Science.gov

Sample records for 3d confocal microscopy

  1. 3D imaging of neutron tracks using confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Wertheim, David; Flowers, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Neutron detection and neutron flux assessment are important aspects in monitoring nuclear energy production. Neutron flux measurements can also provide information on potential biological damage from exposure. In addition to the applications for neutron measurement in nuclear energy, neutron detection has been proposed as a method of enhancing neutrino detectors and cosmic ray flux has also been assessed using ground-level neutron detectors. Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (or SSNTDs) have been used extensively to examine cosmic rays, long-lived radioactive elements, radon concentrations in buildings and the age of geological samples. Passive SSNTDs consisting of a CR-39 plastic are commonly used to measure radon because they respond to incident charged particles such as alpha particles from radon gas in air. They have a large dynamic range and a linear flux response. We have previously applied confocal microscopy to obtain 3D images of alpha particle tracks in SSNTDs from radon track monitoring (1). As a charged particle traverses through the polymer it creates an ionisation trail along its path. The trail or track is normally enhanced by chemical etching to better expose radiation damage, as the damaged area is more sensitive to the etchant than the bulk material. Particle tracks in CR-39 are usually assessed using 2D optical microscopy. In this study 6 detectors were examined using an Olympus OLS4100 LEXT 3D laser scanning confocal microscope (Olympus Corporation, Japan). The detectors had been etched for 2 hours 50 minutes at 85 °C in 6.25M NaOH. Post etch the plastics had been treated with a 10 minute immersion in a 2% acetic acid stop bath, followed by rinsing in deionised water. The detectors examined had been irradiated with a 2mSv neutron dose from an Am(Be) neutron source (producing roughly 20 tracks per mm2). We were able to successfully acquire 3D images of neutron tracks in the detectors studied. The range of track diameter observed was between 4

  2. Correlative Confocal and 3D Electron Microscopy of a Specific Sensory Cell

    PubMed Central

    Bohórquez, Diego; Haque, Fariha; Medicetty, Satish; Liddle, Rodger A.

    2015-01-01

    Delineation of a cell’s ultrastructure is important for understanding its function. This can be a daunting project for rare cell types diffused throughout tissues made of diverse cell types, such as enteroendocrine cells of the intestinal epithelium. These gastrointestinal sensors of food and bacteria have been difficult to study because they are dispersed among other epithelial cells at a ratio of 1:1,000. Recently, transgenic reporter mice have been generated to identify enteroendocrine cells by means of fluorescence. One of those is the peptide YY-GFP mouse. Using this mouse, we developed a method to correlate confocal and serial block-face scanning electron microscopy. We named the method cocem3D and applied it to identify a specific enteroendocrine cell in tissue and unveil the cell’s ultrastructure in 3D. The resolution of cocem3D is sufficient to identify organelles as small as secretory vesicles and to distinguish cell membranes for volume rendering. Cocem3D can be easily adapted to study the 3D ultrastructure of other specific cell types in their native tissue. PMID:26273796

  3. Spectral mapping of 3D multi-cellular tumor spheroids: time-resolved confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Saswat; Nandi, Somen; Chowdhury, Rajdeep; Das, Gaurav; Ghosh, Surajit; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2016-07-21

    A tumor-like multi-cellular spheroid (3D) differs from a 2D cell in a number of ways. This is demonstrated using time resolved confocal microscopy. Two different tumor spheroids - HeLa (cervical cancer) and A549 (lung cancer) - are studied using 3 different fluorescent dyes - C153 (non-covalent), CPM (covalent) and doxorubicin (non-covalent, anti-cancer drug). The pattern of localization of these three fluorescent probes in the 3D tumor cell exhibits significant differences from that in the conventional 2D cells. For both the cells (HeLa and A549), the total uptake of doxorubicin in the 3D cell is much lower than that in the 2D cell. The uptake of doxorubicin molecules in the A549 spheroid is significantly different compared to the HeLa spheroid. The local polarity (i.e. emission maxima) and solvation dynamics in the 3D tumor cell differ from those in 2D cells. The covalent probe CPM exhibits intermittent fluorescence oscillations in the 1-2 s time scale. This is attributed to redox processes. These results may provide new insights into 3D tumors. PMID:27336201

  4. Performance and sensitivity evaluation of 3D spot detection methods in confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Štěpka, Karel; Matula, Pavel; Matula, Petr; Wörz, Stefan; Rohr, Karl; Kozubek, Michal

    2015-08-01

    Reliable 3D detection of diffraction-limited spots in fluorescence microscopy images is an important task in subcellular observation. Generally, fluorescence microscopy images are heavily degraded by noise and non-specifically stained background, making reliable detection a challenging task. In this work, we have studied the performance and parameter sensitivity of eight recent methods for 3D spot detection. The study is based on both 3D synthetic image data and 3D real confocal microscopy images. The synthetic images were generated using a simulator modeling the complete imaging setup, including the optical path as well as the image acquisition process. We studied the detection performance and parameter sensitivity under different noise levels and under the influence of uneven background signal. To evaluate the parameter sensitivity, we propose a novel measure based on the gradient magnitude of the F1 score. We measured the success rate of the individual methods for different types of the image data and found that the type of image degradation is an important factor. Using the F1 score and the newly proposed sensitivity measure, we found that the parameter sensitivity is not necessarily proportional to the success rate of a method. This also provided an explanation why the best performing method for synthetic data was outperformed by other methods when applied to the real microscopy images. On the basis of the results obtained, we conclude with the recommendation of the HDome method for data with relatively low variations in quality, or the Sorokin method for image sets in which the quality varies more. We also provide alternative recommendations for high-quality images, and for situations in which detailed parameter tuning might be deemed expensive. PMID:26033916

  5. 3D Axon structure extraction and analysis in confocal fluorescence microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Xiaobo; Lu, Ju; Lichtman, Jeff; Adjeroh, Donald; Wong, Stephen T C

    2008-08-01

    The morphological properties of axons, such as their branching patterns and oriented structures, are of great interest for biologists in the study of the synaptic connectivity of neurons. In these studies, researchers use triple immunofluorescent confocal microscopy to record morphological changes of neuronal processes. Three-dimensional (3D) microscopy image analysis is then required to extract morphological features of the neuronal structures. In this article, we propose a highly automated 3D centerline extraction tool to assist in this task. For this project, the most difficult part is that some axons are overlapping such that the boundaries distinguishing them are barely visible. Our approach combines a 3D dynamic programming (DP) technique and marker-controlled watershed algorithm to solve this problem. The approach consists of tracking and updating along the navigation directions of multiple axons simultaneously. The experimental results show that the proposed method can rapidly and accurately extract multiple axon centerlines and can handle complicated axon structures such as cross-over sections and overlapping objects. PMID:18336075

  6. Comparison of 3D orientation distribution functions measured with confocal microscopy and diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Kurt; Janve, Vaibhav; Gao, Yurui; Stepniewska, Iwona; Landman, Bennett A; Anderson, Adam W

    2016-04-01

    The ability of diffusion MRI (dMRI) fiber tractography to non-invasively map three-dimensional (3D) anatomical networks in the human brain has made it a valuable tool in both clinical and research settings. However, there are many assumptions inherent to any tractography algorithm that can limit the accuracy of the reconstructed fiber tracts. Among them is the assumption that the diffusion-weighted images accurately reflect the underlying fiber orientation distribution (FOD) in the MRI voxel. Consequently, validating dMRI's ability to assess the underlying fiber orientation in each voxel is critical for its use as a biomedical tool. Here, using post-mortem histology and confocal microscopy, we present a method to perform histological validation of orientation functions in 3D, which has previously been limited to two-dimensional analysis of tissue sections. We demonstrate the ability to extract the 3D FOD from confocal z-stacks, and quantify the agreement between the MRI estimates of orientation information obtained using constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD) and the true geometry of the fibers. We find an orientation error of approximately 6° in voxels containing nearly parallel fibers, and 10-11° in crossing fiber regions, and note that CSD was unable to resolve fibers crossing at angles below 60° in our dataset. This is the first time that the 3D white matter orientation distribution is calculated from histology and compared to dMRI. Thus, this technique serves as a gold standard for dMRI validation studies - providing the ability to determine the extent to which the dMRI signal is consistent with the histological FOD, and to establish how well different dMRI models can predict the ground truth FOD. PMID:26804781

  7. Confocal Microscopy of thick tissue sections: 3D Visualization of rat kidney glomeruli

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) as a technique capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer-acquired images as a virtual 3-dimentional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning approac...

  8. Confocal microscopy of thick tissue sections: 3D visualizaiton of rat kidney glomeruli

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) as a technique capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer-acquired images as a virtual 3-dimentional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning approac...

  9. 3D Quantitative Confocal Laser Microscopy of Ilmenite Volume Distribution in Alpe Arami Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhilov, K. N.

    2001-12-01

    The deep origin of the Alpe Arami garnet lherzolite massif in the Swiss Alps proposed by Dobrzhinetskaya et al. (Science, 1996) has been a focus of heated debate. One of the lines of evidence supporting an exhumation from more than 200 km depth includes the abundance, distribution, and orientation of magnesian ilmenite rods in the oldest generation of olivine. This argument has been disputed in terms of the abundance of ilmenite and consequently the maximum TiO2 content in the discussed olivine. In order to address this issue, we have directly measured the volume fraction of ilmenite of the oldest generation of olivine by applying confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). CLSM is a method which allows for three-dimensional imaging and quantitative volume determination by optical sectioning of the objects. The images for 3D reconstruction and measurements were acquired from petrographic thin sections in reflected laser light with 488 nm wavelength. Measurements of more than 80 olivine grains in six thin sections of our material yielded an average volume fraction of 0.31% ilmenite in the oldest generation of olivine from Alpe Arami. This translates into 0.23 wt.% TiO2 in olivine with error in determination of ±0.097 wt.%, a value significantly different from that of 0.02 to 0.03 wt.% TiO2 determined by Hacker et al. (Science, 1997) by a broad-beam microanalysis technique. During the complex geological history of the Alpe Arami massif, several events of metamorphism are recorded which all could have caused increased mobility of the mineral components. Evidence for loss of TiO2 from olivine is the tendency for high densities of ilmenite to be restricted to cores of old grains, the complete absence of ilmenite inclusions from the younger, recrystallized, generation of olivine, and reduction in ilmenite size and abundance in more serpentinized specimens. These observations suggest that only olivine grains with the highest concentrations of ilmenite are close to the

  10. Parallel deconvolution of large 3D images obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pawliczek, Piotr; Romanowska-Pawliczek, Anna; Soltys, Zbigniew

    2010-03-01

    Various deconvolution algorithms are often used for restoration of digital images. Image deconvolution is especially needed for the correction of three-dimensional images obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Such images suffer from distortions, particularly in the Z dimension. As a result, reliable automatic segmentation of these images may be difficult or even impossible. Effective deconvolution algorithms are memory-intensive and time-consuming. In this work, we propose a parallel version of the well-known Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm developed for a system with distributed memory and implemented with the use of Message Passing Interface (MPI). It enables significantly more rapid deconvolution of two-dimensional and three-dimensional images by efficiently splitting the computation across multiple computers. The implementation of this algorithm can be used on professional clusters provided by computing centers as well as on simple networks of ordinary PC machines. PMID:19725070

  11. Quantification of fluorescent spots in time series of 3D confocal microscopy images of endoplasmic reticulum exit sites based on the HMAX transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matula, Petr; Verissimo, Fatima; Wörz, Stefan; Eils, Roland; Pepperkok, Rainer; Rohr, Karl

    2010-03-01

    We present an approach for the quantification of fluorescent spots in time series of 3-D confocal microscopy images of endoplasmic reticulum exit sites of dividing cells. Fluorescent spots are detected based on extracted image regions of highest response using the HMAX transform and prior convolution of the 3-D images with a Gaussian kernel. The sensitivity of the involved parameters was studied and a quantitative evaluation using both 3-D synthetic and 3-D real data was performed. The approach was successfully applied to more than one thousand 3-D confocal microscopy images.

  12. Analyzing Remodeling of Cardiac Tissue: A Comprehensive Approach Based on Confocal Microscopy and 3D Reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Thomas; Edelmann, J-C; Sachse, Frank B

    2016-05-01

    Microstructural characterization of cardiac tissue and its remodeling in disease is a crucial step in many basic research projects. We present a comprehensive approach for three-dimensional characterization of cardiac tissue at the submicrometer scale. We developed a compression-free mounting method as well as labeling and imaging protocols that facilitate acquisition of three-dimensional image stacks with scanning confocal microscopy. We evaluated the approach with normal and infarcted ventricular tissue. We used the acquired image stacks for segmentation, quantitative analysis and visualization of important tissue components. In contrast to conventional mounting, compression-free mounting preserved cell shapes, capillary lumens and extracellular laminas. Furthermore, the new approach and imaging protocols resulted in high signal-to-noise ratios at depths up to 60 µm. This allowed extensive analyzes revealing major differences in volume fractions and distribution of cardiomyocytes, blood vessels, fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and extracellular space in control vs. infarct border zone. Our results show that the developed approach yields comprehensive data on microstructure of cardiac tissue and its remodeling in disease. In contrast to other approaches, it allows quantitative assessment of all major tissue components. Furthermore, we suggest that the approach will provide important data for physiological models of cardiac tissue at the submicrometer scale. PMID:26399990

  13. 3D image restoration for confocal microscopy: toward a wavelet deconvolution for the study of complex biological structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutet de Monvel, Jacques; Le Calvez, Sophie; Ulfendahl, Mats

    2000-05-01

    Image restoration algorithms provide efficient tools for recovering part of the information lost in the imaging process of a microscope. We describe recent progress in the application of deconvolution to confocal microscopy. The point spread function of a Biorad-MRC1024 confocal microscope was measured under various imaging conditions, and used to process 3D-confocal images acquired in an intact preparation of the inner ear developed at Karolinska Institutet. Using these experiments we investigate the application of denoising methods based on wavelet analysis as a natural regularization of the deconvolution process. Within the Bayesian approach to image restoration, we compare wavelet denoising with the use of a maximum entropy constraint as another natural regularization method. Numerical experiments performed with test images show a clear advantage of the wavelet denoising approach, allowing to `cool down' the image with respect to the signal, while suppressing much of the fine-scale artifacts appearing during deconvolution due to the presence of noise, incomplete knowledge of the point spread function, or undersampling problems. We further describe a natural development of this approach, which consists of performing the Bayesian inference directly in the wavelet domain.

  14. Influences of edges and steep slopes in 3D interference and confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Weichang; Hagemeier, Sebastian; Woidt, Carsten; Hillmer, Harmut; Lehmann, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Optical measurement techniques are widely applied in high-resolution contour, topography and roughness measurement. In this context vertical scanning white-light interferometers and confocal microscopes have become mature instruments over the last decades. The accuracy of measurement results is highly related not only to the type and physical properties of the measuring instruments, but also to the measurement object itself. This contribution focuses on measurement effects occurring at edges and height steps using white-light interferometers of different numerical apertures. If the edge is perfectly perpendicular, batwing effects appear at height steps. These batwings show maximum height if the height-to-wavelength-ratio (HWR) is about one forth or three forth, and they disappear if the HWR value is about an integer multiple of one half. The wavelength that is relevant in this context is the effective wavelength, i.e. the center wavelength of the illuminating light multiplied by a correction factor known as the numerical aperture correction. However, in practice the edges are usually not perfectly perpendicular. In this case, the measurement results depend also on the derivative of the surface height function and they may differ from theory and the prediction according to the HWR value. Measurements of such steps show systematical effects depending on the lateral resolution of the instrument. In this context, a Linnik interferometer with a magnification of 100x and NA = 0.9 is used to characterize the three dimensional topography of more or less rectangular calibration specimens and quasi-perpendicular structures produced by the nanoimprint technology. The Linnik interferometer is equipped with LED light sources emitting at different wavelengths, so that the HWR value can be changed. This is possible since the high NA objective lenses show a rather limited depth of focus such that the temporal coherence gating may be replaced by focal gating in this

  15. 3-D laser confocal microscopy study of the oxidation of NdFeB magnets in atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meakin, J. P.; Speight, J. D.; Sheridan, R. S.; Bradshaw, A.; Harris, I. R.; Williams, A. J.; Walton, A.

    2016-08-01

    Neodymium iron boron (NdFeB) magnets are used in a number of important applications, such as generators in gearless wind turbines, motors in electric vehicles and electronic goods (e.g.- computer hard disk drives, HDD). Hydrogen can be used as a processing gas to separate and recycle scrap sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets from end-of-life products to form a powder suitable for recycling. However, the magnets are likely to have been exposed to atmospheric conditions prior to processing, and any oxidation could lead to activation problems for the hydrogen decrepitation reaction. Many previous studies on the oxidation of NdFeB magnets have been performed at elevated temperatures; however, few studies have been formed under atmospheric conditions. In this paper a combination of 3-D laser confocal microscopy and Raman spectroscopy have been used to assess the composition, morphology and rate of oxidation/corrosion on scrap sintered NdFeB magnets. Confocal microscopy has been employed to measure the growth of surface reaction products at room temperature, immediately after exposure to air. The results showed that there was a significant height increase at the triple junctions of the Nd-rich grain boundaries. Using Raman spectroscopy, the product was shown to consist of Nd2O3 and formed only on the Nd-rich triple junctions. The diffusion coefficient of the triple junction reaction product growth at 20 °C was determined to be approximately 4 × 10-13 cm2/sec. This value is several orders of magnitude larger than values derived from the diffusion controlled oxide growth observations at elevated temperatures in the literature. This indicates that the growth of the room temperature oxidation products are likely defect enhanced processes at the NdFeB triple junctions.

  16. Enhancing 3-D cell structures in confocal and STED microscopy: a joint model for interpolation, deblurring and anisotropic smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persch, Nico; Elhayek, Ahmed; Welk, Martin; Bruhn, Andrés; Grewenig, Sven; Böse, Katharina; Kraegeloh, Annette; Weickert, Joachim

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes an advanced image enhancement method that is specifically tailored towards 3-D confocal and STED microscopy imagery. Our approach unifies image denoising, deblurring and interpolation in one joint method to handle the typical weaknesses of these advanced microscopy techniques: out-of-focus blur, Poisson noise and low axial resolution. In detail, we propose the combination of (i) Richardson-Lucy deconvolution, (ii) image restoration and (iii) anisotropic inpainting in one single scheme. To this end, we develop a novel PDE-based model that realizes these three ideas. First we consider a basic variational image restoration functional that is turned into a joint interpolation scheme by extending the regularization domain. Next, we integrate the variational representation of Richardson-Lucy deconvolution into our model, and illustrate its relation to Poisson distributed noise. In the following step, we supplement the components of our model with sub-quadratic penalization strategies that increase the robustness of the overall method. Finally, we consider the associated minimality conditions, where we exchange the occurring scalar-valued diffusivity function by a so-called diffusion tensor. This leads to an anisotropic regularization that is aligned with structures in the evolving image. As a further contribution of this paper, we propose a more efficient and faster semi-implicit iteration scheme that also increases the stability. Our experiments on real data sets demonstrate that this joint model achieves a superior reconstruction quality of the recorded cell.

  17. Detection of latent fingerprints using high-resolution 3D confocal microscopy in non-planar acquisition scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirst, Stefan; Vielhauer, Claus

    2015-03-01

    In digitized forensics the support of investigators in any manner is one of the main goals. Using conservative lifting methods, the detection of traces is done manually. For non-destructive contactless methods, the necessity for detecting traces is obvious for further biometric analysis. High resolutional 3D confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) grants the possibility for a detection by segmentation approach with improved detection results. Optimal scan results with CLSM are achieved on surfaces orthogonal to the sensor, which is not always possible due to environmental circumstances or the surface's shape. This introduces additional noise, outliers and a lack of contrast, making a detection of traces even harder. Prior work showed the possibility of determining angle-independent classification models for the detection of latent fingerprints (LFP). Enhancing this approach, we introduce a larger feature space containing a variety of statistical-, roughness-, color-, edge-directivity-, histogram-, Gabor-, gradient- and Tamura features based on raw data and gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) using high resolutional data. Our test set consists of eight different surfaces for the detection of LFP in four different acquisition angles with a total of 1920 single scans. For each surface and angles in steps of 10, we capture samples from five donors to introduce variance by a variety of sweat compositions and application influences such as pressure or differences in ridge thickness. By analyzing the present test set with our approach, we intend to determine angle- and substrate-dependent classification models to determine optimal surface specific acquisition setups and also classification models for a general detection purpose for both, angles and substrates. The results on overall models with classification rates up to 75.15% (kappa 0.50) already show a positive tendency regarding the usability of the proposed methods for LFP detection on varying surfaces in non

  18. 3D Imaging of Porous Media Using Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy with Application to Microscale Transport Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrich, J.T.

    1999-02-10

    We present advances in the application of laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) to image, reconstruct, and characterize statistically the microgeometry of porous geologic and engineering materials. We discuss technical and practical aspects of this imaging technique, including both its advantages and limitations. Confocal imaging can be used to optically section a material, with sub-micron resolution possible in the lateral and axial planes. The resultant volumetric image data, consisting of fluorescence intensities for typically {approximately}50 million voxels in XYZ space, can be used to reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of the two-phase medium. We present several examples of this application, including studying pore geometry in sandstone, characterizing brittle failure processes in low-porosity rock deformed under triaxial loading conditions in the laboratory, and analyzing the microstructure of porous ceramic insulations. We then describe approaches to extract statistical microgeometric descriptions from volumetric image data, and present results derived from confocal volumetric data sets. Finally, we develop the use of confocal image data to automatically generate a three-dimensional mesh for numerical pore-scale flow simulations.

  19. FluoRender: An Application of 2D Image Space Methods for 3D and 4D Confocal Microscopy Data Visualization in Neurobiology Research

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yong; Otsuna, Hideo; Chien, Chi-Bin; Hansen, Charles

    2013-01-01

    2D image space methods are processing methods applied after the volumetric data are projected and rendered into the 2D image space, such as 2D filtering, tone mapping and compositing. In the application domain of volume visualization, most 2D image space methods can be carried out more efficiently than their 3D counterparts. Most importantly, 2D image space methods can be used to enhance volume visualization quality when applied together with volume rendering methods. In this paper, we present and discuss the applications of a series of 2D image space methods as enhancements to confocal microscopy visualizations, including 2D tone mapping, 2D compositing, and 2D color mapping. These methods are easily integrated with our existing confocal visualization tool, FluoRender, and the outcome is a full-featured visualization system that meets neurobiologists’ demands for qualitative analysis of confocal microscopy data. PMID:23584131

  20. 3D digital image processing for biofilm quantification from confocal laser scanning microscopy: Multidimensional statistical analysis of biofilm modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Jerzy S.

    The dramatic increase in number and volume of digital images produced in medical diagnostics, and the escalating demand for rapid access to these relevant medical data, along with the need for interpretation and retrieval has become of paramount importance to a modern healthcare system. Therefore, there is an ever growing need for processed, interpreted and saved images of various types. Due to the high cost and unreliability of human-dependent image analysis, it is necessary to develop an automated method for feature extraction, using sophisticated mathematical algorithms and reasoning. This work is focused on digital image signal processing of biological and biomedical data in one- two- and three-dimensional space. Methods and algorithms presented in this work were used to acquire data from genomic sequences, breast cancer, and biofilm images. One-dimensional analysis was applied to DNA sequences which were presented as a non-stationary sequence and modeled by a time-dependent autoregressive moving average (TD-ARMA) model. Two-dimensional analyses used 2D-ARMA model and applied it to detect breast cancer from x-ray mammograms or ultrasound images. Three-dimensional detection and classification techniques were applied to biofilm images acquired using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Modern medical images are geometrically arranged arrays of data. The broadening scope of imaging as a way to organize our observations of the biophysical world has led to a dramatic increase in our ability to apply new processing techniques and to combine multiple channels of data into sophisticated and complex mathematical models of physiological function and dysfunction. With explosion of the amount of data produced in a field of biomedicine, it is crucial to be able to construct accurate mathematical models of the data at hand. Two main purposes of signal modeling are: data size conservation and parameter extraction. Specifically, in biomedical imaging we have four key problems

  1. Highlighting the impact of aging on type I collagen: label-free investigation using confocal reflectance microscopy and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in 3D matrix model

    PubMed Central

    Terryn, Christine; Garnotel, Roselyne; Jeannesson, Pierre; Sockalingum, Ganesh D.; Manfait, Michel; Perraut, François; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Koenig, Anne; Piot, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    During aging, alterations of extracellular matrix proteins contribute to various pathological phenotypes. Among these alterations, type I collagen cross-linking and associated glycation products accumulation over time detrimentally affects its physico-chemical properties, leading to alterations of tissue biomechanical stability. Here, different-age collagen 3D matrices using non-destructive and label-free biophotonic techniques were analysed to highlight the impact of collagen I aging on 3D constructs, at macroscopic and microscopic levels. Matrices were prepared with collagens extracted from tail tendons of rats (newborns, young and old adults) to be within the physiological aging process. The data of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy reveal that aging leads to an inhibition of fibril assembly and a resulting decrease of gel density. Investigations by confocal reflectance microscopy highlight poor-fibrillar structures in oldest collagen networks most likely related to the glycation products accumulation. Complementarily, an infrared analysis brings out marked spectral variations in the Amide I profile, specific of the peptidic bond conformation and for carbohydrates vibrations as function of collagen-age. Interestingly, we also highlight an unexpected behavior for newborn collagen, exhibiting poorly-organized networks and microscopic features close to the oldest collagen. These results demonstrate that changes in collagen optical properties are relevant for investigating the incidence of aging in 3D matrix models. PMID:26885896

  2. The Three-Dimensional Micro- and Nanostructure of the Aortic Medial Lamellar Unit Measured Using 3D Confocal & Electron Microscopy Imaging

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Mary K; Murthy, Sushila; Phan, Samson; Xu, Chengpei; Buchanan, JoAnn; Spilker, Ryan; Dalman, Ronald L; Zarins, Christopher K; Denk, Winfried; Taylor, Charles A

    2009-01-01

    Changes in arterial wall composition and function underlie all forms of vascular disease. The fundamental structural and functional unit of the aortic wall is the medial lamellar unit (MLU). While the basic composition and organization of the MLU is known, three-dimensional (3D) microstructural details are tenuous, due (in part) to lack of three-dimensional data at micro- and nano-scales. We applied novel electron and confocal microscopy techniques to obtain 3D volumetric information of aortic medial microstructure at micro- and nano-scales with all constituents present. For the rat abdominal aorta, we show that medial elastin has three primary forms: with approximately 71% of total elastin as thick, continuous lamellar sheets, 27% as thin, protruding interlamellar elastin fibers (IEFs), and 2% as thick radial struts. Elastin pores are not simply holes in lamellar sheets, but are indented and gusseted openings in lamellae. Smooth Muscle Cells (SMCs) weave throughout the interlamellar elastin framework, with cytoplasmic extensions abutting IEFs, resulting in approximately 20° radial tilt (relative to the lumen surface) of elliptical SMC nuclei. Collagen fibers are organized as large, parallel bundles tightly enveloping SMC nuclei. Quantification of the orientation of collagen bundles, SMC nuclei, and IEFs reveal that all three primary medial constituents have predominantly circumferential orientation, correlating with reported circumferentially dominant values of physiological stress, collagen fiber recruitment, and tissue stiffness. This high resolution three-dimensional view of the aortic media reveals MLU microstructure details that suggest a highly complex and integrated mural organization that correlates with aortic mechanical properties. PMID:18248974

  3. Confocal microscopy in microgravity research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, A. P. H.; Brakenhoff, G. J.; Woldringh, C. L.; Aalders, J. W. G.; Imhof, J. P.; van Kralingen, P.; Mels, W. A.; Schreinemakers, P.; Zegers, A.

    We have studied the application and the feasibility of confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) in microgravity research. Its superior spatial resolution and 3D imaging capabilities and its use of light as a probe, render this instrument ideally suited for the study of living biological material on a (sub-)cellular level. In this paper a number of pertinent biological microgravity experiments is listed, concentrating on the direct observation of developing cells and cellular structures under microgravity condition. A conceptual instrument design is also presented, aimed at sounding rocket application followed by Biorack/Biolab application at a later stage.

  4. Confocal microscopy and exfoliative cytology

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Shyam Prasad; Ramani, Pratibha; Nainani, Purshotam

    2013-01-01

    Context: Early detection of potentially malignant lesions and invasive squamous-cell carcinoma in the oral cavity could be greatly improved through techniques that permit visualization of subtle cellular changes indicative of the neoplastic transformation process. One such technique is confocal microscopy. Combining rapidity with reliability, an innovative idea has been put forward using confocal microscope in exfoliative cytology. Aims: The main objective of this study was to assess confocal microscopy for cytological diagnosis and the results were compared with that of the standard PAP stain. Settings and Design: Confocal microscope, acridine orange (AO) stain, PAP (Papanicolaou) stain. The study was designed to assess confocal microscopy for cytological diagnosis. In the process, smears of patients with (clinically diagnosed and/or suspected) oral squamous cell carcinoma as well as those of controls (normal people) were stained with acridine orange and observed under confocal microscope. The results were compared with those of the standard PAP method. Materials and Methods: Samples of buccal mucosa smears from normal patients and squamous cell carcinoma patients were made, fixed in 100% alcohol, followed by AO staining. The corresponding set of smears was stained with PAP stain using rapid PAP stain kit. The results obtained were compared with those obtained with AO confocal microscopy. Results: The study had shown nuclear changes (malignant cells) in the smears of squamous cell carcinoma patients as increased intensity of fluorescence of the nucleus, when observed under confocal microscope. Acridine orange confocal microscopy showed good amount of sensitivity and specificity (93%) in identifying malignant cells in exfoliative cytological smears. Conclusion: Confocal microscopy was found to have good sensitivity in the identification of cancer (malignant) cells in exfoliative cytology, at par with the PAP method. The rapidity of processing and screening a

  5. Confocal scanning laser microscopy with complementary 3D image analysis allows quantitative studies of functional state of ionoregulatory cells in the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) following salinity challenge.

    PubMed

    Fridman, Sophie; Rana, Krishen J; Bron, James E

    2013-04-01

    The development of a novel three-dimensional image analysis technique of stacks generated by confocal laser scanning microscopy is described allowing visualization of mitochondria-rich cells (MRCs) in the seawater-adapted Nile tilapia in relation to their spatial location. This method permits the assessment and classification of both active and nonactive MRCs based on the distance of the top of the immunopositive cell from the epithelial surface. In addition, this technique offers the potential for informative and quantitative studies, for example, densitometric and morphometric measurements based on MRC functional state. Confocal scanning laser microscopy used with triple staining whole-mount immunohistochemistry was used to detect integumental MRCs in the yolk-sac larvae tail of the Nile tilapia following transfer from freshwater to elevated salinities, that is, 12.5 and 20 ppt. Mean active MRC volume was always significantly larger and displayed a greater staining intensity (GLM; P<0.05) than nonactive MRCs. Following transfer, the percentage of active MRCs was seen to increase as did MRC volume (GLM; P<0.05). PMID:23390074

  6. Digital differential confocal microscopy based on spatial shift transformation.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Wang, Y; Liu, C; Wilson, T; Wang, H; Tan, J

    2014-11-01

    Differential confocal microscopy is a particularly powerful surface profilometry technique in industrial metrology due to its high axial sensitivity and insensitivity to noise. However, the practical implementation of the technique requires the accurate positioning of point detectors in three-dimensions. We describe a simple alternative based on spatial transformation of a through-focus series of images obtained from a homemade beam scanning confocal microscope. This digital differential confocal microscopy approach is described and compared with the traditional Differential confocal microscopy approach. The ease of use of the digital differential confocal microscopy system is illustrated by performing measurements on a 3D standard specimen. PMID:25303106

  7. Novel Application of Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and 3D Volume Rendering toward Improving the Resolution of the Fossil Record of Charcoal

    PubMed Central

    Belcher, Claire M.; Punyasena, Surangi W.; Sivaguru, Mayandi

    2013-01-01

    Variations in the abundance of fossil charcoals between rocks and sediments are assumed to reflect changes in fire activity in Earth’s past. These variations in fire activity are often considered to be in response to environmental, ecological or climatic changes. The role that fire plays in feedbacks to such changes is becoming increasingly important to understand and highlights the need to create robust estimates of variations in fossil charcoal abundance. The majority of charcoal based fire reconstructions quantify the abundance of charcoal particles and do not consider the changes in the morphology of the individual particles that may have occurred due to fragmentation as part of their transport history. We have developed a novel application of confocal laser scanning microscopy coupled to image processing that enables the 3-dimensional reconstruction of individual charcoal particles. This method is able to measure the volume of both microfossil and mesofossil charcoal particles and allows the abundance of charcoal in a sample to be expressed as total volume of charcoal. The method further measures particle surface area and shape allowing both relationships between different size and shape metrics to be analysed and full consideration of variations in particle size and size sorting between different samples to be studied. We believe application of this new imaging approach could allow significant improvement in our ability to estimate variations in past fire activity using fossil charcoals. PMID:23977267

  8. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  9. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  10. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-21

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K(+) channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44(+) EGFR(+) KV1.1(+) MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44(-) EGFR(-) KV1.1(+) 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third

  11. Non-destructive 3D Imaging of Extraterrestrial Materials by Synchrotron X-ray Micro- tomography (XR-CMT) and Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy (LCSM): Beyond Pretty Pictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebel, D. S.; Greenberg, M.

    2009-05-01

    We report scientific results made possible only by the use these two non-destructive 3D imaging techniques. XR-CMT provides 3D image reconstructions at spatial resolutions of 1 to 17 micron/voxel edge. We use XR- CMT to locate potential melt-inclusion-bearing phenocrysts in batches of 100-200 micron lunar fire-fountain spherules; to locate and visualize the morphology of 1-2mm size, irregular, unmelted Ca-, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) and to quantify chondrule/matrix ratios and chondrule size distributions in 6x6x20mm chunks of carbonaceous chondrites; to quantify the modal abundance of opaque phases in similar sized Martian meteorite fragments, and in individual 1-2mm diameter chondrules from chondrites. LCSM provides 3D image stacks at resolutions < 100 nm/pixel. We are the only group creating deconvolved image stacks of 100 to over 1000 micron long comet particle tracks in aerogel keystones from the Stardust mission. We present measurements of track morphology in 3D, and locate high-value particles using complementary synchrotron x- ray fluorescence (XRF) examination. We show that bench-top LCSM extracts maximum information about tracks and particles rapidly and cheaply prior to destructive disassembly. Using XR-CMT we quantify, for the first time, the volumetric abundances of metal grains in 1-2 mm diameter CR chondrite chondrules. Metal abundances vary from 1 to 37 vol.% between 8 chondrules (and more by inspection), in a meteorite with solar (chondritic) Fe/Si ratio, indicating that chondrules formed and accreted locally from bulk solar composition material. They are 'complementary' to each other in Fe/Si ratios. Void spaces in chondritic CAIs and chondrules are shown to be a primary feature, not due to plucking during sectioning. CAI morphology in 3D reveals pre-accretionary impact features, and various types of mineralogical layering, seen in 3D, reveal the formation history of these building blocks of planets and asteroids. We also quantify the x

  12. 3D microscopy - new powerful tools in geomaterials characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauko Pranjić, Alenka; Mladenovič, Ana; Turk, Janez; Šajna, Aljoša; Čretnik, Janko

    2016-04-01

    Microtomography (microCT) is becoming more and more widely recognized in geological sciences as a powerful tool for the spatial characterization of rock and other geological materials. Together with 3D image analysis and other complementary techniques, it has the characteristics of an innovative and non-destructive 3D microscopical technique. On the other hand its main disadvantages are low availability (only a few geological laboratories are equipped with high resolution tomographs), the relatively high prices of testing connected with the use of an xray source, technical limitations connected to the resolution and imaging of certain materials, as well as timeconsuming and complex 3D image analysis, necessary for quantification of 3D tomographic data sets. In this work three examples are presented of optimal 3D microscopy analysis of geomaterials in construction such as porosity characterization of impregnated sandstone, aerated concrete and marble prone to bowing. Studies include processes of microCT imaging, 3D data analysis and fitting of data with complementary analysis, such as confocal microscopy, mercury porosimetry, gas sorption, optical/fluorescent microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Present work has been done in the frame of national research project 3D and 4D microscopy development of new powerful tools in geosciences (ARRS J1-7148) funded by Slovenian Research Agency.

  13. 3D Cell Culture Imaging with Digital Holographic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimiduk, Thomas; Nyberg, Kendra; Almeda, Dariela; Koshelva, Ekaterina; McGorty, Ryan; Kaz, David; Gardel, Emily; Auguste, Debra; Manoharan, Vinothan

    2011-03-01

    Cells in higher organisms naturally exist in a three dimensional (3D) structure, a fact sometimes ignored by in vitro biological research. Confinement to a two dimensional culture imposes significant deviations from the native 3D state. One of the biggest obstacles to wider use of 3D cultures is the difficulty of 3D imaging. The confocal microscope, the dominant 3D imaging instrument, is expensive, bulky, and light-intensive; live cells can be observed for only a short time before they suffer photodamage. We present an alternative 3D imaging techinque, digital holographic microscopy, which can capture 3D information with axial resolution better than 2 μm in a 100 μm deep volume. Capturing a 3D image requires only a single camera exposure with a sub-millisecond laser pulse, allowing us to image cell cultures using five orders of magnitude less light energy than with confocal. This can be done with hardware costing ~ 1000. We use the instrument to image growth of MCF7 breast cancer cells and p. pastoras yeast. We acknowledge support from NSF GRFP.

  14. Automated cellular pathology in noninvasive confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Monica; Krueger, James; Gareau, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    A computer algorithm was developed to automatically identify and count melanocytes and keratinocytes in 3D reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) images of the skin. Computerized pathology increases our understanding and enables prevention of superficial spreading melanoma (SSM). Machine learning involved looking at the images to measure the size of cells through a 2-D Fourier transform and developing an appropriate mask with the erf() function to model the cells. Implementation involved processing the images to identify cells whose image segments provided the least difference when subtracted from the mask. With further simplification of the algorithm, the program may be directly implemented on the RCM images to indicate the presence of keratinocytes in seconds and to quantify the keratinocytes size in the en face plane as a function of depth. Using this system, the algorithm can identify any irregularities in maturation and differentiation of keratinocytes, thereby signaling the possible presence of cancer.

  15. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The goal of a CLSM is to acquire and quantify fluorescence and in some instruments acquire spectral characterization of emitted signals. The accuracy of these measurements demands that...

  16. Richardson-Lucy algorithm with total variation regularization for 3D confocal microscope deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Dey, Nicolas; Blanc-Feraud, Laure; Zimmer, Christophe; Roux, Pascal; Kam, Zvi; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Zerubia, Josiane

    2006-04-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy is a powerful and popular technique for 3D imaging of biological specimens. Although confocal microscopy images are much sharper than standard epifluorescence ones, they are still degraded by residual out-of-focus light and by Poisson noise due to photon-limited detection. Several deconvolution methods have been proposed to reduce these degradations, including the Richardson-Lucy iterative algorithm, which computes maximum likelihood estimation adapted to Poisson statistics. As this algorithm tends to amplify noise, regularization constraints based on some prior knowledge on the data have to be applied to stabilize the solution. Here, we propose to combine the Richardson-Lucy algorithm with a regularization constraint based on Total Variation, which suppresses unstable oscillations while preserving object edges. We show on simulated and real images that this constraint improves the deconvolution results as compared with the unregularized Richardson-Lucy algorithm, both visually and quantitatively. PMID:16586486

  17. Multidepth imaging by chromatic dispersion confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsovsky, Cory A.; Shelton, Ryan L.; Saldua, Meagan A.; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar; Applegate, Brian E.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2012-03-01

    Confocal microscopy has shown potential as an imaging technique to detect precancer. Imaging cellular features throughout the depth of epithelial tissue may provide useful information for diagnosis. However, the current in vivo axial scanning techniques for confocal microscopy are cumbersome, time-consuming, and restrictive when attempting to reconstruct volumetric images acquired in breathing patients. Chromatic dispersion confocal microscopy (CDCM) exploits severe longitudinal chromatic aberration in the system to axially disperse light from a broadband source and, ultimately, spectrally encode high resolution images along the depth of the object. Hyperchromat lenses are designed to have severe and linear longitudinal chromatic aberration, but have not yet been used in confocal microscopy. We use a hyperchromat lens in a stage scanning confocal microscope to demonstrate the capability to simultaneously capture information at multiple depths without mechanical scanning. A photonic crystal fiber pumped with a 830nm wavelength Ti:Sapphire laser was used as a supercontinuum source, and a spectrometer was used as the detector. The chromatic aberration and magnification in the system give a focal shift of 140μm after the objective lens and an axial resolution of 5.2-7.6μm over the wavelength range from 585nm to 830nm. A 400x400x140μm3 volume of pig cheek epithelium was imaged in a single X-Y scan. Nuclei can be seen at several depths within the epithelium. The capability of this technique to achieve simultaneous high resolution confocal imaging at multiple depths may reduce imaging time and motion artifacts and enable volumetric reconstruction of in vivo confocal images of the epithelium.

  18. Holography, tomography and 3D microscopy as linear filtering operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coupland, J. M.; Lobera, J.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, we characterize 3D optical imaging techniques as 3D linear shift-invariant filtering operations. From the Helmholtz equation that is the basis of scalar diffraction theory, we show that the scattered field, or indeed a holographic reconstruction of this field, can be considered to be the result of a linear filtering operation applied to a source distribution. We note that if the scattering is weak, the source distribution is independent of the scattered field and a holographic reconstruction (or in fact any far-field optical imaging system) behaves as a 3D linear shift-invariant filter applied to the refractive index contrast (which effectively defines the object). We go on to consider tomographic techniques that synthesize images from recordings of the scattered field using different illumination conditions. In our analysis, we compare the 3D response of monochromatic optical tomography with the 3D imagery offered by confocal microscopy and scanning white light interferometry (using quasi-monochromatic illumination) and explain the circumstances under which these approaches are equivalent. Finally, we consider the 3D response of polychromatic optical tomography and in particular the response of spectral optical coherence tomography and scanning white light interferometry.

  19. Confocal multiview light-sheet microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Gustavo de; Norlin, Nils; Gunther, Stefan; Albert, Marvin; Panavaite, Laura; Fiuza, Ulla-Maj; Peri, Francesca; Hiiragi, Takashi; Krzic, Uros; Hufnagel, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Selective-plane illumination microscopy has proven to be a powerful imaging technique due to its unsurpassed acquisition speed and gentle optical sectioning. However, even in the case of multiview imaging techniques that illuminate and image the sample from multiple directions, light scattering inside tissues often severely impairs image contrast. Here we combine multiview light-sheet imaging with electronic confocal slit detection implemented on modern camera sensors. In addition to improved imaging quality, the electronic confocal slit detection doubles the acquisition speed in multiview setups with two opposing illumination directions allowing simultaneous dual-sided illumination. Confocal multiview light-sheet microscopy eliminates the need for specimen-specific data fusion algorithms, streamlines image post-processing, easing data handling and storage. PMID:26602977

  20. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: AXIAL RESOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Confocal Microscopy System Performance: Axial resolution.
    Robert M. Zucker, PhD

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Re...

  1. Confocal microscopy imaging of solid tissue

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a technique that is capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer acquired images as a virtual 3-dimensional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning ...

  2. Confocal filtering in cathodoluminescence microscopy of nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Narváez, Angela C. E-mail: j.p.hoogenboom@tudelft.nl; Weppelman, I. Gerward C.; Moerland, Robert J.; Hoogenboom, Jacob P. E-mail: j.p.hoogenboom@tudelft.nl; Kruit, Pieter

    2014-06-23

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy allows optical characterization of nanostructures at high spatial resolution. At the nanoscale, a main challenge of the technique is related to the background CL generated within the sample substrate. Here, we implement confocal detection of the CL signal to minimize the background contribution to the measurement. Nano-phosphors were used as point sources to evaluate the filtering capabilities of our confocal CL system, obtaining an axial intensity profile with 2.7 μm full width at half maximum for the central peak, in good correspondence with theoretical expectations. Considering the electron interaction volume, we found that the confocal filter becomes effective for electron energies above 20 keV, when using a 25 μm pinhole (0.86 Airy units). To illustrate our approach, we present confocal CL imaging of gold nanowires and triangular shaped plates deposited on an indium-tin oxide covered glass substrate, comparing the images with those obtained in standard unfiltered CL detection. The results show that confocal CL microscopy is a valuable tool for the investigation of nanostructures on highly cathodoluminescent substrates, widely used in biological and optical applications.

  3. Confocal Raman Microscopy in Pharmaceutical Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefele, Thomas F.; Paulus, Kurt

    There is a wide range of applications of confocal Raman microscopy in pharmaceutical development. It is a powerful tool to probe the distribution of components within a formulation, to characterize homogeneity of pharmaceutical samples, to determine solid state of drug substances and excipients and to characterize contaminations and foreign particulates. The information obtained by confocal Raman microscopy is extremely useful, sometimes even crucial, for drug substance design, for the development of solid and liquid formulations, as a tool for process analytics and for patent infringements and counterfeit analysis. In this chapter, those aspects and applications will be presented, focusing on solid drug formulations. This chapter will also reveal the advantages and demonstrate the synergies of Raman mapping as compared to similar imaging methods such as SEM/EDX, NIR and MIR imaging.

  4. Correlative Microscopy for 3D Structural Analysis of Dynamic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Sangmi; Zhao, Gongpu; Ning, Jiying; Gibson, Gregory A.; Watkins, Simon C.; Zhang, Peijun

    2013-01-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (cryoET) allows 3D visualization of cellular structures at molecular resolution in a close-to-physiological state1. However, direct visualization of individual viral complexes in their host cellular environment with cryoET is challenging2, due to the infrequent and dynamic nature of viral entry, particularly in the case of HIV-1. While time-lapse live-cell imaging has yielded a great deal of information about many aspects of the life cycle of HIV-13-7, the resolution afforded by live-cell microscopy is limited (~ 200 nm). Our work was aimed at developing a correlation method that permits direct visualization of early events of HIV-1 infection by combining live-cell fluorescent light microscopy, cryo-fluorescent microscopy, and cryoET. In this manner, live-cell and cryo-fluorescent signals can be used to accurately guide the sampling in cryoET. Furthermore, structural information obtained from cryoET can be complemented with the dynamic functional data gained through live-cell imaging of fluorescent labeled target. In this video article, we provide detailed methods and protocols for structural investigation of HIV-1 and host-cell interactions using 3D correlative high-speed live-cell imaging and high-resolution cryoET structural analysis. HeLa cells infected with HIV-1 particles were characterized first by confocal live-cell microscopy, and the region containing the same viral particle was then analyzed by cryo-electron tomography for 3D structural details. The correlation between two sets of imaging data, optical imaging and electron imaging, was achieved using a home-built cryo-fluorescence light microscopy stage. The approach detailed here will be valuable, not only for study of virus-host cell interactions, but also for broader applications in cell biology, such as cell signaling, membrane receptor trafficking, and many other dynamic cellular processes. PMID:23852318

  5. Comprehensive volumetric confocal microscopy with adaptive focusing

    PubMed Central

    Kang, DongKyun; Yoo, Hongki; Jillella, Priyanka; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive microscopy of distal esophagus could greatly improve the screening and surveillance of esophageal diseases such as Barrett’s esophagus by providing histomorphologic information over the entire region at risk. Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a high-speed reflectance confocal microscopy technology that can be configured to image the entire distal esophagus by helically scanning the beam using optics within a balloon-centering probe. It is challenging to image the human esophagus in vivo with balloon-based SECM, however, because patient motion and anatomic tissue surface irregularities decenter the optics, making it difficult to keep the focus at a predetermined location within the tissue as the beam is scanned. In this paper, we present a SECM probe equipped with an adaptive focusing mechanism that can compensate for tissue surface irregularity and dynamic focal variation. A tilted arrangement of the objective lens is employed in the SECM probe to provide feedback signals to an adaptive focusing mechanism. The tilted configuration also allows the probe to obtain reflectance confocal data from multiple depth levels, enabling the acquisition of three-dimensional volumetric data during a single scan of the probe. A tissue phantom with a surface area of 12.6 cm2 was imaged using the new SECM probe, and 8 large-area reflectance confocal microscopy images were acquired over the depth range of 56 μm in 20 minutes. Large-area SECM images of excised swine small intestine tissue were also acquired, enabling the visualization of villous architecture, epithelium, and lamina propria. The adaptive focusing mechanism was demonstrated to enable acquisition of in-focus images even when the probe was not centered and the tissue surface was irregular. PMID:21698005

  6. Optimal pupil design for confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Yogesh G.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2010-02-01

    Confocal reflectance microscopy may enable screening and diagnosis of skin cancers noninvasively and in real-time, as an adjunct to biopsy and pathology. Current instruments are large, complex, and expensive. A simpler, confocal line-scanning microscope may accelerate the translation of confocal microscopy in clinical and surgical dermatology. A confocal reflectance microscope may use a beamsplitter, transmitting and detecting through the pupil, or a divided pupil, or theta configuration, with half used for transmission and half for detection. The divided pupil may offer better sectioning and contrast. We present a Fourier optics model and compare the on-axis irradiance of a confocal point-scanning microscope in both pupil configurations, optimizing the profile of a Gaussian beam in a circular or semicircular aperture. We repeat both calculations with a cylindrical lens which focuses the source to a line. The variable parameter is the fillfactor, h, the ratio of the 1/e2 diameter of the Gaussian beam to the diameter of the full aperture. The optimal values of h, for point scanning are 0.90 (full) and 0.66 for the half-aperture. For line-scanning, the fill-factors are 1.02 (full) and 0.52 (half). Additional parameters to consider are the optimal location of the point-source beam in the divided-pupil configuration, the optimal line width for the line-source, and the width of the aperture in the divided-pupil configuration. Additional figures of merit are field-of-view and sectioning. Use of optimal designs is critical in comparing the experimental performance of the different configurations.

  7. Combined Confocal and Magnetic Resonance Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wind, Robert A.; Majors, Paul D.; Minard, Kevin R.; Ackerman, Eric J.; Daly, Don S.; Holtom, Gary R.; Thrall, Brian D.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2002-05-12

    Confocal and magnetic resonance microscopy are both used to study live cells in a minimally invasive way. Both techniques provide complementary information. Therefore, by examining cells simultaneously with both methodologies, more detailed information is obtained than is possible with each of the microscopes individually. In this paper two configurations of a combined confocal and magnetic resonance microscope described. In both cases the sample compartment is part of a temperature regulated perfusion system. The first configuration is capable of studying large single cells or three-dimensional cell agglomerates, whereas with the second configuration monolayers of mammalian cells can be investigated . Combined images are shown of Xenopus laevis frog oocytes, model JB6 tumor spheroids, and a single layer of Chinese hamster ovary cells. Finally, potential applications of the combined microscope are discussed.

  8. Digital confocal microscopy through a multimode fiber.

    PubMed

    Loterie, Damien; Farahi, Salma; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Goy, Alexandre; Psaltis, Demetri; Moser, Christophe

    2015-09-01

    Acquiring high-contrast optical images deep inside biological tissues is still a challenging problem. Confocal microscopy is an important tool for biomedical imaging since it improves image quality by rejecting background signals. However, it suffers from low sensitivity in deep tissues due to light scattering. Recently, multimode fibers have provided a new paradigm for minimally invasive endoscopic imaging by controlling light propagation through them. Here we introduce a combined imaging technique where confocal images are acquired through a multimode fiber. We achieve this by digitally engineering the excitation wavefront and then applying a virtual digital pinhole on the collected signal. In this way, we are able to acquire images through the fiber with significantly increased contrast. With a fiber of numerical aperture 0.22, we achieve a lateral resolution of 1.5µm, and an axial resolution of 12.7µm. The point-scanning rate is currently limited by our spatial light modulator (20Hz). PMID:26368478

  9. Template-driven segmentation of confocal microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Cheng; Chen, Yung-Chang; Chiang, Ann-Shyn

    2008-03-01

    High quality 3D visualization of anatomic structures is necessary for many applications. The anatomic structures first need to be segmented. A variety of segmentation algorithms have been developed for this purpose. For confocal microscopy images, the noise introduced during the specimen preparation process, such as the procedure of penetration or staining, may cause images to be of low contrast in some regions. This property will make segmentation difficult. Also, the segmented structures may have rugged surfaces in 3D visualization. In this paper, we present a hybrid method that is suitable for segmentation of confocal microscopy images. A rough segmentation result is obtained from the atlas-based segmentation via affine registration. The boundaries of the segmentation result are close to the object boundaries, and are regarded as the initial contours of the active contour models. After convergence of the snake algorithm, the resulting contours in regions of low contrast are locally refined by parametric bicubic surfaces to alleviate the problem of incorrect convergence. The proposed method increases the accuracy of the snake algorithm because of better initial contours. Besides, it can provide smoother segmented results in 3D visualization. PMID:18178286

  10. Estimation of single cell volume from 3D confocal images using automatic data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorvatova, A.; Cagalinec, M.; Mateasik, A.; Chorvat, D., Jr.

    2012-06-01

    Cardiac cells are highly structured with a non-uniform morphology. Although precise estimation of their volume is essential for correct evaluation of hypertrophic changes of the heart, simple and unified techniques that allow determination of the single cardiomyocyte volume with sufficient precision are still limited. Here, we describe a novel approach to assess the cell volume from confocal microscopy 3D images of living cardiac myocytes. We propose a fast procedure based on segementation using active deformable contours. This technique is independent on laser gain and/or pinhole settings and it is also applicable on images of cells stained with low fluorescence markers. Presented approach is a promising new tool to investigate changes in the cell volume during normal, as well as pathological growth, as we demonstrate in the case of cell enlargement during hypertension in rats.

  11. EVALUATION OF CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: PRETTY PICTURES OR CONFOCAL QA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of confocal microscopy system performance: Pretty pictures or confocal QA?

    Robert M. Zucker

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, N...

  12. Confocal microscopy of the living eye.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, H D; Jester, J V; Essepian, J; Shields, W; Lemp, M A

    1990-01-01

    Confocal microscopy is an imaging paradigm that allows optical sectioning of almost any material with increased axial and lateral spatial resolution and better image contrast. We have applied this technology to the study of the living eye of cats, albino rabbits, and humans. The technique allows in vivo, noninvasive, real time images of the eye at magnifications (630x) which allow resolution of anatomical detail at the cellular level. In this paper we report details of our current instrument techniques and some of our results. The past development, present state-of-the-art, and projected future advances and applications of this novel microscopy are discussed. Preliminary observations are reported for all layers of the cornea, the limbus, and wound-healing responses in single animals. PMID:2407380

  13. Characterization of Polymer Blends: Optical Microscopy (*Polarized, Interference and Phase Contrast Microscopy*) and Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, Nathan Muruganathan; Darling, Seth B.

    2015-01-01

    Chapter 15 surveys the characterization of macro, micro and meso morphologies of polymer blends by optical microscopy. Confocal Microscopy offers the ability to view the three dimensional morphology of polymer blends, popular in characterization of biological systems. Confocal microscopy uses point illumination and a spatial pinhole to eliminate out-of focus light in samples that are thicker than the focal plane.

  14. Corneal In Vivo Confocal Microscopy: Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    You, Jae Young; Botelho, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) has become a widely accepted imaging technique to study the human living cornea. It provides a unique opportunity to visualize the corneal tissue at the cellular level without damage and longitudinally observe its pathologic and normative changes. With rapidly evolving technology, there has been an abundance of interest in maximizing its potential to better understand the human cornea in health and disease. This is evidenced by a growing literature analyzing acquired and inherited corneal and also systemic diseases using corneal IVCM. This article provides a narrative review of IVCM and its applications. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-06.asp, free with no login]. PMID:27247970

  15. A linear programming approach to reconstructing subcellular structures from confocal images for automated generation of representative 3D cellular models

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Scott T.; Dean, Brian C.; Dean, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel computer vision algorithm to analyze 3D stacks of confocal images of fluorescently stained single cells. The goal of the algorithm is to create representative in silico model structures that can be imported into finite element analysis software for mechanical characterization. Segmentation of cell and nucleus boundaries is accomplished via standard thresholding methods. Using novel linear programming methods, a representative actin stress fiber network is generated by computing a linear superposition of fibers having minimum discrepancy compared with an experimental 3D confocal image. Qualitative validation is performed through analysis of seven 3D confocal image stacks of adherent vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) grown in 2D culture. The presented method is able to automatically generate 3D geometries of the cell's boundary, nucleus, and representative F-actin network based on standard cell microscopy data. These geometries can be used for direct importation and implementation in structural finite element models for analysis of the mechanics of a single cell to potentially speed discoveries in the fields of regenerative medicine, mechanobiology, and drug discovery. PMID:23395283

  16. Evaluation of reflectance confocal microscopy in dermatophytosis.

    PubMed

    Hui, Dai; Xue-cheng, Sun; Ai-e, Xu

    2013-03-01

    Traditional diagnostic testing for dermatophyte infection currently requires skin scraping for light microscopy and/or fungal culture or skin biopsy. Immunofluorescent microscopy can also be used with calcofluor stain. All of these tests can be time-consuming to perform, require a waiting period for results and are invasive. This study aimed to define the in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) features of superficial cutaneous fungal infections and to analyse concordance with microscopic examination. Totally, 45 patients, who were diagnosed with superficial cutaneous fungal infections according to the positive result of microscopic examination, were enrolled in this study. We selected three typical lesions examined by RCM, and then recorded the results. In the patients with the tinea manus and pedis, mycelium in stratum corneum was found by the RCM in 14 of 22 patients (14/22; 63.64%). In the patients with the tinea cruris, mycelium in stratum corneum was found by the RCM in 19 of 23 patients (19/23; 82.61%). RCM seems to be useful for microscopic evaluation of mycelium features and may have a scientific value in study of superficial cutaneous fungal infections. PMID:22963376

  17. Deep stroma investigation by confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francesca; Tatini, Francesca; Pini, Roberto; Valente, Paola; Ardia, Roberta; Buzzonetti, Luca; Canovetti, Annalisa; Malandrini, Alex; Lenzetti, Ivo; Menabuoni, Luca

    2015-03-01

    Laser assisted keratoplasty is nowadays largely used to perform minimally invasive surgery and partial thickness keratoplasty [1-3]. The use of the femtosecond laser enables to perform a customized surgery, solving the specific problem of the single patient, designing new graft profiles and partial thickness keratoplasty (PTK). The common characteristics of the PTKs and that make them eligible respect to the standard penetrating keratoplasty, are: the preservation of eyeball integrity, a reduced risk of graft rejection, a controlled postoperative astigmatism. On the other hand, the optimal surgical results after these PTKs are related to a correct comprehension of the deep stroma layers morphology, which can help in the identification of the correct cleavage plane during surgeries. In the last years some studies were published, giving new insights about the posterior stroma morphology in adult subjects [4,5]. In this work we present a study performed on two groups of tissues: one group is from 20 adult subjects aged 59 +/- 18 y.o., and the other group is from 15 young subjects, aged 12+/-5 y.o.. The samples were from tissues not suitable for transplant in patients. Confocal microscopy and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) were used for the analysis of the deep stroma. The preliminary results of this analysis show the main differences in between young and adult tissues, enabling to improve the knowledge of the morphology and of the biomechanical properties of human cornea, in order to improve the surgical results in partial thickness keratoplasty.

  18. Biological applications of confocal fluorescence polarization microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Chad E.

    Fluorescence polarization microscopy is a powerful modality capable of sensing changes in the physical properties and local environment of fluorophores. In this thesis we present new applications for the technique in cancer diagnosis and treatment and explore the limits of the modality in scattering media. We describe modifications to our custom-built confocal fluorescence microscope that enable dual-color imaging, optical fiber-based confocal spectroscopy and fluorescence polarization imaging. Experiments are presented that indicate the performance of the instrument for all three modalities. The limits of confocal fluorescence polarization imaging in scattering media are explored and the microscope parameters necessary for accurate polarization images in this regime are determined. A Monte Carlo routine is developed to model the effect of scattering on images. Included in it are routines to track the polarization state of light using the Mueller-Stokes formalism and a model for fluorescence generation that includes sampling the excitation light polarization ellipse, Brownian motion of excited-state fluorophores in solution, and dipole fluorophore emission. Results from this model are compared to experiments performed on a fluorophore-embedded polymer rod in a turbid medium consisting of polystyrene microspheres in aqueous suspension. We demonstrate the utility of the fluorescence polarization imaging technique for removal of contaminating autofluorescence and for imaging photodynamic therapy drugs in cell monolayers. Images of cells expressing green fluorescent protein are extracted from contaminating fluorescein emission. The distribution of meta-tetrahydroxypheny1chlorin in an EMT6 cell monolayer is also presented. A new technique for imaging enzyme activity is presented that is based on observing changes in the anisotropy of fluorescently-labeled substrates. Proof-of-principle studies are performed in a model system consisting of fluorescently labeled bovine

  19. Nondestructive 3D confocal laser imaging with deconvolution of seven whole stardust tracks with complementary XRF and quantitative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, M.; Ebel, D.S.

    2009-03-19

    We present a nondestructive 3D system for analysis of whole Stardust tracks, using a combination of Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy and synchrotron XRF. 3D deconvolution is used for optical corrections, and results of quantitative analyses of several tracks are presented. The Stardust mission to comet Wild 2 trapped many cometary and ISM particles in aerogel, leaving behind 'tracks' of melted silica aerogel on both sides of the collector. Collected particles and their tracks range in size from submicron to millimeter scale. Interstellar dust collected on the obverse of the aerogel collector is thought to have an average track length of {approx}15 {micro}m. It has been our goal to perform a total non-destructive 3D textural and XRF chemical analysis on both types of tracks. To that end, we use a combination of Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy (LCSM) and X Ray Florescence (XRF) spectrometry. Utilized properly, the combination of 3D optical data and chemical data provides total nondestructive characterization of full tracks, prior to flattening or other destructive analysis methods. Our LCSM techniques allow imaging at 0.075 {micro}m/pixel, without the use of oil-based lenses. A full textural analysis on track No.82 is presented here as well as analysis of 6 additional tracks contained within 3 keystones (No.128, No.129 and No.140). We present a method of removing the axial distortion inherent in LCSM images, by means of a computational 3D Deconvolution algorithm, and present some preliminary experiments with computed point spread functions. The combination of 3D LCSM data and XRF data provides invaluable information, while preserving the integrity of the samples for further analysis. It is imperative that these samples, the first extraterrestrial solids returned since the Apollo era, be fully mapped nondestructively in 3D, to preserve the maximum amount of information prior to other, destructive analysis.

  20. Laser scanning confocal microscopy: history, applications, and related optical sectioning techniques.

    PubMed

    Paddock, Stephen W; Eliceiri, Kevin W

    2014-01-01

    Confocal microscopy is an established light microscopical technique for imaging fluorescently labeled specimens with significant three-dimensional structure. Applications of confocal microscopy in the biomedical sciences include the imaging of the spatial distribution of macromolecules in either fixed or living cells, the automated collection of 3D data, the imaging of multiple labeled specimens and the measurement of physiological events in living cells. The laser scanning confocal microscope continues to be chosen for most routine work although a number of instruments have been developed for more specific applications. Significant improvements have been made to all areas of the confocal approach, not only to the instruments themselves, but also to the protocols of specimen preparation, to the analysis, the display, the reproduction, sharing and management of confocal images using bioinformatics techniques. PMID:24052346

  1. Reflectance confocal microscopy for mucosal diseases.

    PubMed

    Cinotti, E; Labeille, B; Cambazard, F; Thuret, G; Gain, P; Perrot, J L

    2015-10-01

    Non-invasive, real-time microscopic imaging using in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) has been demonstrated to be a useful tool for the evaluation of skin diseases and in particular for skin neoplasms. Recently, the RCM devices dedicated to the skin have also been applied to perform "virtual biopsies" of the oral, genital and ocular mucosa. In fact, mucosa is a sensitive area where non invasive imaging techniques are of high interest in order to spare biopsies and excisions. Mucosa is particularly suitable for RCM because of its thin or absent cornified layer and its thin epithelium that allows a deeper penetration of the laser with the consequent possibility of exploring deeper tissue levels. Besides, being useful for the diagnosis, RCM may be helpful to identify the area to be biopsied in case of large or multifocal lesions and may be regarded as a complementary technique for non invasive assessment of treatment efficacy. The RCM features of healthy mucosa are described and a revision of the literature of the mucosal diseases that can be diagnosed by RCM has been performed. PMID:26099354

  2. 3-D reconstruction of neurons from multichannel confocal laser scanning image series.

    PubMed

    Wouterlood, Floris G

    2014-01-01

    A confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) collects information from a thin, focal plane and ignores out-of-focus information. Scanning of a specimen, with stepwise axial (Z-) movement of the stage in between each scan, produces Z-series of confocal images of a tissue volume, which then can be used to 3-D reconstruct structures of interest. The operator first configures separate channels (e.g., laser, filters, and detector settings) for each applied fluorochrome and then acquires Z-series of confocal images: one series per channel. Channel signal separation is extremely important. Measures to avoid bleaching are vital. Post-acquisition deconvolution of the image series is often performed to increase resolution before 3-D reconstruction takes place. In the 3-D reconstruction programs described in this unit, reconstructions can be inspected in real time from any viewing angle. By altering viewing angles and by switching channels off and on, the spatial relationships of 3-D-reconstructed structures with respect to structures visualized in other channels can be studied. Since each brand of CLSM, computer program, and 3-D reconstruction package has its own proprietary set of procedures, a general approach is provided in this protocol wherever possible. PMID:24723320

  3. EVALUATION OF CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND. The confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. Currently there is a subjective nature in the assessment of a confocal microscope's performance by primarily evaluating the system with a specific test slide provided by ea...

  4. Three-dimensional reconstruction of topological deformation in chiral nematic microspheres using fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jin-Kun; Song, Jang-Kun

    2016-04-01

    Chiral nematic droplets exhibit abundant topological defect structures, which have been intensively studied, both theoretically and experimentally. However, to observe and reconstruct the exact shape of three-dimensional (3D) defect structures has been a challenging task. In this study, we successfully reconstruct the 3D defect structures within a CLC microsphere with long helical pitches by combining polarized optical microscopy (POM) and laser scanning type fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy (FCPM). The obtained confocal stack images provide us with the vertical location of disclination defects, to allow reconstruction of the full 3D structures. The reconstructed 3D structures can be viewed from different directions, providing a better understanding of the topological structure. Moreover, the defect lines are identified to be + 1 defects, different from the previous prediction. Thus, FCPM provides an excellent tool to study the complex topological configuration in microspheres, and fosters its potential applicability in new devices based on topologically structured soft media. PMID:27137028

  5. Towards Single Cell Traction Microscopy within 3D Collagen Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Matthew S.; Long, Rong; Feng, Xinzeng; Huang, YuLing; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Wu, Mingming

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Cells require the three dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, current understanding of cell-ECM and cell-cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D cell traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. 3D cell traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single animal cells embedded in either synthetic or natively derived fibrous gels. We discuss here the development of 3D cell traction microscopy, its current limitations, and perspectives on the future of this technology. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying 3D cell traction microscopy to individual tumor cells migration within collagen gels. PMID:23806281

  6. Toward single cell traction microscopy within 3D collagen matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Matthew S.; Long, Rong; Feng, Xinzeng; Huang, YuLing; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Wu, Mingming

    2013-10-01

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Cells require the three-dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, current understanding of cell–ECM and cell–cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D cell traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. 3D cell traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single animal cells embedded in either synthetic or natively derived fibrous gels. We discuss here the development of 3D cell traction microscopy, its current limitations, and perspectives on the future of this technology. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying 3D cell traction microscopy to individual tumor cell migration within collagen gels. - Highlights: • Review of the current state of the art in 3D cell traction force microscopy. • Bulk and micro-characterization of remodelable fibrous collagen gels. • Strategies for performing 3D cell traction microscopy within collagen gels.

  7. CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY OF RAT FOLLICLE DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study used confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to study follicular development in millimeter pieces of rat ovary. To use this technology, it is essential to stain the tissue before laser excitation with the confocal microscope. Various fluorescent stains (Yo-Pro, Bo-Pr...

  8. Managing multiple image stacks from confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbe, Joerg; Goetze, Christian H.; Zuschratter, Werner

    1999-05-01

    A major goal in neuroanatomy is to obtain precise information about the functional organization of neuronal assemblies and their interconnections. Therefore, the analysis of histological sections frequently requires high resolution images in combination with an overview about the structure. To overcome this conflict we have previously introduced a software for the automatic acquisition of multiple image stacks (3D-MISA) in confocal laser scanning microscopy. Here, we describe a Windows NT based software for fast and easy navigation through the multiple images stacks (MIS-browser), the visualization of individual channels and layers and the selection of user defined subregions. In addition, the MIS browser provides useful tools for the visualization and evaluation of the datavolume, as for instance brightness and contrast corrections of individual layers and channels. Moreover, it includes a maximum intensity projection, panning and zoom in/out functions within selected channels or focal planes (x/y) and tracking along the z-axis. The import module accepts any tiff-format and reconstructs the original image arrangement after the user has defined the sequence of images in x/y and z and the number of channels. The implemented export module allows storage of user defined subregions (new single image stacks) for further 3D-reconstruction and evaluation.

  9. Confocal microscopy via multimode fibers: fluorescence bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loterie, Damien; Psaltis, Demetri; Moser, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    We recently described a method for confocal reflection imaging through fibers, as a way to increase contrast when imaging unstained biological specimens. Using a transmission matrix, focused spots can be created at the distal end of a fiber. The backscattered field coming back from the sample can be filtered using optical correlation to obtain spatial selectivity in the detection. In this proceedings article, we briefly review the working principle of this method, and we discuss how the scheme could be adapted to confocal fluorescence imaging. In particular, we show simulations of the achievable detection bandwidth when using step-index multimode fibers as imaging devices.

  10. In Vivo Confocal Microscopy in Chloroquine-Induced Keratopathy

    PubMed Central

    Paladini, Iacopo; Menchini, Ugo; Mencucci, Rita

    2013-01-01

    In vivo confocal microscopy is becoming a mandatory examination to study corneal abnormalities such as drug deposits in systemic disease. A female diagnosed with fibromyalgia on systemic chloroquine for 9 months presented for an ophthalmic examination. Confocal microscopy was performed using the Confoscan 4 (Nidek Co. Ltd., Gamagori, Japan) and multiple highly reflective deposits in the epithelial basal cells were found, that were consistent with choloquine. Deposits were also present in the wing cell layer. In the anterior stroma these deposits were rare. Atypically shaped and branched nerves were also present in the anterior stroma. Corneal deposits of chloroquine can be evaluated by confocal microscopy. Confocal microscopy provides information on corneal metabolism and physiology. Chloroquine keratopathy can affect the anterior stroma in addition to the epithelium. PMID:23580857

  11. Dual-detection confocal microscopy: high-speed surface profiling without depth scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Ryoung; Gweon, Dae-Gab; Yoo, Hongki

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new method for three-dimensional (3-D) imaging without depth scanning that we refer to as the dual-detection confocal microscopy (DDCM). Compared to conventional confocal microscopy, DDCM utilizes two pinholes of different sizes. DDCM generates two axial response curves which have different stiffness according to the pinhole diameters. The two axial response curves can draw the characteristics curve of the system which shows the relationship between the axial position of the sample and the intensity ratio. Utilizing the characteristic curve, the DDCM reconstructs a 3-D surface profile with a single 2-D scanning. The height of each pixel is calculated by the intensity ratio of the pixel and the intensity ratio curve. Since the height information can be obtained directly from the characteristic curve without depth scanning, a major advantage of DDCM over the conventional confocal microscopy is a speed. The 3-D surface profiling time is dramatically reduced. Furthermore, DDCM can measure 3-D images without the influence of the sample condition since the intensity ratio is independent of the quantum yield and reflectance. We present two types of DDCM, such as a fluorescence microscopy and a reflectance microscopy. In addition, we extend the measurement range axially by varying the pupil function. Here, we demonstrate the working principle of DDCM and the feasibility of the proposed methods.

  12. Photobleaching property of confocal laser scanning microscopy with masked illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, DongUk; Moon, Sucbei; Song, Hoseong; Yang, Wenzhong; Kim, Dug Y.

    2010-02-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) has become the tool of choice for high-contrast fluorescence imaging in the study of the three-dimensional and dynamic properties of biological system. However, the high cost and complexity of commercial CLSMs urges many researchers to individually develop low cost and flexible confocal microscopy systems. The high speed scanner is an influential factor in terms of cost and system complexity. Resonant galvo scanners at several kHz have been commonly used in custom-built CLSMs. However, during the repeated illumination for live cell imaging or 3D image formation, photobleaching and image distortion occurred at the edges of the scan field may be more serious than the center due to an inherent property (e.g. sinusoidal angular velocity) of the scan mirror. Usually, no data is acquired at the edges due to large image distortion but the excitation beam is still illuminated. Here, we present the photobleaching property of CLSM with masked illumination, a simple and low cost method, to exclude the unintended excitation illumination at the edges. The mask with a square hole in its center is disposed at the image plane between the scan lens and the tube lens in order to decrease photobleaching and image distortion at the edges. The excluded illumination section is used as the black level of the detected signals for a signal quantizing step. Finally, we demonstrated the reduced photobleaching at the edges on a single layer of fluorescent beads and real-time image acquisition without a standard composite video signal by using a frame grabber.

  13. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: LASER POWER MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laser power abstract
    The reliability of the confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) to obtain intensity measurements and quantify fluorescence data is dependent on using a correctly aligned machine that contains a stable laser power. The laser power test appears to be one ...

  14. Swept confocally-aligned planar excitation (SCAPE) microscopy for high speed volumetric imaging of behaving organisms

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Matthew B.; Voleti, Venkatakaushik; Mendes, César S.; Lacefield, Clay; Grueber, Wesley B.; Mann, Richard S.; Bruno, Randy M.; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.

    2014-01-01

    We report a new 3D microscopy technique that allows volumetric imaging of living samples at ultra-high speeds: Swept, confocally-aligned planar excitation (SCAPE) microscopy. While confocal and two-photon microscopy have revolutionized biomedical research, current implementations are costly, complex and limited in their ability to image 3D volumes at high speeds. Light-sheet microscopy techniques using two-objective, orthogonal illumination and detection require a highly constrained sample geometry, and either physical sample translation or complex synchronization of illumination and detection planes. In contrast, SCAPE microscopy acquires images using an angled, swept light-sheet in a single-objective, en-face geometry. Unique confocal descanning and image rotation optics map this moving plane onto a stationary high-speed camera, permitting completely translationless 3D imaging of intact samples at rates exceeding 20 volumes per second. We demonstrate SCAPE microscopy by imaging spontaneous neuronal firing in the intact brain of awake behaving mice, as well as freely moving transgenic Drosophila larvae. PMID:25663846

  15. Fluorescence performance standards for confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüttinger, Steffen; Kapusta, Peter; Völlkopf, Volker; Koberling, Felix; Erdmann, Rainer; Macdonald, Rainer

    2010-02-01

    State of the art confocal microscopes offer diffraction limited (or even better) spatial resolution, highest (single molecule) sensitivity and ps-fluorescence lifetime measurement accuracy. For developers, manufacturers, as well as users of confocal microscopes it is mandatory to assign values to these qualities. In particular for users, it is often not easy to ascertain that the instrument is properly aligned as a large number of factors influence resolution or sensitivity. Therefore, we aspire to design a set of performance standards to be deployed on a day-to-day fashion in order to check the instruments characteristics. The main quantities such performance standard must address are: • Spatial resolution • Sensitivity • Fluorescence lifetime To facilitate the deployment and thus promote wide range adoption in day-to-day performance testing the corresponding standards have to be ready made, easy to handle and to store. The measurement procedures necessary should be available on as many different setups as possible and the procedures involved in their deployment should be as easy as possible. To this end, we developed two performance standards to accomplish the mentioned goals: • Resolution reference • Combined molecular brightness and fluorescence lifetime reference The first one is based on sub-resolution sized Tetra-SpeckTM fluorescent beads or alternatively on single molecules on a glass surface to image and to determine quantitatively the confocal volume, while the latter is a liquid sample containing fluorescent dyes of different concentrations and spectral properties. Both samples are sealed in order to ease their use and prolong their storage life. Currently long-term tests are performed to ascertain durability and road capabilities.

  16. Detection limits of confocal surface plasmon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pechprasarn, Suejit; Somekh, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper applies rigorous diffraction theory to evaluate the minimum mass sensitivity of a confocal optical microscope designed to excite and detect surface plasmons operating on a planar metallic substrate. The diffraction model is compared with an intuitive ray picture which gives remarkably similar predictions. The combination of focusing the surface plasmons and accurate phase measurement mean that under favorable but achievable conditions detection of small numbers of molecules is possible, however, we argue that reliable detection of single molecules will benefit from the use of structured surfaces. System configurations needed to optimize performance are discussed. PMID:24940537

  17. Subcellular Microanatomy by 3D Deconvolution Brightfield Microscopy: Method and Analysis Using Human Chromatin in the Interphase Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Tadrous, Paul Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Anatomy has advanced using 3-dimensional (3D) studies at macroscopic (e.g., dissection, injection moulding of vessels, radiology) and microscopic (e.g., serial section reconstruction with light and electron microscopy) levels. This paper presents the first results in human cells of a new method of subcellular 3D brightfield microscopy. Unlike traditional 3D deconvolution and confocal techniques, this method is suitable for general application to brightfield microscopy. Unlike brightfield serial sectioning it has subcellular resolution. Results are presented of the 3D structure of chromatin in the interphase nucleus of two human cell types, hepatocyte and plasma cell. I show how the freedom to examine these structures in 3D allows greater morphological discrimination between and within cell types and the 3D structural basis for the classical “clock-face” motif of the plasma cell nucleus is revealed. Potential for further applications discussed. PMID:22567315

  18. Sheet-scanned dual-axis confocal (SS-DAC) microscopy using Richardson-Lucy deconvolution

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Danni; Meza, Daphne; Wang, Yu; Gao, Liang; Liu, Jonathan T.C.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously developed a line-scanned dual-axis confocal (LS-DAC) microscope with subcellular resolution suitable for high-frame-rate diagnostic imaging at shallow depths. Due to the loss of confocality along one dimension, the contrast (signal-to-background ratio) of a LS-DAC microscope is deteriorated compared to a point-scanned DAC microscope. However, by using a sCMOS camera for detection, a short oblique light-sheet is imaged at each scanned position. Therefore, by scanning the light sheet in only one dimension, a thin 3D volume is imaged. Both sequential two-dimensional deconvolution and three-dimensional deconvolution are performed on the thin image volume to improve the resolution and contrast of one en face confocal image section at the center of the volume, a technique we call sheet-scanned dual-axis confocal (SS-DAC) microscopy. PMID:26466290

  19. Sheet-scanned dual-axis confocal microscopy using Richardson-Lucy deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Meza, D; Wang, Y; Gao, L; Liu, J T C

    2014-09-15

    We have previously developed a line-scanned dual-axis confocal (LS-DAC) microscope with subcellular resolution suitable for high-frame-rate diagnostic imaging at shallow depths. Due to the loss of confocality along one dimension, the contrast (signal-to-background ratio) of a LS-DAC microscope is deteriorated compared to a point-scanned DAC microscope. However, by using a sCMOS camera for detection, a short oblique light-sheet is imaged at each scanned position. Therefore, by scanning the light sheet in only one dimension, a thin 3D volume is imaged. Both sequential two-dimensional deconvolution and three-dimensional deconvolution are performed on the thin image volume to improve the resolution and contrast of one en face confocal image section at the center of the volume, a technique we call sheet-scanned dual-axis confocal (SS-DAC) microscopy. PMID:26466290

  20. Confocal fluorescence microscopy for detection of cervical preneoplastic lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikhzadeh, Fahime; Ward, Rabab K.; Carraro, Anita; Chen, Zhaoyang; van Niekerk, Dirk; MacAulay, Calum; Follen, Michele; Lane, Pierre; Guillaud, Martial

    2015-03-01

    We examined and established the potential of ex-vivo confocal fluorescence microscopy for differentiating between normal cervical tissue, low grade Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN1), and high grade CIN (CIN2 and CIN3). Our objectives were to i) use Quantitative Tissue Phenotype (QTP) analysis to quantify nuclear and cellular morphology and tissue architecture in confocal microscopic images of fresh cervical biopsies and ii) determine the accuracy of high grade CIN detection via confocal microscopy. Cervical biopsy specimens of colposcopically normal and abnormal tissues obtained from 15 patients were evaluated by confocal fluorescence microscopy. Confocal images were analyzed and about 200 morphological and architectural features were calculated at the nuclear, cellular, and tissue level. For the purpose of this study, we used four features to delineate disease grade including nuclear size, cell density, estimated nuclear-cytoplasmic (ENC) ratio, and the average of three nearest Delaunay neighbors distance (3NDND). Our preliminary results showed ENC ratio and 3NDND correlated well with histopathological diagnosis. The Spearman correlation coefficient between each of these two features and the histopathological diagnosis was higher than the correlation coefficient between colposcopic appearance and histopathological diagnosis. Sensitivity and specificity of ENC ratio for detecting high grade CIN were both equal to 100%. QTP analysis of fluorescence confocal images shows the potential to discriminate high grade CIN from low grade CIN and normal tissues. This approach could be used to help clinicians identify HGSILs in clinical settings.

  1. Visualizing Cochlear Mechanics Using Confocal Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulfendahl, M.; Boutet de Monvel, J.; Fridberger, A.

    2003-02-01

    The sound-evoked vibration pattern of the hearing organ is based on complex mechanical interactions between different cellular structures. To explore the structural changes occurring within the organ of Corti during basilar-membrane motion, stepwise alterations of the scala tympani pressure were applied in an in vitro preparation of the guinea-pig temporal bone. Confocal images were acquired at each pressure level. In this way, the motion of several structures could be simultaneously observed with high resolution in a nearly intact system. Images were analyzed using a novel wavelet-based optical-flow estimation algorithm. Under the present experimental conditions, the reticular lamina moved as a stiff plate with a center of rotation in the region of the inner hair cells. The outer hair cells appeared non-rigid and the basal, synaptic regions of these cells displayed significant radial motion indicative of cellular bending and internal shearing.

  2. Reflectance confocal microscopy in infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Cinotti, E; Labeille, B; Cambazard, F; Perrot, J L

    2015-10-01

    In vivo reflectance confocal microscope (RCM) is a high-resolution non-invasive imaging technique that was initially focused on the diagnosis of skin cancers. A rising number of other indications have been later described for the diagnosis and management of inflammatory and infectious dermatological disorders. RCM can identify cutaneous parasites that are not visible to naked eye such as Sarcoptes scabiei and Demodex folliculorum and it allows to better identify the different body parts of bigger parasites such as ticks. Fungal filaments can also be identified as elongated bright structures in the cutaneous upper layers. RCM cannot observe virus directly. However, the cytopathic effect associated with some virus can be recognized. In addition of being helpful for the diagnosis and follow-up after treatment, thanks to its non-invasiveness, RCM allows pathophysiological studies. PMID:26129682

  3. Confocal Microscopy of Jammed Matter: From Elasticity to Granular Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorjadze, Ivane

    Packings of particles are ubiquitous in nature and are of interest not only to the scientific community but also to the food, pharmaceutical, and oil industries. In this thesis we use confocal microscopy to investigate packing geometry and stress transmission in 3D jammed particulate systems. By introducing weak depletion attraction we probe the accessible phase-space and demonstrate that a microscopic approach to jammed matter gives validity to statistical mechanics framework, which is intriguing because our particles are not thermally activated. We show that the fluctuations of the local packing parameters can be successfully captured by the recently proposed 'granocentric' model, which generates packing statistics according to simple stochastic processes. This model enables us to calculate packing entropy and granular temperature, the so-called 'compactivity', therefore, providing a basis for a statistical mechanics of granular matter. At a jamming transition point at which there are formed just enough number of contacts to guarantee the mechanical stability, theoretical arguments suggest a singularity which gives rise to the surprising scaling behavior of the elastic moduli and the microstructure, as observed in numerical simulations. Since the contact network in 3D is typically hidden from view, experimental test of the scaling law between the coordination number and the applied pressure is lacking in the literature. Our data show corrections to the linear scaling of the pressure with density which takes into account the creation of contacts. Numerical studies of vibrational spectra, in turn, reveal sudden features such as excess of low frequency modes, dependence of mode localization and structure on the pressure. Chapter four describes the first calculation of vibrational density of states from the experimental 3D data and is in qualitative agreement with the analogous computer simulations. We study the configurational role of the pressure and demonstrate

  4. Single Cell Traction Microscopy within 3D Collagen Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mingming

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion and migration. Cells require the three dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, our current understanding of cell-ECM and cell-cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. It is now clear that what we learn about cellular behavior on a 2D substrate does not always apply to cells embedded within a 3D biomatrix. 3D traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single cells embedded in 3D gel, but current methods cannot account for the fibrous and nonlinear properties of collagen gel. In this talk, I will present a forward computation algorithm that we have developed for 3D cell traction measurements within collagen gels. The application of this technology to understanding cancer migration and invasion will be discussed. This work is supported by the National Center for Research Resources (5R21RR025801-03, NIH) and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (8 R21 GM103388-03,NIH), and the Cornell Center on the Microenvironment & Metastasis.

  5. Chromatic confocal microscopy using staircase diffractive surface.

    PubMed

    Rayer, Mathieu; Mansfield, Daniel

    2014-08-10

    A chromatic confocal microscope (CCM) is a high-dynamic-range noncontact distance measurement sensor; it is based on a hyperchromatic lens. The vast majority of commercial CCMs use refractive-based chromatic dispersion to chromatically code the optical axis. This approach significantly limits the range of applications and performance of the CCM. In order to be a suitable alternative to a laser triangulation gauge and laser encoder, the performance of the CCM must be improved. In this paper, it is shown how hybrid aspheric diffractive (HAD) lenses can bring the CCM to its full potential by increasing the dynamic range by a factor of 2 and the resolution by a factor of 5 while passively athermizing and increasing the light throughput efficiency of the optical head [M. Rayer, U.S. patent 1122052.2 (2011)]. The only commercially suitable manufacturing process is single-point diamond turning. However, the optical power carried by the diffractive side of a hybrid aspheric diffractive lens is limited by the manufacturing process. A theoretical study of manufacturing losses has revealed that the HAD configuration with the highest diffraction efficiency is for a staircase diffractive surface (SDS). SDS lenses have the potential to reduce light losses associated with manufacturing limits by a factor of 5 without increasing surface roughness, allowing scalar diffraction-limited optical design with a diffractive element. PMID:25320920

  6. Diffusion of photoacid generators by laser scanning confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping L.; Webber, Stephen E.; Mendenhall, J.; Byers, Jeffrey D.; Chao, Keith K.

    1998-06-01

    Diffusion of the photogenerated acid during the period of time between exposure and development can cause contrast loss and ultimately loss of the latent image. This is especially relevant for chemically amplified photoresists that require a post-exposure baking step, which in turn facilitates acid diffusion due to the high temperature normally employed. It is thus important to develop techniques with good spatial resolution to monitor the photogeneration of acid. More precisely, we need techniques that provide two distinct types of information: spatial resolution on various length scales within the surface layer and also sufficient depth resolution so that one can observe the transition from very surface layer to bulk structure in the polymer blend coated on silicon substrate. Herein laser scanning confocal microscopy is used to evaluate the resist for the first time. We report the use of the confocal microscopy to map the pag/dye distribution in PHS matrices, with both reflectance images and fluorescence images. A laser beam is focused onto a small 3D volume element, termed a voxel. It is typically 200 nm X 200 nm laterally and 800 nm axially. The illuminated voxel is viewed such that only signals emanating from this voxel are detected, i.e., signal from outside the probed voxel is not detected. By adjusting the vertical position of the laser focal point, the voxel can be moved to the designated lateral plane to produce an image. Contrast caused by topology difference between the exposed and unexposed area can be eliminated. Bis-p-butylphenyl iodonium triflat (7% of polyhydroxystyrene) is used as photoacid generators. 5% - 18% (by weight, PHS Mn equals 13 k) resist in PGMEA solution is spin cast onto the treated quartz disk with thickness of 1.4 micrometers , 5 micrometers space/10 micrometers pitch chrome mask is used to generate the pattern with mercury DUV illumination. Fluoresceinamine, the pH-sensitive dye, is also used to enhance the contrast of

  7. Resolution doubling in fluorescence microscopy with confocal spinning-disk image scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Olaf; Pieper, Christoph; Clever, Michaela; Pfaff, Janine; Ruhlandt, Aike; Kehlenbach, Ralph H.; Wouters, Fred S.; Großhans, Jörg; Bunt, Gertrude; Enderlein, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate how a conventional confocal spinning-disk (CSD) microscope can be converted into a doubly resolving image scanning microscopy (ISM) system without changing any part of its optical or mechanical elements. Making use of the intrinsic properties of a CSD microscope, we illuminate stroboscopically, generating an array of excitation foci that are moved across the sample by varying the phase between stroboscopic excitation and rotation of the spinning disk. ISM then generates an image with nearly doubled resolution. Using conventional fluorophores, we have imaged single nuclear pore complexes in the nuclear membrane and aggregates of GFP-conjugated Tau protein in three dimensions. Multicolor ISM was shown on cytoskeletal-associated structural proteins and on 3D four-color images including MitoTracker and Hoechst staining. The simple adaptation of conventional CSD equipment allows superresolution investigations of a broad variety of cell biological questions. PMID:24324140

  8. Confocal Raman microscopy of protein adsorbed in chromatographic particles.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuewu; Stone, Thomas; Bell, David; Gillespie, Christopher; Portoles, Marta

    2012-09-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy is a nondestructive analytical technique that combines the chemical information from vibrational spectroscopy with the spatial resolution of confocal microscopy. It was applied, for the first time, to measure conformation and distribution of protein adsorbed in wetted chromatographic particles. Monoclonal antibody was loaded into the Fractogel EMD SO(3) (M) cation exchanger at 2 mS/cm or 10 mS/cm. Amide I and III frequencies in the Raman spectrum of the adsorbed protein suggest that there are no detectable changes of the original β-sheet conformation in the chromatographic particles. Protein depth profile measurements indicate that, when the conductivity is increased from 2 mS/cm to 10 mS/cm, there is a change in mass transport mechanism for protein adsorption, from the shrinking-core model to the homogeneous-diffusion model. In this study, the use of confocal Raman microscopy to measure protein distribution in chromatographic particles fundamentally agrees with previous confocal laser scanning microscopic investigations, but confocal Raman spectroscopy enjoys additional advantages: use of unlabeled protein to eliminate fluorescent labeling, ability for characterization of protein secondary structure, and ability for spectral normalization to provide a nondestructive experimental approach to correct light attenuation effects caused by refractive index (RI) mismatching in semiopaque chromatographic particles. PMID:22803776

  9. 3D optical sectioning with a new hyperspectral confocal fluorescence imaging system.

    SciTech Connect

    Nieman, Linda T.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Davidson, George S.; Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Haaland, David Michael; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Bachand, George David; Jones, Howland D. T.

    2007-02-01

    A novel hyperspectral fluorescence microscope for high-resolution 3D optical sectioning of cells and other structures has been designed, constructed, and used to investigate a number of different problems. We have significantly extended new multivariate curve resolution (MCR) data analysis methods to deconvolve the hyperspectral image data and to rapidly extract quantitative 3D concentration distribution maps of all emitting species. The imaging system has many advantages over current confocal imaging systems including simultaneous monitoring of numerous highly overlapped fluorophores, immunity to autofluorescence or impurity fluorescence, enhanced sensitivity, and dramatically improved accuracy, reliability, and dynamic range. Efficient data compression in the spectral dimension has allowed personal computers to perform quantitative analysis of hyperspectral images of large size without loss of image quality. We have also developed and tested software to perform analysis of time resolved hyperspectral images using trilinear multivariate analysis methods. The new imaging system is an enabling technology for numerous applications including (1) 3D composition mapping analysis of multicomponent processes occurring during host-pathogen interactions, (2) monitoring microfluidic processes, (3) imaging of molecular motors and (4) understanding photosynthetic processes in wild type and mutant Synechocystis cyanobacteria.

  10. Video-rate Scanning Confocal Microscopy and Microendoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Alexander J.; Evans, Conor L.

    2011-01-01

    Confocal microscopy has become an invaluable tool in biology and the biomedical sciences, enabling rapid, high-sensitivity, and high-resolution optical sectioning of complex systems. Confocal microscopy is routinely used, for example, to study specific cellular targets1, monitor dynamics in living cells2-4, and visualize the three dimensional evolution of entire organisms5,6. Extensions of confocal imaging systems, such as confocal microendoscopes, allow for high-resolution imaging in vivo7 and are currently being applied to disease imaging and diagnosis in clinical settings8,9. Confocal microscopy provides three-dimensional resolution by creating so-called "optical sections" using straightforward geometrical optics. In a standard wide-field microscope, fluorescence generated from a sample is collected by an objective lens and relayed directly to a detector. While acceptable for imaging thin samples, thick samples become blurred by fluorescence generated above and below the objective focal plane. In contrast, confocal microscopy enables virtual, optical sectioning of samples, rejecting out-of-focus light to build high resolution three-dimensional representations of samples. Confocal microscopes achieve this feat by using a confocal aperture in the detection beam path. The fluorescence collected from a sample by the objective is relayed back through the scanning mirrors and through the primary dichroic mirror, a mirror carefully selected to reflect shorter wavelengths such as the laser excitation beam while passing the longer, Stokes-shifted fluorescence emission. This long-wavelength fluorescence signal is then passed to a pair of lenses on either side of a pinhole that is positioned at a plane exactly conjugate with the focal plane of the objective lens. Photons collected from the focal volume of the object are collimated by the objective lens and are focused by the confocal lenses through the pinhole. Fluorescence generated above or below the focal plane will

  11. Video-rate scanning confocal microscopy and microendoscopy.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Alexander J; Evans, Conor L

    2011-01-01

    Confocal microscopy has become an invaluable tool in biology and the biomedical sciences, enabling rapid, high-sensitivity, and high-resolution optical sectioning of complex systems. Confocal microscopy is routinely used, for example, to study specific cellular targets, monitor dynamics in living cells, and visualize the three dimensional evolution of entire organisms. Extensions of confocal imaging systems, such as confocal microendoscopes, allow for high-resolution imaging in vivo and are currently being applied to disease imaging and diagnosis in clinical settings. Confocal microscopy provides three-dimensional resolution by creating so-called "optical sections" using straightforward geometrical optics. In a standard wide-field microscope, fluorescence generated from a sample is collected by an objective lens and relayed directly to a detector. While acceptable for imaging thin samples, thick samples become blurred by fluorescence generated above and below the objective focal plane. In contrast, confocal microscopy enables virtual, optical sectioning of samples, rejecting out-of-focus light to build high resolution three-dimensional representations of samples. Confocal microscopes achieve this feat by using a confocal aperture in the detection beam path. The fluorescence collected from a sample by the objective is relayed back through the scanning mirrors and through the primary dichroic mirror, a mirror carefully selected to reflect shorter wavelengths such as the laser excitation beam while passing the longer, Stokes-shifted fluorescence emission. This long-wavelength fluorescence signal is then passed to a pair of lenses on either side of a pinhole that is positioned at a plane exactly conjugate with the focal plane of the objective lens. Photons collected from the focal volume of the object are collimated by the objective lens and are focused by the confocal lenses through the pinhole. Fluorescence generated above or below the focal plane will therefore not

  12. Colloidal structural evolution of asphaltene studied by confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Jannett; Castillo, Jimmy A.; Reyes, A.

    2004-10-01

    In this work, a detail analysis of the flocculation kinetic of asphaltenes colloidal particles has been carried out usng confocal microscopy. The colloidal structural evolution of the asphaltene flocculated has had varies postulated; however, the aggregation process of asphaltene is still not fully understood. In a recent paper, using Confocal microscope (homemade), we reported high-resolution micrographic images of asphaltenes flocculated and the correlation between crude oil stability and flocculation process. This technique permitted visualizes directly the physical nature of asphaltene flocculated. In this work, a detail analysis of the flocculation kinetic of asphaltene colloidal particles has been carried out using confocal microscopy. The physical nature of asphaltene flocculated from different crude oils is showed through of high-resolution image micrographies and its colloidal structural evolution.

  13. Single molecule microscopy in 3D cell cultures and tissues.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Florian M; Kaemmerer, Elke; Meckel, Tobias

    2014-12-15

    From the onset of the first microscopic visualization of single fluorescent molecules in living cells at the beginning of this century, to the present, almost routine application of single molecule microscopy, the method has well-proven its ability to contribute unmatched detailed insight into the heterogeneous and dynamic molecular world life is composed of. Except for investigations on bacteria and yeast, almost the entire story of success is based on studies on adherent mammalian 2D cell cultures. However, despite this continuous progress, the technique was not able to keep pace with the move of the cell biology community to adapt 3D cell culture models for basic research, regenerative medicine, or drug development and screening. In this review, we will summarize the progress, which only recently allowed for the application of single molecule microscopy to 3D cell systems and give an overview of the technical advances that led to it. While initially posing a challenge, we finally conclude that relevant 3D cell models will become an integral part of the on-going success of single molecule microscopy. PMID:25453259

  14. FOOD SURFACE TEXTURE MEASUREMENT USING REFLECTIVE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used in the reflection mode to characterize the surface texture (roughness) of sliced food surfaces. Sandpapers of grit size between 150 and 600 were used as the height reference to standardize the CLSM hardware settings. Sandpaper particle sizes were v...

  15. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: FOUNDATIONS FOR MEASUREMENTS, QUANTITATION AND SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The goal of a CLSM is to acquire and quantify fluorescence and in some instruments acquire spectral characterization of the emitted signal. The accuracy of these measurements demands t...

  16. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: QA TESTS, QUANTITATION AND SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal Microscopy System Performance: QA tests, Quantitation and Spectroscopy.

    Robert M. Zucker 1 and Jeremy M. Lerner 2,
    1Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research Development, U.S. Environmen...

  17. Automated 3-D tracking of centrosomes in sequences of confocal image stacks.

    PubMed

    Kerekes, Ryan A; Gleason, Shaun S; Trivedi, Niraj; Solecki, David J

    2009-01-01

    In order to facilitate the study of neuron migration, we propose a method for 3-D detection and tracking of centrosomes in time-lapse confocal image stacks of live neuron cells. We combine Laplacian-based blob detection, adaptive thresholding, and the extraction of scale and roundness features to find centrosome-like objects in each frame. We link these detections using the joint probabilistic data association filter (JPDAF) tracking algorithm with a Newtonian state-space model tailored to the motion characteristics of centrosomes in live neurons. We apply our algorithm to image sequences containing multiple cells, some of which had been treated with motion-inhibiting drugs. We provide qualitative results and quantitative comparisons to manual segmentation and tracking results showing that our average motion estimates agree to within 13% of those computed manually by neurobiologists. PMID:19964725

  18. Three-dimensional imaging of carbon nanostructures by scanning confocal electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Ayako; Shimojo, Masayuki; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2009-10-01

    Although scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) shows a promise for optical depth sectioning with high resolution, practical and theoretical problems have prevented its application to three-dimensional (3D) imaging. We employed a stage-scanning system in which only the specimen is moved three dimensionally under a fixed lens configuration, and an annular dark-field (ADF) aperture which blocks direct beams and selects only the scattered electrons. This ADF-SCEM improved depth resolution sufficiently to perform optical depth sectioning. Finally, we succeeded in demonstrating the 3D reconstruction of carbon nanocoils using ADF-SCEM.

  19. Taylor series expansion based multidimensional image reconstruction for confocal and 4pi microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilipkumar, Shilpa; Pratim Mondal, Partha

    2013-08-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction methodology based on Taylor series approximation (TSA) in a Bayesian image reconstruction formulation. TSA incorporates the requirement of analyticity in the image domain, and acts as a finite impulse response filter. This technique is validated on images obtained from widefield, confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy and two-photon excited 4pi (2PE-4pi) fluorescence microscopy. Studies on simulated 3D objects, mitochondria-tagged yeast cells (labeled with Mitotracker Orange) and mitochondrial networks (tagged with Green fluorescent protein) show a signal-to-background improvement of 40% and resolution enhancement from 360 to 240 nm. This technique can easily be extended to other imaging modalities (single plane illumination microscopy (SPIM), individual molecule localization SPIM, stimulated emission depletion microscopy and its variants).

  20. Applied 3D printing for microscopy in health science research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brideau, Craig; Zareinia, Kourosh; Stys, Peter

    2015-03-01

    The rapid prototyping capability offered by 3D printing is considered advantageous for commercial applications. However, the ability to quickly produce precision custom devices is highly beneficial in the research laboratory setting as well. Biological laboratories require the manipulation and analysis of delicate living samples, thus the ability to create custom holders, support equipment, and adapters allow the extension of existing laboratory machines. Applications include camera adapters and stage sample holders for microscopes, surgical guides for tissue preparation, and small precision tools customized to unique specifications. Where high precision is needed, especially the reproduction of fine features, a printer with a high resolution is needed. However, the introduction of cheaper, lower resolution commercial printers have been shown to be more than adequate for less demanding projects. For direct manipulation of delicate samples, biocompatible raw materials are often required, complicating the printing process. This paper will examine some examples of 3D-printed objects for laboratory use, and provide an overview of the requirements for 3D printing for this application. Materials, printing resolution, production, and ease of use will all be reviewed with an eye to producing better printers and techniques for laboratory applications. Specific case studies will highlight applications for 3D-printed devices in live animal imaging for both microscopy and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

  1. High Resolution, Large Deformation 3D Traction Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    López-Fagundo, Cristina; Reichner, Jonathan; Hoffman-Kim, Diane; Franck, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Traction Force Microscopy (TFM) is a powerful approach for quantifying cell-material interactions that over the last two decades has contributed significantly to our understanding of cellular mechanosensing and mechanotransduction. In addition, recent advances in three-dimensional (3D) imaging and traction force analysis (3D TFM) have highlighted the significance of the third dimension in influencing various cellular processes. Yet irrespective of dimensionality, almost all TFM approaches have relied on a linear elastic theory framework to calculate cell surface tractions. Here we present a new high resolution 3D TFM algorithm which utilizes a large deformation formulation to quantify cellular displacement fields with unprecedented resolution. The results feature some of the first experimental evidence that cells are indeed capable of exerting large material deformations, which require the formulation of a new theoretical TFM framework to accurately calculate the traction forces. Based on our previous 3D TFM technique, we reformulate our approach to accurately account for large material deformation and quantitatively contrast and compare both linear and large deformation frameworks as a function of the applied cell deformation. Particular attention is paid in estimating the accuracy penalty associated with utilizing a traditional linear elastic approach in the presence of large deformation gradients. PMID:24740435

  2. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Interfacial Phenomena Using Confocal Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Ian C.

    Surfactants play an integral role in numerous functions ranging from stabilizing the emulsion in a favorite salad dressing to organizing the cellular components that make life possible. We are interested in lung surfactant, which is a mixture of lipids and proteins essential for normal respiration because it modulates the surface tension of the air-liquid interface of the thin fluid lining in the lungs. Through this surface tension modulation, lung surfactant ensures effortless lung expansion and prevents lung collapse during exhalation, thereby effecting proper oxygenation of the bloodstream. The function of lung surfactant, as well as numerous interfacial lipid systems, is not solely dictated by the behavior of materials confined to the two-dimensional interface. Rather, the distributions of materials in the liquid subphase also greatly influence the performance of interfacial films of lung surfactant. Therefore, to better understand the behavior of lung surfactant and other interfacial lipid systems, we require a three-dimensional characterization technique. In this dissertation, we have developed a novel confocal microscopy methodology for investigating the interfacial phenomena of surfactants at the air-liquid interface of a Langmuir trough. Confocal microscopy provides the excellent combination of in situ, fast, three-dimensional visualization of multiple components of the lung surfactant system that other characterization techniques lack. We detail the solutions to the numerous challenges encountered when imaging a dynamic air-liquid interface with a high-resolution technique like confocal microscopy. We then use confocal microscopy to elucidate the distinct mechanisms by which a polyelectrolyte (chitosan) and nonadsorbing polymer (polyethylene glycol) restore the function of lung surfactant under inhibitory conditions mimicking the effects of lung trauma. Beyond this physiological model, we also investigate several one- and two-component interfacial films

  3. Confocal microscopy and variable-focal length microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Raighne, Aaron M.; Yang, Lisong; Dunbar, L. Andrea; McCabe, Eithne M.; Scharf, Toralf

    2004-07-01

    Confocal microscopy has a unique optical sectioning property which allows three-dimensional images at different depths. Use of a microlens array is a potential alternative to the Nipkow disk for parallel imaging with high throughput in real-time confocal microscopy. The use of variable-focal-length microlenses can provide a way to axially scan the foci electronically avoiding the inflexible mechanical movement of the lens or the sample. Here we demonstrate a combination of a variable-focal-length microlens array and a fiber optic bundle as a way to create a high throughput aperture array that would be potentially applied as confocal imaging in vivo biological specimens. Variable focal length microlenses that we use consist of a liquid crystal film sandwiched between a pair of conductive substrates with patterned electrodes. The incident side of the microlens array was determined by examining the focus distribution in the axial direction. The variation of the focal length obtained by changing the voltage and corresponding focus intensity were measured through a conventional microscope. Meanwhile, the fiber bundle was characterized by coupling with either coherent or incoherent light source. We use the fiber bundle as both a multiple aperture and an image-carrying element and combine it with a microlens array to built up a confocal system. Axial responses are measured in two optical arrangements as a route to investigate endoscope potential.

  4. Confocal microscopy of skin cancers: Translational advances toward clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in translational research in and technology for confocal microscopy of skin cancers, toward clinical applications, are described. Advances in translational research are in diagnosis of melanoma in vivo, pre-operative mapping of lentigo maligna melanoma margins to guide surgery and intra-operative imaging of residual basal cell carcinomas to guide shave-biopsy. Advances in technology include mosaicing microscopy for detection of basal cell carcinomas in large areas of excised tissue, toward rapid pathology-at-the-bedside, and development of small, simple and low-cost line-scanning confocal microscopes for worldwide use in diverse primary healthcare settings. Current limitations and future opportunities and challenges for both clinicians and technologists are discussed. PMID:19964286

  5. Cement paste surface roughness analysis using coherence scanning interferometry and confocal microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Apedo, K.L.; Munzer, C.; He, H.; Montgomery, P.; Serres, N.; Fond, C.; Feugeas, F.

    2015-02-15

    Scanning electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy have been used for several decades to better understand the microstructure of cementitious materials. Very limited work has been performed to date to study the roughness of cementitious materials by optical microscopy such as coherence scanning interferometry (CSI) and chromatic confocal sensing (CCS). The objective of this paper is to better understand how CSI can be used as a tool to analyze surface roughness and topography of cement pastes. Observations from a series of images acquired using this technique on both polished and unpolished samples are described. The results from CSI are compared with those from a STIL confocal microscopy technique (SCM). Comparison between both optical techniques demonstrates the ability of CSI to measure both polished and unpolished cement pastes. - Highlights: • Coherence scanning interferometry (CSI) was used to analyze cement paste surfaces. • The results from the CSI were compared with those from a confocal microscopy. • 3D roughness parameters were obtained using the window resizing method. • Polished and unpolished cement pastes were studied.

  6. Determination of the positions and orientations of concentrated rod-like colloids from 3D microscopy data.

    PubMed

    Besseling, T H; Hermes, M; Kuijk, A; de Nijs, B; Deng, T-S; Dijkstra, M; Imhof, A; van Blaaderen, A

    2015-05-20

    Confocal microscopy in combination with real-space particle tracking has proven to be a powerful tool in scientific fields such as soft matter physics, materials science and cell biology. However, 3D tracking of anisotropic particles in concentrated phases remains not as optimized compared to algorithms for spherical particles. To address this problem, we developed a new particle-fitting algorithm that can extract the positions and orientations of fluorescent rod-like particles from three dimensional confocal microscopy data stacks. The algorithm is tailored to work even when the fluorescent signals of the particles overlap considerably and a threshold method and subsequent clusters analysis alone do not suffice. We demonstrate that our algorithm correctly identifies all five coordinates of uniaxial particles in both a concentrated disordered phase and a liquid-crystalline smectic-B phase. Apart from confocal microscopy images, we also demonstrate that the algorithm can be used to identify nanorods in 3D electron tomography reconstructions. Lastly, we determined the accuracy of the algorithm using both simulated and experimental confocal microscopy data-stacks of diffusing silica rods in a dilute suspension. This novel particle-fitting algorithm allows for the study of structure and dynamics in both dilute and dense liquid-crystalline phases (such as nematic, smectic and crystalline phases) as well as the study of the glass transition of rod-like particles in three dimensions on the single particle level. PMID:25922931

  7. Determination of the positions and orientations of concentrated rod-like colloids from 3D microscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besseling, T. H.; Hermes, M.; Kuijk, A.; de Nijs, B.; Deng, T.-S.; Dijkstra, M.; Imhof, A.; van Blaaderen, A.

    2015-05-01

    Confocal microscopy in combination with real-space particle tracking has proven to be a powerful tool in scientific fields such as soft matter physics, materials science and cell biology. However, 3D tracking of anisotropic particles in concentrated phases remains not as optimized compared to algorithms for spherical particles. To address this problem, we developed a new particle-fitting algorithm that can extract the positions and orientations of fluorescent rod-like particles from three dimensional confocal microscopy data stacks. The algorithm is tailored to work even when the fluorescent signals of the particles overlap considerably and a threshold method and subsequent clusters analysis alone do not suffice. We demonstrate that our algorithm correctly identifies all five coordinates of uniaxial particles in both a concentrated disordered phase and a liquid-crystalline smectic-B phase. Apart from confocal microscopy images, we also demonstrate that the algorithm can be used to identify nanorods in 3D electron tomography reconstructions. Lastly, we determined the accuracy of the algorithm using both simulated and experimental confocal microscopy data-stacks of diffusing silica rods in a dilute suspension. This novel particle-fitting algorithm allows for the study of structure and dynamics in both dilute and dense liquid-crystalline phases (such as nematic, smectic and crystalline phases) as well as the study of the glass transition of rod-like particles in three dimensions on the single particle level.

  8. Three-dimensional resolution and contrast-enhanced confocal microscopy with array detection.

    PubMed

    Ge, Baoliang; Wang, Yifan; Huang, Yujia; Kuang, Cuifang; Fang, Yue; Xiu, Peng; Rong, Zihao; Liu, Xu

    2016-05-01

    What we believe is a novel method for improving confocal microscopy's resolution and contrast in 3D space is proposed. Based on a conventional confocal microscopy setup, we use an array detector composed of 32 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) to replace one point-detector, where the location offset of each PMT caused a different effective point spread function (PSF). By applying array detection and the fluorescence emission difference method of an image with a solid PSF and another with a donut-shaped PSF, we can enhance lateral resolution about 27% in real time with only one scan, and improve the axial resolving ability by about 22% simultaneously. Experimental results of both fluorescent beads and living cells are presented to verify the applicability and effectiveness of our method. PMID:27128062

  9. Analysis of cell-tissue grafts under weightless conditions using confocal fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volova, L. T.; Milyakova, M. N.; Rossinskaya, V. V.; Boltovskaya, V. V.; Kulagina, L. N.; Kurganskaya, L. V.; Timchenko, P. E.; Timchenko, E. V.; Zherdeva Taskina, Larisa A.

    2015-03-01

    The research results of monitoring of viable cells in a cellular-tissue graft using confocal laser fluorescence microscopy at 488 nm and 561 nm with the use of fluorophore propidium iodide (propidium iodide, PI Sigma Aldrich USA) are presented. The processing of the received images was carried out using the software ANDOR. It is experimentally shown that the method of confocal fluorescence microscopy is one of the informational methods for detecting cells populated in a 3-D bio-carrier with a resolution of at least 400 nm. Analysis of the received micrographs suggests that the cells that were in a bio-carrier for 30 days in a synchronous ground-based experiment retained their viability compared to a similar space-based experiment in which the cells were hardly detected in a bio-carrier.

  10. Three-dimensional measurement of cAMP gradients using hyperspectral confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Thomas C.; Annamdevula, Naga; Britain, Andrea L.; Mayes, Samuel; Favreau, Peter F.; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger known to differentially regulate many cellular functions over a wide range of timescales. Several lines of evidence have suggested that the distribution of cAMP within cells is not uniform, and that cAMP compartmentalization is largely responsible for signaling specificity within the cAMP signaling pathway. However, to date, no studies have experimentally measured three dimensional (3D) cAMP distributions within cells. Here we use both 2D and 3D hyperspectral microscopy to visualize cAMP gradients in endothelial cells from the pulmonary microvasculature (PMVECs). cAMP levels were measured using a FRETbased cAMP sensor comprised of a cAMP binding domain from EPAC sandwiched between FRET donors and acceptors -- Turquoise and Venus fluorescent proteins. Data were acquired using either a Nikon A1R spectral confocal microscope or custom spectral microscopy system. Analysis of hyperspectral image stacks from a single confocal slice or from summed images of all slices (2D analysis) indicated little or no cAMP gradients were formed within PMVECs under basal conditions or following agonist treatment. However, analysis of hyperspectral image stacks from 3D cellular geometries (z stacks) demonstrate marked cAMP gradients from the apical to basolateral membrane of PMVECs. These results strongly suggest that 2D imaging studies of cAMP compartmentalization -- whether epifluorescence or confocal microscopy -- may lead to erroneous conclusions about the existence of cAMP gradients, and that 3D studies are required to assess mechanisms of signaling specificity.

  11. Confocal device and application strategies for endoluminal optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Markus; Schnieder, Ludger; Buess, Gerhard F.

    2003-10-01

    While endoscopic optical coherence tomography has been established successfully in vivo ,implementation of endoluminal optical coherence microscopy remains demanding,s suitable confocal probe is lacking. A miniaturized confocal laser scanning microscope is presented,which fulfills the requirements for endoluminal optical coherence microscopy. First,imaging experience gained for optical coherence microscopy of nimal gastrointestinal tissue samples is described. For this purpose,laboratory scale optical coherence microscope with an image acquisition time of 1min 30 s was employed. Cellular membranes can be identified throughout the gastrointestinal organs. Frequency domain image analysis can be used to distinguish columnar from squamous epithelium. Profilometric information on sample surfaces can be obtained directly as isophase lines. Second, the miniaturized confocal laser scanning microscope is characterized. Having an effective diameter of 25 mm, it houses single-mode optical fiber,scanning mirror and an objective lens. The micro-electro-mechanical mirror with gimballed suspension allows two dimensional scanning without introducing an optical path difference. The sinusoidal movement of both axes has to be considered to approximate cartesian image coordinates. Field geometry is illustrated s function of excitation amplitude and frequency. Acceptable image quality is chieved for frame rate of 0.5 Hz. A strategy to position the focal plane axially within the sample volume is discussed.

  12. Confocal fluorometer for diffusion tracking in 3D engineered tissue constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, D.; Zilioli, A.; Tan, N.; Buttenschoen, K.; Chikkanna, B.; Reynolds, J.; Marsden, B.; Hughes, C.

    2016-03-01

    We present results of the development of a non-contacting instrument, called fScan, based on scanning confocal fluorometry for assessing the diffusion of materials through a tissue matrix. There are many areas in healthcare diagnostics and screening where it is now widely accepted that the need for new quantitative monitoring technologies is a major pinch point in patient diagnostics and in vitro testing. With the increasing need to interpret 3D responses this commonly involves the need to track the diffusion of compounds, pharma-active species and cells through a 3D matrix of tissue. Methods are available but to support the advances that are currently only promised, this monitoring needs to be real-time, non-invasive, and economical. At the moment commercial meters tend to be invasive and usually require a sample of the medium to be removed and processed prior to testing. This methodology clearly has a number of significant disadvantages. fScan combines a fiber based optical arrangement with a compact, free space optical front end that has been integrated so that the sample's diffusion can be measured without interference. This architecture is particularly important due to the "wet" nature of the samples. fScan is designed to measure constructs located within standard well plates and a 2-D motion stage locates the required sample with respect to the measurement system. Results are presented that show how the meter has been used to evaluate movements of samples through collagen constructs in situ without disturbing their kinetic characteristics. These kinetics were little understood prior to these measurements.

  13. Modeling of Fibrin Gels Based on Confocal Microscopy and Light-Scattering Data

    PubMed Central

    Magatti, Davide; Molteni, Matteo; Cardinali, Barbara; Rocco, Mattia; Ferri, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Fibrin gels are biological networks that play a fundamental role in blood coagulation and other patho/physiological processes, such as thrombosis and cancer. Electron and confocal microscopies show a collection of fibers that are relatively monodisperse in diameter, not uniformly distributed, and connected at nodal points with a branching order of ∼3–4. Although in the confocal images the hydrated fibers appear to be quite straight (mass fractal dimension Dm = 1), for the overall system 1confocal images, we developed a method to generate three-dimensional (3D) in silico gels made of cylindrical sticks of diameter d, density ρ, and average length 〈L〉, joined at randomly distributed nodal points. The resulting 3D network strikingly resembles real fibrin gels and can be sketched as an assembly of densely packed fractal blobs, i.e., regions of size ξ, where the fiber concentration is higher than average. The blobs are placed at a distance ξ0 between their centers of mass so that they are overlapped by a factor η = ξ/ξ0 and have Dm ∼1.2–1.6. The in silico gels’ structure is quantitatively analyzed by its 3D spatial correlation function g3D(r) and corresponding power spectrum I(q) = FFT3D[g3D(r)], from which ρ, d, Dm, η, and ξ0 can be extracted. In particular, ξ0 provides an excellent estimate of the gel mesh size. The in silico gels’ I(q) compares quite well with real gels’ elastic light-scattering measurements. We then derived an analytical form factor for accurately fitting the scattering data, which allowed us to directly recover the gels’ structural parameters. PMID:23473498

  14. Study of liquid jet instability by confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lisong; Adamson, Leanne J; Bain, Colin D

    2012-07-01

    The instability of a liquid microjet was used to measure the dynamic surface tension of liquids at the surface ages of ≤1 ms using confocal microscopy. The reflected light from a laser beam at normal incidence to the jet surface is linear in the displacement of the surface near the confocal position, leading to a radial resolution of 4 nm and a dynamic range of 4 μm in the surface position, thus permitting the measurement of amplitude of oscillation at the very early stage of jet instability. For larger oscillations outside the linear region of the confocal response, the swell and neck position of the jet can be located separately and the amplitude of oscillation determined with an accuracy of 0.2 μm. The growth rate of periodically perturbed water and ethanol∕water mixture jets with a 100-μm diameter nozzle and mean velocity of 5.7 m s(-1) has been measured. The dynamic surface tension was determined from the growth rate of the instability with a linear, axisymmetric, constant property model. Synchronisation of the confocal imaging system with the perturbation applied to the jet permitted a detailed study of the temporal evolution of the neck into a ligament and eventually into a satellite drop. PMID:22852668

  15. Study of liquid jet instability by confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lisong; Adamson, Leanne J.; Bain, Colin D.

    2012-07-01

    The instability of a liquid microjet was used to measure the dynamic surface tension of liquids at the surface ages of ≤1 ms using confocal microscopy. The reflected light from a laser beam at normal incidence to the jet surface is linear in the displacement of the surface near the confocal position, leading to a radial resolution of 4 nm and a dynamic range of 4 μm in the surface position, thus permitting the measurement of amplitude of oscillation at the very early stage of jet instability. For larger oscillations outside the linear region of the confocal response, the swell and neck position of the jet can be located separately and the amplitude of oscillation determined with an accuracy of 0.2 μm. The growth rate of periodically perturbed water and ethanol/water mixture jets with a 100-μm diameter nozzle and mean velocity of 5.7 m s-1 has been measured. The dynamic surface tension was determined from the growth rate of the instability with a linear, axisymmetric, constant property model. Synchronisation of the confocal imaging system with the perturbation applied to the jet permitted a detailed study of the temporal evolution of the neck into a ligament and eventually into a satellite drop.

  16. Confocal microscopy patterns in nonmelanoma skin cancer and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    González, S; Sánchez, V; González-Rodríguez, A; Parrado, C; Ullrich, M

    2014-06-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy is currently the most promising noninvasive diagnostic tool for studying cutaneous structures between the stratum corneum and the superficial reticular dermis. This tool gives real-time images parallel to the skin surface; the microscopic resolution is similar to that of conventional histology. Numerous studies have identified the main confocal features of various inflammatory skin diseases and tumors, demonstrating the good correlation of these features with certain dermatoscopic patterns and histologic findings. Confocal patterns and diagnostic algorithms have been shown to have high sensitivity and specificity in melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer. Possible present and future applications of this noninvasive technology are wide ranging and reach beyond its use in noninvasive diagnosis. This tool can also be used, for example, to evaluate dynamic skin processes that occur after UV exposure or to assess tumor response to noninvasive treatments such as photodynamic therapy. We explain the characteristic confocal features found in the main nonmelanoma skin tumors and discuss possible applications for this novel diagnostic technique in routine dermatology practice. PMID:24002008

  17. Resolution improvement by 3D particle averaging in localization microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Broeken, Jordi; Johnson, Hannah; Lidke, Diane S.; Liu, Sheng; Nieuwenhuizen, Robert P.J.; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Lidke, Keith A.; Rieger, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by recent developments in localization microscopy that applied averaging of identical particles in 2D for increasing the resolution even further, we discuss considerations for alignment (registration) methods for particles in general and for 3D in particular. We detail that traditional techniques for particle registration from cryo electron microscopy based on cross-correlation are not suitable, as the underlying image formation process is fundamentally different. We argue that only localizations, i.e. a set of coordinates with associated uncertainties, are recorded and not a continuous intensity distribution. We present a method that owes to this fact and that is inspired by the field of statistical pattern recognition. In particular we suggest to use an adapted version of the Bhattacharyya distance as a merit function for registration. We evaluate the method in simulations and demonstrate it on three-dimensional super-resolution data of Alexa 647 labelled to the Nup133 protein in the nuclear pore complex of Hela cells. From the simulations we find suggestions that for successful registration the localization uncertainty must be smaller than the distance between labeling sites on a particle. These suggestions are supported by theoretical considerations concerning the attainable resolution in localization microscopy and its scaling behavior as a function of labeling density and localization precision. PMID:25866640

  18. 3D Light-Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy of Cranial Neurons and Vasculature during Zebrafish Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ok Kyu; Kwak, Jina; Jung, Yoo Jung; Kim, Young Ho; Hong, Hyun-Seok; Hwang, Byung Joon; Kwon, Seung-Hae; Kee, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Precise 3D spatial mapping of cells and their connections within living tissues is required to fully understand developmental processes and neural activities. Zebrafish embryos are relatively small and optically transparent, making them the vertebrate model of choice for live in vivo imaging. However, embryonic brains cannot be imaged in their entirety by confocal or two-photon microscopy due to limitations in optical range and scanning speed. Here, we use light-sheet fluorescence microscopy to overcome these limitations and image the entire head of live transgenic zebrafish embryos. We simultaneously imaged cranial neurons and blood vessels during embryogenesis, generating comprehensive 3D maps that provide insight into the coordinated morphogenesis of the nervous system and vasculature during early development. In addition, blood cells circulating through the entire head, vagal and cardiac vasculature were also visualized at high resolution in a 3D movie. These data provide the foundation for the construction of a complete 4D atlas of zebrafish embryogenesis and neural activity. PMID:26429501

  19. Parallel detection experiment of fluorescence confocal microscopy using DMD.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingqing; Zheng, Jihong; Wang, Kangni; Gui, Kun; Guo, Hanming; Zhuang, Songlin

    2016-05-01

    Parallel detection of fluorescence confocal microscopy (PDFCM) system based on Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) is reported in this paper in order to realize simultaneous multi-channel imaging and improve detection speed. DMD is added into PDFCM system, working to take replace of the single traditional pinhole in the confocal system, which divides the laser source into multiple excitation beams. The PDFCM imaging system based on DMD is experimentally set up. The multi-channel image of fluorescence signal of potato cells sample is detected by parallel lateral scanning in order to verify the feasibility of introducing the DMD into fluorescence confocal microscope. In addition, for the purpose of characterizing the microscope, the depth response curve is also acquired. The experimental result shows that in contrast to conventional microscopy, the DMD-based PDFCM system has higher axial resolution and faster detection speed, which may bring some potential benefits in the biology and medicine analysis. SCANNING 38:234-239, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26331288

  20. 3-D Optical Interference Microscopy at the Lateral Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Peter; Niehues, Jan; Tereschenko, Stanislav

    2014-10-01

    For applications in micro- and nanotechnologies the lateral resolution of optical 3-D microscopes becomes an issue of increasing relevance. However, lateral resolution of 3-D microscopes is hard to define in a satisfying way. Therefore, we first study the measurement capabilities of a highly resolving white-light interference (WLI) microscope close to the limit of lateral resolution. Results of measurements and simulations demonstrate that better lateral resolution seems to be achievable based on the envelope evaluation of a WLI signal. Unfortunately, close to the lateral resolution limit errors in the measured amplitude of micro-structures appear. On the other hand, results of interferometric phase evaluation seem to be strongly low-pass filtered in this case. Furthermore, the instrument transfer characteristics and the lateral resolution capabilities of WLI instruments are also affected by polarization. TM polarized light is less sensitive to edge diffraction and thus systematic errors can be avoided. However, apart from ghost steps due to fringe order errors, the results of phase evaluation seem to be closer to the real surface topography if TE polarized light is used. The lateral resolution can be further improved by combining WLI and structured illumination microscopy. Since the measured height of rectangular profiles close to the lateral resolution limit is generally too small compared to the real height, we introduce a method based on phase evaluation which characterizes the heights of barely laterally resolved rectangular gratings correctly.

  1. Multimodal confocal mosaicing microscopy: an emphasis on squamous cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nathaniel W.; Sensibaugh, Jordan; Ardeshiri, Ardaland; Blanchard, Adam; Jacques, Steven; Gareau, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    Our previous study reported a sensitivity of 96.6% and a specificity of 89.2% in rapidly detecting Basal Cell Carcinomas (BCCs) when nuclei were stained with acridine orange. Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCCs) and infiltrative BCCs remain difficult to detect. More complete screening can be achieved utilizing both acridine orange for nuclei staining and eosin for cytoplasmic contrast, using two lasers to excite the two stains independently. Nuclear fluorescence is achieved by staining with acridine orange (0.5mM, 60 s), and cytoplasmic fluorescence is achieved by staining with eosin working solution (30 s). This work shows good morphological contrast of SCC and infiltrative BCC with eosin, acridine orange, and reflectance, and presents a means for rapid SCC and infiltrative BCC detection in fresh skin excisions using multimodal confocal microscopy. In addition, digital staining is shown to effectively simulate hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histology with confocal mosaics.

  2. Polarization conversion in confocal microscopy with radially polarized illumination.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wai Teng; Yew, Elijah Y S; Sheppard, Colin J R

    2009-07-15

    The effects of using radially polarized illumination in a confocal microscope are discussed, and the introduction of a polarization mode converter into the detection optics of the microscope is proposed. We find that with such a configuration, bright-field imaging can be performed without losing the resolution advantage of radially polarized illumination. The detection efficiency can be increased by three times without having to increase the pinhole radius and sacrificing the confocality of the system. Furthermore, the merits of such a setup are also discussed in relation to surface plasmon microscopy and single-molecule orientation studies, where the doughnut point spread function can be engineered into a single-lobed point spread function. PMID:19823530

  3. Automated identification of epidermal keratinocytes in reflectance confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareau, Dan

    2011-03-01

    Keratinocytes in skin epidermis, which have bright cytoplasmic contrast and dark nuclear contrast in reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM), were modeled with a simple error function reflectance profile: erf( ). Forty-two example keratinocytes were identified as a training set which characterized the nuclear size a = 8.6+/-2.8 μm and reflectance gradient b = 3.6+/-2.1 μm at the nuclear/cytoplasmic boundary. These mean a and b parameters were used to create a rotationally symmetric erf( ) mask that approximated the mean keratinocyte image. A computer vision algorithm used an erf( ) mask to scan RCM images, identifying the coordinates of keratinocytes. Applying the mask to the confocal data identified the positions of keratinocytes in the epidermis. This simple model may be used to noninvasively evaluate keratinocyte populations as a quantitative morphometric diagnostic in skin cancer detection and evaluation of dermatological cosmetics.

  4. Quantifying cellular interaction dynamics in 3-D fluorescence microscopy data

    PubMed Central

    Klauschen, Frederick; Ishii, Masaru; Qi, Hai; Bajénoff, Marc; Egen, Jackson G.; Germain, Ronald N.; Meier-Schellersheim, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The wealth of information available from advanced fluorescence imaging techniques used to analyze biological processes with high spatial and temporal resolution calls for high-throughput image analysis methods. Here, we describe a fully automated approach to analyzing cellular interaction behavior in 3-D fluorescence microscopy images. As example application we present the analysis of drug-induced and S1P1-knock-out-related changes in bone-osteoclast interactions. Moreover, we apply our approach to images showing the spatial association of dendritic cells with the fibroblastic reticular cell network within lymph nodes and to microscopy data about T-B lymphocyte synapse formation. Such analyses that yield important information about the molecular mechanisms determining cellular interaction behavior would be very difficult to perform with approaches that rely on manual/semi-automated analyses. This protocol integrates adaptive threshold segmentation, object detection, adaptive color channel merging and neighborhood analysis and permits rapid, standardized, quantitative analysis and comparison of the relevant features in large data sets. PMID:19696749

  5. Quantitative analysis of autophagy using advanced 3D fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Changou, Chun A; Wolfson, Deanna L; Ahluwalia, Balpreet Singh; Bold, Richard J; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Chuang, Frank Y S

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the leading form of malignancies among men in the U.S. While surgery carries a significant risk of impotence and incontinence, traditional chemotherapeutic approaches have been largely unsuccessful. Hormone therapy is effective at early stage, but often fails with the eventual development of hormone-refractory tumors. We have been interested in developing therapeutics targeting specific metabolic deficiency of tumor cells. We recently showed that prostate tumor cells specifically lack an enzyme (argininosuccinate synthase, or ASS) involved in the synthesis of the amino acid arginine(1). This condition causes the tumor cells to become dependent on exogenous arginine, and they undergo metabolic stress when free arginine is depleted by arginine deiminase (ADI)(1,10). Indeed, we have shown that human prostate cancer cells CWR22Rv1 are effectively killed by ADI with caspase-independent apoptosis and aggressive autophagy (or macroautophagy)(1,2,3). Autophagy is an evolutionarily-conserved process that allows cells to metabolize unwanted proteins by lysosomal breakdown during nutritional starvation(4,5). Although the essential components of this pathway are well-characterized(6,7,8,9), many aspects of the molecular mechanism are still unclear - in particular, what is the role of autophagy in the death-response of prostate cancer cells after ADI treatment? In order to address this question, we required an experimental method to measure the level and extent of autophagic response in cells - and since there are no known molecular markers that can accurately track this process, we chose to develop an imaging-based approach, using quantitative 3D fluorescence microscopy(11,12). Using CWR22Rv1 cells specifically-labeled with fluorescent probes for autophagosomes and lysosomes, we show that 3D image stacks acquired with either widefield deconvolution microscopy (and later, with super-resolution, structured-illumination microscopy) can clearly capture the early

  6. Imaging Single ZnO Vertical Nanowire Laser Cavities using UV-Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gargas, D.J.; Toimil-Molares, M.E.; Yang, P.

    2008-11-17

    We report the fabrication and optical characterization of individual ZnO vertical nanowire laser cavities. Dilute nanowire arrays with interwire spacing>10 ?m were produced by a modified chemical vapor transport (CVT) method yielding an ideal platform for single nanowire imaging and spectroscopy. Lasing characteristics of a single vertical nanowire are presented, as well as high-resolution photoluminescence imaging by UV-laser scanning confocal microscopy. In addition, three-dimensional (3D) mapping of the photoluminescence emission performed in both planar and vertical dimensions demonstrates height-selective imaging useful for vertical nanowires and heteronanostructures emerging in the field of optoelectronics and nanophotonics.

  7. Multimodal confocal hyperspectral imaging microscopy with wavelength sweeping source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Duk; Do, Dukho; Yoo, Hongki; Gweon, DaeGab

    2015-02-01

    There exist microscopes that are able to obtain the chemical properties of a sample, because there are some cases in which it is difficult to find out causality of a phenomenon by using only the structural information of a sample. Obtaining the chemical properties of a sample is important in biomedical imaging, because most biological phenomena include changes in the chemical properties of the sample. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is one of the popular imaging methods for characterizing materials and biological samples by measuring the reflectance or emission spectrum of the sample. Because all materials have a unique reflectance spectrum, it is possible to analyze material properties and detect changes in the chemical properties of a sample by measuring the spectral changes with respect to the original spectrum. Because of its ability to measure the spectrum of a sample, HSI is widely used in materials identification applications such as aerial reconnaissance and is the subject of various studies in microscopy. Although there are many advantages to using the method, conventional HSI has some limitations because of its complex configuration and slow speed. In this research we propose a new type of multimodal confocal hyperspectral imaging microscopy with fast image acquisition and a simple configuration that is capable of both confocal and HSI microscopies.

  8. Imaging intracellular protein dynamics by spinning disk confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stehbens, Samantha; Pemble, Hayley; Murrow, Lindsay; Wittmann, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    The palette of fluorescent proteins has grown exponentially over the last decade, and as a result live imaging of cells expressing fluorescently tagged proteins is becoming more and more main stream. Spinning disk confocal microscopy (SDC) is a high speed optical sectioning technique, and a method of choice to observe and analyze intracellular fluorescent protein dynamics at high spatial and temporal resolution. In an SDC system, a rapidly rotating pinhole disk generates thousands of points of light that scan the specimen simultaneously, which allows direct capture of the confocal image with low noise scientific grade cooled charged-coupled device (CCD) cameras, and can achieve frame rates of up 1000 frames per second. In this chapter we describe important components of a state-of-the-art spinning disk system optimized for live cell microscopy, and provide a rationale for specific design choices. We also give guidelines how other imaging techniques such as total internal reflection (TIRF) microscopy or spatially controlled photoactivation can be coupled with SDC imaging, and provide a short protocol on how to generate cell lines stably expressing fluorescently tagged proteins by lentivirus-mediated transduction. PMID:22264541

  9. Atherosclerotic plaque detection by confocal Brillouin and Raman microscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Basagaoglu, Berkay; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2015-02-01

    Atherosclerosis, the development of intraluminal plaque, is a fundamental pathology of cardiovascular system and remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Biomechanical in nature, plaque rupture occurs when the mechanical properties of the plaque, related to the morphology and viscoelastic properties, are compromised, resulting in intraluminal thrombosis and reduction of coronary blood flow. In this report, we describe the first simultaneous application of confocal Brillouin and Raman microscopies to ex-vivo aortic wall samples. Such a non-invasive, high specific approach allows revealing a direct relationship between the biochemical and mechanical properties of atherosclerotic tissue.

  10. High-resolution confocal microscopy using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    van der Oord, C J; Jones, G R; Shaw, D A; Munro, I H; Levine, Y K; Gerritsen, H C

    1996-06-01

    A confocal scanning light microscope coupled to the Daresbury Synchrotron Radiation Source is described. The broad spectrum of synchrotron radiation and the application of achromatic quartz/CaF2 optics allows for confocal imaging over the wavelength range 200-700 nm. This includes UV light, which is particularly suitable for high-resolution imaging. The results of test measurements using 290-nm light indicate that a lateral resolution better than 100 nm is obtained. An additional advantage of the white synchrotron radiation is that the excitation wavelength can be chosen to match the absorption band of any fluorescent dye. The availability of UV light for confocal microscopy enables studies of naturally occurring fluorophores. The potential applications of the microscope are illustrated by the real-time imaging of hormone traffic using the naturally occurring oestrogen coumestrol. (The IUPAC name for coumestrol is 3,9-dihydroxy-6H-benzofurol[3,2-c][1]benzo-pyran-6-one (Chem. Abstr. Reg. No. 479-13-0). The trivial name will be used throughout this paper. PMID:8801359

  11. Holographic microscopy for 3D tracking of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Jay; Cho, Yong Bin; El-Kholy, Marwan; Bedrossian, Manuel; Rider, Stephanie; Lindensmith, Christian; Wallace, J. Kent

    2016-03-01

    Understanding when, how, and if bacteria swim is key to understanding critical ecological and biological processes, from carbon cycling to infection. Imaging motility by traditional light microscopy is limited by focus depth, requiring cells to be constrained in z. Holographic microscopy offers an instantaneous 3D snapshot of a large sample volume, and is therefore ideal in principle for quantifying unconstrained bacterial motility. However, resolving and tracking individual cells is difficult due to the low amplitude and phase contrast of the cells; the index of refraction of typical bacteria differs from that of water only at the second decimal place. In this work we present a combination of optical and sample-handling approaches to facilitating bacterial tracking by holographic phase imaging. The first is the design of the microscope, which is an off-axis design with the optics along a common path, which minimizes alignment issues while providing all of the advantages of off-axis holography. Second, we use anti-reflective coated etalon glass in the design of sample chambers, which reduce internal reflections. Improvement seen with the antireflective coating is seen primarily in phase imaging, and its quantification is presented here. Finally, dyes may be used to increase phase contrast according to the Kramers-Kronig relations. Results using three test strains are presented, illustrating the different types of bacterial motility characterized by an enteric organism (Escherichia coli), an environmental organism (Bacillus subtilis), and a marine organism (Vibrio alginolyticus). Data processing steps to increase the quality of the phase images and facilitate tracking are also discussed.

  12. Use of confocal microscopy for nanoparticle drug delivery through skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leshuai W.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.

    2013-06-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a well-used microscopic tool that provides valuable morphological and functional information within cells and tissues. The application of CLSM to skin and the topical penetration of nanoparticles (NP) will be addressed. First, we describe the advantages of confocal microscopy compared to other techniques and its use relative to skin research. Second, we discuss the ability of CLSM to detect single NP. Regarding their interaction with skin, the appropriate method to retain nanoparticle localization in the tissue with minimal fixation is critically important. Also, the interaction of several different types of NP (quantum dots, fullerene and dendrimers) and their interaction with skin detected by CLSM under various conditions (flexed, tape stripped and abraded skin) is reviewed. Finally, human epidermal keratinocytes and dendritic cells that serve as appropriate in vitro models for skin cell interactions and cellular uptake of NP are also discussed. In conclusion, the unique functions of CLSM such as the ability to detect fluorescence, optical sectioning, three dimensional remodeling, as well as its use in the reflection mode in tandem with other methods, provides great promise with broad applications regarding the interactions of nanomaterials with skin.

  13. Precise colloids with tunable interactions for confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kodger, Thomas E.; Guerra, Rodrigo E.; Sprakel, Joris

    2015-01-01

    Model colloidal systems studied with confocal microscopy have led to numerous insights into the physics of condensed matter. Though confocal microscopy is an extremely powerful tool, it requires a careful choice and preparation of the colloid. Uncontrolled or unknown variations in the size, density, and composition of the individual particles and interactions between particles, often influenced by the synthetic route taken to form them, lead to difficulties in interpreting the behavior of the dispersion. Here we describe the straightforward synthesis of copolymer particles which can be refractive index- and density-matched simultaneously to a non-plasticizing mixture of high dielectric solvents. The interactions between particles are accurately tuned by surface grafting of polymer brushes using Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP), from hard-sphere-like to long-ranged electrostatic repulsion or mixed charge attraction. We also modify the buoyant density of the particles by altering the copolymer ratio while maintaining their refractive index match to the suspending solution resulting in well controlled sedimentation. The tunability of the inter-particle interactions, the low volatility of the solvents, and the capacity to simultaneously match both the refractive index and density of the particles to the fluid opens up new possibilities for exploring the physics of colloidal systems. PMID:26420044

  14. Segmentation of skin strata in reflectance confocal microscopy depth stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hames, Samuel C.; Ardigò, Marco; Soyer, H. Peter; Bradley, Andrew P.; Prow, Tarl W.

    2015-03-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy is an emerging tool for imaging human skin, but currently requires expert human assessment. To overcome the need for human experts it is necessary to develop automated tools for automatically assessing reflectance confocal microscopy imagery. This work presents a novel approach to this task, using a bag of visual words approach to represent and classify en-face optical sections from four distinct strata of the skin. A dictionary of representative features is learned from whitened and normalised patches using hierarchical spherical k-means. Each image is then represented by extracting a dense array of patches and encoding each with the most similar element in the dictionary. Linear discriminant analysis is used as a simple linear classifier. The proposed framework was tested on 308 depth stacks from 54 volunteers. Parameters are tuned using 10 fold cross validation on a training sub-set of the data, and final evaluation was performed on a held out test set. The proposed method generated physically plausible profiles of the distinct strata of human skin, and correctly classified 81.4% of sections in the test set.

  15. Embryonic Heart Morphogenesis from Confocal Microscopy Imaging and Automatic Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Megan; Pertsov, Arkady M.; Shi, Pengcheng

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic heart morphogenesis (EHM) is a complex and dynamic process where the heart transforms from a single tube into a four-chambered pump. This process is of great biological and clinical interest but is still poorly understood for two main reasons. On the one hand, the existing imaging modalities for investigating EHM suffered from either limited penetration depth or limited spatial resolution. On the other hand, current works typically adopted manual segmentation, which was tedious, subjective, and time consuming considering the complexity of developing heart geometry and the large size of images. In this paper, we propose to utilize confocal microscopy imaging with tissue optical immersion clearing technique to image the heart at different stages of development for EHM study. The imaging method is able to produce high spatial resolution images and achieve large penetration depth at the same time. Furthermore, we propose a novel convex active contour model for automatic image segmentation. The model has the ability to deal with intensity fall-off in depth which is characterized by confocal microscopy images. We acquired the images of embryonic quail hearts from day 6 to day 14 of incubation for EHM study. The experimental results were promising and provided us with an insight view of early heart growth pattern and also paved the road for data-driven heart growth modeling. PMID:24454530

  16. Combined FLIM and reflectance confocal microscopy for epithelial imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbour, Joey M.; Cheng, Shuna; Shrestha, Sebina; Malik, Bilal; Jo, Javier A.; Applegate, Brian; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2012-03-01

    Current methods for detection of oral cancer lack the ability to delineate between normal and precancerous tissue with adequate sensitivity and specificity. The usual diagnostic mechanism involves visual inspection and palpation followed by tissue biopsy and histopathology, a process both invasive and time-intensive. A more sensitive and objective screening method can greatly facilitate the overall process of detection of early cancer. To this end, we present a multimodal imaging system with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for wide field of view guidance and reflectance confocal microscopy for sub-cellular resolution imaging of epithelial tissue. Moving from a 12 x 12 mm2 field of view with 157 ìm lateral resolution using FLIM to 275 x 200 μm2 with lateral resolution of 2.2 μm using confocal microscopy, hamster cheek pouch model is imaged both in vivo and ex vivo. The results indicate that our dual modality imaging system can identify and distinguish between different tissue features, and, therefore, can potentially serve as a guide in early oral cancer detection..

  17. Measurement of steep edges and undercuts in confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mueller, T; Jordan, M; Schneider, T; Poesch, A; Reithmeier, E

    2016-05-01

    Confocal microscopy is widely used to measure the surface topography of specimen with a precision in the micrometer range. The measurement uncertainty and quality of the acquired data of confocal microscopy depends on various effects, such as optical aberrations, vibrations of the measurement setup and variations in the surface reflectivity. In this article, the influence of steep edges and undercuts on measurement results is examined. Steep edges on the specimen's surface lead to a reduced detector signal which influences the measurement accuracy and undercuts cause surface regions, which cannot be captured in a measurement. The article describes a method to overcome the negative effects of steep edges and undercuts by capturing several measurements of the surface with different angles between the surface and the optical axis of the objective. An algorithm is introduced which stitches different angle measurements together without knowledge of the exact position and orientation of the rotation axis. Thus, the measurement uncertainty due to steep edges and undercuts can be avoided without expensive high-precision rotation stages and time consuming adjustment of the measurement setup. PMID:27011256

  18. Extended Field Laser Confocal Microscopy (EFLCM): Combining automated Gigapixel image capture with in silico virtual microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Flaberg, Emilie; Sabelström, Per; Strandh, Christer; Szekely, Laszlo

    2008-01-01

    Background Confocal laser scanning microscopy has revolutionized cell biology. However, the technique has major limitations in speed and sensitivity due to the fact that a single laser beam scans the sample, allowing only a few microseconds signal collection for each pixel. This limitation has been overcome by the introduction of parallel beam illumination techniques in combination with cold CCD camera based image capture. Methods Using the combination of microlens enhanced Nipkow spinning disc confocal illumination together with fully automated image capture and large scale in silico image processing we have developed a system allowing the acquisition, presentation and analysis of maximum resolution confocal panorama images of several Gigapixel size. We call the method Extended Field Laser Confocal Microscopy (EFLCM). Results We show using the EFLCM technique that it is possible to create a continuous confocal multi-colour mosaic from thousands of individually captured images. EFLCM can digitize and analyze histological slides, sections of entire rodent organ and full size embryos. It can also record hundreds of thousands cultured cells at multiple wavelength in single event or time-lapse fashion on fixed slides, in live cell imaging chambers or microtiter plates. Conclusion The observer independent image capture of EFLCM allows quantitative measurements of fluorescence intensities and morphological parameters on a large number of cells. EFLCM therefore bridges the gap between the mainly illustrative fluorescence microscopy and purely quantitative flow cytometry. EFLCM can also be used as high content analysis (HCA) instrument for automated screening processes. PMID:18627634

  19. Confocal reflectance quantitative phase microscopy system for cell biology studies (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vijay Raj; So, Peter T. C.

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase microscopy (QPM), used to measure the refractive index, provides the optical path delay measurement at each point of the specimen under study and becomes an active field in biological science. In this work we present development of confocal reflection phase microscopy system to provide depth resolved quantitative phase information for investigation of intracellular structures and other biological specimen. The system hardware development is mainly divided into two major parts. First, creates a pinhole array for parallel confocal imaging of specimen at multiple locations simultaneously. Here a digital micro mirror device (DMD) is used to generate pinhole array by turning on a subset micro-mirrors arranged on a grid. Second is the detection of phase information of confocal imaging foci by using a common path interferometer. With this novel approach, it is possible to measure the nuclei membrane fluctuations and distinguish them from the plasma membrane fluctuations. Further, depth resolved quantitative phase can be correlated to the intracellular contents and 3D map of refractive index measurements.

  20. In Vivo Confocal Microscopy and Anterior Segment Optic Coherence Tomography Findings in Ocular Ochronosis

    PubMed Central

    Demirkilinc Biler, Elif; Guven Yilmaz, Suzan; Palamar, Melis; Hamrah, Pedram

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To report clinical and in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) findings of two patients with ocular ochronosis secondary due to alkaptonuria. Materials and Methods. Complete ophthalmologic examinations, including IVCM (HRT II/Rostock Cornea Module, Heidelberg, Germany), anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) (Topcon 3D spectral-domain OCT 2000, Topcon Medical Systems, Paramus, NJ, USA), corneal topography (Pentacam, OCULUS Optikgeräte GmbH, Wetzlar, Germany), and anterior segment photography, were performed. Results. Biomicroscopic examination showed bilateral darkly pigmented lesions of the nasal and temporal conjunctiva and episclera in both patients. In vivo confocal microscopy of the lesions revealed prominent degenerative changes, including vacuoles and fragmentation of collagen fibers in the affected conjunctival lamina propria and episclera. Hyperreflective pigment granules in different shapes were demonstrated in the substantia propria beneath the basement membrane. AS-OCT of Case 1 demonstrated hyporeflective areas. Fundus examination was within normal limits in both patients, except tilted optic discs with peripapillary atrophy in one of the patients. Corneal topography, thickness, and macular OCT were normal bilaterally in both cases. Conclusion. The degenerative and anatomic changes due to ochronotic pigment deposition in alkaptonuria can be demonstrated in detail with IVCM and AS-OCT. Confocal microscopic analysis in ocular ochronosis may serve as a useful adjunct in diagnosis and monitoring of the disease progression. PMID:26788390

  1. Atomic-Resolution 3D Electron Microscopy with Dynamic Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Downing, Kenneth H.; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Meisheng, Hu

    2005-02-15

    Achievement of atomic-resolution electron-beam tomography will allow determination of the three-dimensional structure of nanoparticles (and other suitable specimens) at atomic resolution. Three-dimensional reconstructions will yield ''section'' images that resolve atoms overlapped in normal electron microscope images (projections), resolving lighter atoms such as oxygen in the presence of heavier atoms, and atoms that lie on non-lattice sites such as those in non-periodic defect structures. Lower-resolution electron microscope tomography has been used to produce reconstructed 3D images of nanoparticles [1] but extension to atomic resolution is considered not to be straightforward. Accurate three-dimensional reconstruction from two-dimensional projections generally requires that intensity in the series of 2-D images be a monotonic function of the specimen structure (often specimen density, but in our case atomic potential). This condition is not satisfied in electron microscopy when specimens with strong periodicity are tilted close to zone-axis orientation and produce ''anomalous'' image contrast because of strong dynamic diffraction components. Atomic-resolution reconstructions from tilt series containing zone-axis images (with their contrast enhanced by strong dynamical scattering) can be distorted when the stronger zone-axis images overwhelm images obtained in other ''random'' orientations in which atoms do not line up in neat columns. The first demonstrations of 3-D reconstruction to atomic resolution used five zone-axis images from test specimens of staurolite consisting of a mix of light and heavy atoms [2,3]. Initial resolution was to the 1.6{angstrom} Scherzer limit of a JEOL-ARM1000. Later experiments used focal-series reconstruction from 5 to 10 images to produce staurolite images from the ARM1000 with resolution extended beyond the Scherzer limit to 1.38{angstrom} [4,5]. To obtain a representation of the three-dimensional structure, images were obtained

  2. Three-dimensional reconstructions from optical sections of thick mouse inner ears using confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kopecky, B J; Duncan, J S; Elliott, K L; Fritzsch, B

    2012-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of the vertebrate inner ear have provided novel insights into the development of this complex organ. 3D reconstructions enable superior analysis of phenotypic differences between wild type and mutant ears but can result in laborious work when reconstructed from physically sectioned material. Although nondestructive optical sectioning light sheet microscopy may ultimately prove the ideal solution, these technologies are not yet commercially available, or in many instances are not monetarily feasible. Here we introduce a simple technique to image a fluorescently labelled ear at different stages throughout development at high resolution enabling 3D reconstruction of any component of the inner ear using confocal microscopy. We provide a step-by-step manual from tissue preparation to imaging to 3D reconstruction and analysis including a rationale and troubleshooting guide at each step for researchers with different equipment, protocols, and access to resources to successfully incorporate the principles of this method and customize them to their laboratory settings. PMID:23140378

  3. Atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy on the cytoskeleton of permeabilised and embedded cells.

    PubMed

    Meller, Karl; Theiss, Carsten

    2006-03-01

    We describe a technical method of cell permeabilisation and embedding to study the organisation and distribution of intracellular proteins with aid of atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy in identical areas. While confocal laser scanning microscopy is useful for the identification of certain proteins subsequent labelling with markers or antibodies, atomic force microscopy allows the observation of macromolecular structures in fixed and living cells. To demonstrate the field of application of this preparatory technique, cells were permeabilised, fixed, and the actin cytoskeleton was stained with phalloidin-rhodamine. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to show the organisation of these microfilaments, e.g. geodesic dome structures. Thereafter, cells were embedded in Durcupan water-soluble resin, followed by UV-polymerisation of resin at 4 degrees C. This procedure allowed intracellular visualisation of the cell nucleus or cytoskeletal elements by atomic force microscopy, for instance to analyse the globular organisation of actin filaments. Therefore, this method offers a great potential to combine both microscopy techniques in order to understand and interpret intracellular protein relations, for example, the biochemical and morphological interaction of the cytoskeleton. PMID:16360280

  4. Adaptive optics in digital micromirror based confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, P.; Wilding, D.; Soloviev, O.; Vdovin, G.; Verhaegen, M.

    2016-03-01

    This proceeding reports early results in the development of a new technique for adaptive optics in confocal microscopy. The term adaptive optics refers to the branch of optics in which an active element in the optical system is used to correct inhomogeneities in the media through which light propagates. In its most classical form, mostly used in astronomical imaging, adaptive optics is achieved through a closed loop in which the actuators of a deformable mirror are driven by a wavefront sensor. This approach is severely limited in fluorescence microscopy, as the use of a wavefront sensor requires the presence of a bright, point like source in the field of view, a condition rarely satisfied in microscopy samples. Previously reported approaches to adaptive optics in fluorescence microscopy are therefore limited to the inclusion of fluorescent microspheres in the sample, to use as bright stars for wavefront sensors, or time consuming sensorless optimization procedures, requiring several seconds of optimization before the acquisition of a single image. We propose an alternative approach to the problem, implementing sensorless adaptive optics in a Programmable array microscope. A programmable array microscope is a microscope based on a digital micromirror device, in which the single elements of the micromirror act both as point sources and pinholes.

  5. Cosmetic assessment of the human hair by confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hadjur, Christophe; Daty, Gérard; Madry, Geneviève; Corcuff, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    The optical sectioning property of the confocal microscope offers a breakthrough from the classic observation of the hair in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Confocal microscopy requires minimal sampling preparation, and the hair can be observed in its natural environment with less damage than by other microscopic methods such as SEM. While used in the reflection mode, the true morphology of the cuticle and the various exogenous deposits at the surface can be identified and quantified. This relatively noninvasive, nondestructive technique is routinely used by us to monitor the efficiency of cleansing shampoos, to assess the homogeneity of layering polymers, and to evaluate the changes they induce in the optical properties of the hair surface in terms of opacity, transparency, and brilliancy. A second important field of investigation uses the fluorescence channel which reveals the internal structure of the hair. Fluorescent probes (rhodamine and its derivatives) demonstrate the routes of penetration and outline the geometry of cortical cells and of the medulla according to their lipophilic or hydrophilic properties. A volume rendering of a hair cylinder provides a better understanding of the interrelationships between cuticle cells, cortical cells, and the medullar channel. This recent technology is becoming an invaluable tool for the cosmetic assessment of the hair. PMID:11998902

  6. Confocal laser scanning microscopy with spatiotemporal structured illumination.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2016-03-15

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), which is widely utilized in the biological and biomedical sciences, is limited in spatial resolution due to diffraction to about half the light wavelength. Here we have combined structured illumination with CLSM to enhance its spatial resolution. To this end, we have used a spatial light modulator (SLM) to generate fringe patterns of different orientations and phase shifts in the excitation spot without any mechanical movement. We have achieved 1.8 and 1.7 times enhanced lateral and axial resolutions, respectively, by synthesizing the object spectrum along different illumination directions. This technique is thus a promising tool for high-resolution morphological or fluorescence imaging, especially in deep tissue. PMID:26977667

  7. Reflectance confocal microscopy for cutaneous infections and infestations.

    PubMed

    Cinotti, E; Perrot, J L; Labeille, B; Cambazard, F

    2016-05-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a high-resolution emerging imaging technique that allows non-invasive diagnosis of several cutaneous disorders. A systematic review of the literature on the use of RCM for the study of infections and infestations has been performed to evaluate the current use of this technique and its possible future applications in this field. RCM is particularly suitable for the identification of Sarcoptes scabies, Demodex folliculorum, Ixodes, Dermatophytes and Candida species in the clinical practice and for the follow-up after treatment. The cytopathic effect of herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus and molluscipoxvirus is also detectable by this imaging technique even in a pre-vesicular stage. In addition, thanks to its non-invasiveness, RCM allows pathophysiological studies. PMID:26387660

  8. Monitoring Ubiquitin-Coated Bacteria via Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lork, Marie; Delvaeye, Mieke; Gonçalves, Amanda; Van Hamme, Evelien; Beyaert, Rudi

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella is a gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen that is capable of infecting a variety of hosts. Inside host cells, most Salmonella bacteria reside and replicate within Salmonella-containing vacuoles. They use virulence proteins to manipulate the host cell machinery for their own benefit and hijack the host cytoskeleton to travel toward the perinuclear area. However, a fraction of bacteria escapes into the cytosol where they get decorated with a dense layer of polyubiquitin, which labels the bacteria for clearance by autophagy. More specifically, autophagy receptor proteins recognize the ubiquitinated bacteria and deliver them to autophagosomes, which subsequently fuse to lysosomes. Here, we describe methods used to infect HeLa cells with Salmonella bacteria and to detect their ubiquitination via immunofluorescence and laser scanning confocal microscopy. PMID:27613040

  9. Endoscopic probe optics for spectrally encoded confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, DongKyun; Carruth, Robert W.; Kim, Minkyu; Schlachter, Simon C.; Shishkov, Milen; Woods, Kevin; Tabatabaei, Nima; Wu, Tao; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2013-01-01

    Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a form of reflectance confocal microscopy that can achieve high imaging speeds using relatively simple probe optics. Previously, the feasibility of conducting large-area SECM imaging of the esophagus in bench top setups has been demonstrated. Challenges remain, however, in translating SECM into a clinically-useable device; the tissue imaging performance should be improved, and the probe size needs to be significantly reduced so that it can fit into luminal organs of interest. In this paper, we report the development of new SECM endoscopic probe optics that addresses these challenges. A custom water-immersion aspheric singlet (NA = 0.5) was developed and used as the objective lens. The water-immersion condition was used to reduce the spherical aberrations and specular reflection from the tissue surface, which enables cellular imaging of the tissue deep below the surface. A custom collimation lens and a small-size grating were used along with the custom aspheric singlet to reduce the probe size. A dual-clad fiber was used to provide both the single- and multi- mode detection modes. The SECM probe optics was made to be 5.85 mm in diameter and 30 mm in length, which is small enough for safe and comfortable endoscopic imaging of the gastrointestinal tract. The lateral resolution was 1.8 and 2.3 µm for the single- and multi- mode detection modes, respectively, and the axial resolution 11 and 17 µm. SECM images of the swine esophageal tissue demonstrated the capability of this device to enable the visualization of characteristic cellular structural features, including basal cell nuclei and papillae, down to the imaging depth of 260 µm. These results suggest that the new SECM endoscopic probe optics will be useful for imaging large areas of the esophagus at the cellular scale in vivo. PMID:24156054

  10. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in study of bone calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Tetsunari; Kokubu, Mayu; Kato, Hirohito; Imai, Koichi; Tanaka, Akio

    2012-12-01

    Bone regeneration in mandible and maxillae after extraction of teeth or tumor resection and the use of rough surface implants in bone induction must be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of calcification. The calcified tissues are subjected to chemical decalcification or physical grinding to observe their microscopic features with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy where the microscopic tissue morphology is significantly altered. We investigated the usefulness of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for this purpose. After staggering the time of administration of calcein and alizarin red to experimental rats and dogs, rat alveolar bone and dog femur grafted with coral as scaffold or dental implants were observed with CLSM. In rat alveolar bone, the calcification of newly-formed bone and net-like canaliculi was observed at the mesial bone from the roots progressed at the rate of 15 μm/day. In dog femur grafted with coral, newly-formed bones along the space of coral were observed in an orderly manner. In dog femur with dental implants, after 8 weeks, newly-formed bone proceeded along the rough surface of the implants. CLSM produced high-magnification images of newly-formed bone and thin sections were not needed.

  11. Spatial distribution of perylenequinones in lichens and extended quinones in quincyte using confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mathey, A; Lukins, P B

    2001-02-01

    The application of confocal fluorescence microscopy and microspectrofluorimetry to the characterization of the distribution of organic compounds in bulk lichens and mineral structures is demonstrated. Perylenequinones and extended quinones were chosen as both model compounds and as the naturally occurring fluorophores. These molecules occur, respectively, in corticolous microlichens and in a pink-colored mineral called quincyte. The structures of quincyte and of the lichens Cryptothelium rhodotitton and Graphis hematites are described, and the possibilities of energy dissipation and photoprotection mechanisms in these lichens are discussed. This study also illustrates how, for a wide range of specimens, naturally occurring quinone fluorophores in the specimen can be exploited directly to yield chemical and structural information without using fluorescent labelling. These intrinsic quinonoid compounds have molecular fluorescence yields and laser damage thresholds comparable or superior to common microscopy dyes, and can therefore be used to obtain high-contrast 3D fluorescence imaging without the complications introduced by dye labelling. PMID:10936454

  12. Precise quantification of silica and ceria nanoparticle uptake revealed by 3D fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Torrano, Adriano A

    2014-01-01

    Summary Particle_in_Cell-3D is a powerful method to quantify the cellular uptake of nanoparticles. It combines the advantages of confocal fluorescence microscopy with fast and precise semi-automatic image analysis. In this work we present how this method was applied to investigate the impact of 310 nm silica nanoparticles on human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) in comparison to a cancer cell line derived from the cervix carcinoma (HeLa). The absolute number of intracellular silica nanoparticles within the first 24 h was determined and shown to be cell type-dependent. As a second case study, Particle_in_Cell-3D was used to assess the uptake kinetics of 8 nm and 30 nm ceria nanoparticles interacting with human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1). These small nanoparticles formed agglomerates in biological medium, and the particles that were in effective contact with cells had a mean diameter of 417 nm and 316 nm, respectively. A significant particle size-dependent effect was observed after 48 h of interaction, and the number of intracellular particles was more than four times larger for the 316 nm agglomerates. Interestingly, our results show that for both particle sizes there is a maximum dose of intracellular nanoparticles at about 24 h. One of the causes for such an interesting and unusual uptake behavior could be cell division. PMID:25383274

  13. Confocal and Atomic Force Microscopies of Color Centers Produced by Ultrashort Laser Irradiation in LiF Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courrol, Lilia Coronato; Martinez, Oscar; Samad, Ricardo Elgul; Gomes, Laércio; Ranieri, Izilda Márcia; Baldochi, Sonia Licia; de Freitas, Anderson Zanardi; Junior, Nilson Dias Vieira

    2008-04-01

    We report properties of the spatial and spectral distribution of color centers produced in LiF single crystals by ultrashort high intensity laser pulses (60 fs, 10 GW) using confocal spectral microscopy and atomic force microscopy. We could identify a large amount of F centers that gave rise to aggregates such as F2, F4, F2+ and F3+ distributed in cracked shape brownish areas. We have taken a 3D image using confocal microscopy of the sample (luminescent image) and no difference is observed in the different planes. The atomic force microscopy image clearly shows the presence of defects on the modified surface. The formation of micrometer or sub-micrometer voids, filaments and void strings was observed and related to filamentation process.

  14. Photothermal confocal multicolor microscopy of nanoparticles and nanodrugs in live cells.

    PubMed

    Nedosekin, Dmitry A; Foster, Stephen; Nima, Zeid A; Biris, Alexandru S; Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2015-08-01

    Growing biomedical applications of non-fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for molecular imaging, disease diagnosis, drug delivery, and theranostics require new tools for real-time detection of nanomaterials, drug nano-carriers, and NP-drug conjugates (nanodrugs) in complex biological environments without additional labeling. Photothermal (PT) microscopy (PTM) has enormous potential for absorption-based identification and quantification of non-fluorescent molecules and NPs at a single molecule and 1.4 nm gold NP level. Recently, we have developed confocal PTM providing three-dimensional (3D) mapping and spectral identification of multiple chromophores and fluorophores in live cells. Here, we summarize recent advances in the application of confocal multicolor PTM for 3D visualization of single and clustered NPs, alone and in individual cells. In particular, we demonstrate identification of functionalized magnetic and gold-silver NPs, as well as graphene and carbon nanotubes in cancer cells and among blood cells. The potential to use PTM for super-resolution imaging (down to 50 nm), real-time NP tracking, guidance of PT nanotherapy, and multiplex cancer markers targeting, as well as analysis of non-linear PT phenomena and amplification of nanodrug efficacy through NP clustering and nano-bubble formation are also discussed. PMID:26133539

  15. Preservation of protein fluorescence in embedded human dendritic cells for targeted 3D light and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Höhn, K; Fuchs, J; Fröber, A; Kirmse, R; Glass, B; Anders-Össwein, M; Walther, P; Kräusslich, H-G; Dietrich, C

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we present a correlative microscopy workflow to combine detailed 3D fluorescence light microscopy data with ultrastructural information gained by 3D focused ion beam assisted scanning electron microscopy. The workflow is based on an optimized high pressure freezing/freeze substitution protocol that preserves good ultrastructural detail along with retaining the fluorescence signal in the resin embedded specimens. Consequently, cellular structures of interest can readily be identified and imaged by state of the art 3D confocal fluorescence microscopy and are precisely referenced with respect to an imprinted coordinate system on the surface of the resin block. This allows precise guidance of the focused ion beam assisted scanning electron microscopy and limits the volume to be imaged to the structure of interest. This, in turn, minimizes the total acquisition time necessary to conduct the time consuming ultrastructural scanning electron microscope imaging while eliminating the risk to miss parts of the target structure. We illustrate the value of this workflow for targeting virus compartments, which are formed in HIV-pulsed mature human dendritic cells. PMID:25786567

  16. Preservation of protein fluorescence in embedded human dendritic cells for targeted 3D light and electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    HÖHN, K.; FUCHS, J.; FRÖBER, A.; KIRMSE, R.; GLASS, B.; ANDERS‐ÖSSWEIN, M.; WALTHER, P.; KRÄUSSLICH, H.‐G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary In this study, we present a correlative microscopy workflow to combine detailed 3D fluorescence light microscopy data with ultrastructural information gained by 3D focused ion beam assisted scanning electron microscopy. The workflow is based on an optimized high pressure freezing/freeze substitution protocol that preserves good ultrastructural detail along with retaining the fluorescence signal in the resin embedded specimens. Consequently, cellular structures of interest can readily be identified and imaged by state of the art 3D confocal fluorescence microscopy and are precisely referenced with respect to an imprinted coordinate system on the surface of the resin block. This allows precise guidance of the focused ion beam assisted scanning electron microscopy and limits the volume to be imaged to the structure of interest. This, in turn, minimizes the total acquisition time necessary to conduct the time consuming ultrastructural scanning electron microscope imaging while eliminating the risk to miss parts of the target structure. We illustrate the value of this workflow for targeting virus compartments, which are formed in HIV‐pulsed mature human dendritic cells. PMID:25786567

  17. Cell-selective knockout and 3D confocal image analysis reveals separate roles for astrocyte-and endothelial-derived CCL2 in neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Expression of chemokine CCL2 in the normal central nervous system (CNS) is nearly undetectable, but is significantly upregulated and drives neuroinflammation during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis which is considered a contributing factor in the human disease. As astrocytes and brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC) forming the blood–brain barrier (BBB) are sources of CCL2 in EAE and other neuroinflammatory conditions, it is unclear if one or both CCL2 pools are critical to disease and by what mechanism(s). Methods Mice with selective CCL2 gene knockout (KO) in astrocytes (Astro KO) or endothelial cells (Endo KO) were used to evaluate the respective contributions of these sources to neuroinflammation, i.e., clinical disease progression, BBB damage, and parenchymal leukocyte invasion in a myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide (MOG35-55)-induced EAE model. High-resolution 3-dimensional (3D) immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and colloidal gold immuno-electron microscopy were employed to confirm sites of CCL2 expression, and 3D immunofluorescence confocal microscopy utilized to assess inflammatory responses along the CNS microvasculature. Results Cell-selective loss of CCL2 immunoreactivity was demonstrated in the respective KO mice. Compared to wild-type (WT) mice, Astro KO mice showed reduced EAE severity but similar onset, while Endo KO mice displayed near normal severity but significantly delayed onset. Neither of the KO mice showed deficits in T cell proliferation, or IL-17 and IFN-γ production, following MOG35-55 exposure in vitro, or altered MOG-major histocompatibility complex class II tetramer binding. 3D confocal imaging further revealed distinct actions of the two CCL2 pools in the CNS. Astro KOs lacked the CNS leukocyte penetration and disrupted immunostaining of CLN-5 at the BBB seen during early EAE in WT mice, while Endo KOs uniquely displayed leukocytes stalled in the

  18. Advanced 3D Optical Microscopy in ENS Research.

    PubMed

    Vanden Berghe, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Microscopic techniques are among the few approaches that have survived the test of time. Being invented half way the seventeenth century by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek and Robert Hooke, this technology is still essential in modern biomedical labs. Many microscopy techniques have been used in ENS research to guide researchers in their dissections and later to enable electrode recordings. Apart from this, microscopy has been instrumental in the identification of subpopulations of cells in the ENS, using a variety of staining methods. A significant step forward in the use of microscopy was the introduction of fluorescence approaches. Due to the fact that intense excitation light is now filtered away from the longer wavelength emission light, the contrast can be improved drastically, which helped to identify subpopulations of enteric neurons in a variety of species. Later functionalized fluorescent probes were used to measure and film activity in muscle and neuronal cells. Another important impetus to the use of microscopy was the discovery and isolation of the green fluorescent protein (GFP), as it gave rise to the development of many different color variants and functionalized constructs. Recent advances in microscopy are the result of a continuous search to enhance contrast between the item of interest and its background but also to improve resolving power to tell two small objects apart. In this chapter three different microscopy approaches will be discussed that can aid to improve our understanding of ENS function within the gut wall. PMID:27379646

  19. Rhinosporidium seeberi Nuclear Cycle Activities Using Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Delfino, Darly; Mendoza, Leonel; Vilela, Raquel

    2016-02-01

    Rhinosporidium seeberi is an uncultivated Ichthyosporean infecting animals, including humans. Recent studies suggested R. seeberi undergoes synchronized nuclear division without cytokinesis. We used confocal microscopy to investigate R. seeberi nuclear division cycles in formalin-fixed tissues stained with DAPI and phalloidin. We report that R. seeberi nuclei in juvenile and intermediary sporangia synchronously divided without cytokinesis. Intermediary sporangia display numerous 3-4 μm nuclei at different mitotic stages as well as a thick inner layer with strong affinity for phalloidin. Mature sporangia showed numerous 5-12 μm cell-walled endospores, each containing a 2-4 μm in diameter nucleus. Phalloidin did not bind to the inner layers of mature sporangia or endospores. The development of a "germinative zone" in the inner layer of mature sporangia containing hundreds of nuclei was also confirmed. This study establishes that during the R. seeberi life cycle synchronous nuclear divisions without cytokinesis takes place, resulting in the formation of thousands of nuclei. Cytokinesis, on the other hand, is a 1-time event and occurs in the latest stages of intermediate sporangia, after the formation of thousands of nuclei and just before mature sporangia development. PMID:26461427

  20. Three-dimensional reconstruction of paramecium primaurelia oral apparatus through confocal laser scanning optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrame, Francesco; Ramoino, Paola; Fato, Marco; Delmonte Corrado, Maria U.; Marcenaro, Giampiero; Crippa Franceschi, Tina

    1992-06-01

    Studies on the complementary mating types of Paramecium primaurelia (Protozoa, Ciliates) have shown that cell lines which differ from each other in mating type expression are characterized by different cell contents, organization, and physiology. Referring to these differences and to the differential rates of food vacuole formation, oral apparatuses of the two mating type cells are assumed to possibly differ from each other in some traits, such as, for instance, in their lengths. In our work, the highly organized oral structures are analyzed by means of a laser scanning confocal optical microscope (CLSM), which provides their 3-D visualization and measurement. The extraction of the 3-D intrinsic information related to the biological objects under investigation can be in turn related to their functional state, according to the classical paradigm of structure to function relationships identification. In our experiments, we acquired different data sets. These are optical slices of the biological sample under investigation, acquired in a confocal situation, through epi-illumination, in reflection, and, for comparison with conventional microscopy, 2-D images acquired via a standard TV camera coupled to the microscope itself. Our CLSM system is equipped with a laser beam at 488 and 514 nm and the data have been acquired with various steps of optical slicing, ranging from .04 to .25 micrometers. The volumes obtained by piling-up the slices are rendered through different techniques, some of them directly implemented on the workstation controlling the CLSM system, some of them on a SUN SPARC station 1, where the original data were transferred via an Ethernet link. In this last instance, original software has been developed for the visualization and animation of the 3-D structures, running under UNIX and X-Window, according to a ray-tracing algorithm.

  1. Precision 3-D microscopy with intensity modulated fibre optic scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmos, P.

    2016-01-01

    Optical 3-D imagers constitute a family of precision and useful instruments, easily available on the market in a wide variety of configurations and performances. However, besides their cost they usually provide an image of the object (i.e. a more or less faithful representation of the reality) instead of a truly object's reconstruction. Depending on the detailed working principles of the equipment, this reconstruction may become a challenging task. Here a very simple yet reliable device is described; it is able to form images of opaque objects by illuminating them with an optical fibre and collecting the reflected light with another fibre. Its 3-D capability comes from the spatial filtering imposed by the fibres together with their movement (scanning) along the three directions: transversal (surface) and vertical. This unsophisticated approach allows one to model accurately the entire optical process and to perform the desired reconstruction, finding that information about the surface which is of interest: its profile and its reflectance, ultimately related to the type of material.

  2. Study of the collagen structure in the superficial zone and physiological state of articular cartilage using a 3D confocal imaging technique

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian P; Kirk, Thomas B; Zheng, Ming H

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The collagen structure in the superficial zone of articular cartilage is critical to the tissue's durability. Early osteoarthritis is often characterized with fissures on the articular surface. This is closely related to the disruption of the collagen network. However, the traditional histology can not offer visualization of the collagen structure in articular cartilage because it uses conventional optical microscopy that does not have insufficient imaging resolution to resolve collagen from proteoglycans in hyaline articular cartilage. This study examines the 3D collagen network of articular cartilage scored from 0 to 2 in the scoring system of International Cartilage Repair Society, and aims to develop a 3D histology for assessing early osteoarthritis. Methods Articular cartilage was visually classified into five physiological groups: normal cartilage, aged cartilage, cartilage with artificial and natural surface disruption, and fibrillated. The 3D collagen matrix of the cartilage was acquired using a 3D imaging technique developed previously. Traditional histology was followed to grade the physiological status of the cartilage in the scoring system of International Cartilage Repair Society. Results Normal articular cartilage contains interwoven collagen bundles near the articular surface, approximately within the lamina splendens. However, its collagen fibres in the superficial zone orient predominantly in a direction spatially oblique to the articular surface. With age and disruption of the articular surface, the interwoven collagen bundles are gradually disappeared, and obliquely oriented collagen fibres change to align predominantly in a direction spatially perpendicular to the articular surface. Disruption of the articular surface is well related to the disappearance of the interwoven collagen bundles. Conclusion A 3D histology has been developed to supplement the traditional histology and study the subtle changes in the collagen network in the

  3. 3D fluorescence anisotropy imaging using selective plane illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hedde, Per Niklas; Ranjit, Suman; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-08-24

    Fluorescence anisotropy imaging is a popular method to visualize changes in organization and conformation of biomolecules within cells and tissues. In such an experiment, depolarization effects resulting from differences in orientation, proximity and rotational mobility of fluorescently labeled molecules are probed with high spatial resolution. Fluorescence anisotropy is typically imaged using laser scanning and epifluorescence-based approaches. Unfortunately, those techniques are limited in either axial resolution, image acquisition speed, or by photobleaching. In the last decade, however, selective plane illumination microscopy has emerged as the preferred choice for three-dimensional time lapse imaging combining axial sectioning capability with fast, camera-based image acquisition, and minimal light exposure. We demonstrate how selective plane illumination microscopy can be utilized for three-dimensional fluorescence anisotropy imaging of live cells. We further examined the formation of focal adhesions by three-dimensional time lapse anisotropy imaging of CHO-K1 cells expressing an EGFP-paxillin fusion protein. PMID:26368202

  4. 3D fluorescence anisotropy imaging using selective plane illumination microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hedde, Per Niklas; Ranjit, Suman; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence anisotropy imaging is a popular method to visualize changes in organization and conformation of biomolecules within cells and tissues. In such an experiment, depolarization effects resulting from differences in orientation, proximity and rotational mobility of fluorescently labeled molecules are probed with high spatial resolution. Fluorescence anisotropy is typically imaged using laser scanning and epifluorescence-based approaches. Unfortunately, those techniques are limited in either axial resolution, image acquisition speed, or by photobleaching. In the last decade, however, selective plane illumination microscopy has emerged as the preferred choice for three-dimensional time lapse imaging combining axial sectioning capability with fast, camera-based image acquisition, and minimal light exposure. We demonstrate how selective plane illumination microscopy can be utilized for three-dimensional fluorescence anisotropy imaging of live cells. We further examined the formation of focal adhesions by three-dimensional time lapse anisotropy imaging of CHO-K1 cells expressing an EGFP-paxillin fusion protein. PMID:26368202

  5. Improving transverse resolution of confocal microscopy through spatiotemporal modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baokai; Zou, Limin; Zhang, Su; Tan, Jiubin

    2015-11-01

    A new method is proposed in this paper to improve transverse resolution of a confocal microscope. By setting up the model of a confocal microscope system through spatiotemporal modulation with moving gratings or acousto-optical modulation without defocus distance under coherent light illumination and deducing two-dimensional coherent image formula and transfer function, simulation tests are run with or without spatiotemporal modulation to prove the effectiveness of the proposed method. Simulation results indicate the proposed method can be used to improve the transverse resolution of a confocal microscope system.

  6. Laser ablation of basal cell carcinomas guided by confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra, Heidy; Cordova, Miguel; Nehal, Kishwer; Rossi, Anthony; Chen, Chih-Shan Jason; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2016-02-01

    Laser ablation offers precise and fast removal of superficial and early nodular types of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). Nevertheless, the lack of histological confirmation has been a limitation. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) imaging combined with a contrast agent can offer cellular-level histology-like feedback to detect the presence (or absence) of residual BCC directly on the patient. We conducted an ex vivo bench-top study to provide a set of effective ablation parameters (fluence, number of passes) to remove superficial BCCs while also controlling thermal coagulation post-ablation to allow uptake of contrast agent. The results for an Er:YAG laser (2.9 um and pulse duration 250us) show that with 6 passes of 25 J/cm2, thermal coagulation can be effectively controlled, to allow both the uptake of acetic acid (contrast agent) and detection of residual (or absence) BCCs. Confirmation was provided with histological examination. An initial in vivo study on 35 patients shows that the uptake of contrast agent aluminum chloride) and imaging quality is similar to that observed in the ex vivo study. The detection of the presence of residual tumor or complete clearance was confirmed in 10 wounds with (additional) histology and in 25 lesions with follow-up imaging. Our results indicate that resolution is sufficient but further development and use of appropriate contrast agent are necessary to improve sensitivity and specificity. Advances in RCM technology for imaging of lateral and deep margins directly on the patient may provide less invasive, faster and less expensive image-guided approaches for treatment of BCCs.

  7. Ellipsoid Segmentation Model for Analyzing Light-Attenuated 3D Confocal Image Stacks of Fluorescent Multi-Cellular Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Barbier, Michaël; Jaensch, Steffen; Cornelissen, Frans; Vidic, Suzana; Gjerde, Kjersti; de Hoogt, Ronald; Graeser, Ralph; Gustin, Emmanuel; Chong, Yolanda T.

    2016-01-01

    In oncology, two-dimensional in-vitro culture models are the standard test beds for the discovery and development of cancer treatments, but in the last decades, evidence emerged that such models have low predictive value for clinical efficacy. Therefore they are increasingly complemented by more physiologically relevant 3D models, such as spheroid micro-tumor cultures. If suitable fluorescent labels are applied, confocal 3D image stacks can characterize the structure of such volumetric cultures and, for example, cell proliferation. However, several issues hamper accurate analysis. In particular, signal attenuation within the tissue of the spheroids prevents the acquisition of a complete image for spheroids over 100 micrometers in diameter. And quantitative analysis of large 3D image data sets is challenging, creating a need for methods which can be applied to large-scale experiments and account for impeding factors. We present a robust, computationally inexpensive 2.5D method for the segmentation of spheroid cultures and for counting proliferating cells within them. The spheroids are assumed to be approximately ellipsoid in shape. They are identified from information present in the Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) and the corresponding height view, also known as Z-buffer. It alerts the user when potential bias-introducing factors cannot be compensated for and includes a compensation for signal attenuation. PMID:27303813

  8. Ellipsoid Segmentation Model for Analyzing Light-Attenuated 3D Confocal Image Stacks of Fluorescent Multi-Cellular Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Michaël; Jaensch, Steffen; Cornelissen, Frans; Vidic, Suzana; Gjerde, Kjersti; de Hoogt, Ronald; Graeser, Ralph; Gustin, Emmanuel; Chong, Yolanda T

    2016-01-01

    In oncology, two-dimensional in-vitro culture models are the standard test beds for the discovery and development of cancer treatments, but in the last decades, evidence emerged that such models have low predictive value for clinical efficacy. Therefore they are increasingly complemented by more physiologically relevant 3D models, such as spheroid micro-tumor cultures. If suitable fluorescent labels are applied, confocal 3D image stacks can characterize the structure of such volumetric cultures and, for example, cell proliferation. However, several issues hamper accurate analysis. In particular, signal attenuation within the tissue of the spheroids prevents the acquisition of a complete image for spheroids over 100 micrometers in diameter. And quantitative analysis of large 3D image data sets is challenging, creating a need for methods which can be applied to large-scale experiments and account for impeding factors. We present a robust, computationally inexpensive 2.5D method for the segmentation of spheroid cultures and for counting proliferating cells within them. The spheroids are assumed to be approximately ellipsoid in shape. They are identified from information present in the Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) and the corresponding height view, also known as Z-buffer. It alerts the user when potential bias-introducing factors cannot be compensated for and includes a compensation for signal attenuation. PMID:27303813

  9. Registration and 3D visualization of large microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosaliganti, Kishore; Pan, Tony; Sharp, Richard; Ridgway, Randall; Iyengar, Srivathsan; Gulacy, Alexandra; Wenzel, Pamela; de Bruin, Alain; Machiraju, Raghu; Huang, Kun; Leone, Gustavo; Saltz, Joel

    2006-03-01

    Inactivation of the retinoblastoma gene in mouse embryos causes tissue infiltrations into critical sections of the placenta, which has been shown to affect fetal survivability. Our collaborators in cancer genetics are extremely interested in examining the three dimensional nature of these infiltrations given a stack of two dimensional light microscopy images. Three sets of wildtype and mutant placentas was sectioned serially and digitized using a commercial light microscopy scanner. Each individual placenta dataset consisted of approximately 1000 images totaling 700 GB in size, which were registered into a volumetric dataset using National Library of Medicine's (NIH/NLM) Insight Segmentation and Registration Toolkit (ITK). This paper describes our method for image registration to aid in volume visualization of tissue level intermixing for both wildtype and Rb - specimens. The registration process faces many challenges arising from the large image sizes, damages during sectioning, staining gradients both within and across sections, and background noise. These issues limit the direct application of standard registration techniques due to frequent convergence to local solutions. In this work, we develop a mixture of automated and semi-automated enhancements with ground-truth validation for the mutual information-based registration algorithm. Our final volume renderings clearly show tissue intermixing differences between both wildtype and Rb - specimens which are not obvious prior to registration.

  10. Lithographically-fabricated channel arrays for confocal x-ray fluorescence microscopy and XAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woll, Arthur R.; Agyeman-Budu, David; Choudhury, Sanjukta; Coulthard, Ian; Finnefrock, Adam C.; Gordon, Robert; Hallin, Emil; Mass, Jennifer

    2014-03-01

    Confocal X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy (CXRF) employs overlapping focal regions of two x-ray optics—a condenser and collector—to directly probe a 3D volume. The minimum-achievable size of this probe volume is limited by the collector, for which polycapillaries are generally the optic of choice. Recently, we demonstrated an alternative collection optic for CXRF, consisting of an array of micron-scale collimating channels, etched in silicon, and arranged like spokes of a wheel directed towards a single source position. The optic, while successful, had a working distance of only 0.2 mm and exhibited relatively low total collection efficiency, limiting its practical application. Here, we describe a new design in which the collimating channels are formed by a staggered array of pillars whose side-walls taper away from the channel axis. This approach improves both collection efficiency and working distance, while maintaining excellent spatial resolution. We illustrate these improvements with confocal XRF data obtained at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) and the Advanced Photon Source (APS) beamline 20-ID-B.

  11. Confocal (micro)-XRF for 3D anlaysis of elements distribution in hot environmental particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bielewski, M; Eriksson, M; Himbert, J; Simon, R; Betti, M; Hamilton, T F

    2007-11-27

    Studies on the fate and transport of radioactive contaminates in the environment are often constrained by a lack of knowledge on the elemental distribution and general behavior of particulate bound radionuclides contained in hot particles. A number of hot particles were previously isolated from soil samples collected at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands and characterized using non-destructive techniques [1]. The present investigation at HASYLAB is a part of larger research program at ITU regarding the characterization of environmental radioactive particles different locations and source-terms. Radioactive particles in the environment are formed under a number of different release scenarios and, as such, their physicochemical properties may provide a basis for identifying source-term specific contamination regimes. Consequently, studies on hot particles are not only important in terms of studying the elemental composition and geochemical behavior of hot particles but may also lead to advances in assessing the long-term impacts of radioactive contamination on the environment. Six particles isolated from soil samples collected at the Marshall Islands were studied. The element distribution in the particles was determined by confocal {micro}-XRF analysis using the ANKA FLUO beam line. The CRL (compound refractive lens) was used to focus the exciting beam and the polycapillary half lens to collimate the detector. The dimensions of confocal spot were measured by 'knife edge scanning' method with thin gold structure placed at Si wafer. The values of 3.1 x 1.4 x 18.4 {micro}m were achieved if defined as FWHMs of measured L?intensity profiles and when the19.1 keV exciting radiation was used. The collected XRF spectra were analyzed offline with AXIL [2] software to obtain net intensities of element characteristic lines.Further data processing and reconstruction of element distribution was done with the software 'R' [3] dedicated for statistical

  12. Astigmatic multifocus microscopy enables deep 3D super-resolved imaging

    PubMed Central

    Oudjedi, Laura; Fiche, Jean-Bernard; Abrahamsson, Sara; Mazenq, Laurent; Lecestre, Aurélie; Calmon, Pierre-François; Cerf, Aline; Nöllmann, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a 3D super-resolution microscopy method that enables deep imaging in cells. This technique relies on the effective combination of multifocus microscopy and astigmatic 3D single-molecule localization microscopy. We describe the optical system and the fabrication process of its key element, the multifocus grating. Then, two strategies for localizing emitters with our imaging method are presented and compared with a previously described deep 3D localization algorithm. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of the method by imaging the nuclear envelope of eukaryotic cells reaching a depth of field of ~4µm. PMID:27375935

  13. Astigmatic multifocus microscopy enables deep 3D super-resolved imaging.

    PubMed

    Oudjedi, Laura; Fiche, Jean-Bernard; Abrahamsson, Sara; Mazenq, Laurent; Lecestre, Aurélie; Calmon, Pierre-François; Cerf, Aline; Nöllmann, Marcelo

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a 3D super-resolution microscopy method that enables deep imaging in cells. This technique relies on the effective combination of multifocus microscopy and astigmatic 3D single-molecule localization microscopy. We describe the optical system and the fabrication process of its key element, the multifocus grating. Then, two strategies for localizing emitters with our imaging method are presented and compared with a previously described deep 3D localization algorithm. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of the method by imaging the nuclear envelope of eukaryotic cells reaching a depth of field of ~4µm. PMID:27375935

  14. Measuring Corneal Haze by Using Scheimpflug Photography and Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    McLaren, Jay W.; Wacker, Katrin; Kane, Katrina M.; Patel, Sanjay V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We compared corneal backscatter estimated from a Scheimpflug camera with backscatter estimated from a clinical confocal microscope across a wide range of corneal haze. Methods A total of 59 corneas from 35 patients with a range of severity of Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy and 15 corneas from 9 normal participants were examined using a Scheimpflug camera (Pentacam) and a confocal microscope (ConfoScan 4). The mean image brightness from the anterior 120 μm, midcornea, and posterior 60 μm of the cornea across the central 2 mm recorded by the Scheimpflug camera and analogous regions from the confocal microscope were measured and standardized. Differences between instruments and correlations between backscatter and disease severity were determined by using generalized estimating equation models. Results Backscatter measured by the two instruments in the anterior and midcornea were correlated (r = 0.67 and 0.43, respectively, P < 0.001), although in the posterior cornea they were not correlated (r = 0.13, P = 0.66). Measured with the Scheimpflug camera, mean backscatter from the anterior and midcornea were greater, whereas backscatter from the posterior cornea was lower (P < 0.001) than that measured by the confocal microscope. Backscatter from the anterior cornea was correlated with disease severity for both instruments (Scheimpflug, r = 0.55, P < 0.001; confocal, r = 0.49, P = 0.003). Conclusions The Scheimpflug camera and confocal microscope should not be used interchangeably to measure corneal haze. The ability to detect changes in backscatter with disease severity is superior with the Scheimpflug camera. However, the confocal microscope provides higher resolution of corneal structure. PMID:26803798

  15. In vivo confocal microscopy of meibomian glands in primary blepharospasm

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tong; Gong, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to evaluate the morphological changes of meibomian glands (MGs) in primary blepharospasm (PBS) by in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and to investigate the correlations between clinical data of PBS and LSCM parameters of MGs. This prospective and case–control study recruited 30 consecutive PBS patients and 30 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. After questionnaire assessments of ocular surface disease index (OSDI), Jankovic rating scale, and blepharospasm disability index, all subjects underwent blink rate evaluation, tear film break-up time (TBUT), corneal fluorescein staining (CFS), Schirmer test, MG expressibility, meibum quality, MG dropout, and LSCM examination of the MGs. The main LSCM outcomes included the mean MG acinar area and density, orifice diameter, meibum secretion reflectivity, acinar irregularity, and inhomogeneity of interstice and acinar wall. The PBS patients had significantly higher blink rate, higher OSDI and CFS scores, lower TBUT and Schirmer test value, and worse MG expressibility than the controls (All P < 0.05), whereas meibum quality showed no difference (P > 0.05). The PBS patients showed lower values of MG acinar area, orifice diameter and meibum secretion reflectivity, and higher scores of acinar irregularity and inhomogeneity of interstices than the controls (All P < 0.05). For the PBS patients, the severity of blepharospasm evaluated by JCR scale was strong correlated with MG acinar area (P < 0.001), orifice diameter (P = 0.002), meibum secretion reflectivity (P = 0.002), and MG acinar irregularity (P = 0.013). The MG expressibility was significantly correlated to MG acinar area (P = 0.039), orifice diameter (P < 0.001), and MG acinar irregularity (P = 0.014). The OSDI score was moderate correlated with MG acinar irregularity (P = 0.016), whereas the TBUT value was positively correlated with MG acinar area (P = 0.045) and negatively correlated to MG acinar

  16. Imaging of human differentiated 3D neural aggregates using light sheet fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gualda, Emilio J.; Simão, Daniel; Pinto, Catarina; Alves, Paula M.; Brito, Catarina

    2014-01-01

    The development of three dimensional (3D) cell cultures represents a big step for the better understanding of cell behavior and disease in a more natural like environment, providing not only single but multiple cell type interactions in a complex 3D matrix, highly resembling physiological conditions. Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) is becoming an excellent tool for fast imaging of such 3D biological structures. We demonstrate the potential of this technique for the imaging of human differentiated 3D neural aggregates in fixed and live samples, namely calcium imaging and cell death processes, showing the power of imaging modality compared with traditional microscopy. The combination of light sheet microscopy and 3D neural cultures will open the door to more challenging experiments involving drug testing at large scale as well as a better understanding of relevant biological processes in a more realistic environment. PMID:25161607

  17. High-resolution confocal Raman microscopy using pixel reassignment.

    PubMed

    Roider, Clemens; Ritsch-Marte, Monika; Jesacher, Alexander

    2016-08-15

    We present a practical modification of fiber-coupled confocal Raman scanning microscopes that is able to provide high confocal resolution in conjunction with high light collection efficiency. For this purpose, the single detection fiber is replaced by a hexagonal lenslet array in combination with a hexagonally packed round-to-linear multimode fiber bundle. A multiline detector is used to collect individual Raman spectra for each fiber. Data post-processing based on pixel reassignment allows one to improve the lateral resolution by up to 41% compared to a single fiber of equal light collection efficiency. We present results from an experimental implementation featuring seven collection fibers, yielding a resolution improvement of about 30%. We believe that our implementation represents an attractive upgrade for existing confocal Raman microscopes that employ multi-line detectors. PMID:27519099

  18. Reflectance confocal microscopy of red blood cells: simulation and experiment

    PubMed Central

    Zeidan, Adel; Yelin, Dvir

    2015-01-01

    Measuring the morphology of red blood cells is important for clinical diagnosis, providing valuable indications on a patient’s health. In this work, we have simulated the appearance of normal red blood cells under a reflectance confocal microscope and discovered unique relations between the morphological parameters and the resulting characteristic interference patterns of the cell. The simulation results showed good agreement with in vitro reflectance confocal images of red blood cells, acquired using spectrally encoded flow cytometry that imaged the cells in a linear flow without artificial staining. By matching the simulated patterns to confocal images of the cells, this method could be used for measuring cell morphology in three dimensions and for studying their physiology. PMID:26600999

  19. FTIR microscopy and confocal Raman microscopy for studying lateral drug diffusion from a semisolid formulation.

    PubMed

    Gotter, B; Faubel, W; Neubert, R H H

    2010-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microscopy was applied to obtain information on lateral drug diffusion of dithranol in artificial acceptor membranes. Lateral (2D) drug distribution into an artificial membrane was investigated on an area of 300microm x 1000microm with a lateral resolution of 25microm x 25microm by integrating a specific IR band located at 1430cm(-1). The concentration profiles show a heterogeneous distribution of dithranol particles resulting in non-uniform drug diffusion. Use of the FTIR microscope either in the transmission or in the reflection mode was restricted to a thickness of the DDC membrane <15microm. The third dimension (depth profile) was analysed by means of confocal Raman microscopy (CRM). In an artificial membrane, the depth range from a minimum of 1.5microm up to a maximum of 49microm was analysed for dithranol distribution. PMID:19615444

  20. Confocal Raman microscopy for identification of bacterial species in biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beier, Brooke D.; Quivey, Robert G.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2011-03-01

    Implemented through a confocal microscope, Raman spectroscopy has been used to distinguish between biofilm samples of two common oral bacteria species, Streptococcus sanguinis and mutans, which are associated with healthy and cariogenic plaque, respectively. Biofilms of these species are studied as a model of dental plaque. A prediction model has been calibrated and validated using pure biofilms. This model has been used to identify the species of transferred and dehydrated samples (much like a plaque scraping) as well as hydrated biofilms in situ. Preliminary results of confocal Raman mapping of species in an intact two-species biofilm will be shown.

  1. Full-field interferometric confocal microscopy using a VCSEL array

    PubMed Central

    Redding, Brandon; Bromberg, Yaron; Choma, Michael A.; Cao, Hui

    2014-01-01

    We present an interferometric confocal microscope using an array of 1200 VCSELs coupled to a multimode fiber. Spatial coherence gating provides ~18,000 continuous virtual pinholes allowing an entire en face plane to be imaged in a snapshot. This approach maintains the same optical sectioning as a scanning confocal microscope without moving parts, while the high power of the VCSEL array (~5 mW per laser) enables high-speed image acquisition with integration times as short as 100 µs. Interferometric detection also recovers the phase of the image, enabling quantitative phase measurements and improving the contrast when imaging phase objects. PMID:25078199

  2. Spectral confocal reflection microscopy using a white light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, M.; Juškaitis, R.; Wilson, T.

    2008-08-01

    We present a reflection confocal microscope incorporating a white light supercontinuum source and spectral detection. The microscope provides images resolved spatially in three-dimensions, in addition to spectral resolution covering the wavelength range 450-650nm. Images and reflection spectra of artificial and natural specimens are presented, showing features that are not normally revealed in conventional microscopes or confocal microscopes using discrete line lasers. The specimens include thin film structures on semiconductor chips, iridescent structures in Papilio blumei butterfly scales, nacre from abalone shells and opal gemstones. Quantitative size and refractive index measurements of transparent beads are derived from spectral interference bands.

  3. Resolution doubling using confocal microscopy via analogy with structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Shinichi

    2016-08-01

    Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) is a super-resolution fluorescence microscopy with a 2-fold higher lateral resolution than conventional wide-field fluorescence (WF) microscopy. Confocal fluorescence (CF) microscopy has approximately the same optical cutoff frequency as SIM; however, the maximum theoretical increase in lateral resolution over that of WF is 1.4-fold with an infinitesimal pinhole diameter. Quantitative comparisons based on an analytical imaging formula revealed that modulation transfer functions (MTFs) of SIM reconstructed images before postprocessing are nearly identical to those of CF images recorded with an infinitesimal pinhole diameter. Here, we propose a new method using an adequate pinhole diameter combined with the use of an apodized Fourier inverse filter to increase the lateral resolution of CF images to as much as that SIM images without significant noise degradation in practice. Furthermore, the proposed method does not require a posteriori parameterization and has reproducibility. This approach can be easily applied to conventional laser scanning CF, spinning disk CF, and multiphoton microscopies.

  4. Automatic Detection, Segmentation and Classification of Retinal Horizontal Neurons in Large-scale 3D Confocal Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Karakaya, Mahmut; Kerekes, Ryan A; Gleason, Shaun Scott; Martins, Rodrigo; Dyer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Automatic analysis of neuronal structure from wide-field-of-view 3D image stacks of retinal neurons is essential for statistically characterizing neuronal abnormalities that may be causally related to neural malfunctions or may be early indicators for a variety of neuropathies. In this paper, we study classification of neuron fields in large-scale 3D confocal image stacks, a challenging neurobiological problem because of the low spatial resolution imagery and presence of intertwined dendrites from different neurons. We present a fully automated, four-step processing approach for neuron classification with respect to the morphological structure of their dendrites. In our approach, we first localize each individual soma in the image by using morphological operators and active contours. By using each soma position as a seed point, we automatically determine an appropriate threshold to segment dendrites of each neuron. We then use skeletonization and network analysis to generate the morphological structures of segmented dendrites, and shape-based features are extracted from network representations of each neuron to characterize the neuron. Based on qualitative results and quantitative comparisons, we show that we are able to automatically compute relevant features that clearly distinguish between normal and abnormal cases for postnatal day 6 (P6) horizontal neurons.

  5. WHOLE INSECT AND MAMMALIAN EMBRYO IMAGING WITH CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY: MORPHOLOGY AND APOPTOSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: After fluorochromes are incorporated into cells, tissues, and organisms, confocal microscopy can be used to observe three-dimensional structures. LysoTracker Red (LT) is a paraformaldehyde fixable probe that concentrates into acidic compartments of cells and indicates...

  6. Ex Vivo (Fluorescence) Confocal Microscopy in Surgical Pathology: State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Ragazzi, Moira; Longo, Caterina; Piana, Simonetta

    2016-05-01

    First developed in 1957, confocal microscopy is a powerful imaging tool that can be used to obtain near real-time reflected light images of untreated human tissue with nearly histologic resolution. Besides its research applications, in the last decades, confocal microscopy technology has been proposed as a useful device to improve clinical diagnosis, especially in ophthalmology, dermatology, and endomicroscopy settings, thanks to advances in instrument development. Compared with the wider use of the in vivo tissue assessment, ex vivo applications of confocal microscopy are not fully explored. A comprehensive review of the current literature was performed here, focusing on the reliable applications of ex vivo confocal microscopy in surgical pathology and on some potential evolutions of this new technique from pathologists' viewpoint. PMID:27058244

  7. In Vivo Confocal Microscopy of the Ocular Surface: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Villani, Edoardo; Baudouin, Christophe; Efron, Nathan; Hamrah, Pedram; Kojima, Takashi; Patel, Sanjay V.; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Zhivov, Andrey; Dogru, Murat

    2014-01-01

    In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) is an emerging technology that provides minimally invasive, high resolution, steady-state assessment of the ocular surface at the cellular level. Several challenges still remain but, at present, IVCM may be considered a promising technique for clinical diagnosis and management. This mini-review summarizes some key findings in IVCM of the ocular surface, focusing on recent and promising attempts to move “from bench to bedside”. IVCM allows prompt diagnosis, disease course follow-up, and management of potentially blinding atypical forms of infectious processes, such as acanthamoeba and fungal keratitis. This technology has improved our knowledge of corneal alterations and some of the processes that affect the visual outcome after lamellar keratoplasty and excimer keratorefractive surgery. In dry eye disease, IVCM has provided new information on the whole-ocular surface morphofunctional unit. It has also improved understanding of pathophysiologic mechanisms and helped in the assessment of prognosis and treatment. IVCM is particularly useful in the study of corneal nerves, enabling description of the morphology, density, and disease- or surgically induced alterations of nerves, particularly the subbasal nerve plexus. In glaucoma, IVCM constitutes an important aid to evaluate filtering blebs, to better understand the conjunctival wound healing process, and to assess corneal changes induced by topical antiglaucoma medications and their preservatives. IVCM has significantly enhanced our understanding of the ocular response to contact lens wear. It has provided new perspectives at a cellular level on a wide range of contact lens complications, revealing findings that were not previously possible to image in the living human eye. The final section of this mini-review provides a focus on advances in confocal microscopy imaging. These include 2D wide-field mapping, 3D reconstruction of the cornea and automated image analysis. PMID

  8. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: SPECTROSCOPY AND FOUNDATIONS FOR QUANTITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The reliability of the CLSM to obtain specific measurements and quantify fluorescence data is dependent on using a correctly aligned machine that contains a stable laser power. For man...

  9. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: FOUNDATIONS FOR CALIBRATION, QUANTITATION AND SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The goal of a CLSM is to acquire and quantify fluorescence and in some instruments acquire spectral characterization of emitted signals. The accuracy of these measurements demands that...

  10. The use of reflectance confocal microscopy in selected inflammatory skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Białek-Galas, Kamila; Wielowieyska-Szybińska, Dorota; Dyduch, Grzegorz; Wojas-Pelc, Anna

    2015-06-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy is a modern, non-invasive diagnostic method that enables real-time imaging of the epidermis and upper layers of the dermis with nearly histological precision and high contrast. The application of this technology to skin imaging during the last years has resulted in progress of dermatological diagnosis, providing virtual access to living skin, without the need for conventional histopathology. The presented method potentially has broad application in the diagnosis of skin diseases. This article provides a summary of the latest reports and previous achievements in the field of reflectance confocal microscopy. General characteristics of confocal images in selected inflammatory skin diseases are presented. PMID:26247522

  11. Potential and limitations of microscopy and Raman spectroscopy for live-cell analysis of 3D cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Charwat, Verena; Schütze, Karin; Holnthoner, Wolfgang; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Gangnus, Rainer; Hofbauer, Pablo; Hoffmann, Claudia; Angres, Brigitte; Kasper, Cornelia

    2015-07-10

    Today highly complex 3D cell culture formats that closely mimic the in vivo situation are increasingly available. Despite their wide use, the development of analytical methods and tools that can work within the depth of 3D-tissue constructs lags behind. In order to get the most information from a 3D cell sample, adequate and reliable assays are required. However, the majority of tools and methods used today have been originally designed for 2D cell cultures and translation to a 3D environment is in general not trivial. Ideally, an analytical method should be non-invasive and allow for repeated observation of living cells in order to detect dynamic changes in individual cells within the 3D cell culture. Although well-established laser confocal microscopy can be used for these purposes, this technique has serious limitations including penetration depth and availability. Focusing on two relevant analytical methods for live-cell monitoring, we discuss the current challenges of analyzing living 3D samples: microscopy, which is the most widely used technology to observe and examine cell cultures, has been successfully adapted for 3D samples by recording of so-called "z-stacks". However the required equipment is generally very expensive and therefore access is often limited. Consequently alternative and less advanced approaches are often applied that cannot capture the full structural complexity of a 3D sample. Similarly, image analysis tools for quantification of microscopic images range from highly specialized and costly to simplified and inexpensive. Depending on the actual sample composition and scientific question the best approach needs to be assessed individually. Another more recently introduced technology for non-invasive cell analysis is Raman micro-spectroscopy. It enables label-free identification of cellular metabolic changes with high sensitivity and has already been successful applied to 2D and 3D cell cultures. However, its future significance for cell

  12. Multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to analyze multispecies oral biofilms.

    PubMed

    Karygianni, Lamprini; Hellwig, Elmar; Al-Ahmad, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) constitutes a favorable microbiological method for the analysis of spatial distribution of highly variable phenotypes found in multispecies oral biofilms. The combined use of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) produces high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) images of individual bacteria in their natural environment. Here, we describe the application of M-FISH on early (Streptococcus spp., Actinomyces naeslundii) and late colonizers (Fusobacterium nucleatum, Veillonella spp.) of in situ-formed oral biofilms, the acquisition of CLSM images, as well as the qualitative and quantitative analysis of these digitally obtained and processed images. PMID:24664826

  13. Resolution and signal-to-noise ratio improvement in confocal fluorescence microscopy using array detection and maximum-likelihood processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakade, Rohan; Walker, John G.; Phillips, Andrew J.

    2016-08-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) is widely used in biological sciences because of its enhanced 3D resolution that allows image sectioning and removal of out-of-focus blur. This is achieved by rejection of the light outside a detection pinhole in a plane confocal with the illuminated object. In this paper, an alternative detection arrangement is examined in which the entire detection/image plane is recorded using an array detector rather than a pinhole detector. Using this recorded data an attempt is then made to recover the object from the whole set of recorded photon array data; in this paper maximum-likelihood estimation has been applied. The recovered object estimates are shown (through computer simulation) to have good resolution, image sectioning and signal-to-noise ratio compared with conventional pinhole CFM images.

  14. Cytosolic pH gradients in cultured neuronal cell lines studied by laser scanning confocal microscopy, real-time confocal microscopy, and spectral imaging microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Armass, Sergio; Sennoune, Souad; Martinez, Gloria M.; Ortega, Filiberta; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul

    2002-06-01

    Changes in intracellular pH are important for the regulation of many physiological processes including: cell growth and differentiation, exocytosis, synaptic transmission, cell motility and invasion, to name a few. In pathological states such as cancer and diabetes, pH regulation is known to be altered. Nevertheless the physiological and pathological significance of this ion, there are still many gaps in our knowledge. The advent of fluorescent pH probes to monitor this ion, has substantially accelerated its study. New advances in the methods of detection of this ion by fluorescence-based approaches have also helped us to understand more about the regulation of cytosolic pH. This study evaluates the usefulness of real time confocal imaging microscopy, laser scanning confocal microscopy, and spectral imaging microscopy to the study of pH. These approaches exhibit unsurpassed temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution and are complementary. We employed cell lines derived from the brain exhibiting soma and dendrites. The existence of cell polarity suggests that the different protein composition/micro environment in discrete subcellular domains may affect the properties of fluorescent ion indicators. We performed in situ calibration of pH probes in discrete cellular regions of the neuronal cell lines to eliminate any bias in data interpretation because of differences in cell thickness/micro environment. We show that there are distinct in situ calibration parameters in different cellular domains. These indicate that in situ titrations in discrete cellular domains are needed to assign pH values. We concluded that there are distinct pH micro domains in discrete cellular regions of neuronal cell lines.

  15. Anti-translational research: from the bedside back to the bench for reflectance confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareau, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    The reflectance confocal microscope has made translational progress in dermatology. 0.5 micrometer lateral resolution, 0.75mm field-of-view and excellent temporal resolution at ~15 frames/second serve the VivaScope well in the clinic, but it may be overlooked in basic research. This work reviews high spatiotemporal confocal microscopy and presents images acquired of various samples: zebra fish embryo where melanocytes with excellent contrast overly the spinal column, chicken embryo, where myocardium is seen moving at 15 frames/ second, calcium spikes in dendrites (fluorescence mode) just beyond the temporal resolution, and human skin where blood cells race through the artereovenous microvasculature. For an introduction to confocal microscopy, see: http://dangareau.net.s69818.gridserver.com/science/confocal-microscopy

  16. Confocal microscopy for astrocyte in vivo imaging: Recycle and reuse in microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Alvarez, Alberto; Araque, Alfonso; Martín, Eduardo D.

    2013-01-01

    In vivo imaging is one of the ultimate and fundamental approaches for the study of the brain. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) constitutes the state-of-the-art technique in current neuroscience to address questions regarding brain cell structure, development and function, blood flow regulation and metabolism. This technique evolved from laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), which impacted the field with a major improvement in image resolution of live tissues in the 1980s compared to widefield microscopy. While nowadays some of the unparalleled features of 2PLSM make it the tool of choice for brain studies in vivo, such as the possibility to image deep within a tissue, LSCM can still be useful in this matter. Here we discuss the validity and limitations of LSCM and provide a guide to perform high-resolution in vivo imaging of the brain of live rodents with minimal mechanical disruption employing LSCM. We describe the surgical procedure and experimental setup that allowed us to record intracellular calcium variations in astrocytes evoked by sensory stimulation, and to monitor intact neuronal dendritic spines and astrocytic processes as well as blood vessel dynamics. Therefore, in spite of certain limitations that need to be carefully considered, LSCM constitutes a useful, convenient, and affordable tool for brain studies in vivo. PMID:23658537

  17. Comparison between optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy for turbid sample imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    U-Thainual, Paweena; Kim, Do-Hyun

    2015-12-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (ORPAM) in theory provides lateral resolution equivalent to the optical diffraction limit. Scattering media, such as biological turbid media, attenuates the optical signal and also alters the diffraction-limited spot size of the focused beam. The ORPAM signal is generated only from a small voxel in scattering media with dimensions equivalent to the laser spot size after passing through scattering layers and is detected by an acoustic transducer, which is not affected by optical scattering. Thus, both ORPAM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) reject scattered light. A multimodal optical microscopy platform that includes ORPAM and CLSM was constructed, and the lateral resolution of both modes was measured using patterned thin metal film with and without a scattering barrier. The effect of scattering media on the lateral resolution was studied using different scattering coefficients and was compared to computational results based on Monte Carlo simulations. It was found that degradation of lateral resolution due to optical scattering was not significant for either ORPAM or CLSM. The depth discrimination capability of ORPAM and CLSM was measured using microfiber embedded in a light scattering phantom material. ORPAM images demonstrated higher contrast compared to CLSM images partly due to reduced acoustic signal scattering.

  18. Comparison between optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy for turbid sample imaging.

    PubMed

    U-Thainual, Paweena; Kim, Do-Hyun

    2015-12-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (ORPAM) in theory provides lateral resolution equivalent to the optical diffraction limit. Scattering media, such as biological turbid media, attenuates the optical signal and also alters the diffraction-limited spot size of the focused beam. The ORPAM signal is generated only from a small voxel in scattering media with dimensions equivalent to the laser spot size after passing through scattering layers and is detected by an acoustic transducer, which is not affected by optical scattering. Thus, both ORPAM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) reject scattered light. A multimodal optical microscopy platform that includes ORPAM and CLSM was constructed, and the lateral resolution of both modes was measured using patterned thin metal film with and without a scattering barrier. The effect of scattering media on the lateral resolution was studied using different scattering coefficients and was compared to computational results based on Monte Carlo simulations. It was found that degradation of lateral resolution due to optical scattering was not significant for either ORPAM or CLSM. The depth discrimination capability of ORPAM and CLSM was measured using microfiber embedded in a light scattering phantom material. ORPAM images demonstrated higher contrast compared to CLSM images partly due to reduced acoustic signal scattering. PMID:26256640

  19. Human tooth pulp anatomy visualization by 3D magnetic resonance microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sustercic, Dusan; Sersa, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Background Precise assessment of dental pulp anatomy is of an extreme importance for a successful endodontic treatment. As standard radiographs of teeth provide very limited information on dental pulp anatomy, more capable methods are highly appreciated. One of these is 3D magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy of which diagnostic capabilities in terms of a better dental pulp anatomy assessment were evaluated in the study. Materials and methods Twenty extracted human teeth were scanned on a 2.35 T MRI system for MR microscopy using the 3D spin-echo method that enabled image acquisition with isotropic resolution of 100 μm. The 3D images were then post processed by ImageJ program (NIH) to obtain advanced volume rendered views of dental pulps. Results MR microscopy at 2.35 T provided accurate data on dental pulp anatomy in vitro. The data were presented as a sequence of thin 2D slices through the pulp in various orientations or as volume rendered 3D images reconstructed form arbitrary view-points. Sequential 2D images enabled only an approximate assessment of the pulp, while volume rendered 3D images were more precise in visualization of pulp anatomy and clearly showed pulp diverticles, number of pulp canals and root canal anastomosis. Conclusions This in vitro study demonstrated that MR microscopy could provide very accurate 3D visualization of dental pulp anatomy. A possible future application of the method in vivo may be of a great importance for the endodontic treatment. PMID:22933973

  20. Lipid and protein distribution in epithelial cells assessed with confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Kajsa H.; Randen, Michael; Hays, Richard M.; Magnusson, Karl-Eric

    1992-06-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy, image processing, and volume visualization were used to characterize the 3-D distribution of lectin receptors, lipid probes, and actin cytoskeleton in epithelial cells. Small intestine-like cells were grown on glass or filter supports and apically labelled with different fluorescent lipid and lectin probes. The restriction of the probes by the tight junctions was studied in living cells. Series of confocal x-y sections were transferred to an image processing system for analysis. The fluorescence intensity within a specified area of all x-y sections was plotted as a function of the vertical position of the sections. The curve inclination was used to describe the degree of restriction to the probes. It was found that lectins were more confined to the apical part than the lipids, which showed varying degree of redistribution to the basolateral membrane. Volume rendering, and specifically animated sequences with varying viewpoint and opacity mapping, were used to visualize the structure of actin cytoskeleton and distribution of lipid and lectin probes. In toad bladder epithelial cells, actin was labelled before and after treatment with the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin. The hormone-induced redistribution of actin in the apical and lateral portion of the cells was measured on x-z scanned images. Ratios of apical-to-lateral intensity were calculated. It was found that the decrease in the ratios after vasopressin treatment was around 30%. The decrease was due to loss of actin apically. This is supposed to facilitate apical fusion of vesicles containing the water-channel forming proteins, being important in water homeostasis.

  1. Raman confocal microscopy and AFM combined studies of cancerous cells treated with Paclitaxel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derely, L.; Collart Dutilleul, P.-Y.; Michotte de Welle, Sylvain; Szabo, V.; Gergely, C.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2011-03-01

    Paclitaxel interferes with the normal function of microtubule breakdown, induces apoptosis in cancer cells and sequesters free tubulin. As this drug acts also on other cell mechanisms it is important to monitor its accumulation in the cell compartments. The intracellular spreading of the drug was followed using a WITEC 300R confocal Raman microscope equipped with a CCD camera. Hence Atomic force microscopy (an MFP3D- Asylum Research AFM) in imaging and force mode was used to determine the morphological and mechanical modifications induced on living cells. These studies were performed on living epithelial MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Paclitaxel was added to cell culture media for 3, 6 and 9 hours. Among the specific paclitaxel Raman bands we selected the one at 1670 cm-1 because it is not superposed by the spectrum of the cells. Confocal Raman images are formed by monitoring this band, the NH2 and the PO4 band. Paclitaxel slightly accumulates in the nucleus forming patches. The drug is also concentrated in the vicinity of the cell membrane and in an area close to the nucleus where proteins accumulate. Our AFM images reveal that the treated cancerous MCF-7 cells keep the same size as the non treated ones, but their shape becomes more oval. Cell's elasticity is also modified: a difference of 2 kPa in the Young Modulus characterizes the treated MCF-7 mammary cancerous cell. Our observations demonstrate that paclitaxel acts not only on microtubules but accumulates also in other cell compartments (nucleus) where microtubules are absent.

  2. In-vivo multi-spectral confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouse, Andrew R.; Udovich, Joshua A.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2005-03-01

    A multi-spectral confocal microendoscope (MCME) for in-vivo imaging has been developed. The MCME employs a flexible fiber-optic catheter coupled to a slit-scan confocal microscope with an imaging spectrometer. The catheter consists of a fiber-optic imaging bundle linked to a miniature objective and focus assembly. The focus mechanism allows for imaging to a maximum tissue depth of 200 microns. The 3mm diameter catheter may be used on its own or routed though the instrument channel of a commercial endoscope. The confocal nature of the system provides optical sectioning with 3 micron lateral resolution and 30 micron axial resolution. The system incorporates two laser sources and is therefore capable of simultaneous acquisition of spectra from multiple dyes using dual excitation. The prism based multi-spectral detection assembly is typically configured to collect 30 spectral samples over the visible range. The spectral sampling rate varies from 4nm/pixel at 490nm to 8nm/pixel at 660nm and the minimum resolvable wavelength difference varies from 8nm to 16nm over the same spectral range. Each of these characteristics are primarily dictated by the dispersion characteristics of the prism. The MCME is designed to examine cellular structures during optical biopsy and to exploit the diagnostic information contained within the spectral domain. The primary applications for the system include diagnosis of disease in the gastro-intestinal tract and female reproductive system. In-vitro, and ex-vivo multi-spectral results are presented.

  3. 2D and 3D X-Ray Structural Microscopy Using Submicron-Resolution Laue Microdiffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Budai, John D.; Yang, Wenge; Larson, Bennett C.; Tischler, Jonathan Z.; Liu, Wenjun; Ice, Gene E.

    2010-11-10

    We have developed a scanning, polychromatic x-ray microscopy technique with submicron spatial resolution at the Advanced Photon Source. In this technique, white undulator radiation is focused to submicron diameter using elliptical mirrors. Laue diffraction patterns scattered from the sample are collected with an area detector and then analyzed to obtain the local crystal structure, lattice orientation, and strain tensor. These new microdiffraction capabilities have enabled both 2D and 3D structural studies of materials on mesoscopic length-scales of tenths-to-hundreds of microns. For thin samples such as deposited films, 2D structural maps are obtained by step-scanning the area of interest. For example, 2D x-ray microscopy has been applied in studies of the epitaxial growth of oxide films. For bulk samples, a 3D differential-aperture x-ray microscopy technique has been developed that yields the full diffraction information from each submicron volume element. The capabilities of 3D x-ray microscopy are demonstrated here with measurements of grain orientations and grain boundary motion in polycrystalline aluminum during 3D thermal grain growth. X-ray microscopy provides the needed, direct link between the experimentally measured 3D microstructural evolution and the results of theory and modeling of materials processes on mesoscopic length scales.

  4. Enhanced confocal microscopy and ophthalmoscopy with polarization imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Melanie C. W.; Bueno, Juan M.; Cookson, Christopher J.; Liang, Qingyuan; Kisilak, Marsha L.; Hunter, Jennifer J.

    2005-09-01

    We previously developed a Mueller matrix formalism to improve confocal imaging in microscopes and ophthalmoscopes. Here we describe a procedure simplified by firstly introducing a generator of polarization states in the illumination pathway of a confocal scanning laser microscope and secondly computing just four elements of the Mueller matrix of any sample and instrument combination. Using a subset of Mueller matrix elements, the best images are reconstructed. The method was tested for samples with differing properties (specular, diffuse and partially depolarizing). Images were also studied of features at the rear of the eye. The best images obtained with this technique were compared to the original images and those obtained from frame averaging. Images corresponding to non-polarized incident light were also computed. For all cases, the best reconstructed images were of better quality than both the original and frame-averaged images. The best reconstructed images also showed an improvement compared with the images corresponding to non polarized light. This methodology will have broad application in biomedical imaging.

  5. Variational attenuation correction in two-view confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Absorption and refraction induced signal attenuation can seriously hinder the extraction of quantitative information from confocal microscopic data. This signal attenuation can be estimated and corrected by algorithms that use physical image formation models. Especially in thick heterogeneous samples, current single view based models are unable to solve the underdetermined problem of estimating the attenuation-free intensities. Results We present a variational approach to estimate both, the real intensities and the spatially variant attenuation from two views of the same sample from opposite sides. Assuming noise-free measurements throughout the whole volume and pure absorption, this would in theory allow a perfect reconstruction without further assumptions. To cope with real world data, our approach respects photon noise, estimates apparent bleaching between the two recordings, and constrains the attenuation field to be smooth and sparse to avoid spurious attenuation estimates in regions lacking valid measurements. Conclusions We quantify the reconstruction quality on simulated data and compare it to the state-of-the art two-view approach and commonly used one-factor-per-slice approaches like the exponential decay model. Additionally we show its real-world applicability on model organisms from zoology (zebrafish) and botany (Arabidopsis). The results from these experiments show that the proposed approach improves the quantification of confocal microscopic data of thick specimen. PMID:24350574

  6. Strip mosaicing confocal microscopy for rapid imaging over large areas of excised tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeytunge, Sanjee; Li, Yongbiao; Larson, Bjorg; Peterson, Gary; Toledo-Crow, Ricardo; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2012-03-01

    Confocal mosaicing microscopy is a developing technology platform for imaging tumor margins directly in fresh tissue, without the processing that is required for conventional pathology. Previously, basal cell carcinoma margins were detected by mosaicing of confocal images of 12 x 12 mm2 of excised tissue from Mohs surgery. This mosaicing took 9 minutes. Recently we reported the initial feasibility of a faster approach called "strip mosaicing" on 10 x 10 mm2 of tissue that was demonstrated in 3 minutes. In this paper we report further advances in instrumentation and software. Rapid mosaicing of confocal images on large areas of fresh tissue potentially offers a means to perform pathology at the bedside. Thus, strip mosaicing confocal microscopy may serve as an adjunct to pathology for imaging tumor margins to guide surgery.

  7. Seeing a Mycobacterium-Infected Cell in Nanoscale 3D: Correlative Imaging by Light Microscopy and FIB/SEM Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Beckwith, Marianne Sandvold; Beckwith, Kai Sandvold; Sikorski, Pawel; Skogaker, Nan Tostrup

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteria pose a threat to the world health today, with pathogenic and opportunistic bacteria causing tuberculosis and non-tuberculous disease in large parts of the population. Much is still unknown about the interplay between bacteria and host during infection and disease, and more research is needed to meet the challenge of drug resistance and inefficient vaccines. This work establishes a reliable and reproducible method for performing correlative imaging of human macrophages infected with mycobacteria at an ultra-high resolution and in 3D. Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB/SEM) tomography is applied, together with confocal fluorescence microscopy for localization of appropriately infected cells. The method is based on an Aclar poly(chloro-tri-fluoro)ethylene substrate, micropatterned into an advantageous geometry by a simple thermomoulding process. The platform increases the throughput and quality of FIB/SEM tomography analyses, and was successfully applied to detail the intracellular environment of a whole mycobacterium-infected macrophage in 3D. PMID:26406896

  8. Seeing a Mycobacterium-Infected Cell in Nanoscale 3D: Correlative Imaging by Light Microscopy and FIB/SEM Tomography.

    PubMed

    Beckwith, Marianne Sandvold; Beckwith, Kai Sandvold; Sikorski, Pawel; Skogaker, Nan Tostrup; Flo, Trude Helen; Halaas, Øyvind

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteria pose a threat to the world health today, with pathogenic and opportunistic bacteria causing tuberculosis and non-tuberculous disease in large parts of the population. Much is still unknown about the interplay between bacteria and host during infection and disease, and more research is needed to meet the challenge of drug resistance and inefficient vaccines. This work establishes a reliable and reproducible method for performing correlative imaging of human macrophages infected with mycobacteria at an ultra-high resolution and in 3D. Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB/SEM) tomography is applied, together with confocal fluorescence microscopy for localization of appropriately infected cells. The method is based on an Aclar poly(chloro-tri-fluoro)ethylene substrate, micropatterned into an advantageous geometry by a simple thermomoulding process. The platform increases the throughput and quality of FIB/SEM tomography analyses, and was successfully applied to detail the intracellular environment of a whole mycobacterium-infected macrophage in 3D. PMID:26406896

  9. The use of laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) in materials science.

    PubMed

    Hovis, D B; Heuer, A H

    2010-12-01

    Laser scanning confocal microscopes are essential and ubiquitous tools in the biological, biochemical and biomedical sciences, and play a similar role to scanning electron microscopes in materials science. However, modern laser scanning confocal microscopes have a number of advantages for the study of materials, in addition to their obvious uses for high resolution reflected and transmitted light optical microscopy. In this paper, we provide several examples that exploit the laser scanning confocal microscope's capabilities of pseudo-infinite depth of field imaging, topographic imaging, photo-stimulated luminescence imaging and Raman spectroscopic imaging. PMID:21077878

  10. Reconstruction and exploration of three-dimensional confocal microscopy data in an immersive virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Ai, Zhuming; Chen, Xue; Rasmussen, Mary; Folberg, Robert

    2005-07-01

    An immersive virtual environment for interactive three-dimensional reconstruction and exploration of confocal microscopy data is presented. For some structures automatic alignment of serial sections can lead to geometric distortions. The superior visual feedback of a Virtual Reality system is used to aid in registering and aligning serial sections interactively. An ImmersaDesk Virtual Reality display system is used for display and interaction with the volumetric confocal data. Detailed methods for handling both single-section and multi-section confocal data are described. PMID:15893451

  11. Correlating confocal microscopy and atomic force indentation reveals metastatic cancer cells stiffen during invasion into collagen I matrices.

    PubMed

    Staunton, Jack R; Doss, Bryant L; Lindsay, Stuart; Ros, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical interactions between cells and their microenvironment dictate cell phenotype and behavior, calling for cell mechanics measurements in three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrices (ECM). Here we describe a novel technique for quantitative mechanical characterization of soft, heterogeneous samples in 3D. The technique is based on the integration of atomic force microscopy (AFM) based deep indentation, confocal fluorescence microscopy, finite element (FE) simulations and analytical modeling. With this method, the force response of a cell embedded in 3D ECM can be decoupled from that of its surroundings, enabling quantitative determination of the elastic properties of both the cell and the matrix. We applied the technique to the quantification of the elastic properties of metastatic breast adenocarcinoma cells invading into collagen hydrogels. We found that actively invading and fully embedded cells are significantly stiffer than cells remaining on top of the collagen, a clear example of phenotypical change in response to the 3D environment. Treatment with Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor significantly reduces this stiffening, indicating that actomyosin contractility plays a major role in the initial steps of metastatic invasion. PMID:26813872

  12. Correlating confocal microscopy and atomic force indentation reveals metastatic cancer cells stiffen during invasion into collagen I matrices

    PubMed Central

    Staunton, Jack R.; Doss, Bryant L.; Lindsay, Stuart; Ros, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical interactions between cells and their microenvironment dictate cell phenotype and behavior, calling for cell mechanics measurements in three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrices (ECM). Here we describe a novel technique for quantitative mechanical characterization of soft, heterogeneous samples in 3D. The technique is based on the integration of atomic force microscopy (AFM) based deep indentation, confocal fluorescence microscopy, finite element (FE) simulations and analytical modeling. With this method, the force response of a cell embedded in 3D ECM can be decoupled from that of its surroundings, enabling quantitative determination of the elastic properties of both the cell and the matrix. We applied the technique to the quantification of the elastic properties of metastatic breast adenocarcinoma cells invading into collagen hydrogels. We found that actively invading and fully embedded cells are significantly stiffer than cells remaining on top of the collagen, a clear example of phenotypical change in response to the 3D environment. Treatment with Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor significantly reduces this stiffening, indicating that actomyosin contractility plays a major role in the initial steps of metastatic invasion. PMID:26813872

  13. Correlating confocal microscopy and atomic force indentation reveals metastatic cancer cells stiffen during invasion into collagen I matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staunton, Jack R.; Doss, Bryant L.; Lindsay, Stuart; Ros, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical interactions between cells and their microenvironment dictate cell phenotype and behavior, calling for cell mechanics measurements in three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrices (ECM). Here we describe a novel technique for quantitative mechanical characterization of soft, heterogeneous samples in 3D. The technique is based on the integration of atomic force microscopy (AFM) based deep indentation, confocal fluorescence microscopy, finite element (FE) simulations and analytical modeling. With this method, the force response of a cell embedded in 3D ECM can be decoupled from that of its surroundings, enabling quantitative determination of the elastic properties of both the cell and the matrix. We applied the technique to the quantification of the elastic properties of metastatic breast adenocarcinoma cells invading into collagen hydrogels. We found that actively invading and fully embedded cells are significantly stiffer than cells remaining on top of the collagen, a clear example of phenotypical change in response to the 3D environment. Treatment with Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor significantly reduces this stiffening, indicating that actomyosin contractility plays a major role in the initial steps of metastatic invasion.

  14. Digital holographic microscopy for imaging growth and treatment response in 3D tumor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuyu; Petrovic, Ljubica; Celli, Jonathan P.; Yelleswarapu, Chandra S.

    2014-03-01

    While three-dimensional tumor models have emerged as valuable tools in cancer research, the ability to longitudinally visualize the 3D tumor architecture restored by these systems is limited with microscopy techniques that provide only qualitative insight into sample depth, or which require terminal fixation for depth-resolved 3D imaging. Here we report the use of digital holographic microscopy (DHM) as a viable microscopy approach for quantitative, non-destructive longitudinal imaging of in vitro 3D tumor models. Following established methods we prepared 3D cultures of pancreatic cancer cells in overlay geometry on extracellular matrix beds and obtained digital holograms at multiple timepoints throughout the duration of growth. The holograms were digitally processed and the unwrapped phase images were obtained to quantify nodule thickness over time under normal growth, and in cultures subject to chemotherapy treatment. In this manner total nodule volumes are rapidly estimated and demonstrated here to show contrasting time dependent changes during growth and in response to treatment. This work suggests the utility of DHM to quantify changes in 3D structure over time and suggests the further development of this approach for time-lapse monitoring of 3D morphological changes during growth and in response to treatment that would otherwise be impractical to visualize.

  15. Heads-up 3D Microscopy: An Ergonomic and Educational Approach to Microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Bernardino M; Chiodo, Michael V; Vandevender, Darl; Patel, Parit A

    2016-05-01

    Traditional microsurgery can lead surgeons to use postures that cause musculoskeletal fatigue, leaving them more prone to work-related injuries. A new technology from TrueVision transmits the microscopic image onto a 3-dimensional (3D) monitor, allowing surgeons to operate while sitting/standing in a heads-up position. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of performing heads-up 3D microscopy as a more ergonomic alternative to traditional microsurgery. A feasibility study was conducted comparing heads-up 3D microscopy and traditional microscopy by performing femoral artery anastomoses on 8 Sprague-Dawley rats. Operative times and patency rates for each technology were compared. The 8 microsurgeons completed a questionnaire comparing image quality, comfort, technical feasibility, and educational value of the 2 technologies. Rat femoral artery anastomoses were successfully carried out by all 8 microsurgeons with each technology. There was no significant difference in anastomosis time between heads-up 3D and traditional microscopy (average times, 34.5 and 33.8 minutes, respectively; P = 0.66). Heads-up 3D microscopy was rated superior in neck and back comfort by 75% of participants. Image resolution, field of view, and technical feasibility were found to be superior or equivalent in 75% of participants, whereas 63% evaluated depth perception to be superior or equivalent. Heads-up 3D microscopy is a new technology that improves comfort for the microsurgeon without compromising image quality or technical feasibility. Its use has become prevalent in the field of ophthalmology and may also have utility in plastic and reconstructive surgery. PMID:27579241

  16. Heads-up 3D Microscopy: An Ergonomic and Educational Approach to Microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Bernardino M.; Chiodo, Michael V.; Vandevender, Darl

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Traditional microsurgery can lead surgeons to use postures that cause musculoskeletal fatigue, leaving them more prone to work-related injuries. A new technology from TrueVision transmits the microscopic image onto a 3-dimensional (3D) monitor, allowing surgeons to operate while sitting/standing in a heads-up position. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of performing heads-up 3D microscopy as a more ergonomic alternative to traditional microsurgery. A feasibility study was conducted comparing heads-up 3D microscopy and traditional microscopy by performing femoral artery anastomoses on 8 Sprague-Dawley rats. Operative times and patency rates for each technology were compared. The 8 microsurgeons completed a questionnaire comparing image quality, comfort, technical feasibility, and educational value of the 2 technologies. Rat femoral artery anastomoses were successfully carried out by all 8 microsurgeons with each technology. There was no significant difference in anastomosis time between heads-up 3D and traditional microscopy (average times, 34.5 and 33.8 minutes, respectively; P = 0.66). Heads-up 3D microscopy was rated superior in neck and back comfort by 75% of participants. Image resolution, field of view, and technical feasibility were found to be superior or equivalent in 75% of participants, whereas 63% evaluated depth perception to be superior or equivalent. Heads-up 3D microscopy is a new technology that improves comfort for the microsurgeon without compromising image quality or technical feasibility. Its use has become prevalent in the field of ophthalmology and may also have utility in plastic and reconstructive surgery. PMID:27579241

  17. 3D resolution enhancement of deep-tissue imaging based on virtual spatial overlap modulation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Su, I-Cheng; Hsu, Kuo-Jen; Shen, Po-Ting; Lin, Yen-Yin; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2016-07-25

    During the last decades, several resolution enhancement methods for optical microscopy beyond diffraction limit have been developed. Nevertheless, those hardware-based techniques typically require strong illumination, and fail to improve resolution in deep tissue. Here we develop a high-speed computational approach, three-dimensional virtual spatial overlap modulation microscopy (3D-vSPOM), which immediately solves the strong-illumination issue. By amplifying only the spatial frequency component corresponding to the un-scattered point-spread-function at focus, plus 3D nonlinear value selection, 3D-vSPOM shows significant resolution enhancement in deep tissue. Since no iteration is required, 3D-vSPOM is much faster than iterative deconvolution. Compared to non-iterative deconvolution, 3D-vSPOM does not need a priori information of point-spread-function at deep tissue, and provides much better resolution enhancement plus greatly improved noise-immune response. This method is ready to be amalgamated with two-photon microscopy or other laser scanning microscopy to enhance deep-tissue resolution. PMID:27464077

  18. Observation of the early stage of insulin crystallization by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, P.; Klupsch, Th.; Schell, U.; Hilgenfeld, R.

    2001-11-01

    It is demonstrated that high resolution confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a powerful tool for in situ observation and analysis of protein crystal growth. CLSM is used to study the early crystallization stage of Des-ThrB30 human insulin in aqueous solution, under conditions known to lead to monoclinic crystals. A modified batch crystallization method for CLSM purposes is applied which allows the growth behavior of crystallites to be studied in reflected light. A few hours after the start of the experiment, microcrystallites of characteristic shapes (mainly prismatic and pyramidal) are observed, the number of which strongly depends on the concentration of higher insulin aggregates in the initial solution. From direct observation as well as from model calculations we conclude that for solute concentrations up to about 3.5-times the saturation value, growth starts from few active insulin precipitate particles while 3D nucleation is neglegible for observation times up to 24 h. The anisotropic growth rates of monoclinic, prismatic crystallites are measured along the long edge of the cover face and perpendicular to the latter. A simultaneous crossover to signifcantly higher growth rates is found when the crystallite size reaches about 2 μm. The higher growth rates are connected with the appearence of striations. We argue that this growth rate crossover is caused by an increased 2D nucleation rate at the edges and corners, which finally results in bunching of steps simultaneously spreading over adjacent crystallite faces.

  19. Application of Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy to Heat and Mass Transport Modeling in Porous Microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Jochen; Milos, Frank; Fredrich, Joanne; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM) has been used to obtain digital images of the complicated 3-D (three-dimensional) microstructures of rigid, fibrous thermal protection system (TPS) materials. These orthotropic materials are comprised of refractory ceramic fibers with diameters in the range of 1 to 10 microns and have open porosities of 0.8 or more. Algorithms are being constructed to extract quantitative microstructural information from the digital data so that it may be applied to specific heat and mass transport modeling efforts; such information includes, for example, the solid and pore volume fractions, the internal surface area per volume, fiber diameter distributions, and fiber orientation distributions. This type of information is difficult to obtain in general, yet it is directly relevant to many computational efforts which seek to model macroscopic thermophysical phenomena in terms of microscopic mechanisms or interactions. Two such computational efforts for fibrous TPS materials are: i) the calculation of radiative transport properties; ii) the modeling of gas permeabilities.

  20. Digital image acquisition in in vivo confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Petroll, W M; Cavanagh, H D; Lemp, M A; Andrews, P M; Jester, J V

    1992-01-01

    A flexible system for the real-time acquisition of in vivo images has been developed. Images are generated using a tandem scanning confocal microscope interfaced to a low-light-level camera. The video signal from the camera is digitized and stored using a Gould image processing system with a real-time digital disk (RTDD). The RTDD can store up to 3200 512 x 512 pixel images at video rates (30 images s-1). Images can be input directly from the camera during the study, or off-line from a Super VHS video recorder. Once a segment of experimental interest is digitized onto the RTDD, the user can interactively step through the images, average stable sequences, and identify candidates for further processing and analysis. Examples of how this system can be used to study the physiology of various organ systems in vivo are presented. PMID:1552573

  1. Group refractive index reconstruction with broadband interferometric confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Daniel L.; Schlachter, Simon C.; Zysk, Adam M.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel method of measuring the group refractive index of biological tissues at the micrometer scale. The technique utilizes a broadband confocal microscope embedded into a Mach–Zehnder interferometer, with which spectral interferograms are measured as the sample is translated through the focus of the beam. The method does not require phase unwrapping and is insensitive to vibrations in the sample and reference arms. High measurement stability is achieved because a single spectral interferogram contains all the information necessary to compute the optical path delay of the beam transmitted through the sample. Included are a physical framework defining the forward problem, linear solutions to the inverse problem, and simulated images of biologically relevant phantoms. PMID:18451922

  2. Localizing Proteins in Fixed Giardia lamblia and Live Cultured Mammalian Cells by Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nyindodo-Ogari, Lilian; Schwartzbach, Steven D; Skalli, Omar; Estraño, Carlos E

    2016-01-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy (EM) are complementary methods for studying the intracellular localization of proteins. Confocal fluorescence microscopy provides a rapid and technically simple method to identify the organelle in which a protein localizes but only EM can identify the suborganellular compartment in which that protein is present. Confocal fluorescence microscopy, however, can provide information not obtainable by EM but required to understand the dynamics and interactions of specific proteins. In addition, confocal fluorescence microscopy of cells transfected with a construct encoding a protein of interest fused to a fluorescent protein tag allows live cell studies of the subcellular localization of that protein and the monitoring in real time of its trafficking. Immunostaining methods for confocal fluorescence microscopy are also faster and less involved than those for EM allowing rapid optimization of the antibody dilution needed and a determination of whether protein antigenicity is maintained under fixation conditions used for EM immunogold labeling. This chapter details a method to determine by confocal fluorescence microscopy the intracellular localization of a protein by transfecting the organism of interest, in this case Giardia lamblia, with the cDNA encoding the protein of interest and then processing these organisms for double label immunofluorescence staining after chemical fixation. Also presented is a method to identify the organelle targeting information in the presequence of a precursor protein, in this case the presequence of the precursor to the Euglena light harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding protein of photosystem II precursor (pLHCPII), using live cell imaging of mammalian COS7 cells transiently transfected with a plasmid encoding a pLHCPII presequence fluorescent protein fusion and stained with organelle-specific fluorescent dyes. PMID:27515076

  3. Corneal confocal microscopy: Recent progress in the evaluation of diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Papanas, Nikolaos; Ziegler, Dan

    2015-01-01

    The present brief review discusses recent progress with corneal confocal microscopy for the evaluation of diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy. Corneal confocal microscopy is a new, non-invasive and reproducible diagnostic modality, and it can also be easily applied for patient follow up. It enables new perspectives of studying the natural history of diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy, severity of nerve fiber pathology and documenting early nerve fiber regeneration after therapeutic intervention. It shows moderate to high sensitivity and specificity for the timely diagnosis of diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy. Currently, corneal confocal microscopy is mainly used in specialized centers, but deserves more widespread application for the assessment of diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy. Finally, further progress is required in terms of technical improvements for automated nerve fiber quantification and for analysis of larger images. PMID:26221515

  4. Emulation and design of terahertz reflection-mode confocal scanning microscopy based on virtual pinhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yong-fa; Li, Qi

    2014-12-01

    In the practical application of terahertz reflection-mode confocal scanning microscopy, the size of detector pinhole is an important factor that determines the performance of spatial resolution characteristic of the microscopic system. However, the use of physical pinhole brings some inconvenience to the experiment and the adjustment error has a great influence on the experiment result. Through reasonably selecting the parameter of matrix detector virtual pinhole (VPH), it can efficiently approximate the physical pinhole. By using this approach, the difficulty of experimental calibration is reduced significantly. In this article, an imaging scheme of terahertz reflection-mode confocal scanning microscopy that is based on the matrix detector VPH is put forward. The influence of detector pinhole size on the axial resolution of confocal scanning microscopy is emulated and analyzed. Then, the parameter of VPH is emulated when the best axial imaging performance is reached.

  5. Corneal confocal microscopy: Recent progress in the evaluation of diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Papanas, Nikolaos; Ziegler, Dan

    2015-07-01

    The present brief review discusses recent progress with corneal confocal microscopy for the evaluation of diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy. Corneal confocal microscopy is a new, non-invasive and reproducible diagnostic modality, and it can also be easily applied for patient follow up. It enables new perspectives of studying the natural history of diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy, severity of nerve fiber pathology and documenting early nerve fiber regeneration after therapeutic intervention. It shows moderate to high sensitivity and specificity for the timely diagnosis of diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy. Currently, corneal confocal microscopy is mainly used in specialized centers, but deserves more widespread application for the assessment of diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy. Finally, further progress is required in terms of technical improvements for automated nerve fiber quantification and for analysis of larger images. PMID:26221515

  6. Flow assisted assembly of multilayer colloidal crystals studied using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shereda, Laura T.

    Colloidal crystals are highly ordered particle arrays with potential applications including sensors, optical switches, and photonic materials. For production on an industrially viable scale, processes must be developed to form crystals with low defect densities, good long range order, and favorable kinetics. Application of a field to a concentrated colloidal suspension accelerates crystal formation. Ackerson et al. (Ackerson, 1991) established that systems with stress-based Peclet numbers above one resulted in crystal formation. We investigate formation of colloidal crystals by studying structural changes that occur upon shearing using confocal microscopy. Charge-stabilized poly(methylmethacrylate) particles (phi = 0.35) suspended in dioctyl phthalate were used for experiments. After application of shear, assembled structures were immobilized by UV exposure. The full sample thickness was imaged using confocal microscopy. Particle centroids were located in 3D by means of image processing and local crystallinity was quantified by application of local bond order parameter criteria (tenWolde, 1996). We present microstructural analysis of structures formed by both spin coating and uniform shear flow. Spin coating produces spatiotemporal variation in the ordering of concentrated colloidal dispersions that is a universal function of the local reduced critical stress and macroscopic strain. Samples produced at Peclet numbers greater than one and macroscopic strains above two resulted in crystal formation. A plot of the cryrstalline fraction versus Peclet number yielded a sharp order to disorder transition at Peclet number of order unity. The effect of volume fraction on the Peclet number theory was studied. Results indicated that the theory applied to volume fractions within the crystalline regime. Strain requirements for crystal formation of samples undergoing step strain deformation in a parallel plate geometry were investigated by applying stains of 1--300 to samples

  7. Measuring skin penetration by confocal Raman microscopy (CRM): correlation to results from conventional experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunter, Dominique; Daniels, Rolf

    2016-03-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy has become an advancing technique in the characterization of drug transport into the skin. In this study the skin penetration of a local anesthetic from a semisolid preparation was investigated. Furthermore, the effect of the chemical enhancers propylene glycol and POE-23-lauryl ether on its penetration was investigated. The results show that confocal Raman microscopy may provide detailed information on the penetration of APIs into the skin and may elucidate their distribution within the skin with high resolution. The results of the CRM analysis are fully in line with those of conventional permeation and penetration experiments.

  8. 3D image reconstruction algorithms for cryo-electron-microscopy images of virus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerschuk, Peter C.; Johnson, John E.

    2000-11-01

    A statistical model for the object and the complete image formation process in cryo electron microscopy of viruses is presented. Using this model, maximum likelihood reconstructions of the 3D structure of viruses are computed using the expectation maximization algorithm and an example based on Cowpea mosaic virus is provided.

  9. 3D structure of individual nanocrystals in solution by electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jungwon; Elmlund, Hans; Ercius, Peter; Yuk, Jong Min; Limmer, David T.; Chen, Qian; Kim, Kwanpyo; Han, Sang Hoon; Weitz, David A.; Zettl, A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge about the synthesis, growth mechanisms, and physical properties of colloidal nanoparticles has been limited by technical impediments. We introduce a method for determining three-dimensional (3D) structures of individual nanoparticles in solution. We combine a graphene liquid cell, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, a direct electron detector, and an algorithm for single-particle 3D reconstruction originally developed for analysis of biological molecules. This method yielded two 3D structures of individual platinum nanocrystals at near-atomic resolution. Because our method derives the 3D structure from images of individual nanoparticles rotating freely in solution, it enables the analysis of heterogeneous populations of potentially unordered nanoparticles that are synthesized in solution, thereby providing a means to understand the structure and stability of defects at the nanoscale.

  10. High-speed confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy by analog mean-delay method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Youngjae; Kim, Donguk; Yang, Wenzhong; Kim, Dug Y.

    2010-02-01

    We have demonstrated the high-speed confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) by analog mean-delay (AMD) method. The AMD method is a new signal processing technique for calculation of fluorescence lifetime and it is very suitable for the high-speed confocal FLIM with good accuracy and photon economy. We achieved the acquisition speed of 7.7 frames per second for confocal FLIM imaging. Here, the highest photon detection rate for one pixel was larger than 125 MHz and averaged photon detection rate was more than 62.5 MHz. Based on our system, we successfully obtained a sequence of confocal fluorescence lifetime images of RBL-2H3 cell labeled with Fluo-3/AM and excited by 4αPDD (TRPV channel agonist) within one second.

  11. Gastric Tissue Damage Analysis Generated by Ischemia: Bioimpedance, Confocal Endomicroscopy, and Light Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Beltran, Nohra E.; Garcia, Laura E.; Garcia-Lorenzana, Mario

    2013-01-01

    The gastric mucosa ischemic tissular damage plays an important role in critical care patients' outcome, because it is the first damaged tissue by compensatory mechanism during shock. The aim of the study is to relate bioimpedance changes with tissular damage level generated by ischemia by means of confocal endomicroscopy and light microscopy. Bioimpedance of the gastric mucosa and confocal images were obtained from Wistar male rats during basal and ischemia conditions. They were anesthetized, and stain was applied (fluorescein and/or acriflavine). The impedance spectroscopy catheter was inserted and then confocal endomicroscopy probe. After basal measurements and biopsy, hepatic and gastric arteries clamping induced ischemia. Finally, pyloric antrum tissue was preserved in buffered formaldehyde (10%) for histology processing using light microscopy. Confocal images were equalized, binarized, and boundary defined, and infiltrations were quantified. Impedance and infiltrations increased with ischemia showing significant changes between basal and ischemia conditions (P < 0.01). Light microscopy analysis allows detection of general alterations in cellular and tissular integrity, confirming gastric reactance and confocal images quantification increments obtained during ischemia. PMID:23841094

  12. Reflectance confocal microscopy for scarring and non-scarring alopecia real-time assessment.

    PubMed

    Ardigò, Marco; Agozzino, Marina; Franceschini, Chiara; Donadio, Carlo; Abraham, Leonardo Spagnol; Barbieri, Luca; Sperduti, Isabella; Berardesca, Enzo; González, Salvador

    2016-07-01

    Clinical management of alopecia represents one of the major issues in dermatology. Scalp biopsies are not easily accepted because of the high bleeding and sensitive anatomical area. Trichoscopy is routinely used for diagnosis of alopecia, but in several cases lack to provide sufficient information on the status of the disease. Recently, reflectance confocal microscopy demonstrated its usefulness for the evaluation of several inflammatory skin condition and preliminary reports about alopecia have been proposed in the literature. The aim was to identify the confocal features characterizing scarring and non-scarring alopecia. Reflectance confocal microscopy from 86 patients affected by scarring (28 lichen planopilaris and 9 lupus erythematosus) and non-scarring alopecia (30 androgenic alopecia and 19 alopecia areata), were retrospectively, blinded evaluated. Good concordance between different readers on the confocal criteria has been assessed. Statistical significant features, specific for scarring alopecia and non-scarring alopecia have been identified. In this study, data on reflectance confocal microscopy features useful for the differential diagnosis between scarring and non-scarring alopecia have been identified. Further studies focusing on the use of this non-invasive technique in the therapeutic follow-up and distinction of sub-entities of alopecia are still required. PMID:27225248

  13. Clinical applications of in vivo fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Chilhwan; Park, Sangyong; Kim, Junhyung; Ha, Seunghan; Park, Gyuman; Lee, Gunwoo; Lee, Onseok; Chun, Byungseon; Gweon, Daegab

    2008-02-01

    Living skin for basic and clinical research can be evaluated by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) non-invasively. CLSM imaging system can achieve skin image its native state either "in vivo" or "fresh biopsy (ex vivo)" without fixation, sectioning and staining that is necessary for routine histology. This study examines the potential fluorescent CLSM with a various exogenous fluorescent contrast agent, to provide with more resolution images in skin. In addition, in vivo fluorescent CLSM researchers will be extended a range of potential clinical application. The prototype of our CLSM system has been developed by Prof. Gweon's group. The operating parameters are composed of some units, such as illuminated wavelength 488 nm, argon illumination power up to 20mW on the skin, objective lens, 0.9NA oil immersion, axial resolution 1.0μm, field of view 200μm x 100μm (lateral resolution , 0.3μm). In human volunteer, fluorescein sodium was administrated topically and intradermally. Animal studies were done in GFP transgenic mouse, IRC mouse and pig skin. For imaging of animal skin, fluorescein sodium, acridine orange, and curcumine were used for fluorescein contrast agent. We also used the GFP transgenic mouse for fluorescein CLSM imaging. In intact skin, absorption of fluorescein sodium by individual corneocyte and hair. Intradermal administrated the fluorescein sodium, distinct outline of keratinocyte cell border could be seen. Curcumin is a yellow food dye that has similar fluorescent properties to fluorescein sodium. Acridin Orange can be highlight nuclei in viable keratinocyte. In vivo CLSM of transgenic GFP mouse enable on in vivo, high resolution view of GFP expressing skin tissue. GFP signals are brightest in corneocyte, kertinocyte, hair and eccrine gland. In intact skin, absorption of fluorescein sodium by individual corneocyte and hair. Intradermal administrated the fluorescein sodium, distinct outline of keratinocyte cell border could be seen. In

  14. Determination of Nanogram Microparticles from Explosives after Real Open-Air Explosions by Confocal Raman Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Félix; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2016-07-01

    Explosives are increasingly being used for terrorist attacks to cause devastating explosions. The detection of their postblast residues after an explosion is a high challenge, which has been barely investigated, particularly using spectroscopic techniques. In this research, a novel methodology using confocal Raman microscopy has been developed for the analysis of postblast residues from 10 open-air explosions caused by 10 different explosives (TNT, RDX, PETN, TATP, HMTD, dynamite, black powder, ANFO, chloratite, and ammonal) commonly used in improvised explosive devices. The methodology for the determination of postblast particles from explosives consisted of examining the samples surfaces with both the naked eye, first, and microscopically (10× and 50×), immediately afterward; and finally, analyzing the selected residues by confocal Raman spectroscopy in order to identify the postblast particles from explosives. Interestingly, confocal Raman microscopy has demonstrated to be highly suitable to rapidly, selectively, and noninvasively analyze postblast microscopic particles from explosives up to the nanogram range. PMID:27281604

  15. Effects of Fluorescein Staining on Laser In Vivo Confocal Microscopy Images of the Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Sindt, Christine W.; Critser, D. Brice; Grout, Trudy K.; Kern, Jami R.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to identify whether topical fluorescein, a common ophthalmic tool, affects laser in vivo confocal microscopy of the cornea, a tool with growing applications. Twenty-five eye care specialists were asked to identify presence or absence of fluorescein in 99 confocal micrographs of healthy corneas. Responses were statistically similar to guessing for the epithelium (48% ± 14% of respondents correct per image) and the subbasal nerve plexus (49% ± 11% correct), but results were less clear for the stroma. Dendritic immune cells were quantified in bilateral images from subjects who had been unilaterally stained with fluorescein. Density of dendritic immune cells was statistically similar between the unstained and contralateral stained eyes of 24 contact lens wearers (P = .72) and of 10 nonwearers (P = .53). Overall, the results indicated that fluorescein staining did not interfere with laser confocal microscopy of corneal epithelium, subbasal nerves, or dendritic immune cells. PMID:22363837

  16. Coherent Microscopy for 3-D Movement Monitoring and Super-Resolved Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiderman, Yevgeny; Amsel, Avigail; Tzadka, Yaniv; Fixler, Dror; Teicher, Mina; Micó, Vicente; Garcí, Javier; Javidi, Bahram; DaneshPanah, Mehdi; Moon, Inkyu; Zalevsky, Zeev

    In this chapter we present three types of microscopy-related configurations while the first one is used for 3-D movement monitoring of the inspected samples, the second one is used for super-resolved 3-D imaging, and the last one presents an overview digital holographic microscopy applications. The first configuration is based on temporal tracking of secondary reflected speckles when imaged by properly defocused optics. We validate the proposed scheme by using it to monitor 3-D spontaneous contraction of rat's cardiac muscle cells while allowing nanometric tracking accuracy without interferometric recording. The second configuration includes projection of temporally varying speckle patterns on top of the sample and by proper decoding exceeding the diffraction as well as the geometrical-related lateral resolution limitation. In the final part of the chapter, we overview applications of digital holographic microscopy (DHM) for real-time non-invasive 3-D sensing, tracking, and recognition of living microorganisms such as single- or multiple-cell organisms and bacteria.

  17. 3D single-molecule tracking using one- and two-photon excitation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cong; Perillo, Evan P.; Zhuang, Quincy; Huynh, Khang T.; Dunn, Andrew K.; Yeh, Hsin-Chih

    2014-03-01

    Three dimensional single-molecule tracking (3D-SMT) has revolutionized the way we study fundamental cellular processes. By analyzing the spatial trajectories of individual molecules (e.g. a receptor or a signaling molecule) in 3D space, one can discern the internalization or transport dynamics of these molecules, study the heterogeneity of subcellular structures, and elucidate the complex spatiotemporal regulation mechanisms. Sub-diffraction localization precision, sub-millisecond temporal resolution and tens-of-seconds observation period are the benchmarks of current 3D-SMT techniques. We have recently built two molecular tracking systems in our labs. The first system is a previously reported confocal tracking system, which we denote as the 1P-1E-4D (one-photon excitation, one excitation beam, and four fiber-coupled detectors) system. The second system is a whole new design that is based on two-photon excitation, which we denote as the 2P-4E-1D (two-photon excitation, four excitation beams, and only one detector) system. Here we compare these two systems based on Monte Carlo simulation of tracking a diffusing fluorescent molecule. Through our simulation, we have characterized the limitation of individual systems and optimized the system parameters such as magnification, z-plane separation, and feedback gains.

  18. 3D imaging of the cleared intact murine colon with light sheet microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zufiria, B.; Bocancea, D. I.; Gómez-Gaviro, M. V.; Vaquero, J. J.; Desco, M.; Fresno, M.; Ripoll, J.; Arranz, A.

    2016-03-01

    We here show 3D light sheet microscopy images of fixed and cleared murine colon tissue in-toto, which offer relevant cellular information without the need for physically sectioning the tissue. We have applied the recently developed CUBIC protocol (Susaki et al. Cell 157:726, 2014) for colon tissues and have found that this clearing protocol enables imaging all the way to the central part of the lumen with cellular resolution, thus opening new ways for 3D imaging of colon samples.

  19. Quantitative analysis of platelets aggregates in 3D by digital holographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Boudejltia, Karim Zouaoui; Ribeiro de Sousa, Daniel; Uzureau, Pierrick; Yourassowsky, Catherine; Perez-Morga, David; Courbebaisse, Guy; Chopard, Bastien; Dubois, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Platelet spreading and retraction play a pivotal role in the platelet plugging and the thrombus formation. In routine laboratory, platelet function tests include exhaustive information about the role of the different receptors present at the platelet surface without information on the 3D structure of platelet aggregates. In this work, we develop, a method in Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) to characterize the platelet and aggregate 3D shapes using the quantitative phase contrast imaging. This novel method is suited to the study of platelets physiology in clinical practice as well as the development of new drugs. PMID:26417523

  20. MAMMALIAN APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE NEONATAL OVARIES, EMBRYOS AND FETAL LIMBS USING CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emergence of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) as a technique capable of optically generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer-stored images as a virtual 3-dimensional structure offers a viable alternative to traditional section...

  1. MAMMALIAN APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE NEONATAL OVARIES USING CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    MAMMALIAN APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE NEONATAL OVARIES USING CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Robert M. Zucker Susan C. Jeffery and Sally D. Perreault

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Prot...

  2. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of apoptosis in organogenesis-stage mouse embryos

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy combined with a vital stain has been used to study apoptosis in organogenesis-stage mouse embryos. In order to achieve optical sectioning through embryos, it was necessary to use low power objectives and to prepare the sample appropriately. Mous...

  3. Confocal microscopy studies of morphology and apoptosis: ovaries, limbs, embryos and insects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a technique that is capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer-stored images as a virtual 3-dimensional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning ap...

  4. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: FOUNDATIONS FOR QUANTIFYING CYTOMETRIC APPLICATIONS WITH SPECTROSCOPIC INSTRUMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The goal of a CLSM is to acquire and quantify fluorescence and in some instruments acquire spectral characterization of the emitted signal. The accuracy of these measurements demands t...

  5. Generalized recovery algorithm for 3D super-resolution microscopy using rotating point spread functions.

    PubMed

    Shuang, Bo; Wang, Wenxiao; Shen, Hao; Tauzin, Lawrence J; Flatebo, Charlotte; Chen, Jianbo; Moringo, Nicholas A; Bishop, Logan D C; Kelly, Kevin F; Landes, Christy F

    2016-01-01

    Super-resolution microscopy with phase masks is a promising technique for 3D imaging and tracking. Due to the complexity of the resultant point spread functions, generalized recovery algorithms are still missing. We introduce a 3D super-resolution recovery algorithm that works for a variety of phase masks generating 3D point spread functions. A fast deconvolution process generates initial guesses, which are further refined by least squares fitting. Overfitting is suppressed using a machine learning determined threshold. Preliminary results on experimental data show that our algorithm can be used to super-localize 3D adsorption events within a porous polymer film and is useful for evaluating potential phase masks. Finally, we demonstrate that parallel computation on graphics processing units can reduce the processing time required for 3D recovery. Simulations reveal that, through desktop parallelization, the ultimate limit of real-time processing is possible. Our program is the first open source recovery program for generalized 3D recovery using rotating point spread functions. PMID:27488312

  6. Generalized recovery algorithm for 3D super-resolution microscopy using rotating point spread functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuang, Bo; Wang, Wenxiao; Shen, Hao; Tauzin, Lawrence J.; Flatebo, Charlotte; Chen, Jianbo; Moringo, Nicholas A.; Bishop, Logan D. C.; Kelly, Kevin F.; Landes, Christy F.

    2016-08-01

    Super-resolution microscopy with phase masks is a promising technique for 3D imaging and tracking. Due to the complexity of the resultant point spread functions, generalized recovery algorithms are still missing. We introduce a 3D super-resolution recovery algorithm that works for a variety of phase masks generating 3D point spread functions. A fast deconvolution process generates initial guesses, which are further refined by least squares fitting. Overfitting is suppressed using a machine learning determined threshold. Preliminary results on experimental data show that our algorithm can be used to super-localize 3D adsorption events within a porous polymer film and is useful for evaluating potential phase masks. Finally, we demonstrate that parallel computation on graphics processing units can reduce the processing time required for 3D recovery. Simulations reveal that, through desktop parallelization, the ultimate limit of real-time processing is possible. Our program is the first open source recovery program for generalized 3D recovery using rotating point spread functions.

  7. Generalized recovery algorithm for 3D super-resolution microscopy using rotating point spread functions

    PubMed Central

    Shuang, Bo; Wang, Wenxiao; Shen, Hao; Tauzin, Lawrence J.; Flatebo, Charlotte; Chen, Jianbo; Moringo, Nicholas A.; Bishop, Logan D. C.; Kelly, Kevin F.; Landes, Christy F.

    2016-01-01

    Super-resolution microscopy with phase masks is a promising technique for 3D imaging and tracking. Due to the complexity of the resultant point spread functions, generalized recovery algorithms are still missing. We introduce a 3D super-resolution recovery algorithm that works for a variety of phase masks generating 3D point spread functions. A fast deconvolution process generates initial guesses, which are further refined by least squares fitting. Overfitting is suppressed using a machine learning determined threshold. Preliminary results on experimental data show that our algorithm can be used to super-localize 3D adsorption events within a porous polymer film and is useful for evaluating potential phase masks. Finally, we demonstrate that parallel computation on graphics processing units can reduce the processing time required for 3D recovery. Simulations reveal that, through desktop parallelization, the ultimate limit of real-time processing is possible. Our program is the first open source recovery program for generalized 3D recovery using rotating point spread functions. PMID:27488312

  8. Visualizing the Tumor Microenvironment of Liver Metastasis by Spinning Disk Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Babes, Liane; Kubes, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Intravital microscopy has evolved into an invaluable technique to study the complexity of tumors by visualizing individual cells in live organisms. Here, we describe a method for employing intravital spinning disk confocal microscopy to picture high-resolution tumor-stroma interactions in real time. We depict in detail the surgical procedures to image various tumor microenvironments and different cellular components in the liver. PMID:27581024

  9. Video lensfree microscopy of 2D and 3D culture of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allier, C. P.; Vinjimore Kesavan, S.; Coutard, J.-G.; Cioni, O.; Momey, F.; Navarro, F.; Menneteau, M.; Chalmond, B.; Obeid, P.; Haguet, V.; David-Watine, B.; Dubrulle, N.; Shorte, S.; van der Sanden, B.; Di Natale, C.; Hamard, L.; Wion, D.; Dolega, M. E.; Picollet-D'hahan, N.; Gidrol, X.; Dinten, J.-M.

    2014-03-01

    Innovative imaging methods are continuously developed to investigate the function of biological systems at the microscopic scale. As an alternative to advanced cell microscopy techniques, we are developing lensfree video microscopy that opens new ranges of capabilities, in particular at the mesoscopic level. Lensfree video microscopy allows the observation of a cell culture in an incubator over a very large field of view (24 mm2) for extended periods of time. As a result, a large set of comprehensive data can be gathered with strong statistics, both in space and time. Video lensfree microscopy can capture images of cells cultured in various physical environments. We emphasize on two different case studies: the quantitative analysis of the spontaneous network formation of HUVEC endothelial cells, and by coupling lensfree microscopy with 3D cell culture in the study of epithelial tissue morphogenesis. In summary, we demonstrate that lensfree video microscopy is a powerful tool to conduct cell assays in 2D and 3D culture experiments. The applications are in the realms of fundamental biology, tissue regeneration, drug development and toxicology studies.

  10. Sensitivity and Specificity for Detecting Basal Cell Carcinomas in Mohs Excisions with Confocal Fluorescence Mosaicing Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gareau, Daniel S.; Karen, Julie K.; Dusza, Stephen W.; Tudisco, Marie; Nehal, Kishwer S.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the ability of confocal fluorescence mosaicing microscopy to rapidly detect basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) directly in thick and fresh Mohs surgical excisions. Mosaics of confocal images display large areas of tissue with high resolution and magnification equivalent to 2X, which is the standard magnification when examining pathology. Comparison of mosaics to Mohs frozen histopathology was shown to be excellent for all types of BCCs. However, the comparisons in the previous studies were visual and qualitative. In this paper, we report the results of a semi-quantitative preclinical study in which forty-five confocal mosaics were blindly evaluated for the presence (or absence) of BCC tumor. The evaluations were by two clinicians: a senior Mohs surgeon, with prior expertise in interpreting confocal images, and a novice Mohs fellow, with limited experience. The blinded evaluation was compared to the gold standard of frozen histopathology. BCCs were detected with an overall sensitivity of 96.6%, specificity of 89.2%, positive predictive value of 93.0% and negative predictive value of 94.7%. The results demonstrate the potential clinical utility of confocal mosaicing microscopy toward rapid surgical pathology-at-the-bedside to expedite and guide surgery. PMID:19566305

  11. Fast 3D visualization of endogenous brain signals with high-sensitivity laser scanning photothermal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Jun; Iida, Tadatsune; Tanaka, Shinji; Hayashi-Takagi, Akiko; Kasai, Haruo; Okabe, Shigeo; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2016-05-01

    A fast, high-sensitivity photothermal microscope was developed by implementing a spatially segmented balanced detection scheme into a laser scanning microscope. We confirmed a 4.9 times improvement in signal-to-noise ratio in the spatially segmented balanced detection compared with that of conventional detection. The system demonstrated simultaneous bi-modal photothermal and confocal fluorescence imaging of transgenic mouse brain tissue with a pixel dwell time of 20 μs. The fluorescence image visualized neurons expressing yellow fluorescence proteins, while the photothermal signal detected endogenous chromophores in the mouse brain, allowing 3D visualization of the distribution of various features such as blood cells and fine structures probably due to lipids. This imaging modality was constructed using compact and cost-effective laser diodes, and will thus be widely useful in the life and medical sciences. PMID:27231615

  12. Fast 3D visualization of endogenous brain signals with high-sensitivity laser scanning photothermal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Jun; Iida, Tadatsune; Tanaka, Shinji; Hayashi-Takagi, Akiko; Kasai, Haruo; Okabe, Shigeo; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    A fast, high-sensitivity photothermal microscope was developed by implementing a spatially segmented balanced detection scheme into a laser scanning microscope. We confirmed a 4.9 times improvement in signal-to-noise ratio in the spatially segmented balanced detection compared with that of conventional detection. The system demonstrated simultaneous bi-modal photothermal and confocal fluorescence imaging of transgenic mouse brain tissue with a pixel dwell time of 20 μs. The fluorescence image visualized neurons expressing yellow fluorescence proteins, while the photothermal signal detected endogenous chromophores in the mouse brain, allowing 3D visualization of the distribution of various features such as blood cells and fine structures probably due to lipids. This imaging modality was constructed using compact and cost-effective laser diodes, and will thus be widely useful in the life and medical sciences. PMID:27231615

  13. An open-source deconvolution software package for 3-D quantitative fluorescence microscopy imaging

    PubMed Central

    SUN, Y.; DAVIS, P.; KOSMACEK, E. A.; IANZINI, F.; MACKEY, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Deconvolution techniques have been widely used for restoring the 3-D quantitative information of an unknown specimen observed using a wide-field fluorescence microscope. Deconv, an open-source deconvolution software package, was developed for 3-D quantitative fluorescence microscopy imaging and was released under the GNU Public License. Deconv provides numerical routines for simulation of a 3-D point spread function and deconvolution routines implemented three constrained iterative deconvolution algorithms: one based on a Poisson noise model and two others based on a Gaussian noise model. These algorithms are presented and evaluated using synthetic images and experimentally obtained microscope images, and the use of the library is explained. Deconv allows users to assess the utility of these deconvolution algorithms and to determine which are suited for a particular imaging application. The design of Deconv makes it easy for deconvolution capabilities to be incorporated into existing imaging applications. PMID:19941558

  14. Automated Identification and Localization of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in 3D Intravital Microscopy Data

    PubMed Central

    Khorshed, Reema A.; Hawkins, Edwin D.; Duarte, Delfim; Scott, Mark K.; Akinduro, Olufolake A.; Rashidi, Narges M.; Spitaler, Martin; Lo Celso, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Summary Measuring three-dimensional (3D) localization of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) within the bone marrow microenvironment using intravital microscopy is a rapidly expanding research theme. This approach holds the key to understanding the detail of HSC-niche interactions, which are critical for appropriate stem cell function. Due to the complex tissue architecture of the bone marrow and to the progressive introduction of scattering and signal loss at increasing imaging depths, there is no ready-made software to handle efficient segmentation and unbiased analysis of the data. To address this, we developed an automated image analysis tool that simplifies and standardizes the biological interpretation of 3D HSC microenvironment images. The algorithm identifies HSCs and measures their localization relative to surrounding osteoblast cells and bone collagen. We demonstrate here the effectiveness, consistency, and accuracy of the proposed approach compared to current manual analysis and its wider applicability to analyze other 3D bone marrow components. PMID:26120058

  15. Filtering, reconstruction, and measurement of the geometry of nuclei from hippocampal neurons based on confocal microscopy data.

    PubMed

    Queisser, Gillian; Wittmann, Malte; Bading, Hilmar; Wittum, Gabriel

    2008-01-01

    The cell nucleus is often considered a spherical structure. However, the visualization of proteins associated with the nuclear envelope in rat hippocampal neurons indicates that the geometry of nuclei is far more complex. The shape of cell nuclei is likely to influence the nucleo-cytoplasmic exchange of macromolecules and ions, in particular calcium, a key regulator of neuronal gene expression. We developed a tool to retrieve the 3-D view of cell nuclei from laser scanning confocal microscopy data. By applying an inertia-based filter, based on a special structure detection mechanism, the signal-to-noise ratio of the image is enhanced, the signal is smoothed, gaps in the membrane are closed, while at the same time the geometric properties, such as diameters of the membrane, are preserved. After segmentation of the image data, the microscopy data are sufficiently processed to extract surface information of the membrane by creating an isosurface with a marching tetrahedra algorithm combined with a modified Dijkstra graph-search algorithm. All methods are tested on artificial data, as well as on real data, which are recorded with a laser scanning confocal microscope. Significant advantages of the inertia-based filter can be observed when comparing it to other state of the art nonlinear diffusion filters. An additional program is written to calculate surface and volume of cell nuclei. These results represent the first step toward establishing a geometry-based model of the-dynamics of cytoplasmic and nuclear calcium. PMID:18315367

  16. Optical clearing assisted confocal microscopy of ex vivo transgenic mouse skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Eunjoo; Ahn, YoonJoon; Ahn, Jinhyo; Ahn, Soyeon; Kim, Changhwan; Choi, Sanghoon; Boutilier, Richard Martin; Lee, Yongjoong; Kim, Pilhan; Lee, Ho

    2015-10-01

    We examined the optical clearing assisted confocal microscopy of the transgenic mouse skin. The pinna and dorsal skin were imaged with a confocal microscope after the application of glycerol and FocusClear. In case of the glycerol-treated pinna, the clearing was minimal due to the inefficient permeability. However, the imaging depth was improved when the pinna was treated with FocusClear. In case of dorsal skin, we were able to image deeply to the subcutaneous connective tissue with both agents. Various skin structures such as the vessel, epithelium cells, cartilage, dermal cells, and hair follicles were clearly imaged.

  17. 3D imaging of the early embryonic chicken heart with focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rennie, Monique Y.; Gahan, Curran G.; López, Claudia S.; Thornburg, Kent L.; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Early embryonic heart development is a period of dynamic growth and remodeling, with rapid changes occurring at the tissue, cell, and subcellular levels. A detailed understanding of the events that establish the components of the heart wall has been hampered by a lack of methodologies for three dimensional (3D), high-resolution imaging. Focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) is a novel technology for imaging 3D tissue volumes at the subcellular level. FIB-SEM alternates between imaging the block face with a scanning electron beam and milling away thin sections of tissue with a focused ion beam, allowing for collection and analysis of 3D data. FIB-SEM was used to image the three layers of the day 4 chicken embryo heart: myocardium, cardiac jelly, and endocardium. Individual images obtained with FIB-SEM were comparable in quality and resolution to those obtained with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Up to 1100 serial images were obtained in 4 nm increments at 4.88 nm resolution, and image stacks were aligned to create volumes 800–1500 μm3 in size. Segmentation of organelles revealed their organization and distinct volume fractions between cardiac wall layers. We conclude that FIB-SEM is a powerful modality for 3D subcellular imaging of the embryonic heart wall. PMID:24742339

  18. Blind Depth-variant Deconvolution of 3D Data in Wide-field Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Boyoung; Naemura, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a new deconvolution method for 3D fluorescence wide-field microscopy. Most previous methods are insufficient in terms of restoring a 3D cell structure, since a point spread function (PSF) is simply assumed as depth-invariant, whereas a PSF of microscopy changes significantly along the optical axis. A few methods that consider a depth-variant PSF have been proposed; however, they are impractical, since they are non-blind approaches that use a known PSF in a pre-measuring condition, whereas an imaging condition of a target image is different from that of the pre-measuring. To solve these problems, this paper proposes a blind approach to estimate depth-variant specimen-dependent PSF and restore 3D cell structure. It is shown by experiments on that the proposed method outperforms the previous ones in terms of suppressing axial blur. The proposed method is composed of the following three steps: First, a non-parametric averaged PSF is estimated by the Richardson Lucy algorithm, whose initial parameter is given by the central depth prediction from intensity analysis. Second, the estimated PSF is fitted to Gibson's parametric PSF model via optimization, and depth-variant PSFs are generated. Third, a 3D cell structure is restored by using a depth-variant version of a generalized expectation-maximization. PMID:25950821

  19. 3D single molecule tracking in thick cellular specimens using multifocal plane microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Sripad; Ward, E. Sally; Ober, Raimund J.

    2011-03-01

    One of the major challenges in single molecule microscopy concerns 3D tracking of single molecules in cellular specimens. This has been a major impediment to study many fundamental cellular processes, such as protein transport across thick cellular specimens (e.g. a cell-monolayer). Here we show that multifocal plane microscopy (MUM), an imaging modality developed by our group, provides the much needed solution to this longstanding problem. While MUM was previously used for 3D single molecule tracking at shallow depths (~ 1 micron) in live-cells, the question arises if MUM can also live up to the significant challenge of tracking single molecules in thick samples. Here by substantially expanding the capabilities of MUM, we demonstrate 3D tracking of quantum-dot labeled molecules in a ~ 10 micron thick cell monolayer. In this way we have reconstructed the complete 3D intracellular trafficking itinerary of single molecules at high spatial and temporal precision in a thick cell-sample. Funding support: NIH and the National MS Society.

  20. Site-Specific Cryo-focused Ion Beam Sample Preparation Guided by 3D Correlative Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Jan; Mahamid, Julia; Lucic, Vladan; de Marco, Alex; Fernandez, Jose-Jesus; Laugks, Tim; Mayer, Tobias; Hyman, Anthony A; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Plitzko, Jürgen M

    2016-02-23

    The development of cryo-focused ion beam (cryo-FIB) for the thinning of frozen-hydrated biological specimens enabled cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) analysis in unperturbed cells and tissues. However, the volume represented within a typical FIB lamella constitutes a small fraction of the biological specimen. Retaining low-abundance and dynamic subcellular structures or macromolecular assemblies within such limited volumes requires precise targeting of the FIB milling process. In this study, we present the development of a cryo-stage allowing for spinning-disk confocal light microscopy at cryogenic temperatures and describe the incorporation of the new hardware into existing workflows for cellular sample preparation by cryo-FIB. Introduction of fiducial markers and subsequent computation of three-dimensional coordinate transformations provide correlation between light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy/FIB. The correlative approach is employed to guide the FIB milling process of vitrified cellular samples and to capture specific structures, namely fluorescently labeled lipid droplets, in lamellas that are 300 nm thick. The correlation procedure is then applied to localize the fluorescently labeled structures in the transmission electron microscopy image of the lamella. This approach can be employed to navigate the acquisition of cryo-ET data within FIB-lamellas at specific locations, unambiguously identified by fluorescence microscopy. PMID:26769364

  1. Virtual rough samples to test 3D nanometer-scale scanning electron microscopy stereo photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarrubia, J. S.; Tondare, V. N.; Vladár, A. E.

    2016-03-01

    The combination of scanning electron microscopy for high spatial resolution, images from multiple angles to provide 3D information, and commercially available stereo photogrammetry software for 3D reconstruction offers promise for nanometer-scale dimensional metrology in 3D. A method is described to test 3D photogrammetry software by the use of virtual samples—mathematical samples from which simulated images are made for use as inputs to the software under test. The virtual sample is constructed by wrapping a rough skin with any desired power spectral density around a smooth near-trapezoidal line with rounded top corners. Reconstruction is performed with images simulated from different angular viewpoints. The software's reconstructed 3D model is then compared to the known geometry of the virtual sample. Three commercial photogrammetry software packages were tested. Two of them produced results for line height and width that were within close to 1 nm of the correct values. All of the packages exhibited some difficulty in reconstructing details of the surface roughness.

  2. Detection of Gold Nanoparticles Aggregation Growth Induced by Nucleic Acid through Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gary, Ramla; Carbone, Giovani; Petriashvili, Gia; De Santo, Maria Penelope; Barberi, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    The gold nanoparticle (GNP) aggregation growth induced by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is studied by laser scanning confocal and environmental scanning electron microscopies. As in the investigated case the direct light scattering analysis is not suitable, we observe the behavior of the fluorescence produced by a dye and we detect the aggregation by the shift and the broadening of the fluorescence peak. Results of laser scanning confocal microscopy images and the fluorescence emission spectra from lambda scan mode suggest, in fact, that the intruding of the hydrophobic moiety of the probe within the cationic surfactants bilayer film coating GNPs results in a Förster resonance energy transfer. The environmental scanning electron microscopy images show that DNA molecules act as template to assemble GNPs into three-dimensional structures which are reminiscent of the DNA helix. This study is useful to design better nanobiotechnological devices using GNPs and DNA. PMID:26907286

  3. Detection of Gold Nanoparticles Aggregation Growth Induced by Nucleic Acid through Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gary, Ramla; Carbone, Giovani; Petriashvili, Gia; De Santo, Maria Penelope; Barberi, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    The gold nanoparticle (GNP) aggregation growth induced by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is studied by laser scanning confocal and environmental scanning electron microscopies. As in the investigated case the direct light scattering analysis is not suitable, we observe the behavior of the fluorescence produced by a dye and we detect the aggregation by the shift and the broadening of the fluorescence peak. Results of laser scanning confocal microscopy images and the fluorescence emission spectra from lambda scan mode suggest, in fact, that the intruding of the hydrophobic moiety of the probe within the cationic surfactants bilayer film coating GNPs results in a Förster resonance energy transfer. The environmental scanning electron microscopy images show that DNA molecules act as template to assemble GNPs into three-dimensional structures which are reminiscent of the DNA helix. This study is useful to design better nanobiotechnological devices using GNPs and DNA. PMID:26907286

  4. Sub-diffraction imaging with confocal fluorescence microscopy by stochastic photobleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifan; Kuang, Cuifang; Cai, Huanqing; Li, Shuai; Liu, Wei; Hao, Xiang; Ge, Jianhong; Liu, Xu

    2014-02-01

    We propose a single molecule localization method which takes advantage of stochastic photobleaching to improve the resolution of confocal fluorescence microscopy. By detecting the stochastic intensity loss of fluorophores, each fluorophore in the field can be localized. When all locations are known, a sub-diffraction image can be retrieved through single molecule localization algorithms. A confocal scheme is used to record the bleaching process of the sample. Each fluorophore can be localized from the recorded streaming followed by image subtraction. Compared with other single molecule localization concepts such as stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) and photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM), this method does not require a laser cycling equipment and the pixel size is no longer limited by the size of CCD. This technique works well with common fluorescent dyes and does not require the use of engineered photoactivatable proteins or photoswitchable synthetic dye pairs.

  5. Towards non-invasive 3D hepatotoxicity assays with optical coherence phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Leonard J.; Koulovasilopoulos, Andreas; Treskes, Philipp; Hayes, Peter C.; Plevris, John N.; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional tissue-engineered models are increasingly recognised as more physiologically-relevant than standard 2D cell culture for pre-clinical drug toxicity testing. However, many types of conventional toxicity assays are incompatible with dense 3D tissues. This study investigated the use of optical coherence phase microscopy (OCPM) as a novel approach to assess cell death in 3D tissue culture. For 3D micro-spheroid formation Human hepatic C3A cells were encapsulated in hyaluronic acid gels and cultured in 100μl MEME/10%FBS in 96-well plates. After spheroid formation the 3D liver constructs were exposed to acetaminophen on culture day 8. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in 3D cultures was evaluated using standard biochemical assays. An inverted OCPM in common path configuration was developed with a Callisto OCT engine (Thorlabs), centred at 930nm and a custom scanning head. Intensity data were used to perform in-depth microstructural imaging. In addition, phase fluctuations were measured by collecting several successive B scans at the same location, and statistics on the first time derivative of the phase, i.e. time fluctuations, were analysed over the acquisition time interval to retrieve overall cell viability. OCPM intensity (cell cluster size) and phase fluctuation statistics were directly compared with biochemical assays. In this study, we investigated optical coherence phase tomography to assess cell death in a 3d liver model after exposure to a prototypical hepatotoxin, acetaminophen. We showed that OCPM has the potential to assess noninvasively and label-free drug toxicity in 3D tissue models.

  6. Dislocation Density Tensor Characterization of Deformation Using 3D X-Ray Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Ben C; Tischler, Jonathan Zachary; El-Azab, Anter; Liu, Wenjun

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) X-ray microscopy with submicron resolution has been used to make spatially resolved measurements of lattice curvature and elastic strain over two-dimensional slices in thin deformed Si plates. The techniques and capabilities associated with white-beam 3D X-ray microscopy are discussed, and both theoretical and experimental considerations associated with the measurement of Nye dislocation density tensors in deformed materials are presented. The ability to determine the local geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) density in the form of a dislocation density tensor, with micron spatial resolution over mesoscopic length scales, is demonstrated. Results are shown for the special case of an elastically bent (dislocation free) thin Si plate and for a similar thin Si plate that was bent plastically, above the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature, to introduce dislocations. Within the uncertainties of the measurements, the known result that GND density is zero for elastic bending is obtained, and well-defined GND distributions are observed in the plastically deformed Si plate. The direct and absolute connection between experimental measurements of GND density and multiscale modeling and computer simulations of deformation microstructures is discussed to highlight the importance of submicron-resolution 3D X-ray microscopy for mesoscale characterization of material defects and to achieve a fundamental understanding of deformation in ductile materials.

  7. Dislocation density tensor characterization of deformation using 3D x-ray microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, B. C.; Tischler, J. Z.; El-Azab, A.; Liu, W.; ORNL; Florida State Univ.

    2008-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) X-ray microscopy with submicron resolution has been used to make spatially resolved measurements of lattice curvature and elastic strain over two-dimensional slices in thin deformed Si plates. The techniques and capabilities associated with white-beam 3D X-ray microscopy are discussed, and both theoretical and experimental considerations associated with the measurement of Nye dislocation density tensors in deformed materials are presented. The ability to determine the local geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) density in the form of a dislocation density tensor, with micron spatial resolution over mesoscopic length scales, is demonstrated. Results are shown for the special case of an elastically bent (dislocation free) thin Si plate and for a similar thin Si plate that was bent plastically, above the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature, to introduce dislocations. Within the uncertainties of the measurements, the known result that GND density is zero for elastic bending is obtained, and well-defined GND distributions are observed in the plastically deformed Si plate. The direct and absolute connection between experimental measurements of GND density and multiscale modeling and computer simulations of deformation microstructures is discussed to highlight the importance of submicron-resolution 3D X-ray microscopy for mesoscale characterization of material defects and to achieve a fundamental understanding of deformation in ductile materials.

  8. Parallel excitation-emission multiplexed fluorescence lifetime confocal microscopy for live cell imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming; Li, Yu; Peng, Leilei

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel excitation-emission multiplexed fluorescence lifetime microscopy (FLIM) method that surpasses current FLIM techniques in multiplexing capability. The method employs Fourier multiplexing to simultaneously acquire confocal fluorescence lifetime images of multiple excitation wavelength and emission color combinations at 44,000 pixels/sec. The system is built with low-cost CW laser sources and standard PMTs with versatile spectral configuration, which can be implemented as an add-on to commercial confocal microscopes. The Fourier lifetime confocal method allows fast multiplexed FLIM imaging, which makes it possible to monitor multiple biological processes in live cells. The low cost and compatibility with commercial systems could also make multiplexed FLIM more accessible to biological research community. PMID:24921725

  9. Use of a white light supercontinuum laser for confocal interference-reflection microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, L-D; Su, L; Reichelt, S; Amos, WB

    2012-01-01

    Shortly after its development, the white light supercontinuum laser was applied to confocal scanning microscopy as a more versatile substitute for the multiple monochromatic lasers normally used for the excitation of fluorescence. This light source is now available coupled to commercial confocal fluorescence microscopes. We have evaluated a supercontinuum laser as a source for a different purpose: confocal interferometric imaging of living cells and artificial models by interference reflection. We used light in the range 460–700 nm where this source provides a reasonably flat spectrum, and obtained images free from fringe artefacts caused by the longer coherence length of conventional lasers. We have also obtained images of cytoskeletal detail that is difficult to see with a monochromatic laser. PMID:22432542

  10. CINCH (confocal incoherent correlation holography) super resolution fluorescence microscopy based upon FINCH (Fresnel incoherent correlation holography)

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Nisan; Storrie, Brian; Bruce, Marc

    2016-01-01

    FINCH holographic fluorescence microscopy creates high resolution super-resolved images with enhanced depth of focus. The simple addition of a real-time Nipkow disk confocal image scanner in a conjugate plane of this incoherent holographic system is shown to reduce the depth of focus, and the combination of both techniques provides a simple way to enhance the axial resolution of FINCH in a combined method called “CINCH”. An important feature of the combined system allows for the simultaneous real-time image capture of widefield and holographic images or confocal and confocal holographic images for ready comparison of each method on the exact same field of view. Additional GPU based complex deconvolution processing of the images further enhances resolution. PMID:26839443

  11. A new 3D tracking method exploiting the capabilities of digital holography in microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miccio, L.; Memmolo, P.; Merola, F.; Fusco, S.; Embrione, V.; Netti, P. A.; Ferraro, P.

    2013-04-01

    A method for 3D tracking has been developed exploiting Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) features. In the framework of self-consistent platform for manipulation and measurement of biological specimen we use DHM for quantitative and completely label free analysis of specimen with low amplitude contrast. Tracking capability extend the potentiality of DHM allowing to monitor the motion of appropriate probes and correlate it with sample properties. Complete 3D tracking has been obtained for the probes avoiding the issue of amplitude refocusing in traditional tracking processing. Our technique belongs to the video tracking methods that, conversely from Quadrant Photo-Diode method, opens the possibility to track multiples probes. All the common used video tracking algorithms are based on the numerical analysis of amplitude images in the focus plane and the shift of the maxima in the image plane are measured after the application of an appropriate threshold. Our approach for video tracking uses different theoretical basis. A set of interferograms is recorded and the complex wavefields are managed numerically to obtain three dimensional displacements of the probes. The procedure works properly on an higher number of probes and independently from their size. This method overcomes the traditional video tracking issues as the inability to measure the axial movement and the choice of suitable threshold mask. The novel configuration allows 3D tracking of micro-particles and simultaneously can furnish Quantitative Phase-contrast maps of tracked micro-objects by interference microscopy, without changing the configuration. In this paper, we show a new concept for a compact interferometric microscope that can ensure the multifunctionality, accomplishing accurate 3D tracking and quantitative phase-contrast analysis. Experimental results are presented and discussed for in vitro cells. Through a very simple and compact optical arrangement we show how two different functionalities

  12. Deconvolution approach for 3D scanning microscopy with helical phase engineering.

    PubMed

    Roider, Clemens; Heintzmann, Rainer; Piestun, Rafael; Jesacher, Alexander

    2016-07-11

    RESCH (refocusing after scanning using helical phase engineering) microscopy is a scanning technique using engineered point spread functions which provides volumetric information. We present a strategy for processing the collected raw data with a multi-view maximum likelihood deconvolution algorithm, which inherently comprises the resolution gain of pixel-reassignment microscopy. The method, which we term MD-RESCH (for multi-view deconvolved RESCH), achieves in our current implementation a 20% resolution advantage along all three axes compared to RESCH and confocal microscopy. Along the axial direction, the resolution is comparable to that of image scanning microscopy. However, because the method inherently reconstructs a volume from a single 2D scan, a significantly higher optical sectioning becomes directly visible to the user, which would otherwise require collecting multiple 2D scans taken at a series of axial positions. Further, we introduce the use of a single-helical detection PSF to obtain an increased post-acquisition refocusing range. We present data from numerical simulations as well as experiments to confirm the validity of our approach. PMID:27410820

  13. In vivo confocal microscopy of the cornea: New developments in image acquisition, reconstruction and analysis using the HRT-Rostock Corneal Module

    PubMed Central

    Petroll, W. Matthew; Robertson, Danielle M.

    2015-01-01

    The optical sectioning ability of confocal microscopy allows high magnification images to be obtained from different depths within a thick tissue specimen, and is thus ideally suited to the study of intact tissue in living subjects. In vivo confocal microscopy has been used in a variety of corneal research and clinical applications since its development over 25 years ago. In this article we review the latest developments in quantitative corneal imaging with the Heidelberg Retinal Tomograph with Rostock Corneal Module (HRT-RCM). We provide an overview of the unique strengths and weaknesses of the HRT-RCM. We discuss techniques for performing 3-D imaging with the HRT-RCM, including hardware and software modifications that allow full thickness confocal microscopy through focusing (CMTF) of the cornea, which can provide quantitative measurements of corneal sublayer thicknesses, stromal cell and extracellular matrix backscatter, and depth dependent changes in corneal keratocyte density. We also review current approaches for quantitative imaging of the subbasal nerve plexus, which require a combination of advanced image acquisition and analysis procedures, including wide field mapping and 3-D reconstruction of nerve structures. The development of new hardware, software, and acquisition techniques continues to expand the number of applications of the HRT-RCM for quantitative in vivo corneal imaging at the cellular level. Knowledge of these rapidly evolving strategies should benefit corneal clinicians and basic scientists alike. PMID:25998608

  14. In vivo molecular and morphological imaging by real time confocal mini-microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, Martin; Gregor, Sebastian; Fottner, Christian; Garcia-Lazaro, Jose; Schirrmacher, Esther; Kempski, Oliver; Bartenstein, Peter; Weber, Mathias; Biesterfeld, Stefan; Galle, Peter R.; Neurath, Markus F.; Kiesslich, Ralf

    2006-02-01

    We evaluated a newly developed miniaturized confocal laser microscopy probe for real-time in vivo molecular and morphological imaging of normal, inflammatory, and malignant tissue in rodents. In the rigid mini-microscopy probe (diameter 7 mm), a single line laser delivers an excitation wavelength of 488 nm. Optical slice thickness is 7 μm, lateral resolution 0.7 μm. The range of the z-axis is 0 - 250 μm below the tissue surface. Organ systems were examined in vivo in rodent models of human diseases. FITC-labeled Lycopersion esculentum lectin was injected or selected cell populations stained for molecular targeting. Morphological imaging was performed using fluorescein sodium, FITC-labeled dextran, and/or acriflavine hydrochloride. Cellular and subcellular details could be readily visualised in vivo at high resolution. Tissue characteristics of different organs were rendered at real time. Selective blood cell staining allowed observation of blood flow and cell migration. Inflammatory diseases such as hepatitis were diagnosed, and tumors were characterized under microscopic control in vivo. Confocal mini-microscopy allows real time in vivo molecular and morphological histologic imaging at high resolution of normal and diseased tissue. Since confocal microscopy is applicable to humans, this technology will have a high impact on different faculties in medicine.

  15. In-vivo immunofluorescence confocal microscopy of herpes simplex virus type 1 keratitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Stephen C.; Laird, Jeffery A.; Beuerman, Roger W.

    1996-05-01

    The white-light confocal microscope offers an in vivo, cellular-level resolution view of the cornea. This instrument has proven to be a valuable research and diagnostic tool for the study of infectious keratitis. In this study, we investigate the direct visualization of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-infected corneal epithelium, with in vivo confocal microscopy, using HSV-1 immunofluorescent antibodies. New Zealand white rabbits were infected with McKrae strain of HSV-1 in one eye; the other eye of each rabbit was used as an uninfected control. Four days later, the rabbits were anesthetized and a cellulose sponge was applied to each cornea, and a drop of direct HSV fluorescein-tagged antibody was placed on each sponge every 3 to 5 minutes for 1 hour. Fluorescence confocal microscopy was then performed. The HSV-infected corneas showed broad regions of hyperfluorescent epithelial cells. The uninfected corneas revealed no background fluorescence. Thus, using the confocal microscope with a fluorescent cube, we were able to visualize HSV-infected corneal epithelial cells tagged with a direct fluorescent antibody. This process may prove to be a useful clinical tool for the in vivo diagnosis of HSV keratitis.

  16. A 3D Primary Vessel Reconstruction Framework with Serial Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yanhui; Wang, Fusheng; Treanor, Darren; Magee, Derek; Teodoro, George; Zhu, Yangyang; Kong, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional microscopy images present significant potential to enhance biomedical studies. This paper presents an automated method for quantitative analysis of 3D primary vessel structures with histology whole slide images. With registered microscopy images of liver tissue, we identify primary vessels with an improved variational level set framework at each 2D slide. We propose a Vessel Directed Fitting Energy (VDFE) to provide prior information on vessel wall probability in an energy minimization paradigm. We find the optimal vessel cross-section associations along the image sequence with a two-stage procedure. Vessel mappings are first found between each pair of adjacent slides with a similarity function for four association cases. These bi-slide vessel components are further linked by Bayesian Maximum A Posteriori (MAP) estimation where the posterior probability is modeled as a Markov chain. The efficacy of the proposed method is demonstrated with 54 whole slide microscopy images of sequential sections from a human liver. PMID:26478919

  17. 3D imaging and characterization of microlenses and microlens arrays using nonlinear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krmpot, Aleksandar J.; Tserevelakis, George J.; Murić, Branka D.; Filippidis, George; Pantelić, Dejan V.

    2013-05-01

    In this work, nonlinear laser scanning microscopy was employed for the characterization and three-dimensional (3D) imaging of microlenses and microlens arrays. Third-harmonic generation and two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) signals were recorded and the obtained data were further processed in order to generate 3D reconstructions of the examined samples. Femtosecond laser pulses (1028 nm) were utilized for excitation. Microlenses were manufactured on Tot'hema and eosin sensitized gelatin layers using a green (532 nm) continuous wave laser beam using the direct laser writing method. The profiles of the microlens surface were obtained from the radial cross-sections, using a triple-Gaussian fit. The analytical shapes of the profiles were also used for ray tracing. Furthermore, the volumes of the microlenses were determined with high precision. The TPEF signal arising from the volume of the material was recorded and the respective 3D spatial fluorescence distribution of the samples was mapped. Nonlinear microscopy modalities have been shown to be a powerful diagnostic tool for microlens characterization as they enable in-depth investigations of the structural properties of the samples, in a nondestructive manner.

  18. 3D imaging by serial block face scanning electron microscopy for materials science using ultramicrotomy.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Teruo; Thompson, George E; Zhou, Xiaorong; Withers, Philip J

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM) has emerged as a means of obtaining three dimensional (3D) electron images over volumes much larger than possible by focused ion beam (FIB) serial sectioning and at higher spatial resolution than achievable with conventional X-ray computed tomography (CT). Such high resolution 3D electron images can be employed for precisely determining the shape, volume fraction, distribution and connectivity of important microstructural features. While soft (fixed or frozen) biological samples are particularly well suited for nanoscale sectioning using an ultramicrotome, the technique can also produce excellent 3D images at electron microscope resolution in a time and resource-efficient manner for engineering materials. Currently, a lack of appreciation of the capabilities of ultramicrotomy and the operational challenges associated with minimising artefacts for different materials is limiting its wider application to engineering materials. Consequently, this paper outlines the current state of the art for SBFSEM examining in detail how damage is introduced during slicing and highlighting strategies for minimising such damage. A particular focus of the study is the acquisition of 3D images for a variety of metallic and coated systems. PMID:26855205

  19. 3D positional tracking of ellipsoidal particles in a microtube flow using holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Hyeok Jun; Seo, Kyung Won; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-11-01

    Understanding of micro-scale flow phenomena is getting large attention under advances in micro-scale measurement technologies. Especially, the dynamics of particles suspended in a fluid is essential in both scientific and industrial fields. Moreover, most particles handled in research and industrial fields have non-spherical shapes rather than a simple spherical shape. Under various flow conditions, these non-spherical particles exhibit unique dynamic behaviors. To analyze these dynamic behaviors in a fluid flow, 3D positional information of the particles should be measured accurately. In this study, digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is employed to measure the 3D positional information of non-spherical particles, which are fabricated by stretching spherical polystyrene particles. 3D motions of those particles are obtained by interpreting the holograms captured from particles. Ellipsoidal particles with known size and shape are observed to verify the performance of the DHM technique. In addition, 3D positions of particles in a microtube flow are traced. This DHM technique exhibits promising potential in the analysis of dynamic behaviors of non-spherical particles suspended in micro-scale fluid flows.

  20. Combining total internal reflection sum frequency spectroscopy spectral imaging and confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Allgeyer, Edward S; Sterling, Sarah M; Gunewardene, Mudalige S; Hess, Samuel T; Neivandt, David J; Mason, Michael D

    2015-01-27

    Understanding surface and interfacial lateral organization in material and biological systems is critical in nearly every field of science. The continued development of tools and techniques viable for elucidation of interfacial and surface information is therefore necessary to address new questions and further current investigations. Sum frequency spectroscopy (SFS) is a label-free, nonlinear optical technique with inherent surface specificity that can yield critical organizational information on interfacial species. Unfortunately, SFS provides no spatial information on a surface; small scale heterogeneities that may exist are averaged over the large areas typically probed. Over the past decade, this has begun to be addressed with the advent of SFS microscopy. Here we detail the construction and function of a total internal reflection (TIR) SFS spectral and confocal fluorescence imaging microscope directly amenable to surface investigations. This instrument combines, for the first time, sample scanning TIR-SFS imaging with confocal fluorescence microscopy. PMID:25506739

  1. Near-IR fluorescence and reflectance confocal microscopy for imaging of quantum dots in mammalian skin

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Luke J.; Glazowski, Christopher E.; Zavislan, James M.; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the skin penetration of nanoparticles (NPs) is an important concern due to the increasing presence of NPs in consumer products, including cosmetics. Technical challenges have slowed progress in evaluating skin barrier and NP factors that contribute to skin penetration risk. To limit sampling error and other problems associated with histological processing, many researchers are implementing whole tissue confocal or multiphoton microscopies. This work introduces a fluorescence and reflectance confocal microscopy system that utilizes near-IR excitation and emission to detect near-IR lead sulfide quantum dots (QDs) through ex vivo human epidermis. We provide a detailed prediction and experimental analysis of QD detection sensitivity and demonstrate detection of QD skin penetration in a barrier disrupted model. The unique properties of near-IR lead-based QDs will enable future studies that examine the impact of further barrier-disrupting agents on skin penetration of QDs and elucidate mechanistic insight into QD tissue interactions at the cellular level. PMID:21698023

  2. Confocal Raman microscopy to monitor extracellular matrix during dental pulp stem cells differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, Hamideh; Collart-Dutilleul, Pierre-Yves; Gergely, Csilla; Cuisinier, Frédéric J. G.

    2015-07-01

    Regenerative medicine brings promising applications for mesenchymal stem cells, such as dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Confocal Raman microscopy, a noninvasive technique, is used to study osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs. Integrated Raman intensities in the 2800 to 3000 cm-1 region (C-H stretching) and the 960 cm-1 peak (ν1 PO43-) were collected (to image cells and phosphate, respectively), and the ratio of two peaks 1660 over 1690 cm-1 (amide I bands) to measure the collagen cross-linking has been calculated. Raman spectra of DPSCs after 21 days differentiation reveal several phosphate peaks: ν1 (first stretching mode) at 960 cm-1, ν2 at 430 cm-1, and ν4 at 585 cm-1 and collagen cross-linking can also be calculated. Confocal Raman microscopy enables monitoring osteogenic differentiation in vitro and can be a credible tool for clinical stem cell based research.

  3. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) differentiation study by confocal Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, H.; Collart-Dutilleul, P.-Y.; Gergely, C.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2014-03-01

    Regenerative medicine brings a huge application for Mesenchymal stem cells such as Dental Pulp Stem Cells (DPSCs). Confocal Raman microscopy, a non-invasive, label free , real time and high spatial resolution imaging technique is used to study osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs. Integrated Raman intensities in the 2800-3000 cm-1 region (C-H stretching) and 960 cm-1 peak (phosphate PO4 3-) were collected. In Dental Pulp Stem Cells 21st day differentiated in buffer solution, phosphate peaks ν1 PO4 3- (first vibrational mode) at 960cm-1 and ν2 PO4 3- at 430cm-1 and ν4 PO4 3- at 585cm-1 are obviously present. Confocal Raman microscopy enables the detection of cell differentiation and it can be used to investigate clinical stem cell research.

  4. Evaluation of human sclera after femtosecond laser ablation using two photon and confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Kurtz, Ronald; Juhasz, Tibor

    2012-08-01

    Glaucoma is the second-leading cause of blindness worldwide and is often associated with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). Partial thickness intrascleral channels can be created with a femtosecond laser operating at a wavelength of 1700 nm. Such channels have the potential to increase outflow facility and reduce elevated IOP. Analysis of the dimensions and location of these channels is important in understanding their effects. We describe the application of two-photon microscopy and confocal microscopy for noninvasive imaging of the femtosecond laser created partial-thickness scleral channels in human cadaver eyes. High-resolution images, hundreds of microns deep in the sclera, were obtained to allow determination of the shape and dimension of such channels. This demonstrates that concept of integrating femtosecond laser surgery, and two-photon and confocal imaging has the future potential for image-guided high-precision surgery in transparent and translucent tissue.

  5. Computational optical-sectioning microscopy for 3D quantization of cell motion: results and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, James G.

    1994-09-01

    How cells move and navigate within a 3D tissue mass is of central importance in such diverse problems as embryonic development, wound healing and metastasis. This locomotion can now be visualized and quantified by using computation optical-sectioning microscopy. In this approach, a series of 2D images at different depths in a specimen are stacked to construct a 3D image, and then with a knowledge of the microscope's point-spread function, the actual distribution of fluorescent intensity in the specimen is estimated via computation. When coupled with wide-field optics and a cooled CCD camera, this approach permits non-destructive 3D imaging of living specimens over long time periods. With these techniques, we have observed a complex diversity of motile behaviors in a model embryonic system, the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium. To understand the mechanisms which control these various behaviors, we are examining motion in various Dictyostelium mutants with known defects in proteins thought to be essential for signal reception, cell-cell adhesion or locomotion. This application of computational techniques to analyze 3D cell locomotion raises several technical challenges. Image restoration techniques must be fast enough to process numerous 1 Gbyte time-lapse data sets (16 Mbytes per 3D image X 60 time points). Because some cells are weakly labeled and background intensity is often high due to unincorporated dye, the SNR in some of these images is poor. Currently, the images are processed by a regularized linear least- squares restoration method, and occasionally by a maximum-likelihood method. Also required for these studies are accurate automated- tracking procedures to generate both 3D trajectories for individual cells and 3D flows for a group of cells. Tracking is currently done independently for each cell, using a cell's image as a template to search for a similar image at the next time point. Finally, sophisticated visualization techniques are needed to view the

  6. A computational 3D model for reconstruction of neural stem cells in bright-field time-lapse microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degerman, J.; Winterfors, E.; Faijerson, J.; Gustavsson, T.

    2007-02-01

    This paper describes a computational model for image formation of in-vitro adult hippocampal progenitor (AHP) cells, in bright-field time-lapse microscopy. Although this microscopymodality barely generates sufficient contrast for imaging translucent cells, we show that by using a stack of defocused image slices it is possible to extract position and shape of spherically shaped specimens, such as the AHP cells. This inverse problem was solved by modeling the physical objects and image formation system, and using an iterative nonlinear optimization algorithm to minimize the difference between the reconstructed and measured image stack. By assuming that the position and shape of the cells do not change significantly between two time instances, we can optimize these parameters using the previous time instance in a Bayesian estimation approach. The 3D reconstruction algorithm settings, such as focal sampling distance, and PSF, were calibrated using latex spheres of known size and refractive index. By using the residual between reconstructed and measured image intensities, we computed a peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) to 28 dB for the sphere stack. A biological specimen analysis was done using an AHP cell, where reconstruction PSNR was 28 dB as well. The cell was immuno-histochemically stained and scanned in a confocal microscope, in order to compare our cell model to a ground truth. After convergence the modelled cell volume had an error of less than one percent.

  7. Computational methods for constructing protein structure models from 3D electron microscopy maps

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel-Rodríguez, Juan; Kihara, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure determination by cryo-electron microscopy (EM) has made significant progress in the past decades. Resolutions of EM maps have been improving as evidenced by recently reported structures that are solved at high resolutions close to 3 Å. Computational methods play a key role in interpreting EM data. Among many computational procedures applied to an EM map to obtain protein structure information, in this article we focus on reviewing computational methods that model protein three-dimensional (3D) structures from a 3D EM density map that is constructed from two-dimensional (2D) maps. The computational methods we discuss range from de novo methods, which identify structural elements in an EM map, to structure fitting methods, where known high resolution structures are fit into a low-resolution EM map. A list of available computational tools is also provided. PMID:23796504

  8. In vivo confocal microscopy in dermatology: from research to clinical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Martina; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Susanne

    2013-06-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) represents an emerging technique for the noninvasive histomorphological analysis of skin in vivo and has shown its applicability for dermatological research as well as its value as an adjunct tool in the clinical management of skin cancer patients. Herein, we aim to give an overview on the current clinical indications for CLSM in dermatology and also highlight the diverse applications of CLSM in dermatological research.

  9. Single Fluorescent Molecule Confocal Microscopy: A New Tool for Molecular Biology Research and Biosensor Development

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, C.; Huser, T.; Campos, C.; Yan, M.; Lane, S.; Balhorn, R.

    2000-03-09

    Our original proposal was presented to the LDRD committee on February 18, 1999. The revised proposal that followed incorporated changes that addressed the issues, concerns, and suggestions put forth by the committee members both during the presentation and in subsequent discussions we've had with individual committee members. The goal of the proposal was to establish an SMD confocal microscopy capability and technology base at LLNL. Here we report on our progress during the 6-month period for which funding was available.

  10. UNDERSTANDING THE EFFECTS OF SURFACTANT ADDITION ON RHEOLOGY USING LASER SCANNING CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    White, T

    2007-05-08

    The effectiveness of three dispersants to modify rheology was examined using rheology measurements and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) in simulated waste solutions. All of the dispersants lowered the yield stress of the slurries below the baseline samples. The rheology curves were fitted reasonably to a Bingham Plastic model. The three-dimensional LSCM images of simulants showed distinct aggregates were greatly reduced after the addition of dispersants leading to a lowering of the yield stress of the simulated waste slurry solutions.

  11. Three-dimensional imaging of monogenoidean sclerites by laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Galli, Paolo; Strona, Giovanni; Villa, Anna Maria; Benzoni, Francesca; Fabrizio, Stefani; Doglia, Silvia Maria; Kritsky, Delane C

    2006-04-01

    A nondestructive protocol for preparing specimens of Monogenoidea for both alpha-taxonomic studies and reconstruction of 3-dimensional structure is presented. Gomori's trichrome, a stain commonly used to prepare whole-mount specimens of monogenoids for taxonomic purposes, is used to provide fluorescence of genital spines, the copulatory organ, accessory piece, squamodisc, anchors, hooks, bars, and clamps under laser scanning confocal microscopy. PMID:16729702

  12. Application of confocal laser microscopy for monitoring mesh implants in herniology

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, V P; Belokonev, V I; Bratchenko, I A; Timchenko, P E; Vavilov, A V; Volova, L T

    2011-04-30

    The state of the surface of mesh implants and their encapsulation region in herniology is investigated by laser confocal microscopy. A correlation between the probability of developing relapses and the size and density of implant microdefects is experimentally shown. The applicability limits of differential reverse scattering for monitoring the post-operation state of implant and adjacent tissues are established based on model numerical experiments. (optical technologies in biophysics and medicine)

  13. Template confined synthesis of amorphous carbon nanotubes and its confocal Raman microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Maity, Supratim; Roychowdhury, Tuhin; Chattopadhyay, Kalyan Kumar

    2014-04-24

    Amorphous carbon nanotubes (aCNTs) were synthesized by AAO (anodic aluminum oxide) template at a temperature 500 °C in nitrogen atmosphere using the citric acid as a carbon source without the help of any catalyst particles. Morphological analysis of the as prepared samples was carried out by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Confocal Raman imaging has been studied and an attempt has been made to find out the graphitic (sp{sup 2}) and disordered phase of the CNTs.

  14. In vivo confocal microscopy in dermatology: from research to clinical application.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Martina; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Susanne

    2013-06-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) represents an emerging technique for the noninvasive histomorphological analysis of skin in vivo and has shown its applicability for dermatological research as well as its value as an adjunct tool in the clinical management of skin cancer patients. Herein, we aim to give an overview on the current clinical indications for CLSM in dermatology and also highlight the diverse applications of CLSM in dermatological research. PMID:23338938

  15. Actin restructuring during Salmonella typhimurium infection investigated by confocal and super-resolution microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jason J.; Kunde, Yuliya A.; Hong-Geller, Elizabeth; Werner, James H.

    2014-01-01

    We have used super-resolution optical microscopy and confocal microscopy to visualize the cytoskeletal restructuring of HeLa cells that accompanies and enables Salmonella typhimurium internalization. Herein, we report the use of confocal microscopy to verify and explore infection conditions that would be compatible with super-resolution optical microscopy, using Alexa-488 labeled phalloidin to stain the actin cytoskeletal network. While it is well known that actin restructuring and cytoskeletal rearrangements often accompany and assist in bacterial infection, most studies have employed conventional diffraction-limited fluorescence microscopy to explore these changes. Here we show that the superior spatial resolution provided by single-molecule localization methods (such as direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy) enables more precise visualization of the nanoscale changes in the actin cytoskeleton that accompany bacterial infection. In particular, we found that a thin (100-nm) ring of actin often surrounds an invading bacteria 10 to 20 min postinfection, with this ring being transitory in nature. We estimate that a few hundred monofilaments of actin surround the S. typhimurium in this heretofore unreported bacterial internalization intermediate.

  16. Observation of dendritic cell morphology under light, phase-contrast or confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yuen-Fen; Leong, Chooi-Fun; Cheong, Soon-Keng

    2010-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen presenting cells of the immune system. They can be generated in vitro from peripheral blood monocytes supplemented with GM-CSF, IL-4 and TNF alpha. During induction, DCs will increase in size and acquire multiple cytoplasmic projections when compared to their precursor cells such as monocytes or haematopoietic stem cells which are usually round or spherical. Morphology of DCs can be visualized by conventional light microscopy after staining or phase-contrast inverted microscopy or confocal laser scanning microscopy. In this report, we described the morphological appearances of DCs captured using the above-mentioned techniques. We found that confocal laser scanning microscopy yielded DCs images with greater details but the operating cost for such a technique is high. On the other hand, the images obtained through light microscopy after appropriate staining or phase contrast microscopy were acceptable for identification purpose. Besides, these equipments are readily available in most laboratories and the cost of operation is affordable. Nevertheless, morphological identification is just one of the methods to characterise DCs. Other methods such as phenotypic expression markers and mixed leukocyte reactions are additional tools used in the characterisation of DCs. PMID:21329180

  17. Analyzing cell structure and dynamics with confocal light scattering and absorption spectroscopic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Le; Vitkin, Edward; Fang, Hui; Zaman, Munir M.; Andersson, Charlotte; Salahuddin, Saira; Modell, Mark D.; Freedman, Steven D.; Hanlon, Eugene B.; Itzkan, Irving; Perelman, Lev T.

    2007-02-01

    We recently developed a new microscopic optical technique capable of noninvasive analysis of cell structure and cell dynamics on the submicron scale [1]. It combines confocal microscopy, a well-established high-resolution microscopic technique, with light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) and is called confocal light absorption and scattering spectroscopic (CLASS) microscopy. CLASS microscopy requires no exogenous labels and is capable of imaging and continuously monitoring individual viable cells, enabling the observation of cell and organelle functioning at scales on the order of 100 nm. To test the ability of CLASS microscopy to monitor cellular dynamics in vivo we performed experiments with human bronchial epithelial cells treated with DHA and undergoing apoptosis. The treated and untreated cells show not only clear differences in organelle spatial distribution but time sequencing experiments on a single cell show disappearance of certain types of organelles and change of the nuclear shape and density with the progression of apoptosis. In summary, CLASS microscopy provides an insight into metabolic processes within the cell and opens doors for the noninvasive real-time assessment of cellular dynamics. Noninvasive monitoring of cellular dynamics with CLASS microscopy can be used for a real-time dosimetry in a wide variety of medical and environmental applications that have no immediate observable outcome, such as photodynamic therapy, drug screening, and monitoring of toxins.

  18. Combining confocal Raman microscopy and freeze-drying for quantification of substance penetration into human skin.

    PubMed

    Franzen, Lutz; Anderski, Juliane; Planz, Viktoria; Kostka, Karl-Heinz; Windbergs, Maike

    2014-12-01

    In the area of dermatological research, the knowledge of rate and extent of substance penetration into the human skin is essential not only for evaluation of therapeutics, but also for risk assessment of chemicals and cosmetic ingredients. Recently, confocal Raman microscopy emerged as a novel analytical technique for analysis of substance skin penetration. In contrast to destructive drug extraction and quantification, the technique is non-destructive and provides high spatial resolution in three dimensions. However, the generation of time-resolved concentration depth profiles is restrained by ongoing diffusion of the penetrating substance during analysis. To prevent that, substance diffusion in excised human skin can instantly be stopped at defined time points by freeze-drying the sample. Thus, combining sample preparation by freeze-drying with drug quantification by confocal Raman microscopy yields a novel analytical platform for non-invasive and quantitative in vitro analysis of substance skin penetration. This work presents the first proof-of-concept study for non-invasive quantitative substance depth profiling in freeze-dried excised human stratum corneum by confocal Raman microscopy. PMID:25219950

  19. Visualization and quantification of dentin structure using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yuichi; Wilder-Smith, Petra B.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Arrastia-Jitosho, Anna-Marie A.; Liaw, Lih-Huei L.; Matsumoto, Koukichi

    1997-07-01

    Dentin was visualized using a new fluorescence technique and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Thirty extracted human teeth showing no clinical signs of caries were investigated. All teeth were horizontally sectioned to approximately 200 micrometers thickness and sections were subjected to different pretreatment conditions as follows: vacuum only, ultrasonication only, sodium hypochlorite only, sodium hypochlorite and vacuum, sodium hypochlorite and ultrasonication, and a combination of sodium hypochlorite, vacuum, and ultrasonication. Some samples were left untreated to serve as control. Following pretreatment, rhodamine 123 fluorescent dye was used for staining at concentrations ranging from 10-3 to 10-7 M for 1 to 24 h at pH 6.0, 6.5, or 7.4. Optical staining occurred at pH 7.4 and concentrations >= 10-5 M over 3 h or longer. Surface images obtained using confocal laser scanning microscopy were similar to those observed by scanning electron microscopy without the need for sample- altering conventional scanning electron microscope preparation techniques. Subsurface imaging to a depth of approximately 60 micrometers was achieved using confocal laser microscope techniques. This fluorescence technique offers a useful new alternative for visualization and quantification of dentin.

  20. In vivo confocal microscopy for the oral cavity: Current state of the field and future potential.

    PubMed

    Maher, N G; Collgros, H; Uribe, P; Ch'ng, S; Rajadhyaksha, M; Guitera, P

    2016-03-01

    Confocal microscopy (CM) has been shown to correlate with oral mucosal histopathology in vivo. The purposes of this review are to summarize what we know so far about in vivo CM applications for oral mucosal pathologies, to highlight some current developments with CM devices relevant for oral applications, and to formulate where in vivo CM could hold further application for oral mucosal diagnosis and management. Ovid Medline® and/or Google® searches were performed using the terms 'microscopy, confocal', 'mouth neoplasms', 'mouth mucosa', 'leukoplakia, oral', 'oral lichen planus', 'gingiva', 'cheilitis', 'taste', 'inflammatory oral confocal', 'mucosal confocal' and 'confocal squamous cell oral'. In summary, inclusion criteria were in vivo use of any type of CM for the human oral mucosa and studies on normal or pathological oral mucosa. Experimental studies attempting to identify proteins of interest and microorganisms were excluded. In total 25 relevant articles were found, covering 8 main topics, including normal oral mucosal features (n=15), oral dysplasia or neoplasia (n=7), inflamed oral mucosa (n=3), taste impairment (n=3), oral autoimmune conditions (n=2), pigmented oral pathology/melanoma (n=1), delayed type hypersensitivity (n=1), and cheilitis glandularis (n=1). The evidence for using in vivo CM in these conditions is poor, as it is limited to mainly small descriptive studies. Current device developments for oral CM include improved probe design. The authors propose that future applications for in vivo oral CM may include burning mouth syndrome, intra-operative mapping for cancer surgery, and monitoring and targeted biopsies within field cancerization. PMID:26786962

  1. Application of the split-gradient method to 3D image deconvolution in fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vicidomini, G; Boccacci, P; Diaspro, A; Bertero, M

    2009-04-01

    The methods of image deconvolution are important for improving the quality of the detected images in the different modalities of fluorescence microscopy such as wide-field, confocal, two-photon excitation and 4Pi. Because deconvolution is an ill-posed problem, it is, in general, reformulated in a statistical framework such as maximum likelihood or Bayes and reduced to the minimization of a suitable functional, more precisely, to a constrained minimization, because non-negativity of the solution is an important requirement. Next, iterative methods are designed for approximating such a solution. In this paper, we consider the Bayesian approach based on the assumption that the noise is dominated by photon counting, so the likelihood is of the Poisson-type, and that the prior is edge-preserving, as derived from a simple Markov random field model. By considering the negative logarithm of the a posteriori probability distribution, the computation of the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate is reduced to the constrained minimization of a functional that is the sum of the Csiszár I-divergence and a regularization term. For the solution of this problem, we propose an iterative algorithm derived from a general approach known as split-gradient method (SGM) and based on a suitable decomposition of the gradient of the functional into a negative and positive part. The result is a simple modification of the standard Richardson-Lucy algorithm, very easily implementable and assuring automatically the non-negativity of the iterates. Next, we apply this method to the particular case of confocal microscopy for investigating the effect of several edge-preserving priors proposed in the literature using both synthetic and real confocal images. The quality of the restoration is estimated both by computation of the Kullback-Leibler divergence of the restored image from the detected one and by visual inspection. It is observed that the noise artefacts are considerably reduced and desired

  2. The Unique Pollen Morphology of Duparquetia (Leguminosae: Caesalpinioideae): Developmental Evidence of Aperture Orientation Using Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    BANKS, HANNAH; FEIST-BURKHART, SUSANNE; KLITGAARD, BENTE

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims The phylogenetic affinities of the aberrant monotypic genus Duparquetia (subfamily Caesalpinioideae) are at present unresolved. Preliminary results from molecular analyses suggest a basal, isolated position among legumes. A study of Duparquetia pollen was carried out to provide further morphological characters to contribute to multi-data set analyses. Understanding the development of Duparquetia pollen was necessary to clarify the orientation of the apertures. • Methods Pollen grains and developing microspores were examined using light microscopy, confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Evidence for the orientation of the apertures was provided by the examination of microspores within developing tetrads, using (a) confocal microscopy to locate the position of the ectoapertures, and (b) light microscopy and Alcian blue stain to locate the position of the endoapertures. • Key Results Confocal microscopy has been used for the first time to examine developing microspores in order to obtain information on ectoapertures that was unavailable using other techniques. Pollen in Duparquetia develops in tetrahedral tetrads as in other eudicots, with the apertures arranged in a modified pattern following Fischer's rule. Pollen grains are asymmetrical and have one equatorial-encircling ectoaperture with two equatorial endoapertures, a unique feature in Leguminosae, and in eudicots. • Conclusions The pollen morphology of Duparquetia is so unusual that it provides little information to help determine its closest relatives. However, it does fit with a pattern of greater pollen morphological diversity in the first-branching caesalpinioid legume groups than in the more derived clades. The latitudinal ectoaperture of Duparquetia is unique within the Fabales and eudicot clades, resembling more closely the monosulcate pollen found in monocots and basal angiosperms; however, developmental patterns are recognizably similar to those of all other

  3. Scipion: A software framework toward integration, reproducibility and validation in 3D electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa-Trevín, J M; Quintana, A; Del Cano, L; Zaldívar, A; Foche, I; Gutiérrez, J; Gómez-Blanco, J; Burguet-Castell, J; Cuenca-Alba, J; Abrishami, V; Vargas, J; Otón, J; Sharov, G; Vilas, J L; Navas, J; Conesa, P; Kazemi, M; Marabini, R; Sorzano, C O S; Carazo, J M

    2016-07-01

    In the past few years, 3D electron microscopy (3DEM) has undergone a revolution in instrumentation and methodology. One of the central players in this wide-reaching change is the continuous development of image processing software. Here we present Scipion, a software framework for integrating several 3DEM software packages through a workflow-based approach. Scipion allows the execution of reusable, standardized, traceable and reproducible image-processing protocols. These protocols incorporate tools from different programs while providing full interoperability among them. Scipion is an open-source project that can be downloaded from http://scipion.cnb.csic.es. PMID:27108186

  4. Catching HIV ‘in the act’ with 3D electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Earl, Lesley A.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2013-01-01

    The development of a safe, effective vaccine to prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a key step for controlling the disease on a global scale. However, many aspects of HIV biology make vaccine design problematic, including the sequence diversity and structural variability of the surface envelope glycoproteins and the poor accessibility of neutralization-sensitive epitopes on the virus. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding HIV in a structural context using emerging tools in 3D electron microscopy, and outline how some of these advances could be important for a better understanding of mechanisms of viral entry and for vaccine design. PMID:23850373

  5. Evaluation of the therapeutic results of actinic keratosis treated with topical 5% fluorouracil by reflectance confocal laser microscopy: preliminary study*

    PubMed Central

    Ishioka, Priscila; Maia, Marcus; Rodrigues, Sarita Bartholomei; Marta, Alessandra Cristina; Hirata, Sérgio Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Topical treatment for actinic keratosis with 5% fluorouracil has a recurrence rate of 54% in 12 months of follow-up. This study analyzed thirteen actinic keratoses on the upper limbs through confocal microscopy, at the time of clinical diagnosis and after 4 weeks of treatment with fluorouracil. After the treatment was established and evidence of clinical cure was achieved, in two of the nine actinic keratoses, confocal microscopy enabled visualization of focal areas of atypical honeycomb pattern in the epidermis indicating therapeutic failure. Preliminary data suggest the use of confocal microscopy as a tool for diagnosis and therapeutic control of actinic keratosis. PMID:26131881

  6. Fast Imaging with Inelastically Scattered Electrons by Off-Axis Chromatic Confocal Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Changlin; Zhu, Ye; Lazar, Sorin; Etheridge, Joanne

    2014-04-01

    We introduce off-axis chromatic scanning confocal electron microscopy, a technique for fast mapping of inelastically scattered electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope without a spectrometer. The off-axis confocal mode enables the inelastically scattered electrons to be chromatically dispersed both parallel and perpendicular to the optic axis. This enables electrons with different energy losses to be separated and detected in the image plane, enabling efficient energy filtering in a confocal mode with an integrating detector. We describe the experimental configuration and demonstrate the method with nanoscale core-loss chemical mapping of silver (M4,5) in an aluminium-silver alloy and atomic scale imaging of the low intensity core-loss La (M4,5@840 eV) signal in LaB6. Scan rates up to 2 orders of magnitude faster than conventional methods were used, enabling a corresponding reduction in radiation dose and increase in the field of view. If coupled with the enhanced depth and lateral resolution of the incoherent confocal configuration, this offers an approach for nanoscale three-dimensional chemical mapping.

  7. Dye-enhanced reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy as an optical pathology tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroslavsky, Anna N.; Salomatina, Elena; Novak, John; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Castano, Ana; Hamblin, Michael

    2006-02-01

    Early detection and precise excision of neoplasms are imperative requirements for successful cancer treatment. In this study we evaluated the use of dye-enhanced confocal microscopy as an optical pathology tool in the ex vivo trial with fresh thick non-melanoma skin cancer excisions and in vivo trial with B16F10 melanoma cancer in mice. For the experiments the tumors were rapidly stained using aqueous solutions of either toluidine blue or methylene blue and imaged using multimodal confocal microscope. Reflectance images were acquired at the wavelengths of 630nm and 650 nm. Fluorescence was excited at 630 nm and 650 nm. Fluorescence emission was registered in the range between 680 nm and 710 nm. The images were compared to the corresponding en face frozen H&E sections. The results of the study indicate confocal images of stained cancerous tissue closely resemble corresponding H&E sections both in vivo and in vitro. This remarkable similarity enables interpretation of confocal images in a manner similar to that of histopathology. The developed technique may provide an efficient real-time optical tool for detecting skin pathology.

  8. Characterization of X-ray polycapillary optics by LiF crystal radiation detectors through confocal fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfigli, Francesca; Hampai, Dariush; Dabagov, Sultan B.; Montereali, Rosa Maria

    2016-08-01

    Solid-state radiation imaging detectors based on photoluminescent colour centres in lithium fluoride (LiF) crystals have been successfully tested for both advanced 2D and 3D characterizations of X-ray polycapillary optics by a table-top laboratory system. Polycapillary optics can control X-ray beams propagation and allows obtaining quasi-parallel beam (half-lens) or focused beams (full-lens). The combination of a fine-focused micro X-ray tube and a polycapillary lens can provide the high intensity radiation fluxes that are necessary for high resolution X-ray imaging. In this paper we present novel results about advanced characterization of these complex optics by 2D as well as 3D confocal laser fluorescence microscopy of X-ray irradiated LiF crystal detectors. Two dimensional high spatial resolution images on a wide field of view of transmitted X-rays through a semi-lens and 3D direct inspection of the coloured volumes produced in LiF crystals by both focused and parallel X-ray beam transmitted by a full and a semi-lens, respectively, as well as their 3D reconstructions were obtained. The results show that the photoluminescent colour centres volume in LiF crystals combined with an optical sectioning reading system provide information about tomography of transmitted X-ray beams by policapillary optics in a single exposure process. For the first time, the use of LiF crystal plates as versatile radiation imaging luminescent detectors have been used to characterize the operation of polycapillary optics as X-ray lens, in focusing and parallel mode.

  9. Correlated fluorescence and 3D electron microscopy with high sensitivity and spatial precision

    PubMed Central

    Kukulski, Wanda; Schorb, Martin; Welsch, Sonja; Picco, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Correlative electron and fluorescence microscopy has the potential to elucidate the ultrastructural details of dynamic and rare cellular events, but has been limited by low precision and sensitivity. Here we present a method for direct mapping of signals originating from ∼20 fluorescent protein molecules to 3D electron tomograms with a precision of less than 100 nm. We demonstrate that this method can be used to identify individual HIV particles bound to mammalian cell surfaces. We also apply the method to image microtubule end structures bound to mal3p in fission yeast, and demonstrate that growing microtubule plus-ends are flared in vivo. We localize Rvs167 to endocytic sites in budding yeast, and show that scission takes place halfway through a 10-s time period during which amphiphysins are bound to the vesicle neck. This new technique opens the door for direct correlation of fluorescence and electron microscopy to visualize cellular processes at the ultrastructural scale. PMID:21200030

  10. Monitoring of Apoptosis in 3D Cell Cultures by FRET and Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Petra; Schickinger, Sarah; Wagner, Michael; Angres, Brigitte; Bruns, Thomas; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Non-radiative cell membrane associated Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) from an enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP) to an enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) is used for detection of apoptosis in 3-dimensional cell cultures. FRET is visualized in multi-cellular tumor spheroids by light sheet based fluorescence microscopy in combination with microspectral analysis and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). Upon application of staurosporine and to some extent after treatment with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), a specific activator of protein kinase c, the caspase-3 sensitive peptide linker DEVD is cleaved. This results in a reduction of acceptor (EYFP) fluorescence as well as a prolongation of the fluorescence lifetime of the donor (ECFP). Fluorescence spectra and lifetimes may, therefore, be used for monitoring of apoptosis in a realistic 3-dimensional system, while light sheet based microscopy appears appropriate for 3D imaging at low light exposure. PMID:25761242

  11. Quantitative 3D molecular cutaneous absorption in human skin using label free nonlinear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueqin; Grégoire, Sébastien; Formanek, Florian; Galey, Jean-Baptiste; Rigneault, Hervé

    2015-02-28

    Understanding the penetration mechanisms of drugs into human skin is a key issue in pharmaceutical and cosmetics research. To date, the techniques available for percutaneous penetration of compounds fail to provide a quantitative 3D map of molecular concentration distribution in complex tissues as the detected microscopy images are an intricate combination of concentration distribution and laser beam attenuation upon deep penetration. Here we introduce and validate a novel framework for imaging and reconstructing molecular concentration within the depth of artificial and human skin samples. Our approach combines the use of deuterated molecular compounds together with coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy and microscopy that permits targeted molecules to be unambiguously discriminated within skin layers. We demonstrate both intercellular and transcellular pathways for different active compounds, together with in-depth concentration profiles reflecting the detailed skin barrier architecture. This method provides an enabling platform for establishing functional activity of topically applied products. PMID:25550155

  12. Enhanced quantitative confocal microscopy and its application for the measurement of tympanic membrane thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuypers, Liesbeth

    2005-11-01

    This work shows that confocal microscopy allows a quantitative study of delicate 3D-biotissue in fresh condition, thus avoiding histological preparation processes. The developed procedure results in exact and accurate thickness data for mum-sized objects with a measuring error of less than 1mum. It is, however, necessary to take into account the effect of focal shift in the case of refractive index mismatch to obtain such precise data. The use of the proposed method is advised instead of the use of a paraxial approximation for the axial scale correction because the method improves measurement precision by a factor of four. The axial scaling correction factors obtained in this work show that for most practical situations the correction cannot be ignored when one wants to obtain precise quantitative data. The thickness correction method can also be used to determine with high accuracy the index of refraction of biological tissue. The thickness measurement method was applied to fresh, untreated tympanic membranes of the gerbil, the cat and the human. Thickness had to be measured at many points as it differs strongly across the membrane. Similar thickness distributions were found in all pars tensas measured even across the species studied: (1) a very thin, central region with a rather constant thickness, curving as a horse shoe upwards around the manubrium (thickness: gerbil: about 7mum, cat: about 10mum, human: large inter-specimen variation: 40mum-120mum), (2) a thinnest zone at the inferior side, (3) a thicker zone at the supero-anterior side, (4) superior to the umbo, an anterior region thicker than the posterior region, (5) maximal thicknesses in a very small region near the entire manubrium and the entire annular periphery. The pars flaccida is found to be thicker than the pars tensa. It shows no central homogeneous zone: the thickness varies irregularly and very rapidly over short distances. Arbitrarily spaced bumps and notches are present over the entire pars

  13. 3D reconstruction and characterization of laser induced craters by in situ optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casal, A.; Cerrato, R.; Mateo, M. P.; Nicolas, G.

    2016-06-01

    A low-cost optical microscope was developed and coupled to an irradiation system in order to study the induced effects on material during a multipulse regime by an in situ visual inspection of the surface, in particular of the spot generated at different pulses. In the case of laser ablation, a reconstruction of the crater in 3D was made from the images of the sample surface taken during the irradiation process, and the subsequent profiles of ablated material were extracted. The implementation of this homemade optical device gives an added value to the irradiation system, providing information about morphology evolution of irradiated area when successive pulses are applied. In particular, the determination of ablation rates in real time can be especially useful for a better understanding and controlling of the ablation process in applications where removal of material is involved, such as laser cleaning and in-depth characterization of multilayered samples and diffusion processes. The validation of the developed microscope was made by a comparison with a commercial confocal microscope configured for the characterization of materials where similar results of crater depth and diameter were obtained for both systems.

  14. X-ray microscopy for in situ characterization of 3D nanostructural evolution in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornberger, Benjamin; Bale, Hrishikesh; Merkle, Arno; Feser, Michael; Harris, William; Etchin, Sergey; Leibowitz, Marty; Qiu, Wei; Tkachuk, Andrei; Gu, Allen; Bradley, Robert S.; Lu, Xuekun; Withers, Philip J.; Clarke, Amy; Henderson, Kevin; Cordes, Nikolaus; Patterson, Brian M.

    2015-09-01

    X-ray microscopy (XRM) has emerged as a powerful technique that reveals 3D images and quantitative information of interior structures. XRM executed both in the laboratory and at the synchrotron have demonstrated critical analysis and materials characterization on meso-, micro-, and nanoscales, with spatial resolution down to 50 nm in laboratory systems. The non-destructive nature of X-rays has made the technique widely appealing, with potential for "4D" characterization, delivering 3D micro- and nanostructural information on the same sample as a function of sequential processing or experimental conditions. Understanding volumetric and nanostructural changes, such as solid deformation, pore evolution, and crack propagation are fundamental to understanding how materials form, deform, and perform. We will present recent instrumentation developments in laboratory based XRM including a novel in situ nanomechanical testing stage. These developments bridge the gap between existing in situ stages for micro scale XRM, and SEM/TEM techniques that offer nanometer resolution but are limited to analysis of surfaces or extremely thin samples whose behavior is strongly influenced by surface effects. Several applications will be presented including 3D-characterization and in situ mechanical testing of polymers, metal alloys, composites and biomaterials. They span multiple length scales from the micro- to the nanoscale and different mechanical testing modes such as compression, indentation and tension.

  15. A one-piece 3D printed flexure translation stage for open-source microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkey, James P.; Foo, Darryl C. W.; Kabla, Alexandre; Baumberg, Jeremy J.; Bowman, Richard W.

    2016-02-01

    Open source hardware has the potential to revolutionise the way we build scientific instruments; with the advent of readily available 3D printers, mechanical designs can now be shared, improved, and replicated faster and more easily than ever before. However, printed parts are typically plastic and often perform poorly compared to traditionally machined mechanisms. We have overcome many of the limitations of 3D printed mechanisms by exploiting the compliance of the plastic to produce a monolithic 3D printed flexure translation stage, capable of sub-micron-scale motion over a range of 8 × 8 × 4 mm. This requires minimal post-print clean-up and can be automated with readily available stepper motors. The resulting plastic composite structure is very stiff and exhibits remarkably low drift, moving less than 20 μm over the course of a week, without temperature stabilisation. This enables us to construct a miniature microscope with excellent mechanical stability, perfect for time-lapse measurements in situ in an incubator or fume hood. The ease of manufacture lends itself to use in containment facilities where disposability is advantageous and to experiments requiring many microscopes in parallel. High performance mechanisms based on printed flexures need not be limited to microscopy, and we anticipate their use in other devices both within the laboratory and beyond.

  16. A one-piece 3D printed flexure translation stage for open-source microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, James P; Foo, Darryl C W; Kabla, Alexandre; Baumberg, Jeremy J; Bowman, Richard W

    2016-02-01

    Open source hardware has the potential to revolutionise the way we build scientific instruments; with the advent of readily available 3D printers, mechanical designs can now be shared, improved, and replicated faster and more easily than ever before. However, printed parts are typically plastic and often perform poorly compared to traditionally machined mechanisms. We have overcome many of the limitations of 3D printed mechanisms by exploiting the compliance of the plastic to produce a monolithic 3D printed flexure translation stage, capable of sub-micron-scale motion over a range of 8 × 8 × 4 mm. This requires minimal post-print clean-up and can be automated with readily available stepper motors. The resulting plastic composite structure is very stiff and exhibits remarkably low drift, moving less than 20 μm over the course of a week, without temperature stabilisation. This enables us to construct a miniature microscope with excellent mechanical stability, perfect for time-lapse measurements in situ in an incubator or fume hood. The ease of manufacture lends itself to use in containment facilities where disposability is advantageous and to experiments requiring many microscopes in parallel. High performance mechanisms based on printed flexures need not be limited to microscopy, and we anticipate their use in other devices both within the laboratory and beyond. PMID:26931888

  17. Towards real-time image deconvolution: application to confocal and STED microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, R.; Zanghirati, G.; Cavicchioli, R.; Zanni, L.; Boccacci, P.; Bertero, M.; Vicidomini, G.

    2013-01-01

    Although deconvolution can improve the quality of any type of microscope, the high computational time required has so far limited its massive spreading. Here we demonstrate the ability of the scaled-gradient-projection (SGP) method to provide accelerated versions of the most used algorithms in microscopy. To achieve further increases in efficiency, we also consider implementations on graphic processing units (GPUs). We test the proposed algorithms both on synthetic and real data of confocal and STED microscopy. Combining the SGP method with the GPU implementation we achieve a speed-up factor from about a factor 25 to 690 (with respect the conventional algorithm). The excellent results obtained on STED microscopy images demonstrate the synergy between super-resolution techniques and image-deconvolution. Further, the real-time processing allows conserving one of the most important property of STED microscopy, i.e the ability to provide fast sub-diffraction resolution recordings. PMID:23982127

  18. Confocal microscopy with strip mosaicing for rapid imaging over large areas of excised tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeytunge, Sanjee; Li, Yongbiao; Larson, Bjorg; Peterson, Gary; Seltzer, Emily; Toledo-Crow, Ricardo; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2013-06-01

    Confocal mosaicing microscopy is a developing technology platform for imaging tumor margins directly in freshly excised tissue, without the processing required for conventional pathology. Previously, mosaicing on 12-×-12 mm2 of excised skin tissue from Mohs surgery and detection of basal cell carcinoma margins was demonstrated in 9 min. Last year, we reported the feasibility of a faster approach called "strip mosaicing," which was demonstrated on a 10-×-10 mm2 of tissue in 3 min. Here we describe further advances in instrumentation, software, and speed. A mechanism was also developed to flatten tissue in order to enable consistent and repeatable acquisition of images over large areas. We demonstrate mosaicing on 10-×-10 mm2 of skin tissue with 1-μm lateral resolution in 90 s. A 2.5-×-3.5 cm2 piece of breast tissue was scanned with 0.8-μm lateral resolution in 13 min. Rapid mosaicing of confocal images on large areas of fresh tissue potentially offers a means to perform pathology at the bedside. Imaging of tumor margins with strip mosaicing confocal microscopy may serve as an adjunct to conventional (frozen or fixed) pathology for guiding surgery.

  19. Fibre optic confocal imaging (FOCI) for subsurface microscopy of the colon in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, P M; King, R G; Lambert, J R; Harris, M R

    1994-01-01

    Fibre optic confocal imaging (FOCI) is a new type of microscopy which has been recently developed (Delaney et al. 1993). In contrast to conventional light microscopy, FOCI and other confocal techniques allow clear imaging of subsurface structures within translucent objects. However, unlike conventional confocal microscopes which are bulky (because of a need for accurate alignment of large components) FOCI allows the imaging end to be miniaturised and relatively mobile. FOCI is thus particularly suited for clear subsurface imaging of structures within living animals or subjects. The aim of the present study was to assess the suitability of using FOCI for imaging of subsurface structures within the colon, both in vitro (human and rat biopsies) and in vivo (in rats). Images were obtained in fluorescence mode (excitation 488 nm, detection above 515 nm) following topical application of fluorescein. By this technique the glandular structure of the colon was imaged. FOCI is thus suitable for subsurface imaging of the colon in vivo. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8157487

  20. Development and verification of a novel device for dental intra-oral 3D scanning using chromatic confocal technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zint, M.; Stock, K.; Graser, R.; Ertl, T.; Brauer, E.; Heyninck, J.; Vanbiervliet, J.; Dhondt, S.; De Ceuninck, P.; Hibst, R.

    2015-03-01

    The presented work describes the development and verification of a novel optical, powder-free intra-oral scanner based on chromatic confocal technology combined with a multifocal approach. The proof of concept for a chromatic confocal area scanner for intra-oral scanning is given. Several prototype scanners passed a verification process showing an average accuracy (distance deviation on flat surfaces) of less than 31μm +/- 21μm and a reproducibility of less than 4μm +/- 3μm. Compared to a tactile measurement on a full jaw model fitted with 4mm ceramic spheres the measured average distance deviation between the spheres was 49μm +/- 12μm for scans of up to 8 teeth (3- unit bridge, single Quadrant) and 104μm +/- 82μm for larger scans and full jaws. The average deviation of the measured sphere diameter compared to the tactile measurement was 27μm +/- 14μm. Compared to μCT scans of plaster models equipped with human teeth the average standard deviation on up to 3 units was less than 55μm +/- 49μm whereas the reproducibility of the scans was better than 22μm +/- 10μm.

  1. Probing Local Mineralogy in 3D with Dual Energy X-Ray Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelb, J.; Yun, S.; Doerr, D.; Hunter, L.; Johnson, B.; Merkle, A.; Fahey, K.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, 3D imaging of rock microstructures has become routine practice for determining pore-scale properties in the geosciences. X-Ray imaging techniques, such as X-Ray Microscopy (XRM), have demonstrated several unique capabilities: namely, the ability to characterize the same sample across a range of length scales and REVs (from millimeters to nanometers), and to perform these characterizations on the same sample over a range of times/treatments (e.g., to observe fluid transporting through the pore networks in a flow cell). While the XRM technique is a popular choice for structural (i.e., pore) characterization, historically it has provided little mineralogical information. This means that resulting simulations are either based on pore structure alone, or rely on correlative chemical mapping techniques for compositionally-sensitive models. Recent advancements in XRM techniques are now enabling compositional sensitivity for a variety of geological sample types. By collecting high-resolution 3D tomography data sets at two different source settings (energies), results may be mixed together to enhance the appearance (contrast) of specific materials. This approach is proving beneficial, for example, to mining applications to locate and identify precious metals, as well as for oil & gas applications to map local hydrophobicity. Here, we will introduce the technique of dual energy X-Ray microscopy, showing how it extends the capabilities of traditional XRM techniques, affording the same high resolution structural information while adding 3D compositional data. Application examples will be shown to illustrate its effectiveness at both the single to sub-micron length scale for mining applications as well as at the 150 nm length scale for shale rock analysis.

  2. 3D X-ray ultra-microscopy of bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Langer, M; Peyrin, F

    2016-02-01

    We review the current X-ray techniques with 3D imaging capability at the nano-scale: transmission X-ray microscopy, ptychography and in-line phase nano-tomography. We further review the different ultra-structural features that have so far been resolved: the lacuno-canalicular network, collagen orientation, nano-scale mineralization and their use as basis for mechanical simulations. X-ray computed tomography at the micro-metric scale is increasingly considered as the reference technique in imaging of bone micro-structure. The trend has been to push towards increasingly higher resolution. Due to the difficulty of realizing optics in the hard X-ray regime, the magnification has mainly been due to the use of visible light optics and indirect detection of the X-rays, which limits the attainable resolution with respect to the wavelength of the visible light used in detection. Recent developments in X-ray optics and instrumentation have allowed to implement several types of methods that achieve imaging that is limited in resolution by the X-ray wavelength, thus enabling computed tomography at the nano-scale. We review here the X-ray techniques with 3D imaging capability at the nano-scale: transmission X-ray microscopy, ptychography and in-line phase nano-tomography. Further, we review the different ultra-structural features that have so far been resolved and the applications that have been reported: imaging of the lacuno-canalicular network, direct analysis of collagen orientation, analysis of mineralization on the nano-scale and use of 3D images at the nano-scale to drive mechanical simulations. Finally, we discuss the issue of going beyond qualitative description to quantification of ultra-structural features. PMID:26370826

  3. 3D motion of DNA-Au nanoconjugates in graphene liquid cell electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Smith, Jessica M; Park, Jungwon; Kim, Kwanpyo; Ho, Davy; Rasool, Haider I; Zettl, Alex; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2013-09-11

    Liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can probe and visualize dynamic events with structural or functional details at the nanoscale in a liquid medium. Earlier efforts have focused on the growth and transformation kinetics of hard material systems, relying on their stability under electron beam. Our recently developed graphene liquid cell technique pushed the spatial resolution of such imaging to the atomic scale but still focused on growth trajectories of metallic nanocrystals. Here, we adopt this technique to imaging three-dimensional (3D) dynamics of soft materials instead, double strand (dsDNA) connecting Au nanocrystals as one example, at nanometer resolution. We demonstrate first that a graphene liquid cell can seal an aqueous sample solution of a lower vapor pressure than previously investigated well against the high vacuum in TEM. Then, from quantitative analysis of real time nanocrystal trajectories, we show that the status and configuration of dsDNA dictate the motions of linked nanocrystals throughout the imaging time of minutes. This sustained connecting ability of dsDNA enables this unprecedented continuous imaging of its dynamics via TEM. Furthermore, the inert graphene surface minimizes sample-substrate interaction and allows the whole nanostructure to rotate freely in the liquid environment; we thus develop and implement the reconstruction of 3D configuration and motions of the nanostructure from the series of 2D projected TEM images captured while it rotates. In addition to further proving the nanoconjugate structural stability, this reconstruction demonstrates 3D dynamic imaging by TEM beyond its conventional use in seeing a flattened and dry sample. Altogether, we foresee the new and exciting use of graphene liquid cell TEM in imaging 3D biomolecular transformations or interaction dynamics at nanometer resolution. PMID:23944844

  4. Design and fabrication of a freeform prism array for 3D microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Yi, Allen Y

    2010-12-01

    Traditional microscopes have limitations in obtaining true 3D (three-dimensional) stereovision. Although some optical microscopes have been developed for 3D vision, many of them are complex, expensive, or limited to transparent samples. In this research, a freeform optical prism array was designed and fabricated to achieve 3D stereo imaging capability for microscope and machine vision applications. To form clear stereo images from multiple directions simultaneously, freeform optical surface design was applied to the prisms. In a ray tracing operation to determine the optical performance of the freeform prisms, Taylor series was used to calculate the surface shape. The virtual image spot diagrams were generated by using ray tracing methods for both the freeform prisms and the regular prisms. The results showed that all the light rays can be traced back to a single point for the freeform prism, and aberration was much smaller than that of the regular prism. The ray spots formed by the freeform prisms were adequate for image formation. Furthermore, the freeform prism array was fabricated by using a combined ultraprecision diamond turning and slow tool servo broaching process in a single, uninterrupted operation. The slow tool servo process ensured that the relative tolerance among prisms is guaranteed by the precision of the ultraprecision machine without the need for assembly. Finally 3D imaging tests were conducted to verify the freeform prism array's optical performance. The principle of the freeform prism array investigated in this research can be applied to microscopy, machine vision, robotic sensing, and many other areas. PMID:21119746

  5. Confocal Raman microscopy for in depth analysis in the field of cultural heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzetti, G.; Striova, J.; Zoppi, A.; Castellucci, E. M.

    2011-05-01

    In the field of cultural heritage, the main concern when a sample is analyzed is its safeguard, and this means that non-destructive techniques are required. In this work, we show how confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) may be successfully applied in the study of works of art as a valuable alternative to other well established techniques. CRM with a metallurgical objective was tested for the in depth study of thin samples that are of interest in the field of cultural heritage. The sensitivity of the instrumentation was first evaluated by analyzing single layers of pure polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films having a thickness of 12, 25, and 50 μm, respectively, and a multilayer sample of polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PE). Subsequently, the technique was applied to the analysis of historical dyed cotton yarns in order to check whether it was possible to achieve a better discrimination of the fibres' signals for an easier identification. A substantial improvement of the signal to noise ratio was found in the confocal arrangement with respect to the non-confocal one, suggesting the use of this technique for this kind of analysis in the field of cultural heritage. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy in confocal configuration was exploited in the evaluation of cleaning performed on the mural painting specimens, treated with acrylic resin (Paraloid B72). Confocal Raman experiments were performed before and after laser cleaning (at different conditions) in order to monitor the presence and to approximate the polymer thickness: the method proved to be a valid comparative tool in assessment of cleaning efficiencies.

  6. Design and analysis of multi-color confocal microscopy with a wavelength scanning detector.

    PubMed

    Do, Dukho; Chun, Wanhee; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2012-05-01

    Spectral (or multi-color) microscopy has the ability to detect the fluorescent light of biological specimens with a broad range of wavelengths. Currently, the acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) is widely used in spectral microscopy as a substitute for a multiple-dichroic mirror to divide excitation and emission signals while maintaining sufficient light efficiency. In addition, systems which utilize an AOTF have a very fast switching speed and high resolution for wavelength selection. In this paper, confocal-spectral microscopy is proposed with a particular spectrometer design with a wavelength-scanning galvano-mirror. This enables the detection of broadband (480-700 nm) fluorescence signals by a single point detector (photomultiplier tube) instead of a CCD pixel array. For this purpose, a number of optical elements were applicably designed. A prism is used to amplify the dispersion angle, and the design of the relay optics matches the signals to the diameter of the wavelength-scanning galvano-mirror. Also, a birefringent material known as calcite is used to offset the displacement error at the image plane depending on the polarization states. The proposed multi-color confocal microscopy with the unique detection body has many advantages in comparison with commercial devices. In terms of the detection method, it can be easily applied to other imaging modalities. PMID:22667622

  7. Investigation of phosphatidylcholine enhancing FITC-insulin across buccal mucosa by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Weiqun; Su, Li; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming; Gao, Qiuhua; Xu, Huibi

    2002-04-01

    The aim was to characterize the transport of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextran and insulin with different resoluble compounds for peptides and proteins through buccal mucosa. The penetration rate of insulin molecules through porcine buccal mucosa (a nonkeratinized epithelium, comparable to human buccal mucosa) was investigated by measuring transbuccal fluxes and by analyzing the distribution of the fluorescent probe in the rabbit buccal mucosa epithelium, using confocal laser scanning microscopy for visualizing permeation pathways. The confocal images of the distribution pattern of FITC-dextran and FITC-insulin showed that the paracellular route is the major pathway of FITC-dextran through buccal mucosa epithelium, the intra-cellular route is the major pathway of FITC-insulin through buccal mucosa epithelium. The permeation rate can be increased by co-administration of soybean phosphatidylcholine (SPC).

  8. High-speed 3-D measurement with a large field of view based on direct-view confocal microscope with an electrically tunable lens.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyeong-jun; Yoo, Hongki; Gweon, DaeGab

    2016-02-22

    We propose a new structure of confocal imaging system based on a direct-view confocal microscope (DVCM) with an electrically tunable lens (ETL). Since it has no mechanical moving parts to scan both the lateral (x-y) and axial (z) directions, the DVCM with an ETL allows for high-speed 3-dimensional (3-D) imaging. Axial response and signal intensity of the DVCM were analyzed theoretically according to the pinhole characteristics. The system was designed to have an isotropic spatial resolution of 20 µm in both lateral and axial direction with a large field of view (FOV) of 10 × 10 mm. The FOV was maintained according to the various focal shifts as a result of an integrated design of an objective lens with the ETL. The developed system was calibrated to have linear focal shift over a range of 9 mm with an applied current to the ETL. The system performance of 3-D volume imaging was demonstrated using standard height specimens and a dental plaster. PMID:26907034

  9. Determination of sex by exfoliative cytology using acridine orange confocal microscopy: A short study

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, D Shyam Prasad; Sherlin, Herald J; Ramani, Pratibha; Prakash, P Ajay

    2012-01-01

    Context: Establishing individuality is an imperative aspect in any investigation procedure. Sometimes, in identifying an individual, it becomes necessary to determine the sex of that particular individual. Combining rapidity with reliability, an innovative idea has been put forward using a confocal microscope in exfoliative cytology. In the present study, we have determined the sex of the individual from buccal mucosal scrapings. The exfoliative cells were observed for Barr bodies under a confocal microscope, and the percentage of Barr-body-positive cells was determined. Aims: The main objective of this study is to assess confocal microscopy for the determination of sex by observing Barr bodies in the exfoliative cells of both men and women. Settings and Design: Samples of buccal mucosa smears were made followed by acridine orange staining. The stained slides were observed under a confocal microscope and the data obtained was subjected for statistical analysis, especially for mean and standard deviation. Materials and Methods: Samples of buccal mucosa smears from 20 men and 20 women were obtained by scraping with flat wooden sticks (exfoliative cytology). The smears were fixed in 100% alcohol for 15 min, followed by acridine orange (AO) staining as described by Von Bertalanffy et al. Smears stained with AO were examined under a confocal microscope and the percentage of Barr-body-positive cells was determined. Statistical Analysis Used: Data obtained was subjected for statistical analysis, especially for mean and standard deviation. Results: Two non-overlapping ranges for the percentage of Barr-body-positive cells have been obtained for men and women. It was observed that in the male samples, the percentage of Barr-body-positive cells ranged from 0-3%. In the female samples, the percentage of Barr-body-positive cells ranged from 18-72%, and all the females showed the presence of Barr bodies. Conclusion: The study showed that the presence of Barr body in buccal

  10. Advances in combined endoscopic fluorescence confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risi, Matthew D.

    Confocal microendoscopy provides real-time high resolution cellular level images via a minimally invasive procedure. Results from an ongoing clinical study to detect ovarian cancer with a novel confocal fluorescent microendoscope are presented. As an imaging modality, confocal fluorescence microendoscopy typically requires exogenous fluorophores, has a relatively limited penetration depth (100 μm), and often employs specialized aperture configurations to achieve real-time imaging in vivo. Two primary research directions designed to overcome these limitations and improve diagnostic capability are presented. Ideal confocal imaging performance is obtained with a scanning point illumination and confocal aperture, but this approach is often unsuitable for real-time, in vivo biomedical imaging. By scanning a slit aperture in one direction, image acquisition speeds are greatly increased, but at the cost of a reduction in image quality. The design, implementation, and experimental verification of a custom multi-point-scanning modification to a slit-scanning multi-spectral confocal microendoscope is presented. This new design improves the axial resolution while maintaining real-time imaging rates. In addition, the multi-point aperture geometry greatly reduces the effects of tissue scatter on imaging performance. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has seen wide acceptance and FDA approval as a technique for ophthalmic retinal imaging, and has been adapted for endoscopic use. As a minimally invasive imaging technique, it provides morphological characteristics of tissues at a cellular level without requiring the use of exogenous fluorophores. OCT is capable of imaging deeper into biological tissue (˜1-2 mm) than confocal fluorescence microscopy. A theoretical analysis of the use of a fiber-bundle in spectral-domain OCT systems is presented. The fiber-bundle enables a flexible endoscopic design and provides fast, parallelized acquisition of the optical coherence tomography

  11. Segmentation of center brains and optic lobes in 3D confocal images of adult fruit fly brains.

    PubMed

    Lam, Shing Chun Benny; Ruan, Zongcai; Zhao, Ting; Long, Fuhui; Jenett, Arnim; Simpson, Julie; Myers, Eugene W; Peng, Hanchuan

    2010-02-01

    Automatic alignment (registration) of 3D images of adult fruit fly brains is often influenced by the significant displacement of the relative locations of the two optic lobes (OLs) and the center brain (CB). In one of our ongoing efforts to produce a better image alignment pipeline of adult fruit fly brains, we consider separating CB and OLs and align them independently. This paper reports our automatic method to segregate CB and OLs, in particular under conditions where the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is low, the variation of the image intensity is big, and the relative displacement of OLs and CB is substantial. We design an algorithm to find a minimum-cost 3D surface in a 3D image stack to best separate an OL (of one side, either left or right) from CB. This surface is defined as an aggregation of the respective minimum-cost curves detected in each individual 2D image slice. Each curve is defined by a list of control points that best segregate OL and CB. To obtain the locations of these control points, we derive an energy function that includes an image energy term defined by local pixel intensities and two internal energy terms that constrain the curve's smoothness and length. Gradient descent method is used to optimize this energy function. To improve both the speed and robustness of the method, for each stack, the locations of optimized control points in a slice are taken as the initialization prior for the next slice. We have tested this approach on simulated and real 3D fly brain image stacks and demonstrated that this method can reasonably segregate OLs from CBs despite the aforementioned difficulties. PMID:19698789

  12. Scanning a microhabitat: plant-microbe interactions revealed by confocal laser microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cardinale, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    No plant or cryptogam exists in nature without microorganisms associated with its tissues. Plants as microbial hosts are puzzles of different microhabitats, each of them colonized by specifically adapted microbiomes. The interactions with such microorganisms have drastic effects on the host fitness. Since the last 20 years, the combination of microscopic tools and molecular approaches contributed to new insights into microbe-host interactions. Particularly, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) facilitated the exploration of microbial habitats and allowed the observation of host-associated microorganisms in situ with an unprecedented accuracy. Here I present an overview of the progresses made in the study of the interactions between microorganisms and plants or plant-like organisms, focusing on the role of CLSM for the understanding of their significance. I critically discuss risks of misinterpretation when procedures of CLSM are not properly optimized. I also review approaches for quantitative and statistical analyses of CLSM images, the combination with other molecular and microscopic methods, and suggest the re-evaluation of natural autofluorescence. In this review, technical aspects were coupled with scientific outcomes, to facilitate the readers in identifying possible CLSM applications in their research or to expand their existing potential. The scope of this review is to highlight the importance of confocal microscopy in the study of plant-microbe interactions and also to be an inspiration for integrating microscopy with molecular techniques in future researches of microbial ecology. PMID:24639675

  13. Probing the compressibility of tumor cell nuclei by combined atomic force-confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Marina; te Riet, Joost; Wolf, Katarina

    2013-12-01

    The cell nucleus is the largest and stiffest organelle rendering it the limiting compartment during migration of invasive tumor cells through dense connective tissue. We here describe a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM)-confocal microscopy approach for measurement of bulk nuclear stiffness together with simultaneous visualization of the cantilever-nucleus contact and the fate of the cell. Using cantilevers functionalized with either tips or beads and spring constants ranging from 0.06-10 N m-1, force-deformation curves were generated from nuclear positions of adherent HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell populations at unchallenged integrity, and a nuclear stiffness range of 0.2 to 2.5 kPa was identified depending on cantilever type and the use of extended fitting models. Chromatin-decondensating agent trichostatin A (TSA) induced nuclear softening of up to 50%, demonstrating the feasibility of our approach. Finally, using a stiff bead-functionalized cantilever pushing at maximal system-intrinsic force, the nucleus was deformed to 20% of its original height which after TSA treatment reduced further to 5% remaining height confirming chromatin organization as an important determinant of nuclear stiffness. Thus, combined AFM-confocal microscopy is a feasible approach to study nuclear compressibility to complement concepts of limiting nuclear deformation in cancer cell invasion and other biological processes.

  14. 3D elemental sensitive imaging using transmission X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yijin; Meirer, Florian; Wang, Junyue; Requena, Guillermo; Williams, Phillip; Nelson, Johanna; Mehta, Apurva; Andrews, Joy C; Pianetta, Piero

    2012-09-01

    Determination of the heterogeneous distribution of metals in alloy/battery/catalyst and biological materials is critical to fully characterize and/or evaluate the functionality of the materials. Using synchrotron-based transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM), it is now feasible to perform nanoscale-resolution imaging over a wide X-ray energy range covering the absorption edges of many elements; combining elemental sensitive imaging with determination of sample morphology. We present an efficient and reliable methodology to perform 3D elemental sensitive imaging with excellent sample penetration (tens of microns) using hard X-ray TXM. A sample of an Al-Si piston alloy is used to demonstrate the capability of the proposed method. PMID:22349401

  15. Dynamic complex optical fields for optical manipulation, 3D microscopy, and photostimulation of neurotransmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daria, Vincent R.; Stricker, Christian; Bekkers, John; Redman, Steve; Bachor, Hans

    2010-08-01

    We demonstrate a multi-functional system capable of multiple-site two-photon excitation of photo-sensitive compounds as well as transfer of optical mechanical properties on an array of mesoscopic particles. We use holographic projection of a single Ti:Sapphire laser operating in femtosecond pulse mode to show that the projected three-dimensional light patterns have sufficient spatiotemporal photon density for multi-site two-photon excitation of biological fluorescent markers and caged neurotransmitters. Using the same laser operating in continuous-wave mode, we can use the same light patterns for non-invasive transfer of both linear and orbital angular momentum on a variety of mesoscopic particles. The system also incorporates high-speed scanning using acousto-optic modulators to rapidly render 3D images of neuron samples via two-photon microscopy.

  16. Electron Microscopy: From 2D to 3D Images with Special Reference to Muscle

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This is a brief and necessarily very sketchy presentation of the evolution in electron microscopy (EM) imaging that was driven by the necessity of extracting 3-D views from the essentially 2-D images produced by the electron beam. The lens design of standard transmission electron microscope has not been greatly altered since its inception. However, technical advances in specimen preparation, image collection and analysis gradually induced an astounding progression over a period of about 50 years. From the early images that redefined tissues, cell and cell organelles at the sub-micron level, to the current nano-resolution reconstructions of organelles and proteins the step is very large. The review is written by an investigator who has followed the field for many years, but often from the sidelines, and with great wonder. Her interest in muscle ultrastructure colors the writing. More specific detailed reviews are presented in this issue. PMID:26913146

  17. 3D surface reconstruction and FIB microscopy of worn alumina hip prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, P.; Inkson, B. J.; Rainforth, W. M.; Stewart, T.

    2008-08-01

    Interest in alumina-on-alumina total hip replacements (THR) continues to grow for the young and active patient due to their superior wear performance and biocompatibility compared to the alternative traditional polymer/metal prostheses. While alumina on alumina bearings offer an excellent solution, a region of high wear, known as stripe wear, is commonly observed on retrieved alumina hip components that poses concern. These in-vivo stripe wear mechanisms can be replicated in vitro by the introduction of micro-separation during the simulated walking cycle in hip joint simulation. However, the understanding of the mechanisms behind the stripe wear processes is relatively poor. 3D topographic reconstructions of titled SEM stereo pairs from different zones have been obtained to determine the local worn surface topography. Focused ion beam (FIB) microscopy was applied to examine the subsurface damage across the stripe wear. The paper presents novel images of sub-surface microcracks in alumina along with 3D reconstructions of the worn ceramic surfaces and a classification of four distinct wear zones following microseparation in hip prostheses.

  18. Local characterization of hindered Brownian motion by using digital video microscopy and 3D particle tracking.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Simon L; Keyser, Ulrich F; Pagliara, Stefano

    2014-02-01

    In this article we present methods for measuring hindered Brownian motion in the confinement of complex 3D geometries using digital video microscopy. Here we discuss essential features of automated 3D particle tracking as well as diffusion data analysis. By introducing local mean squared displacement-vs-time curves, we are able to simultaneously measure the spatial dependence of diffusion coefficients, tracking accuracies and drift velocities. Such local measurements allow a more detailed and appropriate description of strongly heterogeneous systems as opposed to global measurements. Finite size effects of the tracking region on measuring mean squared displacements are also discussed. The use of these methods was crucial for the measurement of the diffusive behavior of spherical polystyrene particles (505 nm diameter) in a microfluidic chip. The particles explored an array of parallel channels with different cross sections as well as the bulk reservoirs. For this experiment we present the measurement of local tracking accuracies in all three axial directions as well as the diffusivity parallel to the channel axis while we observed no significant flow but purely Brownian motion. Finally, the presented algorithm is suitable also for tracking of fluorescently labeled particles and particles driven by an external force, e.g., electrokinetic or dielectrophoretic forces. PMID:24593372

  19. Local characterization of hindered Brownian motion by using digital video microscopy and 3D particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettmer, Simon L.; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Pagliara, Stefano

    2014-02-01

    In this article we present methods for measuring hindered Brownian motion in the confinement of complex 3D geometries using digital video microscopy. Here we discuss essential features of automated 3D particle tracking as well as diffusion data analysis. By introducing local mean squared displacement-vs-time curves, we are able to simultaneously measure the spatial dependence of diffusion coefficients, tracking accuracies and drift velocities. Such local measurements allow a more detailed and appropriate description of strongly heterogeneous systems as opposed to global measurements. Finite size effects of the tracking region on measuring mean squared displacements are also discussed. The use of these methods was crucial for the measurement of the diffusive behavior of spherical polystyrene particles (505 nm diameter) in a microfluidic chip. The particles explored an array of parallel channels with different cross sections as well as the bulk reservoirs. For this experiment we present the measurement of local tracking accuracies in all three axial directions as well as the diffusivity parallel to the channel axis while we observed no significant flow but purely Brownian motion. Finally, the presented algorithm is suitable also for tracking of fluorescently labeled particles and particles driven by an external force, e.g., electrokinetic or dielectrophoretic forces.

  20. Local characterization of hindered Brownian motion by using digital video microscopy and 3D particle tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Dettmer, Simon L.; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Pagliara, Stefano

    2014-02-15

    In this article we present methods for measuring hindered Brownian motion in the confinement of complex 3D geometries using digital video microscopy. Here we discuss essential features of automated 3D particle tracking as well as diffusion data analysis. By introducing local mean squared displacement-vs-time curves, we are able to simultaneously measure the spatial dependence of diffusion coefficients, tracking accuracies and drift velocities. Such local measurements allow a more detailed and appropriate description of strongly heterogeneous systems as opposed to global measurements. Finite size effects of the tracking region on measuring mean squared displacements are also discussed. The use of these methods was crucial for the measurement of the diffusive behavior of spherical polystyrene particles (505 nm diameter) in a microfluidic chip. The particles explored an array of parallel channels with different cross sections as well as the bulk reservoirs. For this experiment we present the measurement of local tracking accuracies in all three axial directions as well as the diffusivity parallel to the channel axis while we observed no significant flow but purely Brownian motion. Finally, the presented algorithm is suitable also for tracking of fluorescently labeled particles and particles driven by an external force, e.g., electrokinetic or dielectrophoretic forces.

  1. Spectrally encoded slit confocal microscopy using a wavelength-swept laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soocheol; Hwang, Jaehyun; Heo, Jung; Ryu, Suho; Lee, Donghak; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Oh, Seung Jae; Joo, Chulmin

    2015-03-01

    We present an implementation of spectrally encoded slit confocal microscopy. The method employs a rapid wavelength-swept laser as the light source and illuminates a specimen with a line focus that scans through the specimen as the wavelength sweeps. The reflected light from the specimen is imaged with a stationary line scan camera, in which the finite pixel height serves as a slit aperture. This scanner-free operation enables a simple and cost-effective implementation in a small form factor, while allowing for the three-dimensional imaging of biological samples.

  2. Confocal microscopy: A new tool for erosion measurements on large scale plasma facing components in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, E.; Brosset, C.; Roche, H.; Tsitrone, E.; Pégourié, B.; Martinez, A.; Languille, P.; Courtois, X.; Lallier, Y.; Salami, M.

    2013-07-01

    A diagnostic based on confocal microscopy was developed at CEA Cadarache in order to measure erosion on large plasma facing components during shutdown in situ in Tore Supra. This paper describes the diagnostic and presents results obtained on Beryllium and Carbon Fibre Composite (CFC) materials. Erosion in the range of 800 μm was found on one sector of the Toroidal Pumped Limiter (TPL) which provides, by integration to the full limiter a net carbon erosion of about 900 g over the period 2002-2007.

  3. Insights into esophagus tissue architecture using two-photon confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nenrong; Wang, Yue; Feng, Shangyuan; Chen, Rong

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, microstructures of human esophageal mucosa were evaluated using the two-photon laser scanning confocal microscopy (TPLSCM), based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). The distribution of epithelial cells, muscle fibers of muscularis mucosae has been distinctly obtained. Furthermore, esophageal submucosa characteristics with cancer cells invading into were detected. The variation of collagen, elastin and cancer cells is very relevant to the pathology in esophagus, especially early esophageal cancer. Our experimental results indicate that the MPM technique has the much more advantages for label-free imaging, and has the potential application in vivo in the clinical diagnosis and monitoring of early esophageal cancer.

  4. Label-free detection of anticancer drug paclitaxel in living cells by confocal Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, H.; Derely, L.; Vegh, A.-G.; Durand, J.-C.; Gergely, C.; Larroque, C.; Fauroux, M.-A.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2013-03-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy, a non-invasive, label-free, and high spatial resolution imaging technique is employed to trace the anticancer drug paclitaxel in living Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7) cells. The Raman images were treated by K-mean cluster analysis to detect the drug in cells. Distribution of paclitaxel in cells is verified by calculating the correlation coefficient between the reference spectrum of the drug and the whole Raman image spectra. A time dependent gradual diffusion of paclitaxel all over the cell is observed suggesting a complementary picture of the pharmaceutical action of this drug based on rapid binding of free tubulin to crystallized paclitaxel.

  5. Ti-6Al-4V electron beam weld qualification using laser scanning confocal microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wanjara, P. . E-mail: priti.wanjara@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca; Brochu, M.; Jahazi, M.

    2005-03-15

    Processing conditions for manufacturing Ti-6Al-4V components by welding using an electron beam source are known to influence the transformation microstructure in the narrow fusion and heat-affected zones of the weld region. This work examined the effect of multiple-sequence welding on the characteristics of the transformed beta microstructure, using laser scanning confocal microscopy to resolve the Widmanstaetten alpha-beta structure in the fusion zone. The evolution in the alpha interlamellar spacing and plate thickness with processing was then related to microhardness measurements in the weld region.

  6. The application of dermal papillary rings in dermatology by in vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, W. Z.; Xu, A. E.; Xu, J.; Bi, Z. G.; Shang, Y. B.; Ren, Q. S.

    2010-08-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) allows noninvasive visualization of human skin in vivo, without needing to fix or section the tissue. Melanocytes and pigmented keratinocytes at the level of the basal layer form bright dermal papillary rings which are readily amenable to identify in confocal images. Our purpose was to explore the role of dermal papillary rings in assessment of lesion location, the diagnosis, differential diagnosis of lesions and assessment of therapeutic efficacy by in vivo CLSM. Seventy-one patients were imaged with the VivaScope 1500 reflectance confocal microscope provided by Lucid, Inc. The results indicate that dermal papillary rings can assess the location of lesion; the application of dermal papillary rings can provide diagnostic support and differential diagnosis for vitiligo, nevus depigmentosus, tinea versicolor, halo nevus, common nevi, and assess the therapeutic efficacy of NBUVB phototherapy plus topical 0.1 percent tacrolimus ointment for vitiligo. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the dermal papillary rings play an important role in the assessment the location of lesion, diagnosis, differential diagnosis of lesions and assessment of therapeutic efficacy by in vivo CLSM. CLSM may be a promising tool for noninvasive examination in dermatology. However, larger studies are needed to expand the application of dermal papillary rings in dermatology.

  7. Comparison of mouse mammary gland imaging techniques and applications: Reflectance confocal microscopy, GFP Imaging, and ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Tilli, Maddalena T; Parrish, Angela R; Cotarla, Ion; Jones, Laundette P; Johnson, Michael D; Furth, Priscilla A

    2008-01-01

    Background Genetically engineered mouse models of mammary gland cancer enable the in vivo study of molecular mechanisms and signaling during development and cancer pathophysiology. However, traditional whole mount and histological imaging modalities are only applicable to non-viable tissue. Methods We evaluated three techniques that can be quickly applied to living tissue for imaging normal and cancerous mammary gland: reflectance confocal microscopy, green fluorescent protein imaging, and ultrasound imaging. Results In the current study, reflectance confocal imaging offered the highest resolution and was used to optically section mammary ductal structures in the whole mammary gland. Glands remained viable in mammary gland whole organ culture when 1% acetic acid was used as a contrast agent. Our application of using green fluorescent protein expressing transgenic mice in our study allowed for whole mammary gland ductal structures imaging and enabled straightforward serial imaging of mammary gland ducts in whole organ culture to visualize the growth and differentiation process. Ultrasound imaging showed the lowest resolution. However, ultrasound was able to detect mammary preneoplastic lesions 0.2 mm in size and was used to follow cancer growth with serial imaging in living mice. Conclusion In conclusion, each technique enabled serial imaging of living mammary tissue and visualization of growth and development, quickly and with minimal tissue preparation. The use of the higher resolution reflectance confocal and green fluorescent protein imaging techniques and lower resolution ultrasound were complementary. PMID:18215290

  8. High numerical aperture injection-molded miniature objective for fiber-optic confocal reflectance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidley, Matthew Douglas

    This dissertation presents the design of a miniature injection-molded objective lens for a fiber-optic confocal reflectance microscope. This is part of an effort to demonstrate the ability to fabricate low cost, high performance biomedical optics for high resolution in vivo imaging. Disposable endoscopic microscope objectives could help in vivo confocal microscopy technology mature to enable large-scale clinical screening and detection of early cancers and pre-cancerous lesions. This five lens plastic objective has been tested as a stand-alone optical system and has been coupled to a confocal microscope for in vivo imaging of cells and tissue. Changing the spacing and rotation of the individual optical elements can compensate for fabrication inaccuracies and improve performance. An optical-bench testing system was constructed to allow interactive alignment during testing. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of the miniature objective lens is determined using the slanted-edge method. A custom MATLAB program, edgeMTF, was written to collect, analyze, and record test data. An estimated Strehl ratio of 0.64 and an MTF value of 0.70, at the fiber-optic bundle Nyquist frequency, have been obtained. The main performance limitations of the miniature objective are mechanical alignment and flow-induced birefringence. Annealing and experimental injection molding runs were conducted in effort to reduce birefringence.

  9. Synchrotron radiation as a light source in confocal microscopy of biological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerritsen, Hans C.; van der Oord, C. J. R.; Levine, Yehudi K.; Munro, Ian H.; Myring, Wendy J.; Shaw, D. A.; Rommerts, Fokko F.

    1992-04-01

    A novel confocal microscope is presented using the Daresbury Synchrotron Radiation source as its light source. The broad spectrum of synchrotron radiation in combination with the UV compatible microscope allows the extension of confocal microscopy from the visible to the UV region down to about 200 nm. It is envisaged that structures separated by about 70 nm can be resolved at a wavelength of 200 nm. In addition, the tunability of synchrotron radiation affords the selective excitation of any specific fluorescent molecule at the maximum of the absorption band. This avoids the restriction of working at fixed laser lines. A further advantage of using synchrotron radiation is the realization of multiwavelength excitation. Test results using laser systems in the visible and in the UV are presented. Fluorescence images of test targets using UV excitation reveal the superior resolution of the microscope. Furthermore, images of Leydig cells incubated with a fluorescent cholesterol derivative whose maximum of absorption is at 325 nm are shown. These images cannot be produced by conventional confocal laser microscopes. Finally, promising preliminary results obtained with synchrotron radiation are presented.

  10. In vivo Confocal Microscopy Report after Lasik with Sequential Accelerated Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mazzotta, Cosimo; Balestrazzi, Angelo; Traversi, Claudio; Caragiuli, Stefano; Caporossi, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    We report the first pilot qualitative confocal microscopic analysis of a laser in situ keratomileusis (Lasik) treatment combined with sequential high-fluence accelerated corneal collagen cross-linking, denominated Lasik XTra, by means of HRT II laser scanning in vivo confocal microscopy after a 6-month follow-up. After obtaining approval from the Siena University Hospital Institutional Review Board, a 33-year-old female patient underwent a Lasik XTra procedure in her left eye. Confocal analysis demonstrated induced slight corneal microstructural changes by the interaction between UV-A, riboflavin and corneal stromal collagen, beyond the interface to a depth of 160 µm, without adverse events at the interface and endothelial levels. This application may be considered a prophylactic biomechanical treatment, stiffening the intermediate corneal stroma to prevent corneal ectasia and stabilizing the clinical results of refractive surgery. According to our preliminary experiences, this combined approach may be useful in higher-risk Lasik patients for hyperopic treatments, high myopia and lower corneal thicknesses. PMID:24847258

  11. Simultaneous confocal fluorescence microscopy and optical coherence tomography for drug distribution and tissue integrity assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehart, Matthew T.; LaCroix, Jeffrey; Henderson, Marcus; Katz, David; Wax, Adam

    2011-03-01

    The effectiveness of microbicidal gels, topical products developed to prevent infection by sexually transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS, is governed by extent of gel coverage, pharmacokinetics of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), and integrity of vaginal epithelium. While biopsies provide localized information about drug delivery and tissue structure, in vivo measurements are preferable in providing objective data on API and gel coating distribution as well as tissue integrity. We are developing a system combining confocal fluorescence microscopy with optical coherence tomography (OCT) to simultaneously measure local concentrations and diffusion coefficients of APIs during transport from microbicidal gels into tissue, while assessing tissue integrity. The confocal module acquires 2-D images of fluorescent APIs multiple times per second allowing analysis of lateral diffusion kinetics. The custom Fourier domain OCT module has a maximum a-scan rate of 54 kHz and provides depth-resolved tissue integrity information coregistered with the confocal fluorescence measurements. The combined system is validated by imaging phantoms with a surrogate fluorophore. Time-resolved API concentration measured at fixed depths is analyzed for diffusion kinetics. This multimodal system will eventually be implemented in vivo for objective evaluation of microbicide product performance.

  12. Confocal Microscopy of Unfixed Breast Needle Core Biopsies: A Comparison to Fixed and Stained Sections

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Needle core biopsy, often in conjunction with ultrasonic or stereotactic guided techniques, is frequently used to diagnose breast carcinoma in women. Confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) is a technology that provides real-time digital images of tissues with cellular resolution. This paper reports the progress in developing techniques to rapidly screen needle core breast biopsy and surgical specimens at the point of care. CSLM requires minimal tissue processing and has the potential to reduce the time from excision to diagnosis. Following imaging, specimens can still be submitted for standard histopathological preparation. Methods Needle core breast specimens from 49 patients were imaged at the time of biopsy. These lesions had been characterized under the Breast Imaging Reporting And Data System (BI-RADS) as category 3, 4 or 5. The core biopsies were imaged with the CSLM before fixation. Samples were treated with 5% citric acid and glycerin USP to enhance nuclear visibility in the reflectance confocal images. Immediately following imaging, the specimens were fixed in buffered formalin and submitted for histological processing and pathological diagnosis. CSLM images were then compared to the standard histology. Results The pathologic diagnoses by standard histology were 7 invasive ductal carcinomas, 2 invasive lobular carcinomas, 3 ductal carcinomas in-situ (CIS), 21 fibrocystic changes/proliferative conditions, 9 fibroadenomas, and 5 other/benign; two were excluded due to imaging difficulties. Morphologic and cellular features of benign and cancerous lesions were identified in the confocal images and were comparable to standard histologic sections of the same tissue. Conclusion CSLM is a technique with the potential to screen needle core biopsy specimens in real-time. The confocal images contained sufficient information to identify stromal reactions such as fibrosis and cellular proliferations such as intra-ductal and infiltrating carcinoma, and

  13. Programmable illumination and high-speed, multi-wavelength, confocal microscopy using a digital micromirror.

    PubMed

    Martial, Franck P; Hartell, Nicholas A

    2012-01-01

    Confocal microscopy is routinely used for high-resolution fluorescence imaging of biological specimens. Most standard confocal systems scan a laser across a specimen and collect emitted light passing through a single pinhole to produce an optical section of the sample. Sequential scanning on a point-by-point basis limits the speed of image acquisition and even the fastest commercial instruments struggle to resolve the temporal dynamics of rapid cellular events such as calcium signals. Various approaches have been introduced that increase the speed of confocal imaging. Nipkov disk microscopes, for example, use arrays of pinholes or slits on a spinning disk to achieve parallel scanning which significantly increases the speed of acquisition. Here we report the development of a microscope module that utilises a digital micromirror device as a spatial light modulator to provide programmable confocal optical sectioning with a single camera, at high spatial and axial resolution at speeds limited by the frame rate of the camera. The digital micromirror acts as a solid state Nipkov disk but with the added ability to change the pinholes size and separation and to control the light intensity on a mirror-by-mirror basis. The use of an arrangement of concave and convex mirrors in the emission pathway instead of lenses overcomes the astigmatism inherent with DMD devices, increases light collection efficiency and ensures image collection is achromatic so that images are perfectly aligned at different wavelengths. Combined with non-laser light sources, this allows low cost, high-speed, multi-wavelength image acquisition without the need for complex wavelength-dependent image alignment. The micromirror can also be used for programmable illumination allowing spatially defined photoactivation of fluorescent proteins. We demonstrate the use of this system for high-speed calcium imaging using both a single wavelength calcium indicator and a genetically encoded, ratiometric, calcium

  14. One shot confocal microscopy based on wavelength/space conversion by use of multichannel spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Shuji; Hase, Eiji; Ichikawa, Ryuji; Mnamikawa, Takeo; Yasui, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Hirotugu

    2016-03-01

    Confocal laser microscope (CLM) has been widely used in the fields of the non-contact surface topography, biomedical imaging, and other applications, because of two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) imaging capability with the confocal effect and the stray light elimination. Although the conventional CLM has acquired the 2D image by mechanical scanning of the focused beam spot, further reduction of image acquisition time and the robustness to various disturbances are strongly required. To this end, it is essential to omit mechanical scanning for the image acquisition. In this article, we developed the scan-less, full-field CLM by combination of the line-focused CLM with the wavelength/1D-space conversion. This combination enables us to form the 2D focal array of a 2D rainbow beam on a sample and to encode the 2D image information of a sample on the 2D rainbow beam. The image-encoded 2D rainbow beam was decoded as a spectral line image by a multi-channel spectrometer equipped with a CMOS camera without the need for the mechanical scanning. The confocal full-field image was acquired during 0.23 ms with the lateral resolution of 26.3μm and 4.9μm for the horizontal and vertical directions, respectively, and the depth resolution of 34.9μm. We further applied this scan-less, full-field CLM for biomedical imaging of a sliced specimen and non-contact surface topography of an industry products. These demonstrations highlight a high potential of the proposed scan-less, full-field CLM.

  15. 3D imaging of mammalian cells with ion-abrasion scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Heymann, Jurgen A W; Shi, Dan; Kim, Sang; Bliss, Donald; Milne, Jacqueline L S; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2009-04-01

    Understanding the hierarchical organization of molecules and organelles within the interior of large eukaryotic cells is a challenge of fundamental interest in cell biology. We are using ion-abrasion scanning electron microscopy (IA-SEM) to visualize this hierarchical organization in an approach that combines focused ion-beam milling with scanning electron microscopy. Here, we extend our previous studies on imaging yeast cells to image subcellular architecture in human melanoma cells and melanocytes at resolutions as high as approximately 6 and approximately 20 nm in the directions parallel and perpendicular, respectively, to the direction of ion-beam milling. The 3D images demonstrate the striking spatial relationships between specific organelles such as mitochondria and membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum, and the distribution of unique cellular components such as melanosomes. We also show that 10nm-sized gold particles and quantum dot particles with 7 nm-sized cores can be detected in single cross-sectional images. IA-SEM is thus a useful tool for imaging large mammalian cells in their entirety at resolutions in the nanometer range. PMID:19116171

  16. Sensitivity and Specificity of Cardiac Tissue Discrimination Using Fiber-Optics Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Sachse, Frank B; Hitchcock, Robert W; Kaza, Aditya K

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances of the cardiac conduction system constitute a major risk after surgical repair of complex cases of congenital heart disease. Intraoperative identification of the conduction system may reduce the incidence of these disturbances. We previously developed an approach to identify cardiac tissue types using fiber-optics confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores. Here, we applied this approach to investigate sensitivity and specificity of human and automated classification in discriminating images of atrial working myocardium and specialized tissue of the conduction system. Two-dimensional image sequences from atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue of isolated perfused rodent hearts were acquired using a fiber-optics confocal microscope (Leica FCM1000). We compared two methods for local application of extracellular fluorophores: topical via pipette and with a dye carrier. Eight blinded examiners evaluated 162 randomly selected images of atrial working myocardium (n = 81) and nodal tissue (n = 81). In addition, we evaluated the images using automated classification. Blinded examiners achieved a sensitivity and specificity of 99.2 ± 0.3% and 98.0 ± 0.7%, respectively, with the dye carrier method of dye application. Sensitivity and specificity was similar for dye application via a pipette (99.2 ± 0.3% and 94.0 ± 2.4%, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity for automated methods of tissue discrimination were similarly high. Human and automated classification achieved high sensitivity and specificity in discriminating atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue. We suggest that our findings facilitate clinical translation of fiber-optics confocal microscopy as an intraoperative imaging modality to reduce the incidence of conduction disturbances during surgical correction of congenital heart disease. PMID:26808149

  17. Confocal Microscopy and Molecular-Specific Optical Contrast Agents for the Detection of Oral Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Alicia L.; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Williams, Michelle D.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Richards-Kortum, R. R.

    2009-01-01

    Using current clinical diagnostic techniques, it is difficult to visualize tumor morphology and architecture at the cellular level, which is necessary for diagnostic localization of pathologic lesions. Optical imaging techniques have the potential to address this clinical need by providing real-time, sub-cellular resolution images. This paper describes the use of dual mode confocal microscopy and optical molecular-specific contrast agents to image tissue architecture, cellular morphology, and sub-cellular molecular features of normal and neoplastic oral tissues. Fresh tissue slices were prepared from 33 biopsies of clinically normal and abnormal oral mucosa obtained from 14 patients. Reflectance confocal images were acquired after the application of 6% acetic acid, and fluorescence confocal images were acquired after the application of a fluorescence contrast agent targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The dual imaging modes provided images similar to light microscopy of hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemistry staining, but from thick fresh tissue slices. Reflectance images provided information on the architecture of the tissue and the cellular morphology. The nuclear-to-cytoplasmic (N/C) ratio from the reflectance images was at least 7.5 times greater for the carcinoma than the corresponding normal samples, except for one case of highly keratinized carcinoma. Separation of carcinoma from normal and mild dysplasia was achieved using this ratio (p<0.01). Fluorescence images of EGFR expression yielded a mean fluorescence labeling intensity (FLI) that was at least 2.7 times higher for severe dysplasia and carcinoma samples than for the corresponding normal sample, and could be used to distinguish carcinoma from normal and mild dysplasia (p<0.01). Analyzed together, the N/C ratio and the mean FLI may improve the ability to distinguish carcinoma from normal squamous epithelium. PMID:17877424

  18. Sensitivity and Specificity of Cardiac Tissue Discrimination Using Fiber-Optics Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao; Sachse, Frank B.; Hitchcock, Robert W.; Kaza, Aditya K.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances of the cardiac conduction system constitute a major risk after surgical repair of complex cases of congenital heart disease. Intraoperative identification of the conduction system may reduce the incidence of these disturbances. We previously developed an approach to identify cardiac tissue types using fiber-optics confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores. Here, we applied this approach to investigate sensitivity and specificity of human and automated classification in discriminating images of atrial working myocardium and specialized tissue of the conduction system. Two-dimensional image sequences from atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue of isolated perfused rodent hearts were acquired using a fiber-optics confocal microscope (Leica FCM1000). We compared two methods for local application of extracellular fluorophores: topical via pipette and with a dye carrier. Eight blinded examiners evaluated 162 randomly selected images of atrial working myocardium (n = 81) and nodal tissue (n = 81). In addition, we evaluated the images using automated classification. Blinded examiners achieved a sensitivity and specificity of 99.2±0.3% and 98.0±0.7%, respectively, with the dye carrier method of dye application. Sensitivity and specificity was similar for dye application via a pipette (99.2±0.3% and 94.0±2.4%, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity for automated methods of tissue discrimination were similarly high. Human and automated classification achieved high sensitivity and specificity in discriminating atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue. We suggest that our findings facilitate clinical translation of fiber-optics confocal microscopy as an intraoperative imaging modality to reduce the incidence of conduction disturbances during surgical correction of congenital heart disease. PMID:26808149

  19. Confocal Raman microscopy and fluorescent in situ hybridization - A complementary approach for biofilm analysis.

    PubMed

    Kniggendorf, Ann-Kathrin; Nogueira, Regina; Kelb, Christian; Schadzek, Patrik; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Ngezahayo, Anaclet; Roth, Bernhard

    2016-10-01

    We combine confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) of wet samples with subsequent Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) without significant limitations to either technique for analyzing the same sample of a microbial community on a cell-to-cell basis. This combination of techniques allows a much deeper, more complete understanding of complex environmental samples than provided by either technique alone. The minimalistic approach is based on laboratory glassware with micro-engravings for reproducible localization of the sample at cell scale combined with a fixation and de- and rehydration protocol for the respective techniques. As proof of concept, we analyzed a floc of nitrifying activated sludge, demonstrating that the sample can be tracked with cell-scale precision over different measurements and instruments. The collected information includes the microbial content, spatial shape, variant chemical compositions of the floc matrix and the mineral microparticles embedded within. In addition, the direct comparison of CRM and FISH revealed a difference in reported cell size due to the different cell components targeted by the respective technique. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a direct cell-to-cell comparison of confocal Raman microscopy and Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis performed on the same sample. An adaptation of the method to include native samples as a starting point is planned for the near future. The micro-engraving approach itself also opens up the possibility of combining other, functionally incompatible techniques as required for further in-depth investigations of low-volume samples. PMID:27423128

  20. High throughput, detailed, cell-specific neuroanatomy of dendritic spines using microinjection and confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dumitriu, Dani; Rodriguez, Alfredo; Morrison, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Morphological features such as size, shape and density of dendritic spines have been shown to reflect important synaptic functional attributes and potential for plasticity. Here we describe in detail a protocol for obtaining detailed morphometric analysis of spines using microinjection of fluorescent dyes, high resolution confocal microscopy, deconvolution and image analysis using NeuronStudio. Recent technical advancements include better preservation of tissue resulting in prolonged ability to microinject, and algorithmic improvements that compensate for the residual Z-smear inherent in all optical imaging. Confocal imaging parameters were probed systematically for the identification of both optimal resolution as well as highest efficiency. When combined, our methods yield size and density measurements comparable to serial section transmission electron microscopy in a fraction of the time. An experiment containing 3 experimental groups with 8 subjects in each can take as little as one month if optimized for speed, or approximately 4 to 5 months if the highest resolution and morphometric detail is sought. PMID:21886104

  1. Confocal light sheet microscopy: micron-scale neuroanatomy of the entire mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, L; Bria, A; Sacconi, L; Iannello, G; Pavone, F S

    2012-08-27

    Elucidating the neural pathways that underlie brain function is one of the greatest challenges in neuroscience. Light sheet based microscopy is a cutting edge method to map cerebral circuitry through optical sectioning of cleared mouse brains. However, the image contrast provided by this method is not sufficient to resolve and reconstruct the entire neuronal network. Here we combined the advantages of light sheet illumination and confocal slit detection to increase the image contrast in real time, with a frame rate of 10 Hz. In fact, in confocal light sheet microscopy (CLSM), the out-of-focus and scattered light is filtered out before detection, without multiple acquisitions or any post-processing of the acquired data. The background rejection capabilities of CLSM were validated in cleared mouse brains by comparison with a structured illumination approach. We show that CLSM allows reconstructing macroscopic brain volumes with sub-cellular resolution. We obtained a comprehensive map of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum of L7-GFP transgenic mice. Further, we were able to trace neuronal projections across brain of thy1-GFP-M transgenic mice. The whole-brain high-resolution fluorescence imaging assured by CLSM may represent a powerful tool to navigate the brain through neuronal pathways. Although this work is focused on brain imaging, the macro-scale high-resolution tomographies affordable with CLSM are ideally suited to explore, at micron-scale resolution, the anatomy of different specimens like murine organs, embryos or flies. PMID:23037106

  2. Dye-enhanced multimodal confocal microscopy for noninvasive detection of skin cancers in mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jesung; Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.

    2010-03-01

    Skin cancer is the most common form of human cancer. Its early diagnosis and timely treatment is of paramount importance for dermatology and surgical oncology. In this study, we evaluate the use of reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy for detecting skin cancers in an in-vivo trial with B16F10 melanoma and SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma in mice. For the experiments, the mice are anesthetized, then the tumors are infiltrated with aqueous solution of methylene blue and imaged. Reflectance images are acquired at 658 nm. Fluorescence is excited at 658 nm and registered in the range between 690 and 710 nm. After imaging, the mice are sacrificed. The tumors are excised and processed for hematoxylin and eosin histopathology, which is compared to the optical images. The results of the study indicate that in-vivo reflectance images provide valuable information on vascularization of the tumor, whereas the fluorescence images mimic the structural features seen in histopathology. Simultaneous dye-enhanced reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy shows promise for the detection, demarcation, and noninvasive monitoring of skin cancer development.

  3. Depth characterization of photopolymerized films by confocal Raman microscopy using an immersion objective.

    PubMed

    Courtecuisse, François; Dietlin, Céline; Croutxé-Barghorn, Céline; Van der Ven, Leendert G J

    2011-10-01

    The depth characterization of photopolymer films by confocal Raman microscopy is often troublesome due to refraction effects. To minimize these effects, we used an oil immersion objective and a method was developed to avoid penetration of the oil without damaging the sample surface. Since the surface may be sticky if oxygen in the air inhibits the photopolymerization, a protective layer could not be put onto the film. Therefore, the method consists in using a thin polypropylene foil as substrate for the coating and placing the sample upside down under the objective. In this manner, the immersion oil could be deposited on top of the polypropylene. The advantage of this setup is that the oil, polypropylene substrate, and photopolymer film have close refractive indices. Basic calculations showed that the depth resolution is hardly affected in that configuration and double-bond conversion profiles could be plotted as a function of reliable nominal depth. The validity of the methodology was confirmed by experiments carried out with a dry metallurgical objective on the sample surface, face up, where refraction effects are still minor. In addition, infrared spectroscopy, which was used to follow the photopolymerization, corroborated the Raman conversion of the films over their thickness. The confocal Raman microscopy method can be applied to various photopolymerized systems to characterize their behavior towards oxygen inhibition and other heterogeneities in conversion arising from inner filter effects or interactions between additives for instance. PMID:21986072

  4. Highly versatile confocal microscopy system based on a tunable femtosecond Er:fiber source.

    PubMed

    Träutlein, D; Adler, F; Moutzouris, K; Jeromin, A; Leitenstorfer, A; Ferrando-May, E

    2008-03-01

    The performance of a confocal microscopy setup based on a single femtosecond fiber system is explored over a broad range of pump wavelengths for both linear and nonlinear imaging techniques. First, the benefits of a laser source in linear fluorescence excitation that is continuously tunable over most of the visible spectrum are demonstrated. The influences of subpicosecond pulse durations on the bleaching behavior of typical fluorophores are discussed. We then utilize the tunable near-infrared output of the femtosecond system in connection with a specially designed prism compressor for dispersion control. Pulses as short as 33 fs are measured in the confocal region. As a consequence, 2 mW of average power are sufficient for two-photon microscopy in an organotypic sample from the mouse brain. This result shows great prospect for deep-tissue imaging in the optimum transparency window around 1100 nm. In a third experiment, we prove that our compact setup is powerful enough to exploit even higher-order nonlinearities such as three-photon absorption that we use to induce spatially localized photodamage in DNA. PMID:19343635

  5. Metabolic changes of cultured DRG neurons induced by adenosine using confocal microscopy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liqin; Huang, Yimei; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Yang, Hongqin; Zhang, Yanding; Xie, Shusen

    2012-12-01

    Adenosine exerts multiple effects on pain transmission in the peripheral nervous system. This study was performed to use confocal microscopy to evaluate whether adenosine could affect dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons in vitro and test which adenosine receptor mediates the effect of adenosine on DRG neurons. After adding adenosine with different concentration, we compared the metabolic changes by the real time imaging of calcium and mitochondria membrane potential using confocal microscopy. The results showed that the effect of 500 μM adenosine on the metabolic changes of DRG neurons was more significant than others. Furthermore, four different adenosine receptor antagonists were used to study which receptor mediated the influences of adenosine on the cultured DRG neurons. All adenosine receptor antagonists especially A1 receptor antagonist (DPCPX) had effect on the Ca2+ and mitochondria membrane potential dynamics of DRG neurons. The above studies demonstrated that the effect of adenosine which may be involved in the signal transmission on the sensory neurons was dose-dependent, and all the four adenosine receptors especially the A1R may mediate the transmission.

  6. Combining microtomy and confocal laser scanning microscopy for structural analyses of plant-fungus associations.

    PubMed

    Rath, Magnus; Grolig, Franz; Haueisen, Janine; Imhof, Stephan

    2014-05-01

    The serious problem of extended tissue thickness in the analysis of plant-fungus associations was overcome using a new method that combines physical and optical sectioning of the resin-embedded sample by microtomy and confocal microscopy. Improved tissue infiltration of the fungal-specific, high molecular weight fluorescent probe wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 633 resulted in high fungus-specific fluorescence even in deeper tissue sections. If autofluorescence was insufficient, additional counterstaining with Calcofluor White M2R or propidium iodide was applied in order to visualise the host plant tissues. Alternatively, the non-specific fluorochrome acid fuchsine was used for rapid staining of both, the plant and the fungal cells. The intricate spatial arrangements of the plant and fungal cells were preserved by immobilization in the hydrophilic resin Unicryl™. Microtomy was used to section the resin-embedded roots or leaves until the desired plane was reached. The data sets generated by confocal laser scanning microscopy of the remaining resin stubs allowed the precise spatial reconstruction of complex structures in the plant-fungus associations of interest. This approach was successfully tested on tissues from ectomycorrhiza (Betula pendula), arbuscular mycorrhiza (Galium aparine; Polygala paniculata, Polygala rupestris), ericoid mycorrhiza (Calluna vulgaris), orchid mycorrhiza (Limodorum abortivum, Serapias parviflora) and on one leaf-fungus association (Zymoseptoria tritici on Triticum aestivum). The method provides an efficient visualisation protocol applicable with a wide range of plant-fungus symbioses. PMID:24249491

  7. Three-dimensional simultaneous optical coherence tomography and confocal fluorescence microscopy for investigation of lung tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Maria; Cimalla, Peter; Meissner, Sven; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.; Koch, Edmund

    2012-07-01

    Although several strategies exist for a minimal-invasive treatment of patients with lung failure, the mortality rate of acute respiratory distress syndrome still reaches 30% at minimum. This striking number indicates the necessity of understanding lung dynamics on an alveolar level. To investigate the dynamical behavior on a microscale, we used three-dimensional geometrical and functional imaging to observe tissue parameters including alveolar size and length of embedded elastic fibers during ventilation. We established a combined optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal fluorescence microscopy system that is able to monitor the distension of alveolar tissue and elastin fibers simultaneously within three dimensions. The OCT system can laterally resolve a 4.9 μm line pair feature and has an approximately 11 μm full-width-half-maximum axial resolution in air. confocal fluorescence microscopy visualizes molecular properties of the tissue with a resolution of 0.75 μm (laterally), and 5.9 μm (axially) via fluorescence detection of the dye sulforhodamine B specifically binding to elastin. For system evaluation, we used a mouse model in situ to perform lung distension by application of different constant pressure values within the physiological regime. Our method enables the investigation of alveolar dynamics by helping to reveal basic processes emerging during artificial ventilation and breathing.

  8. Determination of nitric oxide mediating intracellular Ca2+ release on neurons based on confocal microscopy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liqin; Wang, Yuhua; He, Yipeng; Zeng, Yixiu; Zhang, Yanding; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    The gas NO is a ubiquitous intercellular messenger that modulates a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological functions. But few studies were made to study the role of NO in the Ca2+ release in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by confocal microscopy. Thus the objective of this study was to assess if NO has a role in Ca2+ signaling in DRG neurons using confocal microscopy combined with special fluorescence probe Fluo-3/AM. A 100 μM concentration of the NO donors (Sodium Nitroprusside, Dihydrate, SNP) and NO synthase inhibitor (NG-Monomethyl-L-arginine, Monoacetate salt, L-NMMA) was used in the study. Results showed that the fluorescence intensity increased rapidly after injecting SNP, which indicated that SNP could enhance intracellular Ca2+ release. And the fluorescence intensity shrank gradually with time and kept at a low level for quite a long period after loading with L-NMMA which indicated that L-NMMA could block intracellular Ca2+ release. All these results demonstrated that NO was involved in the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ release in the DRG neurons.

  9. Adaptive and Background-Aware GAL4 Expression Enhancement of Co-registered Confocal Microscopy Images.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Martin; Schulze, Florian; Novikov, Alexey A; Tirian, Laszlo; J Dickson, Barry; Bühler, Katja

    2016-04-01

    GAL4 gene expression imaging using confocal microscopy is a common and powerful technique used to study the nervous system of a model organism such as Drosophila melanogaster. Recent research projects focused on high throughput screenings of thousands of different driver lines, resulting in large image databases. The amount of data generated makes manual assessment tedious or even impossible. The first and most important step in any automatic image processing and data extraction pipeline is to enhance areas with relevant signal. However, data acquired via high throughput imaging tends to be less then ideal for this task, often showing high amounts of background signal. Furthermore, neuronal structures and in particular thin and elongated projections with a weak staining signal are easily lost. In this paper we present a method for enhancing the relevant signal by utilizing a Hessian-based filter to augment thin and weak tube-like structures in the image. To get optimal results, we present a novel adaptive background-aware enhancement filter parametrized with the local background intensity, which is estimated based on a common background model. We also integrate recent research on adaptive image enhancement into our approach, allowing us to propose an effective solution for known problems present in confocal microscopy images. We provide an evaluation based on annotated image data and compare our results against current state-of-the-art algorithms. The results show that our algorithm clearly outperforms the existing solutions. PMID:26743993

  10. Laser Scanning In Vivo Confocal Microscopy of Clear Grafts after Penetrating Keratoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dai; Song, Peng; Wang, Shuting; Sun, Dapeng; Wang, Yuexin; Zhang, Yangyang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the changes of keratocytes and dendritic cells in the central clear graft by laser scanning in vivo confocal microscopy after penetrating keratoplasty (PK). Methods. Thirty adult subjects receiving PK at Shandong Eye Institute and with clear grafts and no sign of immune rejection after surgery were recruited into this study, and 10 healthy adults were controls. The keratocytes and dendritic cells in the central graft were evaluated by laser scanning confocal microscopy, as well as epithelium cells, keratocytes, corneal endothelium cells, and corneal nerves (especially subepithelial plexus nerves). Results. Median density of subepithelial plexus nerves, keratocyte density in each layer of the stroma, and density of corneal endothelium cells were all lower in clear grafts than in controls. The dendritic cells of five (16.7%) patients were active in Bowman's membrane and stromal membrane of the graft after PK. Conclusions. Activated dendritic cells and Langerhans cells could be detected in some of the clear grafts, which indicated that the subclinical stress of immune reaction took part in the chronic injury of the clear graft after PK, even when there was no clinical rejection episode. PMID:27034940

  11. Live cell imaging using confocal microscopy induces intracellular calcium transients and cell death.

    PubMed

    Knight, Martin M; Roberts, Susan R; Lee, David A; Bader, Dan L

    2003-04-01

    Isolated chondrocytes stained with fluo 4-AM and visualized using standard confocal microscopy techniques exhibited Ca2- transients and oscillations. Decreasing the power of the laser light decreased the percent-age of cells exhibiting these Ca2+ signals. Treatment with the antioxidant ascorbate reduced the Ca2+ response, suggesting that it was mediated by light-induced release of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cell viability 24 h after the 1-h confocal imaging period was approximately 90% for cells that were neither fluorescently stained nor subjected to laser excitation. By contrast, fluorescently stained cells imaged for 1 h exhibited greatly reduced viability. Treatment with ascorbate reduced the level of cell death, suggesting that the effect was mediated by release of exogenous ROS associated with the interaction of light and the fluorochrome. Ca2+ oscillations were not always associated with cell death, suggesting that separate light-sensitive pathways mediate the two processes. Light-activated Ca2+ signaling may trigger alterations in numerous cell processes and thereby represent an important and hitherto overlooked artifact in fluorescent microscopy of viable cells. PMID:12661552

  12. In vivo fluorescence confocal microscopy: indocyanine green enhances the contrast of epidermal and dermal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skvara, Hans; Kittler, Harald; Schmid, Johannes A.; Plut, Ulrike; Jonak, Constanze

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, in vivo skin imaging devices have been successfully implemented in skin research as well as in clinical routine. Of particular importance is the use of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and fluorescence confocal microscopy (FCM) that enable visualization of the tissue with a resolution comparable to histology. A newly developed commercially available multi-laser device in which both technologies are integrated now offers the possibility to directly compare RCM with FCM. The fluorophore indocyanine green (ICG) was intradermally injected into healthy forearm skin of 10 volunteers followed by in vivo imaging at various time points. In the epidermis, accurate assessment of cell morphology with FCM was supplemented by identification of pigmented cells and structures with RCM. In dermal layers, only with FCM connective tissue fibers were clearly contoured down to a depth of more than 100 μm. The fluorescent signal still provided a favorable image contrast 24 and 48 hours after injection. Subsequently, ICG was applied to different types of skin diseases (basal cell carcinoma, actinic keratosis, seborrhoeic keratosis, and psoriasis) in order to demonstrate the diagnostic benefit of FCM when directly compared with RCM. Our data suggest a great impact of FCM in combination with ICG on clinical and experimental dermatology in the future.

  13. Quantification of whey in fluid milk using confocal Raman microscopy and artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Alves da Rocha, Roney; Paiva, Igor Moura; Anjos, Virgílio; Furtado, Marco Antônio Moreira; Bell, Maria José Valenzuela

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we assessed the use of confocal Raman microscopy and artificial neural network as a practical method to assess and quantify adulteration of fluid milk by addition of whey. Milk samples with added whey (from 0 to 100%) were prepared, simulating different levels of fraudulent adulteration. All analyses were carried out by direct inspection at the light microscope after depositing drops from each sample on a microscope slide and drying them at room temperature. No pre- or posttreatment (e.g., sample preparation or spectral correction) was required in the analyses. Quantitative determination of adulteration was performed through a feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN). Different ANN configurations were evaluated based on their coefficient of determination (R2) and root mean square error values, which were criteria for selecting the best predictor model. In the selected model, we observed that data from both training and validation subsets presented R2>99.99%, indicating that the combination of confocal Raman microscopy and ANN is a rapid, simple, and efficient method to quantify milk adulteration by whey. Because sample preparation and postprocessing of spectra were not required, the method has potential applications in health surveillance and food quality monitoring. PMID:25828656

  14. Corneal confocal microscopy reveals trigeminal small sensory fiber neuropathy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Giulio; Grisan, Enrico; Scarpa, Fabio; Fazio, Raffaella; Comola, Mauro; Quattrini, Angelo; Comi, Giancarlo; Rama, Paolo; Riva, Nilo

    2014-01-01

    Although subclinical involvement of sensory neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been previously demonstrated, corneal small fiber sensory neuropathy has not been reported to-date. We examined a group of sporadic ALS patients with corneal confocal microscopy, a recently developed imaging technique allowing in vivo observation of corneal small sensory fibers. Corneal confocal microscopy (CCM) examination revealed a reduction of corneal small fiber sensory nerve number and branching in ALS patients. Quantitative analysis demonstrated an increase in tortuosity and reduction in length and fractal dimension of ALS patients’ corneal nerve fibers compared to age-matched controls. Moreover, bulbar function disability scores were significantly related to measures of corneal nerve fibers anatomical damage. Our study demonstrates for the first time a corneal small fiber sensory neuropathy in ALS patients. This finding further suggests a link between sporadic ALS and facial-onset sensory and motor neuronopathy (FOSMN) syndrome, a rare condition characterized by early sensory symptoms (with trigeminal nerve distribution), followed by wasting and weakness of bulbar and upper limb muscles. In addition, the finding supports a model of neurodegeneration in ALS as a focally advancing process. PMID:25360111

  15. Virtual pinhole confocal microscope

    SciTech Connect

    George, J.S.; Rector, D.M.; Ranken, D.M.; Peterson, B.; Kesteron, J.

    1999-06-01

    Scanned confocal microscopes enhance imaging capabilities, providing improved contrast and image resolution in 3-D, but existing systems have significant technical shortcomings and are expensive. Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel approach--virtual pinhole confocal microscopy--that uses state of the art illumination, detection, and data processing technologies to produce an imager with a number of advantages: reduced cost, faster imaging, improved efficiency and sensitivity, improved reliability and much greater flexibility. Work at Los Alamos demonstrated proof of principle; prototype hardware and software have been used to demonstrate technical feasibility of several implementation strategies. The system uses high performance illumination, patterned in time and space. The authors have built functional confocal imagers using video display technologies (LCD or DLP) and novel scanner based on a micro-lens array. They have developed a prototype system for high performance data acquisition and processing, designed to support realtime confocal imaging. They have developed algorithms to reconstruct confocal images from a time series of spatially sub-sampled images; software development remains an area of active development. These advances allow the collection of high quality confocal images (in fluorescence, reflectance and transmission modes) with equipment that can inexpensively retrofit to existing microscopes. Planned future extensions to these technologies will significantly enhance capabilities for microscopic imaging in a variety of applications, including confocal endoscopy, and confocal spectral imaging.

  16. Quantitative 3D elemental analysis inside plant roots by means of synchrotron confocal micro X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzano, R.; Vekemans, B.; Tomasi, N.; Spagnuolo, M.; Schoonjans, T.; Vincze, L.; Pinton, R.; Cesco, S.; Ruggiero, P.

    2009-04-01

    The knowledge of the distribution and concentration of elements within plants is a fundamental step to better understand how these plants uptake specific elements from the medium of growth and how they manage acquisition and compartmentalisation of nutrients as well as toxic metals. For some elements, either nutrients or toxicants, it can be of relevance to know their concentration level within microscopic volumes in plant organs, where they are stored or accumulated. Usually, this type of microscopic analysis requires complex cutting procedures and extensive sample manipulations. In this research, the technique of synchrotron micro X-ray fluorescence in the confocal mode was applied to image the distribution of elements in selected key-planes of tomato roots without the need of any sample preparation, except washing and freeze-drying. Using this method, a first polycapillary lens focussed the X-ray beam with an energy of 12.4 keV down to a 20 µm beam that is penetrating the sample, and a second polycapillary half-lens, that was positioned at the detection side at 90 degrees to the first polycapillary, could then restrict further the view on this irradiated volume to a defined microscopic volume (typically 20x20x20 µm3) from which the induced fluorescent radiation is finally collected by the energy dispersive detector. In this way, it was possible to investigate the concentration levels of some elements such as K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn within the roots of tomato plants. The quantification was performed by means of a dedicated XRF Fundamental Parameter (FP) method in order to calculate the concentrations of trace elements within the analysed plants. Utilizing fundamental atomic parameters, the applied FP method is taking into account the influence of sample self-absorption and especially the specific detection processes by the polycapillary lens. Quantification was assessed and validated by using different standards: NIST SRM 1573a (trace elements in tomato leaves

  17. Localization and movement of mineral oil in plants by fluorescence and confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tan, B L; Sarafis, V; Beattie, G A C; White, R; Darley, E M; Spooner-Hart, R

    2005-10-01

    Fluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy were explored to investigate the movement and localization of mineral oils in citrus. In a laboratory experiment, fluorescence microscopy observation indicated that when a 'narrow' distillation fraction of an nC23 horticultural mineral oil was applied to adaxial and opposing abaxial leaf surfaces of potted orange [Citrus x aurantium L. (Sapindales: Rutaceae)] trees, oil penetrated steadily into treated leaves and, subsequently, moved to untreated petioles of the leaves and adjacent untreated stems. In another experiment, confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to visualize the penetration into, and the subsequent cellular distribution of, an nC24 agricultural mineral oil in C. trifoliata L. seedlings. Oil droplets penetrated or diffused into plants via both stomata and the cuticle of leaves and stems, and then moved within intercellular spaces and into various cells including phloem and xylem. Oil accumulated in droplets in intercellular spaces and within cells near the cell membrane. Oil entered cells without visibly damaging membranes or causing cell death. In a field experiment with mature orange trees, droplets of an nC23 horticultural mineral oil were observed, by fluorescence microscopy, in phloem sieve elements in spring flush growth produced 4-5 months and 16-17 months after the trees were sprayed with oil. These results suggest that movement of mineral oil in plants is both apoplastic via intercellular spaces and symplastic via plasmodesmata. The putative pattern of the translocation of mineral oil in plants and its relevance to oil-induced chronic phytotoxicity are discussed. PMID:16118255

  18. The potential of 3D-FISH and super-resolution structured illumination microscopy for studies of 3D nuclear architecture: 3D structured illumination microscopy of defined chromosomal structures visualized by 3D (immuno)-FISH opens new perspectives for studies of nuclear architecture.

    PubMed

    Markaki, Yolanda; Smeets, Daniel; Fiedler, Susanne; Schmid, Volker J; Schermelleh, Lothar; Cremer, Thomas; Cremer, Marion

    2012-05-01

    Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) has opened up new possibilities to study nuclear architecture at the ultrastructural level down to the ~100 nm range. We present first results and assess the potential using 3D-SIM in combination with 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization (3D-FISH) for the topographical analysis of defined nuclear targets. Our study also deals with the concern that artifacts produced by FISH may counteract the gain in resolution. We address the topography of DAPI-stained DNA in nuclei before and after 3D-FISH, nuclear pores and the lamina, chromosome territories, chromatin domains, and individual gene loci. We also look at the replication patterns of chromocenters and the topographical relationship of Xist-RNA within the inactive X-territory. These examples demonstrate that an appropriately adapted 3D-FISH/3D-SIM approach preserves key characteristics of the nuclear ultrastructure and that the gain in information obtained by 3D-SIM yields new insights into the functional nuclear organization. PMID:22508100

  19. TRAIL protein localization in human primary T cells by 3D microscopy using 3D interactive surface plot: a new method to visualize plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Gras, Christophe; Smith, Nikaïa; Sengmanivong, Lucie; Gandini, Mariana; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-31

    The apoptotic ligand TNF-related apoptosis ligand (TRAIL) is expressed on the membrane of immune cells during HIV infection. The intracellular stockade of TRAIL in human primary CD4(+) T cells is not known. Here we investigated whether primary CD4(+) T cells expressed TRAIL in their intracellular compartment and whether TRAIL is relocalized on the plasma membrane under HIV activation. We found that TRAIL protein was stocked in intracellular compartment in non activated CD4(+) T cells and that the total level of TRAIL protein was not increased under HIV-1 stimulation. However, TRAIL was massively relocalized on plasma membrane when cells were cultured with HIV. Using three dimensional (3D) microscopy we localized TRAIL protein in human T cells and developed a new method to visualize plasma membrane without the need of a membrane marker. This method used the 3D interactive surface plot and bright light acquired images. PMID:23085529

  20. Robust Adaptive 3-D Segmentation of Vessel Laminae From Fluorescence Confocal Microscope Images and Parallel GPU Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswamy, Arunachalam; Dwarakapuram, Saritha; Bjornsson, Christopher S.; Cutler, Barbara M.; Shain, William

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents robust 3-D algorithms to segment vasculature that is imaged by labeling laminae, rather than the lumenal volume. The signal is weak, sparse, noisy, nonuniform, low-contrast, and exhibits gaps and spectral artifacts, so adaptive thresholding and Hessian filtering based methods are not effective. The structure deviates from a tubular geometry, so tracing algorithms are not effective. We propose a four step approach. The first step detects candidate voxels using a robust hypothesis test based on a model that assumes Poisson noise and locally planar geometry. The second step performs an adaptive region growth to extract weakly labeled and fine vessels while rejecting spectral artifacts. To enable interactive visualization and estimation of features such as statistical confidence, local curvature, local thickness, and local normal, we perform the third step. In the third step, we construct an accurate mesh representation using marching tetrahedra, volume-preserving smoothing, and adaptive decimation algorithms. To enable topological analysis and efficient validation, we describe a method to estimate vessel centerlines using a ray casting and vote accumulation algorithm which forms the final step of our algorithm. Our algorithm lends itself to parallel processing, and yielded an 8× speedup on a graphics processor (GPU). On synthetic data, our meshes had average error per face (EPF) values of (0.1–1.6) voxels per mesh face for peak signal-to-noise ratios from (110–28 dB). Separately, the error from decimating the mesh to less than 1% of its original size, the EPF was less than 1 voxel/face. When validated on real datasets, the average recall and precision values were found to be 94.66% and 94.84%, respectively. PMID:20199906

  1. Local delivery of fluorescent dye for fiber-optics confocal microscopy of the living heart

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao; Kaza, Aditya K.; Hitchcock, Robert W.; Sachse, Frank B.

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-optics confocal microscopy (FCM) is an emerging imaging technology with various applications in basic research and clinical diagnosis. FCM allows for real-time in situ microscopy of tissue at sub-cellular scale. Recently FCM has been investigated for cardiac imaging, in particular, for discrimination of cardiac tissue during pediatric open-heart surgery. FCM relies on fluorescent dyes. The current clinical approach of dye delivery is based on systemic injection, which is associated with high dye consumption, and adverse clinical events. In this study, we investigated approaches for local dye delivery during FCM imaging based on dye carriers attached to the imaging probe. Using three-dimensional confocal microscopy, automated bench tests, and FCM imaging we quantitatively characterized dye release of carriers composed of open-pore foam only and foam loaded with agarose hydrogel. In addition, we compared local dye delivery with a model of systemic dye delivery in the isolated perfused rodent heart. We measured the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of images acquired in various regions of the heart. Our evaluations showed that foam-agarose dye carriers exhibited a prolonged dye release vs. foam-only carriers. Foam-agarose dye carriers allowed reliable imaging of 5–9 lines, which is comparable to 4–8 min of continuous dye release. Our study in the living heart revealed that the SNR of FCM images using local and systemic dye delivery is not different. However, we observed differences in the imaged tissue microstructure with the two approaches. Structural features characteristic of microvasculature were solely observed for systemic dye delivery. Our findings suggest that local dye delivery approach for FCM imaging constitutes an important alternative to systemic dye delivery. We suggest that the approach for local dye delivery will facilitate clinical translation of FCM, for instance, for FCM imaging during pediatric heart surgery. PMID:25309455

  2. Correcting spherical aberrations in confocal light sheet microscopy: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, L; Sacconi, L; Pavone, F S

    2014-07-01

    In the last years, fluorescence light sheet microscopy has attracted an increasing interest among the microscopy community. One of the most promising applications of this technique is the reconstruction of macroscopic biological specimens with microscopic resolution, without physical sectioning. To this aim, light sheet microscopy is combined with clearing protocols based on refractive index matching, which render the tissue transparent. However, these protocols lead to a huge drop in the fluorescence signal, limiting their practical applicability. The reduction of signal to background ratio is commonly ascribed to chemical degradation of the fluorophores by the organic solvents used for clearing. This view however completely neglects another important factor of contrast loss, i.e., optical aberrations. In fact, commercially available objectives suitable for light sheet microscopy are not designed for the refractive index of the clearing solutions, and this mismatch introduces severe spherical aberration. Here we simulated the aberrated point spread function (PSF) of a light sheet microscope with confocal slit detection. We investigated the variation of the PSF as a function of objective numerical aperture (NA) and of imaging depth inside the clearing solution. We also explored the possibility of correcting such spherical aberration by introducing extra optical devices in the detection path. By correcting up to the second order spherical aberration, a quasi-diffraction-limited regime can be recovered, and image quality is restored. PMID:24395714

  3. Coupling Electrochemistry with Fluorescence Confocal Microscopy To Investigate Electrochemical Reactivity: A Case Study with the Resazurin-Resorufin Fluorogenic Couple.

    PubMed

    Doneux, Thomas; Bouffier, Laurent; Goudeau, Bertrand; Arbault, Stéphane

    2016-06-21

    The redox couple resazurin-resorufin exhibits electrofluorochromic properties which are investigated herein by absorption and fluorescence spectroelectrochemistry and by electrochemically coupled-fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy (EC-CLSM). At pH 10, the highly fluorescent resorufin dye is generated at the electrode surface by the electrochemical reduction of the poorly fluorescent resazurin. Performing EC-CLSM at electrode surfaces allows to monitor spatially resolved electrochemical processes in situ and in real time. Using a small (315 μm diameter) cylindrical electrode, a steady-state diffusion layer builds up under potentiostatic conditions at -0.45 V vs Ag|AgCl. Mapping the fluorescence intensity in 3D by CLSM enables us to reconstruct the relative concentration profile of resorufin around the electrode. The comparison of the experimental diffusion-profile with theoretical predictions demonstrates that spontaneous convection has a direct influence on the actual thickness of the diffusion layer, which is smaller than the value predicted for a purely diffusional transport. This study shows that combining fluorescence CLSM with electrochemistry is a powerful tool to study electrochemical reactivity at a spatially resolved level. PMID:27247989

  4. 3D measurements of live cells via digital holographic microscopy and terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun Yong; Oser, Dorian; Iapozzuto, Peter; Norbury, Sean; Mahajan, Supriya; Khmaladze, Alexander; Sharikova, Anna

    2016-03-01

    This is a study of the central nervous system (CNS) cells, including brain micro vascular endothelial cells (BMV) that constitute the blood brain barrier, and C6 glial cells that are the predominant cell in the brain. The cells are exposed to various chemicals by non-invasive, label-free methods. Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is a technique that records an interference pattern between an object and reference waves, so that the computationally reconstructed holographic image contains both amplitude and phase information, and 3D images are obtained. The measurement of cell cultures by digital holographic microscopy yields information about cell death mechanisms, since these processes are correlated with individual cell volume. Our in-house DHM combines a visible (red) laser source with a conventional microscope base, and LabVIEW-run data processing. Terahertz spectral signatures are associated with structural changes in molecules and provide complementary information about cells. Both CNS cells BMV and C6 cells are treated with the drug "Methamphetamine" (METH), which induces apoptosis in neuronal cells and exhibits decrease in cell volume, a characteristic of cells undergoing apoptosis (induced cell death). METH can cause CNS cell death by cross-talk between mitochondria-, endoplasmic reticulum-, and receptor-mediated apoptotic events, all of which results in drug induced changes in neuroplasticity and significant neuropathology. Doxorubicin (DOX), a popular anticancer drug, is used as a control. We observe that METH treatment resulted in more pronounced cell volume shrinkage in both the BMV and C6 cells, as compared to DOX-induced cell apoptosis.

  5. Investigation of resins suitable for the preparation of biological sample for 3-D electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kizilyaprak, Caroline; Longo, Giovanni; Daraspe, Jean; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-02-01

    In the last two decades, the third-dimension has become a focus of attention in electron microscopy to better understand the interactions within subcellular compartments. Initially, transmission electron tomography (TEM tomography) was introduced to image the cell volume in semi-thin sections (∼ 500 nm). With the introduction of the focused ion beam scanning electron microscope, a new tool, FIB-SEM tomography, became available to image much larger volumes. During TEM tomography and FIB-SEM tomography, the resin section is exposed to a high electron/ion dose such that the stability of the resin embedded biological sample becomes an important issue. The shrinkage of a resin section in each dimension, especially in depth, is a well-known phenomenon. To ensure the dimensional integrity of the final volume of the cell, it is important to assess the properties of the different resins and determine the formulation which has the best stability in the electron/ion beam. Here, eight different resin formulations were examined. The effects of radiation damage were evaluated after different times of TEM irradiation. To get additional information on mass-loss and the physical properties of the resins (stiffness and adhesion), the topography of the irradiated areas was analysed with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Further, the behaviour of the resins was analysed after ion milling of the surface of the sample with different ion currents. In conclusion, two resin formulations, Hard Plus and the mixture of Durcupan/Epon, emerged that were considerably less affected and reasonably stable in the electron/ion beam and thus suitable for the 3-D investigation of biological samples. PMID:25433274

  6. Confocal Raman microscopy for investigation of the level of differentiation in living neuroblastoma tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalfi-Happ, Claudia; Jauss, Andrea; Hollricher, Olaf; Fulda, Simone; Hauser, Carmen; Steiner, Rudolf; Rück, Angelika

    2007-07-01

    The investigation of living cells at physiological conditions requires very sensitive, sophisticated, non invasive methods. In this study, Raman spectral imaging is used to identify different biomolecules inside of cells. Raman spectroscopy, a chemically and structurally sensitive measuring technique, is combined with high resolution confocal microscopy. In Raman spectral imaging mode, a complete Raman spectrum is recorded at every confocal image point, giving insight into the chemical composition of each sample compartment. Neuroblastoma is the most common solid extra-cranial tumor in children. One of the unique features of neuroblastoma cells is their ability to differentiate spontaneously, eventually leading to complete remission. Since differentiation agents are currently used in the clinic for neuroblastoma therapy, there is a special need to develop non-invasive and sensitive new methods to monitor neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Neuroblastoma cells at different degrees of differentiation were analysed with the confocal Raman microscope alpha300 R (WITec GmbH, Germany), using a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm and 10 mW for excitation. Integration time per spectrum was 80-100 ms. A lateral resolution in submicrometer range was achieved by using a 60x water immersion lens with a numerical aperture of 1,0. Raman images of cells were generated from these sets of data by either integrating over specific Raman bands, by basis analysis using reference spectra or by cluster analysis. The automated evaluation of all spectra results in spectral unmixed images providing insight into the chemical composition of the sample. With these procedures, different cell organelles, cytosol, membranes could be distinguished. Since neuroblastoma cells at high degree of differentiation overproduce noradrenaline, an attempt was made to trace the presence of this neurotransmitter as a marker for differentiation. The results of this work may have applications in the

  7. Comparison of reflectance confocal microscopy and two-photon second harmonic generation microscopy in fungal keratitis rabbit model ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Ho; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Park, Jin Hyoung; Tchah, Hungwon; Kim, Myoung Joon; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-01-01

    Fungal keratitis is an infection of the cornea by fungal pathogens. Diagnosis methods based on optical microscopy could be beneficial over the conventional microbiology method by allowing rapid and non-invasive examination. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and two-photon second harmonic generation microscopy (TPSHGM) have been applied to pre-clinical or clinical studies of fungal keratitis. In this report, RCM and TPSHGM were characterized and compared in the imaging of a fungal keratitis rabbit model ex vivo. Fungal infection was induced by using two strains of fungi: aspergillus fumigatus and candida albicans. The infected corneas were imaged in fresh condition by both modalities sequentially and their images were analyzed. Both RCM and TPSHGM could detect both fungal strains within the cornea based on morphology: aspergillus fumigatus had distinctive filamentous structures, and candida albicans had round structures superficially and elongated structures in the corneal stroma. These imaging results were confirmed by histology. Comparison between RCM and TPSHGM showed several characteristics. Although RCM and TPSHGM images had good correlation each other, their images were slightly different due to difference in contrast mechanism. RCM had relatively low image contrast with the infected turbid corneas due to high background signal. TPSHGM visualized cells and collagen in the cornea clearly compared to RCM, but used higher laser power to compensate low autofluorescence. Since these two modalities provide complementary information, combination of RCM and TPSHGM would be useful for fungal keratitis detection by compensating their weaknesses each other. PMID:26977371

  8. Prototype study on a miniaturized dual-modality imaging system for photoacoustic microscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sung-Liang; Xie, Zhixing; Guo, L. Jay; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    It is beneficial to study tumor angiogenesis and microenvironments by imaging the microvasculature and cells at the same time. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is capable of sensitive three-dimensional mapping of microvasculature, while fluorescence microscopy may be applied to assessment of tissue pathology. In this work, a fiber-optic based PAM and confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) dual-modality imaging system was designed and built, serving as a prototype of a miniaturized dual-modality imaging probe for endoscopic applications. As for the design, we employed miniature components, including a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanner, a miniature objective lens, and a small size optical microring resonator as an acoustic detector. The system resolutions were calibrated as 8.8 μm in the lateral directions for both PAM and CFM, and 19 μm and 53 μm in the axial direction for PAM and CFM, respectively. Images of the animal bladders ex vivo were demonstrated to show the ability of the system in imaging not only microvasculature but also cellular structure.

  9. Comparison of reflectance confocal microscopy and two-photon second harmonic generation microscopy in fungal keratitis rabbit model ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Ho; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J; Park, Jin Hyoung; Tchah, Hungwon; Kim, Myoung Joon; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-02-01

    Fungal keratitis is an infection of the cornea by fungal pathogens. Diagnosis methods based on optical microscopy could be beneficial over the conventional microbiology method by allowing rapid and non-invasive examination. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and two-photon second harmonic generation microscopy (TPSHGM) have been applied to pre-clinical or clinical studies of fungal keratitis. In this report, RCM and TPSHGM were characterized and compared in the imaging of a fungal keratitis rabbit model ex vivo. Fungal infection was induced by using two strains of fungi: aspergillus fumigatus and candida albicans. The infected corneas were imaged in fresh condition by both modalities sequentially and their images were analyzed. Both RCM and TPSHGM could detect both fungal strains within the cornea based on morphology: aspergillus fumigatus had distinctive filamentous structures, and candida albicans had round structures superficially and elongated structures in the corneal stroma. These imaging results were confirmed by histology. Comparison between RCM and TPSHGM showed several characteristics. Although RCM and TPSHGM images had good correlation each other, their images were slightly different due to difference in contrast mechanism. RCM had relatively low image contrast with the infected turbid corneas due to high background signal. TPSHGM visualized cells and collagen in the cornea clearly compared to RCM, but used higher laser power to compensate low autofluorescence. Since these two modalities provide complementary information, combination of RCM and TPSHGM would be useful for fungal keratitis detection by compensating their weaknesses each other. PMID:26977371

  10. Clean localization super-resolution microscopy for 3D biological imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Partha P.; Curthoys, Nikki M.; Hess, Samuel T.

    2016-01-01

    We propose clean localization microscopy (a variant of fPALM) using a molecule filtering technique. Localization imaging involves acquiring a large number of images containing single molecule signatures followed by one-to-one mapping to render a super-resolution image. In principle, this process can be repeated for other z-planes to construct a 3D image. But, single molecules observed from off-focal planes result in false representation of their presence in the focal plane, resulting in incorrect quantification and analysis. We overcome this with a single molecule filtering technique that imposes constraints on the diffraction limited spot size of single molecules in the image plane. Calibration with sub-diffraction size beads puts a natural cutoff on the actual diffraction-limited size of single molecules in the focal plane. This helps in distinguishing beads present in the focal plane from those in the off-focal planes thereby providing an estimate of the single molecules in the focal plane. We study the distribution of actin (labeled with a photoactivatable CAGE 552 dye) in NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblast cells.

  11. Blind deconvolution of 3D fluorescence microscopy using depth-variant asymmetric PSF.

    PubMed

    Kim, Boyoung; Naemura, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    The 3D wide-field fluorescence microscopy suffers from depth-variant asymmetric blur. The depth-variance and axial asymmetry are due to refractive index mismatch between the immersion and the specimen layer. The radial asymmetry is due to lens imperfections and local refractive index inhomogeneities in the specimen. To obtain the PSF that has these characteristics, there were PSF premeasurement trials. However, they are useless since imaging conditions such as camera position and refractive index of the specimen are changed between the premeasurement and actual imaging. In this article, we focus on removing unknown depth-variant asymmetric blur in such an optical system under the assumption of refractive index homogeneities in the specimen. We propose finding few parameters in the mathematical PSF model from observed images in which the PSF model has a depth-variant asymmetric shape. After generating an initial PSF from the analysis of intensities in the observed image, the parameters are estimated based on a maximum likelihood estimator. Using the estimated PSF, we implement an accelerated GEM algorithm for image deconvolution. Deconvolution result shows the superiority of our algorithm in terms of accuracy, which quantitatively evaluated by FWHM, relative contrast, standard deviation values of intensity peaks and FWHM. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:480-494, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27062314

  12. In situ 3D characterization of historical coatings and wood using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Latour, Gaël; Echard, Jean-Philippe; Didier, Marie; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2012-10-22

    We demonstrate multimodal nonlinear optical imaging of historical artifacts by combining Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (2PEF) microscopies. We first identify the nonlinear optical response of materials commonly encountered in coatings of cultural heritage artifacts by analyzing one- and multi-layered model samples. We observe 2PEF signals from cochineal lake and sandarac and show that pigments and varnish films can be discriminated by exploiting their different emission spectral ranges as in luminescence linear spectroscopy. We then demonstrate SHG imaging of a filler, plaster, composed of bassanite particles which exhibit a non centrosymmetric crystal structure. We also show that SHG/2PEF imaging enables the visualization of wood microstructure through typically 60 µm-thick coatings by revealing crystalline cellulose (SHG signal) and lignin (2PEF signal) in the wood cell walls. Finally, in situ multimodal nonlinear imaging is demonstrated in a historical violin. SHG/2PEF imaging thus appears as a promising non-destructive and contactless tool for in situ 3D investigation of historical coatings and more generally for wood characterization and coating analysis at micrometer scale. PMID:23187225

  13. Segmentation of vascular structures and hematopoietic cells in 3D microscopy images and quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Jian; Yang, Lin; Kamocka, Malgorzata M.; Zollman, Amy L.; Carlesso, Nadia; Chen, Danny Z.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present image processing methods for quantitative study of how the bone marrow microenvironment changes (characterized by altered vascular structure and hematopoietic cell distribution) caused by diseases or various factors. We develop algorithms that automatically segment vascular structures and hematopoietic cells in 3-D microscopy images, perform quantitative analysis of the properties of the segmented vascular structures and cells, and examine how such properties change. In processing images, we apply local thresholding to segment vessels, and add post-processing steps to deal with imaging artifacts. We propose an improved watershed algorithm that relies on both intensity and shape information and can separate multiple overlapping cells better than common watershed methods. We then quantitatively compute various features of the vascular structures and hematopoietic cells, such as the branches and sizes of vessels and the distribution of cells. In analyzing vascular properties, we provide algorithms for pruning fake vessel segments and branches based on vessel skeletons. Our algorithms can segment vascular structures and hematopoietic cells with good quality. We use our methods to quantitatively examine the changes in the bone marrow microenvironment caused by the deletion of Notch pathway. Our quantitative analysis reveals property changes in samples with deleted Notch pathway. Our tool is useful for biologists to quantitatively measure changes in the bone marrow microenvironment, for developing possible therapeutic strategies to help the bone marrow microenvironment recovery.

  14. A resource from 3D electron microscopy of hippocampal neuropil for user training and tool development

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Kristen M.; Spacek, Josef; Bell, Maria Elizabeth; Parker, Patrick H.; Lindsey, Laurence F.; Baden, Alexander D.; Vogelstein, Joshua T.; Burns, Randal

    2015-01-01

    Resurgent interest in synaptic circuitry and plasticity has emphasized the importance of 3D reconstruction from serial section electron microscopy (3DEM). Three volumes of hippocampal CA1 neuropil from adult rat were imaged at X-Y resolution of ~2 nm on serial sections of ~50–60 nm thickness. These are the first densely reconstructed hippocampal volumes. All axons, dendrites, glia, and synapses were reconstructed in a cube (~10 μm3) surrounding a large dendritic spine, a cylinder (~43 μm3) surrounding an oblique dendritic segment (3.4 μm long), and a parallelepiped (~178 μm3) surrounding an apical dendritic segment (4.9 μm long). The data provide standards for identifying ultrastructural objects in 3DEM, realistic reconstructions for modeling biophysical properties of synaptic transmission, and a test bed for enhancing reconstruction tools. Representative synapses are quantified from varying section planes, and microtubules, polyribosomes, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, and endosomes are identified and reconstructed in a subset of dendrites. The original images, traces, and Reconstruct software and files are freely available and visualized at the Open Connectome Project (Data Citation 1). PMID:26347348

  15. Real Time Gabor-Domain Optical Coherence Microscopy for 3D Imaging.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Jannick P; Canavesi, Cristina; Tankam, Patrice; Cogliati, Andrea; Lanis, Mara; Santhanam, Anand P

    2016-01-01

    Fast, robust, nondestructive 3D imaging is needed for the characterization of microscopic tissue structures across various clinical applications. A custom microelectromechanical system (MEMS)-based 2D scanner was developed to achieve, together with a multi-level GPU architecture, 55 kHz fast-axis A-scan acquisition in a Gabor-domain optical coherence microscopy (GD-OCM) custom instrument. GD-OCM yields high-definition micrometer-class volumetric images. A dynamic depth of focusing capability through a bio-inspired liquid lens-based microscope design, as in whales' eyes, was developed to enable the high definition instrument throughout a large field of view of 1 mm3 volume of imaging. Developing this technology is prime to enable integration within the workflow of clinical environments. Imaging at an invariant resolution of 2 μm has been achieved throughout a volume of 1 × 1 × 0.6 mm3, acquired in less than 2 minutes. Volumetric scans of human skin in vivo and an excised human cornea are presented. PMID:27046601

  16. Single Particle Cryo-electron Microscopy and 3-D Reconstruction of Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fei; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    With fast progresses in instrumentation, image processing algorithms, and computational resources, single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) 3-D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses has now reached near-atomic resolutions (3–4 Å). With comparable resolutions and more predictable outcomes, cryo-EM is now considered a preferred method over X-ray crystallography for determination of atomic structure of icosahedral viruses. At near-atomic resolutions, all-atom models or backbone models can be reliably built that allow residue level understanding of viral assembly and conformational changes among different stages of viral life cycle. With the developments of asymmetric reconstruction, it is now possible to visualize the complete structure of a complex virus with not only its icosahedral shell but also its multiple non-icosahedral structural features. In this chapter, we will describe single particle cryo-EM experimental and computational procedures for both near-atomic resolution reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and asymmetric reconstruction of viruses with both icosahedral and non-icosahedral structure components. Procedures for rigorous validation of the reconstructions and resolution evaluations using truly independent de novo initial models and refinements are also introduced. PMID:24357374

  17. A resource from 3D electron microscopy of hippocampal neuropil for user training and tool development.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kristen M; Spacek, Josef; Bell, Maria Elizabeth; Parker, Patrick H; Lindsey, Laurence F; Baden, Alexander D; Vogelstein, Joshua T; Burns, Randal

    2015-01-01

    Resurgent interest in synaptic circuitry and plasticity has emphasized the importance of 3D reconstruction from serial section electron microscopy (3DEM). Three volumes of hippocampal CA1 neuropil from adult rat were imaged at X-Y resolution of ~2 nm on serial sections of ~50-60 nm thickness. These are the first densely reconstructed hippocampal volumes. All axons, dendrites, glia, and synapses were reconstructed in a cube (~10 μm(3)) surrounding a large dendritic spine, a cylinder (~43 μm(3)) surrounding an oblique dendritic segment (3.4 μm long), and a parallelepiped (~178 μm(3)) surrounding an apical dendritic segment (4.9 μm long). The data provide standards for identifying ultrastructural objects in 3DEM, realistic reconstructions for modeling biophysical properties of synaptic transmission, and a test bed for enhancing reconstruction tools. Representative synapses are quantified from varying section planes, and microtubules, polyribosomes, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, and endosomes are identified and reconstructed in a subset of dendrites. The original images, traces, and Reconstruct software and files are freely available and visualized at the Open Connectome Project (Data Citation 1). PMID:26347348

  18. Readily Accessible Multiplane Microscopy: 3D Tracking the HIV-1 Genome in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Itano, Michelle S; Bleck, Marina; Johnson, Daniel S; Simon, Sanford M

    2016-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection and the associated disease AIDS are a major cause of human death worldwide with no vaccine or cure available. The trafficking of HIV-1 RNAs from sites of synthesis in the nucleus, through the cytoplasm, to sites of assembly at the plasma membrane are critical steps in HIV-1 viral replication, but are not well characterized. Here we present a broadly accessible microscopy method that captures multiple focal planes simultaneously, which allows us to image the trafficking of HIV-1 genomic RNAs with high precision. This method utilizes a customization of a commercial multichannel emission splitter that enables high-resolution 3D imaging with single-macromolecule sensitivity. We show with high temporal and spatial resolution that HIV-1 genomic RNAs are most mobile in the cytosol, and undergo confined mobility at sites along the nuclear envelope and in the nucleus and nucleolus. These provide important insights regarding the mechanism by which the HIV-1 RNA genome is transported to the sites of assembly of nascent virions. PMID:26567131

  19. Fault localization and analysis in semiconductor devices with optical-feedback infrared confocal microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sarmiento, Raymund; Cemine, Vernon Julius; Tagaca, Imee Rose; Salvador, Arnel; Mar Blanca, Carlo; Saloma, Caesar

    2007-11-01

    We report on a cost-effective optical setup for characterizing light-emitting semiconductor devices with optical-feedback confocal infrared microscopy and optical beam-induced resistance change.We utilize the focused beam from an infrared laser diode to induce local thermal resistance changes across the surface of a biased integrated circuit (IC) sample. Variations in the multiple current paths are mapped by scanning the IC across the focused beam. The high-contrast current maps allow accurate differentiation of the functional and defective sites, or the isolation of the surface-emittingp-i-n devices in the IC. Optical beam-induced current (OBIC) is not generated since the incident beam energy is lower than the bandgap energy of the p-i-n device. Inhomogeneous current distributions in the IC become apparent without the strong OBIC background. They are located at a diffraction-limited resolution by referencing the current maps against the confocal reflectance image that is simultaneously acquired via optical-feedback detection. Our technique permits the accurate identification of metal and semiconductor sites as well as the classification of different metallic structures according to thickness, composition, or spatial inhomogeneity.

  20. Quantitative confocal fluorescence microscopy of dynamic processes by multifocal fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krmpot, Aleksandar J.; Nikolić, Stanko N.; Vitali, Marco; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios K.; Oasa, Sho; Thyberg, Per; Tisa, Simone; Kinjo, Masataka; Nilsson, Lennart; Gehring, Walter J.; Terenius, Lars; Rigler, Rudolf; Vukojevic, Vladana

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging without scanning is developed for the study of fast dynamical processes. The method relies on the use of massively parallel Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (mpFCS). Simultaneous excitation of fluorescent molecules across the specimen is achieved by passing a single laser beam through a Diffractive Optical Element (DOE) to generate a quadratic illumination matrix of 32×32 light sources. Fluorescence from 1024 illuminated spots is detected in a confocal arrangement by a matching matrix detector consisting of the same number of single-photon avalanche photodiodes (SPADs). Software was developed for data acquisition and fast autoand cross-correlation analysis by parallel signal processing using a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU). Instrumental performance was assessed using a conventional single-beam FCS instrument as a reference. Versatility of the approach for application in biomedical research was evaluated using ex vivo salivary glands from Drosophila third instar larvae expressing a fluorescently-tagged transcription factor Sex Combs Reduced (Scr) and live PC12 cells stably expressing the fluorescently tagged mu-opioid receptor (MOPeGFP). We show that quantitative mapping of local concentration and mobility of transcription factor molecules across the specimen can be achieved using this approach, which paves the way for future quantitative characterization of dynamical reaction-diffusion landscapes across live cells/tissue with a submillisecond temporal resolution (presently 21 μs/frame) and single-molecule sensitivity.

  1. Fluorescence imaging and time-resolved spectroscopy of steroid using confocal synchrotron radiation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerritsen, Hans C.; van der Oord, C. J. R.; Levine, Yehudi K.; Munro, Ian H.; Jones, Gareth R.; Shaw, D. A.; Rommerts, Fokko F.

    1994-08-01

    The Confocal Synchrotron Radiation Microscope at Daresbury was used in a study of the transport and distribution of the steroid Coumestrol in single Leydig cells. The broad spectrum of synchrotron radiation in combination with UV compatible microscope optics affords the extension of confocal microscopy from the visible to the UV region down to about 200 nm. Consequently fluorescent molecules with absorption bands in the UV can be imaged. In addition the pulsed nature of the light source allows us to perform time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy experiments on microscopic volumes. Coumestrol is a naturally fluorescing plant steroid exhibiting estrogenic activity. In physiological environments it has an absorption peak in the UV at 340 nm and it emits around 440 nm. First results indicate that the Coumestrol transport through the cell membrane is diffusion limited. The weak fluorescence observed in the nuclei of the Leydig cells may be due to fluorescence quenching arising from the interaction of the Coumesterol with nuclear components. However, micro-volume time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy experiments on cell nuclei have revealed the same decay behavior for Coumesterol in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of the cells.

  2. Confocal mosaicing microscopy in skin excisions: a demonstration of rapid surgical pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gareau, D.S.; Patel, Y.G.; Li, Y.; Aranda, I.; Halpern, A.C.; Nehal, K.S.; Rajadhyaksha, M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Precise micro-surgical removal of tumour with minimal damage to the surrounding normal tissue requires a series of excisions, each guided by an examination of frozen histology of the previous. An example is Mohs surgery for the removal of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) in skin. The preparation of frozen histology is labour-intensive and slow. Confocal microscopy may enable rapid detection of tumours directly in surgical excisions with minimal need for frozen histology. Mosaicing of images enables observation of nuclear and cellular morphology in large areas of surgically excised tissue. In skin, the use of 10–1% acetic acid as a reflectance contrast agent brightens nuclei in 0.5–5 min and enhances nuclear-to-dermis contrast and detectability of BCCs. A tissue fixture was engineered for precisely mounting surgical excisions to enable mosaicing of 36 × 36 images to create a field of view of 12 × 12 mm. This large field of view displays the excision at 2× magnification, similar to that routinely used by Mohs surgeons when examining frozen histology. Comparison of mosaics to histology demonstrates detectability of BCCs. Confocal mosaicing presently requires 9 min, instead of 20–45 min per excision for preparing frozen histology, and thus may provide a means for rapid pathology-at-the-bedside to expedite and guide surgery. PMID:19196421

  3. The method of axial drift compensation of laser differential confocal microscopy based on zero-tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yajie; Cui, Han; Wang, Yun; Qiu, Lirong; Zhao, Weiqian

    2015-08-01

    Laser differential confocal microscopy (DCM) has advantages of high axial resolution and strong ability of focus identification. However, the imaging mechanism of point scanning needs long measurement time, in the process due to itself mechanical instability and the influence of environment vibration the axial drift of object position is inevitable, which will reduce lateral resolution of the DCM. To ensure the lateral resolution we propose an axial drift compensation method based on zero-tracking in this paper. The method takes advantage of the linear region of differential confocal axial response curve, gets axial drift by detecting the laser intensity; uses grating sensor to monitor the real-time axial drift of lifting stage and realizes closed-loop control; uses capacitive sensor of objective driver to measure its position. After getting the axial drift of object, the lifting stage and objective driver will be driven to compensate position according to the axial drift. This method is realized by using Visual Studio 2010, and the experiment demonstrates that the compensation precision of the proposed method can reach 6 nm. It is not only easy to implement, but also can compensate the axial drift actively and real-timely. Above all, this method improves the system stability of DCM effectively.

  4. Effects of axial scanning in confocal microscopy employing adaptive lenses (CAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukourakis, N.; Finkeldey, M.; Stürmer, M.; Gerhardt, N. C.; Wallrabe, U.; Hofmann, M. R.; Czarske, J. W.; Fischer, A.

    2014-05-01

    We analyze axial scanning in Confocal microscopy based on Adaptive Lenses (CAL). A tunable lens located in the illumination path of a confocal setup enables scanning the focus position by applying an electrical voltage. This opens up the possibility to replace mechanical axial scanning which is commonly used. In our proof-of-principle experiment, we demonstrate a tuning range of about 380 μm. The range can easily be extended by using the whole possible tuning range. During the scan the axial resolution degrades by a factor of about 2.3. The deterioration is introduced by aberrations that strongly depend on the scanning process. Therefore a second lens is located in the detection path of the CAL setup to balance the aberration effects. Both experiments and simulations show that this approach allows creating a homogeneous axial resolution throughout the scan. This is at the cost of tuning range which halves to about 200 μm. The lateral resolution is not noticeably affected and amounts to 500 nm.

  5. Structure and chemical composition of the dentin-enamel junction analyzed by Confocal Raman Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desoutter, A.; Salehi, H.; Slimani, A.; Marquet, P.; Jacquot, B.; Tassery, H.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2014-02-01

    The structure and chemical composition of the human dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) was studied using confocal Raman microscopy - a chemical imaging technique. Slices of non-fixed, sound teeth were prepared with an Isomet diamond saw and scanned with Witec Alpha300R system. The combination of different characteristics peaks of phosphate, carbonate and organic matrix (respectively 960, 1072 and 1545 cm-1), generates images representing the chemical composition of the DEJ area. Images are also calculated using peak ratios enabling precise determination of the chemical composition across the DEJ. Then, with two characterized peaks, different pictures are calculated to show the ratio of two components. The images of the spatial distribution of mineral phosphate (960cm-1) to organic matrix (1545 cm-1) ratios, mineral carbonates (1072cm-1) to mineral phosphate ratios; and mineral carbonates to organic matrix ratios were reconstructed. Cross sectional and calculated graphic profile show the variations of the different chemical component ratios through the enamel and the dentin. Phosphate to organic ratio shows an accumulation of organic material under the enamel surface. The cross sectional profile of these pictures shows a high phosphate content compared to enamel in the vicinity of the DEJ. The Confocal Raman imaging technique can be used to further provide full chemical imaging of tooth, particularly of the whole DEJ and to study enamel and dentin decay.

  6. Automated detection of malignant features in confocal microscopy on superficial spreading melanoma versus nevi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareau, Dan; Hennessy, Ricky; Wan, Eric; Pellacani, Giovanni; Jacques, Steven L.

    2010-11-01

    In-vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) shows promise for the early detection of superficial spreading melanoma (SSM). RCM of SSM shows pagetoid melanocytes (PMs) in the epidermis and disarray at the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ), which are automatically quantified with a computer algorithm that locates depth of the most superficial pigmented surface [DSPS(x,y)] containing PMs in the epidermis and pigmented basal cells near the DEJ. The algorithm uses 200 noninvasive confocal optical sections that image the superficial 200 μm of ten skin sites: five unequivocal SSMs and five nevi. The pattern recognition algorithm automatically identifies PMs in all five SSMs and finds none in the nevi. A large mean gradient ψ (roughness) between laterally adjacent points on DSPS(x,y) identifies DEJ disruption in SSM ψ = 11.7 +/- 3.7 [-] for n = 5 SSMs versus a small ψ = 5.5 +/- 1.0 [-] for n = 5 nevi (significance, p = 0.0035). Quantitative endpoint metrics for malignant characteristics make digital RCM data an attractive diagnostic asset for pathologists, augmenting studies thus far, which have relied largely on visual assessment.

  7. Mapping Li(+) Concentration and Transport via In Situ Confocal Raman Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Forster, Jason D; Harris, Stephen J; Urban, Jeffrey J

    2014-06-01

    We demonstrate confocal Raman microscopy as a general, nonperturbative tool to measure spatially resolved lithium ion concentrations in liquid electrolytes. By combining this high-spatial-resolution technique with a simple microfluidic device, we are able to measure the diffusion coefficient of lithium ions in dimethyl carbonate in two different concentration regimes. Because lithium ion transport plays a key role in the function of a variety of electrochemical devices, quantifying and visualizing this process is crucial for understanding device performance. This method for detecting lithium ions should be immediately useful in the study of lithium-ion-based devices, ion transport in porous media, and at electrode-electrolyte interfaces, and the analytical framework is useful for any system exhibiting a concentration-dependent Raman spectrum. PMID:26273887

  8. Musculature of an illoricate predatory rotifer Asplanchnopus multiceps as revealed by phalloidin fluorescence and confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kotikova, E A; Raikova, O I; Reuter, M; Gustafsson, M K S

    2004-06-01

    The pattern of muscles in the actively swimming predatory rotifer Asplanchnopus multiceps is revealed by staining with tetramethyl-rhodamine isothiocyanate (TRITC)-labelled phalloidin and confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). The major components of the musculature are: prominent semicircular muscles of the corona; paired lateral, dorsal and ventral retractors in the trunk; a network of six seemingly complete circular muscles and anastomosing longitudinal muscles in the trunk; two short foot retractors, originating from a transverse muscle in the lower third of the trunk. The sphincter of the corona marks the boundary between the head and the trunk. The muscular patterns in rotifers with different lifestyles differ clearly, therefore, the muscular patterns seem to be determined by the mode of locomotion and feeding behaviour. PMID:15140596

  9. Confocal Microscopy Studies of Trypsin Immobilization on Porous Glycidyl Methacrylate Beads.

    PubMed

    Malmsten; Xing; Ljunglöf

    1999-12-15

    The immobilization of trypsin on porous glycidyl methacrylate (GMA-GDMA) beads has been investigated. In particular, the distribution within the beads of trypsin and of dextran used for hydrophilizing the bead surface prior to protein immobilization was investigated with confocal microscopy. For the system investigated, the fluorescence intensity profiles obtained when using borate buffer as an ambient solution displayed a distinct minimum at the center of the beads, irrespective of the observation depth. However, by reduction of the refractive index difference between the solution and the beads through the addition of glucose to the aqueous solution, artifacts relating to optical length differences could be reduced. For both low molecular weight fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), FITC-labeled trypsin, and FITC-labeled dextran, an essentially homogeneous distribution throughout the beads was observed. This simple "contrast matching" method seems therefore to be an interesting tool when investigating the distribution of immobilized protein in porous chromatography media. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10607463

  10. Further study of trichosanthin's effect on mouse embryos with confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui; Zhang, Chunyang; Ma, Hui; Chen, Die Yan

    2001-09-01

    Trichosanthin(TCS), a ribosome inactivating protein extracted from the root tuber of a traditional Chinese medicine herb Tian Huo Fen(THF), possessed abortifacient, anti-tumor and anti-human immunodeficiency virus(HIV) activities. For centuries in China, THF has been used as an effective folk medicine to terminate early and midtrimester pregnancies and to treat ectopic pregnancies, hydatidiform moles and trophoblastic tumor. We observed the changes in reactive oxygen species and intracellular calcium in mouse embryos induced by TCS with confocal laser scanning microscopy in combination with the fluorescene diacetate (DCFHDA) and Fluo-3-AM. The results indicated that TCS induced increase in intracellular calcium and production of reactive oxygen species in mouse embryos , and TCS inhibited the development of mouse embryos effectively. Mouse embryos of different developmental stages before implantation are used in the experiments. This provides new insight into mechanism for abortifacient activity of TCS.

  11. HIV detection by in-situ hybridization based on confocal reflected light microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Louis C.; Jericevic, Zeljko; Cuellar, Roland; Paddock, Stephen W.; Lewis, Dorothy E.

    1991-05-01

    Elucidation of the pathogenesis of AIDS is confounded by the finding that few actively infected CD4+ cells (1 in 104-105) can be detected in the peripheral blood, even though there is dramatic depletion (often >90%) of CD4+ cells as the disease progresses. A sensitive, 35S-based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mRNA in situ hybridization technique was coupled with a new detection method, confocal laser scanning microscopy, to examine transcriptionally active HIV-infected cells from individuals at different disease stages. An algorithm for image segmentation and analysis has been developed to determine the proportion of HIV-positive cells. Data obtained using this improved detection method suggest that there are more HIV mRNA-producing cells in HIV-infected individuals than previously thought, based on other detection methods.

  12. Starch/carrageenan/milk proteins interactions studied using multiple staining and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Matignon, A; Moulin, G; Barey, P; Desprairies, M; Mauduit, S; Sieffermann, J M; Michon, C

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on the effects of the interactions between modified waxy maize starch, kappa carrageenan and skim milk on the microstructure of their mixed systems using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). A multiple staining of the components was set up with a view to improving starch covalent staining. In starch/carrageenan pasted mixtures, carrageenan was found to adsorb on and penetrate slightly into the starch granules, whereas no interactions were observed between starch and milk proteins. In ternary mixtures, interactions between starch granules and carrageenan were no longer observed, even when milk proteins were added after starch swelling in the carrageenan solution, thus showing preferential interactions between carrageenan/milk proteins in comparison to carrageenan/starch granules. Modifying the blending order of the components led to microstructure differences depending on several parameters such as starch/carrageenan interactions, carrageenan/milk proteins network structure, level of starch granules disruption and amylopectin contribution to the microstructure. PMID:24274517

  13. Separation of ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons in confocal Light-Sheet Microscopy of Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Meinert, Tobias; Tietz, Olaf; Palme, Klaus J; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Image quality in light-sheet fluorescence microscopy is strongly affected by the shape of the illuminating laser beam inside embryos, plants or tissue. While the phase of Gaussian or Bessel beams propagating through thousands of cells can be partly controlled holographically, the propagation of fluorescence light to the detector is difficult to control. With each scatter process a fluorescence photon loses information necessary for the image generation. Using Arabidopsis root tips we demonstrate that ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons can be separated by analyzing the image spectra in each plane without a priori knowledge. We introduce a theoretical model allowing to extract typical scattering parameters of the biological material. This allows to attenuate image contributions from diffusive photons and to amplify the relevant image contributions from ballistic photons through a depth dependent deconvolution. In consequence, image contrast and resolution are significantly increased and scattering artefacts are minimized especially for Bessel beams with confocal line detection. PMID:27553506

  14. Dual-Model Automatic Detection of Nerve-Fibres in Corneal Confocal Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Dabbah, M.A.; Graham, J.; Petropoulos, I.; Tavakoli, M.; Malik, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Corneal Confocal Microscopy (CCM) imaging is a non-invasive surrogate of detecting, quantifying and monitoring diabetic peripheral neuropathy. This paper presents an automated method for detecting nerve-fibres from CCM images using a dual-model detection algorithm and compares the performance to well-established texture and feature detection methods. The algorithm comprises two separate models, one for the background and another for the foreground (nerve-fibres), which work interactively. Our evaluation shows significant improvement (p ≈ 0) in both error rate and signal-to-noise ratio of this model over the competitor methods. The automatic method is also evaluated in comparison with manual ground truth analysis in assessing diabetic neuropathy on the basis of nerve-fibre length, and shows a strong correlation (r = 0.92). Both analyses significantly separate diabetic patients from control subjects (p ≈ 0). PMID:20879244

  15. An alternative method of promoter assessment by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Dipak K; Ranjan, Rajiv; Kumar, Deepak; Kumar, Alok; Sahoo, Bhabani S; Raha, Sumita; Maiti, Indu B; Dey, Nrisingha

    2009-10-01

    A rapid and useful method of promoter activity analysis using techniques of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is described in the present study. The activities of some pararetroviral promoters such as CaMV35S (Cauliflower mosaic virus), FMVSgt3 (Figwort mosaic virus sub-genomic transcript) and MMVFLt12 (Mirabilis mosaic virus full-length transcript) coupled to GFP (green fluorescent protein) and GUS (beta-glucuronidase) reporter genes were determined simultaneously by the CLSM technique and other available conventional methods for reporter gene assay based on relevant biochemical and molecular approaches. Consistent and comparable results obtained by CLSM as well as by other conventional assay methods confirm the effectiveness of the CLSM approach for assessment of promoter activity. Hence the CLSM method can be suggested as an alternative way for promoter analysis on the basis of high throughput. PMID:19540268

  16. Separation of ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons in confocal Light-Sheet Microscopy of Arabidopsis roots

    PubMed Central

    Meinert, Tobias; Tietz, Olaf; Palme, Klaus J.; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Image quality in light-sheet fluorescence microscopy is strongly affected by the shape of the illuminating laser beam inside embryos, plants or tissue. While the phase of Gaussian or Bessel beams propagating through thousands of cells can be partly controlled holographically, the propagation of fluorescence light to the detector is difficult to control. With each scatter process a fluorescence photon loses information necessary for the image generation. Using Arabidopsis root tips we demonstrate that ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons can be separated by analyzing the image spectra in each plane without a priori knowledge. We introduce a theoretical model allowing to extract typical scattering parameters of the biological material. This allows to attenuate image contributions from diffusive photons and to amplify the relevant image contributions from ballistic photons through a depth dependent deconvolution. In consequence, image contrast and resolution are significantly increased and scattering artefacts are minimized especially for Bessel beams with confocal line detection. PMID:27553506

  17. Detection of apoptosis caused by anticancer drug paclitaxel in MCF-7 cells by confocal Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, H.; Middendorp, E.; Végh, A.-G.; Ramakrishnan, S.-K.; Gergely, C.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2013-02-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy, a non-invasive, label free imaging technique is used to study apoptosis in living MCF-7 cells. The images are based on Raman spectra of cells components. K-mean clustering was used to determine mitochondria position in cells and cytochrome c distribution inside the cells was based on correlation analysis. Cell apoptosis is defined as cytochrome c diffusion in cytoplasm. Co-localization of cytochrome c is found within mitochondria after three hours of incubation with 10 μM paclitaxel. Our results demonstrate that the presence of paclitaxel at this concentration in the culture media for 3 hours does not induce apoptosis of MCF7 cells via a caspase independent pathway.

  18. Analytic 3D Imaging of Mammalian Nucleus at Nanoscale Using Coherent X-Rays and Optical Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Changyong; Takagi, Masatoshi; Park, Jaehyun; Xu, Rui; Gallagher-Jones, Marcus; Imamoto, Naoko; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Despite the notable progress that has been made with nano-bio imaging probes, quantitative nanoscale imaging of multistructured specimens such as mammalian cells remains challenging due to their inherent structural complexity. Here, we successfully performed three-dimensional (3D) imaging of mammalian nuclei by combining coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy, explicitly visualizing nuclear substructures at several tens of nanometer resolution, and optical fluorescence microscopy, cross confirming the substructures with immunostaining. This demonstrates the successful application of coherent x-rays to obtain the 3D ultrastructure of mammalian nuclei and establishes a solid route to nanoscale imaging of complex specimens. PMID:25185543

  19. Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy for diagnosing breast cancer in excision and margin specimens.

    PubMed

    Brachtel, Elena F; Johnson, Nicole B; Huck, Amelia E; Rice-Stitt, Travis L; Vangel, Mark G; Smith, Barbara L; Tearney, Guillermo J; Kang, Dongkyun

    2016-04-01

    A large percentage of breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving surgery need to undergo multiple surgeries due to positive margins found during post-operative margin assessment. Carcinomas could be removed completely during the initial surgery and additional surgery avoided if positive margins can be determined intraoperatively. Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a high-speed reflectance confocal microscopy technology that has a potential to rapidly image the entire surgical margin at subcellular resolution and accurately determine margin status intraoperatively. In this study, in order to test the feasibility of using SECM for intraoperative margin assessment, we have evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of SECM for detecting various types of breast cancers. Forty-six surgically removed breast specimens were imaged with an SECM system. Side-by-side comparison between SECM and histologic images showed that SECM images can visualize key histomorphologic patterns of normal/benign and malignant breast tissues. Small (500 μm × 500 μm) spatially registered SECM and histologic images (n=124 for each) were diagnosed independently by three pathologists with expertise in breast pathology. Diagnostic accuracy of SECM for determining malignant tissues was high, average sensitivity of 0.91, specificity of 0.93, positive predictive value of 0.95, and negative predictive value of 0.87. Intra-observer agreement and inter-observer agreement for SECM were also high, 0.87 and 0.84, respectively. Results from this study suggest that SECM may be developed into an intraoperative margin assessment tool for guiding breast cancer excisions. PMID:26779830

  20. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Mice: Comparison with Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy and Fluorescein Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Giannakaki-Zimmermann, Helena; Kokona, Despina; Wolf, Sebastian; Ebneter, Andreas; Zinkernagel, Martin S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A) allows noninvasive visualization of retinal vessels in vivo. OCT-A was used to characterize the vascular network of the mouse retina and was compared with fluorescein angiography (FA) and histology. Methods In the present study, OCT-A based on a Heidelberg Engineering Spectralis system was used to investigate the vascular network in mice. Data was compared with FA and confocal microscopy of flat-mount histology stained with isolectin IB4. For quantitative analysis the National Cancer Institute's AngioTool software was used. Vessel density, the number of vessel junctions, and endpoints were measured and compared between the imaging modalities. Results The configuration of the superficial capillary network was comparable with OCT-A and flat-mount histology in BALBc mice. However, vessel density and the number of vessel junctions per region of interest (P = 0.0161 and P = 0.0015, respectively) in the deep vascular network of BALBc mice measured by OCT-A was significantly higher than with flat-mount histology. In C3A.Cg-Pde6b+Prph2Rd2/J mice, where the deep capillary plexus is absent, analysis of the superficial network provided similar results for all three imaging modalities. Conclusion OCT-A is a helpful imaging tool for noninvasive, in vivo imaging of the vascular plexus in mice. It may offer advantages over FA and confocal microscopy especially for imaging the deep vascular plexus. Translational Relevance The present study shows that OCT-A can be employed for small animal imaging to assess the vascular network and offers advantages over flat-mount histology and FA. PMID:27570710

  1. A virtual size-variable pinhole for single photon confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guangjun; Khoobehi, Bahram

    2013-03-01

    Pinhole is a critical device in single photon confocal microscopy (SPCM) owning to its ability to block the background noise scattered from back and forth of the focal plane. Without pinhole, the sectioning ability of SPCM will be degraded and many background noise signals will occurred together with useful signals, and sometimes these bad noises can submerge the details that we are interested in. However a pinhole with too small diameter will block both background noises and part of signals and decrease the intensity of the image. Therefore in many cases pinhole size should be selected carefully. Unfortunately because of constrains in mechanics, a pinhole that can change its size continuously, for example from 10 μm to 100 μm, is unavailable. For most commercial confocal microscopies, only several discrete pinhole sizes are provided, such as 10 μm, 30 μm, 60 μm etc. Things will be even harder for some imaging systems which use the input interface of a single mode fiber as the pinhole of SPCM, and then the pinhole size of these systems will be fixed, which far limit the optimization of systems' performance. In this paper, we design a size-variable pinhole setup that can offer a virtual pinhole with its diameter adjustable, which includes a physical pinhole (or single mode fiber) and a fine designed zoom relay (ZR) optical system. The magnification ratio of this ZR can vary smoothly while keeping the conjugation distance unchanged. The aberrations of the ZR are well balanced and diffraction-limited image performance are obtained so that the virtual pinhole can block background scattering noise and pass the in-focus signal effectively and accurately. Simulation results are also provided and discussed.

  2. Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy of esophageal tissues at 100 kHz line rate

    PubMed Central

    Schlachter, Simon C.; Kang, DongKyun; Gora, Michalina J.; Vacas-Jacques, Paulino; Wu, Tao; Carruth, Robert W.; Wilsterman, Eric J.; Bouma, Brett E.; Woods, Kevin; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2013-01-01

    Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a reflectance confocal microscopy technology that uses a diffraction grating to illuminate different locations on the sample with distinct wavelengths. SECM can obtain line images without any beam scanning devices, which opens up the possibility of high-speed imaging with relatively simple probe optics. This feature makes SECM a promising technology for rapid endoscopic imaging of internal organs, such as the esophagus, at microscopic resolution. SECM imaging of the esophagus has been previously demonstrated at relatively low line rates (5 kHz). In this paper, we demonstrate SECM imaging of large regions of esophageal tissues at a high line imaging rate of 100 kHz. The SECM system comprises a wavelength-swept source with a fast sweep rate (100 kHz), high output power (80 mW), and a detector unit with a large bandwidth (100 MHz). The sensitivity of the 100-kHz SECM system was measured to be 60 dB and the transverse resolution was 1.6 µm. Excised swine and human esophageal tissues were imaged with the 100-kHz SECM system at a rate of 6.6 mm2/sec. Architectural and cellular features of esophageal tissues could be clearly visualized in the SECM images, including papillae, glands, and nuclei. These results demonstrate that large-area SECM imaging of esophageal tissues can be successfully conducted at a high line imaging rate of 100 kHz, which will enable whole-organ SECM imaging in vivo. PMID:24049684

  3. Automated Microscopy: Macro Language Controlling a Confocal Microscope and its External Illumination: Adaptation for Photosynthetic Organisms.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Gábor; Kaňa, Radek

    2016-04-01

    Photosynthesis research employs several biophysical methods, including the detection of fluorescence. Even though fluorescence is a key method to detect photosynthetic efficiency, it has not been applied/adapted to single-cell confocal microscopy measurements to examine photosynthetic microorganisms. Experiments with photosynthetic cells may require automation to perform a large number of measurements with different parameters, especially concerning light conditions. However, commercial microscopes support custom protocols (through Time Controller offered by Olympus or Experiment Designer offered by Zeiss) that are often unable to provide special set-ups and connection to external devices (e.g., for irradiation). Our new system combining an Arduino microcontroller with the Cell⊕Finder software was developed for controlling Olympus FV1000 and FV1200 confocal microscopes and the attached hardware modules. Our software/hardware solution offers (1) a text file-based macro language to control the imaging functions of the microscope; (2) programmable control of several external hardware devices (light sources, thermal controllers, actuators) during imaging via the Arduino microcontroller; (3) the Cell⊕Finder software with ergonomic user environment, a fast selection method for the biologically important cells and precise positioning feature that reduces unwanted bleaching of the cells by the scanning laser. Cell⊕Finder can be downloaded from http://www.alga.cz/cellfinder. The system was applied to study changes in fluorescence intensity in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 cells under long-term illumination. Thus, we were able to describe the kinetics of phycobilisome decoupling. Microscopy data showed that phycobilisome decoupling appears slowly after long-term (>1 h) exposure to high light. PMID:27050040

  4. Confocal microscopy and electrophysiological study of single patient corneal endothelium cell cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatini, Francesca; Rossi, Francesca; Coppi, Elisabetta; Magni, Giada; Fusco, Irene; Menabuoni, Luca; Pedata, Felicita; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Pini, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The characterization of the ion channels in corneal endothelial cells and the elucidation of their involvement in corneal pathologies would lead to the identification of new molecular target for pharmacological treatments and to the clarification of corneal physiology. The corneal endothelium is an amitotic cell monolayer with a major role in preserving corneal transparency and in regulating the water and solute flux across the posterior surface of the cornea. Although endothelial cells are non-excitable, they express a range of ion channels, such as voltage-dependent Na+ channels and K+ channels, L-type Ca2 channels and many others. Interestingly, purinergic receptors have been linked to a variety of conditions within the eye but their presence in the endothelium and their role in its pathophysiology is still uncertain. In this study, we were able to extract endothelial cells from single human corneas, thus obtaining primary cultures that represent the peculiarity of each donor. Corneas were from tissues not suitable for transplant in patients. We characterized the endothelial cells by confocal microscopy, both within the intact cornea and in the primary endothelial cells cultures. We also studied the functional role of the purinergic system (adenosine, ATP and their receptors) by means of electrophysiological recordings. The experiments were performed by patch clamp recordings and confocal time-lapse microscopy and our results indicate that the application of purinergic compounds modulates the amplitude of outward currents in the isolated endothelial cells. These findings may lead to the proposal of new therapies for endothelium-related corneal diseases.

  5. Effects of acids used in the microabrasion technique: Microhardness and confocal microscopy analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Núbia-Inocencya-Pavesi; Ambrosano, Gláucia-Maria-Bovi; da Silva, Wander-José; Aguiar, Flávio-Henrique-Baggio; Lovadino, José-Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the effects of the acids used in the microabrasion on enamel. Material and Methods Seventy enamel/dentine blocks (25 mm2) of bovine incisors were divided into 7 groups (n=10). Experimental groups were treated by active/passive application of 35% H3PO4 (E1/E2) or 6.6% HCl (E3/E4). Control groups were treated by microabrasion with H3PO4+pumice (C5), HCl+silica (C6), or no treatment (C7). The superficial (SMH) and cross-sectional (CSMH; depths of 10, 25, 50, and 75 µm) microhardness of enamel were analyzed. Morphology was evaluated by confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM). Data were analyzed by analysis of variance (Proc Mixed), Tukey, and Dunnet tests (α=5%). Results Active application (E1 and E3) resulted in higher microhardness than passive application (E2 and E4), with no difference between acids. For most groups, the CSMH decreased as the depth increased. All experimental groups and negative controls (C5 and C6) showed significantly reduced CSMH values compared to the control. A significantly higher mean CSMH result was obtained with the active application of H3PO4 (E1) compared to HCl (E3). Passive application did not result in CSMH differences between acids. CLSM revealed the conditioning pattern for each group. Conclusions Although the acids displayed an erosive action, use of microabrasive mixture led to less damage to the enamel layers. Key words:Enamel microabrasion, enamel microhardness, confocal laser scanning microscopy. PMID:26535098

  6. Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) for rapid assessment of breast excision specimens (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brachtel, Elena F.; Johnson, Nicole B.; Huck, Amelia E.; Rice-Stitt, Travis L.; Vangel, Mark G.; Smith, Barbara L.; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Kang, DongKyun

    2016-03-01

    Unacceptably large percentage (20-40%) of breast cancer lumpectomy patients are required to undergo multiple surgeries when positive margins are found upon post-operative histologic assessment. If the margin status can be determined during surgery, surgeon can resect additional tissues to achieve tumor-free margin, which will reduce the need for additional surgeries. Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a high-speed reflectance confocal microscopy technology that has a potential to image the entire surgical margin within a short procedural time. Previously, SECM was shown to rapidly image a large area (10 mm by 10 mm) of human esophageal tissue within a short procedural time (15 seconds). When used in lumpectomy, SECM will be able to image the entire margin surface of ~30 cm2 in around 7.5 minutes. SECM images will then be used to determine margin status intra-operatively. In this paper, we present results from a study of testing accuracy of SECM for diagnosing malignant breast tissues. We have imaged freshly-excised breast specimens (N=46) with SECM. SECM images clearly visualized histomorphologic features associated with normal/benign and malignant breast tissues in a similar manner to histologic images. Diagnostic accuracy was tested by comparing SECM diagnoses made by three junior pathologists with corresponding histologic diagnoses made by a senior pathologist. SECM sensitivity and specificity were high, 0.91 and 0.93, respectively. Intra-observer agreement and inter-observer agreement were also high, 0.87 and 0.84, respectively. Results from this study showed that SECM has a potential to accurately determine margin status during breast cancer lumpectomy.

  7. Elastomeric photo-actuators and their investigation by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaniková, Klaudia; Ilčíková, Markéta; Krupa, Igor; Mičušík, Matej; Kasák, Peter; Pavlova, Ewa; Mosnáček, Jaroslav; Chorvát, Dušan, Jr.; Omastová, Mária

    2013-10-01

    The photo-actuation behavior of nanocomposites based on ethylene-vinylacetate copolymer (EVA) and styrene-isoprene-styrene (SIS) block copolymer filled with well-dispersed and modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is discussed in this paper. The nanocomposites were prepared by casting from solution. To improve the dispersion of the MWCNTs in EVA, the MWCNT surface was modified with a non-covalent surfactant, cholesteryl 1-pyrenecarboxylate (PyChol). To prepare SIS nanocomposites, the MWCNT surface was covalently modified with polystyrene chains. The good dispersion of the filler was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Special, custom-made punch/die molds were used to create a Braille element (BE)-like shape, which under shear forces induces a uniaxial orientation of the MWCNTs within the matrix. The uniaxial orientation of MWCNTs is an essential precondition to ensure the photo-actuating behavior of MWCNTs in polymeric matrices. The orientation of the MWCNTs within the matrices was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Nanocomposite BEs were illuminated from the bottom by a red light-emitting diode (LED), and the photo-actuation was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). When the BEs were exposed to light, a temporary increase in the height of the element was detected. This process was observed to be reversible: after switching off the light, the BEs returned to their original shape and height.

  8. Oral biofilm analysis of palatal expanders by fluorescence in-situ hybridization and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Klug, Barbara; Rodler, Claudia; Koller, Martin; Wimmer, Gernot; Kessler, Harald H; Grube, Martin; Santigli, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    microscopy. Well-known configurations could be visualized, including mushroom-style formations and clusters of coccoid bacteria pervaded by channels. In addition, the bacterial composition of these typical biofilm structures were analyzed and 2D and 3D images created. PMID:22041974

  9. Roughness of biopores and cracks in Bt-horizons by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leue, Martin; Gerke, Horst H.

    2016-04-01

    During preferential flow events in structured soils, the movement of water and reactive solutes is mostly restricted to larger inter-aggregate pores, cracks, and biopores. The micro-topography of such macropores in terms of pore shapes, geometry, and roughness is crucial for describing the exchange of water and solutes between macropores and the soil matrix. The objective of this study was to determine the surface roughness of intact structural surfaces from the Bt-horizon of Luvisols by confocal laser scanning microscopy. For this purpose, samples with the structural surface types including cracks with and without clay-organic coatings from Bt-horizons developed on loess and glacial till were compared. The surface roughness of these structures was calculated in terms of three parameters from selected surface regions of 0.36 mm² determined with a confocal laser scanning microscope of the type Keyence VK-X100K. These data were evaluated in terms of the root-mean-squared roughness, Rq, the curvature, Rku, and the ratio between surface area and base area, RA. Values of Rq and RA were smaller for coated as compared to uncoated cracks and earthworm burrows of the Bt-horizons from both parent materials. The results indicated that the illuviation of clayey material led to a "smoothing" of the crack surfaces, which was similar for the coarser textured till-Bt and the finer-textured loess-Bt surfaces. The roughness indicated by Rq and RA values was only slightly smaller and that indicated by Rku slightly higher for the structural surfaces from the loess as compared to those from the glacial till. These results suggest a minor importance of the parent material on the roughness of structural surfaces in the Bt-horizon. The similarity of Rq, RA, and Rku values between surfaces of earthworm burrows and uncoated cracks did not confirm an expected smoothing effect of the burrow walls by the earthworm. In contrast to burrow walls, root channels from the loess-Bt were smoother

  10. Visualising the 3D Structure of Fine-Grained Estuarine Sediments; Preliminary Interpretations of a Novel Dataset Obtained via Volume Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatland, Jonathan; Bushby, Andy; Spencer, Kate; Carr, Simon

    2014-05-01

    Accurate measurement of the physical characteristics of sediment are critical to determining sediment transport behaviour and the stability of settled deposits. The properties (e.g. particle size, density, and settling velocity) of coarse-grained sediments (> 63 μm φ) can be easily characterised, hence their behaviour is relatively simple to predict and model. However, due to their small size and tendency to interact with their surrounding medium, the characteristics of fine sediments (< 63 μm φ) and their behaviour during transportation, deposition and consolidation is poorly understood. Recent studies have used correlative microscopy, a multi-method technique combining scanning confocal laser microscopy (SCLM), conventional optical microscopy (COM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), to characterise fine sediments at both the gross (> 1 μm) and sub-micron scale (Droppo et al., 1996). Whilst this technique has proven insightful, the measurement of geometric properties (e.g. the shape of primary particles and their spatial arrangement) can only be achieved by three-dimensional (3D) analysis and the scale of observation for e.g. TEM does not overlap with those techniques used to characterise sediments at larger scales (100s to 1000s microns) (e.g. video analysis). Volume electron microscopy [or focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM)] provides 3D analysis at scales of 10s to 1000s microns and though widely used in cell biology, has not been used to observe sediment. FIB-SEM requires samples that are vacuum stable and a key challenge will be to capture fragile, hydrated sediment samples whilst preserving their structural integrity. The aims of this work are therefore: 1) to modify preparation techniques currently used in cell biology for the stabilization of sedimentary materials; 2) to acquire 3D datasets for both fragile suspended sediments (flocs) and consolidated bed sediments and 3) to interpret the 3D structure of these samples. In

  11. Automated Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and Semiautomated Image Processing for Analysis of Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Martin; Hausner, Martina; Bungartz, Hans-Joachim; Wagner, Michael; Wilderer, Peter A.; Wuertz, Stefan

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and apply a quantitative optical method suitable for routine measurements of biofilm structures under in situ conditions. A computer program was designed to perform automated investigations of biofilms by using image acquisition and image analysis techniques. To obtain a representative profile of a growing biofilm, a nondestructive procedure was created to study and quantify undisturbed microbial populations within the physical environment of a glass flow cell. Key components of the computer-controlled processing described in this paper are the on-line collection of confocal two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional images from a preset 3D domain of interest followed by the off-line analysis of these 2D images. With the quantitative extraction of information contained in each image, a three-dimensional reconstruction of the principal biological events can be achieved. The program is convenient to handle and was generated to determine biovolumes and thus facilitate the examination of dynamic processes within biofilms. In the present study, Pseudomonas fluorescens or a green fluorescent protein-expressing Escherichia coli strain, EC12, was inoculated into glass flow cells and the respective monoculture biofilms were analyzed in three dimensions. In this paper we describe a method for the routine measurements of biofilms by using automated image acquisition and semiautomated image analysis. PMID:9797255

  12. Improved volume rendering for the visualization of living cells examined with confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enloe, L. Charity; Griffing, Lawrence R.

    2000-02-01

    This research applies recent advances in 3D isosurface reconstruction to images of test spheres and plant cells growing in suspension culture. Isosurfaces that represent object boundaries are constructed with a Marching Cubes algorithm applied to simple data sets, i.e., fluorescent test beads, and complex data sets, i.e., fluorescent plant cells, acquired with a Zeiss Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (LSM). The marching cubes algorithm treats each pixel or voxel of the image as a separate entity when performing computations. To test the spatial accuracy of the reconstruction, control data representing the volume of a 25 micrometer test shaper was obtained with the LSM. This volume was then judged on the basis of uniformity and smoothness. Using polygon decimation and smoothing algorithms available through the visualization toolkit, 'voxellated' test spheres and cells were smoothed using several different smoothing algorithms after unessential polygons were eliminated. With these improvements, the shape of subcellular organelles could be modeled at various levels of accuracy. However, in order to accurately reconstruct these complex structures of interest to us, the subcellular organelles of the endosomal system or the endoplasmic reticulum of plant cells, measurements of the accuracy of connectedness of structures need to be developed.

  13. Multimodal interferometric microscopy for label-free 3D imaging of live cells in flow (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaked, Natan Tzvi

    2016-03-01

    I present multimodal wide-field interferometric microscopy platform for label-free 3-D imaging of live cells during fast flow. Using holographic optical tweezers, multiple cells can be optically trapped and rapidity rotated on all axes, while acquired using an external off-axis wide-field interferometric module developed in our lab. The interferometric projections are rapidly processed into the 3-D refractive-index profile of the cells using a tomographic phase microscopy algorithms that take into consideration optical diffraction effects. The algorithms for the 3-D refractive-index reconstruction, and for calculating various morphological parameters that should serve for online sorting of cells, are efficiently implemented in a nearly real-time manner. The potential of this new high-throughput imaging technique is for label-free image analysis and sorting of cells during flow, to substitute current cell sorting devices, which are based on external labeling that eventually damages the cell sample.

  14. Fast 3D dark-field reflection-mode photoacoustic microscopy in vivo with a 30-MHz ultrasound linear array

    PubMed Central

    Song, Liang; Maslov, Konstantin; Bitton, Rachel; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-01-01

    We present an in vivo dark-field reflection-mode photoacoustic microscopy system that performs cross-sectional (B-scan) imaging at 50 Hz with realtime beamforming and 3D imaging consisting of 166 B-scan frames at 1 Hz with post-beamforming. To our knowledge, this speed is currently the fastest in photoacoustic imaging. A custom-designed light delivery system is integrated with a 30-MHz ultrasound linear array to realize dark-field reflection-mode imaging. Linear mechanical scanning of the array produces 3D images. The system has axial, lateral, and elevational resolutions of 25, 70, and 200 μm, respectively, and can image 3 mm deep in scattering biological tissues. Volumetric images of subcutaneous vasculature in rats are demonstrated in vivo. Fast 3D photoacoustic microscopy is anticipated to facilitate applications of photoacoustic imaging in biomedical studies that involve dynamics and clinical procedures that demand immediate diagnosis. PMID:19021408

  15. Infrared differential interference contrast microscopy for overlay metrology on 3D-interconnect bonded wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Yi-sha; Shyu, Deh-Ming; Lin, Yeou-Sung; Cho, Chia-Hung

    2013-04-01

    Overlay metrology for stacked layers will be playing a key role in bringing 3D IC devices into manufacturing. However, such bonded wafer pairs present a metrology challenge for optical microscopy tools by the opaque nature of silicon. Using infrared microscopy, silicon wafers become transparent to the near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum, enabling metrology at the interface of bonded wafer pairs. Wafers can be bonded face to face (F2F) or face to back (F2B) which the stacking direction is dictated by how the stacks are carried in the process and functionality required. For example, Memory stacks tend to use F2B stacking enables a better managed design. Current commercial tools use single image technique for F2F bonding overlay measurement because depth of focus is sufficient to include both surfaces; and use multiple image techniques for F2B overlay measurement application for the depth of focus is no longer sufficient to include both stacked wafer surfaces. There is a need to specify the Z coordinate or stacking wafer number through the silicon when visiting measurement wafer sites. Two shown images are of the same (X, Y) but separate Z location acquired at focus position of each wafer surface containing overlay marks. Usually the top surface image is bright and clear; however, the bottom surface image is somewhat darker and noisier as an adhesive layer is used in between to bond the silicon wafers. Thus the top and bottom surface images are further processed to achieve similar brightness and noise level before merged for overlay measurement. This paper presents a special overlay measurement technique, using the infrared differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy technique to measure the F2B wafer bonding overlay by a single shot image. A pair of thinned wafers at 50 and 150 μm thickness is bonded on top of a carrier wafer to evaluate the bonding overlay. It works on the principle of interferometry to gain information about the

  16. Methods of Hematoxylin and Erosin Image Information Acquisition and Optimization in Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Woong Bae; Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Kwang Gi; Choi, Yongdoo; Chang, Hee Jin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We produced hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining-like color images by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), which can obtain the same or more information in comparison to conventional tissue staining. Methods We improved images by using several image converting techniques, including morphological methods, color space conversion methods, and segmentation methods. Results An image obtained after image processing showed coloring very similar to that in images produced by H&E staining, and it is advantageous to conduct analysis through fluorescent dye imaging and microscopy rather than analysis based on single microscopic imaging. Conclusions The colors used in CLSM are different from those seen in H&E staining, which is the method most widely used for pathologic diagnosis and is familiar to pathologists. Computer technology can facilitate the conversion of images by CLSM to be very similar to H&E staining images. We believe that the technique used in this study has great potential for application in clinical tissue analysis. PMID:27525165

  17. New fluorogenic dyes for analysis of cellular processes by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Kalina; Kaloyanova, Stefka; Mihaylova, Nikolina; Stoitsova, Stoyanka; Chausheva, Stela; Vasilev, Aleksey; Lesev, Nedyalko; Dimitrova, Petya; Deligeorgiev, Todor; Tchorbanov, Andrey

    2013-12-01

    Fluorescent microscopy and fluorescent imaging by flow cytometry are two of the fastest growing areas in the medical and biological research. Innovations in fluorescent chemistry and synthesis of new dye probes are closely related to the development of service equipment such as light sources, and detection techniques. Among compounds known as fluorescent labels, the cyanine-based dyes have become widely used since they have high excitation coefficients, narrow emission bands and high fluorescence upon binding to nucleic acids. The key methods for evaluation of apoptosis and cell cycle allow measuring DNA content by several flow cytometric techniques. We have synthesized new monomethine cyanine dyes and have characterized their applicability for staining of live and/or apoptotic cells. Imaging experiments by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) have been also performed. Two of the dyes have shown high-affinity binding to the nuclei at high dilutions, up to 10(-9)M. Flow cytometry and CLSM have confirmed that these dyes labeled selectively non-living, e.g. ethanol-fixed cells that makes them appropriate for estimations of cell viability and apoptosis. The novel structures proved to be appropriate also for analysis of the cell cycle. PMID:24231377

  18. Shear bond strength, failure modes, and confocal microscopy of bonded amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Cianconi, Luigi; Conte, Gabriele; Mancini, Manuele

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength, failure modes, and confocal microscopy of two different amalgam alloy restorations lined with five adhesive systems. Two regular-set high-copper dental amalgam alloys, Amalcap Plus and Valiant Ph.D, and five commercially available adhesive systems were selected. One hundred and twenty freshly-extracted human third molars were used for the study. The results were statistically evaluated using two-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA). The shear bond strength (SBS) of amalgam to dentin was significantly affected by both the adhesive (p<0.0001) and amalgam alloy (p<0.0002). Regarding mode of failure (MF), among samples restored with Valiant Ph.D, 31 of 50 exhibited adhesive failure, and 19 displayed mixed failure. Laser optical microscopy (OM) of the bonded interface revealed the presence of a good hybrid layer was evident in all experimental groups. Higher bond strengths were measured for four of the five adhesives when used in combination with the spherical alloy. PMID:21383518

  19. Spatial Gradients in Particle Reinforced Polymers Characterized by X-Ray Attenuation and Laser Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    LAGASSE,ROBERT R.; THOMPSON,KYLE R.

    2000-06-12

    The goal of this work is to develop techniques for measuring gradients in particle concentration within filled polymers, such as encapsulant. A high concentration of filler particles is added to such materials to tailor physical properties such as thermal expansion coefficient. Sedimentation and flow-induced migration of particles can produce concentration gradients that are most severe near material boundaries. Therefore, techniques for measuring local particle concentration should be accurate near boundaries. Particle gradients in an alumina-filled epoxy resin are measured with a spatial resolution of 0.2 mm using an x-ray beam attenuation technique, but an artifact related to the finite diameter of the beam reduces accuracy near the specimen's edge. Local particle concentration near an edge can be measured more reliably using microscopy coupled with image analysis. This is illustrated by measuring concentration profiles of glass particles having 40 {micro}m median diameter using images acquired by a confocal laser fluorescence microscope. The mean of the measured profiles of volume fraction agrees to better than 3% with the expected value, and the shape of the profiles agrees qualitatively with simple theory for sedimentation of monodisperse particles. Extending this microscopy technique to smaller, micron-scale filler particles used in encapsulant for microelectronic devices is illustrated by measuring the local concentration of an epoxy resin containing 0.41 volume fraction of silica.

  20. Assessing strain mapping by electron backscatter diffraction and confocal Raman microscopy using wedge-indented Si.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Lawrence H; Vaudin, Mark D; Stranick, Stephan J; Stan, Gheorghe; Gerbig, Yvonne B; Osborn, William; Cook, Robert F

    2016-04-01

    The accuracy of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) for small-scale strain mapping are assessed using the multi-axial strain field surrounding a wedge indentation in Si as a test vehicle. The strain field is modeled using finite element analysis (FEA) that is adapted to the near-indentation surface profile measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The assessment consists of (1) direct experimental comparisons of strain and deformation and (2) comparisons in which the modeled strain field is used as an intermediate step. Direct experimental methods (1) consist of comparisons of surface elevation and gradient measured by AFM and EBSD and of Raman shifts measured and predicted by CRM and EBSD, respectively. Comparisons that utilize the combined FEA-AFM model (2) consist of predictions of distortion, strain, and rotation for comparison with EBSD measurements and predictions of Raman shift for comparison with CRM measurements. For both EBSD and CRM, convolution of measurements in depth-varying strain fields is considered. The interconnected comparisons suggest that EBSD was able to provide an accurate assessment of the wedge indentation deformation field to within the precision of the measurements, approximately 2×10(-4) in strain. CRM was similarly precise, but was limited in accuracy to several times this value. PMID:26939030

  1. Three-dimensional imaging of the intact mouse cochlea by fluorescent laser scanning confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Glen H; Rubel, Edwin W

    2008-09-01

    The complex anatomy of the mammalian cochlea is most readily understood by representation in three-dimensions. However, the cochlea is often sectioned to minimize the effects of its anatomic complexity and optical properties on image acquisition by light microscopy. We have found that optical aberrations present in the decalcified cochlea can be greatly reduced by dehydration through graded ethanols followed by clearing with a mixture of five parts methyl salicylate and three parts benzyl benzoate (MSBB). Clearing the cochlea with MSBB enables acquisition of high-resolution images with multiple fluorescent labels, through the full volume of the cochlea by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The resulting images are readily applicable to three-dimensional morphometric analysis and volumetric visualizations. This method promises to be particularly useful for three-dimensional characterization of anatomy, innervation and expression of genes or proteins in the many new animal models of hearing and balance generated by genetic manipulation. Furthermore, the MSBB is compatible with most non-protein fluorophores used for histological labeling, and may be removed with traditional transitional solvents to allow subsequent epoxy embedding for sectioning. PMID:18573326

  2. Correlated Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements via Combined Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Ona, Ositadinma; Majors, Paul D.

    2008-02-18

    Bacterial biofilms are complex, three-dimensional, communities that are found nearly everywhere in nature1 and are being recognized as the cause of treatment-resistant infections1 2. Advanced methods are required to characterize their collective and spatial patterns of metabolism however most techniques are invasive or destructive. Here we describe the use of a combined confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopy system to monitor structure, mass transport, and metabolism in active biofilms. Non-invasive NMR methods provide macroscopic structure along with spatially-resolved metabolite profiles and diffusion measurements. CLSM enables monitoring of cells by fluorescent protein reporters to investigate biofilm structure and gene expression concurrently. A planar sample chamber design facilitates depth-resolved measurements on 140 nL sample volumes under laminar flow conditions. The techniques and approaches described here are applicable to environmental and medically relevant microbial communities, thus providing key metabolic information for promoting beneficial biofilms and treating associated diseases.

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Subcellular Distribution of the SUMO Conjugation System by Confocal Microscopy Imaging.

    PubMed

    Mas, Abraham; Amenós, Montse; Lois, L Maria

    2016-01-01

    Different studies point to an enrichment in SUMO conjugation in the cell nucleus, although non-nuclear SUMO targets also exist. In general, the study of subcellular localization of proteins is essential for understanding their function within a cell. Fluorescence microscopy is a powerful tool for studying subcellular protein partitioning in living cells, since fluorescent proteins can be fused to proteins of interest to determine their localization. Subcellular distribution of proteins can be influenced by binding to other biomolecules and by posttranslational modifications. Sometimes these changes affect only a portion of the protein pool or have a partial effect, and a quantitative evaluation of fluorescence images is required to identify protein redistribution among subcellular compartments. In order to obtain accurate data about the relative subcellular distribution of SUMO conjugation machinery members, and to identify the molecular determinants involved in their localization, we have applied quantitative confocal microscopy imaging. In this chapter, we will describe the fluorescent protein fusions used in these experiments, and how to measure, evaluate, and compare average fluorescence intensities in cellular compartments by image-based analysis. We show the distribution of some components of the Arabidopsis SUMOylation machinery in epidermal onion cells and how they change their distribution in the presence of interacting partners or even when its activity is affected. PMID:27424751

  4. Evaluation of confocal laser scanning microscopy for enumeration of virus-like particles in aquatic systems

    PubMed Central

    Agis, Martin; Luef, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Abundances of virus-like particles (VLPs, mostly bacteriophages) are high in aquatic environments; therefore, techniques for precise enumeration are essential in ecological monitoring. VLPs were determined after staining with SYBR Gold by conventional epifluorescence microscopy and compared to enumerations performed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). In order to assess the potential of CLSM for viral direct counts (VDCs), we processed samples from different freshwater and marine systems. Optical sectioning by CLSM and production of an overlay picture of multiple scans enables the often uneven whole investigated filter area to be brought to the plane of focus. This allows for subsequent image analysis of digitally created high-quality images. Another advantage using the CLSM was that the short spot excitation of the stain via laser beam minimized fading of the stain. The VDC results show that there is no significant difference between the two methods. Regarding the known difficulties of viral abundance estimates on particulate material, CLSM was further applied to enumerate VLPs on a small set of marine transparent exopolymeric particles sampled from the Atlantic Ocean. Our data suggest that CLSM is a useful tool to count viruses in water samples as well as attached to certain types of aquatic aggregates. PMID:23108709

  5. Improving Axial Resolution in Confocal Microscopy with New High Refractive Index Mounting Media

    PubMed Central

    Fouquet, Coralie; Gilles, Jean-François; Heck, Nicolas; Dos Santos, Marc; Schwartzmann, Richard; Cannaya, Vidjeacoumary; Morel, Marie-Pierre; Davidson, Robert Stephen; Trembleau, Alain; Bolte, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Resolution, high signal intensity and elevated signal to noise ratio (SNR) are key issues for biologists who aim at studying the localisation of biological structures at the cellular and subcellular levels using confocal microscopy. The resolution required to separate sub-cellular biological structures is often near to the resolving power of the microscope. When optimally used, confocal microscopes may reach resolutions of 180 nm laterally and 500 nm axially, however, axial resolution in depth is often impaired by spherical aberration that may occur due to refractive index mismatches. Spherical aberration results in broadening of the point-spread function (PSF), a decrease in peak signal intensity when imaging in depth and a focal shift that leads to the distortion of the image along the z-axis and thus in a scaling error. In this study, we use the novel mounting medium CFM3 (Citifluor Ltd., UK) with a refractive index of 1.518 to minimize the effects of spherical aberration. This mounting medium is compatible with most common fluorochromes and fluorescent proteins. We compare its performance with established mounting media, harbouring refractive indices below 1.500, by estimating lateral and axial resolution with sub-resolution fluorescent beads. We show furthermore that the use of the high refractive index media renders the tissue transparent and improves considerably the axial resolution and imaging depth in immuno-labelled or fluorescent protein labelled fixed mouse brain tissue. We thus propose to use those novel high refractive index mounting media, whenever optimal axial resolution is required. PMID:25822785

  6. Laser-induced cartilage damage: an ex-vivo model using confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenz, Martin; Zueger, Benno J.; Monin, D.; Weiler, C.; Mainil-Varlet, P. M.; Weber, Heinz P.; Schaffner, Thomas

    1999-06-01

    Although there is an increasing popularity of lasers in orthopedic surgery, there is a growing concern about negative side effects of this therapy e.g. prolonged restitution time, radiation damage to adjacent cartilage or depth effects like bone necrosis. Despite case reports and experimental investigations over the last few years little is known about the extent of acute cartilage damage induced by different lasers types and energies. Histological examination offers only limited insights in cell viability and metabolism. Ho:YAG and Er:YAG lasers emitting at 2.1 micrometer and 2.94 micrometer, respectively, are ideally suited for tissue treatment because these wavelengths are strongly absorbed in water. The Purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effect of laser type and energy on chondrocyte viability in an ex vivo model. Free running Er:YAG (E equals 100 and 150 mJ) and Ho:YAG (E equals 500 and 800 mJ) lasers were used at different energy levels using a fixed pulse length of 400 microseconds. The energy was delivered at 8 Hz through optical fibers. Fresh bovine hyaline cartilage samples were mounted in a water bath at room temperature and the fiber was positioned at 30 degree and 180 degree angles relative to the tissue surface. After laser irradiation the samples were assessed by a life-dead cell viability test using a confocal microscope and by standard histology. Thermal damage was much deeper with Ho:YAG (up to 1800 micrometer) than with the Er:YAG laser (up to 70 micrometer). The cell viability test revealed a damage zone about twice the one determined by standard histology. Confocal microscopy is a powerful tool for assessing changes in tissue structure after laser treatment. In addition this technique allows to quantify these alterations without necessitating time consuming and expensive animal experiments.

  7. Analysis of cellular phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate levels and distribution using confocal fluorescent microscopy.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Michelle; Nowell, Cameron J; Condron, Melanie; Gardiner, James; Holmes, Andrew B; Desai, Jayesh; Burgess, Antony W; Catimel, Bruno

    2010-11-01

    We have developed an immunocytochemistry method for the semiquantitative detection of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5)P3) at the cell plasma membrane. This protocol combines the use of a glutathione S-transferase-tagged pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of the general phosphoinositides-1 receptor (GST-GRP1PH) with fluorescence confocal microscopy and image segmentation using cell mask software analysis. This methodology allows the analysis of PI(3,4,5)P3 subcellular distribution in resting and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated HEK293T cells and in LIM1215 (wild-type phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)) and LIM2550 (H1047R mutation in PI3K catalytic domain) colonic carcinoma cells. Formation of PI(3,4,5)P3 was observed 5min following EGF stimulation and resulted in an increase of the membrane/cytoplasm fluorescence ratio from 1.03 to 1.53 for HEK293T cells and from 2.2 to 3.3 for LIM1215 cells. Resting LIM2550 cells stained with GST-GRP1PH had an elevated membrane/cytoplasm fluorescence ratio of 9.8, suggesting constitutive PI3K activation. The increase in the membrane/cytoplasm fluorescent ratio was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. This cellular confocal imaging assay can be used to directly assess the effects of PI3K mutations in cancer cell lines and to determine the potential specificity and effectiveness of PI3K inhibitors in cancer cells. PMID:20599646

  8. Automated acquisition and analysis of airway surface liquid height by confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyun-Chul; Kim, Christine Seul Ki

    2015-01-01

    The airway surface liquid (ASL) is a thin-liquid layer that lines the luminal side of airway epithelia. ASL contains many molecules that are involved in primary innate defense in the lung. Measurement of ASL height on primary airway cultures by confocal microscopy is a powerful tool that has enabled researchers to study ASL physiology and pharmacology. Previously, ASL image acquisition and analysis were performed manually. However, this process is time and labor intensive. To increase the throughput, we have developed an automatic ASL measurement technique that combines a fully automated confocal microscope with novel automatic image analysis software that was written with image processing techniques derived from the computer science field. We were able to acquire XZ ASL images at the rate of ∼1 image/s in a reproducible fashion. Our automatic analysis software was able to analyze images at the rate of ∼32 ms/image. As proofs of concept, we generated a time course for ASL absorption and a dose response in the presence of SPLUNC1, a known epithelial sodium channel inhibitor, on human bronchial epithelial cultures. Using this approach, we determined the IC50 for SPLUNC1 to be 6.53 μM. Furthermore, our technique successfully detected a difference in ASL height between normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) human bronchial epithelial cultures and detected changes in ATP-stimulated Cl−/ASL secretion. We conclude that our automatic ASL measurement technique can be applied for repeated ASL height measurements with high accuracy and consistency and increased throughput. PMID:26001773

  9. Any Way You Slice It—A Comparison of Confocal Microscopy Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Jonkman, James

    2015-01-01

    The confocal fluorescence microscope has become a popular tool for life sciences researchers, primarily because of its ability to remove blur from outside of the focal plane of the image. Several different kinds of confocal microscopes have been developed, each with advantages and disadvantages. This article will cover the grid confocal, classic confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM), the resonant scanning-CLSM, and the spinning-disk confocal microscope. The way each microscope technique works, the best applications the technique is suited for, the limitations of the technique, and new developments for each technology will be presented. Researchers who have access to a range of different confocal microscopes (e.g., through a local core facility) should find this paper helpful for choosing the best confocal technology for specific imaging applications. Others with funding to purchase an instrument should find the article helpful in deciding which technology is ideal for their area of research. PMID:25802490

  10. Monitoring UVR induced damage in single cells and isolated nuclei using SR-FTIR microspectroscopy and 3D confocal Raman imaging.

    PubMed

    Lipiec, Ewelina; Bambery, Keith R; Heraud, Philip; Kwiatek, Wojciech M; McNaughton, Don; Tobin, Mark J; Vogel, Christian; Wood, Bayden R

    2014-09-01

    SR-FTIR in combination with Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was applied to investigate macromolecular changes in a population of melanocytes and their extracted nuclei induced by environmentally relevant fluxes of UVR (Ultraviolet Radiation). Living cells and isolated cellular nuclei were investigated post-irradiation for three different irradiation dosages (130, 1505, 15,052 Jm(-2) UVR, weighted) after either 24 or 48 hours of incubation. DNA conformational changes were observed in cells exposed to an artificial UVR solar-simulator source as evidenced by a shift in the DNA asymmetric phosphodiester vibration from 1236 cm(-1) to 1242 cm(-1) in the case of the exposed cells and from 1225 cm(-1) to 1242 cm(-1) for irradiated nuclei. PCA Scores plots revealed distinct clustering of spectra from irradiated cells and nuclei from non-irradiated controls in response to the range of applied UVR radiation doses. 3D Raman confocal imaging in combination with k-means cluster analysis was applied to study the effect of the UVR radiation exposure on cellular nuclei. Chemical changes associated with apoptosis were detected and included intra-nuclear lipid deposition along with chromatin condensation. The results reported here demonstrate the utility of SR-FTIR and Raman spectroscopy to probe in situ DNA damage in cell nuclei resulting from UVR exposure. These results are in agreement with the increasing body of evidence that lipid accumulation is a characteristic of aggressive cancer cells, and are involved in the production of membranes for rapid cell proliferation. PMID:24995477

  11. The use of Interferometric Microscopy to assess 3D modifications of deteriorated medieval glass.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentaz, L.; Lombardo, T.; Chabas, A.

    2012-04-01

    Due to low durability, Northern European medieval glass undergoes the action of the atmospheric environment leading in some cases to a state of dramatic deterioration. Modification features varies from a simple loss of transparency to a severe material loss. In order to understand the underlying mechanisms and preserve this heritage, fundamental research is necessary too. In this optic, field exposure of analogues and original stained glass was carried out to study the early stages of the glass weathering. Model glass and original stained glass (after removal of deterioration products) were exposed in real conditions in an urban site (Paris) for 48 months. A regular withdrawal of samples allowed a follow-up of short-term glass evolution. Morphological modifications of the exposed samples were investigated through conventional and non destructive microscopy, using respectively a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and an Interferometric Microscope (IM). This latter allows a 3D quantification of the object with no sample preparation. For all glasses, both surface recession and build-up of deposit were observed as a consequence of a leaching process (interdiffusion of protons and glass cations). The build-up of a deposit comes from the reaction between the extracted glass cations and atmospheric gases. Instead, surface recession is due mainly to the formation of brittle layer of altered glass at the sub-surface, where a fracture network can appear, leading to the scaling of parts of this modified glass. Finally, dissolution of the glass takes place, inducing the formation of pits and craters. The arithmetic roughness (Ra) was used as an indicator of weathering increase, in order to evaluate the deterioration state. For instance, the Ra grew from few tens of nm for pristine glass to thousands of nm for scaled areas. This technique also allowed a precise quantification of dimensions (height, depth and width) of deposits and pits, and the estimation of their overall

  12. Development of a viability standard curve for microencapsulated probiotic bacteria using confocal microscopy and image analysis software.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sarah; Kailasapathy, Kasipathy; Phillips, Michael; Jones, Mark R

    2015-07-01

    Microencapsulation is proposed to protect probiotic strains from food processing procedures and to maintain probiotic viability. Little research has described the in situ viability of microencapsulated probiotics. This study successfully developed a real-time viability standard curve for microencapsulated bacteria using confocal microscopy, fluorescent dyes and image analysis software. PMID:25887694

  13. Thermal maturity of Tasmanites microfossils from confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, Paul C.; Kus, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    We report here, for the first time, spectral properties of Tasmanites microfossils determined by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy (CLSM, using Ar 458 nm excitation). The Tasmanites occur in a well-characterized natural maturation sequence (Ro 0.48–0.74%) of Devonian shale (n = 3 samples) from the Appalachian Basin. Spectral property λmax shows excellent agreement (r2 = 0.99) with extant spectra from interlaboratory studies which used conventional fluorescence microscopy techniques. This result suggests spectral measurements from CLSM can be used to infer thermal maturity of fluorescent organic materials in geologic samples. Spectra of regions with high fluorescence intensity at fold apices and flanks in individual Tasmanites are blue-shifted relative to less-deformed areas in the same body that have lower fluorescence intensity. This is interpreted to result from decreased quenching moiety concentration at these locations, and indicates caution is needed in the selection of measurement regions in conventional fluorescence microscopy, where it is common practice to select high intensity regions for improved signal intensity and better signal to noise ratios. This study also documents application of CLSM to microstructural characterization of Tasmanites microfossils. Finally, based on an extant empirical relation between conventional λmax values and bitumen reflectance, λmax values from CLSM of Tasmanites microfossils can be used to calculate a bitumen reflectance equivalent value. The results presented herein can be used as a basis to broaden the future application of CLSM in the geological sciences into hydrocarbon prospecting and basin analysis.

  14. Correlative scanning electron and confocal microscopy imaging of labeled cells coated by indium-tin-oxide.

    PubMed

    Rodighiero, Simona; Torre, Bruno; Sogne, Elisa; Ruffilli, Roberta; Cagnoli, Cinzia; Francolini, Maura; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Falqui, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    Confocal microscopy imaging of cells allows to visualize the presence of specific antigens by using fluorescent tags or fluorescent proteins, with resolution of few hundreds of nanometers, providing their localization in a large field-of-view and the understanding of their cellular function. Conversely, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the surface morphology of cells is imaged down to nanometer scale using secondary electrons. Combining both imaging techniques have brought to the correlative light and electron microscopy, contributing to investigate the existing relationships between biological surface structures and functions. Furthermore, in SEM, backscattered electrons (BSE) can image local compositional differences, like those due to nanosized gold particles labeling cellular surface antigens. To perform SEM imaging of cells, they could be grown on conducting substrates, but obtaining images of limited quality. Alternatively, they could be rendered electrically conductive, coating them with a thin metal layer. However, when BSE are collected to detect gold-labeled surface antigens, heavy metals cannot be used as coating material, as they would mask the BSE signal produced by the markers. Cell surface could be then coated with a thin layer of chromium, but this results in a loss of conductivity due to the fast chromium oxidation, if the samples come in contact with air. In order to overcome these major limitations, a thin layer of indium-tin-oxide was deposited by ion-sputtering on gold-decorated HeLa cells and neurons. Indium-tin-oxide was able to provide stable electrical conductivity and preservation of the BSE signal coming from the gold-conjugated markers. PMID:25810353

  15. Simultaneous pH measurement in endocytic and cytosolic compartments in living cells using confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lucien, Fabrice; Harper, Kelly; Pelletier, Pierre-Paul; Volkov, Leonid; Dubois, Claire M

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pH is tightly regulated and differences in pH between the cytoplasm and organelles have been reported(1). Regulation of cellular pH is crucial for homeostatic control of physiological processes that include: protein, DNA and RNA synthesis, vesicular trafficking, cell growth and cell division. Alterations in cellular pH homeostasis can lead to detrimental functional changes and promote progression of various diseases(2). Various methods are available for measuring intracellular pH but very few of these allow simultaneous measurement of pH in the cytoplasm and in organelles. Here, we describe in detail a rapid and accurate method for the simultaneous measurement of cytoplasmic and organellar pH by using confocal microscopy on living cells(3). This goal is achieved with the use of two pH-sensing ratiometric dyes that possess selective cellular compartment partitioning. For instance, SNARF-1 is compartmentalized inside the cytoplasm whereas HPTS is compartmentalized inside endosomal/lysosomal organelles. Although HPTS is commonly used as a cytoplasmic pH indicator, this dye can specifically label vesicles along the endosomal-lysosomal pathway after being taken up by pinocytosis(3,4). Using these pH-sensing probes, it is possible to simultaneously measure pH within the endocytic and cytoplasmic compartments. The optimal excitation wavelength of HPTS varies depending on the pH while for SNARF-1, it is the optimal emission wavelength that varies. Following loading with SNARF-1 and HPTS, cells are cultured in different pH-calibrated solutions to construct a pH standard curve for each probe. Cell imaging by confocal microscopy allows elimination of artifacts and background noise. Because of the spectral properties of HPTS, this probe is better suited for measurement of the mildly acidic endosomal compartment or to demonstrate alkalinization of the endosomal/lysosomal organelles. This method simplifies data analysis, improves accuracy of pH measurements and can

  16. Blinking correlation in nanocrystal quantum dots probed with novel laser scanning confocal microscopy methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hefti, Ryan Alf

    Semiconductor quantum dots have a vast array of applications: as fluorescent labels in biological systems, as physical or chemical sensors, as components in photovoltaic technology, and in display devices. An attribute of nearly every quantum dot is its blinking, or fluorescence intermittency, which tends to be a disadvantage in most applications. Despite the fact that blinking has been a nearly universal phenomenon among all types of fluorescent constructs, it is more prevalent in quantum dots than in traditional fluorophores. Furthermore, no unanimously accepted model of quantum dot blinking yet exists. The work encompassed by this dissertation began with an in-depth study of molecular motor protein dynamics in a variety of environments using two specially developed techniques, both of which feature applicability to live cell systems. Parked-beam confocal microscopy was utilized to increase temporal resolution of molecular motor motion dynamics by an order of magnitude over other popular methods. The second technique, fast-scanning confocal microscopy (FSCM), was used for long range observation of motor proteins. While using FSCM on motor protein assays, we discovered an unusual phenomenon. Single quantum dots seemingly communicated with neighboring quantum dots, indicated by a distinct correlation in their blinking patterns. In order to explain this novel correlation phenomenon, the majority of blinking models developed thus far would suggest a dipole-dipole interaction or a Coulomb interaction between singly charged quantum dots. However, our results indicate that the interaction energy is higher than supported by current models, thereby prompting a renewed examination. We propose that the blinking correlation we observed is due to a Coulomb interaction on the order of 3-4 elementary charges per quantum dot and that multiple charging of individual quantum dots may be required to plunge them into a non-emissive state. As a result of charging, charge carriers are

  17. Reflectance confocal microscopy for the diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis: a pilot study conducted on biopsy specimens

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hongki; Kang, DongKyun; Katz, Aubrey J.; Lauwers, Gregory Y.; Nishioka, Norman S.; Yagi, Yukako; Tanpowpong, Pornthep; Namati, Jacqueline; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) currently requires endoscopic biopsy and histopathologic analysis of the biopsy specimens to count intraepithelial eosinophils. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is an endomicroscopy technology that is capable of obtaining high-resolution, optically sectioned images of esophageal mucosa without the administration of exogenous contrast. Objective In this study, we investigated the capability of a high-speed form of RCM, termed spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM), to count intraepithelial esophageal eosinophils and characterize other microscopic findings of EoE. Design A total of 43 biopsy samples from 35 pediatric patients and 8 biopsy samples from 8 adult patients undergoing EGD for EoE were imaged by SECM immediately after their removal and then processed for routine histopathology. Two SECM readers, trained on adult cases, prospectively counted intraepithelial eosinophils and detected the presence of abscess, degranulation, and basal cell hyperplasia on SECM images from the pediatric patients. A pathologist blinded to the SECM data analyzed the same from corresponding slides. Setting The Gastrointestinal Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital. Results Eosinophils by SECM demonstrated a higher reflectance than the surrounding cells and other inflammatory cells. There was good correlation between SECM and histology maximum eosinophil counts/high-power field (R = 0.76, P < .0001). Intra- and interobserver correlations for SECM counts were very good (R = 0.93 and R = 0.92, respectively; P < .0001). For the commonly used eosinophil count cutoff of 15 per high-power field, the sensitivity and specificity of SECM for EoE were 100%. The sensitivity and specificity for abscess, degranulation, and basal cell hyperplasia were 100% and 82%, 91% and 60%, and 94% and 80%, respectively. Intra- and interobserver agreements for these microscopic features of EoE were very good (κ = 0.9/0.9, 0.84/1.0, 0

  18. Imaging genes, chromosomes, and nuclear structures using laser-scanning confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Stephen G.

    1990-08-01

    For 350 years, the optical microscope has had a powerful symbiotic relationship with biology. Until this century, optical microscopy was the only means of examining cellular structure; in return, biologists have contributed greatly to the evolution of microscope design and technique. Recent advances in the detection and processing of optical images, together with methods for labelling specific biological molecules, have brought about a resurgence in the application of optical microscopy to the biological sciences. One of the areas in which optical microscopy is breaking new ground is in elucidating the large scale organization of chromatin in chromosomes and cell nuclei. Nevertheless, imaging the contents of the cell nucleus is a difficult challenge for light microscopy, for two principal reasons. First, the dimensions of all but the largest nuclear structures (nucleoli, vacuoles) are close to or below the resolving power of far field optics. Second, the native optical contrast properties of many important chromatin structures (eg. chromosome domains, centromere regions) are very weak, or essentially zero. As an extreme example, individual genes probably have nothing to distinguish them other than their sequence of DNA bases, which cannot be directly visualized with any current form of microscopy. Similarly, the interphase nucleus shows no direct visible evidence of focal chromatin domains. Thus, imaging of such entities depends heavily on contrast enhancement methods. The most promising of these is labelling DNA in situ using sequence-specific probes that may be visualized using fluorescent dyes. We have applied this method to detecting individual genes in metaphase chromosomes and interphase nuclei, and to imaging a number of DNA-containing structures including chromosome domains, metaphase chromosomes and centromere regions. We have also demonstrated the applicability of in situ fluorescent labelling to detecting numerical and structural abnormalities both in

  19. Intraoperative imaging during Mohs surgery with reflectance confocal microscopy: initial clinical experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Eileen S.; Cordova, Miguel; Kose, Kivanc; Phillips, William; Rossi, Anthony; Nehal, Kishwer; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2015-06-01

    Mohs surgery for the removal of nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) is performed in stages, while being guided by the examination for residual tumor with frozen pathology. However, preparation of frozen pathology at each stage is time consuming and labor intensive. Real-time intraoperative reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM), combined with video mosaicking, may enable rapid detection of residual tumor directly in the surgical wounds on patients. We report our initial experience on 25 patients, using aluminum chloride for nuclear contrast. Imaging was performed in quadrants in the wound to simulate the Mohs surgeon's examination of pathology. Images and videos of the epidermal and dermal margins were found to be of clinically acceptable quality. Bright nuclear morphology was identified at the epidermal margin and detectable in residual NMSC tumors. The presence of residual tumor and normal skin features could be detected in the peripheral and deep dermal margins. Intraoperative RCM imaging may enable detection of residual tumor directly on patients during Mohs surgery, and may serve as an adjunct for frozen pathology. Ultimately, for routine clinical utility, a stronger tumor-to-dermis contrast may be necessary, and also a smaller microscope with an automated approach for imaging in the entire wound in a rapid and controlled manner.

  20. The Effect of Autologous Platelet Lysate Eye Drops: An In Vivo Confocal Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Fea, Antonio M.; Testa, Valeria; Machetta, Federica; Parisi, Simone; D'Antico, Sergio; Spinetta, Roberta; Fusaro, Enrico; Grignolo, Federico M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the effectiveness of autologous platelet lysate (APL) eye drops in patients with primary Sjögren syndrome (SS) dry eye, refractory to standard therapy, in comparison with patients treated with artificial tears. We focused on the effect of APL on cornea morphology with the in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM). Methods. Patients were assigned to two groups: group A used autologous platelet lysate QID, and group B used preservative-free artificial tears QID, for 90 days. Ophthalmological assessments included ocular surface disease index (OSDI), best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), Schirmer test, fluorescein score, and breakup time (BUT). A subgroup of patients in group A underwent IVCM: corneal basal epithelium, subbasal nerves, Langerhans cells, anterior stroma activated keratocytes, and reflectivity were evaluated. Results. 60 eyes of 30 patients were enrolled; in group A (n = 20 patients) mean OSDI, fluorescein score, and BUT showed significant improvement compared with group B (n = 10 patients). The IVCM showed a significant increase in basal epithelium cells density and subbasal nerve plexus density and number and a decrease in Langerhans cells density (p < 0.05). Conclusion. APL was found effective in the treatment of SS dry eye. IVCM seems to be a useful tool to visualize cornea morphologic modifications. PMID:27200376

  1. Tracking the Dephosphorylation of Resveratrol Triphosphate in Skin by Confocal Raman Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guojin; Flach, Carol R.; Mendelsohn, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Polyphenolic resveratrol has been identified as a potent antioxidant acting as both a free radical scavenger and an inhibitor of enzyme oxidative activity. However, the reactive propensity of resveratrol also limits its use in topical formulations. A transient derivative of resveratrol, resveratrol triphosphate, has been designed to provide a means for the delayed delivery of the active compound in skin tissue where endogenous enzymes capable of dephosphorylation reside. Confocal Raman microscopy studies of intact pigskin biopsies treated with modified resveratrol provided information about the spatial distribution and time-dependence of permeation and conversion to the native active form. Conversion to the active form was not observed when skin samples were exposed to steam, a procedure that likely inactivates endogenous skin enzymes. In addition, treatment with the triphosphate compared to the parent compound revealed a more homogeneous distribution of resveratrol throughout the stratum corneum and viable epidermis when the former was applied. Thus, the bioavailability of resveratrol in the epidermis appears to be enhanced upon application of the pro-molecule compared to resveratrol. PMID:17826862

  2. Corneal Confocal Microscopy Detects Early Nerve Regeneration in Diabetic Neuropathy After Simultaneous Pancreas and Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Mitra; Mitu-Pretorian, Maria; Petropoulos, Ioannis N.; Fadavi, Hassan; Asghar, Omar; Alam, Uazman; Ponirakis, Georgios; Jeziorska, Maria; Marshall, Andy; Efron, Nathan; Boulton, Andrew J.; Augustine, Titus; Malik, Rayaz A.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. To date, limited data in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes demonstrate nerve fiber repair after intervention. This may reflect a lack of efficacy of the interventions but may also reflect difficulty of the tests currently deployed to adequately assess nerve fiber repair, particularly in short-term studies. Corneal confocal microscopy (CCM) represents a novel noninvasive means to quantify nerve fiber damage and repair. Fifteen type 1 diabetic patients undergoing simultaneous pancreas–kidney transplantation (SPK) underwent detailed assessment of neurologic deficits, quantitative sensory testing (QST), electrophysiology, skin biopsy, corneal sensitivity, and CCM at baseline and at 6 and 12 months after successful SPK. At baseline, diabetic patients had a significant neuropathy compared with control subjects. After successful SPK there was no significant change in neurologic impairment, neurophysiology, QST, corneal sensitivity, and intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD). However, CCM demonstrated significant improvements in corneal nerve fiber density, branch density, and length at 12 months. Normalization of glycemia after SPK shows no significant improvement in neuropathy assessed by the neurologic deficits, QST, electrophysiology, and IENFD. However, CCM shows a significant improvement in nerve morphology, providing a novel noninvasive means to establish early nerve repair that is missed by currently advocated assessment techniques. PMID:23002037

  3. Determine scattering coefficient and anisotropy of scattering of murine tissues using reflectance-mode confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samatham, Ravikant; Jacques, Steven L.

    2013-02-01

    Different techniques have been developed to determine the optical properties of turbid media, which include collimated transmission, diffuse reflectance, adding-doubling and goniometry. While goniometry can be used to determine the anisotropy of scattering (g), other techniques are used to measure the absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient (μs(1-g)). But separating scattering coefficient (μs) and anisotropy of scattering from reduced scattering coefficient has been tricky. We developed an algorithm to determine anisotropy of scattering from the depth dependent decay of reflectance-mode confocal scanning laser microscopy (rCSLM) data. This report presents the testing of the algorithm on tissue phantoms with different anisotropies (g = 0.127 to 0.868, at 488 nm wavelength). Tissue phantoms were made from polystyrene microspheres (6 sizes 0.1-0.5 μm dia.) dispersed in both aqueous solutions and agarose gels. Three dimensional images were captured. The rCSLM-signal followed an exponential decay as a function of depth of the focal volume, R(z)ρexp(-μz) where ρ (dimensionless, ρ = 1 for a mirror) is the local reflectivity and μ [cm-1] is the exponential decay constant. The theory was developed to uniquely map the experimentally determined μ and ρ into the optical scattering properties μs and g. The values of μs and g depend on the composition and microstructure of tissues, and allow characterization of a tissue.

  4. Skeletal remodeling dynamics: New approaches with imaging instrumentation. [Laser confocal microscopy:a2

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, N.J.; Pinkerton, K.E.; Seibert, J.A.; Pool, R.R.

    1991-01-01

    This report of progress and future objectives timetable is based on an included schematic of goals and objectives and the project abstract which is included as Appendix 1. Five matters are summarized in the order of (1) novel methods of calcified bone confocal microscopy and reconstruction image analysis of decalcified beagle and human cortical bone serial sections, (2) macroscopic cross-correlation of beagle and human cortical and cancellous bone fractions with CT analysis, (3) guidance to the most radiobiologically important skeletal regions of interest with the just completed {sup 90}Sr bone tumor map from life time beagle studies, (4) deposition patterns of radioactive agents that participate in apatite crystal nucleation processes in bone and leave radiation-excited electrons trapped in bone mineral, and (5) the budget period timetable. The discovery that beta particles from {sup 166}Ho (T{sub {1/2}} =26 hr, {beta}{sub max} = 1.8 MeV) phosphonic acid bone agents leave detectable, long-lived, electron paramagnetic resonance signals in bone is included in Appendix 2 as a joint report.

  5. Modeling enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic substrates using fluorescent confocal microscopy II: pretreated biomass.

    PubMed

    Luterbacher, Jeremy S; Moran-Mirabal, Jose M; Burkholder, Eric W; Walker, Larry P

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we extend imaging and modeling work that was done in Part I of this report for a pure cellulose substrate (filter paper) to more industrially relevant substrates (untreated and pretreated hardwood and switchgrass). Using confocal fluorescence microscopy, we are able to track both the structure of the biomass particle via its autofluorescence, and bound enzyme from a commercial cellulase cocktail supplemented with a small fraction of fluorescently labeled Trichoderma reseii Cel7A. Imaging was performed throughout hydrolysis at temperatures relevant to industrial processing (50°C). Enzyme bound predominantly to areas with low autofluorescence, where structure loss and lignin removal had occurred during pretreatment; this confirms the importance of these processes for successful hydrolysis. The overall shape of both untreated and pretreated hardwood and switchgrass particles showed little change during enzymatic hydrolysis beyond a drop in autofluorescence intensity. The permanence of shape along with a relatively constant bound enzyme signal throughout hydrolysis was similar to observations previously made for filter paper, and was consistent with a modeling geometry of a hollowing out cylinder with widening pores represented as infinite slits. Modeling estimates of available surface areas for pretreated biomass were consistent with previously reported experimental results. PMID:25042048

  6. Intraoperative imaging during Mohs surgery with reflectance confocal microscopy: initial clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Eileen S.; Cordova, Miguel; Kose, Kivanc; Phillips, William; Rossi, Anthony; Nehal, Kishwer; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Mohs surgery for the removal of nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) is performed in stages, while being guided by the examination for residual tumor with frozen pathology. However, preparation of frozen pathology at each stage is time consuming and labor intensive. Real-time intraoperative reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM), combined with video mosaicking, may enable rapid detection of residual tumor directly in the surgical wounds on patients. We report our initial experience on 25 patients, using aluminum chloride for nuclear contrast. Imaging was performed in quadrants in the wound to simulate the Mohs surgeon’s examination of pathology. Images and videos of the epidermal and dermal margins were found to be of clinically acceptable quality. Bright nuclear morphology was identified at the epidermal margin and detectable in residual NMSC tumors. The presence of residual tumor and normal skin features could be detected in the peripheral and deep dermal margins. Intraoperative RCM imaging may enable detection of residual tumor directly on patients during Mohs surgery, and may serve as an adjunct for frozen pathology. Ultimately, for routine clinical utility, a stronger tumor-to-dermis contrast may be necessary, and also a smaller microscope with an automated approach for imaging in the entire wound in a rapid and controlled manner. PMID:25706821

  7. In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy evaluation of cheilitis glandularis: a report of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Silvia V; Kos, Eliana; Borguezan Nunes, Thais; Bologna, Sheyla B; Sangueza, Martin; Nico, Marcello M S

    2015-03-01

    Cheilitis glandularis (CG) is an uncommon condition of unknown origin; it is clinically characterized by variable degrees of macrocheilia associated with red dilated ostia of minor salivary glands on the vermilion area, which secrete viscous saliva. Histopathological characteristics of CG are comprised of chronic sialadenitis with engorged acinar lobules and dilated ducts; CG also features chronic sun damage (actinic cheilitis and squamous cell carcinoma). These changes may be localized, and a punch biopsy specimen might fail to reveal enough criteria to support the diagnosis of CG. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a noninvasive imaging technique that enables an in vivo en face visualization of tissues with a resolution close to conventional histopathology. Its use allows analysis of the entire lip, without excision. We reported the evaluation of 5 cases of CG based on clinical RCM and histopathological correlation. RCM examination of the lip vermilion mainly revealed a bright aspect of the superficial epithelial layers, which corresponded to labial keratosis. Alteration of the classical epithelial honeycomb pattern was observed in RCM, which corresponded to epithelial changes in actinic cheilitis at histopathology. Round, dark empty spaces intermingling the epithelium, corresponded to the ectopic excretory salivary gland ducts that open their ostia within the lip vermilion. In the lamina propria, the most striking feature was superficial salivary gland lobules, seen as dark gray lobular structures. Our study, demonstrated the use of RCM in the evaluation of CG, showing that a correlation between the clinical, digital RCM images and histopathology improved the diagnostic skills in CG evaluation. PMID:25238451

  8. Automated Segmentation of Skin Strata in Reflectance Confocal Microscopy Depth Stacks.

    PubMed

    Hames, Samuel C; Ardigò, Marco; Soyer, H Peter; Bradley, Andrew P; Prow, Tarl W

    2016-01-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a powerful tool for in-vivo examination of a variety of skin diseases. However, current use of RCM depends on qualitative examination by a human expert to look for specific features in the different strata of the skin. Developing approaches to quantify features in RCM imagery requires an automated understanding of what anatomical strata is present in a given en-face section. This work presents an automated approach using a bag of features approach to represent en-face sections and a logistic regression classifier to classify sections into one of four classes (stratum corneum, viable epidermis, dermal-epidermal junction and papillary dermis). This approach was developed and tested using a dataset of 308 depth stacks from 54 volunteers in two age groups (20-30 and 50-70 years of age). The classification accuracy on the test set was 85.6%. The mean absolute error in determining the interface depth for each of the stratum corneum/viable epidermis, viable epidermis/dermal-epidermal junction and dermal-epidermal junction/papillary dermis interfaces were 3.1 μm, 6.0 μm and 5.5 μm respectively. The probabilities predicted by the classifier in the test set showed that the classifier learned an effective model of the anatomy of human skin. PMID:27088865

  9. A model system using confocal fluorescence microscopy for examining real-time intracellular sodium ion regulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jacqueline A; Collings, David A; Glover, Chris N

    2016-08-15

    The gills of euryhaline fish are the ultimate ionoregulatory tissue, achieving ion homeostasis despite rapid and significant changes in external salinity. Cellular handling of sodium is not only critical for salt and water balance but is also directly linked to other essential functions such as acid-base homeostasis and nitrogen excretion. However, although measurement of intracellular sodium ([Na(+)]i) is important for an understanding of gill transport function, it is challenging and subject to methodological artifacts. Using gill filaments from a model euryhaline fish, inanga (Galaxias maculatus), the suitability of the fluorescent dye CoroNa Green as a probe for measuring [Na(+)]i in intact ionocytes was confirmed via confocal microscopy. Cell viability was verified, optimal dye loading parameters were determined, and the dye-ion dissociation constant was measured. Application of the technique to freshwater- and 100% seawater-acclimated inanga showed salinity-dependent changes in branchial [Na(+)]i, whereas no significant differences in branchial [Na(+)]i were determined in 50% seawater-acclimated fish. This technique facilitates the examination of real-time changes in gill [Na(+)]i in response to environmental factors and may offer significant insight into key homeostatic functions associated with the fish gill and the principles of sodium ion transport in other tissues and organisms. PMID:27235170

  10. Quantitative analyses of Streptococcus mutans biofilms with quartz crystal microbalance, microjet impingement and confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kreth, J; Hagerman, E; Tam, K; Merritt, J; Wong, D T W; Wu, B M; Myung, N V; Shi, W; Qi, F

    2004-10-01

    Microbial biofilm formation can be influenced by many physiological and genetic factors. The conventional microtiter plate assay provides useful but limited information about biofilm formation. With the fast expansion of the biofilm research field, there are urgent needs for more informative techniques to quantify the major parameters of a biofilm, such as adhesive strength and total biomass. It would be even more ideal if these measurements could be conducted in a real-time, non-invasive manner. In this study, we used quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and microjet impingement (MJI) to measure total biomass and adhesive strength, respectively, of S. mutans biofilms formed under different sucrose concentrations. In conjunction with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and the COMSTAT software, we show that sucrose concentration affects the biofilm strength, total biomass, and architecture in both qualitative and quantitative manners. Our data correlate well with previous observations about the effect of sucrose on the adherence of S. mutans to the tooth surface, and demonstrate that QCM is a useful tool for studying the kinetics of biofilm formation in real time and that MJI is a sensitive, easy-to-use device to measure the adhesive strength of a biofilm. PMID:16429589

  11. In Vivo Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy of Human Meibomian Glands in Aging and Ocular Surface Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fasanella, Vincenzo; Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Brescia, Lorenza; Di Staso, Federico; Ciancaglini, Marco; Mastropasqua, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Meibomian glands (MGs) play a crucial role in the ocular surface homeostasis by providing lipids to the superficial tear film. Their dysfunction destabilizes the tear film leading to a progressive loss of the ocular surface equilibrium and increasing the risk for dry eye. In fact, nowadays, the meibomian gland dysfunction is one of the leading causes of dry eye. Over the past decades, MGs have been mainly studied by using meibography, which, however, cannot image the glandular structure at a cellular level. The diffusion of the in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) provided a new approach for the structural assessment of MGs permitting a major step in the noninvasive evaluation of these structures. LSCM is capable of showing MGs modifications during aging and in the most diffuse ocular surface diseases such as dry eye, allergy, and autoimmune conditions and in the drug-induced ocular surface disease. On the other hand, LSCM may help clinicians in monitoring the tissue response to therapy. In this review, we summarized the current knowledge about the role of in vivo LSCM in the assessment of MGs during aging and in the most diffuse ocular surface diseases. PMID:27047965

  12. In Vivo Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy of Human Meibomian Glands in Aging and Ocular Surface Diseases.

    PubMed

    Fasanella, Vincenzo; Agnifili, Luca; Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Brescia, Lorenza; Di Staso, Federico; Ciancaglini, Marco; Mastropasqua, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Meibomian glands (MGs) play a crucial role in the ocular surface homeostasis by providing lipids to the superficial tear film. Their dysfunction destabilizes the tear film leading to a progressive loss of the ocular surface equilibrium and increasing the risk for dry eye. In fact, nowadays, the meibomian gland dysfunction is one of the leading causes of dry eye. Over the past decades, MGs have been mainly studied by using meibography, which, however, cannot image the glandular structure at a cellular level. The diffusion of the in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) provided a new approach for the structural assessment of MGs permitting a major step in the noninvasive evaluation of these structures. LSCM is capable of showing MGs modifications during aging and in the most diffuse ocular surface diseases such as dry eye, allergy, and autoimmune conditions and in the drug-induced ocular surface disease. On the other hand, LSCM may help clinicians in monitoring the tissue response to therapy. In this review, we summarized the current knowledge about the role of in vivo LSCM in the assessment of MGs during aging and in the most diffuse ocular surface diseases. PMID:27047965

  13. A fully automated tortuosity quantification system with application to corneal nerve fibres in confocal microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Annunziata, Roberto; Kheirkhah, Ahmad; Aggarwal, Shruti; Hamrah, Pedram; Trucco, Emanuele

    2016-08-01

    Recent clinical research has highlighted important links between a number of diseases and the tortuosity of curvilinear anatomical structures like corneal nerve fibres, suggesting that tortuosity changes might detect early stages of specific conditions. Currently, clinical studies are mainly based on subjective, visual assessment, with limited repeatability and inter-observer agreement. To address these problems, we propose a fully automated framework for image-level tortuosity estimation, consisting of a hybrid segmentation method and a highly adaptable, definition-free tortuosity estimation algorithm. The former combines an appearance model, based on a Scale and Curvature-Invariant Ridge Detector (SCIRD), with a context model, including multi-range learned context filters. The latter is based on a novel tortuosity estimation paradigm in which discriminative, multi-scale features can be automatically learned for specific anatomical objects and diseases. Experimental results on 140 in vivo confocal microscopy images of corneal nerve fibres from healthy and unhealthy subjects demonstrate the excellent performance of our method compared to state-of-the-art approaches and ground truth annotations from 3 expert observers. PMID:27136674

  14. In Vivo Confocal Microscopy in Dry Eye Disease and Related Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Alhatem, Albert; Cavalcanti, Bernardo; Hamrah, Pedram

    2015-01-01

    A new era of ocular imaging has recently begun with the advent of in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM), shedding more light on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and potential treatment strategies for dry eye disease. IVCM is a noninvasive and powerful tool that allows detection of changes in ocular surface epithelium, immune and inflammatory cells, corneal nerves, keratocytes, and meibomian gland structures on a cellular level. Ocular surface structures in dry eye-related conditions have been assessed and alterations have been quantified using IVCM. IVCM may aid in the assessment of dry eye disease prognosis and treatment, as well as lead to improved understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms in this complex disease. Further, due to visualization of subclinical findings, IVCM may allow detection of disease at much earlier stages and allow stratification of patients for clinical trials. Finally, by providing an objective methodology to monitor treatment efficacy, image-guided therapy may allow the possibility of tailoring treatment based on cellular changes, rather than on clinical changes alone. PMID:23163268

  15. In vivo confocal microscopy of meibomian glands and palpebral conjunctiva in vernal keratoconjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qiaoling; Le, Qihua; Hong, Jiaxu; Xiang, Jun; Wei, Anji; Xu, Jianjiang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the correlations between conjunctival inflammatory status and meibomian gland (MG) morphology in vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) patients by using in vivo confocal microscopy (CM). Materials and Methods: Nineteen VKC patients (7 limbal, 7 tarsal, and 5 mixed forms) and 16 normal volunteers (controls) were enrolled. All subjects underwent CM scanning to obtain the images of upper palpebral conjunctiva and MGs. Inflammatory cell (IC) density in palpebral conjunctival epithelial and stromal layers, Langerhans cell (LC) density at lid margins and the stroma adjacent to the MG, and MG acinar unit density (MGAUD) were recorded. The longest and shortest diameters of MG acinar were measured. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the parameter differences whereas the Spearman's rank correlation analysis was applied to determine their correlations. Results: Among all groups, no significant statistical differences were found in epithelial and stromal IC densities, mean values of MG acinar unit densities, or longest and shortest diameters. Both LC parameters in the tarsal-mixed groups were significantly higher than those in the limbal and control groups. All LC densities of VKC patients showed a positive correlation with MGAUD and shortest diameter. Conclusions: In VKC patients, the conjunctival inflammatory status could be associated with the MG status. In vivo CM is a noninvasive, efficient tool in the assessment of MG status and ocular surface. PMID:26044472

  16. Implementation of fluorescence confocal mosaicing microscopy by "early adopter" Mohs surgeons: a review of recent progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Manu; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Nehal, Kishwer

    2016-03-01

    Confocal mosaicing microscopy (CMM) enables rapid imaging of large areas of fresh tissue ex vivo without the processing that is necessary for conventional histology. When performed with fluorescence mode using acridine orange (nuclear specific dye) it enhances nuclei-to-dermis contrast that enables detection of all types of BCCs including thin strands of infiltrative basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). Thus far, this technique has been mostly validated in research setting for the analysis of BCC tumor margins. Recently, CMM has been adopted and implemented in real clinical settings by some surgeons as an alternative tool to frozen section (FS) during Mohs surgery. In this review article we summarize the development of CMM guided imaging of ex vivo tissues from bench to bedside. We also present its current state of application in routine clinical workflow not only for the assessment of BCC margin but also for other skin cancers such as melanoma, SCC, and some infectious diseases where FS is not routinely performed. Lastly, we also discuss the potential limitations of this technology as well as future developments. As this technology advances further, it may serve as an adjunct to standard histology and enable rapid surgical pathology of skin cancers at the bedside.

  17. Visualization and quantification of healthy and carious dentin structure using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yuichi; Wilder-Smith, Petra B. B.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Arrastia-Jitosho, Anna-Marie A.; Liaw, Lih-Huei L.; Matsumoto, Koukichi; Berns, Michael W.

    1996-04-01

    In this study, a fluorescence technique was developed for visualization of dentin using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Eighteen extracted human teeth were used: 13 showing no clinical signs of caries and 5 with visually apparent decay. Preliminary study: All teeth were horizontally sectioned to approx. 200 micrometers thickness and pre-treated as follows: no pretreatment; vacuum only; ultrasonication only; sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) only; vacuum and NaOCl; ultrasonication and NaOCl; or vacuum, ultrasonication and NaOCl. Samples were stained with Rhodamine 123 fluorescent dye at a concentration of 10-5 M in phosphate buffer saline for 1 to 24 hours. Caries study: Dentin surfaces, some with pre-existing caries, were visualized using CLSM. Most dentin tubules in sound dentin appeared open using CLSM, but most dentin tubules in carious dentin appeared closed or narrowed. Surface images obtained using CLSM were similar to those seen by SEM, but additional subsurface imaging was possible using CLSM at depth intervals of 1 micrometers to a depth of 30 - 50 micrometers . This technique shows good potential for non-invasive surface and subsurface imaging of dentin structures.

  18. Detection of wood cell wall porosity using small carbohydrate molecules and confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, L A; Kroese, H W; Hill, S J; Franich, R A

    2015-09-01

    A novel approach to nanoscale detection of cell wall porosity using confocal fluorescence microscopy is described. Infiltration of cell walls with a range of nitrophenyl-substituted carbohydrates of different molecular weights was assessed by measuring changes in the intensity of lignin fluorescence, in response to the quenching effect of the 4-nitrophenyl group. The following carbohydrates were used in order of increasing molecular weight; 4-nitrophenyl β-D-glucopyrano-side (monosaccharide), 4-nitrophenyl β-D-lactopyranoside (disaccharide), 2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl β-D-maltotrioside (trisaccharide), and 4-nitrophenyl α-D-maltopentaoside (pentasaccharide). This technique was used to compare cell wall porosity in wood which had been dewatered to 40% moisture content using supercritical CO2, where cell walls remain fully hydrated, with kiln dried wood equilibrated to 12% moisture content. Infiltration of cell walls as measured by fluorescence quenching, was found to decrease with increasing molecular weight, with the pentasaccharide being significantly excluded compared to the monosaccharide. Porosity experiments were performed on blocks and sections to assess differences in cell wall accessibility. Dewatered and kiln dried wood infiltrated as blocks showed similar results, but greater infiltration was achieved by using sections, indicating that not all pores were easily accessible by infiltration from the lumen surface. In wood blocks infiltrated with 4-nitrophenyl α-D-maltopentaoside, quenching of the secondary wall was quite variable, especially in kiln dried wood, indicating limited connectivity of pores accessible from the lumen surface. PMID:25925133

  19. Localization of extracellular matrix components in developing mouse salivary glands by confocal microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, P.; Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    The importance of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in developing organisms is well established. Proteoglycans and interstitial collagens are required for the growth, morphogenesis, and differentiation of epithelial organs and the distribution of these molecules has been described. However, much less is known about other ECM macromolecules in developing epithelial organs. We used confocal microscopy to examine the distribution of laminin, heparan sulfate (BM-1) proteoglycan, fibronectin, and collagen types I, IV, and V, in mouse embryonic salivary glands. Organ rudiments were isolated from gestational day 13 mouse embryos and cultured for 24, 48, or 72 hours. Whole mounts were stained by indirect immunofluorescence and then examined using a Zeiss Laser Scan Microscope. We found that each ECM component examined had a distinct distribution and that the distribution of some molecules varied with culture time. Laminin was mainly restricted to the basement membrane. BM-1 proteoglycan was concentrated in the basement membrane and also formed a fine network throughout the mesenchyme. Type IV collagen was mainly located in the basement membrane of the epithelium, but it was also present throughout the mesenchyme. Type V collagen was distributed throughout the mesenchyme at 24 hours, but at 48 hours was principally located in the basement membrane. Type I collagen was distributed throughout the mesenchyme at all culture times, and accumulated in the clefts and particularly at the epithelial-mesenchymal interface as time in culture increased. Fibronectin was observed throughout the mesenchyme at all times.

  20. Evaluation of Yogurt Microstructure Using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Skytte, Jacob L; Ghita, Ovidiu; Whelan, Paul F; Andersen, Ulf; Møller, Flemming; Dahl, Anders B; Larsen, Rasmus

    2015-06-01

    The microstructure of protein networks in yogurts defines impor