaldi; O. Gayou; R. Gilman; J. Gomez; P. Gueye; P.A.M. Guichon; B. Guillon; O. Hansen; D. Hayes; D. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; C.E. Hyde; H. Ibrahim; R. Igarashi; X. Jiang; H.S. Jo; L.J. Kaufman; A. Kelleher; A. Kolarkar; G. Kumbartzki; G. Laveissiere; J.J. LeRose; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; H.-J. Lu; D.J. Margaziotis; Z.-E. Meziani; K. McCormick; R. Michaels; B. Michel; B. Moffit; P. Monaghan; S. Nanda; V. Nelyubin; M. Potokar; Y. Qiang; R.D. Ransome; J.-S. Real; B. Reitz; Y. Roblin; J. Roche; F. Sabatie; A. Saha; S. Sirca; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; R. Subedi; V. Sulkosky; P.E. Ulmer; E. Voutier; K. Wang; L.B. Weinstein; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Zheng; L. Zhu

    2007-12-01

    The present experiment exploits the interference between the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and the Bethe-Heitler processes to extract the imaginary part of DVCS amplitudes on the neutron and on the deuteron from the helicity-dependent D$({\\vec e},e'\\gamma)X$ cross section measured at $Q^2$=1.9 GeV$^2$ and $x_B$=0.36. We extract a linear combination of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) particularly sensitive to $E_q$, the least constrained GPD. A model dependent constraint on the contribution of the up and down quarks to the nucleon spin is deduced.

  5. Biophysical applications of neutron Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanderlingh, U. N.; Albergamo, F.; Hayward, R. L.; Middendorf, H. D.

    Neutron Compton scattering (NCS) can be applied to measuring nuclear momentum distributions and potential parameters in molecules of biophysical interest. We discuss the analysis of NCS spectra from peptide models, focusing on the characterisation of the amide proton dynamics in terms of the width of the H-bond potential well, its Laplacian, and the mean kinetic energy of the proton. The Sears expansion is used to quantify deviations from the high-Q limit (impulse approximation), and line-shape asymmetry parameters are evaluated in terms of Hermite polynomials. Results on NCS from selectively deuterated acetanilide are used to illustrate this approach.

  6. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off the Neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Mazouz, M.; Guillon, B.; Real, J.-S.; Voutier, E.

    2007-12-14

    The present experiment exploits the interference between the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) and the Bethe-Heitler processes to extract the imaginary part of DVCS amplitudes on the neutron and on the deuteron from the helicity-dependent D(e-vector,e{sup '}{gamma})X cross section measured at Q{sup 2}=1.9 GeV{sup 2} and x{sub B}=0.36. We extract a linear combination of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) particularly sensitive to E{sub q}, the least constrained GPD. A model dependent constraint on the contribution of the up and down quarks to the nucleon spin is deduced.

  7. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joosten, Sylvester; CLAS Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The European Muon Collaboration (EMC) observed the first signs of a modification of the partonic structure of the nucleon when present in a nuclear medium. The precise nature of these effects, as well as their underlying cause, is yet to be determined. The generalized parton distribution (GPD) framework provides a powerful tool to study the partonic structure of nucleons inside a nucleus. Hard exclusive leptoproduction of a real photon off a nucleon, deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS), is presently considered the cleanest experimental access to the GPDs, through the Compton form factors (CFFs). This is especially the case for scattering off the spin-zero helium nucleus, where only a single CFF contributes to the process. The real and imaginary parts of this CFF can be constrained through the beam-spin asymmetry (BSA). We will present the first measurements of the DVCS process off 4He using the CEBAF 6 GeV polarized electron beam and the CLAS detector at JLab. The CLAS detector was supplemented with an inner electromagnetic calorimeter for photons produced at small angles, as well as a radial time projection chamber (RTPC) to detect low-energy recoil nuclei. This setup allowed for a clean measurement of the BSA in both the coherent and incoherent channels.

  8. Compton coincidence volumetric imaging: a new x-ray volumetric imaging modality based on Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaochao

    2014-03-01

    Compton scattering is a dominant interaction during radiography and computed tomography x-ray imaging. However, the scattered photons are not used for extracting imaging information, but seriously degrade image quality. Here we introduce a new scheme that overcomes most of the problems associated with existing Compton scattering imaging schemes and allows Compton scattered photons to be effectively used for imaging. In our scheme, referred as Compton coincidence volumetric imaging (CCVI), a collimated monoenergetic x-ray beam is directed onto a thin semiconductor detector. A small portion of the photons is Compton scattered by the detector and their energy loss is detected. Some of the scattered photons intersect the imaging object, where they are Compton scattered a second time. The finally scattered photons are recorded by an areal energy resolving detector panel around the object. The two detectors work in coincidence mode. CCVI images the spatial electron density distribution in the imaging object. Similar to PET imaging, the event location can be located within a curve; therefore the imaging reconstruction algorithms are also similar to those of PET. Two statistical iterative imaging reconstruction algorithms are tested. Our study verifies the feasibility of CCVI in imaging acquisition and reconstruction. Various aspects of CCVI are discussed. If successfully implemented, it will offer a great potential for imaging dose reduction compared with x-ray CT. Furthermore, a CCVI modality will have no moving parts, which potentially offers cost reduction and faster imaging speed.

  9. Evidence for virtual Compton scattering from the proton

    SciTech Connect

    van den Brand, J.F.J.; Ent, R.; Anthony, P.L.; Arnold, R.G.; Arrington, J.; Beise, E.J.; Belz, J.E.; Bosted, P.E.; Bulten, H.; Chapman, M.S.; Coulter, K.P.; Dietrich, F.S.; Epstein, M.; Filippone, B.W.; Gao, H.; Gearhart, R.A.; Geesaman, D.F.; Hansen, J.; Holt, R.J.; Jackson, H.E.; Jones, C.E.; Keppel, C.E.; Kinney, E.R.; Kuhn, S.; Lee, K.; Lorenzon, W.; Lung, A.; Makins, N.C.R.; Margaziotis, D.J.; McKeown, R.D.; Milner, R.G.; Mueller, B.; Napolitano, J.; Nelson, J.; O`Neill, T.G.; Papavassiliou, V.; Petratos, G.G.; Potterveld, D.H.; Rock, S.E.; Spengos, M.; Szalata, Z.M.; Tao, L.H.; van Bibber, K.; Wasson, D.A.; White, J.L.; Zeidman, B. ||||||||||

    1995-11-01

    In virtual Compton scattering an electron is scattered off a nucleon such that the nucleon emits a photon. We show that these events can be selected experimentally, and present the first evidence for virtual Compton scattering from the proton in data obtained at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The angular and energy dependence of the data is well described by a calculation that includes the coherent sum of electron and proton radiation.

  10. Generalized poisson 3-D scatterer distributions.

    PubMed

    Laporte, Catherine; Clark, James J; Arbel, Tal

    2009-02-01

    This paper describes a simple, yet powerful ultrasound scatterer distribution model. The model extends a 1-D generalized Poisson process to multiple dimensions using a Hilbert curve. The model is intuitively tuned by spatial density and regularity parameters which reliably predict the first and second-order statistics of varied synthetic imagery. PMID:19251530

  11. Inverse compton scattering gamma ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, S.; Frigola, P.; Murokh, A.; Ruelas, M.; Jovanovic, I.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Travish, G.

    2009-09-01

    Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) (e.g. U-235, Pu-239) can be detected by active interrogation with gamma rays (>6 MeV) through photofission. For long-range detection (˜1 km), an intense beam of gamma rays (˜10 14 per second) is required in order to produce measurable number of neutrons. The production of such fluxes of gamma rays, and in the pulse formats useful for detection, presents many technical challenges, and requires novel approaches to the accelerator and laser technology. RadiaBeam is currently designing a gamma ray source based on Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) from a high-energy electron beam. To achieve this, improvements in photoinjector, linac, final focus, and laser system are planned. These enhanced sub-systems build on parallel work being performed at RadiaBeam, UCLA, and elsewhere. A high-repetition rate photoinjector, a high-gradient S-band linac, and a laser pulse recirculator will be used. The proposed system will be a transportable source of high-flux, high-energy quasi-monochromatic gamma rays for active interrogation of special nuclear materials.

  12. Scaling limit of deeply virtual Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    A. Radyushkin

    2000-07-01

    The author outlines a perturbative QCD approach to the analysis of the deeply virtual Compton scattering process {gamma}{sup *}p {r_arrow} {gamma}p{prime} in the limit of vanishing momentum transfer t=(p{prime}{minus}p){sup 2}. The DVCS amplitude in this limit exhibits a scaling behavior described by a two-argument distributions F(x,y) which specify the fractions of the initial momentum p and the momentum transfer r {equivalent_to} p{prime}{minus}p carried by the constituents of the nucleon. The kernel R(x,y;{xi},{eta}) governing the evolution of the non-forward distributions F(x,y) has a remarkable property: it produces the GLAPD evolution kernel P(x/{xi}) when integrated over y and reduces to the Brodsky-Lepage evolution kernel V(y,{eta}) after the x-integration. This property is used to construct the solution of the one-loop evolution equation for the flavor non-singlet part of the non-forward quark distribution.

  13. Compact Laser Technology for Compton Scattering Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shverdin, M.; Albert, F.; Anderson, S. G.; Bayramian, A.; Betts, S. M.; Ebbers, C.; Gibson, D.; Messerly, M.; Hartemann, F. V.; Siders, C. W.; McNabb, D. P.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2009-11-01

    We describe compact laser technology for Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering light source at LLNL. The high energy, 120W interaction laser utilizes chirped pulse amplification (CPA) in Nd:YAG to amplify a sub-nanometer bandwidth 20 μJ pulses from a fiber system to 1J. A novel pulse stretcher provides a dispersion of over 7000ps/nm to expand a several picosecond wide seed pulse to 6ns. After amplification, the pulse is recompressed to 10ps with a hyper-dispersive pulse compressor. We also describe a technique for over an order of magnitude increase in the generated gamma-ray flux by recirculation of the interaction laser pulse. This technique, termed Recirculation Injection by Nonlinear Gating (RING), consists of frequency doubling the incident laser pulse inside a dichroic mirror cavity. The resonator mirrors transmit at 1φ and reflect at 2φ. The 2^nd harmonic of the incident pulse then becomes trapped inside the cavity. To date, we demonstrated 14 times cavity enhancement of 180mJ, 10ps, 532nm laser pulses.

  14. NDE of spacecraft materials using 3D Compton backscatter x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, E. R.; Grubsky, V.; Romanov, V.; Shoemaker, K.

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of testing of the NDE performance of a Compton Imaging Tomography (CIT) system for single-sided, penetrating 3D inspection. The system was recently developed by Physical Optics Corporation (POC) and delivered to NASA for testing and evaluation. The CIT technology is based on 3D structure mapping by collecting the information on density profiles in multiple object cross sections through hard x-ray Compton backscatter imaging. The individual cross sections are processed and fused together in software, generating a 3D map of the density profile of the object which can then be analyzed slice-by-slice in x, y, or z directions. The developed CIT scanner is based on a 200-kV x-ray source, flat-panel x-ray detector (FPD), and apodized x-ray imaging optics. The CIT technology is particularly well suited to the NDE of lightweight aerospace materials, such as the thermal protection system (TPS) ceramic and composite materials, micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shielding, spacecraft pressure walls, inflatable habitat structures, composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), and aluminum honeycomb materials. The current system provides 3D localization of defects and features with field of view 20x12x8 cm3 and spatial resolution ˜2 mm. In this paper, we review several aerospace NDE applications of the CIT technology, with particular emphasis on TPS. Based on the analysis of the testing results, we provide recommendations for continued development on TPS applications that can benefit the most from the unique capabilities of this new NDE technology.

  15. Scattering robust 3D reconstruction via polarized transient imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rihui; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Feng; Zhang, Yongdong; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-09-01

    Reconstructing 3D structure of scenes in the scattering medium is a challenging task with great research value. Existing techniques often impose strong assumptions on the scattering behaviors and are of limited performance. Recently, a low-cost transient imaging system has provided a feasible way to resolve the scene depth, by detecting the reflection instant on the time profile of a surface point. However, in cases with scattering medium, the rays are both reflected and scattered during transmission, and the depth calculated from the time profile largely deviates from the true value. To handle this problem, we used the different polarization behaviors of the reflection and scattering components, and introduced active polarization to separate the reflection component to estimate the scattering robust depth. Our experiments have demonstrated that our approach can accurately reconstruct the 3D structure underlying the scattering medium. PMID:27607944

  16. Nucleon Compton scattering in the Dyson-Schwinger approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, Gernot; Fischer, Christian S.

    2013-02-01

    We analyze the nucleon’s Compton scattering amplitude in the Dyson-Schwinger/Faddeev approach. We calculate a subset of diagrams that implements the nonperturbative handbag contribution as well as all t-channel resonances. At the quark level, these ingredients are represented by the quark Compton vertex whose analytic properties we study in detail. We derive a general form for a fermion two-photon vertex that is consistent with its Ward-Takahashi identities and free of kinematic singularities, and we relate its transverse part to the on-shell nucleon Compton amplitude. We solve an inhomogeneous Bethe-Salpeter equation for the quark Compton vertex in rainbow-ladder truncation and implement it in the nucleon Compton scattering amplitude. The remaining ingredients are the dressed quark propagator and the nucleon’s bound-state amplitude which are consistently solved from Dyson-Schwinger and covariant Faddeev equations. We verify numerically that the resulting quark Compton vertex and nucleon Compton amplitude both reproduce the πγγ transition form factor when the pion pole in the t channel is approached.

  17. Ultra-fast hybrid CPU-GPU multiple scatter simulation for 3-D PET.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Sang; Son, Young Don; Cho, Zang Hee; Ra, Jong Beom; Ye, Jong Chul

    2014-01-01

    Scatter correction is very important in 3-D PET reconstruction due to a large scatter contribution in measurements. Currently, one of the most popular methods is the so-called single scatter simulation (SSS), which considers single Compton scattering contributions from many randomly distributed scatter points. The SSS enables a fast calculation of scattering with a relatively high accuracy; however, the accuracy of SSS is dependent on the accuracy of tail fitting to find a correct scaling factor, which is often difficult in low photon count measurements. To overcome this drawback as well as to improve accuracy of scatter estimation by incorporating multiple scattering contribution, we propose a multiple scatter simulation (MSS) based on a simplified Monte Carlo (MC) simulation that considers photon migration and interactions due to photoelectric absorption and Compton scattering. Unlike the SSS, the MSS calculates a scaling factor by comparing simulated prompt data with the measured data in the whole volume, which enables a more robust estimation of a scaling factor. Even though the proposed MSS is based on MC, a significant acceleration of the computational time is possible by using a virtual detector array with a larger pitch by exploiting that the scatter distribution varies slowly in spatial domain. Furthermore, our MSS implementation is nicely fit to a parallel implementation using graphic processor unit (GPU). In particular, we exploit a hybrid CPU-GPU technique using the open multiprocessing and the compute unified device architecture, which results in 128.3 times faster than using a single CPU. Overall, the computational time of MSS is 9.4 s for a high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT) system. The performance of the proposed MSS is validated through actual experiments using an HRRT.

  18. Compton scattering by a pion and off-shell effects

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, S.; Fearing, H.W. )

    1995-01-01

    We consider Compton scattering by a pion in the framework of chiral perturbation theory. We investigate off-shell effects in the [ital s]- and [ital u]-channel pole diagrams. For that purpose we perform a field transformation which, in comparison with the standard Gasser and Leutwyler Lagrangian, generates additional terms at order [ital p][sup 4] proportional to the lowest-order equation of motion. As a result of the equivalence theorem the two Lagrangians predict the same Compton scattering [ital S]-matrix even though they generate different off-shell form factors. We conclude that off-shell effects are not only model dependent but also representation dependent.

  19. Spin and orbital magnetization loops obtained using magnetic Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.; Koizumi, A.

    2013-02-25

    We present an application of magnetic Compton scattering (MCS) to decompose a total magnetization loop into spin and orbital magnetization contributions. A spin magnetization loop of SmAl{sub 2} was measured by recording the intensity of magnetic Compton scattering as a function of applied magnetic field. Comparing the spin magnetization loop with the total magnetization one measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer, the orbital magnetization loop was obtained. The data display an anti-coupled behavior between the spin and orbital magnetizations and confirm that the orbital part dominates the magnetization.

  20. Low-intensity nonlinear spectral effects in compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Hartemann, Frederic V; Albert, Félicie; Siders, Craig W; Barty, C P J

    2010-09-24

    Nonlinear effects are known to occur in Compton scattering light sources, when the laser normalized potential A approaches unity. In this Letter, it is shown that nonlinear spectral features can appear at arbitrarily low values of A, if the fractional bandwidth of the laser pulse Δϕ⁻¹ is sufficiently small to satisfy A²Δϕ≃1. A three-dimensional analysis, based on a local plane wave, slow-varying envelope approximation, enables the study of these effects for realistic interactions between an electron beam and a laser pulse, and their influence on high-precision Compton scattering light sources.

  1. Low-Intensity Nonlinear Spectral Effects in Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Albert, Félicie; Siders, Craig W.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2010-09-01

    Nonlinear effects are known to occur in Compton scattering light sources, when the laser normalized potential A approaches unity. In this Letter, it is shown that nonlinear spectral features can appear at arbitrarily low values of A, if the fractional bandwidth of the laser pulse Δϕ-1 is sufficiently small to satisfy A2Δϕ≃1. A three-dimensional analysis, based on a local plane wave, slow-varying envelope approximation, enables the study of these effects for realistic interactions between an electron beam and a laser pulse, and their influence on high-precision Compton scattering light sources.

  2. Low-intensity nonlinear spectral effects in compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Hartemann, Frederic V; Albert, Félicie; Siders, Craig W; Barty, C P J

    2010-09-24

    Nonlinear effects are known to occur in Compton scattering light sources, when the laser normalized potential A approaches unity. In this Letter, it is shown that nonlinear spectral features can appear at arbitrarily low values of A, if the fractional bandwidth of the laser pulse Δϕ⁻¹ is sufficiently small to satisfy A²Δϕ≃1. A three-dimensional analysis, based on a local plane wave, slow-varying envelope approximation, enables the study of these effects for realistic interactions between an electron beam and a laser pulse, and their influence on high-precision Compton scattering light sources. PMID:21230757

  3. Unified ab initio treatment of attosecond photoionization and Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, G. L.; Bondar, D. I.; Patchkovskii, S.; Corkum, P. B.; Bandrauk, A. D.

    2009-10-01

    We present a new theoretical approach to attosecond laser-assisted photo- and Compton ionization. Attosecond x-ray absorption and scattering are described by \\hat{\\mathscr{S}}^{(1,2)} -matrices, which are coherent superpositions of 'monochromatic' \\skew{3}\\hat{S}^{(1,2)} -matrices in a laser-modified Furry representation. Besides refining the existing theory of the soft x-ray photoelectron attosecond streak camera and spectral phase interferometry (ASC and ASPI), we formulate a theory of hard x-ray photoelectron and Compton ASC and ASPI. The resulting scheme has a simple structure and leads to closed-form expressions for ionization amplitudes. We investigate Compton electron interference in the separable Coulomb-Volkov continuum with both Coulomb and laser fields treated non-perturbatively. We find that at laser-field intensities below 1013 Wcm-2 normalized Compton lines almost coincide with the lines obtained in the laser-free regime. At higher intensities, attosecond interferences survive integration over electron momenta, and feature prominently in the Compton lines themselves. We define a regime where the electron ground-state density can be measured with controllable accuracy in an attosecond time interval. The new theory provides a firm basis for extracting photo- and Compton electron phases and atomic and molecular wavefunctions from experimental data.

  4. New JLab/Hall A Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering results

    SciTech Connect

    Defurne, Maxime

    2015-08-01

    New data points for unpolarized Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering cross sections have been extracted from the E00-110 experiment at Q2=1.9 GeV2 effectively doubling the statistics available in the valence region. A careful study of systematic uncertainties has been performed.

  5. An electromagnetic calorimeter for the JLab real compton scattering experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, D J; Wojtsekhowski, B; Annand, J.R. M.; Chang, T -H; Chudakov, E; Danagoulian, A; Degtyarenko, P; Egiyan, K; Gilman, R; Gorbenko, V; Hines, J; Hovhannisyan, E; Hyde-Wright, C E; de Jager, C W; Ketikyan, A; Mamyan, V H; Michaels, R; Natham, A M; Nelyubin, V; Rachek, I; Roedelbrom, M; Petrosyan, A; Pomatsalyuk, R; Popov, V; Segal, J; Shestakov, Y; Templon, J; Voskanyan, H

    2011-07-01

    A lead–glass hodoscope calorimeter that was constructed for use in the Jefferson Lab Real Compton Scattering experiment is described. The detector provides a measurement of the coordinates and the energy of scattered photons in the GeV energy range with resolutions of 5 mm and 6%/View the MathML source. Features of both the detector design and its performance in the high luminosity environment during the experiment are presented.

  6. Advanced Compton scattering light source R&D at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Anderson, G; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Gibson, D J; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M; Shverdin, M Y; Wu, S; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P

    2010-02-16

    We report the design and current status of a monoenergetic laser-based Compton scattering 0.5-2.5 MeV {gamma}-ray source. Previous nuclear resonance fluorescence results and future linac and laser developments for the source are presented. At MeV photon energies relevant for nuclear processes, Compton scattering light sources are attractive because of their relative compactness and improved brightness above 100 keV, compared to typical 4th generation synchrotrons. Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of tunable Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A new precision, tunable gamma-ray source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development and construction at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by an X-band linac designed in collaboration with SLAC will interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps, diode-pumped CPA laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. Based on the success of the previous Thomson-Radiated Extreme X-rays (T-REX) Compton scattering source at LLNL, the source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence lines in various isotopes; applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. After a brief presentation of successful nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) experiments done with T-REX, the new source design, key parameters, and current status are presented.

  7. Generalized parton distributions from deep virtual compton scattering at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Guidal, M.

    2010-04-24

    Here, we have analyzed the beam spin asymmetry and the longitudinally polarized target spin asymmetry of the Deep Virtual Compton Scattering process, recently measured by the Jefferson Lab CLAS collaboration. Our aim is to extract information about the Generalized Parton Distributions of the proton. By fitting these data, in a largely model-independent procedure, we are able to extract numerical values for the two Compton Form Factors $H_{Im}$ and $\\tilde{H}_{Im}$ with uncertainties, in average, of the order of 30%.

  8. Generalized parton distributions from deep virtual compton scattering at CLAS

    DOE PAGES

    Guidal, M.

    2010-04-24

    Here, we have analyzed the beam spin asymmetry and the longitudinally polarized target spin asymmetry of the Deep Virtual Compton Scattering process, recently measured by the Jefferson Lab CLAS collaboration. Our aim is to extract information about the Generalized Parton Distributions of the proton. By fitting these data, in a largely model-independent procedure, we are able to extract numerical values for the two Compton Form Factorsmore » $$H_{Im}$$ and $$\\tilde{H}_{Im}$$ with uncertainties, in average, of the order of 30%.« less

  9. Handy Compton camera using 3D position-sensitive scintillators coupled with large-area monolithic MPPC arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, J.; Kishimoto, A.; Nishiyama, T.; Fujita, T.; Takeuchi, K.; Kato, T.; Nakamori, T.; Ohsuka, S.; Nakamura, S.; Hirayanagi, M.; Adachi, S.; Uchiyama, T.; Yamamoto, K.

    2013-12-01

    The release of radioactive isotopes (mainly 137Cs, 134Cs and 131I) from the crippled Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant remains a serious problem in Japan. To help identify radiation hotspots and ensure effective decontamination operation, we are developing a novel Compton camera weighting only 1 kg and measuring just ∼10 cm2 in size. Despite its compactness, the camera realizes a wide 180° field of vision with a sensitivity about 50 times superior to other cameras being tested in Fukushima. We expect that a hotspot producing a 5 μSv/h dose at a distance of 3 m can be imaged every 10 s, with angular resolution better than 10° (FWHM). The 3D position-sensitive scintillators and thin monolithic MPPC arrays are the key technologies developed here. By measuring the pulse-height ratio of MPPC-arrays coupled at both ends of a Ce:GAGG scintillator block, the depth of interaction (DOI) is obtained for incident gamma rays as well as the usual 2D positions, with accuracy better than 2 mm. By using two identical 10 mm cubic Ce:GAGG scintillators as a scatterer and an absorber, we confirmed that the 3D configuration works well as a high-resolution gamma camera, and also works as spectrometer achieving typical energy resolution of 9.8% (FWHM) for 662 keV gamma rays. We present the current status of the prototype camera (weighting 1.5 kg and measuring 8.5×14×16 cm3 in size) being fabricated by Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. Although the camera still operates in non-DOI mode, angular resolution as high as 14° (FWHM) was achieved with an integration time of 30 s for the assumed hotspot described above.

  10. Relativistic induced Compton scattering in synchrotron self-absorbed sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sincell, Mark W.; Krolik, Julian H.

    1994-01-01

    We present a model of the radio emission from synchrotron self-absorbed sources, including the effects of induced Compton scattering by the relativistic electrons in the source. Order of magnitude estimates show that stimulated scattering becomes the dominant absorption process when (kT(sub B)/m(sub e) c(exp 2))Tau(sub T) greater than or approximately 1.0. Numerical simulations demonstrate that relativistic induced Compton scattering limits the brightness temperature of a self-absorbed synchroton sources to T(sub B) less than or approximately 2 x 10(exp 11) nu(exp -1/p + 3) (sub zero, 9) gamma(exp p + 2/p + 5) (sub min) K, where gamma(sub min) is the low-energy cutoff to the relativistic electron distribution with a power-law index of p. It can also significantly flatten the radio spectrum. The radio spectrum of the core of 3C 279 is well matched by a model in which stimulated scattering is important, and the additional constraint T(sub B) less than 2 x 10(exp 11)K may be important to the interpretation of the broadband spectra in variable extragalactic compact radio sources. Stimulated scattering reduces the amplitude of the radio frequency variability relative to the X-ray variability, an effect which can be detected by multiwavelength variability studies. Data for a sample of resolved compact radio cores indicate that it is inconsistent to neglect induced Compton scattering when inferring the physical parameters of the sources. The necessary generalizations to the standard synchrotron self-Compton theory are p resented.

  11. Generalized Parton Distributions And Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering At Clas

    SciTech Connect

    De Masi, Rita

    2007-09-01

    The deeply virtual Compton scattering is the simplest process to access the generalized parton distributions of the nucleon. A dedicated large statistics experiment for the measurement of deeply virtual Compton scattering with a 6 GeV polarized electron beam on a proton target has been performed at the Hall-B of Jefferson Laboratory with the CLAS spectrometer. The experiment covered a wide kinematic range, allowing the study of the beam spin asymmetry as function of the Bjorken variable xB, the Mandelstam variable t, the virtual photon four-momentum squared Q2 and the angle phi between leptonic and hadronic planes. The preliminary results are in agreement with previous measurements and with the predicted twist-2 dominance.

  12. COMPACT, TUNABLE COMPTON SCATTERING GAMMA-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; O'Neill, K L; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Raubenheimer, T O

    2009-08-20

    Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable gamma-ray source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by the linac interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. The source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence lines in various isotopes; applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented.

  13. Resonant Compton scattering and gamma-ray burst continuum spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, M. G.

    1995-01-01

    The Thomson limit of resonant inverse Compton scattering in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars is considered as a mechanism for producing gamma-ray burst continuum spectra. Photon production spectra and electron cooling rates are presented using the full magnetic Thomson cross-section. Model emission spectra are obtained as self-consistent solutions of a set of photon and electron kinetic equations, displaying spectral breaks and other structure at gamma-ray energies.

  14. Detection of detachments and inhomogeneities in frescos by Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, A.; Cesareo, R.; Buccolieri, G.; Donativi, M.; Palamà, F.; Quarta, S.; De Nunzio, G.; Brunetti, A.; Marabelli, M.; Santamaria, U.

    2005-07-01

    A mobile instrument has been developed for the detection and mapping of detachments in frescos by using Compton back scattered photons. The instrument is mainly composed of a high energy X-ray tube, an X-ray detection system and a translation table. The instrument was first applied to samples simulating various detachment situations, and then transferred to the Vatican Museum to detect detachments and inhomogeneities in the stanza di Eliodoro, one of the "Raphael's stanze".

  15. Nucleon Compton Scattering with Two Space-Like Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Afanasev; I. Akushevich; N.P. Merenkov

    2002-08-01

    We calculate two-photon exchange effects for elastic electron-proton scattering at high momentum transfers. The corresponding nucleon Compton amplitude is defined by two space-like virtual photons that appear to have significant virtualities. We make predictions for (a) a single-spin beam asymmetry, and (b) a single-spin target asymmetry or recoil proton polarization caused by an unpolarized electron beam.

  16. Magnetic properties of Ga doped cobalt ferrite: Compton scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Arvind; Sahariya, Jagrati; Mund, H. S.; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.; Ahuja, B. L.

    2014-04-01

    We present the spin momentum density of Ga doped CoFe2O4 at 100 K using magnetic Compton scattering. The measurement has been performed using circularly polarized synchrotron radiations of 182.65 keV at SPring8, Japan. The experimental profile is decomposed into its constituent profile to determine the spin moment at individual sites. Co atom has the maximum contribution (about 58%) in the total spin moment of the doped CoFe2O4.

  17. Three-dimensional theory of weakly nonlinear Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, F.; Anderson, S. G.; Gibson, D. J.; Marsh, R. A.; Siders, C. W.; Barty, C. P. J.; Hartemann, F. V.

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear effects are known to occur in light sources when the wiggler parameter, or normalized 4-potential, A =e√-AμAμ /m0c, approaches unity. In this paper, it is shown that nonlinear spectral features can appear at arbitrarily low values of A if the fractional bandwidth of the undulator, Δϕ-1, is sufficiently small and satisfies the condition A2Δϕ ˜1. Consequences for the spectral brightness of Compton scattering light sources are outlined. Compton and Thomson scattering theories are compared with the Klein-Nishina cross-section formula to highlight differences in the case of narrow band gamma-ray operation. A weakly nonlinear Compton scattering theory is developed in one (plane wave) and three (local plane wave approximation) dimensions. Analytical models are presented and benchmarked against numerical calculations solving the Lorentz force equation with a fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm. Finally, narrow band gamma-ray spectra are calculated for realistic laser and electron beams.

  18. Induced Compton Scattering by Relativistic Electrons in Magnetized Astrophysical Plasmas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sincell, Mark William

    1994-01-01

    The effects of stimulated scattering on high brightness temperature radiation are studied in two important contexts. In the first case, we assume that the radiation is confined to a collimated beam traversing a relativistically streaming magnetized plasma. When the plasma is cold in the bulk frame, stimulated scattering is only significant if the angle between the photon motion and the plasma velocity is less than gamma^{-1} , where gamma is the bulk Lorentz factor. Under the assumption that the center of the photon beam is parallel to the bulk motion, we calculate the scattering rate as a function of the angular spread of the beam and gamma. Magnetization changes the photon recoil, without which stimulated scattering has no effect. It also introduces a strong dependence on frequency and polarization: if the photon frequency matches the electron cyclotron frequency, the scattering rate of photons polarized perpendicular to the magnetic field can be substantially enhanced relative to Thomson, and if the photon frequency is much less than the cyclotron frequency the scattering is suppressed. Applying these calculations to pulsars, we find that stimulated scattering of the radio beam in the magnetized wind believed to exist outside the light cylinder can substantially alter the spectrum and polarization state of the radio signal. We suggest that the scattering rate is so high in some pulsars that the ability of the radio signal to penetrate the pulsar magnetosphere requires modification of either the conventional model of the magnetosphere or assumptions about the effects of stimulated scattering upon a beam. In the second case, we present a model of the radio emission from synchrotron self-absorbed sources, including the effects of induced Compton scattering by the relativistic electrons in the source. Order of magnitude estimates show that stimulated scattering becomes the dominant absorption process when (kTB/m ec^2)tau_{T }_sp{~}> 0.1. Numerical simulations

  19. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off the Neutron: Measurements with CLAS and CLAS12 at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokhan, Daria

    Measurements of Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) give access to Generalised Parton Distributions (GPDs) which provide a 3D image of the nucleon and carry information on the composition of its spin. Data from both proton and neutron targets is highly desirable for an extraction of all GPDs and to allow their flavour-decomposition. Although a number of measurements have been made on proton targets, data on the neutron is almost non-existent. We present preliminary results in the extraction of beam-spin asymmetry in neutron DVCS from CLAS and the proposed experimental programme with CLAS12 at Jefferson Laboratory.

  20. Polarisation Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, David Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    The Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment E99-114 comprised a series of measurements to explore proton Compton scattering at high momentum transfer. For the first time, the polarisation transfer observables in the p ($\\vec{γ}$, γ' \\vec{p}$) reaction were measured in the GeV energy range, where it is believed that quark-gluon degrees of freedom begin to dominate. The experiment utilised a circularly polarised photon beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target, with the scattered photon and recoil proton detected in a lead-glass calorimeter and a magnetic spectrometer, respectively.

  1. Compton scattering from positronium and validity of the impulse approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaliman, Z.; Pisk, K.; Pratt, R. H.

    2011-05-15

    The cross sections for Compton scattering from positronium are calculated in the range from 1 to 100 keV incident photon energy. The calculations are based on the A{sup 2} term of the photon-electron or photon-positron interaction. Unlike in hydrogen, the scattering occurs from two centers and the interference effect plays an important role for energies below 8 keV. Because of the interference, the criterion for validity of the impulse approximation for positronium is more restrictive compared to that for hydrogen.

  2. A hard X-ray polarimeter utilizing Compton scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, H.; Noma, M.; Niizeki, H.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes a 50-cm-diam prototype of a novel Compton-scattering-type polarimeter for hard X-rays in the energy range 30-100 keV. The characteristics of the prototype polarimeter were investigated for various conditions. It was found that, with polarized X-rays from a simple polarizer, the detection efficiency and the modulation factor of the polarimeter with a 40-mm thick scatterer were 3.2 percent and 0.57 percent, respectively, at about 60 keV.

  3. The role of Compton scattering in scinti-mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Pani, R.; Scopinaro, F.; Pergola, A.

    1996-12-31

    Functional breast imaging using {sup 99m}Tc MIBI is showing that this technique is able to detect cancer with more than 90% specificity. Using a dedicated gamma camera, with the breast under compression, i.e. in similar conditions of mammography, the detection of sub-centimeter cancers can be improved. A number of factors affects the detection of small cancers as: thickness of the breast, distance between tumor and collimator, cardiac activity. Radioactivity emitted from the body can obscure the breast activity mainly due to the large difference on radioactivity concentration. In this work we analyze the intensity and the energy distribution of Compton scattering coming from the breast by a Germanium detector and by a dedicated imager with a small FOV placed in a geometrical condition similar to mammography. In vivo measurements were performed in patients with a breast cancer ranging between 8 mm and 15 mm. Intensity of Compton scattering from 4 to 10 times greater than full energy peak events resulted. Measurements were compared with ones obtained by a phantom simulating the breast without chest activity demonstrating how large is the Compton contribution from the chest.

  4. The polarization effect of a laser in multiphoton Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Guo-Hua; Lü, Qing-Zheng; Teng, Ai-Ping; Li, Ying-Jun

    2014-05-01

    The multiphoton Compton scattering in a high-intensity laser beam is studied by using the laser-dressed quantum electrodynamics (QED) method, which is a non-perturbative theory for the interaction between a plane electromagnetic field and a charged particle. In order to analyze in the real experimental condition, a Lorentz transformation for the cross section of this process is derived between the laboratory frame and the initial rest frame of electrons. The energy of the scattered photon is analyzed, as well as the cross sections for different laser intensities and polarizations and different electron velocities. The angular distribution of the emitted photon is investigated in a special velocity of the electron, in which for a fixed number of absorbed photons, the electron energy will not change after the scattering in the lab frame. We obtain the conclusion that higher laser intensities suppress few-laser-photon absorption and enhance more-laser-photon absorption. A comparison between different polarizations is also made, and we find that the linearly polarized laser is more suitable to generate nonlinear Compton scattering.

  5. Gamma-ray burst polarization via Compton scattering process

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Zhe; Lin, Hai-Nan; Jiang, Yunguo

    2014-03-01

    Synchrotron radiation and Compton scattering are widely accepted as the most likely emission mechanisms of some astrophysical phenomena, such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and active galactic nuclei. The measurement of the polarization of photons provides a useful tool to distinguish different emission mechanisms and structures of the emission region. Based on the differential cross section of a polarized photon scattered by an unpolarized electron of any initial momentum, we derive an analytical formula of polarization for beamed photons scattered by isotropic electrons with a power-law distribution. Numerical calculations are carried out in four special cases: electrons at rest, Thomson limit, head-on collision, and monochromatic electrons. It is found that the maximum polarization can be as high as 100% for low energy photons, if the electrons are at rest. Although polarization is highly suppressed due to the isotropic electrons, a maximum value of ∼10%-20% can still be achieved. The Compton scattering process can be used to explain the polarization of GRB 041219A and GRB 100826A.

  6. Understanding spin structure in metallacrown single-molecule magnets using magnetic compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Deb, Aniruddha; Boron, Thaddeus T; Itou, Masayoshi; Sakurai, Yoshiharu; Mallah, Talal; Pecoraro, Vincent L; Penner-Hahn, James E

    2014-04-01

    The 3d-4f mixed metallacrowns frequently show single-molecule magnetic behavior. We have used magnetic Compton scattering to characterize the spin structure and orbital interactions in three isostructural metallacrowns: Gd2Mn4, Dy2Mn4, and Y2Mn4. These data allow the direct determination of the spin only contribution to the overall magnetic moment. We find that the lanthanide 4f spin in Gd2Mn4 and Dy2Mn4 is aligned parallel to the Mn 3d spin. For Y2Mn4 (manganese-only spin) we find evidence for spin delocalization into the O 2p orbitals. Comparing the magnetic Compton scattering data with SQUID studies that measure the total magnetic moment suggests that Gd2Mn4 and Y2Mn4 have only a small orbital contribution to the moment. In contrast, the total magnetic moment for Dy2Mn4 MCs is much larger than the spin-only moment, demonstrating a significant orbital contribution to the overall magnetic moment. Overall, these data provide direct insight into the correlation of molecular design with molecular magnetic properties.

  7. Densitometry and temperature measurement of combustion gas by X-ray Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Nobuyuki; Itou, Masayoshi; Tomita, Eiji; Suzuki, Kosuke; Sakurai, Yoshiharu

    2016-03-01

    Measurement of combustion gas by high-energy X-ray Compton scattering is reported. The intensity of Compton-scattered X-rays has shown a position dependence across the flame of the combustion gas, allowing us to estimate the temperature distribution of the combustion flame. The energy spectra of Compton-scattered X-rays have revealed a significant difference across the combustion reaction zone, which enables us to detect the combustion reaction. These results demonstrate that high-energy X-ray Compton scattering can be employed as an in situ technique to probe inside a combustion reaction.

  8. Densitometry and temperature measurement of combustion gas by X-ray Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Nobuyuki; Itou, Masayoshi; Tomita, Eiji; Suzuki, Kosuke; Sakurai, Yoshiharu

    2016-03-01

    Measurement of combustion gas by high-energy X-ray Compton scattering is reported. The intensity of Compton-scattered X-rays has shown a position dependence across the flame of the combustion gas, allowing us to estimate the temperature distribution of the combustion flame. The energy spectra of Compton-scattered X-rays have revealed a significant difference across the combustion reaction zone, which enables us to detect the combustion reaction. These results demonstrate that high-energy X-ray Compton scattering can be employed as an in situ technique to probe inside a combustion reaction. PMID:26917151

  9. Densitometry and temperature measurement of combustion gas by X-ray Compton scattering

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Nobuyuki; Itou, Masayoshi; Tomita, Eiji; Suzuki, Kosuke; Sakurai, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of combustion gas by high-energy X-ray Compton scattering is reported. The intensity of Compton-scattered X-rays has shown a position dependence across the flame of the combustion gas, allowing us to estimate the temperature distribution of the combustion flame. The energy spectra of Compton-scattered X-rays have revealed a significant difference across the combustion reaction zone, which enables us to detect the combustion reaction. These results demonstrate that high-energy X-ray Compton scattering can be employed as an in situ technique to probe inside a combustion reaction. PMID:26917151

  10. Virtual Compton scattering off the nucleon at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, S.; Korchin, A.Y.; Koch, J.H.

    1996-08-01

    We investigate the low-energy behavior of the four-point Green{close_quote}s function {Gamma}{sup {mu}{nu}} describing virtual Compton scattering off the nucleon. Using Lorentz invariance, gauge invariance, and crossing symmetry, we derive the leading terms of an expansion of the operator in the four-momenta {ital q} and {ital q}{sup {prime}} of the initial and final photon, respectively. The model-independent result is expressed in terms of the electromagnetic form factors of the free nucleon, i.e., on-shell information which one obtains from electron-nucleon scattering experiments. Model-dependent terms appear in the operator at {ital O}({ital q}{sub {alpha}}{ital q}{sub {beta}}{sup {prime}}), whereas the orders {ital O}({ital q}{sub {alpha}}{ital q}{sub {beta}}) and {ital O}({ital q}{sub {alpha}}{sup {prime}}{ital q}{sub {beta}}{sup {prime}}) are contained in the low-energy theorem for {Gamma}{sup {mu}{nu}}, i.e., no new parameters appear. We discuss the leading terms of the matrix element and comment on the use of on-shell equivalent electromagnetic vertices in the calculation of {open_quote}{open_quote}Born terms{close_quote}{close_quote} for virtual Compton scattering. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  11. Energy measurement of electron beams by Compton scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keppel, Cynthia

    1995-01-01

    A method has been proposed to utilize the well-known Compton scattering process as a tool to measure the centroid energy of a high energy electron beam at the 0.01% level. It is suggested to use the Compton scattering of an infrared laser off the electron beam, and then to measure the energy of the scattered gamma-rays very precisely using solid-state detectors. The technique proposed is applicable for electron beams with energies from 200 MeV to 16 GeV using presently available lasers. This technique was judged to be the most viable of all those proposed for beam energy measurements at the nearby Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). Plans for a prototype test of the technique are underway, where the main issues are the possible photon backgrounds associated with an electron accelerator and the electron and laser beam stabilities and diagnostics. The bulk of my ASEE summer research has been spent utilizing the expertise of the staff at the Aerospace Electronics Systems Division at LaRC to assist in the design of the test. Investigations were made regarding window and mirror transmission and radiation damage issues, remote movement of elements in ultra-high vacuum conditions, etc. The prototype test of the proposed laser backscattering method is planned for this December.

  12. Nonlinear single Compton scattering of an electron wave packet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angioi, A.; Mackenroth, F.; Di Piazza, A.

    2016-05-01

    Nonlinear single Compton scattering has been thoroughly investigated in the literature under the assumption that the electron initially has a definite momentum. Here, we study a more general initial state and consider the electron as a wave packet. In particular, we investigate the energy spectrum of the emitted radiation and show that, in typical experimental situations, some features of the spectra shown in previous works are almost completely washed out. Moreover, we show that, at comparable relative uncertainties, the one in the momentum of the incoming electron has a larger impact on the photon spectra at a fixed observation direction than the one on the laser frequency.

  13. Quantum radiation reaction effects in multiphoton Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Di Piazza, A; Hatsagortsyan, K Z; Keitel, C H

    2010-11-26

    Radiation reaction effects in the interaction of an electron and a strong laser field are investigated in the realm of quantum electrodynamics. We identify the quantum radiation reaction with the multiple photon recoils experienced by the laser-driven electron due to consecutive incoherent photon emissions. After determining a quantum radiation dominated regime, we demonstrate how in this regime quantum signatures of the radiation reaction strongly affect multiphoton Compton scattering spectra and that they could be measurable in principle with presently available laser technology.

  14. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering at JLab Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Voutier

    2007-04-16

    The deeply virtual Compton scattering reaction has been investigated in the Hall A of the Jefferson Laboratory by measuring longitudinally polarized (e,e'gamma) cross sections, in the valence quark region, for protons and neutrons. In the proton channel, experimental results strongly support the factorization of the cross section at Q2 as low as 2 GeV2, opening the path to systematic measurements of generalized parton distributions (GPDs). In the neutron case, preliminary data show sensitivity to the angular momentum of quarks.

  15. Quantum Radiation Reaction Effects in Multiphoton Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Di Piazza, A.; Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Keitel, C. H.

    2010-11-26

    Radiation reaction effects in the interaction of an electron and a strong laser field are investigated in the realm of quantum electrodynamics. We identify the quantum radiation reaction with the multiple photon recoils experienced by the laser-driven electron due to consecutive incoherent photon emissions. After determining a quantum radiation dominated regime, we demonstrate how in this regime quantum signatures of the radiation reaction strongly affect multiphoton Compton scattering spectra and that they could be measurable in principle with presently available laser technology.

  16. Polarization Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, D.J.; Annand, J.R.M.; Mamyan, V.H.; Aniol, K.A.; Margaziotis, D.J.; Bertin, P.Y.; Camsonne, A.; Laveissiere, G.; Bosted, P.; Paschke, K.; Calarco, J.R.; Chang, G.C.; Horn, T.; Savvinov, N.; Chang, T.-H.; Danagoulian, A.; Nathan, A.M.; Roedelbronn, M.; Chen, J.-P.

    2005-06-24

    Compton scattering from the proton was investigated at s=6.9 GeV{sup 2} and t=-4.0 GeV{sup 2} via polarization transfer from circularly polarized incident photons. The longitudinal and transverse components of the recoil proton polarization were measured. The results are in disagreement with a prediction of perturbative QCD based on a two-gluon exchange mechanism, but agree well with a prediction based on a reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton.

  17. The equivalence of inverse Compton scattering and the undulator concept

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y,; /Fermilab

    2009-08-01

    Inverse Compton scattering is a method to produce very high frequency photon beam. However, the production mechanism can also be viewed as a undulator emission. This is because the electron sees electric and magnetic fields of the incident laser beam and is driven into transverse oscillatory motion in exactly the same way when the electron passes through a undulator consisting of alternating magnetic field. This note gives a detailed examination of the similarity about the two views. Equivalent undulator parameters are derived for the incident laser beam, as well as the differential cross section of photon emission.

  18. Nucleon polarizabilities: From Compton scattering to hydrogen atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelstein, Franziska; Miskimen, Rory; Pascalutsa, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    We review the current state of knowledge of the nucleon polarizabilities and of their role in nucleon Compton scattering and in hydrogen spectrum. We discuss the basic concepts, the recent lattice QCD calculations and advances in chiral effective-field theory. On the experimental side, we review the ongoing programs aimed to measure the nucleon (scalar and spin) polarizabilities via the Compton scattering processes, with real and virtual photons. A great part of the review is devoted to the general constraints based on unitarity, causality, discrete and continuous symmetries, which result in model-independent relations involving nucleon polarizabilities. We (re-)derive a variety of such relations and discuss their empirical value. The proton polarizability effects are presently the major sources of uncertainty in the assessment of the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift and hyperfine structure. Recent calculations of these effects are reviewed here in the context of the "proton-radius puzzle". We conclude with summary plots of the recent results and prospects for the near-future work.

  19. A storage ring based inverse Compton scattering angiography source?

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, E.B.

    1993-09-01

    Producing the 33.17 keV photons required for coronary angiography with synchrotron radiation requires a combination of a high energy storage ring with an extremely high field wiggler. Such a source may be too big and expensive to be installed in even the largest medical center. Something other than synchrotron radiation may be needed for a practical source. Inverse Compton scattering has been used in the LEGS experiment at NSLS and elsewhere to produce high energy photons. In this process, a head on collision between a low energy photon and a high energy electron transfers energy to the photon which is then emitted in approximately the direction of the incoming electron. For a given electron energy, more higher energy photons can be produced by this method than by synchrotron radiation. This suggests that inverse Compton scattering can possibly be used for a low cost angiography source. The prospects for such a source will be examined in this paper. Unfortunately, the results will show that although it is easy to obtain the required photon energy, an extremely complicated source will be needed to produce the required number of photons.

  20. Bursts of gamma rays from Compton scattering at cosmological distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Svensson, Roland; Paczynski, Bohdan

    1991-01-01

    Compton scattering of the microwave background photons by beams of ultrarelativistic electrons at large redshifts, z much greater than 1, is proposed as a source of some gamma-ray bursts. Such beams may be produced by cusps on superconducting cosmic strings. In the present model, a very narrow beam of ultrarelativistic electron-positron pairs scatters the microwave background photons into a very narrow beam of gamma rays. While the pairs lose energy, the beam of gamma rays opens up and sweeps the observer. The expected time variability and spectra of the resulting gamma-ray burst are calculated. The bursts have a rapid rise time, followed by a more gradual decline. The spectra are initially very hard and become softer during the decline.

  1. Commissioning of a Compton-Scattering-Based Gamma Ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, David; Albert, Felicie; Anderson, Scott; Hartemann, Fred; Messerly, Mike; Shverdin, Miro; McNabb, Dennis; Siders, Craig; Barty, Chris

    2009-11-01

    Recently a Compton-scattering based gamma-ray source, in which a high-intensity laser scatters off a high-brightness electron beam and emerges as a narrow-band gamma-ray beam, has been commissioned at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Operating at energies from 0.1 to 0.9 MeV, the source produces fluxes upwards of 10^6 photons/sec with a brightness of 10^ 15 photons/s/mm^2/mrad^2/0.1% BW. Presented here is a discussion of the design and performance of the laser and electron subsystems that are used to drive the source, and an overview of the parameters of the generated gamma-ray beam.

  2. Determination of Rest Mass Energy of the Electron by a Compton Scattering Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasannakumar, S.; Krishnaveni, S.; Umesh, T. K.

    2012-01-01

    We report here a simple Compton scattering experiment which may be carried out in graduate and undergraduate laboratories to determine the rest mass energy of the electron. In the present experiment, we have measured the energies of the Compton scattered gamma rays with a NaI(Tl) gamma ray spectrometer coupled to a 1 K multichannel analyzer at…

  3. The effect of relativistic Compton scattering on thermonuclear burn of pure deuterium fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemizad, A.; Nazirzadeh, M.; Khanbabaei, B.

    2016-08-01

    The relativistic effects of the Compton scattering on the thermonuclear burn-up of pure deuterium fuel in non-equilibrium plasma have been studied by four temperature (4T) theory. In the limit of low electron temperatures and photon energies, the nonrelativistic Compton scattering is valid and a convenient approximation, but in the high energy exchange rates between electrons and photons, is seen to break down. The deficiencies of the nonrelativistic approximation can be overcome by using the relativistic correction in the photons kinetic equation. In this research, we have utilized the four temperature (4T) theory to calculate the critical burn-up parameter for pure deuterium fuel, while the Compton scattering is considered as a relativistic phenomenon. It was shown that the measured critical burn-up parameter in ignition with relativistic Compton scattering is smaller than that of the parameter in the ignition with the nonrelativistic Compton scattering.

  4. Observation of enhanced Compton scattering in a supercavity

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, M.; Asakawa, M.; Chen, J.

    1995-12-31

    The enhanced Compton scattering in a supercavity has been observed experimentally. The supercavity with {approximately}99.99% reflectivity mirrors was used to confine the LD-pumped Nd:YAG laser light ({lambda} {approximately} 1.06 {mu} m, CW power {approximately} 500 mW, bandwidth <5kHz). The confined photons were scattered by 100kV electron beams generated from the laser-heated CW electrostatic accelerator. In this experiment, the scattered photon wavelength was in a visible range (<380nm). In order to increase the beam current and the system efficiency, the design of a beam recovery system is also in progress. As an alternative way to confine the laser power, a novel multi-pass optical resonator is being designed. 9MeV electron bunch from the rf linac with photoinjector will be used to interact with MW {approximately} TW high peak power laser pulse in the resonator. In this experiment, the scattered photon energy is in a x-ray regime. These experimental data is used to design the monochromatic {gamma}-ray sources for annihilation of the radioactive nuclear waste.

  5. Measurement of Compton scattering in phantoms by germanium detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zasadny, K.R.; Koral, K.F. . Medical Center); Floyd, C.E. Jr.; Jaszczak, R.J. . Dept. of Radiology)

    1990-04-01

    Quantitative Anger-camera tomography requires correction for Compton scattering. The Anger camera spectral-fitting technique can measure scatter fractions at designated positions in an image allowing for correction. To permit verification of those measurements for {sup 131}I, the authors have determined scatter fractions with a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and various phantom configurations. The scatter fraction values for {sup 99m}Tc were also measured and are compared to results from Monte Carlo simulation. The phantom consisted of a 22.2 cm diameter {times} 18.6 cm high cylinder filled with water and a 6 cm diameter water-filled sphere placed at various locations inside the cylinder. Radioisotope is added to either the sphere or the cylinder. The source is collimated by an Anger camera collimator and the active area of the HPGe detector is defined by a 0.6 cm diameter hole in a lead shielding mask. Corrections include accounting for the HPGe detector efficiency as a function of gamma-ray energy, the finite energy resolution of detector and the HPGe detector energy resolution compared to that for a NaI(Tl) Anger camera.

  6. Hadron Optics: Diffraction Patterns in Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S

    2006-05-16

    We show that the Fourier transform of the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) amplitude with respect to the skewness variable {zeta} provides a unique way to visualize the light-front wavefunctions (LFWFs) of the target state in the boost-invariant longitudinal coordinate space variable ({sigma} = P{sup +}y{sup -}/2). The results are analogous to the diffractive scattering of a wave in optics in which the dependence of the amplitude on {sigma} measures the physical size of the scattering center of a one-dimensional system. If one combines this longitudinal transform with the Fourier transform of the DVCS amplitude with respect to the transverse momentum transfer {Delta}{sup {perpendicular}}, one can obtain a complete three-dimensional description of hadron optics at fixed light-front time {tau} = t + z/c. As a specific example, we utilize the quantum fluctuations of a fermion state at one loop in QED to obtain the behavior of the DVCS amplitude for electron-photon scattering. We then simulate the wavefunctions for a hadron by differentiating the above LFWFs with respect to M{sup 2} and study the corresponding DVCS amplitudes in {sigma} space.

  7. Longitudinal target-spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Seder, E.; Biselli, A.; Pisano, S.; Niccolai, S.; Smith, G. D.; Joo, K.; Adhikari, K.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, W.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Carlin, C.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crabb, D.; Crede, V.; D’Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hirlinger Saylor, N.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R.; Moody, C. I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Senderovich, I.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Tian, Y.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zonta, I.

    2015-01-22

    A measurement of the electroproduction of photons off protons in the deeply inelastic regime was performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly 6-GeV electron beam, a longitudinally polarized proton target and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Target-spin asymmetries for ep → e'p'y events, which arise from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes, were extracted over the widest kinematics in Q2, xB, t and Φ, for 166 four-dimensional bins. In the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), at leading twist the t dependence of these asymmetries provides insight on the spatial distribution of the axial charge of the proton, which appears to be concentrated in its center. In conclusion, these results bring important and necessary constraints for the existing parametrizations of chiral-even GPDs.

  8. Gauge invariance and Compton scattering from relativistic composite systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, H.; Gross, F. |

    1993-09-01

    Using the Ward-Takahashi (W-T) identity and the Bethe-Salpeter (B-S) wave equation, we investigate the dynamical requirements imposed by electromagnetic gauge invariance on Compton scattering from relativistic composite system. The importance of off-shell rescattering in intermediate states, which is equivalent to final state interactions in inclusive processes, is clarified in the context of current conservation. It is shown that, if the nuclear force is nonlocal, there will be both two-photon interaction currents and rescattering contributions to terms involving one-photon interaction currents. We derive the two-body W-T identity for the two-photon interaction currents, and obtain explicit forms for the interaction current operators for three illustrative models of nuclear forces: (a) two-pion exchange forces with baryon resonances, (b) covariant separable forces, and (c) charged one-pion exchange.

  9. Virtual Compton scattering off the nucleon in chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmert, T.R.; Holstein, B.R.; Knoechlein, G.; Scherer, S.

    1997-03-01

    We investigate the spin-independent part of the virtual Compton scattering (VCS) amplitude off the nucleon within the framework of chiral perturbation theory. We perform a consistent calculation to third order in external momenta according to Weinberg`s power counting. With this calculation we can determine the second- and fourth-order structure-dependent coefficients of the general low-energy expansion of the spin-averaged VCS amplitude based on gauge invariance, crossing symmetry, and the discrete symmetries. We discuss the kinematical regime to which our calculation can be applied and compare our expansion with the multipole expansion by Guichon, Liu, and Thomas. We establish the connection of our calculation with the generalized polarizabilities of the nucleon where it is possible. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Longitudinal target-spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Seder, E.; Biselli, A.; Pisano, S.; Niccolai, S.; Smith, G. D.; Joo, K.; Adhikari, K.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; et al

    2015-01-22

    A measurement of the electroproduction of photons off protons in the deeply inelastic regime was performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly 6-GeV electron beam, a longitudinally polarized proton target and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Target-spin asymmetries for ep → e'p'y events, which arise from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes, were extracted over the widest kinematics in Q2, xB, t and Φ, for 166 four-dimensional bins. In the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), at leading twist the t dependence of these asymmetries provides insight on the spatial distribution of the axialmore » charge of the proton, which appears to be concentrated in its center. In conclusion, these results bring important and necessary constraints for the existing parametrizations of chiral-even GPDs.« less

  11. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering Beam-Spin Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    F.X. Girod; R.A. Niyazov

    2008-01-24

    The beam spin asymmetries in the hard exclusive electroproduction of photons on the proton (ep -> epg) were measured over a wide kinematic range and with high statistical accuracy. These asymmetries result from the interference of the Bethe-Heitler process and of deeply virtual Compton scattering. Over the whole kinematic range (x_B from 0.11 to 0.58, Q^2 from 1 to 4.8 GeV^2, -t from 0.09 to 1.8 GeV^2), the azimuthal dependence of the asymmetries is compatible with expectations from leading-twist dominance, A = a*sin(phi)/[1+c*cos(phi)]. This extensive set of data can thus be used to constrain significantly the generalized parton distributions of the nucleon in the valence quark sector.

  12. Wide Angle Compton Scattering within the SCET factorization Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivel, Nikolay

    2016-03-01

    Existing data for the electromagnetic proton form factors and for the cross section of the wide angle Compton scattering (WACS) show that the hard two-gluon exchange mechanism (collinear factorization) is still not applicable in the kinematical region where Mandelstam variables s ~ -t ~ -u are about few GeV2. On the other hand these observables can be described in phenomenological models where spectator quarks are soft which assumes a large contribution due to the soft-overlap mechanism. It turns out that the simple QCD factorization picture is not complete and must also include the soft-overlap contribution which can be described as a certain matrix element in the soft collinear effective theory (SCET). Then the leading power contribution to WACS amplitude is described as a sum of the hard- and soft-spectator contributions. The existing experimental data allows one to check certain conclusions based on the assumption about dominant role of the soft-spectator mechanism.

  13. Deeply virtual Compton scattering from gauge/gravity duality

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Miguel S.; Djuric, Marko

    2013-04-15

    We use gauge/gravity duality to study deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) in the limit of high center of mass energy at fixed momentum transfer, corresponding to the limit of low Bjorken x, where the process is dominated by the exchange of the pomeron. At strong coupling, the pomeron is described as the graviton Regge trajectory in AdS space, with a hard wall to mimic confinement effects. This model agrees with HERA data in a large kinematical range. The behavior of the DVCS cross section for very high energies, inside saturation, can be explained by a simple AdS black disk model. In a restricted kinematical window, this model agrees with HERA data as well.

  14. Gamma-ray burst spectra from photon-deficient Compton scattering by nonthermal electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Lamb, Don Q.

    1986-01-01

    Consideration is given to a model of gamma-ray burst sources based on repeated Compton scatterings of soft photons by relativistic nonthermal electrons. Relativistic electrons which are continuously produced in the source radiate the total power L supplied to them. Higher order Compton scatterings, which occur when L(soft) is much less than L make the model distinct. The spectrum having an X-ray energy index of about one results from the superposition of the spectral components from several orders of Compton scattering; the change of the slope at several hundred keV arises from the Klein-Nishina decline of the scattering cross section.

  15. Compton scattering of self-absorbed synchrotron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, He; Lei, Wei-Hua; Wu, Xue-Feng; Zhang, Bing

    2013-11-01

    Synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) scattering is an important emission mechanism in many astronomical sources, such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and active galactic nuclei. We give a complete presentation of the analytical approximations for the Compton scattering of synchrotron emission with both weak and strong synchrotron self-absorption. All possible orders of the characteristic synchrotron spectral breaks (νa, νm and νc) are studied. In the weak self-absorption regime, i.e. νa < νc, the electron energy distribution is not modified by the self-absorption process. The shape of the SSC component broadly resembles that of synchrotron, but with the following features: The SSC flux increases linearly with frequency up to the SSC break frequency corresponding to the self-absorption frequency νa; and the presence of a logarithmic term in the high-frequency range of the SSC spectra makes it harder than the power-law approximation. In the strong absorption regime, i.e. νa > νc, heating of low-energy electrons due to synchrotron absorption leads to pile-up of electrons, and form a thermal component besides the broken power-law component. This leads to two-component (thermal + non-thermal) spectra for both the synchrotron and SSC spectral components. For νc < νa < νm, the spectrum is thermal (non-thermal) dominated if ν _a > √{ν _m ν _c} (ν _a < √{ν _m ν _c}). Similar to the weak-absorption regime, the SSC spectral component is broader than the simple broken power-law approximation. We derive the critical condition for strong absorption (electron pile-up), and discuss a case of GRB reverse shock emission in a wind medium, which invokes νa > max(νm, νc).

  16. Gamma ray polarimetry. [compton scattering and pair production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, K. S.; Novick, R.

    1978-01-01

    Spectroscopic instruments currently being proposed may possess polarimetric capabilities which sould be nurtured and enhanced to permit characterization of basic emission mechanisms which are impossible using other techniques. Compton scattering and pair production detected the polarization of high energy (E is greater than 50 keV) protons in laboratory experiments. The polarization properties of a detection system consisting of 19 germanium crystals in a closed packed array are examined and the advantages of such a detector over Thompson scattering are discussed. The possiblity of using pair production to detect polarization of high energy gamma rays, and the associated modulation factors are discussed. The central difficulty involved in using pair production polarimeters in astrophysical applications is that the typical opening of the electron or positron direction with respect to the incident photon aircitron is small, of order E/sq mc. Multiple scattering in the material used to convert the photons to an electron positron pair causes deviations in the direction of the electron and positron.

  17. Compton scattering of an X-ray photon by an open-shell atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopersky, A. N.; Nadolinsky, A. M.

    2012-09-01

    A nonrelativistic quantum theory for the nonresonant Compton scattering of an X-ray photon by a free many-electron atom with an open shell in the ground state has been constructed in the single-configuration Hartree-Fock approximation outside the impulse approximation widely used in the literature. The transition to an atom with closed shells reproduces the results obtained previously in [6, 7]. The results of a test calculation for atoms with open (Ti, Fe) and closed (Zn) 3 d core shells are presented. The effects of the radial relaxation of one-electron states in the field of core vacancies have been taken into account. The results of the calculation agree well with the experimental results [15, 16]. It has been established that the results of the impulse approximation in the investigated X-ray photon energy ranges disagree with those of our theory not only quantitatively but also qualitatively. In particular, the impulse approximation near the elastic (Thomson and Rayleigh) scattering line leads to a gross overestimation of the contributions from the deep atomic shells involved in the inelastic photon scattering only virtually to the scattering probability. The presented theory is general in character and its applicability to a particular element of the Mendeleev table with an open core shell or to a many-electron atomic ion is limited only by the requirement that the nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock approximation be properly used in describing the scattering-state wave functions.

  18. Compton scattering of an X-ray photon by an open-shell atom

    SciTech Connect

    Hopersky, A. N. Nadolinsky, A. M.

    2012-09-15

    A nonrelativistic quantum theory for the nonresonant Compton scattering of an X-ray photon by a free many-electron atom with an open shell in the ground state has been constructed in the single-configuration Hartree-Fock approximation outside the impulse approximation widely used in the literature. The transition to an atom with closed shells reproduces the results obtained previously in [6, 7]. The results of a test calculation for atoms with open (Ti, Fe) and closed (Zn) 3d core shells are presented. The effects of the radial relaxation of one-electron states in the field of core vacancies have been taken into account. The results of the calculation agree well with the experimental results [15, 16]. It has been established that the results of the impulse approximation in the investigated X-ray photon energy ranges disagree with those of our theory not only quantitatively but also qualitatively. In particular, the impulse approximation near the elastic (Thomson and Rayleigh) scattering line leads to a gross overestimation of the contributions from the deep atomic shells involved in the inelastic photon scattering only virtually to the scattering probability. The presented theory is general in character and its applicability to a particular element of the Mendeleev table with an open core shell or to a many-electron atomic ion is limited only by the requirement that the nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock approximation be properly used in describing the scattering-state wave functions.

  19. Compton scattering of electrons from optical pulses for quantum nondemolition measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Friberg, S.R. ); Hawkins, R.J. )

    1995-01-01

    Compton scattering of electrons from photons destroys neither electrons nor photons, permitting quantum nondemolition measurements of the photon number. Here we consider a Compton scattering quantum nondemolition measurement of the photon number of an optical pulse traveling in a prepared optical fiber. A beam of electrons is directed through the evanescent field associated with the optical pulse, causing the electrons to scatter through an angle proportional to the pulse's photon number.

  20. Beam-shape effects in nonlinear Compton and Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Heinzl, T.; Seipt, D.; Kaempfer, B.

    2010-02-15

    We discuss intensity effects in collisions between beams of optical photons from a high-power laser and relativistic electrons. Our main focus is on the modifications of the emission spectra due to realistic finite-beam geometries. By carefully analyzing the classical limit we precisely quantify the distinction between strong-field QED Compton scattering and classical Thomson scattering. A purely classical, but fully covariant, calculation of the bremsstrahlung emitted by an electron in a plane-wave laser field yields radiation into harmonics, as expected. This result is generalized to pulses of finite duration and explains the appearance of line broadening and harmonic substructure as an interference phenomenon. The ensuing numerical treatment confirms that strong focusing of the laser leads to a broad continuum while higher harmonics become visible only at moderate focusing, and hence lower intensity. We present a scaling law for the backscattered photon spectral density which facilitates averaging over electron beam phase space. Finally, we propose a set of realistic parameters such that the observation of intensity-induced spectral red shift, higher harmonics, and their substructure becomes feasible.

  1. Compton scattering imaging of a working battery using synchrotron high-energy X-rays.

    PubMed

    Itou, Masayoshi; Orikasa, Yuki; Gogyo, Yuma; Suzuki, Kosuke; Sakurai, Hiroshi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Sakurai, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Results of studies on Compton scattering imaging using synchrotron high-energy X-rays are reported. The technique is applied to a discharging coin cell, and the intensity of Compton scattered X-rays from the inside of the cell has been measured as a function of position and time. The position-time intensity map captures the migration of lithium ions in the positive electrode and reveals the structural change due to the volume expansion of the electrode. This experiment is a critical step in developing synchrotron-based Compton scattering imaging for electrochemical cells at a product level.

  2. Compton scattering and nucleon polarisabilities in chiral EFT: Status and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grießhammer, Harald W.; McGovern, Judith A.; Phillips, Daniel R.

    2016-05-01

    We review theoretical progress and prospects for determining the nucleon's static dipole polarisabilities from Compton scattering on few-nucleon targets, including new values; see Refs. [1-5] for details and a more thorough bibliography.

  3. Initial State Helicity Correlation in Wide Angle Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jixie; Day, Donal; Keller, Dustin; Rondon, Oscar

    2014-09-01

    The applicability of pQCD to exclusive reactions at medium energies is a subject of considerable interest. Real Compton scattering (RCS) has the potential to provide insight to this unsettled issue. In pQCD, three active quarks and two hard gluons are involved when describing RCS. But the cross sections do not agree with the pQCD predictions. In contrast, a handbag dominance model, involving only one single quark coupling to the spectator through generalized parton distributions (GPDs) does a good job of matching the cross section data. A measurement of the longitudinal polarization transfer parameter KLL was found inconsistent with predictions of pQCD yet consistent with calculations within the hand-bag mechanism. Further Miller's handbag approach, which including quark and hadron helicity flip, contradicts pQCD and others which demands that KLL =ALL , the initial state helicity correlation asymmetry, by finding that KLL ≠ALL . The first ever measurement of ALL has been proposed to run in Jefferson Lab's Hall C. This experiment will utilize an untagged bremsstrahlung photon beam and the longitudinally polarized UVA/JLAB proton target. After a brief introduction to the physics, the experiment will be described and the expected results presented.

  4. Deeply virtual Compton scattering and generalized parton distributions at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Niccolai, Silvia

    2008-11-01

    The exclusive electroproduction of real photons and mesons at high momentum transfer allows us to access the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). The formalism of the GPDs provides a unified description of the hadronic structure in terms of quark and gluonic degrees of freedom. In particular, the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS), ep â e2p2Å , is one of the key reactions to determine the GPDs experimentally, as it is the simplest process that can be described in terms of GPDs. A dedicated experiment to study DVCS has been carried out in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. Beam-spin asymmetries, resulting from the interference of the Bethe-Heitler process and DVCS have been extracted over the widest kinematic range ever accessed for this reaction ( 1.2 < Q 2 < 3.7 (GeV/c 2, 0.09 < - t < 1.3 (GeV/c 2, 0.13 < x B < 0.46 . In this paper, the results obtained experimentally are shown and compared to GPD parametrizations.

  5. Deeply virtual Compton Scattering cross section measured with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Guegan, Baptistse

    2014-09-01

    The Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) provide a new description of nucleon structure in terms of its elementary constituents, the quarks and the gluons. Including and extending the information provided by the form factors and the parton distribution functions, they describe the correlation between the transverse position and the longitudinal momentum fraction of the partons in the nucleon. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS), the electroproduction of a real photon on a single quark in the nucleon eN --> e'N'g, is the exclusive process most directly interpretable in terms of GPDs. A dedicated experiment to study DVCS with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab has been carried out using a 5.9-GeV polarized electron beam and an unpolarized hydrogen target, allowing us to collect DVCS events in the widest kinematic range ever explored in the valence region : 1.0 < Q2 < 4.6 GeV2, 0.1 < xB < 0.58 and 0.09 < -t < 2.0 GeV2. In this paper, we show preliminary results of unpolarized cross sections and of polarized cross section differences for the DVCS channel.

  6. Laser Design for Next Generation Compton Scattering Source at LLNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shverdin, Miro; Albert, Felicie; Anderson, Scott; Bayramian, Andy; Betts, Shawn; Cross, Rick; Ebbers, Chris; Gibson, David; Marsh, Roark; Messerly, Michael; Hartemann, Fred; Scarpetti, Ray; Siders, Craig; Barty, Chris

    2010-11-01

    We describe laser systems designed for the next generation Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-ray) Compton scattering light source at LLNL. An 80 fs Yb:doped fiber oscillator seeds a photogun drive laser (PDL) and a high energy interaction system laser (ILS). Utilizing chirped pulse amplification (CPA) in fiber, the PDL will generate 80 μJ, spatially and temporally shaped pulses at 263 nm at 120 Hz precisely synchronized to the linac RF. The PDL system employs large mode photonic bandgap fibers and large area multi-layer dielectric gratings to generate over 1mJ per pulse with high recompression fidelity prior to frequency quadrupling. The high energy, 120 W ILS utilizes (CPA) in Nd:YAG to amplify a sub-nanometer bandwidth 20 μJ pulses from a fiber system to 1 J. A novel pulse stretcher provides a dispersion of over 7000 ps/nm to expand a several picosecond wide seed pulse to 6 ns. After amplification, the pulse is recompressed to 10 ps with a hyper-dispersive pulse compressor. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Parity assignments in photon scattering using Compton polarimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneissl, U.

    The high selectivity of the Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence method in exciting dipole transitions in combination with the progress achieved in measuring polarization observables has led to a substantial amount of new experimental data concerning the distribution of magnetic and electric dipole strengths in deformed nuclei. Systematic experiments have been performed at the bremsstrahlung facility of the Stuttgart Dynamitron. Precise excitation energies, transition strengths, spins and decay branching ratios were deduced for numerous low lying dipole excitations in deformed rare earth nuclei. Measurements of the linear polarization of resonantly scattered photons using simultaneously two Compton polarimeters enabled model independent parity assignments. With this technique for the first time positive parities could be established for groups of states in the neighbouring deformed nuclei 150Nd, 160Gd, 162Dy. Most of these states are concentrated near 3 MeV and should be attributed to orbital isovector M1 excitations (often referred to as “ Scissors Mode”). The surprising novel result of the present systematic studies, however, was the first observation of enhanced electric dipole excitations in the same deformed nuclei at excitation energies of 2.414, 2.471, and 2.520 MeV, respectively. Furthermore, all three states systematically exhibit decay branching ratios which hint at K-mixing. The transition energies and the enhanced B( E1)↑ strengths of 3 to 5.10 -3e 2fm 2 support the interpretation in terms of the predicted new type of collective electric dipole excitations in deformed nuclei due to reflection asymmetric shapes like octupole deformations and/or cluster configurations.

  8. High-Power Laser Pulse Recirculation for Inverse Compton Scattering-Produced Gamma-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, I; Shverdin, M; Gibson, D; Brown, C

    2007-04-17

    Inverse Compton scattering of high-power laser pulses on relativistic electron bunches represents an attractive method for high-brightness, quasi-monoenergetic {gamma}-ray production. The efficiency of {gamma}-ray generation via inverse Compton scattering is severely constrained by the small Thomson scattering cross section. Furthermore, repetition rates of high-energy short-pulse lasers are poorly matched with those available from electron accelerators, resulting in low repetition rates for generated {gamma}-rays. Laser recirculation has been proposed as a method to address those limitations, but has been limited to only small pulse energies and peak powers. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an alternative method for laser pulse recirculation that is uniquely capable of recirculating short pulses with energies exceeding 1 J. Inverse Compton scattering of recirculated Joule-level laser pulses has a potential to produce unprecedented peak and average {gamma}-ray brightness in the next generation of sources.

  9. A graphical tool for an analytical approach of scattering photons by the Compton effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scannavino, Francisco A.; Cruvinel, Paulo E.

    2012-05-01

    The photons scattered by the Compton effect can be used to characterize the physical properties of a given sample due to the influence that the electron density exerts on the number of scattered photons. However, scattering measurements involve experimental and physical factors that must be carefully analyzed to predict uncertainty in the detection of Compton photons. This paper presents a method for the optimization of the geometrical parameters of an experimental arrangement for Compton scattering analysis, based on its relations with the energy and incident flux of the X-ray photons. In addition, the tool enables the statistical analysis of the information displayed and includes the coefficient of variation (CV) measurement for a comparative evaluation of the physical parameters of the model established for the simulation.

  10. A method for determination mass absorption coefficient of gamma rays by Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    El Abd, A

    2014-12-01

    A method was proposed for determination mass absorption coefficient of gamma rays for compounds, alloys and mixtures. It is based on simulating interaction processes of gamma rays with target elements having atomic numbers from Z=1 to Z=92 using the MCSHAPE software. Intensities of Compton scattered gamma rays at saturation thicknesses and at a scattering angle of 90° were calculated for incident gamma rays of different energies. The obtained results showed that the intensity of Compton scattered gamma rays at saturations and mass absorption coefficients can be described by mathematical formulas. These were used to determine mass absorption coefficients for compound, alloys and mixtures with the knowledge of their Compton scattered intensities. The method was tested by calculating mass absorption coefficients for some compounds, alloys and mixtures. There is a good agreement between obtained results and calculated ones using WinXom software. The advantages and limitations of the method were discussed.

  11. Exclusive Vector Meson Production and Deep Virtual Compton Scattering in Electron-Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cazaroto, E. R.; Navarra, F. S.; Carvalho, F.; Kugeratski, M. S.; Goncalves, V. P.

    2010-11-12

    We calculate the nuclear cross section for coherent and incoherent deep virtual Compton scattering as well as for coherent and incoherent vector meson production for the mesons J/{Psi}, {phi} and {rho} within the QCD color dipole picture, including saturation effects. Theoretical estimates for scattering on both light and heavy nuclei are given over a wide range of energy.

  12. An energy-subtraction Compton scatter camera design for in vivo medical imaging of radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Rohe, R.C.; Valentine, J.D.

    1996-12-01

    A Compton scatter camera (CSC) design is proposed for imaging radioisotopes used as biotracers. A clinical version may increase sensitivity by a factor of over 100, while maintaining or improving spatial resolution, as compared with existing Anger cameras that use lead collimators. This novel approach is based on using energy subtraction ({Delta}E = E{sub 0} {minus} E{sub SC}, where E{sub 0}, {Delta}E, and E{sub SC} are the energy of the emitted gamma ray, the energy deposited by the initial Compton scatter, and the energy of the Compton scattered photon) to determine the amount of energy deposited in the primary system. The energy subtraction approach allows the requirement of high energy resolution to be placed on a secondary detector system instead of the primary detector system. Requiring primary system high energy resolution has significantly limited previous CSC designs for medical imaging applications. Furthermore, this approach is dependent on optimizing the camera design for data acquisition of gamma rays that undergo only one Compton scatter in a low-Z primary detector system followed by a total absorption of the Compton scattered photon in a high-Z secondary detector system. The proposed approach allows for a more compact primary detector system, a more simplified pulse processing interface, and a much less complicated detector cooling scheme as compared with previous CSC designs. Analytical calculations and Monte Carlo simulation results for some specific detector materials and geometries are presented.

  13. Measuring the Spin-Polarizabilities of the Proton in Polarized Compton scattering at MAMI-Mainz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskimen, Rory; A2 Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    At O (ω3) four new structure constants are present in the nucleon Compton scattering amplitude; these are the spin-polarizabilities γE 1 E 1, γM 1 M 1, γE 1 M 2, and γM 1 E 2. The most model independent way to determine the spin-polarizabilities is by measuring a double-polarized Compton scattering asymmetry with polarized target and circularly polarized photons, and by measuring an in-plane/transverse-plane Compton scattering asymmetry with linearly polarized photons (Σ3) . This talk will present new Compton scattering asymmetry data taken in the Δ region by the A2 Collaboration using the Crystal Ball at Mainz, with transverse polarized proton target and circularly polarized photons, the Σ2 x asymmetry (1). A dispersion model and an EFT calculation of Compton scattering are used to fit the four spin-polarizabilities to the new experimental data on Σ2 x, earlier results (2) on Σ3, and previous determinations of γ0 and γπ. The results of the fits are compared with theoretical calculations.

  14. A Compton scattering study of refractory niobium diborides.

    PubMed

    Bhamu, K C; Ahuja, B L

    2012-06-01

    Isotropic Compton profile of NbB(2) using 20 Ci (137)Cs Compton spectrometer is compared with our theoretical profiles obtained from the density functional theory (DFT) within the first and the second order generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and the hybridization of Hartree-Fock and DFT. A good agreement between GGA based profiles and the experiment validates the applicability of second order GGA in momentum densities. Energy bands, density of states and real space analysis of the experimental profile show metallic character of NbB(2).

  15. Fully 3D iterative scatter-corrected OSEM for HRRT PET using a GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Sang; Ye, Jong Chul

    2011-08-01

    Accurate scatter correction is especially important for high-resolution 3D positron emission tomographies (PETs) such as high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT) due to large scatter fraction in the data. To address this problem, a fully 3D iterative scatter-corrected ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) in which a 3D single scatter simulation (SSS) is alternatively performed with a 3D OSEM reconstruction was recently proposed. However, due to the computational complexity of both SSS and OSEM algorithms for a high-resolution 3D PET, it has not been widely used in practice. The main objective of this paper is, therefore, to accelerate the fully 3D iterative scatter-corrected OSEM using a graphics processing unit (GPU) and verify its performance for an HRRT. We show that to exploit the massive thread structures of the GPU, several algorithmic modifications are necessary. For SSS implementation, a sinogram-driven approach is found to be more appropriate compared to a detector-driven approach, as fast linear interpolation can be performed in the sinogram domain through the use of texture memory. Furthermore, a pixel-driven backprojector and a ray-driven projector can be significantly accelerated by assigning threads to voxels and sinograms, respectively. Using Nvidia's GPU and compute unified device architecture (CUDA), the execution time of a SSS is less than 6 s, a single iteration of OSEM with 16 subsets takes 16 s, and a single iteration of the fully 3D scatter-corrected OSEM composed of a SSS and six iterations of OSEM takes under 105 s for the HRRT geometry, which corresponds to acceleration factors of 125× and 141× for OSEM and SSS, respectively. The fully 3D iterative scatter-corrected OSEM algorithm is validated in simulations using Geant4 application for tomographic emission and in actual experiments using an HRRT.

  16. Fully 3D iterative scatter-corrected OSEM for HRRT PET using a GPU.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Sang; Ye, Jong Chul

    2011-08-01

    Accurate scatter correction is especially important for high-resolution 3D positron emission tomographies (PETs) such as high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT) due to large scatter fraction in the data. To address this problem, a fully 3D iterative scatter-corrected ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) in which a 3D single scatter simulation (SSS) is alternatively performed with a 3D OSEM reconstruction was recently proposed. However, due to the computational complexity of both SSS and OSEM algorithms for a high-resolution 3D PET, it has not been widely used in practice. The main objective of this paper is, therefore, to accelerate the fully 3D iterative scatter-corrected OSEM using a graphics processing unit (GPU) and verify its performance for an HRRT. We show that to exploit the massive thread structures of the GPU, several algorithmic modifications are necessary. For SSS implementation, a sinogram-driven approach is found to be more appropriate compared to a detector-driven approach, as fast linear interpolation can be performed in the sinogram domain through the use of texture memory. Furthermore, a pixel-driven backprojector and a ray-driven projector can be significantly accelerated by assigning threads to voxels and sinograms, respectively. Using Nvidia's GPU and compute unified device architecture (CUDA), the execution time of a SSS is less than 6 s, a single iteration of OSEM with 16 subsets takes 16 s, and a single iteration of the fully 3D scatter-corrected OSEM composed of a SSS and six iterations of OSEM takes under 105 s for the HRRT geometry, which corresponds to acceleration factors of 125× and 141× for OSEM and SSS, respectively. The fully 3D iterative scatter-corrected OSEM algorithm is validated in simulations using Geant4 application for tomographic emission and in actual experiments using an HRRT.

  17. Characterization and correction for scatter in 3D PET using rebinned plane integrals

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.; Ordonez, C.E.; Chen, C.T. . Dept. of Radiology)

    1994-12-01

    The scatter characteristics of three-dimensional (3D) positron emission tomography (PET) in terms of the plane-integral scatter response function (SRF) are studied. To obtain the plane-integral SRF and study its properties, Monte Carlo simulations were carried out which generated coincidence events from point sources located at different positions in water-filled spheres of various sizes. In each simulation, the plane-integral SRF is obtained by rebinning the detected true and scatter events into two separate sets of plane integrals and then dividing the plane integrals of scatter events by the plane integral of true events of the plane in which the point source is located. A spherical PET scanner was assumed for these simulations. Examination of the SRF shows that the SRF in 3D PET can be modeled not by an exponential function as in the case of 2D PET, but by a Gaussian with its peak shifted away from the primary peak. Using this plane-integral SRF, a scatter correction method was developed for 3D PET that first converts an attenuation-corrected 3D PET data set into plane integrals, then obtains the scatter components in the rebinned plane integrals by integral transformation of the rebinned plane integrals with the SRF, and finally subtracts the scatter components from the rebinned plane integrals to yield the scatter-corrected plane integrals. From the scatter-corrected plane integrals, a 3D image was reconstructed by using a 3D filtered-backprojection algorithm. To test the method, a cylindrical PET scanner imaging an ellipsoid phantom with a 3-cm cold bar at the center was simulated, and 3D images of the phantom with and without scatter correction were reconstructed. Comparison of the two images shows that this method compensates reasonably well for scatter events. The advantages of the proposed method are that it treats the scatter in 3D PET in a truly 3D manner and that it is computationally efficient.

  18. A Compton scattering technique to determine wood density and locating defects in it

    SciTech Connect

    Tondon, Akash Sandhu, B. S.; Singh, Bhajan; Singh, Mohinder

    2015-08-28

    A Compton scattering technique is presented to determine density and void location in the given wooden samples. The technique uses a well collimated gamma ray beam from {sup 137}Cs along with the NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. First, a linear relationship is established between Compton scattered intensity and known density of chemical compounds, and then density of the wood is determined from this linear relation. In another experiment, the ability of penetration of gamma rays is explored to detect voids in wooden (low Z) sample. The sudden reduction in the Compton scattered intensities agrees well with the position and size of voids in the wooden sample. It is concluded that wood density and the voids of size ∼ 4 mm and more can be detected easily by this method.

  19. The limitations of resonant Compton scattering as a gamma-ray burst model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Resonant Compton upscattering is commended as a mechanism that produces a hard gamma-ray spectrum while suppressing X-rays. This model, however, has severe physical and observational limitations. Effective X-ray suppression places a lower limit on the electron density; above this limit X-rays scatter multiple times, so the single-scattering approximation of this mechanism is invalid. Multiple scattering produces a spectrum that is much harder than the single-scattering spectrum. As the Thomson optical depth of a power-law electron beam approaches unity, photon spawning commences at a high rate and physically invalidates the underlying electron distribution. The Compton upscattering model is therefore only valid over a narrow range of electron densities. An observational consequence of this model is the absence of the third cyclotron resonance. Resonant scattering produces gamma-rays that propagate nearly along the magnetic field. The resonant cross section of the third harmonic, which is strongly angle dependent, falls below the Compton continuum for these gamma rays. The observation of a third cyclotron resonance in a gamma-ray burst spectrum would eliminate resonant Compton scattering as a gamma-ray burst process.

  20. On the line-shape analysis of Compton profiles and its application to neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanelli, G.; Krzystyniak, M.

    2016-05-01

    Analytical properties of Compton profiles are used in order to simplify the analysis of neutron Compton scattering experiments. In particular, the possibility to fit the difference of Compton profiles is discussed as a way to greatly decrease the level of complexity of the data treatment, making the analysis easier, faster and more robust. In the context of the novel method proposed, two mathematical models describing the shapes of differenced Compton profiles are discussed: the simple Gaussian approximation for harmonic and isotropic local potential, and an analytical Gauss-Hermite expansion for an anharmonic or anisotropic potential. The method is applied to data collected by VESUVIO spectrometer at ISIS neutron and muon pulsed source (UK) on Copper and Aluminium samples at ambient and low temperatures.

  1. Quality Control of Pavements and Tarmacs Using ({sup 137}Cs){gamma} Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pino, F.; Barros, H.; Bernal, M.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Palacios, D.; Greaves, E. D.; Viesti, G.

    2010-08-04

    The {gamma} Compton scattering over a volume of concrete has been studied in order to design an instrument for density measurements. It will be used for the quality control in road construction, where large surfaces must be monitored. The experimental results and Monte Carlo simulations of the {gamma} Compton scattering over homogeneous and inhomogeneous volumes of concrete are shown. MC simulations have been useful to optimize the values of several parameters to improve the experimental set up and to estimate the extension of the explored volume.

  2. Double electron ionization in Compton scattering of high energy photons by helium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Amusia, M.Y.; Mikhailov, A.I.

    1995-08-01

    The cross section for double-electron ionization of two-electron atoms and ions in Compton scattering of high energy photons is calculated. It is demonstrated that its dependence on the incoming photon frequency is the same as that for single-electron ionization. The ratio of {open_quotes}double-to-single{close_quotes} ionization in Compton scattering was found to be energy independent and almost identical with the corresponding value for photoionization. For the He atom it is 1.68%. This surprising result deserves experimental verification.

  3. Compton Scattering X-Ray Sources Driven by Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Gibson, D J; Brown, W J; Rousse, A; Phuoc, K T; Pukhov, A

    2005-10-19

    Recent laser wakefield acceleration experiments have demonstrated the generation of femtosecond, nano-Coulomb, low emittance, nearly monokinetic relativistic electron bunches of sufficient quality to produce bright, tunable, ultrafast x-rays via Compton scattering. Design parameters for a proof-of-concept experiment are presented using a three-dimensional Compton scattering code and a laser-plasma interaction particle-in-cell code modeling the wakefield acceleration process; x-ray fluxes exceeding 10{sup 22} s{sup -1} are predicted, with a peak brightness > 10{sup 20} photons/(mm{sup 2} x mrad{sup 2} x s x 0.1% bandwidth).

  4. Acoustic Scattering by Three-Dimensional Stators and Rotors Using the SOURCE3D Code. Volume 2; Scattering Plots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Harold D.

    1999-01-01

    This second volume of Acoustic Scattering by Three-Dimensional Stators and Rotors Using the SOURCE3D Code provides the scattering plots referenced by Volume 1. There are 648 plots. Half are for the 8750 rpm "high speed" operating condition and the other half are for the 7031 rpm "mid speed" operating condition.

  5. Small-angle Compton Scattering to Determine the Depth of a Radioactive Source in Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Oberer, R. B.; Gunn, C. A.; Chiang, L. G.; Valiga, R. E.; Cantrell, J. A.

    2011-04-01

    A gamma-ray peak in a spectrum is often accompanied by a discontinuity in the Compton continuum at the peak. The Compton continuum results from Compton scattering in the detector. The discontinuity at a peak results from small-angle Compton scattering by the gamma rays in matter situated directly between the gamma-ray source and the detector. The magnitude of this discontinuity with respect to the gamma-ray peak is therefore an indicator of the amount of material or shielding between the gamma-ray source and the detector. This small-angle scattering was used to determine the depth of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) solution standards in a concrete floor mockup. The empirical results of the use of this small-angle scattering discontinuity in a concrete floor experiment will be described. A Monte Carlo calculation of the experiment will also be described. In addition, the depth determined from small-angle scattering was used in conjunction with differential attenuation to more accurately measure the uranium content of the mockup. Following these empirical results, the theory of small-angle scattering will be discussed. The magnitude of the discontinuity compared to the peak count rate is directly related to the depth of the gamma-ray source in matter. This relation can be described by relatively simple mathematical expressions. This is the first instance that we are aware of in which the small-angle Compton scattering has been used to determine the depth of a radioactive source. Furthermore this is the first development of the theoretical expressions for the magnitude of the small-angle scattering discontinuity.

  6. Sensitivity Analysis of the Scattering-Based SARBM3D Despeckling Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Di Simone, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery greatly suffers from multiplicative speckle noise, typical of coherent image acquisition sensors, such as SAR systems. Therefore, a proper and accurate despeckling preprocessing step is almost mandatory to aid the interpretation and processing of SAR data by human users and computer algorithms, respectively. Very recently, a scattering-oriented version of the popular SAR Block-Matching 3D (SARBM3D) despeckling filter, named Scattering-Based (SB)-SARBM3D, was proposed. The new filter is based on the a priori knowledge of the local topography of the scene. In this paper, an experimental sensitivity analysis of the above-mentioned despeckling algorithm is carried out, and the main results are shown and discussed. In particular, the role of both electromagnetic and geometrical parameters of the surface and the impact of its scattering behavior are investigated. Furthermore, a comprehensive sensitivity analysis of the SB-SARBM3D filter against the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) resolution and the SAR image-DEM coregistration step is also provided. The sensitivity analysis shows a significant robustness of the algorithm against most of the surface parameters, while the DEM resolution plays a key role in the despeckling process. Furthermore, the SB-SARBM3D algorithm outperforms the original SARBM3D in the presence of the most realistic scattering behaviors of the surface. An actual scenario is also presented to assess the DEM role in real-life conditions. PMID:27347971

  7. Sensitivity Analysis of the Scattering-Based SARBM3D Despeckling Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Di Simone, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery greatly suffers from multiplicative speckle noise, typical of coherent image acquisition sensors, such as SAR systems. Therefore, a proper and accurate despeckling preprocessing step is almost mandatory to aid the interpretation and processing of SAR data by human users and computer algorithms, respectively. Very recently, a scattering-oriented version of the popular SAR Block-Matching 3D (SARBM3D) despeckling filter, named Scattering-Based (SB)-SARBM3D, was proposed. The new filter is based on the a priori knowledge of the local topography of the scene. In this paper, an experimental sensitivity analysis of the above-mentioned despeckling algorithm is carried out, and the main results are shown and discussed. In particular, the role of both electromagnetic and geometrical parameters of the surface and the impact of its scattering behavior are investigated. Furthermore, a comprehensive sensitivity analysis of the SB-SARBM3D filter against the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) resolution and the SAR image-DEM coregistration step is also provided. The sensitivity analysis shows a significant robustness of the algorithm against most of the surface parameters, while the DEM resolution plays a key role in the despeckling process. Furthermore, the SB-SARBM3D algorithm outperforms the original SARBM3D in the presence of the most realistic scattering behaviors of the surface. An actual scenario is also presented to assess the DEM role in real-life conditions. PMID:27347971

  8. Sensitivity Analysis of the Scattering-Based SARBM3D Despeckling Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Di Simone, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery greatly suffers from multiplicative speckle noise, typical of coherent image acquisition sensors, such as SAR systems. Therefore, a proper and accurate despeckling preprocessing step is almost mandatory to aid the interpretation and processing of SAR data by human users and computer algorithms, respectively. Very recently, a scattering-oriented version of the popular SAR Block-Matching 3D (SARBM3D) despeckling filter, named Scattering-Based (SB)-SARBM3D, was proposed. The new filter is based on the a priori knowledge of the local topography of the scene. In this paper, an experimental sensitivity analysis of the above-mentioned despeckling algorithm is carried out, and the main results are shown and discussed. In particular, the role of both electromagnetic and geometrical parameters of the surface and the impact of its scattering behavior are investigated. Furthermore, a comprehensive sensitivity analysis of the SB-SARBM3D filter against the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) resolution and the SAR image-DEM coregistration step is also provided. The sensitivity analysis shows a significant robustness of the algorithm against most of the surface parameters, while the DEM resolution plays a key role in the despeckling process. Furthermore, the SB-SARBM3D algorithm outperforms the original SARBM3D in the presence of the most realistic scattering behaviors of the surface. An actual scenario is also presented to assess the DEM role in real-life conditions.

  9. 3D flame topography obtained by tomographic chemiluminescence with direct comparison to planar Mie scattering measurements.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenjiang; Wickersham, A J; Wu, Yue; He, Fan; Ma, Lin

    2015-03-20

    This work reports the measurements of 3D flame topography using tomographic chemiluminescence and its validation by direct comparison against planar Mie scattering measurements. Tomographic measurements of the 3D topography of various well-controlled laboratory flames were performed using projections measured by seven cameras, and a simultaneous Mie scattering measurement was performed to measure a 2D cross section of the 3D flame topography. The tomographic measurements were based on chemiluminescence emissions from the flame, and the Mie scattering measurements were based on micrometer-size oil droplets seeded into the flow. The flame topography derived from the 3D tomographic and the Mie scattering measurement was then directly compared. The results show that the flame topography obtained from tomographic chemiluminescence and the Mie measurement agreed qualitatively (i.e., both methods yielded the same profile of the flame fronts), but a quantitative difference on the order of millimeters was observed between these two methods. These results are expected to be useful for understanding the capabilities and limitations of the 3D tomographic and Mie scattering techniques in combustion diagnostics.

  10. Foreign body detection in food materials using compton scattered x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, Nigel James Bruce

    This thesis investigated the application of X-ray Compton scattering to the problem of foreign body detection in food. The methods used were analytical modelling, simulation and experiment. A criterion was defined for detectability, and a model was developed for predicting the minimum time required for detection. The model was used to predict the smallest detectable cubes of air, glass, plastic and steel. Simulations and experiments were performed on voids and glass in polystyrene phantoms, water, coffee and muesli. Backscatter was used to detect bones in chicken meat. The effects of geometry and multiple scatter on contrast, signal-to-noise, and detection time were simulated. Compton scatter was compared with transmission, and the effect of inhomogeneity was modelled. Spectral shape was investigated as a means of foreign body detection. A signal-to-noise ratio of 7.4 was required for foreign body detection in food. A 0.46 cm cube of glass or a 1.19 cm cube of polystyrene were detectable in a 10 cm cube of water in one second. The minimum time to scan a whole sample varied as the 7th power of the foreign body size, and the 5th power of the sample size. Compton scatter inspection produced higher contrasts than transmission, but required longer measurement times because of the low number of photon counts. Compton scatter inspection of whole samples was very slow compared to production line speeds in the food industry. There was potential for Compton scatter in applications which did not require whole-sample scanning, such as surface inspection. There was also potential in the inspection of inhomogeneous samples. The multiple scatter fraction varied from 25% to 55% for 2 to 10 cm cubes of water, but did not have a large effect on the detection time. The spectral shape gave good contrasts and signal-to-noise ratios in the detection of chicken bones.

  11. Compton sources for the observation of elastic photon-photon scattering events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micieli, D.; Drebot, I.; Bacci, A.; Milotti, E.; Petrillo, V.; Conti, M. Rossetti; Rossi, A. R.; Tassi, E.; Serafini, L.

    2016-09-01

    We present the design of a photon-photon collider based on conventional Compton gamma sources for the observation of elastic γ γ scattering. Two symmetric electron beams, generated by photocathodes and accelerated in linacs, produce two primary gamma rays through Compton backscattering with two high energy lasers. The elastic photon-photon scattering is analyzed by start-to-end simulations from the photocathodes to the detector. A new Monte Carlo code has been developed ad hoc for the counting of the QED events. Realistic numbers of the secondary gamma yield, obtained by using the parameters of existing or approved Compton devices, a discussion of the feasibility of the experiment and of the nature of the background are presented.

  12. Inexpensive Mie scattering experiment for the classroom manufactured by 3D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Christian; Sack, Achim; Heckel, Michael; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2016-09-01

    Scattering experiments are fundamental for structure analysis of matter on molecular, atomic and sub-atomic length scales. In contrast, it is not standard to demonstrate optical scattering experiments on the undergraduate level beyond simple diffraction gratings. We present an inexpensive Mie scattering setup manufactured with 3D printing and open hardware. The experiment can be used to determine the particle size in dilute monodisperse colloidal suspensions with surprisingly high accuracy and is, thus, suitable to demonstrate relations between scattering measurements and microscopic properties of particles within undergraduate lab course projects.

  13. Sensitivity booster for DOI-PET scanner by utilizing Compton scattering events between detector blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Yamaya, Taiga

    2014-11-01

    In a conventional PET scanner, coincidence events are measured with a limited energy window for detection of photoelectric events in order to reject Compton scatter events that occur in a patient, but Compton scatter events caused in detector crystals are also rejected. Scatter events within the patient causes scatter coincidences, but inter crystal scattering (ICS) events have useful information for determining an activity distribution. Some researchers have reported the feasibility of PET scanners based on a Compton camera for tracing ICS into the detector. However, these scanners require expensive semiconductor detectors for high-energy resolution. In the Anger-type block detector, single photons interacting with multiple detectors can be obtained for each interacting position and complete information can be gotten just as for photoelectric events in the single detector. ICS events in the single detector have been used to get coincidence, but single photons interacting with multiple detectors have not been used to get coincidence. In this work, we evaluated effect of sensitivity improvement using Compton kinetics in several types of DOI-PET scanners. The proposed method promises to improve the sensitivity using coincidence events of single photons interacting with multiple detectors, which are identified as the first interaction (FI). FI estimation accuracy can be improved to determine FI validity from the correlation between Compton scatter angles calculated on the coincidence line-of-response. We simulated an animal PET scanner consisting of 42 detectors. Each detector block consists of three types of scintillator crystals (LSO, GSO and GAGG). After the simulation, coincidence events are added as information for several depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolutions. From the simulation results, we concluded the proposed method promises to improve the sensitivity considerably when effective atomic number of a scintillator is low. Also, we showed that FI estimate

  14. X-ray irradiated model stellar atmospheres. II. Comprehensive treatment of Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madej, J.; Rózańska, A.

    2000-11-01

    We present equations and details of the computer code for model atmosphere computations, in which we include both nonzero external illumination by very hard X-rays, and Compton scattering opacity and emissivity. We assume both radiative and hydrostatic equilibrium, and LTE equation of state. The code solves simultaneously transfer of thermal radiation emitted by a hot main sequence stellar atmosphere and incident hard X-rays of photon energy approaching electron rest mass. The equation of radiative transfer and remaining equations of equilibrium contain Compton scattering terms appropriate for scattering of photons of arbitrarily large initial energies. In our paper we consider Compton scattering of photons of energy up to 400 keV on free electrons in fully relativistic thermal motion. In this paper we consider illumination of a B3 V type star by isotropic X-rays of diluted thermal spectral distribution with temperature Trad=108 K. Two series of models are computed, hydrogen-helium models and iron rich models. Our results demonstrate, that the external illumination causes extreme temperature rise at least in the uppermost layers. Outgoing spectra exhibit: big UV bump, numerous H, He, and Fe b-f opacity jumps mostly in emission, and also reflected incident spectrum with Compton cut-off. The model spectra also reflect qualitatively spectral properties of the active galactic nuclei (AGN).

  15. Polarization Transfer in Wide-Angle Compton Scattering and Single-Pion Photoproduction from the Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, C.; Cisbani, E.; Hamilton, D. J.; Salmé, G.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ahmidouch, A.; Annand, J. R. M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Beaufait, J.; Bosted, P.; Brash, E. J.; Butuceanu, C.; Carter, P.; Christy, E.; Chudakov, E.; Danagoulian, S.; Day, D.; Degtyarenko, P.; Ent, R.; Fenker, H.; Fowler, M.; Frlez, E.; Gaskell, D.; Gilman, R.; Horn, T.; Huber, G. M.; de Jager, C. W.; Jensen, E.; Jones, M. K.; Kelleher, A.; Keppel, C.; Khandaker, M.; Kohl, M.; Kumbartzki, G.; Lassiter, S.; Li, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Lovelace, H.; Luo, W.; Mack, D.; Mamyan, V.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Maxwell, J.; Mbianda, G.; Meekins, D.; Meziane, M.; Miller, J.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Mulholland, J.; Nelyubin, V.; Pentchev, L.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Piasetzky, E.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Punjabi, V.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Slifer, K.; Smith, G.; Solvignon, P.; Subedi, R.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wood, S.; Ye, Z.; Zheng, X.

    2015-10-01

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The wide-angle Compton scattering polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θcmp=70 ° . The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ±0.059 ±0.048 , where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton. However, the observed value is ˜3 times larger than predicted by the generalized-parton-distribution-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.

  16. Intershell correlations in nonresonant Compton scattering of an X-ray photon by an atom

    SciTech Connect

    Hopersky, A. N. Nadolinsky, A. M.; Ikoeva, K. Kh.; Khoroshavina, O. A.

    2011-11-15

    The role of intershell correlations in nonresonant Compton scattering of an X-ray photon by a free multielectron atom is studied theoretically for the Ar atom. The results of calculation are of a predictive nature. The developed mathematical formalism is general in nature and can be applied to a wide set of elements from the Periodic Table, for which the description of the wavefunctions of scattering states in the nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock approximation remains correct.

  17. Optimization of a multiple-scattering Compton camera as a photon-tracking imager for 6-MV photon therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taewoong; Yoon, Changyeon; Lee, Wonho

    2014-06-01

    During radiation therapy, the irradiated position and the energy deposited in a patient must be monitored. In general, calculations before photon exposure or 2D measurements of the transmitted photons have been widely used for making dose estimates. In this paper, we propose a real-time 3D dose measurement using Compton imaging technology. On the basis of the Monte-Carlo method, we designed a multiple-scattering Compton camera system (MSCC) with semiconductor and scintillation detectors. The MSCC was constructed with two semiconductor detectors as scattering detectors and a cadmium-tungstate (CWO) scintillator detector as an absorber detector. The two planar semiconductor arrays, and the CWO array consisted of 40 × 40 pixels, each with a size of 1 × 1 × ɛ mm3, where ɛ is the variable thickness of the detectors. The design parameters, such as the types of semiconductors, detector thicknesses and distances between detectors, were optimized on the basis of the detection efficiency and angular resolution of reconstructed images for a point source. Under the optimized conditions, uncertainty factors in geometry and energy were estimated for various inter-detector distances. We used a source corresponding to photons scattered from a water phantom exposed to 6-MeV peak X-rays. According to our simulation results, the figure of merit, reached its maximum value when the inter-detector distance was 3 cm. In order to achieve a high FOM, we chose 1 cm as the optimum thickness for the scattering and absorbed detectors. A cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detector showed the best performance among the simulated semiconductors. The position uncertainty caused by the pixelization effect was the major factor in degrading the angular resolution of the reconstructed images, and the degradation caused by energy broadening was less than expected. The angular uncertainties caused by Doppler broadening and incorrect sequencing were minimal compared with that of pixelization. Our

  18. Numerical Analysis of Electromagnetic Scattering from 3-D Dielectric Objects Using the Yasuura Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koba, Koichi; Ikuno, Hiroyoshi; Kawano, Mitsunori

    In order to calculate 3-D electromagnetic scattering problems by dielectric objects which we need to solve a big size simultaneous linear equation, we present a rapid algorithm on the Yasuura method where we accelerate the convergence rate of solution by using an array of multipoles as well as a conventional multipole. As a result, we can obtain the radar cross sections of dielectric objects in the optical wave region over a relative wide frequency range and a TDG pulse response. Furthermore, we analyze the scattering data about dielectric objects by using the pulse responses cut by an appropriate window function in the time domain and clarify the scattering processes on dielectric objects.

  19. Galactic gamma rays produced by Compton scattering of cosmic ray electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higdon, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Previous models of the Compton scattering of the galactic gamma rays have been based on starlight distributions determined from galactic mass models and a constant luminosity per unit mass. The fact that the spiral arms have a significantly higher photon density than does the base disk containing the bulk of the galactic mass has been neglected in calculating the Compton gamma-ray component. The inclusion of the spiral arm Compton component produces enhanced gamma-ray intensities along tangents to spiral arms. Irrespective of whether the cosmic-ray electron density is enhanced in the spiral arms, increased gamma-ray emission is produced along the spiral arm tangents due to increased photon density. Thus, cosmic ray sources are not necessarily located in the arms.

  20. First refraction contrast imaging via Laser-Compton Scattering X-ray at KEK

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaue, Kazuyuki; Aoki, Tatsuro; Washio, Masakazu; Araki, Sakae; Fukuda, Masafumi; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Urakawa, Junji

    2012-07-31

    Laser-Compton Scattering (LCS) is one of the most feasible techniques for high quality, high brightness, and compact X-ray source. High energy electron beam produced by accelerators scatters off the laser photon at a small spot. As a laser target, we have been developing a pulsedlaser storage cavity for increasing an X-ray flux. The X-ray flux was still inadequate that was 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5}/sec, however, we performed first refraction contrast imaging in order to evaluate the quality of LCS X-ray. Edge enhanced contrast imaging was achieved by changing the distance from sample to detector. The edge enhancement indicates that the LCS X-ray has small source size, i.e. high brightness. We believe that the result has demonstrated good feasibility of linac-based high brightness X-ray sources via laser-electron Compton scatterings.

  1. X-ray-photon Compton scattering by a linear molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopersky, A. N.; Nadolinsky, A. M.; Novikov, S. A.; Yavna, V. A.; Ikoeva, K. Kh

    2015-09-01

    We formulate a nonrelativistic quantum theory for the nonresonant inelastic scattering process of an x-ray photon by a free linear molecule outside of the impulse approximation framework. We find a strong orientation effect dependent on changes in the schemes of the proposed experiments. Calculations of the absolute values and forms for the double differential scattering cross sections are carried out for the HF molecule and have a predictive character. The presented theory is of a general nature, and its applicability to a particular linear molecule is constrained only by the demand of correctness of nonrelativistic methods for constructing molecular scattering orbitals.

  2. Time-step limits for a Monte Carlo Compton-scattering method

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffery D; Warsa, James S; Lowrie, Robert B

    2008-01-01

    Compton scattering is an important aspect of radiative transfer in high energy density applications. In this process, the frequency and direction of a photon are altered by colliding with a free electron. The change in frequency of a scattered photon results in an energy exchange between the photon and target electron and energy coupling between radiation and matter. Canfield, Howard, and Liang have presented a Monte Carlo method for simulating Compton scattering that models the photon-electron collision kinematics exactly. However, implementing their technique in multiphysics problems that include the effects of radiation-matter energy coupling typically requires evaluating the material temperature at its beginning-of-time-step value. This explicit evaluation can lead to unstable and oscillatory solutions. In this paper, we perform a stability analysis of this Monte Carlo method and present time-step limits that avoid instabilities and nonphysical oscillations by considering a spatially independent, purely scattering radiative-transfer problem. Examining a simplified problem is justified because it isolates the effects of Compton scattering, and existing Monte Carlo techniques can robustly model other physics (such as absorption, emission, sources, and photon streaming). Our analysis begins by simplifying the equations that are solved via Monte Carlo within each time step using the Fokker-Planck approximation. Next, we linearize these approximate equations about an equilibrium solution such that the resulting linearized equations describe perturbations about this equilibrium. We then solve these linearized equations over a time step and determine the corresponding eigenvalues, quantities that can predict the behavior of solutions generated by a Monte Carlo simulation as a function of time-step size and other physical parameters. With these results, we develop our time-step limits. This approach is similar to our recent investigation of time discretizations for the

  3. The integration of improved Monte Carlo compton scattering algorithms into the Integrated TIGER Series.

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, Thomas, J., IV

    2004-08-01

    The Integrated TIGER Series (ITS) is a software package that solves coupled electron-photon transport problems. ITS performs analog photon tracking for energies between 1 keV and 1 GeV. Unlike its deterministic counterpart, the Monte Carlo calculations of ITS do not require a memory-intensive meshing of phase space; however, its solutions carry statistical variations. Reducing these variations is heavily dependent on runtime. Monte Carlo simulations must therefore be both physically accurate and computationally efficient. Compton scattering is the dominant photon interaction above 100 keV and below 5-10 MeV, with higher cutoffs occurring in lighter atoms. In its current model of Compton scattering, ITS corrects the differential Klein-Nishina cross sections (which assumes a stationary, free electron) with the incoherent scattering function, a function dependent on both the momentum transfer and the atomic number of the scattering medium. While this technique accounts for binding effects on the scattering angle, it excludes the Doppler broadening the Compton line undergoes because of the momentum distribution in each bound state. To correct for these effects, Ribbefor's relativistic impulse approximation (IA) will be employed to create scattering cross section differential in both energy and angle for each element. Using the parameterizations suggested by Brusa et al., scattered photon energies and angle can be accurately sampled at a high efficiency with minimal physical data. Two-body kinematics then dictates the electron's scattered direction and energy. Finally, the atomic ionization is relaxed via Auger emission or fluorescence. Future work will extend these improvements in incoherent scattering to compounds and to adjoint calculations.

  4. Methods of constructing a 3D geological model from scatter data

    SciTech Connect

    Horsman, J.; Bethel, W.

    1995-04-01

    Most geoscience applications, such as assessment of an oil reservoir or hazardous waste site, require geological characterization of the site. Geological characterization involves analysis of spatial distributions of lithology, porosity, etc. Because of the complexity of the spatial relationships, the authors find that a 3-D model of geology is better suited for integration of many different types of data and provides a better representation of a site than a 2-D one. A 3-D model of geology is constructed from sample data obtained from field measurements, which are usually scattered. To create a volume model from scattered data, interpolation between points is required. The interpolation can be computed using one of several computational algorithms. Alternatively, a manual method may be employed, in which an interactive graphics device is used to input by hand the information that lies between the data points. For example, a mouse can be used to draw lines connecting data points with equal values. The combination of these two methods presents yet another approach. In this study, the authors will compare selected methods of 3-D geological modeling, They used a flow-based, modular visualization environment (AVS) to construct the geological models computationally. Within this system, they used three modules, scat{_}3d, trivar and scatter{_}to{_}ucd, as examples of computational methods. They compare these methods to the combined manual and computational approach. Because there are no tools readily available in AVS for this type of construction, they used a geological modeling system to demonstrate this method.

  5. A Set of Monte Carlo Subroutines for Treating the Physics of Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    John Lestone; Jonathan Earnhart; Thomas Prettyman

    1998-12-01

    A set of portable Monte Carlo subroutines is presented to treat the physics of Compton scattering. Electron binding energies are included by the modification of the Klein-Nishina probability distribution by the incoherent scattering function. In addition the scattered photon's energy is calculated by taking into account the momentum distribution of the electron. These subroutines have been verified and validated by calculating the total cross section over incident photon energies of 10 keV to 100 MeV for elements of Z=l to Z=l 00 and are within 1.08% of published values.

  6. COOLING RATES FOR RELATIVISTIC ELECTRONS UNDERGOING COMPTON SCATTERING IN STRONG MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Baring, Matthew G.; Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Gonthier, Peter L. E-mail: zw1@rice.edu

    2011-05-20

    For inner magnetospheric models of hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission in high-field pulsars and magnetars, resonant Compton upscattering is anticipated to be the most efficient process for generating continuum radiation. This is in part due to the proximity of a hot soft photon bath from the stellar surface to putative radiation dissipation regions in the inner magnetosphere. Moreover, because the scattering process becomes resonant at the cyclotron frequency, the effective cross section exceeds the classical Thomson value by over two orders of magnitude, thereby enhancing the efficiency of continuum production and the cooling of relativistic electrons. This paper presents computations of the electron cooling rates for this process, which are needed for resonant Compton models of non-thermal radiation from such highly magnetized pulsars. The computed rates extend previous calculations of magnetic Thomson cooling to the domain of relativistic quantum effects, sampled near and above the quantum critical magnetic field of 44.13 TG. This is the first exposition of fully relativistic, quantum magnetic Compton cooling rates for electrons, and it employs both the traditional Johnson and Lippmann cross section and a newer Sokolov and Ternov (ST) formulation of Compton scattering in strong magnetic fields. Such ST formalism is formally correct for treating spin-dependent effects that are important in the cyclotron resonance and has not been addressed before in the context of cooling by Compton scattering. The QED effects are observed to profoundly lower the rates below extrapolations of the familiar magnetic Thomson results, as expected, when recoil and Klein-Nishina reductions become important.

  7. On the possibility of using X-ray Compton scattering to study magnetoelectrical properties of crystals.

    PubMed

    Collins, S P; Laundy, D; Connolley, T; van der Laan, G; Fabrizi, F; Janssen, O; Cooper, M J; Ebert, H; Mankovsky, S

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of using Compton scattering--an inelastic X-ray scattering process that yields a projection of the electron momentum density--to probe magnetoelectrical properties. It is shown that an antisymmetric component of the momentum density is a unique fingerprint of such time- and parity-odd physics. It is argued that polar ferromagnets are ideal candidates to demonstrate this phenomenon and the first experimental results are shown, on a single-domain crystal of GaFeO3. The measured antisymmetric Compton profile is very small (≃ 10(-5) of the symmetric part) and of the same order of magnitude as the statistical errors. Relativistic first-principles simulations of the antisymmetric Compton profile are presented and it is shown that, while the effect is indeed predicted by theory, and scales with the size of the valence spin-orbit interaction, its magnitude is significantly overestimated. The paper outlines some important constraints on the properties of the antisymmetric Compton profile arising from the underlying crystallographic symmetry of the sample. PMID:26919371

  8. On the possibility of using X-ray Compton scattering to study magnetoelectrical properties of crystals

    PubMed Central

    Collins, S. P.; Laundy, D.; Connolley, T.; van der Laan, G.; Fabrizi, F.; Janssen, O.; Cooper, M. J.; Ebert, H.; Mankovsky, S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of using Compton scattering – an inelastic X-ray scattering process that yields a projection of the electron momentum density – to probe magnetoelectrical properties. It is shown that an antisymmetric component of the momentum density is a unique fingerprint of such time- and parity-odd physics. It is argued that polar ferromagnets are ideal candidates to demonstrate this phenomenon and the first experimental results are shown, on a single-domain crystal of GaFeO3. The measured antisymmetric Compton profile is very small (≃ 10−5 of the symmetric part) and of the same order of magnitude as the statistical errors. Relativistic first-principles simulations of the antisymmetric Compton profile are presented and it is shown that, while the effect is indeed predicted by theory, and scales with the size of the valence spin–orbit interaction, its magnitude is significantly overestimated. The paper outlines some important constraints on the properties of the antisymmetric Compton profile arising from the underlying crystallographic symmetry of the sample. PMID:26919371

  9. Estimation of effective atomic number in the Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio using different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurudirek, M.; Büyükyıldız, M.

    2016-06-01

    The Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio (R/C) is a very convenient parameter, which can be utilized in material analysis and estimating effective atomic number (Zeff). In the case for a relatively low scattering angle, for which the energy of the Compton scattered photons is not very much different from that of incident photons, the corrections due to self-absorption for Rayleigh and Compton scattering will be roughly equal. Therefore, it enables a result to be obtained which is almost independent of X-ray attenuation inside the sample and it will depend only on the material under investigation. The most frequently used method for calculation of Zeff available in literature is plotting R/C of elements as a function of atomic number and constituting the best fit curve. From this fit curve, the respective Zeff can be determined using R/C of the material. In the present study, we report Zeff of different materials using different methods such as interpolation and direct methods as possible alternatives to the most common fitting method. The results were compared with the experiments wherever possible. The agreement between interpolation method and the fitting method was found to be very satisfactory as relative changes (%) were always less than 9% while the direct method results with somehow significantly higher values of Zeff when compared to the other methods.

  10. Multiple resonant scattering in the Compton upscatter model of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Resonant Compton scattering, an increasingly popular mechanism for suppressing X-rays and producing gamma rays, must be treated as a multiple-scattering process for conditions thought characteristic of gamma-ray bursts. Photons that multiply scatter with a beamed power-law electron distribution in a uniform magnetic field produce a flat spectrum between the cyclotron frequency and an optical-depth-dependent critical energy; this critical energy ranges between several hundred keV and several MeV. Above this critical energy, the gamma-ray spectrum has a shape determined by the electron distribution and described by a single-scattering model. Only electron distributions that are nearly proportional to the electron momentum are able to simultaneously suppress X-rays and produce a single-scattering spectrum. As the Thomson optical depth approaches unity, photons that experience multiple scatterings often spawn additional photons at a rate that makes the model unphysical.

  11. Nonlinear Compton scattering of ultrashort intense laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Seipt, D.; Kaempfer, B.

    2011-02-15

    The scattering of temporally shaped intense laser pulses off electrons is discussed by means of manifestly covariant quantum electrodynamics. We employ a framework based on Volkov states with a time-dependent laser envelope in light-cone coordinates within the Furry picture. An expression for the cross section is constructed unambiguously in respect of the pulse length. A broad distribution of scattered photons with a rich pattern of subpeaks like that obtained in Thomson scattering is found. These broad peaks may overlap at sufficiently high laser intensity, rendering inappropriate the notion of individual harmonics. The limit of monochromatic plane waves as well as the classical limit of Thomson scattering are discussed. As a main result, a scaling law is presented connecting the Thomson limit with the general result for arbitrary kinematics. In the overlapping regions of the spectral density, the classical and quantum calculations give different results, even in the Thomson limit. Thus, a phase-space region is identified where the differential photon distribution is strongly modified by quantum effects.

  12. Nonlinear Compton scattering of ultrashort intense laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seipt, D.; Kämpfer, B.

    2011-02-01

    The scattering of temporally shaped intense laser pulses off electrons is discussed by means of manifestly covariant quantum electrodynamics. We employ a framework based on Volkov states with a time-dependent laser envelope in light-cone coordinates within the Furry picture. An expression for the cross section is constructed unambiguously in respect of the pulse length. A broad distribution of scattered photons with a rich pattern of subpeaks like that obtained in Thomson scattering is found. These broad peaks may overlap at sufficiently high laser intensity, rendering inappropriate the notion of individual harmonics. The limit of monochromatic plane waves as well as the classical limit of Thomson scattering are discussed. As a main result, a scaling law is presented connecting the Thomson limit with the general result for arbitrary kinematics. In the overlapping regions of the spectral density, the classical and quantum calculations give different results, even in the Thomson limit. Thus, a phase-space region is identified where the differential photon distribution is strongly modified by quantum effects.

  13. Study of the proton structure by measurements of polarization transfers in real Compton scattering at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Cristiano Fanelli; Cisbani, Evarostp; Hamilton, David; Salme, G.; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-03-01

    A preliminary analysis of polarization-transfer data at large scattering angle (70°), obtained in an experiment of real Compton scattering on proton, performed in Hall-C of Jefferson Lab, is presented. It is also discussed the relevance of this kind of experiments for shedding light on the non-perturbative structure of the proton, at low energy, and on the transition from the non-perturbative regime to the perturbative one, that occurs at high energy. Moreover, the possibility to extract Compton form factors and the Generalized Parton Distributions, one of the most promising theoretical tool to determine the total angular momentum contribution of quarks and gluons to nucleon spin, is emphasized.

  14. A measurement method of a detector response function for monochromatic electrons based on the Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhlanov, S. V.; Bazlov, N. V.; Derbin, A. V.; Drachnev, I. S.; Kayunov, A. S.; Muratova, V. N.; Semenov, D. A.; Unzhakov, E. V.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present a method of scintillation detector energy calibration using the gamma-rays. The technique is based on the Compton scattering of gamma-rays in a scintillation detector and subsequent photoelectric absorption of the scattered photon in the Ge-detector. The novelty of this method is that the source of gamma rays, the germanium and scintillation detectors are immediately arranged adjacent to each other. The method presents an effective solution for the detectors consisting of a low atomic number materials, when the ratio between Compton effect and photoelectric absorption is large and the mean path of gamma-rays is comparable to the size of the detector. The technique can be used for the precision measurements of the scintillator light yield dependence on the electron energy.

  15. Compton scattering from a pion: Off-shell effects and the equivalence theorem

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, S.; Fearing, H.W.

    1995-05-10

    We consider Compton scattering from a pion in the framework of chiral perturbation theory ({chi}{ital PT}). We investigate off-shell effects in the s- and u-channel pole diagrams. For that purpose we perform a field transformation which, in comparison with the standard Gasser and Leutwyler lagrangian, generates additional terms at order {ital p}{sup 4} proportional to the lowest-order equation of motion. We demonstrate that the two lagrangians which generate different off-shell form factors predict the same Compton scattering S-matrix. This result is interpreted as an application of a generalized equivalence theorem. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  16. Quantitative phase retrieval with picosecond X-ray pulses from the ATF Inverse Compton Scattering source

    SciTech Connect

    Endrizzi, M.; Pogorelsky, I.; Gureyev, T.E.; Delogu, P.; Oliva, P.; Golosio, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Yakimenko, Y.; Bottigli, U.

    2011-01-28

    Quantitative phase retrieval is experimentally demonstrated using the Inverse Compton Scattering X-ray source available at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) in the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Phase-contrast images are collected using in-line geometry, with a single X-ray pulse of approximate duration of one picosecond. The projected thickness of homogeneous samples of various polymers is recovered quantitatively from the time-averaged intensity of transmitted X-rays. The data are in good agreement with the expectations showing that ATF Inverse Compton Scattering source is suitable for performing phase-sensitive quantitative X-ray imaging on the picosecond scale. The method shows promise for quantitative imaging of fast dynamic phenomena.

  17. Design and Initial Operation of a Tunable Compton-Scattering Based Gamma-Ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, David; Anderson, Scott; Betts, Shawn; Johnson, Micah; McNabb, Dennis; Messerly, Mike; Pruet, Jason; Shverdin, Miroslav; Tremaine, Aaron; Hartemann, Fred; Siders, Craig; Barty, Chris

    2007-11-01

    Tunable, monochromatic gamma-ray sources are currently being developed at LLNL for nuclear photo-science and related applications. These novel systems are based on Compton scattering of laser photons by a high brightness relativistic electron beam produced by an rf photoinjector and offer a path to high-brightness high-energy (> 1 MeV) x-ray & gamma-rays due to their favorable scaling with electron energy. The current demonstration source, called the ``Thomson-Radiated Extreme X-Ray" (T-REX) source, targets photon energies up to 1 MeV. With extensive modeling using PARMELA and well-benchmarked custom Compton-scattering simulation codes, the optimal design parameters for an interaction (including factors such as the collision angle, focal spot size, bunch charge, laser intensity, pulse duration, and laser beam path) can be determined. Here we present the results of this optimization, including early experimental results from the newly commissioned system.

  18. Design of narrow-band Compton scattering sources for nuclear resonance fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, F.; Anderson, S. G.; Gibson, D. J.; Marsh, R. A.; Wu, S. S.; Siders, C. W.; Barty, C. P. J.; Hartemann, F. V.

    2011-05-01

    The design of narrow-band Compton scattering sources for specific applications using nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) is presented. NRF lines are extremely narrow (ΔE/Ẽ10-6) and require spectrally narrow sources to be excited selectively and efficiently. This paper focuses on the theory of spectral broadening mechanisms involved during Compton scattering of laser photons from relativistic electron beams. It is shown that in addition to the electron beam emittance, energy spread, and the laser parameters, nonlinear processes during the laser-electron interaction can have a detrimental effect on the gamma-ray source bandwidth, including a newly identified weakly nonlinear phase shift accumulated over the effective interaction duration. Finally, a design taking these mechanisms into consideration is outlined.

  19. LLNL Precision Compton Scattering Light Source: X-band RF Photoinjector and Accelerator Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Roark; Anderson, S. G.; Gibson, D. J.; Wu, S. S.; Hartemann, F. V.; Houck, T. L.; Ebbers, C.; Scarpetti, R. D.; Barty, C. P. J.; Adolphsen, C.; Chu, T. S.; Li, Z.; Tantawi, S. G.; Vlieks, A. E.; Wang, J. W.; Raubenheimer, T. O.

    2010-11-01

    The design and optimization of a Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering source are presented. This precision light source with up to 2.5 MeV photon energy is currently being built at LLNL using high gradient X-band accelerator technology in collaboration with SLAC. The design of a high brightness 5.59 cell X-band RF photoinjector will be presented. An ``early light'' machine has been designed using the 250 pC, <1mm-mrad electron bunches from the photoinjector, a single T53 traveling wave accelerator section, and Joule-class diode pumped laser pulses to produce diagnostic Compton scattered photons. Design of this ``early-light'' machine will be presented with discussion of the various components, layout considerations, and plans for the full 250 MeV linear accelerator.

  20. Time-step limits for a Monte Carlo Compton-scattering method

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffery D; Warsa, James S; Lowrie, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    We perform a stability analysis of a Monte Carlo method for simulating the Compton scattering of photons by free electron in high energy density applications and develop time-step limits that avoid unstable and oscillatory solutions. Implementing this Monte Carlo technique in multi physics problems typically requires evaluating the material temperature at its beginning-of-time-step value, which can lead to this undesirable behavior. With a set of numerical examples, we demonstrate the efficacy of our time-step limits.

  1. A simple method for computing the relativistic Compton scattering kernel for radiative transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, M. K.; Kershaw, D. S.; Beason, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    Correct computation of the Compton scattering kernel (CSK), defined to be the Klein-Nishina differential cross section averaged over a relativistic Maxwellian electron distribution, is reported. The CSK is analytically reduced to a single integral, which can then be rapidly evaluated using a power series expansion, asymptotic series, and rational approximation for sigma(s). The CSK calculation has application to production codes that aim at understanding certain astrophysical, laser fusion, and nuclear weapons effects phenomena.

  2. Generalized polarizabilities and the spin-averaged amplitude in virtual Compton scattering off the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Drechsel, D.; Knoechlein, G.; Metz, A.; Scherer, S.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the low-energy behavior of the spin-averaged amplitude of virtual Compton scattering off a nucleon. Based on gauge invariance, Lorentz invariance, and the discrete symmetries, it is shown that to first order in the frequency of the final real photon only two generalized polarizabilities appear. Different low-energy expansion schemes are discussed and put into perspective. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. External Compton Scattering in Blazar Jets and the Location of the Gamma-Ray Emitting Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, Justin D.

    2016-10-01

    I study the location of the γ-ray emission in blazar jets by creating a Compton-scattering approximation that is valid for all anisotropic radiation fields in the Thomson through Klein–Nishina regimes, is highly accurate, and can speed up numerical calculations by up to a factor of ∼10. I apply this approximation to synchrotron self-Compton, external Compton scattering of photons from the accretion disk, broad line region (BLR), and dust torus. I use a stratified BLR model and include detailed Compton-scattering calculations of a spherical and flattened BLR. I create two dust torus models, one where the torus is an annulus and one where it is an extended disk. I present detailed calculations of the photoabsorption optical depth using my detailed BLR and dust torus models, including the full angle dependence. I apply these calculations to the emission from a relativistically moving blob traveling through these radiation fields. The ratio of γ-ray to optical flux produces a predictable pattern that could help locate the γ-ray emission region. I show that the bright flare from 3C 454.3 in 2010 November detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope is unlikely to originate from a single blob inside the BLR. This is because it moves outside the BLR in a time shorter than the flare duration, although emission by multiple blobs inside the BLR is possible. Also, γ-rays are unlikely to originate from outside of the BLR, due to the scattering of photons from an extended dust torus, since the cooling timescale would be too long to explain the observed short variability.

  4. Quantitative fully 3D PET via model-based scatter correction

    SciTech Connect

    Ollinger, J.M.

    1994-05-01

    We have investigated the quantitative accuracy of fully 3D PET using model-based scatter correction by measuring the half-life of Ga-68 in the presence of scatter from F-18. The inner chamber of a Data Spectrum cardiac phantom was filled with 18.5 MBq of Ga-68. The outer chamber was filled with an equivalent amount of F-18. The cardiac phantom was placed in a 22x30.5 cm elliptical phantom containing anthropomorphic lung inserts filled with a water-Styrofoam mixture. Ten frames of dynamic data were collected over 13.6 hours on Siemens-CTI 953B scanner with the septa retracted. The data were corrected using model-based scatter correction, which uses the emission images, transmission images and an accurate physical model to directly calculate the scatter distribution. Both uncorrected and corrected data were reconstructed using the Promis algorithm. The scatter correction required 4.3% of the total reconstruction time. The scatter fraction in a small volume of interest in the center of the inner chamber of the cardiac insert rose from 4.0% in the first interval to 46.4% in the last interval as the ratio of F-18 activity to Ga-68 activity rose from 1:1 to 33:1. Fitting a single exponential to the last three data points yields estimates of the half-life of Ga-68 of 77.01 minutes and 68.79 minutes for uncorrected and corrected data respectively. Thus, scatter correction reduces the error from 13.3% to 1.2%. This suggests that model-based scatter correction is accurate in the heterogeneous attenuating medium found in the chest, making possible quantitative, fully 3D PET in the body.

  5. Analysis of position-dependent Compton scatter in scintimammography with mild compression

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Williams; Deepa Narayanan; Mitali J. More; Patricia J. Goodale; Stanislaw Majewski; Douglas Kieper

    2003-10-01

    In breast scintigraphy using /sup 99m/Tc-sestamibi the relatively low radiotracer uptake in the breast compared to that in other organs such as the heart results in a large fraction of the detected events being Compton scattered gamma-rays. In this study, our goal was to determine whether generalized conclusions regarding scatter-to-primary ratios at various locations within the breast image are possible, and if so, to use them to make explicit scatter corrections to the breast scintigrams. Energy spectra were obtained from patient scans for contiguous regions of interest (ROIs) centered left to right within the image of the breast, and extending from the chest wall edge of the image to the anterior edge. An anthropomorphic torso phantom with fillable internal organs and a compressed-shape breast containing water only was used to obtain realistic position-dependent scatter-only spectra. For each ROI, the measured patient energy spectrum was fitted with a linear combination of the scatter-only spectrum from the anthropomorphic phantom and the scatter-free spectrum from a point source. We found that although there is a very strong dependence on location within the breast of the scatter-to-primary ratio, the spectra are well modeled by a linear combination of position-dependent scatter-only spectra and a position-independent scatter-free spectrum, resulting in a set of position-dependent correction factors. These correction factors can be used along with measured emission spectra from a given breast to correct for the Compton scatter in the scintigrams. However, the large variation among patients in the magnitude of the position-dependent scatter makes the success of universal correction approaches unlikely.

  6. 3D reconstruction of carbon nanotube networks from neutron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, Mostafa; Baniassadi, Majid; Baghani, Mostafa; Dadmun, Mark; Tehrani, Mehran

    2015-09-01

    Structure reconstruction from statistical descriptors, such as scattering data obtained using x-rays or neutrons, is essential in understanding various properties of nanocomposites. Scattering based reconstruction can provide a realistic model, over various length scales, that can be used for numerical simulations. In this study, 3D reconstruction of a highly loaded carbon nanotube (CNT)-conducting polymer system based on small and ultra-small angle neutron scattering (SANS and USANS, respectively) data was performed. These light-weight and flexible materials have recently shown great promise for high-performance thermoelectric energy conversion, and their further improvement requires a thorough understanding of their structure-property relationships. The first step in achieving such understanding is to generate models that contain the hierarchy of CNT networks over nano and micron scales. The studied system is a single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly (styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). SANS and USANS patterns of the different samples containing 10, 30, and 50 wt% SWCNTs were measured. These curves were then utilized to calculate statistical two-point correlation functions of the nanostructure. These functions along with the geometrical information extracted from SANS data and scanning electron microscopy images were used to reconstruct a representative volume element (RVE) nanostructure. Generated RVEs can be used for simulations of various mechanical and physical properties. This work, therefore, introduces a framework for the reconstruction of 3D RVEs of high volume faction nanocomposites containing high aspect ratio fillers from scattering experiments.

  7. Multiple-mode Lamb wave scattering simulations using 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique.

    PubMed

    Leckey, Cara A C; Rogge, Matthew D; Miller, Corey A; Hinders, Mark K

    2012-02-01

    We have implemented three-dimensional (3D) elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) simulations to model Lamb wave scattering for two flaw-types in an aircraft-grade aluminum plate, a rounded rectangle flat-bottom hole and a disbond of the same shape. The plate thickness and flaws explored in this work include frequency-thickness regions where several Lamb wave modes exist and sometimes overlap in phase and/or group velocity. For the case of the flat-bottom hole the depth was incrementally increased to explore progressive changes in multiple-mode Lamb wave scattering due to the damage. The flat-bottom hole simulation results have been compared to experimental data and are shown to provide key insight for this well-defined experimental case by explaining unexpected results in experimental waveforms. For the rounded rectangle disbond flaw, which would be difficult to implement experimentally, we found that Lamb wave behavior differed significantly from the flat-bottom hole flaw. Most of the literature in this field is restricted to low frequency-thickness regions due to difficulties in interpreting data when multiple modes exist. We found that benchmarked 3D EFIT simulations can yield an understanding of scattering behavior for these higher frequency-thickness regions and in cases that would be difficult to set up experimentally. Additionally, our results show that 2D simulations would not have been sufficient for modeling the complicated scattering that occurred. PMID:21908011

  8. 3D Finite-Difference Modeling of Scattered Teleseismic Wavefields in a Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, I. B.; Zheng, H.

    2005-12-01

    For a teleseismic array targeting subducting crust in a zone of active subduction, scattering from the zone underlying the trench result in subhorizontally-propagating waves that could be difficult to distinguish from converted P- and S- wave backscattered from the surface. Because back-scattered modes often provide the most spectacular images of subducting slabs, it is important to understand their differences from the arrivals scattered from the trench zone. To investigate the detailed teleseismic wavefield in a subduction zone environment, we performed a full-waveform, 3-D visco-elastic finite-difference modeling of teleseismic wave propagation using a Beowulf cluster. The synthetics show strong scattering from the trench zone, dominated by the mantle and crustal P-waves propagating at 6.2-8.1.km/s and slower. These scattered waves occupy the same time and moveout intervals as the backscattered modes, and also have similar amplitudes. Although their amplitude decay characters are different, with the uncertainties in the velocity and density structure of the subduction zone, unambiguous distinguishing of these modes appears difficult. However, under minimal assumptions (in particular, without invoking slab dehydration), recent observations of receiver function amplitudes decreasing away from the trench favor the interpretation of trench-zone scattering.

  9. Relativistic electron beam acceleration by Compton scattering of extraordinary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Sugaya, R.

    2006-05-15

    Relativistic transport equations, which demonstrate that relativistic and nonrelativistic particle acceleration along and across a magnetic field and the generation of an electric field transverse to the magnetic field, are induced by nonlinear wave-particle scattering (nonlinear Landau and cyclotron damping) of almost perpendicularly propagating electromagnetic waves in a relativistic magnetized plasma were derived from the relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell equations. The relativistic transport equations show that electromagnetic waves can accelerate particles in the k{sup ''} direction (k{sup ''}=k-k{sup '}). Simultaneously, an intense cross-field electric field, E{sub 0}=B{sub 0}xv{sub d}/c, is generated via the dynamo effect owing to perpendicular particle drift to satisfy the generalized Ohm's law, which means that this cross-field particle drift is identical to the ExB drift. On the basis of these equations, acceleration and heating of a relativistic electron beam due to nonlinear wave-particle scattering of electromagnetic waves in a magnetized plasma were investigated theoretically and numerically. Two electromagnetic waves interact nonlinearly with the relativistic electron beam, satisfying the resonance condition of {omega}{sub k}-{omega}{sub k{sup '}}-(k{sub perpendicular}-k{sub perpendicula=} r{sup '})v{sub d}-(k{sub parallel}-k{sub parallel}{sup '})v{sub b}{approx_equal}m{omega}{sub ce}, where v{sub b} and v{sub d} are the parallel and perpendicular velocities of the relativistic electron beam, respectively, and {omega}{sub ce} is the relativistic electron cyclotron frequency. The relativistic transport equations using the relativistic drifted Maxwellian momentum distribution function of the relativistic electron beam were derived and analyzed. It was verified numerically that extraordinary waves can accelerate the highly relativistic electron beam efficiently with {beta}m{sub e}c{sup 2} < or approx. 1 GeV, where {beta}=(1-v{sub b}{sup 2}/c{sup 2}){sup -1/2}.

  10. Evaluation of the forward Compton scattering off protons: Spin-independent amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryniuk, Oleksii; Hagelstein, Franziska; Pascalutsa, Vladimir

    2015-10-01

    We evaluate the forward Compton scattering off the proton, based on Kramers-Kronig kind of relations which express the Compton amplitudes in terms of integrals of total photoabsorption cross sections. We obtain two distinct fits to the world data on the unpolarized total photoabsorption cross section and evaluate the various spin-independent sum rules using these fits. For the sum of proton electric and magnetic dipole polarizabilities governed by the Baldin sum rule, we obtain the following average (between the two fits): αE 1+βM 1=14.0 (2 )×1 0-4 fm3 . An analogous sum rule involving the quadrupole polarizabilities of the proton is evaluated too. The spin-independent forward amplitude of proton Compton scattering is evaluated in a broad energy range. The results are compared with previous evaluations and the only experimental data point for this amplitude (at 2.2 GeV). We remark on sum rules for the elastic component of polarizabilities.

  11. X-ray Compton scattering experiments for fluid alkali metals at high temperatures and pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, K. Fukumaru, T.; Kimura, K.; Yao, M.; Tamura, K.; Katoh, M.; Kajihara, Y.; Inui, M.; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.

    2015-08-17

    We have developed a high-pressure vessel and a cell for x-ray Compton scattering measurements of fluid alkali metals. Measurements have been successfully carried out for alkali metal rubidium at elevated temperatures and pressures using synchrotron radiation at SPring-8. The width of Compton profiles (CPs) of fluid rubidium becomes narrow with decreasing fluid density, which indicates that the CPs sensitively detect the effect of reduction in the valence electron density. At the request of all authors of the paper, and with the agreement of the Proceedings Editor, an updated version of this article was published on 10 September 2015. The original article supplied to AIP Publishing was not the final version and contained PDF conversion errors in Formulas (1) and (2). The errors have been corrected in the updated and re-published article.

  12. Application of edge-based finite elements and vector ABCs in 3D scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Jin, J. M.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    A finite element absorbing boundary condition (FE-ABC) solution of the scattering by arbitrary 3-D structures is considered. The computational domain is discretized using edge-based tetrahedral elements. In contrast to the node-based elements, edge elements can treat geometries with sharp edges, are divergence-less, and easily satisfy the field continuity condition across dielectric interfaces. They do, however, lead to a higher unknown count but this is balanced by the greater sparsity of the resulting finite element matrix. Thus, the computation time required to solve such a system iteratively with a given degree of accuracy is less than the traditional node-based approach. The purpose is to examine the derivation and performance of the ABC's when applied to 2-D and 3-D problems and to discuss the specifics of our FE-ABC implementation.

  13. The use of Compton scattering in detecting anomaly in soil-possible use in pyromaterial detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedin, Ahmad Firdaus Zainal; Ibrahim, Noorddin; Zabidi, Noriza Ahmad; Demon, Siti Zulaikha Ngah

    2016-01-01

    The Compton scattering is able to determine the signature of land mine detection based on dependency of density anomaly and energy change of scattered photons. In this study, 4.43 MeV gamma of the Am-Be source was used to perform Compton scattering. Two detectors were placed between source with distance of 8 cm and radius of 1.9 cm. Detectors of thallium-doped sodium iodide NaI(TI) was used for detecting gamma ray. There are 9 anomalies used in this simulation. The physical of anomaly is in cylinder form with radius of 10 cm and 8.9 cm height. The anomaly is buried 5 cm deep in the bed soil measured 80 cm radius and 53.5 cm height. Monte Carlo methods indicated the scattering of photons is directly proportional to density of anomalies. The difference between detector response with anomaly and without anomaly namely contrast ratio values are in a linear relationship with density of anomalies. Anomalies of air, wood and water give positive contrast ratio values whereas explosive, sand, concrete, graphite, limestone and polyethylene give negative contrast ratio values. Overall, the contrast ratio values are greater than 2 % for all anomalies. The strong contrast ratios result a good detection capability and distinction between anomalies.

  14. Spectroscopic and X-ray Scattering Models in SPECT3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovkin, Igor; Gregori, Gianluca; Macfarlane, Joseph; Hall, Iain; Woodruff, Pamela; Bailey, James; Harding, Eric; Ao, Tom

    2012-10-01

    Spectrally resolved X-ray scattering has become a very effective method for diagnosing the electron temperatures, densities, and average ionization of warm dense matter. We present a newly implemented capability to compute scattering from realistic experiment configurations, including the influence of plasma non-uniformities and collecting scattered x-rays from a range of angles. The method is based on a formalism developed by G. Gregori [1]. The x-ray scattering modeling has been added to the multi-dimensional collisional-radiative spectral and imaging package SPECT3D [2]. Ability to compute emissivity and attenuation of scattered photons within a multi-dimensional plasma with non-uniform temperature and density distributions adds major new functionality to existing models. We will discuss the implementation details and demonstrate results relevant to ongoing experimental investigations at Sandia National Laboratories.[4pt] [1] G. Gregori, S. H. Glenzer, W. Rozmus, R. W. Lee, and O. L. Landen, Phys. Rev. E 67, 026412 (2003).[0pt] [2] J. J. MacFarlane, I. E. Golovkin, P. Wang, P. R. Woodruff, and N. A. Pereyra, High Energy Density Phys., Vol. 3, p. 181-190 (2007).

  15. Compton Scattering by Static and Moving Media. Part 1; The Transfer Equation and its Moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Psaltis, Dimitrios; Lamb, Frederick K.

    1997-01-01

    Compton scattering of photons by nonrelativistic particles is thought to play an important role in forming the radiation spectrum of many astrophysical systems. Here we derive the time-dependent photon kinetic equation that describes spontaneous and induced Compton scattering, as well as absorption and emission by static and moving media, the corresponding radiative transfer equation, and their zeroth and first angular moments, both in the system frame and in the frame comoving with the medium. We show that it is necessary to use the correct relativistic differential scattering cross section in order to obtain a photon kinetic equation that is correct to first order in Epsilon/m(sub e), T(sub e)/m(sub e), and V, where Epsilon is the photon energy, T(sub e) and m(sub e) are the electron temperature and rest mass, and V is the electron bulk velocity in units of the speed of light. We also demonstrate that the terms in the radiative transfer equation that are second order in V should usually be retained, because if the radiation energy density is sufficiently large, compared to the radiation flux, the effects of bulk Comptonization described by the terms that are second order in V can be as important as the effects described by the terms that are first order in V, even when V is small. The system- and fluid-frame equations that we derive are correct to first order in Epsilon/m(sub e). Our system-frame equations, which are correct to second order in V, may be used when V is not too large. Our fluid-frame equations, which are exact in V, may be used when V approaches 1. Both sets of equations are valid for systems of arbitrary optical depth and can therefore be used in both the free-streaming and diffusion regimes. We demonstrate that Comptonization by the electron bulk motion occurs whether or not the radiation field is isotropic or the bulk flow converges and that it is more important than thermal Comptonization if V(sup 2) is greater than 3T(sub e)/m(sub e).

  16. Multilevel fast multipole method based on a potential formulation for 3D electromagnetic scattering problems.

    PubMed

    Fall, Mandiaye; Boutami, Salim; Glière, Alain; Stout, Brian; Hazart, Jerome

    2013-06-01

    A combination of the multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM) and boundary element method (BEM) can solve large scale photonics problems of arbitrary geometry. Here, MLFMM-BEM algorithm based on a scalar and vector potential formulation, instead of the more conventional electric and magnetic field formulations, is described. The method can deal with multiple lossy or lossless dielectric objects of arbitrary geometry, be they nested, in contact, or dispersed. Several examples are used to demonstrate that this method is able to efficiently handle 3D photonic scatterers involving large numbers of unknowns. Absorption, scattering, and extinction efficiencies of gold nanoparticle spheres, calculated by the MLFMM, are compared with Mie's theory. MLFMM calculations of the bistatic radar cross section (RCS) of a gold sphere near the plasmon resonance and of a silica coated gold sphere are also compared with Mie theory predictions. Finally, the bistatic RCS of a nanoparticle gold-silver heterodimer calculated with MLFMM is compared with unmodified BEM calculations.

  17. Polarization transfer in wide-angle Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton

    DOE PAGES

    Fanelli, Cristiano V.

    2015-10-06

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The WACS polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θPcm = 70°. The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ± 0.059 ± 0.048, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton.more » However, the observed value is ~3 times larger than predicted by the GPD-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.« less

  18. Polarization transfer in wide-angle Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Cristiano V.

    2015-10-06

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The WACS polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θPcm = 70°. The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ± 0.059 ± 0.048, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton. However, the observed value is ~3 times larger than predicted by the GPD-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.

  19. Compton scattered imaging based on the V-line radon transform and its medical imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, M K; Regniery, R; Truong, T T; Zaidi, H

    2010-01-01

    The Radon transform (RT) on straight lines deals as mathematical foundation for many tomographic modalities (e.g. Xray scanner, Positron Emission Tomography), using only primary radiation. In this paper, we consider a new RT defined on a pair of half-lines forming a letter V, arising from the modeling a two-dimensional emission imaging process by Compton scattered gamma rays. We establish its analytic inverse, which is shown to support the feasibility of the reconstruction of a two-dimensional image from scattered radiation collected on a one-dimensional collimated camera. Moreover, a filtered back-projection inversion method is also constructed. Its main advantages are algorithmic efficiency and computational rapidity. We present numerical simulations to illustrate the working. To sum up, the V-line RT leads not only to a new imaging principle, but also to a new concept of detector with high energetic resolution capable to collect the scattered radiation.

  20. Compton scattering off polarized electrons with a high-finesse Fabry-Perot Cavity at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolas Falletto; Martial Authier; Maud Baylac; M. Boyer; Francois Bugeon; Etienne Burtin; Christian Cavata; Nathalie Colombel; G. Congretel; R. Coquillard; G. Coulloux; Bertrand Couzy; P Deck; Alain Delbart; D. Desforges; A. Donati; B. Duboue; Stephanie Escoffier; F. Farci; Bernard Frois; P Girardot; J Guillotau; C Henriot; Claude Jeanney; M Juillard; J. P. Jorda; P. Legou; David Lhuillier; Y Lussignol; Phillippe Mangeot; X. Martin; Frederic Marie; Jacques Martino; M. Maurier; Bernard Mazeau; J.F. Millot; F. Molinie; J.-P. Mols; Jean-pierre Mouly; M. Mur; Damien Neyret; T. Pedrol; Stephane Platchkov; G. Pontet; Thierry Pussieux; Yannick Queinec; Philippe Rebourgeard; J. C. Sellier; Gerard Tarte; Christian Veyssiere; Andre Zakarian; Pierre Bertin; Alain Cosquer; Jian-ping Chen; Joseph Mitchell; J.-M. Mackowski; L. Pinard

    2001-03-01

    We built and commissioned a new type of Compton polarimeter to measure the electron beam polarization at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Virginia, USA). The heart of this polarimeter is a high-finesse monolithic Fabry-Perot cavity. Its purpose is to amplify a primary 300 mW laser beam in order to improve the signal to noise ratio of the polarimeter. It is the first time that a high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity is enclosed in the vacuum of a particle accelerator to monitor the beam polarization by Compton polarimetry. The measured finesse and amplification gain of the cavity are F=26000 and G=7300. The electron beam crosses this high-power photon source at an angle of 23 mrad in the middle of the cavity where the photon beam power density is estimated to be 0.85MW/cm2. We have used this facility during the HAPPEX experiment (April-July 1999) and we give a preliminary measurement of Compton scattering asymmetry.

  1. Expected level of self-Compton scattering in radio loud quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, Steven D.; Marscher, Alan P.

    1992-01-01

    Radio-loud quasars usually contain parsec-scale nonthermal jets. The most compact emission region ('the core'), and perhaps some of the moving 'knots', are expected to be efficient producers of inverse Compton scattered X-rays and gamma-rays since many of the synchrotron photons will upscatter before escaping. Through multifrequency flux density observations and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) measurements of angular sizes, one can predict the flux density of this self-Compton high-energy emission. It is not always the case that the brightest synchrotron sources are also the brightest X-ray and gamma-ray sources. Perhaps a better predictor of high-energy brightness is the ratio of hard X-ray to high-frequency radio emission. Using the synchrotron self-Compton relations, we predict the gamma-ray fluxes of several sources we expect to be detected by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). More accurate predictions will be made when we complete a program of contemporaneous radio-submillimeter and X-ray observations during the course of the EGRET all-sky survey.

  2. Correction of radiation absorption on biological samples using Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Marcelo O.; Conti, Claudio de Carvalho; dos Anjos, Marcelino J.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a method to correct the absorbed radiation (the mass attenuation coefficient curve) in low energy (E < 30 keV) applied to a biological matrix based on the Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio and the effective atomic number. For calibration, scattering measurements were performed on standard samples of radiation produced by a gamma-ray source of 241Am (59.54 keV) also applied to certified biological samples of milk powder, hay powder and bovine liver (NIST 1557B). In addition, six methods of effective atomic number determination were used as described in literature to determinate the Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio (R/C), in order to calculate the mass attenuation coefficient. The results obtained by the proposed method were compared with those obtained using the transmission method. The experimental results were in good agreement with transmission values suggesting that the method to correct radiation absorption presented in this paper is adequate for biological samples.

  3. Wide angle Compton scattering on the proton: study of power suppressed corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivel, N.; Vanderhaeghen, M.

    2015-10-01

    We study the wide angle Compton scattering process on a proton within the soft-collinear factorization (SCET) framework. The main purpose of this work is to estimate the effect due to certain power suppressed corrections. We consider all possible kinematical power corrections and also include the subleading amplitudes describing the scattering with nucleon helicity flip. Under certain assumptions we present a leading-order factorization formula for these amplitudes which includes the hard- and soft-spectator contributions. We apply the formalism and perform a phenomenological analysis of the cross section and asymmetries in the wide angle Compton scattering on a proton. We assume that in the relevant kinematical region where -t,-u>2.5 GeV2 the dominant contribution is provided by the soft-spectator mechanism. The hard coefficient functions of the corresponding SCET operators are taken in the leading-order approximation. The analysis of existing cross section data shows that the contribution of the helicity-flip amplitudes to this observable is quite small and comparable with other expected theoretical uncertainties. We also show predictions for double polarization observables for which experimental information exists.

  4. High-energy photon radiography system using laser-Compton scattering for inspection of bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokawa, Hiroyuki; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Mikado, Tomohisa; Yamada, Kawakatsu

    2002-09-01

    Transmission radiography of bulk materials using continuously energy-tunable quasimonochromatic photon beams has been performed with the photons of a few tens MeV. The photon beam is generated with the laser-Compton scattering of the 300-800 MeV electrons in the electron storage ring "TERAS" with laser lights. The present radiography system is applicable to an inspection of bulk materials and to nondestructive testing of large industrial products. The effectiveness of the method has been examined using metals, ceramics, and concrete blocks. The spatial resolution of the radiography system was measured to be 650 mum using a 1 mm collimator system.

  5. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering on the Neutron: JLab Experiment E08-025

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benali, Meriem; Mazouz, Malek; Fonvieille, Helene

    2016-03-01

    This paper gives the preliminary results of the experimental cross section for deeply virtual Compton scattering on the neutron (en → enγ). The E08-025 experiment was performed at Jefferson Lab Hall A. We measured the (D(e; eX - H(e; e'γ)X) unpolarized cross section and we extracted, for the first time, a non-zero contribution of (neutron-DVCS + coherent-deuteron-DVCS) at Q2 = 1.75 GeV2 and xB = 0.36.

  6. Deeply virtual Compton scattering on longitudinally polarized protons and neutrons at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Silvia Niccolai

    2012-04-01

    This paper focuses on a measurement of deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly-6-GeV polarized electron beam, two longitudinally polarized (via DNP) solid targets of protons (NH{sub 3}) and deuterons (ND{sub 3}) and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Here, preliminary results for target-spin asymmetries and double (beam-target) asymmetries for proton DVCS, as well as a very preliminary extraction of beam-spin asymmetry for neutron DVCS, are presented and linked to Generalized Parton Distributions.

  7. Time evolution analysis of the electron distribution in Thomson/Compton back-scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Petrillo, V.; Bacci, A.; Curatolo, C.; Maroli, C.; Serafini, L.; Rossi, A. R.

    2013-07-28

    We present the time evolution of the energy distribution of a relativistic electron beam after the Compton back-scattering with a counter-propagating laser field, performed in the framework of the Quantum Electrodynamics, by means of the code CAIN. As the correct angular distribution of the spontaneous emission is accounted, the main effect is the formation of few stripes, followed by the diffusion of the more energetic particles toward lower values in the longitudinal phase space. The Chapman-Kolmogorov master equation gives results in striking agreement with the numerical ones. An experiment on the Thomson source at SPARC-LAB is proposed.

  8. Compton-Scattering Cross Section on the Proton at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Danagoulian, A.; Roedelbronn, M.; Chang, T.-H.; Nathan, A. M.; Mamyan, V. H.; Aniol, K. A.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Annand, J. R. M.; Hamilton, D. J.; Bertin, P. Y.; Camsonne, A.; Laveissiere, G.; Bosted, P.; Paschke, K.; Calarco, J. R.; Chang, C. C.; Horn, T.; Savvinov, N.; Chen, J.-P.

    2007-04-13

    Cross-section values for Compton scattering on the proton were measured at 25 kinematic settings over the range s=5-11 and -t=2-7 GeV{sup 2} with a statistical accuracy of a few percent. The scaling power for the s dependence of the cross section at fixed center-of-mass angle was found to be 8.0{+-}0.2, strongly inconsistent with the prediction of perturbative QCD. The observed cross-section values are in fair agreement with the calculations using the handbag mechanism, in which the external photons couple to a single quark.

  9. MeV Mono-Energetic Gamma Ray Compton Scattering Source R&D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartemann, Fred; Albert, Felicie; Anderson, Scott; Chu, Sam; Cross, Rick; Ebbers, Chris; Gibson, David; Messerly, Mike; Semenov, Vlad; Shverdin, Miro; Siders, Craig; McNabb, Dennis; Barty, Chris; Vlieks, Arnold; Tantawi, Sami

    2009-11-01

    A precision, tunable gamma-ray source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by the linac interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps laser pulse to generate tunable γ-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. The source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence lines in various isotopes; applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented.

  10. Broadband Near-Field Ground Motion Simulations in 3D Scattering Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imperatori, Walter; Mai, Martin

    2013-04-01

    The heterogeneous nature of Earth's crust is manifested in the scattering of propagating seismic waves. In recent years, different techniques have been developed to include such phenomenon in broadband ground-motion calculations, either considering scattering as a semi-stochastic or pure stochastic process. In this study, we simulate broadband (0-10 Hz) ground motions using a 3D finite-difference wave propagation solver using several 3D media characterized by Von Karman correlation functions with different correlation lengths and standard deviation values. Our goal is to investigate scattering characteristics and its influence on the seismic wave-field at short and intermediate distances from the source in terms of ground motion parameters. We also examine other relevant scattering-related phenomena, such as the loss of radiation pattern and the directivity breakdown. We first simulate broadband ground motions for a point-source characterized by a classic omega-squared spectrum model. Fault finiteness is then introduced by means of a Haskell-type source model presenting both sub-shear and super-shear rupture speed. Results indicate that scattering plays an important role in ground motion even at short distances from the source, where source effects are thought to be dominating. In particular, peak ground motion parameters can be affected even at relatively low frequencies, implying that earthquake ground-motion simulations should include scattering also for PGV calculations. At the same time, we find a gradual loss of the source signature in the 2-5 Hz frequency range, together with a distortion of the Mach cones in case of super-shear rupture. For more complex source models and truly heterogeneous Earth, these effects may occur even at lower frequencies. Our simulations suggest that Von Karman correlation functions with correlation length between several hundred meters and few kilometers, Hurst exponent around 0.3 and standard deviation in the 5-10% range

  11. FERM3D: A finite element R-matrix electron molecule scattering code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonzani, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    FERM3D is a three-dimensional finite element program, for the elastic scattering of a low energy electron from a general polyatomic molecule, which is converted to a potential scattering problem. The code is based on tricubic polynomials in spherical coordinates. The electron-molecule interaction is treated as a sum of three terms: electrostatic, exchange, and polarization. The electrostatic term can be extracted directly from ab initio codes ( GAUSSIAN 98 in the work described here), while the exchange term is approximated using a local density functional. A local polarization potential based on density functional theory [C. Lee, W. Yang, R.G. Parr, Phys. Rev. B 37 (1988) 785] describes the long range attraction to the molecular target induced by the scattering electron. Photoionization calculations are also possible and illustrated in the present work. The generality and simplicity of the approach is important in extending electron-scattering calculations to more complex targets than it is possible with other methods. Program summaryTitle of program:FERM3D Catalogue identifier:ADYL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYL_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested:Intel Xeon, AMD Opteron 64 bit, Compaq Alpha Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested:HP Tru64 Unix v5.1, Red Hat Linux Enterprise 3 Programming language used:Fortran 90 Memory required to execute with typical data:900 MB (neutral CO 2), 2.3 GB (ionic CO 2), 1.4 GB (benzene) No. of bits in a word:32 No. of processors used:1 Has the code been vectorized?:No No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:58 383 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:561 653 Distribution format:tar.gzip file CPC Program library subprograms used:ADDA, ACDP Nature of physical problem:Scattering of an

  12. Local Two-Photon Couplings and the J=0 Fixed Pole in Real and Virtual Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2008-12-05

    The local coupling of two photons to the fundamental quark currents of a hadron gives an energy-independent contribution to the Compton amplitude proportional to the charge squared of the struck quark, a contribution which has no analog in hadron scattering reactions. We show that this local contribution has a real phase and is universal, giving the same contribution for real or virtual Compton scattering for any photon virtuality and skewness at fixed momentum transfer squared t. The t-dependence of this J = 0 fixed Regge pole is parameterized by a yet unmeasured even charge-conjugation form factor of the target nucleon. The t = 0 limit gives an important constraint on the dependence of the nucleon mass on the quark mass through the Weisberger relation. We discuss how this 1=x form factor can be extracted from high energy deeply virtual Compton scattering and examine predictions given by models of the H generalized parton distribution.

  13. Evaluation of the forward Compton scattering off protons. II. Spin-dependent amplitude and observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryniuk, Oleksii; Hagelstein, Franziska; Pascalutsa, Vladimir

    2016-08-01

    The forward Compton scattering off the proton is determined by substituting the empirical total photoabsorption cross sections into dispersive sum rules. In addition to the spin-independent amplitude evaluated previously [Phys. Rev. D 92, 074031 (2015)], we obtain the spin-dependent amplitude over a broad energy range. The two amplitudes contain all the information about the forward CS process and we hence can reconstruct the observables. The results are compared with predictions of chiral perturbation theory where available. The low-energy expansion of the spin-dependent Compton scattering amplitude yields the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH) sum rule and relations for the forward spin polarizabilities (FSPs) of the proton. Our evaluation provides an empirical verification of the GDH sum rule for the proton and yields empirical values of the proton FSPs. For the GDH integral, we obtain 204.5 (21.4 ) μ b , in agreement with the sum rule prediction: 204.784481 (4 ) μ b . For the FSPs, we obtain γ0=-92.9 (10.5 )×10-6 fm4 and γ0¯=48.4 (8.2 )×10-6 fm6, improving on the accuracy of previous evaluations.

  14. Compton scattering of microwave background radiation by gas in galaxy clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, R. J.; Rephaeli, Y.

    1978-01-01

    Based on data on the X-ray spectrum of the Coma cluster, interpreted as thermal bremsstrahlung, the expected brightness depletion from Compton scattering of the microwave background in the direction of the cluster is computed. The calculated depletion is about one-third that recently observed by Gull and Northover, and the discrepancy is discussed. In comparing the observed microwave depletion in the direction of other clusters which are X-ray sources it is found that there is no correlation with the cluster X-ray luminosity. Consequently, the microwave depletion observations cannot yet be taken as good evidence for a thermal bremsstrahlung origin for the X-ray emission. The perturbation from Compton scattering of photons on the high-frequency (Wien) tail of the blackbody distribution is computed and found to be much larger than predicted in previous calculations. In the Wien tail the effect is a relative increase in the blackbody intensity that is appreciably greater in magnitude than the depletion in the Rayleigh-Jeans domain.

  15. Towards direct reconstruction from a gamma camera based on compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cree, M.J.; Bones, P.J. . Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    The Compton scattering camera (sometimes called the electronically collimated camera) has been shown by others to have the potential to better the photon counting statistics and the energy resolution of the Anger camera for imaging in SPECT. By using coincident detection of Compton scattering events on two detecting planes, a photon can be localized to having been sourced on the surface of a cone. New algorithms are needed to achieve fully three-dimensional reconstruction of the source distribution from such a camera. If a complete set of cone-surface projections are collected over an infinitely extending plane, it is shown that the reconstruction problem is not only analytically solvable, but also overspecified in the absence of measurement uncertainties. Two approaches to direct reconstruction are proposed, both based on the photons which travel perpendicularly between the detector planes. Results of computer simulations are presented which demonstrate the ability of the algorithms to achieve useful reconstructions in the absence of measurement uncertainties (other than those caused by quantization). The modifications likely to be required in the presence of realistic measurement uncertainties are discussed.

  16. Data acquisition and analysis for the energy-subtraction Compton scatter camera for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamzin, Murat Kamilevich

    In response to the shortcomings of the Anger camera currently being used in conventional SPECT, particularly the trade-off between sensitivity and spatial resolution, a novel energy-subtraction Compton scatter camera, or the ESCSC, has been proposed. A successful clinical implementation of the ESCSC could revolutionize the field of SPECT. Features of this camera include utilization of silicon and CdZnTe detectors in primary and secondary detector systems, list-mode time stamping data acquisition, modular architecture, and post-acquisition data analysis. Previous ESCSC studies were based on Monte Carlo modeling. The objective of this work is to test the theoretical framework developed in previous studies by developing the data acquisition and analysis techniques necessary to implement the ESCSC. The camera model working in list-mode with time stamping was successfully built and tested thus confirming potential of the ESCSC that was predicted in previous simulation studies. The obtained data were processed during the post-acquisition data analysis based on preferred event selection criteria. Along with the construction of a camera model and proving the approach, the post-acquisition data analysis was further extended to include preferred event weighting based on the likelihood of a preferred event to be a true preferred event. While formulated to show ESCSC capabilities, the results of this study are important for any Compton scatter camera implementation as well as for coincidence data acquisition systems in general.

  17. 120-Hz Diode-Pumped Kilowatt Class Laser for Compton Scattering Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayramian, Andy; Beer, Glenn; Campbell, Rob; Freitas, Barry; Molander, William; Sutton, Steve; Telford, Steve; Barty, Chris

    2009-11-01

    A Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-ray) Compton scattering light source is currently based on a 120-Hz electron accelerator. A 120-Hz laser source can increase the current gamma ray production by more than an order of magnitude and further enhancements are possible. Diode pumped solid state lasers (DPSSLs) offer the potential to operate at these higher repetition rates where flash lamp pumped laser systems are currently limited by thermal and lamp lifetime issues. Utilizing LLNL expertise in high energy DPSSLs, a 10-J, 120-Hz diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser architecture has been developed. The laser design makes use of advances in diode packaging, power conditioning, and beam conditioning to provide over 100-kW peak power array. Sapphire heatsinks and longitudinal cooling of the amplifier yields low parasitic loss and low wavefront distortion. An image relayed architecture and adaptive optics will yield a diffraction limited beam ideal for Compton scattering. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Precision 0.5 GW X-band rf system for advanced Compton scattering source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, T. S.; Anderson, G.; Gibson, D.; Hartemann, F. V.; Barty, C. P. J.; Vlieks, A.; Tantawi, S.; Jongewaard, E.; Anderson, S. G.

    2009-11-01

    A Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering light source is being developed at LLNL. The electron beam for the Compton scattering interaction will be generated by a X-band RF gun and a X-band LINAC at the frequency of 11.424 GHz. High power RF in excess of 500 MW is needed to accelerate the electrons to energy of 250 MeV or greater for the interaction. Two high power klystron amplifiers, each capable of generating 50 MW, 1.5 msec pulses, will be the main high power RF sources for the system. These klystrons will be powered by state of the art solid-state high voltage modulators. A RF pulse compressor, similar to the SLED II pulse compressor, will compress the klystron output pulse with a power gain factor of five. This will give us 500 MW (0.5 GW) at output of the compressor. The compressed pulse will then be distributed to the RF gun and to the LINAC with specific phase and amplitude control points to allow for parameter control during operation. This high power RF system is being designed and constructed. In this paper, we will present the design, layout, and status of this RF system.

  19. Compton scattering S matrix and cross section in strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtukov, Alexander A.; Nagirner, Dmitrij I.; Poutanen, Juri

    2016-05-01

    Compton scattering of polarized radiation in a strong magnetic field is considered. The recipe for calculation of the scattering matrix elements, the differential and total cross sections based on quantum electrodynamic second-order perturbation theory is presented for the case of arbitrary initial and final Landau level, electron momentum along the field and photon momentum. Photon polarization and electron spin state are taken into account. The correct dependence of natural Landau level width on the electron spin state is taken into account in a general case of arbitrary initial photon momentum for the first time. A number of steps in the calculations were simplified analytically making the presented recipe easy to use. The redistribution functions over the photon energy, momentum and polarization states are presented and discussed. The paper generalizes already known results and offers a basis for the accurate calculation of radiation transfer in a strong B field, for example, in strongly magnetized neutron stars.

  20. Quasi-free Compton scattering and the polarizabilities of the neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossert, K.; Camen, M.; Wissmann, F.; Ahrens, J.; Annand, J. R. M.; Arends, H.-J.; Beck, R.; Caselotti, G.; Grabmayr, P.; Jahn, O.; Jennewein, P.; Levchuk, M. I.; L'vov, A. I.; McGeorge, J. C.; Natter, A.; Olmos de León, V.; Petrun'kin, V. A.; Rosner, G.; Schumacher, M.; Seitz, B.; Smend, F.; Thomas, A.; Weihofen, W.; Zapadtka, F.

    Differential cross-sections for quasi-free Compton scattering from the proton and neutron bound in the deuteron have been measured using the Glasgow/Mainz photon tagging spectrometer at the Mainz MAMI accelerator together with the Mainz [48]cm ;SPMOslash; × [64]cm NaI(Tl) photon detector and the Göttingen SENECA recoil detector. The data cover photon energies ranging from [200]MeV to [400]MeV at θLABγ = 136.2°. Liquid deuterium and hydrogen targets allowed direct comparison of free and quasi-free scattering from the proton. The neutron detection efficiency of the SENECA detector was measured via the reaction p(γ,π+n). The ``free'' proton Compton scattering cross-sections extracted from the bound proton data are in reasonable agreement with those for the free proton which gives confidence in the method to extract the differential cross-section for free scattering from quasi-free data. Differential cross-sections on the free neutron have been extracted and the difference of the electromagnetic polarizabilities of the neutron has been determined to be αn - βn = 9.8+/-3.6(stat)+2.1-1.1(syst)+/-2.2(model) in units of [10-4]fm3. In combination with the polarizability sum αn + βn = 15.2+/-0.5 deduced from photoabsorption data, the neutron electric and magnetic polarizabilities, αn = 12.5+/-1.8(stat)+1.1-0.6(syst)+/-1.1(model) and βn = 2.7+/-1.8(stat)+0.6-1.1(syst)+/-1.1(model) are obtained. The backward spin polarizability of the neutron was determined to be γ(n)π = (58.6+/-4.0)×10-4fm4.

  1. 3D Ag/ZnO hybrids for sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chenyue; Xu, Chunxiang; Lu, Junfeng; Li, Zhaohui; Tian, Zhengshan

    2016-03-01

    To combine the surface plasma resonance of metal and local field enhancement in metal/semiconductor interface, Ag nanoparticles (NPs) were assembled on a ZnO nanorod array which was grown by hydrothermally on carbon fibers. The construction of dimensional (3D) Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrate is used for the sensitive detection of organic pollutants with the advantages such as facile synthesis, short detection time and low cost. The hybrid substrate was manifested a high sensitivity to phenol red at a lower concentration of 1 × 10-9 M and a higher enhancement factor of 3.18 × 109. Moreover, the ZnO nanostructures decorated with Ag NPs were demonstrated self-cleaning function under UV irradiation via photocatalytic degradation of the analytic molecules. The fabrication process of the materials and sensors, optimization of the SERS behaviors for different sized Ag NPs, the mechanism of SERS and recovery were presented with a detailed discussion.

  2. Compton scattering for spectroscopic detection of ultra-fast, high flux, broad energy range X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Cipiccia, S.; Wiggins, S. M.; Brunetti, E.; Vieux, G.; Yang, X.; Welsh, G. H.; Anania, M.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Maneuski, D.; Montgomery, R.; Smith, G.; Hoek, M.; Hamilton, D. J.; Shea, V. O.; Issac, R. C.; Lemos, N. R. C.; Dias, J. M.; and others

    2013-11-15

    Compton side-scattering has been used to simultaneously downshift the energy of keV to MeV energy range photons while attenuating their flux to enable single-shot, spectrally resolved, measurements of high flux X-ray sources to be undertaken. To demonstrate the technique a 1 mm thick pixelated cadmium telluride detector has been used to measure spectra of Compton side-scattered radiation from a Cobalt-60 laboratory source and a high flux, high peak brilliance X-ray source of betatron radiation from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator.

  3. Femtosecond laser clocked compact X-band high gradient photoinjector and accelerator for Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destefano, Christopher A.

    High brightness and low emittance electron beams have found application throughout a variety of scientific research. The ability to produce such beams in the MeV range has previously been restricted to National Laboratory size facilities. While these sources have been successful, the reduction in size could provide valuable access for further scientific endeavors. One such application is the production of monochromatic x-rays through Compton scattering with a high intensity laser pulse. These x-rays would be tunable from 10 keV to more than 100 keV. A compact source of synchrotron type radiation capable of installation in medical institutions would be desirable for further investigation. A combination of X-band microwave and vacuum technologies developed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) was assembled. The system uses a pair of X-band klystrons. The first provides the microwave drive power for a 5.5 cell RF gun capable of operating with an accelerating gradient of 200 MV/m. Following the RF gun is a 1.05 m linac capable of accelerating the electron bunches to over 60 MeV with an energy spread of less than 1%. Using a novel frequency selection scheme a Titantium:Sapphire femtosecond laser oscillator serves as both the master clock for the microwave components and optical seed for the following amplifiers. This insures the tabletop laser amplifiers are inherently synchronized to the RF sources. A regenerative amplifier provides the first boost in energy. Half of the output is used for producing UV light for photo injection of the RF gun. The other half is sent to a multi-pass amplifier capable of producing 100 mJ pulses compressed to 50 fs for the Compton scattering. This interaction laser is then focused inside the electron beam vacuum system. The final timing between the optical pulses and the electron beam is achieved with a physical delay line placed after the final amplifier compressor. Background Bremsstrahlung radiation due to interception of

  4. Compton scattering from the proton in an effective field theory with explicit Delta degrees of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGovern, J. A.; Phillips, D. R.; Grießhammer, H. W.

    2013-01-01

    We analyse the proton Compton-scattering differential cross section for photon energies up to 325 MeV using Chiral Effective Field Theory (χEFT) and extract new values for the electric and magnetic polarisabilities of the proton. Our approach builds in the key physics in two different regimes: photon energies ω ≲ m π ("low energy"), and the higher energies where the Δ(1232) resonance plays a key role. The Compton amplitude is complete at N4LO, {O}( {e^2 δ ^4 } ), in the low-energy region, and at NLO, {O}( {e^2 δ ^0 } ), in the resonance region. Throughout, the Delta-pole graphs are dressed with π N loops and γN Δ vertex corrections. A statistically consistent database of proton Compton experiments is used to constrain the free parameters in our amplitude: the M1 γN Δ transition strength b 1 (which is fixed in the resonance region) and the polarisabilities α E1 and β M1 (which are fixed from data below 170 MeV). In order to obtain a reasonable fit, we find it necessary to add the spin polarisability γ M1 M1 as a free parameter, even though it is, strictly speaking, predicted in χEFT at the order to which we work. We show that the fit is consistent with the Baldin sum rule, and then use that sum rule to constrain α E1 + β M1. In this way we obtain α E1 = [10.65 ± 0.35(stat) ± 0.2(Baldin) ± 0.3(theory)] × 10-4 fm3 and β M1 = [3.15 ∓ 0.35(state) ± 0.2(Baldin) ∓ 0.3()theory] × 10-4 fm3, with χ2 = 113.2 for 135 degrees of freedom. A detailed rationale for the theoretical uncertainties assigned to this result is provided.

  5. THE VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM PULSARS: A CASE FOR INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Otte, Nepomuk; McCann, Andrew

    2012-07-20

    The observations of gamma-ray emission from pulsars with the Fermi-LAT detector and the detection of the Crab pulsar with the VERITAS array of Cherenkov telescopes at energies above 100 GeV make it unlikely that curvature radiation is the main source of photons above GeV energies in the Crab and many other pulsars. We outline a model in which the broad UV-X-ray component and the very high energy {gamma}-ray emission of pulsars are explained within the synchrotron self-Compton framework. We argue that the bulk of the observed radiation is generated by the secondary plasma, which is produced in cascades in the outer gaps of the magnetosphere. We find that the inverse Compton (IC) scattering occurs in the Klein-Nishina regime, which favors synchrotron photons in the UV band as target field for the scattering process. The primary beam is accelerated in a modest electric field, with a field strength that is of the order of a few percent of the magnetic field near the light cylinder. Overall, for IC scattering occurring in the Klein-Nishina regime, the particle distribution in the gap does not evolve toward a stationary distribution and thus is intrinsically time-dependent. We point out that in a radiation reaction-limited regime of particle acceleration the gamma-ray luminosity L{sub {gamma}} scales linearly with the pulsar spin-down power E-dot , L{sub {gamma}}{proportional_to} E-dot , and not proportional to {radical}( E-dot ) as expected from potential-limited acceleration.

  6. Spin Asymmetry Measurements for Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering on Polarized Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seder, Erin; CLAS Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) have emerged as a universal tool to describe hadrons, particularly nucleons, in terms of their elementary constituents, quarks and gluons. Spin asymmetry measurements in the reaction e --> p --> --> ep γ, such as the proton target spin asymmetry which is directly proportional to the imaginary part of the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering amplitude, give access to different combinations of GPDs. Combined measurements of proton target spin asymmetry (TSA), electron beam helicity asymmetry (BSA), and electron-proton double spin asymmetry (DSA) at the same kinematic points allows access to GPDs through a semi-model independent extraction of Compton Form Factors (CFFs). Preliminary TSA, BSA, and DSA studies for the reaction e --> p --> --> ep γ and extracted CFFs will be presented from a dedicated experiment at Jefferson Lab using the CEBAF 6 GeV polarized electron beam, a polarized solid state 14 NH3 target, and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) equipped with an additional Inner Calorimeter (IC). The accessible kinematic range for these measurements covers 1 < Q2 < 4.5 GeV2, 0.1 < xB < 0.58, and 0.08 < - t < 1.8 GeV2.

  7. Influence of electron-neutral collisions on the Compton scattering cross section and the Salpeter structure factor in warm collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-03-15

    The electron-neutral collision effects on the Compton scattering process are investigated in warm collisional plasmas. The Compton scattering cross section in warm collisional plasmas is obtained by the Salpeter structure factor with the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and the plasma dielectric function as a function of the electron-neutral collision frequency, Debye length, and wave number. It is shown that the influence of electron-neutral collision strongly suppresses the Compton scattering cross section in warm collisional plasmas. It is also found that the electron-neutral collision effect on the differential Compton scattering cross section is more significant in forward scattering directions. We show that the differential Compton scattering cross section has a maximum at the scattering angle φ=π/2. In addition, we find that the electron-neutral collision effect on the total Compton scattering cross section increases with increasing Debye length and wave number. The variation of the Compton scattering cross section due to the change of collision frequency and plasma parameters is also discussed.

  8. Segmentation of the body and lungs from Compton scatter and photopeak window data in SPECT: A Monte-Carlo investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, T.S.; King, M.A.; Vries, D.J. de; Ljungberg, M.

    1996-02-01

    In SPECT imaging of the chest, nonuniform attenuation correction requires use of a patient specific attenuation ({mu}) map. Such a map can be obtained by estimating the regions of (1) the lungs and (2) the soft tissues and bones, and then assigning an appropriate value of attenuation coefficient ({mu}) to each region. The authors proposed a method to segment such regions from the Compton scatter and photopeak window SPECT slices of Tc-99m Sestamibi studies. The Compton scatter slices are used to segment the body outline and to estimate the regions of the lungs. Locations of the back bone and sternum are estimated from the photopeak window slices to assist in the segmentation. To investigate the accuracy of using Compton scatter slices in estimating the regions of the body and the lungs, a Monte-Carlo SPECT simulation of an anthropomorphic phantom with an activity distribution and noise characteristics similar to patient data was conducted. Energy windows of various widths were simulated for use in locating a suitable Compton scatter window for imaging. The effects of attenuation correction using a {mu} map based on segmentation were also studied.

  9. Acoustic Scattering by Three-Dimensional Stators and Rotors Using the SOURCE3D Code. Volume 1; Analysis and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Harold D.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides a study of rotor and stator scattering using the SOURCE3D Rotor Wake/Stator Interaction Code. SOURCE3D is a quasi-three-dimensional computer program that uses three-dimensional acoustics and two-dimensional cascade load response theory to calculate rotor and stator modal reflection and transmission (scattering) coefficients. SOURCE3D is at the core of the TFaNS (Theoretical Fan Noise Design/Prediction System), developed for NASA, which provides complete fully coupled (inlet, rotor, stator, exit) noise solutions for turbofan engines. The reason for studying scattering is that we must first understand the behavior of the individual scattering coefficients provided by SOURCE3D, before eventually understanding the more complicated predictions from TFaNS. To study scattering, we have derived a large number of scattering curves for vane and blade rows. The curves are plots of output wave power divided by input wave power (in dB units) versus vane/blade ratio. Some of these plots are shown in this report. All of the plots are provided in a separate volume. To assist in understanding the plots, formulas have been derived for special vane/blade ratios for which wavefronts are either parallel or normal to rotor or stator chords. From the plots, we have found that, for the most part, there was strong transmission and weak reflection over most of the vane/blade ratio range for the stator. For the rotor, there was little transmission loss.

  10. Quasi-monochromatic hard X-ray source via laser Compton scattering and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, R.; Toyokawa, H.; Yasumoto, M.; Ikeura-Sekiguchi, H.; Koike, M.; Yamada, K.; Yanagida, T.; Nakajyo, T.; Sakai, F.; Mori, K.

    2011-05-01

    We have developed a quasi-monochromatic hard X-ray source via laser Compton scattering (LCS) based on an S-band compact electron linac at AIST. The number of total photons and the maximum X-ray energy was 107 photons/sec and about 40 keV, respectively, in 15-degree crossing angle between a 42 MeV electron beam and a 800 nm Ti:Sa laser. The biological observation of the human bone with fractures has been successfully demonstrated using the LCS X-ray of 26.4 keV with the in-line phase contrast scheme. Good contrast enhancement is clearly observed between the absorption and the phase contrast images.

  11. Evidence for a narrow N{sup *}(1685) resonance in quasifree Compton scattering on the neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, V.; Polyakov, M. V.; Bellini, V.; Giusa, A.; Mammoliti, F.; Randieri, C.; Russo, G.; Sperduto, M. L.; Boiko, T.; Chebotaryov, S.; Dho, H.-S.; Kim, W.; Milman, E.; Ni, A.; Gervino, G.; Ghio, F.; Kim, A.; Perevalova, I. A.; Vall, A. N.; Sutera, C. M.

    2011-02-15

    The study of quasifree Compton scattering on the neutron in the energy range of E{sub {gamma}}=0.75-1.5 GeV is presented. The data reveal a narrow peak at W{approx}1.685 GeV. This result, being considered in conjunction with the recent evidence for a narrow structure at W{approx}1.68 GeV in {eta} photoproduction on the neutron, suggests the existence of a nucleon resonance with unusual properties: a mass M{approx}1.685 GeV, a narrow width {Gamma}{<=}30 MeV, and the much stronger photoexcitation on the neutron than on the proton.

  12. Exploration of deeply virtual Compton scattering on the neutron in the Hall A of Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Mazouz, Malek

    2006-12-08

    Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) are universal functions which provide a comprehensive description of hadron properties in terms of quarks and gluons. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) is the simplest hard exclusive process involving GPDs. In particular, the DVCS on the neutron is mostly sensitive to E, the less constrained GPD, wich allows to access to the quark angular momentum. The first dedicated DVCS experiment on the neutron ran in the Hall A of Jefferson Lab in fall 2004. The high luminosity of the experiment and the resulting background rate recquired specific devices which are decribed in this document. The analysis methods and the experiment results, leading to preliminary constraints on the GPD E, are presented.

  13. Compton back scatter imaging for mild steel rebar detection and depth characterization embedded in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margret, M.; Menaka, M.; Venkatraman, B.; Chandrasekaran, S.

    2015-01-01

    A novel non-destructive Compton scattering technique is described to ensure the feasibility, reliability and applicability of detecting the reinforcing steel bar in concrete. The indigenously developed prototype system presented in this paper is capable of detecting the reinforcement of varied diameters embedded in the concrete and as well as up to 60 mm depth, with the aid of Caesium-137(137Cs) radioactive source and a high resolution HPGe detector. The technique could also detect the inhomogeneities present in the test specimen by interpreting the material density variation caused due to the count rate. The experimental results are correlated using established techniques such as radiography and rebar locators. The results obtained from its application to locate the rebars are quite promising and also been successfully used for reinforcement mapping. This method can be applied, especially when the intrusion is located underneath the cover of the concrete or considerably at larger depths and where two sided access is restricted.

  14. Virtual Compton Scattering at low energy and the generalized polarizabilities of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Helene Fonvieille

    2003-05-01

    Virtual Compton Scattering (VCS) {gamma}*p {yields} {gamma}p at low CM energy gives access to the Generalized Polarizabilities of the nucleon. These observables generalize the concept of electromagnetic polarizabilities to the case of a virtual photon. Dedicated VCS experiments have been performed at MAMI, Jefferson Lab and MIT-Bates. The experimental status is reviewed, including analysis methods and physics results. The measurement of absolute (ep {yields} ep{gamma}) cross sections allows the extraction of the two unpolarized VCS structure functions P{sub LL}-P{sub TT}/{epsilon} and P{sub LT}, which are combinations of the Generalized Polarizabilities of the proton. Future prospects in the field of VCS at low energy are also presented.

  15. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering on nucleons and nuclei in generalized vector meson dominance model

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim Guzey; Klaus Goeke; Marat Siddikov

    2008-02-01

    We consider Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) on nucleons and nuclei in the framework of generalized vector meson dominance (GVMD) model. We demonstrate that the GVMD model provides a good description of the HERA data on the dependence of the proton DVCS cross section on $Q^2$, $W$ (at $Q^2=4$ GeV$^2$) and $t$. At $Q^2 = 8$ GeV$^2$, the soft $W$-behavior of the GVMD model somewhat underestimates the $W$-dependence of the DVCS cross section due to the hard contribution not present in the GVMD model. We estimate $1/Q^2$ power-suppressed corrections to the DVCS amplitude and the DVCS cross section and find them large. We also make predictions for the nuclear DVCS amplitude and cross section in the kinematics of the future Electron-Ion Collider. We predict significant nuclear shadowing, which matches well predictions of the leading-twist nuclear shadowing in DIS on nuclei.

  16. Attosecond Gamma-Ray Pulses via Nonlinear Compton Scattering in the Radiation-Dominated Regime.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Xing; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z; Galow, Benjamin J; Keitel, Christoph H

    2015-11-13

    The feasibility of the generation of bright ultrashort gamma-ray pulses is demonstrated in the interaction of a relativistic electron bunch with a counterpropagating tightly focused superstrong laser beam in the radiation-dominated regime. The Compton scattering spectra of gamma radiation are investigated using a semiclassical description for the electron dynamics in the laser field and a quantum electrodynamical description for the photon emission. We demonstrate the feasibility of ultrashort gamma-ray bursts of hundreds of attoseconds and of dozens of megaelectronvolt photon energies in the near-backwards direction of the initial electron motion. The tightly focused laser field structure and the radiation reaction are shown to be responsible for such short gamma-ray bursts, which are independent of the durations of the electron bunch and of the laser pulse. The results are measurable with the laser technology available in the near future. PMID:26613446

  17. Photon-deficient Compton scattering by nonthermal electrons - Comparison with gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Lamb, Don Q.

    1986-01-01

    The model of gamma-ray-burst spectra proposed by Zdziarski and Lamb (1986, 1987) is reviewed and compared with observed spectra. In the model, the spectrum arises from multiple Compton scatterings in a nonthermal source with a deficit of soft photons. The steady-state electron distribution in such a source is a nonthermal power law that joins at low energies onto a thermal distribution that may be either optically thick or thin. Both cases lead naturally to a two-component spectrum with a photon-energy index in the X-ray spectrum which is much less than one and a photon-energy index in the gamma-ray spectrum which is larger than the X-ray photon-energy index. Fits to the observed gamma-ray-burst spectra (where data exist for both X-ray and gamma-ray energies) show good agreement with the model.

  18. Scaling Tests of the Cross Section for Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Camacho, C. Munoz; Beaumel, M.; Garcon, M.; Guichon, P. A. M.; Sabatie, F.; Gavalian, G.; Amarian, M.; Hayes, D.; Hyde-Wright, C. E.; Ibrahim, H.

    2006-12-31

    We present the first measurements of the e(vector sign)p{yields}ep{gamma} cross section in the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) regime and the valence quark region. The Q{sup 2} dependence (from 1.5 to 2.3 GeV{sup 2}) of the helicity-dependent cross section indicates the twist-2 dominance of DVCS, proving that generalized parton distributions (GPDs) are accessible to experiment at moderate Q{sup 2}. The helicity-independent cross section is also measured at Q{sup 2}=2.3 GeV{sup 2}. We present the first model-independent measurement of linear combinations of GPDs and GPD integrals up to the twist-3 approximation.

  19. Measurement of Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering with a Polarized Proton Target

    SciTech Connect

    S. Chen; H. Avakian; V. Burkert; P. Eugenio

    2006-05-05

    The longitudinal target-spin asymmetry A{sub UL} for the exclusive electroproduction of high energy photons was measured for the first time in p(e,e'p/gamma). The data have been accumulated at Jefferson Lab with the CLAS spectrometer using 5.7 GeV electrons and a longitudinally polarized NH{sub 3} target. A significant azimuthal angular dependence was observed, resulting from the interference of the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering and Bethe-Heitler processes. The amplitude of the sin(phi) moment is 0.252 +/- 0.042(stat) +/- 0.020(sys). Theoretical calculations are in good agreement with the magnitude and the kinematic dependence of the target-spin asymmetry, which is sensitive to the generalized parton distributions H and H-tilde.

  20. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering and Meson Production at Jlab/CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Hyon-Suk Jo

    2012-04-01

    This report reviews the recent experimental results from the CLAS collaboration (Hall B of Jefferson Lab, or JLab) on Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and Deeply Virtual Meson Production (DVMP) and discusses their interpretation in the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). The impact of the experimental data on the applicability of the GPD mechanism to these exclusive reactions is discussed. Initial results obtained from JLab 6 GeV data indicate that DVCS might already be interpretable in this framework while GPD models fail to describe the exclusive meson production (DVMP) data with the GPD parameterizations presently used. An exception is the {phi} meson production for which the GPD mechanism appears to apply. The recent global analyses aiming to extract GPDs from fitting DVCS CLAS and world data are discussed. The GPD experimental program at CLAS12, planned with the upcoming 12 GeV upgrade of JLab, is briefly presented.

  1. Measurements of Compton Scattering on the Proton at 2 - 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Danagoulian, Areg

    2006-01-01

    Similar to elastic electron scattering, Compton Scattering on the proton at high momentum transfers(and high p⊥) can be an effective method to study its short-distance structure. An experiment has been carried out to measure the cross sections for Real Compton Scattering (RCS) on the proton for 2.3-5.7 GeV electron beam energies and a wide distribution of large scattering angles. The 25 kinematic settings sampled a domain of s = 5-11(GeV/c)2,-t = -7(GeV/c)2 and -u = 0.5-6.5(GeV/c)2. In addition, a measurement of longitudinal and transverse polarization transfer asymmetries was made at a 3.48 GeV beam energy and a scattering angle of θcm = 120°. These measurements were performed to test the existing theoretical mechanisms for this process as well as to determine RCS form factors. At the heart of the scientific motivation is the desire to understand the manner in which a nucleon interacts with external excitations at the above listed energies, by comparing and contrasting the two existing models – Leading Twist Mechanism and Soft Overlap “Handbag” Mechanism – and identify the dominant mechanism. Furthermore, the Handbag Mechanism allows one to calculate reaction observables in the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPD), which have the function of bridging the wide gap between the exclusive(form factors) and inclusive(parton distribution functions) description of the proton. The experiment was conducted in Hall A of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility(Jefferson Lab). It used a polarized and unpolarized electron beam, a 6% copper radiator with the thickness of 6.1% radiation lengths (to produce a bremsstrahlung photon beam), the Hall A liquid hydrogen target, a high resolution spectrometer with a focal plane polarimeter, and a photon hodoscope calorimeter. Results of the differential cross sections are presented, and discussed in the general context of the scientific motivation.

  2. 3D nanostar dimers with a sub-10-nm gap for single-/few-molecule surface-enhanced raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Chirumamilla, Manohar; Toma, Andrea; Gopalakrishnan, Anisha; Das, Gobind; Zaccaria, Remo Proietti; Krahne, Roman; Rondanina, Eliana; Leoncini, Marco; Liberale, Carlo; De Angelis, Francesco; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2014-04-16

    Plasmonic nanostar-dimers, decoupled from the substrate, have been fabricated by combining electron-beam lithography and reactive-ion etching techniques. The 3D architecture, the sharp tips of the nanostars and the sub-10 nm gap size promote the formation of giant electric-field in highly localized hot-spots. The single/few molecule detection capability of the 3D nanostar-dimers has been demonstrated by Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering.

  3. A sectored Ge-Compton polarimeter for parity assignments in photon scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlitt, B.; Maier, U.; Friedrichs, H.; Albers, S.; Bauske, I.; von Brentano, P.; Heil, R. D.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Kneissl, U.; Margraf, J.; Pitz, H. H.; Wesselborg, C.; Zilges, A.

    1994-01-01

    Parities of nuclear levels excited in photon scattering experiments can be determined by measurements of the linear polarization of the scattered photons. The needed theoretical formalism is summarized. A fourfold sectored single crystal Ge-Compton polarimeter, its operation and performances are described. The compact polarimeter has an outstanding coincidence efficiency ɛcoinc of about 25% and a good energy resolution of 2.2 keV at 1.333 MeV. The polarization sensitivity of the device as determined in (γ, overlineγ) polarization correlation measurements and several ( p, p' overlineγ) reaction studies amounts to about 20% at photon energies of 0.5 MeV and is about 10% at 4 MeV photon energies. The polarimeter has been successfully operated in systematic photon scattering experiments at the bremsstrahlung beam at the Stuttgart Dynamitron facility to investigate enhanced magnetic and electric dipole excitations in heavy deformed nuclei. Typical results are shown and discussed.

  4. Model-Based Detection of Radioactive Contraband for Harbor Defense Incorporating Compton Scattering Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V; Chambers, D H; Breitfeller, E F; Guidry, B L; Verbeke, J M; Axelrod, M A; Sale, K E; Meyer, A M

    2010-03-02

    The detection of radioactive contraband is a critical problem is maintaining national security for any country. Photon emissions from threat materials challenge both detection and measurement technologies especially when concealed by various types of shielding complicating the transport physics significantly. This problem becomes especially important when ships are intercepted by U.S. Coast Guard harbor patrols searching for contraband. The development of a sequential model-based processor that captures both the underlying transport physics of gamma-ray emissions including Compton scattering and the measurement of photon energies offers a physics-based approach to attack this challenging problem. The inclusion of a basic radionuclide representation of absorbed/scattered photons at a given energy along with interarrival times is used to extract the physics information available from the noisy measurements portable radiation detection systems used to interdict contraband. It is shown that this physics representation can incorporated scattering physics leading to an 'extended' model-based structure that can be used to develop an effective sequential detection technique. The resulting model-based processor is shown to perform quite well based on data obtained from a controlled experiment.

  5. Hadron Optics in Three-Dimensional Invariant Coordinate Space from Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S J; Chakrabarti, D; Harindranath, A; Mukherjee, A; Vary, J P

    2006-11-10

    The Fourier transform of the deeply virtual Compton scattering amplitude (DVCS) with respect to the skewness parameter {zeta} = Q{sup 2}/2p {center_dot} q can be used to provide an image of the target hadron in the boost-invariant variable {sigma}, the coordinate conjugate to light-front time {tau} = t + z/c. As an illustration, we construct a consistent covariant model of the DVCS amplitude and its associated generalized parton distributions using the quantum fluctuations of a fermion state at one loop in QED, thus providing a representation of the light-front wavefunctions of a lepton in {sigma} space. A consistent model for hadronic amplitudes can then be obtained by differentiating the light-front wavefunctions with respect to the bound-state mass. The resulting DVCS helicity amplitudes are evaluated as a function of {sigma} and the impact parameter {rvec b}{sub {perpendicular}}, thus providing a light-front ''photograph'' of the target hadron in a frame-independent three-dimensional light-front coordinate space. We find that in the models studied, the Fourier transform of the DVCS amplitudes exhibit diffraction patterns. The results are analogous to the diffractive scattering of a wave in optics where the distribution in {sigma} measures the physical size of the scattering center in a one-dimensional system.

  6. Passive 3D imaging of nuclear waste containers with Muon Scattering Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomay, C.; Velthuis, J.; Poffley, T.; Baesso, P.; Cussans, D.; Frazão, L.

    2016-03-01

    The non-invasive imaging of dense objects is of particular interest in the context of nuclear waste management, where it is important to know the contents of waste containers without opening them. Using Muon Scattering Tomography (MST), it is possible to obtain a detailed 3D image of the contents of a waste container on reasonable timescales, showing both the high and low density materials inside. We show the performance of such a method on a Monte Carlo simulation of a dummy waste drum object containing objects of different shapes and materials. The simulation has been tuned with our MST prototype detector performance. In particular, we show that both a tungsten penny of 2 cm radius and 1 cm thickness, and a uranium sheet of 0.5 cm thickness can be clearly identified. We also show the performance of a novel edge finding technique, by which the edges of embedded objects can be identified more precisely than by solely using the imaging method.

  7. The hydrogen anomaly in neutron Compton scattering: new experiments and a quantitative theoretical explanation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, E. B.; Hartmann, O.; Chatzidimitriou-Dreismann, C. A.; Abdul-Redah, T.

    2016-08-01

    No consensus has been reached so far about the hydrogen anomaly problem in Compton scattering of neutrons, although strongly reduced H cross-sections were first reported almost 20 years ago. Over the years, this phenomenon has been observed in many different hydrogen-containing materials. Here, we use yttrium hydrides as test objects, YH2, YH3, YD2 and YD3, Y(H x D1-x )2 and Y(H x D1-x )3, for which we observe H anomalies increasing with transferred momentum q. We also observe reduced deuteron cross-sections in YD2 and YD3 and have followed those up to scattering angles of 140° corresponding to high momentum transfers. In addition to data taken using the standard Au-197 foils for neutron energy selection, the present work includes experiments with Rh-103 foils and comparisons were also made with data from different detector setups. The H and D anomalies are discussed in terms of the different models proposed for their interpretation. The ‘electron loss model’ (which assumes energy transfer to excited electrons) is contradicted by the present data, but it is shown here that exchange effects in scattering from two or more protons (or deuterons) in the presence of large zero-point vibrations, can explain quantitatively the reduction of the cross-sections as well as their q-dependence. Decoherence processes also play an essential role. In a scattering time representation, shake-up processes can be followed on the attosecond scale. The theory also shows that large anomalies can appear only when the neutron coherence lengths (determined by energy selection and detector geometry) are about the same size as the distance between the scatterers.

  8. The hydrogen anomaly in neutron Compton scattering: new experiments and a quantitative theoretical explanation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, E. B.; Hartmann, O.; Chatzidimitriou-Dreismann, C. A.; Abdul-Redah, T.

    2016-08-01

    No consensus has been reached so far about the hydrogen anomaly problem in Compton scattering of neutrons, although strongly reduced H cross-sections were first reported almost 20 years ago. Over the years, this phenomenon has been observed in many different hydrogen-containing materials. Here, we use yttrium hydrides as test objects, YH2, YH3, YD2 and YD3, Y(H x D1‑x )2 and Y(H x D1‑x )3, for which we observe H anomalies increasing with transferred momentum q. We also observe reduced deuteron cross-sections in YD2 and YD3 and have followed those up to scattering angles of 140° corresponding to high momentum transfers. In addition to data taken using the standard Au-197 foils for neutron energy selection, the present work includes experiments with Rh-103 foils and comparisons were also made with data from different detector setups. The H and D anomalies are discussed in terms of the different models proposed for their interpretation. The ‘electron loss model’ (which assumes energy transfer to excited electrons) is contradicted by the present data, but it is shown here that exchange effects in scattering from two or more protons (or deuterons) in the presence of large zero-point vibrations, can explain quantitatively the reduction of the cross-sections as well as their q-dependence. Decoherence processes also play an essential role. In a scattering time representation, shake-up processes can be followed on the attosecond scale. The theory also shows that large anomalies can appear only when the neutron coherence lengths (determined by energy selection and detector geometry) are about the same size as the distance between the scatterers.

  9. Lorentz Invariance Violation: Modification of the Compton Scattering and the GZK Cutoff and Other Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidharth, B. G.; Das, Abhishek; Roy, Arka Dev

    2016-05-01

    This paper deals with the violation of Lorentz symmetry. The approach is based on Compton scattering which becomes modified due to a modified dispersion relation arising from a minimum spacetime cut off as in modern Quantum Gravity approaches. With this amendment, we find that two high-energy rays of different energies develop a time-lag. This time separation becomes prominent when the energies of the considered photons is ≥ 1 GeV. Extending our approach to gamma rays of cosmic origin we predict that they undergo innumerable such scattering processes before reaching us. Therefore, it accounts for the time-lag phenomena of gamma ray bursts ( GRB)'s which have been claimed to be observed. Also, we find that resorting to the modified Snyder-Sidharth Hamiltonian it is possible to extend the GZK cut off beyond its normal limit, 1020 eV. Some observations of ultra high energy cosmic rays support this. This extends the limits of special theory of relativity.

  10. Inverse Compton Scattering as a Diagnostic Tool for the Measurement of Electron Beam Energies in Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Critchley, A. D. J.

    2003-10-01

    The main emphasis of the diode research project at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) UK is to produce small diameter radiographic spot sizes at high dose to improve the resolution of the transmission radiographs taken during hydrodynamic experiments. Experimental measurements of conditions within the diodes of Pulsed Power driven flash x-ray machines are vital to provide a benchmark for electromagnetic PIC codes such as LSP which are used to develop new diode designs. The potential use of inverse Compton scattering (ICS) as a diagnostic technique in the determination of electron energies within the diode has been investigated. The interaction of a laser beam with a beam of high-energy electrons will create an ICS spectrum of photons. Theoretically, one should be able to glean information on the energies and positions of the electrons from the energy spectrum and differential cross section of the scattered photons. The feasibility of fielding this technique on various diode designs has been explored, and an experimental setup with the greatest likelihood of success is proposed.

  11. Deeply virtual Compton scattering at small x in future electron-ion colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, V. P.; Pires, D. S.

    2015-05-01

    The study of exclusive processes in the future electron-ion (e A ) colliders will be an important tool to investigate the QCD dynamics at high energies as they are in general driven by the gluon content of the target which is strongly subject to parton saturation effects. In this paper we compute the coherent and incoherent cross sections for the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) process relying on the color dipole approach and considering different models for the dipole-proton scattering amplitude. The dependencies of the cross sections with the energy, photon virtuality, nuclear mass number, and squared momentum transfer are analyzed in detail. We demonstrate that the ratio between the incoherent and coherent cross sections decreases at smaller values of Q2 and increases at smaller values of A . We show that the coherent cross section dominates at small t and exhibits the typical diffractive pattern, with the number of dips in the range |t | ≤0.3 GeV2 increasing with the mass atomic number. Our results indicate that the position of the dips are independent of the model used to treat the dipole-proton interaction as well as of the center-of-mass energy.

  12. Properties and applications of mono-energetic gamma-rays from laser-Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Felicie; Anderson, Scott; Anderson, Gerry; Betts, Shawn; Gibson, David; Hagmann, Christian; Johnson, Micah; Messerly, Mike; Shverdin, Miroslav; Hartemann, Frederic; Siders, Craig; McNabb, Dennis; Barty, Christopher

    2009-11-01

    Properties of a Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering source are presented. It produces 0.1 MeV-0.9 MeV photons. Its experimental key parameters are: its size (0.01 mm^2), divergence (10x6 mrad^2), duration (ps), spectrum (15% bandwidth) and intensity (10^5 photons/shot), which yield an on-axis peak brightness of ˜10^15 photons/mm^2/mrad^2/s/0.1% bandwidth at 0.478 MeV. We detected the 0.478 MeV nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) line of ^7Li. A LiH sample was in the beam path, and the NRF scattered photons were detected by a germanium detector oriented at 90^o with respect to the incident beam axis. The resulting spectrum shows the 0.478 MeV line of ^7Li, with several characteristic lines from the interaction. With this experiment, we have shown that MEGa-Ray sources will provide a unique specific isotope detection capability. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. 3d-shell contribution to the energy loss of protons during grazing scattering from Cu(111) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gravielle, M. S.; Alducin, M.; Juaristi, J. I.; Silkin, V. M.

    2007-10-15

    Motivated by a recent experimental work [S. Lederer and H. Winter, Phys. Rev. A 73, 054901 (2006)] we study the contribution of the 3d shell electrons to the energy loss of 100 keV protons scattered off from the Cu(111) surface. To describe this process we use a multiple collision formalism, where the interaction of the projectile with 3d electrons is described by means of a sequence of single encounters with atoms belonging to the first atomic layer. In order to compare the theoretical energy loss with the experimental data, we add the contribution of valence electrons, which is evaluated in linear response theory using a response function that incorporates information on the surface band structure. For completeness, the energy lost by protons is also calculated within a jellium model that includes 3d and valence electrons with equal footing. Fair agreement between theory and experiment exists when the 3d shell is taken into account in the calculation.

  14. Hadron Optics in Three-Dimensional Invariant Coordinate Space from Deeply VirtualCompton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; Chakrabarti, D.; Harindranath, A.; Mukherjee, A.; Vary, J.P.

    2006-11-30

    The Fourier transform of the deeply virtual Compton scattering amplitude (DVCS) with respect to the skewness parameter {zeta} = Q{sup 2}/2p {center_dot} q can be used to provide an image of the target hadron in the boost-invariant variable {sigma}, the coordinate conjugate to light-front time {tau} = t + z/c. As an illustration, we construct a consistent covariant model of the DVCS amplitude and its associated generalized parton distributions using the quantum fluctuations of a fermion state at one loop in QED, thus providing a representation of the light-front wave functions of a lepton in {sigma} space. A consistent model for hadronic amplitudes can then be obtained by differentiating the light-front wave functions with respect to the bound-state mass. The resulting DVCS helicity amplitudes are evaluated as a function of {sigma} and the impact parameter {rvec b}{sub {perpendicular}}, thus providing a light-front image of the target hadron in a frame-independent three-dimensional light-front coordinate space. Models for the LFWFs of hadrons in (3 + 1) dimensions displaying confinement at large distances and conformal symmetry at short distances have been obtained using the AdS/CFT method. We also compute the LFWFs in this model in invariant three dimensional coordinate space. We find that in the models studied, the Fourier transform of the DVCS amplitudes exhibit diffraction patterns. The results are analogous to the diffractive scattering of a wave in optics where the distribution in ? measures the physical size of the scattering center in a one-dimensional system.

  15. X-band RF gun and linac for medical Compton scattering X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobashi, Katsuhito; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Fukasawa, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Fumito; Ebina, Futaro; Ogino, Haruyuki; Urakawa, Junji; Higo, Toshiyasu; Akemoto, Mitsuo; Hayano, Hitoshi; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2004-12-01

    Compton scattering hard X-ray source for 10-80 keV are under construction using the X-band (11.424 GHz) electron linear accelerator and YAG laser at Nuclear Engineering Research laboratory, University of Tokyo. This work is a part of the national project on the development of advanced compact medical accelerators in Japan. National Institute for Radiological Science is the host institute and U.Tokyo and KEK are working for the X-ray source. Main advantage is to produce tunable monochromatic hard (10-80 keV) X-rays with the intensities of 108-1010 photons/s (at several stages) and the table-top size. Second important aspect is to reduce noise radiation at a beam dump by adopting the deceleration of electrons after the Compton scattering. This realizes one beamline of a 3rd generation SR source at small facilities without heavy shielding. The final goal is that the linac and laser are installed on the moving gantry. We have designed the X-band (11.424 GHz) traveling-wave-type linac for the purpose. Numerical consideration by CAIN code and luminosity calculation are performed to estimate the X-ray yield. X-band thermionic-cathode RF-gun and RDS(Round Detuned Structure)-type X-band accelerating structure are applied to generate 50 MeV electron beam with 20 pC microbunches (104) for 1 microsecond RF macro-pulse. The X-ray yield by the electron beam and Q-switch Nd:YAG laser of 2 J/10 ns is 107 photons/RF-pulse (108 photons/sec at 10 pps). We design to adopt a technique of laser circulation to increase the X-ray yield up to 109 photons/pulse (1010 photons/s). 50 MW X-band klystron and compact modulator have been constructed and now under tuning. The construction of the whole system has started. X-ray generation and medical application will be performed in the early next year.

  16. Simplified Formulae System for Resonant Inverse Compton Scattering of a Fast Electron in an Intense Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    You, J. H.; Chen, W. P.; Zhang, S. N.; Chen, L.; Liu, D.; Chou, C. K.

    2003-01-01

    We present simple analytical formulae for the emission spectrum and total power of a special kind of resonant inverse Compton scattering (RICS) of a relativistic electron in an intense magnetic field. In contrast with the available formulae system, we obtain a markedly simplified one based on the semiclassical quantum theory, which is more understandable for people who are unfamiliar with quantum electrodynamics. We show that the RICS process, under an appropriate 'accommodation condition' derived in this paper, is predominantly much more efficient than the coexistent ordinary inverse Compton scattering, and produces highly beamed high-frequency radiation with moderately good monochromaticity. Our formulae are simple to use - thus offering a lucid physical intuition for the theory - and may find wide applications in hard X-ray and gamma-ray astrophysics.

  17. Visualizing the mixed bonding properties of liquid boron with high-resolution x-ray Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Okada, J T; Sit, P H-L; Watanabe, Y; Barbiellini, B; Ishikawa, T; Wang, Y J; Itou, M; Sakurai, Y; Bansil, A; Ishikawa, R; Hamaishi, M; Paradis, P-F; Kimura, K; Ishikawa, T; Nanao, S

    2015-05-01

    Bonding characteristics of liquid boron at 2500 K are studied by using high-resolution Compton scattering. An excellent agreement is found between the measurements and the corresponding Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. Covalent bond pairs are clearly shown to dominate in liquid boron along with the coexistence of diffuse pairs. Our study reveals the complex bonding pattern of liquid boron and gives insight into the unusual properties of this high-temperature liquid.

  18. Constraints on the virtual Compton scattering on the nucleon in a new dispersive formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprini, Irinel

    2016-04-01

    The dispersive representation of the virtual Compton forward scattering amplitude has been recently reexamined in connection with the evaluation of the Cottingham formula for the proton-neutron electromagnetic mass difference and the proton radius puzzle. The most difficult part of the analysis is related to one of the invariant amplitudes, denoted as T1(ν ,Q2), which requires a subtraction in the standard dispersion relation with respect to the energy ν at fixed photon momentum squared q2=-Q2. We propose an alternative dispersive framework, which implements analyticity and unitarity by combining the Cauchy integral relation at low and moderate energies with the modulus representation of the amplitude at high energies. Using techniques of functional analysis, we derive a necessary and sufficient condition for the consistency with analyticity of the subtraction function S1(Q2)=T1(0 ,Q2) , the cross sections measured at low and moderate energies and the Regge model assumed to be valid at high energies. From this condition we obtain model-independent constraints on the subtraction function, confronting them with the available information on nucleon magnetic polarizabilities and results reported recently in the literature. The formalism can be used also for testing the existence of a fixed pole at J =0 in the angular momentum plane, but more accurate data are necessary for a definite answer.

  19. Measurement of electron beam polarization from the energy asymmetry of Compton scattered photons

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.C.; Woods, M.; Zhou, J.; Frey, R.; Arodzero, A.

    1998-06-01

    The authors describe a new method for precision measurement ({approximately} 1%) of the longitudinal polarization of high-energy electron beams. The method relies on measuring the energy asymmetry of Compton scattered photons which result from collisions between the electron beam and a polarized laser beam. The measurement takes place near the electron-positron interaction point at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). The detector described here (PGC) is a threshold gas Cherenkov device which follows a lead radiator. The Cherenkov threshold (14 MeV) is essential for eliminating enormous synchrotron radiation-induced backgrounds at the position of interest in the SLC. They also describe the calibration of the PGC energy response in a test beam and its performance as a working polarimeter for the SLC/SLD physics program. Preliminary results from the 1996 run indicate that PGC measurement with total error at or below the 1% level is indeed achievable, and hence serves as a valuable crosscheck of the polarization scale.

  20. Driver linac design for a femtosecond head-on inverse Compton scatteringX-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, N. Y.; Lau, W. K.; Liang, C. C.; Lee, A. P.; Cheng, W. C.; Yang, S. S.

    2011-05-01

    The feasibility of generating an ultra-short relativistic electron beam with a thermionic cathode rf gun driver linac for a femtosecond head-on inverse Compton scattering (ICS) X-ray source has been examined by space charge tracking throughout the entire beamline, from the cathode to the interaction point. It has been determined that GHz-repetition-rate electron pulses as short as 49 fs can be produced by compressing the energy-chirped beam from a 2998-MHz, 1.5-cell rf gun with an alpha magnet and an rf linac operating at the injection phase near the zero crossing. These electron pulses, with a 42-pC bunch charge, are accelerated to 27 MeV with an S-band traveling-wave constant-gradient linac structure for the ICS in an interaction chamber located downstream. The driver linac design that allows the operation of an ultra-short ICS X-ray source at a 0.7-Å wavelength, with a peak photon flux of 9.08×1017 photons/s, is presented in this paper.

  1. Triple coincidence beam spin asymmetry measurements in Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canan, Mustafa

    2011-12-01

    The Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) provides hitherto the most complete information about the quark structure of hadron. GPDs are accessible through hard-exclusive reactions, among which Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) is the cleanest reaction. A dedicated DVCS experiment on Hydrogen (E00-110) ran in the Hall A at Jefferson Laboratory in Fall 2004. I present here Beam Spin Asymmetry (BSA) results for the ep → epgamma reaction studied in the E00-110 experiment with fully exclusive triple coincidence H(e, e'gammap ) detection. I present a re-calibration of the electromagnetic calorimeter used to detect the high energy photon. This calibration is necessary to account for the effects of pile-up. The results show a 1-sigma disagreement with the double coincidence H(e, e'gamma )p results, I also presents a feasibility study for measurements of neutron GPDs via the 3He ? (e, e'gamma)ppn reaction on a polarized 3He target with JLab at 12 GeV. These measurements offer the prospect of a determination of all four GPDs.

  2. Fermi-Compton scattering due to magnetopause surface fluctuations in Jupiter's magnetospheric cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of boundary surface fluctuations on a spectrum of electromagnetic radiation trapped in a high Q (quality) cavity are considered. Undulating walls introduce small frequency shifts at reflection to the radiation, and it is argued that the process is entirely analogous to both Fermi (particle) acceleration and inverse Compton scattering. A Fokker-Planck formalism is pursued; it yields a diffusion equation in frequency for which the Green's function and steady-state solutions are found. Applying this analysis to the Jovian continuum radiation discovered by Voyager spacecraft, it is suggested that characteristic diffusion times are greater than 1 year, and that in order to account for the steep frequency spectra observed, an unidentified loss mechanism must operate in the cavity with a decay time constant approximately equal to the characteristic diffusion time divided by 28. A radiator-reactor model of the cavity is investigated to provide an estimate for the intrinsic luminosity of the low frequency (approximately 100 Hz) continuum source whose power is approximately 7 x 10 to the 6th W.

  3. The Operation Modes of Kharkov X-Ray Generator Based on Compton Scattering NESTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Bulyak, E.V.; Gladkikh, P.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Mytsykov, A.; Shcherbakov, A.A.; Zelinsky, A.Y.; Tatchyn, R.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-05-09

    The results of theoretical and numerical considerations of linear Compton scattering are used to evaluate characteristics of X-rays produced by collision between a low emittance electron beam and intensive laser light in an X-ray generator NESTOR of NSC KIPT. Two main generation modes have been under consideration at preliminary NESTOR design. There are the operation mode for medicine 33.4 keV X-rays production using 43 Mev electron beam and Nd:YAG laser beam and higher energy X-rays production mode providing X-rays with energy up to 900 keV with 225 MeV electron beam and Nd:YAG laser beam. It was supposed to use an optical cavity for laser beam accumulation of about 2.6 m long and an interaction angle of about 3{sup o} in both operation modes. A few more operation modes provide possibility to expand operation range of NESTOR. Using interaction angle 10{sup o} and 150{sup o} along with optical resonator of 42 cm long and the second mode of laser light it is possible to produce X-rays in energy range from a few keV till 1.5 MeV. The intensity and spectral brightness of the X-rays is expected to be {approx} 10{sup 13} phot/s and {approx}10{sup 13} phot/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1%BW respectively.

  4. CONSTRAINT ON THE PARAMETERS OF THE INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING MODEL FOR RADIO PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, M.; Wang, H. G.; Lee, K. J.; Qiao, G. J.; Xu, R. X.

    2011-11-01

    The inverse Compton scattering (ICS) model can explain various pulse profile shapes and the diversity of the pulse profile evolution based on the mechanism where the radio emission is generated through ICS between secondary relativistic particles and radio waves from polar gap avalanches. In this paper, we study the parameter space of the ICS model for 15 pulsars that share the common pulse profile evolution phenomenon, where the pulse profiles are narrower at higher observing frequencies. Two key parameters, the initial Lorentz factor and the energy loss factor of secondary particles, are constrained using the least-squares fitting method, where we fit the theoretical curve of the 'beam-frequency mapping' of the ICS model to the observed pulse widths at multiple frequencies. The uncertainty of the inclination and viewing angles are taken into account in the fitting process. It is found that the initial Lorentz factor is larger than 4000, and the energy loss factor is between 20 and 560. The Lorentz factor is consistent with the prediction of the inner vacuum gap model. Such high-energy loss factors suggest significant energy loss for secondary particles at altitudes of a few tens to hundreds of kilometers.

  5. Compton scattering and the gamma-ray power-law spectrum in Markarian 421

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Krolik, Julian H.

    1993-01-01

    The nearest BL Lac object, Mrk 421, has a gamma-ray spectrum which is approximately flat in EF-sub E from E less than about 50 MeV to E greater than about 1 TeV. Inverse Compton scattering can explain this smooth spectrum, despite the structure in the Klein-Nishina cross section, if the injected electron distribution function is proportional to gamma exp -2, where gamma is the electron Lorentz factor. When this is the case, the structure imprinted on the steady state electron distribution function by the structure in the Klein-Nishina cross section is almost exactly compensated in the radiated spectrum. Because particle acceleration in strong shocks injects particles with this distribution function, this shape injection function is in fact quite plausible. Other blazars may be explained by the same model if the cutoff below TeV energies observed in other objects is due to pair production on the cosmological IR background, as suggested by Stecker et al. (1992).

  6. Nucleon polarisabilities from Compton scattering off the one- and few-nucleon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grießhammer, Harald W.

    2005-07-01

    These proceedings sketch how combining recent theoretical advances with data from the new generation of high-precision Compton scattering experiments on both the proton and few-nucleon systems offers fresh, detailed insight into the Physics of the nucleon polarisabilities. A multipole-analysis is presented to simplify their interpretation. Predictions from Chiral Effective Field Theory with special emphasis on the spin-polarisabilities can serve as a guideline for doubly-polarised experiments below 300 MeV. The strong energy-dependence of the scalar magnetic dipole-polarisability β turns out to be crucial to understanding the proton and deuteron data. Finally, a high-accuracy determination of the proton and neutron polarisabilities shows that they are identical within error-bars. For details and a better list of references, consult Refs. [H.W. Grießhammer, T.R. Hemmert, Phys. Rev. C 65 (2002) 045207, nucl-th/0110006; R.P. Hildebrandt, H.W. Grießhammer, T.R. Hemmert, B. Pasquini, Eur. Phys. J. A 20 (2004) 293, nucl-th/0307070; R.P. Hildebrandt, H.W. Grießhammer, T.R. Hemmert, Eur. Phys. J. A 20 (2004) 329, nucl-th/0308054; R.P. Hildebrandt, H.W. Grießhammer, T.R. Hemmert, D.R. Phillips, Eur. Phys. J. A, nucl-th/0405077 (in press)].

  7. Scaling Tests of the Cross Section for Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos Munoz Camacho; Alexandre Camsonne; Malek Mazouz; Catherine Ferdi; Gagik Gavalian; Elena Kuchina; Moscov Amaryan; Konrad Aniol; Matthieu Beaumel; Hachemi Benaoum; Pierre Bertin; Michel Brossard; Jian-Ping Chen; Eugene Chudakov; Brandon Craver; Francesco Cusanno; Kees de Jager; Alexandre Deur; Robert Feuerbach; Jean Fieschi; Salvatore Frullani; Michel Garcon; Franco Garibaldi; Olivier Gayou; Ronald Gilman; Javier Gomez; Paul Gueye; Pierre Guichon; Benoit Guillon; Jens-ole Hansen; David Hayes; Douglas Higinbotham; Timothy Holmstrom; Charles Hyde-Wright; Hassan Ibrahim; Ryuichi Igarashi; Xiaodong Jiang; Hyon-Suk Jo; Lisa Kaufman; Aidan Kelleher; Ameya Kolarkar; Gerfried Kumbartzki; Geraud Laveissiere; John LeRose; Richard Lindgren; Nilanga Liyanage; Hai-jiang Lu; Demetrius Margaziotis; Zein-Eddine Meziani; Kathy McCormick; Robert Michaels; Bernard Michel; Bryan Moffit; Peter Monaghan; Sirish Nanda; Vladimir Nelyubin; Milan Potokar; Yi Qiang; Ronald Ransome; Jean-Sebastien Real; Bodo Reitz; Yves Roblin; Julie Roche; Franck Sabatie; Arunava Saha; Simon Sirca; Karl Slifer; Patricia Solvignon; Ramesh Subedi; Vincent Sulkosky; Paul Ulmer; Eric Voutier; Kebin Wang; Lawrence Weinstein; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Xiaochao Zheng; Lingyan Zhu

    2006-07-27

    We present the first measurements of {rvec e}p {yields} ep{gamma} cross section in the deep virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) regime and the valence quark region (x{sub Bj} = 0.36). From JLab E00-110, we extract the imaginary part of the Bethe-Heitler (BH)--DVCS interference terms, to order twist-3 for Q{sup 2} = 1.5, 1.9, and 2.3 GeV{sup 2}, and the real part of the BH-DVCS interference terms at Q{sup 2}2 = 2.3 GeV{sup 2}. We present the first model-independent measurement of linear combinations of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) and GPD integrals up to twist-3 approximation. The validity of this approximation is strongly supported by the absence of Q{sup 2}-variation of the extracted terms--thereby constraining the size of higher twist contributions to our observables.

  8. Design and optimization of MeV class Compton scattering MEGa-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Felicie; Anderson, S. G.; Betts, S. M.; Cross, R. R.; Ebbers, C. A.; Houck, T. L.; Gibson, D. J.; Marsh, R. A.; Messerly, M.; Shverdin, M. Y.; Wu, S. S.; Hartemann, F. V.; Siders, C. W.; Scarpetti, R. D.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2010-11-01

    The design and optimization of a Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering source are presented. A new precision source with up to 2.5 MeV photon energies, enabled by state of the art laser and x-band linac technologies, is currently being built at LLNL. Various aspects of the theoretical design, including dose and brightness optimization, will be presented. In particular, while it is known that nonlinear effects occur in such light sources when the laser normalized potential is close to unity, we show that these can appear at lower values of the potential. A three dimensional analytical model and numerical benchmarks have been developed to model the source characteristics, including nonlinear spectra. Since MEGa-ray sources are being developed for precision applications such as nuclear resonance fluorescence, assessing spectral broadening mechanisms is essential. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. A 3D boundary integral equation method for ultrasonic scattering in a fluid-loaded elastic half space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimoto, K.; Hirose, S.

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents a boundary integral equation method for 3D ultrasonic scattering problems in a fluid-loaded elastic half space. Since full scale of numerical calculation using finite element or boundary element method is still very expensive, we formulate a boundary integral equation for the scattered field, which is amenable to numerical treatment. In order to solve the problem using the integral equation, however, the wave field without scattering objects, so-called free field need to be given in advance. We calculate the free field by the plane wave spectral method where the asymptotic approximation is introduced for computational efficiency. To show the efficiency of our method, scattering by a spherical cavity near fluid-solid interface is solved and the validity of the results is discussed.

  10. Scatterer size and concentration estimation technique based on a 3D acoustic impedance map from histologic sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamou, Jonathan; Oelze, Michael L.; O'Brien, William D.; Zachary, James F.

    2001-05-01

    Accurate estimates of scatterer parameters (size and acoustic concentration) are beneficial adjuncts to characterize disease from ultrasonic backscatterer measurements. An estimation technique was developed to obtain parameter estimates from the Fourier transform of the spatial autocorrelation function (SAF). A 3D impedance map (3DZM) is used to obtain the SAF of tissue. 3DZMs are obtained by aligning digitized light microscope images from histologic preparations of tissue. Estimates were obtained for simulated 3DZMs containing spherical scatterers randomly located: relative errors were less than 3%. Estimates were also obtained from a rat fibroadenoma and a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor (MMT). Tissues were fixed (10% neutral-buffered formalin), embedded in paraffin, serially sectioned and stained with H&E. 3DZM results were compared to estimates obtained independently against ultrasonic backscatter measurements. For the fibroadenoma and MMT, average scatterer diameters were 91 and 31.5 μm, respectively. Ultrasonic measurements yielded average scatterer diameters of 105 and 30 μm, respectively. The 3DZM estimation scheme showed results similar to those obtained by the independent ultrasonic measurements. The 3D impedance maps show promise as a powerful tool to characterize ultrasonic scattering sites of tissue. [Work supported by the University of Illinois Research Board.

  11. Design and Operation of a tunable MeV-level Compton-scattering-based (gamma-ray) source

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, D J; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Betts, S M; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C P

    2009-07-07

    A mono-energetic gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source based on Compton-scattering, targeting nuclear physics applications such as nuclear resonance fluorescence, has been constructed and commissioned at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In this paper, the overall architecture of the system, as well as some of the critical design decisions made in the development of the source, are discussed. The performances of the two laser systems (one for electron production, one for scattering), the electron photoinjector, and the linear accelerator are also detailed, and initial {gamma}-ray results are presented.

  12. Design and operation of a tunable MeV-level Compton-scattering-based γ-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, D. J.; Albert, F.; Anderson, S. G.; Betts, S. M.; Messerly, M. J.; Phan, H. H.; Semenov, V. A.; Shverdin, M. Y.; Tremaine, A. M.; Hartemann, F. V.; Siders, C. W.; McNabb, D. P.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2010-07-01

    A monoenergetic gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source based on Compton scattering, targeting nuclear physics applications such as nuclear resonance fluorescence, has been constructed and commissioned at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In this paper, the overall architecture of the system, as well as some of the design decisions (such as laser pulse lengths and interaction geometry) made in the development of the source, are discussed. The performances of the two laser systems (one for electron production, one for scattering), the electron photoinjector, and the linear accelerator are also detailed, and initial γ-ray results are presented.

  13. Mineral crystal alignment in mineralized fracture callus determined by 3D small-angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yifei; Manjubala, Inderchand; Roschger, Paul; Schell, Hanna; Duda, Georg N.; Fratzl, Peter

    2010-10-01

    Callus tissue formed during bone fracture healing is a mixture of different tissue types as revealed by histological analysis. But the structural characteristics of mineral crystals within the healing callus are not well known. Since two-dimensional (2D) scanning small-angle X-ray scattering (sSAXS) patterns showed that the size and orientation of callus crystals vary both spatially and temporally [1] and 2D electron microscopic analysis implies an anisotropic property of the callus morphology, the mineral crystals within the callus are also expected to vary in size and orientation in 3D. Three-dimensional small-angle X-ray scattering (3D SAXS), which combines 2D SAXS patterns collected at different angles of sample tilting, has been previously applied to investigate bone minerals in horse radius [2] and oim/oim mouse femur/tibia [3]. We implement a similar 3D SAXS method but with a different way of data analysis to gather information on the mineral alignment in fracture callus. With the proposed accurate yet fast assessment of 3D SAXS information, it was shown that the plate shaped mineral particles in the healing callus were aligned in groups with their predominant orientations occurring as a fiber texture.

  14. In Situ Fabrication of 3D Ag@ZnO Nanostructures for Microfluidic Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we develop an in situ method to grow highly controllable, sensitive, three-dimensional (3D) surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates via an optothermal effect within microfluidic devices. Implementing this approach, we fabricate SERS substrates composed of Ag@ZnO structures at prescribed locations inside microfluidic channels, sites within which current fabrication of SERS structures has been arduous. Conveniently, properties of the 3D Ag@ZnO nanostructures such as length, packing density, and coverage can also be adjusted by tuning laser irradiation parameters. After exploring the fabrication of the 3D nanostructures, we demonstrate a SERS enhancement factor of up to ∼2 × 106 and investigate the optical properties of the 3D Ag@ZnO structures through finite-difference time-domain simulations. To illustrate the potential value of our technique, low concentrations of biomolecules in the liquid state are detected. Moreover, an integrated cell-trapping function of the 3D Ag@ZnO structures records the surface chemical fingerprint of a living cell. Overall, our optothermal-effect-based fabrication technique offers an effective combination of microfluidics with SERS, resolving problems associated with the fabrication of SERS substrates in microfluidic channels. With its advantages in functionality, simplicity, and sensitivity, the microfluidic-SERS platform presented should be valuable in many biological, biochemical, and biomedical applications. PMID:25402207

  15. Edge-based finite elements and vector ABCs applied to 3D scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Jin, J. M.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    An edge based finite element formulation with vector absorbing boundary conditions is presented for scattering by composite structures having boundaries satisfying impedance and/or transition conditions. Remarkably accurate results are obtained by placing the mesh a small fraction of a wavelength away from the scatterer.

  16. Characterization of image quality for 3D scatter-corrected breast CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachon, Jan H.; Shah, Jainil; Tornai, Martin P.

    2011-03-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the image quality of our dedicated, quasi-monochromatic spectrum, cone beam breast imaging system under scatter corrected and non-scatter corrected conditions for a variety of breast compositions. CT projections were acquired of a breast phantom containing two concentric sets of acrylic spheres that varied in size (1-8mm) based on their polar position. The breast phantom was filled with 3 different concentrations of methanol and water, simulating a range of breast densities (0.79-1.0g/cc); acrylic yarn was sometimes included to simulate connective tissue of a breast. For each phantom condition, 2D scatter was measured for all projection angles. Scatter-corrected and uncorrected projections were then reconstructed with an iterative ordered subsets convex algorithm. Reconstructed image quality was characterized using SNR and contrast analysis, and followed by a human observer detection task for the spheres in the different concentric rings. Results show that scatter correction effectively reduces the cupping artifact and improves image contrast and SNR. Results from the observer study indicate that there was no statistical difference in the number or sizes of lesions observed in the scatter versus non-scatter corrected images for all densities. Nonetheless, applying scatter correction for differing breast conditions improves overall image quality.

  17. Verification of Compton scattering spectrum of a 662keV photon beam scattered on a cylindrical steel target using MCNP5 code.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Tran Thien; Nguyen, Vo Hoang; Chuong, Huynh Dinh; Tran, Le Bao; Tam, Hoang Duc; Binh, Nguyen Thi; Tao, Chau Van

    2015-11-01

    This article focuses on the possible application of a (137)Cs low-radioactive source (5mCi) and a NaI(Tl) detector for measuring the saturation thickness of solid cylindrical steel targets. In order to increase the reliability of the obtained experimental results and to verify the detector response function of Compton scattering spectrum, simulation using Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP5) code is performed. The obtained results are in good agreement with the response functions of the simulation scattering and experimental scattering spectra. On the basis of such spectra, the saturation depth of a steel cylinder is determined by experiment and simulation at about 27mm using gamma energy of 662keV ((137)Cs) at a scattering angle of 120°. This study aims at measuring the diameter of solid cylindrical objects by gamma-scattering technique. PMID:26363240

  18. X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) Assay Using Laser Compton Scattered (LCS) X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, Syed F.; Chouffani, Khalid; Wells, Douglas P.

    2009-03-01

    Laser Compton Scattered (LCS) X-rays are produced as a result of the interaction between accelerated electrons and a laser beam. The yield of LCS X-rays is dependent on the laser power, angle of collision between interacting particles, and the electron linear accelerator's (linac) electron beam energy and its current. One of our research goals at the Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC) focuses on applications such as detection and imaging of fissionable isotopes for nuclear non-proliferation, safeguards and homeland security. Quasi monochromatic LCS X-rays offer much better signal-to-noise ratios for such applications. The energy of LCS X-rays is tunable, that enable element-specific analysis. Two sharp 36.5 keV and 98.4 keV LCS peaks were observed in two separate experiments based on electron beams tuned at 32 MeV and 37 MeV, that were brought in collision with the (Power)peak = 4 GW Nd.YAG laser operating at 532 nm and 266 nm wavelengths. The linac was operating at 60 Hz with an electron beam pulse length of about 50 ps and a peak current of about 7 A. We exploited X-ray fluorescence (XRF) techniques to identify elemental Kα1, Kα2, and Kβ1 lines in a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, with a 0.5 mm thick Beryllium (Be) absorbing layer, emitted from tin (Sn), cadmium (Cd), silver (Ag), gold (Au), and lead (Pb) foils with thicknesses ranging from 25-500 μm, following absorption of 36.1 keV and 98.4 keV LCS X-rays. These reference foils were used for the proof of principle, and some have atomic numbers near to that of relevant fission products.

  19. Performance and field tests of a handheld Compton camera using 3-D position-sensitive scintillators coupled to multi-pixel photon counter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, A.; Kataoka, J.; Nishiyama, T.; Fujita, T.; Takeuchi, K.; Okochi, H.; Ogata, H.; Kuroshima, H.; Ohsuka, S.; Nakamura, S.; Hirayanagi, M.; Adachi, S.; Uchiyama, T.; Suzuki, H.

    2014-11-01

    After the nuclear disaster in Fukushima, radiation decontamination has become particularly urgent. To help identify radiation hotspots and ensure effective decontamination operation, we have developed a novel Compton camera based on Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 scintillators and multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) arrays. Even though its sensitivity is several times better than that of other cameras being tested in Fukushima, we introduce a depth-of-interaction (DOI) method to further improve the angular resolution. For gamma rays, the DOI information, in addition to 2-D position, is obtained by measuring the pulse-height ratio of the MPPC arrays coupled to ends of the scintillator. We present the detailed performance and results of various field tests conducted in Fukushima with the prototype 2-D and DOI Compton cameras. Moreover, we demonstrate stereo measurement of gamma rays that enables measurement of not only direction but also approximate distance to radioactive hotspots.

  20. Accurate and efficient Nyström volume integral equation method for the Maxwell equations for multiple 3-D scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Duan; Cai, Wei; Zinser, Brian; Cho, Min Hyung

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we develop an accurate and efficient Nyström volume integral equation (VIE) method for the Maxwell equations for a large number of 3-D scatterers. The Cauchy Principal Values that arise from the VIE are computed accurately using a finite size exclusion volume together with explicit correction integrals consisting of removable singularities. Also, the hyper-singular integrals are computed using interpolated quadrature formulae with tensor-product quadrature nodes for cubes, spheres and cylinders, that are frequently encountered in the design of meta-materials. The resulting Nyström VIE method is shown to have high accuracy with a small number of collocation points and demonstrates p-convergence for computing the electromagnetic scattering of these objects. Numerical calculations of multiple scatterers of cubic, spherical, and cylindrical shapes validate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed method.

  1. Scattering of elastic waves by an arbitrary shaped 3-D planar crack using the Indirect Boundary Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viveros, U.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Luzon, F.

    2001-12-01

    The scattering of elastic waves by various types of cracks is an important engineering problem. From a physical point of view the question that arises is up to what degree will a local perturbation in a medium modifies the scattered wave field. For instance, in the seismic monitoring to enhance oil recovery (due to extensive presence of cracks and cavities) a crucial problem is to determine zones where there are physical property changes. Modelling such highly heterogeneous media is critical to increased production from oil and gas. In order to study scattering effects caused by arbitrary-shaped cracks a simplified indirect boundary element method (BEM) is used to compute the seismic response of a 3-D crack under incident elastic P and S waves. The method is based on the integral representation for scattered elastic waves using single layer boundary sources. This approach is called indirect BEM in the literature as the sources strengths should be obtained as an intermediate step. Scattered waves are constructed at the boundaries from which they radiate. Therefore, this method can be regarded as a numerical realization of Huygens' principle. Boundary conditions lead to a system of integral for boundary sources. A simplified discretization scheme is used. It is based on the approximate rectification of the surfaces involved using circles for the numerical and analytical integration of the exact Green's function for the unbounded elastic space. Radiation patterns for penny-shaped and croissant-shaped cracks are explored. The scattering effects of the elastic waves in a homogeneous isotropic infinite elastic medium with a 3-D crack are displayed in both frequency and time domains.

  2. Development of 3D control of a tiny dew droplet by scattered laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Shigeaki

    2009-06-01

    In order to study dropwise condensation on a metal plate, the method for controlling a tiny dew droplet deposited on a copper plate has been developed by using scattered laser light. The method employed the proportional control combined with shifting movement by an integrator to control the intensity of the scattered laser light constantly. Also, the control simulation of the method has been developed to confirm the usefulness of the method and the simulated three-dimensional shape of controlled dew droplet was obtained with the control action. A tiny thin dew droplet, of which the diameter was of handreds micrometers and the mass was about 10-7 g, was controlled in the atmosphere at room temperature for 60 minutes at the preset level of the intensity of scattered laser light and the three-dimensional shape of the controlled dew droplet was shown from the interference fringes.

  3. Compton tomography system

    DOEpatents

    Grubsky, Victor; Romanoov, Volodymyr; Shoemaker, Keith; Patton, Edward Matthew; Jannson, Tomasz

    2016-02-02

    A Compton tomography system comprises an x-ray source configured to produce a planar x-ray beam. The beam irradiates a slice of an object to be imaged, producing Compton-scattered x-rays. The Compton-scattered x-rays are imaged by an x-ray camera. Translation of the object with respect to the source and camera or vice versa allows three-dimensional object imaging.

  4. The influence of 3d3 type transition metals on light scattering properties of sulfur cycle bacteria Desulfuromonas acetoxidans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilyi, Oleksandr I.; Vasyliv, Oresta M.; Hnatush, Svitlana O.; Getman, Vasyl B.; Kotsyumbas, Galyna I.

    2011-07-01

    Light scattering properties of bacterial cells mostly depend on their sizes, refractive indexes of their components and surrounding environment. Interaction between bacterial cells and 3d3 type transition metals causes their optical characteristics' changes. Desulfuromonas acetoxidans are uncolored gram-negative obligatory anaerobic sulfur reducing bacteria that can be used as microbial fuel cells with high electron recovery from different organic compounds oxidation to electric current as a result of electrons transfer in the processes of sulfur and some 3d3 type transition metals reduction, such as Ferrum and Manganese. In this study size distribution and relative content in the chosen interval of sizes (0.2 - 2.0 μm) of sulfur reducing D. acetoxidans bacterial cells under the influence of different concentrations of manganese chloride (II) hexahydrate, ferrous chloride (III) hexahydrate and ferrous sulfate (II) have been investigated by the new method of measuring. A method includes sounding of flow suspended bacterial cells by monochromatic coherent light, registration of signals of co-operation of sounding radiation with the explored microbiological objects by detects amplitudes and durations of scattered light impulses. Correlation between changes of light-scattering properties and growth of Desulfuromonas acetoxidans cells under these conditions has been shown.

  5. Phase-retrieved optical projection tomography for 3D imaging through scattering layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancora, Daniele; Di Battista, Diego; Giasafaki, Georgia; Psycharakis, Stylianos; Liapis, Evangelos; Zacharopoulos, Athanasios; Zacharakis, Giannis

    2016-03-01

    Recently great progress has been made in biological and biomedical imaging by combining non-invasive optical methods, novel adaptive light manipulation and computational techniques for intensity-based phase recovery and three dimensional image reconstruction. In particular and in relation to the work presented here, Optical Projection Tomography (OPT) is a well-established technique for imaging mostly transparent absorbing biological models such as C. Elegans and Danio Rerio. On the contrary, scattering layers like the cocoon surrounding the Drosophila during the pupae stage constitutes a challenge for three dimensional imaging through such a complex structure. However, recent studies enabled image reconstruction through scattering curtains up to few transport mean free paths via phase retrieval iterative algorithms allowing to uncover objects hidden behind complex layers. By combining these two techniques we explore the possibility to perform a three dimensional image reconstruction of fluorescent objects embedded between scattering layers without compromising its structural integrity. Dynamical cross correlation registration was implemented for the registration process due to translational and flipping ambiguity of the phase retrieval problem, in order to provide the correct aligned set of data to perform the back-projection reconstruction. We have thus managed to reconstruct a hidden complex object between static scattering curtains and compared with the effective reconstruction to fully understand the process before the in-vivo biological implementation.

  6. Virtual Compton scattering and neutral pion electroproduction in the resonance region up to the deep inelastic region at backward angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laveissière, G.; Degrande, N.; Jaminion, S.; Jutier, C.; Todor, L.; Salvo, R. Di; Hoorebeke, L. Van; Alexa, L. C.; Anderson, B. D.; Aniol, K. A.; Arundell, K.; Audit, G.; Auerbach, L.; Baker, F. T.; Baylac, M.; Berthot, J.; Bertin, P. Y.; Bertozzi, W.; Bimbot, L.; Boeglin, W. U.; Brash, E. J.; Breton, V.; Breuer, H.; Burtin, E.; Calarco, J. R.; Cardman, L. S.; Cavata, C.; Chang, C.-C.; Chen, J.-P.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Dale, D. S.; de Jager, C. W.; de Leo, R.; Deur, A.; D'Hose, N.; Dodge, G. E.; Domingo, J. J.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Epstein, M. B.; Ewell, L. A.; Finn, J. M.; Fissum, K. G.; Fonvieille, H.; Fournier, G.; Frois, B.; Frullani, S.; Furget, C.; Gao, H.; Gao, J.; Garibaldi, F.; Gasparian, A.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, A.; Glashausser, C.; Gomez, J.; Gorbenko, V.; Grenier, P.; Guichon, P. A. M.; Hansen, J. O.; Holmes, R.; Holtrop, M.; Howell, C.; Huber, G. M.; Hyde, C. E.; Incerti, S.; Iodice, M.; Jardillier, J.; Jones, M. K.; Kahl, W.; Kamalov, S.; Kato, S.; Katramatou, A. T.; Kelly, J. J.; Kerhoas, S.; Ketikyan, A.; Khayat, M.; Kino, K.; Kox, S.; Kramer, L. H.; Kumar, K. S.; Kumbartzki, G.; Kuss, M.; Leone, A.; Lerose, J. J.; Liang, M.; Lindgren, R. A.; Liyanage, N.; Lolos, G. J.; Lourie, R. W.; Madey, R.; Maeda, K.; Malov, S.; Manley, D. M.; Marchand, C.; Marchand, D.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marroncle, J.; Martino, J.; McCormick, K.; McIntyre, J.; Mehrabyan, S.; Merchez, F.; Meziani, Z. E.; Michaels, R.; Miller, G. W.; Mougey, J. Y.; Nanda, S. K.; Neyret, D.; Offermann, E. A. J. M.; Papandreou, Z.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Perrino, R.; Petratos, G. G.; Platchkov, S.; Pomatsalyuk, R.; Prout, D. L.; Punjabi, V. A.; Pussieux, T.; Quémenér, G.; Ransome, R. D.; Ravel, O.; Real, J. S.; Renard, F.; Roblin, Y.; Rowntree, D.; Rutledge, G.; Rutt, P. M.; Saha, A.; Saito, T.; Sarty, A. J.; Serdarevic, A.; Smith, T.; Smirnov, G.; Soldi, K.; Sorokin, P.; Souder, P. A.; Suleiman, R.; Templon, J. A.; Terasawa, T.; Tiator, L.; Tieulent, R.; Tomasi-Gustaffson, E.; Tsubota, H.; Ueno, H.; Ulmer, P. E.; Urciuoli, G. M.; de Vyver, R. Van; der Meer, R. L. J. Van; Vernin, P.; Vlahovic, B.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Watson, J. W.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wijesooriya, K.; Wilson, R.; Wojtsekhowski, B. B.; Zainea, D. G.; Zhang, W.-M.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, Z.-L.

    2009-01-01

    We have made the first measurements of the virtual Compton scattering (VCS) process via the H(e, e'p)γ exclusive reaction in the nucleon resonance region, at backward angles. Results are presented for the W-dependence at fixed Q2=1GeV2 and for the Q2 dependence at fixed W near 1.5 GeV. The VCS data show resonant structures in the first and second resonance regions. The observed Q2 dependence is smooth. The measured ratio of H(e, e'p)γ to H(e, e'p)π0 cross sections emphasizes the different sensitivity of these two reactions to the various nucleon resonances. Finally, when compared to real Compton scattering (RCS) at high energy and large angles, our VCS data at the highest W (1.8-1.9 GeV) show a striking Q2 independence, which may suggest a transition to a perturbative scattering mechanism at the quark level.

  7. Virtual Compton scattering and neutral pion electroproduction in the resonance region up to the deep inelastic region at backward angles

    SciTech Connect

    Laveissiere, Geraud; Degrande, Natalie; Jaminion, Stephanie; Jutier, Christophe; Todor, Luminita; Di Salvo, Rachele; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Alexa, L.C.; Anderson, Brian; Aniol, Konrad; Arundell, Kathleen; Audit, Gerard; Auerbach, Leonard; Baker, F.; Baylac, Maud; Berthot, J.; Bertin, Pierre; Bertozzi, William; Bimbot, Louis; Boeglin, Werner; Brash, Edward; Breton, Vincent; Breuer, Herbert; Burtin, Etienne; Calarco, John; Cardman, Lawrence; Cavata, Christian; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chen, Jian-Ping; Chudakov, Eugene; Cisbani, Evaristo; Dale, Daniel; De Jager, Cornelis; De Leo, Raffaele; Deur, Alexandre; D'Hose, Nicole; Dodge, Gail; Domingo, John; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Epstein, Martin; Ewell, Lars; Finn, John; Fissum, Kevin; Fonvieille, Helene; Fournier, Guy; Frois, Bernard; Frullani, Salvatore; Furget, Christophe; Gao, Haiyan; Gao, Juncai; Garibaldi, Franco; Gasparian, Ashot; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Glashausser, Charles; Gomez, Javier; Gorbenko, Viktor; Grenier, Philippe; Guichon, Pierre; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Holmes, Richard; Holtrop, Maurik; Howell, Calvin; Huber, Garth; Hyde, Charles; Incerti, Sebastien; Iodice, Mauro; Jardillier, Johann; Jones, Mark; Kahl, William; Kamalov, Sabit; Kato, Seigo; Katramatou, A.T.; Kelly, James; Kerhoas, Sophie; Ketikyan, Armen; Khayat, Mohammad; Kino, Kouichi; Kox, Serge; Kramer, Laird; Kumar, Krishna; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; Kuss, Michael; Leone, Antonio; LeRose, John; Liang, Meihua; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Lolos, George; Lourie, Robert; Madey, Richard; Maeda, Kazushige; Malov, Sergey; Manley, D.; Marchand, Claude; Marchand, Dominique; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marroncle, Jacques; Martino, Jacques; McCormick, Kathy; McIntyre, Justin; Mehrabyan, Surik; Merchez, Fernand; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Miller, Gerald; Mougey, Jean; Nanda, Sirish; Neyret, Damien; Offermann, Edmond; Papandreou, Zisis; Perdrisat, Charles; Perrino, R.; Petratos, Gerassimos; Platchkov, Stephane; Pomatsalyuk, Roman; Prout, David; Punjabi, Vina; Pussieux, Thierry; Quemener, Gilles; Ransome, Ronald; Ravel, Oliver; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Renard, F.; Roblin, Yves; Rowntree, David; Rutledge, Gary; Rutt, Paul; Saha, Arunava; Saito, Teijiro; Sarty, Adam; Serdarevic, A.; Smith, T.; Smirnov, G.; Soldi, K.; Sorokin, Pavel; Souder, Paul; Suleiman, Riad; Templon, Jeffrey; Terasawa, Tatsuo; Tiator, Lothar; Tieulent, Raphael; Tomasi-Gustaffson, E.; Tsubota, Hiroaki; Ueno, Hiroaki; Ulmer, Paul; Urciuoli, Guido; Van De Vyver, R.; van der Meer, Rob; Vernin, Pascal; Vlahovic, B.; Voskanyan, Hakob; Voutier, Eric; Watson, J.W.; Weinstein, Lawrence; Wijesooriya, Krishni; Wilson, R.; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Zainea, Dan; Zhang, Wei-Ming; Zhao, Jie; Zhou, Z.-L.

    2009-01-01

    We have made the first measurements of the virtual Compton scattering (VCS) process via the H(e,e'p)? exclusive reaction in the nucleon resonance region, at backward angles. Results are presented for the W-dependence at fixed Q2=1 GeV2, and for the Q2-dependence at fixed W near 1.5 GeV. The VCS data show resonant structures in the first and second resonance regions. The observed Q2-dependence is smooth. The measured ratio of H(e,e'p)? to H(e,e'p)?0 cross sections emphasizes the different sensitivity of these two reactions to the various nucleon resonances. Finally, when compared to Real Compton Scattering (RCS) at high energy and large angles, our VCS data at the highest W (1.8-1.9 GeV) show a striking Q2-independence, which may suggest a transition to a perturbative scattering mechanism at the quark level.

  8. Virtual Compton scattering and neutral pion electroproduction in the resonance region up to the deep inelastic region at backward angles

    SciTech Connect

    Laveissiere, G.; Jaminion, S.; Salvo, R. Di; Berthot, J.; Bertin, P. Y.; Breton, V.; Fonvieille, H.; Grenier, P.; Ravel, O.; Roblin, Y.; Smirnov, G.; Jutier, C.; Hyde, C. E.; Todor, L.; Dodge, G. E.; McCormick, K.; Ulmer, P. E.

    2009-01-15

    We have made the first measurements of the virtual Compton scattering (VCS) process via the H(e, e{sup '}p){gamma} exclusive reaction in the nucleon resonance region, at backward angles. Results are presented for the W-dependence at fixed Q{sup 2}=1 GeV{sup 2} and for the Q{sup 2} dependence at fixed W near 1.5 GeV. The VCS data show resonant structures in the first and second resonance regions. The observed Q{sup 2} dependence is smooth. The measured ratio of H(e, e{sup '}p){gamma} to H(e, e{sup '}p){pi}{sup 0} cross sections emphasizes the different sensitivity of these two reactions to the various nucleon resonances. Finally, when compared to real Compton scattering (RCS) at high energy and large angles, our VCS data at the highest W (1.8-1.9 GeV) show a striking Q{sup 2} independence, which may suggest a transition to a perturbative scattering mechanism at the quark level.

  9. Probabilistic models and numerical calculation of system matrix and sensitivity in list-mode MLEM 3D reconstruction of Compton camera images.

    PubMed

    Maxim, Voichita; Lojacono, Xavier; Hilaire, Estelle; Krimmer, Jochen; Testa, Etienne; Dauvergne, Denis; Magnin, Isabelle; Prost, Rémy

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of evaluating the system matrix and the sensitivity for iterative reconstruction in Compton camera imaging. Proposed models and numerical calculation strategies are compared through the influence they have on the three-dimensional reconstructed images. The study attempts to address four questions. First, it proposes an analytic model for the system matrix. Second, it suggests a method for its numerical validation with Monte Carlo simulated data. Third, it compares analytical models of the sensitivity factors with Monte Carlo simulated values. Finally, it shows how the system matrix and the sensitivity calculation strategies influence the quality of the reconstructed images.

  10. The 3D-architecture of individual free silver nanoparticles captured by X-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Barke, Ingo; Hartmann, Hannes; Rupp, Daniela; Flückiger, Leonie; Sauppe, Mario; Adolph, Marcus; Schorb, Sebastian; Bostedt, Christoph; Treusch, Rolf; Peltz, Christian; Bartling, Stephan; Fennel, Thomas; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Möller, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of nanoparticle shapes generated by condensation from gaseous matter reflects the fundamental competition between thermodynamic equilibration and the persistence of metastable configurations during growth. In the kinetically limited regime, intermediate geometries that are favoured only in early formation stages can be imprinted in the finally observed ensemble of differently structured specimens. Here we demonstrate that single-shot wide-angle scattering of femtosecond soft X-ray free-electron laser pulses allows three-dimensional characterization of the resulting metastable nanoparticle structures. For individual free silver particles, which can be considered frozen in space for the duration of photon exposure, both shape and orientation are uncovered from measured scattering images. We identify regular shapes, including species with fivefold symmetry and surprisingly large aspect ratio up to particle radii of the order of 100 nm. Our approach includes scattering effects beyond Born’s approximation and is remarkably efficient—opening up new routes in ultrafast nanophysics and free-electron laser science. PMID:25650004

  11. Electromagnetic Scattering From a Rectangular Cavity Recessed in a 3-D Conducting Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M. D.; Reddy, C. J.

    1995-01-01

    The problem of electromagnetic (EM) scattering from an aperture backed by a rectangular cavity recessed in a three-dimensional conducting body is analyzed using the coupled field integral equation approach. Using the free-space Green's function, EM fields scattered outside the cavity are determined in terms of (1) an equivalent electric surface current density flowing on the three-dimensional conducting surface of the object including the cavity aperture and (2) an equivalent magnetic surface current density flowing over the aperture only. The EM fields inside the cavity are determined using the waveguide modal expansion functions. Making the total tangential electric and magnetic fields across the aperture continuous and subjecting the total tangential electric field on the outer conducting three-dimensional surface of the object to zero, a set of coupled integral equations is obtained. The equivalent electric and magnetic surface currents are then obtained by solving the coupled integral equation using the Method of Moments. The numerical results on scattering from rectangular cavities embedded in various three-dimensional objects are compared with the results obtained by other numerical techniques.

  12. Optical phase conjugation assisted scattering lens: variable focusing and 3D patterning

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jihee; Jang, Mooseok; Eom, Tae Joong; Yang, Changhuei; Chung, Euiheon

    2016-01-01

    Variable light focusing is the ability to flexibly select the focal distance of a lens. This feature presents technical challenges, but is significant for optical interrogation of three-dimensional objects. Numerous lens designs have been proposed to provide flexible light focusing, including zoom, fluid, and liquid-crystal lenses. Although these lenses are useful for macroscale applications, they have limited utility in micron-scale applications due to restricted modulation range and exacting requirements for fabrication and control. Here, we present a holographic focusing method that enables variable light focusing without any physical modification to the lens element. In this method, a scattering layer couples low-angle (transverse wave vector) components into a full angular spectrum, and a digital optical phase conjugation (DOPC) system characterizes and plays back the wavefront that focuses through the scattering layer. We demonstrate micron-scale light focusing and patterning over a wide range of focal distances of 22–51 mm. The interferometric nature of the focusing scheme also enables an aberration-free scattering lens. The proposed method provides a unique variable focusing capability for imaging thick specimens or selective photoactivation of neuronal networks. PMID:27049442

  13. Optical phase conjugation assisted scattering lens: variable focusing and 3D patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jihee; Jang, Mooseok; Eom, Tae Joong; Yang, Changhuei; Chung, Euiheon

    2016-04-01

    Variable light focusing is the ability to flexibly select the focal distance of a lens. This feature presents technical challenges, but is significant for optical interrogation of three-dimensional objects. Numerous lens designs have been proposed to provide flexible light focusing, including zoom, fluid, and liquid-crystal lenses. Although these lenses are useful for macroscale applications, they have limited utility in micron-scale applications due to restricted modulation range and exacting requirements for fabrication and control. Here, we present a holographic focusing method that enables variable light focusing without any physical modification to the lens element. In this method, a scattering layer couples low-angle (transverse wave vector) components into a full angular spectrum, and a digital optical phase conjugation (DOPC) system characterizes and plays back the wavefront that focuses through the scattering layer. We demonstrate micron-scale light focusing and patterning over a wide range of focal distances of 22–51 mm. The interferometric nature of the focusing scheme also enables an aberration-free scattering lens. The proposed method provides a unique variable focusing capability for imaging thick specimens or selective photoactivation of neuronal networks.

  14. Rigorous 3-D vectorial complex ray model applied to light scattering by an arbitrary spheroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bingqiang; Kattawar, George W.; Yang, Ping; Ren, Kuan Fang

    2016-08-01

    After a ray bundle passes a curved surface, the equal-phase wavefront associated with the refracted rays will be distorted. Consequently, the cross-section of a ray bundle with a curved wavefront during propagation in a homogeneous medium will vary with the ray-bundle propagation distance. Moreover, the phase of a ray bundle with convergent wavefront will undergo a phase shift of π/2 with each passage of a focal line. The contribution to the scattering amplitude by a ray bundle after passing a scatterer is determined by three elements: the cross-section variation of its wavefront, the total phase, and the refraction coefficients determined by Fresnel equations. In the geometric optics regime, the aforesaid three elements caused by a curved surface can be systematically quantified in terms of the vectorial complex ray-tracing technique. In this study, rigorous vectorial complex ray-tracing calculations are conducted for light scattering by a general spheroid and the results are validated in comparison with the benchmarks provided by the rigorous T-matrix method.

  15. The 3D-architecture of individual free silver nanoparticles captured by X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Barke, Ingo; Hartmann, Hannes; Rupp, Daniela; Flückiger, Leonie; Sauppe, Mario; Adolph, Marcus; Schorb, Sebastian; Bostedt, Christoph; Treusch, Rolf; Peltz, Christian; Bartling, Stephan; Fennel, Thomas; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Möller, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of nanoparticle shapes generated by condensation from gaseous matter reflects the fundamental competition between thermodynamic equilibration and the persistence of metastable configurations during growth. In the kinetically limited regime, intermediate geometries that are favoured only in early formation stages can be imprinted in the finally observed ensemble of differently structured specimens. Here we demonstrate that single-shot wide-angle scattering of femtosecond soft X-ray free-electron laser pulses allows three-dimensional characterization of the resulting metastable nanoparticle structures. For individual free silver particles, which can be considered frozen in space for the duration of photon exposure, both shape and orientation are uncovered from measured scattering images. We identify regular shapes, including species with fivefold symmetry and surprisingly large aspect ratio up to particle radii of the order of 100 nm. Our approach includes scattering effects beyond Born's approximation and is remarkably efficient-opening up new routes in ultrafast nanophysics and free-electron laser science. PMID:25650004

  16. The 3D-architecture of individual free silver nanoparticles captured by X-ray scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Barke, Ingo; Hartmann, Hannes; Rupp, Daniela; Flückiger, Leonie; Sauppe, Mario; Adolph, Marcus; Schorb, Sebastian; Bostedt, Christoph; Treusch, Rolf; Peltz, Christian; et al

    2015-02-04

    The diversity of nanoparticle shapes generated by condensation from gaseous matter reflects the fundamental competition between thermodynamic equilibration and the persistence of metastable configurations during growth. In the kinetically limited regime, intermediate geometries that are favoured only in early formation stages can be imprinted in the finally observed ensemble of differently structured specimens. Here we demonstrate that single-shot wide-angle scattering of femtosecond soft X-ray free-electron laser pulses allows three-dimensional characterization of the resulting metastable nanoparticle structures. For individual free silver particles, which can be considered frozen in space for the duration of photon exposure, both shape and orientation are uncoveredmore » from measured scattering images. We identify regular shapes, including species with fivefold symmetry and surprisingly large aspect ratio up to particle radii of the order of 100 nm. Our approach includes scattering effects beyond Born’s approximation and is remarkably efficient—opening up new routes in ultrafast nanophysics and free-electron laser science« less

  17. The 3D-architecture of individual free silver nanoparticles captured by X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Barke, Ingo; Hartmann, Hannes; Rupp, Daniela; Flückiger, Leonie; Sauppe, Mario; Adolph, Marcus; Schorb, Sebastian; Bostedt, Christoph; Treusch, Rolf; Peltz, Christian; Bartling, Stephan; Fennel, Thomas; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Möller, Thomas

    2015-02-04

    The diversity of nanoparticle shapes generated by condensation from gaseous matter reflects the fundamental competition between thermodynamic equilibration and the persistence of metastable configurations during growth. In the kinetically limited regime, intermediate geometries that are favoured only in early formation stages can be imprinted in the finally observed ensemble of differently structured specimens. Here we demonstrate that single-shot wide-angle scattering of femtosecond soft X-ray free-electron laser pulses allows three-dimensional characterization of the resulting metastable nanoparticle structures. For individual free silver particles, which can be considered frozen in space for the duration of photon exposure, both shape and orientation are uncovered from measured scattering images. We identify regular shapes, including species with fivefold symmetry and surprisingly large aspect ratio up to particle radii of the order of 100 nm. Our approach includes scattering effects beyond Born’s approximation and is remarkably efficient—opening up new routes in ultrafast nanophysics and free-electron laser science

  18. The scattering potential of partial derivative wavefields in 3D elastic orthorhombic media: An inversion prospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Ju-Won; Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2016-07-01

    Multi-parameter full waveform inversion (FWI) applied to an elastic orthorhombic model description of the subsurface requires in theory a nine-parameter representation of each pixel of the model. Even with optimal acquisition on the Earth surface that includes large offsets, full azimuth, and multi component sensors, the potential for tradeoff between the elastic orthorhombic parameters are large. The first step to understanding such trade-off is analysing the scattering potential of each parameter, and specifically, its scattering radiation patterns. We investigate such radiation patterns for diffraction and for scattering from a horizontal reflector considering a background isotropic model. The radiation patterns show considerable potential for trade-off between the parameters and the potentially limited resolution in their recovery. The radiation patterns of C11, C22 and C33 are well separated so that we expect to recover these parameters with limited trade-offs. However, the resolution of their recovery represented by recovered range of model wavenumbers varies between these parameters. We can only invert for the short wavelength components (reflection) of C33 while we can mainly invert for the long wavelength components (transmission) of the elastic coefficients C11 and C22 if we have large enough offsets. The elastic coefficients C13, C23 and C12 suffer from strong trade-offs with C55, C44 and C66, respectively. The trade-offs between C13 and C55, as well as C23 and C44, can be partially mitigated if we acquire P-SV and SV-SV waves. However, to reduce the trade-offs between C12 and C66, we require credible SH-SH waves. The analytical radiation patterns of the elastic constants are supported by numerical gradients of these parameters.

  19. The scattering potential of partial derivative wavefields in 3-D elastic orthorhombic media: an inversion prospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Ju-Won; Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2016-09-01

    Multiparameter full waveform inversion (FWI) applied to an elastic orthorhombic model description of the subsurface requires in theory a nine-parameter representation of each pixel of the model. Even with optimal acquisition on the Earth surface that includes large offsets, full azimuth, and multicomponent sensors, the potential for trade-off between the elastic orthorhombic parameters are large. The first step to understanding such trade-off is analysing the scattering potential of each parameter, and specifically, its scattering radiation patterns. We investigate such radiation patterns for diffraction and for scattering from a horizontal reflector considering a background isotropic model. The radiation patterns show considerable potential for trade-off between the parameters and the potentially limited resolution in their recovery. The radiation patterns of C11, C22, and C33 are well separated so that we expect to recover these parameters with limited trade-offs. However, the resolution of their recovery represented by recovered range of model wavenumbers varies between these parameters. We can only invert for the short wavelength components (reflection) of C33 while we can mainly invert for the long wavelength components (transmission) of the elastic coefficients C11 and C22 if we have large enough offsets. The elastic coefficients C13, C23, and C12 suffer from strong trade-offs with C55, C44, and C66, respectively. The trade-offs between C13 and C55, as well as C23 and C44, can be partially mitigated if we acquire P-SV and SV-SV waves. However, to reduce the trade-offs between C12 and C66, we require credible SH-SH waves. The analytical radiation patterns of the elastic constants are supported by numerical gradients of these parameters.

  20. Precise Animated 3-D Displays Of The Heart Constructed From X-Ray Scatter Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInerney, J. J.; Herr, M. D.; Copenhaver, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    A technique, based upon the interrogation of x-ray scatter, has been used to construct precise animated displays of the three-dimensional surface of the heart throughout the cardiac cycle. With the selection of motion amplification, viewing orientation, beat rate, and repetitive playbacks of isolated segments of the cardiac cycle, these displays are used to directly visualize epicardial surface velocity and displacement patterns, to construct regional maps of old or new myocardial infarction, and to visualize diastolic stiffening of the ventricle associated with acute ischemia. The procedure is non-invasive. Cut-downs or injections are not required.

  1. Time-resolved diffusion tomographic 2D and 3D imaging in highly scattering turbid media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfano, Robert R. (Inventor); Cai, Wei (Inventor); Liu, Feng (Inventor); Lax, Melvin (Inventor); Das, Bidyut B. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method for imaging objects in highly scattering turbid media. According to one embodiment of the invention, the method involves using a plurality of intersecting source/detectors sets and time-resolving equipment to generate a plurality of time-resolved intensity curves for the diffusive component of light emergent from the medium. For each of the curves, the intensities at a plurality of times are then inputted into the following inverse reconstruction algorithm to form an image of the medium: ##EQU1## wherein W is a matrix relating output at source and detector positions r.sub.s and r.sub.d, at time t, to position r, .LAMBDA. is a regularization matrix, chosen for convenience to be diagonal, but selected in a way related to the ratio of the noise, to fluctuations in the absorption (or diffusion) X.sub.j that we are trying to determine: .LAMBDA..sub.ij =.lambda..sub.j .delta..sub.ij with .lambda..sub.j =/<.DELTA.Xj.DELTA.Xj> Y is the data collected at the detectors, and X.sup.k is the kth iterate toward the desired absoption information. An algorithm, which combines a two dimensional (2D) matrix inversion with a one-dimensional (1D) Fourier transform inversion is used to obtain images of three dimensional hidden objects in turbid scattering media.

  2. Time-resolved diffusion tomographic 2D and 3D imaging in highly scattering turbid media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfano, Robert R. (Inventor); Cai, Wei (Inventor); Gayen, Swapan K. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A method for imaging objects in highly scattering turbid media. According to one embodiment of the invention, the method involves using a plurality of intersecting source/detectors sets and time-resolving equipment to generate a plurality of time-resolved intensity curves for the diffusive component of light emergent from the medium. For each of the curves, the intensities at a plurality of times are then inputted into the following inverse reconstruction algorithm to form an image of the medium: wherein W is a matrix relating output at source and detector positions r.sub.s and r.sub.d, at time t, to position r, .LAMBDA. is a regularization matrix, chosen for convenience to be diagonal, but selected in a way related to the ratio of the noise, to fluctuations in the absorption (or diffusion) X.sub.j that we are trying to determine: .LAMBDA..sub.ij =.lambda..sub.j .delta..sub.ij with .lambda..sub.j =/<.DELTA.Xj.DELTA.Xj> Y is the data collected at the detectors, and X.sup.k is the kth iterate toward the desired absorption information. An algorithm, which combines a two dimensional (2D) matrix inversion with a one-dimensional (1D) Fourier transform inversion is used to obtain images of three dimensional hidden objects in turbid scattering media.

  3. Bulk phonon scattering in perturbed quasi-3D multichannel crystallographic waveguide.

    PubMed

    Rabia, M S

    2008-11-19

    In the present paper, we concentrate on the influence of local defects on scattering properties of elastic waves in perturbed crystalline quasi-three-dimensional nanostructures in the harmonic approximation. Our model consists of three infinite atomic planes, assimilated into a perfect waveguide in which different distributions of scatterers (or defects) are inserted in the bulk. We have investigated phonon transmission and conductance for three bulk defect configurations. The numerical treatment of the problem, based on the Landauer approach, resorts to the matching method initially employed for the study of surface localized phonons and resonances. We present a detailed study of the defect-induced fluctuations in the transmission spectra. These fluctuations can be related to Fano resonances and Fabry-Pérot oscillations. The first is due to the coupling between localized defect states and the perfect waveguide propagating modes whereas the latter results from the interference between incidental and reflected waves. Numerical results reveal the intimate relation between transmission spectra and localized impurity states and provide a basis for the understanding of conductance spectroscopy experiments in disordered mesoscopic systems. PMID:21693856

  4. Detailed characterization of 2D and 3D scatter-to-primary ratios of various breast geometries using a dedicated CT mammotomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Jainil; Pachon, Jan H.; Madhav, Priti; Tornai, Martin P.

    2011-03-01

    With a dedicated breast CT system using a quasi-monochromatic x-ray source and flat-panel digital detector, the 2D and 3D scatter to primary ratios (SPR) of various geometric phantoms having different densities were characterized in detail. Projections were acquired using geometric and anthropomorphic breast phantoms. Each phantom was filled with 700ml of 5 different water-methanol concentrations to simulate effective boundary densities of breast compositions from 100% glandular (1.0g/cm3) to 100% fat (0.79g/cm3). Projections were acquired with and without a beam stop array. For each projection, 2D scatter was determined by cubic spline interpolating the values behind the shadow of each beam stop through the object. Scatter-corrected projections were obtained by subtracting the scatter, and the 2D SPRs were obtained as a ratio of the scatter to scatter-corrected projections. Additionally the (un)corrected data were individually iteratively reconstructed. The (un)corrected 3D volumes were subsequently subtracted, and the 3D SPRs obtained from the ratio of the scatter volume-to-scatter-corrected (or primary) volume. Results show that the 2D SPR values peak in the center of the volumes, and were overall highest for the simulated 100% glandular composition. Consequently, scatter corrected reconstructions have visibly reduced cupping regardless of the phantom geometry, as well as more accurate linear attenuation coefficients. The corresponding 3D SPRs have increased central density, which reduces radially. Not surprisingly, for both 2D and 3D SPRs there was a dependency on both phantom geometry and object density on the measured SPR values, with geometry dominating for 3D SPRs. Overall, these results indicate the need for scatter correction given different geometries and breast densities that will be encountered with 3D cone beam breast CT.

  5. High Power Experiment of X-Band Thermionic Cathode RF Gun for Compton Scattering X-ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Fumito; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Dobashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Meng, De; Urakawa, Junji; Higo, Toshiyasu; Akemoto, Mitsuo; Matsuo, Kenichi; Sakae, Hisaharu; Yamamoto, Masashi

    2006-11-27

    We are currently developing a compact monochromatic X-ray source based on laser-electron collision. To realize remarkably compact-, high-intensity- and highly-stable-system, we adopt an X-band multi-bunch liner accelerator (linac) and reliable Q-switch laser. The X-ray yields by the multi-bunch electron beam and Q-switch Nd: YAG laser of 1.4 J/10 ns (FWHM) (532 nm, second harmonic) is 107 photons/RF-pulse (108 photons/sec for 10 Hz operation). The injector of the system consists of a 3.5-cell X-band thermionic cathode RF gun and an alpha magnet. So far we have achieved beam generation from the X-band thermionic cathode RF gun. The peak beam energy is 2 MeV. This experimental high energy ({approx}2 MeV) beam generation from the X-band thermionic cathode RF gun is the first in the world. In this paper, we describe the system of the Compton scattering X-ray source based on the X-band linac, experimental results of X-band thermionic cathode RF gun and the details of the experimental setup for Compton scattering X-ray generation that are under construction.

  6. Techniques and use of a tunable, laser-based, MeV-Class Compton scattering light source

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Messerly, M; Semenov, V; Shverdin, M Y; Rusnak, B; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C P

    2009-06-30

    A Compton scattering {gamma}-ray source, capable of producing photons with energies ranging from 0.1 MeV to 0.9 MeV has been commissioned and characterized, and then used to perform nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) experiments. The key source parameters are the size (0.01 mm{sup 2}), horizontal and vertical divergence (6 x 10 mrad{sup 2}), duration (10 ps), spectrum and intensity (10{sup 5} photons/shot). These parameters are summarized by the peak brightness, 1.5 x 10{sup 15} photons/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/s/0.1%bandwidth, measured at 478 keV. Additional measurements of the flux as a function of the timing difference between the drive laser pulse and the relativistic photoelectron bunch, {gamma}-ray beam profile, and background evaluations are presented. These results are systematically compared to theoretical models and computer simulations. NRF measurements performed on {sup 7}Li in LiH demonstrate the potential of Compton scattering photon sources to accurately detect isotopes in situ.

  7. Characterization and applications of a tunable, laser-based, MeV-class Compton-scattering γ-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, F.; Anderson, S. G.; Gibson, D. J.; Hagmann, C. A.; Johnson, M. S.; Messerly, M.; Semenov, V.; Shverdin, M. Y.; Rusnak, B.; Tremaine, A. M.; Hartemann, F. V.; Siders, C. W.; McNabb, D. P.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2010-07-01

    A high peak brilliance, laser-based Compton-scattering γ-ray source, capable of producing quasimonoenergetic photons with energies ranging from 0.1 to 0.9 MeV has been recently developed and used to perform nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) experiments. Techniques for characterization of γ-ray beam parameters are presented. The key source parameters are the size (0.01mm2), horizontal and vertical divergence (6×10mrad2), duration (16 ps), and spectrum and intensity (105photons/shot). These parameters are summarized by the peak brilliance, 1.5×1015photons/mm2/mrad2/s/0.1% bandwidth, measured at 478 keV. Additional measurements of the flux as a function of the timing difference between the drive laser pulse and the relativistic photoelectron bunch, γ-ray beam profile, and background evaluations are presented. These results are systematically compared to theoretical models and computer simulations. NRF measurements performed on Li7 in LiH demonstrate the potential of Compton-scattering photon sources to accurately detect isotopes in situ.

  8. Revolutionising incoherent scatter science with EISCAT_3D: A European three-dimensional imaging radar for atmospheric and geospace research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turunen, Esa; McCrea, Ian; Kosch, Mike

    2010-05-01

    EISCAT_3D will be Europe's next-generation radar for the study of the high-latitude atmosphere and geospace, located in northern Fenno-Scandinavia, with capabilities going well beyond anything currently available to the international research community. The facility will consist of several very large active phased-array antenna transmitters/receivers, and multiple passive sites located in three countries. Depending on the available funding, EISCAT_3D will be comprised of tens of thousands, up to more than 100 000, individual antenna elements. EISCAT_3D combines several key attributes which have never before been available together in a single radar, such as volumetric imaging and tracking, aperture synthesis imaging, multistatic configuration, improved sensitivity and transmitter flexibility. The use of advanced beam-forming technology allows the beam direction to be switched in milliseconds, rather than the minutes which it can take to re-position dish-based radars. This allows very wide spatial coverage to be obtained, by interleaving multiple beam directions to carry out quasi-simultaneous volumetric imaging. It also allows objects such as satellites and space debris to be tracked across the sky. At the passive sites, the design allows for at least five simultaneous beams at full bandwidth, rising to over twenty beams if the bandwidth is limited to the ion line, allowing the whole range of the transmitted beam to be imaged from each passive site, using holographic radar techniques. EISCAT_3D has a modular configuration, which allows an active array to be split into smaller elements to be used for aperture synthesis imaging. The result will be an entirely new data product, consisting of range-dependent images of small sub-beamwidth scale structures, with sizes down to 20 m. EISCAT_3D will be the first phased array incoherent scatter radar to use a multistatic configuration. A minimum of five radar sites, consisting of two pairs located around 120 km and 250 km

  9. Solution of 3D inverse scattering problems by combined inverse equivalent current and finite element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kılıç, Emre Eibert, Thomas F.

    2015-05-01

    An approach combining boundary integral and finite element methods is introduced for the solution of three-dimensional inverse electromagnetic medium scattering problems. Based on the equivalence principle, unknown equivalent electric and magnetic surface current densities on a closed surface are utilized to decompose the inverse medium problem into two parts: a linear radiation problem and a nonlinear cavity problem. The first problem is formulated by a boundary integral equation, the computational burden of which is reduced by employing the multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM). Reconstructed Cauchy data on the surface allows the utilization of the Lorentz reciprocity and the Poynting's theorems. Exploiting these theorems, the noise level and an initial guess are estimated for the cavity problem. Moreover, it is possible to determine whether the material is lossy or not. In the second problem, the estimated surface currents form inhomogeneous boundary conditions of the cavity problem. The cavity problem is formulated by the finite element technique and solved iteratively by the Gauss–Newton method to reconstruct the properties of the object. Regularization for both the first and the second problems is achieved by a Krylov subspace method. The proposed method is tested against both synthetic and experimental data and promising reconstruction results are obtained.

  10. Microstructure of 3D-Printed Polymer Composites Investigated by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Tae Hui; Compton, Brett G.; Heller, William T.; Urban, Voker S.; Duty, Chad E.; Do, Changwoo

    Polymer composites printed from the large scale printer at Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). For the Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS)/Carbon Fiber (CF) composites, the microstructure of polymer domains and the alignment of CF have been characterized across the layer from the printed piece. CF shows strong anisotropic alignment along the printing direction due to the flow of polymer melt at the nozzle. Order parameter of the anisotropy which ranges from -0.11 to -0.06 exhibits strong correlation with the position within the layer: stronger alignment near the layer interface. It is also confirmed that the existence of CF reduces the polymer domain correlation length significantly and reinforces the mechanical strength of the polymer composites. For the Epoxy/nano-clay platelet composites, the effect of processing condition, nozzle size, and the addition of the another filler, Silicon Carbide (SC), have been investigated by SANS. Nano-clay platelet shows strong anisotropic alignment along the printing direction as well. Order parameter of the anisotropy varies according to nozzle size and presence of the SC, and difference disappears at high Q region. Scientific User Facilities Division and Materials Sciences and Energy Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy.

  11. New approach for the modeling and smoothing of scattered 3D data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbacher, Stefan; Haeusler, Gerd

    1998-03-01

    In order to digitize the whole surface of a three-dimensional object by means of an optical range sensor, usually multiple range images are acquired from different viewpoints and merged into a single surface description. The simplest and most accurate way is to generate a polyhedral surface. The data are usually distorted by measuring errors like noise, aliasing, outliers, calibration and registration errors, etc., so that they have to be filtered. Calibration and registration errors first appear after merging of different views. As the merged data are no longer represented on a grid, conventional filters for digital signal processing are not applicable. We introduce a new approach for modeling and smoothing scattered data based on an approximation of a mesh of circular arcs. This new method enables interpolation of curved surfaces using solely the vertex position and the associated vertex normals of a polyhedral mesh. The new smoothing filter is specifically adapted to the requirements of geometric data, as it minimizes curvature variations. In contrast to linear filters, undesired surface undulations are avoided, which is an important pre- condition for NC milling and rendering.

  12. Measurement of Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) cross sections with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Hyon-Suk Jo

    2012-04-01

    Extraction of DVCS unpolarized and polarized cross sections in the largest kinematic domain ever explored in the valence region. Results are in good agreement with GPD model (VGG) predictions. Extraction of Compton Form Factors (M. Guidal) by fitting simultaneously these unpolarizedand polarized cross sections gives a large set of results in a very large kinematic domain for Re(H ) and Im(H ). Analysis of the data from the second part of the e1-DVCS experiment underway.

  13. Electronic properties of RDX and HMX: Compton scattering experiment and first-principles calculation.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, B L; Jain, Pradeep; Sahariya, Jagrati; Heda, N L; Soni, Pramod

    2013-07-11

    The first-ever electron momentum density (EMD) measurements of explosive materials, namely, RDX (1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane, (CH2-N-NO2)3) and HMX (1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane, (CH2-N-NO2)4), have been reported using a 740 GBq (137)Cs Compton spectrometer. Experimental Compton profiles (CPs) are compared with the EMDs derived from linear combination of atomic orbitals with density functional theory. It is found that the CPs deduced from generalized gradient approximation (GGA) with Wu-Cohen exchange energies give a better agreement with the corresponding experimental profiles than those from local density approximation and other schemes of GGA. Further, Mulliken population, energy bands, partial and total density of states, and band gap have also been reported using GGA calculations. Present ground state calculations unambiguously show large band gap semiconductor nature of both RDX and HMX. A similar type of bonding in these materials is uniquely established using Compton data and density of states. It is also outstandingly consistent with the Mulliken population, which predicts almost equal amount of charge transfer (0.84 and 0.83 e(-)) from H1 + H2 + N2 to C1 + N1 + O1 + O2 in both the explosives.

  14. Hotspot-engineered quasi-3D metallic network for surface-enhanced Raman scattering based on colloid monolayer templating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Wei; Liu, Long; Gu, Ping; Hu, Jingguo; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Fanxin; Wang, Zhenlin

    2016-09-01

    A hotspot-engineered quasi-3D metallic network with controllable nanogaps is purposed as a high-quality surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate, which is prepared by a combination of non-close-packed colloid monolayer templating and metal physical deposition. The significant SERS effect arises from a strongly enhanced local electric field originating from the ultra-small-gaps between neighboring metal-caps and tiny interstices and between the metal-caps and the metal-bumps on the base, which is recognized by the numerical simulation. A remarkable average SERS enhancement factor of up to 1.5 × 108 and a SERS intensity relative standard deviation (RSD) of 10.5% are achieved by optimizing the nanogap size to sub-10 nm scale, leading to an excellent capability for Raman detection, which is represented by the clearly identified SERS signal of the Rhodamine 6G solution with a fairly low concentration of 1 nM.

  15. A flow cell for measuring X-ray Compton scattering of liquid at temperatures up to 623 K and pressures up to 20 MPa.

    PubMed

    Ono, Takumi; Watanabe, Masaru; Sato, Yoshiyuki; Inomata, Hiroshi; Nakahara, Koichi; Itou, Masayoshi; Sakurai, Yoshiharu

    2016-08-01

    A flow-type cell was developed for measuring Compton scattering spectra of heat-sensitive aqueous solution. Compton scattering spectra of water and ethanol were measured in the region from ambient conditions to 623 K and 20 MPa. Compton profiles derived from measurement with the flow-type cell were comparable with those in the literature. Results obtained from the flow-type cell showed that delocalization of electronic charge density of water and ethanol at high temperatures occurred. Delocalization of the electronic charge density of ethanol was greater than that of water at high temperature, which is consistent with the prior works that use proton NMR chemical shifts to describe hydrogen bonding. PMID:27587099

  16. A flow cell for measuring X-ray Compton scattering of liquid at temperatures up to 623 K and pressures up to 20 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Takumi; Watanabe, Masaru; Sato, Yoshiyuki; Inomata, Hiroshi; Nakahara, Koichi; Itou, Masayoshi; Sakurai, Yoshiharu

    2016-08-01

    A flow-type cell was developed for measuring Compton scattering spectra of heat-sensitive aqueous solution. Compton scattering spectra of water and ethanol were measured in the region from ambient conditions to 623 K and 20 MPa. Compton profiles derived from measurement with the flow-type cell were comparable with those in the literature. Results obtained from the flow-type cell showed that delocalization of electronic charge density of water and ethanol at high temperatures occurred. Delocalization of the electronic charge density of ethanol was greater than that of water at high temperature, which is consistent with the prior works that use proton NMR chemical shifts to describe hydrogen bonding.

  17. Spectral evolution of active galactic nuclei Penrose Compton scattering processes and gamma ray emission from Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiter, Darryl; Boldt, Elihu

    1990-01-01

    In black hole spectral evolution models for active galactic nuclei (AGN), present epoch Seyfert galaxies evolve from an earlier precursor active galaxy (PAG) stage at redshift z is approximately 7 where they acted as the thermal sources responsible for the residual cosmic x ray background (RCXB). The Seyfert galaxies which emerge in this context emit Penrose Compton Scattering (PCS) gamma ray transients on the order of hours with a kinematic cutoff in the spectrum less than or equal to 3 MeV. The EGRET (Energetic Gamma-Ray Experimental Telescope/ OSSE (Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment/ COMPTEL (Compton Telescope)/ BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment) instruments on the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) are appropriate instruments to carry out further tests of this model by studying: PCS gamma ray transient emission from individual galaxies and, the possibility that present epoch PCS gamma ray emitting Seyfert galaxies contribute observable temporal variability to the excess diffuse gamma ray background component less than or equal to 3 MeV.

  18. Fast Numerical Algorithms for 3-D Scattering from PEC and Dielectric Random Rough Surfaces in Microwave Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lisha

    We present fast and robust numerical algorithms for 3-D scattering from perfectly electrical conducting (PEC) and dielectric random rough surfaces in microwave remote sensing. The Coifman wavelets or Coiflets are employed to implement Galerkin's procedure in the method of moments (MoM). Due to the high-precision one-point quadrature, the Coiflets yield fast evaluations of the most off-diagonal entries, reducing the matrix fill effort from O(N2) to O( N). The orthogonality and Riesz basis of the Coiflets generate well conditioned impedance matrix, with rapid convergence for the conjugate gradient solver. The resulting impedance matrix is further sparsified by the matrix-formed standard fast wavelet transform (SFWT). By properly selecting multiresolution levels of the total transformation matrix, the solution precision can be enhanced while matrix sparsity and memory consumption have not been noticeably sacrificed. The unified fast scattering algorithm for dielectric random rough surfaces can asymptotically reduce to the PEC case when the loss tangent grows extremely large. Numerical results demonstrate that the reduced PEC model does not suffer from ill-posed problems. Compared with previous publications and laboratory measurements, good agreement is observed.

  19. Calculation of Characteristics of Radiation Generated with Compton Scattering Through Classical Electrodynamics Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Drebot, I.; Grigor'ev, Y.; Zelinsky, A.

    2007-01-19

    Integration of Lorentz equation for a relativistic electron moving in the field of running, plane, linear polarized electromagnetic wave has been carried out. Using derived formulas for electron trajectories expressions for the radiation intensity spectrum were obtained. It is shown that for low intensity of the interacting electromagnetic wave the results of energy and angular spectrum calculations in the frame of classical electrodynamics completely coincide with calculation results produced using quantum electrodynamics. Simultaneously, derived expressions give possibilities to investigate dependence of energy and angular Compton radiation spectrum on phase of interaction and the interacting wave intensity.

  20. Effective atomic numbers of blue topaz at different gamma-rays energies obtained from Compton scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuschareon, S.; Limkitjaroenporn, P.; Kaewkhao, J.

    2014-03-01

    Topaz occurs in a wide range of colors, including yellow, orange, brown, pink-to-violet and blue. All of these color differences are due to color centers. In order to improve the color of natural colorless topaz, the most commonly used is irradiated with x- or gamma-rays, indicated that attenuation parameters is important to enhancements by irradiation. In this work, the mass attenuation coefficients of blue topaz were measured at the different energy of γ-rays using the Compton scattering technique. The results show that, the experimental values of mass attenuation coefficient are in good agreement with the theoretical values. The mass attenuation coefficients increase with the decrease in gamma rays energies. This may be attributed to the higher photon interaction probability of blue topaz at lower energy. This result is a first report of mass attenuation coefficient of blue topaz at different gamma rays energies.

  1. Beam Measurement of 11.424 GHz X-Band Linac for Compton Scattering X-ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Natsui, Takuya; Mori, Azusa; Masuda, Hirotoshi; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Sakamoto, Fumito

    2010-11-04

    An inverse Compton scattering X-ray source for medical applications, consisting of an X-band (11.424 GHz) linac and Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, is currently being developed at the University of Tokyo. This system uses an X-band 3.5-cell thermionic cathode RF gun for electron beam generation. We can obtain a multi-bunch electron beam with this gun. The beam is accelerated to 30 MeV by a traveling-wave accelerating tube. So far, we have verified stable beam generation (around 2.3 MeV) by using the newly designed RF gun and we have succeeded in beam transportation to a beam dump.

  2. Effective atomic numbers of blue topaz at different gamma-rays energies obtained from Compton scattering technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tuschareon, S. Limkitjaroenporn, P. Kaewkhao, J.

    2014-03-24

    Topaz occurs in a wide range of colors, including yellow, orange, brown, pink-to-violet and blue. All of these color differences are due to color centers. In order to improve the color of natural colorless topaz, the most commonly used is irradiated with x- or gamma-rays, indicated that attenuation parameters is important to enhancements by irradiation. In this work, the mass attenuation coefficients of blue topaz were measured at the different energy of γ-rays using the Compton scattering technique. The results show that, the experimental values of mass attenuation coefficient are in good agreement with the theoretical values. The mass attenuation coefficients increase with the decrease in gamma rays energies. This may be attributed to the higher photon interaction probability of blue topaz at lower energy. This result is a first report of mass attenuation coefficient of blue topaz at different gamma rays energies.

  3. Microscopic magnetic properties of an oxygen-doped Tb-Fe thin film by magnetic Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Agui, Akane; Unno, Tomoya; Matsumoto, Sayaka; Suzuki, Kousuke; Sakurai, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Akihisa

    2013-11-14

    The magnetic Compton scattering of a Tb{sub 32}Fe{sub 55}O{sub 13} film was measured in order to investigate the microscopic magnetization processes (i.e., the spin moment, orbital moment, and element specific moments). The trend of the spin magnetic moment was the same as that of the total magnetic moment but opposite to the orbital magnetic moment. In the low magnetic field region, the magnetic moments were not perfectly aligned perpendicular to the film surface, and the perpendicular components were found to mainly arise from the magnetic moment of Tb. Oxygen atoms hinder long range magnetic interaction and hence also affect the magnetization process of the magnetic moments of Tb and Fe.

  4. Simple synchronization technique of a mode-locked laser for Laser-Compton scattering γ-ray source.

    PubMed

    Mori, Michiaki; Kosuge, Atsushi; Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Hajima, Ryoichi; Kondo, Kiminori

    2016-06-01

    We propose a simple and effective synchronization technique between a reference electrical oscillator and a mode-locked laser for a narrowband picosecond Laser-Compton scattering γ-ray source by using a commercial-based 1-chip frequency synthesizer, which is widely used in radio communication. The mode-locked laser has been successfully synchronized in time with a jitter of 180 fs RMS for 10 Hz-100 kHz bandwidth. A good stability of 640 μHz at 80 MHz repetition rate for 10 h operation has also been confirmed. We discuss in detail the design and performance of this technique (in terms of timing jitter, stability, and validity). PMID:27370447

  5. Measurement of the beam-recoil polarization in low-energy virtual Compton scattering from the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doria, L.; Janssens, P.; Achenbach, P.; Ayerbe Gayoso, C.; Baumann, D.; Bensafa, I.; Benali, M.; Beričič, J.; Bernauer, J. C.; Böhm, R.; Bosnar, D.; Correa, L.; D'Hose, N.; Defaÿ, X.; Ding, M.; Distler, M. O.; Fonvieille, H.; Friedrich, J.; Friedrich, J. M.; Laveissière, G.; Makek, M.; Marroncle, J.; Merkel, H.; Mihovilovič, M.; Müller, U.; Nungesser, L.; Pasquini, B.; Pochodzalla, J.; Postavaru, O.; Potokar, M.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sánchez Majos, S.; Schlimme, B. S.; Seimetz, M.; Širca, S.; Tamas, G.; Van de Vyver, R.; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Van Overloop, A.; Walcher, Th.; Weinriefer, M.; A1 Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Double-polarization observables in the reaction e ⃗p →e'p ⃗'γ have been measured at Q2=0.33 (GeV/c ) 2 . The experiment was performed at the spectrometer setup of the A1 Collaboration using the 855 MeV polarized electron beam provided by the Mainz Microtron (MAMI) and a recoil proton polarimeter. From the double-polarization observables the structure function PLT ⊥ is extracted for the first time, with the value (-15.4 ±3 .3(stat .)-2.4+1.5(syst.)) GeV-2 , using the low-energy theorem for virtual Compton scattering. This structure function provides a hitherto unmeasured linear combination of the generalized polarizabilities of the proton.

  6. Simple synchronization technique of a mode-locked laser for Laser-Compton scattering γ-ray source.

    PubMed

    Mori, Michiaki; Kosuge, Atsushi; Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Hajima, Ryoichi; Kondo, Kiminori

    2016-06-01

    We propose a simple and effective synchronization technique between a reference electrical oscillator and a mode-locked laser for a narrowband picosecond Laser-Compton scattering γ-ray source by using a commercial-based 1-chip frequency synthesizer, which is widely used in radio communication. The mode-locked laser has been successfully synchronized in time with a jitter of 180 fs RMS for 10 Hz-100 kHz bandwidth. A good stability of 640 μHz at 80 MHz repetition rate for 10 h operation has also been confirmed. We discuss in detail the design and performance of this technique (in terms of timing jitter, stability, and validity).

  7. Simple synchronization technique of a mode-locked laser for Laser-Compton scattering γ-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Michiaki; Kosuge, Atsushi; Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Hajima, Ryoichi; Kondo, Kiminori

    2016-06-01

    We propose a simple and effective synchronization technique between a reference electrical oscillator and a mode-locked laser for a narrowband picosecond Laser-Compton scattering γ-ray source by using a commercial-based 1-chip frequency synthesizer, which is widely used in radio communication. The mode-locked laser has been successfully synchronized in time with a jitter of 180 fs RMS for 10 Hz-100 kHz bandwidth. A good stability of 640 μHz at 80 MHz repetition rate for 10 h operation has also been confirmed. We discuss in detail the design and performance of this technique (in terms of timing jitter, stability, and validity).

  8. 3D finite element analysis of a metallic sphere scatterer comparison of first and second order vector absorbing boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanellopoulos, V. N.; Webb, J. P.

    1993-03-01

    A 3D vector analysis of plane wave scattering by a metallic sphere using finite elements and Absorbing Boundary Conditions (ABCs) is presented. The ABCs are applied on the outer surface that truncates the infinitely extending domain. Mixed order curvilinear covariantprojection elements are used to avoid spurious corruptions. The second order ABC is superior to the first at no extra computational cost. The errors due to incomplete absorption decrease as the outer surface is moved further away from the scatterer. An error of about 1% in near-field values was obtained with the second order ABC, when the outer surface was less than half a wavelength from the scatterer. Une analyse tridimensionnelle vectorielle de la diffusion d'onde plane sur une sphère métallique utilisant des éléments finis et des Conditions aux Limites Absorbantes (CLA) est présentée. Les CLA sont appliquées sur la surface exteme tronquant le domaine s'étendant à l'infini. Des éléments curvilignes mixtes utilisant des projections covariantes sont utilisés pour éviter des solutions parasites. La CLA de second ordre est supérieure à celle de premier ordre sans effort de calcul additionnel. Les erreurs dues à l'absorption incomplète décroissent à mesure que l'on déplace la surface externe à une distance croissante du diffuseur. Un taux d'erreur d'environ 1 % dans les valeurs du champ proche a été obtenu avec les CLA de second ordre lorsque la surface externe était placée à une distance inférieure à une demi-longueur de la source de diffusion.

  9. The Quantum Mechanics of Nano-Confined Water: New Cooperative Effects Revealed with Neutron and X-Ray Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, G. F.; Deb, Aniruddha

    2014-12-01

    Neutron Compton scattering(NCS) measurements of the momentum distribution of light ions using the Vesuvio instrument at ISIS provide a sensitive local probe of the environment of those ions. NCS measurements of the proton momentum distribution in bulk water show only small deviations from the usual picture of water as a collection of molecules, with the protons covalently bonded to an oxygen and interacting weakly, primarily electrostatically, with nearby molecules. However, a series of measurements of the proton momentum distribution in carbon nanotubes, xerogel, and Nafion show that the proton delocalizes over distances of 0.2-0.3Å when water is confined on the scale of 20Å. This delocalization must be the result of changes in the Born-Oppenheimer surface for the protons, which would imply that there are large deviations in the electron distribution from that of a collection of weakly interacting molecules. This has been observed at Spring-8 using x-ray Compton scattering. The observed deviation in the valence electron momentum distribution from that of bulk water is more than an order of magnitude larger than the change observed in bulk water as the water is heated from just above melting to just below boiling. We conclude that the protons and electrons in nano-confined water are in a qualitatively different ground state from that of bulk water. Since the properties of this state persist at room temperature, and the confinement distance necessary to observe it is comparable to the distance between the elements of biological cells, this state presumably plays a role in the functioning of those cells.

  10. Critical dimension small angle X-ray scattering measurements of FinFET and 3D memory structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settens, Charles; Bunday, Benjamin; Thiel, Brad; Kline, R. Joseph; Sunday, Daniel; Wang, Chengqing; Wu, Wen-li; Matyi, Richard

    2013-04-01

    We have demonstrated that transmission critical dimension small angle X-ray scattering (CD-SAXS) provides high accuracy and precision CD measurements on advanced 3D microelectronic architectures. The competitive advantage of CD-SAXS over current 3D metrology methods such as optical scatterometry is that CD-SAXS is able to decouple and fit cross-section parameters without any significant parameter cross-correlations. As the industry aggressively scales beyond the 22 nm node, CD-SAXS can be used to quantitatively measure nanoscale deviations in the average crosssections of FinFETs and high-aspect ratio (HAR) memory devices. Fitting the average cross-section of 18:1 isolated HAR contact holes with an effective trapezoid model yielded an average pitch of 796.9 +/- 0.4 nm, top diameter of 70.3 +/- 0.9 nm, height of 1088 +/- 4 nm, and sidewall angle below 0.1°. Simulations of dense 40:1 HAR contact holes and FinFET fin-gate crossbar structures have been analyzed using CD-SAXS to inquire the theoretical precision of the technique to measure important process parameters such as fin CD, height, and sidewall angle; BOX etch recess, thickness of hafnium oxide and titanium nitride layers; gate CD, height, and sidewall angle; and hafnium oxide and titanium nitride etch recess. The simulations of HAR and FinFET structures mimic the characteristics of experimental data collected at a synchrotron x-ray source. Using the CD-SAXS simulator, we estimate the measurement capabilities for smaller similar structures expected at future nodes to predict the applicability of this technique to fulfill important CD metrology needs.

  11. Electron Linac design to drive bright Compton back-scattering gamma-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bacci, A.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Alesini, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Boni, R.; Chiadroni, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Esposito, A.; Ferrario, M.; Gallo, A.; Gatti, G.; Ghigo, A.; Spataro, B.; Vaccarezza, C.; Antici, P.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Cianchi, A.; and others

    2013-05-21

    The technological development in the field of high brightness linear accelerators and high energy/high quality lasers enables today designing high brilliance Compton-X and Gamma-photon beams suitable for a wide range of applications in the innovative field of nuclear photonics. The challenging requirements of this kind of source comprise: tunable energy (1-20 MeV), very narrow bandwidth (0.3%), and high spectral density (10{sup 4} photons/s/eV). We present here a study focused on the design and the optimization of an electron Linac aimed to meet the source specifications of the European Extreme Light Infrastructure-Nuclear Physics project, currently funded and seeking for an innovative machine design in order to outperform state-of-the-art facilities. We show that the phase space density of the electron beam, at the collision point against the laser pulse, is the main quality factor characterizing the Linac.

  12. Limits on light-speed anisotropies from Compton scattering of high-energy electrons.

    PubMed

    Bocquet, J-P; Moricciani, D; Bellini, V; Beretta, M; Casano, L; D'Angelo, A; Di Salvo, R; Fantini, A; Franco, D; Gervino, G; Ghio, F; Giardina, G; Girolami, B; Giusa, A; Gurzadyan, V G; Kashin, A; Knyazyan, S; Lapik, A; Lehnert, R; Levi Sandri, P; Lleres, A; Mammoliti, F; Mandaglio, G; Manganaro, M; Margarian, A; Mehrabyan, S; Messi, R; Nedorezov, V; Perrin, C; Randieri, C; Rebreyend, D; Rudnev, N; Russo, G; Schaerf, C; Sperduto, M L; Sutera, M C; Turinge, A; Vegna, V

    2010-06-18

    The possibility of anisotropies in the speed of light relative to the limiting speed of electrons is considered. The absence of sidereal variations in the energy of Compton-edge photons at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility's GRAAL facility constrains such anisotropies representing the first nonthreshold collision-kinematics study of Lorentz violation. When interpreted within the minimal standard-model extension, this result yields the two-sided limit of 1.6×10(-14) at 95% confidence level on a combination of the parity-violating photon and electron coefficients (κ(o+))(YZ), (κ(o+))(ZX), c(TX), and c(TY). This new constraint provides an improvement over previous bounds by 1 order of magnitude.

  13. Gold Nanoplate-Based 3D Hierarchical Microparticles: A Single Particle with High Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry

    2016-08-01

    Formation of intended nano- and microstructures with regular building blocks has attracted much attention because of their potential applications in the fields of optics, electronics, and catalysis. Herein, we report a novel strategy to spontaneously grow three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical cabbagelike microparticles (CLMPs) constructed by individual Au nanoplates. By reducing gold precursor to gold atoms, N-(3-amidino)-aniline (NAAN) itself was oxidized to form poly(N-(3-amidino)-aniline) (PNAAN), which specifically binds on Au(111) facet as a capping agent and which leads to the formation of gold nanoplates. Because of the incomplete coverage of Au(111) facet, new gold nanoplate growth sites were spontaneously generated from the crystal plane of existing Au nanoplates for the growth of other nanoplates. This process continued until the nanoplate density reached its maximum range, eventually resulting in CLMPs with well-controlled structures. This opens a new avenue to utilize the imperfection during nanoparticle (NP) growth for the construction of microstructures. The individual CLMP shows excellent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) performance with high enhancement factor (EF) and good reproducibility as it integrates the SERS enhancement effects of individual Au nanoplate and the nanogaps formed by the uniform and hierarchical structures. PMID:27452074

  14. Compton Gamma Ray Observatory/BATSE observations of energetic electrons scattered by cyclotron resonance with waves from powerful VLF transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datlowe, Dayton W.; Imhof, William L.

    1994-01-01

    To obtain a better understanding of the wave-particle mechanisms responsible for the loss of electrons from the radiation belts, energetic electron data from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the NASA's Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) was studied. Powerful ground-based VLF transmitters resonantly scatter electrons from the inner radiation belt onto trajectories from which they precipitate into the atmosphere as they drift eastward. 563 instances in which the satellite traversed a cloud of energetic electrons which had been scattered into quasi-trapped trajectories were identified. From the longitude distribution, it was concluded that waves from the VLF transmitter NWC at 114 deg E are the origin of 257 of the events, and waves from UMSat 44 deg E related to 45 more. In another 177 cases the electrons had drifted from the longitude of these transmitters to a location in the western hemisphere. The previously reported seasonal variation in the frequency of occurrence of cyclotron resonance interaction is confirmed with the continuous coverage provided by GRO. The frequency of occurrence of the cyclotron resonance interactions is largest before sunrise, which we attribute to the diurnal variations in the transmission VLF waves through the ionosphere. For the first time, unique very narrow sheets of electrons occurring in the aftermath of a large geomagnetic storm are reported.

  15. Simple analytical approximations for treatment of inverse Compton scattering of relativistic electrons in the blackbody radiation field

    SciTech Connect

    Khangulyan, D.; Kelner, S. R. E-mail: Felix.Aharonian@mpi-hd.mpg.de

    2014-03-10

    The inverse Compton (IC) scattering of relativistic electrons is one of the major gamma-ray production mechanisms in different environments. Often, the target photons for IC scattering are dominated by blackbody (or graybody) radiation. In this case, the precise treatment of the characteristics of IC radiation requires numerical integrations over the Planckian distribution. Formally, analytical integrations are also possible but they result in series of several special functions; this limits the efficiency of usage of these expressions. The aim of this work is the derivation of approximate analytical presentations that would provide adequate accuracy for the calculations of the energy spectra of upscattered radiation, the rate of electron energy losses, and the mean energy of emitted photons. Such formulae have been obtained by merging the analytical asymptotic limits. The coefficients in these expressions are calculated via the least-squares fitting of the results of numerical integrations. The simple analytical presentations, obtained for both the isotropic and anisotropic target radiation fields, provide adequate (as good as 1%) accuracy for broad astrophysical applications.

  16. Neutron Compton scattering as a molecular characterization technique: A study on NaHF{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Colognesi, D.; Pietropaolo, A.; Senesi, R.; Ramirez-Cuesta, A. J.

    2007-11-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering experiments were performed at intermediate and high momentum transfers, up to 85-90 A ring {sup -1}, to study the proton momentum distribution in polycrystalline sodium hydrogen fluoride (NaHF{sub 2}) at low temperature (below 5 K). The H mean kinetic energy was extracted and compared to the results from hydrogen-projected density of phonon states derived from intermediate momentum transfer inelastic neutron scattering and lattice dynamics simulations. A reasonable agreement between the two figures was found. In addition, relevant aspects of high momentum transfer neutron scattering from NaHF{sub 2} were explored in detail, ranging from an alternative evaluation of final state effects to the role played by the instrumental resolution and to the possibility to reconstruct the potential felt by a proton from its momentum distribution.

  17. Low-momentum-transfer nonrelativistic limit of the relativistic impulse approximation expression for Compton-scattering doubly differential cross sections and characterization of their relativistic contributions

    SciTech Connect

    LaJohn, L. A.

    2010-04-15

    The nonrelativistic (nr) impulse approximation (NRIA) expression for Compton-scattering doubly differential cross sections (DDCS) for inelastic photon scattering is recovered from the corresponding relativistic expression (RIA) of Ribberfors [Phys. Rev. B 12, 2067 (1975)] in the limit of low momentum transfer (q{yields}0), valid even at relativistic incident photon energies {omega}{sub 1}>m provided that the average initial momentum of the ejected electron is not too high, that is, scattering angle {theta} to 0 deg. ({theta}{yields}0 deg.) around the Compton peak maximum. This explains the observation that it is possible to obtain an accurate Compton peak (CP) even when {omega}{sub 1}>m using nr expressions when {theta} is small. For example, a 1% accuracy can be obtained when {omega}{sub 1}=1 MeV if {theta}<20 deg. However as {omega}{sub 1} increases into the MeV range, the maximum {theta} at which an accurate Compton peak can be obtained from nr expressions approaches closer to zero, because the {theta} at which the relativistic shift of CP to higher energy is greatest, which starts at 180 deg. when {omega}{sub 1}<300 keV, begins to decrease, approaching zero even though the {theta} at which the relativistic increase in the CP magnitude remains greatest around {theta}=180 deg. The relativistic contribution to the prediction of Compton doubly differential cross sections (DDCS) is characterized in simple terms using Ribberfors further approximation to his full RIA expression. This factorable form is given by DDCS=KJ, where K is the kinematic factor and J the Compton profile. This form makes it possible to account for the relativistic shift of CP to higher energy and the increase in the CP magnitude as being due to the dependence of J(p{sub min},{rho}{sub rel}) (where p{sub min} is the relativistic version of the z

  18. Low-momentum-transfer nonrelativistic limit of the relativistic impulse approximation expression for Compton-scattering doubly differential cross sections and characterization of their relativistic contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajohn, L. A.

    2010-04-01

    The nonrelativistic (nr) impulse approximation (NRIA) expression for Compton-scattering doubly differential cross sections (DDCS) for inelastic photon scattering is recovered from the corresponding relativistic expression (RIA) of Ribberfors [Phys. Rev. B 12, 2067 (1975)] in the limit of low momentum transfer (q→0), valid even at relativistic incident photon energies ω1>m provided that the average initial momentum of the ejected electron is not too high, that is, scattering angle θ to 0° (θ→0°) around the Compton peak maximum. This explains the observation that it is possible to obtain an accurate Compton peak (CP) even when ω1>m using nr expressions when θ is small. For example, a 1% accuracy can be obtained when ω1=1MeV if θ<20°. However as ω1 increases into the MeV range, the maximum θ at which an accurate Compton peak can be obtained from nr expressions approaches closer to zero, because the θ at which the relativistic shift of CP to higher energy is greatest, which starts at 180° when ω1<300 keV, begins to decrease, approaching zero even though the θ at which the relativistic increase in the CP magnitude remains greatest around θ=180°. The relativistic contribution to the prediction of Compton doubly differential cross sections (DDCS) is characterized in simple terms using Ribberfors further approximation to his full RIA expression. This factorable form is given by DDCS=KJ, where K is the kinematic factor and J the Compton profile. This form makes it possible to account for the relativistic shift of CP to higher energy and the increase in the CP magnitude as being due to the dependence of J(pmin,ρrel) (where pmin is the relativistic version of the z component of the momentum of the initial electron and ρrel is the relativistic charge density) and K(pmin) on pmin. This characterization approach was used as a guide

  19. Solution structure of the complex between CR2 SCR 1-2 and C3d of human complement: an X-ray scattering and sedimentation modelling study.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Hannah E; Eaton, Julian T; Hannan, Jonathan P; Holers, V Michael; Perkins, Stephen J

    2005-02-25

    Complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21) forms a tight complex with C3d, a fragment of C3, the major complement component. Previous crystal structures of the C3d-CR2 SCR 1-2 complex and free CR2 SCR 1-2 showed that the two SCR domains of CR2 form contact with each other in a closed V-shaped structure. SCR 1 and SCR 2 are connected by an unusually long eight-residue linker peptide. Medium-resolution solution structures for CR2 SCR 1-2, C3d, and their complex were determined by X-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation. CR2 SCR 1-2 is monomeric. For CR2 SCR 1-2, its radius of gyration R(G) of 2.12(+/-0.05) nm, its maximum length of 10nm and its sedimentation coefficient s20,w(o) of 1.40(+/-0.03) S do not agree with those calculated from the crystal structures, and instead suggest an open structure. Computer modelling of the CR2 SCR1-2 solution structure was based on the structural randomisation of the eight-residue linker peptide joining SCR 1 and SCR 2 to give 9950 trial models. Comparisons with the X-ray scattering curve indicated that the most favoured arrangements for the two SCR domains corresponded to an open V-shaped structure with no contacts between the SCR domains. For C3d, X-ray scattering and sedimentation velocity experiments showed that it exists as a monomer-dimer equilibrium with a dissociation constant of 40 microM. The X-ray scattering curve for monomeric C3d gave an R(G) value of 1.95 nm, and this together with its s20,w(o) value of 3.17 S gave good agreement with the monomeric C3d crystal structure. Modelling of the C3d dimer gave good agreements with its scattering and ultracentrifugation parameters. For the complex, scattering and ultracentrifugation experiments showed that there was no dimerisation, indicating that the C3d dimerisation site was located close to the CR2 SCR 1-2 binding site. The R(G) value of 2.44(+/-0.1) nm, its length of 9 nm and its s20,w(o) value of 3.45(+/-0.01) S showed that its structure was not much more

  20. First observation of multi-pulse X-ray train via multi-collision laser Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, R.; Toyokawa, H.; Yasumoto, M.; Ikeura-Sekiguchi, H.; Koike, M.; Yamada, K.; Yanagida, T.; Nakajyo, T.; Sakai, F.

    2009-09-01

    A compact hard X-ray source via laser Compton scattering (LCS) has been developed for biological and medical applications at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) in Japan. The multi-collision LCS has been investigated in order to enhance the X-ray yields. The first observation of multi-pulse X-ray train with 6 pulses via the multi-collision LCS has been successfully demonstrated between the multi-bunch electron train with 6 bunches and the multi-pulse Ti:Sa laser train with 6 pulses. The 32 MeV electron train was generated from a Cs 2Te photocathode rf gun with a multi-pulse UV laser and the S-band linac. The Ti:Sa laser train was obtained with the chirp pulse amplification (CPA) including the modified regenerative amplifier. The X-ray train with 6 pulses with 12.6 ns spacing was observed with the micro-channel plate (MCP). The maximum energy of the X-ray is analytically estimated to be about 24 keV and the total number of generated photons was calculated to be about 1.8×10 6 photons/train.

  1. Compton scattering by internal shields based on melanin-containing mushrooms provides protection of gastrointestinal tract from ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Revskaya, Ekaterina; Chu, Peter; Howell, Robertha C; Schweitzer, Andrew D; Bryan, Ruth A; Harris, Matthew; Gerfen, Gary; Jiang, Zewei; Jandl, Thomas; Kim, Kami; Ting, Li-Min; Sellers, Rani S; Dadachova, Ekaterina; Casadevall, Arturo

    2012-11-01

    There is a need for radioprotectors that protect normal tissues from ionizing radiation in patients receiving high doses of radiation and during nuclear emergencies. We investigated the possibility of creating an efficient oral radioprotector based on the natural pigment melanin that would act as an internal shield and protect the tissues via Compton scattering followed by free radical scavenging. CD-1 mice were fed melanin-containing black edible mushrooms Auricularia auricila-judae before 9 Gy total body irradiation. The location of the mushrooms in the body before irradiation was determined by in vivo fluorescent imaging. Black mushrooms protected 80% of mice from the lethal dose, while control mice or those given melanin-devoid mushrooms died from gastrointestinal syndrome. The crypts of mice given black mushrooms showed less apoptosis and more cell division than those in control mice, and their white blood cell and platelet counts were restored at 45 days to preradiation levels. The role of melanin in radioprotection was proven by the fact that mice given white mushrooms supplemented with melanin survived at the same rate as mice given black mushrooms. The ability of melanin-containing mushrooms to provide remarkable protection against radiation suggests that they could be developed into oral radioprotectors.

  2. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Y.; Toyokawa, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yamamoto, N.; Adachi, M.; Tanaka, S.; Katoh, M.

    2013-05-15

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90 Degree-Sign collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF{sub 2} scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF{sub 2} scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

  3. Proposal for an advanced hybrid K-edge/XRF densitometry (HKED) using a monochromatic photon beam from laser Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizuma, Toshiyuki; Hajima, Ryoichi; Hayakawa, Takehito; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Sonoda, Takashi; Seya, Michio

    2011-10-01

    The general purpose Monte Carlo electron-gamma shower computer code (EGS5) was used to obtain the U, Np, and Pu X-ray response from the hybrid K-edge/XRF densitometry (HKED). In the present simulation, we adopt a monochromatic, linearly polarized photon beam generated by using inverse Compton scattering of laser light with high-energy electrons from an energy recovery linac. The simulation has been carried out under various conditions of the U, Np, and Pu concentrations to investigate the effect of counting rates as well as counting precision. The results of the simulation show that the assessment time for low concentration Pu input solutions is reduced by improving the signal-to-background ratios. It is also shown that the Np concentration is determined with the counting precision of 0.67-1.8% in standard deviation during 1 h live time measurement for a 3N HNO 3 sample solution (1.1-1.3 g/cm 2) including U (10-200 g/L), Np (0.1 g/L), and Pu (10 g/L).

  4. X-ray suppression in gamma-ray bursts through resonant Compton scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    An X-ray that scatters with an electron in the first Landau level of a strong magnetic field is converted into a gamma ray. This process has a resonant cross section at X-ray energies and is therefore highly likely to occur even when the first Landau level is sparsely populated. Converted X-rays are cyclotron absorbed, maintaining the equilibrium between the cyclotron photon density and the population of the first Landau level. By suppressing a neutron star's black body emission, this mechanism can produce a gamma-ray burst with a low X-ray flux.

  5. A Cryogenic Target for Compton Scattering Experiments at HI γS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendellen, David; Ahmed, Mohammad; Weller, Henry; Feldman, Gerald

    2015-04-01

    We have designed, constructed, and tested a cryogenic target for use at the High Intensity γ-ray Source (HI γS). The target is able to liquefy helium (LHe), hydrogen (LH2), and deuterium (LD2). It precools room-temperature gas in two stages with a Gifford-McMahon cryocooler. The precooled gas condenses onto a series of copper fins and drips down to fill a 0.25 L Kapton target cell. The cryotarget will be used to measure nuclear and nucleon electromagnetic polarizabilities. The electromagnetic polarizabilities of the nucleons, α and β, will be probed by scattering a γ-ray beam on unpolarized LD2 and LH2 targets. Scattered photons will be detected by the HI γS NaI Detector Array (HINDA). We have tested the target with LHe at 3 K and are preparing for LD2 testing and production running. Work supported by US Department of Energy Contracts DE-FG02-97ER41033, DE-FG02-06ER41422, and DE-SCOO0536.

  6. A diffuser-based three-dimensional measurement of polarization-dependent scattering characteristics of optical films for 3D-display applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Yeon; Seo, Jong-Wook

    2015-01-26

    We propose an accurate and easy-to-use three-dimensional measurement method using a diffuser plate to analyze the scattering characteristics of optical films. The far-field radiation pattern of light scattered by the optical film is obtained from the illuminance pattern created on the diffuser plate by the light. A mathematical model and calibration methods were described, and the results were compared with those obtained by a direct measurement using a luminance meter. The new method gave very precise three-dimensional polarization-dependent scattering characteristics of scattering polarizer films, and it can play an effective role in developing high performance polarization-selective screens for 3D display applications. PMID:25835866

  7. Bedside assistance in freehand ultrasonic diagnosis by real-time visual feedback of 3D scatter diagram of pulsatile tissue-motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, M.; Kawata, K.; Nakamori, N.; Kitsunezuka, Y.

    2011-03-01

    By real-time visual feedback of 3D scatter diagram of pulsatile tissue-motion, freehand ultrasonic diagnosis of neonatal ischemic diseases has been assisted at the bedside. The 2D ultrasonic movie was taken with a conventional ultrasonic apparatus (ATL HDI5000) and ultrasonic probes of 5-7 MHz with the compact tilt-sensor to measure the probe orientation. The real-time 3D visualization was realized by developing an extended version of the PC-based visualization system. The software was originally developed on the DirectX platform and optimized with the streaming SIMD extensions. The 3D scatter diagram of the latest pulsatile tissues has been continuously generated and visualized as projection image with the ultrasonic movie in the current section more than 15 fps. It revealed the 3D structure of pulsatile tissues such as middle and posterior cerebral arteries, Willis ring and cerebellar arteries, in which pediatricians have great interests in the blood flow because asphyxiated and/or low-birth-weight neonates have a high risk of ischemic diseases such as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and periventricular leukomalacia. Since the pulsatile tissue-motion is due to local blood flow, it can be concluded that the system developed in this work is very useful to assist freehand ultrasonic diagnosis of ischemic diseases in the neonatal cranium.

  8. A Compton scatter camera for spectral imaging of 0.5 to 3.0 MeV gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.B.

    1994-12-31

    A prototype Compton scatter camera for imaging gamma rays has been built and tested. This camera addresses unique aspects of gamma-ray imaging at nuclear industrial sites, including gamma-ray energies in the 0.5 to 3.0 MeV range and polychromatic fields. Analytic models of camera efficiency, resolution and contaminating events are developed. The response of the camera bears strong similarity to emission computed tomography devices used in nuclear medicine. A direct Fourier based algorithm is developed to reconstruct two-dimensional images of measured gamma-ray fields. Iterative ART and MLE algorithms are also investigated. The point response of the camera to gamma rays of energies from 0.5 to 2.8 MeV is measured and compared to the analytic models. The direct reconstruction algorithm is at least ten times more efficient than the iterative algorithms are also investigated. The point response of the camera to gamma rays energies from 0.5 to 2.8 MeV is measured and compared to the analytic models. The direct reconstruction algorithm is at least ten times more efficient than the iterative algorithms and produces images that are, in general, of the same quality. Measured images of several phantoms are shown. Important results include angular resolutions as low as 4.4{degrees}, reproduction of phantom size and position within 7%, and contrast recovery of 84% or better. Spectral imaging is demonstrated with independent images from a multi-energy phantom consisting of two sources imaged simultaneously.

  9. Solar Wind Halo Formation by the Scattering of the Strahl via Direct Cluster/PEACE Observations of the 3D Velocity Distribution Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Gurgiolo, Chris A.; Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested by a number of authors that the solar wind electron halo can be formed by the scattering of the strahl. On frequent occasions we have observed in electron angular skymaps (Phi/Theta-plots) of the electron 3D velocity distribution functions) a bursty-filament of particles connecting the strahl to the solar wind core-halo. These are seen over a very limited energy range. When the magnetic field is well off the nominal solar wind flow direction such filaments are inconsistent with any local forces and are probably the result of strong scattering. Furthermore, observations indicates that the strahl component is frequently and significantly anisotropic (Tper/Tpal approx.2). This provides a possible free energy source for the excitation of whistler waves as a possible scattering mechanism. The empirical observational evidence between the halo and the strahl suggests that the strahl population may be, at least in part, the source of the halo component.

  10. Can the cosmic x ray and gamma ray background be due to reflection of a steep power law spectrum and Compton scattering by relativistic electrons?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zycki, Piotr T.; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Svensson, Roland

    1991-01-01

    We reconsider the recent model for the origin in the cosmic X-ray and gamma-ray background by Rogers and Field. The background in the model is due to an unresolved population of AGNs. An individual AGN spectrum contains three components: a power law with the energy index of alpha = 1.1, an enhanced reflection component, and a component from Compton scattering by relativistic electrons with a low energy cutoff at some minimum Lorentz factor, gamma(sub min) much greater than 1. The MeV bump seen in the gamma-ray background is then explained by inverse Compton emission by the electrons. We show that the model does not reproduce the shape of the observed X-ray and gamma-ray background below 10 MeV and that it overproduces the background at larger energies. Furthermore, we find the assumptions made for the Compton component to be physically inconsistent. Relaxing the inconsistent assumptions leads to model spectra even more different from that of the observed cosmic background. Thus, we can reject the hypothesis that the high-energy cosmic background is due to the described model.

  11. Ultrahigh brilliance quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays based on self-synchronized all-optical Compton scattering

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Changhai; Qi, Rong; Wang, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Wentao; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhijun; Liu, Jiaqi; Qin, Zhiyong; Fang, Ming; Feng, Ke; Wu, Ying; Tian, Ye; Xu, Yi; Wu, Fenxiang; Leng, Yuxin; Weng, Xiufeng; Wang, Jihu; Wei, Fuli; Yi, Yicheng; Song, Zhaohui; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-01-01

    Inverse Compton scattering between ultra-relativistic electrons and an intense laser field has been proposed as a major route to generate compact high-brightness and high-energy γ-rays. Attributed to the inherent synchronization mechanism, an all-optical Compton scattering γ-ray source, using one laser to both accelerate electrons and scatter via the reflection of a plasma mirror, has been demonstrated in proof-of-principle experiments to produce a x-ray source near 100 keV. Here, by designing a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator to generate high-quality monoenergetic e-beams, which are bound to head-on collide with the intense driving laser pulse via the reflection of a 20-um-thick Ti foil, we produce tunable quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays (33% full-width at half-maximum) with a peak brilliance of ~3 × 1022 photons s−1 mm−2 mrad−2 0.1% BW at 1 MeV. To the best of our knowledge, it is one order of magnitude higher than ever reported value of its kinds in MeV regime. This compact ultrahigh brilliance γ-ray source may provide applications in nuclear resonance fluorescence, x-ray radiology and ultrafast pump-probe nondestructive inspection. PMID:27405540

  12. Relativistic regimes in which Compton scattering doubly differential cross sections obtained from impulse approximation are accurate due to cancelation of errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajohn, L. A.; Pratt, R. H.

    2015-05-01

    There is no simple parameter that can be used to predict when impulse approximation (IA) can yield accurate Compton scattering doubly differential cross sections (DDCS) in relativistic regimes. When Z is low, a small value of the parameter /q (where is the average initial electron momentum and q is the momentum transfer) suffices. For small Z the photon electron kinematic contribution described in relativistic S-matrix (SM) theory reduces to an expression, Xrel, which is present in the relativistic impulse approximation (RIA) formula for Compton DDCS. When Z is high, the S-Matrix photon electron kinematics no longer reduces to Xrel, and this along with the error characterized by the magnitude of /q contribute to the RIA error Δ. We demonstrate and illustrate in the form of contour plots that there are regimes of incident photon energy ωi and scattering angle θ in which the two types of errors at least partially cancel. Our calculations show that when θ is about 65° for Uranium K-shell scattering, Δ is less than 1% over an ωi range of 300 to 900 keV.

  13. Ultrahigh brilliance quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays based on self-synchronized all-optical Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changhai; Qi, Rong; Wang, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Wentao; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhijun; Liu, Jiaqi; Qin, Zhiyong; Fang, Ming; Feng, Ke; Wu, Ying; Tian, Ye; Xu, Yi; Wu, Fenxiang; Leng, Yuxin; Weng, Xiufeng; Wang, Jihu; Wei, Fuli; Yi, Yicheng; Song, Zhaohui; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-07-13

    Inverse Compton scattering between ultra-relativistic electrons and an intense laser field has been proposed as a major route to generate compact high-brightness and high-energy γ-rays. Attributed to the inherent synchronization mechanism, an all-optical Compton scattering γ-ray source, using one laser to both accelerate electrons and scatter via the reflection of a plasma mirror, has been demonstrated in proof-of-principle experiments to produce a x-ray source near 100 keV. Here, by designing a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator to generate high-quality monoenergetic e-beams, which are bound to head-on collide with the intense driving laser pulse via the reflection of a 20-um-thick Ti foil, we produce tunable quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays (33% full-width at half-maximum) with a peak brilliance of ~3 × 10(22) photons s(-1) mm(-2) mrad(-2) 0.1% BW at 1 MeV. To the best of our knowledge, it is one order of magnitude higher than ever reported value of its kinds in MeV regime. This compact ultrahigh brilliance γ-ray source may provide applications in nuclear resonance fluorescence, x-ray radiology and ultrafast pump-probe nondestructive inspection.

  14. Ultrahigh brilliance quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays based on self-synchronized all-optical Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changhai; Qi, Rong; Wang, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Wentao; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhijun; Liu, Jiaqi; Qin, Zhiyong; Fang, Ming; Feng, Ke; Wu, Ying; Tian, Ye; Xu, Yi; Wu, Fenxiang; Leng, Yuxin; Weng, Xiufeng; Wang, Jihu; Wei, Fuli; Yi, Yicheng; Song, Zhaohui; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-01-01

    Inverse Compton scattering between ultra-relativistic electrons and an intense laser field has been proposed as a major route to generate compact high-brightness and high-energy γ-rays. Attributed to the inherent synchronization mechanism, an all-optical Compton scattering γ-ray source, using one laser to both accelerate electrons and scatter via the reflection of a plasma mirror, has been demonstrated in proof-of-principle experiments to produce a x-ray source near 100 keV. Here, by designing a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator to generate high-quality monoenergetic e-beams, which are bound to head-on collide with the intense driving laser pulse via the reflection of a 20-um-thick Ti foil, we produce tunable quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays (33% full-width at half-maximum) with a peak brilliance of ~3 × 10(22) photons s(-1) mm(-2) mrad(-2) 0.1% BW at 1 MeV. To the best of our knowledge, it is one order of magnitude higher than ever reported value of its kinds in MeV regime. This compact ultrahigh brilliance γ-ray source may provide applications in nuclear resonance fluorescence, x-ray radiology and ultrafast pump-probe nondestructive inspection. PMID:27405540

  15. Ultrahigh brilliance quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays based on self-synchronized all-optical Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Changhai; Qi, Rong; Wang, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Wentao; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhijun; Liu, Jiaqi; Qin, Zhiyong; Fang, Ming; Feng, Ke; Wu, Ying; Tian, Ye; Xu, Yi; Wu, Fenxiang; Leng, Yuxin; Weng, Xiufeng; Wang, Jihu; Wei, Fuli; Yi, Yicheng; Song, Zhaohui; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-07-01

    Inverse Compton scattering between ultra-relativistic electrons and an intense laser field has been proposed as a major route to generate compact high-brightness and high-energy γ-rays. Attributed to the inherent synchronization mechanism, an all-optical Compton scattering γ-ray source, using one laser to both accelerate electrons and scatter via the reflection of a plasma mirror, has been demonstrated in proof-of-principle experiments to produce a x-ray source near 100 keV. Here, by designing a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator to generate high-quality monoenergetic e-beams, which are bound to head-on collide with the intense driving laser pulse via the reflection of a 20-um-thick Ti foil, we produce tunable quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays (33% full-width at half-maximum) with a peak brilliance of ~3 × 1022 photons s‑1 mm‑2 mrad‑2 0.1% BW at 1 MeV. To the best of our knowledge, it is one order of magnitude higher than ever reported value of its kinds in MeV regime. This compact ultrahigh brilliance γ-ray source may provide applications in nuclear resonance fluorescence, x-ray radiology and ultrafast pump-probe nondestructive inspection.

  16. Ultrahigh brilliance quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays based on self-synchronized all-optical Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Changhai; Qi, Rong; Wang, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Wentao; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhijun; Liu, Jiaqi; Qin, Zhiyong; Fang, Ming; Feng, Ke; Wu, Ying; Tian, Ye; Xu, Yi; Wu, Fenxiang; Leng, Yuxin; Weng, Xiufeng; Wang, Jihu; Wei, Fuli; Yi, Yicheng; Song, Zhaohui; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-07-01

    Inverse Compton scattering between ultra-relativistic electrons and an intense laser field has been proposed as a major route to generate compact high-brightness and high-energy γ-rays. Attributed to the inherent synchronization mechanism, an all-optical Compton scattering γ-ray source, using one laser to both accelerate electrons and scatter via the reflection of a plasma mirror, has been demonstrated in proof-of-principle experiments to produce a x-ray source near 100 keV. Here, by designing a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator to generate high-quality monoenergetic e-beams, which are bound to head-on collide with the intense driving laser pulse via the reflection of a 20-um-thick Ti foil, we produce tunable quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays (33% full-width at half-maximum) with a peak brilliance of ~3 × 1022 photons s-1 mm-2 mrad-2 0.1% BW at 1 MeV. To the best of our knowledge, it is one order of magnitude higher than ever reported value of its kinds in MeV regime. This compact ultrahigh brilliance γ-ray source may provide applications in nuclear resonance fluorescence, x-ray radiology and ultrafast pump-probe nondestructive inspection.

  17. Study of Generalized Parton Distributions and Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering on the nucleon with the CLAS and CLAS12 detectors at the Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Guegan, Baptiste

    2012-11-01

    The exclusive leptoproduction of a real photon is considered to be the "cleanest" way to access the Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD). This process is called Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) lN {yields} lN{gamma} , and is sensitive to all the four GPDs. Measuring the DVCS cross section is one of the main goals of this thesis. In this thesis, we present the work performed to extract on a wide phase-space the DVCS cross-section from the JLab data at a beam energy of 6 GeV.

  18. Measurement of the Generalized Polarizabilities of the Proton in Virtual Compton Scattering at Q2=0.92 and 1.76 Gev2: II. Dispersion Relation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Geraud Laveissiere; Luminita Todor; Natalie Degrande; Stephanie Jaminion; Christophe Jutier; Rachele Di Salvo; L. Van Hoorebeke; et al

    2003-12-01

    Virtual Compton Scattering is studied at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in the energy domain below pion threshold and in the Delta(1232) resonance region. The data analysis is based on the Dispersion Relation (DR) approach. The electric and magnetic Generalized Polarizabilities (GPs) of the proton and the structure functions Pll-Ptt/epsilon and Plt are determined at four-momentum transfer squared Q2=0.92 and 1.76 GeV2. The DR analysis is consistent with the low-energy expansion analysis. The world data set indicates that neither the electric nor magnetic GP follows a simple dipole form.

  19. The Penrose photoproduction scenario for NGC 4151: A black hole gamma-ray emission mechanism for active galactic nuclei and Seyfert galaxies. [Compton scattering and pair production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiter, D.

    1979-01-01

    A consistent theoretical interpretation is given for the suggestion that a steepening of the spectrum between X-ray and gamma ray energies may be a general, gamma-ray characteristic of Seyfert galaxies, if the diffuse gamma ray spectrum is considered to be a superposition of unresolved contributions, from one or more classes of extragalactic objects. In the case of NGC 4151, the dominant process is shown to be Penrose Compton scattering in the ergosphere of a Kerr black hole, assumed to exist in the Seyfert's active galactic nucleus.

  20. Laser-Compton Scattered x-rays for non-destructive assay of surrogate fuel-cycle samples and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, Syed F.

    One of our research goals at the Idaho Accelerator Center focuses on Laser-Compton Scattering (LCS) based nuclear science applications such as non-destructively quantifying concentrations of transuranic (TRIJ) elements in a surrogate of spent nuclear fuel and imaging. Non-destructive techniques include x-ray transmission and x-ray fluorescence. Both of these can be very sensitive techniques with tunable monochromatic x-rays. We investigated quasi-monochromatic x-rays from LCS for this purpose. Four sharp ˜20 keV, ˜36.7 keV, ˜99 keV, and ˜122 keV LCS peaks were produced in four separate experiments using electron beams tuned to ˜33 MeV, -˜32 MeV, ˜37 MeV, and ˜41 MeV that were brought in collision with the Nd:YAG laser (the peak laser power was 4 GW) operating at 1064 nm, 532 nm and 266 nm wavelengths respectively. The linac was operating at 60 Hz with an electron beam pulse length of about 50 ps and a peak current of about 7 A. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) experiments were first carried out to identify elemental XRF emission from Ag, Cd, and Sn foils with thicknesses ranging from 25--500 mum, following the absorption of ˜36.7 keV LCS x-rays. The intensities of the measured Kalpha1 emission lines were then compared to the predicted Kalpha1 intensities; based on the comparison, there was an estimated deviation of up to ≈10.4% between the predicted and measured Kalpha1 intensities. Next, the transmission experiments were carried out by transmitting a ˜99 keV LCS x-ray beam through Bi foils of thicknesses ranging from 50--250 mum to measure the transmission of the interrogating LCS x-ray beam. There was a relative deviation of up to ≈9.4 % between the predicted and measured transmission respectively. We then focused on exploiting the Hybrid K-Edge Densitometry (HKED) technique for the purpose of quantifying the concentrations of Uranium in the surrogate of spent nuclear fuel using a ˜122 keV LCS x-ray beam. The measured concentrations deviated by about 2

  1. In-vivo Optical Tomography of Small Scattering Specimens: time-lapse 3D imaging of the head eversion process in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Arranz, Alicia; Dong, Di; Zhu, Shouping; Savakis, Charalambos; Tian, Jie; Ripoll, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Even though in vivo imaging approaches have witnessed several new and important developments, specimens that exhibit high light scattering properties such as Drosophila melanogaster pupae are still not easily accessible with current optical imaging techniques, obtaining images only from subsurface features. This means that in order to obtain 3D volumetric information these specimens need to be studied either after fixation and a chemical clearing process, through an imaging window - thus perturbing physiological development -, or during early stages of development when the scattering contribution is negligible. In this paper we showcase how Optical Projection Tomography may be used to obtain volumetric images of the head eversion process in vivo in Drosophila melanogaster pupae, both in control and headless mutant specimens. Additionally, we demonstrate the use of Helical Optical Projection Tomography (hOPT) as a tool for high throughput 4D-imaging of several specimens simultaneously. PMID:25471694

  2. In-vivo optical tomography of small scattering specimens: time-lapse 3D imaging of the head eversion process in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Arranz, Alicia; Dong, Di; Zhu, Shouping; Savakis, Charalambos; Tian, Jie; Ripoll, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Even though in vivo imaging approaches have witnessed several new and important developments, specimens that exhibit high light scattering properties such as Drosophila melanogaster pupae are still not easily accessible with current optical imaging techniques, obtaining images only from subsurface features. This means that in order to obtain 3D volumetric information these specimens need to be studied either after fixation and a chemical clearing process, through an imaging window--thus perturbing physiological development -, or during early stages of development when the scattering contribution is negligible. In this paper we showcase how Optical Projection Tomography may be used to obtain volumetric images of the head eversion process in vivo in Drosophila melanogaster pupae, both in control and headless mutant specimens. Additionally, we demonstrate the use of Helical Optical Projection Tomography (hOPT) as a tool for high throughput 4D-imaging of several specimens simultaneously. PMID:25471694

  3. 500 MW X-Band RF System of a 0.25 GeV Electron LINAC for Advanced Compton Scattering Source Application

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Tak Sum; Anderson, Scott; Barty, Christopher; Gibson, David; Hartemann, Fred; Marsh, Roark; Siders, Craig; Adolphsen, Chris; Jongewaard, Erik; Raubenheimer, Tor; Tantawi, Sami; Vlieks, Arnold; Wang, Juwen; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    A Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering light source is being developed at LLNL in collaboration with the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The electron beam for the Compton scattering interaction will be generated by a X-band RF gun and a X-band LINAC at the frequency of 11.424 GHz. High power RF in excess of 500 MW is needed to accelerate the electrons to energy of 250 MeV or greater for the interaction. Two high power klystron amplifiers, each capable of generating 50 MW, 1.5 msec pulses, will be the main high power RF sources for the system. These klystrons will be powered by state of the art solid-state high voltage modulators. A RF pulse compressor, similar to the SLED II pulse compressor, will compress the klystron output pulse with a power gain factor of five. For compactness consideration, we are looking at a folded waveguide setup. This will give us 500 MW at output of the compressor. The compressed pulse will then be distributed to the RF gun and to six traveling wave accelerator sections. Phase and amplitude control are located at the RF gun input and additional control points along the LINAC to allow for parameter control during operation. This high power RF system is being designed and constructed. In this paper, we will present the design, layout, and status of this RF system.

  4. 500 MW X-BAND RF SYSTEM OF A 0.25 GEV ELECTRON LINAC FOR ADVANCED COMPTON SCATTERING SOURCE APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T S; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Marsh, R A; Siders, C; Barty, C P; Adolphsen, C; Jongewaard, E; Tantawi, S; Vlieks, A; Wang, J W; Raubenheimer, T

    2010-05-12

    A Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering light source is being developed at LLNL in collaboration with SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The electron beam for the Compton scattering interaction will be generated by a X-band RF gun and a X-band LINAC at the frequency of 11.424 GHz. High power RF in excess of 500 MW is needed to accelerate the electrons to energy of 250 MeV or greater for the interaction. Two high power klystron amplifiers, each capable of generating 50 MW, 1.5 msec pulses, will be the main high power RF sources for the system. These klystrons will be powered by state of the art solid-state high voltage modulators. A RF pulse compressor, similar to the SLED II pulse compressor, will compress the klystron output pulse with a power gain factor of five. For compactness consideration, we are looking at a folded waveguide setup. This will give us 500 MW at output of the compressor. The compressed pulse will then be distributed to the RF gun and to six traveling wave accelerator sections. Phase and amplitude control are located at the RF gun input and additional control points along the LINAC to allow for parameter control during operation. This high power RF system is being designed and constructed. In this paper, we will present the design, layout, and status of this RF system.

  5. Ag Nanoparticles Decorated Cactus-Like Ag Dendrites/Si Nanoneedles as Highly Efficient 3D Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Substrates toward Sensitive Sensing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Ma, Dayan; Chen, Feng; Bai, Min; Xu, Kewei; Zhao, Yongxi

    2015-10-20

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been considered as a promising sensing technique to detect low-level analytes. However, its practical application was hindered owing to the lack of uniform SERS substrates for ultrasensitive and reproducible assay. Herein, inspired by the natural cactus structure, we developed a cactus-like 3D nanostructure with uniform and high-density hotspots for highly efficient SERS sensing by both grafting the silicon nanoneedles onto Ag dendrites and subsequent decoration with Ag nanoparticles. The hierarchical scaffolds and high-density hotspots throughout the whole substrate result in great amplification of SERS signal. A high Raman enhancement factor of crystal violet up to 6.6 × 10(7) was achieved. Using malachite green (MG) as a model target, the fabricated SERS substrates exhibited good reproducibility (RSD ∼ 9.3%) and pushed the detection limit down to 10(-13) M with a wide linear range of 10(-12) M to 10(-7) M. Excellent selectivity was also demonstrated by facilely distinguishing MG from its derivative, some organics, and coexistent metal ions. Finally, the practicality and reliability of the 3D SERS substrates were confirmed by the quantitative analysis of spiked MG in environmental water with high recoveries (91.2% to 109.6%). By virtue of the excellent performance (good reproducibility, high sensitivity, and selectivity), the cactus-like 3D SERS substrate has great potential to become a versatile sensing platform in environmental monitoring, food safety, and medical diagnostics. PMID:26406111

  6. Solar Wind Halo Formation by the Scattering of the Strahl: Direct Cluster/PEACE Observations of the 3D Velocity Distribution Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinas, A. F.; Gurgiolo, C. A.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Wendel, D. E.; Goldstein, M. L.; Fazakerley, A. N.

    2010-12-01

    The current hypothesis of the formation of the solar wind halo electrons is that they are produced from scattering of the strahl. This hypothesis is strengthened by direct observations of the strahl electrons being scattered into the halo in an isolated event. On frequent occasions we have observed in electron angular skymaps (Phi/Theta-plots) of the electron 3D velocity distribution functions, a bursty-filament of particles connecting the strahl to the solar wind core-halo. These are seen over a limited energy range. The observation implies that the formation of the halo is not a continuous process but occurs in bursts in regions where conditions for wave growth providing the scattering are optimum. Sometimes, observations indicates that the strahl component is anisotropic (Tper/Tpal ~ 2). This provides a possible free energy source for the excitation of whistler waves as a possible scattering mechanism, however this condition is not always observed. The empirical observational evidence between the halo and the strahl suggests that the strahl population may be, at least in part, the source of the halo component.

  7. In-situ Neutron Scattering Determination of 3D Phase-Morphology Correlations in Fullerene Block Copolymer Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karim, Alamgir; Bucknall, David; Raghavan, Dharmaraj

    2015-02-23

    a fundamental study that does not set out to evaluate new materials or produce devices, but rather we wish to understand from first principles how the molecular structure of polymer-fullerene mixtures determined using neutron scattering (small angle neutron scattering and neutron reflection) affects device characteristics and consequently performance. While this seems a very obvious question to ask, this critical understanding is far from being realized despite the wealth of studies into OPV’s and is severely limiting organic PV devices from achieving their theoretical potential. Despite the fundamental nature of proposed work, it is essential to remain technologically relevant and therefore to ensure we address these issues we have developed relationships on the fundamental nature of structure-processing-property paradigm as applied to future need for large area, flexible OPV devices. Nanoscale heterojunction systems consisting of fullerenes dispersed in conjugated polymers are promising materials candidates for achieving high performance organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. In order to understand the phase behavior in these devices, neutron reflection is used to determine the behavior of model conjugated polymer-fullerene mixtures. Neutron reflection is particularly useful for these types of thin film studies since the fullerene generally have a high scattering contrast with respect to most polymers. We are studying model bulk heterojunction (BHJ) films based on mixtures of poly(3-hexyl thiophene)s (P3HT), a widely used photoconductive polymer, and different fullerenes (C60, PCBM and bis-PCBM). The characterization technique of neutron reflectivity measurements have been used to determine film morphology in a direction normal to the film surfaces. The novelty of the approach over previous studies is that the BHJ layer is sandwiched between a PEDOT/PSS and Al layers in real device configuration. Using this model system, the effect of typical thermal annealing

  8. Comment on "Evidence for narrow resonant structures at W ≈1.68 GeV and W ≈1.72 GeV in real Compton scattering off the proton"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werthmüller, D.; Witthauer, L.; Glazier, D. I.; Krusche, B.

    2015-12-01

    We comment on the statement by Kuznetsov et al. that the structure around W =1.72 GeV seen in the beam asymmetry in Compton scattering off the proton is not observed in the total cross section of η photoproduction on the neutron.

  9. Nonperturbative NN scattering in {sup 3}S{sub 1}–{sup 3}D{sub 1} channels of EFT(⁄π)

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ji-Feng

    2013-12-15

    The closed-form T matrices in the {sup 3}S{sub 1}–{sup 3}D{sub 1} channels of EFT(⁄π) for NN scattering with the potentials truncated at order O(Q{sup 4}) are presented with the nonperturbative divergences parametrized in a general manner. The stringent constraints imposed by the closed form of the T matrices are exploited in the underlying theory perspective and turned into virtues in the implementation of subtractions and the manifestation of power counting rules in nonperturbative regimes, leading us to the concept of EFT scenario. A number of scenarios of the EFT description of NN scattering are compared with PSA data in terms of effective range expansion and {sup 3}S{sub 1} phase shifts, showing that it is favorable to proceed in a scenario with conventional EFT couplings and sophisticated renormalization in order to have large NN scattering lengths. The informative utilities of fine tuning are demonstrated in several examples and naturally interpreted in the underlying theory perspective. In addition, some of the approaches adopted in the recent literature are also addressed in the light of EFT scenario. -- Highlights: •Closed-form unitary T matrices for NN scattering are obtained in EFT(⁄π). •Nonperturbative properties inherent in such closed-form T matrices are explored. •Nonperturbative renormalization is implemented through exploiting these properties. •Unconventional power counting of couplings is shown to be less favored by PSA data. •The ideas about nonperturbative renormalization here might have wider applications.

  10. DESIGN OF A 250 MeV, X-BAND PHOTOINJECTOR LINAC FOR A PRECISION COMPTON-SCATTERING BASED GAMMA-RAY SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S G; Albert, F; Gibson, D J; McNabb, D; Messerly, M; Rusnak, B; Shverdin, M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C J; Tantawi, S; Vlieks, A

    2009-05-07

    We present a compact, X-band, high-brightness accelerator design suitable for driving a precision gamma-ray source. Future applications of gamma-rays generated by Compton-scattering of laser and relativistic electron beams place stringent demands on the brightness and stability of the incident electron beam. This design identifies the beam parameters required for gamma-ray production, including position, and pointing stability. The design uses an emittance compensated, 11.4 GHz photo-gun and linac to generate 400 pC, 1-2 mm-mrad electron bunches at up to 250 MeV and 120 Hz repetition rate. The effects of jitter in the RF power system are analyzed as well as structure and optic misalignments. Finally, strategies for the mitigation of on-axis Bremsstrahlung noise are discussed.

  11. In-line phase-contrast imaging of a biological specimen using a compact laser-Compton scattering-based x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeura-Sekiguchi, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yasumoto, M.; Toyokawa, H.; Koike, M.; Yamada, K.; Sakai, F.; Mori, K.; Maruyama, K.; Oka, H.; Kimata, T.

    2008-03-31

    Laser-Compton scattering (LCS) x-ray sources have recently attracted much attention for their potential use at local medical facilities because they can produce ultrashort pulsed, high-brilliance, and quasimonochromatic hard x rays with a small source size. The feasibility of in-line phase-contrast imaging for a 'thick' biological specimens of rat lumbar vertebrae using the developed compact LCS-X in AIST was investigated for the promotion of clinical imaging. In the higher-quality images, anatomical details of the spinous processes of the vertebrae are more clearly observable than with conventional absorption radiography. The results demonstrate that phase-contrast radiography can be performed using LCS-X.

  12. Virtual Compton Scattering and the Generalized Polarizabilities of the Proton at Q^2=0.92 and 1.76 GeV^2

    SciTech Connect

    Helene Fonvieille, Geraud Laveissiere, Natalie Degrande, Stephanie Jaminion, Christophe Jutier, Luminita Todor, L. Van Hoorebeke, Bryon Anderson, Konrad Aniol, Kathleen Arundell, Gerard Audit, Leonard Auerbach, F. Baker, Maud Baylac, J. Berthot, Pierre Bertin, William Bertozzi, Louis Bimbot, Werner Boeglin, Edward Brash, Vincent Breton, Herbert Breuer, Etienne Burtin, John Calarco, Lawrence Cardman, Christian Cavata, Jian-Ping Chen, Eugene Chudakov, Evaristo Cisbani, Daniel Dale, Cornelis De Jager, Raffaele De Leo, Alexandre Deur, Nicole D'Hose, Gail Dodge, John Domingo, Latifa Elouadrhiri, Martin Epstein, Lars Ewell, John Finn, Kevin Fissum, Guy Fournier, Bernhard Frois, Salvatore Frullani, Christophe Furget, Haiyan Gao, Juncai Gao, Franco Garibaldi, Ashot Gasparian, Shalev Gilad, Ronald Gilman, Oleksandr Glamazdin, Charles Glashausser, Javier Gomez, Viktor Gorbenko, Pierre Guichon, Jens-Ole Hansen, Richard Holmes, Maurik Holtrop, Calvin Howell, Garth Huber, Charles Hyde, Sebastien Incerti, Mauro Iodice, Johann Jardillier, Mark Jones, Seigo Kato, James Kelly, Armen Ketikyan, Mohammad Khayat, Kouichi Kino, Serge Kox, Laird Kramer, Krishna Kumar, Gerfried Kumbartzki, Michael Kuss, Antonio Leone, John LeRose, Richard Lindgren, Nilanga Liyanage, George Lolos, Kazushige Maeda, Sergey Malov, D. Manley, Claude Marchand, Dominique Marchand, Demetrius Margaziotis, Pete Markowitz, Jacques Marroncle, Jacques Martino, Kathy McCormick, James McIntyre, Surik Mehrabyan, Fernand Merchez, Zein-Eddine Meziani, Robert Michaels, Jean Mougey, Sirish Nanda, Amra Offermann, Zisis Papandreou, Charles Perdrisat, R. Perrino, Gerassimos Petratos, Stephane Platchkov, Roman Pomatsalyuk, David Prout, Vina Punjabi, Thierry Pussieux, Gilles Quemener, Ronald Ransome, Oliver Ravel, Jean-Sebastien Real, Yves Roblin, David Rowntree, Gary Rutledge, Paul Rutt, Arunava Saha, Teijiro Saito, Adam Sarty, Tim Smith, Paul Souder, Riad Suleiman, Jeffrey Templon, Tatsuo Terasawa, Raphael Tieulent, Egle Tomasi, Hiroaki Tsubota, Hiroaki Ueno, Paul Ulmer, Guido Urciuoli, Marc Vanderhaeghen, Rob van der Meer, R.Van De Vyver, Pascal Vernin, Branislav Vlahovic, Hakob Voskanyan, Eric Voutier, John Watson, Lawrence Weinstein, Krishni Wijesooriya, Richard Wilson, Bogdan Wojtsekhowski, Dan Zainea, Zilu Zhou, Rachele Di Salvo

    2012-07-01

    Virtual Compton Scattering (VCS) on the proton has been studied at Jefferson Lab using the exclusive photon electroproduction reaction (e p --> e p gamma). This paper gives a detailed account of the analysis which has led to the determination of the structure functions P{sub LL}-P{sub TT}/epsilon and P{sub LT}, and the electric and magnetic generalized polarizabilities (GPs) alpha{sub E}(Q{sup 2}) and beta{sub M}(Q{sup 2}) at values of the four-momentum transfer squared Q{sup 2} = 0.92 and 1.76 GeV{sup 2}. These data, together with the results of VCS experiments at lower momenta, help building a coherent picture of the electric and magnetic GPs of the proton over the full measured Q{sup 2}-range, and point to their non-trivial behavior.

  13. Measurement of the Generalized Polarizabilities of the Proton in Virtual Compton Scattering at Q2= 0.92 and 1.76 GeV2

    SciTech Connect

    Geraud Laveissiere; Natalie Degrande; Stephanie Jaminion; Christophe Jutier; Luminita Todor; Rachele Di Salvo; L. Van Hoorebeke; Et. Al.

    2004-09-01

    We report a Virtual Compton Scattering study of the proton at low CM energies. We have determined the structure functions P{sub LL} - P{sub TT}/{epsilon} and P{sub LT}, and the electric and magnetic Generalized Polarizabilities (GPs) {alpha}{sub E}(Q{sup 2}) and {beta}{sub M}(Q{sup 2}) at momentum transfer Q{sup 2} = 0.92 and 1.76 GeV{sup 2}. The electric GP shows a strong fall-off with Q{sup 2}, and its global behavior does not follow a simple dipole form. The magnetic GP shows a rise and then a fall-off; this can be interpreted as the dominance of a long-distance diamagnetic pion cloud at low Q{sup 2}, compensated at higher Q{sup 2} by a paramagnetic contribution from {pi}N intermediate states.

  14. Poster — Thur Eve — 01: The effect of the number of projections on MTF and CNR in Compton scatter tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chighvinadze, T; Pistorius, S

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To investigate the dependence of the reconstructed image quality on the number of projections in multi-projection Compton scatter tomography (MPCST). The conventional relationship between the projection number used for reconstruction and reconstructed image quality pertained to CT does not necessarily apply to MPCST, which can produce images from a single projection if the detectors have sufficiently high energy and spatial resolution. Methods: The electron density image was obtained using filtered-backprojection of the scatter signal over circular arcs formed using Compton equation. The behavior of the reconstructed image quality as a function of the projection number was evaluated through analytical simulations and characterized by CNR and MTF. Results: The increase of the projection number improves the contrast with this dependence being a function of fluence. The number of projections required to approach the asymptotic maximum contrast decreases as the fluence increases. Increasing projection number increases the CNR but not spatial resolution. Conclusions: For MPCST using a 500eV energy resolution and a 2×2mm{sup 2} size detector, an adequate image quality can be obtained with a small number of projections provided the incident fluence is high enough. This is conceptually different from conventional CT where a minimum number of projections is required to obtain an adequate image quality. While increasing projection number, even for the lowest dose value, the CNR increases even though the number of photons per projection decreases. The spatial resolution of the image is improved by increasing the sampling within a projection rather than by increasing the number of projections.

  15. Fast and Broadband Signal Integrity Analysis of Multiple Vias in Heterogeneous 3D IC and Die-Level Packaging by Using Generalized Foldy-Lax Scattering Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Xin

    This dissertation proposal is concerned with the use of fast and broadband full-wave electromagnetic methods for modeling high speed interconnects (e.g, vertical vias and horizontal traces) and passive components (e.g, decoupling capacitors) for structures of PCB and packages, in 3D IC, Die-level packaging and SIW based devices, to effectively modeling the designs signal integrity (SI) and power integrity (PI) aspects. The main contributions finished in this thesis is to create a novel methodology, which hybridizes the Foldy-Lax multiple scattering equations based fast full wave method, method of moment (MoM) based 1D technology, modes decoupling based geometry decomposition and cavity modes expansions, to model and simulate the electromagnetic scattering effects for the irregular power/ground planes, multiple vias and traces, for fast and accurate analysis of link level simulation on multilayer electronic structures. For the modeling details, the interior massively-coupled multiple vias problem is modeled most-analytically by using the Foldy-Lax multiple scattering equations. The dyadic Green's functions of the magnetic field are expressed in terms of waveguide modes in the vertical direction and vector cylindrical wave expansions or cavity modes expansions in the horizontal direction, combined with 2D MoM realized by 1D technology. For the incident field of the case of vias in the arbitrarily shaped antipad in finite large cavity/waveguide, the exciting and scattering field coefficients are calculated based on the transformation which converts surface integration of magnetic surface currents in antipad into 1D line integration of surface charges on the vias and on the ground plane. Geometry decomposition method is applied to model and integrate both the vertical and horizontal interconnects/traces in arbitrarily shaped power/ground planes. Moreover, a new form of multiple scattering equations is derived for solving coupling effects among mixed metallic

  16. Single and double spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering measured with CLAS and a longitudinally polarized proton target

    SciTech Connect

    Pisano, S.; Biselli, A.; Niccolai, S.; Seder, E.; Guidal, M.; Mirazita, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, B.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carlin, C.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crabb, D. G.; Crede, V.; D' Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garcon, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacCormick, M.; MacGregor, Ian J. D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Meyer, C. A.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moody, C. I.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J. J.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatie, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Skorodumina, I.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Turisini, M.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2015-03-19

    Single-beam, single-target, and double-spin asymmetries for hard exclusive photon production on the proton e→p→e'p'γ are presented. The data were taken at Jefferson Lab using the CLAS detector and a longitudinally polarized 14NH3 target. The three asymmetries were measured in 165 4-dimensional kinematic bins, covering the widest kinematic range ever explored simultaneously for beam and target-polarization observables in the valence quark region. The kinematic dependences of the obtained asymmetries are discussed and compared to the predictions of models of Generalized Parton Distributions. As a result, the measurement of three DVCS spin observables at the same kinematic points allows a quasi-model-independent extraction of the imaginary parts of the H and H~ Compton Form Factors, which give insight into the electric and axial charge distributions of valence quarks in the proton.

  17. Compton imager based on a single planar segmented HPGe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaplanov, A.; Pettersson, J.; Cederwall, B.

    2007-10-01

    A collimator-free Compton imaging system has been developed based on a single high-purity germanium detector and used to generate images of radioactive sources emitting γ rays. The detector has a planar crystal with one pixellated contact with a total of 25 segments. Pulse shape analysis has been applied to achieve a 3D-position sensitivity of the detector. The first imaging results from this detector are presented, based on the reconstruction of events where a γ ray is fully absorbed after scattering between adjacent segments.

  18. SU-F-18C-05: Characterization of a Silicon Strip Photon-Counting Detector in the Presence of Compton Scatter: A Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemer, B; Ding, H; Cho, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of Compton scatter on detection efficiency and charge-sharing for a Si strip photon-counting detector as a function of pixel pitch, slice thickness and total pixel length. Methods: A CT imaging system employing a silicon photon-counting detector was implemented using the GATE Monte Carlo package. A focal spot size of 300 µm, magnification of 1.33, and pixel pitches of 0.1 and 0.5mm were initially investigated. A 60 kVp spectrum with 3 mm Al filter was used and energy spectral degradation based on a prototype detector was simulated. To study charge-sharing, a single pixel was illuminated, and the detector response in neighboring pixels was investigated. A longitudinally semiinfinite detector was simulated to optimize the quantum detection efficiency of the imaging system as a function of pixel pitch, slice thickness and depth of interaction. A 2.5 mm thick tungsten plate with a 0.01 mm by 1.5 mm slit was implemented to calculate the modulation transfer function (MTF) from projection-based images. A threshold of 15 keV was implemented in the detector simulation. The preliminary charge sharing investigation results considered only scattering effects and the detector electronics related factors were neglected. Results: Using a 15 keV threshold, 1% of the pixel charge migrated into neighboring pixels with a pixel size of 0.1×0.1 mm{sup 2}. The quantum detection efficiency was 77%, 84%, 87% and 89% for 15 mm, 22.5 mm, 30 mm, and 45 mm length silicon detector pixels, respectively. For a pixel pitch of 0.1 mm, the spatial frequency at 10% of the maximum MTF was found to be 5.2 lp/mm. This agreed with an experimental MTF measurement of 5.3 lp/mm with a similar detector configuration. Conclusion: Using optimized design parameters, Si strip photon-counting detectors can offer high detection efficiency and spatial resolution even in the presence of Compton scatter.

  19. Measurements of the Electron-Helicity Dependent Cross Sections of Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering with CEBAF at 12 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    J. Roche; C. E. Hyde-Wright; B. Michel; C. Munoz Camacho; et al.

    2006-09-11

    We propose precision measurements of the helicity-dependent and helicity independent cross sections for the ep {yields} ep{gamma} reaction in Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) kinematics. DVCS scaling is obtained in the limits Q{sup 2} >> {Lambda}{sub QCD}{sup 2}, x{sub Bj} fixed, and -{Delta}{sup 2} = -(q-q{prime}){sup 2} << Q{sup 2}. We consider the specific kinematic range Q{sup 2} > 2 GeV{sup 2}, W > 2 GeV, and -{Delta}{sup 2} {le} 1 GeV{sup 2}. We will use our successful technique from the 5.75 GeV Hall A DVCS experiment (E00-110). With polarized 6.6, 8.8, and 11 GeV beams incident on the liquid hydrogen target, we will detect the scattered electron in the Hall A HRS-L spectrometer (maximum central momentum 4.3 GeV/c) and the emitted photon in a slightly expanded PbF{sub 2} calorimeter. In general, we will not detect the recoil proton. The H(e,e{prime}{gamma})X missing mass resolution is sufficient to isolate the exclusive channel with 3% systematic precision.

  20. Refinement of the Compton-Rayleigh scatter ratio method for use on the Mars Science Laboratory alpha particle X-ray spectrometer: II - Extraction of invisible element content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrett, Glynis M.; Campbell, John L.; Gellert, Ralf; King, Penelope L.; Nield, Emily; O'Meara, Joanne M.; Pradler, Irina

    2016-02-01

    The intensity ratio C/R between Compton and Rayleigh scatter peaks of the exciting Pu L X-rays in the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) is strongly affected by the presence of very light elements such as oxygen which cannot be detected directly by the APXS. C/R values are determined along with element concentrations by fitting APXS spectra of geochemical reference materials (GRMs) with the GUAPX code. A quantity K is defined as the ratio between the C/R value determined by Monte Carlo simulation based on the measured element concentrations and the fitted C/R value from the spectrum. To ensure optimally accurate K values, the choice of appropriate GRMs is explored in detail, with attention paid to Rb and Sr, whose characteristic Kα X-ray peaks overlap the Pu Lα scatter peaks. The resulting relationship between the ratio K and the overall oxygen fraction is linear. This provides a calibration from which the concentration of additional light invisible constituents (ALICs) such as water may be estimated in unknown rock and conglomerate samples. Several GRMs are used as 'unknowns' in order to evaluate the accuracy of ALIC concentrations derived in this manner.

  1. Investigation of 3D silvernanodendrite@glass as surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate for the detection of Sildenafil and GSH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Meng; Gu, Huaimin; Yuan, Xiaojuan; Gao, Junxiang; Cai, Tiantian

    2012-12-01

    A solid-phase dendritic Ag nanostructure was synthesized in the presence of silk fibroin biomacromolecule and planted on the glass to form three-dimensional (3D) silvernanodendrite@glass film. When NO3-, Cl- and SO42- were added in the synthesis process of the film to study their influence on the Raman activity of this substrate using MB as probe molecule, it's found that the substrate with Cl-1 gives the most intensive enhancement, and two ways were proposed to explain this phenomenon. Its superiority in practical application of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was verified by analyzing the characteristic Raman spectrum of Sildenafil between 1150 cm-1 and 1699 cm-1. Besides, the absorption mechanism of GSH on the film through the role of peptide bond was analyzed. GSH interacts strongly with the silver surface via the ν(Csbnd S) in two different conformers. The carboxyl and the amide groups are also involved in the adsorption process. In this experiment, we synthesized, studied and applied this as-growth substrate and found some information about its interaction with different molecular bonds and functional groups of peptide.

  2. Synthesis-atomic structure-properties relationships in metallic nanoparticles by total scattering experiments and 3D computer simulations: case of Pt-Ru nanoalloy catalysts.

    PubMed

    Prasai, Binay; Ren, Yang; Shan, Shiyao; Zhao, Yinguang; Cronk, Hannah; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian; Petkov, Valeri

    2015-05-01

    An approach to determining the 3D atomic structure of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) in fine detail and using the unique knowledge obtained for rationalizing their synthesis and properties targeted for optimization is described and exemplified on Pt-Ru alloy NPs of importance to the development of devices for clean energy conversion such as fuel cells. In particular, PtxRu100-x alloy NPs, where x = 31, 49 and 75, are synthesized by wet chemistry and activated catalytically by a post-synthesis treatment involving heating under controlled N2-H2 atmosphere. So-activated NPs are evaluated as catalysts for gas-phase CO oxidation and ethanol electro-oxidation reactions taking place in fuel cells. Both as-synthesized and activated NPs are characterized structurally by total scattering experiments involving high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs) analysis. 3D structure models both for as-synthesized and activated NPs are built by molecular dynamics simulations based on the archetypal for current theoretical modelling Sutton-Chen method. Models are refined against the experimental PDF data by reverse Monte Carlo simulations and analysed in terms of prime structural characteristics such as metal-to-metal bond lengths, bond angles and first coordination numbers for Pt and Ru atoms. Analysis indicates that, though of a similar type, the atomic structure of as-synthesized and respective activated NPs differ in several details of importance to NP catalytic properties. Structural characteristics of activated NPs and data for their catalytic activity are compared side by side and strong evidence found that electronic effects, indicated by significant changes in Pt-Pt and Ru-Ru metal bond lengths at NP surface, and practically unrecognized so far atomic ensemble effects, indicated by distinct stacking of atomic layers near NP surface and prevalence of particular configurations of Pt and Ru atoms in these layers, contribute to the

  3. Improvements to a Compton Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavness, Brandon; Gaskell, Dave; Dalton, Mark

    2011-10-01

    The Jefferson Lab in Newport News, Virginia, uses a polarized beam of electrons to perform research on the substructure of nuclei and nucleons. Jefferson Lab uses a relatively new Compton polarimeter to continuously measure the polarization of the electron beam delivered by the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) accelerator. The Compton polarimeter determines beam polarization by colliding a high-power laser with the electron beam and measuring the scattered photons and electrons. The Compton polarimeter utilizes this asymmetry of Compton scattering rates to measure polarization to (+/-)1% every few hours. For an accurate measurement, the laser polarization and the position of the scattered photon cone must be well known. The focus of this project was to expand the instrumentation to monitor and control the Compton polarimeter with the intent of improving the electron beam polarization measurement. The individual components of the system are all working as intended, but the system as a whole will not be tested until beam operations resume. An improved measurement of the electron beam polarization will reduce the uncertainty of future experiments.

  4. Dual parametrization of the proton generalized parton distribution functions H and E, and description of the deeply virtual Compton scattering cross sections and asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Guzey, V.; Teckentrup, T.

    2006-09-01

    We develop the minimal model of a new leading order parametrization of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) introduced by Polyakov and Shuvaev. The model for GPDs H and E is formulated in terms of the forward quark distributions, the Gegenbauer moments of the D-term, and the forward limit of the GPD E. The model is designed primarily for small and medium-size values of x{sub B}, x{sub B}{<=}0.2. We examine two different models of the t dependence of the GPDs: the factorized exponential model and the nonfactorized Regge-motivated model. Using our model, we successfully described the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) cross section measured by H1 and ZEUS, the moments of the beam-spin A{sub LU}{sup sin{phi}}, the beam-charge A{sub C}{sup cos{phi}}, and the transversely polarized target A{sub UT}{sup sin{phi}}{sup cos{phi}} DVCS asymmetries measured by HERMES and A{sub LU}{sup sin{phi}} measured by CLAS. The data on A{sub C}{sup cos{phi}} prefer the Regge-motivated model of the t dependence of the GPDs. The data on A{sub UT}{sup sin{phi}}{sup cos{phi}} indicate that the u and d quarks carry only a small fraction of the proton total angular momentum.

  5. A new transportable instrument for in-situ void and corrosion imaging in thick structural sections by three dimensional Compton scatter imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridge, B.

    2000-05-01

    When X Gamma or other kinds of subatomic particle radiation are being used for NDE, measurements are almost always made on the primary beam after transmission through the object under test. Cases are described where better results, i.e., image quality or cost effectiveness can be obtained from measurements on scattered radiation rather than the primary beam. Compton imaging of high volume resolution in thick structures has previously been achieved only by fixed laboratory installations involving massive primary beam shields (collimators) between source and detectors. Here the design of a relatively portable collimator (98 kg mass) for a cobalt 60 source is given. It permits three dimensional material density imaging, with voxel (3-dimensional pixel) volumes small enough to permit the detection of voids down to 10 cubic mm in up to 30 mm thickness of steel or 250 mm of wood (for example, a 500 mm diameter tree trunk). Using a 370 GBq source, typical results of thickness measurements to a precision of 1 mm over cross sections down to 10 square mm are presented. The collimator mass is reducible to about 68 kg with the use of depleted uranium instead of lead. The means of deploying such a collimator in a mobile way are discussed. A typical in-situ application is the detection of inner wall corrosion and flooding of tubular members of underwater offshore oil platforms and ship hulls without the need to remove hard marine growth. Another case is the detection of telegraph pole and tree rot below ground level.

  6. Compton scattering in jets: A mechanism for approximately 0.4 and less than or approximately 0.2 MeV line production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skibo, J. G.; Dermer, C. D.; Ramaty, R.

    1994-01-01

    We show that gamma-ray line emission at approximately 0.4 and less than or approximately 0.2 MeV can be produced by Compton scattering of beamed radiation in the jets of Galactic black hole candidates. This mechanism has the novel feature of not invoking the presence of e(exp +)-e(exp -) pairs. To produce the two lines, we employ a symmetric double-sided jet with bulk flow velocity of about 0.5c and incident beam radiation with a hard energy spectrum. We show that the two lines can be seen at viewing-angle cosines relative to the jet ranging from 0.2 to 0.6. This comprises 40% of the total solid angle. In addition, the line radiation is approximately 10% polarized. Depending on the bulk flow and viewing angle, the model can produce lines at other energies as well. In particular, a broad feature near 1 MeV can be seen by viewing the jet close to its axis. Our model can also accommodate single-line spectra if the beamed gamma-ray emission or the jets themselves are asymmetric.

  7. E00-110 experiment at Jefferson Lab Hall A: Deeply virtual Compton scattering off the proton at 6 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defurne, M.; Amaryan, M.; Aniol, K. A.; Beaumel, M.; Benaoum, H.; Bertin, P.; Brossard, M.; Camsonne, A.; Chen, J.-P.; Chudakov, E.; Craver, B.; Cusanno, F.; de Jager, C. W.; Deur, A.; Feuerbach, R.; Ferdi, C.; Fieschi, J.-M.; Frullani, S.; Fuchey, E.; Garçon, M.; Garibaldi, F.; Gayou, O.; Gavalian, G.; Gilman, R.; Gomez, J.; Gueye, P.; Guichon, P. A. M.; Guillon, B.; Hansen, O.; Hayes, D.; Higinbotham, D.; Holmstrom, T.; Hyde, C. E.; Ibrahim, H.; Igarashi, R.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Kaufman, L. J.; Kelleher, A.; Keppel, C.; Kolarkar, A.; Kuchina, E.; Kumbartzki, G.; Laveissière, G.; LeRose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Lu, H.-J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Mazouz, M.; Meziani, Z.-E.; McCormick, K.; Michaels, R.; Michel, B.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Muñoz Camacho, C.; Nanda, S.; Nelyubin, V.; Paremuzyan, R.; Potokar, M.; Qiang, Y.; Ransome, R. D.; Réal, J.-S.; Reitz, B.; Roblin, Y.; Roche, J.; Sabatié, F.; Saha, A.; Sirca, S.; Slifer, K.; Solvignon, P.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Ulmer, P. E.; Voutier, E.; Wang, K.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.; Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We present final results on the photon electroproduction (e ⃗p →e p γ ) cross section in the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) regime and the valence quark region from Jefferson Lab experiment E00-110. Results from an analysis of a subset of these data were published before, but the analysis has been improved, which is described here at length, together with details on the experimental setup. Furthermore, additional data have been analyzed, resulting in photon electroproduction cross sections at new kinematic settings for a total of 588 experimental bins. Results of the Q2 and xB dependencies of both the helicity-dependent and the helicity-independent cross sections are discussed. The Q2 dependence illustrates the dominance of the twist-2 handbag amplitude in the kinematics of the experiment, as previously noted. Thanks to the excellent accuracy of this high-luminosity experiment, it becomes clear that the unpolarized cross section shows a significant deviation from the Bethe-Heitler process in our kinematics, compatible with a large contribution from the leading twist-2 DVCS2 term to the photon electroproduction cross section. The necessity to include higher-twist corrections to fully reproduce the shape of the data is also discussed. The DVCS cross sections in this paper represent the final set of experimental results from E00-110, superseding the previous publication.

  8. E00-110 experiment at Jefferson Lab Hall A: Deeply virtual Compton scattering off the proton at 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Defurne, M.; Amaryan, M.; Aniol, K. A.; Beaumel, M.; Benaoum, H.; Bertin, P.; Brossard, M.; Camsonne, A.; Chen, J. -P.; Chudakov, E.; Craver, B.; Cusanno, F.; de Jager, C. W.; Deur, A.; Feuerbach, R.; Ferdi, C.; Fieschi, J. -M.; Frullani, S.; Fuchey, E.; Garçon, M.; Garibaldi, F.; Gayou, O.; Gavalian, G.; Gilman, R.; Gomez, J.; Gueye, P.; Guichon, P. A. M.; Guillon, B.; Hansen, O.; Hayes, D.; Higinbotham, D.; Holmstrom, T.; Hyde, C. E.; Ibrahim, H.; Igarashi, R.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Kaufman, L. J.; Kelleher, A.; Keppel, C.; Kolarkar, A.; Kuchina, E.; Kumbartzki, G.; Laveissière, G.; LeRose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Lu, H. -J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Mazouz, M.; Meziani, Z. -E.; McCormick, K.; Michaels, R.; Michel, B.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Muñoz Camacho, C.; Nanda, S.; Nelyubin, V.; Paremuzyan, R.; Potokar, M.; Qiang, Y.; Ransome, R. D.; Réal, J. -S.; Reitz, B.; Roblin, Y.; Roche, J.; Sabatié, F.; Saha, A.; Sirca, S.; Slifer, K.; Solvignon, P.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Ulmer, P. E.; Voutier, E.; Wang, K.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.

    2015-11-03

    We present final results on the photon electroproduction ($\\vec{e}p\\rightarrow ep\\gamma$) cross section in the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) regime and the valence quark region from Jefferson Lab experiment E00-110. Results from an analysis of a subset of these data were published before, but the analysis has been improved which is described here at length, together with details on the experimental setup. Furthermore, additional data have been analyzed resulting in photon electroproduction cross sections at new kinematic settings, for a total of 588 experimental bins. Results of the $Q^2$- and $x_B$-dependences of both the helicity-dependent and helicity-independent cross sections are discussed. The $Q^2$-dependence illustrates the dominance of the twist-2 handbag amplitude in the kinematics of the experiment, as previously noted. Thanks to the excellent accuracy of this high luminosity experiment, it becomes clear that the unpolarized cross section shows a significant deviation from the Bethe-Heitler process in our kinematics, compatible with a large contribution from the leading twist-2 DVCS$^2$ term to the photon electroproduction cross section. The necessity to include higher-twist corrections in order to fully reproduce the shape of the data is also discussed. The DVCS cross sections in this study represent the final set of experimental results from E00-110, superseding the previous publication.

  9. E00-110 experiment at Jefferson Lab Hall A: Deeply virtual Compton scattering off the proton at 6 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Defurne, M.; Amaryan, M.; Aniol, K. A.; Beaumel, M.; Benaoum, H.; Bertin, P.; Brossard, M.; Camsonne, A.; Chen, J. -P.; Chudakov, E.; et al

    2015-11-03

    We present final results on the photon electroproduction (more » $$\\vec{e}p\\rightarrow ep\\gamma$$) cross section in the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) regime and the valence quark region from Jefferson Lab experiment E00-110. Results from an analysis of a subset of these data were published before, but the analysis has been improved which is described here at length, together with details on the experimental setup. Furthermore, additional data have been analyzed resulting in photon electroproduction cross sections at new kinematic settings, for a total of 588 experimental bins. Results of the $Q^2$- and $x_B$-dependences of both the helicity-dependent and helicity-independent cross sections are discussed. The $Q^2$-dependence illustrates the dominance of the twist-2 handbag amplitude in the kinematics of the experiment, as previously noted. Thanks to the excellent accuracy of this high luminosity experiment, it becomes clear that the unpolarized cross section shows a significant deviation from the Bethe-Heitler process in our kinematics, compatible with a large contribution from the leading twist-2 DVCS$^2$ term to the photon electroproduction cross section. The necessity to include higher-twist corrections in order to fully reproduce the shape of the data is also discussed. The DVCS cross sections in this study represent the final set of experimental results from E00-110, superseding the previous publication.« less

  10. Synthesis-atomic structure-properties relationships in metallic nanoparticles by total scattering experiments and 3D computer simulations: case of Pt-Ru nanoalloy catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasai, Binay; Ren, Yang; Shan, Shiyao; Zhao, Yinguang; Cronk, Hannah; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian; Petkov, Valeri

    2015-04-01

    An approach to determining the 3D atomic structure of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) in fine detail and using the unique knowledge obtained for rationalizing their synthesis and properties targeted for optimization is described and exemplified on Pt-Ru alloy NPs of importance to the development of devices for clean energy conversion such as fuel cells. In particular, PtxRu100-x alloy NPs, where x = 31, 49 and 75, are synthesized by wet chemistry and activated catalytically by a post-synthesis treatment involving heating under controlled N2-H2 atmosphere. So-activated NPs are evaluated as catalysts for gas-phase CO oxidation and ethanol electro-oxidation reactions taking place in fuel cells. Both as-synthesized and activated NPs are characterized structurally by total scattering experiments involving high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs) analysis. 3D structure models both for as-synthesized and activated NPs are built by molecular dynamics simulations based on the archetypal for current theoretical modelling Sutton-Chen method. Models are refined against the experimental PDF data by reverse Monte Carlo simulations and analysed in terms of prime structural characteristics such as metal-to-metal bond lengths, bond angles and first coordination numbers for Pt and Ru atoms. Analysis indicates that, though of a similar type, the atomic structure of as-synthesized and respective activated NPs differ in several details of importance to NP catalytic properties. Structural characteristics of activated NPs and data for their catalytic activity are compared side by side and strong evidence found that electronic effects, indicated by significant changes in Pt-Pt and Ru-Ru metal bond lengths at NP surface, and practically unrecognized so far atomic ensemble effects, indicated by distinct stacking of atomic layers near NP surface and prevalence of particular configurations of Pt and Ru atoms in these layers, contribute to the

  11. 3D Structure of Sulfolobus solfataricus Carboxypeptidase Developed by Molecular Modeling is Confirmed by Site-Directed Mutagenesis and Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Occhipinti, Emanuela; Martelli, Pier Luigi; Spinozzi, Francesco; Corsi, Federica; Formantici, Cristina; Molteni, Laura; Amenitsch, Heintz; Mariani, Paolo; Tortora, Paolo; Casadio, Rita

    2003-01-01

    Sulfolobus solfataricus carboxypeptidase (CPSso) is a thermostable zinc-metalloenzyme with a Mr of 43,000. Taking into account the experimentally determined zinc content of one ion per subunit, we developed two alternative 3D models, starting from the available structures of Thermoactinomyces vulgaris carboxypeptidase (Model A) and Pseudomonas carboxypeptidase G2 (Model B). The former enzyme is monomeric and has one metal ion in the active site, while the latter is dimeric and has two bound zinc ions. The two models were computed by exploiting the structural alignment of the one zinc- with the two zinc-containing active sites of the two templates, and with a threading procedure. Both computed structures resembled the respective template, with only one bound zinc with tetrahedric coordination in the active site. With these models, two different quaternary structures can be modeled: one using Model A with a hexameric symmetry, the other from Model B with a tetrameric symmetry. Mutagenesis experiments directed toward the residues putatively involved in metal chelation in either of the models disproved Model A and supported Model B, in which the metal-binding site comprises His108, Asp109, and His168. We also identified Glu142 as the acidic residue interacting with the water molecule occupying the fourth chelation site. Furthermore, the overall fold and the oligomeric structure of the molecule was validated by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). An ab initio original approach was used to reconstruct the shape of the CPSso in solution from the experimental curves. The results clearly support a tetrameric structure. The Monte Carlo method was then used to compare the crystallographic coordinates of the possible quaternary structures for CPSso with the SAXS profiles. The fitting procedure showed that only the model built using the Pseudomonas carboxypeptidase G2 structure as a template fitted the experimental data. PMID:12885660

  12. The Spring 2016 Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) Run (E12-06-114) in Hall A of TJNAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlamini, Mongi

    2016-03-01

    The DVCS experiment in Hall A of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility will provide high precision data necessary to map out the 3D structure of the nucleon in the Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD) framework. GPDs are a new class of light-cone matrix elements which encode the transverse momentum and spatial distribution of partons as a function of the longitudinal momentum of the nucleon. DVCS off the nucleon (γ*N --> γN) is the cleanest process that can access GPDs. The Hall A DVCS experiment is set to run in the Spring of 2016 using a polarized electron beam with energy ranging from 8 to 11 GeV, allowing an extended kinematic range coverage. This experiment will measure both polarized and unpolarized cross sections of the H(e,e' γ)p and H(e,e'π0)p reactions and hence probe proton GPDs. The run will complete Q2 scans at xBj ranging from 0.36 to 0.60. The Q2-dependent cross sections allow the separation of the leading-twist GPD amplitude from the higher-twist scaling-violating terms. In this talk, the status of the experiment will be presented. JLab HAll A DVCS Collaboration, JLab Hall A Collaboration.

  13. Autofocus for 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Elkin, Forest

    2008-04-01

    Three dimensional (3D) autofocus remains a significant challenge for the development of practical 3D multipass radar imaging. The current 2D radar autofocus methods are not readily extendable across sensor passes. We propose a general framework that allows a class of data adaptive solutions for 3D auto-focus across passes with minimal constraints on the scene contents. The key enabling assumption is that portions of the scene are sparse in elevation which reduces the number of free variables and results in a system that is simultaneously solved for scatterer heights and autofocus parameters. The proposed method extends 2-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) methods to an arbitrary number of passes allowing the consideration of scattering from multiple height locations. A specific case from the proposed autofocus framework is solved and demonstrates autofocus and coherent multipass 3D estimation across the 8 passes of the "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set" X-Band radar data.

  14. Crystal Compton Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Braverman, Joshua B.; Harrison, Mark J.; Hornback, Donald Eric; Fabris, Lorenzo; Newby, Jason

    2013-09-26

    Stand-off detection is one of the most important radiation detection capabilities for arms control and the control of illicit nuclear materials. For long range passive detection one requires a large detector and a means of “seeing through” the naturally occurring and varying background radiation, i.e. imaging. Arguably, Compton imaging is the best approach over much of the emission band suitable for long range detection. It provides not only imaging, but more information about the direction of incidence of each detected gamma-ray than the alternate approach of coded-aperture imaging. The directional information allows one to reduce the background and hence improve the sensitivity of a measurement. However, to make an efficient Compton imager requires localizing and measuring the simultaneous energy depositions when gamma-rays Compton scatter and are subsequently captured within a single, large detector volume. This concept has been demonstrated in semi-conductor detectors (HPGe, CZT, Si) but at ~ $1k/cm3 these materials are too expensive to build the large systems needed for standoff detection. Scintillator detectors, such as NaI(Tl), are two orders of magnitude less expensive and possess the energy resolution required to make such an imager. However, they do not currently have the ability to localize closely spaced, simultaneous energy depositions in a single large crystal. In this project we are applying a new technique that should, for the first time ever, allow cubic-millimeter event localization in a bulk scintillator crystal.

  15. Experimental magnetic form factors in Co3V2O8 : A combined study of ab initio calculations, magnetic Compton scattering, and polarized neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, N.; Zbiri, M.; Rodríguez-Carvajal, J.; Stunault, A.; Ressouche, E.; Hansen, T. C.; Fernández-Díaz, M. T.; Johnson, M. R.; Fuess, H.; Ehrenberg, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Itou, M.; Gillon, B.; Wolf, Th.; Rodríguez-Velamazan, J. A.; Sánchez-Montero, J.

    2009-03-01

    We present a combination of ab initio calculations, magnetic Compton scattering, and polarized neutron experiments, which elucidate the density distribution of unpaired electrons in the kagome staircase system Co3V2O8 . Ab initio wave functions were used to calculate the spin densities in real and momentum spaces, which show good agreement with the respective experiments. It has been found that the spin polarized orbitals are equally distributed between the t2g and the eg levels for the spine (s) Co ions while the eg orbitals of the cross-tie (c) Co ions only represent 30% of the atomic spin density. Furthermore, the results reveal that the magnetic moments of the cross-tie Co ions, which are significantly smaller than those of the spine Co ions in the zero-field ferromagnetic structure, do not saturate by applying an external magnetic field of 2 T along the easy axis a . In turn, the increasing bulk magnetization, which can be observed by field dependent macroscopic measurements, originates from induced magnetic moments on the O and V sites. The refined individual magnetic moments are μ(Coc)=1.54(4)μB , μ(Cos)=2.87(3)μB , μ(V)=0.41(4)μB , μ(O1)=0.05(5)μB , μ(O2)=0.35(5)μB , and μ(O3)=0.36(5)μB combining to the same macroscopic magnetization value, which was previously only attributed to the Co ions.

  16. AN ELECTRON-TRACKING COMPTON TELESCOPE FOR A SURVEY OF THE DEEP UNIVERSE BY MeV GAMMA-RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanimori, T.; Kubo, H.; Takada, A.; Iwaki, S.; Komura, S.; Matsuoka, Y.; Miyamoto, S.; Mizumoto, T.; Mizumura, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, S.; Oda, M.; Parker, J. D.; Sawano, T.; Sonoda, S.; Takemura, T.; Tomono, D.; Ueno, K.; Kurosawa, S.; Miuchi, K.

    2015-09-01

    Photon imaging for MeV gammas has serious difficulties due to huge backgrounds and unclearness in images, which originate from incompleteness in determining the physical parameters of Compton scattering in detection, e.g., lack of the directional information of the recoil electrons. The recent major mission/instrument in the MeV band, Compton Gamma Ray Observatory/COMPTEL, which was Compton Camera (CC), detected a mere ∼30 persistent sources. It is in stark contrast with the ∼2000 sources in the GeV band. Here we report the performance of an Electron-Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC), and prove that it has a good potential to break through this stagnation in MeV gamma-ray astronomy. The ETCC provides all the parameters of Compton-scattering by measuring 3D recoil electron tracks; then the Scatter Plane Deviation (SPD) lost in CCs is recovered. The energy loss rate (dE/dx), which CCs cannot measure, is also obtained, and is found to be helpful to reduce the background under conditions similar to those in space. Accordingly, the significance in gamma detection is improved severalfold. On the other hand, SPD is essential to determine the point-spread function (PSF) quantitatively. The SPD resolution is improved close to the theoretical limit for multiple scattering of recoil electrons. With such a well-determined PSF, we demonstrate for the first time that it is possible to provide reliable sensitivity in Compton imaging without utilizing an optimization algorithm. As such, this study highlights the fundamental weak-points of CCs. In contrast we demonstrate the possibility of ETCC reaching the sensitivity below 1 × 10{sup −12} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} at 1 MeV.

  17. Bimetallic 3D nanostar dimers in ring cavities: recyclable and robust surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates for signal detection from few molecules.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Anisha; Chirumamilla, Manohar; De Angelis, Francesco; Toma, Andrea; Zaccaria, Remo Proietti; Krahne, Roman

    2014-08-26

    Top-down fabrication of electron-beam lithography (EBL)-defined metallic nanostructures is a successful route to obtain extremely high electromagnetic field enhancement via plasmonic effects in well-defined regions. To this aim, various geometries have been introduced such as disks, triangles, dimers, rings, self-similar lenses, and more. In particular, metallic dimers are highly efficient for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), and their decoupling from the substrate in a three-dimensional design has proven to further improve their performance. However, the large fabrication time and cost has hindered EBL-defined structures from playing a role in practical applications. Here we present three-dimensional nanostar dimer devices that can be recycled via maskless metal etching and deposition processes, due to conservation of the nanostructure pattern in the 3D geometry of the underlying Si substrate. Furthermore, our 3D-nanostar-dimer-in-ring structures (3D-NSDiRs) incorporate several advantageous aspects for SERS by enhancing the performance of plasmonic dimers via an external ring cavity, by efficient decoupling from the substrate through an elevated 3D design, and by bimetallic AuAg layers that exploit the increased performance of Ag while maintaining the biocompatibility of Au. We demonstrate SERS detection on rhodamine and adenine at extremely low density up to the limit of few molecules and analyze the field enhancement of the 3D-NSDiRs with respect to the exciting wavelength and metal composition.

  18. The Compton Effect Red Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kierein, John

    2004-05-01

    In 1923 (Phil Mag. 46, 897.) A. H. Compton noted that the Compton effect produces a red shift for all wavelengths when the scattered electron is free and not bound to an atom or molecule. He suggested that the red shift in the visible spectrum at the limb of the sun is larger than that at the center due to the Compton effect from the greater number of free electrons in the sun's atmosphere along the line of sight. Kierein and Sharp (1968, Solar Physics 3, 450) quantified this and showed a good correlation of red shift observations with the variation in the number of these electrons along the line of sight from center to limb and suggested that the quasar red shift and cosmological red shift could be similarly explained. Grote Reber mapped and measured the background hectometric radiation and found it to be unexpectedly bright. In 1968 (J. Franklin Inst. 285,1), while describing these measurements and maps he explained this brightness as being due to the Compton effect causing the cosmological red shift and accelerating intergalactic electrons. The resulting universe is static. The predicted red shift from the Compton effect deviates from Hubble's law only at large red shifts.

  19. WE-F-16A-03: 3D Printer Application in Proton Therapy: A Novel Method to Deliver Passive-Scattering Proton Beams with a Fixed Range and Modulation for SRS and SRT

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, X; Witztum, A; Liang, X; Reiche, M; Lin, H; Teo, B; Yin, L; Fiene, J; McDonough, J; Kassaee, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To present a novel technique to deliver passive-scattering proton beam with fixed range and modulation using a 3D printed patient-specific bolus for proton stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy. Methods: A CIRS head phantom was used to simulate a patient with a small brain lesion. A custom bolus was created in the Eclipse Treatment Planning System (TPS) to compensate for the different water equivalent depths from the patient surface to the target from multiple beam directions. To simulate arc therapy, a plan was created on the initial CT using three passive-scattering proton beams with a fixed range and modulations irradiating from different angles. The DICOM-RT structure file of the bolus was exported from the TPS and converted to STL format for 3D printing. The phantom was rescanned with the printed custom bolus and head cup to verify the dose distribution comparing to the initial plan. EBT3 films were placed in the sagital plane of the target to verify the delivered dose distribution. The relative stopping power of the printing material(ABSplus-P430) was measured using the Zebra multi-plate ion chamber. Results: The relative stopping power of the 3D printing material, ABSplus-P430 was 1.05 which is almost water equivalent. The dose difference between verification CT and Initial CT is almost negligible. Film measurement also confirmed the accuracy for this new proton delivery technique. Conclusion: Our method using 3D printed range modifiers simplify the treatment delivery of multiple passive-scattering beams in treatment of small lesion in brain. This technique makes delivery of multiple beam more efficient and can be extended to allow arc therapy with proton beams. The ability to create and construct complex patient specific bolus structures provides a new dimension in creating optimized quality treatment plans not only for proton therapy but also for electron and photon therapy.

  20. Scattering of near normal incidence SH waves by sinusoidal and rough surfaces in 3-D: comparison to the scalar wave approximation.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Andrew J C; Cegla, Frederic B

    2014-07-01

    The challenge of accurately simulating how incident scalar waves interact with rough boundaries has made it an important area of research within many scientific disciplines. Conventional methods, which in the majority of cases focus only on scattering in two dimensions, often suffer from long simulation times or reduced accuracy, neglecting phenomena such as multiple scattering and surface self-shadowing. A simulation based on the scalar wave distributed point source method (DPSM) is presented as an alternative which is computationally more efficient than fully meshed numerical methods while obtaining greater accuracy than approximate analytical techniques. Comparison is made to simulated results obtained using the finite element method for a sinusoidally periodic surface where scattering only occurs in two dimensions, showing very good agreement (<0.2 dB). In addition to two-dimensional scattering, comparison to experimental results is also carried out for scattering in three dimensions when the surface has a Gaussian roughness distribution. Results indicate that for two-dimensional scattering and for rough surfaces with a correlation length equal to the incident wavelength (λ) and a root mean square height less than 0.2λ, the scalar wave approximation predicts reflected pulse shape change and envelope amplitudes generally to within 1 dB. Comparison between transducers within a three-element array also illustrate the sensitivity pulse amplitude can have to sensor position above a rough surface, differing by as much as 17 dB with a positional change of just 1.25λ. PMID:24960707

  1. Scattering of near normal incidence SH waves by sinusoidal and rough surfaces in 3-D: comparison to the scalar wave approximation.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Andrew J C; Cegla, Frederic B

    2014-07-01

    The challenge of accurately simulating how incident scalar waves interact with rough boundaries has made it an important area of research within many scientific disciplines. Conventional methods, which in the majority of cases focus only on scattering in two dimensions, often suffer from long simulation times or reduced accuracy, neglecting phenomena such as multiple scattering and surface self-shadowing. A simulation based on the scalar wave distributed point source method (DPSM) is presented as an alternative which is computationally more efficient than fully meshed numerical methods while obtaining greater accuracy than approximate analytical techniques. Comparison is made to simulated results obtained using the finite element method for a sinusoidally periodic surface where scattering only occurs in two dimensions, showing very good agreement (<0.2 dB). In addition to two-dimensional scattering, comparison to experimental results is also carried out for scattering in three dimensions when the surface has a Gaussian roughness distribution. Results indicate that for two-dimensional scattering and for rough surfaces with a correlation length equal to the incident wavelength (λ) and a root mean square height less than 0.2λ, the scalar wave approximation predicts reflected pulse shape change and envelope amplitudes generally to within 1 dB. Comparison between transducers within a three-element array also illustrate the sensitivity pulse amplitude can have to sensor position above a rough surface, differing by as much as 17 dB with a positional change of just 1.25λ.

  2. Compton Polarization with Nustar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotti, Simone; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin; Perri, Matteo; Puccetti, Simonetta

    In this study we assess the NuSTAR capabilities to detect polarized signals in the Compton regime, through the use of Monte Carlo simulations and comparison with observational data. Both NuSTAR focal plane detectors are equipped with high resolution pixilated CZT arrays, sensitive in the energy range 2.5-80 keV. These units have intrinsic polarization capabilities due to their high quality factor, very low background and scattering angles of ~90°, which is ideal for incident photon energies below 100 keV. However the sensitivity is limited by the very low efficiency of the CZT for Compton interactions and by intrinsic readout systematics, such as charge sharing between pixels. An additional source of degradation is the incompleteness of double events information in the science telemetry. We estimated the Minimum Detectable Polarization of cosmic sources as a function of intensity, and the results obtained were validated through the comparison with the first actual data from the Crab Nebula and Cygnus X-1. We also evaluated the count rate and the background expected for polarization measurements, comparing our estimates with the data measured in flight. Our simulations reproduce well the actual NuSTAR data, showing that the focal plane detectors should be able to detect polarization from highly polarized sources like the Crab and other potential bright sources, dominated by synchrotron and/or SSC emission. The background for polarization measurements was found to be negligible.

  3. 90° Compton and Rayleigh measurements and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesareo, R.; Balogun, F.; Brunetti, A.; Cappio Borlino, C.

    2001-06-01

    A simple apparatus for measurement and imaging of objects using scattered X-rays was designed and constructed. This is composed of a well-collimated photon beam from an X-ray tube, a CZT thermoelectrically cooled semiconductor detector and an ( x, y, ϑ) translation-rotation table containing the object to be studied. First, the output beam was monochromatized; studies on Compton and Rayleigh scattered radiation were then carried out, including the Compton profile. Then direct bremsstrahlung radiation of proper energy was employed, and energy intervals are selected where Rayleigh or Compton effects largely prevail. Compton images were finally obtained.

  4. Investigating the Compton Effect with a Spreadsheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinderman, Jesusa Valdez

    1992-01-01

    Describes a computer simulation of the Compton effect designed to lead students to discover (1) the relationship of the electron's final kinetic energy to its angle of scattering and (2) the relationship between the scattering angles of the outgoing electron and photon. (MDH)

  5. The Compton polarimeter for SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Fero, M.J.; The SLD Collaboration

    1992-12-01

    We report on the use of a Compton scattering based polarimeter to measure beam polarization near the e{sup +}e{sub -} interaction point at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). Measurement of the beam polarization to a statistical precision of {delta}P/P={plus_minus}3% requires approximately three minutes under normal conditions. An average beam polarization of 22.4{plus_minus}0.7%(syst.) was measured over the course of the 1992 polarized beam run.

  6. The Compton polarimeter for SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Fero, M.J. )

    1992-12-01

    We report on the use of a Compton scattering based polarimeter to measure beam polarization near the e[sup +]e[sub -] interaction point at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). Measurement of the beam polarization to a statistical precision of [delta]P/P=[plus minus]3% requires approximately three minutes under normal conditions. An average beam polarization of 22.4[plus minus]0.7%(syst.) was measured over the course of the 1992 polarized beam run.

  7. SPEIR: A Ge Compton Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Mihailescu, L; Vetter, K M; Burks, M T; Hull, E L; Craig, W W

    2004-02-11

    The SPEctroscopic Imager for {gamma}-Rays (SPEIR) is a new concept of a compact {gamma}-ray imaging system of high efficiency and spectroscopic resolution with a 4-{pi} field-of-view. The system behind this concept employs double-sided segmented planar Ge detectors accompanied by the use of list-mode photon reconstruction methods to create a sensitive, compact Compton scatter camera.

  8. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  9. Compton polarimetry revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, D.

    2015-11-01

    We compute the average polarisation asymmetry from the Klein-Nishina differential cross-section on free electrons at rest. As expected from the expression for the asymmetry, the average asymmetry is found to decrease like the inverse of the incident photon energy asymptotically at high energy. We then compute a simple estimator of the polarisation fraction that makes optimal use of all the kinematic information present in an event final state, by the use of "moments" method, and we compare its statistical power to that of a simple fit of the azimuthal distribution. In contrast to polarimetry with pair creation, for which we obtained an improvement by a factor of larger than two in a previous work, here for Compton scattering the improvement is only of 10-20%.

  10. Compton Sources of Electromagnetic Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft,Gerd Priebe

    2011-01-01

    When a relativistic electron beam interacts with a high-field laser beam, intense and highly collimated electromagnetic radiation will be generated through Compton scattering. Through relativistic upshifting and the relativistic Doppler effect, highly energetic polarized photons are radiated along the electron beam motion when the electrons interact with the laser light. For example, X-ray radiation can be obtained when optical lasers are scattered from electrons of tens-of-MeV beam energy. Because of the desirable properties of the radiation produced, many groups around the world have been designing, building, and utilizing Compton sources for a wide variety of purposes. In this review article, we discuss the generation and properties of the scattered radiation, the types of Compton source devices that have been constructed to date, and the prospects of radiation sources of this general type. Due to the possibilities of producing hard electromagnetic radiation in a device that is small compared to the alternative storage ring sources, it is foreseen that large numbers of such sources may be constructed in the future.

  11. Development of Electron Tracking Compton Camera using micro pixel gas chamber for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabuki, Shigeto; Hattori, Kaori; Kohara, Ryota; Kunieda, Etsuo; Kubo, Atsushi; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Miuchi, Kentaro; Nakahara, Tadaki; Nagayoshi, Tsutomu; Nishimura, Hironobu; Okada, Yoko; Orito, Reiko; Sekiya, Hiroyuki; Shirahata, Takashi; Takada, Atsushi; Tanimori, Toru; Ueno, Kazuki

    2007-10-01

    We have developed the Electron Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC) with reconstructing the 3-D tracks of the scattered electron in Compton process for both sub-MeV and MeV gamma rays. By measuring both the directions and energies of not only the recoil gamma ray but also the scattered electron, the direction of the incident gamma ray is determined for each individual photon. Furthermore, a residual measured angle between the recoil electron and scattered gamma ray is quite powerful for the kinematical background rejection. For the 3-D tracking of the electrons, the Micro Time Projection Chamber (μ-TPC) was developed using a new type of the micro pattern gas detector. The ETCC consists of this μ-TPC (10×10×8 cm 3) and the 6×6×13 mm 3 GSO crystal pixel arrays with a flat panel photo-multiplier surrounding the μ-TPC for detecting recoil gamma rays. The ETCC provided the angular resolution of 6.6° (FWHM) at 364 keV of 131I. A mobile ETCC for medical imaging, which is fabricated in a 1 m cubic box, has been operated since October 2005. Here, we present the imaging results for the line sources and the phantom of human thyroid gland using 364 keV gamma rays of 131I.

  12. Monitoring the distribution of prompt gamma rays in boron neutron capture therapy using a multiple-scattering Compton camera: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taewoong; Lee, Hyounggun; Lee, Wonho

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluated the use of Compton imaging technology to monitor prompt gamma rays emitted by 10B in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) applied to a computerized human phantom. The Monte Carlo method, including particle-tracking techniques, was used for simulation. The distribution of prompt gamma rays emitted by the phantom during irradiation with neutron beams is closely associated with the distribution of the boron in the phantom. Maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) method was applied to the information obtained from the detected prompt gamma rays to reconstruct the distribution of the tumor including the boron uptake regions (BURs). The reconstructed Compton images of the prompt gamma rays were combined with the cross-sectional images of the human phantom. Quantitative analysis of the intensity curves showed that all combined images matched the predetermined conditions of the simulation. The tumors including the BURs were distinguishable if they were more than 2 cm apart.

  13. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  14. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  15. Strong light scattering and broadband (UV to IR) photoabsorption in stretchable 3D hybrid architectures based on Aerographite decorated by ZnO nanocrystallites.

    PubMed

    Tiginyanu, Ion; Ghimpu, Lidia; Gröttrup, Jorit; Postolache, Vitalie; Mecklenburg, Matthias; Stevens-Kalceff, Marion A; Ursaki, Veaceslav; Payami, Nader; Feidenhansl, Robert; Schulte, Karl; Adelung, Rainer; Mishra, Yogendra Kumar

    2016-09-12

    In present work, the nano- and microscale tetrapods from zinc oxide were integrated on the surface of Aerographite material (as backbone) in carbon-metal oxide hybrid hierarchical network via a simple and single step magnetron sputtering process. The fabricated hybrid networks are characterized for morphology, microstructural and optical properties. The cathodoluminescence investigations revealed interesting luminescence features related to carbon impurities and inherent host defects in zinc oxide. Because of the wide bandgap of zinc oxide and its intrinsic defects, the hybrid network absorbs light in the UV and visible regions, however, this broadband photoabsorption behavior extends to the infrared (IR) region due to the dependence of the optical properties of ZnO architectures upon size and shape of constituent nanostructures and their doping by carbon impurities. Such a phenomenon of broadband photoabsorption ranging from UV to IR for zinc oxide based hybrid materials is novel. Additionally, the fabricated network exhibits strong visible light scattering behavior. The developed Aerographite/nanocrystalline ZnO hybrid network materials, equipped with broadband photoabsorption and strong light scattering, are very promising candidates for optoelectronic technologies.

  16. An efficient hybrid MLFMA-FFT solver for the volume integral equation in case of sparse 3D inhomogeneous dielectric scatterers

    SciTech Connect

    Zaeytijd, J. de Bogaert, I.; Franchois, A.

    2008-07-01

    Electromagnetic scattering problems involving inhomogeneous objects can be numerically solved by applying a Method of Moments discretization to the volume integral equation. For electrically large problems, the iterative solution of the resulting linear system is expensive, both computationally and in memory use. In this paper, a hybrid MLFMA-FFT method is presented, which combines the fast Fourier transform (FFT) method and the High Frequency Multilevel Fast Multipole Algorithm (MLFMA) in order to reduce the cost of the matrix-vector multiplications needed in the iterative solver. The method represents the scatterers within a set of possibly disjoint identical cubic subdomains, which are meshed using a uniform cubic grid. This specific mesh allows for the application of FFTs to calculate the near interactions in the MLFMA and reduces the memory cost considerably, since the aggregation and disaggregation matrices of the MLFMA can be reused. Additional improvements to the general MLFMA framework, such as an extention of the FFT interpolation scheme of Sarvas et al. from the scalar to the vectorial case in combination with a more economical representation of the radiation patterns on the lowest level in vector spherical harmonics, are proposed and the choice of the subdomain size is discussed. The hybrid method performs better in terms of speed and memory use on large sparse configurations than both the FFT method and the HF MLFMA separately and it has lower memory requirements on general large problems. This is illustrated on a number of representative numerical test cases.

  17. Strong light scattering and broadband (UV to IR) photoabsorption in stretchable 3D hybrid architectures based on Aerographite decorated by ZnO nanocrystallites.

    PubMed

    Tiginyanu, Ion; Ghimpu, Lidia; Gröttrup, Jorit; Postolache, Vitalie; Mecklenburg, Matthias; Stevens-Kalceff, Marion A; Ursaki, Veaceslav; Payami, Nader; Feidenhansl, Robert; Schulte, Karl; Adelung, Rainer; Mishra, Yogendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    In present work, the nano- and microscale tetrapods from zinc oxide were integrated on the surface of Aerographite material (as backbone) in carbon-metal oxide hybrid hierarchical network via a simple and single step magnetron sputtering process. The fabricated hybrid networks are characterized for morphology, microstructural and optical properties. The cathodoluminescence investigations revealed interesting luminescence features related to carbon impurities and inherent host defects in zinc oxide. Because of the wide bandgap of zinc oxide and its intrinsic defects, the hybrid network absorbs light in the UV and visible regions, however, this broadband photoabsorption behavior extends to the infrared (IR) region due to the dependence of the optical properties of ZnO architectures upon size and shape of constituent nanostructures and their doping by carbon impurities. Such a phenomenon of broadband photoabsorption ranging from UV to IR for zinc oxide based hybrid materials is novel. Additionally, the fabricated network exhibits strong visible light scattering behavior. The developed Aerographite/nanocrystalline ZnO hybrid network materials, equipped with broadband photoabsorption and strong light scattering, are very promising candidates for optoelectronic technologies. PMID:27616632

  18. Strong light scattering and broadband (UV to IR) photoabsorption in stretchable 3D hybrid architectures based on Aerographite decorated by ZnO nanocrystallites

    PubMed Central

    Tiginyanu, Ion; Ghimpu, Lidia; Gröttrup, Jorit; Postolache, Vitalie; Mecklenburg, Matthias; Stevens-Kalceff, Marion A.; Ursaki, Veaceslav; Payami, Nader; Feidenhansl, Robert; Schulte, Karl; Adelung, Rainer; Mishra, Yogendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    In present work, the nano- and microscale tetrapods from zinc oxide were integrated on the surface of Aerographite material (as backbone) in carbon-metal oxide hybrid hierarchical network via a simple and single step magnetron sputtering process. The fabricated hybrid networks are characterized for morphology, microstructural and optical properties. The cathodoluminescence investigations revealed interesting luminescence features related to carbon impurities and inherent host defects in zinc oxide. Because of the wide bandgap of zinc oxide and its intrinsic defects, the hybrid network absorbs light in the UV and visible regions, however, this broadband photoabsorption behavior extends to the infrared (IR) region due to the dependence of the optical properties of ZnO architectures upon size and shape of constituent nanostructures and their doping by carbon impurities. Such a phenomenon of broadband photoabsorption ranging from UV to IR for zinc oxide based hybrid materials is novel. Additionally, the fabricated network exhibits strong visible light scattering behavior. The developed Aerographite/nanocrystalline ZnO hybrid network materials, equipped with broadband photoabsorption and strong light scattering, are very promising candidates for optoelectronic technologies. PMID:27616632

  19. Strong light scattering and broadband (UV to IR) photoabsorption in stretchable 3D hybrid architectures based on Aerographite decorated by ZnO nanocrystallites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiginyanu, Ion; Ghimpu, Lidia; Gröttrup, Jorit; Postolache, Vitalie; Mecklenburg, Matthias; Stevens-Kalceff, Marion A.; Ursaki, Veaceslav; Payami, Nader; Feidenhansl, Robert; Schulte, Karl; Adelung, Rainer; Mishra, Yogendra Kumar

    2016-09-01

    In present work, the nano- and microscale tetrapods from zinc oxide were integrated on the surface of Aerographite material (as backbone) in carbon-metal oxide hybrid hierarchical network via a simple and single step magnetron sputtering process. The fabricated hybrid networks are characterized for morphology, microstructural and optical properties. The cathodoluminescence investigations revealed interesting luminescence features related to carbon impurities and inherent host defects in zinc oxide. Because of the wide bandgap of zinc oxide and its intrinsic defects, the hybrid network absorbs light in the UV and visible regions, however, this broadband photoabsorption behavior extends to the infrared (IR) region due to the dependence of the optical properties of ZnO architectures upon size and shape of constituent nanostructures and their doping by carbon impurities. Such a phenomenon of broadband photoabsorption ranging from UV to IR for zinc oxide based hybrid materials is novel. Additionally, the fabricated network exhibits strong visible light scattering behavior. The developed Aerographite/nanocrystalline ZnO hybrid network materials, equipped with broadband photoabsorption and strong light scattering, are very promising candidates for optoelectronic technologies.

  20. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  1. Application of the incomplete Cholesky factorization preconditioned Krylov subspace method to the vector finite element method for 3-D electromagnetic scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Huang, Ting-Zhu; Jing, Yan-Fei; Zhang, Yong

    2010-02-01

    The incomplete Cholesky (IC) factorization preconditioning technique is applied to the Krylov subspace methods for solving large systems of linear equations resulted from the use of edge-based finite element method (FEM). The construction of the preconditioner is based on the fact that the coefficient matrix is represented in an upper triangular compressed sparse row (CSR) form. An efficient implementation of the IC factorization is described in detail for complex symmetric matrices. With some ordering schemes our IC algorithm can greatly reduce the memory requirement as well as the iteration numbers. Numerical tests on harmonic analysis for plane wave scattering from a metallic plate and a metallic sphere coated by a lossy dielectric layer show the efficiency of this method.

  2. Quantum theory of stimulated Cherenkov emission and stimulated compton scattering of electromagnetic waves by a low-density relativistic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzelev, M. V.

    2010-07-15

    A quantum theory of instabilities of a relativistic electron beam due to the stimulated Cherenkov effect in a dielectric and the stimulated Compton effect in vacuum is presented. The instability growth rates are found in a linear approximation and are shown to go over to the familiar growth rates in the classical approximation. A nonlinear theory of instabilities in the quantum case is developed. Analytic solutions are obtained that describe the nonlinear saturation of the amplitudes of the electromagnetic waves emitted by the beam.

  3. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  4. Longitudinal, 3D in vivo imaging of sebaceous glands by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy –normal function and response to cryotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yookyung; Tam, Joshua; Jalian, H. Ray; Anderson, R. Rox; Evans, Conor L.

    2014-01-01

    Sebaceous glands perform complex functions, and are centrally involved in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. Current techniques for studying sebaceous glands are mostly static in nature, whereas the gland’s main function – excretion of sebum via the holocrine mechanism – can only be evaluated over time. We present a longitudinal, real-time alternative – the in vivo, label-free imaging of sebaceous glands using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy, which is used to selectively visualize lipids. In mouse ears, CARS microscopy revealed dynamic changes in sebaceous glands during the holocrine secretion process, as well as in response to damage to the glands caused by cooling. Detailed gland structure, plus the active migration of individual sebocytes and cohorts of sebocytes were measured. Cooling produced characteristic changes in sebocyte structure and migration. This study demonstrates that CARS microscopy is a promising tool for studying the sebaceous gland and its associated disorders in three-dimensions in vivo. PMID:25026458

  5. 3D local structure around copper site of rabbit prion-related protein: Quantitative determination by XANES spectroscopy combined with multiple-scattering calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, P. X.; Lian, F. L.; Wang, Y.; Wen, Yi; Chu, W. S.; Zhao, H. F.; Zhang, S.; Li, J.; Lin, D. H.; Wu, Z. Y.

    2014-02-01

    Prion-related protein (PrP), a cell-surface copper-binding glycoprotein, is considered to be responsible for a number of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). The structural conversion of PrP from the normal cellular isoform (PrPC) to the post-translationally modified form (PrPSc) is thought to be relevant to Cu2+ binding to histidine residues. Rabbits are one of the few mammalian species that appear to be resistant to TSEs, because of the structural characteristics of the rabbit prion protein (RaPrPC) itself. Here we determined the three-dimensional local structure around the C-terminal high-affinity copper-binding sites using X-ray absorption near-edge structure combined with ab initio calculations in the framework of the multiple-scattering (MS) theory. Result shows that two amino acid resides, Gln97 and Met108, and two histidine residues, His95 and His110, are involved in binding this copper(II) ion. It might help us understand the roles of copper in prion conformation conversions, and the molecular mechanisms of prion-involved diseases.

  6. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  7. Ground calibrations of Nuclear Compton Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Jeng-Lun; Liu, Zhong-Kai; Bandstra, Mark S.; Bellm, Eric C.; Liang, Jau-Shian; Perez-Becker, Daniel; Zoglauer, Andreas; Boggs, Steven E.; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Huang, Minghuey A.; Amman, Mark; Chiang, Shiuan-Juang; Hung, Wei-Che; Lin, Chih-Hsun; Luke, Paul N.; Run, Ray-Shine; Wunderer, Cornelia B.

    2010-07-01

    The Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT) is a balloon-borne soft gamma ray (0.2-10 MeV) telescope designed to study astrophysical sources of nuclear line emission and polarization. The heart of NCT is an array of 12 cross-strip germanium detectors, designed to provide 3D positions for each photon interaction with full 3D position resolution to < 2 mm^3. Tracking individual interactions enables Compton imaging, effectively reduces background, and enables the measurement of polarization. The keys to Compton imaging with NCT's detectors are determining the energy deposited in the detector at each strip and tracking the gamma-ray photon interaction within the detector. The 3D positions are provided by the orthogonal X and Y strips, and by determining the interaction depth using the charge collection time difference (CTD) between the anode and cathode. Calibrations of the energy as well as the 3D position of interactions have been completed, and extensive calibration campaigns for the whole system were also conducted using radioactive sources prior to our flights from Ft. Sumner, New Mexico, USA in Spring 2009, and from Alice Springs, Australia in Spring 2010. Here we will present the techniques and results of our ground calibrations so far, and then compare the calibration results of the effective area throughout NCT's field of view with Monte Carlo simulations using a detailed mass model.

  8. Recent developments in DFD (depth-fused 3D) display and arc 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suyama, Shiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu

    2015-05-01

    We will report our recent developments in DFD (Depth-fused 3D) display and arc 3D display, both of which have smooth movement parallax. Firstly, fatigueless DFD display, composed of only two layered displays with a gap, has continuous perceived depth by changing luminance ratio between two images. Two new methods, called "Edge-based DFD display" and "Deep DFD display", have been proposed in order to solve two severe problems of viewing angle and perceived depth limitations. Edge-based DFD display, layered by original 2D image and its edge part with a gap, can expand the DFD viewing angle limitation both in 2D and 3D perception. Deep DFD display can enlarge the DFD image depth by modulating spatial frequencies of front and rear images. Secondly, Arc 3D display can provide floating 3D images behind or in front of the display by illuminating many arc-shaped directional scattering sources, for example, arcshaped scratches on a flat board. Curved Arc 3D display, composed of many directional scattering sources on a curved surface, can provide a peculiar 3D image, for example, a floating image in the cylindrical bottle. The new active device has been proposed for switching arc 3D images by using the tips of dual-frequency liquid-crystal prisms as directional scattering sources. Directional scattering can be switched on/off by changing liquid-crystal refractive index, resulting in switching of arc 3D image.

  9. Simulation for CZT Compton PET (Maximization of the efficiency for PET using Compton event)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Changyeon; Lee, Wonho; Lee, Taewoong

    2011-10-01

    Multiple interactions in positron emission tomography (PET) using scintillators are generally treated as noise events because each interacted position and energy of the multiple interactions cannot be obtained individually and the sequence of multiple scattering is not fully known. Therefore, the first interaction position, which is the crucial information for a PET image reconstruction, cannot be determined correctly. However, in the case of a pixelized semiconductor detector, such as CdZnTe, each specific position and energy information of multiple interactions can be obtained. Moreover, for the emission of two 511 keV radiations in PET, if one radiation deposits all the energy in one position (photoelectric effect) and the other radiation undergoes Compton scattering followed by the photoelectric effect, the sequence of Compton scattering followed by the photoelectric effect can be determined using the Compton scattering formula. Hence, the correct position of Compton scattering can be determined, and the Compton scattering effect, which is discarded in conventional PET systems can be recovered in the new system reported in this study. The PET system in this study, which was simulated using GATE 5.0 code, was composed of 20 mm×10 mm×10 mm CdZnTe detectors consisting of 1 mm×0.5 mm×2.5 mm pixels. The angular uncertainties caused by Doppler broadening, pixelization effect and energy broadening were estimated and compared. The pixelized effect was the main factor in increasing the angular uncertainty and was strongly dependent on the distance between the 1st and 2nd interaction positions. The effect of energy broadening to an angular resolution less than expected and that of Doppler broadening was minimal. The number of Compton events was double that of the photoelectric effect assuming full energy absorption. Therefore, the detection efficiency of this new PET system can be improved greatly because both the photoelectric effect and Compton scattering are

  10. The tracks of the Compton effect.

    PubMed

    del Regato, J A

    1981-01-01

    The observation of scattered radiations of larger wavelength than the primary had been repeatedly rejected or explained away by many researchers, including Compton. After years of vacillations, he recognized the effect named after him and was the first to develop a quantal equation predicting the wavelength of scattered radiation. It became one of the most significant contributions to modern radiation physics, opening the doors of quantum mechanics.

  11. Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest Investigator Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a final report for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest Investigator Program from 06/01/91-07/31/97. The topics include: 1) Solar Flare Neutron Spectra and Accelerated Ions; 2) Gamma Ray Lines From The Orion Complex; 3) Implications of Nuclear Line Emission From The Orion Complex; 4) Possible Sites of Nuclear Line Emission From Massive OB Associations; 5) Gamma-Ray Burst Repitition and BATSE Position Uncertainties; 6) Effects of Compton Scattering on BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Spectra; and 7) Selection Biases on the Spectral and Temporal Distribution of Gamma Ray Bursts.

  12. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  13. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  14. Novel design of a parallax free Compton enhanced PET scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braem, A.; Chamizo, M.; Chesi, E.; Colonna, N.; Cusanno, F.; De Leo, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Joram, C.; Marrone, S.; Mathot, S.; Nappi, E.; Schoenahl, F.; Seguinot, J.; Weilhammer, P.; Zaidi, H.

    2004-06-01

    Molecular imaging by PET is a powerful tool in modern clinical practice for cancer diagnosis. Nevertheless, improvements are needed with respect to the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the technique for its application to specific human organs (breast, prostate, brain, etc.), and to small animals. Presently, commercial PET scanners do not detect the depth of interaction of photons in scintillators, which results in a not negligible parallax error. We describe here a novel concept of PET scanner design that provides full three-dimensional (3D) gamma reconstruction with high spatial resolution over the total detector volume, free of parallax errors. It uses matrices of long scintillators read at both ends by hybrid photon detectors. This so-called 3D axial concept also enhances the gamma detection efficiency since it allows one to reconstruct a significant fraction of Compton scattered events. In this note, we describe the concept, a possible design and the expected performance of this new PET device. We also report about first characterization measurements of 10 cm long YAP:Ce scintillation crystals.

  15. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  16. Resonant Compton Physics for Magnetar Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ickes, Jesse; Gonthier, Peter L.; Eiles, Matthew; Baring, Matthew G.

    2016-01-01

    Various telescopes including RXTE, INTEGRAL, Suzaku, and Fermi have detected steady non-thermal X-ray emission in the 10 - 200 keV band from strongly magnetic neutron stars known as magnetars. Magnetic inverse Compton scattering is believed to be the leading candidate for the production of this intense X-ray radiation. Scattering at ultra-relativistic energies leads to attractive simplifications in the analytics of the magnetic Compton cross section. We have recently addressed such a case by developing compact analytic expressions using correct spin-dependent widths acquired through the implementation of Sokolov & Ternov basis states, focusing specifically on ground-state-ground-state scattering. Compton scattering in magnetar magnetospheres can cool electrons down to mildly relativistic energies. Moreover, soft gamma-ray flaring in magnetars may involve strong Comptonization in expanding clouds of mildly relativistic pairs. Such environs necessitate the development of more general magnetic scattering cross sections, in which the incoming photons acquire substantial incident angles relative to the field in the rest frame of the electron leading to arbitrary Landau excitations of the intermediate and final states. Due to the rapid transitions of the excited-state to the ground-state, the initial electron is still assumed to be in the ground state. The cross sections treat the plethora of harmonic resonances associated with various cyclotron transitions between Landau states. Polarization and spin dependence of the cross section for the four scattering modes is compared to the cross section obtained with spin-averaged widths. We present numerical results to show the comparisons to highlight the role of the spin-dependent widths of the resonances. The findings presented here will have applications to various neutron star problems, including computation of Eddington luminosities and polarization mode-switching rates in transient magnetar fireballs.

  17. Venus in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, J. J.

    1993-08-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  18. 3D reservoir visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Van, B.T.; Pajon, J.L.; Joseph, P. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper shows how some simple 3D computer graphics tools can be combined to provide efficient software for visualizing and analyzing data obtained from reservoir simulators and geological simulations. The animation and interactive capabilities of the software quickly provide a deep understanding of the fluid-flow behavior and an accurate idea of the internal architecture of a reservoir.

  19. Reviews Book: Marie Curie and Her Daughters Resource: Cumulus Equipment: Alpha Particle Scattering Apparatus Equipment: 3D Magnetic Tube Equipment: National Grid Transmission Model Book: Einstein's Physics Equipment: Barton's Pendulums Equipment: Weather Station Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    WE RECOMMEND Marie Curie and Her Daughters An insightful study of a resilient and ingenious family and their achievements Cumulus Simple to install and operate and with obvious teaching applications, this weather station 'donationware' is as easy to recommend as it is to use Alpha Particle Scattering Apparatus Good design and construction make for good results National Grid Transmission Model Despite its expense, this resource offers excellent value Einstein's Physics A vivid, accurate, compelling and rigorous treatment, but requiring an investment of time and thought WORTH A LOOK 3D Magnetic Tube Magnetic fields in three dimensions at a low cost Barton's Pendulums A neat, well-made and handy variant, but not a replacement for the more traditional version Weather Station Though not as robust or substantial as hoped for, this can be put to good use with the right software WEB WATCH An online experiment and worksheet are useful for teaching motor efficiency, a glance at CERN, and NASA's interesting information on the alpha-magnetic spectrometer and climate change

  20. 3D rapid mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaksson, Folke; Borg, Johan; Haglund, Leif

    2008-04-01

    In this paper the performance of passive range measurement imaging using stereo technique in real time applications is described. Stereo vision uses multiple images to get depth resolution in a similar way as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) uses multiple measurements to obtain better spatial resolution. This technique has been used in photogrammetry for a long time but it will be shown that it is now possible to do the calculations, with carefully designed image processing algorithms, in e.g. a PC in real time. In order to get high resolution and quantitative data in the stereo estimation a mathematical camera model is used. The parameters to the camera model are settled in a calibration rig or in the case of a moving camera the scene itself can be used for calibration of most of the parameters. After calibration an ordinary TV camera has an angular resolution like a theodolite, but to a much lower price. The paper will present results from high resolution 3D imagery from air to ground. The 3D-results from stereo calculation of image pairs are stitched together into a large database to form a 3D-model of the area covered.

  1. The use of short and wide x-ray pulses for time-of-flight x-ray Compton Scatter Imaging in cargo security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, Nick; Betcke, Marta M.; Cresswell, John R.; Deacon, Alick N.; Gleeson, Anthony J.; Judson, Daniel S.; Mason, Peter; McIntosh, Peter A.; Morton, Edward J.; Nolan, Paul J.; Ollier, James; Procter, Mark G.; Speller, Robert D.

    2015-05-01

    Using a short pulse width x-ray source and measuring the time-of-flight of photons that scatter from an object under inspection allows for the point of interaction to be determined, and a profile of the object to be sampled along the path of the beam. A three dimensional image can be formed by interrogating the entire object. Using high energy x rays enables the inspection of cargo containers with steel walls, in the search for concealed items. A longer pulse width x-ray source can also be used with deconvolution techniques to determine the points of interaction. We present time-of-flight results from both short (picosecond) width and long (hundreds of nanoseconds) width x-ray sources, and show that the position of scatter can be localised with a resolution of 2 ns, equivalent to 30 cm, for a 3 cm thick plastic test object.

  2. Bin mode estimation methods for Compton camera imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, S.; Odaka, H.; Uemura, M.; Takahashi, T.; Watanabe, S.; Takeda, S.

    2014-10-01

    We study the image reconstruction problem of a Compton camera which consists of semiconductor detectors. The image reconstruction is formulated as a statistical estimation problem. We employ a bin-mode estimation (BME) and extend an existing framework to a Compton camera with multiple scatterers and absorbers. Two estimation algorithms are proposed: an accelerated EM algorithm for the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) and a modified EM algorithm for the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation. Numerical simulations demonstrate the potential of the proposed methods.

  3. Taming supersymmetric defects in 3d-3d correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Dongmin; Kim, Nakwoo; Romo, Mauricio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-07-01

    We study knots in 3d Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group {SL}(N,{{C}}), in the context of its relation with 3d { N }=2 theory (the so-called 3d-3d correspondence). The defect has either co-dimension 2 or co-dimension 4 inside the 6d (2,0) theory, which is compactified on a 3-manifold \\hat{M}. We identify such defects in various corners of the 3d-3d correspondence, namely in 3d {SL}(N,{{C}}) CS theory, in 3d { N }=2 theory, in 5d { N }=2 super Yang-Mills theory, and in the M-theory holographic dual. We can make quantitative checks of the 3d-3d correspondence by computing partition functions at each of these theories. This Letter is a companion to a longer paper [1], which contains more details and more results.

  4. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  5. Portable compton gamma-ray detection system

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Oldaker, Mark E.

    2008-03-04

    A Compton scattered gamma-ray detector system. The system comprises a gamma-ray spectrometer and an annular array of individual scintillators. The scintillators are positioned so that they are arrayed around the gamma-ray spectrometer. The annular array of individual scintillators includes a first scintillator. A radiation shield is positioned around the first scintillator. A multi-channel analyzer is operatively connected to the gamma-ray spectrometer and the annular array of individual scintillators.

  6. Quasilinear theory of terahertz free-electron lasers based on Compton scattering of incoherent pump wave by intense relativistic electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Kocharovskaya, E. R.

    2016-08-01

    The use of incoherent broadband pump radiation for improving the electron efficiency in the free-electron lasers (FEL) based on stimulated backscattering is considered. On the basis of a quasilinear approach, it is shown that the efficiency increases in proportion to the width of the pump spectrum. The effect is owing to a broadening of the spectrum of synchronous combination waves and realization of a mechanism of stochastic particle deceleration. The injection of a monochromatic seed signal in a single pass FEL amplifier or the implementation of a selective high-Q resonator in an FEL oscillator makes the high-frequency scattered radiation be monochromatic in spite of an incoherent pumping. In the regime of stochastic particle deceleration, the efficiency only slightly depends on the spread of the beam parameters, which is beneficial for a terahertz FEL powered by intense relativistic electron beams.

  7. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Matthew; Lazerson, Samuel A.

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of applied 3D fields in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous slowing down, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database. Elementary benchmark calculations are presented to verify the collisionless particle orbits, NBI model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields. Notice: this manuscript has been authored by Princeton University under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  8. Parallel CARLOS-3D code development

    SciTech Connect

    Putnam, J.M.; Kotulski, J.D.

    1996-02-01

    CARLOS-3D is a three-dimensional scattering code which was developed under the sponsorship of the Electromagnetic Code Consortium, and is currently used by over 80 aerospace companies and government agencies. The code has been extensively validated and runs on both serial workstations and parallel super computers such as the Intel Paragon. CARLOS-3D is a three-dimensional surface integral equation scattering code based on a Galerkin method of moments formulation employing Rao- Wilton-Glisson roof-top basis for triangular faceted surfaces. Fully arbitrary 3D geometries composed of multiple conducting and homogeneous bulk dielectric materials can be modeled. This presentation describes some of the extensions to the CARLOS-3D code, and how the operator structure of the code facilitated these improvements. Body of revolution (BOR) and two-dimensional geometries were incorporated by simply including new input routines, and the appropriate Galerkin matrix operator routines. Some additional modifications were required in the combined field integral equation matrix generation routine due to the symmetric nature of the BOR and 2D operators. Quadrilateral patched surfaces with linear roof-top basis functions were also implemented in the same manner. Quadrilateral facets and triangular facets can be used in combination to more efficiently model geometries with both large smooth surfaces and surfaces with fine detail such as gaps and cracks. Since the parallel implementation in CARLOS-3D is at high level, these changes were independent of the computer platform being used. This approach minimizes code maintenance, while providing capabilities with little additional effort. Results are presented showing the performance and accuracy of the code for some large scattering problems. Comparisons between triangular faceted and quadrilateral faceted geometry representations will be shown for some complex scatterers.

  9. The Compton effect: Transition to quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuewer, R. H.

    2000-11-01

    The discovery of the Compton effect at the end of 1922 was a decisive event in the transition to the new quantum mechanics of 1925-1926 because it stimulated physicists to examine anew the fundamental problem of the interaction between radiation and matter. I first discuss Albert Einstein's light-quantum hypothesis of 1905 and why physicists greeted it with extreme skepticism, despite Robert A. Millikan's confirmation of Einstein's equation of the photoelectric effect in 1915. I then follow in some detail the experimental and theoretical research program that Arthur Holly Compton pursued between 1916 and 1922 at the University of Minnesota, the Westinghouse Lamp Company, the Cavendish Laboratory, and Washington University that culminated in his discovery of the Compton effect. Surprisingly, Compton was not influenced directly by Einstein's light-quantum hypothesis, in contrast to Peter Debye and H.A. Kramers, who discovered the quantum theory of scattering independently. I close by discussing the most significant response to that discovery, the Bohr-Kramers-Slater theory of 1924, its experimental refutation, and its influence on the emerging new quantum mechanics.

  10. A flying spot x-ray system for Compton backscatter imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Herr, M.D.; McInerney, J.J.; Copenhaver, G.L. ); Lamser, D.G. )

    1994-09-01

    A Compton x-ray backscatter imaging (CBI) system using a single detector and a mechanically rastered flying spot'' x-ray beam has been designed, built, and tested. While retaining the essential noninvasive imaging capability of previous multiple detector CBI devices, this single detector system incorporates several advances over earlier CBI devices: more efficient detection of scattered x-rays, reduced x-ray exposure, and a simplified scan protocol more suitable for use with humans. This new CBI system also has specific design features to permit automating data acquisition from multiple two-dimensional image planes for integration into a 3-D dynamic surface image. A simulated multislice scan study of a human thorax phantom provided x-ray dosimetry data verifying a very low x-ray dose delivered by this imaging device. Validation experiments with mechanical models show that surface displacement of typical heart beam frequencies can be measured to the nearest 0.1 mm (SD).

  11. Inclusive and Exclusive Compton Processes in Quantum Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ales Psaker

    2005-12-31

    In our work, we describe two types of Compton processes. As an example of an inclusive process, we consider the high-energy photoproduction of massive muon pairs off the nucleon. We analyze the process in the framework of the QCD parton model, in which the usual parton distributions emerge as a tool to describe the nucleon in terms of quark and gluonic degrees of freedom. To study its exclusive version, a new class of phenomenological functions is required, namely, generalized parton distributions. They can be considered as a generalization of the usual parton distributions measured in deeply inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering. Generalized parton distributions (GPDs) may be observed in hard exclusive reactions such as deeply virtual Compton scattering. We develop an extension of this particular process into the weak interaction sector. We also investigate a possible application of the GPD formalism to wide-angle real Compton scattering.

  12. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  13. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  14. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This area of terrain near the Sagan Memorial Station was taken on Sol 3 by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.' It stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  15. Compton Profile Study of Intermetallic Ti{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, V.; Sharma, G.; Mishra, M. C.; Sharma, B. K.; Joshi, K. B.

    2011-10-20

    The Compton scattering measurement on intermetallic alloy Ti{sub 3}Al is reported in this work. The measurement is made using 59.54 keV gamma-rays from Am{sup 241} source. Theoretical calculation of Compton profile is also performed employing CRYSTAL code within the framework of density functional theory to compare with the measurement. The theoretical profile of the alloy is also synthesized following the superposition model taking the published Compton profiles of elemental solids from the APW method. The experimental study of charge transfer in the alloys has also been done by performing the experimental Compton profile measurements on Ti and Al following the superposition model and charge transfer from Al to Ti is clearly seen on the alloy formation.

  16. Advanced PET using both compton and photoelectric events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Changyeon; Lee, Wonho

    2012-08-01

    This study presents image reconstruction and evaluation of advanced positron emission tomography (PET) by using a simple backprojection and an maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) method. Advanced PET can use not only the photoelectric effect but also the Compton scattering effect for image reconstruction; hence, the detection efficiency should be inherently higher than that of conventional PET. By using a voxelized cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector, the detected position and deposited energy of the gamma ray were found precisely. With the position and energy information, the interaction sequence, which is one of the main factors to consider in the reconstruction of the source image, was identified correctly. The reconstruction algorithms were simple backprojection and MLEM methods, and three methods were used to evaluate the advanced PET compared with conventional PET, which uses the photoelectric effect only. The full widths at half maximum (FWHM) and the maximum counts of images reconstructed by using simple backprojection were calculated for comparison. Using an MLEM method, the FWHM and the relative standard deviation of the counts in the range of half of the FWHM around the maximum pixel were calculated at each iteration to evaluate the modalities quantitatively. For a 3D source phantom, the simple backprojection and the MLEM methods were applied to each modality, and the reconstructed images were compared with each other by using the relative standard deviation for each component of the reconstructed image and by using visual inspection.

  17. Helium Compton Form Factor Measurements at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Voutier, Eric J.-M.

    2013-07-01

    The distribution of the parton content of nuclei, as encoded via the generalized parton distributions (GPDs), can be accessed via the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) process contributing to the cross section for leptoproduction of real photons. Similarly to the scattering of light by a material, DVCS provides information about the dynamics and the spatial structure of hadrons. The sensitivity of this process to the lepton beam polarization allows to single-out the DVCS amplitude in terms of Compton form factors that contain GPDs information. The beam spin asymmetry of the $^4$He($\\vec {\\mathrm e}$,e$' \\gamma ^4$He) process was measured in the experimental Hall B of the Jefferson Laboratory to extract the real and imaginary parts of the twist-2 Compton form factor of the $^4$He nucleus. The experimental results reported here demonstrate the relevance of this method for such a goal, and suggest the dominance of the Bethe-Heitler amplitude to the unpolarized process in the kinematic range explored by the experiment.

  18. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  19. The EISCAT_3D Science Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjulin, A.; Mann, I.; McCrea, I.; Aikio, A. T.

    2013-05-01

    EISCAT_3D will be a world-leading international research infrastructure using the incoherent scatter technique to study the atmosphere in the Fenno-Scandinavian Arctic and to investigate how the Earth's atmosphere is coupled to space. The EISCAT_3D phased-array multistatic radar system will be operated by EISCAT Scientific Association and thus be an integral part of an organisation that has successfully been running incoherent scatter radars for more than thirty years. The baseline design of the radar system contains a core site with transmitting and receiving capabilities located close to the intersection of the Swedish, Norwegian and Finnish borders and five receiving sites located within 50 to 250 km from the core. The EISCAT_3D project is currently in its Preparatory Phase and can smoothly transit into implementation in 2014, provided sufficient funding. Construction can start 2016 and first operations in 2018. The EISCAT_3D Science Case is prepared as part of the Preparatory Phase. It is regularly updated with annual new releases, and it aims at being a common document for the whole future EISCAT_3D user community. The areas covered by the Science Case are atmospheric physics and global change; space and plasma physics; solar system research; space weather and service applications; and radar techniques, new methods for coding and analysis. Two of the aims for EISCAT_3D are to understand the ways natural variability in the upper atmosphere, imposed by the Sun-Earth system, can influence the middle and lower atmosphere, and to improve the predictivity of atmospheric models by providing higher resolution observations to replace the current parametrised input. Observations by EISCAT_3D will also be used to monitor the direct effects from the Sun on the ionosphere-atmosphere system and those caused by solar wind magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction. In addition, EISCAT_3D will be used for remote sensing the large-scale behaviour of the magnetosphere from its

  20. A Maximum NEC Criterion for Compton Collimation to Accurately Identify True Coincidences in PET

    PubMed Central

    Chinn, Garry; Levin, Craig S.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we propose a new method to increase the accuracy of identifying true coincidence events for positron emission tomography (PET). This approach requires 3-D detectors with the ability to position each photon interaction in multi-interaction photon events. When multiple interactions occur in the detector, the incident direction of the photon can be estimated using the Compton scatter kinematics (Compton Collimation). If the difference between the estimated incident direction of the photon relative to a second, coincident photon lies within a certain angular range around colinearity, the line of response between the two photons is identified as a true coincidence and used for image reconstruction. We present an algorithm for choosing the incident photon direction window threshold that maximizes the noise equivalent counts of the PET system. For simulated data, the direction window removed 56%–67% of random coincidences while retaining > 94% of true coincidences from image reconstruction as well as accurately extracted 70% of true coincidences from multiple coincidences. PMID:21317079

  1. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-21

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K(+) channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44(+) EGFR(+) KV1.1(+) MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44(-) EGFR(-) KV1.1(+) 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third

  2. New Spectral State of Supercritical Accretion Flow with Comptonizing Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Tomohisa; Ohsuga, Ken; Mineshige, Shin; Heinzeller, Dominikus; Takabe, Hideaki; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2009-08-01

    Supercritical accretion flows inevitably produce radiation-pressure driven outflows, which Compton up-scatter soft photons from the underlying accretion flow, thereby making hard emission. We performed two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations of supercritical accretion flows and outflows, while incorporating such Compton scattering effects, and demonstrated that there appears a new hard spectral state at higher photon luminosities than that of the slim-disk state. In this state, as the photon luminosity increases, the photon index decreases and the fraction of the hard emission increases. The Compton y-parameter is on the order of unity (and thus the photon index will be ˜2) when the apparent photon luminosity is ˜30LE (with LE being the Eddington luminosity) for nearly face-on sources. This explains the observed spectral hardening of the ULX NGC 1313 X-2 in its brightening phase, and thus supports the model of supercritical accretion onto stellar-mass black holes in this ULX.

  3. G. E. M. Jauncey and the Compton Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkin, John

    In late 1922 Arthur Holly Compton (1892-1962) discovered that an X-ray quantum of radiation undergoes a discrete change in wavelength when it experiences a billiard-ball collision with a single atomic electron, a phenomenon that became known as the Compton effect and for which he shared the Nobel Prize in Physics for 1927. But for more than five years before he made his discovery, Compton had analyzed X-ray scattering in terms of classical electrodynamics. I suggest that his colleague at Washington University in St. Louis, G. E. M. Jauncey (1888-1947), helped materially to persuade him to embrace the quantum interpretation of his X-ray scattering experiments.

  4. The cross section for double Compton scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Employing elementary methods in nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics, the cross section for gamma sub 0 + e yields e + gamma + gamma is computed for arbitrary energy in the spectrum of the outgoing photons. The final result is given, differential in the energy of one of these photons, for the case where the incident photon is unpolarized and has energy E sub 0 much less than mc-squared, a polarization sum and angular integration being performed for the final-state photons. The cross section has a simple algebraic form resulting from contributions from the sum of squared direct and exchange amplitudes; interference terms from these amplitudes do not contribute to the angular-integrated cross section.

  5. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering with CLAS12

    SciTech Connect

    Latifa Elouadrhiri

    2007-05-21

    An overview is given about the capabilities provided by the JLab 12 GeV Upgrade to measure deeply virtual exclusive processes with high statistics and covering a large kinematics range in the parameters that are needed to allow reconstruction of a spatial image of the nucleon's quark structure. The measurements planned with CLAS12 will cross section asymmetries with polarized beams and with longitudinally and transversely polarized proton targets in the constrained kinematics $x = \\pm \\xi$. In addition, unpolarized DVCS cross sections, and doubly polarized beam target asymmetries will be measured as well. In this talk only the beam and target asymmetries will be discussed.

  6. Statistical performance evaluation and comparison of a Compton medical imaging system and a collimated Anger camera for higher energy photon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Li; Rogers, W. Leslie; Huh, Sam S.; Clinthorne, Neal

    2008-12-01

    In radionuclide treatment, tumor cells are primarily destroyed by charged particles emitted by the compound while associated higher energy photons are used to image the tumor in order to determine radiation dose and monitor shrinkage. However, the higher energy photons are difficult to image with conventional collimated Anger cameras, since a tradeoff exists between resolution and sensitivity, and the collimator septal penetration and scattering is increased due to the high energy photons. This research compares imaging performance of the conventional Anger camera to a Compton imaging system that can have improved spatial resolution and sensitivity for high energy photons because this tradeoff is decoupled, and the effect of Doppler broadening at higher gamma energies is decreased. System performance is analyzed by the modified uniform Cramer-Rao bound (M-UCRB) algorithms based on the developed system modeling. The bound shows that the effect of Doppler broadening is the limiting factor for Compton camera performance for imaging 364.4 keV photons emitted from 131I. According to the bound, the Compton camera outperforms the collimated system for an equal number of detected events when the desired spatial resolution for a 26 cm diameter uniform disk object is better than 12 mm FWHM. For a 3D cylindrical phantom, the lower bound on variance for the collimated camera is greater than for the Compton imaginer over the resolution range from 0.5 to 2 cm FWHM. Furthermore, the detection sensitivity of the proposed Compton imaging system is about 15-20 times higher than that of the collimated Anger camera.

  7. IFSAR processing for 3D target reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Christian D.; Moses, Randolph L.

    2005-05-01

    In this paper we investigate the use of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) processing for the 3D reconstruction of radar targets. A major source of reconstruction error is induced by multiple scattering responses in a resolution cell, giving rise to height errors. We present a model for multiple scattering centers and analyze the errors that result using traditional IFSAR height estimation. We present a simple geometric model that characterizes the height error and suggests tests for detecting or reducing this error. We consider the use of image magnitude difference as a test statistic to detect multiple scattering responses in a resolution cell, and we analyze the resulting height error reduction and hypothesis test performance using this statistic. Finally, we consider phase linearity test statistics when three or more IFSAR images are available. Examples using synthetic Xpatch backhoe imagery are presented.

  8. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  9. Evaluation of a multistage CdZnTe Compton camera for prompt γ imaging for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCleskey, M.; Kaye, W.; Mackin, D. S.; Beddar, S.; He, Z.; Polf, J. C.

    2015-06-01

    A new detector system, Polaris J from H3D, has been evaluated for its potential application as a Compton camera (CC) imaging device for prompt γ rays (PGs) emitted during proton radiation therapy (RT) for the purpose of dose range verification. This detector system consists of four independent CdZnTe detector stages and a coincidence module, allowing the user to construct a Compton camera in different geometrical configurations and to accept both double and triple scatter events. Energy resolution for the 662 keV line from 137Cs was found to be 9.7 keV FWHM. The raw absolute efficiencies for double and triple scatter events were 2.2 ×10-5 and 5.8 ×10-7, respectively, for γs from a 60Co source. The position resolution for the reconstruction of a point source from the measured CC data was about 2 mm. Overall, due to the low efficiency of the Polaris J CC, the current system was deemed not viable for imaging PGs emitted during proton RT treatment delivery. However, using a validated Monte Carlo model of the CC, we found that by increasing the size of the detectors and placing them in a two stage configuration, the efficiency could be increased to a level to make PG imaging possible during proton RT.

  10. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  11. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  12. Spectra of clinical CT scanners using a portable Compton spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Duisterwinkel, H. A.; Abbema, J. K. van; Kawachimaru, R.; Paganini, L.; Graaf, E. R. van der; Brandenburg, S.; Goethem, M. J. van

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Spectral information of the output of x-ray tubes in (dual source) computer tomography (CT) scanners can be used to improve the conversion of CT numbers to proton stopping power and can be used to advantage in CT scanner quality assurance. The purpose of this study is to design, validate, and apply a compact portable Compton spectrometer that was constructed to accurately measure x-ray spectra of CT scanners. Methods: In the design of the Compton spectrometer, the shielding materials were carefully chosen and positioned to reduce background by x-ray fluorescence from the materials used. The spectrum of Compton scattered x-rays alters from the original source spectrum due to various physical processes. Reconstruction of the original x-ray spectrum from the Compton scattered spectrum is based on Monte Carlo simulations of the processes involved. This reconstruction is validated by comparing directly and indirectly measured spectra of a mobile x-ray tube. The Compton spectrometer is assessed in a clinical setting by measuring x-ray spectra at various tube voltages of three different medical CT scanner x-ray tubes. Results: The directly and indirectly measured spectra are in good agreement (their ratio being 0.99) thereby validating the reconstruction method. The measured spectra of the medical CT scanners are consistent with theoretical spectra and spectra obtained from the x-ray tube manufacturer. Conclusions: A Compton spectrometer has been successfully designed, constructed, validated, and applied in the measurement of x-ray spectra of CT scanners. These measurements show that our compact Compton spectrometer can be rapidly set-up using the alignment lasers of the CT scanner, thereby enabling its use in commissioning, troubleshooting, and, e.g., annual performance check-ups of CT scanners.

  13. The development of a Compton lung densitometer

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, B.W.; Goulding, F.S.; Madden, N.W.; Simon, D.S.

    1988-11-01

    A field instrument is being developed for the non-invasive determination of absolute lung density using unique Compton backscattering techniques. A system consisting of a monoenergetic gamma-ray beam and a shielded high resolution high-purity-germanium (HPGe) detector in a close-coupled geometry is designed to minimize errors due to multiple scattering and uncontrollable attenuation in the chestwall. Results of studies on system performance with phantoms, the optimization of detectors, and the fabrication of a practical gamma-ray source are presented. 3 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  15. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  16. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  17. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  18. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible.

  19. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  20. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery. PMID:26657435

  1. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  2. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  3. High flux, narrow bandwidth compton light sources via extended laser-electron interactions

    DOEpatents

    Barty, V P

    2015-01-13

    New configurations of lasers and electron beams efficiently and robustly produce high flux beams of bright, tunable, polarized quasi-monoenergetic x-rays and gamma-rays via laser-Compton scattering. Specifically, the use of long-duration, pulsed lasers and closely-spaced, low-charge and low emittance bunches of electron beams increase the spectral flux of the Compton-scattered x-rays and gamma rays, increase efficiency of the laser-electron interaction and significantly reduce the overall complexity of Compton based light sources.

  4. Method and apparatus for measuring lung density by Compton backscattering

    DOEpatents

    Loo, B.W.; Goulding, F.S.

    1988-03-11

    The density of the lung of a patient suffering from pulmonary edema is monitored by irradiating the lung by a single collimated beam of monochromatic photons and measuring the energies of photons compton back-scattered from the lung by a single high-resolution, high-purity germanium detector. A compact system geometry and a unique data extraction scheme are utilized to minimize systematic errors due to the presence of the chestwall and multiple scattering. 11 figs., 1 tab.

  5. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  6. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  7. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  8. The scanning Compton polarimeter for the SLD experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, M.; SLD Collaboration

    1996-10-01

    For the 1994/95 run of the SLD experiment at SLAC, a Compton polarimeter measured the luminosity-weighted electron beam polarization to be (77.2 {+-} 0.5)%. This excellent accuracy is achieved by measuring the rate asymmetry of Compton-scattered electrons near the kinematic endpoint. The polarimeter takes data continuously while the electron and positron beams are in collision and achieves a statistical precision of better than 1% in a three minute run. To calibrate the polarimeter and demonstrate its accuracy, many scans are frequently done. These include scans of the laser polarization, the detector position with respect to the kinematic edge, and the laser power.

  9. Fallon FORGE 3D Geologic Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-03-01

    An x,y,z scattered data file for the 3D geologic model of the Fallon FORGE site. Model created in Earthvision by Dynamic Graphic Inc. The model was constructed with a grid spacing of 100 m. Geologic surfaces were extrapolated from the input data using a minimum tension gridding algorithm. The data file is tabular data in a text file, with lithology data associated with X,Y,Z grid points. All the relevant information is in the file header (the spatial reference, the projection etc.) In addition all the fields in the data file are identified in the header.

  10. Synchrotron Self-Compton Emission from the Crab and Other Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Kalapotharakos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Results of a simulation of synchrotron-self Compton (SSC) emission from a rotation-powered pulsar are presented. The radiating particles are assumed to be both accelerated primary electrons and a spectrum of electron-positron pairs produced in cascades near the polar cap. They follow trajectories in a slot gap using 3D force-free magnetic field geometry, gaining pitch angles through resonant cyclotron absorption of radio photons, radiating and scattering synchrotron emission at high altitudes out to and beyond the light cylinder. Full angular dependence of the synchrotron photon density is simulated in the scattering and all processes are treated in the inertial observer frame. Spectra for the Crab and Vela pulsars as well as two energetic millisecond pulsars, B1821-24 and B1937+21 are simulated using this model. The simulation of the Crab pulsar radiation can reproduce both the flux level and the shape of the observed optical to hard X-ray emission assuming a pair multiplicity of M+ = 3x10(exp 5), as well as the very-high- energy emission above 50 GeV detected by MAGIC and VERITAS, with both the synchrotron and SSC components reflecting the shape of the pair spectrum. Simulations of Vela, B1821-24 and B1937+21, for M+ up to 10(exp 5), do not produce pair SSC emission that is detectable by current telescopes, indicating that only Crab-like pulsars produce significant SSC components. The pair synchrotron emission matches the observed X-ray spectrum of the millisecond pulsars and the predicted peak of this emission at 1-10 MeV would be detectable with planned Compton telescopes.

  11. Spatially resolved 3D noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefner, David P.; Preece, Bradley L.; Doe, Joshua M.; Burks, Stephen D.

    2016-05-01

    When evaluated with a spatially uniform irradiance, an imaging sensor exhibits both spatial and temporal variations, which can be described as a three-dimensional (3D) random process considered as noise. In the 1990s, NVESD engineers developed an approximation to the 3D power spectral density (PSD) for noise in imaging systems known as 3D noise. In this correspondence, we describe how the confidence intervals for the 3D noise measurement allows for determination of the sampling necessary to reach a desired precision. We then apply that knowledge to create a smaller cube that can be evaluated spatially across the 2D image giving the noise as a function of position. The method presented here allows for both defective pixel identification and implements the finite sampling correction matrix. In support of the reproducible research effort, the Matlab functions associated with this work can be found on the Mathworks file exchange [1].

  12. Accepting the T3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, D.O.; Pope, S.C.; DeLapp, J.G.

    1994-10-01

    In April, a 128 PE Cray T3D was installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Advanced Computing Laboratory as part of the DOE`s High-Performance Parallel Processor Program (H4P). In conjunction with CRI, the authors implemented a 30 day acceptance test. The test was constructed in part to help them understand the strengths and weaknesses of the T3D. In this paper, they briefly describe the H4P and its goals. They discuss the design and implementation of the T3D acceptance test and detail issues that arose during the test. They conclude with a set of system requirements that must be addressed as the T3D system evolves.

  13. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  14. 3D Multigroup Sn Neutron Transport Code

    2001-02-14

    ATTILA is a 3D multigroup transport code with arbitrary order ansotropic scatter. The transport equation is solved in first order form using a tri-linear discontinuous spatial differencing on an arbitrary tetrahedral mesh. The overall solution technique is source iteration with DSA acceleration of the scattering source. Anisotropic boundary and internal sources may be entered in the form of spherical harmonics moments. Alpha and k eigenvalue problems are allowed, as well as fixed source problems. Forwardmore » and adjoint solutions are available. Reflective, vacumn, and source boundary conditions are available. ATTILA can perform charged particle transport calculations using slowing down (CSD) terms. ATTILA can also be used to peform infra-red steady-state calculations for radiative transfer purposes.« less

  15. External inverse-Compton Emission from Blazar Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, Jennifer E.; Chiang, James; /SLAC

    2007-09-25

    According to leptonic models for the high-energy emission from blazars, relativistic electrons in the inner jets inverse-Compton scatter photons from a variety of sources. Seed photons are certainly introduced via the synchrotron process from the electrons themselves, but external sources of seed photons may also be present. In this paper, we present detailed derivations of the equations describing external inverse-Compton scattering from two sources of seed photons: direct emission from the accretion disk, and accretion disk photons that have scattered off the broad line region. For each source, we derive the seed photon spectrum incident on the jet, the single electron energy loss rate, and the emitted photon spectrum.

  16. A 3D CZT hard x-ray polarimeter for a balloon-borne payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caroli, E.; Alvarez, J. M.; Auricchio, N.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Curado da Silva, R. M.; Del Sordo, S.; Ferrando, P.; Laurent, P.; Limousin, O.; Galvèz, J. L.; Gloster, C. P.; Hernanz, M.; Isern, J.; Kuvvetli, I.; Maia, J. M.; Meuris, A.; Stephen, J. B.; Zappettini, A.

    2012-09-01

    Today it is widely recognised that a measurement of the polarization status of cosmic sources high energy emission is a key observational parameter to understand the active production mechanism and its geometry. Therefore new instrumentation operating in the hard X/soft γ rays energy range should be optimized also for this type of measurement. In this framework, we present the concept of a small high-performance spectrometer designed for polarimetry between 100 and 1000 keV suitable as a stratospheric balloon-borne payload dedicated to perform an accurate and reliable measurement of the polarization status of the Crab pulsar, i.e. the polarization level and direction. The detector with 3D spatial resolution is based on a CZT spectrometer in a highly segmented configuration designed to operate as a high performance scattering polarimeter. We discuss different configurations based on recent development results and possible improvements currently under study. Furthermore we describe a possible baseline design of the payload, which can be also seen as a pathfinder for a high performance focal plane detector in new hard X and soft gamma ray focussing telescopes and/or advanced Compton instruments. Finally we present preliminary data from Montecarlo undergoing studies to determine the best trade-off between polarimetric performance and detector design complexity.

  17. LASTRAC.3d: Transition Prediction in 3D Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2004-01-01

    Langley Stability and Transition Analysis Code (LASTRAC) is a general-purpose, physics-based transition prediction code released by NASA for laminar flow control studies and transition research. This paper describes the LASTRAC extension to general three-dimensional (3D) boundary layers such as finite swept wings, cones, or bodies at an angle of attack. The stability problem is formulated by using a body-fitted nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinate system constructed on the body surface. The nonorthogonal coordinate system offers a variety of marching paths and spanwise waveforms. In the extreme case of an infinite swept wing boundary layer, marching with a nonorthogonal coordinate produces identical solutions to those obtained with an orthogonal coordinate system using the earlier release of LASTRAC. Several methods to formulate the 3D parabolized stability equations (PSE) are discussed. A surface-marching procedure akin to that for 3D boundary layer equations may be used to solve the 3D parabolized disturbance equations. On the other hand, the local line-marching PSE method, formulated as an easy extension from its 2D counterpart and capable of handling the spanwise mean flow and disturbance variation, offers an alternative. A linear stability theory or parabolized stability equations based N-factor analysis carried out along the streamline direction with a fixed wavelength and downstream-varying spanwise direction constitutes an efficient engineering approach to study instability wave evolution in a 3D boundary layer. The surface-marching PSE method enables a consistent treatment of the disturbance evolution along both streamwise and spanwise directions but requires more stringent initial conditions. Both PSE methods and the traditional LST approach are implemented in the LASTRAC.3d code. Several test cases for tapered or finite swept wings and cones at an angle of attack are discussed.

  18. 3D Ultrasonic Wave Simulations for Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Leckey Cara A/; Miler, Corey A.; Hinders, Mark K.

    2011-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) for the detection of damage in aerospace materials is an important area of research at NASA. Ultrasonic guided Lamb waves are a promising SHM damage detection technique since the waves can propagate long distances. For complicated flaw geometries experimental signals can be difficult to interpret. High performance computing can now handle full 3-dimensional (3D) simulations of elastic wave propagation in materials. We have developed and implemented parallel 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (3D EFIT) code to investigate ultrasound scattering from flaws in materials. EFIT results have been compared to experimental data and the simulations provide unique insight into details of the wave behavior. This type of insight is useful for developing optimized experimental SHM techniques. 3D EFIT can also be expanded to model wave propagation and scattering in anisotropic composite materials.

  19. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  20. A Compton profile representation for some second period elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Geoffrey; Olesinski, Stephan

    2011-09-01

    Compton profiles for the elements C, N and O, which are important both in medical science and security screening, are represented here as weighted sums of three Gaussians. Simple scaling relationships describe the dependence on atomic number ( Z) of the amplitudes and standard deviations of the component Gaussians, which are identified with the Compton profiles of the 1s, 2s and 2p orbitals. This representation of the Compton profile agrees with tabulated values for C, N and O to a rms deviation of the order of 1% of the mean profile amplitude over the momentum range 0≤ q≤4, where q is expressed in units of the hydrogen ground state momentum. This representation allows a "mean atomic number" for mixtures and compounds dominated by second period elements to be assigned on the basis of experimental measurements of the Doppler broadening of back-scattered X-ray K characteristic lines. Processed spectra of water and ethanol from a Compton spectrometer equipped with a room-temperature semiconductor detector are compared with the Compton profiles synthesized as suggested here, and a satisfactory agreement between the measured and theoretical mean atomic numbers and the profile shapes is found.

  1. Results of a Si/Cdte Compton Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Oonuki, Kousuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Watanabe, Shin; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Mitani, Takefumi; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Nomachi, Masaharu; /Sagamihara, Inst. Space Astron. Sci. /Tokyo U. /SLAC /Hiroshima U. /Osaka U.

    2005-09-23

    We have been developing a semiconductor Compton telescope to explore the universe in the energy band from several tens of keV to a few MeV. We use a Si strip and CdTe pixel detector for the Compton telescope to cover an energy range from 60 keV. For energies above several hundred keV, the higher efficiency of CdTe semiconductor in comparison with Si is expected to play an important role as an absorber and a scatterer. In order to demonstrate the spectral and imaging capability of a CdTe-based Compton Telescope, we have developed a Compton telescope consisting of a stack of CdTe pixel detectors as a small scale prototype. With this prototype, we succeeded in reconstructing images and spectra by solving the Compton equation from 122 keV to 662 keV. The energy resolution (FWHM) of reconstructed spectra is 7.3 keV at 511 keV and 3.1 keV at 122 keV, respectively. The angular resolution obtained at 511 keV is measured to be 12.2{sup o}(FWHM).

  2. 3D structure and nuclear targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupré, Raphaël; Scopetta, Sergio

    2016-06-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical ideas are laying the ground for a new era in the knowledge of the parton structure of nuclei. We report on two promising directions beyond inclusive deep inelastic scattering experiments, aimed at, among other goals, unveiling the three-dimensional structure of the bound nucleon. The 3D structure in coordinate space can be accessed through deep exclusive processes, whose non-perturbative content is parametrized in terms of generalized parton distributions. In this way the distribution of partons in the transverse plane will be obtained, providing a pictorial view of the realization of the European Muon Collaboration effect. In particular, we show how, through the generalized parton distribution framework, non-nucleonic degrees of freedom in nuclei can be unveiled. Analogously, the momentum space 3D structure can be accessed by studying transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering processes. The status of measurements is also summarized, in particular novel coincidence measurements at high-luminosity facilities, such as Jefferson Laboratory. Finally the prospects for the next years at future facilities, such as the 12GeV Jefferson Laboratory and the Electron Ion Collider, are presented.

  3. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  4. Remote 3D Medical Consultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Greg; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry; Cairns, Bruce; Mayer-Patel, Ketan; Yang, Ruigang; State, Andrei; Towles, Herman; Ilie, Adrian; Krishnan, Srinivas; Söderholm, Hanna M.

    Two-dimensional (2D) video-based telemedical consultation has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years. Two issues that seem to arise in most relevant case studies are the difficulty associated with obtaining the desired 2D camera views, and poor depth perception. To address these problems we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to synthesize a spatially continuous range of dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and events. The 3D views can be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote viewers with fixed displays or mobile devices such as a personal digital assistant (PDA). The viewpoints could be specified manually or automatically via user head or PDA tracking, giving the remote viewer virtual head- or hand-slaved (PDA-based) remote cameras for mono or stereo viewing. We call this idea remote 3D medical consultation (3DMC). In this article we motivate and explain the vision for 3D medical consultation; we describe the relevant computer vision/graphics, display, and networking research; we present a proof-of-concept prototype system; and we present some early experimental results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical consultation could offer benefits over conventional 2D televideo.

  5. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  6. 3D-Printed Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony K; Huynh, Wilson; Horowitz, Lisa F; Folch, Albert

    2016-03-14

    The advent of soft lithography allowed for an unprecedented expansion in the field of microfluidics. However, the vast majority of PDMS microfluidic devices are still made with extensive manual labor, are tethered to bulky control systems, and have cumbersome user interfaces, which all render commercialization difficult. On the other hand, 3D printing has begun to embrace the range of sizes and materials that appeal to the developers of microfluidic devices. Prior to fabrication, a design is digitally built as a detailed 3D CAD file. The design can be assembled in modules by remotely collaborating teams, and its mechanical and fluidic behavior can be simulated using finite-element modeling. As structures are created by adding materials without the need for etching or dissolution, processing is environmentally friendly and economically efficient. We predict that in the next few years, 3D printing will replace most PDMS and plastic molding techniques in academia.

  7. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  8. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  9. SNL3dFace

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial featuresmore » of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.« less

  10. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  11. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  12. Synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission from blazar jets - III. Compton-dominant blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, William J.; Cotter, Garret

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we develop the extended jet model of Potter & Cotter to model the simultaneous multiwavelength spectra of six Compton-dominant blazars. We include an accelerating parabolic base transitioning to a slowly decelerating conical jet with a geometry set by observations of M87 and consistent with simulations and theory. We investigate several jet models and find that the optically thick to thin synchrotron break in the radio spectrum requires the jet to first come into equipartition at large distances along the jet, consistent with the observed transition from parabolic to conical at 105Rs in the jet of M87. We confirm this result analytically and calculate the expected frequency core-shift relations for the models under consideration. We find that a parabolic jet transitioning to a ballistic conical jet at 105Rs, which starts in equipartition and becomes more particle dominated at larger distances, fits the multiwavelength data of the six blazars well, whilst an adiabatic equipartition conical section requires very large bulk Lorentz factors to reproduce the Compton dominance of the blazars. We find that all these blazars require high power (>1039 W), high bulk Lorentz factor (>20) jets observed close to the line of sight (<2°) as we expect from the blazar sequence and consistent with the results from Paper II. The inverse-Compton emission in our fits is due to inverse-Compton scattering of high-redshift cosmic microwave background photons at large distances along the jet due to the high bulk Lorentz factors of the jets. We postulate a new interpretation of the blazar sequence based on the radius of the transition region of the jet (where the jet is brightest in synchrotron emission) scaling linearly with black hole mass.

  13. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  14. Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D.; Huang, Zhirong

    2000-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  15. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, R.D.; Huang, Z.

    1998-10-20

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source is disclosed for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications. 4 figs.

  16. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D.; Huang, Zhirong

    1998-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  17. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar detection and estimation based 3D image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Christian D.; Moses, Randolph L.

    2006-05-01

    This paper explores three-dimensional (3D) interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) image reconstruction when multiple scattering centers and noise are present in a radar resolution cell. We introduce an IFSAR scattering model that accounts for both multiple scattering centers and noise. The problem of 3D image reconstruction is then posed as a multiple hypothesis detection and estimation problem; resolution cells containing a single scattering center are detected and the 3D location of these cells' pixels are estimated; all other pixels are rejected from the image. Detection and estimation statistics are derived using the multiple scattering center IFSAR model. A 3D image reconstruction algorithm using these statistics is then presented, and its performance is evaluated for a 3D reconstruction of a backhoe from noisy IFSAR data.

  18. Forensic 3D scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles Q.; Small, Daniel E.; Peters, Ralph R.; Rigdon, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a fieldable prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  19. 3D Printable Graphene Composite.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-08

    In human being's history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today's personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite's linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C(-1) from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  20. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.