Science.gov

Sample records for 3d contact analysis

  1. Comparison of Gap Elements and Contact Algorithm for 3D Contact Analysis of Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibel, G. D.; Tiku, K.; Kumar, A.; Handschuh, R.

    1994-01-01

    Three dimensional stress analysis of spiral bevel gears in mesh using the finite element method is presented. A finite element model is generated by solving equations that identify tooth surface coordinates. Contact is simulated by the automatic generation of nonpenetration constraints. This method is compared to a finite element contact analysis conducted with gap elements.

  2. A Procedure for 3-D Contact Stress Analysis of Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.; Bibel, G.

    1994-01-01

    Contact stress distribution of spiral bevel gears using nonlinear finite element static analysis is presented. Procedures have been developed to solve the nonlinear equations that identify the gear and pinion surface coordinates based on the kinematics of the cutting process and orientate the pinion and the gear in space to mesh with each other. Contact is simulated by connecting GAP elements along the intersection of a line from each pinion point (parallel to the normal at the contact point) with the gear surface. A three dimensional model with four gear teeth and three pinion teeth is used to determine the contact stresses at two different contact positions in a spiral bevel gearset. A summary of the elliptical contact stress distribution is given. This information will be helpful to helicopter and aircraft transmission designers who need to minimize weight of the transmission and maximize reliability.

  3. Static analysis of offshore risers with a geometrically-exact 3D beam model subjected to unilateral contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, Alfredo Gay; Martins, Clóvis A.; Pimenta, Paulo M.

    2014-01-01

    In offshore applications there are elements that can be modeled as long beams, such as umbilical cables, flexible and rigid pipes and hoses, immersed in the sea water, suspended from the floating unit to the seabed. The suspended part of these elements is named "riser" and is subjected to the ocean environment loads, such as waves and sea current. This work presents a structural geometrically-exact 3D beam model, discretized using the finite element method for riser modeling. An updated Lagrangian framework for the rotation parameterization has been used for the description of the exact kinematics. The goal is to perform a complete static analysis, considering the oceanic loads and the unilateral contact with the seabed, extending the current standard analysis for situations in which very large rotations occurs, in particular, large torsion. Details of the nonlinear 3D model and loads from oceanic environment are discussed, including the contact unilateral constraint.

  4. A T1 and DTI fused 3D corpus callosum analysis in pre- vs. post-season contact sports players

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, Yi; Law, Meng; Shi, Jie; Gajawelli, Niharika; Haas, Lauren; Wang, Yalin; Leporé, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Sports related traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a worldwide public health issue, and damage to the corpus callosum (CC) has been considered as an important indicator of TBI. However, contact sports players suffer repeated hits to the head during the course of a season even in the absence of diagnosed concussion, and less is known about their effect on callosal anatomy. In addition, T1-weighted and diffusion tensor brain magnetic resonance images (DTI) have been analyzed separately, but a joint analysis of both types of data may increase statistical power and give a more complete understanding of anatomical correlates of subclinical concussions in these athletes. Here, for the first time, we fuse T1 surface-based morphometry and a new DTI analysis on 3D surface representations of the CCs into a single statistical analysis on these subjects. Our new combined method successfully increases detection power in detecting differences between pre- vs. post-season contact sports players. Alterations are found in the ventral genu, isthmus, and splenium of CC. Our findings may inform future health assessments in contact sports players. The new method here is also the first truly multimodal diffusion and T1-weighted analysis of the CC, and may be useful to detect anatomical changes in the corpus callosum in other multimodal datasets.

  5. A 3D Contact Smoothing Method

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M A; Laursen, T A

    2002-05-02

    Smoothing of contact surfaces can be used to eliminate the chatter typically seen with node on facet contact and give a better representation of the actual contact surface. The latter affect is well demonstrated for problems with interference fits. In this work we present two methods for the smoothing of contact surfaces for 3D finite element contact. In the first method, we employ Gregory patches to smooth the faceted surface in a node on facet implementation. In the second method, we employ a Bezier interpolation of the faceted surface in a mortar method implementation of contact. As is well known, node on facet approaches can exhibit locking due to the failure of the Babuska-Brezzi condition and in some instances fail the patch test. The mortar method implementation is stable and provides optimal convergence in the energy of error. In the this work we demonstrate the superiority of the smoothed versus the non-smoothed node on facet implementations. We also show where the node on facet method fails and some results from the smoothed mortar method implementation.

  6. Some recent advances in 3D crack and contact analysis of elastic solids with transverse isotropy and multifield coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Qiu

    2015-10-01

    Significant progress has been made in mixed boundary-value problems associated with three-dimensional (3D) crack and contact analyses of advanced materials featuring more complexities compared to the conventional isotropic elastic materials. These include material anisotropy and multifield coupling, two typical characteristics of most current multifunctional materials. In this paper we try to present a state-of-the-art description of 3D exact/analytical solutions derived for crack and contact problems of elastic solids with both transverse isotropy and multifield coupling in the latest decade by the potential theory method in the spirit of V. I. Fabrikant, whose ingenious breakthrough brings new vigor and vitality to the old research subject of classical potential theory. We are particularly interested in crack and contact problems with certain nonlinear features. Emphasis is also placed on the coupling between the temperature field (or the like) and other physical fields (e.g., elastic, electric, and magnetic fields). We further highlight the practical significance of 3D contact solutions, in particular in applications related to modern scanning probe microscopes.

  7. Automated real-time search and analysis algorithms for a non-contact 3D profiling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Mark; Wu, Chih-Hang John; Beck, B. Terry; Peterman, Robert J.

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a new means of identifying and extracting geometrical feature statistics from a non-contact precision-measurement 3D profilometer. Autonomous algorithms have been developed to search through large-scale Cartesian point clouds to identify and extract geometrical features. These algorithms are developed with the intent of providing real-time production quality control of cold-rolled steel wires. The steel wires in question are prestressing steel reinforcement wires for concrete members. The geometry of the wire is critical in the performance of the overall concrete structure. For this research a custom 3D non-contact profilometry system has been developed that utilizes laser displacement sensors for submicron resolution surface profiling. Optimizations in the control and sensory system allow for data points to be collected at up to an approximate 400,000 points per second. In order to achieve geometrical feature extraction and tolerancing with this large volume of data, the algorithms employed are optimized for parsing large data quantities. The methods used provide a unique means of maintaining high resolution data of the surface profiles while keeping algorithm running times within practical bounds for industrial application. By a combination of regional sampling, iterative search, spatial filtering, frequency filtering, spatial clustering, and template matching a robust feature identification method has been developed. These algorithms provide an autonomous means of verifying tolerances in geometrical features. The key method of identifying the features is through a combination of downhill simplex and geometrical feature templates. By performing downhill simplex through several procedural programming layers of different search and filtering techniques, very specific geometrical features can be identified within the point cloud and analyzed for proper tolerancing. Being able to perform this quality control in real time

  8. Automatic contact in DYNA3D for vehicle crashworthiness

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.; Engelmann, B.E.

    1993-07-15

    This paper presents a new formulation for the automatic definition and treatment of mechanical contact in explicit nonlinear finite element analysis. Automatic contact offers the benefits of significantly reduced model construction time and fewer opportunities for user error, but faces significant challenges in reliability and computational costs. This paper discusses in detail a new four-step automatic contact algorithm. Key aspects of the proposed method include automatic identification of adjacent and opposite surfaces in the global search phase, and the use of a smoothly varying surface normal which allows a consistent treatment of shell intersection and corner contact conditions without ad-hoc rules. The paper concludes with three examples which illustrate the performance of the newly proposed algorithm in the public DYNA3D code.

  9. Contact Interface Verification for DYNA3D Scenario 1: Basic Contact

    SciTech Connect

    McMichael, L D

    2006-05-10

    A suite of test problems has been developed to examine contact behavior within the nonlinear, three-dimensional, explicit finite element analysis (FEA) code DYNA3D (Lin, 2005). The test problems address the basic functionality of the contact algorithms, including the behavior of various kinematic, penalty, and Lagrangian enforcement formulations. The results from the DYNA3D analyses are compared to closed form solutions to verify the contact behavior. This work was performed as part of the Verification and Validation efforts of LLNL W Program within the NNSA's Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program. DYNA3D models the transient dynamic response of solids and structures including the interactions between disjoint bodies (parts). A wide variety of contact surfaces are available to represent the diverse interactions possible during an analysis, including relative motion (sliding), separation and gap closure (voids), and fixed relative position (tied). The problem geometry may be defined using a combination of element formulations, including one-dimensional beam and truss elements, two-dimensional shell elements, and three-dimensional solid elements. Consequently, it is necessary to consider various element interactions for each contact algorithm being verified. Most of the contact algorithms currently available in DYNA3D are examined; the exceptions are the Type 4--Single Surface Contact and Type 11--SAND algorithms. It is likely that these algorithms will be removed since their functionality is embodied in other, more robust, contact algorithms. The automatic contact algorithm is evaluated using the Type 12 interface. Two other variations of automatic contact, Type 13 and Type 14, offer additional means to adapt the interface domain, but share the same search and restoration algorithms as Type 12. The contact algorithms are summarized in Table 1. This report and associated test problems examine the scenario where one contact surface exists between two

  10. ClaRNA: a classifier of contacts in RNA 3D structures based on a comparative analysis of various classification schemes

    PubMed Central

    Waleń, Tomasz; Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Gierski, Przemysław; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of folding and function of RNA molecules depends on the identification and classification of interactions between ribonucleotide residues. We developed a new method named ClaRNA for computational classification of contacts in RNA 3D structures. Unique features of the program are the ability to identify imperfect contacts and to process coarse-grained models. Each doublet of spatially close ribonucleotide residues in a query structure is compared to clusters of reference doublets obtained by analysis of a large number of experimentally determined RNA structures, and assigned a score that describes its similarity to one or more known types of contacts, including pairing, stacking, base–phosphate and base–ribose interactions. The accuracy of ClaRNA is 0.997 for canonical base pairs, 0.983 for non-canonical pairs and 0.961 for stacking interactions. The generalized squared correlation coefficient (GC2) for ClaRNA is 0.969 for canonical base pairs, 0.638 for non-canonical pairs and 0.824 for stacking interactions. The classifier can be easily extended to include new types of spatial relationships between pairs or larger assemblies of nucleotide residues. ClaRNA is freely available via a web server that includes an extensive set of tools for processing and visualizing structural information about RNA molecules. PMID:25159614

  11. A new automatic contact formulation in DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.; Engelmann, B.E.

    1993-08-01

    This paper presents a new approach for the automatic definition and treatment of mechanical contact in DYNA3D. Automatic contact offers the benefits of significantly reduced model construction time and fewer opportunities for user error, but must maintain high reliability and acceptable computational costs. The major features of the proposed new method include automatic identification of potentially contacting surfaces during the initialization phase, a new high-performance contact search procedure, and the use of a well-defined surface normal which allows a consistent treatment of shell intersection and corner contact conditions without ad-hoc rules. Three examples are presented which illustrate the performance of newly proposed algorithm in the public DYNA3D code.

  12. Contact Interface Verification for DYNA3D Scenario 2: Multi-Surface Contact

    SciTech Connect

    McMichael, L D

    2006-05-10

    A suite of test problems has been developed to examine contact behavior within the nonlinear, three-dimensional, explicit finite element analysis (FEA) code DYNA3D (Lin, 2005). The test problems use multiple interfaces and a combination of enforcement methods to assess the basic functionality of the contact algorithms. The results from the DYNA3D analyses are compared to closed form solutions to verify the contact behavior. This work was performed as part of the Verification and Validation efforts of LLNL W Program within the NNSA's Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program. DYNA3D models the transient dynamic response of solids and structures including the interactions between disjoint bodies (parts). A wide variety of contact surfaces are available to represent the diverse interactions possible during an analysis, including relative motion (sliding), separation and gap closure (voids), and fixed relative position (tied). The problem geometry may be defined using a combination of element formulations, including one-dimensional beam and truss elements, two-dimensional shell elements, and three-dimensional solid elements. Consequently, it is necessary to consider various element interactions during contact. This report and associated test problems examine the scenario where multiple bodies interact with each other via multiple interfaces. The test problems focus on whether any ordering issues exist in the contact logic by using a combination of interface types, contact enforcement options (i.e., penalty, Lagrange, and kinematic), and element interactions within each problem. The influence of rigid materials on interface behavior is also examined. The companion report (McMichael, 2006) and associated test problems address the basic contact scenario where one contact surface exists between two disjoint bodies. The test problems are analyzed using version 5.2 (compiled on 12/22/2005) of DYNA3D. The analytical results are used to form baseline solutions for

  13. An augmented Lagrangian finite element formulation for 3D contact of biphasic tissues.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongqiang; Spilker, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    Biphasic contact analysis is essential to obtain a complete understanding of soft tissue biomechanics, and the importance of physiological structure on the joint biomechanics has long been recognised; however, up to date, there are no successful developments of biphasic finite element contact analysis for three-dimensional (3D) geometries of physiological joints. The aim of this study was to develop a finite element formulation for biphasic contact of 3D physiological joints. The augmented Lagrangian method was used to enforce the continuity of contact traction and fluid pressure across the contact interface. The biphasic contact method was implemented in the commercial software COMSOL Multiphysics 4.2(®) (COMSOL, Inc., Burlington, MA). The accuracy of the implementation was verified using 3D biphasic contact problems, including indentation with a flat-ended indenter and contact of glenohumeral cartilage layers. The ability of the method to model multibody biphasic contact of physiological joints was proved by a 3D knee model. The 3D biphasic finite element contact method developed in this study can be used to study the biphasic behaviours of the physiological joints. PMID:23181617

  14. 3D stochastic geophysical inversion for contact surface geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelièvre, Peter; Farquharson, Colin; Bijani, Rodrigo

    2015-04-01

    Geologists' interpretations about the Earth typically involve distinct rock units with contacts (interfaces) between them. As such, 3D geological Earth models typically comprise wireframe contact surfaces of tessellated triangles or other polygonal planar facets. In contrast, standard minimum-structure geophysical inversions are performed on meshes of space-filling cells (typically prisms or tetrahedra) and recover smoothly varying physical property distributions that are inconsistent with typical geological interpretations. There are several approaches through which mesh-based geophysical inversion can help recover models with some of the desired characteristics. However, a more effective strategy is to consider a fundamentally different type of inversion that works directly with models that comprise surfaces representing contacts between rock units. We are researching such an approach, our goal being to perform geophysical forward and inverse modelling directly with 3D geological models of any complexity. Geological and geophysical models should be specified using the same parameterization such that they are, in essence, the same Earth model. We parameterize the wireframe contact surfaces in a 3D model as the coordinates of the nodes (facet vertices). The physical properties of each rock unit in a model remain fixed while the geophysical inversion controls the position of the contact surfaces via the control nodes, perturbing the surfaces as required to fit the geophysical data responses. This is essentially a "geometry inversion", which can be used to recover the unknown geometry of a target body or to investigate the viability of a proposed Earth model. We apply global optimization strategies to solve the inverse problem, including stochastic sampling to obtain statistical information regarding the likelihood of particular features in the model, helping to assess the viability of a proposed model. Jointly inverting multiple types of geophysical data is simple

  15. Accuracy in Quantitative 3D Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bassel, George W.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative 3D imaging is becoming an increasingly popular and powerful approach to investigate plant growth and development. With the increased use of 3D image analysis, standards to ensure the accuracy and reproducibility of these data are required. This commentary highlights how image acquisition and postprocessing can introduce artifacts into 3D image data and proposes steps to increase both the accuracy and reproducibility of these analyses. It is intended to aid researchers entering the field of 3D image processing of plant cells and tissues and to help general readers in understanding and evaluating such data. PMID:25804539

  16. Effect of 3D fractal dimension on contact area and asperity interactions in elastoplastic contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourani, Abdeljalil

    2016-05-01

    Few models are devoted to investigate the effect of 3D fractal dimension Ds on contact area and asperity interactions. These models used statistical approaches or two-dimensional deterministic simulations without considering the asperity interactions and elastic-plastic transition regime. In this study, a complete 3D deterministic model is adopted to simulate the contact between fractal surfaces which are generated using a modified two-variable Weierstrass-Mandelbrot function. This model incorporates the asperity interactions and considers the different deformation modes of surface asperities which range from entirely elastic through elastic-plastic to entirely plastic contact. The simulations reveal that the elastoplastic model is more appropriate to calculate the contact area ratio and pressure field. It is also shown that the influence of the asperity interactions cannot be neglected, especially at lower fractal dimension Ds and higher load.

  17. 3D BEM for orthotropic frictional contact of piezoelectric bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Tembleque, Luis; Buroni, Federico C.; Sáez, Andrés

    2015-09-01

    A numerical methodology to model the three-dimensional frictional contact interaction of piezoelectric materials in presence of electric fields is presented in this work. The boundary element method (BEM) is used in order to compute the electro-elastic influence coefficients. The proposed BEM formulation employs an explicit approach for the evaluation of the corresponding fundamental solutions, which are valid for general anisotropic behaviour meanwhile mathematical degeneracies in the context of the Stroh formalism are allowed. The contact methodology is based on an augmented Lagrangian formulation and uses an iterative Uzawa scheme of resolution. An orthotropic frictional law is implemented in this work so anisotropy is present both in the bulk and in the surface. The methodology is validated by comparison with benchmark analytical solutions. Some additional examples are presented and discussed in detail, revealing the importance of considering orthotropic frictional contact conditions in the electro-elastic analysis of this kind of problems.

  18. Accuracy of 3D scanners in tooth mark analysis.

    PubMed

    Molina, Ana; Martin-de-las-Heras, Stella

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the accuracy of contact and laser 3D scanners in tooth mark analysis. Ten dental casts were scanned with both 3D scanners. Seven linear measurements were made from the 3D images of dental casts and biting edges generated with DentalPrint© software (University of Granada, Granada, Spain). The uncertainty value for contact 3D scanning was 0.833 for the upper dental cast and 0.660 mm for the lower cast; similar uncertainty values were found for 3D-laser scanning. Slightly higher uncertainty values were obtained for the 3D biting edges generated. The uncertainty values for single measurements ranged from 0.1 to 0.3 mm with the exception of the intercanine distance, in which higher values were obtained. Knowledge of the error rate in the 3D scanning of dental casts and biting edges is especially relevant to be applied in practical forensic cases. PMID:25388960

  19. An automatic contact algorithm in DYNA3D for impact problems

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.; Engelmann, B.E.

    1993-07-23

    This paper presents a new approach for the automatic definition and treatment of mechanical contact in explicit nonlinear finite element analysis. Automatic contact offers the benefits of significantly reduced model construction time and fewer opportunities for user error, but faces significant challenges in reliability and computational costs. Key aspects of the proposed new method include automatic identification of adjacent and opposite surfaces in the global search phase, and the use of a well-defined surface normal which allows a consistent treatment of shell intersection and corner contact conditions without a ad-hoc rules. The paper concludes with three examples which illustrate the performance of the newly proposed algorithm in the public DYNA3D code.

  20. Predicted residue-residue contacts can help the scoring of 3D models.

    PubMed

    Tress, Michael L; Valencia, Alfonso

    2010-06-01

    During the 7th Critical Assessment of Protein Structure Prediction (CASP7) experiment, it was suggested that the real value of predicted residue-residue contacts might lie in the scoring of 3D model structures. Here, we have carried out a detailed reassessment of the contact predictions made during the recent CASP8 experiment to determine whether predicted contacts might aid in the selection of close-to-native structures or be a useful tool for scoring 3D structural models. We used the contacts predicted by the CASP8 residue-residue contact prediction groups to select models for each target domain submitted to the experiment. We found that the information contained in the predicted residue-residue contacts would probably have helped in the selection of 3D models in the free modeling regime and over the harder comparative modeling targets. Indeed, in many cases, the models selected using just the predicted contacts had better GDT-TS scores than all but the best 3D prediction groups. Despite the well-known low accuracy of residue-residue contact predictions, it is clear that the predictive power of contacts can be useful in 3D model prediction strategies. PMID:20408174

  1. Pre-Processing of Point-Data from Contact and Optical 3D Digitization Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Budak, Igor; Vukelić, Djordje; Bračun, Drago; Hodolič, Janko; Soković, Mirko

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary 3D digitization systems employed by reverse engineering (RE) feature ever-growing scanning speeds with the ability to generate large quantity of points in a unit of time. Although advantageous for the quality and efficiency of RE modelling, the huge number of point datas can turn into a serious practical problem, later on, when the CAD model is generated. In addition, 3D digitization processes are very often plagued by measuring errors, which can be attributed to the very nature of measuring systems, various characteristics of the digitized objects and subjective errors by the operator, which also contribute to problems in the CAD model generation process. This paper presents an integral system for the pre-processing of point data, i.e., filtering, smoothing and reduction, based on a cross-sectional RE approach. In the course of the proposed system development, major emphasis was placed on the module for point data reduction, which was designed according to a novel approach with integrated deviation analysis and fuzzy logic reasoning. The developed system was verified through its application on three case studies, on point data from objects of versatile geometries obtained by contact and laser 3D digitization systems. The obtained results demonstrate the effectiveness of the system. PMID:22368513

  2. Parallel contact detection algorithm for transient solid dynamics simulations using PRONTO3D

    SciTech Connect

    Attaway, S.W.; Hendrickson, B.A.; Plimpton, S.J.

    1996-09-01

    An efficient, scalable, parallel algorithm for treating material surface contacts in solid mechanics finite element programs has been implemented in a modular way for MIMD parallel computers. The serial contact detection algorithm that was developed previously for the transient dynamics finite element code PRONTO3D has been extended for use in parallel computation by devising a dynamic (adaptive) processor load balancing scheme.

  3. 3D ESPI and 3D shearography measurements applied to NDT and FEM analysis validation for industrial quality control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack, Erwin K.; Riner, Marc

    2001-10-01

    Laser interferometric methods opened the way to measure displacements and deformations of an object in a while- field, non-contact and 3D manner. Therefore, they are used in non-destructive testing and validation of 3D finite element (FE) simulation results. This paper emphasizes the fact that the process of validating an FE result comprises in turn the validation and assessment of the optical measurement method and the experimental bou8ndary condition. Application examples for FE analysis validation and NDT from machine engineering, space technology, and biomedical engineering are presented.

  4. 3D surface defect analysis and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B.; Jia, M.; Song, G. J.; Tao, L.; Harding, K. G.

    2008-08-01

    A method is proposed for surface defect analysis and evaluation. Good 3D point clouds can now be obtained through a variety of surface profiling methods such as stylus tracers, structured light, or interferometry. In order to inspect a surface for defects, first a reference surface that represents the surface without any defects needs to be identified. This reference surface can then be fit to the point cloud. The algorithm we present finds the least square solution for the overdetermined equation set to obtain the parameters of the reference surface mathematical description. The distance between each point within the point cloud and the reference surface is then calculated using to the derived reference surface equation. For analysis of the data, the user can preset a threshold distance value. If the calculated distance is bigger than the threshold value, the corresponding point is marked as a defect point. The software then generates a color-coded map of the measured surface. Defect points that are connected together are formed into a defect-clustering domain. Each defect-clustering domain is treated as one defect area. We then use a clustering domain searching algorithm to auto-search all the defect areas in the point cloud. The different critical parameters used for evaluating the defect status of a point cloud that can be calculated are described as: P-Depth,a peak depth of all defects; Defect Number, the number of surface defects; Defects/Area, the defect number in unit area; and Defect Coverage Ratio which is a ratio of the defect area to the region of interest.

  5. Justification for a 2D versus 3D fingertip finite element model during static contact simulations.

    PubMed

    Harih, Gregor; Tada, Mitsunori; Dolšak, Bojan

    2016-10-01

    The biomechanical response of a human hand during contact with various products has not been investigated in details yet. It has been shown that excessive contact pressure on the soft tissue can result in discomfort, pain and also cumulative traumatic disorders. This manuscript explores the benefits and limitations of a simplified two-dimensional vs. an anatomically correct three-dimensional finite element model of a human fingertip. Most authors still use 2D FE fingertip models due to their simplicity and reduced computational costs. However we show that an anatomically correct 3D FE fingertip model can provide additional insight into the biomechanical behaviour. The use of 2D fingertip FE models is justified when observing peak contact pressure values as well as displacement during the contact for the given studied cross-section. On the other hand, an anatomically correct 3D FE fingertip model provides a contact pressure distribution, which reflects the fingertip's anatomy. PMID:26856769

  6. 3D face analysis for demographic biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Tokola, Ryan A; Mikkilineni, Aravind K; Boehnen, Chris Bensing

    2015-01-01

    Despite being increasingly easy to acquire, 3D data is rarely used for face-based biometrics applications beyond identification. Recent work in image-based demographic biometrics has enjoyed much success, but these approaches suffer from the well-known limitations of 2D representations, particularly variations in illumination, texture, and pose, as well as a fundamental inability to describe 3D shape. This paper shows that simple 3D shape features in a face-based coordinate system are capable of representing many biometric attributes without problem-specific models or specialized domain knowledge. The same feature vector achieves impressive results for problems as diverse as age estimation, gender classification, and race classification.

  7. On the 3D normal tire/off-road vibro-contact problem with friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munteanu, Ligia; Chiroiu, Veturia; Brişan, Cornel; Dumitriu, Dan; Sireteanu, Tudor; Petre, Simona

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a virtual experiment concerning driving on off-roads is investigated via 3D normal vibro-contact problem with friction. The dynamic road concept is introduced in order to characterize a particular stretch of road by total longitudinal, lateral, and normal forces and their geometric distributions in the contact patches. The off-road profiles are built by image sonification technique. The cross-sectional curves of off-roads before and after deformation, the contact between the tire and the road, the distribution of contact and friction forces in the contact domain, the natural frequencies and modes when the tire is in ground contact, are estimated. The approach is exercised on two particular problems and results compare favorably to existing analytical and numerical solutions. The feasibility of image sonification technique is useful to build a low-cost virtual reality environment with an increased degree of realism for driving simulators and higher user flexibility.

  8. A 3D Frictional Segment-to-Segment Contact Method for Large Deformations and Quadratic Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M; Laursen, T; Solberg, J

    2004-04-01

    Node-on-segment contact is the most common form of contact used today but has many deficiencies ranging from potential locking to non-smooth behavior with large sliding. Furthermore, node-on-segment approaches are not at all applicable to higher order discretizations (e.g. quadratic elements). In a previous work, [3, 4] we developed a segment-to-segment contact approach for eight node hexahedral elements based on the mortar method that was applicable to large deformation mechanics. The approach proved extremely robust since it eliminated the over-constraint that caused 'locking' and provided smooth force variations in large sliding. Here, we extend this previous approach to treat frictional contact problems. In addition, the method is extended to 3D quadratic tetrahedrals and hexahedrals. The proposed approach is then applied to several challenging frictional contact problems that demonstrate its effectiveness.

  9. An accurate quadrature technique for the contact boundary in 3D finite element computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Thang X.; Sauer, Roger A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new numerical integration technique for 3D contact finite element implementations, focusing on a remedy for the inaccurate integration due to discontinuities at the boundary of contact surfaces. The method is based on the adaptive refinement of the integration domain along the boundary of the contact surface, and is accordingly denoted RBQ for refined boundary quadrature. It can be used for common element types of any order, e.g. Lagrange, NURBS, or T-Spline elements. In terms of both computational speed and accuracy, RBQ exhibits great advantages over a naive increase of the number of quadrature points. Also, the RBQ method is shown to remain accurate for large deformations. Furthermore, since the sharp boundary of the contact surface is determined, it can be used for various purposes like the accurate post-processing of the contact pressure. Several examples are presented to illustrate the new technique.

  10. Non-contact 3D fingerprint scanner using structured light illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troy, Mike; Hassebrook, Laurence; Yalla, Veeraganesh; Daley, Raymond

    2011-03-01

    As crime prevention and national security remain a top priority, requirements for the use of fingerprints for identification continue to grow. While the size of fingerprint databases continues to expand, new technologies that can improve accuracy and ultimately matching performance will become more critical to maintain the effectiveness of the systems. FlashScan3D has developed non-contact, fingerprint scanners based on the principles of Structured Light Illumination (SLI) that capture 3Dimensional data of fingerprints quickly, accurately and independently of an operator. FlashScan3D will present findings from various research projects performed for the US Army and the Department of Homeland Security.

  11. 3D Hollow Framework Silver Nanowire Electrodes for High-Performance Bottom-Contact Organic Transistors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiye; Lee, So Hee; Kim, Haekyoung; Kim, Se Hyun; Park, Chan Eon

    2015-07-01

    We successfully fabricated high performance bottom-contact organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) using silver nanowire (AgNW) network electrodes by spray deposition. The synthesized AgNWs have the dimensions of 40-80 nm in diameter and 30-80 μm in length and are randomly distributed and interconnected to form a 3D hollow framework. The AgNWs networks, deposited by spray coating, yield an average optical transmittance of up to 88% and a sheet resistance as low as 10 ohm/sq. For using AgNWs as source/drain electrodes of OFETs with a bottom-contact configuration, the large contact resistance at the AgNWs/organic channel remains a critical issue for charge injection. To enhance charge injection, we fabricate semiconductor crystals on the AgNW using an adsorbed residual poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) layer. The resulting bottom-contact OFETs exhibit high mobility up to 1.02 cm(2)/(V s) and are similar to that of the top-contact Au electrodes OFETs with low contact resistance. A morphological study shows that the pentacene crystals coalesced to form continuous morphology on the nanowires and are highly interconnected with those on the channel. These features contribute to efficient charge injection and encourage the improvement of the bottom-contact device performance. Furthermore, the large contact area of individual AgNWs spreading out to the channel at the edge of the electrode also improves device performance. PMID:26083099

  12. An optical real-time 3D measurement for analysis of facial shape and movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qican; Su, Xianyu; Chen, Wenjing; Cao, Yiping; Xiang, Liqun

    2003-12-01

    Optical non-contact 3-D shape measurement provides a novel and useful tool for analysis of facial shape and movement in presurgical and postsurgical regular check. In this article we present a system, which allows a precise 3-D visualization of the patient's facial before and after craniofacial surgery. We discussed, in this paper, the real time 3-D image capture, processing and the 3-D phase unwrapping method to recover complex shape deformation when the movement of the mouth. The result of real-time measurement for facial shape and movement will be helpful for the more ideal effect in plastic surgery.

  13. Full-hand 3D non-contact scanner using sub-window-based structured light-illumination technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalla, Veeraganesh; Hassebrook, Laurence; Daley, Ray; Boles, Colby; Troy, Mike

    2012-06-01

    Fingerprint identification is a well-regarded and widely accepted modality in the field of biometrics for its high recognition rates. Legacy 2D contact based methods, though highly evolved in terms of technology suffer from certain drawbacks. Being contact based, there are many known issues which affect the recognition rates. Flashscan3D/University of Kentucky (UKY) developed state of the art 3D non-contact fingerprint scanners using different structured light illumination (SLI) techniques namely SLI single Point Of View (POV) and the SLI Subwindowing techniques. Capturing the fingerprints by non-contact means in 3D gives much higher quality fingerprint data which ultimately improves matching rates over a traditional 2D approach. In this paper, we present a full hand 3D non-contact scanner using the SLI Sub-windowing technique. Sample fingerprint data and experimental results for fingerprint matching based on a small sample 3D fingerprint test set are presented.

  14. 3D surface analysis and classification in neuroimaging segmentation.

    PubMed

    Zagar, Martin; Mlinarić, Hrvoje; Knezović, Josip

    2011-06-01

    This work emphasizes new algorithms for 3D edge and corner detection used in surface extraction and new concept of image segmentation in neuroimaging based on multidimensional shape analysis and classification. We propose using of NifTI standard for describing input data which enables interoperability and enhancement of existing computing tools used widely in neuroimaging research. In methods section we present our newly developed algorithm for 3D edge and corner detection, together with the algorithm for estimating local 3D shape. Surface of estimated shape is analyzed and segmented according to kernel shapes. PMID:21755723

  15. 3D modeling for solving forward model of no-contact fluorescence diffuse optical tomography method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouizi, F.; Chabrier, R.; Torregrossa, M.; Poulet, P.

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents detailed computational aspects of a new 3D modeling for solving the direct problem in a no-contact time-resolved Fluorescent Diffuse Optical Tomography (FDOT) method that rely on near-infrared scattered and fluorescent photons to image the optical properties and distribution of fluorescent probes in small laboratory animals. An optical scanner allowing performing in-vivo measurements in no-contact scheme was built in our laboratory and is presented. We use the three-dimensional Finite Element Method (FEM) to solve the coupled diffusion equations of excitation and fluorescence photons in highly scattering objects. The computed results allowed yielding photon density maps and the temporal profiles of photons on the surface of the small animal. Our 3D modeling of propagation of photons in the void space between the surface of the object and the detectors allows calculating the quantity of photons reaching the optodes. Simulations were carried-out on two test objects: a resin cylinder and a mouse phantom. The results demonstrate the potential applications of the method to pre-clinical imaging.

  16. Unconventional superconductivity at mesoscopic point contacts on the 3D Dirac semimetal Cd3As2.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Leena; Gaurav, Abhishek; Thakur, Gohil S; Haque, Zeba; Ganguli, Ashok K; Sheet, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetals exist close to topological phase boundaries which, in principle, should make it possible to drive them into exotic new phases, such as topological superconductivity, by breaking certain symmetries. A practical realization of this idea has, however, hitherto been lacking. Here we show that the mesoscopic point contacts between pure silver (Ag) and the 3D Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 (ref. ) exhibit unconventional superconductivity with a critical temperature (onset) greater than 6 K whereas neither Cd3As2 nor Ag are superconductors. A gap amplitude of 6.5 meV is measured spectroscopically in this phase that varies weakly with temperature and survives up to a remarkably high temperature of 13 K, indicating the presence of a robust normal-state pseudogap. The observations indicate the emergence of a new unconventional superconducting phase that exists in a quantum mechanically confined region under a point contact between a Dirac semimetal and a normal metal. PMID:26524131

  17. The modular approach enables a fully ab initio simulation of the contacts between 3D and 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Fediai, Artem; Ryndyk, Dmitry A; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2016-10-01

    Up to now, the electrical properties of the contacts between 3D metals and 2D materials have never been computed at a fully ab initio level due to the huge number of atomic orbitals involved in a current path from an electrode to a pristine 2D material. As a result, there are still numerous open questions and controversial theories on the electrical properties of systems with 3D/2D interfaces-for example, the current path and the contact length scalability. Our work provides a first-principles solution to this long-standing problem with the use of the modular approach, a method which rigorously combines a Green function formalism with the density functional theory (DFT) for this particular contact type. The modular approach is a general approach valid for any 3D/2D contact. As an example, we apply it to the most investigated among 3D/2D contacts-metal/graphene contacts-and show its abilities and consistency by comparison with existing experimental data. As it is applicable to any 3D/2D interface, the modular approach allows the engineering of 3D/2D contacts with the pre-defined electrical properties. PMID:27502169

  18. USJ metrology: from 0D to 3D analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vandervorst, Wilfried

    2007-09-26

    The analysis of ultra shallow junctions is becoming a challenging task for which numerous tools and concepts are available. The requirements range from a simple 0D-analysis such as the integral dose or the sheet resistance over a simple 1D-profile (as obtained on blanket films) towards the 2D-dopant profile within a transistor. The ultimate complexity will be the analysis of a complete 3D-structure such as a FINFET, requiring a metrology tool with 3D-resolution. In each of these areas significant progress has been made in recent years and new concepts are emerging which will be discussed in this review.

  19. 3-D object-oriented image analysis of geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadel, I.; Kerle, N.; van der Meijde, M.

    2014-07-01

    Geophysical data are the main source of information about the subsurface. Geophysical techniques are, however, highly non-unique in determining specific physical parameters and boundaries of subsurface objects. To obtain actual physical information, an inversion process is often applied, in which measurements at or above the Earth surface are inverted into a 2- or 3-D subsurface spatial distribution of the physical property. Interpreting these models into structural objects, related to physical processes, requires a priori knowledge and expert analysis which is susceptible to subjective choices and is therefore often non-repeatable. In this research, we implemented a recently introduced object-based approach to interpret the 3-D inversion results of a single geophysical technique using the available a priori information and the physical and geometrical characteristics of the interpreted objects. The introduced methodology is semi-automatic and repeatable, and allows the extraction of subsurface structures using 3-D object-oriented image analysis (3-D OOA) in an objective knowledge-based classification scheme. The approach allows for a semi-objective setting of thresholds that can be tested and, if necessary, changed in a very fast and efficient way. These changes require only changing the thresholds used in a so-called ruleset, which is composed of algorithms that extract objects from a 3-D data cube. The approach is tested on a synthetic model, which is based on a priori knowledge on objects present in the study area (Tanzania). Object characteristics and thresholds were well defined in a 3-D histogram of velocity versus depth, and objects were fully retrieved. The real model results showed how 3-D OOA can deal with realistic 3-D subsurface conditions in which the boundaries become fuzzy, the object extensions become unclear and the model characteristics vary with depth due to the different physical conditions. As expected, the 3-D histogram of the real data was

  20. Grounding line dynamics inferred from a 3D full-Stokes model solving the contact problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favier, Lionel; Gagliardini, Olivier; Durand, Gael; Zwinger, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    The mass balance of marine ice-sheets, such as the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, is mostly controlled by their grounding line dynamics. Most numerical models simulating marine ice-sheets involve simplifications and do not include all the stress gradients. First results obtained with a 3D full-Stokes model for the grounded ice-sheet / floating ice-shelf transition, using the finite-element code Elmer/Ice, are presented. The initial geometry, which takes into account a dome and a calving front, has been laterally extruded from a previously investigated 2D flowline geometry. The grounding line migration is computed by solving the contact problem between the ice and the rigid downward sloping bedrock, where a non linear friction law is applied in the two horizontal directions. The evolutions of the sea-air and sea-ice interfaces are determined by the solution of a local transport equation. The consistency between the 3D model and the analogous results of the flowline model is shown by comparing the results in the basic extruded case, with no normal flux through lateral boundaries. Thereafter, spatially non uniform perturbations are introduced, to simulate the grounding line dynamics under fully three-dimensional perturbations.

  1. 3-D transient analysis of pebble-bed HTGR by TORT-TD/ATTICA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Seubert, A.; Sureda, A.; Lapins, J.; Buck, M.; Bader, J.; Laurien, E.

    2012-07-01

    As most of the acceptance criteria are local core parameters, application of transient 3-D fine mesh neutron transport and thermal hydraulics coupled codes is mandatory for best estimate evaluations of safety margins. This also applies to high-temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR). Application of 3-D fine-mesh transient transport codes using few energy groups coupled with 3-D thermal hydraulics codes becomes feasible in view of increasing computing power. This paper describes the discrete ordinates based coupled code system TORT-TD/ATTICA3D that has recently been extended by a fine-mesh diffusion solver. Based on transient analyses for the PBMR-400 design, the transport/diffusion capabilities are demonstrated and 3-D local flux and power redistribution effects during a partial control rod withdrawal are shown. (authors)

  2. Time Series Analysis of 3D Coordinates Using Nonstochastic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velsink, Hiddo

    2016-03-01

    Adjustment and testing of a combination of stochastic and nonstochastic observations is applied to the deformation analysis of a time series of 3D coordinates. Nonstochastic observations are constant values that are treated as if they were observations. They are used to formulate constraints on the unknown parameters of the adjustment problem. Thus they describe deformation patterns. If deformation is absent, the epochs of the time series are supposed to be related via affine, similarity or congruence transformations. S-basis invariant testing of deformation patterns is treated. The model is experimentally validated by showing the procedure for a point set of 3D coordinates, determined from total station measurements during five epochs. The modelling of two patterns, the movement of just one point in several epochs, and of several points, is shown. Full, rank deficient covariance matrices of the 3D coordinates, resulting from free network adjustments of the total station measurements of each epoch, are used in the analysis.

  3. SAMA: A Method for 3D Morphological Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cerruti, Florent; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture models are critical tools for understanding tissue morphogenesis. A key requirement for their analysis is the ability to reconstruct the tissue into computational models that allow quantitative evaluation of the formed structures. Here, we present Software for Automated Morphological Analysis (SAMA), a method by which epithelial structures grown in 3D cultures can be imaged, reconstructed and analyzed with minimum human intervention. SAMA allows quantitative analysis of key features of epithelial morphogenesis such as ductal elongation, branching and lumen formation that distinguish different hormonal treatments. SAMA is a user-friendly set of customized macros operated via FIJI (http://fiji.sc/Fiji), an open-source image analysis platform in combination with a set of functions in R (http://www.r-project.org/), an open-source program for statistical analysis. SAMA enables a rapid, exhaustive and quantitative 3D analysis of the shape of a population of structures in a 3D image. SAMA is cross-platform, licensed under the GPLv3 and available at http://montevil.theobio.org/content/sama. PMID:27035711

  4. 3D Regression Heat Map Analysis of Population Study Data.

    PubMed

    Klemm, Paul; Lawonn, Kai; Glaßer, Sylvia; Niemann, Uli; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Völzke, Henry; Preim, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies comprise heterogeneous data about a subject group to define disease-specific risk factors. These data contain information (features) about a subject's lifestyle, medical status as well as medical image data. Statistical regression analysis is used to evaluate these features and to identify feature combinations indicating a disease (the target feature). We propose an analysis approach of epidemiological data sets by incorporating all features in an exhaustive regression-based analysis. This approach combines all independent features w.r.t. a target feature. It provides a visualization that reveals insights into the data by highlighting relationships. The 3D Regression Heat Map, a novel 3D visual encoding, acts as an overview of the whole data set. It shows all combinations of two to three independent features with a specific target disease. Slicing through the 3D Regression Heat Map allows for the detailed analysis of the underlying relationships. Expert knowledge about disease-specific hypotheses can be included into the analysis by adjusting the regression model formulas. Furthermore, the influences of features can be assessed using a difference view comparing different calculation results. We applied our 3D Regression Heat Map method to a hepatic steatosis data set to reproduce results from a data mining-driven analysis. A qualitative analysis was conducted on a breast density data set. We were able to derive new hypotheses about relations between breast density and breast lesions with breast cancer. With the 3D Regression Heat Map, we present a visual overview of epidemiological data that allows for the first time an interactive regression-based analysis of large feature sets with respect to a disease. PMID:26529689

  5. A spherical harmonics intensity model for 3D segmentation and 3D shape analysis of heterochromatin foci.

    PubMed

    Eck, Simon; Wörz, Stefan; Müller-Ott, Katharina; Hahn, Matthias; Biesdorf, Andreas; Schotta, Gunnar; Rippe, Karsten; Rohr, Karl

    2016-08-01

    The genome is partitioned into regions of euchromatin and heterochromatin. The organization of heterochromatin is important for the regulation of cellular processes such as chromosome segregation and gene silencing, and their misregulation is linked to cancer and other diseases. We present a model-based approach for automatic 3D segmentation and 3D shape analysis of heterochromatin foci from 3D confocal light microscopy images. Our approach employs a novel 3D intensity model based on spherical harmonics, which analytically describes the shape and intensities of the foci. The model parameters are determined by fitting the model to the image intensities using least-squares minimization. To characterize the 3D shape of the foci, we exploit the computed spherical harmonics coefficients and determine a shape descriptor. We applied our approach to 3D synthetic image data as well as real 3D static and real 3D time-lapse microscopy images, and compared the performance with that of previous approaches. It turned out that our approach yields accurate 3D segmentation results and performs better than previous approaches. We also show that our approach can be used for quantifying 3D shape differences of heterochromatin foci. PMID:27037463

  6. 3D statistical failure analysis of monolithic dental ceramic crowns.

    PubMed

    Nasrin, Sadia; Katsube, Noriko; Seghi, Robert R; Rokhlin, Stanislav I

    2016-07-01

    For adhesively retained ceramic crown of various types, it has been clinically observed that the most catastrophic failures initiate from the cement interface as a result of radial crack formation as opposed to Hertzian contact stresses originating on the occlusal surface. In this work, a 3D failure prognosis model is developed for interface initiated failures of monolithic ceramic crowns. The surface flaw distribution parameters determined by biaxial flexural tests on ceramic plates and point-to-point variations of multi-axial stress state at the intaglio surface are obtained by finite element stress analysis. They are combined on the basis of fracture mechanics based statistical failure probability model to predict failure probability of a monolithic crown subjected to single-cycle indentation load. The proposed method is verified by prior 2D axisymmetric model and experimental data. Under conditions where the crowns are completely bonded to the tooth substrate, both high flexural stress and high interfacial shear stress are shown to occur in the wall region where the crown thickness is relatively thin while high interfacial normal tensile stress distribution is observed at the margin region. Significant impact of reduced cement modulus on these stress states is shown. While the analyses are limited to single-cycle load-to-failure tests, high interfacial normal tensile stress or high interfacial shear stress may contribute to degradation of the cement bond between ceramic and dentin. In addition, the crown failure probability is shown to be controlled by high flexural stress concentrations over a small area, and the proposed method might be of some value to detect initial crown design errors. PMID:27215334

  7. Numerical analysis of 3-D potential flow in centrifugal turbomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daiguji, H.

    1983-09-01

    A numerical method is developed for analysing a three-dimensional steady incompressible potential flow through an impeller in centrifugal turbomachines. The method is the same as the previous method which was developed for the axial flow turbomachines, except for some treatments in the downstream region. In order to clarify the validity and limitation of the method, a comparison with the existing experimental data and numerical results is made for radial flow compressor impellers. The calculated blade surface pressure distributions almost coincide with the quasi-3-D calculation by Krimerman and Adler (1978), but are different partly from the quasi-3-D calculation using one meridional flow analysis. It is suggested from this comparison that the flow through an impeller with high efficiency near the design point can be predicted by this fully 3-D numerical method.

  8. Error analysis of a 3D imaging system based on fringe projection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zonghua; Dai, Jie

    2013-12-01

    In the past few years, optical metrology has found numerous applications in scientific and commercial fields owing to its non-contact nature. One of the most popular methods is the measurement of 3D surface based on fringe projection techniques because of the advantages of non-contact operation, full-field and fast acquisition and automatic data processing. In surface profilometry by using digital light processing (DLP) projector, many factors affect the accuracy of 3D measurement. However, there is no research to give the complete error analysis of a 3D imaging system. This paper will analyze some possible error sources of a 3D imaging system, for example, nonlinear response of CCD camera and DLP projector, sampling error of sinusoidal fringe pattern, variation of ambient light and marker extraction during calibration. These error sources are simulated in a software environment to demonstrate their effects on measurement. The possible compensation methods are proposed to give high accurate shape data. Some experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of these error sources on 3D shape measurement. Experimental results and performance evaluation show that these errors have great effect on measuring 3D shape and it is necessary to compensate for them for accurate measurement.

  9. 3-D Experimental Fracture Analysis at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Jackson; Albert S. Kobayashi

    2001-09-14

    T*e, which is an elastic-plastic fracture parameter based on incremental theory of plasticity, was determined numerically and experimentally. The T*e integral of a tunneling crack in 2024-T3 aluminum, three point bend specimen was obtained through a hybrid analysis of moire interferometry and 3-D elastic-plastic finite element analysis. The results were verified by the good agreement between the experimentally and numerically determined T*e on the specimen surface.

  10. Observation of superconductivity induced by a point contact on 3D Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 crystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, He; Wang, Huichao; Liu, Haiwen; Lu, Hong; Yang, Wuhao; Jia, Shuang; Liu, Xiong-Jun; Xie, X C; Wei, Jian; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetals, which possess 3D linear dispersion in the electronic structure as a bulk analogue of graphene, have lately generated widespread interest in both materials science and condensed matter physics. Recently, crystalline Cd3As2 has been proposed and proved to be a 3D Dirac semimetal that can survive in the atmosphere. Here, by using point contact spectroscopy measurements, we observe exotic superconductivity around the point contact region on the surface of Cd3As2 crystals. The zero-bias conductance peak (ZBCP) and double conductance peaks (DCPs) symmetric around zero bias suggest p-wave-like unconventional superconductivity. Considering the topological properties of 3D Dirac semimetals, our findings may indicate that Cd3As2 crystals under certain conditions could be topological superconductors, which are predicted to support Majorana zero modes or gapless Majorana edge/surface modes in the boundary depending on the dimensionality of the material. PMID:26524129

  11. A 3D image analysis tool for SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontos, Despina; Wang, Qiang; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios; Maurer, Alan H.; Knight, Linda C.; Kantor, Steve; Fisher, Robert S.; Simonian, Hrair P.; Parkman, Henry P.

    2005-04-01

    We have developed semi-automated and fully-automated tools for the analysis of 3D single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. The focus is on the efficient boundary delineation of complex 3D structures that enables accurate measurement of their structural and physiologic properties. We employ intensity based thresholding algorithms for interactive and semi-automated analysis. We also explore fuzzy-connectedness concepts for fully automating the segmentation process. We apply the proposed tools to SPECT image data capturing variation of gastric accommodation and emptying. These image analysis tools were developed within the framework of a noninvasive scintigraphic test to measure simultaneously both gastric emptying and gastric volume after ingestion of a solid or a liquid meal. The clinical focus of the particular analysis was to probe associations between gastric accommodation/emptying and functional dyspepsia. Employing the proposed tools, we outline effectively the complex three dimensional gastric boundaries shown in the 3D SPECT images. We also perform accurate volume calculations in order to quantitatively assess the gastric mass variation. This analysis was performed both with the semi-automated and fully-automated tools. The results were validated against manual segmentation performed by a human expert. We believe that the development of an automated segmentation tool for SPECT imaging of the gastric volume variability will allow for other new applications of SPECT imaging where there is a need to evaluate complex organ function or tumor masses.

  12. SNR analysis of 3D magnetic resonance tomosynthesis (MRT) imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Oh; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2012-03-01

    In conventional 3D Fourier transform (3DFT) MR imaging, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is governed by the well-known relationship of being proportional to the voxel size and square root of the imaging time. Here, we introduce an alternative 3D imaging approach, termed MRT (Magnetic Resonance Tomosynthesis), which can generate a set of tomographic MR images similar to multiple 2D projection images in x-ray. A multiple-oblique-view (MOV) pulse sequence is designed to acquire the tomography-like images used in tomosynthesis process and an iterative back-projection (IBP) reconstruction method is used to reconstruct 3D images. SNR analysis is performed and shows that resolution and SNR tradeoff is not governed as with typical 3DFT MR imaging case. The proposed method provides a higher SNR than the conventional 3D imaging method with a partial loss of slice-direction resolution. It is expected that this method can be useful for extremely low SNR cases.

  13. The 3D distribution of cordierite and biotite in hornfels from the Bugaboo contact aureole (British Columbia, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidies, Fred; Petley-Ragan, Arianne; Pattison, David

    2016-04-01

    the scales that would be obtained if a spherical geometry would have been assumed. Our results highlight the importance of a critical assessment of the geometrical model assumptions commonly applied in the 3D analysis of crystal size distributions, and underline the need for a quantitative understanding of interface processes in order to appreciate their role in the kinetics of contact metamorphic reactions and rock texture formation. References: Petley-Ragan A, Gaidies F, Pattison DRM (2016) A statistical analysis of the distribution of cordierite and biotite in hornfels from the Bugaboo contact aureole: implications for the kinetics of porphyroblast crystallization. Journal of Metamorphic Geology 34:85-101

  14. 3D Guided Wave Motion Analysis on Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have proved useful for structural health monitoring (SHM) and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) due to their ability to propagate long distances with less energy loss compared to bulk waves and due to their sensitivity to small defects in the structure. Analysis of actively transmitted ultrasonic signals has long been used to detect and assess damage. However, there remain many challenging tasks for guided wave based SHM due to the complexity involved with propagating guided waves, especially in the case of composite materials. The multimodal nature of the ultrasonic guided waves complicates the related damage analysis. This paper presents results from parallel 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) simulations used to acquire 3D wave motion in the subject laminated carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. The acquired 3D wave motion is then analyzed by frequency-wavenumber analysis to study the wave propagation and interaction in the composite laminate. The frequency-wavenumber analysis enables the study of individual modes and visualization of mode conversion. Delamination damage has been incorporated into the EFIT model to generate "damaged" data. The potential for damage detection in laminated composites is discussed in the end.

  15. Advanced computational tools for 3-D seismic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barhen, J.; Glover, C.W.; Protopopescu, V.A.

    1996-06-01

    The global objective of this effort is to develop advanced computational tools for 3-D seismic analysis, and test the products using a model dataset developed under the joint aegis of the United States` Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) and the European Association of Exploration Geophysicists (EAEG). The goal is to enhance the value to the oil industry of the SEG/EAEG modeling project, carried out with US Department of Energy (DOE) funding in FY` 93-95. The primary objective of the ORNL Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) is to spearhead the computational innovations techniques that would enable a revolutionary advance in 3-D seismic analysis. The CESAR effort is carried out in collaboration with world-class domain experts from leading universities, and in close coordination with other national laboratories and oil industry partners.

  16. Visualization and Analysis of 3D Gene Expression Data

    SciTech Connect

    Bethel, E. Wes; Rubel, Oliver; Weber, Gunther H.; Hamann, Bernd; Hagen, Hans

    2007-10-25

    Recent methods for extracting precise measurements ofspatial gene expression patterns from three-dimensional (3D) image dataopens the way for new analysis of the complex gene regulatory networkscontrolling animal development. To support analysis of this novel andhighly complex data we developed PointCloudXplore (PCX), an integratedvisualization framework that supports dedicated multi-modal, physical andinformation visualization views along with algorithms to aid in analyzingthe relationships between gene expression levels. Using PCX, we helpedour science stakeholders to address many questions in 3D gene expressionresearch, e.g., to objectively define spatial pattern boundaries andtemporal profiles of genes and to analyze how mRNA patterns arecontrolled by their regulatory transcription factors.

  17. A 3D-Video-Based Computerized Analysis of Social and Sexual Interactions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Jumpei; Urakawa, Susumu; Takamura, Yusaku; Malcher-Lopes, Renato; Hori, Etsuro; Tomaz, Carlos; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    A large number of studies have analyzed social and sexual interactions between rodents in relation to neural activity. Computerized video analysis has been successfully used to detect numerous behaviors quickly and objectively; however, to date only 2D video recording has been used, which cannot determine the 3D locations of animals and encounters difficulties in tracking animals when they are overlapping, e.g., when mounting. To overcome these limitations, we developed a novel 3D video analysis system for examining social and sexual interactions in rats. A 3D image was reconstructed by integrating images captured by multiple depth cameras at different viewpoints. The 3D positions of body parts of the rats were then estimated by fitting skeleton models of the rats to the 3D images using a physics-based fitting algorithm, and various behaviors were recognized based on the spatio-temporal patterns of the 3D movements of the body parts. Comparisons between the data collected by the 3D system and those by visual inspection indicated that this system could precisely estimate the 3D positions of body parts for 2 rats during social and sexual interactions with few manual interventions, and could compute the traces of the 2 animals even during mounting. We then analyzed the effects of AM-251 (a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist) on male rat sexual behavior, and found that AM-251 decreased movements and trunk height before sexual behavior, but increased the duration of head-head contact during sexual behavior. These results demonstrate that the use of this 3D system in behavioral studies could open the door to new approaches for investigating the neuroscience of social and sexual behavior. PMID:24205238

  18. A 3D-video-based computerized analysis of social and sexual interactions in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Jumpei; Urakawa, Susumu; Takamura, Yusaku; Malcher-Lopes, Renato; Hori, Etsuro; Tomaz, Carlos; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    A large number of studies have analyzed social and sexual interactions between rodents in relation to neural activity. Computerized video analysis has been successfully used to detect numerous behaviors quickly and objectively; however, to date only 2D video recording has been used, which cannot determine the 3D locations of animals and encounters difficulties in tracking animals when they are overlapping, e.g., when mounting. To overcome these limitations, we developed a novel 3D video analysis system for examining social and sexual interactions in rats. A 3D image was reconstructed by integrating images captured by multiple depth cameras at different viewpoints. The 3D positions of body parts of the rats were then estimated by fitting skeleton models of the rats to the 3D images using a physics-based fitting algorithm, and various behaviors were recognized based on the spatio-temporal patterns of the 3D movements of the body parts. Comparisons between the data collected by the 3D system and those by visual inspection indicated that this system could precisely estimate the 3D positions of body parts for 2 rats during social and sexual interactions with few manual interventions, and could compute the traces of the 2 animals even during mounting. We then analyzed the effects of AM-251 (a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist) on male rat sexual behavior, and found that AM-251 decreased movements and trunk height before sexual behavior, but increased the duration of head-head contact during sexual behavior. These results demonstrate that the use of this 3D system in behavioral studies could open the door to new approaches for investigating the neuroscience of social and sexual behavior. PMID:24205238

  19. Advancements in 3D Structural Analysis of Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Siler, Drew L; Faulds, James E; Mayhew, Brett; McNamara, David

    2013-06-23

    Robust geothermal activity in the Great Basin, USA is a product of both anomalously high regional heat flow and active fault-controlled extension. Elevated permeability associated with some fault systems provides pathways for circulation of geothermal fluids. Constraining the local-scale 3D geometry of these structures and their roles as fluid flow conduits is crucial in order to mitigate both the costs and risks of geothermal exploration and to identify blind (no surface expression) geothermal resources. Ongoing studies have indicated that much of the robust geothermal activity in the Great Basin is associated with high density faulting at structurally complex fault intersection/interaction areas, such as accommodation/transfer zones between discrete fault systems, step-overs or relay ramps in fault systems, intersection zones between faults with different strikes or different senses of slip, and horse-tailing fault terminations. These conceptualized models are crucial for locating and characterizing geothermal systems in a regional context. At the local scale, however, pinpointing drilling targets and characterizing resource potential within known or probable geothermal areas requires precise 3D characterization of the system. Employing a variety of surface and subsurface data sets, we have conducted detailed 3D geologic analyses of two Great Basin geothermal systems. Using EarthVision (Dynamic Graphics Inc., Alameda, CA) we constructed 3D geologic models of both the actively producing Brady’s geothermal system and a ‘greenfield’ geothermal prospect at Astor Pass, NV. These 3D models allow spatial comparison of disparate data sets in 3D and are the basis for quantitative structural analyses that can aid geothermal resource assessment and be used to pinpoint discrete drilling targets. The relatively abundant data set at Brady’s, ~80 km NE of Reno, NV, includes 24 wells with lithologies interpreted from careful analysis of cuttings and core, a 1

  20. 3D video analysis of the novel object recognition test in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Jumpei; Uehara, Takashi; Urakawa, Susumu; Takamura, Yusaku; Sumiyoshi, Tomiki; Suzuki, Michio; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2014-10-01

    The novel object recognition (NOR) test has been widely used to test memory function. We developed a 3D computerized video analysis system that estimates nose contact with an object in Long Evans rats to analyze object exploration during NOR tests. The results indicate that the 3D system reproducibly and accurately scores the NOR test. Furthermore, the 3D system captures a 3D trajectory of the nose during object exploration, enabling detailed analyses of spatiotemporal patterns of object exploration. The 3D trajectory analysis revealed a specific pattern of object exploration in the sample phase of the NOR test: normal rats first explored the lower parts of objects and then gradually explored the upper parts. A systematic injection of MK-801 suppressed changes in these exploration patterns. The results, along with those of previous studies, suggest that the changes in the exploration patterns reflect neophobia to a novel object and/or changes from spatial learning to object learning. These results demonstrate that the 3D tracking system is useful not only for detailed scoring of animal behaviors but also for investigation of characteristic spatiotemporal patterns of object exploration. The system has the potential to facilitate future investigation of neural mechanisms underlying object exploration that result from dynamic and complex brain activity. PMID:24991752

  1. Beam Optics Analysis - An Advanced 3D Trajectory Code

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Bui, Thuc; Vogler, William; Neilson, Jeff; Read, Mike; Shephard, Mark; Bauer, Andrew; Datta, Dibyendu; Beal, Mark

    2006-01-03

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. has completed initial development of an advanced, 3D program for modeling electron trajectories in electromagnetic fields. The code is being used to design complex guns and collectors. Beam Optics Analysis (BOA) is a fully relativistic, charged particle code using adaptive, finite element meshing. Geometrical input is imported from CAD programs generating ACIS-formatted files. Parametric data is inputted using an intuitive, graphical user interface (GUI), which also provides control of convergence, accuracy, and post processing. The program includes a magnetic field solver, and magnetic information can be imported from Maxwell 2D/3D and other programs. The program supports thermionic emission and injected beams. Secondary electron emission is also supported, including multiple generations. Work on field emission is in progress as well as implementation of computer optimization of both the geometry and operating parameters. The principle features of the program and its capabilities are presented.

  2. Beam Optics Analysis — An Advanced 3D Trajectory Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Bui, Thuc; Vogler, William; Neilson, Jeff; Read, Mike; Shephard, Mark; Bauer, Andrew; Datta, Dibyendu; Beal, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. has completed initial development of an advanced, 3D program for modeling electron trajectories in electromagnetic fields. The code is being used to design complex guns and collectors. Beam Optics Analysis (BOA) is a fully relativistic, charged particle code using adaptive, finite element meshing. Geometrical input is imported from CAD programs generating ACIS-formatted files. Parametric data is inputted using an intuitive, graphical user interface (GUI), which also provides control of convergence, accuracy, and post processing. The program includes a magnetic field solver, and magnetic information can be imported from Maxwell 2D/3D and other programs. The program supports thermionic emission and injected beams. Secondary electron emission is also supported, including multiple generations. Work on field emission is in progress as well as implementation of computer optimization of both the geometry and operating parameters. The principle features of the program and its capabilities are presented.

  3. 3D Landslides Susceptibility Analysis in Romanian Subcarpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandric, Ionuc; Ilinca, Viorel; Chitu, Zenaida; Jurchescu, Marta

    2015-04-01

    Most of the present day studies make use the 2.5D raster data formats for the landslide susceptibility analysis at regional scales. This data format has some disadvantages when geological and lithological settings are spatial discretized, hence these disadvantages propagate in the landslides susceptibility analysis and especially where only surface lithology is used. The main disadvantage when using 3D data models for the assessment of landslide susceptibility at regional scales is represented by the quality of the geological and lithological information that is available for a depth of no more than 100m. In order to mitigate this, a sufficient number of boreholes is required and sometimes is not available. In order to overcome the lack of borehole data, our approach was to make use of the present-day geological maps at scales ranging from 1:25,000 to 1:50,000 and to generate a geological 3D model up to a depth of 100m. The geological model was generated based on expert knowledge interpretations and geological cross sections provided on these geological maps. Using the 3D geological model a more complex 3D model was generated for the landslide susceptibility analysis that also contains information from other predictor factors like slope gradient, land-cover and land-use. For the landslide susceptibility analysis instead of using map algebra equations on classic pixel based data sets, the equations were adapted for 3D data models and map algebra equations on voxels. The test sites are located in the areas of Romanian Subcarpathians. The Romanian Subcarpathians are located to the exterior of the Carpathians. They consist of a large variety of rocks, flysch-type deposits in the inner part and molasse deposits in the outer part, ranging from a Cretacic-Paleogene to a Quaternary age. While some parts of the Subcarpathians have a basic geology, with a monoclinal geological structure, other parts like the Curvature Subcarpathians, present acomplex folded and faulted

  4. The 3D Radiation Dose Analysis For Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhenbo; Lin, Guocheng; Chen, Guozhen; Liu, Xia

    2002-01-01

    hence, it is too simple to guide satellite radiation protection and ground experiments only based on the 1D radiation analysis results. To comprehend the radiation dose status of satellite adequately, it's essential to perform 3D radiation analysis for satellites. using computer software. From this 3D layout, the satellite model can be simplified appropriately. First select the point to be analyzed in the simplified satellite model, and extend many lines to the outside space, which divides the 4 space into many corresponding small areas with a certain solid angle. Then the shielding masses through the satellite equipment and structures along each direction are calculated, resulting in the shielding mass distribution in all space directions based on the satellite layout. Finally, using the relationship between radiation dose and shielding thickness from the 1D analysis, calculate the radiation dose in each area represented by each line. After we obtain the radiation dose and its space distribution for the point of interest, the 3D satellite radiation analysis is completed. radiation analysis based on satellite 3D CAD layout has larger benefit for engineering applications than the 1D analysis based on the solid sphere shielding model. With the 3D model, the analysis of space environment and its effect is combined closely with actual satellite engineering. The 3D radiation analysis not only provides valuable engineering data for satellite radiation design and protection, but also provides possibility to apply new radiation protection approaches, which expands technology horizon and broadens ways for technology development.

  5. Uncertainty Analysis for RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron J. Pawel; Dr. George L. Mesina

    2011-08-01

    In its current state, RELAP5-3D is a 'best-estimate' code; it is one of our most reliable programs for modeling what occurs within reactor systems in transients from given initial conditions. This code, however, remains an estimator. A statistical analysis has been performed that begins to lay the foundation for a full uncertainty analysis. By varying the inputs over assumed probability density functions, the output parameters were shown to vary. Using such statistical tools as means, variances, and tolerance intervals, a picture of how uncertain the results are based on the uncertainty of the inputs has been obtained.

  6. Computerized 3D morphological analysis of glenoid orientation.

    PubMed

    Ghafurian, Soheil; Galdi, Balazs; Bastian, Sevag; Tan, Virak; Li, Kang

    2016-04-01

    An accurate preoperative measurement of glenoid orientation is crucial for evaluating pathologies and successful total shoulder arthroplasty. Existing methods may be labor-intensive, observer-dependent, and sensitive to the misalignment between the scapula plane and CT scanning direction. In this study, we proposed a computation framework and performed an automated analysis of the glenoid orientation based on 3D surface data. Three-dimensional models of 12 scapulae were analyzed. The glenoid cavity and external anatomical features were automatically extracted from these 3D models. Glenoid version was calculated using the scapula plane and the fulcrum axis alternatively. Glenoid inclination was measured both relative to transverse axis of the scapula and the medial pole-inferior tip axis. The mean (±SD) of the fulcrum-based glenoid version was -0.55° (±4.17°), while the scapular-plane-based glenoid version was -5.05° (±3.50°). The mean (±SD) of glenoid inclinations based on the medial pole and inferior tip was 12.75° (±5.03°) while the mean (±SD) of the glenoid inclination based on the medial pole and glenoid center was 4.63° (±4.86°). Our computational framework was able to extract the reproducible morphological measures free of inter- and intra- observer variability. For the first time in 3D, we showed that the fulcrum axis was practically perpendicular to the glenoid plane normal (radial line), and thus extended the fulcrum-based glenoid version for quantifying 3D glenoid orientation. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:692-698, 2016. PMID:26400654

  7. On 3D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Chen, P. C.; Dame, L. T.; Holt, R. V.; Huang, H.; Hartle, M.; Gellin, S.; Allen, D. H.; Haisler, W. E.

    1986-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for the 2-year program, to develop advanced 3-D inelastic structural stress analysis methods and solution strategies for more accurate and cost effective analysis of combustors, turbine blades and vanes. The approach was to develop a matrix of formulation elements and constitutive models. Three constitutive models were developed in conjunction with optimized iterating techniques, accelerators, and convergence criteria within a framework of dynamic time incrementing. Three formulations models were developed; an eight-noded mid-surface shell element, a nine-noded mid-surface shell element and a twenty-noded isoparametric solid element. A separate computer program was developed for each combination of constitutive model-formulation model. Each program provides a functional stand alone capability for performing cyclic nonlinear structural analysis. In addition, the analysis capabilities incorporated into each program can be abstracted in subroutine form for incorporation into other codes or to form new combinations.

  8. The 3D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Maffeo, R. J.; Tipton, M. T.; Weber, G.

    1992-01-01

    A two-year program to develop advanced 3D inelastic structural stress analysis methods and solution strategies for more accurate and cost effective analysis of combustors, turbine blades, and vanes is described. The approach was to develop a matrix of formulation elements and constitutive models. Three constitutive models were developed in conjunction with optimized iterating techniques, accelerators, and convergence criteria within a framework of dynamic time incrementing. Three formulation models were developed: an eight-noded midsurface shell element; a nine-noded midsurface shell element; and a twenty-noded isoparametric solid element. A separate computer program has been developed for each combination of constitutive model-formulation model. Each program provides a functional stand alone capability for performing cyclic nonlinear structural analysis. In addition, the analysis capabilities incorporated into each program can be abstracted in subroutine form for incorporation into other codes or to form new combinations.

  9. Dual anode contact geometries for x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy and 3D localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. W.; Garson, A. B., III; Li, Q.; Lee, K.; Groza, M.; Buliga, V.; Burger, A.; Krawczynski, H.

    2009-08-01

    We report on the continued development and testing of unique types of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors. Using large volume (10×20×20 mm3) CZT crystals, we contact various "dual anode" detector designs. We incorporate a segmented cathode with five regions so that the charge on all seven contacts can be used to determine the energy and the 3-D interaction location of detected X-ray and gamma-ray photons. We describe the status of the detector development program, emphasize strengths and weaknesses of the different contact configurations, and discuss possible applications of Dual Anode Detectors in radiation detection applications.

  10. Uncertainty Analysis of RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandra E Gertman; Dr. George L Mesina

    2012-07-01

    As world-wide energy consumption continues to increase, so does the demand for the use of alternative energy sources, such as Nuclear Energy. Nuclear Power Plants currently supply over 370 gigawatts of electricity, and more than 60 new nuclear reactors have been commissioned by 15 different countries. The primary concern for Nuclear Power Plant operation and lisencing has been safety. The safety of the operation of Nuclear Power Plants is no simple matter- it involves the training of operators, design of the reactor, as well as equipment and design upgrades throughout the lifetime of the reactor, etc. To safely design, operate, and understand nuclear power plants, industry and government alike have relied upon the use of best-estimate simulation codes, which allow for an accurate model of any given plant to be created with well-defined margins of safety. The most widely used of these best-estimate simulation codes in the Nuclear Power industry is RELAP5-3D. Our project focused on improving the modeling capabilities of RELAP5-3D by developing uncertainty estimates for its calculations. This work involved analyzing high, medium, and low ranked phenomena from an INL PIRT on a small break Loss-Of-Coolant Accident as wall as an analysis of a large break Loss-Of- Coolant Accident. Statistical analyses were performed using correlation coefficients. To perform the studies, computer programs were written that modify a template RELAP5 input deck to produce one deck for each combination of key input parameters. Python scripting enabled the running of the generated input files with RELAP5-3D on INL’s massively parallel cluster system. Data from the studies was collected and analyzed with SAS. A summary of the results of our studies are presented.

  11. Correlative Microscopy for 3D Structural Analysis of Dynamic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Sangmi; Zhao, Gongpu; Ning, Jiying; Gibson, Gregory A.; Watkins, Simon C.; Zhang, Peijun

    2013-01-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (cryoET) allows 3D visualization of cellular structures at molecular resolution in a close-to-physiological state1. However, direct visualization of individual viral complexes in their host cellular environment with cryoET is challenging2, due to the infrequent and dynamic nature of viral entry, particularly in the case of HIV-1. While time-lapse live-cell imaging has yielded a great deal of information about many aspects of the life cycle of HIV-13-7, the resolution afforded by live-cell microscopy is limited (~ 200 nm). Our work was aimed at developing a correlation method that permits direct visualization of early events of HIV-1 infection by combining live-cell fluorescent light microscopy, cryo-fluorescent microscopy, and cryoET. In this manner, live-cell and cryo-fluorescent signals can be used to accurately guide the sampling in cryoET. Furthermore, structural information obtained from cryoET can be complemented with the dynamic functional data gained through live-cell imaging of fluorescent labeled target. In this video article, we provide detailed methods and protocols for structural investigation of HIV-1 and host-cell interactions using 3D correlative high-speed live-cell imaging and high-resolution cryoET structural analysis. HeLa cells infected with HIV-1 particles were characterized first by confocal live-cell microscopy, and the region containing the same viral particle was then analyzed by cryo-electron tomography for 3D structural details. The correlation between two sets of imaging data, optical imaging and electron imaging, was achieved using a home-built cryo-fluorescence light microscopy stage. The approach detailed here will be valuable, not only for study of virus-host cell interactions, but also for broader applications in cell biology, such as cell signaling, membrane receptor trafficking, and many other dynamic cellular processes. PMID:23852318

  12. Triangulation Based 3D Laser Imaging for Fracture Orientation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mah, J.; Claire, S.; Steve, M.

    2009-05-01

    sets (strike/dip: 060/00, 114/86) were identified from 49 manual inclinometer measurements A stereonet of joint poles from the 3D laser data was generated using the commercial software Split-FX. Joint sets were identified successfully and their orientations correlated well with the hand measurements. However, Split-Fx overlays a simply 2D grid of equal-sized triangles onto the 3D surface and requires significant user input. In a more automated approach, we have developed a MATLAB script which directly imports the Polyworks 3D triangular mesh. A typical mesh is composed of over 1 million triangles of variable sizes: smooth regions are represented by large triangles, whereas rough surfaces are captured by several smaller triangles. Using the triangle vertices, the script computes the strike and dip of each triangle. This approach opens possibilities for statistical analysis of a large population of fracture orientation estimates, including surface texture. The methodology will be used to evaluate both synthetic and field data.

  13. The 3D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, L. T.; Mcknight, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop an analytical tool capable of economically evaluating the cyclic time dependent plasticity which occurs in hot section engine components in areas of strain concentration resulting from the combination of both mechanical and thermal stresses. The techniques developed must be capable of accommodating large excursions in temperatures with the associated variations in material properties including plasticity and creep. The overall objective of this proposed program is to develop advanced 3-D inelastic structural/stress analysis methods and solution strategies for more accurate and yet more cost effective analysis of combustors, turbine blades, and vanes. The approach will be to develop four different theories, one linear and three higher order with increasing complexities including embedded singularities.

  14. Comparative visual analysis of 3D urban wind simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röber, Niklas; Salim, Mohamed; Grawe, David; Leitl, Bernd; Böttinger, Michael; Schlünzen, Heinke

    2016-04-01

    Climate simulations are conducted in large quantity for a variety of different applications. Many of these simulations focus on global developments and study the Earth's climate system using a coupled atmosphere ocean model. Other simulations are performed on much smaller regional scales, to study very small fine grained climatic effects. These microscale climate simulations pose similar, yet also different, challenges for the visualization and the analysis of the simulation data. Modern interactive visualization and data analysis techniques are very powerful tools to assist the researcher in answering and communicating complex research questions. This presentation discusses comparative visualization for several different wind simulations, which were created using the microscale climate model MITRAS. The simulations differ in wind direction and speed, but are all centered on the same simulation domain: An area of Hamburg-Wilhelmsburg that hosted the IGA/IBA exhibition in 2013. The experiments contain a scenario case to analyze the effects of single buildings, as well as examine the impact of the Coriolis force within the simulation. The scenario case is additionally compared with real measurements from a wind tunnel experiment to ascertain the accuracy of the simulation and the model itself. We also compare different approaches for tree modeling and evaluate the stability of the model. In this presentation, we describe not only our workflow to efficiently and effectively visualize microscale climate simulation data using common 3D visualization and data analysis techniques, but also discuss how to compare variations of a simulation and how to highlight the subtle differences in between them. For the visualizations we use a range of different 3D tools that feature techniques for statistical data analysis, data selection, as well as linking and brushing.

  15. 3D-Geomorphometrics tooth shape analysis in hypodontia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shahrani, Ibrahim; Dirks, Wendy; Jepson, Nicholas; Khalaf, Khaled

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of tooth morphology is an important part of the diagnosis and management of hypodontia patients. Several techniques have been used to analyze tooth form in hypodontia patients and these have shown smaller tooth dimensions and anomalous tooth shapes in patients with hypodontia when compared with controls. However, previous studies have mainly used 2D images and provided limited information. In the present study, 3D surface-imaging and statistical shape analysis were used to evaluate tooth form differences between hypodontia and control patients. Eighteen anatomical landmarks were recorded on the clinical crown of the lower left first permanent molar of 3D scanned study models of hypodontia and control subjects. The study sample group comprised of 120 hypodontia patients (40 mild, 40 moderate, and 40 severe hypodontia patients) and 40 age- and sex-matched controls. Procrustes coordinates were utilized to scale and superimpose the landmark coordinate data and then were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA). Subsequently, differences in shape as well as size were tested statistically using allometric analysis and MANOVA. Significant interaction was found between the two factor variables “group” and “sex” (p < 0.002). Overall expected accuracies were 66 and 56% for females and males, respectively, in the cross-validated discriminant-analysis using the first 20 PCs. Hypodontia groups showed significant shape differences compared with the control subjects (p < 0.0001). Significant differences in tooth crown shape were also found between sexes (p < 0.0001) within groups. Furthermore, the degree of variation in tooth form was proportional to the degree of the severity of the hypodontia. Thus, quantitative measurement of tooth shape in hypodontia patients may enhance the multidisciplinary management of those patients. PMID:24795649

  16. Dynamical Systems Analysis of Fully 3D Ocean Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    Dynamical systems analysis of transport and stirring processes has been developed most thoroughly for 2D flow fields. The calculation of manifolds, turnstile lobes, transport barriers, etc. based on observations of the ocean is most often conducted near the sea surface, whereas analyses at depth, usually carried out with model output, is normally confined to constant-z surfaces. At the meoscale and larger, ocean flows are quasi 2D, but smaller scale (submesoscale) motions, including mixed layer phenomena with significant vertical velocity, may be predominantly 3D. The zoology of hyperbolic trajectories becomes richer in such cases and their attendant manifolds are much more difficult to calculate. I will describe some of the basic geometrical features and corresponding Lagrangian Coherent Features expected to arise in upper ocean fronts, eddies, and Langmuir circulations. Traditional GFD models such as the rotating can flow may capture the important generic features. The dynamical systems approach is most helpful when these features are coherent and persistent and the implications and difficulties for this requirement in fully 3D flows will also be discussed.

  17. Studying the TEM response of a 3-D conductor at a geological contact using the FDTD method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.; Tripp, A.C.; Hohmann, G.W.

    1995-07-01

    Many mineral targets are located near contact zones. Since the change of resistivity across the contact can distort or obscure the transient electromagnetic (TEM) response of the target, it is important to understand the possible effects. Previous investigators have examined similar problems using scale models. For example, Spies and Parker (1984) studied the TEM responses of fixed-loop and moving-loop configurations to geological contacts with lateral resistivity variations. More recently, Wilt (1991) systematically studied TEM soundings near a geological contact and observed that different survey systems respond to the contact in different ways. This paper will illustrate the use of the finite-difference, time-domain (FDTD) algorithm of Wang and Hohmann (1993) for calculating the TEM response of a 3-D conductive body at a geological contact. The algorithm is based on the Yee staggered grid FDTD method for solving the transient electrical nonmagnetic field responses of a 3-D model. On a suitable computer, a wide range of model responses can be readily calculated, a versatility that scale modeling does not share. This study uses a fixed transmitter loop, roving-receiver configuration. Many other configurations can be regarded as special cases of this survey. It is commonly employed, for instance, by the Newmont EMP (Body and Wiles, 1984), UTEM (West et al., 1984), and Geonics EM37 systems. The configuration also facilitates finite-difference, time-domain modeling because it does not require frequent movement of the source.

  18. Colossal Tooling Design: 3D Simulation for Ergonomic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Steve L.; Dischinger, Charles; Thomas, Robert E.; Babai, Majid

    2003-01-01

    The application of high-level 3D simulation software to the design phase of colossal mandrel tooling for composite aerospace fuel tanks was accomplished to discover and resolve safety and human engineering problems. The analyses were conducted to determine safety, ergonomic and human engineering aspects of the disassembly process of the fuel tank composite shell mandrel. Three-dimensional graphics high-level software, incorporating various ergonomic analysis algorithms, was utilized to determine if the process was within safety and health boundaries for the workers carrying out these tasks. In addition, the graphical software was extremely helpful in the identification of material handling equipment and devices for the mandrel tooling assembly/disassembly process.

  19. Structural analysis of tropical cyclone using INSAT-3D observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Neeru; Kishtawal, C. M.

    2016-05-01

    The continuous observations from visible and thermal infrared (TIR) channels of geostationary satellites are highly useful for obtaining the features associated with the shape and dynamics of cloud structures within the tropical cyclones (TCs). As TC develops from an unstructured cloud cluster and intensifies, the cloud structures become more axisymmetric around the centre of the TC. To better understand the structure of TC during different stages of its evolution i.e. from its cyclogenesis to maturity and dissipation, the continuous satellite observations plays a key role. The high spatial and temporal resolution observations from geostationary satellites are very useful in order to analyze the cloud organization during the cyclogenesis. The gradient of the brightness temperatures measures the level of symmetry of each structure, which characterizes the degree of cloud organization of the TC. In the present work, the structural analysis of TC during its life period using the observations from Indian geostationary satellite INSAT-3D has been discussed. The visible and TIR observations from INSAT-3D satellite were used to fix the center position of the cyclone which is an input for the cyclone track and intensity prediction models. This data is also used to estimate the intensity of cyclone in the advanced Dvorak technique (ADT), and in the estimation of radius of maximum winds (Rmax) of TC which is an essential input parameter for the prediction of storm surge associated to the cyclones. The different patterns of cloud structure during the intensification stage, eye-wall formation and dissipation have been discussed. The early identification of these features helps in predicting the rapid intensification of TC which in turn improves the intensity predictions.

  20. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Particle-Reinforced Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, H.; Lissenden, C. J.

    2002-01-01

    Deformation in particle-reinforced aluminum has been simulated using three distinct types of finite element model: a three-dimensional repeating unit cell, a three-dimensional multi-particle model, and two-dimensional multi-particle models. The repeating unit cell model represents a fictitious periodic cubic array of particles. The 3D multi-particle (3D-MP) model represents randomly placed and oriented particles. The 2D generalized plane strain multi-particle models were obtained from planar sections through the 3D-MP model. These models were used to study the tensile macroscopic stress-strain response and the associated stress and strain distributions in an elastoplastic matrix. The results indicate that the 2D model having a particle area fraction equal to the particle representative volume fraction of the 3D models predicted the same macroscopic stress-strain response as the 3D models. However, there are fluctuations in the particle area fraction in a representative volume element. As expected, predictions from 2D models having different particle area fractions do not agree with predictions from 3D models. More importantly, it was found that the microscopic stress and strain distributions from the 2D models do not agree with those from the 3D-MP model. Specifically, the plastic strain distribution predicted by the 2D model is banded along lines inclined at 45 deg from the loading axis while the 3D model prediction is not. Additionally, the triaxial stress and maximum principal stress distributions predicted by 2D and 3D models do not agree. Thus, it appears necessary to use a multi-particle 3D model to accurately predict material responses that depend on local effects, such as strain-to-failure, fracture toughness, and fatigue life.

  1. Image-Based 3d Reconstruction and Analysis for Orthodontia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyaz, V. A.

    2012-08-01

    Among the main tasks of orthodontia are analysis of teeth arches and treatment planning for providing correct position for every tooth. The treatment plan is based on measurement of teeth parameters and designing perfect teeth arch curve which teeth are to create after treatment. The most common technique for teeth moving uses standard brackets which put on teeth and a wire of given shape which is clamped by these brackets for producing necessary forces to every tooth for moving it in given direction. The disadvantages of standard bracket technique are low accuracy of tooth dimensions measurements and problems with applying standard approach for wide variety of complex orthodontic cases. The image-based technique for orthodontic planning, treatment and documenting aimed at overcoming these disadvantages is proposed. The proposed approach provides performing accurate measurements of teeth parameters needed for adequate planning, designing correct teeth position and monitoring treatment process. The developed technique applies photogrammetric means for teeth arch 3D model generation, brackets position determination and teeth shifting analysis.

  2. Technical note: 3D representation and analysis of enthesis morphology.

    PubMed

    Noldner, Lara K; Edgar, Heather J H

    2013-11-01

    This comparison of methods for assessing the development of muscle insertion sites, or entheses, suggests that three-dimensional (3D) quantification of enthesis morphology can produce a picture of habitual muscle use patterns in a past population that is similar to one produced by ordinal scores for describing enthesis morphology. Upper limb skeletal elements (humeri, radii, and ulnae) from a sample of 24 middle-aged adult males from the Pottery Mound site in New Mexico were analyzed for both fibrous and fibrocartilaginous enthesis development with three different methods: ordinal scores, two-dimensional (2D) area measurements, and 3D surface areas. The methods were compared using tests for asymmetry and correlations among variables in each quantitative data set. 2D representations of enthesis area did not agree as closely as ordinal scores and 3D surface areas did regarding which entheses were significantly asymmetrical. There was significant correlation between 3D and 2D data, but correlation coefficients were not consistently high. Intraobserver error was also assessed for the 3D method. Cronbach's alpha values fell between 0.68 and 0.73, and error rates for all entheses fell between 10% and 15%. Marginally acceptable intraobserver error and the analytic versatility of 3D images encourage further investigation of using 3D scanning technology for quantifying enthesis development. PMID:24105032

  3. Understanding Crystal Populations; Looking Towards 3D Quantitative Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerram, D. A.; Morgan, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    In order to understand volcanic systems, the potential record held within crystal populations needs to be revealed. It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that the crystal populations that arrive at the surface in volcanic eruptions are commonly mixtures of crystals, which may be representative of simple crystallization, recycling of crystals and incorporation of alien crystals. If we can quantify the true 3D population within a sample then we will be able to separate crystals with different histories and begin to interrogate the true and complex plumbing within the volcanic system. Modeling crystal populations is one area where we can investigate the best methodologies to use when dealing with sections through 3D populations. By producing known 3D shapes and sizes with virtual textures and looking at the statistics of shape and size when such populations are sectioned, we are able to gain confidence about what our 2D information is telling us about the population. We can also use this approach to test the size of population we need to analyze. 3D imaging through serial sectioning or x-ray CT, provides a complete 3D quantification of a rocks texture. Individual phases can be identified and in principle the true 3D statistics of the population can be interrogated. In practice we need to develop strategies (as with 2D-3D transformations), that enable a true characterization of the 3D data, and an understanding of the errors and pitfalls that exist. Ultimately, the reproduction of true 3D textures and the wealth of information they hold, is now within our reach.

  4. Observation of superconductivity induced by a point contact on 3D Dirac semimetal Cd3 As2 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, He; Wang, Huichao; Liu, Haiwen; Lu, Hong; Yang, Wuhao; Jia, Shuang; Liu, Xiongjun; Xie, Xincheng; Wei, Jian; Wang, Jian

    The 3D Dirac semimetal state is located at the topological phase boundary and can potentially be driven into other topological phases including topological insulator, topological metal and the long-pursuit topological superconductor states. Crystalline Cd3As2 has been proposed and proved to be one of 3D Dirac semimetals which can survive in atmosphere. By precisely controlled point contact (PC) measurements, we observe the exotic superconductivity in the vicinity of the point contact region on the surface of Cd3As2 crystal, which might be induced by the local pressure in the out-of-plane direction from the metallic tip for PC. The observation of zero bias conductance peak (ZBCP) and double conductance peaks (DCPs) symmetric to zero bias further reveals p-wave like unconventional superconductivity in Cd3As2. Considering the special topological property of the 3D Dirac semimetal, our findings may indicate that the Cd3As2 crystal under certain conditions is a candidate of topological superconductor, which is predicted to support Majorana zero modes or gapless Majorana edge/surface modes on the boundary depending on the dimensionality of the material. This work was financially supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Greanted Nos. 2012CB927400).

  5. Quantitative analysis of autophagy using advanced 3D fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Changou, Chun A; Wolfson, Deanna L; Ahluwalia, Balpreet Singh; Bold, Richard J; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Chuang, Frank Y S

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the leading form of malignancies among men in the U.S. While surgery carries a significant risk of impotence and incontinence, traditional chemotherapeutic approaches have been largely unsuccessful. Hormone therapy is effective at early stage, but often fails with the eventual development of hormone-refractory tumors. We have been interested in developing therapeutics targeting specific metabolic deficiency of tumor cells. We recently showed that prostate tumor cells specifically lack an enzyme (argininosuccinate synthase, or ASS) involved in the synthesis of the amino acid arginine(1). This condition causes the tumor cells to become dependent on exogenous arginine, and they undergo metabolic stress when free arginine is depleted by arginine deiminase (ADI)(1,10). Indeed, we have shown that human prostate cancer cells CWR22Rv1 are effectively killed by ADI with caspase-independent apoptosis and aggressive autophagy (or macroautophagy)(1,2,3). Autophagy is an evolutionarily-conserved process that allows cells to metabolize unwanted proteins by lysosomal breakdown during nutritional starvation(4,5). Although the essential components of this pathway are well-characterized(6,7,8,9), many aspects of the molecular mechanism are still unclear - in particular, what is the role of autophagy in the death-response of prostate cancer cells after ADI treatment? In order to address this question, we required an experimental method to measure the level and extent of autophagic response in cells - and since there are no known molecular markers that can accurately track this process, we chose to develop an imaging-based approach, using quantitative 3D fluorescence microscopy(11,12). Using CWR22Rv1 cells specifically-labeled with fluorescent probes for autophagosomes and lysosomes, we show that 3D image stacks acquired with either widefield deconvolution microscopy (and later, with super-resolution, structured-illumination microscopy) can clearly capture the early

  6. 3D bicipital groove shape analysis and relationship to tendopathy.

    PubMed

    Ward, Aaron D; Hamarneh, Ghassan; Schweitzer, Mark E

    2008-06-01

    The bicipital groove of the proximal humerus is formed by the medial and lateral tuberosities and serves to retain the long biceps tendon in its proper place as the arm moves. Bicipital root and proximal tendon disorders are an important symptom generator in the shoulder. The accuracy of the diagnosis of many shoulder disorders visually without quantitative shape analysis is limited, motivating a clinical need for some ancillary method to assess the proximal biceps. In previous studies, measurements of bicipital groove shape were 2-dimensional (2D), taken from a single axial slice. Because of significant variations in groove shape from one axial slice to another in a single patient, such approaches risk overlooking shape features important to long biceps tendon pathology. In this paper, we present a study of the relationship between bicipital groove shape and long biceps tendon pathology using a novel 3-dimensional (3D) shape descriptor for the bicipital groove. In addition to providing quantitative measures of the shape of the groove and its relation to tendopathy, the new descriptor allows for intuitive, descriptive visualization of the shape of the groove. PMID:17342555

  7. Automatic 3-D grayscale volume matching and shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Guétat, Grégoire; Maitre, Matthieu; Joly, Laurène; Lai, Sen-Lin; Lee, Tzumin; Shinagawa, Yoshihisa

    2006-04-01

    Recently, shape matching in three dimensions (3-D) has been gaining importance in a wide variety of fields such as computer graphics, computer vision, medicine, and biology, with applications such as object recognition, medical diagnosis, and quantitative morphological analysis of biological operations. Automatic shape matching techniques developed in the field of computer graphics handle object surfaces, but ignore intensities of inner voxels. In biology and medical imaging, voxel intensities obtained by computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imagery (MRI), and confocal microscopes are important to determine point correspondences. Nevertheless, most biomedical volume matching techniques require human interactions, and automatic methods assume matched objects to have very similar shapes so as to avoid combinatorial explosions of point. This article is aimed at decreasing the gap between the two fields. The proposed method automatically finds dense point correspondences between two grayscale volumes; i.e., finds a correspondent in the second volume for every voxel in the first volume, based on the voxel intensities. Mutiresolutional pyramids are introduced to reduce computational load and handle highly plastic objects. We calculate the average shape of a set of similar objects and give a measure of plasticity to compare them. Matching results can also be used to generate intermediate volumes for morphing. We use various data to validate the effectiveness of our method: we calculate the average shape and plasticity of a set of fly brain cells, and we also match a human skull and an orangutan skull. PMID:16617625

  8. Crashworthiness analysis using advanced material models in DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, R.W.; Burger, M.J.; McMichael, L.D.; Parkinson, R.D.

    1993-10-22

    As part of an electric vehicle consortium, LLNL and Kaiser Aluminum are conducting experimental and numerical studies on crashworthy aluminum spaceframe designs. They have jointly explored the effect of heat treat on crush behavior and duplicated the experimental behavior with finite-element simulations. The major technical contributions to the state of the art in numerical simulation arise from the development and use of advanced material model descriptions for LLNL`s DYNA3D code. Constitutive model enhancements in both flow and failure have been employed for conventional materials such as low-carbon steels, and also for lighter weight materials such as aluminum and fiber composites being considered for future vehicles. The constitutive model enhancements are developed as extensions from LLNL`s work in anisotropic flow and multiaxial failure modeling. Analysis quality as a function of level of simplification of material behavior and mesh is explored, as well as the penalty in computation cost that must be paid for using more complex models and meshes. The lightweight material modeling technology is being used at the vehicle component level to explore the safety implications of small neighborhood electric vehicles manufactured almost exclusively from these materials.

  9. 3-D Printed Ultem 9085 Testing and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, Daniel; Christensen, Sean; Fox, Emmet J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to analyze the mechanical properties of 3-D printed Ultem 9085. This document will focus on the capabilities, limitations, and complexities of 3D printing in general, and explain the methods by which this material is tested. Because 3-D printing is a relatively new process that offers an innovative means to produce hardware, it is important that the aerospace community understands its current advantages and limitations, so that future endeavors involving 3-D printing may be completely safe. This document encompasses three main sections: a Slosh damage assessment, a destructive test of 3-D printed Ultem 9085 samples, and a test to verify simulation for the 3-D printed SDP (SPHERES Docking Port). Described below, 'Slosh' and 'SDP' refer to two experiments that are built using Ultem 9085 for use with the SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites) program onboard the International Space Station (ISS) [16]. The SPHERES Facility is managed out of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center in California.

  10. A contact algorithm for 3D discrete and finite element contact problems based on penalty function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Mengyan; Gao, Wei; Lei, Zhou

    2011-11-01

    A contact algorithm in the context of the combined discrete element (DE) and finite element (FE) method is proposed. The algorithm, which is based on the node-to-surface method used in finite element method, treats each spherical discrete element as a slave node and the surfaces of the finite element domain as the master surfaces. The contact force on the contact interface is processed by using a penalty function method. Afterward, a modification of the combined DE/FE method is proposed. Following that, the corresponding numerical code is implemented into the in-house developed code. To test the accuracy of the proposed algorithm, the impact between two identical bars and the vibration process of a laminated glass plate under impact of elastic sphere are simulated in elastic range. By comparing the results with the analytical solution and/or that calculated by using LS-DYNA, it is found that they agree with each other very well. The accuracy of the algorithm proposed in this paper is proved.

  11. Contact genomics: scaffolding and phasing (meta)genomes using chromosome 3D physical signatures.

    PubMed

    Flot, Jean-François; Marie-Nelly, Hervé; Koszul, Romain

    2015-10-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing technologies are fuelling an accelerating trend to assemble de novo or resequence the genomes of numerous species as well as to complete unfinished assemblies. While current DNA sequencing technologies remain limited to reading stretches of a few hundreds or thousands of base pairs, experimental and computational methods are continuously improving with the goal of assembling entire genomes from large numbers of short DNA sequences. However, the algorithms that piece together DNA strands face important limitations due, notably, to the presence of repeated sequences or of multiple haplotypes within one genome, thus leaving many assemblies incomplete. Recently, the realization that the physical contacts experienced by a portion of a DNA molecule could be used as a robust and quantitative assay to determine its genomic position has led to the emerging field of contact genomics, which promises to revolutionize current genome assembly approaches by exploiting the flexible polymer properties of chromosomes. Here we review the current applications of contact genomics to genome scaffolding, haplotyping and metagenomic assembly, then outline the future developments we envision. PMID:25935414

  12. An analogue contact probe using a compact 3D optical sensor for micro/nano coordinate measuring machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui-Jun; Fan, Kuang-Chao; Miao, Jin-Wei; Huang, Qiang-Xian; Tao, Sheng; Gong, Er-min

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a new analogue contact probe based on a compact 3D optical sensor with high precision. The sensor comprises an autocollimator and a polarizing Michelson interferometer, which can detect two angles and one displacement of the plane mirror at the same time. In this probe system, a tungsten stylus with a ruby tip-ball is attached to a floating plate, which is supported by four V-shape leaf springs fixed to the outer case. When a contact force is applied to the tip, the leaf springs will experience elastic deformation and the plane mirror mounted on the floating plate will be displaced. The force-motion characteristics of this probe were investigated and optimum parameters were obtained with the constraint of allowable physical size of the probe. Simulation results show that the probe is uniform in 3D and its contacting force gradient is within 1 mN µm - 1. Experimental results indicate that the probe has 1 nm resolution,  ± 10 µm measuring range in X - Y plane, 10 µm measuring range in Z direction and within 30 nm measuring standard deviation. The feasibility of the probe has been preliminarily verified by testing the flatness and step height of high precision gauge blocks.

  13. Computerized analysis of pelvic incidence from 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrtovec, Tomaž; Janssen, Michiel M. A.; Pernuš, Franjo; Castelein, René M.; Viergever, Max A.

    2012-02-01

    The sagittal alignment of the pelvis can be evaluated by the angle of pelvic incidence (PI), which is constant for an arbitrary subject position and orientation and can be therefore compared among subjects in standing, sitting or supine position. In this study, PI was measured from three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) images of normal subjects that were acquired in supine position. A novel computerized method, based on image processing techniques, was developed to automatically determine the anatomical references required to measure PI, i.e. the centers of the femoral heads in 3D, and the center and inclination of the sacral endplate in 3D. Multiplanar image reformation was applied to obtain perfect sagittal views with all anatomical structures completely in line with the hip axis, from which PI was calculated. The resulting PI (mean+/-standard deviation) was equal to 46.6°+/-9.2° for male subjects (N = 189), 47.6°+/-10.7° for female subjects (N = 181), and 47.1°+/-10.0° for all subjects (N = 370). The obtained measurements of PI from 3D images were not biased by acquisition projection or structure orientation, because all anatomical structures were completely in line with the hip axis. The performed measurements in 3D therefore represent PI according to the actual geometrical relationships among anatomical structures of the sacrum, pelvis and hips, as observed from the perfect sagittal views.

  14. Transient 3d contact problems—NTS method: mixed methods and conserving integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesch, Christian; Betsch, Peter

    2011-10-01

    The present work deals with a new formulation for transient large deformation contact problems. It is well known, that one-step implicit time integration schemes for highly non-linear systems fail to conserve the total energy of the system. To deal with this drawback, a mixed method is newly proposed in conjunction with the concept of a discrete gradient. In particular, we reformulate the well known and widely-used node-to-segment methods and establish an energy-momentum scheme. The advocated approach ensures robustness and enhanced numerical stability, demonstrated in several three-dimensional applications of the proposed algorithm.

  15. Hybrid segmentation framework for 3D medical image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ting; Metaxas, Dimitri N.

    2003-05-01

    Medical image segmentation is the process that defines the region of interest in the image volume. Classical segmentation methods such as region-based methods and boundary-based methods cannot make full use of the information provided by the image. In this paper we proposed a general hybrid framework for 3D medical image segmentation purposes. In our approach we combine the Gibbs Prior model, and the deformable model. First, Gibbs Prior models are applied onto each slice in a 3D medical image volume and the segmentation results are combined to a 3D binary masks of the object. Then we create a deformable mesh based on this 3D binary mask. The deformable model will be lead to the edge features in the volume with the help of image derived external forces. The deformable model segmentation result can be used to update the parameters for Gibbs Prior models. These methods will then work recursively to reach a global segmentation solution. The hybrid segmentation framework has been applied to images with the objective of lung, heart, colon, jaw, tumor, and brain. The experimental data includes MRI (T1, T2, PD), CT, X-ray, Ultra-Sound images. High quality results are achieved with relatively efficient time cost. We also did validation work using expert manual segmentation as the ground truth. The result shows that the hybrid segmentation may have further clinical use.

  16. 3D kinematic and dynamic analysis of the front crawl tumble turn in elite male swimmers.

    PubMed

    Puel, F; Morlier, J; Avalos, M; Mesnard, M; Cid, M; Hellard, P

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify kinematic and dynamic variables related to the best tumble turn times (3mRTT, the turn time from 3-m in to 3-m out, independent variable) in ten elite male swimmers using a three-dimensional (3D) underwater analysis protocol and the Lasso (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator) as statistical method. For each swimmer, the best-time turn was analyzed with five stationary and synchronized underwater cameras. The 3D reconstruction was performed using the Direct Linear Transformation algorithm. An underwater piezoelectric 3D force platform completed the set-up to compute dynamic variables. Data were smoothed by the Savitzky-Golay filtering method. Three variables were considered relevant in the best Lasso model (3mRTT=2.58-0.425 RD+0.204 VPe+0.0046 TD): the head-wall distance where rotation starts (RD), the horizontal speed at the force peak (VPe), and the 3D length of the path covered during the turn (TD). Furthermore, bivariate analysis showed that upper body (CUBei) and lower limb extension indexes at first contact (CLLei) were also linked to the turn time (r=-0.65 and p<0.05 for both variables). Thus the best turn times were associated with a long RD, slower VPe and reduced TD. By an early transverse rotation, male elite swimmers reach the wall with a slightly flexed posture that results in fast extension. These swimmers opt for a movement that is oriented forward and they focus on reducing the distance covered. PMID:22176710

  17. Customisable 3D printed microfluidics for integrated analysis and optimisation.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, T; Harding, M J; Harris, R A; Friel, R J; Christie, S D R

    2016-08-16

    The formation of smart Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) devices featuring integrated sensing optics is currently hindered by convoluted and expensive manufacturing procedures. In this work, a series of 3D-printed LOC devices were designed and manufactured via stereolithography (SL) in a matter of hours. The spectroscopic performance of a variety of optical fibre combinations were tested, and the optimum path length for performing Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy determined. The information gained in these trials was then used in a reaction optimisation for the formation of carvone semicarbazone. The production of high resolution surface channels (100-500 μm) means that these devices were capable of handling a wide range of concentrations (9 μM-38 mM), and are ideally suited to both analyte detection and process optimisation. This ability to tailor the chip design and its integrated features as a direct result of the reaction being assessed, at such a low time and cost penalty greatly increases the user's ability to optimise both their device and reaction. As a result of the information gained in this investigation, we are able to report the first instance of a 3D-printed LOC device with fully integrated, in-line monitoring capabilities via the use of embedded optical fibres capable of performing UV-vis spectroscopy directly inside micro channels. PMID:27452498

  18. Metrological analysis of the human foot: 3D multisensor exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz Potosi, A.; Meneses Fonseca, J.; León Téllez, J.

    2011-08-01

    In the podiatry field, many of the foot dysfunctions are mainly generated due to: Congenital malformations, accidents or misuse of footwear. For the treatment or prevention of foot disorders, the podiatrist diagnoses prosthesis or specific adapted footwear, according to the real dimension of foot. Therefore, it is necessary to acquire 3D information of foot with 360 degrees of observation. As alternative solution, it was developed and implemented an optical system of threedimensional reconstruction based in the principle of laser triangulation. The system is constituted by an illumination unit that project a laser plane into the foot surface, an acquisition unit with 4 CCD cameras placed around of axial foot axis, an axial moving unit that displaces the illumination and acquisition units in the axial axis direction and a processing and exploration unit. The exploration software allows the extraction of distances on three-dimensional image, taking into account the topography of foot. The optical system was tested and their metrological performances were evaluated in experimental conditions. The optical system was developed to acquire 3D information in order to design and make more appropriate footwear.

  19. Validation of 3D/1D Analysis of ICRF Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanesio, D.; Lancellotti, V.; Kyrytsya, V.; Maggiora, R.; Vecchi, G.; Parisot, A.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2004-11-01

    An innovative tool has been realized for the 3D/1D simulation of Ion Cyclotron Radio Frequency (ICRF), i.e. accounting for antennas in a realistic 3D geometry and with an accurate 1D plasma model. The approach to the problem is based on an integral-equation formulation for the self-consistent evaluation of the current distribution on the conductors. The environment has been subdivided in two coupled region: the plasma region and the vacuum region. The two problems are linked by means of electromagnetic current distribution on the aperture between the two regions. The plasma enters the formalism via a surface impedance matrix for this reason any plasma model can be used. The source term directly models the TEM mode of the coax feeding the antenna and the current in the coax is determined self-consistently, giving the input impedance/admittance of the antenna itself. The suite, called TOPICA, has been used in the design of various ICRF antennas and also for the performance prediction of the ALCATOR C-MOD D and E antenna. An extensive set of comparisons between measured and simulated antenna parameters during ALCATOR C-MOD operation will be presented.

  20. Wear Analysis of Thermal Spray Coatings on 3D Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Luo, W.; Selvadurai, U.

    2014-01-01

    Even though the application of thermal spray coatings on complex geometries gained a greater interest in the last decade, the effect of different geometrical features on the wear behavior is still ill-defined. In this study, the wear resistance of FTC-FeCSiMn coated 3D surfaces was investigated. The wear test was carried out by means of two innovative testing procedures. The first test is a Pin-on-Tubes test where the rotating motion is realized by a lathe chuck. The specimens in the second test were fixed on the table and a robot arm operated the pin. This wear test was applied on specimens with concave or convex surfaces. The residual stresses, which were determined by means of an incremental hole-drilling method, show a dependency on the substrate geometry. The obtained stresses were put in relation to the different radii. After the wear test, a 3D-profilometer determined the wear volume and the sections of the coatings were characterized by a scanning electron microscope. The results indicate that the wear resistance is strongly influenced by the geometry of the substrate.

  1. Measuring the impact of 3D data geometric modeling on spatial analysis: Illustration with Skyview factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasebin, M.; Perret, J.; Mustière, S.; Weber, C.

    2012-10-01

    The increased availability of 3D urban data reflects a growing interest in 3D spatial analysis. As 3D spatial analysis often uses complex 3D data, studies of the potential gains of using more detailed 3D urban databases for specific uses is an important issue. First, more complex data implies an increase in time and memory usage for the analysis (and calls for more research on the efficiency of the algorithms used). Second, detailed 3D urban data are complex to produce, expensive and it is important to be well informed in order to decide whether of not to invest in such data. Currently, many studies have been led about the fitness for use of 2D data but they are very scarce concerning 3D data. This article presents a method to determine the influence of 3D modeling on the results of 3D analysis by isolating the potential sources of errors (such as roof modeling and geometric accuracy). This method is applied on two 3D datasets (LOD1 and LOD2) and a 3D indicator (the sky view factor or SVF). The results show that the significant influence of roof modeling is globally compensated by the difference in geometric modeling but that important local variations are noticed. Nevertheless, for 75% of the SVF processed the difference between the results using these two databases is lower than 2%.

  2. Modeling 3D conjugate heat and mass transfer for turbulent air drying of Chilean papaya in a direct contact dryer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemus-Mondaca, Roberto A.; Vega-Gálvez, Antonio; Zambra, Carlos E.; Moraga, Nelson O.

    2016-03-01

    A 3D model considering heat and mass transfer for food dehydration inside a direct contact dryer is studied. The k- ɛ model is used to describe turbulent air flow. The samples thermophysical properties as density, specific heat, and thermal conductivity are assumed to vary non-linearly with temperature. FVM, SIMPLE algorithm based on a FORTRAN code are used. Results unsteady velocity, temperature, moisture, kinetic energy and dissipation rate for the air flow are presented, whilst temperature and moisture values for the food also are presented. The validation procedure includes a comparison with experimental and numerical temperature and moisture content results obtained from experimental data, reaching a deviation 7-10 %. In addition, this turbulent k- ɛ model provided a better understanding of the transport phenomenon inside the dryer and sample.

  3. Analysis of patient movement during 3D USCT data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiter, N. V.; Hopp, T.; Zapf, M.; Kretzek, E.; Gemmeke, H.

    2016-04-01

    In our first clinical study with a full 3D Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT) system patient data was acquired in eight minutes for one breast. In this paper the patient movement during the acquisition was analyzed quantitatively and as far as possible corrected in the resulting images. The movement was tracked in ten successive reflectivity reconstructions of full breast volumes acquired during 10 s intervals at different aperture positions, which were separated by 41 s intervals. The mean distance between initial and final position was 2.2 mm (standard deviation (STD) +/- 0.9 mm, max. 4.1 mm, min. 0.8 mm) and the average sum of all moved distances was 4.9 mm (STD +/- 1.9 mm, max. 8.8 mm, min. 2.7 mm). The tracked movement was corrected by summing successive images, which were transformed according to the detected movement. The contrast of these images increased and additional image content became visible.

  4. 3D object-oriented image analysis in 3D geophysical modelling: Analysing the central part of the East African Rift System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadel, I.; van der Meijde, M.; Kerle, N.; Lauritsen, N.

    2015-03-01

    Non-uniqueness of satellite gravity interpretation has traditionally been reduced by using a priori information from seismic tomography models. This reduction in the non-uniqueness has been based on velocity-density conversion formulas or user interpretation of the 3D subsurface structures (objects) based on the seismic tomography models and then forward modelling these objects. However, this form of object-based approach has been done without a standardized methodology on how to extract the subsurface structures from the 3D models. In this research, a 3D object-oriented image analysis (3D OOA) approach was implemented to extract the 3D subsurface structures from geophysical data. The approach was applied on a 3D shear wave seismic tomography model of the central part of the East African Rift System. Subsequently, the extracted 3D objects from the tomography model were reconstructed in the 3D interactive modelling environment IGMAS+, and their density contrast values were calculated using an object-based inversion technique to calculate the forward signal of the objects and compare it with the measured satellite gravity. Thus, a new object-based approach was implemented to interpret and extract the 3D subsurface objects from 3D geophysical data. We also introduce a new approach to constrain the interpretation of the satellite gravity measurements that can be applied using any 3D geophysical model.

  5. Photoemission spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis of 3D topological and Kondo insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibayev, Pavel

    2015-03-01

    The advantage of studying 3D topological insulators (TIs), compounds that have attracted the attention of many in the condensed matter field, is the ability for their existence at room temperature and no magnetic fields, allowing both for resolving their band structure via angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and understanding electrical transport and other properties via X-ray diffraction (XRD) and point-contact spectroscopy (PCS). A comprehensive quantitative analysis of Bi2Se3, a 3D TI, was carried out using these methods. The Bi2Se3\\ crystals were synthesized in-house at Princeton University. A first-principles calculation based on density functional theory, DFT, was performed using the Abinit software. The band structure of the crystal was then resolved via ARPES at the Advanced Light Source in LBNL, resulting in a surprisingly stark and clear single Dirac cone. A large band gap was confirmed, suggesting an increased potential for applications. In contrast, Kondo insulators are found in rare-earth based materials with f-electron degrees of freedom. Photon energy dependent dispersion relationships and temperature dependence studies were performed on a Kondo candidate CeB6 via ARPES, showing an even number of Dirac cones and a non-TI behavior. Analysis of I-V characteristics through PCS will follow, in addition to characterization via Bruker XRD for both compounds. Research group led by Professor M. Zahid Hasan (Princeton University).

  6. 3D mapping of geological contacts by coupling Aerial Laser Scanning, Gigapixel photography and open access pictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Liliane; Guerin, Antoine; Abellán, Antonio; Carrea, Dario; Derron, Marc-Henri; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Multiple sources of geological data exist nowadays, most of them are in 2D (e.g. geological maps, geological panoramic sketch), and only a few are in 3D (e.g. block diagram). One of the current challenges in geological mapping consists not only in providing a more consistent 3D data, but also in pursuing a gathering and a harmonisation of the geological information in order to obtain a more consistent interpretations of the 3D geological models. New remote sensing techniques have significantly improved the representation of three-dimensional surfaces during the last decade, especially for steep and inaccessible rockcliffs. Therefore, we present an exploratory study aiming to find a reliable method for carrying out a three-dimensional mapping of geological contacts using a High Resolution Digital Elevation Model (HRDEM) with a 1 meter cell size. To this end, we selected the "Scex Rouge Mountain" as pilot study area. This outcrop, which is located in the Diablerets Massif (Vaud, Swiss Alps), has the particularity to present very distinguishable folded geological boundaries on its Southern face. The Southern slope belongs to the Wildhorn nappe, which is mainly composed of sedimentary rocks. The top-layer is composed of siliceous limestones, the well-visible fold layer is the "Pygurus layer" and consist of sandy limestone. Finally the bottom-layer includes marly schist and clayey limestones. At first, different sources of information has been draped on the HRDEM of the Scex Rouge Mountain, including not only classical geological maps (1:25 000) but also different sources of imagery (e.g. gigapixel panoramas, open access images, etc.). In a second step, several three-dimensional polylines have been drawn following the geological limit on each drapped HRDEM. Then we investigated the accuracy of 2D classical geological maps by comparing these geological limits with the drawn 3D polylines. Furthermore, in order to evaluate the accuracy of the method, a ground truth needs

  7. 3D/1D Analysis of ICRF Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggiora, Riccardo; Lancellotti, Vito; Vecchi, Giuseppe

    2003-10-01

    An innovative tool has been realized for the 3D/1D simulation of Ion Cyclotron Radio Frequency (ICRF), i.e. accounting for antennas in a realistic 3D geometry and with an accurate 1D plasma model. The approach to the problem is based on an integral-equation formulation for the self-consistent evaluation of the current distribution on the conductors. The environment has been subdivided in two coupled region: the plasma region and the vacuum region. The two problems are linked by means of a magnetic current (electric field) distribution on the aperture between the two regions. In the vacuum region all the calculations are executed in the spatial domain while in the plasma region an extraction in the spectral domain of some integrals is employed that permits to significantly reduce the integration support and to obtain a high numerical efficiency leading to the practical possibility of using a large number of sub-domain (rectangular or triangular) basis functions on each solid conductor of the system. The plasma enters the formalism of the plasma region via a surface impedance matrix; for this reason any plasma model can be used; at present the FELICE code has been adopted, that affords density and temperature profiles, and FLR effects. The source term directly models the TEM mode of the coax feeding the antenna and the current in the coax is determined self-consistently, giving the input impedance/admittance of the antenna itself. Calculation of field distributions (both magnetic and electric), useful for sheath considerations, is included. This tool has been implemented in a suite, called TOPICA, that is modular and applicable to ICRF antenna structures of arbitrary shape. This new simulation tool can assist during the detailed design phase and for this reason can be considered a "Virtual Prototyping Laboratory" (VPL). The TOPICA suite has been tested against assessed codes and against measurements and data of mock-ups and existing antennas. The VPL is being used in

  8. Tensorial analysis of Eshelby stresses in 3D supercooled liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaître, Anaël

    2015-10-01

    It was recently proposed that the local rearrangements governing relaxation in supercooled liquids impress on the liquid medium long-ranged (Eshelby) stress fluctuations that accumulate over time. From this viewpoint, events must be characterized by elastic dipoles, which are second order tensors, and Eshelby fields are expected to show up in stress and stress increment correlations, which are fourth order tensor fields. We construct here an analytical framework that permits analyzing such tensorial correlations in isotropic media in view of accessing Eshelby fields. Two spherical bases are introduced, which correspond to Cartesian and spherical coordinates for tensors. We show how they can be used to decompose stress correlations and thus test such properties as isotropy and power-law scalings. Eshelby fields and the predicted stress correlations in an infinite medium are shown to belong to an algebra that can conveniently be described using the spherical tensor bases. Using this formalism, we demonstrate that the inherent stress field of 3D supercooled liquids is power law correlated and carries the signature of Eshelby fields, thus supporting the idea that relaxation events give rise to Eshelby stresses that accumulate over time.

  9. Systematic error analysis for 3D nanoprofiler tracing normal vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Ryota; Tokuta, Yusuke; Nakano, Motohiro; Yamamura, Kazuya; Endo, Katsuyoshi

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, demand for an optical element having a high degree of freedom shape is increased. High-precision aspherical shape is required for the X-ray focusing mirror etc. For the head-mounted display etc., optical element of the free-form surface is used. For such an optical device fabrication, measurement technology is essential. We have developed a high- precision 3D nanoprofiler. By nanoprofiler, the normal vector information of the sample surface is obtained on the basis of the linearity of light. Normal vector information is differential value of the shape, it is possible to determine the shape by integrating. Repeatability of sub-nanometer has been achieved by nanoprofiler. To pursue the accuracy of shapes, systematic error is analyzed. The systematic errors are figure error of sample and assembly errors of the device. This method utilizes the information of the ideal shape of the sample, and the measurement point coordinates and normal vectors are calculated. However, measured figure is not the ideal shape by the effect of systematic errors. Therefore, the measurement point coordinate and the normal vector is calculated again by feeding back the measured figure. Correction of errors have been attempted by figure re-derivation. It was confirmed theoretically effectiveness by simulation. This approach also applies to the experiment, it was confirmed the possibility of about 4 nm PV figure correction in the employed sample.

  10. Tensorial analysis of Eshelby stresses in 3D supercooled liquids.

    PubMed

    Lemaître, Anaël

    2015-10-28

    It was recently proposed that the local rearrangements governing relaxation in supercooled liquids impress on the liquid medium long-ranged (Eshelby) stress fluctuations that accumulate over time. From this viewpoint, events must be characterized by elastic dipoles, which are second order tensors, and Eshelby fields are expected to show up in stress and stress increment correlations, which are fourth order tensor fields. We construct here an analytical framework that permits analyzing such tensorial correlations in isotropic media in view of accessing Eshelby fields. Two spherical bases are introduced, which correspond to Cartesian and spherical coordinates for tensors. We show how they can be used to decompose stress correlations and thus test such properties as isotropy and power-law scalings. Eshelby fields and the predicted stress correlations in an infinite medium are shown to belong to an algebra that can conveniently be described using the spherical tensor bases. Using this formalism, we demonstrate that the inherent stress field of 3D supercooled liquids is power law correlated and carries the signature of Eshelby fields, thus supporting the idea that relaxation events give rise to Eshelby stresses that accumulate over time. PMID:26520535

  11. Numerical analysis of human dental occlusal contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, F. S.; Las Casas, E. B.; Godoy, G. C. D.; Meireles, A. B.

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain real contact areas, forces, and pressures acting on human dental enamel as a function of the nominal pressure during dental occlusal contact. The described development consisted of three steps: characterization of the surface roughness by 3D contact profilometry test, finite element analysis of micro responses for each pair of main asperities in contact, and homogenization of macro responses using an assumed probability density function. The inelastic deformation of enamel was considered, adjusting the stress-strain relationship of sound enamel to that obtained from instrumented indentation tests conducted with spherical tip. A mechanical part of the static friction coefficient was estimated as the ratio between tangential and normal components of the overall resistive force, resulting in μd = 0.057. Less than 1% of contact pairs reached the yield stress of enamel, indicating that the occlusal contact is essentially elastic. The micro-models indicated an average hardness of 6.25GPa, and the homogenized result for macroscopic interface was around 9GPa. Further refinements of the methodology and verification using experimental data can provide a better understanding of processes related to contact, friction and wear of human tooth enamel.

  12. RETRAN-3D MOD003 Peach Bottom Turbine Trip 2 Multidimensional Kinetics Analysis Models and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Michitsugu; Ogura, Katsunori; Gose, Garry C.; Wu, J.-Y

    2003-04-15

    An analysis of the Peach Bottom Unit 2 Turbine Trip Test 2 (PB2/TT2) has been performed using RETRAN-3D MOD003. The purpose of the analysis was to investigate the PB2/TT2 overpressurization transient using the RETRAN-3D multidimensional kinetics model.

  13. Finite Element Analysis of Mechanical Properties of 3D Four-directional Rectangular Braided Composites—Part 2: Validation of the 3D Finite Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dian-Sen; Fang, Dai-Ning; Lu, Zi-Xing; Yang, Zhen-Yu; Jiang, Nan

    2010-08-01

    In the first part of the work, we have established a new parameterized three-dimensional (3D) finite element model (FEM) which precisely simulated the spatial configuration of the braiding yarns and considered the cross-section deformation as well as the surface contact relationship between the yarns. This paper presents a prediction of the effective elastic properties and the meso-scale mechanical response of 3D braided composites to verify the validation of the FEM. The effects of the braiding parameters on the mechanical properties are investigated in detail. By analyzing the deformation and stress nephogram of the model, a reasonable overall stress field is provided and the results well support the strength prediction. The results indicate it is convenient to predict all the elastic constants of 3D braided composites with different parameters simultaneously using the FEM. Moreover, the FEM can successfully predict the meso-scale mechanical response of 3D braided composites containing periodical structures.

  14. and 3D TOF-SIMS Imaging for Biological Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, John S.

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is an established technique in the field of surface analysis but until recently has played only a very small role in the area of biological analysis. This chapter provides an overview of the application of secondary ion mass spectrometry to the analysis of biological samples including single cells, bacteria and tissue sections. The chapter will discuss how the challenges of biological analysis by SIMS have created an impetus for the development of new technology and methodology giving improved mass resolution, spatial resolution and sensitivity.

  15. 3D timelapse analysis of muscle satellite cell motility.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Ashley L; Atchison, Kevin; Fisher, Kevin E; Davis, George E; Cornelison, D D W

    2009-10-01

    Skeletal muscle repair and regeneration requires the activity of satellite cells, a population of myogenic stem cells scattered throughout the tissue and activated to proliferate and differentiate in response to myotrauma or disease. While it seems likely that satellite cells would need to navigate local muscle tissue to reach damaged areas, relatively little data on such motility exist, and most studies have been with immortalized cell lines. We find that primary satellite cells are significantly more motile than myoblast cell lines, and that adhesion to laminin promotes primary cell motility more than fourfold over other substrates. Using timelapse videomicroscopy to assess satellite cell motility on single living myofibers, we have identified a requirement for the laminin-binding integrin alpha 7 beta 1 in satellite cell motility, as well as a role for hepatocyte growth factor in promoting directional persistence. The extensive migratory behavior of satellite cells resident on muscle fibers suggests caution when determining, based on fixed specimens, whether adjacent cells are daughters from the same mother cell. We also observed more persistent long-term contact between individual satellite cells than has been previously supposed, potential cell-cell attractive and repulsive interactions, and migration between host myofibers. Based on such activity, we assayed for expression of "pathfinding" cues, and found that satellite cells express multiple guidance ligands and receptors. Together, these data suggest that satellite cell migration in vivo may be more extensive than currently thought, and could be regulated by combinations of signals, including adhesive haptotaxis, soluble factors, and guidance cues. PMID:19609936

  16. 3D Timelapse Analysis of Muscle Satellite Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Ashley L; Atchison, Kevin; Fisher, Kevin E; Davis, George E; Cornelison, DDW

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle repair and regeneration requires the activity of satellite cells, a population of myogenic stem cells scattered throughout the tissue and activated to proliferate and differentiate in response to myotrauma or disease. While it seems likely that satellite cells would need to navigate local muscle tissue to reach damaged areas, relatively little data on such motility exist, and most studies have been with immortalized cell lines. We find that primary satellite cells are significantly more motile than myoblast cell lines, and that adhesion to laminin promotes primary cell motility more than fourfold over other substrates. Using timelapse videomicroscopy to assess satellite cell motility on single living myofibers, we have identified a requirement for the laminin-binding integrin α7β1 in satellite cell motility, as well as a role for hepatocyte growth factor in promoting directional persistence. The extensive migratory behavior of satellite cells resident on muscle fibers suggests caution when determining, based on fixed specimens, whether adjacent cells are daughters from the same mother cell. We also observed more persistent long-term contact between individual satellite cells than has been previously supposed, potential cell-cell attractive and repulsive interactions, and migration between host myofibers. Based on such activity, we assayed for expression of “pathfinding” cues, and found that satellite cells express multiple guidance ligands and receptors. Together, these data suggest that satellite cell migration in vivo may be more extensive than currently thought, and could be regulated by combinations of signals, including adhesive haptotaxis, soluble factors, and guidance cues. Stem Cells 2009;27:2527–2538 PMID:19609936

  17. Reducing Non-Uniqueness in Satellite Gravity Inversion using 3D Object Oriented Image Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadel, I.; van der Meijde, M.; Kerle, N.

    2013-12-01

    Non-uniqueness of satellite gravity interpretation has been usually reduced by using a priori information from various sources, e.g. seismic tomography models. The reduction in non-uniqueness has been based on velocity-density conversion formulas or user interpretation for 3D subsurface structures (objects) in seismic tomography models. However, these processes introduce additional uncertainty through the conversion relations due to the dependency on the other physical parameters such as temperature and pressure, or through the bias in the interpretation due to user choices and experience. In this research, a new methodology is introduced to extract the 3D subsurface structures from 3D geophysical data using a state-of-art 3D Object Oriented Image Analysis (OOA) technique. 3D OOA is tested using a set of synthetic models that simulate the real situation in the study area of this research. Then, 3D OOA is used to extract 3D subsurface objects from a real 3D seismic tomography model. The extracted 3D objects are used to reconstruct a forward model and its response is compared with the measured satellite gravity. Finally, the result of the forward modelling, based on the extracted 3D objects, is used to constrain the inversion process of satellite gravity data. Through this work, a new object-based approach is introduced to interpret and extract the 3D subsurface objects from 3D geophysical data. This can be used to constrain modelling and inversion of potential field data using the extracted 3D subsurface structures from other methods. In summary, a new approach is introduced to constrain inversion of satellite gravity measurements and enhance interpretation capabilities.

  18. 3D Blade Vibration Measurements on an 80 m Diameter Wind Turbine by Using Non-contact Remote Measurement Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbek, Muammer; Rixen, Daniel J.

    Non-contact optical measurement systems photogrammetry and laser interferometry are introduced as cost efficient alternatives to the conventional wind turbine/farm monitoring systems that are currently in use. The proposed techniques are proven to provide an accurate measurement of the dynamic behavior of a 2.5 MW—80 m diameter—wind turbine. Several measurements are taken on the test turbine by using 4 CCD cameras and 1 laser vibrometer and the response of the turbine is monitored from a distance of 220 m. The results of the infield tests and the corresponding analyses show that photogrammetry (also can be called as videogrammetry or computer vision technique) enable the 3D deformations of the rotor to be measured at 33 different points simultaneously with an average accuracy of ±25 mm, while the turbine is rotating. Several important turbine modes can also be extracted from the recorded data. Similarly, laser interferometry (used for the parked turbine only) provides very valuable information on the dynamic properties of the turbine structure. Twelve different turbine modes can be identified from the obtained response data.

  19. 3D geometric analysis of the aorta in 3D MRA follow-up pediatric image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörz, Stefan; Alrajab, Abdulsattar; Arnold, Raoul; Eichhorn, Joachim; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Schenk, Jens-Peter; Rohr, Karl

    2014-03-01

    We introduce a new model-based approach for the segmentation of the thoracic aorta and its main branches from follow-up pediatric 3D MRA image data. For robust segmentation of vessels even in difficult cases (e.g., neighboring structures), we propose a new extended parametric cylinder model which requires only relatively few model parameters. The new model is used in conjunction with a two-step fitting scheme for refining the segmentation result yielding an accurate segmentation of the vascular shape. Moreover, we include a novel adaptive background masking scheme and we describe a spatial normalization scheme to align the segmentation results from follow-up examinations. We have evaluated our proposed approach using different 3D synthetic images and we have successfully applied the approach to follow-up pediatric 3D MRA image data.

  20. 3D neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled analysis of MYRRHA

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, M.; Martin-Fuertes, F.

    2012-07-01

    The current tendency in multiphysics calculations applied to reactor physics is the use of already validated computer codes, coupled by means of an iterative approach. In this paper such an approach is explained concerning neutronics and thermal-hydraulics coupled analysis with MCNPX and COBRA-IV codes using a driver program and file exchange between codes. MCNPX provides the neutronic analysis of heterogeneous nuclear systems, both in critical and subcritical states, while COBRA-IV is a subchannel code that can be used for rod bundles or core thermal-hydraulics analysis. In our model, the MCNP temperature dependence of nuclear data is handled via pseudo-material approach, mixing pre-generated cross section data set to obtain the material with the desired cross section temperature. On the other hand, COBRA-IV has been updated to allow for the simulation of liquid metal cooled reactors. The coupled computational tool can be applied to any geometry and coolant, as it is the case of single fuel assembly, at pin-by-pin level, or full core simulation with the average pin of each fuel-assembly. The coupling tool has been applied to the critical core layout of the SCK-CEN MYRRHA concept, an experimental LBE cooled fast reactor presently in engineering design stage. (authors)

  1. Vector algorithms for geometrically nonlinear 3D finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, John D.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms for geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis are presented which exploit the vector processing capability of the VPS-32, which is closely related to the CYBER 205. By manipulating vectors (which are long lists of numbers) rather than individual numbers, very high processing speeds are obtained. Long vector lengths are obtained without extensive replication or reordering by storage of intermediate results in strategic patterns at all stages of the computations. Comparisons of execution times with those from programs using either scalar or other vector programming techniques indicate that the algorithms presented are quite efficient.

  2. 3D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, L. T.; Chen, P. C.; Hartle, M. S.; Huang, H. T.

    1985-01-01

    The objective is to develop analytical tools capable of economically evaluating the cyclic time dependent plasticity which occurs in hot section engine components in areas of strain concentration resulting from the combination of both mechanical and thermal stresses. Three models were developed. A simple model performs time dependent inelastic analysis using the power law creep equation. The second model is the classical model of Professors Walter Haisler and David Allen of Texas A and M University. The third model is the unified model of Bodner, Partom, et al. All models were customized for linear variation of loads and temperatures with all material properties and constitutive models being temperature dependent.

  3. Pulse electrochemical machining on Invar alloy: Optical microscopic/SEM and non-contact 3D measurement study of surface analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Choi, S. G.; Choi, W. K.; Yang, B. Y.; Lee, E. S.

    2014-09-01

    In this study, Invar alloy (Fe 63.5%, Ni 36.5%) was electrochemically polished by PECM (Pulse Electro Chemical Machining) in a mixture of NaCl, glycerin, and distilled water. A series of PECM experiments were carried out with different voltages and different electrode shapes, and then the surfaces of polished Invar alloy were investigated. The polished Invar alloy surfaces were investigated by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and non-contact 3D measurement (white light microscopes) and it was found that different applied voltages produced different surface characteristics on the Invar alloy surface because of the locally concentrated applied voltage on the Invar alloy surface. Moreover, we found that the shapes of electrode also have an effect on the surface characteristics on Invar alloy surface by influencing the applied voltage. These experimental findings provide fundamental knowledge for PECM of Invar alloy by surface analysis.

  4. Sub aquatic 3D visualization and temporal analysis utilizing ArcGIS online and 3D applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used 3D Visualization tools to illustrate some complex water quality data we’ve been collecting in the Great Lakes. These data include continuous tow data collected from our research vessel the Lake Explorer II, and continuous water quality data collected from an autono...

  5. Code System for Analysis of 3-D Reinforced Concrete Structures.

    1999-11-22

    Version 00 NONSAP-C is a finite element program for determining the static and dynamic response of three-dimensional reinforced concrete structures. Long-term, or creep, behavior of concrete structures can also be analyzed. Nonlinear constitutive relations for concrete under short-term loads are incorporated in two time-independent models, a variable-modulus approach with orthotropic behavior induced in the concrete due to the development of different tangent moduli in different directions and an elastic-plastic model in which the concrete ismore » assumed to be a continuous, isotropic, and linearly elastic-plastic strain-hardening-fracture material. A viscoelastic constitutive model for long-term thermal creep of concrete is included. Three-dimensional finite elements available in NONSAP-C include a truss element, a multinode tendon element for prestressed and post tensioned concrete structures, an elastic-plastic membrane element to represent the behavior of cavity liners, and a general isoparametric element with a variable number of nodes for analysis of solids and thick shells.« less

  6. Global stability analysis of turbulent 3D wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigas, Georgios; Sipp, Denis; Juniper, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    At low Reynolds numbers, corresponding to laminar and transitional regimes, hydrodynamic stability theory has aided the understanding of the dynamics of bluff body wake-flows and the application of effective control strategies. However, flows of fundamental importance to many industries, in particular the transport industry, involve high Reynolds numbers and turbulent wakes. Despite their turbulence, such wake flows exhibit organisation which is manifested as coherent structures. Recent work has shown that the turbulent coherent structures retain the shape of the symmetry-breaking laminar instabilities and only those manifest as large-scale structures in the near wake (Rigas et al., JFM vol. 750:R5 2014, JFM vol. 778:R2 2015). Based on the findings of the persistence of the laminar instabilities at high Reynolds numbers, we investigate the global stability characteristics of a turbulent wake generated behind a bluff three-dimensional axisymmetric body. We perform a linear global stability analysis on the experimentally obtained mean flow and we recover the dynamic characteristics and spatial structure of the coherent structures, which are linked to the transitional instabilities. A detailed comparison of the predictions with the experimental measurements will be provided.

  7. Sexual Dimorphism Analysis and Gender Classification in 3D Human Face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuan; Lu, Li; Yan, Jingqi; Liu, Zhi; Shi, Pengfei

    In this paper, we present the sexual dimorphism analysis in 3D human face and perform gender classification based on the result of sexual dimorphism analysis. Four types of features are extracted from a 3D human-face image. By using statistical methods, the existence of sexual dimorphism is demonstrated in 3D human face based on these features. The contributions of each feature to sexual dimorphism are quantified according to a novel criterion. The best gender classification rate is 94% by using SVMs and Matcher Weighting fusion method.This research adds to the knowledge of 3D faces in sexual dimorphism and affords a foundation that could be used to distinguish between male and female in 3D faces.

  8. Advanced Visualization and Analysis of Climate Data using DV3D and UV-CDAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, T. P.

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes DV3D, a Vistrails package of high-level modules for the Ultra-scale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) interactive visual exploration system that enables exploratory analysis of diverse and rich data sets stored in the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF). DV3D provides user-friendly workflow interfaces for advanced visualization and analysis of climate data at a level appropriate for scientists. The application builds on VTK, an open-source, object-oriented library, for visualization and analysis. DV3D provides the high-level interfaces, tools, and application integrations required to make the analysis and visualization power of VTK readily accessible to users without exposing burdensome details such as actors, cameras, renderers, and transfer functions. It can run as a desktop application or distributed over a set of nodes for hyperwall or distributed visualization applications. DV3D is structured as a set of modules which can be linked to create workflows in Vistrails. Figure 1 displays a typical DV3D workflow as it would appear in the Vistrails workflow builder interface of UV-CDAT and, on the right, the visualization spreadsheet output of the workflow. Each DV3D module encapsulates a complex VTK pipeline with numerous supporting objects. Each visualization module implements a unique interactive 3D display. The integrated Vistrails visualization spreadsheet offers multiple synchronized visualization displays for desktop or hyperwall. The currently available displays include volume renderers, volume slicers, 3D isosurfaces, 3D hovmoller, and various vector plots. The DV3D GUI offers a rich selection of interactive query, browse, navigate, and configure options for all displays. All configuration operations are saved as Vistrails provenance. DV3D's seamless integration with UV-CDAT's climate data management system (CDMS) and other climate data analysis tools provides a wide range of climate data analysis operations, e

  9. PRONTO3D users` instructions: A transient dynamic code for nonlinear structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Attaway, S.W.; Mello, F.J.; Heinstein, M.W.; Swegle, J.W.; Ratner, J.A.; Zadoks, R.I.

    1998-06-01

    This report provides an updated set of users` instructions for PRONTO3D. PRONTO3D is a three-dimensional, transient, solid dynamics code for analyzing large deformations of highly nonlinear materials subjected to extremely high strain rates. This Lagrangian finite element program uses an explicit time integration operator to integrate the equations of motion. Eight-node, uniform strain, hexahedral elements and four-node, quadrilateral, uniform strain shells are used in the finite element formulation. An adaptive time step control algorithm is used to improve stability and performance in plasticity problems. Hourglass distortions can be eliminated without disturbing the finite element solution using either the Flanagan-Belytschko hourglass control scheme or an assumed strain hourglass control scheme. All constitutive models in PRONTO3D are cast in an unrotated configuration defined using the rotation determined from the polar decomposition of the deformation gradient. A robust contact algorithm allows for the impact and interaction of deforming contact surfaces of quite general geometry. The Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics method has been embedded into PRONTO3D using the contact algorithm to couple it with the finite element method.

  10. GIANT: pattern analysis of molecular interactions in 3D structures of protein–small ligand complexes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interpretation of binding modes of protein–small ligand complexes from 3D structure data is essential for understanding selective ligand recognition by proteins. It is often performed by visual inspection and sometimes largely depends on a priori knowledge about typical interactions such as hydrogen bonds and π-π stacking. Because it can introduce some biases due to scientists’ subjective perspectives, more objective viewpoints considering a wide range of interactions are required. Description In this paper, we present a web server for analyzing protein–small ligand interactions on the basis of patterns of atomic contacts, or “interaction patterns” obtained from the statistical analyses of 3D structures of protein–ligand complexes in our previous study. This server can guide visual inspection by providing information about interaction patterns for each atomic contact in 3D structures. Users can visually investigate what atomic contacts in user-specified 3D structures of protein–small ligand complexes are statistically overrepresented. This server consists of two main components: “Complex Analyzer”, and “Pattern Viewer”. The former provides a 3D structure viewer with annotations of interacting amino acid residues, ligand atoms, and interacting pairs of these. In the annotations of interacting pairs, assignment to an interaction pattern of each contact and statistical preferences of the patterns are presented. The “Pattern Viewer” provides details of each interaction pattern. Users can see visual representations of probability density functions of interactions, and a list of protein–ligand complexes showing similar interactions. Conclusions Users can interactively analyze protein–small ligand binding modes with statistically determined interaction patterns rather than relying on a priori knowledge of the users, by using our new web server named GIANT that is freely available at http://giant.hgc.jp/. PMID:24423161

  11. JULIDE: a software tool for 3D reconstruction and statistical analysis of autoradiographic mouse brain sections.

    PubMed

    Ribes, Delphine; Parafita, Julia; Charrier, Rémi; Magara, Fulvio; Magistretti, Pierre J; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2010-01-01

    In this article we introduce JULIDE, a software toolkit developed to perform the 3D reconstruction, intensity normalization, volume standardization by 3D image registration and voxel-wise statistical analysis of autoradiographs of mouse brain sections. This software tool has been developed in the open-source ITK software framework and is freely available under a GPL license. The article presents the complete image processing chain from raw data acquisition to 3D statistical group analysis. Results of the group comparison in the context of a study on spatial learning are shown as an illustration of the data that can be obtained with this tool. PMID:21124830

  12. User's Manual for DuctE3D: A Program for 3D Euler Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Analysis of Ducted Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    1997-01-01

    The program DuctE3D is used for steady or unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of ducted fans. This guide describes the input data required and the output files generated, in using DuctE3D. The analysis solves three dimensional unsteady, compressible Euler equations to obtain the aerodynamic forces. A normal mode structural analysis is used to obtain the aeroelastic equations, which are solved using either the time domain or the frequency domain solution method. Sample input and output files are included in this guide for steady aerodynamic analysis and aeroelastic analysis of an isolated fan row.

  13. A Framework for 3D Vessel Analysis using Whole Slide Images of Liver Tissue Sections

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yanhui; Wang, Fusheng; Treanor, Darren; Magee, Derek; Roberts, Nick; Teodoro, George; Zhu, Yangyang; Kong, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) high resolution microscopic images have high potential for improving the understanding of both normal and disease processes where structural changes or spatial relationship of disease features are significant. In this paper, we develop a complete framework applicable to 3D pathology analytical imaging, with an application to whole slide images of sequential liver slices for 3D vessel structure analysis. The analysis workflow consists of image registration, segmentation, vessel cross-section association, interpolation, and volumetric rendering. To identify biologically-meaningful correspondence across adjacent slides, we formulate a similarity function for four association cases. The optimal solution is then obtained by constrained Integer Programming. We quantitatively and qualitatively compare our vessel reconstruction results with human annotations. Validation results indicate a satisfactory concordance as measured both by region-based and distance-based metrics. These results demonstrate a promising 3D vessel analysis framework for whole slide images of liver tissue sections. PMID:27034719

  14. 3D shape analysis for early diagnosis of malignant lung nodules.

    PubMed

    El-Baz, Ayman; Nitzken, Matthew; Elnakib, Ahmed; Khalifa, Fahmi; Gimel'farb, Georgy; Falk, Robert; El-Ghar, Mohamed Abou

    2011-01-01

    An alternative method of diagnosing malignant lung nodules by their shape, rather than conventional growth rate, is proposed. The 3D surfaces of the detected lung nodules are delineated by spherical harmonic analysis that represents a 3D surface of the lung nodule supported by the unit sphere with a linear combination of special basis functions, called Spherical Harmonics (SHs). The proposed 3D shape analysis is carried out in five steps: (i) 3D lung nodule segmentation with a deformable 3D boundary controlled by a new prior visual appearance model; (ii) 3D Delaunay triangulation to construct a 3D mesh model of the segmented lung nodule surface; (iii) mapping this model to the unit sphere; (iv) computing the SHs for the surface; and (v) determining the number of the SHs to delineate the lung nodule. We describe the lung nodule shape complexity with a new shape index, the estimated number of the SHs, and use it for the K-nearest classification into malignant and benign lung nodules. Preliminary experiments on 327 lung nodules (153 malignant and 174 benign) resulted in a classification accuracy of 93.6%, showing that the proposed method is a promising supplement to current technologies for the early diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:22003697

  15. 3D shape analysis for early diagnosis of malignant lung nodules.

    PubMed

    El-Bazl, Ayman; Nitzken, Matthew; Khalifa, Fahmi; Elnakib, Ahmed; Gimel'farb, Georgy; Falk, Robert; El-Ghar, Mohammed Abo

    2011-01-01

    An alternative method for diagnosing malignant lung nodules by their shape rather than conventional growth rate is proposed. The 3D surfaces of the detected lung nodules are delineated by spherical harmonic analysis, which represents a 3D surface of the lung nodule supported by the unit sphere with a linear combination of special basis functions, called spherical harmonics (SHs). The proposed 3D shape analysis is carried out in five steps: (i) 3D lung nodule segmentation with a deformable 3D boundary controlled by two probabilistic visual appearance models (the learned prior and the estimated current appearance one); (ii) 3D Delaunay triangulation to construct a 3D mesh model of the segmented lung nodule surface; (iii) mapping this model to the unit sphere; (iv) computing the SHs for the surface, and (v) determining the number of the SHs to delineate the lung nodule. We describe the lung nodule shape complexity with a new shape index, the estimated number of the SHs, and use it for the K-nearest classification to distinguish malignant and benign lung nodules. Preliminary experiments on 327 lung nodules (153 malignant and 174 benign) resulted in the 93.6% correct classification (for the 95% confidence interval), showing that the proposed method is a promising supplement to current technologies for the early diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:21761703

  16. Analysis of the 3D distribution of stacked self-assembled quantum dots by electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The 3D distribution of self-assembled stacked quantum dots (QDs) is a key parameter to obtain the highest performance in a variety of optoelectronic devices. In this work, we have measured this distribution in 3D using a combined procedure of needle-shaped specimen preparation and electron tomography. We show that conventional 2D measurements of the distribution of QDs are not reliable, and only 3D analysis allows an accurate correlation between the growth design and the structural characteristics. PMID:23249477

  17. Mobile 3D quality of experience evaluation: a hybrid data collection and analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utriainen, Timo; Häyrynen, Jyrki; Jumisko-Pyykkö, Satu; Boev, Atanas; Gotchev, Atanas; Hannuksela, Miska M.

    2011-02-01

    The paper presents a hybrid approach to study the user's experienced quality of 3D visual content on mobile autostereoscopic displays. It combines extensive subjective tests with collection and objective analysis of eye-tracked data. 3D cues which are significant for mobiles are simulated in the generated 3D test content. The methodology for conducting subjective quality evaluation includes hybrid data-collection of quantitative quality preferences, qualitative impressions, and binocular eye-tracking. We present early results of the subjective tests along with eye movement reaction times, areas of interest and heatmaps obtained from raw eye-tracked data after statistical analysis. The study contributes to the question what is important to be visualized on portable auto-stereoscopic displays and how to maintain and visually enhance the quality of 3D content for such displays.

  18. 3D photography in the objective analysis of volume augmentation including fat augmentation and dermal fillers.

    PubMed

    Meier, Jason D; Glasgold, Robert A; Glasgold, Mark J

    2011-11-01

    The authors present quantitative and objective 3D data from their studies showing long-term results with facial volume augmentation. The first study analyzes fat grafting of the midface and the second study presents augmentation of the tear trough with hyaluronic filler. Surgeons using 3D quantitative analysis can learn the duration of results and the optimal amount to inject, as well as showing patients results that are not demonstrable with standard, 2D photography. PMID:22004863

  19. Sensitivity Analysis of the Scattering-Based SARBM3D Despeckling Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Di Simone, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery greatly suffers from multiplicative speckle noise, typical of coherent image acquisition sensors, such as SAR systems. Therefore, a proper and accurate despeckling preprocessing step is almost mandatory to aid the interpretation and processing of SAR data by human users and computer algorithms, respectively. Very recently, a scattering-oriented version of the popular SAR Block-Matching 3D (SARBM3D) despeckling filter, named Scattering-Based (SB)-SARBM3D, was proposed. The new filter is based on the a priori knowledge of the local topography of the scene. In this paper, an experimental sensitivity analysis of the above-mentioned despeckling algorithm is carried out, and the main results are shown and discussed. In particular, the role of both electromagnetic and geometrical parameters of the surface and the impact of its scattering behavior are investigated. Furthermore, a comprehensive sensitivity analysis of the SB-SARBM3D filter against the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) resolution and the SAR image-DEM coregistration step is also provided. The sensitivity analysis shows a significant robustness of the algorithm against most of the surface parameters, while the DEM resolution plays a key role in the despeckling process. Furthermore, the SB-SARBM3D algorithm outperforms the original SARBM3D in the presence of the most realistic scattering behaviors of the surface. An actual scenario is also presented to assess the DEM role in real-life conditions. PMID:27347971

  20. Sensitivity Analysis of the Scattering-Based SARBM3D Despeckling Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Di Simone, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery greatly suffers from multiplicative speckle noise, typical of coherent image acquisition sensors, such as SAR systems. Therefore, a proper and accurate despeckling preprocessing step is almost mandatory to aid the interpretation and processing of SAR data by human users and computer algorithms, respectively. Very recently, a scattering-oriented version of the popular SAR Block-Matching 3D (SARBM3D) despeckling filter, named Scattering-Based (SB)-SARBM3D, was proposed. The new filter is based on the a priori knowledge of the local topography of the scene. In this paper, an experimental sensitivity analysis of the above-mentioned despeckling algorithm is carried out, and the main results are shown and discussed. In particular, the role of both electromagnetic and geometrical parameters of the surface and the impact of its scattering behavior are investigated. Furthermore, a comprehensive sensitivity analysis of the SB-SARBM3D filter against the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) resolution and the SAR image-DEM coregistration step is also provided. The sensitivity analysis shows a significant robustness of the algorithm against most of the surface parameters, while the DEM resolution plays a key role in the despeckling process. Furthermore, the SB-SARBM3D algorithm outperforms the original SARBM3D in the presence of the most realistic scattering behaviors of the surface. An actual scenario is also presented to assess the DEM role in real-life conditions. PMID:27347971

  1. Quantitative Analysis and Modeling of 3-D TSV-Based Power Delivery Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Huanyu

    As 3-D technology enters the commercial production stage, it is critical to understand different 3-D power delivery architectures on the stacked ICs and packages with through-silicon vias (TSVs). Appropriate design, modeling, analysis, and optimization approaches of the 3-D power delivery system are of foremost significance and great practical interest to the semiconductor industry in general. Based on fundamental physics of 3-D integration components, the objective of this thesis work is to quantitatively analyze the power delivery for 3D-IC systems, develop appropriate physics-based models and simulation approaches, understand the key issues, and provide potential solutions for design of 3D-IC power delivery architectures. In this work, a hybrid simulation approach is adopted as the major approach along with analytical method to examine 3-D power networks. Combining electromagnetic (EM) tools and circuit simulators, the hybrid approach is able to analyze and model micrometer-scale components as well as centimeter-scale power delivery system with high accuracy and efficiency. The parasitic elements of the components on the power delivery can be precisely modeled by full-wave EM solvers. Stack-up circuit models for the 3-D power delivery networks (PDNs) are constructed through a partition and assembly method. With the efficiency advantage of the SPICE circuit simulation, the overall 3-D system power performance can be analyzed and the 3-D power delivery architectures can be evaluated in a short computing time. The major power delivery issues are the voltage drop (IR drop) and voltage noise. With a baseline of 3-D power delivery architecture, the on-chip PDNs of TSV-based chip stacks are modeled and analyzed for the IR drop and AC noise. The basic design factors are evaluated using the hybrid approach, such as the number of stacked chips, the number of TSVs, and the TSV arrangement. Analytical formulas are also developed to evaluate the IR drop in 3-D chip stack in

  2. A new heat transfer analysis in machining based on two steps of 3D finite element modelling and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddag, B.; Kagnaya, T.; Nouari, M.; Cutard, T.

    2013-01-01

    Modelling machining operations allows estimating cutting parameters which are difficult to obtain experimentally and in particular, include quantities characterizing the tool-workpiece interface. Temperature is one of these quantities which has an impact on the tool wear, thus its estimation is important. This study deals with a new modelling strategy, based on two steps of calculation, for analysis of the heat transfer into the cutting tool. Unlike the classical methods, considering only the cutting tool with application of an approximate heat flux at the cutting face, estimated from experimental data (e.g. measured cutting force, cutting power), the proposed approach consists of two successive 3D Finite Element calculations and fully independent on the experimental measurements; only the definition of the behaviour of the tool-workpiece couple is necessary. The first one is a 3D thermomechanical modelling of the chip formation process, which allows estimating cutting forces, chip morphology and its flow direction. The second calculation is a 3D thermal modelling of the heat diffusion into the cutting tool, by using an adequate thermal loading (applied uniform or non-uniform heat flux). This loading is estimated using some quantities obtained from the first step calculation, such as contact pressure, sliding velocity distributions and contact area. Comparisons in one hand between experimental data and the first calculation and at the other hand between measured temperatures with embedded thermocouples and the second calculation show a good agreement in terms of cutting forces, chip morphology and cutting temperature.

  3. Sketch on dynamic gesture tracking and analysis exploiting vision-based 3D interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Woontack; Kim, Namgyu; Wong, Karen; Tadenuma, Makoto

    2000-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a vision-based 3D interface exploiting invisible 3D boxes, arranged in the personal space (i.e. reachable space by the body without traveling), which allows robust yet simple dynamic gesture tracking and analysis, without exploiting complicated sensor-based motion tracking systems. Vision-based gesture tracking and analysis is still a challenging problem, even though we have witnessed rapid advances in computer vision over the last few decades. The proposed framework consists of three main parts, i.e. (1) object segmentation without bluescreen and 3D box initialization with depth information, (2) movement tracking by observing how the body passes through the 3D boxes in the personal space and (3) movement feature extraction based on Laban's Effort theory and movement analysis by mapping features to meaningful symbols using time-delay neural networks. Obviously, exploiting depth information using multiview images improves the performance of gesture analysis by reducing the errors introduced by simple 2D interfaces In addition, the proposed box-based 3D interface lessens the difficulties in both tracking movement in 3D space and in extracting low-level features of the movement. Furthermore, the time-delay neural networks lessens the difficulties in movement analysis by training. Due to its simplicity and robustness, the framework will provide interactive systems, such as ATR I-cubed Tangible Music System or ATR Interactive Dance system, with improved quality of the 3D interface. The proposed simple framework also can be extended to other applications requiring dynamic gesture tracking and analysis on the fly.

  4. Analysis of Approximations and Aperture Distortion for 3D Migration of Bistatic Radar Data with the Two-Step Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanzi, Luigi; Lualdi, Maurizio

    2010-12-01

    The two-step approach is a fast algorithm for 3D migration originally introduced to process zero-offset seismic data. Its application to monostatic GPR (Ground Penetrating Radar) data is straightforward. A direct extension of the algorithm for the application to bistatic radar data is possible provided that the TX-RX azimuth is constant. As for the zero-offset case, the two-step operator is exactly equivalent to the one-step 3D operator for a constant velocity medium and is an approximation of the one-step 3D operator for a medium where the velocity varies vertically. Two methods are explored for handling a heterogeneous medium; both are suitable for the application of the two-step approach, and they are compared in terms of accuracy of the final 3D operator. The aperture of the two-step operator is discussed, and a solution is proposed to optimize its shape. The analysis is of interest for any NDT application where the medium is expected to be heterogeneous, or where the antenna is not in direct contact with the medium (e.g., NDT of artworks, humanitarian demining, radar with air-launched antennas).

  5. Cascaded systems analysis of the 3D NEQ for cone-beam CT and tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tward, D. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Fahrig, R. A.; Pineda, A. R.

    2008-03-01

    Crucial to understanding the factors that govern imaging performance is a rigorous analysis of signal and noise transfer characteristics (e.g., MTF, NPS, and NEQ) applied to a task-based performance metric (e.g., detectability index). This paper advances a theoretical framework for calculation of the NPS, NEQ, and DQE of cone-beam CT (CBCT) and tomosynthesis based on cascaded systems analysis. The model considers the 2D projection NPS propagated through a series of reconstruction stages to yield the 3D NPS, revealing a continuum (from 2D projection radiography to limited-angle tomosynthesis and fully 3D CBCT) for which NEQ and detectability index may be investigated as a function of any system parameter. Factors considered in the cascade include: system geometry; angular extent of source-detector orbit; finite number of views; log-scaling; application of ramp, apodization, and interpolation filters; back-projection; and 3D noise aliasing - all of which have a direct impact on the 3D NEQ and DQE. Calculations of the 3D NPS were found to agree with experimental measurements across a broad range of imaging conditions. The model presents a theoretical framework that unifies 3D Fourier-based performance metrology in tomosynthesis and CBCT, providing a guide to optimization that rigorously considers the system configuration, reconstruction parameters, and imaging task.

  6. 3D Analysis of the Proximal Interphalangeal Joint Kinematics during Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Fürnstahl, Philipp; Gallo, Luigi-Maria; Schweizer, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Background. Dynamic joint motion recording combined with CT-based 3D bone and joint surface data is accepted as a helpful and precise tool to analyse joint. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of these techniques for quantitative motion analysis of the interphalangeal joint in 3D. Materials and Method. High resolution motion data was combined with an accurate 3D model of a cadaveric index finger. Three light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were used to record dynamic data, and a CT scan of the finger was done for 3D joint surface geometry. The data allowed performing quantitative evaluations such as finite helical axis (FHA) analysis, coordinate system optimization, and measurement of the joint distances in 3D. Results. The FHA varies by 4.9 ± 1.7° on average. On average, the rotation in adduction/abduction and internal/external rotation were 0.3 ± 0.91° and 0.1 ± 0.97°, respectively. During flexion, a translational motion between 0.06 mm and 0.73 mm was observed. Conclusions. The proposed technique and methods appear to be feasible for the accurate assessment and evaluation of the PIP joint motion in 3D. The presented method may help to gain additional insights for the design of prosthetic implants, rehabilitation, and new orthotic devices. PMID:24302972

  7. Direct growth of carbon nanofibers to generate a 3D porous platform on a metal contact to enable an oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Pan, David; Ombaba, Matthew; Zhou, Zhi-You; Liu, Yang; Chen, Shaowei; Lu, Jennifer

    2012-12-21

    For carbon nanotube-based electronics to achieve their full performance potential, it is imperative to minimize the contact resistance between macroscale metal contacts and the carbon nanotube (CNT) nanoelectrodes. We have developed a three-dimensional electrode platform that consists of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) that are directly grown on a metal contact, such as copper (Cu). Carbon nanofiber morphology can be tailored by adjusting the annealing time of a thin electrochemically deposited nickel catalyst layer on copper. We demonstrate that increasing the annealing time increases the amount of copper infused into the nickel catalyst layer. This reduces the carbon deposition rate, and consequently a more well-defined CNF 3D architecture can be fabricated. This direct growth of CNFs on a Cu substrate yields an excellent electron transfer pathway, with contact resistance between CNFs and Cu being comparable to that of a Cu-Cu interface. Furthermore, the excellent bonding strength between CNFs and Cu can be maintained over prolonged periods of ultrasonication. The porous 3D platform affixed with intertwined CNFs allows facile surface functionalization. Using a simple solution soaking procedure, the CNF surface has been successfully functionalized with iron(II) phthalocyanine (FePc). FePc functionalized CNFs exhibit excellent oxygen reduction capability, equivalent to platinum-carbon electrodes. This result demonstrates the technological promise of this new 3D electrode platform that can be exploited in other applications that include sensing, battery, and supercapacitors. PMID:23171171

  8. 3D-QSAR and 3D-QSSR studies of thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl hydrazone analogues as CDK4 inhibitors by CoMFA analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Bao-qin; Jin, Hai-xiao; Yan, Xiao-jun; Zhu, Peng; Hu, Gui-xiang

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the structural basis underlying potency and selectivity of a series of novel analogues of thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl hydrazones as cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) inhibitors and to use this information for drug design strategies. Methods: Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) and three-dimensional quantitative structure-selectivity relationship (3D-QSSR) models using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) were conducted on a training set of 48 compounds. Partial least squares (PLS) analysis was employed. External validation was performed with a test set of 9 compounds. Results: The obtained 3D-QSAR model (q2=0.724, r2=0.965, r2pred=0.945) and 3D-QSSR model (q2=0.742, r2=0.923, r2pred=0.863) were robust and predictive. Contour maps with good compatibility to active binding sites provided insight into the potentially important structural features required to enhance activity and selectivity. The contour maps indicated that bulky groups at R1 position could potentially enhance CDK4 inhibitory activity, whereas bulky groups at R3 position have the opposite effect. Appropriate incorporation of bulky electropositive groups at R4 position is favorable and could improve both potency and selectivity to CDK4. Conclusion: These two models provide useful information to guide drug design strategies aimed at obtaining potent and selective CDK4 inhibitors. PMID:24122012

  9. Development of the PARVMEC Code for Rapid Analysis of 3D MHD Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seal, Sudip; Hirshman, Steven; Cianciosa, Mark; Wingen, Andreas; Unterberg, Ezekiel; Wilcox, Robert; ORNL Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The VMEC three-dimensional (3D) MHD equilibrium has been used extensively for designing stellarator experiments and analyzing experimental data in such strongly 3D systems. Recent applications of VMEC include 2D systems such as tokamaks (in particular, the D3D experiment), where application of very small (delB/B ~ 10-3) 3D resonant magnetic field perturbations render the underlying assumption of axisymmetry invalid. In order to facilitate the rapid analysis of such equilibria (for example, for reconstruction purposes), we have undertaken the task of parallelizing the VMEC code (PARVMEC) to produce a scalable and temporally rapidly convergent equilibrium code for use on parallel distributed memory platforms. The parallelization task naturally splits into three distinct parts 1) radial surfaces in the fixed-boundary part of the calculation; 2) two 2D angular meshes needed to compute the Green's function integrals over the plasma boundary for the free-boundary part of the code; and 3) block tridiagonal matrix needed to compute the full (3D) pre-conditioner near the final equilibrium state. Preliminary results show that scalability is achieved for tasks 1 and 3, with task 2 still nearing completion. The impact of this work on the rapid reconstruction of D3D plasmas using PARVMEC in the V3FIT code will be discussed. Work supported by U.S. DOE under Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC.

  10. 3D finite element analysis of porous Ti-based alloy prostheses.

    PubMed

    Mircheski, Ile; Gradišar, Marko

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, novel designs of porous acetabular cups are created and tested with 3D finite element analysis (FEA). The aim is to develop a porous acetabular cup with low effective radial stiffness of the structure, which will be near to the architectural and mechanical behavior of the natural bone. For the realization of this research, a 3D-scanner technology was used for obtaining a 3D-CAD model of the pelvis bone, a 3D-CAD software for creating a porous acetabular cup, and a 3D-FEA software for virtual testing of a novel design of the porous acetabular cup. The results obtained from this research reveal that a porous acetabular cup from Ti-based alloys with 60 ± 5% porosity has the mechanical behavior and effective radial stiffness (Young's modulus in radial direction) that meet and exceed the required properties of the natural bone. The virtual testing with 3D-FEA of a novel design with porous structure during the very early stage of the design and the development of orthopedic implants, enables obtaining a new or improved biomedical implant for a relatively short time and reduced price. PMID:27015664

  11. Fully-coupled analysis of jet mixing problems. Three-dimensional PNS model, SCIP3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, D. E.; Sinha, N.; Dash, S. M.

    1988-01-01

    Numerical procedures formulated for the analysis of 3D jet mixing problems, as incorporated in the computer model, SCIP3D, are described. The overall methodology closely parallels that developed in the earlier 2D axisymmetric jet mixing model, SCIPVIS. SCIP3D integrates the 3D parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) jet mixing equations, cast in mapped cartesian or cylindrical coordinates, employing the explicit MacCormack Algorithm. A pressure split variant of this algorithm is employed in subsonic regions with a sublayer approximation utilized for treating the streamwise pressure component. SCIP3D contains both the ks and kW turbulence models, and employs a two component mixture approach to treat jet exhausts of arbitrary composition. Specialized grid procedures are used to adjust the grid growth in accordance with the growth of the jet, including a hybrid cartesian/cylindrical grid procedure for rectangular jets which moves the hybrid coordinate origin towards the flow origin as the jet transitions from a rectangular to circular shape. Numerous calculations are presented for rectangular mixing problems, as well as for a variety of basic unit problems exhibiting overall capabilities of SCIP3D.

  12. A Numerical Analysis of 3D EM Imaging from a Single Borehole

    SciTech Connect

    Alumbaugh, David L.; Wilt, Michael J.

    1999-07-27

    In this study we analyze the feasibility of three dimensional (3D) electromagnetic (EM) imaging from a single borehole. The proposed logging tool consists of three mutually orthogonal magnetic dipole sources and multiple three component magnetic field receivers. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the most important sensor configuration for providing 3D geological information about the borehole consists of a transmitter with moment aligned parallel to the axis of the borehole, and receivers aligned perpendicular to the axis. The standard coaxial logging configuration provides the greatest depth of sensitivity compared to other configurations, but offers no information regarding 3D structure. Two other tool configurations in which both the source and receiver are aligned perpendicular to the borehole axis provide some directional information and therefore better image resolution, but not true 3D information. A 3D inversion algorithm has been employed to demonstrate the plausibility of 3D inversion using data collected with the proposed logging tool. This study demonstrates that an increase in image resolution results when three orthogonal sources are incorporated into the logging tool rather than a single axially aligned source.

  13. Analysis of scalability of high-performance 3D image processing platform for virtual colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Wu, Yin; Cai, Wenli

    2014-03-19

    One of the key challenges in three-dimensional (3D) medical imaging is to enable the fast turn-around time, which is often required for interactive or real-time response. This inevitably requires not only high computational power but also high memory bandwidth due to the massive amount of data that need to be processed. For this purpose, we previously developed a software platform for high-performance 3D medical image processing, called HPC 3D-MIP platform, which employs increasingly available and affordable commodity computing systems such as the multicore, cluster, and cloud computing systems. To achieve scalable high-performance computing, the platform employed size-adaptive, distributable block volumes as a core data structure for efficient parallelization of a wide range of 3D-MIP algorithms, supported task scheduling for efficient load distribution and balancing, and consisted of a layered parallel software libraries that allow image processing applications to share the common functionalities. We evaluated the performance of the HPC 3D-MIP platform by applying it to computationally intensive processes in virtual colonoscopy. Experimental results showed a 12-fold performance improvement on a workstation with 12-core CPUs over the original sequential implementation of the processes, indicating the efficiency of the platform. Analysis of performance scalability based on the Amdahl's law for symmetric multicore chips showed the potential of a high performance scalability of the HPC 3D-MIP platform when a larger number of cores is available. PMID:24910506

  14. Analysis of scalability of high-performance 3D image processing platform for virtual colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Wu, Yin; Cai, Wenli

    2014-01-01

    One of the key challenges in three-dimensional (3D) medical imaging is to enable the fast turn-around time, which is often required for interactive or real-time response. This inevitably requires not only high computational power but also high memory bandwidth due to the massive amount of data that need to be processed. For this purpose, we previously developed a software platform for high-performance 3D medical image processing, called HPC 3D-MIP platform, which employs increasingly available and affordable commodity computing systems such as the multicore, cluster, and cloud computing systems. To achieve scalable high-performance computing, the platform employed size-adaptive, distributable block volumes as a core data structure for efficient parallelization of a wide range of 3D-MIP algorithms, supported task scheduling for efficient load distribution and balancing, and consisted of a layered parallel software libraries that allow image processing applications to share the common functionalities. We evaluated the performance of the HPC 3D-MIP platform by applying it to computationally intensive processes in virtual colonoscopy. Experimental results showed a 12-fold performance improvement on a workstation with 12-core CPUs over the original sequential implementation of the processes, indicating the efficiency of the platform. Analysis of performance scalability based on the Amdahl’s law for symmetric multicore chips showed the potential of a high performance scalability of the HPC 3D-MIP platform when a larger number of cores is available. PMID:24910506

  15. Visualization and analysis of 3D gene expression patterns in zebrafish using web services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potikanond, D.; Verbeek, F. J.

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of patterns of gene expression patterns analysis plays an important role in developmental biology and molecular genetics. Visualizing both quantitative and spatio-temporal aspects of gene expression patterns together with referenced anatomical structures of a model-organism in 3D can help identifying how a group of genes are expressed at a certain location at a particular developmental stage of an organism. In this paper, we present an approach to provide an online visualization of gene expression data in zebrafish (Danio rerio) within 3D reconstruction model of zebrafish in different developmental stages. We developed web services that provide programmable access to the 3D reconstruction data and spatial-temporal gene expression data maintained in our local repositories. To demonstrate this work, we develop a web application that uses these web services to retrieve data from our local information systems. The web application also retrieve relevant analysis of microarray gene expression data from an external community resource; i.e. the ArrayExpress Atlas. All the relevant gene expression patterns data are subsequently integrated with the reconstruction data of the zebrafish atlas using ontology based mapping. The resulting visualization provides quantitative and spatial information on patterns of gene expression in a 3D graphical representation of the zebrafish atlas in a certain developmental stage. To deliver the visualization to the user, we developed a Java based 3D viewer client that can be integrated in a web interface allowing the user to visualize the integrated information over the Internet.

  16. User's manuals for DYNA3D and DYNAP: nonlinear dynamic analysis of solids in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1981-07-01

    This report provides a user's manual for DYNA3D, an explicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the large deformation dynamic response of inelastic solids. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, and the equations-of-motion are integrated by the central difference method. Post-processors for DYNA3D include GRAPE for plotting deformed shapes and stress contours and DYNAP for plotting time histories. A user's manual for DYNAP is also provided in this report.

  17. 3D analysis of eddy current loss in the permanent magnet coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zina; Meng, Zhuo

    2016-07-01

    This paper first presents a 3D analytical model for analyzing the radial air-gap magnetic field between the inner and outer magnetic rotors of the permanent magnet couplings by using the Amperian current model. Based on the air-gap field analysis, the eddy current loss in the isolation cover is predicted according to the Maxwell's equations. A 3D finite element analysis model is constructed to analyze the magnetic field spatial distributions and vector eddy currents, and then the simulation results obtained are analyzed and compared with the analytical method. Finally, the current losses of two types of practical magnet couplings are measured in the experiment to compare with the theoretical results. It is concluded that the 3D analytical method of eddy current loss in the magnet coupling is viable and could be used for the eddy current loss prediction of magnet couplings.

  18. 3D shape measurement of shoeprint impression with structured illumination and fringe pattern analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xianyu; Cao, Yiping; Xiang, Liqun; Chen, Wenjing

    2002-06-01

    The shoeprint impressions of suspect left at the crime scene can sometimes tell investigators what type of shoes to be looked for. These shoeprint impressions as one of the important evidence are useful in the detection of criminals. In this paper we propose a novel technique for identifying and analyzing the 3D characteristics of shoeprint impressions. We also design 3D shoeprint impression analysis system based on the combination the 3D shape measurement with structured illumination and fringe pattern analysis. We give a detail discussion on the principle and configuration of the system. Laboratory experiments show the technique is efficient in the detection of shoeprint and in the offering the reference for judicial evidence.

  19. 3D analysis of eddy current loss in the permanent magnet coupling.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zina; Meng, Zhuo

    2016-07-01

    This paper first presents a 3D analytical model for analyzing the radial air-gap magnetic field between the inner and outer magnetic rotors of the permanent magnet couplings by using the Amperian current model. Based on the air-gap field analysis, the eddy current loss in the isolation cover is predicted according to the Maxwell's equations. A 3D finite element analysis model is constructed to analyze the magnetic field spatial distributions and vector eddy currents, and then the simulation results obtained are analyzed and compared with the analytical method. Finally, the current losses of two types of practical magnet couplings are measured in the experiment to compare with the theoretical results. It is concluded that the 3D analytical method of eddy current loss in the magnet coupling is viable and could be used for the eddy current loss prediction of magnet couplings. PMID:27475575

  20. Analysis of 3-D images of dental imprints using computer vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubin, Michele; Cote, Jean; Laurendeau, Denis; Poussart, Denis

    1992-05-01

    This paper addressed two important aspects of dental analysis: (1) location and (2) identification of the types of teeth by means of 3-D image acquisition and segmentation. The 3-D images of both maxillaries are acquired using a wax wafer as support. The interstices between teeth are detected by non-linear filtering of the 3-D and grey-level data. Two operators are presented: one for the detection of the interstices between incisors, canines, and premolars and one for those between molars. Teeth are then identified by mapping the imprint under analysis on the computer model of an 'ideal' imprint. For the mapping to be valid, a set of three reference points is detected on the imprint. Then, the points are put in correspondence with similar points on the model. Two such points are chosen based on a least-squares fit of a second-order polynomial of the 3-D data in the area of canines. This area is of particular interest since the canines show a very characteristic shape and are easily detected on the imprint. The mapping technique is described in detail in the paper as well as pre-processing of the 3-D profiles. Experimental results are presented for different imprints.

  1. Ultrascale Climate Data Visualization and Analysis Using UVCDAT and DV3D (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, T. P.; Williams, D. N.; Potter, G. L.

    2013-12-01

    Earth system scientists are being inundated by an explosion of data generated by ever-increasing resolution in both global models and remote sensors. Advanced tools for accessing, analyzing, and visualizing very large and complex climate data are required to maintain rapid progress in Earth system research. To meet this need, the NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) at Goddard Space Flight Center is developing an advanced computational infrastructure that can provide high-performance analysis and visualization capabilities to the desktops of climate scientists. In collaboration with the Ultra-scale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) development consortium, NCCS is developing climate data analysis and visualization tools for UV-CDAT, which provides data analysis capabilities for the Earth System Grid (ESG). These tools feature workflow interfaces, interactive 3D data exploration, hyperwall and stereo visualization, automated provenance generation, parallel task execution, and streaming data parallel pipelines. NASA's DV3D is a UV-CDAT package that enables exploratory analysis of diverse and rich data sets from various sources including the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF). DV3D provides user-friendly workflow interfaces for advanced visualization and analysis of climate data at a level appropriate for scientists. DV3D's integration with CDAT's climate data management system (CDMS) and other climate data analysis tools provides a wide range of climate data analysis operations, e.g. simple arithmetic operations, regridding, conditioned comparisons, weighted averages, various statistical operations, etc. Several teams are developing parallel versions of these tools that will enable users to analyze and display large data sets that cannot currently be processed with existing desktop tools. This enables scientists to run analyses that were previously intractable due to the large size of the datasets and, using DV3D, seamlessly couple these

  2. Capillary forces exerted by liquid drops caught between crossed cylinders. A 3-D meniscus problem with free contact line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patzek, T. W.; Scriven, L. E.

    1982-01-01

    The Young-Laplace equation is solved for three-dimensional menisci between crossed cylinders, with either the contact line fixed or the contact angle prescribed, by means of the Galerkin/finite element method. Shapes are computed, and with them the practically important quantities: drop volume, wetted area, capillary pressure force, surface tension force, and the total force exerted by the drop on each cylinder. The results show that total capillary force between cylinders increases with decreasing contact angle, i.e. with better wetting. Capillary force is also increases with decreasing drop volume, approaching an asymptotic limit. However, the wetted area on each cylinder decreases with decreasing drop volume, which raises the question of the optimum drop volume to strive for, when permanent bonding is sought from solidified liquid. For then the strength of the bond is likely to depend upon the area of contact, which is the wetted area when the bonding agent was introduced in liquid form.

  3. Ultrascale Climate Data Visualization and Analysis Using DV3D and UVCDAT.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, T. P.; Potter, G. L.; Williams, D. N.; Doutriaux, C.; Chaudhary, A.

    2014-12-01

    Earth system scientists are being inundated by an explosion of data generated by ever-increasing resolution in both global models and remote sensors. Advanced tools for accessing, analyzing, and visualizing very large and complex climate data are required to maintain rapid progress in Earth system research. To meet this need, the NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) at Goddard Space Flight Center is developing an advanced computational infrastructure that can provide high-performance analysis and visualization capabilities to the desktops of climate scientists. In collaboration with the Ultra-scale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) development consortium, NCCS is developing climate data analysis and visualization tools for UV-CDAT, which provides data analysis capabilities for the Earth System Grid (ESG). These tools feature workflow interfaces, interactive 3D data exploration, hyperwall and stereo visualization, automated provenance generation, parallel task execution, and streaming data parallel pipelines. NASA's DV3D is a UV-CDAT package that enables exploratory analysis of diverse and rich data sets from various sources including the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF). DV3D provides user-friendly workflow interfaces for advanced visualization and analysis of climate data at a level appropriate for scientists. DV3D's integration with CDAT's climate data management system (CDMS) and other tools provides a wide range of climate data analysis operations, e.g. simple arithmetic operations, regridding, conditioned comparisons, weighted averages, various statistical operations, etc. Several teams are developing parallel versions of these tools that will enable users to analyze and display large data sets that cannot currently be processed with existing desktop tools. This enables scientists to run analyses that were previously intractable due to the large size of the datasets and, using DV3D, seamlessly couple these analyses with advanced

  4. 3D intrathoracic region definition and its application to PET-CT analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Bascom, Rebecca; Allen, Thomas W.; Higgins, William E.

    2014-03-01

    Recently developed integrated PET-CT scanners give co-registered multimodal data sets that offer complementary three-dimensional (3D) digital images of the chest. PET (positron emission tomography) imaging gives highly specific functional information of suspect cancer sites, while CT (X-ray computed tomography) gives associated anatomical detail. Because the 3D CT and PET scans generally span the body from the eyes to the knees, accurate definition of the intrathoracic region is vital for focusing attention to the central-chest region. In this way, diagnostically important regions of interest (ROIs), such as central-chest lymph nodes and cancer nodules, can be more efficiently isolated. We propose a method for automatic segmentation of the intrathoracic region from a given co-registered 3D PET-CT study. Using the 3D CT scan as input, the method begins by finding an initial intrathoracic region boundary for a given 2D CT section. Next, active contour analysis, driven by a cost function depending on local image gradient, gradient-direction, and contour shape features, iteratively estimates the contours spanning the intrathoracic region on neighboring 2D CT sections. This process continues until the complete region is defined. We next present an interactive system that employs the segmentation method for focused 3D PET-CT chest image analysis. A validation study over a series of PET-CT studies reveals that the segmentation method gives a Dice index accuracy of less than 98%. In addition, further results demonstrate the utility of the method for focused 3D PET-CT chest image analysis, ROI definition, and visualization.

  5. Analysis of scalability of high-performance 3D image processing platform for virtual colonoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Wu, Yin; Cai, Wenli

    2014-03-01

    One of the key challenges in three-dimensional (3D) medical imaging is to enable the fast turn-around time, which is often required for interactive or real-time response. This inevitably requires not only high computational power but also high memory bandwidth due to the massive amount of data that need to be processed. For this purpose, we previously developed a software platform for high-performance 3D medical image processing, called HPC 3D-MIP platform, which employs increasingly available and affordable commodity computing systems such as the multicore, cluster, and cloud computing systems. To achieve scalable high-performance computing, the platform employed size-adaptive, distributable block volumes as a core data structure for efficient parallelization of a wide range of 3D-MIP algorithms, supported task scheduling for efficient load distribution and balancing, and consisted of a layered parallel software libraries that allow image processing applications to share the common functionalities. We evaluated the performance of the HPC 3D-MIP platform by applying it to computationally intensive processes in virtual colonoscopy. Experimental results showed a 12-fold performance improvement on a workstation with 12-core CPUs over the original sequential implementation of the processes, indicating the efficiency of the platform. Analysis of performance scalability based on the Amdahl's law for symmetric multicore chips showed the potential of a high performance scalability of the HPC 3DMIP platform when a larger number of cores is available.

  6. Image-based RSA: Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis based on 2D-3D image registration.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, P W; Kaptein, B L; Stoel, B C; Reiber, J H C; Rozing, P M; Valstar, E R

    2008-01-01

    Image-based Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (IBRSA) integrates 2D-3D image registration and conventional RSA. Instead of radiopaque RSA bone markers, IBRSA uses 3D CT data, from which digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) are generated. Using 2D-3D image registration, the 3D pose of the CT is iteratively adjusted such that the generated DRRs resemble the 2D RSA images as closely as possible, according to an image matching metric. Effectively, by registering all 2D follow-up moments to the same 3D CT, the CT volume functions as common ground. In two experiments, using RSA and using a micromanipulator as gold standard, IBRSA has been validated on cadaveric and sawbone scapula radiographs, and good matching results have been achieved. The accuracy was: |mu |< 0.083 mm for translations and |mu| < 0.023 degrees for rotations. The precision sigma in x-, y-, and z-direction was 0.090, 0.077, and 0.220 mm for translations and 0.155 degrees , 0.243 degrees , and 0.074 degrees for rotations. Our results show that the accuracy and precision of in vitro IBRSA, performed under ideal laboratory conditions, are lower than in vitro standard RSA but higher than in vivo standard RSA. Because IBRSA does not require radiopaque markers, it adds functionality to the RSA method by opening new directions and possibilities for research, such as dynamic analyses using fluoroscopy on subjects without markers and computer navigation applications. PMID:17706656

  7. 3D Printed Microfluidic Device with Integrated Biosensors for Online Analysis of Subcutaneous Human Microdialysate

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This work presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a robust 3D printed microfluidic analysis system that integrates with FDA-approved clinical microdialysis probes for continuous monitoring of human tissue metabolite levels. The microfluidic device incorporates removable needle type integrated biosensors for glucose and lactate, which are optimized for high tissue concentrations, housed in novel 3D printed electrode holders. A soft compressible 3D printed elastomer at the base of the holder ensures a good seal with the microfluidic chip. Optimization of the channel size significantly improves the response time of the sensor. As a proof-of-concept study, our microfluidic device was coupled to lab-built wireless potentiostats and used to monitor real-time subcutaneous glucose and lactate levels in cyclists undergoing a training regime. PMID:26070023

  8. Application of 3D X-ray CT data sets to finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, P.L.; Martz, H.E.; Brand, H.R.; Hollerbach, K.

    1995-08-31

    Finite Element Modeling (FEM) is becoming more important as industry drives toward concurrent engineering. A fundamental hindrance to fully exploiting the power of FEM is the human effort required to acquire complex part geometry, particularly as-built geometry, as a FEM mesh. Many Quantitative Non Destructive Evaluation (QNDE) techniques that produce three-dimensional (3D) data sets provide a substantial reduction in the effort required to apply FEM to as-built parts. This paper describes progress at LLNL on the application of 3D X-ray computed tomography (CT) data sets to more rapidly produce high-quality FEM meshes of complex, as-built geometries. Issues related to the volume segmentation of the 3D CT data as well as the use of this segmented data to tailor generic hexahedral FEM meshes to part specific geometries are discussed. The application of these techniques to FEM analysis in the medical field is reported here.

  9. 3D Printed Microfluidic Device with Integrated Biosensors for Online Analysis of Subcutaneous Human Microdialysate.

    PubMed

    Gowers, Sally A N; Curto, Vincenzo F; Seneci, Carlo A; Wang, Chu; Anastasova, Salzitsa; Vadgama, Pankaj; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Boutelle, Martyn G

    2015-08-01

    This work presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a robust 3D printed microfluidic analysis system that integrates with FDA-approved clinical microdialysis probes for continuous monitoring of human tissue metabolite levels. The microfluidic device incorporates removable needle type integrated biosensors for glucose and lactate, which are optimized for high tissue concentrations, housed in novel 3D printed electrode holders. A soft compressible 3D printed elastomer at the base of the holder ensures a good seal with the microfluidic chip. Optimization of the channel size significantly improves the response time of the sensor. As a proof-of-concept study, our microfluidic device was coupled to lab-built wireless potentiostats and used to monitor real-time subcutaneous glucose and lactate levels in cyclists undergoing a training regime. PMID:26070023

  10. 3D city models for CAAD-supported analysis and design of urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinning-Meister, M.; Gruen, A.; Dan, H.

    A joint research project was conducted at ETH Zurich to develop a user-friendly software environment for the representation, visual manipulation, analysis and design of urban areas. Three groups were involved in the project: (1) the 'Architecture and Planning' group defined the requirements and expectations for the system; (2) the 'Photogrammetry' group acquired and processed raster and 3D vector data to form a 3D model of the urban area; and (3) the 'CAAD' (Computer Aided Architectural Design) group embedded the data into AutoCAD and implemented database functionality. Results of the photogrammetry group are presented, including the implementation of a 'topology builder' which automatically fits roof planes to manually or semi-automatically measured roof points in order to create AutoCAD-compatible 3D building models. Digital orthoimages and derived products such as perspective views, and the geometric correction of house roofs in digital orthoimages also were generated for test sites in Switzerland.

  11. A Review of Failure Analysis Methods for Advanced 3D Microelectronic Packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Srinath, Purushotham Kaushik Muthur; Goyal, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Advanced three dimensional (3D) packaging is a key enabler in driving form factor reduction, performance benefits, and package cost reduction, especially in the fast paced mobility and ultraportable consumer electronics segments. The high level of functional integration and the complex package architecture pose a significant challenge for conventional fault isolation (FI) and failure analysis (FA) methods. Innovative FI/FA tools and techniques are required to tackle the technical and throughput challenges. In this paper, the applications of FI and FA techniques such as Electro Optic Terahertz Pulse Reflectometry, 3D x-ray computed tomography, lock-in thermography, and novel physical sample preparation methods to 3D packages with package on package and stacked die with through silicon via configurations are reviewed, along with the key FI and FA challenges.

  12. Towards true 3D textural analysis; using your crystal mush wisely.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerram, D. A.; Morgan, D. J.; Pankhurst, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The crystal cargo that is found in volcanic and plutonic rocks contains a wealth of information about magmatic mush processes, crystallisation history, crystal entrainment and recycling. Phenocryst populations predominantly record episodes of growth/nucleation and bulk geochemical changes within an evolving crystal-melt body. Ante- and xeno-crysts provide useful clues to the nature of mush interaction with wall rock and with principal magma(s). Furthermore, crystal evolutions (core to rim) record pathways through pressure, temperature and compositional space. These can often illustrate complex recycling within systems, describing the plumbing architecture. Understanding this architecture underpins our knowledge of how igneous systems can interact with the crust, grow, freeze, re-mobilise and prime for eruption. Initially, 2D studies produced corrected 3D crystal size distributions to help provide information about nucleation and residence times. It immediately became clear that crystal shape is an important factor in determining the confidence placed upon 3D reconstructions of 2D data. Additionally studies utilised serial sections of medium- to coarse-grain-size populations which allowed 3D reconstruction using modelling software to be improved, since size and shape etc. can be directly constrained. Finally the advent of textural studies using X-ray tomography has revolutionised the way in which we can inspect the crystal cargo in mushy systems, allowing us to image in great detail crystal packing arrangements, 3D CSDs, shapes and orientations etc. The latest most innovative studies use X-ray micro-computed tomography to rapidly characterise chemical populations within the crystal cargo, adding a further dimension to this approach, and implies the ability to untangle magmatic chemical components to better understand their individual and combined evolution. In this contribution key examples of the different types of textural analysis techniques in 2D and 3D

  13. Efficient curve-skeleton computation for the analysis of biomedical 3d images - biomed 2010.

    PubMed

    Brun, Francesco; Dreossi, Diego

    2010-01-01

    Advances in three dimensional (3D) biomedical imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT), make it easy to reconstruct high quality 3D models of portions of human body and other biological specimens. A major challenge lies in the quantitative analysis of the resulting models thus allowing a more comprehensive characterization of the object under investigation. An interesting approach is based on curve-skeleton (or medial axis) extraction, which gives basic information concerning the topology and the geometry. Curve-skeletons have been applied in the analysis of vascular networks and the diagnosis of tracheal stenoses as well as a 3D flight path in virtual endoscopy. However curve-skeleton computation is a crucial task. An effective skeletonization algorithm was introduced by N. Cornea in [1] but it lacks in computational performances. Thanks to the advances in imaging techniques the resolution of 3D images is increasing more and more, therefore there is the need for efficient algorithms in order to analyze significant Volumes of Interest (VOIs). In the present paper an improved skeletonization algorithm based on the idea proposed in [1] is presented. A computational comparison between the original and the proposed method is also reported. The obtained results show that the proposed method allows a significant computational improvement making more appealing the adoption of the skeleton representation in biomedical image analysis applications. PMID:20467122

  14. Exploratory Climate Data Visualization and Analysis Using DV3D and UVCDAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Earth system scientists are being inundated by an explosion of data generated by ever-increasing resolution in both global models and remote sensors. Advanced tools for accessing, analyzing, and visualizing very large and complex climate data are required to maintain rapid progress in Earth system research. To meet this need, NASA, in collaboration with the Ultra-scale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UVCOAT) consortium, is developing exploratory climate data analysis and visualization tools which provide data analysis capabilities for the Earth System Grid (ESG). This paper describes DV3D, a UV-COAT package that enables exploratory analysis of climate simulation and observation datasets. OV3D provides user-friendly interfaces for visualization and analysis of climate data at a level appropriate for scientists. It features workflow inte rfaces, interactive 40 data exploration, hyperwall and stereo visualization, automated provenance generation, and parallel task execution. DV30's integration with CDAT's climate data management system (COMS) and other climate data analysis tools provides a wide range of high performance climate data analysis operations. DV3D expands the scientists' toolbox by incorporating a suite of rich new exploratory visualization and analysis methods for addressing the complexity of climate datasets.

  15. Application of FUN3D and CFL3D to the Third Workshop on CFD Uncertainty Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, C. L.; Thomas, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    Two Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computer codes - one unstructured and one structured - are applied to two workshop cases (for the 3rd Workshop on CFD Uncertainty Analysis, held at Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon, in October 2008) for the purpose of uncertainty analysis. The Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model is employed. The first case uses the method of manufactured solution and is intended as a verification case. In other words, the CFD solution is expected to approach the exact solution as the grid is refined. The second case is a validation case (comparison against experiment), for which modeling errors inherent in the turbulence model and errors/uncertainty in the experiment may prevent close agreement. The results from the two computer codes are also compared. This exercise verifies that the codes are consistent both with the exact manufactured solution and with each other. In terms of order property, both codes behave as expected for the manufactured solution. For the backward facing step, CFD uncertainty on the finest grid is computed and is generally very low for both codes (whose results are nearly identical). Agreement with experiment is good at some locations for particular variables, but there are also many areas where the CFD and experimental uncertainties do not overlap.

  16. High-resolution 3D micro-CT imaging of breast microcalcifications: a preliminary analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Detection of microcalcifications on mammograms indicates the presence of breast lesion, and the shapes of the microcalcifications as seen by conventional mammography correlates with the probability of malignancy. This preliminary study evaluated the 3D shape of breast microcalcifications using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and compared the findings with those obtained using anatomopathological analysis. Methods The study analyzed breast biopsy samples from 11 women with findings of suspicious microcalcifications on routine mammograms. The samples were imaged using a micro-CT (SkyScan 1076) at a resolution of 35 μm. Images were reconstructed using filtered back-projection and analyzed in 3D using surface rendering. The samples were subsequently analyzed by the pathology service. Reconstructed 3D images were compared with the corresponding histological slices. Results Anatomopathological analysis showed that 5 of 11 patients had ductal breast carcinoma in situ. One patient was diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma. Individual object analysis was performed on 597 microcalcifications. Malignant microcalcifications tended to be thinner and to have a smaller volume and surface area, while their surface area-to-volume ratio was greater than that of benign microcalcifications. The structure model index values were the same for malignant and benign microcalcifications. Conclusions This is the first study to use micro-CT for quantitative 3D analysis of microcalcifications. This high-resolution imaging technique will be valuable for gaining a greater understanding of the morphologic characteristics of malignant and benign microcalcifications. The presence of many small microcalcifications can be an indication of malignancy. For the larger microcalcifications, 3D parameters confirmed the more irregular shape of malignant microcalcifications. PMID:24393444

  17. PROP3D: A Program for 3D Euler Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic (Flutter and Forced Response) Analysis of Propellers. Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    1996-01-01

    This guide describes the input data required, for steady or unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of propellers and the output files generated, in using PROP3D. The aerodynamic forces are obtained by solving three dimensional unsteady, compressible Euler equations. A normal mode structural analysis is used to obtain the aeroelastic equations, which are solved using either time domain or frequency domain solution method. Sample input and output files are included in this guide for steady aerodynamic analysis of single and counter-rotation propellers, and aeroelastic analysis of single-rotation propeller.

  18. Geomorphometric analysis of cave ceiling channels mapped with 3-D terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallay, Michal; Hochmuth, Zdenko; Kaňuk, Ján; Hofierka, Jaroslav

    2016-05-01

    The change of hydrological conditions during the evolution of caves in carbonate rocks often results in a complex subterranean geomorphology, which comprises specific landforms such as ceiling channels, anastomosing half tubes, or speleothems organized vertically in different levels. Studying such complex environments traditionally requires tedious mapping; however, this is being replaced with terrestrial laser scanning technology. Laser scanning overcomes the problem of reaching high ceilings, providing new options to map underground landscapes with unprecedented level of detail and accuracy. The acquired point cloud can be handled conveniently with dedicated software, but applying traditional geomorphometry to analyse the cave surface is limited. This is because geomorphometry has been focused on parameterization and analysis of surficial terrain. The theoretical and methodological concept has been based on two-dimensional (2-D) scalar fields, which are sufficient for most cases of the surficial terrain. The terrain surface is modelled with a bivariate function of altitude (elevation) and represented by a raster digital elevation model. However, the cave is a 3-D entity; therefore, a different approach is required for geomorphometric analysis. In this paper, we demonstrate the benefits of high-resolution cave mapping and 3-D modelling to better understand the palaeohydrography of the Domica cave in Slovakia. This methodological approach adopted traditional geomorphometric methods in a unique manner and also new methods used in 3-D computer graphics, which can be applied to study other 3-D geomorphological forms.

  19. A 3-D aerodynamic method for the analysis of isolated horizontal-axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Ammara, I.; Masson, C.; Paraschivoiu, I.

    1997-12-31

    In most existing performance-analysis methods, wind turbines are considered isolated so that interference effects caused by other rotors or by the site topography are neglected. The main objective of this paper is to propose a practical 3-D method suitable for the study of these effects, in order to optimize the arrangement and the positioning of Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbines (HAWTs) in a wind farm. In the proposed methodology, the flow field around isolated HAWTs is predicted by solving the 3-D, time-averaged, steady-state, incompressible, Navier-Stokes equations in which the turbines are represented by distributions of momentum sources. The resulting governing equations are solved using a Control-Volume Finite Element Method (CVFEM). The fundamental aspects related to the development of a practical 3-D method are discussed in this paper, with an emphasis on some of the challenges that arose during its implementation. The current implementation is limited to the analysis of isolated HAWTs. Preliminary results have indicated that, the proposed 3-D method reaches the same level of accuracy, in terms of performance predictions, that the previously developed 2-D axisymmetric model and the well-known momentum-strip theory, while still using reasonable computers resources. It can be considered as a useful tool for the design of HAWTs. Its main advantages, however, are its intrinsic capacity to predict the details of the flow in the wake, and its capabilities of modelling arbitrary wind-turbine arrangements and including ground effects.

  20. Analysis results from the Los Alamos 2D/3D program

    SciTech Connect

    Boyack, B.E.; Cappiello, M.W.; Harmony, S.C.; Shire, P.R.; Siebe, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a participant in the 2D/3D program. Activities conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory in support of 2D/3D program goals include analysis support of facility design, construction, and operation; provision of boundary and initial conditions for test-facility operations based on analysis of pressurized water reactors; performance of pretest and posttest predictions and analyses; and use of experimental results to validate and assess the single- and multi-dimensional, nonequilibrium features in the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC). During fiscal year 1987, Los Alamos conducted analytical assessment activities using data from the Slab Core Test Facility, The Cylindrical Core Test Facility, and the Upper Plenum Test Facility. Finally, Los Alamos continued work to provide TRAC improvements. In this paper, Los Alamos activities during fiscal year 1987 will be summarized; several significant accomplishments will be described in more detail to illustrate the work activities at Los Alamos.

  1. Characteristic of the Nanoparticles Formed on the Carbon Steel Surface Contacting with 3d-Metal Water Salt Solutions in the Open-Air System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrynenko, O. M.; Pavlenko, O. Yu; Shchukin, Yu S.

    2016-02-01

    The contact of a steel electrode with water dispersion medium in an open-air system leads to the development of various polymorphic iron oxides and oxyhydroxides on the steel surface. Whereas the usage of distilled water causes the obtaining of Fe(II)-Fe(III) layered double hydroxides (green rust) as a primary mineral phase, but in the presence of inorganic 3d-metal water salt solutions, mixed layered double hydroxides (LDHs) together with non-stoichiometric spinel ferrite nanoparticles are formed on the steel surface. Mixed LDHs keep stability against further oxidation and complicate the obtaining of spinel ferrite nanoparticles. Thermal treatment of mixed LDHs among other mineral phases formed via the rotation-corrosion dispergation process at certain temperatures permits to obtain homogenous nanoparticles of spinel ferrites as well as maghemite or hematite doped by 3d-metal cations.

  2. Characteristic of the Nanoparticles Formed on the Carbon Steel Surface Contacting with 3d-Metal Water Salt Solutions in the Open-Air System.

    PubMed

    Lavrynenko, O M; Pavlenko, O Yu; Shchukin, Yu S

    2016-12-01

    The contact of a steel electrode with water dispersion medium in an open-air system leads to the development of various polymorphic iron oxides and oxyhydroxides on the steel surface. Whereas the usage of distilled water causes the obtaining of Fe(II)-Fe(III) layered double hydroxides (green rust) as a primary mineral phase, but in the presence of inorganic 3d-metal water salt solutions, mixed layered double hydroxides (LDHs) together with non-stoichiometric spinel ferrite nanoparticles are formed on the steel surface. Mixed LDHs keep stability against further oxidation and complicate the obtaining of spinel ferrite nanoparticles. Thermal treatment of mixed LDHs among other mineral phases formed via the rotation-corrosion dispergation process at certain temperatures permits to obtain homogenous nanoparticles of spinel ferrites as well as maghemite or hematite doped by 3d-metal cations. PMID:26847693

  3. Quantification of Dynamic Morphological Drug Responses in 3D Organotypic Cell Cultures by Automated Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Härmä, Ville; Schukov, Hannu-Pekka; Happonen, Antti; Ahonen, Ilmari; Virtanen, Johannes; Siitari, Harri; Åkerfelt, Malin; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Nees, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Glandular epithelial cells differentiate into complex multicellular or acinar structures, when embedded in three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix. The spectrum of different multicellular morphologies formed in 3D is a sensitive indicator for the differentiation potential of normal, non-transformed cells compared to different stages of malignant progression. In addition, single cells or cell aggregates may actively invade the matrix, utilizing epithelial, mesenchymal or mixed modes of motility. Dynamic phenotypic changes involved in 3D tumor cell invasion are sensitive to specific small-molecule inhibitors that target the actin cytoskeleton. We have used a panel of inhibitors to demonstrate the power of automated image analysis as a phenotypic or morphometric readout in cell-based assays. We introduce a streamlined stand-alone software solution that supports large-scale high-content screens, based on complex and organotypic cultures. AMIDA (Automated Morphometric Image Data Analysis) allows quantitative measurements of large numbers of images and structures, with a multitude of different spheroid shapes, sizes, and textures. AMIDA supports an automated workflow, and can be combined with quality control and statistical tools for data interpretation and visualization. We have used a representative panel of 12 prostate and breast cancer lines that display a broad spectrum of different spheroid morphologies and modes of invasion, challenged by a library of 19 direct or indirect modulators of the actin cytoskeleton which induce systematic changes in spheroid morphology and differentiation versus invasion. These results were independently validated by 2D proliferation, apoptosis and cell motility assays. We identified three drugs that primarily attenuated the invasion and formation of invasive processes in 3D, without affecting proliferation or apoptosis. Two of these compounds block Rac signalling, one affects cellular cAMP/cGMP accumulation. Our approach supports

  4. Integrated 3D-printed reactionware for chemical synthesis and analysis.

    PubMed

    Symes, Mark D; Kitson, Philip J; Yan, Jun; Richmond, Craig J; Cooper, Geoffrey J T; Bowman, Richard W; Vilbrandt, Turlif; Cronin, Leroy

    2012-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing has the potential to transform science and technology by creating bespoke, low-cost appliances that previously required dedicated facilities to make. An attractive, but unexplored, application is to use a 3D printer to initiate chemical reactions by printing the reagents directly into a 3D reactionware matrix, and so put reactionware design, construction and operation under digital control. Here, using a low-cost 3D printer and open-source design software we produced reactionware for organic and inorganic synthesis, which included printed-in catalysts and other architectures with printed-in components for electrochemical and spectroscopic analysis. This enabled reactions to be monitored in situ so that different reactionware architectures could be screened for their efficacy for a given process, with a digital feedback mechanism for device optimization. Furthermore, solely by modifying reactionware architecture, reaction outcomes can be altered. Taken together, this approach constitutes a relatively cheap, automated and reconfigurable chemical discovery platform that makes techniques from chemical engineering accessible to typical synthetic laboratories. PMID:22522253

  5. A finite element analysis of a 3D auxetic textile structure for composite reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Zhaoyang; Hu, Hong; Liu, Yanping

    2013-08-01

    This paper reports the finite element analysis of an innovative 3D auxetic textile structure consisting of three yarn systems (weft, warp and stitch yarns). Different from conventional 3D textile structures, the proposed structure exhibits an auxetic behaviour under compression and can be used as a reinforcement to manufacture auxetic composites. The geometry of the structure is first described. Then a 3D finite element model is established using ANSYS software and validated by the experimental results. The deformation process of the structure at different compression strains is demonstrated, and the validated finite element model is finally used to simulate the auxetic behaviour of the structure with different structural parameters and yarn properties. The results show that the auxetic behaviour of the proposed structure increases with increasing compression strain, and all the structural parameters and yarn properties have significant effects on the auxetic behaviour of the structure. It is expected that the study could provide a better understanding of 3D auxetic textile structures and could promote their application in auxetic composites.

  6. ZIP3D: An elastic and elastic-plastic finite-element analysis program for cracked bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    ZIP3D is an elastic and an elastic-plastic finite element program to analyze cracks in three dimensional solids. The program may also be used to analyze uncracked bodies or multi-body problems involving contacting surfaces. For crack problems, the program has several unique features including the calculation of mixed-mode strain energy release rates using the three dimensional virtual crack closure technique, the calculation of the J integral using the equivalent domain integral method, the capability to extend the crack front under monotonic or cyclic loading, and the capability to close or open the crack surfaces during cyclic loading. The theories behind the various aspects of the program are explained briefly. Line-by-line data preparation is presented. Input data and results for an elastic analysis of a surface crack in a plate and for an elastic-plastic analysis of a single-edge-crack-tension specimen are also presented.

  7. 3D cephalometric analysis obtained from computed tomography. Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Rossini, Giulia; Cavallini, Costanza; Cassetta, Michele; Barbato, Ersilia

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction The aim of this systematic review is to estimate accuracy and reproducibility of craniometric measurements and reliability of landmarks identified with computed tomography (CT) techniques in 3D cephalometric analysis. Methods Computerized and manual searches were conducted up to 2011 for studies that addressed these objectives. The selection criteria were: (1) the use of human specimen; (2) the comparison between 2D and 3D cephalometric analysis; (3) the assessment of accuracy, reproducibility of measurements and reliability of landmark identification with CT images compared with two-dimensional conventional radiographs. The Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions was used as the guideline for this article. Results Twenty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria. Most of them demonstrated high measurements accuracy and reproducibility, and landmarks reliability, but their cephalometric analysis methodology varied widely. Conclusion These differencies among the studies in making measurements don’t permit a direct comparison between them. The future developments in the knowledge of these techniques should provide a standardized method to conduct the 3D CT cephalometric analysis. PMID:22545187

  8. Statistical 3D shape analysis of gender differences in lateral ventricles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qing; Karpman, Dmitriy; Duan, Ye

    2010-03-01

    This paper aims at analyzing gender differences in the 3D shapes of lateral ventricles, which will provide reference for the analysis of brain abnormalities related to neurological disorders. Previous studies mostly focused on volume analysis, and the main challenge in shape analysis is the required step of establishing shape correspondence among individual shapes. We developed a simple and efficient method based on anatomical landmarks. 14 females and 10 males with matching ages participated in this study. 3D ventricle models were segmented from MR images by a semiautomatic method. Six anatomically meaningful landmarks were identified by detecting the maximum curvature point in a small neighborhood of a manually clicked point on the 3D model. Thin-plate spline was used to transform a randomly selected template shape to each of the rest shape instances, and the point correspondence was established according to Euclidean distance and surface normal. All shapes were spatially aligned by Generalized Procrustes Analysis. Hotelling T2 twosample metric was used to compare the ventricle shapes between males and females, and False Discovery Rate estimation was used to correct for the multiple comparison. The results revealed significant differences in the anterior horn of the right ventricle.

  9. Error Analysis of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data by Means of Spherical Statistics and 3D Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Cuartero, Aurora; Armesto, Julia; Rodríguez, Pablo G.; Arias, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a complete analysis of the positional errors of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data based on spherical statistics and 3D graphs. Spherical statistics are preferred because of the 3D vectorial nature of the spatial error. Error vectors have three metric elements (one module and two angles) that were analyzed by spherical statistics. A study case has been presented and discussed in detail. Errors were calculating using 53 check points (CP) and CP coordinates were measured by a digitizer with submillimetre accuracy. The positional accuracy was analyzed by both the conventional method (modular errors analysis) and the proposed method (angular errors analysis) by 3D graphics and numerical spherical statistics. Two packages in R programming language were performed to obtain graphics automatically. The results indicated that the proposed method is advantageous as it offers a more complete analysis of the positional accuracy, such as angular error component, uniformity of the vector distribution, error isotropy, and error, in addition the modular error component by linear statistics. PMID:22163461

  10. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Special finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, S.

    1988-01-01

    This annual status report presents the results of work performed during the fourth year of the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Section Components program (NASA Contract NAS3-23697). The objective of the program is to produce a series of new computer codes permitting more accurate and efficient 3-D analysis of selected hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades and turbine vanes. The computer codes embody a progression of math models and are streamlined to take advantage of geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of material response that distinguish each group of selected components. Volume 1 of this report discusses the special finite element models developed during the fourth year of the contract.

  11. Importance of a 3D forward modeling tool for surface wave analysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pageot, Damien; Le Feuvre, Mathieu; Donatienne, Leparoux; Philippe, Côte; Yann, Capdeville

    2016-04-01

    Since a few years, seismic surface waves analysis methods (SWM) have been widely developed and tested in the context of subsurface characterization and have demonstrated their effectiveness for sounding and monitoring purposes, e.g., high-resolution tomography of the principal geological units of California or real time monitoring of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano. Historically, these methods are mostly developed under the assumption of semi-infinite 1D layered medium without topography. The forward modeling is generally based on Thomson-Haskell matrix based modeling algorithm and the inversion is driven by Monte-Carlo sampling. Given their efficiency, SWM have been transfered to several scale of which civil engineering structures in order to, e.g., determine the so-called V s30 parameter or assess other critical constructional parameters in pavement engineering. However, at this scale, many structures may often exhibit 3D surface variations which drastically limit the efficiency of SWM application. Indeed, even in the case of an homogeneous structure, 3D geometry can bias the dispersion diagram of Rayleigh waves up to obtain discontinuous phase velocity curves which drastically impact the 1D mean velocity model obtained from dispersion inversion. Taking advantages of high-performance computing center accessibility and wave propagation modeling algorithm development, it is now possible to consider the use of a 3D elastic forward modeling algorithm instead of Thomson-Haskell method in the SWM inversion process. We use a parallelized 3D elastic modeling code based on the spectral element method which allows to obtain accurate synthetic data with very low numerical dispersion and a reasonable numerical cost. In this study, we choose dike embankments as an illustrative example. We first show that their longitudinal geometry may have a significant effect on dispersion diagrams of Rayleigh waves. Then, we demonstrate the necessity of 3D elastic modeling as a forward

  12. Performance analysis of high quality parallel preconditioners applied to 3D finite element structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kolotilina, L.; Nikishin, A.; Yeremin, A.

    1994-12-31

    The solution of large systems of linear equations is a crucial bottleneck when performing 3D finite element analysis of structures. Also, in many cases the reliability and robustness of iterative solution strategies, and their efficiency when exploiting hardware resources, fully determine the scope of industrial applications which can be solved on a particular computer platform. This is especially true for modern vector/parallel supercomputers with large vector length and for modern massively parallel supercomputers. Preconditioned iterative methods have been successfully applied to industrial class finite element analysis of structures. The construction and application of high quality preconditioners constitutes a high percentage of the total solution time. Parallel implementation of high quality preconditioners on such architectures is a formidable challenge. Two common types of existing preconditioners are the implicit preconditioners and the explicit preconditioners. The implicit preconditioners (e.g. incomplete factorizations of several types) are generally high quality but require solution of lower and upper triangular systems of equations per iteration which are difficult to parallelize without deteriorating the convergence rate. The explicit type of preconditionings (e.g. polynomial preconditioners or Jacobi-like preconditioners) require sparse matrix-vector multiplications and can be parallelized but their preconditioning qualities are less than desirable. The authors present results of numerical experiments with Factorized Sparse Approximate Inverses (FSAI) for symmetric positive definite linear systems. These are high quality preconditioners that possess a large resource of parallelism by construction without increasing the serial complexity.

  13. Integrating Data Clustering and Visualization for the Analysis of 3D Gene Expression Data

    SciTech Connect

    Data Analysis and Visualization and the Department of Computer Science, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis CA 95616, USA,; nternational Research Training Group ``Visualization of Large and Unstructured Data Sets,'' University of Kaiserslautern, Germany; Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Genomics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley CA 94720, USA; Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley CA 94720, USA,; Computer Science Division,University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA,; Computer Science Department, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA,; All authors are with the Berkeley Drosophila Transcription Network Project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,; Rubel, Oliver; Weber, Gunther H.; Huang, Min-Yu; Bethel, E. Wes; Biggin, Mark D.; Fowlkes, Charless C.; Hendriks, Cris L. Luengo; Keranen, Soile V. E.; Eisen, Michael B.; Knowles, David W.; Malik, Jitendra; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd

    2008-05-12

    The recent development of methods for extracting precise measurements of spatial gene expression patterns from three-dimensional (3D) image data opens the way for new analyses of the complex gene regulatory networks controlling animal development. We present an integrated visualization and analysis framework that supports user-guided data clustering to aid exploration of these new complex datasets. The interplay of data visualization and clustering-based data classification leads to improved visualization and enables a more detailed analysis than previously possible. We discuss (i) integration of data clustering and visualization into one framework; (ii) application of data clustering to 3D gene expression data; (iii) evaluation of the number of clusters k in the context of 3D gene expression clustering; and (iv) improvement of overall analysis quality via dedicated post-processing of clustering results based on visualization. We discuss the use of this framework to objectively define spatial pattern boundaries and temporal profiles of genes and to analyze how mRNA patterns are controlled by their regulatory transcription factors.

  14. Microstructure analysis of the secondary pulmonary lobules by 3D synchrotron radiation CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, Y.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Umetani, K.; Nakano, Y.; Ohmatsu, H.; Moriyama, N.; Itoh, H.

    2014-03-01

    Recognition of abnormalities related to the lobular anatomy has become increasingly important in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of lung abnormalities at clinical routines of CT examinations. This paper aims a 3-D microstructural analysis of the pulmonary acinus with isotropic spatial resolution in the range of several micrometers by using micro CT. Previously, we demonstrated the ability of synchrotron radiation micro CT (SRμCT) using offset scan mode in microstructural analysis of the whole part of the secondary pulmonary lobule. In this paper, we present a semiautomatic method to segment the acinar and subacinar airspaces from the secondary pulmonary lobule and to track small vessels running inside alveolar walls in human acinus imaged by the SRμCT. The method beains with and segmentation of the tissues such as pleural surface, interlobular septa, alveola wall, or vessel using a threshold technique and 3-D connected component analysis. 3-D air space are then conustructed separated by tissues and represented branching patterns of airways and airspaces distal to the terminal bronchiole. A graph-partitioning approach isolated acini whose stems are interactively defined as the terminal bronchiole in the secondary pulmonary lobule. Finally, we performed vessel tracking using a non-linear sate space which captures both smoothness of the trajectories and intensity coherence along vessel orientations. Results demonstrate that the proposed method can extract several acinar airspaces from the 3-D SRμCT image of secondary pulmonary lobule and that the extracted acinar airspace enable an accurate quantitative description of the anatomy of the human acinus for interpretation of the basic unit of pulmonary structure and function.

  15. Simultaneous Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Optimization (SAADO) for a 3-D Flexible Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumbert, Clyde R.; Hou, Gene J.-W.

    2001-01-01

    The formulation and implementation of an optimization method called Simultaneous Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Optimization (SAADO) are extended from single discipline analysis (aerodynamics only) to multidisciplinary analysis - in this case, static aero-structural analysis - and applied to a simple 3-D wing problem. The method aims to reduce the computational expense incurred in performing shape optimization using state-of-the-art Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flow analysis, Finite Element Method (FEM) structural analysis and sensitivity analysis tools. Results for this small problem show that the method reaches the same local optimum as conventional optimization. However, unlike its application to the win,, (single discipline analysis), the method. as I implemented here, may not show significant reduction in the computational cost. Similar reductions were seen in the two-design-variable (DV) problem results but not in the 8-DV results given here.

  16. Highly efficient full-wave electromagnetic analysis of 3-D arbitrarily shaped waveguide microwave devices using an integral equation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, A.; San-Blas, A. A.; Quesada-Pereira, F. D.; Pérez-Soler, J.; Gil, J.; Vicente, C.; Gimeno, B.; Boria, V. E.

    2015-07-01

    A novel technique for the full-wave analysis of 3-D complex waveguide devices is presented. This new formulation, based on the Boundary Integral-Resonant Mode Expansion (BI-RME) method, allows the rigorous full-wave electromagnetic characterization of 3-D arbitrarily shaped metallic structures making use of extremely low CPU resources (both time and memory). The unknown electric current density on the surface of the metallic elements is represented by means of Rao-Wilton-Glisson basis functions, and an algebraic procedure based on a singular value decomposition is applied to transform such functions into the classical solenoidal and nonsolenoidal basis functions needed by the original BI-RME technique. The developed tool also provides an accurate computation of the electromagnetic fields at an arbitrary observation point of the considered device, so it can be used for predicting high-power breakdown phenomena. In order to validate the accuracy and efficiency of this novel approach, several new designs of band-pass waveguides filters are presented. The obtained results (S-parameters and electromagnetic fields) are successfully compared both to experimental data and to numerical simulations provided by a commercial software based on the finite element technique. The results obtained show that the new technique is specially suitable for the efficient full-wave analysis of complex waveguide devices considering an integrated coaxial excitation, where the coaxial probes may be in contact with the metallic insets of the component.

  17. Nanometer depth resolution in 3D topographic analysis of drug-loaded nanofibrous mats without sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Paaver, Urve; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Kassamakov, Ivan; Hæggström, Edward; Ylitalo, Tuomo; Nolvi, Anton; Kozlova, Jekaterina; Laidmäe, Ivo; Kogermann, Karin; Veski, Peep

    2014-02-28

    We showed that scanning white light interferometry (SWLI) can provide nanometer depth resolution in 3D topographic analysis of electrospun drug-loaded nanofibrous mats without sample preparation. The method permits rapidly investigating geometric properties (e.g. fiber diameter, orientation and morphology) and surface topography of drug-loaded nanofibers and nanomats. Electrospun nanofibers of a model drug, piroxicam (PRX), and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) were imaged. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) served as a reference method. SWLI 3D images featuring 29 nm by 29 nm active pixel size were obtained of a 55 μm × 40 μm area. The thickness of the drug-loaded non-woven nanomats was uniform, ranging from 2.0 μm to 3.0 μm (SWLI), and independent of the ratio between HPMC and PRX. The average diameters (n=100, SEM) for drug-loaded nanofibers were 387 ± 125 nm (HPMC and PRX 1:1), 407 ± 144 nm (HPMC and PRX 1:2), and 290 ± 100 nm (HPMC and PRX 1:4). We found advantages and limitations in both techniques. SWLI permits rapid non-contacting and non-destructive characterization of layer orientation, layer thickness, porosity, and surface morphology of electrospun drug-loaded nanofibers and nanomats. Such analysis is important because the surface topography affects the performance of nanomats in pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. PMID:24378328

  18. Non-Newtonian Fluids Spreading with Surface Tension Effect: 3D Numerical Analysis Using FEM and Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bin; Kieweg, Sarah

    2010-11-01

    Gravity-driven thin film flow down an incline is studied for optimal design of polymeric drug delivery vehicles, such as anti-HIV topical microbicides. We develop a 3D FEM model using non-Newtonian mechanics to model the flow of gels in response to gravity, surface tension and shear-thinning. Constant volume setup is applied within the lubrication approximation scope. The lengthwise profiles of the 3D model agree with our previous 2D finite difference model, while the transverse contact line patterns of the 3D model are compared to the experiments. With incorporation of surface tension, capillary ridges are observed at the leading front in both 2D and 3D models. Previously published studies show that capillary ridge can amplify the fingering instabilities in transverse direction. Sensitivity studies (2D & 3D) and experiments are carried out to describe the influence of surface tension and shear-thinning on capillary ridge and fingering instabilities.

  19. A Generalized Approach to the Modeling and Analysis of 3D Surface Morphology in Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Janice L.; Miller, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    The surface geometry of an organism represents the boundary of its three-dimensional (3D) form and can be used as a proxy for the phenotype. A mathematical approach is presented that describes surface morphology using parametric 3D equations with variables expressed as x, y, z in terms of parameters u, v. Partial differentiation of variables with respect to parameters yields elements of the Jacobian representing tangent lines and planes of every point on the surface. Jacobian elements provide a compact size-free summary of the entire surface, and can be used as variables in principal components analysis to produce a morphospace. Mollusk and echinoid models are generated to demonstrate that whole organisms can be represented in a common morphospace, regardless of differences in size, geometry, and taxonomic affinity. Models can be used to simulate theoretical forms, novel morphologies, and patterns of phenotypic variation, and can also be empirically-based by designing them with reference to actual forms using reverse engineering principles. Although this study uses the Jacobian to summarize models, they can also be analyzed with 3D methods such as eigensurface, spherical harmonics, wavelet analysis, and geometric morphometrics. This general approach should prove useful for exploring broad questions regarding morphological evolution and variation. PMID:24204866

  20. Shadow Effect on Photovoltaic Potentiality Analysis Using 3d City Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, N.; Coors, V.; Zlatanova, S.; Oosterom, P. J. M.

    2012-07-01

    Due to global warming, green-house effect and various other drawbacks of existing energy sources, renewable energy like Photovoltaic system is being popular for energy production. The result of photovoltaic potentiality analysis depends on data quality and parameters. Shadow rapidly decreases performance of the Photovoltaic system and it always changes due to the movement of the sun. Solar radiation incident on earth's atmosphere is relatively constant but the radiation at earth's surface varies due to absorption, scattering, reflection, change in spectral content, diffuse component, water vapor, clouds and pollution etc. In this research, it is being investigated that how efficiently real-time shadow can be detected for both direct and diffuse radiation considering reflection and other factors in contrast with the existing shadow detection methods using latest technologies and what is the minimum quality of data required for this purpose. Of course, geometric details of the building geometry and surroundings directly affect the calculation of shadows. In principle, 3D city models or point clouds, which contain roof structure, vegetation, thematically differentiated surface and texture, are suitable to simulate exact real-time shadow. This research would develop an automated procedure to measure exact shadow effect from the 3D city models and a long-term simulation model to determine the produced energy from the photovoltaic system. In this paper, a developed method for detecting shadow for direct radiation has been discussed with its result using a 3D city model to perform a solar energy potentiality analysis.

  1. Quantitative analysis of the central-chest lymph nodes based on 3D MDCT image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kongkuo; Bascom, Rebecca; Mahraj, Rickhesvar P. M.; Higgins, William E.

    2009-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. In lung-cancer staging, central-chest lymph nodes and associated nodal stations, as observed in three-dimensional (3D) multidetector CT (MDCT) scans, play a vital role. However, little work has been done in relation to lymph nodes, based on MDCT data, due to the complicated phenomena that give rise to them. Using our custom computer-based system for 3D MDCT-based pulmonary lymph-node analysis, we conduct a detailed study of lymph nodes as depicted in 3D MDCT scans. In this work, the Mountain lymph-node stations are automatically defined by the system. These defined stations, in conjunction with our system's image processing and visualization tools, facilitate lymph-node detection, classification, and segmentation. An expert pulmonologist, chest radiologist, and trained technician verified the accuracy of the automatically defined stations and indicated observable lymph nodes. Next, using semi-automatic tools in our system, we defined all indicated nodes. Finally, we performed a global quantitative analysis of the characteristics of the observed nodes and stations. This study drew upon a database of 32 human MDCT chest scans. 320 Mountain-based stations (10 per scan) and 852 pulmonary lymph nodes were defined overall from this database. Based on the numerical results, over 90% of the automatically defined stations were deemed accurate. This paper also presents a detailed summary of central-chest lymph-node characteristics for the first time.

  2. A stabilized complementarity formulation for nonlinear analysis of 3D bimodular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Zhang, H. W.; Wu, J.; Yan, B.

    2016-06-01

    Bi-modulus materials with different mechanical responses in tension and compression are often found in civil, composite, and biological engineering. Numerical analysis of bimodular materials is strongly nonlinear and convergence is usually a problem for traditional iterative schemes. This paper aims to develop a stabilized computational method for nonlinear analysis of 3D bimodular materials. Based on the parametric variational principle, a unified constitutive equation of 3D bimodular materials is proposed, which allows the eight principal stress states to be indicated by three parametric variables introduced in the principal stress directions. The original problem is transformed into a standard linear complementarity problem (LCP) by the parametric virtual work principle and a quadratic programming algorithm is developed by solving the LCP with the classic Lemke's algorithm. Update of elasticity and stiffness matrices is avoided and, thus, the proposed algorithm shows an excellent convergence behavior compared with traditional iterative schemes. Numerical examples show that the proposed method is valid and can accurately analyze mechanical responses of 3D bimodular materials. Also, stability of the algorithm is greatly improved.

  3. A stabilized complementarity formulation for nonlinear analysis of 3D bimodular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Zhang, H. W.; Wu, J.; Yan, B.

    2015-10-01

    Bi-modulus materials with different mechanical responses in tension and compression are often found in civil, composite, and biological engineering. Numerical analysis of bimodular materials is strongly nonlinear and convergence is usually a problem for traditional iterative schemes. This paper aims to develop a stabilized computational method for nonlinear analysis of 3D bimodular materials. Based on the parametric variational principle, a unified constitutive equation of 3D bimodular materials is proposed, which allows the eight principal stress states to be indicated by three parametric variables introduced in the principal stress directions. The original problem is transformed into a standard linear complementarity problem (LCP) by the parametric virtual work principle and a quadratic programming algorithm is developed by solving the LCP with the classic Lemke's algorithm. Update of elasticity and stiffness matrices is avoided and, thus, the proposed algorithm shows an excellent convergence behavior compared with traditional iterative schemes. Numerical examples show that the proposed method is valid and can accurately analyze mechanical responses of 3D bimodular materials. Also, stability of the algorithm is greatly improved.

  4. Quantitative analysis and feature recognition in 3-D microstructural data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, A. C.; Suh, C.; Stukowski, M.; Geltmacher, A. B.; Spanos, G.; Rajan, K.

    2006-12-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of an austenitic stainless-steel microstructure was used as input for an image-based finite-element model to simulate the anisotropic elastic mechanical response of the microstructure. The quantitative data-mining and data-warehousing techniques used to correlate regions of high stress with critical microstructural features are discussed. Initial analysis of elastic stresses near grain boundaries due to mechanical loading revealed low overall correlation with their location in the microstructure. However, the use of data-mining and feature-tracking techniques to identify high-stress outliers revealed that many of these high-stress points are generated near grain boundaries and grain edges (triple junctions). These techniques also allowed for the differentiation between high stresses due to boundary conditions of the finite volume reconstructed, and those due to 3-D microstructural features.

  5. Mechanical Performance and Parameter Sensitivity Analysis of 3D Braided Composites Joints

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yue; Nan, Bo; Chen, Liang

    2014-01-01

    3D braided composite joints are the important components in CFRP truss, which have significant influence on the reliability and lightweight of structures. To investigate the mechanical performance of 3D braided composite joints, a numerical method based on the microscopic mechanics is put forward, the modeling technologies, including the material constants selection, element type, grid size, and the boundary conditions, are discussed in detail. Secondly, a method for determination of ultimate bearing capacity is established, which can consider the strength failure. Finally, the effect of load parameters, geometric parameters, and process parameters on the ultimate bearing capacity of joints is analyzed by the global sensitivity analysis method. The results show that the main pipe diameter thickness ratio γ, the main pipe diameter D, and the braided angle α are sensitive to the ultimate bearing capacity N. PMID:25121121

  6. An Application of the Method of Arbitrary Lines to 3D Elastic Stress Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminishi, Ken; Ando, Ryuma

    The MAL (Method of Arbitrary Lines) is a technique of reducing a partial differential equation to a system of ordinary differential equations. It is known that relevant use of this procedure yields high accuracy in some problems of two-dimensional elasticity and elastoplasticity. Since the basic concept of MAL is simple and based on generality, it is expected that many problems in other fields will be effectively solvable by this method. In this study, we consider the application of MAL to 3D (three-dimensional) elasticity analysis. We first give a MAL formulation of 3D elasticity problems, and demonstrate its effectiveness and accuracy for a typical problem. The reported numerical results are compared with the exact solution or that of the finite element method (FEM).

  7. Mechanical performance and parameter sensitivity analysis of 3D braided composites joints.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Nan, Bo; Chen, Liang

    2014-01-01

    3D braided composite joints are the important components in CFRP truss, which have significant influence on the reliability and lightweight of structures. To investigate the mechanical performance of 3D braided composite joints, a numerical method based on the microscopic mechanics is put forward, the modeling technologies, including the material constants selection, element type, grid size, and the boundary conditions, are discussed in detail. Secondly, a method for determination of ultimate bearing capacity is established, which can consider the strength failure. Finally, the effect of load parameters, geometric parameters, and process parameters on the ultimate bearing capacity of joints is analyzed by the global sensitivity analysis method. The results show that the main pipe diameter thickness ratio γ, the main pipe diameter D, and the braided angle α are sensitive to the ultimate bearing capacity N. PMID:25121121

  8. Spatio-temporal registration in multiplane MRI acquisitions for 3D colon motiliy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutter, Oliver; Kirchhoff, Sonja; Berkovich, Marina; Reiser, Maximilian; Navab, Nassir

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for analyzing and visualizing dynamic peristaltic motion of the colon in 3D from two series of differently oriented 2D MRI images. To this end, we have defined an MRI examination protocol, and introduced methods for spatio-temporal alignment of the two MRI image series into a common reference. This represents the main contribution of this paper, which enables the 3D analysis of peristaltic motion. The objective is to provide a detailed insight into this complex motion, aiding in the diagnosis and characterization of colon motion disorders. We have applied the proposed spatio-temporal method on Cine MRI data sets of healthy volunteers. The results have been inspected and validated by an expert radiologist. Segmentation and cylindrical approximation of the colon results in a 4D visualization of the peristaltic motion.

  9. Uncertainty analysis for 3D geological modeling using the Kriging variance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yosoon; Choi, Younjung; Park, Sebeom; Um, Jeong-Gi

    2014-05-01

    The credible estimation of geological properties is critical in many geosciences fields including the geotechnical engineering, environmental engineering, mining engineering and petroleum engineering. Many interpolation techniques have been developed to estimate the geological properties from limited sampling data such as borehole logs. The Kriging is an interpolation technique that gives the best linear unbiased prediction of the intermediate values. It also provides the Kriging variance which quantifies the uncertainty of the kriging estimates. This study provides a new method to analyze the uncertainty in 3D geological modeling using the Kriging variance. The cut-off values determined by the Kriging variance were used to effectively visualize the 3D geological models with different confidence levels. This presentation describes the method for uncertainty analysis and a case study which evaluates the amount of recoverable resources by considering the uncertainty.

  10. Analysis of method of 3D shape reconstruction using scanning deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, Jiří; Novák, Pavel; Mikš, Antonín.

    2013-04-01

    This work presents a scanning deflectometric approach to solving a 3D surface reconstruction problem, which is based on measurements of a surface gradient of optically smooth surfaces. It is shown that a description of this problem leads to a nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) of the first order, from which the surface shape can be reconstructed numerically. The method for effective finding of the solution of this differential equation is proposed, which is based on the transform of the problem of PDE solving to the optimization problem. We describe different types of surface description for the shape reconstruction and a numerical simulation of the presented method is performed. The reconstruction process is analyzed by computer simulations and presented on examples. The performed analysis confirms a robustness of the reconstruction method and a good possibility for measurements and reconstruction of the 3D shape of specular surfaces.

  11. A quantitative analysis of 3-D coronary modeling from two or more projection images.

    PubMed

    Movassaghi, B; Rasche, V; Grass, M; Viergever, M A; Niessen, W J

    2004-12-01

    A method is introduced to examine the geometrical accuracy of the three-dimensional (3-D) representation of coronary arteries from multiple (two and more) calibrated two-dimensional (2-D) angiographic projections. When involving more then two projections, (multiprojection modeling) a novel procedure is presented that consists of fully automated centerline and width determination in all available projections based on the information provided by the semi-automated centerline detection in two initial calibrated projections. The accuracy of the 3-D coronary modeling approach is determined by a quantitative examination of the 3-D centerline point position and the 3-D cross sectional area of the reconstructed objects. The measurements are based on the analysis of calibrated phantom and calibrated coronary 2-D projection data. From this analysis a confidence region (alpha degrees approximately equal to [35 degrees - 145 degrees]) for the angular distance of two initial projection images is determined for which the modeling procedure is sufficiently accurate for the applied system. Within this angular border range the centerline position error is less then 0.8 mm, in terms of the Euclidean distance to a predefined ground truth. When involving more projections using our new procedure, experiments show that when the initial pair of projection images has an angular distance in the range alpha degrees approximately equal to [35 degrees - 145 degrees], the centerlines in all other projections (gamma = 0 degrees - 180 degrees) were indicated very precisely without any additional centering procedure. When involving additional projection images in the modeling procedure a more realistic shape of the structure can be provided. In case of the concave segment, however, the involvement of multiple projections does not necessarily provide a more realistic shape of the reconstructed structure. PMID:15575409

  12. The Double Hierarchy Method. A parallel 3D contact method for the interaction of spherical particles with rigid FE boundaries using the DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santasusana, Miquel; Irazábal, Joaquín; Oñate, Eugenio; Carbonell, Josep Maria

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we present a new methodology for the treatment of the contact interaction between rigid boundaries and spherical discrete elements (DE). Rigid body parts are present in most of large-scale simulations. The surfaces of the rigid parts are commonly meshed with a finite element-like (FE) discretization. The contact detection and calculation between those DE and the discretized boundaries is not straightforward and has been addressed by different approaches. The algorithm presented in this paper considers the contact of the DEs with the geometric primitives of a FE mesh, i.e. facet, edge or vertex. To do so, the original hierarchical method presented by Horner et al. (J Eng Mech 127(10):1027-1032, 2001) is extended with a new insight leading to a robust, fast and accurate 3D contact algorithm which is fully parallelizable. The implementation of the method has been developed in order to deal ideally with triangles and quadrilaterals. If the boundaries are discretized with another type of geometries, the method can be easily extended to higher order planar convex polyhedra. A detailed description of the procedure followed to treat a wide range of cases is presented. The description of the developed algorithm and its validation is verified with several practical examples. The parallelization capabilities and the obtained performance are presented with the study of an industrial application example.

  13. The Double Hierarchy Method. A parallel 3D contact method for the interaction of spherical particles with rigid FE boundaries using the DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santasusana, Miquel; Irazábal, Joaquín; Oñate, Eugenio; Carbonell, Josep Maria

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present a new methodology for the treatment of the contact interaction between rigid boundaries and spherical discrete elements (DE). Rigid body parts are present in most of large-scale simulations. The surfaces of the rigid parts are commonly meshed with a finite element-like (FE) discretization. The contact detection and calculation between those DE and the discretized boundaries is not straightforward and has been addressed by different approaches. The algorithm presented in this paper considers the contact of the DEs with the geometric primitives of a FE mesh, i.e. facet, edge or vertex. To do so, the original hierarchical method presented by Horner et al. (J Eng Mech 127(10):1027-1032, 2001) is extended with a new insight leading to a robust, fast and accurate 3D contact algorithm which is fully parallelizable. The implementation of the method has been developed in order to deal ideally with triangles and quadrilaterals. If the boundaries are discretized with another type of geometries, the method can be easily extended to higher order planar convex polyhedra. A detailed description of the procedure followed to treat a wide range of cases is presented. The description of the developed algorithm and its validation is verified with several practical examples. The parallelization capabilities and the obtained performance are presented with the study of an industrial application example.

  14. Error analysis of 3D laser scanning system for gangue monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shaoxing; Xia, Yuyang; Zhang, Aiwu

    2012-01-01

    The paper put forward the system error evaluation method of 3D scanning system for gangue monitoring; analyzed system errors including integrated error which can be avoided, and measurement error which needed whole analysis; firstly established the system equation after understanding the relationship of each structure. Then, used error independent effect and spread law to set up the entire error analysis system, and simulated the trend of error changing along X, Y, Z directions. At last, it is analytic that the laser rangefinder carries some weight in system error, and the horizontal and vertical scanning angles have some influences on system error in the certain vertical and horizontal scanning parameters.

  15. Dynamic Analysis of 2D Electromagnetic Resonant Optical Scanner Using 3D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Katsuhiro; Hong, Sara; Maeda, Kengo

    The optical scanner is a scanning device in which a laser beam is reflected by a mirror that can be rotated or oscillated. In this paper, we propose a new 2D electromagnetic resonant optical scanner that employs electromagnets and leaf springs. Torque characteristics and resonance characteristics of the scanner are analyzed using the 3D finite element method. The validity of the analysis is shown by comparing the characteristics inferred from the analysis with the characteristics of the prototype. Further, 2D resonance is investigated by introducing a superimposed-frequency current in a single coil.

  16. A 3D moisture-stress FEM analysis for time dependent problems in timber structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortino, Stefania; Mirianon, Florian; Toratti, Tomi

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents a 3D moisture-stress numerical analysis for timber structures under variable humidity and load conditions. An orthotropic viscoelastic-mechanosorptive material model is specialized on the basis of previous models. Both the constitutive model and the equations needed to describe the moisture flow across the structure are implemented into user subroutines of the Abaqus finite element code and a coupled moisture-stress analysis is performed for several types of mechanical loads and moisture changes. The presented computational approach is validated by analyzing some wood tests described in the literature and comparing the computational results with the reported experimental data.

  17. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components (base program)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. B.; Bak, M. J.; Nakazawa, S.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    A 3-D Inelastic Analysis Method program is described. This program consists of a series of new computer codes embodying a progression of mathematical models (mechanics of materials, special finite element, boundary element) for streamlined analysis of: (1) combustor liners, (2) turbine blades, and (3) turbine vanes. These models address the effects of high temperatures and thermal/mechanical loadings on the local (stress/strain)and global (dynamics, buckling) structural behavior of the three selected components. Three computer codes, referred to as MOMM (Mechanics of Materials Model), MHOST (Marc-Hot Section Technology), and BEST (Boundary Element Stress Technology), have been developed and are briefly described in this report.

  18. Human factors flight trial analysis for 2D/3D SVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiefele, Jens; Howland, Duncan; Maris, John; Wipplinger, Patrick

    2004-08-01

    The paper describes flight trials performed in Reno, NV. Flight trial were conducted with a Cheyenne 1 from Marinvent. Twelve pilots flew the Cheyenne in seventy-two approaches to the Reno airfield. All pilots flew completely andomized settings. Three different settings (standard displays, 2D moving map, and 2D/3D moving map) were evaluated. They included seamless evaluation for STAR, approach, and taxi operations. The flight trial goal was to evaluate the objective performance of pilots compared among the different settings. As dependent variables, positional and time accuracy were measured. Analysis was conducted by an ANOVA test. In parallel, all pilots answered subjective Cooper-Harper, situation awareness rating technique (SART), situational awareness probe (SAP), and questionnaires.This article describes the human factor analysis from flight trials performed in Reno, NV. Flight trials were conducted with a Cheyenne 1 from Marinvent. Thirteen pilots flew the Cheyenne in seventy-two approaches to the Reno airfield. All pilots flew completely randomized settings. Three different display configurations: Elec. Flight Information System (EFIS), EFIS and 2D moving map, and 3D SVS Primary Flight Display (PFD) and 2D moving map were evaluated. They included normal/abnormal procedure evaluation for: Steep turns and reversals, Unusual attitude recovery, Radar vector guidance towards terrain, Non-precision approaches, En-route alternate for non-IFR rated pilots encountering IMC, and Taxiing on complex taxi-routes. The flight trial goal was to evaluate the objective performance of pilots for the different display configurations. As dependent variables, positional and time data were measured. Analysis was performed by an ANOVA test. In parallel, all pilots answered subjective NASA Task Load Index, Cooper-Harper, Situation Awareness Rating Technique (SART), and questionnaires. The result shows that pilots flying 2D/3D SVS perform no worse than pilots with conventional

  19. Lacunarity analysis of raster datasets and 1D, 2D, and 3D point patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Pinliang

    2009-10-01

    Spatial scale plays an important role in many fields. As a scale-dependent measure for spatial heterogeneity, lacunarity describes the distribution of gaps within a set at multiple scales. In Earth science, environmental science, and ecology, lacunarity has been increasingly used for multiscale modeling of spatial patterns. This paper presents the development and implementation of a geographic information system (GIS) software extension for lacunarity analysis of raster datasets and 1D, 2D, and 3D point patterns. Depending on the application requirement, lacunarity analysis can be performed in two modes: global mode or local mode. The extension works for: (1) binary (1-bit) and grey-scale datasets in any raster format supported by ArcGIS and (2) 1D, 2D, and 3D point datasets as shapefiles or geodatabase feature classes. For more effective measurement of lacunarity for different patterns or processes in raster datasets, the extension allows users to define an area of interest (AOI) in four different ways, including using a polygon in an existing feature layer. Additionally, directionality can be taken into account when grey-scale datasets are used for local lacunarity analysis. The methodology and graphical user interface (GUI) are described. The application of the extension is demonstrated using both simulated and real datasets, including Brodatz texture images, a Spaceborne Imaging Radar (SIR-C) image, simulated 1D points on a drainage network, and 3D random and clustered point patterns. The options of lacunarity analysis and the effects of polyline arrangement on lacunarity of 1D points are also discussed. Results from sample data suggest that the lacunarity analysis extension can be used for efficient modeling of spatial patterns at multiple scales.

  20. Action Sport Cameras as an Instrument to Perform a 3D Underwater Motion Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bernardina, Gustavo R D; Cerveri, Pietro; Barros, Ricardo M L; Marins, João C B; Silvatti, Amanda P

    2016-01-01

    Action sport cameras (ASC) are currently adopted mainly for entertainment purposes but their uninterrupted technical improvements, in correspondence of cost decreases, are going to disclose them for three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis in sport gesture study and athletic performance evaluation quantitatively. Extending this technology to sport analysis however still requires a methodologic step-forward to making ASC a metric system, encompassing ad-hoc camera setup, image processing, feature tracking, calibration and 3D reconstruction. Despite traditional laboratory analysis, such requirements become an issue when coping with both indoor and outdoor motion acquisitions of athletes. In swimming analysis for example, the camera setup and the calibration protocol are particularly demanding since land and underwater cameras are mandatory. In particular, the underwater camera calibration can be an issue affecting the reconstruction accuracy. In this paper, the aim is to evaluate the feasibility of ASC for 3D underwater analysis by focusing on camera setup and data acquisition protocols. Two GoPro Hero3+ Black (frequency: 60Hz; image resolutions: 1280×720/1920×1080 pixels) were located underwater into a swimming pool, surveying a working volume of about 6m3. A two-step custom calibration procedure, consisting in the acquisition of one static triad and one moving wand, carrying nine and one spherical passive markers, respectively, was implemented. After assessing camera parameters, a rigid bar, carrying two markers at known distance, was acquired in several positions within the working volume. The average error upon the reconstructed inter-marker distances was less than 2.5mm (1280×720) and 1.5mm (1920×1080). The results of this study demonstrate that the calibration of underwater ASC is feasible enabling quantitative kinematic measurements with accuracy comparable to traditional motion capture systems. PMID:27513846

  1. Action Sport Cameras as an Instrument to Perform a 3D Underwater Motion Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cerveri, Pietro; Barros, Ricardo M. L.; Marins, João C. B.; Silvatti, Amanda P.

    2016-01-01

    Action sport cameras (ASC) are currently adopted mainly for entertainment purposes but their uninterrupted technical improvements, in correspondence of cost decreases, are going to disclose them for three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis in sport gesture study and athletic performance evaluation quantitatively. Extending this technology to sport analysis however still requires a methodologic step-forward to making ASC a metric system, encompassing ad-hoc camera setup, image processing, feature tracking, calibration and 3D reconstruction. Despite traditional laboratory analysis, such requirements become an issue when coping with both indoor and outdoor motion acquisitions of athletes. In swimming analysis for example, the camera setup and the calibration protocol are particularly demanding since land and underwater cameras are mandatory. In particular, the underwater camera calibration can be an issue affecting the reconstruction accuracy. In this paper, the aim is to evaluate the feasibility of ASC for 3D underwater analysis by focusing on camera setup and data acquisition protocols. Two GoPro Hero3+ Black (frequency: 60Hz; image resolutions: 1280×720/1920×1080 pixels) were located underwater into a swimming pool, surveying a working volume of about 6m3. A two-step custom calibration procedure, consisting in the acquisition of one static triad and one moving wand, carrying nine and one spherical passive markers, respectively, was implemented. After assessing camera parameters, a rigid bar, carrying two markers at known distance, was acquired in several positions within the working volume. The average error upon the reconstructed inter-marker distances was less than 2.5mm (1280×720) and 1.5mm (1920×1080). The results of this study demonstrate that the calibration of underwater ASC is feasible enabling quantitative kinematic measurements with accuracy comparable to traditional motion capture systems. PMID:27513846

  2. Reconstruction Accuracy Assessment of Surface and Underwater 3D Motion Analysis: A New Approach

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Kelly; de Jesus, Karla; Figueiredo, Pedro; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo; Fernandes, Ricardo Jorge; Machado, Leandro José

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed accuracy of surface and underwater 3D reconstruction of a calibration volume with and without homography. A calibration volume (6000 × 2000 × 2500 mm) with 236 markers (64 above and 88 underwater control points—with 8 common points at water surface—and 92 validation points) was positioned on a 25 m swimming pool and recorded with two surface and four underwater cameras. Planar homography estimation for each calibration plane was computed to perform image rectification. Direct linear transformation algorithm for 3D reconstruction was applied, using 1600000 different combinations of 32 and 44 points out of the 64 and 88 control points for surface and underwater markers (resp.). Root Mean Square (RMS) error with homography of control and validations points was lower than without it for surface and underwater cameras (P ≤ 0.03). With homography, RMS errors of control and validation points were similar between surface and underwater cameras (P ≥ 0.47). Without homography, RMS error of control points was greater for underwater than surface cameras (P ≤ 0.04) and the opposite was observed for validation points (P ≤ 0.04). It is recommended that future studies using 3D reconstruction should include homography to improve swimming movement analysis accuracy. PMID:26175796

  3. 3D distribution of interstellar medium in the Galaxy: Preparation for analysis of Gaia observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspitarini, Lucky; Lallement, Rosine

    2015-09-01

    Accurate and detailed three-dimensional (3D) maps of Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) are still lacking. One way to obtain such 3D descriptions is to record a large set of individual absorption or reddening measurements toward target stars located at various known distances and directions. The inversion of these measurements using a tomographic method can produce spatial distribution of the ISM. Until recently absorption data were very limited and distances to the target stars are still uncertain, but the situation will greatly improve thanks to current and future massive stellar surveys from ground, and to Gaia mission. To prepare absorption data for inversion from a huge number of stellar spectra, automated tools are needed. We have developed various spectral analysis tools adapted to different type of spectra, early- or late- type star. We also have used diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) to trace IS structures and kinematics. Although we do not know yet their carriers, they can be a promising tool to trace distant interstellar clouds or Galactic arms. We present some examples of the interstellar fitting and show the potentiality of DIBs in tracing the ISM. We will also briefly show and comment the latest 3D map of the local ISM which reveal nearby cloud complexes and cavities.

  4. Spacecraft charging analysis with the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D

    SciTech Connect

    Deca, J.; Lapenta, G.; Marchand, R.; Markidis, S.

    2013-10-15

    We present the first results on the analysis of spacecraft charging with the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, designed for running on massively parallel supercomputers. The numerical algorithm is presented, highlighting the implementation of the electrostatic solver and the immersed boundary algorithm; the latter which creates the possibility to handle complex spacecraft geometries. As a first step in the verification process, a comparison is made between the floating potential obtained with iPic3D and with Orbital Motion Limited theory for a spherical particle in a uniform stationary plasma. Second, the numerical model is verified for a CubeSat benchmark by comparing simulation results with those of PTetra for space environment conditions with increasing levels of complexity. In particular, we consider spacecraft charging from plasma particle collection, photoelectron and secondary electron emission. The influence of a background magnetic field on the floating potential profile near the spacecraft is also considered. Although the numerical approaches in iPic3D and PTetra are rather different, good agreement is found between the two models, raising the level of confidence in both codes to predict and evaluate the complex plasma environment around spacecraft.

  5. 3D distribution of interstellar medium in the Galaxy: Preparation for analysis of Gaia observations

    SciTech Connect

    Puspitarini, Lucky; Lallement, Rosine

    2015-09-30

    Accurate and detailed three-dimensional (3D) maps of Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) are still lacking. One way to obtain such 3D descriptions is to record a large set of individual absorption or reddening measurements toward target stars located at various known distances and directions. The inversion of these measurements using a tomographic method can produce spatial distribution of the ISM. Until recently absorption data were very limited and distances to the target stars are still uncertain, but the situation will greatly improve thanks to current and future massive stellar surveys from ground, and to Gaia mission. To prepare absorption data for inversion from a huge number of stellar spectra, automated tools are needed. We have developed various spectral analysis tools adapted to different type of spectra, early- or late- type star. We also have used diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) to trace IS structures and kinematics. Although we do not know yet their carriers, they can be a promising tool to trace distant interstellar clouds or Galactic arms. We present some examples of the interstellar fitting and show the potentiality of DIBs in tracing the ISM. We will also briefly show and comment the latest 3D map of the local ISM which reveal nearby cloud complexes and cavities.

  6. 3D imaging for ballistics analysis using chromatic white light sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makrushin, Andrey; Hildebrandt, Mario; Dittmann, Jana; Clausing, Eric; Fischer, Robert; Vielhauer, Claus

    2012-03-01

    The novel application of sensing technology, based on chromatic white light (CWL), gives a new insight into ballistic analysis of cartridge cases. The CWL sensor uses a beam of white light to acquire highly detailed topography and luminance data simultaneously. The proposed 3D imaging system combines advantages of 3D and 2D image processing algorithms in order to automate the extraction of firearm specific toolmarks shaped on fired specimens. The most important characteristics of a fired cartridge case are the type of the breech face marking as well as size, shape and location of extractor, ejector and firing pin marks. The feature extraction algorithm normalizes the casing surface and consistently searches for the appropriate distortions on the rim and on the primer. The location of the firing pin mark in relation to the lateral scratches on the rim provides unique rotation invariant characteristics of the firearm mechanisms. Additional characteristics are the volume and shape of the firing pin mark. The experimental evaluation relies on the data set of 15 cartridge cases fired from three 9mm firearms of different manufacturers. The results show very high potential of 3D imaging systems for casing-based computer-aided firearm identification, which is prospectively going to support human expertise.

  7. Diagnostic clinical benefits of digital spot and digital 3D mammography following analysis of screening findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtimaki, Mari; Pamilo, Martti; Raulisto, Leena; Roiha, Marja; Kalke, Martti; Siltanen, Samuli; Ihamäki, Timo

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to find out the impact of 3-dimensional digital mammography and digital spot imaging following analysis of the abnormal findings of screening mammograms. Over a period of eight months, digital 3-D mammography imaging TACT Tuned Aperture Computed Tomography+, digital spot imaging (DSI), screen-film mammography imaging (SFM) and diagnostic film imaging (DFM) examinations were performed on 60 symptomatic cases. All patients were recalled because it was not possible to exclude the presence of breast cancer on screening films. Abnormal findings on the screening films were non-specific tumor-like parenchymal densities, parenchymal asymmetries or distortions with or without microcalcifications or just microcalcifications. Mammography work-up (film imaging) included spot compression and microfocus magnification views. The 3-D softcopy reading in all cases was done with Delta 32 TACT mammography workstation, while the film images were read using a mammography-specific light box. During the softcopy reading only windowing tools were allowed. The result of this study indicates that the clinical diagnostic image quality of digital 3-D and digital spot images are better than in film images, even in comparison with diagnostic work-up films. Potential advantages are to define if the mammography finding is caused by a real abnormal lesion or by superimposition of normal parenchymal structures, to detect changes in breast tissue which would otherwise be missed, to verify the correct target for biopsies and to reduce the number of biopsies performed.

  8. A complete system for 3D reconstruction of roots for phenotypic analysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pankaj; Cai, Jinhai; Miklavcic, Stanley J

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a complete system for 3D reconstruction of roots grown in a transparent gel medium or washed and suspended in water. The system is capable of being fully automated as it is self calibrating. The system starts with detection of root tips in root images from an image sequence generated by a turntable motion. Root tips are detected using the statistics of Zernike moments on image patches centred on high curvature points on root boundary and Bayes classification rule. The detected root tips are tracked in the image sequence using a multi-target tracking algorithm. Conics are fitted to the root tip trajectories using a novel ellipse fitting algorithm which weighs the data points by its eccentricity. The conics projected from the circular trajectory have a complex conjugate intersection which are image of the circular points. Circular points constraint the image of the absolute conics which are directly related to the internal parameters of the camera. The pose of the camera is computed from the image of the rotation axis and the horizon. The silhouettes of the roots and camera parameters are used to reconstruction the 3D voxel model of the roots. We show the results of real 3D reconstruction of roots which are detailed and realistic for phenotypic analysis. PMID:25381112

  9. Using articulated scene models for dynamic 3d scene analysis in vista spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuter, Niklas; Swadzba, Agnes; Kummert, Franz; Wachsmuth, Sven

    2010-09-01

    In this paper we describe an efficient but detailed new approach to analyze complex dynamic scenes directly in 3D. The arising information is important for mobile robots to solve tasks in the area of household robotics. In our work a mobile robot builds an articulated scene model by observing the environment in the visual field or rather in the so-called vista space. The articulated scene model consists of essential knowledge about the static background, about autonomously moving entities like humans or robots and finally, in contrast to existing approaches, information about articulated parts. These parts describe movable objects like chairs, doors or other tangible entities, which could be moved by an agent. The combination of the static scene, the self-moving entities and the movable objects in one articulated scene model enhances the calculation of each single part. The reconstruction process for parts of the static scene benefits from removal of the dynamic parts and in turn, the moving parts can be extracted more easily through the knowledge about the background. In our experiments we show, that the system delivers simultaneously an accurate static background model, moving persons and movable objects. This information of the articulated scene model enables a mobile robot to detect and keep track of interaction partners, to navigate safely through the environment and finally, to strengthen the interaction with the user through the knowledge about the 3D articulated objects and 3D scene analysis. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. 3D Axon structure extraction and analysis in confocal fluorescence microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Xiaobo; Lu, Ju; Lichtman, Jeff; Adjeroh, Donald; Wong, Stephen T C

    2008-08-01

    The morphological properties of axons, such as their branching patterns and oriented structures, are of great interest for biologists in the study of the synaptic connectivity of neurons. In these studies, researchers use triple immunofluorescent confocal microscopy to record morphological changes of neuronal processes. Three-dimensional (3D) microscopy image analysis is then required to extract morphological features of the neuronal structures. In this article, we propose a highly automated 3D centerline extraction tool to assist in this task. For this project, the most difficult part is that some axons are overlapping such that the boundaries distinguishing them are barely visible. Our approach combines a 3D dynamic programming (DP) technique and marker-controlled watershed algorithm to solve this problem. The approach consists of tracking and updating along the navigation directions of multiple axons simultaneously. The experimental results show that the proposed method can rapidly and accurately extract multiple axon centerlines and can handle complicated axon structures such as cross-over sections and overlapping objects. PMID:18336075

  11. 3D MRI Analysis of the Lower Legs of Treated Idiopathic Congenital Talipes Equinovarus (Clubfoot)

    PubMed Central

    Duce, Suzanne L.; D’Alessandro, Mariella; Du, Yimeng; Jagpal, Baljit; Gilbert, Fiona J.; Crichton, Lena; Barker, Simon; Collinson, J. Martin; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia

    2013-01-01

    Background Idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV) is the commonest form of clubfoot. Its exact cause is unknown, although it is related to limb development. The aim of this study was to quantify the anatomy of the muscle, subcutaneous fat, tibia, fibula and arteries in the lower legs of teenagers and young adults with CTEV using 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and thus to investigate the anatomical differences between CTEV participants and controls. Methodology/Principal Findings The lower legs of six CTEV (2 bilateral, 4 unilateral) and five control young adults (age 12–28) were imaged using a 3T MRI Philips scanner. 5 of the CTEV participants had undergone soft-tissue and capsular release surgery. 3D T1-weighted and 3D magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) images were acquired. Segmentation software was used for volumetric, anatomical and image analysis. Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests were performed. The volumes of the lower affected leg, muscle, tibia and fibula in unilateral CTEV participants were consistently smaller compared to their contralateral unaffected leg, this was most pronounced in muscle. The proportion of muscle in affected CTEV legs was significantly reduced compared with control and unaffected CTEV legs, whilst proportion of muscular fat increased. No spatial abnormalities in the location or branching of arteries were detected, but hypoplastic anomalies were observed. Conclusions/Significance Combining 3D MRI and MRA is effective for quantitatively characterizing CTEV anatomy. Reduction in leg muscle volume appears to be a sensitive marker. Since 5/6 CTEV cases had soft-tissue surgery, further work is required to confirm that the treatment did not affect the MRI features observed. We propose that the proportion of muscle and intra-muscular fat within the lower leg could provide a valuable addition to current clinical CTEV classification. These measures could be useful for clinical care and guiding treatment pathways, as well as

  12. A Method for 3D Histopathology Reconstruction Supporting Mouse Microvasculature Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yiwen; Pickering, J Geoffrey; Nong, Zengxuan; Gibson, Eli; Arpino, John-Michael; Yin, Hao; Ward, Aaron D

    2015-01-01

    Structural abnormalities of the microvasculature can impair perfusion and function. Conventional histology provides good spatial resolution with which to evaluate the microvascular structure but affords no 3-dimensional information; this limitation could lead to misinterpretations of the complex microvessel network in health and disease. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate an accurate, fully automated 3D histology reconstruction method to visualize the arterioles and venules within the mouse hind-limb. Sections of the tibialis anterior muscle from C57BL/J6 mice (both normal and subjected to femoral artery excision) were reconstructed using pairwise rigid and affine registrations of 5 µm-thick, paraffin-embedded serial sections digitized at 0.25 µm/pixel. Low-resolution intensity-based rigid registration was used to initialize the nucleus landmark-based registration, and conventional high-resolution intensity-based registration method. The affine nucleus landmark-based registration was developed in this work and was compared to the conventional affine high-resolution intensity-based registration method. Target registration errors were measured between adjacent tissue sections (pairwise error), as well as with respect to a 3D reference reconstruction (accumulated error, to capture propagation of error through the stack of sections). Accumulated error measures were lower (p < 0.01) for the nucleus landmark technique and superior vasculature continuity was observed. These findings indicate that registration based on automatic extraction and correspondence of small, homologous landmarks may support accurate 3D histology reconstruction. This technique avoids the otherwise problematic "banana-into-cylinder" effect observed using conventional methods that optimize the pairwise alignment of salient structures, forcing them to be section-orthogonal. This approach will provide a valuable tool for high-accuracy 3D histology tissue reconstructions for

  13. LEWICE3D/GlennHT Particle Analysis of the Honeywell Al502 Low Pressure Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin S.; Rigby, David L.

    2015-01-01

    A flow and ice particle trajectory analysis was performed for the booster of the Honeywell AL502 engine. The analysis focused on two closely related conditions one of which produced a rollback and another which did not rollback during testing in the Propulsion Systems Lab at NASA Glenn Research Center. The flow analysis was generated using the NASA Glenn GlennHT flow solver and the particle analysis was generated using the NASA Glenn LEWICE3D v3.56 ice accretion software. The flow and particle analysis used a 3D steady flow, mixing plane approach to model the transport of flow and particles through the engine. The inflow conditions for the rollback case were: airspeed, 145 ms; static pressure, 33,373 Pa; static temperature, 253.3 K. The inflow conditions for the non-roll-back case were: airspeed, 153 ms; static pressure, 34,252 Pa; static temperature, 260.1 K. Both cases were subjected to an ice particle cloud with a median volume diameter of 24 microns, an ice water content of 2.0 gm3 and a relative humidity of 100 percent. The most significant difference between the rollback and non-rollback conditions was the inflow static temperature which was 6.8 K higher for the non-rollback case.

  14. 3D time series analysis of cell shape using Laplacian approaches

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fundamental cellular processes such as cell movement, division or food uptake critically depend on cells being able to change shape. Fast acquisition of three-dimensional image time series has now become possible, but we lack efficient tools for analysing shape deformations in order to understand the real three-dimensional nature of shape changes. Results We present a framework for 3D+time cell shape analysis. The main contribution is three-fold: First, we develop a fast, automatic random walker method for cell segmentation. Second, a novel topology fixing method is proposed to fix segmented binary volumes without spherical topology. Third, we show that algorithms used for each individual step of the analysis pipeline (cell segmentation, topology fixing, spherical parameterization, and shape representation) are closely related to the Laplacian operator. The framework is applied to the shape analysis of neutrophil cells. Conclusions The method we propose for cell segmentation is faster than the traditional random walker method or the level set method, and performs better on 3D time-series of neutrophil cells, which are comparatively noisy as stacks have to be acquired fast enough to account for cell motion. Our method for topology fixing outperforms the tools provided by SPHARM-MAT and SPHARM-PDM in terms of their successful fixing rates. The different tasks in the presented pipeline for 3D+time shape analysis of cells can be solved using Laplacian approaches, opening the possibility of eventually combining individual steps in order to speed up computations. PMID:24090312

  15. Semi-automated 3D Leaf Reconstruction and Analysis of Trichome Patterning from Light Microscopic Images

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Andrea; Hülskamp, Martin; Tresch, Achim

    2013-01-01

    Trichomes are leaf hairs that are formed by single cells on the leaf surface. They are known to be involved in pathogen resistance. Their patterning is considered to emerge from a field of initially equivalent cells through the action of a gene regulatory network involving trichome fate promoting and inhibiting factors. For a quantitative analysis of single and double mutants or the phenotypic variation of patterns in different ecotypes, it is imperative to statistically evaluate the pattern reliably on a large number of leaves. Here we present a method that enables the analysis of trichome patterns at early developmental leaf stages and the automatic analysis of various spatial parameters. We focus on the most challenging young leaf stages that require the analysis in three dimensions, as the leaves are typically not flat. Our software TrichEratops reconstructs 3D surface models from 2D stacks of conventional light-microscope pictures. It allows the GUI-based annotation of different stages of trichome development, which can be analyzed with respect to their spatial distribution to capture trichome patterning events. We show that 3D modeling removes biases of simpler 2D models and that novel trichome patterning features increase the sensitivity for inter-accession comparisons. PMID:23637587

  16. Analysis results from the Los Alamos 2D/3D program

    SciTech Connect

    Boyack, B.E.; Cappiello, M.W.; Stumpf, H.; Shire, P.; Gilbert, J.; Hedstrom, J.

    1986-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a participant in the 2D/3D program. Activities conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory in support of 2D/3D program goals include analysis support of facility design, construction, and operation; provision of boundary and initial conditions for test facility operations based on analysis of pressurized water reactors; performance of pretest and posttest predictions and analyses; and use of experimental results to validate and assess the single- and multidimensional nonequilibrium features in the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC). During Fiscal Year 1986, Los Alamos conducted analytical assessment activities using data from the Cylindrical Core Test Facility and the Slab Core Test Facility. Los Alamos also continued to provide support analysis for the planning of Upper Plenum Test Facility experiments. Finally, Los Alamos either completed or is currently working on three areas of TRAC modeling improvement. In this paper, Los Alamos activities during Fiscal Year 1986 are summarized; several significant accomplishments are described in more detail to illustrate the work activities at Los Alamos.

  17. 3D visualisation and analysis of single and coalescing tracks in Solid state Nuclear Track Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertheim, David; Gillmore, Gavin; Brown, Louise; Petford, Nick

    2010-05-01

    Exposure to radon gas (222Rn) and associated ionising decay products can cause lung cancer in humans (1). Solid state Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) can be used to monitor radon concentrations (2). Radon particles form tracks in the detectors and these tracks can be etched in order to enable 2D surface image analysis. We have previously shown that confocal microscopy can be used for 3D visualisation of etched SSNTDs (3). The aim of the study was to further investigate track angles and patterns in SSNTDs. A 'LEXT' confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Japan) was used to acquire 3D image datasets of five CR-39 plastic SSNTD's. The resultant 3D visualisations were analysed by eye and inclination angles assessed on selected tracks. From visual assessment, single isolated tracks as well as coalescing tracks were observed on the etched detectors. In addition varying track inclination angles were observed. Several different patterns of track formation were seen such as single isolated and double coalescing tracks. The observed track angles of inclination may help to assess the angle at which alpha particles hit the detector. Darby, S et al. Radon in homes and risk of lung cancer : collaborative analysis of individual data from 13 European case-control studies. British Medical Journal 2005; 330, 223-226. Phillips, P.S., Denman, A.R., Crockett, R.G.M., Gillmore, G., Groves-Kirkby, C.J., Woolridge, A., Comparative Analysis of Weekly vs. Three monthly radon measurements in dwellings. DEFRA Report No., DEFRA/RAS/03.006. (2004). Wertheim D, Gillmore G, Brown L, and Petford N. A new method of imaging particle tracks in Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors. Journal of Microscopy 2010; 237: 1-6.

  18. Correction of magnetotelluric static shift by analysis of 3D forward modelling and measured test data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Wei, Wenbo; Lu, Qingtian; Wang, Huafeng; Zhang, Yawei

    2016-06-01

    To solve the problem of correction of magnetotelluric (MT) static shift, we quantise factors that influence geological environments and observation conditions and study MT static shift according to 3D MT numerical forward modelling and field tests with real data collection. We find that static shift distortions affect both the apparent resistivity and the impedance phase. The distortion results are also related to the frequency. On the basis of synthetic and real data analysis, we propose the concept of generalised static shift resistivity (GSSR) and a new method for correcting MT static shift. The approach is verified by studying 2D inversion models using synthetic and real data.

  19. 3-D in vivo brain tumor geometry study by scaling analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres Hoyos, F.; Martín-Landrove, M.

    2012-02-01

    A new method, based on scaling analysis, is used to calculate fractal dimension and local roughness exponents to characterize in vivo 3-D tumor growth in the brain. Image acquisition was made according to the standard protocol used for brain radiotherapy and radiosurgery, i.e., axial, coronal and sagittal magnetic resonance T1-weighted images, and comprising the brain volume for image registration. Image segmentation was performed by the application of the k-means procedure upon contrasted images. We analyzed glioblastomas, astrocytomas, metastases and benign brain tumors. The results show significant variations of the parameters depending on the tumor stage and histological origin.

  20. 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 2: Advanced special functions models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. B.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1987-01-01

    This Annual Status Report presents the results of work performed during the third year of the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Sections Components program (NASA Contract NAS3-23697). The objective of the program is to produce a series of computer codes that permit more accurate and efficient three-dimensional analyses of selected hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. The computer codes embody a progression of mathematical models and are streamlined to take advantage of geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of material response that distinguish each group of selected components.

  1. CASMO5/TSUNAMI-3D spent nuclear fuel reactivity uncertainty analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrer, R.; Rhodes, J.; Smith, K.

    2012-07-01

    The CASMO5 lattice physics code is used in conjunction with the TSUNAMI-3D sequence in ORNL's SCALE 6 code system to estimate the uncertainties in hot-to-cold reactivity changes due to cross-section uncertainty for PWR assemblies at various burnup points. The goal of the analysis is to establish the multiplication factor uncertainty similarity between various fuel assemblies at different conditions in a quantifiable manner and to obtain a bound on the hot-to-cold reactivity uncertainty over the various assembly types and burnup attributed to fundamental cross-section data uncertainty. (authors)

  2. Analysis of the Possibilities of Using Low-Cost Scanning System in 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedzierski, M.; Wierzbickia, D.; Fryskowska, A.; Chlebowska, B.

    2016-06-01

    The laser scanning technique is still a very popular and fast growing method of obtaining information on modeling 3D objects. The use of low-cost miniature scanners creates new opportunities for small objects of 3D modeling based on point clouds acquired from the scan. The same, the development of accuracy and methods of automatic processing of this data type is noticeable. The article presents methods of collecting raw datasets in the form of a point-cloud using a low-cost ground-based laser scanner FabScan. As part of the research work 3D scanner from an open source FabLab project was constructed. In addition, the results for the analysis of the geometry of the point clouds obtained by using a low-cost laser scanner were presented. Also, some analysis of collecting data of different structures (made of various materials such as: glass, wood, paper, gum, plastic, plaster, ceramics, stoneware clay etc. and of different shapes: oval and similar to oval and prism shaped) have been done. The article presents two methods used for analysis: the first one - visual (general comparison between the 3D model and the real object) and the second one - comparative method (comparison between measurements on models and scanned objects using the mean error of a single sample of observations). The analysis showed, that the low-budget ground-based laser scanner FabScan has difficulties with collecting data of non-oval objects. Items built of glass painted black also caused problems for the scanner. In addition, the more details scanned object contains, the lower the accuracy of the collected point-cloud is. Nevertheless, the accuracy of collected data (using oval-straight shaped objects) is satisfactory. The accuracy, in this case, fluctuates between ± 0,4 mm and ± 1,0 mm whereas when using more detailed objects or a rectangular shaped prism the accuracy is much more lower, between 2,9 mm and ± 9,0 mm. Finally, the publication presents the possibility (for the future expansion of

  3. Comprehensive nanostructure and defect analysis using a simple 3D light-scatter sensor.

    PubMed

    Herffurth, Tobias; Schröder, Sven; Trost, Marcus; Duparré, Angela; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-05-10

    Light scattering measurement and analysis is a powerful tool for the characterization of optical and nonoptical surfaces. A new 3D scatter measurement system based on a detector matrix is presented. A compact light-scatter sensor is used to characterize the scattering and nanostructures of surfaces and to identify the origins of anisotropic scattering features. The results from the scatter sensor are directly compared with white light interferometry to analyze surface defects as well as surface roughness and the corresponding scattering distributions. The scattering of surface defects is modeled based on the Kirchhoff integral equation and the approach of Beckmann for rough surfaces. PMID:23669841

  4. Error analysis in stereo vision for location measurement of 3D point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunting; Zhang, Jun; Tian, Jinwen

    2015-12-01

    Location measurement of 3D point in stereo vision is subjected to different sources of uncertainty that propagate to the final result. For current methods of error analysis, most of them are based on ideal intersection model to calculate the uncertainty region of point location via intersecting two fields of view of pixel that may produce loose bounds. Besides, only a few of sources of error such as pixel error or camera position are taken into account in the process of analysis. In this paper we present a straightforward and available method to estimate the location error that is taken most of source of error into account. We summed up and simplified all the input errors to five parameters by rotation transformation. Then we use the fast algorithm of midpoint method to deduce the mathematical relationships between target point and the parameters. Thus, the expectations and covariance matrix of 3D point location would be obtained, which can constitute the uncertainty region of point location. Afterwards, we turned back to the error propagation of the primitive input errors in the stereo system and throughout the whole analysis process from primitive input errors to localization error. Our method has the same level of computational complexity as the state-of-the-art method. Finally, extensive experiments are performed to verify the performance of our methods.

  5. Structural description and combined 3D display for superior analysis of cerebral vascularity from MRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szekely, Gabor; Koller, Thomas; Kikinis, Ron; Gerig, Guido

    1994-09-01

    Medical image analysis has to support the clinicians ability to identify, manipulate and quantify anatomical structures. On scalar 2D image data, a human observer is often superior to computer assisted analysis, but the interpretation of vector- valued data or data combined from different modalities, especially in 3D, can benefit from computer assistance. The problem of how to convey the complex information to the clinician is often tackled by providing colored multimodality renderings. We propose to go a step beyond by supplying a suitable modelling of anatomical and functional structures encoding important shape features and physical properties. The multiple attributes regarding geometry, topology and function are carried by the symbolic description and can be interactively queried and edited. Integrated 3D rendering of object surfaces and symbolic representation acts as a visual interface to allow interactive communication between the observer and the complex data, providing new possibilities for quantification and therapy planning. The discussion is guided by the prototypical example of investigating the cerebral vasculature in MRA volume data. Geometric, topological and flow-related information can be assessed by interactive analysis on a computer workstation, providing otherwise hidden qualitative and quantitative information. Several case studies demonstrate the potential usage for structure identification, definition of landmarks, assessment of topology for catheterization, and local simulation of blood flow.

  6. Multivariate statistical analysis as a tool for the segmentation of 3D spectral data.

    PubMed

    Lucas, G; Burdet, P; Cantoni, M; Hébert, C

    2013-01-01

    Acquisition of three-dimensional (3D) spectral data is nowadays common using many different microanalytical techniques. In order to proceed to the 3D reconstruction, data processing is necessary not only to deal with noisy acquisitions but also to segment the data in term of chemical composition. In this article, we demonstrate the value of multivariate statistical analysis (MSA) methods for this purpose, allowing fast and reliable results. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) coupled with a focused ion beam (FIB), a stack of spectrum images have been acquired on a sample produced by laser welding of a nickel-titanium wire and a stainless steel wire presenting a complex microstructure. These data have been analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) and factor rotations. PCA allows to significantly improve the overall quality of the data, but produces abstract components. Here it is shown that rotated components can be used without prior knowledge of the sample to help the interpretation of the data, obtaining quickly qualitative mappings representative of elements or compounds found in the material. Such abundance maps can then be used to plot scatter diagrams and interactively identify the different domains in presence by defining clusters of voxels having similar compositions. Identified voxels are advantageously overlaid on secondary electron (SE) images with higher resolution in order to refine the segmentation. The 3D reconstruction can then be performed using available commercial softwares on the basis of the provided segmentation. To asses the quality of the segmentation, the results have been compared to an EDX quantification performed on the same data. PMID:24035679

  7. Analysis of fracture networks in a reservoir dolomite by 3D micro-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorn, Maarten; Hoyer, Stefan; Exner, Ulrike; Reuschlé, Thierry

    2013-04-01

    Narrow fractures in reservoir rocks can be of great importance when determining the hydrocarbon potential of such a reservoir. Such fractures can contribute significantly to - or even be dominant for - the porosity and permeability characteristics of such rocks. Investigating these narrow fractures is therefore important, but not always trivial. Standard laboratory measurements on sample plugs from a reservoir are not always suitable for fractured rocks. Thin section analysis can provide very important information, but mostly only in 2D. Also other sources of information have major drawbacks, such as FMI (Formation Micro-Imager) during coring (insufficient resolution) and hand specimen analysis (no internal information). 3D imaging of reservoir rock samples is a good alternative and extension to the methods mentioned above. The 3D information is in our case obtained by X-ray Micro-Computed Tomography (µCT) imaging. Our used samples are 2 and 3 cm diameter plugs of a narrowly fractured (apertures generally <200 µm) reservoir dolomite (Hauptdolomit formation) from below the Vienna Basin, Austria. µCT has the large advantage of being non-destructive to the samples, and with the chosen sample sizes and settings, the sample rocks and fractures can be imaged with sufficient quality at sufficient resolution. After imaging, the fracture networks need to be extracted (segmented) from the background. Unfortunately, available segmentation approaches in the literature do not provide satisfactory results on such narrow fractures. We therefore developed the multiscale Hessian fracture filter, with which we are able to extract the fracture networks from the datasets in a better way. The largest advantages of this technique are that it is inherently 3D, runs on desktop computers with limited resources, and is implemented in public domain software (ImageJ / FIJI). The results from the multiscale Hessian fracture filtering approach serve as input for porosity determination. Also

  8. Development of computer program NAS3D using Vector processing for geometric nonlinear analysis of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangalgiri, P. D.; Prabhakaran, R.

    1986-01-01

    An algorithm for vectorized computation of stiffness matrices of an 8 noded isoparametric hexahedron element for geometric nonlinear analysis was developed. This was used in conjunction with the earlier 2-D program GAMNAS to develop the new program NAS3D for geometric nonlinear analysis. A conventional, modified Newton-Raphson process is used for the nonlinear analysis. New schemes for the computation of stiffness and strain energy release rates is presented. The organization the program is explained and some results on four sample problems are given. The study of CPU times showed that savings by a factor of 11 to 13 were achieved when vectorized computation was used for the stiffness instead of the conventional scalar one. Finally, the scheme of inputting data is explained.

  9. A 3D endoscopy reconstruction as a saliency map for analysis of polyp shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruano, Josue; Martínez, Fabio; Gómez, Martín.; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    A first diagnosis of colorectal cancer is performed by examination of polyp shape and appearance during an endoscopy routine procedure. However, the video-endoscopy is highly noisy because exacerbated physiological conditions like increased motility or secretion may limit the visual analysis of lesions. In this work a 3D reconstruction of the digestive tract is proposed, facilitating the polyp shape evaluation by highlighting its surface geometry and allowing an analysis from different perspectives. The method starts by a spatio-temporal map, constructed to group the different regions of the tract by their similar dynamic patterns during the sequence. Then, such map was convolved with a second derivative of a Gaussian kernel that emulates the camera distortion and allows to highlight the polyp surface. The position initialization in each frame of the kernel was computed from expert manual delineation and propagated along the sequence based on. Results show reliable reconstructions, with a salient 3D polyp structure that can then be better observed.

  10. Detection of ancient morphology and potential hydrocarbon traps using 3-D seismic data and attribute analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Heggland, R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the use of seismic attributes on 3D data to reveal Tertiary and Cretaceous geological features in Norwegian block 9/2. Some of the features would hardly be possible to map using only 2D seismic data. The method which involves a precise interpretation of horizons, attribute analysis and manipulation of colour displays, may be useful when studying morphology, faults and hydrocarbon traps. The interval of interest in this study was from 0 to 1.5 s TWT. Horizontal displays (timeslices and attribute maps), seemed to highlight very nicely geological features such as shallow channels, fractures, karst topography and faults. The attributes used for mapping these features were amplitude, total reflection energy (a volume or time interval attribute), dip and azimuth. The choice of colour scale and manipulation of colour displays were also critical for the results. The data examples clearly demonstrate how it is possible to achieve a very detailed mapping of geological features using 3D seismic data and attribute analysis. The results of this study were useful for the understanding of hydrocarbon migration paths and hydrocarbon traps.

  11. A coordinate-free method for the analysis of 3D facial change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Zhili; Siebert, Jan Paul; Cockshott, W. Paul; Ayoub, Ashraf Farouk

    2004-05-01

    Euclidean Distance Matrix Analysis (EDMA) is widely held as the most important coordinate-free method by which to analyze landmarks. It has been used extensively in the field of medical anthropometry and has already produced many useful results. Unfortunately this method renders little information regarding the surface on which these points are located and accordingly is inadequate for the 3D analysis of surface anatomy. Here we shall present a new inverse surface flatness metric, the ratio between the Geodesic and the Euclidean inter-landmark distances. Because this metric also only reflects one aspect of three-dimensional shape, i.e. surface flatness, we have combined it with the Euclidean distance to investigate 3D facial change. The goal of this investigation is to be able to analyze three-dimensional facial change in terms of bilateral symmetry as encoded both by surface flatness and by geometric configuration. Our initial study, based on 25 models of surgically managed children (unilateral cleft lip repair) and 40 models of control children at the age of 2 years, indicates that the faces of the surgically managed group were found to be significantly less symmetric than those of the control group in terms of surface flatness, geometric configuration and overall symmetry.

  12. Photometric analysis as an aid to 3D reconstruction of indoor scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serfaty, Veronique; Ackah-Miezan, Andrew; Lutton, Evelyne; Gagalowicz, Andre

    1993-06-01

    In an Image Understanding framework, our aim is to reconstruct an actual indoor scene from a (sequence of) color pair(s) of stereoscopic images. The desired (synthesis-oriented) description requires the analysis of both 3D geometric and photometric parameters in order to use the feedback provided by image synthesis to control the image analysis. The environment model is a hierarchy of polyhedral 3D objects (planar lambertian facets). Two main physical phenomena determine the image intensities: surface reflectance properties and light sources. From illumination models established in Computer Graphics, we derive the appropriate irradiance equations. Rather than use a point source located at infinity, we choose instead isotropic point sources with decreasing energy. This allows us to discriminate small irradiance gradients inside regions. For indoor scenes, such photometric models are more realistic, due to the presence of ceiling lights, desk lamps, and so on. Both a photometric reconstruction algorithm and a technique for localizing the 'dominant' light source are presented along with lighting simulations. For comparison purposes, corresponding artificial images are shown. Using this work, we wish to highlight the fruitful cooperation between the Vision and Graphics domains in order to perform a more accurate scene reconstruction, both photometrically and geometrically. The emphasis is on the illumination characterization which influences the scene interpretation.

  13. Shape Analysis of 3D Head Scan Data for U.S. Respirator Users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Ziqing; Slice, DennisE; Benson, Stacey; Lynch, Stephanie; Viscusi, DennisJ

    2010-12-01

    In 2003, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted a head-and-face anthropometric survey of diverse, civilian respirator users. Of the 3,997 subjects measured using traditional anthropometric techniques, surface scans and 26 three-dimensional (3D) landmark locations were collected for 947 subjects. The objective of this study was to report the size and shape variation of the survey participants using the 3D data. Generalized Procrustes Analysis (GPA) was conducted to standardize configurations of landmarks associated with individuals into a common coordinate system. The superimposed coordinates for each individual were used as commensurate variables that describe individual shape and were analyzed using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to identify population variation. The first four principal components (PC) account for 49% of the total sample variation. The first PC indicates that overall size is an important component of facial variability. The second PC accounts for long and narrow or short and wide faces. Longer narrow orbits versus shorter wider orbits can be described by PC3, and PC4 represents variation in the degree of ortho/prognathism. Geometric Morphometrics provides a detailed and interpretable assessment of morphological variation that may be useful in assessing respirators and devising new test and certification standards.

  14. Analysis of Impact of 3D Printing Technology on Traditional Manufacturing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Niyan; Chen, Qi; Liao, Linzhi; Wang, Xin

    With quiet rise of 3D printing technology in automobile, aerospace, industry, medical treatment and other fields, many insiders hold different opinions on its development. This paper objectively analyzes impact of 3D printing technology on mold making technology and puts forward the idea of fusion and complementation of 3D printing technology and mold making technology through comparing advantages and disadvantages of 3D printing mold and traditional mold making technology.

  15. Analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs by computer tomography (cone beam CT)--3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Marques, Jeidson; Musse, Jamilly; Caetano, Catarina; Corte-Real, Francisco; Corte-Real, Ana Teresa

    2013-12-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) analysis of forensic evidence is highlighted in comparison with traditional methods. This three-dimensional analysis is based on the registration of the surface from a bitten object. The authors propose to use Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), which is used in dental practice, in order to study the surface and interior of bitten objects and dental casts of suspects. In this study, CBCT is applied to the analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs, which may be found in a forensic case scenario. 6 different types of foodstuffs were used: chocolate, cheese, apple, chewing gum, pizza and tart (flaky pastry and custard). The food was bitten into and dental casts of the possible suspects were made. The dental casts and bitten objects were registered using an x-ray source and the CBCT equipment iCAT® (Pennsylvania, EUA). The software InVivo5® (Anatomage Inc, EUA) was used to visualize and analyze the tomographic slices and 3D reconstructions of the objects. For each material an estimate of its density was assessed by two methods: HU values and specific gravity. All the used materials were successfully reconstructed as good quality 3D images. The relative densities of the materials in study were compared. Amongst the foodstuffs, the chocolate had the highest density (median value 100.5 HU and 1,36 g/cm(3)), while the pizza showed to have the lowest (median value -775 HU and 0,39 g/cm(3)), on both scales. Through tomographic slices and three-dimensional reconstructions it was possible to perform the metric analysis of the bite marks in all the foodstuffs, except for the pizza. These measurements could also be obtained from the dental casts. The depth of the bite mark was also successfully determined in all the foodstuffs except for the pizza. Cone Beam Computed Tomography has the potential to become an important tool for forensic sciences, namely for the registration and analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs that may be found in a crime

  16. Advanced methods for 3-D inelastic structural analysis for hot engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    Three-dimensional Inelastic Analysis Methods are described. These methods were incorporated into a series of new computer codes embodying a progression of mathematical models (mechanics of materials, specialty finite element, boundary element) for streamlined analysis of hot engine structures such as: (1) combustor liners, (2) turbine blades, and (3) turbine vanes. These models address the effects of high temperatures and thermal/mechanical loadings on the local (stress/strain) and global (displacements, frequencies, amplitudes, buckling) structural behavior of the three respective components. The methods and the three computer codes, referred to as MOMM (Mechanics Of Materials Model), MHOST (MARC-Hot Section Technology), and BEST3D (Boundary Element Stress Technology), have been developed and are briefly described.

  17. Analysis of the SL-1 Accident Using RELAPS5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Francisco, A.D. and Tomlinson, E. T.

    2007-11-08

    On January 3, 1961, at the National Reactor Testing Station, in Idaho Falls, Idaho, the Stationary Low Power Reactor No. 1 (SL-1) experienced a major nuclear excursion, killing three people, and destroying the reactor core. The SL-1 reactor, a 3 MW{sub t} boiling water reactor, was shut down and undergoing routine maintenance work at the time. This paper presents an analysis of the SL-1 reactor excursion using the RELAP5-3D thermal-hydraulic and nuclear analysis code, with the intent of simulating the accident from the point of reactivity insertion to destruction and vaporization of the fuel. Results are presented, along with a discussion of sensitivity to some reactor and transient parameters (many of the details are only known with a high level of uncertainty).

  18. Thermal analysis of 3D composites by a new fast multipole hybrid boundary node method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yu; Wang, Qiao; Zhu, Hongping; Li, Yinping

    2014-01-01

    This paper applies the hybrid boundary node method (Hybrid BNM) for the thermal analysis of 3D composites. A new formulation is derived for the inclusion-based composites. In the new formulation, the unknowns of the interfaces are assembled only once in the final system equation, which can reduce nearly one half of degrees of freedom (DOFs) compared with the conventional multi-domain solver when there are lots of inclusions. A new version of the fast multipole method (FMM) is also coupled with the new formulation and the technique is applied to thermal analysis of composites with many inclusions. In the new fast multipole hybrid boundary node method (FM-HBNM), a diagonal form for translation operators is used and the method presented can be applied to the computation of more than 1,000,000 DOFs on a personal computer. Numerical examples are presented to analyze the thermal behavior of composites with many inclusions.

  19. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Special finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, S.

    1987-01-01

    This Annual Status Report presents the results of work performed during the third year of the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Section Components program (NASA Contract NAS3-23697). The objective of the program is to produce a series of new computer codes that permit more accurate and efficient three-dimensional analysis of selected hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. The computer codes embody a progression of mathematical models and are streamlined to take advantage of geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of material response that distinguish each group of selected components. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume 1 describes effort performed under Task 4B, Special Finite Element Special Function Models, while Volume 2 concentrates on Task 4C, Advanced Special Functions Models.

  20. 3-D geometrical analysis tool for meteoroids/debris impact risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borde, J.; Drolshagen, G.

    1991-01-01

    It is widely appreciated that meteoroids and space debris are critical factors in the safety and reliability of future missions, especially long-term mission such as the Space Station Freedom. In this paper, enhanced a 3-D numerical analysis tool for meteoroids/debris risk evaluation is presented. It is based on presently available environment and particle/wall interaction models together with spacecraft shielding design. This provides impact probabilities and resulting damaging effects using realistic geometrical treatments. The shielding by other parts of the spacecraft is considered. It accounts for directional and geometrical effects both in the environment and in the damage evaluation. It includes the latest environment and design models and allows an easy updating of these data as they are improved upon. This tool is a new application of the ESABASE framework, a geometrical system level analysis and engineering tool developed by MATRA ESPACE for ESA/ESTEC.

  1. Analysis of Annular Thermoelectric Couples with Nonuniform Temperature Distribution by Means of 3-D Multiphysics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauknecht, Andreas; Steinert, Torsten; Spengler, Carsten; Suck, Gerrit

    2013-07-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) modules with annular geometry are very attractive for waste heat recovery within the automotive world, especially when integrated as stacks into tubular heat exchangers. The required temperature difference is built up between the coolant, which flows inside an inner tube, and the exhaust gas, which flows around an outer tube. The flow pattern of the exhaust gas can be axial or circumferential, which can lead to higher heat transfer coefficients on the outer surface of the tube. However, this multidimensional construction in combination with a complex flow pattern can lead to a nonuniform heat flux. Additionally, the system experiences a nonuniform temperature distribution which consequently leads to complex conditions regarding the electrical potential. The relevant effects are investigated using a three-dimensional (3-D) numerical model implemented in the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation environment Star-CCM+. The model supports temperature-dependent characteristics of the materials, contact resistances, and parasitic effects in the TE module. Furthermore, it involves techniques to quickly find the exact maximum power point of the TE module with the given boundary conditions. Using the validated model the influence of the nonuniform temperature distribution is investigated with emphasis on the electrical output and TE efficiency.

  2. Segmentation and Tracking of Adherens Junctions in 3D for the Analysis of Epithelial Tissue Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cilla, Rodrigo; Mechery, Vinodh; Hernandez de Madrid, Beatriz; Del Signore, Steven; Dotu, Ivan; Hatini, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial morphogenesis generates the shape of tissues, organs and embryos and is fundamental for their proper function. It is a dynamic process that occurs at multiple spatial scales from macromolecular dynamics, to cell deformations, mitosis and apoptosis, to coordinated cell rearrangements that lead to global changes of tissue shape. Using time lapse imaging, it is possible to observe these events at a system level. However, to investigate morphogenetic events it is necessary to develop computational tools to extract quantitative information from the time lapse data. Toward this goal, we developed an image-based computational pipeline to preprocess, segment and track epithelial cells in 4D confocal microscopy data. The computational pipeline we developed, for the first time, detects the adherens junctions of epithelial cells in 3D, without the need to first detect cell nuclei. We accentuate and detect cell outlines in a series of steps, symbolically describe the cells and their connectivity, and employ this information to track the cells. We validated the performance of the pipeline for its ability to detect vertices and cell-cell contacts, track cells, and identify mitosis and apoptosis in surface epithelia of Drosophila imaginal discs. We demonstrate the utility of the pipeline to extract key quantitative features of cell behavior with which to elucidate the dynamics and biomechanical control of epithelial tissue morphogenesis. We have made our methods and data available as an open-source multiplatform software tool called TTT (http://github.com/morganrcu/TTT) PMID:25884654

  3. BWR ex-vessel steam explosion analysis with MC3D code

    SciTech Connect

    Leskovar, M.

    2012-07-01

    A steam explosion may occur, during a severe reactor accident, when the molten core comes into contact with the coolant water. A strong enough steam explosion in a nuclear power plant could jeopardize the containment integrity and so lead to a direct release of radioactive material to the environment. To resolve the open issues in steam explosion understanding and modeling, the OECD program SERENA phase 2 was launched at the end of year 2007, focusing on reactor applications. To verify the progress made in the understanding and modeling of fuel coolant interaction key phenomena for reactor applications a reactor exercise has been performed. In this paper the BWR ex-vessel steam explosion study, which was carried out with the MC3D code in conditions of the SERENA reactor exercise for the BWR case, is presented and discussed. The premixing simulations were performed with two different jet breakup modeling approaches and the explosion was triggered also at the expected most challenging time. For the most challenging case, at the cavity wall the highest calculated pressure was {approx}20 MPa and the highest pressure impulse was {approx}90 kPa.s. (authors)

  4. Automated extraction and analysis of rock discontinuity characteristics from 3D point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchetti, Matteo; Villa, Alberto; Agliardi, Federico; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2016-04-01

    A reliable characterization of fractured rock masses requires an exhaustive geometrical description of discontinuities, including orientation, spacing, and size. These are required to describe discontinuum rock mass structure, perform Discrete Fracture Network and DEM modelling, or provide input for rock mass classification or equivalent continuum estimate of rock mass properties. Although several advanced methodologies have been developed in the last decades, a complete characterization of discontinuity geometry in practice is still challenging, due to scale-dependent variability of fracture patterns and difficult accessibility to large outcrops. Recent advances in remote survey techniques, such as terrestrial laser scanning and digital photogrammetry, allow a fast and accurate acquisition of dense 3D point clouds, which promoted the development of several semi-automatic approaches to extract discontinuity features. Nevertheless, these often need user supervision on algorithm parameters which can be difficult to assess. To overcome this problem, we developed an original Matlab tool, allowing fast, fully automatic extraction and analysis of discontinuity features with no requirements on point cloud accuracy, density and homogeneity. The tool consists of a set of algorithms which: (i) process raw 3D point clouds, (ii) automatically characterize discontinuity sets, (iii) identify individual discontinuity surfaces, and (iv) analyse their spacing and persistence. The tool operates in either a supervised or unsupervised mode, starting from an automatic preliminary exploration data analysis. The identification and geometrical characterization of discontinuity features is divided in steps. First, coplanar surfaces are identified in the whole point cloud using K-Nearest Neighbor and Principal Component Analysis algorithms optimized on point cloud accuracy and specified typical facet size. Then, discontinuity set orientation is calculated using Kernel Density Estimation and

  5. A Direct analysis of elastic contact using super elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Pauli

    2006-02-01

    Solutions to contact problems are important in mechanical as well as in civil engineering, and even for the most simple problems there is still a need for research results. In the present paper we suggest an alternative finite element procedure and by examples show the need for more knowledge related to the compliance of contact surfaces. The most simple solutions are named Hertz solutions from 1882, and we use some of these solutions for comparison with our finite element results. As a function of the total contact force we find the size of the contact area, the distribution of the contact pressure, and the contact compliance. In models of finite size the compliance depends on the flexibility of the total model, including the boundary condition of the model, and therefore disagreement with the locally based analytical models is expected and found. With computational contact mechanics we can solve more advanced contact problems and treat models that are closer to physical reality. The finite element method is widely used and solutions are obtained by incrementation and/or iteration for these non-linear problems with unknown boundary conditions. Still with these advanced tools the solution is difficult because of extreme sensitivity. Here we present a direct analysis of elastic contact without incrementation and iteration, and the procedure is based on a finite element super element technique. This means that the contacting bodies can be analyzed independently, and are only coupled through a direct analysis with low order super element stiffness matrices. The examples of the present paper are restricted to axisymmetric problems with isotropic, elastic materials and excluding friction. Direct extensions to cases of non-isotropy, including laminates, and to plane and general 3D models are possible.

  6. Novel 3D Microscopic Analysis of Human Placental Villous Trees Reveals Unexpected Significance of Branching Angles

    PubMed Central

    Haeussner, Eva; Buehlmeyer, Antonia; Schmitz, Christoph; von Koch, Franz Edler; Frank, Hans-Georg

    2014-01-01

    The villous trees of human placentas delineate the fetomaternal border and are complex three-dimensional (3D) structures. Thus far, they have primarily been analyzed as thin, two-dimensional (2D) histological sections. However, 2D sections cannot provide access to key aspects such as branching nodes and branch order. Using samples taken from 50 normal human placentas at birth, in the present study we show that analysis procedures for 3D reconstruction of neuronal dendritic trees can also be used for analyzing trees of human placentas. Nodes and their branches (e.g., branching hierarchy, branching angles, diameters, and lengths of branches) can be efficiently measured in whole-mount preparations of isolated villous trees using high-end light microscopy. Such data differ qualitatively from the data obtainable from histological sections and go substantially beyond the morphological horizon of such histological data. Unexpectedly, branching angles of terminal branches of villous trees varied inversely with the fetoplacental weight ratio, a widely used clinical parameter. Since branching angles have never before been determined in the human placenta, this result requires further detailed studies in order to fully understand its impact. PMID:25155961

  7. Comparative 3D Genome Structure Analysis of the Fission and the Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ke; Tjong, Harianto; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine; Alber, Frank

    2015-01-01

    We studied the 3D structural organization of the fission yeast genome, which emerges from the tethering of heterochromatic regions in otherwise randomly configured chromosomes represented as flexible polymer chains in an nuclear environment. This model is sufficient to explain in a statistical manner many experimentally determined distinctive features of the fission yeast genome, including chromatin interaction patterns from Hi-C experiments and the co-locations of functionally related and co-expressed genes, such as genes expressed by Pol-III. Our findings demonstrate that some previously described structure-function correlations can be explained as a consequence of random chromatin collisions driven by a few geometric constraints (mainly due to centromere-SPB and telomere-NE tethering) combined with the specific gene locations in the chromosome sequence. We also performed a comparative analysis between the fission and budding yeast genome structures, for which we previously detected a similar organizing principle. However, due to the different chromosome sizes and numbers, substantial differences are observed in the 3D structural genome organization between the two species, most notably in the nuclear locations of orthologous genes, and the extent of nuclear territories for genes and chromosomes. However, despite those differences, remarkably, functional similarities are maintained, which is evident when comparing spatial clustering of functionally related genes in both yeasts. Functionally related genes show a similar spatial clustering behavior in both yeasts, even though their nuclear locations are largely different between the yeast species. PMID:25799503

  8. SAFE-3D analysis of a piezoelectric transducer to excite guided waves in a rail web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramatlo, Dineo A.; Long, Craig S.; Loveday, Philip W.; Wilke, Daniel N.

    2016-02-01

    Our existing Ultrasonic Broken Rail Detection system detects complete breaks and primarily uses a propagating mode with energy concentrated in the head of the rail. Previous experimental studies have demonstrated that a mode with energy concentrated in the head of the rail, is capable of detecting weld reflections at long distances. Exploiting a mode with energy concentrated in the web of the rail would allow us to effectively detect defects in the web of the rail and could also help to distinguish between reflections from welds and cracks. In this paper, we will demonstrate the analysis of a piezoelectric transducer attached to the rail web. The forced response at different frequencies is computed by the Semi-Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) method and compared to a full three-dimensional finite element method using ABAQUS. The SAFE method only requires the rail track cross-section to be meshed using two-dimensional elements. The ABAQUS model in turn requires a full three-dimensional discretisation of the rail track. The SAFE approach can yield poor predictions at cut-on frequencies associated with other modes in the rail. Problematic frequencies are identified and a suitable frequency range identified for transducer design. The forced response results of the two methods were found to be in good agreement with each other. We then use a previously developed SAFE-3D method to analyse a practical transducer over the selected frequency range. The results obtained from the SAFE-3D method are in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  9. Image-based 3D scene analysis for navigation of autonomous airborne systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Klaus; Bers, Karl-Heinz

    2001-10-01

    In this paper we describe a method for automatic determination of sensor pose (position and orientation) related to a 3D landmark or scene model. The method is based on geometrical matching of 2D image structures with projected elements of the associated 3D model. For structural image analysis and scene interpretation, a blackboard-based production system is used resulting in a symbolic description of image data. Knowledge of the approximated sensor pose measured for example by IMU or GPS enables to estimate an expected model projection used for solving the correspondence problem of image structures and model elements. These correspondences are presupposed for pose computation carried out by nonlinear numerical optimization algorithms. We demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method by navigation update approaching a bridge scenario and flying over urban area, whereas data were taken with airborne infrared sensors in high oblique view. In doing so we simulated image-based navigation for target engagement and midcourse guidance suited for the concepts of future autonomous systems like missiles and drones.

  10. 3D optoelectronic analysis of interfractional patient setup variability in frameless extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baroni, Guido . E-mail: guido.baroni@polimi.it; Garibaldi, Cristina; Riboldi, Marco; Spadea, Maria F.; Catalano, Gianpiero; Tagaste, Barbara B.S.; Tosi, Giampiero; Orecchia, Roberto; Pedotti, Antonio

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate size and frequency of interfractional patient setup variability in hypofractionated stereotactic extracranial radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Infrared optical 3D tracking of surface markers was applied to quantify setup variability on 51 patients. Isocenter position repeatability was assessed by means of frameless anatomic calibration and was compared with portal image evaluation. Specific data analysis allowed for compensation of patients' breathing movements and for separation of the effects of operator-dependent misalignments and respiration-induced displacements. Effects of patient position (supine vs. prone) and treatment table configuration were investigated. Results: Patient positioning assisted by the optical tracking device allowed reducing displacements of surface control points within the 3-mm range. Errors in isocenter localization were in the range of a few millimeters. This was in agreement with the portal image evaluation. Breathing motion introduced appreciable errors, which increased control points and isocenter 3D variability. This effect was significantly higher than those related to other investigated factors. Conclusions: The role of infrared optical tracking devices for patient positioning is assessed on a large patient population. Their use in the frame of high-precision radiotherapy is emphasized by the application of related methodologies for breathing phase detection and frameless isocenter localization.

  11. Texture analysis of the 3D collagen network and automatic classification of the physiology of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaojuan; Wu, Jianping; Swift, Benjamin; Kirk, Thomas Brett

    2015-07-01

    A close relationship has been found between the 3D collagen structure and physiological condition of articular cartilage (AC). Studying the 3D collagen network in AC offers a way to determine the condition of the cartilage. However, traditional qualitative studies are time consuming and subjective. This study aims to develop a computer vision-based classifier to automatically determine the condition of AC tissue based on the structural characteristics of the collagen network. Texture analysis was applied to quantitatively characterise the 3D collagen structure in normal (International Cartilage Repair Society, ICRS, grade 0), aged (ICRS grade 1) and osteoarthritic cartilages (ICRS grade 2). Principle component techniques and linear discriminant analysis were then used to classify the microstructural characteristics of the 3D collagen meshwork and the condition of the AC. The 3D collagen meshwork in the three physiological condition groups displayed distinctive characteristics. Texture analysis indicated a significant difference in the mean texture parameters of the 3D collagen network between groups. The principle component and linear discriminant analysis of the texture data allowed for the development of a classifier for identifying the physiological status of the AC with an expected prediction error of 4.23%. An automatic image analysis classifier has been developed to predict the physiological condition of AC (from ICRS grade 0 to 2) based on texture data from the 3D collagen network in the tissue. PMID:24428581

  12. Laser Scanning for 3D Object Characterization: Infrastructure for Exploration and Analysis of Vegetation Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, K.; Höfle, B.

    2012-04-01

    Mapping and characterization of the three-dimensional nature of vegetation is increasingly gaining in importance. Deeper insight is required for e.g. forest management, biodiversity assessment, habitat analysis, precision agriculture, renewable energy production or the analysis of interaction between biosphere and atmosphere. However the potential of 3D vegetation characterization has not been exploited so far and new technologies are needed. Laser scanning has evolved into the state-of-the-art technology for highly accurate 3D data acquisition. By now several studies indicated a high value of 3D vegetation description by using laser data. The laser sensors provide a detailed geometric presentation (geometric information) of scanned objects as well as a full profile of laser energy that was scattered back to the sensor (radiometric information). In order to exploit the full potential of these datasets, profound knowledge on laser scanning technology for data acquisition, geoinformation technology for data analysis and object of interest (e.g. vegetation) for data interpretation have to be joined. A signature database is a collection of signatures of reference vegetation objects acquired under known conditions and sensor parameters and can be used to improve information extraction from unclassified vegetation datasets. Different vegetation elements (leaves, branches, etc.) at different heights above ground with different geometric composition contribute to the overall description (i.e. signature) of the scanned object. The developed tools allow analyzing tree objects according to single features (e.g. echo width and signal amplitude) and to any relation of features and derived statistical values (e.g. ratio of laser point attributes). For example, a single backscatter cross section value does not allow for tree species determination, whereas the average echo width per tree segment can give good estimates. Statistical values and/or distributions (e.g. Gaussian

  13. 3D texture analysis of solitary pulmonary nodules using co-occurrence matrix from volumetric lung CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhara, Ashis Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we have investigated a new approach for texture features extraction using co-occurrence matrix from volumetric lung CT image. Traditionally texture analysis is performed in 2D and is suitable for images collected from 2D imaging modality. The use of 3D imaging modalities provide the scope of texture analysis from 3D object and 3D texture feature are more realistic to represent 3D object. In this work, Haralick's texture features are extended in 3D and computed from volumetric data considering 26 neighbors. The optimal texture features to characterize the internal structure of Solitary Pulmonary Nodules (SPN) are selected based on area under curve (AUC) values of ROC curve and p values from 2-tailed Student's t-test. The selected texture feature in 3D to represent SPN can be used in efficient Computer Aided Diagnostic (CAD) design plays an important role in fast and accurate lung cancer screening. The reduced number of input features to the CAD system will decrease the computational time and classification errors caused by irrelevant features. In the present work, SPN are classified from Ground Glass Nodule (GGN) using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) classifier considering top five 3D texture features and top five 2D texture features separately. The classification is performed on 92 SPN and 25 GGN from Imaging Database Resources Initiative (IDRI) public database and classification accuracy using 3D texture features and 2D texture features provide 97.17% and 89.1% respectively.

  14. 3D GeoWall Analysis System for Shuttle External Tank Foreign Object Debris Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Richard; Navard, Andrew; Spruce, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    An analytical, advanced imaging method has been developed for the initial monitoring and identification of foam debris and similar anomalies that occur post-launch in reference to the space shuttle s external tank (ET). Remote sensing technologies have been used to perform image enhancement and analysis on high-resolution, true-color images collected with the DCS 760 Kodak digital camera located in the right umbilical well of the space shuttle. Improvements to the camera, using filters, have added sharpness/definition to the image sets; however, image review/analysis of the ET has been limited by the fact that the images acquired by umbilical cameras during launch are two-dimensional, and are usually nonreferenceable between frames due to rotation translation of the ET as it falls away from the space shuttle. Use of stereo pairs of these images can enable strong visual indicators that can immediately portray depth perception of damaged areas or movement of fragments between frames is not perceivable in two-dimensional images. A stereoscopic image visualization system has been developed to allow 3D depth perception of stereo-aligned image pairs taken from in-flight umbilical and handheld digital shuttle cameras. This new system has been developed to augment and optimize existing 2D monitoring capabilities. Using this system, candidate sequential image pairs are identified for transformation into stereo viewing pairs. Image orientation is corrected using control points (similar points) between frames to place the two images in proper X-Y viewing perspective. The images are then imported into the WallView stereo viewing software package. The collected control points are used to generate a transformation equation that is used to re-project one image and effectively co-register it to the other image. The co-registered, oriented image pairs are imported into a WallView image set and are used as a 3D stereo analysis slide show. Multiple sequential image pairs can be used

  15. 3D pore-network analysis and permeability estimation of deformation bands hosted in carbonate grainstones.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambrano, Miller; Tondi, Emanuele; Mancini, Lucia; Trias, F. Xavier; Arzilli, Fabio; Lanzafame, Gabriele; Aibibula, Nijiati

    2016-04-01

    In porous rocks strain is commonly localized in narrow Deformation Bands (DBs), where the petrophysical properties are significantly modified with respect the pristine rock. As a consequence, DBs could have an important effect on production and development of porous reservoirs representing baffles zones or, in some cases, contribute to reservoir compartmentalization. Taking in consideration that the decrease of permeability within DBs is related to changes in the porous network properties (porosity, connectivity) and the pores morphology (size distribution, specific surface area), an accurate porous network characterization is useful for understanding both the effect of deformation banding on the porous network and their influence upon fluid flow through the deformed rocks. In this work, a 3D characterization of the microstructure and texture of DBs hosted in porous carbonate grainstones was obtained at the Elettra laboratory (Trieste, Italy) by using two different techniques: phase-contrast synchrotron radiation computed microtomography (micro-CT) and microfocus X-ray micro-CT. These techniques are suitable for addressing quantitative analysis of the porous network and implementing Computer Fluid Dynamics (CFD)experiments in porous rocks. Evaluated samples correspond to grainstones highly affected by DBs exposed in San Vito Lo Capo peninsula (Sicily, Italy), Favignana Island (Sicily, Italy) and Majella Mountain (Abruzzo, Italy). For the analysis, the data were segmented in two main components porous and solid phases. The properties of interest are porosity, connectivity, a grain and/or porous textural properties, in order to differentiate host rock and DBs in different zones. Permeability of DB and surrounding host rock were estimated by the implementation of CFD experiments, permeability results are validated by comparing with in situ measurements. In agreement with previous studies, the 3D image analysis and flow simulation indicate that DBs could be constitute

  16. Non-linear dynamic analysis of ancient masonry structures by 3D rigid block models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orduña, Agustin; Ayala, A. Gustavo

    2015-12-01

    This work presents a formulation for non-linear dynamic analysis of unreinforced masonry structures using rigid block models. This procedure is akin to the distinct element family of methods, nevertheless, we assume that small displacements occur and, therefore, the formulation does not involve the search for new contacts between blocks. This proposal is also related to the rigid element method, although, in this case we use full three-dimensional models and a more robust interface formulation.

  17. A novel mesh processing based technique for 3D plant analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In recent years, imaging based, automated, non-invasive, and non-destructive high-throughput plant phenotyping platforms have become popular tools for plant biology, underpinning the field of plant phenomics. Such platforms acquire and record large amounts of raw data that must be accurately and robustly calibrated, reconstructed, and analysed, requiring the development of sophisticated image understanding and quantification algorithms. The raw data can be processed in different ways, and the past few years have seen the emergence of two main approaches: 2D image processing and 3D mesh processing algorithms. Direct image quantification methods (usually 2D) dominate the current literature due to comparative simplicity. However, 3D mesh analysis provides the tremendous potential to accurately estimate specific morphological features cross-sectionally and monitor them over-time. Result In this paper, we present a novel 3D mesh based technique developed for temporal high-throughput plant phenomics and perform initial tests for the analysis of Gossypium hirsutum vegetative growth. Based on plant meshes previously reconstructed from multi-view images, the methodology involves several stages, including morphological mesh segmentation, phenotypic parameters estimation, and plant organs tracking over time. The initial study focuses on presenting and validating the accuracy of the methodology on dicotyledons such as cotton but we believe the approach will be more broadly applicable. This study involved applying our technique to a set of six Gossypium hirsutum (cotton) plants studied over four time-points. Manual measurements, performed for each plant at every time-point, were used to assess the accuracy of our pipeline and quantify the error on the morphological parameters estimated. Conclusion By directly comparing our automated mesh based quantitative data with manual measurements of individual stem height, leaf width and leaf length, we obtained the mean

  18. Inlining 3d Reconstruction, Multi-Source Texture Mapping and Semantic Analysis Using Oblique Aerial Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frommholz, D.; Linkiewicz, M.; Poznanska, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes an in-line method for the simplified reconstruction of city buildings from nadir and oblique aerial images that at the same time are being used for multi-source texture mapping with minimal resampling. Further, the resulting unrectified texture atlases are analyzed for façade elements like windows to be reintegrated into the original 3D models. Tests on real-world data of Heligoland/ Germany comprising more than 800 buildings exposed a median positional deviation of 0.31 m at the façades compared to the cadastral map, a correctness of 67% for the detected windows and good visual quality when being rendered with GPU-based perspective correction. As part of the process building reconstruction takes the oriented input images and transforms them into dense point clouds by semi-global matching (SGM). The point sets undergo local RANSAC-based regression and topology analysis to detect adjacent planar surfaces and determine their semantics. Based on this information the roof, wall and ground surfaces found get intersected and limited in their extension to form a closed 3D building hull. For texture mapping the hull polygons are projected into each possible input bitmap to find suitable color sources regarding the coverage and resolution. Occlusions are detected by ray-casting a full-scale digital surface model (DSM) of the scene and stored in pixel-precise visibility maps. These maps are used to derive overlap statistics and radiometric adjustment coefficients to be applied when the visible image parts for each building polygon are being copied into a compact texture atlas without resampling whenever possible. The atlas bitmap is passed to a commercial object-based image analysis (OBIA) tool running a custom rule set to identify windows on the contained façade patches. Following multi-resolution segmentation and classification based on brightness and contrast differences potential window objects are evaluated against geometric constraints and

  19. The 3D EdgeRunner Pipeline: a novel shape-based analysis for neoplasms characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yepes-C, Fernando; Johnson, Rebecca; Lao, Yi; Hwang, Darryl; Coloigner, Julie; Yap, Felix; Bushan, Desai; Cheng, Phillip; Gill, Inderbir; Duddalwar, Vinay; Lepore, Natasha

    2016-03-01

    The characterization of tumors after being imaged is currently a qualitative process performed by skilled professionals. If we can aid their diagnosis by identifying quantifiable features associated with tumor classification, we may avoid invasive procedures such as biopsies and enhance efficiency. The aim of this paper is to describe the 3D EdgeRunner Pipeline which characterizes the shape of a tumor. Shape analysis is relevant as malignant tumors tend to be more lobular and benign ones tare generally more symmetrical. The method described considers the distance from each point on the edge of the tumor to the centre of a synthetically created field of view. The method then determines coordinates where the measured distances are rapidly changing (peaks) using a second derivative found by five point differentiation. The list of coordinates considered to be peaks can then be used as statistical data to compare tumors quantitatively. We have found this process effectively captures the peaks on a selection of kidney tumors.

  20. Noise analysis for near field 3-D FM-CW radar imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.

    2015-06-19

    Near field radar imaging systems are used for several applications including concealed weapon detection in airports and other high-security venues. Despite the near-field operation, phase noise and thermal noise can limit the performance in several ways including reduction in system sensitivity and reduction of image dynamic range. In this paper, the effects of thermal noise, phase noise, and processing gain are analyzed in the context of a near field 3-D FM-CW imaging radar as might be used for concealed weapon detection. In addition to traditional frequency domain analysis, a time-domain simulation is employed to graphically demonstrate the effect of these noise sources on a fast-chirping FM-CW system.

  1. Motion error analysis of the 3D coordinates of airborne lidar for typical terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Tao; Lan, Tian; Ni, Guoqiang

    2013-07-01

    A motion error model of 3D coordinates is established and the impact on coordinate errors caused by the non-ideal movement of the airborne platform is analyzed. The simulation results of the model show that when the lidar system operates at high altitude, the influence on the positioning errors derived from laser point cloud spacing is small. For the model the positioning errors obey simple harmonic vibration whose amplitude envelope gradually reduces with the increase of the vibration frequency. When the vibration period number is larger than 50, the coordinate errors are almost uncorrelated with time. The elevation error is less than the plane error and in the plane the error in the scanning direction is less than the error in the flight direction. Through the analysis of flight test data, the conclusion is verified.

  2. 3D Plasma Clusters: Analysis of dynamical evolution and individual particle interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Antonova, T.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.; Annaratone, B. M.

    2008-09-07

    3D plasma clusters (up to 100 particles) have been built inside small (32 mm{sup 3}) plasma volume in gravity. It has been estimated that the external confinement has a negligible influence on the processes inside the clusters. At such conditions the analysis of dynamical evolution and individual particle interactions have shown that the binary interaction among particles in addition to the repelling Coulomb force exhibits also an attractive part. The tendency of the systems to approach the state with minimum energy by rearranging particles inside has been detected. The measured 63 particles' cluster vibrations are in close agreement with vibrations of a drop with surface tension. This indicates that even a 63 particle cluster already exhibits properties normally associated with the cooperative regime.

  3. Wavelet transform analysis of truncated fringe patterns in 3-D surface profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorthi, Sai Siva; Lolla, Kameswara R.

    2005-06-01

    Wavelet transform analysis of projected fringe pattern for phase recovery in 3-D shape measurement of objects is investigated. The present communication specifically outlines and evaluates the errors that creep in to the reconstructed profiles when fringe images do not satisfy periodicity. Three specific cases that give raise to non-periodicity of fringe image are simulated and leakage effects caused by each one of them are analyzed with continuous complex Morlet wavelet transform. Same images are analyzed with FFT method to make a comparison of the reconstructed profiles with both methods. Simulation results revealed a significant advantage of wavelet transform profilometry (WTP), that the distortions that arise due to leakage are confined to the locations of discontinuity and do not spread out over the entire projection as in the case of Fourier transform profilometry (FTP).

  4. A 3-D Magnetic Analysis of a Linear Alternator For a Stirling Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Steven M.; Schwarze, Gene E.; Niedra, Janis M.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center and the Department of Energy (DOE) are developing advanced radioisotope Stirling convertors, under contract with Stirling Technology Company (STC), for space applications. Of critical importance to the successful development of the Stirling convertor for space power applications is the development of a lightweight and highly efficient linear alternator. This paper presents a 3-D finite element method (FEM) approach for evaluating Stirling convertor linear alternators. Preliminary correlations with open-circuit voltage measurements provide an encouraging level of confidence in the model. Spatial plots of magnetic field strength (H) are presented in the region of the exciting permanent magnets. These plots identify regions of high H, where at elevated temperature and under electrical load, the potential to alter the magnetic moment of the magnets exists. This implies the need for further testing and analysis.

  5. Thermal hydraulic analysis for the Oregon State TRIGA reactor using RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Marcum, W.R.; Woods, B.G.; Hartman, M.

    2008-07-15

    Thermal hydraulic analyses have being conducted at Oregon State University (OSU) in support of the conversion of the OSU TRIGA reactor (OSTR) core from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel as part of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program. The goals of the thermal hydraulic analyses were to calculate natural circulation flow rates, coolant temperatures and fuel temperatures as a function of core power for both the HEU and LEU cores; calculate peak values of fuel temperature, cladding temperature, surface heat flux as well as departure from nuclear boiling ratio (DNBR) for steady state and pulse operation; and perform accident analyses for the accident scenarios identified in the OSTR safety analysis report. RELAP5-3D Version 2.4.2 was implemented to develop a model for the thermal hydraulic study. The OSTR core conversion is planned to take place in late 2008. (author)

  6. Analysis of Composite Panel-Stiffener Debonding Using a Shell/3D Modeling Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2006-01-01

    Interlaminar fracture mechanics has proven useful for characterizing the onset of delaminations in composites and has been used with limited success primarily to investigate onset in fracture toughness specimens and laboratory size coupon type specimens. Future acceptance of the methodology by industry and certification authorities however, requires the successful demonstration of the methodology on structural level. For this purpose a panel was selected that was reinforced with stringers. Shear loading cases the panel to buckle and the resulting out-of-plane deformations initiate skin/stringer separation at the location of an embedded defect. For finite element analysis, the panel and surrounding load fixture were modeled with shell element. A small section of the stringer foot and the panel in the vicinity of the embedded defect were modeled with a local 3D solid model. A failure index was calculated by correlating computed mixed-mode failure criterion of the graphite/epoxy material.

  7. Evaluation of 3D multimodality image registration using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holton Tainter, Kerrie S.; Robb, Richard A.; Taneja, Udita; Gray, Joel E.

    1995-04-01

    Receiver operating characteristic analysis has evolved as a useful method for evaluating the discriminatory capability and efficacy of visualization. The ability of such analysis to account for the variance in decision criteria of multiple observers, multiple reading, and a wide range of difficulty in detection among case studies makes ROC especially useful for interpreting the results of a viewing experiment. We are currently using ROC analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of using fused multispectral, or complementary multimodality imaging data in the diagnostic process. The use of multispectral image recordings, gathered from multiple imaging modalities, to provide advanced image visualization and quantization capabilities in evaluating medical images is an important challenge facing medical imaging scientists. Such capabilities would potentially significantly enhance the ability of clinicians to extract scientific and diagnostic information from images. a first step in the effective use of multispectral information is the spatial registration of complementary image datasets so that a point-to-point correspondence exists between them. We are developing a paradigm of measuring the accuracy of existing image registration techniques which includes the ability to relate quantitative measurements, taken from the images themselves, to the decisions made by observers about the state of registration (SOR) of the 3D images. We have used ROC analysis to evaluate the ability of observers to discriminate between correctly registered and incorrectly registered multimodality fused images. We believe this experience is original and represents the first time that ROC analysis has been used to evaluate registered/fused images. We have simulated low-resolution and high-resolution images from real patient MR images of the brain, and fused them with the original MR to produce colorwash superposition images whose exact SOR is known. We have also attempted to extend this analysis to

  8. UNIQUIMER 3D, a software system for structural DNA nanotechnology design, analysis and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jinhao; Wei, Bryan; Yuan, Yuan; Mi, Yongli

    2009-01-01

    A user-friendly software system, UNIQUIMER 3D, was developed to design DNA structures for nanotechnology applications. It consists of 3D visualization, internal energy minimization, sequence generation and construction of motif array simulations (2D tiles and 3D lattices) functionalities. The system can be used to check structural deformation and design errors under scaled-up conditions. UNIQUIMER 3D has been tested on the design of both existing motifs (holiday junction, 4 × 4 tile, double crossover, DNA tetrahedron, DNA cube, etc.) and nonexisting motifs (soccer ball). The results demonstrated UNIQUIMER 3D's capability in designing large complex structures. We also designed a de novo sequence generation algorithm. UNIQUIMER 3D was developed for the Windows environment and is provided free of charge to the nonprofit research institutions. PMID:19228709

  9. 3-D stress analysis in laminated plates using a combination of ANSYS and sub-element/deficient approximation function analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanovich, A.; Pastore, C.; Kumar, V.; German, M.

    1994-12-31

    The method of combining the use of ANSYS SOLID 46 finite element and the sub-element/deficient approximation function (SEDAF) analysis is developed and demonstrated on the benchmark problem of Pagano. The algorithm incorporates a primary displacement calculation using ANSYS and the successive stress calculation using 3-D SEDAF analysis. A special mathematical procedure aimed to convert the global displacement output of the commercial finite element code into the local displacement input of the SEDAF analysis is presented. The results show a considerably higher accuracy provided by this combination compared to the original ANSYS results when calculating both the in-plane and transverse stresses, especially for their values at the interfaces. After some generalization, the presented ANSYS/SEDAF algorithm seems to be promising for obtaining a sufficiently accurate 3-D stress distributions in any structural analysis problem allowing for the application of ANSYS code.

  10. 3D analysis of the reactivity insertion accident in VVER-1000

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullayev, A. M.; Zhukov, A. I.; Slyeptsov, S. M.

    2012-07-01

    Fuel parameters such as peak enthalpy and temperature during rod ejection accident are calculated. The calculations are performed by 3D neutron kinetics code NESTLE and 3D thermal-hydraulic code VIPRE-W. Both hot zero power and hot full power cases were studied for an equilibrium cycle with Westinghouse hex fuel in VVER-1000. It is shown that the use of 3D methodology can significantly increase safety margins for current criteria and met future criteria. (authors)

  11. 3D visual discomfort predictor: analysis of horizontal disparity and neural activity statistics.

    PubMed

    Park, Jincheol; Oh, Heeseok; Lee, Sanghoon; Bovik, Alan Conrad

    2015-03-01

    Being able to predict the degree of visual discomfort that is felt when viewing stereoscopic 3D (S3D) images is an important goal toward ameliorating causative factors, such as excessive horizontal disparity, misalignments or mismatches between the left and right views of stereo pairs, or conflicts between different depth cues. Ideally, such a model should account for such factors as capture and viewing geometries, the distribution of disparities, and the responses of visual neurons. When viewing modern 3D displays, visual discomfort is caused primarily by changes in binocular vergence while accommodation in held fixed at the viewing distance to a flat 3D screen. This results in unnatural mismatches between ocular fixations and ocular focus that does not occur in normal direct 3D viewing. This accommodation vergence conflict can cause adverse effects, such as headaches, fatigue, eye strain, and reduced visual ability. Binocular vision is ultimately realized by means of neural mechanisms that subserve the sensorimotor control of eye movements. Realizing that the neuronal responses are directly implicated in both the control and experience of 3D perception, we have developed a model-based neuronal and statistical framework called the 3D visual discomfort predictor (3D-VDP)that automatically predicts the level of visual discomfort that is experienced when viewing S3D images. 3D-VDP extracts two types of features: 1) coarse features derived from the statistics of binocular disparities and 2) fine features derived by estimating the neural activity associated with the processing of horizontal disparities. In particular, we deploy a model of horizontal disparity processing in the extrastriate middle temporal region of occipital lobe. We compare the performance of 3D-VDP with other recent discomfort prediction algorithms with respect to correlation against recorded subjective visual discomfort scores,and show that 3D-VDP is statistically superior to the other methods. PMID

  12. 3D combinational curves for accuracy and performance analysis of positive biometrics identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yingzi; Chang, Chein-I.

    2008-06-01

    The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve has been widely used as an evaluation criterion to measure the accuracy of biometrics system. Unfortunately, such an ROC curve provides no indication of the optimum threshold and cost function. In this paper, two kinds of 3D combinational curves are proposed: the 3D combinational accuracy curve and the 3D combinational performance curve. The 3D combinational accuracy curve gives a balanced view of the relationships among FAR (false alarm rate), FRR (false rejection rate), threshold t, and Cost. Six 2D curves can be derived from the 3D combinational accuracy curve: the conventional 2D ROC curve, 2D curve of (FRR, t), 2D curve of (FAR, t), 2D curve of (FRR, Cost), 2D curve of (FAR, Cost), and 2D curve of ( t, Cost). The 3D combinational performance curve can be derived from the 3D combinational accuracy curve which can give a balanced view among Security, Convenience, threshold t, and Cost. The advantages of using the proposed 3D combinational curves are demonstrated by iris recognition systems where the experimental results show that the proposed 3D combinational curves can provide more comprehensive information of the system accuracy and performance.

  13. Phenylalanine-508 mediates a cytoplasmic-membrane domain contact in the CFTR 3D structure crucial to assembly and channel function.

    PubMed

    Serohijos, Adrian W R; Hegedus, Tamás; Aleksandrov, Andrei A; He, Lihua; Cui, Liying; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Riordan, John R

    2008-03-01

    Deletion of phenylalanine-508 (Phe-508) from the N-terminal nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, disrupts both its folding and function and causes most cystic fibrosis. Most mutant nascent chains do not pass quality control in the ER, and those that do remain thermally unstable, only partially functional, and are rapidly endocytosed and degraded. Although the lack of the Phe-508 peptide backbone diminishes the NBD1 folding yield, the absence of the aromatic side chain is primarily responsible for defective CFTR assembly and channel gating. However, the site of interdomain contact by the side chain is unknown as is the high-resolution 3D structure of the complete protein. Here we present a 3D structure of CFTR, constructed by molecular modeling and supported biochemically, in which Phe-508 mediates a tertiary interaction between the surface of NBD1 and a cytoplasmic loop (CL4) in the C-terminal membrane-spanning domain (MSD2). This crucial cytoplasmic membrane interface, which is dynamically involved in regulation of channel gating, explains the known sensitivity of CFTR assembly to many disease-associated mutations in CL4 as well as NBD1 and provides a sharply focused target for small molecules to treat CF. In addition to identifying a key intramolecular site to be repaired therapeutically, our findings advance understanding of CFTR structure and function and provide a platform for focused biochemical studies of other features of this unique ABC ion channel. PMID:18305154

  14. Phenylalanine-508 mediates a cytoplasmic–membrane domain contact in the CFTR 3D structure crucial to assembly and channel function

    PubMed Central

    Serohijos, Adrian W. R.; Hegedűs, Tamás; Aleksandrov, Andrei A.; He, Lihua; Cui, Liying; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Riordan, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Deletion of phenylalanine-508 (Phe-508) from the N-terminal nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, disrupts both its folding and function and causes most cystic fibrosis. Most mutant nascent chains do not pass quality control in the ER, and those that do remain thermally unstable, only partially functional, and are rapidly endocytosed and degraded. Although the lack of the Phe-508 peptide backbone diminishes the NBD1 folding yield, the absence of the aromatic side chain is primarily responsible for defective CFTR assembly and channel gating. However, the site of interdomain contact by the side chain is unknown as is the high-resolution 3D structure of the complete protein. Here we present a 3D structure of CFTR, constructed by molecular modeling and supported biochemically, in which Phe-508 mediates a tertiary interaction between the surface of NBD1 and a cytoplasmic loop (CL4) in the C-terminal membrane-spanning domain (MSD2). This crucial cytoplasmic membrane interface, which is dynamically involved in regulation of channel gating, explains the known sensitivity of CFTR assembly to many disease-associated mutations in CL4 as well as NBD1 and provides a sharply focused target for small molecules to treat CF. In addition to identifying a key intramolecular site to be repaired therapeutically, our findings advance understanding of CFTR structure and function and provide a platform for focused biochemical studies of other features of this unique ABC ion channel. PMID:18305154

  15. Tear analysis in contact lens wearers.

    PubMed Central

    Farris, R L

    1985-01-01

    Tear analysis in contact lens wearers was compared with tear analysis in aphakics without contact lens wear and normal phakic patients. Subjects were divided into five groups: group 1, aphakic without contact lens; group 2, phakic with daily-wear hard contact lens; group 3, phakic with daily-wear soft contact lens; group 4, phakic with extended-wear soft contact lens; and group 5, aphakic with extended-wear soft contact lens. The experimental groups were compared with age- and sex-matched control groups for statistical analysis of tear variables by means of the Student's t-test. The variables measured were tear osmolarity, tear albumin, and lysozyme and lactoferrin concentrations in basal and reflex tears. Highly significant elevations of tear osmolarity were found in aphakic subjects without contact lenses. Less significant differences in tear osmolarity were found in phakic subjects with hard daily-wear lenses or with extended-wear soft lenses. Tear albumin, lysozyme, and lactoferrin in basal and reflex tears were not significantly different in the different groups of contact lens wearers or in the group of aphakic subjects without contact lenses compared with their control groups. Individual variations in tear albumin, lysozyme, and lactoferrin appeared to be responsible for the inability to demonstrate significant differences in tear composition in association with the wearing of different types of contact lenses. Older and aphakic patients demonstrated a tendency to have increased concentrations of proteins in the tears compared with younger, phakic contact lens wearers and normal controls without contact lenses. PMID:3914131

  16. 3-D MT modelling and HMT analysis for the north-west part of Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ślęzak, Katarzyna; Brasse, Heinrich; Jóźwiak, Waldemar; Nowożyński, Krzysztof

    2014-05-01

    The area covered by magnetotelluric survey is a part of the Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ). The TESZ is the largest tectonic boundary in Europe, extending from the British Isles through Poland to the Black Sea. Several two-dimensional (2-D) models of the electrical resistivity distribution have already been constructed for this area but it turned out that the region had a complicated, three-dimensional structure. Thus a three-dimensional (3-D) inversion model appears to be relevant and interesting to investigate. In cooperation with the Berlin Magnetotelluric Work Group several additional long-period magnetotelluric (LMT) sites were assembled in 2012 and 2013. The mesh was located in the north-west part of Poland (Pomerania region). As a result we obtained 17 new sites over the surface area of approximately of 100 km × 50 km, in addition to 9 stations set up earlier. The collected data were converted to a uniform format and the initial processing was executed. By using the latest software the transfer functions (impedances) and the ellipses of the phase tensor for the sites of our mesh have been calculated. The apparent resistivities and phase responses as functions of period are calculated from the impedance components. The computer program ModEM (Egbert G.D., Kelbert A., 2012), which is used for this work, is a parallel 3-D inversion program for magnetotelluric data. The inversion code employs MPI and, besides impedances, includes tippers and magnetic tensor. The main result of this work is a 3-D model with a good RMS fit of ~2.2 which we could compare with previous outcomes. In this model two prominent, NW-SE striking conductive lineaments located in the mid-crustal levels are noticed. These structures we relate tentatively to the Variscan and Caledonian deformation fronts. Also the analysis of the invariants of the Horizontal Magnetic Tensor (HMT) obtained from previous results (Jozwiak, 2012) allowed us to examine the TESZ in more detail.

  17. Earth Science Research Discovery, Integration, 3D Visualization and Analysis using NASA World Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alameh, N.; Hogan, P.

    2008-12-01

    more possible to include virtual globe capability in support of any Earth science objective. 3- With the source code being fully accessible, anyone can advance this technology (including in a commercial or other proprietary manner). Such features enable World Wind to provide easy discovery, access and 3D integration/visualization/analysis of Earth observation data in a flexible, customizable open source tool. This positions World Wind to become a key part of an Advanced Information Systems infrastructure supporting a collaborative decision-making environment for a variety of applications.

  18. Within-guild dietary discrimination from 3-D textural analysis of tooth microwear in insectivorous mammals

    PubMed Central

    Purnell, M A; Crumpton, N; Gill, P G; Jones, G; Rayfield, E J

    2013-01-01

    Resource exploitation and competition for food are important selective pressures in animal evolution. A number of recent investigations have focused on linkages between diversification, trophic morphology and diet in bats, partly because their roosting habits mean that for many bat species diet can be quantified relatively easily through faecal analysis. Dietary analysis in mammals is otherwise invasive, complicated, time consuming and expensive. Here we present evidence from insectivorous bats that analysis of three-dimensional (3-D) textures of tooth microwear using International Organization for Standardization (ISO) roughness parameters derived from sub-micron surface data provides an additional, powerful tool for investigation of trophic resource exploitation in mammals. Our approach, like scale-sensitive fractal analysis, offers considerable advantages over two-dimensional (2-D) methods of microwear analysis, including improvements in robustness, repeatability and comparability of studies. Our results constitute the first analysis of microwear textures in carnivorous mammals based on ISO roughness parameters. They demonstrate that the method is capable of dietary discrimination, even between cryptic species with subtly different diets within trophic guilds, and even when sample sizes are small. We find significant differences in microwear textures between insectivore species whose diet contains different proportions of ‘hard’ prey (such as beetles) and ‘soft’ prey (such as moths), and multivariate analyses are able to distinguish between species with different diets based solely on their tooth microwear textures. Our results show that, compared with previous 2-D analyses of microwear in bats, ISO roughness parameters provide a much more sophisticated characterization of the nature of microwear surfaces and can yield more robust and subtle dietary discrimination. ISO-based textural analysis of tooth microwear thus has a useful role to play

  19. surf3d: A 3-D finite-element program for the analysis of surface and corner cracks in solids subjected to mode-1 loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A computer program, surf3d, that uses the 3D finite-element method to calculate the stress-intensity factors for surface, corner, and embedded cracks in finite-thickness plates with and without circular holes, was developed. The cracks are assumed to be either elliptic or part eliptic in shape. The computer program uses eight-noded hexahedral elements to model the solid. The program uses a skyline storage and solver. The stress-intensity factors are evaluated using the force method, the crack-opening displacement method, and the 3-D virtual crack closure methods. In the manual the input to and the output of the surf3d program are described. This manual also demonstrates the use of the program and describes the calculation of the stress-intensity factors. Several examples with sample data files are included with the manual. To facilitate modeling of the user's crack configuration and loading, a companion program (a preprocessor program) that generates the data for the surf3d called gensurf was also developed. The gensurf program is a three dimensional mesh generator program that requires minimal input and that builds a complete data file for surf3d. The program surf3d is operational on Unix machines such as CRAY Y-MP, CRAY-2, and Convex C-220.

  20. Prospective in (Primate) Dental Analysis through Tooth 3D Topographical Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Franck; Gouvard, Florent; Boistel, Renaud; Euriat, Adelaïde; Lazzari, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    The occlusal morphology of the teeth is mostly determined by the enamel-dentine junction morphology; the enamel-dentine junction plays the role of a primer and conditions the formation of the occlusal enamel reliefs. However, the accretion of the enamel cap yields thickness variations that alter the morphology and the topography of the enamel–dentine junction (i.e., the differential deposition of enamel by the ameloblasts create an external surface that does not necessarily perfectly parallel the enamel–dentine junction). This self-reliant influence of the enamel on tooth morphology is poorly understood and still under-investigated. Studies considering the relationship between enamel and dentine morphologies are rare, and none of them tackled this relationship in a quantitative way. Major limitations arose from: (1) the difficulties to characterize the tooth morphology in its comprehensive tridimensional aspect and (2) practical issues in relating enamel and enamel–dentine junction quantitative traits. We present new aspects of form representation based exclusively on 3D analytical tools and procedures. Our method is applied to a set of 21 unworn upper second molars belonging to eight extant anthropoid genera. Using geometrical analysis of polygonal meshes representatives of the tooth form, we propose a 3D dataset that constitutes a detailed characterization of the enamel and of the enamel–dentine junction morphologies. Also, for the first time, to our knowledge, we intend to establish a quantitative method for comparing enamel and enamel–dentine junction surfaces descriptors (elevation, inclination, orientation, etc.). New indices that allow characterizing the occlusal morphology are proposed and discussed. In this note, we present technical aspects of our method with the example of anthropoid molars. First results show notable individual variations and taxonomic heterogeneities for the selected topographic parameters and for the pattern and strength of

  1. Molecular Determinants of Juvenile Hormone Action as Revealed by 3D QSAR Analysis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Beňo, Milan; Farkaš, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Background Postembryonic development, including metamorphosis, of many animals is under control of hormones. In Drosophila and other insects these developmental transitions are regulated by the coordinate action of two principal hormones, the steroid ecdysone and the sesquiterpenoid juvenile hormone (JH). While the mode of ecdysone action is relatively well understood, the molecular mode of JH action remains elusive. Methodology/Principal Findings To gain more insights into the molecular mechanism of JH action, we have tested the biological activity of 86 structurally diverse JH agonists in Drosophila melanogaster. The results were evaluated using 3D QSAR analyses involving CoMFA and CoMSIA procedures. Using this approach we have generated both computer-aided and species-specific pharmacophore fingerprints of JH and its agonists, which revealed that the most active compounds must possess an electronegative atom (oxygen or nitrogen) at both ends of the molecule. When either of these electronegative atoms are replaced by carbon or the distance between them is shorter than 11.5 Å or longer than 13.5 Å, their biological activity is dramatically decreased. The presence of an electron-deficient moiety in the middle of the JH agonist is also essential for high activity. Conclusions/Significance The information from 3D QSAR provides guidelines and mechanistic scope for identification of steric and electrostatic properties as well as donor and acceptor hydrogen-bonding that are important features of the ligand-binding cavity of a JH target protein. In order to refine the pharmacophore analysis and evaluate the outcomes of the CoMFA and CoMSIA study we used pseudoreceptor modeling software PrGen to generate a putative binding site surrogate that is composed of eight amino acid residues corresponding to the defined molecular interactions. PMID:19547707

  2. Prospective in (Primate) dental analysis through tooth 3D topographical quantification.

    PubMed

    Guy, Franck; Gouvard, Florent; Boistel, Renaud; Euriat, Adelaïde; Lazzari, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    The occlusal morphology of the teeth is mostly determined by the enamel-dentine junction morphology; the enamel-dentine junction plays the role of a primer and conditions the formation of the occlusal enamel reliefs. However, the accretion of the enamel cap yields thickness variations that alter the morphology and the topography of the enamel-dentine junction (i.e., the differential deposition of enamel by the ameloblasts create an external surface that does not necessarily perfectly parallel the enamel-dentine junction). This self-reliant influence of the enamel on tooth morphology is poorly understood and still under-investigated. Studies considering the relationship between enamel and dentine morphologies are rare, and none of them tackled this relationship in a quantitative way. Major limitations arose from: (1) the difficulties to characterize the tooth morphology in its comprehensive tridimensional aspect and (2) practical issues in relating enamel and enamel-dentine junction quantitative traits. We present new aspects of form representation based exclusively on 3D analytical tools and procedures. Our method is applied to a set of 21 unworn upper second molars belonging to eight extant anthropoid genera. Using geometrical analysis of polygonal meshes representatives of the tooth form, we propose a 3D dataset that constitutes a detailed characterization of the enamel and of the enamel-dentine junction morphologies. Also, for the first time, to our knowledge, we intend to establish a quantitative method for comparing enamel and enamel-dentine junction surfaces descriptors (elevation, inclination, orientation, etc.). New indices that allow characterizing the occlusal morphology are proposed and discussed. In this note, we present technical aspects of our method with the example of anthropoid molars. First results show notable individual variations and taxonomic heterogeneities for the selected topographic parameters and for the pattern and strength of

  3. 3D models as a platform for urban analysis and studies on human perception of space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher-Gewirtzman, D.

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this work is to develop an integrated visual analysis and modelling for environmental and urban systems in respect to interior space layout and functionality. This work involves interdisciplinary research efforts that focus primarily on architecture design discipline, yet incorporates experts from other and different disciplines, such as Geoinformatics, computer sciences and environment-behavior studies. This work integrates an advanced Spatial Openness Index (SOI) model within realistic geovisualized Geographical Information System (GIS) environment and assessment using subjective residents' evaluation. The advanced SOI model measures the volume of visible space at any required view point practically, for every room or function. This model enables accurate 3D simulation of the built environment regarding built structure and surrounding vegetation. This paper demonstrates the work on a case study. A 3D model of Neve-Shaanan neighbourhood in Haifa was developed. Students that live in this neighbourhood had participated in this research. Their apartments were modelled in details and inserted into a general model, representing topography and the volumes of buildings. The visual space for each room in every apartment was documented and measured and at the same time the students were asked to answer questions regarding their perception of space and view from their residence. The results of this research work had shown potential contribution to professional users, such as researchers, designers and city planners. This model can be easily used by professionals and by non-professionals such as city dwellers, contractors and developers. This work continues with additional case studies having different building typologies and functions variety, using virtual reality tools.

  4. Reservoir lithofacies analysis using 3D seismic data in dissimilarity space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, M.; Riahi, M. A.; Hashemi, H.

    2013-06-01

    Seismic data interpretation is one of the most important steps in exploration seismology. Seismic facies analysis (SFA) with emphasis on lithofacies can be used to extract more information about structures and geology, which results in seismic interpretation enhancement. Facies analysis is based on unsupervised and supervised classification using seismic attributes. In this paper, supervised classification by a support vector machine using well logs and seismic attributes is applied. Dissimilarity as a new measuring space is employed, after which classification is carried out. Often, SFA is carried out in a feature space in which each dimension stands as a seismic attribute. Different facies show lots of class overlap in the feature space; hence, high classification error values are reported. Therefore, decreasing class overlap before classification is a necessary step to be targeted. To achieve this goal, a dissimilarity space is initially created. As a result of the definition of the new space, the class overlap between objects (seismic samples) is reduced and hence the classification can be done reliably. This strategy causes an increase in the accuracy of classification, and a more trustworthy lithofacies analysis is attained. For applying this method, 3D seismic data from an oil field in Iran were selected and the results obtained by a support vector classifier (SVC) in dissimilarity space are presented, discussed and compared with the SVC applied in conventional feature space.

  5. Cake porosity analysis using 1D-3D fractal dimensions in coagulation-microfiltration of NOM.

    PubMed

    Raspati, G S; Leiknes, T O

    2015-01-01

    Fouling during coagulation-ceramic microfiltration of natural organic matter was investigated. Two process configurations (inline coagulation (IC) and tank coagulation (TC)) and two process conditions (types of coagulants-aluminum-based PAX and iron-based PIX-and G-values) were studied. The rate of irreversible fouling corresponding to the increase of initial transmembrane pressure after backwash of IC-PAX was lowest followed by TC-PAX and TC-PIX, while the performance of IC-PIX was found worst. The 1D and 2D fractal analysis revealed that flocs from IC were morphologically different from those of TC, leading to different filtration characteristics. The 3D fractal analysis revealed two groups of morphologically similar flocs: one led to successful filtration experiments, whereas the other led to unsuccessful ones. Cake porosity was found dependent on the floc morphology. Thus, such an approach was found complementary with fouling analysis by means of a membrane fouling model and minimization of fouling phenomenon was achieved by combining the two approaches. PMID:25768221

  6. Estimation of Hydraulic Fracturing in the Earth Fill Dam by 3-D Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Shin-Ichi

    It is necessary to calculate strength and strain for estimation of hydraulic fracturing in the earth fill dam, and to which the FEM is effective. 2-D analysis can produce good results to some extent if an embankment is linear and the plain strain condition can be set to the cross section. However, there may be some conditions not possible to express in the 2-D plain because the actual embankment of agricultural reservoirs is formed by straight and curved lines. Moreover, it may not be possible to precisely calculate strain in the direction of dam axis because the 2-D analysis in the cross section cannot take the shape in the vertical section into consideration. Therefore, we performed 3-D built up analysis targeting the actually-leaked agricultural reservoir to examine hazards of hydraulic fracturing based on the shape of an embankment and by rapid impoundment of water. It resulted in the occurrence of hydraulic fracturing to develop by water pressure due to the vertical cracks caused by tensile strain in the valley and refractive section of the foundation.

  7. Localization of spots in FISH images of breast cancer using 3-D shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Les, T; Markiewicz, T; Osowski, S; Jesiotr, M; Kozlowski, W

    2016-06-01

    The fluorescence in situ (FISH) belongs to the most often used molecular cytogenetic techniques, applied in many areas of diagnosis and research. The analysis of FISH images relies on localization and counting the red and green spots in order to determine HER2 status of the breast cancer samples. The algorithm of spot localization presented in the paper is based on 3-D shape analysis of the image objects. The subsequent regions of the image are matched to the reference pattern and the results of this matching influence localization of spots. The paper compares different shapes of the reference pattern and their efficiency in spot localization. The numerical experiments have been performed on the basis of 12 cases (patients), each represented by three images. Few thousands of cells have been analysed. The quantitative analyses comparing different versions of algorithm are presented and compared to the expert results. The best version of the procedure provides the absolute relative difference to the expert results smaller than 3%. These results confirm high efficiency of the proposed approach to the spot identification. The proposed method of FISH image analysis improves the efficiency of detecting fluorescent signals in FISH images. The evaluation results are encouraging for further testing of the developed automatic system directed to application in medical practice. PMID:26694535

  8. Comparison of a quasi-3D analysis and experimental performance for three compact radial turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonyi, P. S.; Boyle, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental aerodynamic evaluation of three compact radial turbine builds was performed. Two rotors which were 40-50 percent shorter in axial length than conventional state-of-the-art radial rotors were tested. A single nozzle design was used. One rotor was tested with the nozzle at two stagger angle settings. A second rotor was tested with the nozzle in only the closed down setting. Experimental results were compared to predicted results from a quasi-3D inviscid and boundary layer analysis, called MTSB (Meridl/Tsonic/Blayer). This analysis was used to predict turbine performance. It has previously been calibrated only for axial, not radial, turbomachinery. The predicted and measured efficiencies were compared at the design point for the three turbines. At the design points the analysis overpredicted the efficiency by less than 1.7 points. Comparisons were also made at off-design operating points. The results of these comparisons showed the importance of an accurate clearance model for efficiency predictions and also that there are deficiencies in the incidence loss model used.

  9. Comparison of a quasi-3D analysis and experimental performance for three compact radial turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonyi, P. S.; Boyle, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental aerodynamic evaluation of three compact radial turbine builds was performed. Two rotors which were 40 to 50 percent shorter in axial length than conventional state of the art radial rotors were tested. A single nozzle design was used. One rotor was tested with the nozzle at two stagger angle settings. A second rotor was tested with the nozzle in only the closed down setting. Experimental results were compared to predict results from a quasi-3D inviscid and boundary layer analysis, called Meridl/Tsonic/Blayer (MTSB). This analysis was used to predict turbine performance. It has previously been calibrated only for axial, not radial, turbomachinery. The predicted and measured efficiencies were compared at the design point for the three turbines. At the design points the analysis overpredicted the efficiency by less than 1.7 points. Comparisons were also made at off-design operating points. The results of these comparisons showed the importance of an accurate clearance model for efficiency predictions and also that there are deficiencies in the incidence loss model used.

  10. Analysis of simple 2-D and 3-D metal structures subjected to fragment impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witmer, E. A.; Stagliano, T. R.; Spilker, R. L.; Rodal, J. J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical methods were developed for predicting the large-deflection elastic-plastic transient structural responses of metal containment or deflector (C/D) structures to cope with rotor burst fragment impact attack. For two-dimensional C/D structures both, finite element and finite difference analysis methods were employed to analyze structural response produced by either prescribed transient loads or fragment impact. For the latter category, two time-wise step-by-step analysis procedures were devised to predict the structural responses resulting from a succession of fragment impacts: the collision force method (CFM) which utilizes an approximate prediction of the force applied to the attacked structure during fragment impact, and the collision imparted velocity method (CIVM) in which the impact-induced velocity increment acquired by a region of the impacted structure near the impact point is computed. The merits and limitations of these approaches are discussed. For the analysis of 3-d responses of C/D structures, only the CIVM approach was investigated.

  11. Tomographic Spectral Imaging with Multivariate Statistical Analysis: Comprehensive 3D Microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Kotula, Paul G; Keenan, Michael R; Michael, Joseph R

    2006-02-01

    A comprehensive three-dimensional (3D) microanalysis procedure using a combined scanning electron microscope (SEM)/focused ion beam (FIB) system equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) has been developed. The FIB system was used first to prepare a site-specific region for X-ray microanalysis followed by the acquisition of an electron-beam generated X-ray spectral image. A small section of material was then removed by the FIB, followed by the acquisition of another X-ray spectral image. This serial sectioning procedure was repeated 10-12 times to sample a volume of material. The series of two-spatial-dimension spectral images were then concatenated into a single data set consisting of a series of volume elements or voxels each with an entire X-ray spectrum. This four-dimensional (three real space and one spectral dimension) spectral image was then comprehensively analyzed with Sandia's automated X-ray spectral image analysis software. This technique was applied to a simple Cu-Ag eutectic and a more complicated localized corrosion study where the powerful site-specific comprehensive analysis capability of tomographic spectral imaging (TSI) combined with multivariate statistical analysis is demonstrated. PMID:17481340

  12. Earthscape, a Multi-Purpose Interactive 3d Globe Viewer for Hybrid Data Visualization and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarthou, A.; Mas, S.; Jacquin, M.; Moreno, N.; Salamon, A.

    2015-08-01

    The hybrid visualization and interaction tool EarthScape is presented here. The software is able to display simultaneously LiDAR point clouds, draped videos with moving footprint, volume scientific data (using volume rendering, isosurface and slice plane), raster data such as still satellite images, vector data and 3D models such as buildings or vehicles. The application runs on touch screen devices such as tablets. The software is based on open source libraries, such as OpenSceneGraph, osgEarth and OpenCV, and shader programming is used to implement volume rendering of scientific data. The next goal of EarthScape is to perform data analysis using ENVI Services Engine, a cloud data analysis solution. EarthScape is also designed to be a client of Jagwire which provides multisource geo-referenced video fluxes. When all these components will be included, EarthScape will be a multi-purpose platform that will provide at the same time data analysis, hybrid visualization and complex interactions. The software is available on demand for free at france@exelisvis.com.

  13. 3D CT spine data segmentation and analysis of vertebrae bone lesions.

    PubMed

    Peter, R; Malinsky, M; Ourednicek, P; Jan, J

    2013-01-01

    A method is presented aiming at detecting and classifying bone lesions in 3D CT data of human spine, via Bayesian approach utilizing Markov random fields. A developed algorithm for necessary segmentation of individual possibly heavily distorted vertebrae based on 3D intensity modeling of vertebra types is presented as well. PMID:24110203

  14. SCEC/CME CyberShake: Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Using 3D Seismic Waveform Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaghan, S.; Maechling, P. J.; Cui, Y.; Faerman, M.; Field, E.; Graves, R.; Gupta, N.; Gupta, V.; Jordan, T. H.; Kesselman, C.; Mehta, G.; Okaya, D.; Vahi, K.; Zhao, L.

    2005-12-01

    Researchers on the SCEC Community Modeling Environment (SCEC/CME) Project are calculating Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Curves for several sites in the Los Angeles area. The hazard curves calculated in this study use Intensity Measure Relationships (IMRs) based on 3D ground motion simulations rather than on attenuation relationships. State-of-the-art Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) is currently conducted using IMRs that use empirically-based attenuation relationships. These attenuation relationships represent relatively simple analytical models based on the regression of observed data. However, it is widely believed that significant improvements in SHA will rely on the use of more physics-based, waveform modeling. In fact, a more physics-based approach to PSHA was endorsed in a recent assessment of earthquake science by National Research Council (2003). In order to introduce the use of 3D seismic waveform modeling into PSHA hazard curve calculations, the SCEC/CME CyberShake group is integrating state-of-the-art PSHA software tools (OpenSHA), SCEC-developed geophysical models (SCEC CVM3.0), validated anelastic wave modeling (AWM) software, and state-of-the-art computational technologies including high performance computing and grid-based scientific workflows in an effort to develop an OpenSHA-compatible 3D waveform-based IMR component. This will allow researchers to combine a new class of waveform-based IMRs with the large number of existing PSHA components, such as Earthquake Rupture Forecasts (ERF's), that are currently implemented in the OpenSHA system. To calculate a probabilistic hazard curve for a site of interest, we use the OpenSHA implementation of the NSHMP-2002 ERF and identify all ruptures within 200km of the site of interest. For each of these ruptures, we convert the NSHMP-2002 rupture definition into one, or more, Ruptures with Slip Time History (Rupture Variations) using newly developed Rupture Generator software. Strain Green Tensors are

  15. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1989-01-01

    The user options available for running the MHOST finite element analysis package is described. MHOST is a solid and structural analysis program based on the mixed finite element technology, and is specifically designed for 3-D inelastic analysis. A family of 2- and 3-D continuum elements along with beam and shell structural elements can be utilized, many options are available in the constitutive equation library, the solution algorithms and the analysis capabilities. The outline of solution algorithms is discussed along with the data input and output, analysis options including the user subroutines and the definition of the finite elements implemented in the program package.

  16. BWR station blackout: A RISMC analysis using RAVEN and RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Mandelli, D.; Smith, C.; Riley, T.; Nielsen, J.; Alfonsi, A.; Cogliati, J.; Rabiti, C.; Schroeder, J.

    2016-01-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated from these plants via power uprates and improved operations. In order to evaluate the impact of these factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) project aims to provide insights to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions and accident scenarios. This paper presents a case study in order to show the capabilities of the RISMC methodology to assess impact of power uprate of a Boiling Water Reactor system during a Station Black-Out accident scenario. We employ a system simulator code, RELAP5-3D, coupled with RAVEN which perform the stochastic analysis. Lastly, our analysis is performed by: 1) sampling values from a set of parameters from the uncertainty space of interest, 2) simulating the system behavior for that specific set of parameter values and 3) analyzing the outcomes from the set of simulation runs.

  17. BWR station blackout: A RISMC analysis using RAVEN and RELAP5-3D

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mandelli, D.; Smith, C.; Riley, T.; Nielsen, J.; Alfonsi, A.; Cogliati, J.; Rabiti, C.; Schroeder, J.

    2016-01-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated from these plants via power uprates and improved operations. In order to evaluate the impact of these factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) project aims to provide insights to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions and accident scenarios. This paper presents a case study in order to show the capabilities of the RISMC methodology to assess impact of power uprate of a Boiling Watermore » Reactor system during a Station Black-Out accident scenario. We employ a system simulator code, RELAP5-3D, coupled with RAVEN which perform the stochastic analysis. Lastly, our analysis is performed by: 1) sampling values from a set of parameters from the uncertainty space of interest, 2) simulating the system behavior for that specific set of parameter values and 3) analyzing the outcomes from the set of simulation runs.« less

  18. Design of 3-D Nacelle near Flat-Plate Wing Using Multiblock Sensitivity Analysis (ADOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eleshaky, Mohamed E.; Baysal, Oktay

    1994-01-01

    One of the major design tasks involved in reducing aircraft drag is the integration of the engine nacelles and airframe. With this impetus, nacelle shapes with and without the presence of a flat-plate wing nearby were optimized. This also served as a demonstration of the 3-D version of the recently developed aerodynamic design optimization methodology using sensitivity analysis, ADOS. The required flow analyses were obtained by solving the three-dimensional, compressible, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations using an implicit, upwind-biased, finite volume scheme. The sensitivity analyses were performed using the preconditioned version of the SADD scheme (sensitivity analysis on domain decomposition). In addition to demonstrating the present method's capability for automatic optimization, the results offered some insight into two important issues related to optimizing the shapes of multicomponent configurations in close proximity. First, inclusion of the mutual interference between the components resulted in a different shape as opposed to shaping an isolated component. Secondly, exclusion of the viscous effects compromised not only the flow physics but also the optimized shapes even for isolated components.

  19. Segmentation of vascular structures and hematopoietic cells in 3D microscopy images and quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Jian; Yang, Lin; Kamocka, Malgorzata M.; Zollman, Amy L.; Carlesso, Nadia; Chen, Danny Z.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present image processing methods for quantitative study of how the bone marrow microenvironment changes (characterized by altered vascular structure and hematopoietic cell distribution) caused by diseases or various factors. We develop algorithms that automatically segment vascular structures and hematopoietic cells in 3-D microscopy images, perform quantitative analysis of the properties of the segmented vascular structures and cells, and examine how such properties change. In processing images, we apply local thresholding to segment vessels, and add post-processing steps to deal with imaging artifacts. We propose an improved watershed algorithm that relies on both intensity and shape information and can separate multiple overlapping cells better than common watershed methods. We then quantitatively compute various features of the vascular structures and hematopoietic cells, such as the branches and sizes of vessels and the distribution of cells. In analyzing vascular properties, we provide algorithms for pruning fake vessel segments and branches based on vessel skeletons. Our algorithms can segment vascular structures and hematopoietic cells with good quality. We use our methods to quantitatively examine the changes in the bone marrow microenvironment caused by the deletion of Notch pathway. Our quantitative analysis reveals property changes in samples with deleted Notch pathway. Our tool is useful for biologists to quantitatively measure changes in the bone marrow microenvironment, for developing possible therapeutic strategies to help the bone marrow microenvironment recovery.

  20. 3D Elasto-Plastic Stress Analysis by the Method of Arbitrary Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminishi, Ken; Ando, Ryuma

    The method of arbitrary lines (MAL) constitutes a general dimensional reduction methodology for elliptic boundary value problems (BVP) in arbitrary two- and three-dimensional domains by solving systems of one-dimensional boundary value ordinary differential equations (ODEs). It has been already applied to two-dimensional problem, and the good results have been reported. In this work, we consider the extension of the MAL to three-dimensional elasto-plastic stress analysis. We first give the MAL formulation of three-dimensional elasto-plastic problems. Although the MAL formulation is derived from the principle of three-dimensional increment virtual work as well as the finite element method (FEM), the MAL is different from FEM in that displacement increment and virtual displacement increment are expressed continuous functions along one direction and shape-functions along other two directions. Substituting displacement increment and virtual displacement increment into the principle of three-dimensional increment virtual work, we have a system of ODEs. The three-dimensional elasto-plastic analysis of BGA model, which was a method of the solder joints of electronic component, was carried out. As results, it was confirmed that to solve 3D elasto-plastic problem at the good accuracy was possible by the MAL.

  1. Telediagnosis system for orthopedic deformity analysis based on 3D medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myoung-Hee; Hong, Helen; Kim, Min-A.

    2000-04-01

    Due to the structural complexity of the bone, it is difficult to diagnose and make a treatment plan for injuries and diseases in bones. In this paper, we designed and implemented a telediagnosis system for orthopedic deformity analysis based on 3D medical imaging. In order to define the intersseous relationships in each bone and to evaluate a deformity without invasions, the system produces volumetric images by reconstructing the planar images spatially and provides deformity analysis by measuring distance, area, volume and angle among the bones. The reconstructed volumetric images are freely manipulated to simulate surgical operations such as translation, scaling, rotation and so on. Our system integrates three main components: server, clients and communication subsystem. It is also composed of three main functions including the information control manager for event and message process used between client and server, and surgical simulation manager for object visualization and manipulation in individual bones, and the medical database manager for patient information. The system also supports user-friendly graphical user interface and simultaneous use by multiple users.

  2. An example of neutronic penalizations in reactivity transient analysis using 3D coupled chain HEMERA

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, F.; Normand, B.; Sargeni, A.

    2012-07-01

    HEMERA (Highly Evolutionary Methods for Extensive Reactor Analyses), is a fully coupled 3D computational chain developed jointly by IRSN and CEA. It is composed of CRONOS2 (core neutronics, cross sections library from APOLLO2), FLICA4 (core thermal-hydraulics) and the system code CATHARE. Multi-level and multi-dimensional models are developed to account for neutronics, core thermal-hydraulics, fuel thermal analysis and system thermal-hydraulics, dedicated to best-estimate, conservative simulations and sensitivity analysis. In IRSN, the HEMERA chain is widely used to study several types of reactivity accidents and for sensitivity studies. Just as an example of the HEMERA possibilities, we present here two types of neutronic penalizations and their impact on a power transient due to a REA (Rod Ejection Accident): in the first one, we studied a bum-up distribution modification and in the second one, a delayed-neutron fraction modification. Both modifications are applied to the whole core or localized in a few assemblies. Results show that it is possible to use global or local changes but 1) in case of bum-up modification, the total core power can increase when assembly peak power decrease so, care has to be taken if the goal is to maximize a local power peak and 2) for delayed-neutron fraction, a local modification can have the same effect as the one on the whole core, provided that it is large enough. (authors)

  3. Tunneling Analyst: A 3D GIS extension for rock mass classification and fault zone analysis in tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yosoon; Yoon, Seo-Youn; Park, Hyeong-Dong

    2009-06-01

    In this study, an extension called Tunneling Analyst (TA) has been developed in ArcScene 3D GIS software, part of the ArcGIS software package. It dramatically extends the functionalities of ArcScene because it allows: (1) estimation of the 3D distribution of rock mass rating (RMR) values using borehole and geophysical exploration data, (2) the modeling of 3D discontinuity planes such as faults from field-based structural measurements, and (3) analysis of 3D intersections and 3D buffer zones between proposed tunnel alignments and some discontinuities. Because TA can handle and visualize both 2D and 3D geological data in a single GIS environment, the tedious tasks required for data conversion between various software packages can be reduced significantly. The application to the Daecheong tunneling project in Korea shows that TA could present a rational solution to evaluating the rock mass classes along a proposed tunnel alignment and can also provide specific 3D spatial query tools to support the tunnel design work. This paper describes the concept and details of the development and implementation of TA.

  4. Quality Analysis of 3d Surface Reconstruction Using Multi-Platform Photogrammetric Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lari, Z.; El-Sheimy, N.

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, the necessity of accurate 3D surface reconstruction has been more pronounced for a wide range of mapping, modelling, and monitoring applications. The 3D data for satisfying the needs of these applications can be collected using different digital imaging systems. Among them, photogrammetric systems have recently received considerable attention due to significant improvements in digital imaging sensors, emergence of new mapping platforms, and development of innovative data processing techniques. To date, a variety of techniques haven been proposed for 3D surface reconstruction using imagery collected by multi-platform photogrammetric systems. However, these approaches suffer from the lack of a well-established quality control procedure which evaluates the quality of reconstructed 3D surfaces independent of the utilized reconstruction technique. Hence, this paper aims to introduce a new quality assessment platform for the evaluation of the 3D surface reconstruction using photogrammetric data. This quality control procedure is performed while considering the quality of input data, processing procedures, and photo-realistic 3D surface modelling. The feasibility of the proposed quality control procedure is finally verified by quality assessment of the 3D surface reconstruction using images from different photogrammetric systems.

  5. Nondestructive 3D confocal laser imaging with deconvolution of seven whole stardust tracks with complementary XRF and quantitative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, M.; Ebel, D.S.

    2009-03-19

    We present a nondestructive 3D system for analysis of whole Stardust tracks, using a combination of Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy and synchrotron XRF. 3D deconvolution is used for optical corrections, and results of quantitative analyses of several tracks are presented. The Stardust mission to comet Wild 2 trapped many cometary and ISM particles in aerogel, leaving behind 'tracks' of melted silica aerogel on both sides of the collector. Collected particles and their tracks range in size from submicron to millimeter scale. Interstellar dust collected on the obverse of the aerogel collector is thought to have an average track length of {approx}15 {micro}m. It has been our goal to perform a total non-destructive 3D textural and XRF chemical analysis on both types of tracks. To that end, we use a combination of Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy (LCSM) and X Ray Florescence (XRF) spectrometry. Utilized properly, the combination of 3D optical data and chemical data provides total nondestructive characterization of full tracks, prior to flattening or other destructive analysis methods. Our LCSM techniques allow imaging at 0.075 {micro}m/pixel, without the use of oil-based lenses. A full textural analysis on track No.82 is presented here as well as analysis of 6 additional tracks contained within 3 keystones (No.128, No.129 and No.140). We present a method of removing the axial distortion inherent in LCSM images, by means of a computational 3D Deconvolution algorithm, and present some preliminary experiments with computed point spread functions. The combination of 3D LCSM data and XRF data provides invaluable information, while preserving the integrity of the samples for further analysis. It is imperative that these samples, the first extraterrestrial solids returned since the Apollo era, be fully mapped nondestructively in 3D, to preserve the maximum amount of information prior to other, destructive analysis.

  6. External fixator configurations in tibia fractures: 1D optimization and 3D analysis comparison.

    PubMed

    Roseiro, Luis M; Neto, M Augusta; Amaro, Ana; Leal, Rogerio P; Samarra, Miguel C

    2014-01-01

    The use of external fixation devices in orthopedic surgery is very common in open tibial fractures. A properly applied fixator may improve the healing process while one improperly applied might delay the healing process. The several external fixator systems used in clinical today, can be categorized into uniplanar-unilateral, uniplanar-bilateral, biplanar and multiplanar. The stability on the fracture focus and, therefore, the fracture healing process, is related with the type of external fixator configuration that is selected. The aim of this study is to discuss the principles for the successful application of unilateral-uniplanar external fixation, the assembly of its components, for the case of a transverse fractures using computational models. In this context, the fixation stiffness characteristics are evaluated using a simplified 1D finite element model for the tibia and external fixator. The beams are modeled with realistic cross-sectional geometry and material properties instead of a simplified model. The VABS (the Variational Asymptotic Beam Section analysis) methodology is used to compute the cross-sectional model for the generalized Timoshenko model, which was embedded in the finite element solver FEAP. The use of Timoshenko beam theory allows accounting for several kinds of loads, including torsion moments. Optimal design is performed with respect to the assembly of fixator components using a genetic algorithm. The optimization procedure is based on the evaluation of an objective function, which is dependent on the displacement at the fracture focus. The initial and optimal results are compared by performing a 3D analysis, for which different three-dimensional finite element models are created. The geometrical model of a tibia is created on the basis of data acquired by CAT scan, made for a healthy tibia of a 22 year old male. The 3D comparison of the 1D optimal results show a clear improvement on the objective function for the several load cases and

  7. Parameterization and Analysis of 3-D Solar Radiative Transfer in Clouds: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Y. Harrington

    2012-09-21

    This document reports on the research that we have done over the course of our two-year project. The report also covers the research done on this project during a 1 year no-cost extension of the grant. Our work has had two main, inter-related thrusts: The first thrust was to characterize the response of stratocumulus cloud structure and dynamics to systematic changes in cloud infrared radiative cooling and solar heating using one-dimensional radiative transfer models. The second was to couple a three-dimensional (3-D) solar radiative transfer model to the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model that we use to simulate stratocumulus. The purpose of the studies with 3-D radiative transfer was to examine the possible influences of 3-D photon transport on the structure, evolution, and radiative properties of stratocumulus. While 3-D radiative transport has been examined in static cloud environments, few studies have attempted to examine whether the 3-D nature of radiative absorption and emission influence the structure and evolution of stratocumulus. We undertook this dual approach because only a small number of LES simulations with the 3-D radiative transfer model are possible due to the high computational costs. Consequently, LES simulations with a 1-D radiative transfer solver were used in order to examine the portions of stratocumulus parameter space that may be most sensitive to perturbations in the radiative fields. The goal was then to explore these sensitive regions with LES using full 3-D radiative transfer. Our overall goal was to discover whether 3-D radiative processes alter cloud structure and evolution, and whether this may have any indirect implications for cloud radiative properties. In addition, we collaborated with Dr. Tamas Varni, providing model output fields for his attempt at parameterizing 3-D radiative effects for cloud models.

  8. Analysis of 3D-printed metal for rapid-prototyped reflective terahertz optics.

    PubMed

    Headland, Daniel; Withayachumnankul, Withawat; Webb, Michael; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Luiten, Andre; Abbott, Derek

    2016-07-25

    We explore the potential of 3D metal printing to realize complex conductive terahertz devices. Factors impacting performance such as printing resolution, surface roughness, oxidation, and material loss are investigated via analytical, numerical, and experimental approaches. The high degree of control offered by a 3D-printed topology is exploited to realize a zone plate operating at 530 GHz. Reflection efficiency at this frequency is found to be over 90%. The high-performance of this preliminary device suggest that 3D metal printing can play a strong role in guided-wave and general beam control devices in the terahertz range. PMID:27464185

  9. Analysis of 3D-printed metal for rapid-prototyped reflective terahertz optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Headland, Daniel; Withayachumnankul, Withawat; Webb, Michael; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Luiten, Andre; Abbott, Derek

    2016-07-01

    We explore the potential of 3D metal printing to realize complex conductive terahertz devices. Factors impacting performance such as printing resolution, surface roughness, oxidation, and material loss are investigated via analytical, numerical, and experimental approaches. The high degree of control offered by a 3D-printed topology is exploited to realize a zone plate operating at 530 GHz. Reflection efficiency at this frequency is found to be over 90%. The high-performance of this preliminary device suggest that 3D metal printing can play a strong role in guided-wave and general beam control devices in the terahertz range.

  10. RESTRUCTURING RELAP5-3D FOR NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; George L. Mesina; Joshua M. Hykes

    2006-06-01

    RELAP5-3D is used worldwide for analyzing nuclear reactors under both operational transients and postulated accident conditions. Development of the RELAP code series began in 1975 and since that time the code has been continuously improved, enhanced, verified and validated [1]. Since RELAP5-3D will continue to be the premier thermal hydraulics tool well into the future, it is necessary to modernize the code to accommodate the incorporation of additional capabilities to support the development of the next generation of nuclear reactors [2]. This paper discusses the reengineering of RELAP5-3D into structured code.

  11. Analysis and Processing the 3D-Range-Image-Data for Robot Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohoutek, Tobias

    2008-09-01

    Industrial robots are commonly used for physically stressful jobs in complex environments. In any case collisions with heavy and high dynamic machines need to be prevented. For this reason the operational range has to be monitored precisely, reliably and meticulously. The advantage of the SwissRanger® SR-3000 is that it delivers intensity images and 3D-information simultaneously of the same scene that conveniently allows 3D-monitoring. Due to that fact automatic real time collision prevention within the robots working space is possible by working with 3D-coordinates.

  12. Super Cooled Large Droplet Analysis of Several Geometries Using LEWICE3D Version 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin S.

    2011-01-01

    Super Cooled Large Droplet (SLD) collection efficiency calculations were performed for several geometries using the LEWICE3D Version 3 software. The computations were performed using the NASA Glenn Research Center SLD splashing model which has been incorporated into the LEWICE3D Version 3 software. Comparisons to experiment were made where available. The geometries included two straight wings, a swept 64A008 wing tip, two high lift geometries, and the generic commercial transport DLR-F4 wing body configuration. In general the LEWICE3D Version 3 computations compared well with the 2D LEWICE 3.2.2 results and with experimental data where available.

  13. 3-D description of fracture surfaces and stress-sensitivity analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Q.; Jioa, D.; Meng, Y.F.; Fan, Y.

    1997-08-01

    Three kinds of reservoir cores (limestone, sandstone, and shale with natural fractures) were used to study the effect of morphology of fracture surfaces on stress sensitivity. The cores, obtained from the reservoirs with depths of 2170 to 2300 m, have fractures which are mated on a large scale, but unmated on a fine scale. A specially designed photoelectric scanner with a computer was used to describe the topography of the fracture surfaces. Then, theoretical analysis of the fracture closure was carried out based on the fracture topography generated. The scanning results show that the asperity has almost normal distributions for all three types of samples. For the tested samples, the fracture closure predicted by the elastic-contact theory is different from the laboratory measurements because plastic deformation of the aspirates plays an important role under the testing range of normal stresses. In this work, the traditionally used elastic-contact theory has been modified to better predict the stress sensitivity of reservoir fractures. Analysis shows that the standard deviation of the probability density function of asperity distribution has a great effect on the fracture closure rate.

  14. Scoliosis corrective force estimation from the implanted rod deformation using 3D-FEM analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Improvement of material property in spinal instrumentation has brought better deformity correction in scoliosis surgery in recent years. The increase of mechanical strength in instruments directly means the increase of force, which acts on bone-implant interface during scoliosis surgery. However, the actual correction force during the correction maneuver and safety margin of pull out force on each screw were not well known. In the present study, estimated corrective forces and pull out forces were analyzed using a novel method based on Finite Element Analysis (FEA). Methods Twenty adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients (1 boy and 19 girls) who underwent reconstructive scoliosis surgery between June 2009 and Jun 2011 were included in this study. Scoliosis correction was performed with 6mm diameter titanium rod (Ti6Al7Nb) using the simultaneous double rod rotation technique (SDRRT) in all cases. The pre-maneuver and post-maneuver rod geometry was collected from intraoperative tracing and postoperative 3D-CT images, and 3D-FEA was performed with ANSYS. Cobb angle of major curve, correction rate and thoracic kyphosis were measured on X-ray images. Results Average age at surgery was 14.8, and average fusion length was 8.9 segments. Major curve was corrected from 63.1 to 18.1 degrees in average and correction rate was 71.4%. Rod geometry showed significant change on the concave side. Curvature of the rod on concave and convex sides decreased from 33.6 to 17.8 degrees, and from 25.9 to 23.8 degrees, respectively. Estimated pull out forces at apical vertebrae were 160.0N in the concave side screw and 35.6N in the convex side screw. Estimated push in force at LIV and UIV were 305.1N in the concave side screw and 86.4N in the convex side screw. Conclusions Corrective force during scoliosis surgery was demonstrated to be about four times greater in the concave side than in convex side. Averaged pull out and push in force fell below previously reported safety

  15. Breast Density Analysis with Automated Whole-Breast Ultrasound: Comparison with 3-D Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jeon-Hor; Lee, Yan-Wei; Chan, Si-Wa; Yeh, Dah-Cherng; Chang, Ruey-Feng

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a semi-automatic breast segmentation method was proposed on the basis of the rib shadow to extract breast regions from 3-D automated whole-breast ultrasound (ABUS) images. The density results were correlated with breast density values acquired with 3-D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI images of 46 breasts were collected from 23 women without a history of breast disease. Each subject also underwent ABUS. We used Otsu's thresholding method on ABUS images to obtain local rib shadow information, which was combined with the global rib shadow information (extracted from all slice projections) and integrated with the anatomy's breast tissue structure to determine the chest wall line. The fuzzy C-means classifier was used to extract the fibroglandular tissues from the acquired images. Whole-breast volume (WBV) and breast percentage density (BPD) were calculated in both modalities. Linear regression was used to compute the correlation of density results between the two modalities. The consistency of density measurement was also analyzed on the basis of intra- and inter-operator variation. There was a high correlation of density results between MRI and ABUS (R(2) = 0.798 for WBV, R(2) = 0.825 for PBD). The mean WBV from ABUS images was slightly smaller than the mean WBV from MR images (MRI: 342.24 ± 128.08 cm(3), ABUS: 325.47 ± 136.16 cm(3), p < 0.05). In addition, the BPD calculated from MR images was smaller than the BPD from ABUS images (MRI: 24.71 ± 15.16%, ABUS: 28.90 ± 17.73%, p < 0.05). The intra-operator and inter-operator variant analysis results indicated that there was no statistically significant difference in breast density measurement variation between the two modalities. Our results revealed a high correlation in WBV and BPD between MRI and ABUS. Our study suggests that ABUS provides breast density information useful in the assessment of breast health. PMID:26831342

  16. Integrated Idl Tool For 3d Modeling And Imaging Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, Gelu M.; Fleishman, G. D.; Gary, D. E.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Kontar, E. P.

    2012-05-01

    Addressing many key problems in solar physics requires detailed analysis of non-simultaneous imaging data obtained in various wavelength domains with different spatial resolution and their comparison with each other supplied by advanced 3D physical models. To facilitate achieving this goal, we have undertaken a major enhancement and improvements of IDL-based simulation tools developed earlier for modeling microwave and X-ray emission. The greatly enhanced object-based architecture provides interactive graphic user interface that allows the user i) to import photospheric magnetic field maps and perform magnetic field extrapolations to almost instantly generate 3D magnetic field models, ii) to investigate the magnetic topology of these models by interactively creating magnetic field lines and associated magnetic field tubes, iii) to populate them with user-defined nonuniform thermal plasma and anisotropic nonuniform nonthermal electron distributions; and iv) to calculate the spatial and spectral properties of radio and X-ray emission. The application integrates DLL and Shared Libraries containing fast gyrosynchrotron emission codes developed in FORTRAN and C++, soft and hard X-ray codes developed in IDL, and a potential field extrapolation DLL produced based on original FORTRAN code developed by V. Abramenko and V. Yurchishin. The interactive interface allows users to add any user-defined IDL or external callable radiation code, as well as user-defined magnetic field extrapolation routines. To illustrate the tool capabilities, we present a step-by-step live computation of microwave and X-ray images from realistic magnetic structures obtained from a magnetic field extrapolation preceding a real event, and compare them with the actual imaging data produced by NORH and RHESSI instruments. This work was supported in part by NSF grants AGS-0961867, AST-0908344, AGS-0969761, and NASA grants NNX10AF27G and NNX11AB49G to New Jersey Institute of Technology, by a UK STFC

  17. Efficient 3D/1D self-consistent integral-equation analysis of ICRH antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggiora, R.; Vecchi, G.; Lancellotti, V.; Kyrytsya, V.

    2004-08-01

    This work presents a comprehensive account of the theory and implementation of a method for the self-consistent numerical analysis of plasma-facing ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antenna arrays. The method is based on the integral-equation formulation of the boundary-value problem, solved via a weighted-residual scheme. The antenna geometry (including Faraday shield bars and a recess box) is fairly general and three-dimensional (3D), and the plasma is in the one-dimensional (1D) 'slab' approximation; finite-Larmor radius effects, as well as plasma density and temperature gradients, are considered. Feeding via the voltages in the access coaxial lines is self-consistently accounted throughout and the impedance or scattering matrix of the antenna array obtained therefrom. The problem is formulated in both the dual space (physical) and spectral (wavenumber) domains, which allows the extraction and simple handling of the terms that slow the convergence in the spectral domain usually employed. This paper includes validation tests of the developed code against measured data, both in vacuo and in the presence of plasma. An example of application to a complex geometry is also given.

  18. Population-based 3D genome structure analysis reveals driving forces in spatial genome organization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyuan; Kalhor, Reza; Dai, Chao; Hao, Shengli; Gong, Ke; Zhou, Yonggang; Li, Haochen; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine; Le Gros, Mark A.; Larabell, Carolyn A.; Chen, Lin; Alber, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Conformation capture technologies (e.g., Hi-C) chart physical interactions between chromatin regions on a genome-wide scale. However, the structural variability of the genome between cells poses a great challenge to interpreting ensemble-averaged Hi-C data, particularly for long-range and interchromosomal interactions. Here, we present a probabilistic approach for deconvoluting Hi-C data into a model population of distinct diploid 3D genome structures, which facilitates the detection of chromatin interactions likely to co-occur in individual cells. Our approach incorporates the stochastic nature of chromosome conformations and allows a detailed analysis of alternative chromatin structure states. For example, we predict and experimentally confirm the presence of large centromere clusters with distinct chromosome compositions varying between individual cells. The stability of these clusters varies greatly with their chromosome identities. We show that these chromosome-specific clusters can play a key role in the overall chromosome positioning in the nucleus and stabilizing specific chromatin interactions. By explicitly considering genome structural variability, our population-based method provides an important tool for revealing novel insights into the key factors shaping the spatial genome organization. PMID:26951677

  19. CraMs: Craniometric Analysis Application Using 3D Skull Models.

    PubMed

    Dias, Paulo; Neves, Luis; Santos, Daniel; Coelho, Catarina; Ferreira, Maria Teresa; Santos, Helder; Silva, Samuel; Santos, Beatriz Sousa

    2015-01-01

    Craniometric analysis plays an important role in anthropology studies and forensics. This paper presents CraMs, an application using a new craniometric approach based on 3D models of the skull. The main objective is to obtain, through a process supervised by anthropologists, the main points of interest used to compute craniometric measurements. The application aids this process by analyzing the skull geometry and automatically providing points of interest. The application also allows for semiautomatic point detection, where the user provides an initial guess that might be refined based on the curvature of the skull, as well as the manual selection of any other points of interest. Moreover, results comparing measurements obtained with CraMs and traditional craniometry methods on eight skulls suggest that the application provides comparable craniometric measurements and lower inter-observer variability. This approach offers advantages such as an easier access to skulls with no risk of bone damage and the possibility of defining new measurements based on morphology or other skull characteristics, which are not possible using traditional methods. PMID:26594956

  20. Analysis and modeling of 3D complex modulus tests on hot and warm bituminous mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Nguyen Hoang; Sauzéat, Cédric; Di Benedetto, Hervé; González-León, Juan A.; Barreto, Gilles; Nicolaï, Aurélia; Jakubowski, Marc

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents the results of laboratory testing of hot and warm bituminous mixtures containing Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement (RAP). Complex modulus measurements, using the tension-compression test on cylindrical specimens, were conducted to determine linear viscoelastic (LVE) behavior. Sinusoidal cyclic loadings, with strain amplitude of approximately 50ṡ10-6, were applied at several temperatures (from -25 to +45 °C) and frequencies (from 0.03 Hz to 10 Hz). In addition to axial stresses and strains, radial strains were also measured. The complex modulus E ∗ and complex Poisson's ratios ν ∗ were then obtained in two perpendicular directions. Measured values in these two directions do not indicate anisotropy on Poisson's ratio. The time-temperature superposition principle (TTSP) was verified with good approximation in one-dimensional (1D) and three-dimensional (3D) conditions for the same values of shift factor. Experimental results were modeled using the 2S2P1D model previously developed at the University of Lyon/ENTPE. In addition, specific analysis showed that eventual damage created during complex modulus test is very small and is equivalent to the effect of an increase of temperature of about 0.25 °C.

  1. Electrical performance analysis of HTS synchronous motor based on 3D FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, S. K.; Kwon, Y. K.; Kim, H. M.; Lee, J. D.; Kim, Y. C.; Park, G. S.

    2010-11-01

    A 1-MW class superconducting motor with High-Temperature Superconducting (HTS) field coil is analyzed and tested. This machine is a prototype to make sure applicability aimed at generator and industrial motor applications such as blowers, pumps and compressors installed in large plants. This machine has the HTS field coil made of Bi-2223 HTS wire and the conventional copper armature (stator) coils cooled by water. The 1-MW class HTS motor is analyzed by 3D electromagnetic Finite Element Method (FEM) to get magnetic field distribution, self and mutual inductance, and so forth. Especially excitation voltage (Back EMF) is estimated by using the mutual inductance between armature and field coils and compared with experimental result. Open and short circuit tests were conducted in generator mode while a 1.1-MW rated induction machine was rotating the HTS machine. Electrical parameters such as mutual inductance and synchronous inductance are deduced from these tests and also compared with the analysis results from FEM.

  2. Filtered chorochronic interface as a capability for 3-D unsteady throughflow analysis of multistage turbomachinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerolymos, G. A.

    2013-02-01

    This note reviews the widely used phased-lagged [Erdos, J. L., E. Alzner, and W. McNally. 1977. AIAA Journal 15: 1559-68.] approach and corresponding chorochronic interface relations [Gerolymos G. A., G. J. Michon, and J. Neubauer. 2002. Journal of Propulsion and Power 18: 1139-52.] and explores its potential extension to the approximate unsteady throughflow analysis of multistage turbomachinery. The basic relations pertaining to the binary blade-row interaction case, for which chorochronic periodicity is exact in a phase-averaged rans framework, are briefly formulated, and selected computational examples illustrate the application of the method. Then, the filtered chorochronic interface is defined as the unsteady counterpart of the well-known mixing-plane concept. This interface takes into account only those tθ-waves which are compatible with the interaction of the immediately upstream and downstream blade-rows. The concept, which is similar to the decomposition-and-superposition method [Li, H. D., and L. He. 2005. ASME J ournal of Turbomachinery 127: 589-98.], is illustrated by 3-D computations of a ½-stage transonic compressor.

  3. An analysis of 3D anisotropic-viscoelastic forward modeling and dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chunying; Li, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Yun

    2015-12-01

    The anisotropic-viscoelastic wave equation is a generalized expression of a transversely isotropic-viscoelastic medium. The viscoelastic horizontal-tranverse isotropic (HTI) medium is a special case. Considering the horizontal symmetry axis of viscoelastic HTI media, we develop elasticities and wave equations for preserving its transverse isotropy. To model anisotropic-viscoelastic wave propagation, we apply the fourth-order Runge-Kutta and Fourier pseudospectral method to discretize the wave equation. The convolutional perfectly matched layer (CPML) absorbed boundary condition is applied to the 3D modeling algorithm and the result shows that it absorbs reflected energy efficiently. We present three models to investigate anisotropic-viscoelastic waves. Two half-space models demonstrate the azimuthal attenuation, which appears both on the PP and PSv wave. The quality factor is greater along the fracture direction for both the PP and PSv waves. Analysis shows that frequency-dependent amplitude attenuation behaves differently along the fracture azimuth. This demonstates that we can use this property for reservoir detection.

  4. CCTV Coverage Index Based on Surveillance Resolution and Its Evaluation Using 3D Spatial Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyoungah; Lee, Impyeong

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel approach to evaluating how effectively a closed circuit television (CCTV) system can monitor a targeted area. With 3D models of the target area and the camera parameters of the CCTV system, the approach produces surveillance coverage index, which is newly defined in this study as a quantitative measure for surveillance performance. This index indicates the proportion of the space being monitored with a sufficient resolution to the entire space of the target area. It is determined by computing surveillance resolution at every position and orientation, which indicates how closely a specific object can be monitored with a CCTV system. We present full mathematical derivation for the resolution, which depends on the location and orientation of the object as well as the geometric model of a camera. With the proposed approach, we quantitatively evaluated the surveillance coverage of a CCTV system in an underground parking area. Our evaluation process provided various quantitative-analysis results, compelling us to examine the design of the CCTV system prior to its installation and understand the surveillance capability of an existing CCTV system. PMID:26389909

  5. CCTV Coverage Index Based on Surveillance Resolution and Its Evaluation Using 3D Spatial Analysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyoungah; Lee, Impyeong

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel approach to evaluating how effectively a closed circuit television (CCTV) system can monitor a targeted area. With 3D models of the target area and the camera parameters of the CCTV system, the approach produces surveillance coverage index, which is newly defined in this study as a quantitative measure for surveillance performance. This index indicates the proportion of the space being monitored with a sufficient resolution to the entire space of the target area. It is determined by computing surveillance resolution at every position and orientation, which indicates how closely a specific object can be monitored with a CCTV system. We present full mathematical derivation for the resolution, which depends on the location and orientation of the object as well as the geometric model of a camera. With the proposed approach, we quantitatively evaluated the surveillance coverage of a CCTV system in an underground parking area. Our evaluation process provided various quantitative-analysis results, compelling us to examine the design of the CCTV system prior to its installation and understand the surveillance capability of an existing CCTV system. PMID:26389909

  6. 3-D seakeeping analysis with water on deck and slamming. Part 2: Experiments and physical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, M.; Bouscasse, B.; Lugni, C.

    2012-08-01

    A synergic 3-D experimental and numerical investigation is conducted for wave-ship interactions involving the water-on-deck and slamming phenomena. The adopted solver has been developed in Greco and Lugni (in press) and combines (A) a weakly nonlinear external solution for the wave-vessel interactions with (B) a 2-D in-deck shallow-water approximation, which describes water shipping events, and (C) a local analytical analysis of the bottom-slamming phenomenon. This solver can handle regular and irregular sea states and vessels at rest or with limited speed. The experiments examine a patrol ship at rest or with forward speed that is free to oscillate in heave and pitch in regular and irregular waves. In this study, the head-sea regular-wave conditions are examined in terms of (1) response amplitude operators (RAOs) and relative motions, (2) occurrence, features and loads of water-on-deck, bottom-slamming and flare-slamming events and (3) added resistance in waves. A systematic and comprehensive analysis of the phenomena is made available in terms of the Froude number, incoming wavelength-to-ship length ratio and wave steepness for the examined ship geometry. The main parameters that affect the global and local quantities are identified and possible danger in terms of water-on-deck severity and structural consequences are determined. Different slamming behaviors were identified, depending on the spatial location of the impact on the vessel: single-peak, church-roof and double-peak behaviors. A bottom-slamming criterion, using the Ochi's (1964) velocity condition and the Greco and Lugni's (2012) pressure condition, is assessed. A statistical analysis of more than 100 events is needed for the bottom-slamming pressure peaks. The numerical solver is promising. The major discrepancies with the experiments are discussed, and the importance of viscous hull damping and flare impact for the most violent conditions is emphasized. Inclusion of these effects improved the

  7. Understanding North Texas Seismicity: A Joint Analysis of Seismic Data and 3D Pore Pressure Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeShon, H. R.; Hornbach, M. J.; Ellsworth, W. L.; Oldham, H. R.; Hayward, C.; Stump, B. W.; Frohlich, C.; Olson, J. E.; Luetgert, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    In November 2013, a series of earthquakes began along a mapped ancient fault system near Azle, Texas. The Azle events are the third felt earthquake sequence in the Fort Worth (Barnett Shale) Basin since 2008, and several production and injection wells in the area are drilled to depths near the recent seismic activity. Understanding if and/or how injection and removal of fluids in the crystalline crust reactivates faults have important implications for seismology, the energy industry, and society. We assessed whether the Azle earthquakes were induced using a joint analysis of the earthquake data, subsurface geology and fault structure, and 3D pore pressure modeling. Using a 12-station temporary seismic deployment, we have recorded and located >300 events large enough to be recorded on multiple stations and 1000s of events during periods of swarm activity. High-resolution locations and focal mechanisms indicate that events occurred on NE-SW trending, steeply dipping normal faults associated with the southern end of the Newark East Fault Zone with hypocenters between 2-8 km depth. We considered multiple causes that might have changed stress along this system. Earthquakes resulting from natural processes, though perhaps unlikely in this historically inactive region, can be neither ruled out nor confirmed due to lack of information on the natural stress state of these faults. Analysis of lake and groundwater variations near Azle showed that no significant stress changes occurred prior to or during the earthquake sequence. In contrast, analysis of pore-pressure models shows that the combination of formation water production and wastewater injection near the fault could have caused pressure increases that induced earthquakes on near-critically stressed faults.

  8. Meshless deformable models for 3D cardiac motion and strain analysis from tagged MRI.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxu; Chen, Ting; Zhang, Shaoting; Schaerer, Joël; Qian, Zhen; Huh, Suejung; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Tagged magnetic resonance imaging (TMRI) provides a direct and noninvasive way to visualize the in-wall deformation of the myocardium. Due to the through-plane motion, the tracking of 3D trajectories of the material points and the computation of 3D strain field call for the necessity of building 3D cardiac deformable models. The intersections of three stacks of orthogonal tagging planes are material points in the myocardium. With these intersections as control points, 3D motion can be reconstructed with a novel meshless deformable model (MDM). Volumetric MDMs describe an object as point cloud inside the object boundary and the coordinate of each point can be written in parametric functions. A generic heart mesh is registered on the TMRI with polar decomposition. A 3D MDM is generated and deformed with MR image tagging lines. Volumetric MDMs are deformed by calculating the dynamics function and minimizing the local Laplacian coordinates. The similarity transformation of each point is computed by assuming its neighboring points are making the same transformation. The deformation is computed iteratively until the control points match the target positions in the consecutive image frame. The 3D strain field is computed from the 3D displacement field with moving least squares. We demonstrate that MDMs outperformed the finite element method and the spline method with a numerical phantom. Meshless deformable models can track the trajectory of any material point in the myocardium and compute the 3D strain field of any particular area. The experimental results on in vivo healthy and patient heart MRI show that the MDM can fully recover the myocardium motion in three dimensions. PMID:25157446

  9. Meshless deformable models for 3D cardiac motion and strain analysis from tagged MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxu; Chen, Ting; Zhang, Shaoting; Schaerer, Joël; Qian, Zhen; Huh, Suejung; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Tagged magnetic resonance imaging (TMRI) provides a direct and noninvasive way to visualize the in-wall deformation of the myocardium. Due to the through-plane motion, the tracking of 3D trajectories of the material points and the computation of 3D strain field call for the necessity of building 3D cardiac deformable models. The intersections of three stacks of orthogonal tagging planes are material points in the myocardium. With these intersections as control points, 3D motion can be reconstructed with a novel meshless deformable model (MDM). Volumetric MDMs describe an object as point cloud inside the object boundary and the coordinate of each point can be written in parametric functions. A generic heart mesh is registered on the TMRI with polar decomposition. A 3D MDM is generated and deformed with MR image tagging lines. Volumetric MDMs are deformed by calculating the dynamics function and minimizing the local Laplacian coordinates. The similarity transformation of each point is computed by assuming its neighboring points are making the same transformation. The deformation is computed iteratively until the control points match the target positions in the consecutive image frame. The 3D strain field is computed from the 3D displacement field with moving least squares. We demonstrate that MDMs outperformed the finite element method and the spline method with a numerical phantom. Meshless deformable models can track the trajectory of any material point in the myocardium and compute the 3D strain field of any particular area. The experimental results on in vivo healthy and patient heart MRI show that the MDM can fully recover the myocardium motion in three dimensions. PMID:25157446

  10. A Workstation for Interactive Display and Quantitative Analysis of 3-D and 4-D Biomedical Images

    PubMed Central

    Robb, R.A.; Heffeman, P.B.; Camp, J.J.; Hanson, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    The capability to extract objective and quantitatively accurate information from 3-D radiographic biomedical images has not kept pace with the capabilities to produce the images themselves. This is rather an ironic paradox, since on the one hand the new 3-D and 4-D imaging capabilities promise significant potential for providing greater specificity and sensitivity (i.e., precise objective discrimination and accurate quantitative measurement of body tissue characteristics and function) in clinical diagnostic and basic investigative imaging procedures than ever possible before, but on the other hand, the momentous advances in computer and associated electronic imaging technology which have made these 3-D imaging capabilities possible have not been concomitantly developed for full exploitation of these capabilities. Therefore, we have developed a powerful new microcomputer-based system which permits detailed investigations and evaluation of 3-D and 4-D (dynamic 3-D) biomedical images. The system comprises a special workstation to which all the information in a large 3-D image data base is accessible for rapid display, manipulation, and measurement. The system provides important capabilities for simultaneously representing and analyzing both structural and functional data and their relationships in various organs of the body. This paper provides a detailed description of this system, as well as some of the rationale, background, theoretical concepts, and practical considerations related to system implementation. ImagesFigure 5Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16

  11. A Shell/3D Modeling Technique for the Analysis of Delaminated Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; OBrien, T. Kevin

    2000-01-01

    A shell/3D modeling technique was developed for which a local solid finite element model is used only in the immediate vicinity of the delamination front. The goal was to combine the accuracy of the full three-dimensional solution with the computational efficiency of a shell finite element model. Multi-point constraints provided a kinematically compatible interface between the local 3D model and the global structural model which has been meshed with shell finite elements. Double Cantilever Beam, End Notched Flexure, and Single Leg Bending specimens were analyzed first using full 3D finite element models to obtain reference solutions. Mixed mode strain energy release rate distributions were computed using the virtual crack closure technique. The analyses were repeated using the shell/3D technique to study the feasibility for pure mode I, mode II and mixed mode I/II cases. Specimens with a unidirectional layup and with a multidirectional layup were simulated. For a local 3D model, extending to a minimum of about three specimen thicknesses on either side of the delamination front, the results were in good agreement with mixed mode strain energy release rates obtained from computations where the entire specimen had been modeled with solid elements. For large built-up composite structures the shell/3D modeling technique offers a great potential for reducing the model size, since only a relatively small section in the vicinity of the delamination front needs to be modeled with solid elements.

  12. Performance Analysis of a Low-Cost Triangulation-Based 3d Camera: Microsoft Kinect System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    . K. Chow, J. C.; Ang, K. D.; Lichti, D. D.; Teskey, W. F.

    2012-07-01

    Recent technological advancements have made active imaging sensors popular for 3D modelling and motion tracking. The 3D coordinates of signalised targets are traditionally estimated by matching conjugate points in overlapping images. Current 3D cameras can acquire point clouds at video frame rates from a single exposure station. In the area of 3D cameras, Microsoft and PrimeSense have collaborated and developed an active 3D camera based on the triangulation principle, known as the Kinect system. This off-the-shelf system costs less than 150 USD and has drawn a lot of attention from the robotics, computer vision, and photogrammetry disciplines. In this paper, the prospect of using the Kinect system for precise engineering applications was evaluated. The geometric quality of the Kinect system as a function of the scene (i.e. variation of depth, ambient light conditions, incidence angle, and object reflectivity) and the sensor (i.e. warm-up time and distance averaging) were analysed quantitatively. This system's potential in human body measurements was tested against a laser scanner and 3D range camera. A new calibration model for simultaneously determining the exterior orientation parameters, interior orientation parameters, boresight angles, leverarm, and object space features parameters was developed and the effectiveness of this calibration approach was explored.

  13. Analysis and Visualization of 3D Motion Data for UPDRS Rating of Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Piro, Neltje E; Piro, Lennart K; Kassubek, Jan; Blechschmidt-Trapp, Ronald A

    2016-01-01

    Remote monitoring of Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients with inertia sensors is a relevant method for a better assessment of symptoms. We present a new approach for symptom quantification based on motion data: the automatic Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) classification in combination with an animated 3D avatar giving the neurologist the impression of having the patient live in front of him. In this study we compared the UPDRS ratings of the pronation-supination task derived from: (a) an examination based on video recordings as a clinical reference; (b) an automatically classified UPDRS; and (c) a UPDRS rating from the assessment of the animated 3D avatar. Data were recorded using Magnetic, Angular Rate, Gravity (MARG) sensors with 15 subjects performing a pronation-supination movement of the hand. After preprocessing, the data were classified with a J48 classifier and animated as a 3D avatar. Video recording of the movements, as well as the 3D avatar, were examined by movement disorder specialists and rated by UPDRS. The mean agreement between the ratings based on video and (b) the automatically classified UPDRS is 0.48 and with (c) the 3D avatar it is 0.47. The 3D avatar is similarly suitable for assessing the UPDRS as video recordings for the examined task and will be further developed by the research team. PMID:27338400

  14. Pep-3D-Search: a method for B-cell epitope prediction based on mimotope analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan Xin; Bao, Yong Li; Guo, Shu Yan; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Chun Guang; Li, Yu Xin

    2008-01-01

    Background The prediction of conformational B-cell epitopes is one of the most important goals in immunoinformatics. The solution to this problem, even if approximate, would help in designing experiments to precisely map the residues of interaction between an antigen and an antibody. Consequently, this area of research has received considerable attention from immunologists, structural biologists and computational biologists. Phage-displayed random peptide libraries are powerful tools used to obtain mimotopes that are selected by binding to a given monoclonal antibody (mAb) in a similar way to the native epitope. These mimotopes can be considered as functional epitope mimics. Mimotope analysis based methods can predict not only linear but also conformational epitopes and this has been the focus of much research in recent years. Though some algorithms based on mimotope analysis have been proposed, the precise localization of the interaction site mimicked by the mimotopes is still a challenging task. Results In this study, we propose a method for B-cell epitope prediction based on mimotope analysis called Pep-3D-Search. Given the 3D structure of an antigen and a set of mimotopes (or a motif sequence derived from the set of mimotopes), Pep-3D-Search can be used in two modes: mimotope or motif. To evaluate the performance of Pep-3D-Search to predict epitopes from a set of mimotopes, 10 epitopes defined by crystallography were compared with the predicted results from a Pep-3D-Search: the average Matthews correlation oefficient (MCC), sensitivity and precision were 0.1758, 0.3642 and 0.6948. Compared with other available prediction algorithms, Pep-3D-Search showed comparable MCC, specificity and precision, and could provide novel, rational results. To verify the capability of Pep-3D-Search to align a motif sequence to a 3D structure for predicting epitopes, 6 test cases were used. The predictive performance of Pep-3D-Search was demonstrated to be superior to that of other

  15. Structural analysis of San Leo (RN, Italy) east and north cliffs using 3D point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spreafico, Margherita Cecilia; Bacenetti, Marco; Borgatti, Lisa; Cignetti, Martina; Giardino, Marco; Perotti, Luigi

    2013-04-01

    The town of San Leo, like many others in the historical region of Montefeltro (Northern Apennines, Italy), was built in medieval period on a calcarenite and sandstone slab, bordered by subvertical and overhanging cliffs up to 100 m high, for defense purposes. The slab and the underlying clayey substratum show widespread landslide phenomena: the first is tectonized and crossed by joints and faults, and it is affected by lateral spreading with associated rock falls, topples and tilting. Moreover, the underlying clayey substratum is involved in plastic movements, like earth flows and slides. The main cause of instability in the area, which brings about these movements, is the high deformability contrast between the plate and the underlying clays. The aim of our research is to set up a numerical model that can well describe the processes and take into account the different factors that influence the evolution of the movements. One of these factors is certainly the structural setting of the slab, characterized by several joints and faults; in order to better identify and detect the main joint sets affecting the study area a structural analysis was performed. Up to date, a series of scans of San Leo cliff taken in 2008 and 2011, with a Riegl Z420i were analyzed. Initially, we chose a test area, located in the east side of the cliff, in which analyses were performed using two different softwares: COLTOP 3D and Polyworks. We repeated the analysis using COLTOP for all the east wall and for a part of the north wall, including an area affected by a rock fall in 2006. In the test area we identified five sets with different dips and dip directions. The analysis of the east and north walls permitted to identify eight sets (seven plus the bedding) of discontinuities. We compared these results with previous ones from surveys taken by others authors in some areas and with some preliminary data from a traditional geological survey of the whole area. With traditional methods only a

  16. 3D pre- versus post-season comparisons of surface and relative pose of the corpus callosum in contact sport athletes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, Yi; Gajawelli, Niharika; Haas, Lauren; Wilkins, Bryce; Hwang, Darryl; Tsao, Sinchai; Wang, Yalin; Law, Meng; Leporé, Natasha

    2014-03-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) or concussive injury affects 1.7 million Americans annually, of which 300,000 are due to recreational activities and contact sports, such as football, rugby, and boxing[1]. Finding the neuroanatomical correlates of brain TBI non-invasively and precisely is crucial for diagnosis and prognosis. Several studies have shown the in influence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on the integrity of brain WM [2-4]. The vast majority of these works focus on athletes with diagnosed concussions. However, in contact sports, athletes are subjected to repeated hits to the head throughout the season, and we hypothesize that these have an influence on white matter integrity. In particular, the corpus callosum (CC), as a small structure connecting the brain hemispheres, may be particularly affected by torques generated by collisions, even in the absence of full blown concussions. Here, we use a combined surface-based morphometry and relative pose analyses, applying on the point distribution model (PDM) of the CC, to investigate TBI related brain structural changes between 9 pre-season and 9 post-season contact sport athlete MRIs. All the data are fed into surface based morphometry analysis and relative pose analysis. The former looks at surface area and thickness changes between the two groups, while the latter consists of detecting the relative translation, rotation and scale between them.

  17. 3D micro profile measurement with the method of spatial frequency domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yongxiang

    2015-10-01

    3D micro profiles are often needed for measurement in many fields, e.g., binary optics, electronic industry, mechanical manufacturing, aeronautic and space industry, etc. In the case where height difference between two neighboring points of a test profile is equal to or greater than λ / 4, microscopic interferometry based on laser source will no longer be applicable because of the uncertainty in phase unwrapping. As white light possesses the characteristic of interference length approximate to zero, applying it for micro profilometry can avoid the trouble and can yield accurate results. Using self-developed Mirau-type scanning interference microscope, a step-like sample was tested twice, with 128 scanning interferograms recorded for each test. To process each set of the interferograms, the method of spatial frequency domain analysis was adopted. That is, for each point, by use of Furrier transform, white-light interference intensities were decomposed in spatial frequency domain, thus obtaining phase values corresponding to different wavenumbers; by using least square fitting on phases and wave numbers, a group-velocity OPD was gained for the very point; and finally in terms of the relation between relative height and the group-velocity OPD, the profile of the test sample was obtained. Two tests yielded same profile result for the sample, and step heights obtained were 50.88 nm and 50.94 nm, respectively. Meantime, the sample was also measured with a Zygo Newview 7200 topography instrument, with same profile result obtained and step height differing by 0.9 nm. In addition, data processing results indicate that chromatic dispersion equal to and higher than 2nd order is negligible when applying spatial frequency domain analysis method.

  18. Stylolite shape, roughness growth dynamics and related burial history: a 3D analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, Nicolas; Koehn, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Stylolites are dissolution features that develop under applied pressure and during chemical compaction. Stylolites are common in sedimentary basin, altering the chemistry and physical properties of rocks, as well as the small- to large-scale hydrological system. This contribution follows recent finding about the self-affine roughness growth properties leading to a fractal, stitch-like shape of stylolites. 3D surface scanning and X-ray computed microtomography imaging have been carried out onto numerous stylolites from the southern Permian Zechstein basin (Germany) and from the Umbria Marches fold-and-thrust belts (Italy). In these two environments stylolites have been sorted following a recent advanced classification of stylolite based on the shape and growth dynamics. This classification consists in four classes (rectangular layer type, seismogram pinning type suture/sharp peak type and simple wave-like type) and we aim to characterize the roughness properties for each of these classes. A fractal analysis has been conducted accordingly using Fourier transform and Correlation function signal analysis over roughness surfaces. These fractal analyses have been used to reconstruct the maximum burial depth recorded by each stylolite. The reconstruction of burial depths at the same place but regarding all stylolite classes returns and maximum depth evolution. This dataset is thus used 1- to understand the links between the roughness growth dynamics of stylolites and their final shape and 2- to establish a relationship linking the shape of roughness to the maximum burial depth recorded. We hope results and interpretation reported can push the community to consider stylolite as an efficient tool and reliable way to appraise burial history in sedimentary basins.

  19. 3-D segmentation and quantitative analysis of inner and outer walls of thrombotic abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyungmoo; Yin, Yin; Wahle, Andreas; Olszewski, Mark E.; Sonka, Milan

    2008-03-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is an area of a localized widening of the abdominal aorta, with a frequent presence of thrombus. A ruptured aneurysm can cause death due to severe internal bleeding. AAA thrombus segmentation and quantitative analysis are of paramount importance for diagnosis, risk assessment, and determination of treatment options. Until now, only a small number of methods for thrombus segmentation and analysis have been presented in the literature, either requiring substantial user interaction or exhibiting insufficient performance. We report a novel method offering minimal user interaction and high accuracy. Our thrombus segmentation method is composed of an initial automated luminal surface segmentation, followed by a cost function-based optimal segmentation of the inner and outer surfaces of the aortic wall. The approach utilizes the power and flexibility of the optimal triangle mesh-based 3-D graph search method, in which cost functions for thrombus inner and outer surfaces are based on gradient magnitudes. Sometimes local failures caused by image ambiguity occur, in which case several control points are used to guide the computer segmentation without the need to trace borders manually. Our method was tested in 9 MDCT image datasets (951 image slices). With the exception of a case in which the thrombus was highly eccentric, visually acceptable aortic lumen and thrombus segmentation results were achieved. No user interaction was used in 3 out of 8 datasets, and 7.80 +/- 2.71 mouse clicks per case / 0.083 +/- 0.035 mouse clicks per image slice were required in the remaining 5 datasets.

  20. A comparative analysis of 2D and 3D CAD for calcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Ray, Shonket; Keller, Brad M.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Conant, Emily F.

    2015-03-01

    Many medical centers offer digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and 2D digital mammography acquired under the same compression (i.e., "Combo" examination) for screening. This paper compares a conventional 2D CAD algorithm (Hologic® ImageChecker® CAD v9.4) for calcification detection against a prototype 3D algorithm (Hologic® ImageChecker® 3D Calc CAD v1.0). Due to the newness of DBT, the development of this 3D CAD algorithm is ongoing, and it is currently not FDA-approved in the United States. For this study, DBT screening cases with suspicious calcifications were identified retrospectively at the University of Pennsylvania. An expert radiologist (E.F.C.) reviewed images with both 2D and DBT CAD marks, and compared the marks to biopsy results. Control cases with one-year negative follow-up were also studied; these cases either possess clearly benign calcifications or lacked calcifications. To allow the user to alter the sensitivity for cancer detection, an operating point is assigned to each CAD mark. As expected from conventional 2D CAD, increasing the operating point in 3D CAD increases sensitivity and reduces specificity. Additionally, we showed that some cancers are occult to 2D CAD at all operating points. By contrast, 3D CAD allows for detection of some cancers that are missed on 2D CAD. We also demonstrated that some non-cancerous CAD marks in 3D are not present at analogous locations in the 2D image. Hence, there are additional marks when using both 2D and 3D CAD in combination, leading to lower specificity than with conventional 2D CAD alone.

  1. Simulation of dielectrophoretic assembly of carbon nanotubes using 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Berger, S D; McGruer, N E; Adams, G G

    2015-04-17

    One of the most important methods for selective and repeatable assembly of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is alternating current dielectrophoresis (DEP). This method has been demonstrated experimentally as a viable technique for nano-scale manufacturing of novel CNT based devices. Previous numerical analyses have studied the motion of nanotubes, the volume from which they are assembled, and the rate of assembly, but have been restricted by various simplifying assumptions. In this paper we present a method for simulating the motion and behavior of CNTs subjected to dielectrophoresis using a three-dimensional electrostatic finite element analysis. By including the CNT in the finite element model, we can accurately predict the effect of the CNT on the electric field and the resulting force distribution across the CNT can be determined. We have used this information to calculate the motion of CNTs assembling onto the electrodes, and show how they tend to move towards the center of an electrode and come into contact at highly skewed angles. Our analysis suggests that the CNTs move to the electrode gap only after initially contacting the electrodes. We have also developed a model of the elastic deformation of CNTs as they approach the electrodes demonstrating how the induced forces can significantly alter the CNT shape during assembly. These results show that the CNT does not behave as a rigid body when in close proximity to the electrodes. In the future this method can be applied to a variety of real electrode geometries on a case-by-case basis and will provide more detailed insight into the specific motion and assembly parameters necessary for effective DEP assembly. PMID:25804394

  2. Simulation of dielectrophoretic assembly of carbon nanotubes using 3D finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, S. D.; McGruer, N. E.; Adams, G. G.

    2015-04-01

    One of the most important methods for selective and repeatable assembly of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is alternating current dielectrophoresis (DEP). This method has been demonstrated experimentally as a viable technique for nano-scale manufacturing of novel CNT based devices. Previous numerical analyses have studied the motion of nanotubes, the volume from which they are assembled, and the rate of assembly, but have been restricted by various simplifying assumptions. In this paper we present a method for simulating the motion and behavior of CNTs subjected to dielectrophoresis using a three-dimensional electrostatic finite element analysis. By including the CNT in the finite element model, we can accurately predict the effect of the CNT on the electric field and the resulting force distribution across the CNT can be determined. We have used this information to calculate the motion of CNTs assembling onto the electrodes, and show how they tend to move towards the center of an electrode and come into contact at highly skewed angles. Our analysis suggests that the CNTs move to the electrode gap only after initially contacting the electrodes. We have also developed a model of the elastic deformation of CNTs as they approach the electrodes demonstrating how the induced forces can significantly alter the CNT shape during assembly. These results show that the CNT does not behave as a rigid body when in close proximity to the electrodes. In the future this method can be applied to a variety of real electrode geometries on a case-by-case basis and will provide more detailed insight into the specific motion and assembly parameters necessary for effective DEP assembly.

  3. Mixed-Mode Fracture and Fatigue Analysis of Cracked 3D Complex Structures using a 3D SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavanam, Sharada

    The aim of this thesis is to numerically evaluate the mixed-mode Stress Intensity Factors (SIFs) of complex 3D structural geometries with arbitrary 3D cracks using the Symmetric Galerkin Boundary Element Method-Finite Element Method (SGBEM-FEM) Alternating Method. Various structural geometries with different loading scenarios and crack configurations were examined in this thesis to understand the behavior and trends of the mixed-mode SIFs as well as the fatigue life for these complex structural geometries. Although some 3D structures have empirical and numerical solutions that are readily available in the open literature, some do not; therefore this thesis presents the results of fracture and fatigue analyses of these 3D complex structures using the SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method to serve as reference for future studies. Furthermore, there are advantages of using the SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method compared to traditional FEM methods. For example, the fatigue-crack-growth and fatigue life can be better estimated for a structure because different fatigue models (i.e. Walker, Paris, and NASGRO) can be used within the same framework of the SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method. The FEM (un-cracked structure)/BEM(crack model) meshes are modeled independently, which speeds up the computation process and reduces the cost of human labor. A simple coarse mesh can be used for all fracture and fatigue analyses of complex structures. In this thesis, simple coarse meshes were used for 3D complex structures, which were below 5000 elements as compared to traditional FEM, which require meshes where the elements range on the order of ˜250,000 to ˜106 and sometimes even more than that.

  4. Coupled thermoelastic analysis of fretting contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapathy, Harish

    Fretting fatigue is the contact phenomenon occurring when two bodies in contact experience oscillatory loads. The surface tribology and contact stress evolution in a fretting contact has been studied using coupled thermoelastic analysis. Both, an aluminum and titanium alloy have been studied. Full-field real-time in-situ temperature maps of the contact region and its vicinity have been obtained using a multi-element infrared camera. The distinguishing features of the contact including the sliding regime, partial slip contact, bulk stress effects, boundary conditions effects etc. have been successfully captured using temperature measurement of the order of millikelvin. The coupled thermoclastic response of aluminum and titanium alloy has been successfully characterized, including the mean stress effect. A full coupled thermoelastic finite element model with Coulomb friction, frictional heating and gap conductance, has been used to predict the experimental temperatures. Changes in loads and changes in the coefficient of friction produce changes in different areas of the temperature field. The coupled thermoelastic effect may be used as a powerful tool to guide the march towards the complete understanding of the phenomenon of fretting. The method has been successfully used to guide the finite element analysis of a lap joint specimen.

  5. Stereoscopic motion analysis in densely packed clusters: 3D analysis of the shimmering behaviour in Giant honey bees

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The detailed interpretation of mass phenomena such as human escape panic or swarm behaviour in birds, fish and insects requires detailed analysis of the 3D movements of individual participants. Here, we describe the adaptation of a 3D stereoscopic imaging method to measure the positional coordinates of individual agents in densely packed clusters. The method was applied to study behavioural aspects of shimmering in Giant honeybees, a collective defence behaviour that deters predatory wasps by visual cues, whereby individual bees flip their abdomen upwards in a split second, producing Mexican wave-like patterns. Results Stereoscopic imaging provided non-invasive, automated, simultaneous, in-situ 3D measurements of hundreds of bees on the nest surface regarding their thoracic position and orientation of the body length axis. Segmentation was the basis for the stereo matching, which defined correspondences of individual bees in pairs of stereo images. Stereo-matched "agent bees" were re-identified in subsequent frames by the tracking procedure and triangulated into real-world coordinates. These algorithms were required to calculate the three spatial motion components (dx: horizontal, dy: vertical and dz: towards and from the comb) of individual bees over time. Conclusions The method enables the assessment of the 3D positions of individual Giant honeybees, which is not possible with single-view cameras. The method can be applied to distinguish at the individual bee level active movements of the thoraces produced by abdominal flipping from passive motions generated by the moving bee curtain. The data provide evidence that the z-deflections of thoraces are potential cues for colony-intrinsic communication. The method helps to understand the phenomenon of collective decision-making through mechanoceptive synchronization and to associate shimmering with the principles of wave propagation. With further, minor modifications, the method could be used to study

  6. Uncovering the true nature of deformation microstructures using 3D analysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, M.; Quadir, M. Z.; Afrin, N.; Xu, W.; Loeb, A.; Soe, B.; McMahon, C.; George, C.; Bassman, L.

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional electron backscatter diffraction (3D EBSD) has emerged as a powerful technique for generating 3D crystallographic information in reasonably large volumes of a microstructure. The technique uses a focused ion beam (FIB) as a high precision serial sectioning device for generating consecutive ion milled surfaces of a material, with each milled surface subsequently mapped by EBSD. The successive EBSD maps are combined using a suitable post-processing method to generate a crystallographic volume of the microstructure. The first part of this paper shows the usefulness of 3D EBSD for understanding the origin of various structural features associated with the plastic deformation of metals. The second part describes a new method for automatically identifying the various types of low and high angle boundaries found in deformed and annealed metals, particularly those associated with grains exhibiting subtle and gradual variations in orientation. We have adapted a 2D image segmentation technique, fast multiscale clustering, to 3D EBSD data using a novel variance function to accommodate quaternion data. This adaptation is capable of segmenting based on subtle and gradual variation as well as on sharp boundaries within the data. We demonstrate the excellent capabilities of this technique with application to 3D EBSD data sets generated from a range of cold rolled and annealed metals described in the paper.

  7. Analysis of optical characteristics of photopolymer-based VHOE for multiview autostereoscopic 3D display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Byung-Chul; Gu, Jung-Sik; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2002-06-01

    Generally, an autostereoscopic display presents a 3D image to a viewer without the need for glasses or other encumbering viewing aids. In this paper, we propose a new autostereoscopic 3D video display system which allows viewers to observe 3D images in the same range of viewing angle. In this system, a photopolymer-based VHOE is made from volume holographic recording materials and it is used for projecting a multiview images to the spatially different directions sequentially in time. Since this technique is based on the VHOE made from the photorefractive photopolymer instead of the conventional parallax barrier or lenticular sheet, the resolution and parallax number of the proposed VHOE-based 3D display system are limited by the photopolymer's physical and optical properties. To make the photopolymer to be applicable for a multiview autostereoscopic 3D display system, the photopolymer must be capable of achieving some properties such as a low distortion of the diffracted light beam, high diffraction efficiency, and uniform intensities of the reconstructed diffracted lights from the fully recorded diffraction gratings. In this paper, the optical and physical characteristics of the DuPont HRF photopolymer-based VHOE such as a distortion of displayed image, uniformity of the diffracted light intensity, photosensitivity and diffraction efficiency are measured and discussed.

  8. Finite Element Analysis of Thermo-Mechanical Properties of 3D Braided Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li-li; Xu, Guo-dong; Cheng, Su; Lu, Xia-mei; Zeng, Tao

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a modified finite element model (FEM) to investigate the thermo-mechanical properties of three-dimensional (3D) braided composite. The effective coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) and the meso-scale mechanical response of 3D braided composites are predicted. The effects of the braiding angle and fiber volume fraction on the effective CTE are evaluated. The results are compared to the experimental data available in the literature to demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of the present method. The tensile stress distributions of the representative volume element (RVE) are also outlined. It is found that the stress of the braiding yarn has a significant increase with temperature rise; on the other hand, the temperature change has an insignificant effect on the stress of the matrix. In addition, a rapid decrease in the tensile strength of 3D braided composites is observed with the increase in temperature. It is revealed that the thermal conditions have a significant effect on the strength of 3D braided composites. The present method provides an effective tool to predict the stresses of 3D braided composites under thermo-mechanical loading.

  9. 3D numerical analysis of crack propagation of heterogeneous notched rock under uniaxial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. Y.; Sloan, S. W.; Sheng, D. C.; Tang, C. A.

    2016-05-01

    Macroscopic notches play an important role in evaluating the fracture process zone (FPZ) and the strengths of a heterogeneous rock mass. Crack initiation, propagation and coalescence for unnotched, single-notched and double-notched rock specimens are numerically simulated in a 3-D numerical model (RFPA3D). A feature of the code RFPA3D is that it can numerically simulate the evolution of cracks in three-dimensional space, as well as the heterogeneity of the rock mass. For the unnotched case, special attention is given to the complete stress-strain curve and the corresponding AE events for the failure process of rock specimen. By comparing with published experimental results, the simulation results from RFPA3D are found to be satisfactory. For the single-notched case, the effect of the length and the depth of the single notch and the thickness of the specimen on the failure mode and peak stress are evaluated. The 3D FPZ is very different from that in two dimensions. For the double-notched case, the effects of the separation distance and overlap distance of the double notches, as well as influence of the homogeneity index (m) are also investigated. As the overlap distance increases, the direction of the principal tensile stress at each notch-end changes from a perpendicular direction (tensile stress field) to a nearly parallel direction (compressive stress field), which affects the evolution of the cracks from the two notches.

  10. A quality assessment of 3D video analysis for full scale rockfall experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkwein, A.; Glover, J.; Bourrier, F.; Gerber, W.

    2012-04-01

    Main goal of full scale rockfall experiments is to retrieve a 3D trajectory of a boulder along the slope. Such trajectories then can be used to calibrate rockfall simulation models. This contribution presents the application of video analysis techniques capturing rock fall velocity of some free fall full scale rockfall experiments along a rock face with an inclination of about 50 degrees. Different scaling methodologies have been evaluated. They mainly differ in the way the scaling factors between the movie frames and the reality and are determined. For this purpose some scale bars and targets with known dimensions have been distributed in advance along the slope. The single scaling approaches are briefly described as follows: (i) Image raster is scaled to the distant fixed scale bar then recalibrated to the plane of the passing rock boulder by taking the measured position of the nearest impact as the distance to the camera. The distance between the camera, scale bar, and passing boulder are surveyed. (ii) The image raster was scaled using the four nearest targets (identified using frontal video) from the trajectory to be analyzed. The average of the scaling factors was finally taken as scaling factor. (iii) The image raster was scaled using the four nearest targets from the trajectory to be analyzed. The scaling factor for one trajectory was calculated by balancing the mean scaling factors associated with the two nearest and the two farthest targets in relation to their mean distance to the analyzed trajectory. (iv) Same as previous method but with varying scaling factors during along the trajectory. It has shown that a direct measure of the scaling target and nearest impact zone is the most accurate. If constant plane is assumed it doesn't account for the lateral deviations of the rock boulder from the fall line consequently adding error into the analysis. Thus a combination of scaling methods (i) and (iv) are considered to give the best results. For best results

  11. Noise analysis for near-field 3D FM-CW radar imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.

    2015-05-01

    Near field radar imaging systems are used for demanding security applications including concealed weapon detection in airports and other high-security venues. Despite the near-field operation, phase noise and thermal noise can limit performance in several ways. Practical imaging systems can employ arrays with low gain antennas and relatively large signal distribution networks that have substantial losses which limit transmit power and increase the effective noise figure of the receiver chain, resulting in substantial thermal noise. Phase noise can also limit system performance. The signal coupled from transmitter to receiver is much larger than expected target signals. Phase noise from this coupled signal can set the system noise floor if the oscillator is too noisy. Frequency modulated continuous wave (FM-CW) radar transceivers used in short range systems are relatively immune to the effects of the coupled phase noise due to range correlation effects. This effect can reduce the phase-noise floor such that it is below the thermal noise floor for moderate performance oscillators. Phase noise is also manifested in the range response around bright targets, and can cause smaller targets to be obscured. Noise in synthetic aperture imaging systems is mitigated by the processing gain of the system. In this paper, the effects of thermal noise, phase noise, and processing gain are analyzed in the context of a near field 3-D FM-CW imaging radar as might be used for concealed weapon detection. In addition to traditional frequency domain analysis, a time-domain simulation is employed to graphically demonstrate the effect of these noise sources on a fast-chirping FM-CW system.

  12. 3D surface analysis of hippocampal microvasculature in the irradiated brain.

    PubMed

    Craver, Brianna M; Acharya, Munjal M; Allen, Barrett D; Benke, Sarah N; Hultgren, Nan W; Baulch, Janet E; Limoli, Charles L

    2016-06-01

    Cranial irradiation used to control CNS malignancies can also disrupt the vasculature and impair neurotransmission and cognition. Here we describe two distinct methodologies for quantifying early and late radiation injury in CNS microvasculature. Intravascular fluorescently labeled lectin was used to visualize microvessels in the brain of the irradiated mouse 2 days post exposure and RECA-1 immunostaining was similarly used to visualize microvessels in the brain of the irradiated rat 1-month post exposure. Confocal microscopy, image deconvolution and 3-dimensional rendering methods were used to define vascular structure in a ∼4 × 10(7) μm(3) defined region of the brain. Quantitative analysis of these 3D images revealed that irradiation caused significant short- and long-term reductions in capillary density, diameter and volume. In mice, irradiation reduced mean vessel volume from 2,250 to 1,470 μm(3) and mean vessel diameter from 5.0 to 4.5 μm, resulting in significant reductions of 34% and 10%, in the hippocampus respectively. The number of vessel branch points and area was also found to also drop significantly in mice 2 days after irradiation. For rats, immunostaining revealed a significant, three-fold drop in capillary density 1 month after exposure compared to controls. Such radiation-induced disruption of the CNS microvasculature may be contributory if not causal to any number of neurocognitive side effects that manifest in cancer patients following cranial radiotherapy. This study demonstrates the utility of two distinct methodologies for quantifying these important adverse effects of radiotherapy. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:341-349, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27175611

  13. Landmark detection from 3D mesh facial models for image-based analysis of dysmorphology.

    PubMed

    Chendeb, Marwa; Tortorici, Claudio; Al Muhairi, Hassan; Al Safar, Habiba; Linguraru, Marius; Werghi, Naoufel

    2015-01-01

    Facial landmark detection is a task of interest for facial dysmorphology, an important factor in the diagnosis of genetic conditions. In this paper, we propose a framework for feature points detection from 3D face images. The method is based on 3D Constrained Local Model (CLM) which learns both global variations in the 3D facial scan and local changes around every vertex landmark. Compared to state of the art methods our framework is distinguished by the following novel aspects: 1) It operates on facial surfaces, 2) It allows fusion of shape and color information on the mesh surface, 3) It introduces the use of LBP descriptors on the mesh. We showcase our landmarks detection framework on a set of scans including down syndrome and control cases. We also validate our method through a series of quantitative experiments conducted with the publicly available Bosphorus database. PMID:26736227

  14. Quantitative analysis of 3D extracellular matrix remodelling by pancreatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Benjamin K.; Cortes, Ernesto; Rice, Alistair J.; Sarper, Muge

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling is integral to numerous physiological and pathological processes in biology, such as embryogenesis, wound healing, fibrosis and cancer. Until recently, most cellular studies have been conducted on 2D environments where mechanical cues significantly differ from physiologically relevant 3D environments, impacting cellular behaviour and masking the interpretation of cellular function in health and disease. We present an integrated methodology where cell-ECM interactions can be investigated in 3D environments via ECM remodelling. Monitoring and quantification of collagen-I structure in remodelled matrices, through designated algorithms, show that 3D matrices can be used to correlate remodelling with increased ECM stiffness observed in fibrosis. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are the key effectors of the stromal fibrosis associated to pancreatic cancer. We use PSCs to implement our methodology and demonstrate that PSC matrix remodelling capabilities depend on their contractile machinery and β1 integrin-mediated cell-ECM attachment. PMID:27170254

  15. Nanoscale Analysis of a Hierarchical Hybrid Solar Cell in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Divitini, Giorgio; Stenzel, Ole; Ghadirzadeh, Ali; Guarnera, Simone; Russo, Valeria; Casari, Carlo S; Bassi, Andrea Li; Petrozza, Annamaria; Di Fonzo, Fabio; Schmidt, Volker; Ducati, Caterina

    2014-01-01

    A quantitative method for the characterization of nanoscale 3D morphology is applied to the investigation of a hybrid solar cell based on a novel hierarchical nanostructured photoanode. A cross section of the solar cell device is prepared by focused ion beam milling in a micropillar geometry, which allows a detailed 3D reconstruction of the titania photoanode by electron tomography. It is found that the hierarchical titania nanostructure facilitates polymer infiltration, thus favoring intermixing of the two semiconducting phases, essential for charge separation. The 3D nanoparticle network is analyzed with tools from stochastic geometry to extract information related to the charge transport in the hierarchical solar cell. In particular, the experimental dataset allows direct visualization of the percolation pathways that contribute to the photocurrent. PMID:25834481

  16. 3D numerical simulation analysis of passive drag near free surface in swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Jie-min; Li, Tian-zeng; Chen, Xue-bin; Li, Yok-sheung; Wai, Wing-hong Onyx

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this work is to build a 3D numerical model to study the characteristics of passive drag on competitive swimmers taking into account the impact of the free surface. This model solves the 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using RNG k- ɛ turbulence closure. The volume of fluid (VOF) method is used to locate the free surface. The 3D virtual model is created by Computer Aided Industrial Design (CAID) software, Rhinoceros. Firstly, a specific posture of swimming is studied. The simulation results are in good agreement with the data from mannequin towing experiments. The effects of a swimmer's arms and legs positions on swimming performance are then studied. Finally, it is demonstrated that the present method is capable of simulating gliding near the free surface.

  17. Analysis of the TREAT loss-of-flow tests L6 and L7 using SAS3D

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, E.E.; Simms, R.; Gruber, E.E.

    1985-01-01

    The TREAT loss-of-flow tests L6 and L7 have been analyzed using the SAS3D accident analysis code. The impetus for the analysis was the need for experimentally supported fuel motion modeling in whole core accident studies performed in support of licensing of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project. The input prescription chosen for the SAS3D/SLUMPY fuel motion model gave reasonable agreement with the test results. Tests L6 and L7, each conducted with a cluster of three fuel pins, were planned to simulate key events in the loss-of-flow accident scenario for the Clinch River homogeneous reactor.

  18. F3D Image Processing and Analysis for Many - and Multi-core Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-01

    F3D is written in OpenCL, so it achieve[sic] platform-portable parallelism on modern mutli-core CPUs and many-core GPUs. The interface and mechanims to access F3D core are written in Java as a plugin for Fiji/ImageJ to deliver several key image-processing algorithms necessary to remove artifacts from micro-tomography data. The algorithms consist of data parallel aware filters that can efficiently utilizes[sic] resources and can work on out of core datasets and scale efficiently across multiple accelerators. Optimizing for data parallel filters, streaming out of core datasets, and efficient resource and memory and data managements over complex execution sequence of filters greatly expedites any scientific workflow with image processing requirements. F3D performs several different types of 3D image processing operations, such as non-linear filtering using bilateral filtering and/or median filtering and/or morphological operators (MM). F3D gray-level MM operators are one-pass constant time methods that can perform morphological transformations with a line-structuring element oriented in discrete directions. Additionally, MM operators can be applied to gray-scale images, and consist of two parts: (a) a reference shape or structuring element, which is translated over the image, and (b) a mechanism, or operation, that defines the comparisons to be performed between the image and the structuring element. This tool provides a critical component within many complex pipelines such as those for performing automated segmentation of image stacks. F3D is also called a "descendent" of Quant-CT, another software we developed in the past. These two modules are to be integrated in a next version. Further details were reported in: D.M. Ushizima, T. Perciano, H. Krishnan, B. Loring, H. Bale, D. Parkinson, and J. Sethian. Structure recognition from high-resolution images of ceramic composites. IEEE International Conference on Big Data, October 2014.

  19. Potential and limitations of microscopy and Raman spectroscopy for live-cell analysis of 3D cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Charwat, Verena; Schütze, Karin; Holnthoner, Wolfgang; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Gangnus, Rainer; Hofbauer, Pablo; Hoffmann, Claudia; Angres, Brigitte; Kasper, Cornelia

    2015-07-10

    Today highly complex 3D cell culture formats that closely mimic the in vivo situation are increasingly available. Despite their wide use, the development of analytical methods and tools that can work within the depth of 3D-tissue constructs lags behind. In order to get the most information from a 3D cell sample, adequate and reliable assays are required. However, the majority of tools and methods used today have been originally designed for 2D cell cultures and translation to a 3D environment is in general not trivial. Ideally, an analytical method should be non-invasive and allow for repeated observation of living cells in order to detect dynamic changes in individual cells within the 3D cell culture. Although well-established laser confocal microscopy can be used for these purposes, this technique has serious limitations including penetration depth and availability. Focusing on two relevant analytical methods for live-cell monitoring, we discuss the current challenges of analyzing living 3D samples: microscopy, which is the most widely used technology to observe and examine cell cultures, has been successfully adapted for 3D samples by recording of so-called "z-stacks". However the required equipment is generally very expensive and therefore access is often limited. Consequently alternative and less advanced approaches are often applied that cannot capture the full structural complexity of a 3D sample. Similarly, image analysis tools for quantification of microscopic images range from highly specialized and costly to simplified and inexpensive. Depending on the actual sample composition and scientific question the best approach needs to be assessed individually. Another more recently introduced technology for non-invasive cell analysis is Raman micro-spectroscopy. It enables label-free identification of cellular metabolic changes with high sensitivity and has already been successful applied to 2D and 3D cell cultures. However, its future significance for cell

  20. 3-D FEM field analysis in controlled-PM LSM for Maglev vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kinjiro; Lee, J.; Kim, Y.J.

    1997-03-01

    The magnetic fields in the controlled-PM LSM for Maglev vehicle, of which the width is not only finite with lateral edges, but also an effective electric-airgap is very large, are accurately analyzed by using 3-D FEM. The lateral airgap-flux due to lateral edges of the machine is made clear and its effects on thrust and lift forces are evaluated quantitatively from the comparison with 2-D FEA. The accuracy of 3-D FEA is verified by comparing the calculated results with the measured values.

  1. Quantitative analysis of platelets aggregates in 3D by digital holographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Boudejltia, Karim Zouaoui; Ribeiro de Sousa, Daniel; Uzureau, Pierrick; Yourassowsky, Catherine; Perez-Morga, David; Courbebaisse, Guy; Chopard, Bastien; Dubois, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Platelet spreading and retraction play a pivotal role in the platelet plugging and the thrombus formation. In routine laboratory, platelet function tests include exhaustive information about the role of the different receptors present at the platelet surface without information on the 3D structure of platelet aggregates. In this work, we develop, a method in Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) to characterize the platelet and aggregate 3D shapes using the quantitative phase contrast imaging. This novel method is suited to the study of platelets physiology in clinical practice as well as the development of new drugs. PMID:26417523

  2. 3D DVH-based metric analysis versus per-beam planar analysis in IMRT pretreatment verification

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, Pablo; Jornet, Nuria; Latorre, Artur; Eudaldo, Teresa; Ruiz, Agusti; Ribas, Montserrat

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate methods of pretreatment IMRT analysis, using real measurements performed with a commercial 2D detector array, for clinical relevance and accuracy by comparing clinical DVH parameters. Methods: We divided the work into two parts. The first part consisted of six in-phantom tests aimed to study the sensitivity of the different analysis methods. Beam fluences, 3D dose distribution, and DVH of an unaltered original plan were compared to those of the delivered plan, in which an error had been intentionally introduced. The second part consisted of comparing gamma analysis with DVH metrics for 17 patient plans from various sites. Beam fluences were measured with the MapCHECK 2 detector, per-beam planar analysis was performed with the MapCHECK software, and 3D gamma analysis and the DVH evaluation were performed using 3DVH software. Results: In a per-beam gamma analysis some of the tests yielded false positives or false negatives. However, the 3DVH software correctly described the DVH of the plan which included the error. The measured DVH from the plan with controlled error agreed with the planned DVH within 2% dose or 2% volume. We also found that a gamma criterion of 3%/3 mm was too lax to detect some of the forced errors. Global analysis masked some problems, while local analysis magnified irrelevant errors at low doses. Small hotspots were missed for all metrics due to the spatial resolution of the detector panel. DVH analysis for patient plans revealed small differences between treatment plan calculations and 3DVH results, with the exception of very small volume structures such as the eyes and the lenses. Target coverage (D{sub 98} and D{sub 95}) of the measured plan was systematically lower than that predicted by the treatment planning system, while other DVH characteristics varied depending on the parameter and organ. Conclusions: We found no correlation between the gamma index and the clinical impact of a discrepancy for any of the gamma index

  3. Feasibility study on 3-D shape analysis of high-aspect-ratio features using through-focus scanning optical microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Attota, Ravi Kiran; Weck, Peter; Kramar, John A.; Bunday, Benjamin; Vartanian, Victor

    2016-01-01

    In-line metrologies currently used in the semiconductor industry are being challenged by the aggressive pace of device scaling and the adoption of novel device architectures. Metrology and process control of three-dimensional (3-D) high-aspect-ratio (HAR) features are becoming increasingly important and also challenging. In this paper we present a feasibility study of through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM) for 3-D shape analysis of HAR features. TSOM makes use of 3-D optical data collected using a conventional optical microscope for 3-D shape analysis. Simulation results of trenches and holes down to the 11 nm node are presented. The ability of TSOM to analyze an array of HAR features or a single isolated HAR feature is also presented. This allows for the use of targets with area over 100 times smaller than that of conventional gratings, saving valuable real estate on the wafers. Indications are that the sensitivity of TSOM may match or exceed the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) measurement requirements for the next several years. Both simulations and preliminary experimental results are presented. The simplicity, lowcost, high throughput, and nanometer scale 3-D shape sensitivity of TSOM make it an attractive inspection and process monitoring solution for nanomanufacturing. PMID:27464112

  4. A Comparative Analysis between Active and Passive Techniques for Underwater 3D Reconstruction of Close-Range Objects

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, Gianfranco; Gallo, Alessandro; Bruno, Fabio; Muzzupappa, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    In some application fields, such as underwater archaeology or marine biology, there is the need to collect three-dimensional, close-range data from objects that cannot be removed from their site. In particular, 3D imaging techniques are widely employed for close-range acquisitions in underwater environment. In this work we have compared in water two 3D imaging techniques based on active and passive approaches, respectively, and whole-field acquisition. The comparison is performed under poor visibility conditions, produced in the laboratory by suspending different quantities of clay in a water tank. For a fair comparison, a stereo configuration has been adopted for both the techniques, using the same setup, working distance, calibration, and objects. At the moment, the proposed setup is not suitable for real world applications, but it allowed us to conduct a preliminary analysis on the performances of the two techniques and to understand their capability to acquire 3D points in presence of turbidity. The performances have been evaluated in terms of accuracy and density of the acquired 3D points. Our results can be used as a reference for further comparisons in the analysis of other 3D techniques and algorithms. PMID:23966193

  5. A comparative analysis between active and passive techniques for underwater 3D reconstruction of close-range objects.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Gianfranco; Gallo, Alessandro; Bruno, Fabio; Muzzupappa, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    In some application fields, such as underwater archaeology or marine biology, there is the need to collect three-dimensional, close-range data from objects that cannot be removed from their site. In particular, 3D imaging techniques are widely employed for close-range acquisitions in underwater environment. In this work we have compared in water two 3D imaging techniques based on active and passive approaches, respectively, and whole-field acquisition. The comparison is performed under poor visibility conditions, produced in the laboratory by suspending different quantities of clay in a water tank. For a fair comparison, a stereo configuration has been adopted for both the techniques, using the same setup, working distance, calibration, and objects. At the moment, the proposed setup is not suitable for real world applications, but it allowed us to conduct a preliminary analysis on the performances of the two techniques and to understand their capability to acquire 3D points in presence of turbidity. The performances have been evaluated in terms of accuracy and density of the acquired 3D points. Our results can be used as a reference for further comparisons in the analysis of other 3D techniques and algorithms. PMID:23966193

  6. Feasibility study on 3-D shape analysis of high-aspect-ratio features using through-focus scanning optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Attota, Ravi Kiran; Weck, Peter; Kramar, John A; Bunday, Benjamin; Vartanian, Victor

    2016-07-25

    In-line metrologies currently used in the semiconductor industry are being challenged by the aggressive pace of device scaling and the adoption of novel device architectures. Metrology and process control of three-dimensional (3-D) high-aspect-ratio (HAR) features are becoming increasingly important and also challenging. In this paper we present a feasibility study of through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM) for 3-D shape analysis of HAR features. TSOM makes use of 3-D optical data collected using a conventional optical microscope for 3-D shape analysis. Simulation results of trenches and holes down to the 11 nm node are presented. The ability of TSOM to analyze an array of HAR features or a single isolated HAR feature is also presented. This allows for the use of targets with area over 100 times smaller than that of conventional gratings, saving valuable real estate on the wafers. Indications are that the sensitivity of TSOM may match or exceed the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) measurement requirements for the next several years. Both simulations and preliminary experimental results are presented. The simplicity, lowcost, high throughput, and nanometer scale 3-D shape sensitivity of TSOM make it an attractive inspection and process monitoring solution for nanomanufacturing. PMID:27464112

  7. Shaped 3D Singular Spectrum Analysis for Quantifying Gene Expression, with Application to the Early Zebrafish Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Shlemov, Alex; Golyandina, Nina; Holloway, David; Spirov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in microscopy technologies, biological markers, and automated processing methods is making possible the development of gene expression atlases at cellular-level resolution over whole embryos. Raw data on gene expression is usually very noisy. This noise comes from both experimental (technical/methodological) and true biological sources (from stochastic biochemical processes). In addition, the cells or nuclei being imaged are irregularly arranged in 3D space. This makes the processing, extraction, and study of expression signals and intrinsic biological noise a serious challenge for 3D data, requiring new computational approaches. Here, we present a new approach for studying gene expression in nuclei located in a thick layer around a spherical surface. The method includes depth equalization on the sphere, flattening, interpolation to a regular grid, pattern extraction by Shaped 3D singular spectrum analysis (SSA), and interpolation back to original nuclear positions. The approach is demonstrated on several examples of gene expression in the zebrafish egg (a model system in vertebrate development). The method is tested on several different data geometries (e.g., nuclear positions) and different forms of gene expression patterns. Fully 3D datasets for developmental gene expression are becoming increasingly available; we discuss the prospects of applying 3D-SSA to data processing and analysis in this growing field. PMID:26495320

  8. Some Methods of Applied Numerical Analysis to 3d Facial Reconstruction Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roşu, Şerban; Ianeş, Emilia; Roşu, Doina

    2010-09-01

    This paper deals with the collective work performed by medical doctors from the University Of Medicine and Pharmacy Timisoara and engineers from the Politechnical Institute Timisoara in the effort to create the first Romanian 3d reconstruction software based on CT or MRI scans and to test the created software in clinical practice.

  9. Constructing topologically connected surfaces for the comprehensive analysis of 3-D medical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvin, Alan D.; Cutting, Court B.; Haddad, Betsy; Noz, Marilyn E.

    1991-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) medical imaging deals with the visualization, manipulation, and measuring of objects in 3D medical images. So far, research efforts have concentrated primarily on visualization, using well-developed methods from computer graphics. Very little has been achieved in developing techniques for manipulating medical objects, or for extracting quantitative measurements from them beyond volume calculation (by counting voxels), and computing distances and angles between manually located surface points. A major reason for the slow pace in the development of manipulation and quantification methods lies with the limitations of current algorithms for constructing surfaces from 3D solid objects. We show that current surface construction algorithms either (a) do not construct valid surface descriptions of solid objects or (b) produce surface representations that are not particularly suitable for anything other than visualization. We present ALLIGATOR, a new surface construction algorithm that produces valid, topologically connected surface representations of solid objects. We have developed a modeling system based on the surface representations created by ALLIGATOR that is suitable for developing algorithms to visualize, manipulate, and quantify 3D medical objects. Using this modeling system we have developed a method for efficiently computing principle curvatures and directions on surfaces. These measurements form the basis for a new metric system being developed for morphometrics. The modeling system is also being used in the development of systems for quantitative pre-surgical planning and surgical augmentation.

  10. Analysis of the rupture process of the 1995 Kobe earthquake using a 3D velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yujia; Koketsu, Kazuki; Ohno, Taichi

    2013-12-01

    A notable feature of the 1995 Kobe (Hyogo-ken Nanbu) earthquake is that violent ground motions occurred in a narrow zone. Previous studies have shown that the origin of such motions can be explained by the 3D velocity structure in this zone. This indicates not only that the 3D velocity structure significantly affects strong ground motions, but also that we should consider its effects in order to determine accurately the rupture process of the earthquake. Therefore, we have performed a joint source inversion of strong-motion, geodetic, and teleseismic data, where 3D Green's functions were calculated for strong-motion and geodetic data in the Osaka basin. Our source model estimates the total seismic moment to be about 2.1 × 1019 N m and the maximum slip reaches 2.9 m near the hypocenter. Although the locations of large slips are similar to those reported by Yoshida et al. (1996), there are quantitative differences between our results and their results due to the differences between the 3D and 1D Green's functions. We have also confirmed that our source model realized a better fit to the strong motion observations, and a similar fit as Yoshida et al. (1996) to the observed static displacements.

  11. CFL3D Version 6.4-General Usage and Aeroelastic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2006-01-01

    This document contains the course notes on the computational fluid dynamics code CFL3D version 6.4. It is intended to provide from basic to advanced users the information necessary to successfully use the code for a broad range of cases. Much of the course covers capability that has been a part of previous versions of the code, with material compiled from a CFL3D v5.0 manual and from the CFL3D v6 web site prior to the current release. This part of the material is presented to users of the code not familiar with computational fluid dynamics. There is new capability in CFL3D version 6.4 presented here that has not previously been published. There are also outdated features no longer used or recommended in recent releases of the code. The information offered here supersedes earlier manuals and updates outdated usage. Where current usage supersedes older versions, notation of that is made. These course notes also provides hints for usage, code installation and examples not found elsewhere.

  12. A Critical Analysis of a Hand Orthosis Reverse Engineering and 3D Printing Process

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to realize highly customized orthoses is receiving boost thanks to the widespread diffusion of low-cost 3D printing technologies. However, rapid prototyping (RP) with 3D printers is only the final stage of patient personalized orthotics processes. A reverse engineering (RE) process is in fact essential before RP, to digitize the 3D anatomy of interest and to process the obtained surface with suitable modeling software, in order to produce the virtual solid model of the orthosis to be printed. In this paper, we focus on the specific and demanding case of the customized production of hand orthosis. We design and test the essential steps of the entire production process with particular emphasis on the accurate acquisition of the forearm geometry and on the subsequent production of a printable model of the orthosis. The choice of the various hardware and software tools (3D scanner, modeling software, and FDM printer) is aimed at the mitigation of the design and production costs while guaranteeing suitable levels of data accuracy, process efficiency, and design versatility. Eventually, the proposed method is critically analyzed so that the residual issues and critical aspects are highlighted in order to discuss possible alternative approaches and to derive insightful observations that could guide future research activities. PMID:27594781

  13. Quantitative analysis of two-phase 3D+time aortic MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fei; Zhang, Honghai; Walker, Nicholas E.; Yang, Fuxing; Olszewski, Mark E.; Wahle, Andreas; Scholz, Thomas; Sonka, Milan

    2006-03-01

    Automated and accurate segmentation of the aorta in 3D+time MR image data is important for early detection of connective tissue disorders leading to aortic aneurysms and dissections. A computer-aided diagnosis method is reported that allows the objective identification of subjects with connective tissue disorders from two-phase 3D+time aortic MR images. Our automated segmentation method combines level-set and optimal border detection. The resulting aortic lumen surface was registered with an aortic model followed by calculation of modal indices of aortic shape and motion. The modal indices reflect the differences of any individual aortic shape and motion from an average aortic behavior. The indices were input to a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier and a discrimination model was constructed. 3D+time MR image data sets acquired from 22 normal and connective tissue disorder subjects at end-diastole (R-wave peak) and at 45% of the R-R interval were used to evaluate the performance of our method. The automated 3D segmentation result produced accurate aortic surfaces covering the aorta from the left-ventricular outflow tract to the diaphragm and yielded subvoxel accuracy with signed surface positioning errors of -0.09+/-1.21 voxel (-0.15+/-2.11 mm). The computer aided diagnosis method distinguished between normal and connective tissue disorder subjects with a classification correctness of 90.1 %.

  14. Phenotypic analysis of bovine chondrocytes cultured in 3D collagen sponges: effect of serum substitutes.

    PubMed

    Yates, Karen E; Allemann, Florin; Glowacki, Julie

    2005-01-01

    Repair of damaged cartilage usually requires replacement tissue or substitute material. Tissue engineering is a promising means to produce replacement cartilage from autologous or allogeneic cell sources. Scaffolds provide a three-dimensional (3D) structure that is essential for chondrocyte function and synthesis of cartilage-specific matrix proteins (collagen type II, aggrecan) and sulfated proteoglycans. In this study, we assessed porous, 3D collagen sponges for in vitro engineering of cartilage in both standard and serum-free culture conditions. Bovine articular chondrocytes (bACs) cultured in 3D sponges accumulated and maintained cartilage matrix over 4 weeks, as assessed by quantitative measures of matrix content, synthesis, and gene expression. Chondrogenesis by bACs cultured with Nutridoma as a serum replacement was equivalent or better than control cultures in serum. In contrast, chondrogenesis in insulin-transferrin-selenium (ITS(+3)) serum replacement cultures was poor, apparently due to decreased cell survival. These data indicate that porous 3D collagen sponges maintain chondrocyte viability, shape, and synthetic activity by providing an environment favorable for high-density chondrogenesis. With quantitative assays for cartilage-specific gene expression and biochemical measures of chondrogenesis in these studies, we conclude that the collagen sponges have potential as a scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:15735900

  15. A Critical Analysis of a Hand Orthosis Reverse Engineering and 3D Printing Process.

    PubMed

    Baronio, Gabriele; Harran, Sami; Signoroni, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to realize highly customized orthoses is receiving boost thanks to the widespread diffusion of low-cost 3D printing technologies. However, rapid prototyping (RP) with 3D printers is only the final stage of patient personalized orthotics processes. A reverse engineering (RE) process is in fact essential before RP, to digitize the 3D anatomy of interest and to process the obtained surface with suitable modeling software, in order to produce the virtual solid model of the orthosis to be printed. In this paper, we focus on the specific and demanding case of the customized production of hand orthosis. We design and test the essential steps of the entire production process with particular emphasis on the accurate acquisition of the forearm geometry and on the subsequent production of a printable model of the orthosis. The choice of the various hardware and software tools (3D scanner, modeling software, and FDM printer) is aimed at the mitigation of the design and production costs while guaranteeing suitable levels of data accuracy, process efficiency, and design versatility. Eventually, the proposed method is critically analyzed so that the residual issues and critical aspects are highlighted in order to discuss possible alternative approaches and to derive insightful observations that could guide future research activities. PMID:27594781

  16. BOPACE 3-D (the Boeing Plastic Analysis Capability for 3-dimensional Solids Using Isoparametric Finite Elements)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.; Straayer, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The BOPACE 3-D is a finite element computer program, which provides a general family of three-dimensional isoparametric solid elements, and includes a new algorithm for improving the efficiency of the elastic-plastic-creep solution procedure. Theoretical, user, and programmer oriented sections are presented to describe the program.

  17. Rigorous analysis of an electric-field-driven liquid crystal lens for 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bong-Sik; Lee, Seung-Chul; Park, Woo-Sang

    2014-08-01

    We numerically analyzed the optical performance of an electric field driven liquid crystal (ELC) lens adopted for 3-dimensional liquid crystal displays (3D-LCDs) through rigorous ray tracing. For the calculation, we first obtain the director distribution profile of the liquid crystals by using the Erickson-Leslie motional equation; then, we calculate the transmission of light through the ELC lens by using the extended Jones matrix method. The simulation was carried out for a 9view 3D-LCD with a diagonal of 17.1 inches, where the ELC lens was slanted to achieve natural stereoscopic images. The results show that each view exists separately according to the viewing position at an optimum viewing distance of 80 cm. In addition, our simulation results provide a quantitative explanation for the ghost or blurred images between views observed from a 3D-LCD with an ELC lens. The numerical simulations are also shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The present simulation method is expected to provide optimum design conditions for obtaining natural 3D images by rigorously analyzing the optical functionalities of an ELC lens.

  18. 3D P-wave velocity structure of the deep Galicia rifted margin: A first analysis of the Galicia 3D wide-angle seismic dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakci, Gaye; Minshull, Timothy A.; Davy, Richard G.; Karplus, Marianne S.; Kaeschen, Dirk; Papenberg, Cord; Krabbenhoeft, Anne; Sawyer, Dale; Reston, Timothy J.; Shillington, Donna J.; Ranero, César R.

    2014-05-01

    Galicia 3D, a reflection-refraction and long offset seismic experiment was carried out from May through September 2013, at the Galicia rifted margin (in the northeast Atlantic Ocean, west of Spain) as a collaboration between US, UK, German and Spanish groups. The 3D multichannel seismic acquisition conducted by R/V Marcus Langseth covered a 64 km by 20 km (1280 km2) zone where the main geological features are the Peridotite Ridge (PR), composed of serpentinized peridotite and thought be upper mantle exhumed to the seafloor during rifting, and the S reflector which has been interpreted to be a low angle detachment fault overlain by fault bounded, rotated, continental crustal blocks. In the 3D box, two airgun arrays of 3300 cu.in. were fired alternately (in flip-flop configuration) every 37.5 m. All shots are recorded by 44 short period four component ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) and 26 ocean bottom hydrophones (OBH) deployed and recovered by R/V Poseidon, as well as four 6 km hydrophone streamers with 12.5 m channel spacing towed by R/V Marcus Langseth. We present the preliminary results of the first arrival time tomography study which is carried out with a subset of the wide-angle dataset, in order to generate a 3D P-wave velocity volume for the entire depth sampled by the reflection data. After the relocation of OBSs and OBHs, an automatic first-arrival time picking approach is applied to a subset of the dataset, which comprises more than 5.5 million source-receiver pairs. Then, the first-arrival times are checked visually, in 3-dimensions. The a priori model used for the first-arrival time tomography is built up using information from previous seismic surveys carried out at the Galicia margin (e.g. ISE, 1997). The FAST algorithm of Zelt and Barton (1998) is used for the first-arrival time inversion. The 3D P-wave velocity volume can be used in interpreting the reflection dataset, as a starting point for migration, to quantify the thinning of the crustal layers

  19. Quantitative Analysis of Vascular Heterogeneity in Breast Lesions Using Contrast-Enhanced 3-D Harmonic and Subharmonic Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Anush; Eisenbrey, John R.; Machado, Priscilla; Ojeda-Fournier, Haydee; Wilkes, Annina; Sevrukov, Alexander; Mattrey, Robert F.; Wallace, Kirk; Chalek, Carl L.; Thomenius, Kai E.; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Ability to visualize breast lesion vascularity and quantify the vascular heterogeneity using contrast-enhanced 3-D harmonic (HI) and subharmonic (SHI) ultrasound imaging was investigated in a clinical population. Patients (n = 134) identified with breast lesions on mammography were scanned using power Doppler imaging, contrast-enhanced 3-D HI, and 3-D SHI on a modified Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare). A region of interest corresponding to ultrasound contrast agent flow was identified in 4D View (GE Medical Systems) and mapped to raw slice data to generate a map of time-intensity curves for the lesion volume. Time points corresponding to baseline, peak intensity, and washout of ultrasound contrast agent were identified and used to generate and compare vascular heterogeneity plots for malignant and benign lesions. Vascularity was observed with power Doppler imaging in 84 lesions (63 benign and 21 malignant). The 3-D HI showed flow in 8 lesions (5 benign and 3 malignant), whereas 3-D SHI visualized flow in 68 lesions (49 benign and 19 malignant). Analysis of vascular heterogeneity in the 3-D SHI volumes found benign lesions having a significant difference in vascularity between central and peripheral sections (1.71 ± 0.96 vs. 1.13 ± 0.79 dB, p < 0.001, respectively), whereas malignant lesions showed no difference (1.66 ± 1.39 vs. 1.24 ± 1.14 dB, p = 0.24), indicative of more vascular coverage. These preliminary results suggest quantitative evaluation of vascular heterogeneity in breast lesions using contrast-enhanced 3-D SHI is feasible and able to detect variations in vascularity between central and peripheral sections for benign and malignant lesions. PMID:25935933

  20. Analysis of surface cracks at hole by a 3-D weight function method with stresses from finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, W.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Sutton, M. A.; Shivakumar, K. N.; Wu, X. R.

    1995-01-01

    Parallel with the work in Part-1, stress intensity factors for semi-elliptical surface cracks emanating from a circular hole are determined. The 3-D weight function method with the 3D finite element solutions for the uncracked stress distribution as in Part-1 is used for the analysis. Two different loading conditions, i.e. remote tension and wedge loading, are considered for a wide range in geometrical parameters. Both single and double surface cracks are studied and compared with other solutions available in the literature. Typical crack opening displacements are also provided.

  1. A unified and efficient framework for court-net sports video analysis using 3D camera modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jungong; de With, Peter H. N.

    2007-01-01

    The extensive amount of video data stored on available media (hard and optical disks) necessitates video content analysis, which is a cornerstone for different user-friendly applications, such as, smart video retrieval and intelligent video summarization. This paper aims at finding a unified and efficient framework for court-net sports video analysis. We concentrate on techniques that are generally applicable for more than one sports type to come to a unified approach. To this end, our framework employs the concept of multi-level analysis, where a novel 3-D camera modeling is utilized to bridge the gap between the object-level and the scene-level analysis. The new 3-D camera modeling is based on collecting features points from two planes, which are perpendicular to each other, so that a true 3-D reference is obtained. Another important contribution is a new tracking algorithm for the objects (i.e. players). The algorithm can track up to four players simultaneously. The complete system contributes to summarization by various forms of information, of which the most important are the moving trajectory and real-speed of each player, as well as 3-D height information of objects and the semantic event segments in a game. We illustrate the performance of the proposed system by evaluating it for a variety of court-net sports videos containing badminton, tennis and volleyball, and we show that the feature detection performance is above 92% and events detection about 90%.

  2. Variation and diversity in Homo erectus: a 3D geometric morphometric analysis of the temporal bone.

    PubMed

    Terhune, Claire E; Kimbel, William H; Lockwood, Charles A

    2007-07-01

    Although the level of taxonomic diversity within the fossil hominin species Homo erectus (sensu lato) is continually debated, there have been relatively few studies aiming to quantify the morphology of this species. Instead, most researchers have relied on qualitative descriptions or the evaluation of nonmetric characters, which in many cases display continuous variation. Also, only a few studies have used quantitative data to formally test hypotheses regarding the taxonomic composition of the "erectus" hypodigm. Despite these previous analyses, however, and perhaps in part due to these varied approaches for assessing variation within specimens typically referred to H. erectus (sensu lato) and the general lack of rigorous statistical testing of how variation within this taxon is partitioned, there is currently little consensus regarding whether this group is a single species, or whether it should instead be split into separate temporal or geographically delimited taxa. In order to evaluate possible explanations for variation within H. erectus, we tested the general hypothesis that variation within the temporal bone morphology of H. erectus is consistent with that of a single species, using great apes and humans as comparative taxa. Eighteen three-dimensional (3D) landmarks of the temporal bone were digitized on a total of 520 extant and fossil hominid crania. Landmarks were registered by Generalized Procrustes Analysis, and Procrustes distances were calculated for comparisons of individuals within and between the extant taxa. Distances between fossil specimens and between a priori groupings of fossils were then compared to the distances calculated within the extant taxa to assess the variation within the H. erectus sample relative to that of known species, subspecies, and populations. Results of these analyses indicate that shape variation within the entire H. erectus sample is generally higher than extant hominid intraspecific variation, and putative H. ergaster

  3. Evaluation of AN Integrated Gis-Based Crime Analysis & 3d Modelling for Izmir-Konak Municipality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarhan, C.; Deniz, D.

    2011-08-01

    GIS integrated 3D modelling is crucial for the city planning and design processes because urban modelling is a tool used in virtual environments, and provides convenience to work. Although, the creation and display of 3D city models for large regions is difficult it is vital for planning and designing safer cities, as well as public places. Today, crime is a significant problem in Turkey. When it was compared by years of crime rates, population growth and urbanization rate, an increasing more than in parallel has been observed. This paper aims to discuss GIS integrated 3D modelling affects in urban planning and design, explaining Turkish planning processes with GIS and 3D modelling. To do that, it presents a case study for Izmir Konak Municipality about GIS integrated crime analysis and 3D models of the crime scenes. Izmir crime records has been obtained from Izmir Police Department belonging to 2003-2004 and 2005 (D. Deniz, 2007) are used for districts' crime map. In the light of these data, the highest rate crime district, Konak, is analyzed between 2001 and 2005 data.

  4. A 3-D CFD Analysis of the Space Shuttle RSRM With Propellant Fins @ 1 sec. Burn-Back

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morstadt, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    In this study 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) runs have been made for the Space Shuttle RSRM using 2 different grids and 4 different turbulent models, which were the Standard KE, the RNG KE, the Realizable KE, and the Reynolds stress model. The RSRM forward segment consists of 11 fins. By taking advantage of the forward fin symmetry only half of one fin along the axis had to be used in making the grid. This meant that the 3-D model consisted of a pie slice that encompassed 1/22nd of the motor circumference and went along the axis of the entire motor. The 3-D flow patterns in the forward fin region are of particular interest. Close inspection of these flow patterns indicate that 2 counter-rotating axial vortices emerge from each submerged solid propellant fin. Thus, the 3-D CFD analysis allows insight into complicated internal motor flow patterns that are not available from the simpler 2-D axi-symmetric studies. In addition, a comparison is made between the 3-D bore pressure drop and the 2-D axi-symmetric pressure drop.

  5. An improved independent component analysis model for 3D chromatogram separation and its solution by multi-areas genetic algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The 3D chromatogram generated by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array Detector (HPLC-DAD) has been researched widely in the field of herbal medicine, grape wine, agriculture, petroleum and so on. Currently, most of the methods used for separating a 3D chromatogram need to know the compounds' number in advance, which could be impossible especially when the compounds are complex or white noise exist. New method which extracts compounds from 3D chromatogram directly is needed. Methods In this paper, a new separation model named parallel Independent Component Analysis constrained by Reference Curve (pICARC) was proposed to transform the separation problem to a multi-parameter optimization issue. It was not necessary to know the number of compounds in the optimization. In order to find all the solutions, an algorithm named multi-areas Genetic Algorithm (mGA) was proposed, where multiple areas of candidate solutions were constructed according to the fitness and distances among the chromosomes. Results Simulations and experiments on a real life HPLC-DAD data set were used to demonstrate our method and its effectiveness. Through simulations, it can be seen that our method can separate 3D chromatogram to chromatogram peaks and spectra successfully even when they severely overlapped. It is also shown by the experiments that our method is effective to solve real HPLC-DAD data set. Conclusions Our method can separate 3D chromatogram successfully without knowing the compounds' number in advance, which is fast and effective. PMID:25474487

  6. Automated detection, 3D segmentation and analysis of high resolution spine MR images using statistical shape models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubert, A.; Fripp, J.; Engstrom, C.; Schwarz, R.; Lauer, L.; Salvado, O.; Crozier, S.

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances in high resolution magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the spine provide a basis for the automated assessment of intervertebral disc (IVD) and vertebral body (VB) anatomy. High resolution three-dimensional (3D) morphological information contained in these images may be useful for early detection and monitoring of common spine disorders, such as disc degeneration. This work proposes an automated approach to extract the 3D segmentations of lumbar and thoracic IVDs and VBs from MR images using statistical shape analysis and registration of grey level intensity profiles. The algorithm was validated on a dataset of volumetric scans of the thoracolumbar spine of asymptomatic volunteers obtained on a 3T scanner using the relatively new 3D T2-weighted SPACE pulse sequence. Manual segmentations and expert radiological findings of early signs of disc degeneration were used in the validation. There was good agreement between manual and automated segmentation of the IVD and VB volumes with the mean Dice scores of 0.89 ± 0.04 and 0.91 ± 0.02 and mean absolute surface distances of 0.55 ± 0.18 mm and 0.67 ± 0.17 mm respectively. The method compares favourably to existing 3D MR segmentation techniques for VBs. This is the first time IVDs have been automatically segmented from 3D volumetric scans and shape parameters obtained were used in preliminary analyses to accurately classify (100% sensitivity, 98.3% specificity) disc abnormalities associated with early degenerative changes.

  7. Uncertainty analysis in 3D global models: Aerosol representation in MOZART-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasore, J.; Prinn, R. G.

    2012-12-01

    The Probabilistic Collocation Method (PCM) has been proven to be an efficient general method of uncertainty analysis in atmospheric models (Tatang et al 1997, Cohen&Prinn 2011). However, its application has been mainly limited to urban- and regional-scale models and chemical source-sink models, because of the drastic increase in computational cost when the dimension of uncertain parameters increases. Moreover, the high-dimensional output of global models has to be reduced to allow a computationally reasonable number of polynomials to be generated. This dimensional reduction has been mainly achieved by grouping the model grids into a few regions based on prior knowledge and expectations; urban versus rural for instance. As the model output is used to estimate the coefficients of the polynomial chaos expansion (PCE), the arbitrariness in the regional aggregation can generate problems in estimating uncertainties. To address these issues in a complex model, we apply the probabilistic collocation method of uncertainty analysis to the aerosol representation in MOZART-4, which is a 3D global chemical transport model (Emmons et al., 2010). Thereafter, we deterministically delineate the model output surface into regions of homogeneous response using the method of Principal Component Analysis. This allows the quantification of the uncertainty associated with the dimensional reduction. Because only a bulk mass is calculated online in Mozart-4, a lognormal number distribution is assumed with a priori fixed scale and location parameters, to calculate the surface area for heterogeneous reactions involving tropospheric oxidants. We have applied the PCM to the six parameters of the lognormal number distributions of Black Carbon, Organic Carbon and Sulfate. We have carried out a Monte-Carlo sampling from the probability density functions of the six uncertain parameters, using the reduced PCE model. The global mean concentration of major tropospheric oxidants did not show a

  8. F3D Image Processing and Analysis for Many - and Multi-core Platforms

    2014-10-01

    F3D is written in OpenCL, so it achieve[sic] platform-portable parallelism on modern mutli-core CPUs and many-core GPUs. The interface and mechanims to access F3D core are written in Java as a plugin for Fiji/ImageJ to deliver several key image-processing algorithms necessary to remove artifacts from micro-tomography data. The algorithms consist of data parallel aware filters that can efficiently utilizes[sic] resources and can work on out of core datasets and scale efficiently across multiple accelerators. Optimizingmore » for data parallel filters, streaming out of core datasets, and efficient resource and memory and data managements over complex execution sequence of filters greatly expedites any scientific workflow with image processing requirements. F3D performs several different types of 3D image processing operations, such as non-linear filtering using bilateral filtering and/or median filtering and/or morphological operators (MM). F3D gray-level MM operators are one-pass constant time methods that can perform morphological transformations with a line-structuring element oriented in discrete directions. Additionally, MM operators can be applied to gray-scale images, and consist of two parts: (a) a reference shape or structuring element, which is translated over the image, and (b) a mechanism, or operation, that defines the comparisons to be performed between the image and the structuring element. This tool provides a critical component within many complex pipelines such as those for performing automated segmentation of image stacks. F3D is also called a "descendent" of Quant-CT, another software we developed in the past. These two modules are to be integrated in a next version. Further details were reported in: D.M. Ushizima, T. Perciano, H. Krishnan, B. Loring, H. Bale, D. Parkinson, and J. Sethian. Structure recognition from high-resolution images of ceramic composites. IEEE International Conference on Big Data, October 2014.« less

  9. Capturing tumor complexity in vitro: Comparative analysis of 2D and 3D tumor models for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Stock, Kristin; Estrada, Marta F; Vidic, Suzana; Gjerde, Kjersti; Rudisch, Albin; Santo, Vítor E; Barbier, Michaël; Blom, Sami; Arundkar, Sharath C; Selvam, Irwin; Osswald, Annika; Stein, Yan; Gruenewald, Sylvia; Brito, Catarina; van Weerden, Wytske; Rotter, Varda; Boghaert, Erwin; Oren, Moshe; Sommergruber, Wolfgang; Chong, Yolanda; de Hoogt, Ronald; Graeser, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures growing on plastic do not recapitulate the three dimensional (3D) architecture and complexity of human tumors. More representative models are required for drug discovery and validation. Here, 2D culture and 3D mono- and stromal co-culture models of increasing complexity have been established and cross-comparisons made using three standard cell carcinoma lines: MCF7, LNCaP, NCI-H1437. Fluorescence-based growth curves, 3D image analysis, immunohistochemistry and treatment responses showed that end points differed according to cell type, stromal co-culture and culture format. The adaptable methodologies described here should guide the choice of appropriate simple and complex in vitro models. PMID:27364600

  10. Capturing tumor complexity in vitro: Comparative analysis of 2D and 3D tumor models for drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Kristin; Estrada, Marta F.; Vidic, Suzana; Gjerde, Kjersti; Rudisch, Albin; Santo, Vítor E.; Barbier, Michaël; Blom, Sami; Arundkar, Sharath C.; Selvam, Irwin; Osswald, Annika; Stein, Yan; Gruenewald, Sylvia; Brito, Catarina; van Weerden, Wytske; Rotter, Varda; Boghaert, Erwin; Oren, Moshe; Sommergruber, Wolfgang; Chong, Yolanda; de Hoogt, Ronald; Graeser, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures growing on plastic do not recapitulate the three dimensional (3D) architecture and complexity of human tumors. More representative models are required for drug discovery and validation. Here, 2D culture and 3D mono- and stromal co-culture models of increasing complexity have been established and cross-comparisons made using three standard cell carcinoma lines: MCF7, LNCaP, NCI-H1437. Fluorescence-based growth curves, 3D image analysis, immunohistochemistry and treatment responses showed that end points differed according to cell type, stromal co-culture and culture format. The adaptable methodologies described here should guide the choice of appropriate simple and complex in vitro models. PMID:27364600

  11. Irregular geometries in normal unmyelinated axons: a 3D serial EM analysis.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, M M; Leitao, C; Trogadis, J; Stevens, J K

    1990-12-01

    Axons have generally been represented as straight cylinders. It is not at all uncommon for anatomists to take single cross-sections of an axonal bundle, and from the axonal diameter compute expected conduction velocities. This assumes that each cross-section represents a slice through a perfect cylinder. We have examined the three-dimensional geometry of 98 central and peripheral unmyelinated axons, using computer-assisted serial electron microscopy. These reconstructions reveal that virtually all unmyelinated axons have highly irregular axial shapes consisting of periodic varicosities. The varicosities were, without exception, filled with membranous organelles frequently including mitochondria, and have obligatory volumes similar to that described in other neurites. The mitochondria make contact with microtubules, while the other membraneous organelles were frequently found free floating in the cytoplasm. We conclude that unmyelinated axons are fundamentally varicose structures created by the presence of organelles, and that an axon's calibre is dynamic in both space and time. These irregular axonal geometries raise serious doubts about standard two dimensional morphometric analysis and suggest that electrical properties may be more heterogeneous than expected from single section data. These results also suggest that the total number of microtubules contained in an axon, rather than its single section diameter, may prove to be a more accurate predictor of properties such as conduction velocity. Finally, these results offer an explanation for a number of pathological changes that have been described in unmyelinated axons. PMID:2292722

  12. High-throughput analysis of horse sperms' 3D swimming patterns using computational on-chip imaging.

    PubMed

    Su, Ting-Wei; Choi, Inkyum; Feng, Jiawen; Huang, Kalvin; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-06-01

    Using a high-throughput optical tracking technique that is based on partially-coherent digital in-line holography, here we report a detailed analysis of the statistical behavior of horse sperms' three-dimensional (3D) swimming dynamics. This dual-color and dual-angle lensfree imaging platform enables us to track individual 3D trajectories of ∼1000 horse sperms at sub-micron level within a sample volume of ∼9μL at a frame rate of 143 frames per second (FPS) and collect thousands of sperm trajectories within a few hours for statistical analysis of their 3D dynamics. Using this high-throughput imaging platform, we recorded >17,000 horse sperm trajectories that can be grouped into six major categories: irregular, linear, planar, helical, ribbon, and hyperactivated, where the hyperactivated swimming patterns can be further divided into four sub-categories, namely hyper-progressive, hyper-planar, hyper-ribbon, and star-spin. The large spatio-temporal statistics that we collected with this 3D tracking platform revealed that irregular, planar, and ribbon trajectories are the dominant 3D swimming patterns observed in horse sperms, which altogether account for >97% of the trajectories that we imaged in plasma-free semen extender medium. Through our experiments we also found out that horse seminal plasma in general increases sperms' straightness in their 3D trajectories, enhancing the relative percentage of linear swimming patterns and suppressing planar swimming patterns, while barely affecting the overall percentage of ribbon patterns. PMID:26826909

  13. Parallel ALLSPD-3D: Speeding Up Combustor Analysis Via Parallel Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fricker, David M.

    1997-01-01

    The ALLSPD-3D Computational Fluid Dynamics code for reacting flow simulation was run on a set of benchmark test cases to determine its parallel efficiency. These test cases included non-reacting and reacting flow simulations with varying numbers of processors. Also, the tests explored the effects of scaling the simulation with the number of processors in addition to distributing a constant size problem over an increasing number of processors. The test cases were run on a cluster of IBM RS/6000 Model 590 workstations with ethernet and ATM networking plus a shared memory SGI Power Challenge L workstation. The results indicate that the network capabilities significantly influence the parallel efficiency, i.e., a shared memory machine is fastest and ATM networking provides acceptable performance. The limitations of ethernet greatly hamper the rapid calculation of flows using ALLSPD-3D.

  14. 3D structural analysis of proteins using electrostatic surfaces based on image segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Champeris Tsaniras, Spyridon; Tsiliki, Georgia; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios; Kossida, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we present a novel strategy to analyse and characterize proteins using protein molecular electro-static surfaces. Our approach starts by calculating a series of distinct molecular surfaces for each protein that are subsequently flattened out, thus reducing 3D information noise. RGB images are appropriately scaled by means of standard image processing techniques whilst retaining the weight information of each protein’s molecular electrostatic surface. Then homogeneous areas in the protein surface are estimated based on unsupervised clustering of the 3D images, while performing similarity searches. This is a computationally fast approach, which efficiently highlights interesting structural areas among a group of proteins. Multiple protein electrostatic surfaces can be combined together and in conjunction with their processed images, they can provide the starting material for protein structural similarity and molecular docking experiments.

  15. Measurement error analysis of the 3D four-wheel aligner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiancheng; Yang, Tianlong; Huang, Dongzhao; Ding, Xun

    2013-10-01

    Positioning parameters of four-wheel have significant effects on maneuverabilities, securities and energy saving abilities of automobiles. Aiming at this issue, the error factors of 3D four-wheel aligner, which exist in extracting image feature points, calibrating internal and exeternal parameters of cameras, calculating positional parameters and measuring target pose, are analyzed respectively based on the elaborations of structure and measurement principle of 3D four-wheel aligner, as well as toe-in and camber of four-wheel, kingpin inclination and caster, and other major positional parameters. After that, some technical solutions are proposed for reducing the above error factors, and on this basis, a new type of aligner is developed and marketed, it's highly estimated among customers because the technical indicators meet requirements well.

  16. Code portability and data management considerations in the SAS3D LMFBR accident-analysis code

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, F.E.

    1981-01-01

    The SAS3D code was produced from a predecessor in order to reduce or eliminate interrelated problems in the areas of code portability, the large size of the code, inflexibility in the use of memory and the size of cases that can be run, code maintenance, and running speed. Many conventional solutions, such as variable dimensioning, disk storage, virtual memory, and existing code-maintenance utilities were not feasible or did not help in this case. A new data management scheme was developed, coding standards and procedures were adopted, special machine-dependent routines were written, and a portable source code processing code was written. The resulting code is quite portable, quite flexible in the use of memory and the size of cases that can be run, much easier to maintain, and faster running. SAS3D is still a large, long running code that only runs well if sufficient main memory is available.

  17. Analysis of the 3D acoustic cloaking problems using optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, G. V.; Spivak, Yu E.

    2016-06-01

    Control problems for the 3D model of acoustic scattering which describes scattering acoustic waves by a permeable obstacle with the form of a spherical layer are considered. These problems arise while developing the design technologies of acoustic cloaking devices using the wave flow method. The solvability of direct and control problems for the acoustic scattering model under study is proved. The sufficient conditions which provide local uniqueness and stability of optimal solutions are established.

  18. 3D segmentation of lung CT data with graph-cuts: analysis of parameter sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Jung won; Dunlap, Neal; Wang, Brian; Amini, Amir

    2016-03-01

    Lung boundary image segmentation is important for many tasks including for example in development of radiation treatment plans for subjects with thoracic malignancies. In this paper, we describe a method and parameter settings for accurate 3D lung boundary segmentation based on graph-cuts from X-ray CT data1. Even though previously several researchers have used graph-cuts for image segmentation, to date, no systematic studies have been performed regarding the range of parameter that give accurate results. The energy function in the graph-cuts algorithm requires 3 suitable parameter settings: K, a large constant for assigning seed points, c, the similarity coefficient for n-links, and λ, the terminal coefficient for t-links. We analyzed the parameter sensitivity with four lung data sets from subjects with lung cancer using error metrics. Large values of K created artifacts on segmented images, and relatively much larger value of c than the value of λ influenced the balance between the boundary term and the data term in the energy function, leading to unacceptable segmentation results. For a range of parameter settings, we performed 3D image segmentation, and in each case compared the results with the expert-delineated lung boundaries. We used simple 6-neighborhood systems for n-link in 3D. The 3D image segmentation took 10 minutes for a 512x512x118 ~ 512x512x190 lung CT image volume. Our results indicate that the graph-cuts algorithm was more sensitive to the K and λ parameter settings than to the C parameter and furthermore that amongst the range of parameters tested, K=5 and λ=0.5 yielded good results.

  19. Development of direct-inverse 3-D methods for applied aerodynamic design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1988-01-01

    Several inverse methods have been compared and initial results indicate that differences in results are primarily due to coordinate systems and fuselage representations and not to design procedures. Further, results from a direct-inverse method that includes 3-D wing boundary layer effects, wake curvature, and wake displacement are presented. These results show that boundary layer displacements must be included in the design process for accurate results.

  20. Icing Analysis of a Swept NACA 0012 Wing Using LEWICE3D Version 3.48

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin S.

    2014-01-01

    Icing calculations were performed for a NACA 0012 swept wing tip using LEWICE3D Version 3.48 coupled with the ANSYS CFX flow solver. The calculated ice shapes were compared to experimental data generated in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). The IRT tests were designed to test the performance of the LEWICE3D ice void density model which was developed to improve the prediction of swept wing ice shapes. Icing tests were performed for a range of temperatures at two different droplet inertia parameters and two different sweep angles. The predicted mass agreed well with the experiment with an average difference of 12%. The LEWICE3D ice void density model under-predicted void density by an average of 30% for the large inertia parameter cases and by 63% for the small inertia parameter cases. This under-prediction in void density resulted in an over-prediction of ice area by an average of 115%. The LEWICE3D ice void density model produced a larger average area difference with experiment than the standard LEWICE density model, which doesn't account for the voids in the swept wing ice shape, (115% and 75% respectively) but it produced ice shapes which were deemed more appropriate because they were conservative (larger than experiment). Major contributors to the overly conservative ice shape predictions were deficiencies in the leading edge heat transfer and the sensitivity of the void ice density model to the particle inertia parameter. The scallop features present on the ice shapes were thought to generate interstitial flow and horse shoe vortices which enhance the leading edge heat transfer. A set of changes to improve the leading edge heat transfer and the void density model were tested. The changes improved the ice shape predictions considerably. More work needs to be done to evaluate the performance of these modifications for a wider range of geometries and icing conditions

  1. Icing Analysis of a Swept NACA 0012 Wing Using LEWICE3D Version 3.48

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin S.

    2014-01-01

    Icing calculations were performed for a NACA 0012 swept wing tip using LEWICE3D Version 3.48 coupled with the ANSYS CFX flow solver. The calculated ice shapes were compared to experimental data generated in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). The IRT tests were designed to test the performance of the LEWICE3D ice void density model which was developed to improve the prediction of swept wing ice shapes. Icing tests were performed for a range of temperatures at two different droplet inertia parameters and two different sweep angles. The predicted mass agreed well with the experiment with an average difference of 12%. The LEWICE3D ice void density model under-predicted void density by an average of 30% for the large inertia parameter cases and by 63% for the small inertia parameter cases. This under-prediction in void density resulted in an over-prediction of ice area by an average of 115%. The LEWICE3D ice void density model produced a larger average area difference with experiment than the standard LEWICE density model, which doesn't account for the voids in the swept wing ice shape, (115% and 75% respectively) but it produced ice shapes which were deemed more appropriate because they were conservative (larger than experiment). Major contributors to the overly conservative ice shape predictions were deficiencies in the leading edge heat transfer and the sensitivity of the void ice density model to the particle inertia parameter. The scallop features present on the ice shapes were thought to generate interstitial flow and horse shoe vortices which enhance the leading edge heat transfer. A set of changes to improve the leading edge heat transfer and the void density model were tested. The changes improved the ice shape predictions considerably. More work needs to be done to evaluate the performance of these modifications for a wider range of geometries and icing conditions.

  2. Extending a teleradiology system by tools for 3D-visualization and volumetric analysis through a plug-in mechanism.

    PubMed

    Evers, H; Mayer, A; Engelmann, U; Schröter, A; Baur, U; Wolsiffer, K; Meinzer, H P

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes ongoing research concerning interactive volume visualization coupled with tools for volumetric analysis. To establish an easy to use application, the 3D-visualization has been embedded in a state of the art teleradiology system, where additional functionality is often desired beyond basic image transfer and management. Major clinical requirements for deriving spatial measures are covered by the tools, in order to realize extended diagnosis support and therapy planning. Introducing the general plug-in mechanism this work exemplarily describes the useful extension of an approved application. Interactive visualization was achieved by a hybrid approach taking advantage of both the precise volume visualization based on the Heidelberg Raytracing Model and the graphics acceleration of modern workstations. Several tools for volumetric analysis extend the 3D-viewing. They offer 3D-pointing devices to select locations in the data volume, measure anatomical structures or control segmentation processes. A haptic interface provides a realistic perception while navigating within the 3D-reconstruction. The work is closely related to research work in the field of heart, liver and head surgery. In cooperation with our medical partners the development of tools as presented proceed the integration of image analysis into clinical routine. PMID:10384617

  3. 3D endobronchial ultrasound reconstruction and analysis for multimodal image-guided bronchoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Xiaonan; Bascom, Rebecca; Gilbert, Christopher R.; Toth, Jennifer W.; Higgins, William E.

    2014-03-01

    State-of-the-art image-guided intervention (IGI) systems for lung-cancer management draw upon high-resolution three-dimensional multi-detector computed-tomography (MDCT) images and bronchoscopic video. An MDCT scan provides a high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) image of the chest that is used for preoperative procedure planning, while bronchoscopy gives live intraoperative video of the endobronchial airway tree structure. However, because neither source provides live extraluminal information on suspect nodules or lymph nodes, endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) is often introduced during a procedure. Unfortunately, existing IGI systems provide no direct synergistic linkage between the MDCT/video data and EBUS data. Hence, EBUS proves difficult to use and can lead to inaccurate interpretations. To address this drawback, we present a prototype of a multimodal IGI system that brings together the various image sources. The system enables 3D reconstruction and visualization of structures depicted in the 2D EBUS video stream. It also provides a set of graphical tools that link the EBUS data directly to the 3D MDCT and bronchoscopic video. Results using phantom and human data indicate that the new system could potentially enable smooth natural incorporation of EBUS into the system-level work flow of bronchoscopy.

  4. Perineal body anatomy in living women: 3-D analysis using thin-slice magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Kindra A.; Yousuf, Aisha; Lewicky-Gaupp, Christina; Fenner, Dee E.; DeLancey, John O.L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe a framework for visualizing the perineal body's complex anatomy using thin-slice MR imaging. Study Design Two mm-thick MR images were acquired in 11 women with normal pelvic support and no incontinence/prolapse symptoms. Anatomic structures were analyzed in axial, sagittal and coronal slices. 3-D models were generated from these images. Results Three distinct perineal body regions are visible on MRI: (1) a superficial region at the level of the vestibular bulb, (2) a mid region at the proximal end of the superficial transverse perineal muscle, and (3) a deep region at the level of the midurethra and puborectalis muscle. Structures are best visualized on axial scans while cranio-caudal relationships are appreciated on sagittal scans. The 3-D model further clarifies inter-relationships. Conclusion Advances in MR technology allow visualization of perineal body anatomy in living women and development of 3D models which enhance our understanding of its three different regions: superficial, mid and deep. PMID:21055513

  5. Quality Analysis on 3d Buidling Models Reconstructed from Uav Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarzabek-Rychard, M.; Karpina, M.

    2016-06-01

    Recent developments in UAV technology and structure from motion techniques have effected that UAVs are becoming standard platforms for 3D data collection. Because of their flexibility and ability to reach inaccessible urban parts, drones appear as optimal solution for urban applications. Building reconstruction from the data collected with UAV has the important potential to reduce labour cost for fast update of already reconstructed 3D cities. However, especially for updating of existing scenes derived from different sensors (e.g. airborne laser scanning), a proper quality assessment is necessary. The objective of this paper is thus to evaluate the potential of UAV imagery as an information source for automatic 3D building modeling at LOD2. The investigation process is conducted threefold: (1) comparing generated SfM point cloud to ALS data; (2) computing internal consistency measures of the reconstruction process; (3) analysing the deviation of Check Points identified on building roofs and measured with a tacheometer. In order to gain deep insight in the modeling performance, various quality indicators are computed and analysed. The assessment performed according to the ground truth shows that the building models acquired with UAV-photogrammetry have the accuracy of less than 18 cm for the plannimetric position and about 15 cm for the height component.

  6. 3-D Human Action Recognition by Shape Analysis of Motion Trajectories on Riemannian Manifold.

    PubMed

    Devanne, Maxime; Wannous, Hazem; Berretti, Stefano; Pala, Pietro; Daoudi, Mohamed; Del Bimbo, Alberto

    2015-07-01

    Recognizing human actions in 3-D video sequences is an important open problem that is currently at the heart of many research domains including surveillance, natural interfaces and rehabilitation. However, the design and development of models for action recognition that are both accurate and efficient is a challenging task due to the variability of the human pose, clothing and appearance. In this paper, we propose a new framework to extract a compact representation of a human action captured through a depth sensor, and enable accurate action recognition. The proposed solution develops on fitting a human skeleton model to acquired data so as to represent the 3-D coordinates of the joints and their change over time as a trajectory in a suitable action space. Thanks to such a 3-D joint-based framework, the proposed solution is capable to capture both the shape and the dynamics of the human body, simultaneously. The action recognition problem is then formulated as the problem of computing the similarity between the shape of trajectories in a Riemannian manifold. Classification using k-nearest neighbors is finally performed on this manifold taking advantage of Riemannian geometry in the open curve shape space. Experiments are carried out on four representative benchmarks to demonstrate the potential of the proposed solution in terms of accuracy/latency for a low-latency action recognition. Comparative results with state-of-the-art methods are reported. PMID:25216492

  7. 3D Analysis of Remote-Sensed Heliospheric Data for Space Weather Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H. S.; Jackson, B. V.; Hick, P. P.; Buffington, A.; Bisi, M. M.; Odstrcil, D.; Hong, S.; Kim, J.; Yi, J.; Tokumaru, M.; Gonzalez-Esparza, A.

    2015-12-01

    The University of California, San Diego (UCSD) time-dependent iterative kinematic reconstruction technique has been used and expanded upon for over two decades. It currently provides some of the most accurate predictions and three-dimensional (3D) analyses of heliospheric solar-wind parameters now available using interplanetary scintillation (IPS) data. The parameters provided include reconstructions of velocity, density, and magnetic fields. Precise time-dependent results are obtained at any solar distance in the inner heliosphere using current Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STELab), Nagoya University, Japan IPS data sets, but the reconstruction technique can also incorporate data from other IPS systems from around the world. With access using world IPS data systems, not only can predictions using the reconstruction technique be made without observation dead times due to poor longitude coverage or system outages, but the program can itself be used to standardize observations of IPS. Additionally, these analyses are now being exploited as inner-boundary values to drive an ENLIL 3D-MHD heliospheric model in real time. A major potential of this is that it will use the more realistic physics of 3D-MHD modeling to provide an automatic forecast of CMEs and corotating structures up to several days in advance of the event/features arriving at Earth, with or without involving coronagraph imagery or the necessity of magnetic fields being used to provide the background solar wind speeds.

  8. Segment-interaction in sprint start: Analysis of 3D angular velocity and kinetic energy in elite sprinters.

    PubMed

    Slawinski, J; Bonnefoy, A; Ontanon, G; Leveque, J M; Miller, C; Riquet, A; Chèze, L; Dumas, R

    2010-05-28

    The aim of the present study was to measure during a sprint start the joint angular velocity and the kinetic energy of the different segments in elite sprinters. This was performed using a 3D kinematic analysis of the whole body. Eight elite sprinters (10.30+/-0.14s 100 m time), equipped with 63 passive reflective markers, realised four maximal 10 m sprints start on an indoor track. An opto-electronic Motion Analysis system consisting of 12 digital cameras (250 Hz) was used to collect the 3D marker trajectories. During the pushing phase on the blocks, the 3D angular velocity vector and its norm were calculated for each joint. The kinetic energy of 16 segments of the lower and upper limbs and of the total body was calculated. The 3D kinematic analysis of the whole body demonstrated that joints such as shoulders, thoracic or hips did not reach their maximal angular velocity with a movement of flexion-extension, but with a combination of flexion-extension, abduction-adduction and internal-external rotation. The maximal kinetic energy of the total body was reached before clearing block (respectively, 537+/-59.3 J vs. 514.9+/-66.0 J; p< or =0.01). These results suggested that a better synchronization between the upper and lower limbs could increase the efficiency of pushing phase on the blocks. Besides, to understand low interindividual variances in the sprint start performance in elite athletes, a 3D complete body kinematic analysis shall be used. PMID:20226465

  9. 3D galaxy clustering with future wide-field surveys: Advantages of a spherical Fourier-Bessel analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Upcoming spectroscopic galaxy surveys are extremely promising to help in addressing the major challenges of cosmology, in particular in understanding the nature of the dark universe. The strength of these surveys, naturally described in spherical geometry, comes from their unprecedented depth and width, but an optimal extraction of their three-dimensional information is of utmost importance to best constrain the properties of the dark universe. Aims: Although there is theoretical motivation and novel tools to explore these surveys using the 3D spherical Fourier-Bessel (SFB) power spectrum of galaxy number counts Cℓ(k,k'), most survey optimisations and forecasts are based on the tomographic spherical harmonics power spectrum C(ij)_ℓ. The goal of this paper is to perform a new investigation of the information that can be extracted from these two analyses in the context of planned stage IV wide-field galaxy surveys. Methods: We compared tomographic and 3D SFB techniques by comparing the forecast cosmological parameter constraints obtained from a Fisher analysis. The comparison was made possible by careful and coherent treatment of non-linear scales in the two analyses, which makes this study the first to compare 3D SFB and tomographic constraints on an equal footing. Nuisance parameters related to a scale- and redshift-dependent galaxy bias were also included in the computation of the 3D SFB and tomographic power spectra for the first time. Results: Tomographic and 3D SFB methods can recover similar constraints in the absence of systematics. This requires choosing an optimal number of redshift bins for the tomographic analysis, which we computed to be N = 26 for zmed ≃ 0.4, N = 30 for zmed ≃ 1.0, and N = 42 for zmed ≃ 1.7. When marginalising over nuisance parameters related to the galaxy bias, the forecast 3D SFB constraints are less affected by this source of systematics than the tomographic constraints. In addition, the rate of increase of the

  10. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  11. Coupled 2D-3D finite element method for analysis of a skin panel with a discontinuous stiffener

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. T.; Lotts, C. G.; Davis, D. D., Jr.; Krishnamurthy, T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a computationally efficient analysis method which was used to predict detailed stress states in a typical composite compression panel with a discontinuous hat stiffener. A global-local approach was used. The global model incorporated both 2D shell and 3D brick elements connected by newly developed transition elements. Most of the panel was modeled with 2D elements, while 3D elements were employed to model the stiffener flange and the adjacent skin. Both linear and geometrically nonlinear analyses were performed on the global model. The effect of geometric nonlinearity induced by the eccentric load path due to the discontinuous hat stiffener was significant. The local model used a fine mesh of 3D brick elements to model the region at the end of the stiffener. Boundary conditions of the local 3D model were obtained by spline interpolation of the nodal displacements from the global analysis. Detailed in-plane and through-the-thickness stresses were calculated in the flange-skin interface near the end of the stiffener.

  12. Shape analysis of hypertrophic and hypertensive heart disease using MRI-based 3D surface models of left ventricular geometry.

    PubMed

    Ardekani, Siamak; Jain, Saurabh; Sanzi, Alianna; Corona-Villalobos, Celia P; Abraham, Theodore P; Abraham, M Roselle; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Wu, Katherine C; Winslow, Raimond L; Miller, Michael I; Younes, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    The focus of this study was to develop advanced mathematical tools to construct high-resolution 3D models of left-ventricular (LV) geometry to evaluate focal geometric differences between patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and hypertensive heart disease (HHD) using cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) cross-sectional images. A limiting factor in 3D analysis of cardiac MR cross-sections is the low out-of-plane resolution of the acquired images. To overcome this problem, we have developed a mathematical framework to construct a population-based high-resolution 3D LV triangulated surface (template) in which an iterative matching algorithm maps a surface mesh of a normal heart to a set of cross-sectional contours that were extracted from short-axis cine cardiac MR images of patients who were diagnosed with either HCM or HHD. A statistical analysis was conducted on deformations that were estimated at each surface node to identify shape differences at end-diastole (ED), end-systole (ES), and motion-related shape variation from ED to ES. Some significant shape difference in radial thickness was detected at ES. Differences of LV 3D surface geometry were identified focally on the basal anterior septum wall. Further research is needed to relate these findings to the HCM morphological substrate and to design a classifier to discriminate among different etiologies of LV hypertrophy. PMID:26766206

  13. Computer-aided segmentation and 3D analysis of in vivo MRI examinations of the human vocal tract during phonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wismüller, Axel; Behrends, Johannes; Hoole, Phil; Leinsinger, Gerda L.; Meyer-Baese, Anke; Reiser, Maximilian F.

    2008-03-01

    We developed, tested, and evaluated a 3D segmentation and analysis system for in vivo MRI examinations of the human vocal tract during phonation. For this purpose, six professionally trained speakers, age 22-34y, were examined using a standardized MRI protocol (1.5 T, T1w FLASH, ST 4mm, 23 slices, acq. time 21s). The volunteers performed a prolonged (>=21s) emission of sounds of the German phonemic inventory. Simultaneous audio tape recording was obtained to control correct utterance. Scans were made in axial, coronal, and sagittal planes each. Computer-aided quantitative 3D evaluation included (i) automated registration of the phoneme-specific data acquired in different slice orientations, (ii) semi-automated segmentation of oropharyngeal structures, (iii) computation of a curvilinear vocal tract midline in 3D by nonlinear PCA, (iv) computation of cross-sectional areas of the vocal tract perpendicular to this midline. For the vowels /a/,/e/,/i/,/o/,/ø/,/u/,/y/, the extracted area functions were used to synthesize phoneme sounds based on an articulatory-acoustic model. For quantitative analysis, recorded and synthesized phonemes were compared, where area functions extracted from 2D midsagittal slices were used as a reference. All vowels could be identified correctly based on the synthesized phoneme sounds. The comparison between synthesized and recorded vowel phonemes revealed that the quality of phoneme sound synthesis was improved for phonemes /a/ and /y/, if 3D instead of 2D data were used, as measured by the average relative frequency shift between recorded and synthesized vowel formants (p<0.05, one-sided Wilcoxon rank sum test). In summary, the combination of fast MRI followed by subsequent 3D segmentation and analysis is a novel approach to examine human phonation in vivo. It unveils functional anatomical findings that may be essential for realistic modelling of the human vocal tract during speech production.

  14. Analysis of Composite Panel-Stiffener Debonding Using a Shell/3D Modeling Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Ratcliffe, James; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2007-01-01

    Interlaminar fracture mechanics has proven useful for characterizing the onset of delaminations in composites and has been used successfully primarily to investigate onset in fracture toughness specimens and laboratory size coupon type specimens. Future acceptance of the methodology by industry and certification authorities, however, requires the successful demonstration of the methodology on the structural level. For this purpose, a panel was selected that is reinforced with stiffeners. Shear loading causes the panel to buckle, and the resulting out-of-plane deformations initiate skin/stiffener separation at the location of an embedded defect. A small section of the stiffener foot, web and noodle as well as the panel skin in the vicinity of the delamination front were modeled with a local 3D solid model. Across the width of the stiffener foot, the mixedmode strain energy release rates were calculated using the virtual crack closure technique. A failure index was calculated by correlating the results with a mixed-mode failure criterion of the graphite/epoxy material. Computed failure indices were compared to corresponding results where the entire web was modeled with shell elements and only a small section of the stiffener foot and panel were modeled locally with solid elements. Including the stiffener web in the local 3D solid model increased the computed failure index. Further including the noodle and transition radius in the local 3D solid model changed the local distribution across the width. The magnitude of the failure index decreased with increasing transition radius and noodle area. For the transition radii modeled, the material properties used for the noodle area had a negligible effect on the results. The results of this study are intended to be used as a guide for conducting finite element and fracture mechanics analyses of delamination and debonding in complex structures such as integrally stiffened panels.

  15. Effect of Frictions on the Ballistic Performance of a 3D Warp Interlock Fabric: Numerical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha-Minh, Cuong; Boussu, François; Kanit, Toufik; Crépin, David; Imad, Abdellatif

    2012-06-01

    3D interlock woven fabrics are promising materials to replace the 2D structures in the field of ballistic protection. The structural complexity of this material caused many difficulties in numerical modeling. This paper presents a new tool that permits to generate a geometry model of any woven fabric, then, mesh this model in shell or solid elements, and apply the mechanical properties of yarns to them. The tool shows many advantages over existing software. It is very handy in use with an organization of the functions in menu and using a graphic interface. It can describe correctly the geometry of all textile woven fabrics. With this tool, the orientation of the local axes of finite elements following the yarn direction facilitates defining the yarn mechanical properties in a numerical model. This tool can be largely applied because it is compatible with popular finite element codes such as Abaqus, Ansys, Radioss etc. Thanks to this tool, a finite element model was carried out to describe a ballistic impact on a 3D warp interlock Kevlar KM2® fabric. This work focuses on studying the effect of friction onto the ballistic impact behavior of this textile interlock structure. Results showed that the friction among yarns affects considerably on the impact behavior of this fabric. The effect of the friction between projectile and yarn is less important. The friction plays an important role in keeping the fabric structural stability during the impact event. This phenomenon explained why the projectile is easier to penetrate this 3D warp interlock fabric in the no-friction case. This result also indicates that the ballistic performance of the interlock woven fabrics can be improved by using fibers with great friction coefficients.

  16. Modeling and Analysis of a Lunar Space Reactor with the Computer Code RELAP5-3D/ATHENA

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, Juan J; Qualls, A L

    2008-01-01

    The transient analysis 3-dimensional (3-D) computer code RELAP5-3D/ATHENA has been employed to model and analyze a space reactor of 180 kW(thermal), 40 kW (net, electrical) with eight Stirling engines (SEs). Each SE will generate over 6 kWe; the excess power will be needed for the pumps and other power management devices. The reactor will be cooled by NaK (a eutectic mixture of sodium and potassium which is liquid at ambient temperature). This space reactor is intended to be deployed over the surface of the Moon or Mars. The reactor operating life will be 8 to 10 years. The RELAP5-3D/ATHENA code is being developed and maintained by Idaho National Laboratory. The code can employ a variety of coolants in addition to water, the original coolant employed with early versions of the code. The code can also use 3-D volumes and 3-D junctions, thus allowing for more realistic representation of complex geometries. A combination of 3-D and 1-D volumes is employed in this study. The space reactor model consists of a primary loop and two secondary loops connected by two heat exchangers (HXs). Each secondary loop provides heat to four SEs. The primary loop includes the nuclear reactor with the lower and upper plena, the core with 85 fuel pins, and two vertical heat exchangers (HX). The maximum coolant temperature of the primary loop is 900 K. The secondary loops also employ NaK as a coolant at a maximum temperature of 877 K. The SEs heads are at a temperature of 800 K and the cold sinks are at a temperature of ~400 K. Two radiators will be employed to remove heat from the SEs. The SE HXs surrounding the SE heads are of annular design and have been modeled using 3-D volumes. These 3-D models have been used to improve the HX design by optimizing the flows of coolant and maximizing the heat transferred to the SE heads. The transients analyzed include failure of one or more Stirling engines, trip of the reactor pump, and trips of the secondary loop pumps feeding the HXs of the

  17. 3D numerical thermal stress analysis of the high power target for the SLC Positron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Reuter, E.M.; Hodgson, J.A.

    1991-05-01

    The volumetrically nonuniform power deposition of the incident 33 GeV electron beam in the SLC Positron Source Target is hypothesized to be the most likely cause target failure. The resultant pulsed temperature distributions are known to generate complicated stress fields with no known closed-form analytical solution. 3D finite element analyses of these temperature distributions and associated thermal stress fields in the new High Power Target are described here. Operational guidelines based on the results of these analyses combined with assumptions made about the fatigue characteristics of the exotic target material are proposed. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Web-based visualisation and analysis of 3D electron-microscopy data from EMDB and PDB☆

    PubMed Central

    Lagerstedt, Ingvar; Moore, William J.; Patwardhan, Ardan; Sanz-García, Eduardo; Best, Christoph; Swedlow, Jason R.; Kleywegt, Gerard J.

    2013-01-01

    The Protein Data Bank in Europe (PDBe) has developed web-based tools for the visualisation and analysis of 3D electron microscopy (3DEM) structures in the Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) and Protein Data Bank (PDB). The tools include: (1) a volume viewer for 3D visualisation of maps, tomograms and models, (2) a slice viewer for inspecting 2D slices of tomographic reconstructions, and (3) visual analysis pages to facilitate analysis and validation of maps, tomograms and models. These tools were designed to help non-experts and experts alike to get some insight into the content and assess the quality of 3DEM structures in EMDB and PDB without the need to install specialised software or to download large amounts of data from these archives. The technical challenges encountered in developing these tools, as well as the more general considerations when making archived data available to the user community through a web interface, are discussed. PMID:24113529

  19. Web-based visualisation and analysis of 3D electron-microscopy data from EMDB and PDB.

    PubMed

    Lagerstedt, Ingvar; Moore, William J; Patwardhan, Ardan; Sanz-García, Eduardo; Best, Christoph; Swedlow, Jason R; Kleywegt, Gerard J

    2013-11-01

    The Protein Data Bank in Europe (PDBe) has developed web-based tools for the visualisation and analysis of 3D electron microscopy (3DEM) structures in the Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) and Protein Data Bank (PDB). The tools include: (1) a volume viewer for 3D visualisation of maps, tomograms and models, (2) a slice viewer for inspecting 2D slices of tomographic reconstructions, and (3) visual analysis pages to facilitate analysis and validation of maps, tomograms and models. These tools were designed to help non-experts and experts alike to get some insight into the content and assess the quality of 3DEM structures in EMDB and PDB without the need to install specialised software or to download large amounts of data from these archives. The technical challenges encountered in developing these tools, as well as the more general considerations when making archived data available to the user community through a web interface, are discussed. PMID:24113529

  20. Sandwich-format 3D printed microfluidic mixers: a flexible platform for multi-probe analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kise, Drew P; Reddish, Michael J; Dyer, R Brian

    2015-01-01

    We report on a microfluidic mixer fabrication platform that increases the versatility and flexibility of mixers for biomolecular applications. A sandwich-format design allows the application of multiple spectroscopic probes to the same mixer. A polymer spacer is ‘sandwiched’ between two transparent windows, creating a closed microfluidic system. The channels of the mixer are defined by regions in the polymer spacer that lack material and therefore the polymer need not be transparent in the spectral region of interest. Suitable window materials such as CaF2 make the device accessible to a wide range of optical probe wavelengths, from the deep UV to the mid-IR. In this study, we use a commercially available 3D printer to print the polymer spacers to apply three different channel designs into the passive, continuous-flow mixer, and integrated them with three different spectroscopic probes. All three spectroscopic probes are applicable to each mixer without further changes. The sandwich-format mixer coupled with cost-effective 3D printed fabrication techniques could increase the applicability and accessibility of microfluidic mixing to intricate kinetic schemes and monitoring chemical synthesis in cases where only one probe technique proves insufficient. PMID:26855478

  1. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Spider Non-isothermal Forging Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Ling; Wei, Wei; Wei, Kun Xia; Alexandrov, Igor V.; Hu, Jing

    2016-05-01

    The differences of effective stress, effective strain, velocity field, and the load-time curves between the spider isothermal and non-isothermal forging processes are investigated by making full use of 3D FEA, and verified by the production experiment of spider forging. Effective stress is mainly concentrated on the pin, and becomes lower closer to the front of the pin. The maximum effective strain in the non-isothermal forging is lower than that in the isothermal. The great majority of strain in the non-isothermal forging process is 1.76, which is larger than the strain of 1.31 in the isothermal forging. The maximum load required in the isothermal forging is higher than that in the non-isothermal. The maximum experimental load and deformation temperature in the spider production are in good agreement with those in the non-isothermal FEA. The results indicate that the non-isothermal 3D FEA results can guide the design of the spider forging process.

  2. Photogrammetric 3d Acquisition and Analysis of Medicamentous Induced Pilomotor Reflex ("goose Bumps")

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D.; Hecht, A.

    2016-06-01

    In a current study at the University Hospital Dresden, Department of Neurology, the autonomous function of nerve fibres of the human skin is investigated. For this purpose, a specific medicament is applied on a small area of the skin of a test person which results in a local reaction (goose bumps). Based on the extent of the area, where the stimulation of the nerve fibres is visible, it can be concluded how the nerve function of the skin works. The aim of the investigation described in the paper is to generate 3D data of these goose bumps. Therefore, the paper analyses and compares different photogrammetric surface measurement techniques in regard to their suitability for the 3D acquisition of silicone imprints of the human skin. Furthermore, an appropriate processing procedure for analysing the recorded point cloud data is developed and presented. It was experimentally proven that by using (low-cost) photogrammetric techniques medicamentous induced goose bumps can be acquired in three dimensions and can be analysed almost fully automatically from the perspective of medical research questions. The relative accuracy was determined with 1% (RMSE) of the area resp. the volume of an individual goose bump.

  3. Error analysis for creating 3D face templates based on cylindrical quad-tree structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutfeter, Weronika

    2015-09-01

    Development of new biometric algorithms is parallel to advances in technology of sensing devices. Some of the limitations of the current face recognition systems may be eliminated by integrating 3D sensors into these systems. Depth sensing devices can capture a spatial structure of the face in addition to the texture and color. This kind of data is yet usually very voluminous and requires large amount of computer resources for being processed (face scans obtained with typical depth cameras contain more than 150 000 points per face). That is why defining efficient data structures for processing spatial images is crucial for further development of 3D face recognition methods. The concept described in this work fulfills the aforementioned demands. Modification of the quad-tree structure was chosen because it can be easily transformed into less dimensional data structures and maintains spatial relations between data points. We are able to interpret data stored in the tree as a pyramid of features which allow us to analyze face images using coarse-to-fine strategy, often exploited in biometric recognition systems.

  4. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Spider Non-isothermal Forging Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Ling; Wei, Wei; Wei, Kun Xia; Alexandrov, Igor V.; Hu, Jing

    2016-06-01

    The differences of effective stress, effective strain, velocity field, and the load-time curves between the spider isothermal and non-isothermal forging processes are investigated by making full use of 3D FEA, and verified by the production experiment of spider forging. Effective stress is mainly concentrated on the pin, and becomes lower closer to the front of the pin. The maximum effective strain in the non-isothermal forging is lower than that in the isothermal. The great majority of strain in the non-isothermal forging process is 1.76, which is larger than the strain of 1.31 in the isothermal forging. The maximum load required in the isothermal forging is higher than that in the non-isothermal. The maximum experimental load and deformation temperature in the spider production are in good agreement with those in the non-isothermal FEA. The results indicate that the non-isothermal 3D FEA results can guide the design of the spider forging process.

  5. Sandwich-format 3D printed microfluidic mixers: a flexible platform for multi-probe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kise, Drew P.; Reddish, Michael J.; Dyer, R. Brian

    2015-12-01

    We report on a microfluidic mixer fabrication platform that increases the versatility and flexibility of mixers for biomolecular applications. A sandwich-format design allows the application of multiple spectroscopic probes to the same mixer. A polymer spacer is ‘sandwiched’ between two transparent windows, creating a closed microfluidic system. The channels of the mixer are defined by regions in the polymer spacer that lack material and therefore the polymer need not be transparent in the spectral region of interest. Suitable window materials such as CaF2 make the device accessible to a wide range of optical probe wavelengths, from the deep UV to the mid-IR. In this study, we use a commercially available 3D printer to print the polymer spacers to apply three different channel designs into the passive, continuous-flow mixer, and integrated them with three different spectroscopic probes. All three spectroscopic probes are applicable to each mixer without further changes. The sandwich-format mixer coupled with cost-effective 3D printed fabrication techniques could increase the applicability and accessibility of microfluidic mixing to intricate kinetic schemes and monitoring chemical synthesis in cases where only one probe technique proves insufficient.

  6. Combinatorial Pharmacophore-Based 3D-QSAR Analysis and Virtual Screening of FGFR1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Nannan; Xu, Yuan; Liu, Xian; Wang, Yulan; Peng, Jianlong; Luo, Xiaomin; Zheng, Mingyue; Chen, Kaixian; Jiang, Hualiang

    2015-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor/fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGF/FGFR) signaling pathway plays crucial roles in cell proliferation, angiogenesis, migration, and survival. Aberration in FGFRs correlates with several malignancies and disorders. FGFRs have proved to be attractive targets for therapeutic intervention in cancer, and it is of high interest to find FGFR inhibitors with novel scaffolds. In this study, a combinatorial three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) model was developed based on previously reported FGFR1 inhibitors with diverse structural skeletons. This model was evaluated for its prediction performance on a diverse test set containing 232 FGFR inhibitors, and it yielded a SD value of 0.75 pIC50 units from measured inhibition affinities and a Pearson’s correlation coefficient R2 of 0.53. This result suggests that the combinatorial 3D-QSAR model could be used to search for new FGFR1 hit structures and predict their potential activity. To further evaluate the performance of the model, a decoy set validation was used to measure the efficiency of the model by calculating EF (enrichment factor). Based on the combinatorial pharmacophore model, a virtual screening against SPECS database was performed. Nineteen novel active compounds were successfully identified, which provide new chemical starting points for further structural optimization of FGFR1 inhibitors. PMID:26110383

  7. Panel Stiffener Debonding Analysis using a Shell/3D Modeling Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Ratcliffe, James G.; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2008-01-01

    A shear loaded, stringer reinforced composite panel is analyzed to evaluate the fidelity of computational fracture mechanics analyses of complex structures. Shear loading causes the panel to buckle. The resulting out -of-plane deformations initiate skin/stringer separation at the location of an embedded defect. The panel and surrounding load fixture were modeled with shell elements. A small section of the stringer foot, web and noodle as well as the panel skin near the delamination front were modeled with a local 3D solid model. Across the width of the stringer fo to, the mixed-mode strain energy release rates were calculated using the virtual crack closure technique. A failure index was calculated by correlating the results with a mixed-mode failure criterion of the graphite/epoxy material. The objective was to study the effect of the fidelity of the local 3D finite element model on the computed mixed-mode strain energy release rates and the failure index.

  8. Panel-Stiffener Debonding and Analysis Using a Shell/3D Modeling Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Ratcliffe, James G.; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2007-01-01

    A shear loaded, stringer reinforced composite panel is analyzed to evaluate the fidelity of computational fracture mechanics analyses of complex structures. Shear loading causes the panel to buckle. The resulting out-of-plane deformations initiate skin/stringer separation at the location of an embedded defect. The panel and surrounding load fixture were modeled with shell elements. A small section of the stringer foot, web and noodle as well as the panel skin near the delamination front were modeled with a local 3D solid model. Across the width of the stringer foot, the mixed-mode strain energy release rates were calculated using the virtual crack closure technique. A failure index was calculated by correlating the results with a mixed-mode failure criterion of the graphite/epoxy material. The objective was to study the effect of the fidelity of the local 3D finite element model on the computed mixed-mode strain energy release rates and the failure index.

  9. Semi-automatic segmentation for 3D motion analysis of the tongue with dynamic MRI.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junghoon; Woo, Jonghye; Xing, Fangxu; Murano, Emi Z; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L

    2014-12-01

    Dynamic MRI has been widely used to track the motion of the tongue and measure its internal deformation during speech and swallowing. Accurate segmentation of the tongue is a prerequisite step to define the target boundary and constrain the tracking to tissue points within the tongue. Segmentation of 2D slices or 3D volumes is challenging because of the large number of slices and time frames involved in the segmentation, as well as the incorporation of numerous local deformations that occur throughout the tongue during motion. In this paper, we propose a semi-automatic approach to segment 3D dynamic MRI of the tongue. The algorithm steps include seeding a few slices at one time frame, propagating seeds to the same slices at different time frames using deformable registration, and random walker segmentation based on these seed positions. This method was validated on the tongue of five normal subjects carrying out the same speech task with multi-slice 2D dynamic cine-MR images obtained at three orthogonal orientations and 26 time frames. The resulting semi-automatic segmentations of a total of 130 volumes showed an average dice similarity coefficient (DSC) score of 0.92 with less segmented volume variability between time frames than in manual segmentations. PMID:25155697

  10. 3D shape descriptors for face segmentation and fiducial points detection: an anatomical-based analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Augusto E.; Cerón, Alexander; Prieto, Flavio A.

    2011-03-01

    The behavior of nine 3D shape descriptors which were computed on the surface of 3D face models, is studied. The set of descriptors includes six curvature-based ones, SPIN images, Folded SPIN Images, and Finger prints. Instead of defining clusters of vertices based on the value of a given primitive surface feature, a face template composed by 28 anatomical regions, is used to segment the models and to extract the location of different landmarks and fiducial points. Vertices are grouped by: region, region boundaries, and subsampled versions of them. The aim of this study is to analyze the discriminant capacity of each descriptor to characterize regions and to identify key points on the facial surface. The experiment includes testing with data from neutral faces and faces showing expressions. Also, in order to see the usefulness of the bending-invariant canonical form (BICF) to handle variations due to facial expressions, the descriptors are computed directly from the surface and also from its BICF. In the results: the values, distributions, and relevance indexes of each set of vertices, were analyzed.

  11. ALE3D Model Predictions and Experimental Analysis of the Cookoff Response of Comp B*

    SciTech Connect

    Maienschein, J L; McClelland, M A; Wardell, J F; Reaugh, J E; Nichols, A L; Tran, T D

    2003-11-24

    ALE3D simulations are presented for the thermal explosion of Comp B (RDX,TNT) in a Scaled Thermal Explosion Experiment (STEX). Candidate models and numerical strategies are being tested using the ALE3D code which simulates the coupled thermal, mechanical, and chemical behavior during heating, ignition, and explosion. The mechanical behavior of the solid constituents is represented by a Steinberg-Guinan model while polynomial and gamma-law expressions are used for the equation of state of the solid and gas species, respectively. A gamma-law model is employed for the air in gaps, and a mixed material model is used for the interface between air and explosive. A three-step chemical kinetics model is used for each of the RDX and TNT reaction sequences during the heating and ignition phases, and a pressure-dependent deflagration model is employed during the rapid expansion. Parameters for the three-step kinetics model are specified using measurements of the One-Dimensional-Time-to-Explosion (ODTX), while measurements for burn rate are employed to determine parameters in the burn front model. We compare model predictions to measurements for temperature fields, ignition temperature, and tube wall strain during the heating, ignition, and explosive phases.

  12. Relevance of 2D radiographic texture analysis for the assessment of 3D bone micro-architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Apostol, Lian; Boudousq, Vincent; Basset, Oliver; Odet, Christophe; Yot, Sophie; Tabary, Joachim; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Boller, Elodie; Kotzki, Pierre-Olivier; Peyrin, Francoise

    2006-09-15

    Although the diagnosis of osteoporosis is mainly based on dual x-ray absorptiometry, it has been shown that trabecular bone micro-architecture is also an important factor in regard to fracture risk. In vivo, techniques based on high-resolution x-ray radiography associated to texture analysis have been proposed to investigate bone micro-architecture, but their relevance for giving pertinent 3D information is unclear. Thirty-three calcaneus and femoral neck bone samples including the cortical shells (diameter: 14 mm, height: 30-40 mm) were imaged using 3D-synchrotron x-ray micro-CT at the ESRF. The 3D reconstructed images with a cubic voxel size of 15 {mu}m were further used for two purposes: (1) quantification of three-dimensional trabecular bone micro-architecture (2) simulation of realistic x-ray radiographs under different acquisition conditions. The simulated x-ray radiographs were then analyzed using a large variety of texture analysis methods (co-occurrence, spectral density, fractal, morphology, etc.). The range of micro-architecture parameters was in agreement with previous studies and rather large, suggesting that the population was representative. More than 350 texture parameters were tested. A small number of them were selected based on their correlation to micro-architectural morphometric parameters. Using this subset of texture parameters, multiple regression allowed one to predict up to 93% of the variance of micro-architecture parameters using three texture features. 2D texture features predicting 3D micro-architecture parameters other than BV/TV were identified. The methodology proposed for evaluating the relationships between 3D micro-architecture and 2D texture parameters may also be used for optimizing the conditions for radiographic imaging. Further work will include the application of the method to physical radiographs. In the future, this approach could be used in combination with DXA to refine osteoporosis diagnosis.

  13. Analysis of thin baked-on silicone layers by FTIR and 3D-Laser Scanning Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Funke, Stefanie; Matilainen, Julia; Nalenz, Heiko; Bechtold-Peters, Karoline; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Friess, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Pre-filled syringes (PFS) and auto-injection devices with cartridges are increasingly used for parenteral administration. To assure functionality, silicone oil is applied to the inner surface of the glass barrel. Silicone oil migration into the product can be minimized by applying a thin but sufficient layer of silicone oil emulsion followed by thermal bake-on versus spraying-on silicone oil. Silicone layers thicker than 100nm resulting from regular spray-on siliconization can be characterized using interferometric profilometers. However, the analysis of thin silicone layers generated by bake-on siliconization is more challenging. In this paper, we have evaluated Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy after solvent extraction and a new 3D-Laser Scanning Microscopy (3D-LSM) to overcome this challenge. A multi-step solvent extraction and subsequent FTIR spectroscopy enabled to quantify baked-on silicone levels as low as 21-325μg per 5mL cartridge. 3D-LSM was successfully established to visualize and measure baked-on silicone layers as thin as 10nm. 3D-LSM was additionally used to analyze the silicone oil distribution within cartridges at such low levels. Both methods provided new, highly valuable insights to characterize the siliconization after processing, in order to achieve functionality. PMID:26316044

  14. 2D fluid model analysis for the effect of 3D gas flow on a capacitively coupled plasma deposition reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2016-06-01

    The wide applicability of capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) deposition has increased the interest in developing comprehensive numerical models, but CCP imposes a tremendous computational cost when conducting a transient analysis in a three-dimensional (3D) model which reflects the real geometry of reactors. In particular, the detailed flow features of reactive gases induced by 3D geometric effects need to be considered for the precise calculation of radical distribution of reactive species. Thus, an alternative inclusive method for the numerical simulation of CCP deposition is proposed to simulate a two-dimensional (2D) CCP model based on the 3D gas flow results by simulating flow, temperature, and species fields in a 3D space at first without calculating the plasma chemistry. A numerical study of a cylindrical showerhead-electrode CCP reactor was conducted for particular cases of SiH4/NH3/N2/He gas mixture to deposit a hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiN x H y ) film. The proposed methodology produces numerical results for a 300 mm wafer deposition reactor which agree very well with the deposition rate profile measured experimentally along the wafer radius.

  15. Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Expansion in Contact with Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in a Hanging Drop Model Uncovers Disadvantages of 3D Culture

    PubMed Central

    Schmal, Olga; Seifert, Jan; Schäffer, Tilman E.; Walter, Christina B.; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Klein, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Efficient ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells with a concomitant preservation of stemness and self-renewal potential is still an unresolved ambition. Increased numbers of methods approaching this issue using three-dimensional (3D) cultures were reported. Here, we describe a simplified 3D hanging drop model for the coculture of cord blood-derived CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). When seeded as a mixed cell suspension, MSCs segregated into tight spheroids. Despite the high expression of niche-specific extracellular matrix components by spheroid-forming MSCs, HSPCs did not migrate into the spheroids in the initial phase of coculture, indicating strong homotypic interactions of MSCs. After one week, however, HSPC attachment increased considerably, leading to spheroid collapse as demonstrated by electron microscopy and immunofluorescence staining. In terms of HSPC proliferation, the conventional 2D coculture system was superior to the hanging drop model. Furthermore, expansion of primitive hematopoietic progenitors was more favored in 2D than in 3D, as analyzed in colony-forming assays. Conclusively, our data demonstrate that MSCs, when arranged with a spread (monolayer) shape, exhibit better HSPC supportive qualities than spheroid-forming MSCs. Therefore, 3D systems are not necessarily superior to traditional 2D culture in this regard. PMID:26839560

  16. 3D seismic attribute-assisted analysis of microseismic events in the Marcellus Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Ariel Kelton

    Microseismic monitoring is often used during the process of oil and gas exploitation to monitor seismicity that may be triggered by hydraulic fracturing, a common practice in the Appalachian Basin. Anthropogenically-induced minor upward fracture growth is not uncommon in the Marcellus shale; however, in the area of study, significant microseismic activity was registered above the target zone. In order to ascertain whether out-of-zone growth might have been predictable and identify which areas are more likely to experience brittle failure first, 3D seismic and microseismic data were analyzed with a focus on better understanding variations in the acoustic properties associated with unconventional naturally fractured reservoirs. Ant Tracking was used to identify areas of increased local seismic discontinuity, as these areas are generally more intensely deformed and may represent zones of increased fracture intensity. Ant Tracking results reveal discontinuities in the Marcellus are oriented approximately at N52E and N41W; discontinuities do not coincide with N25E trending folds apparent in the 3D seismic, but tend to follow deeper structural trends instead. These discontinuity orientations are interpreted to be a result of continued movement on deeper faults throughout the Paleozoic; these faults possibly acted as seed points for fractures further upsection and potentially led to the precipitation of the large N25E trending imbricate backthrusts seen in the 3D seismic. The reservoir's response to hydraulic fracturing also provided insights into local stress anisotropy and into optimal well and stage spacing needed to maximize drainage area and locate additional wells during the field development phase. Microseismic, well, and pump data used to gauge the reservoir's response to a hydraulic fracture treatment indicated that the number of stages, lateral length, total proppant volume, and fracture energy heavily influence how a well produces. SHmax in the area is oriented

  17. 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components (base program). [turbine blades, turbine vanes, and combustor liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. B.; Bak, M. J.; Nakazawa, S.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    A 3-D inelastic analysis methods program consists of a series of computer codes embodying a progression of mathematical models (mechanics of materials, special finite element, boundary element) for streamlined analysis of combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. These models address the effects of high temperatures and thermal/mechanical loadings on the local (stress/strain) and global (dynamics, buckling) structural behavior of the three selected components. These models are used to solve 3-D inelastic problems using linear approximations in the sense that stresses/strains and temperatures in generic modeling regions are linear functions of the spatial coordinates, and solution increments for load, temperature and/or time are extrapolated linearly from previous information. Three linear formulation computer codes, referred to as MOMM (Mechanics of Materials Model), MHOST (MARC-Hot Section Technology), and BEST (Boundary Element Stress Technology), were developed and are described.

  18. Computational Analysis of the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel Using FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chwalowski, Pawel; Quon, Eliot; Brynildsen, Scott E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results from an exploratory two-year effort of applying Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to analyze the empty-tunnel flow in the NASA Langley Research Center Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). The TDT is a continuous-flow, closed circuit, 16- x 16-foot slotted-test-section wind tunnel, with capabilities to use air or heavy gas as a working fluid. In this study, experimental data acquired in the empty tunnel using the R-134a test medium was used to calibrate the computational data. The experimental calibration data includes wall pressures, boundary-layer profiles, and the tunnel centerline Mach number profiles. Subsonic and supersonic flow regimes were considered, focusing on Mach 0.5, 0.7 and Mach 1.1 in the TDT test section. This study discusses the computational domain, boundary conditions, and initial conditions selected and the resulting steady-state analyses using NASA's FUN3D CFD software.

  19. 3D image analysis and artificial intelligence for bone disease classification.

    PubMed

    Akgundogdu, Abdurrahim; Jennane, Rachid; Aufort, Gabriel; Benhamou, Claude Laurent; Ucan, Osman Nuri

    2010-10-01

    In order to prevent bone fractures due to disease and ageing of the population, and to detect problems while still in their early stages, 3D bone micro architecture needs to be investigated and characterized. Here, we have developed various image processing and simulation techniques to investigate bone micro architecture and its mechanical stiffness. We have evaluated morphological, topological and mechanical bone features using artificial intelligence methods. A clinical study is carried out on two populations of arthritic and osteoporotic bone samples. The performances of Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS), Support Vector Machines (SVM) and Genetic Algorithm (GA) in classifying the different samples have been compared. Results show that the best separation success (100 %) is achieved with Genetic Algorithm. PMID:20703627

  20. High sensitivity and high resolution element 3D analysis by a combined SIMS-SPM instrument.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Yves; Wirtz, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Using the recently developed SIMS-SPM prototype, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) data was combined with topographical data from the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) module for five test structures in order to obtain accurate chemical 3D maps: a polystyrene/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PS/PVP) polymer blend, a nickel-based super-alloy, a titanium carbonitride-based cermet, a reticle test structure and Mg(OH)2 nanoclusters incorporated inside a polymer matrix. The examples illustrate the potential of this combined approach to track and eliminate artefacts related to inhomogeneities of the sputter rates (caused by samples containing various materials, different phases or having a non-flat surface) and inhomogeneities of the secondary ion extraction efficiencies due to local field distortions (caused by topography with high aspect ratios). In this respect, this paper presents the measured relative sputter rates between PVP and PS as well as in between the different phases of the TiCN cermet. PMID:26171285

  1. Package analysis of 3D-printed piezoresistive strain gauge sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sumit Kumar; Baptist, Joshua R.; Sahasrabuddhe, Ritvij; Lee, Woo H.; Popa, Dan O.

    2016-05-01

    Poly(3,4-ethyle- nedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) or PEDOT:PSS is a flexible polymer which exhibits piezo-resistive properties when subjected to structural deformation. PEDOT:PSS has a high conductivity and thermal stability which makes it an ideal candidate for use as a pressure sensor. Applications of this technology includes whole body robot skin that can increase the safety and physical collaboration of robots in close proximity to humans. In this paper, we present a finite element model of strain gauge touch sensors which have been 3D-printed onto Kapton and silicone substrates using Electro-Hydro-Dynamic ink-jetting. Simulations of the piezoresistive and structural model for the entire packaged sensor was carried out using COMSOLR , and compared with experimental results for validation. The model will be useful in designing future robot skin with predictable performances.

  2. 3D Heart: a new visual training method for electrocardiographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Olson, Charles W; Lange, David; Chan, Jack-Kang; Olson, Kim E; Albano, Alfred; Wagner, Galen S; Selvester, Ronald H S

    2007-01-01

    This new training method is based on developing a sound understanding of the sequence in which electrical excitation spreads through both the normal and the infarcted myocardium. The student is made aware of the cardiac electrical performance through a series of 3-dimensional pictures during the excitation process. The electrocardiogram 3D Heart 3-dimensional program contains a variety of different activation simulations. Currently, this program enables the user to view the activation simulation for all of the following pathology examples: normal activation; large, medium, and small anterior myocardial infarction (MI); large, medium, and small posterolateral MI; large, medium, and small inferior MI. Simulations relating to other cardiac abnormalities, such as bundle branch block and left ventricular hypertrophy fasicular block, are being developed as part of a National Institute of Health (NIH) Phase 1 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. PMID:17604044

  3. 3D Dynamic Finite Element Analysis of the Nonuniform Residual Stress in Ultrasonic Impact Treatment Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shengsun; Guo, Chaobo; Wang, Dongpo; Wang, Zhijiang

    2016-07-01

    The nonuniform distributions of the residual stress were simulated by a 3D finite element model to analyze the elastic-plastic dynamic ultrasonic impact treatment (UIT) process of multiple impacts on the 2024 aluminum alloy. The evolution of the stress during the impact process was discussed. The successive impacts during the UIT process improve the uniformity of the plastic deformation and decrease the maximum compressive residual stress beneath the former impact indentations. The influences of different controlled parameters, including the initial impact velocity, pin diameter, pin tip, device moving, and offset distances, on the residual stress distributions were analyzed. The influences of the controlled parameters on the residual stress distributions are apparent in the offset direction due to the different surface coverage in different directions. The influences can be used to understand the UIT process and to obtain the desired residual stress by optimizing the controlled parameters.

  4. Supergravity Analysis of Hybrid Inflation Model from D3--D7 System

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, Fumikazu; Tachikawa, Yuji; Watari, Taizan

    2003-11-20

    The slow-roll inflation is a beautiful paradigm, yet the inflaton potential can hardly be sufficiently flat when unknown gravitational effects are taken into account. However, the hybrid inflation models constructed in D = 4 N = 1 supergravity can be consistent with N = 2 supersymmetry, and can be naturally embedded into string theory. This article discusses the gravitational effects carefully in the string model, using D = 4 supergravity description. We adopt the D3--D7 system of Type IIB string theory compactified on K3 x T^2/Z_2 orientifold for definiteness. It turns out that the slow-roll parameter can be sufficiently small despite the non-minimal Kahler potential of the model. The conditions for this to happen are clarified in terms of string vacua. We also find that the geometry obtained by blowing up singularity, which is necessary for the positive vacuum energy, is stabilized by introducing certain 3-form fluxes.

  5. Numerical analysis of the aeroelastic behaviour for the last turbine stage in 3D transonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnesin, Vitaly; Kolodyazhnaya, Lyubov

    2004-11-01

    An understanding of the physics of the mutual interaction between gas flow and oscillating blades, and the development of predictive capabilities is essential for improving overall efficiency, durability and reliability. In this study presented the algorithm proposed involving the coupled solution of 3D unsteady flow through a turbine stage and dynamic problem for rotor blades motion by action of aerodynamic forces without separating outer and inner flow fluctuations. There has been performed the calculations for the last stage of the steam turbine under design and off-design regimes. It has investigated the mutual influence of both outer flow non-uniformity and blades oscillations. It has shown that amplitude-frequency spectrum of blade oscillations contains the high frequency harmonics, corresponding to rotor moving one stator blade pitch, and low frequency harmonics caused by blade oscillations and flow non-uniformity downstream from the blade row.

  6. Contact Prediction for Beta and Alpha-Beta Proteins Using Integer Linear Optimization and its Impact on the First Principles 3D Structure Prediction Method ASTRO-FOLD

    PubMed Central

    Rajgaria, R.; Wei, Y.; Floudas, C. A.

    2010-01-01

    An integer linear optimization model is presented to predict residue contacts in β, α + β, and α/β proteins. The total energy of a protein is expressed as sum of a Cα – Cα distance dependent contact energy contribution and a hydrophobic contribution. The model selects contacts that assign lowest energy to the protein structure while satisfying a set of constraints that are included to enforce certain physically observed topological information. A new method based on hydrophobicity is proposed to find the β-sheet alignments. These β-sheet alignments are used as constraints for contacts between residues of β-sheets. This model was tested on three independent protein test sets and CASP8 test proteins consisting of β, α + β, α/β proteins and was found to perform very well. The average accuracy of the predictions (separated by at least six residues) was approximately 61%. The average true positive and false positive distances were also calculated for each of the test sets and they are 7.58 Å and 15.88 Å, respectively. Residue contact prediction can be directly used to facilitate the protein tertiary structure prediction. This proposed residue contact prediction model is incorporated into the first principles protein tertiary structure prediction approach, ASTRO-FOLD. The effectiveness of the contact prediction model was further demonstrated by the improvement in the quality of the protein structure ensemble generated using the predicted residue contacts for a test set of 10 proteins. PMID:20225257

  7. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 3: Systems' manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1989-01-01

    The internal structure is discussed of the MHOST finite element program designed for 3-D inelastic analysis of gas turbine hot section components. The computer code is the first implementation of the mixed iterative solution strategy for improved efficiency and accuracy over the conventional finite element method. The control structure of the program is covered along with the data storage scheme and the memory allocation procedure and the file handling facilities including the read and/or write sequences.

  8. A Retrospective 3D Radiologic Analysis of 52 Patients with Mandible Fractures.

    PubMed

    Özkan, Heval Selman; Irkoren, Saime; Durum, Yasemin; Karaca, Can

    2016-02-01

    When fractured, mandible angulates. For better preoperative evaluation, movements of fractured mandibular segments should be documented in x-, y-, and z-axes. This article quantitatively evaluates the pattern and degree of the angulation. Fifty-two patients with mandible fractures were involved in this study. After defining a three-dimensional (3D) coordination system consisting of the x-axis (the axis directed from the medial to lateral side of the skull), y-axis (directed from the inferior to superior side), and z-axis (directed from the posterior to anterior side), the degree with which the fractured ma