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Sample records for 3d dielectric layers

  1. Thin-dielectric-layer engineering for 3D nanostructure integration using an innovative planarization approach.

    PubMed

    Guerfi, Y; Doucet, J B; Larrieu, G

    2015-10-23

    Three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures are emerging as promising building blocks for a large spectrum of applications. One critical issue in integration regards mastering the thin, flat, and chemically stable insulating layer that must be implemented on the nanostructure network in order to build striking nano-architectures. In this letter, we report an innovative method for nanoscale planarization on 3D nanostructures by using hydrogen silesquioxane as a spin-on-glass (SOG) dielectric material. To decouple the thickness of the final layer from the height of the nanostructure, we propose to embed the nanowire network in the insulator layer by exploiting the planarizing properties of the SOG approach. To achieve the desired dielectric thickness, the structure is chemically etched back with a highly diluted solution to control the etch rate precisely. The roughness of the top surface was less than 2 nm. There were no surface defects and the planarity was excellent, even in the vicinity of the nanowires. This newly developed process was used to realize a multilevel stack architecture with sub-deca-nanometer-range layer thickness.

  2. Thin-dielectric-layer engineering for 3D nanostructure integration using an innovative planarization approach.

    PubMed

    Guerfi, Y; Doucet, J B; Larrieu, G

    2015-10-23

    Three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures are emerging as promising building blocks for a large spectrum of applications. One critical issue in integration regards mastering the thin, flat, and chemically stable insulating layer that must be implemented on the nanostructure network in order to build striking nano-architectures. In this letter, we report an innovative method for nanoscale planarization on 3D nanostructures by using hydrogen silesquioxane as a spin-on-glass (SOG) dielectric material. To decouple the thickness of the final layer from the height of the nanostructure, we propose to embed the nanowire network in the insulator layer by exploiting the planarizing properties of the SOG approach. To achieve the desired dielectric thickness, the structure is chemically etched back with a highly diluted solution to control the etch rate precisely. The roughness of the top surface was less than 2 nm. There were no surface defects and the planarity was excellent, even in the vicinity of the nanowires. This newly developed process was used to realize a multilevel stack architecture with sub-deca-nanometer-range layer thickness. PMID:26422697

  3. Thin-dielectric-layer engineering for 3D nanostructure integration using an innovative planarization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerfi, Y.; Doucet, J. B.; Larrieu, G.

    2015-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures are emerging as promising building blocks for a large spectrum of applications. One critical issue in integration regards mastering the thin, flat, and chemically stable insulating layer that must be implemented on the nanostructure network in order to build striking nano-architectures. In this letter, we report an innovative method for nanoscale planarization on 3D nanostructures by using hydrogen silesquioxane as a spin-on-glass (SOG) dielectric material. To decouple the thickness of the final layer from the height of the nanostructure, we propose to embed the nanowire network in the insulator layer by exploiting the planarizing properties of the SOG approach. To achieve the desired dielectric thickness, the structure is chemically etched back with a highly diluted solution to control the etch rate precisely. The roughness of the top surface was less than 2 nm. There were no surface defects and the planarity was excellent, even in the vicinity of the nanowires. This newly developed process was used to realize a multilevel stack architecture with sub-deca-nanometer-range layer thickness.

  4. LASTRAC.3d: Transition Prediction in 3D Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2004-01-01

    Langley Stability and Transition Analysis Code (LASTRAC) is a general-purpose, physics-based transition prediction code released by NASA for laminar flow control studies and transition research. This paper describes the LASTRAC extension to general three-dimensional (3D) boundary layers such as finite swept wings, cones, or bodies at an angle of attack. The stability problem is formulated by using a body-fitted nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinate system constructed on the body surface. The nonorthogonal coordinate system offers a variety of marching paths and spanwise waveforms. In the extreme case of an infinite swept wing boundary layer, marching with a nonorthogonal coordinate produces identical solutions to those obtained with an orthogonal coordinate system using the earlier release of LASTRAC. Several methods to formulate the 3D parabolized stability equations (PSE) are discussed. A surface-marching procedure akin to that for 3D boundary layer equations may be used to solve the 3D parabolized disturbance equations. On the other hand, the local line-marching PSE method, formulated as an easy extension from its 2D counterpart and capable of handling the spanwise mean flow and disturbance variation, offers an alternative. A linear stability theory or parabolized stability equations based N-factor analysis carried out along the streamline direction with a fixed wavelength and downstream-varying spanwise direction constitutes an efficient engineering approach to study instability wave evolution in a 3D boundary layer. The surface-marching PSE method enables a consistent treatment of the disturbance evolution along both streamwise and spanwise directions but requires more stringent initial conditions. Both PSE methods and the traditional LST approach are implemented in the LASTRAC.3d code. Several test cases for tapered or finite swept wings and cones at an angle of attack are discussed.

  5. Printing 3D dielectric elastomer actuators for soft robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossiter, Jonathan; Walters, Peter; Stoimenov, Boyko

    2009-03-01

    We present a new approach to the fabrication of soft dielectric elastomer actuators using a 3D printing process. Complete actuators including active membranes and support structures can be 3D printed in one go, resulting in a great improvement in fabrication speed and increases in accuracy and consistency. We describe the fabrication process and present force and displacement results for a double-membrane antagonistic actuator. In this structure controlled prestrain is applied by the simple process of pressing together two printed actuator halves. The development of 3D printable soft actuators will have a large impact on many application areas including engineering, medicine and the emerging field of soft robotics.

  6. Monolithic 3D CMOS Using Layered Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Sachid, Angada B; Tosun, Mahmut; Desai, Sujay B; Hsu, Ching-Yi; Lien, Der-Hsien; Madhvapathy, Surabhi R; Chen, Yu-Ze; Hettick, Mark; Kang, Jeong Seuk; Zeng, Yuping; He, Jr-Hau; Chang, Edward Yi; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Javey, Ali; Hu, Chenming

    2016-04-01

    Monolithic 3D integrated circuits using transition metal dichalcogenide materials and low-temperature processing are reported. A variety of digital and analog circuits are implemented on two sequentially integrated layers of devices. Inverter circuit operation at an ultralow supply voltage of 150 mV is achieved, paving the way to high-density, ultralow-voltage, and ultralow-power applications. PMID:26833783

  7. Prediction of 3-D boundary layer in the curved inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zongwen; Wang, Jianmin

    1992-06-01

    A prediction method for 3D compressible turbulent boundary layers in curved inlets is investigated. 3D boundary layer integral equations in nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinate system are used and solved by lag-entrainment method with an introduced 3D entrainment coefficient equation. During numerical calculation, the prediction corrector method is employed. With the cubic spline function, the interpolation and differentiation accuracy and smoothness of discrete data is ensured. The developed program may be operated on a personal computer. The influence of cross flow on boundary layer development is clearly shown by the calculated results. The calculated pressure recovery of the inlet is in good agreement with experiment data.

  8. Single-layer graphene-assembled 3D porous carbon composites with PVA and Fe₃O₄ nano-fillers: an interface-mediated superior dielectric and EMI shielding performance.

    PubMed

    Rao, B V Bhaskara; Yadav, Prasad; Aepuru, Radhamanohar; Panda, H S; Ogale, Satishchandra; Kale, S N

    2015-07-28

    In this study, a novel composite of Fe3O4 nanofiller-decorated single-layer graphene-assembled porous carbon (SLGAPC) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) having flexibility and a density of 0.75 g cm(-3) is explored for its dielectric and electromagnetic interference (EMI) response properties. The composite is prepared by the solution casting method and its constituents are optimized as 15 wt% SLGAPC and 20 wt% Fe3O4 through a novel solvent relaxation nuclear magnetic resonance experiment. The PVA-SLGAPC-Fe3O4 composite shows high dielectric permittivity in the range of 1 Hz-10 MHz, enhanced by a factor of 4 as compared to that of the PVA-SLGAPC composite, with a reduced loss by a factor of 2. The temperature dependent dielectric properties reveal the activation energy behaviour with reference to the glass transition temperature (80 °C) of PVA. The dielectric hysteresis with the temperature cycle reveals a remnant polarization. The enhanced dielectric properties are suggested to be the result of improvement in the localized polarization of the integrated interface system (Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars (MWS) polarization) formed by the uniform adsorption of Fe3O4 on the surface of SLGAPC conjugated with PVA. The EMI shielding property of the composite with a low thickness of 0.3 mm in the X-band (8.2-12.4 GHz) shows a very impressive shielding efficiency of ∼15 dB and a specific shielding effectiveness of 20 dB (g cm(-3))(-1), indicating the promising character of this material for flexible EMI shielding applications. PMID:26105548

  9. Single-layer graphene-assembled 3D porous carbon composites with PVA and Fe₃O₄ nano-fillers: an interface-mediated superior dielectric and EMI shielding performance.

    PubMed

    Rao, B V Bhaskara; Yadav, Prasad; Aepuru, Radhamanohar; Panda, H S; Ogale, Satishchandra; Kale, S N

    2015-07-28

    In this study, a novel composite of Fe3O4 nanofiller-decorated single-layer graphene-assembled porous carbon (SLGAPC) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) having flexibility and a density of 0.75 g cm(-3) is explored for its dielectric and electromagnetic interference (EMI) response properties. The composite is prepared by the solution casting method and its constituents are optimized as 15 wt% SLGAPC and 20 wt% Fe3O4 through a novel solvent relaxation nuclear magnetic resonance experiment. The PVA-SLGAPC-Fe3O4 composite shows high dielectric permittivity in the range of 1 Hz-10 MHz, enhanced by a factor of 4 as compared to that of the PVA-SLGAPC composite, with a reduced loss by a factor of 2. The temperature dependent dielectric properties reveal the activation energy behaviour with reference to the glass transition temperature (80 °C) of PVA. The dielectric hysteresis with the temperature cycle reveals a remnant polarization. The enhanced dielectric properties are suggested to be the result of improvement in the localized polarization of the integrated interface system (Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars (MWS) polarization) formed by the uniform adsorption of Fe3O4 on the surface of SLGAPC conjugated with PVA. The EMI shielding property of the composite with a low thickness of 0.3 mm in the X-band (8.2-12.4 GHz) shows a very impressive shielding efficiency of ∼15 dB and a specific shielding effectiveness of 20 dB (g cm(-3))(-1), indicating the promising character of this material for flexible EMI shielding applications.

  10. Pseudo single crystal, direct-band-gap Ge{sub 0.89}Sn{sub 0.11} on amorphous dielectric layers towards monolithic 3D photonic integration

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Haofeng; Brouillet, Jeremy; Wang, Xiaoxin; Liu, Jifeng

    2014-11-17

    We demonstrate pseudo single crystal, direct-band-gap Ge{sub 0.89}Sn{sub 0.11} crystallized on amorphous layers at <450 °C towards 3D Si photonic integration. We developed two approaches to seed the lateral single crystal growth: (1) utilize the Gibbs-Thomson eutectic temperature depression at the tip of an amorphous GeSn nanotaper for selective nucleation; (2) laser-induced nucleation at one end of a GeSn strip. Either way, the crystallized Ge{sub 0.89}Sn{sub 0.11} is dominated by a single grain >18 μm long that forms optoelectronically benign twin boundaries with others grains. These pseudo single crystal, direct-band-gap Ge{sub 0.89}Sn{sub 0.11} patterns are suitable for monolithic 3D integration of active photonic devices on Si.

  11. Lithographically-generated 3D lamella layers and their structural color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sichao; Chen, Yifang; Lu, Bingrui; Liu, Jianpeng; Shao, Jinhai; Xu, Chen

    2016-04-01

    Inspired by the structural color from the multilayer nanophotonic structures in Morpho butterfly wing scales, 3D lamellae layers in dielectric polymers (polymethyl methacrylate, PMMA) with n ~ 1.5 were designed and fabricated by standard top-down electron beam lithography with one-step exposure followed by an alternating development/dissolution process of PMMA/LOR (lift-off resist) multilayers. This work offers direct proof of the structural blue/green color via lithographically-replicated PMMA/air multilayers, analogous to those in real Morpho butterfly wings. The success of nanolithography in this work for the 3D lamellae structures in dielectric polymers not only enables us to gain deeper insight into the mysterious blue color of the Morpho butterfly wings, but also breaks through the bottleneck in technical development toward broad applications in gas/liquid sensors, 3D meta-materials, coloring media, and infrared imaging devices, etc.

  12. Numerical Analysis of Electromagnetic Scattering from 3-D Dielectric Objects Using the Yasuura Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koba, Koichi; Ikuno, Hiroyoshi; Kawano, Mitsunori

    In order to calculate 3-D electromagnetic scattering problems by dielectric objects which we need to solve a big size simultaneous linear equation, we present a rapid algorithm on the Yasuura method where we accelerate the convergence rate of solution by using an array of multipoles as well as a conventional multipole. As a result, we can obtain the radar cross sections of dielectric objects in the optical wave region over a relative wide frequency range and a TDG pulse response. Furthermore, we analyze the scattering data about dielectric objects by using the pulse responses cut by an appropriate window function in the time domain and clarify the scattering processes on dielectric objects.

  13. 3D Framework DNA Origami with Layered Crossovers.

    PubMed

    Hong, Fan; Jiang, Shuoxing; Wang, Tong; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Designer DNA architectures with nanoscale geometric controls provide a programmable molecular toolbox for engineering complex nanodevices. Scaffolded DNA origami has dramatically improved our ability to design and construct DNA nanostructures with finite size and spatial addressability. Here we report a novel design strategy to engineer multilayered wireframe DNA structures by introducing crossover pairs that connect neighboring layers of DNA double helices. These layered crossovers (LX) allow the scaffold or helper strands to travel through different layers and can control the relative orientation of DNA helices in neighboring layers. Using this design strategy, we successfully constructed four versions of two-layer parallelogram structures with well-defined interlayer angles, a three-layer structure with triangular cavities, and a 9- and 15-layer square lattices. This strategy provides a general route to engineer 3D framework DNA nanostructures with controlled cavities and opportunities to design host-guest networks analogs to those produced with metal organic frameworks.

  14. 3D Framework DNA Origami with Layered Crossovers.

    PubMed

    Hong, Fan; Jiang, Shuoxing; Wang, Tong; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Designer DNA architectures with nanoscale geometric controls provide a programmable molecular toolbox for engineering complex nanodevices. Scaffolded DNA origami has dramatically improved our ability to design and construct DNA nanostructures with finite size and spatial addressability. Here we report a novel design strategy to engineer multilayered wireframe DNA structures by introducing crossover pairs that connect neighboring layers of DNA double helices. These layered crossovers (LX) allow the scaffold or helper strands to travel through different layers and can control the relative orientation of DNA helices in neighboring layers. Using this design strategy, we successfully constructed four versions of two-layer parallelogram structures with well-defined interlayer angles, a three-layer structure with triangular cavities, and a 9- and 15-layer square lattices. This strategy provides a general route to engineer 3D framework DNA nanostructures with controlled cavities and opportunities to design host-guest networks analogs to those produced with metal organic frameworks. PMID:27628457

  15. 3-D Flow Visualization of a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurow, Brian; Williams, Steven; Lynch, Kyle

    2009-11-01

    A recently developed 3-D flow visualization technique is used to visualize large-scale structures in a turbulent boundary layer. The technique is based on the scanning of a laser light sheet through the flow field similar to that of Delo and Smits (1997). High-speeds are possible using a recently developed MHz rate pulse burst laser system, an ultra-high-speed camera capable of 500,000 fps and a galvanometric scanning mirror yielding a total acquisition time of 136 microseconds for a 220 x 220 x 68 voxel image. In these experiments, smoke is seeded into the boundary layer formed on the wall of a low-speed wind tunnel. The boundary layer is approximately 1.5'' thick at the imaging location with a free stream velocity of 24 ft/s yielding a Reynolds number of 18,000 based on boundary layer thickness. The 3-D image volume is approximately 4'' x 4'' x 4''. Preliminary results using 3-D iso-surface visualizations show a collection of elongated large-scale structures inclined in the streamwise direction. The spanwise width of the structures, which are located in the outer region, is on the order of 25 -- 50% of the boundary layer thickness.

  16. 3D Imaging of the OH mesospheric emissive layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouahla, M. N.; Moreels, G.; Faivre, M.; Clairemidi, J.; Meriwether, J. W.; Lehmacher, G. A.; Vidal, E.; Veliz, O.

    2010-01-01

    A new and original stereo imaging method is introduced to measure the altitude of the OH nightglow layer and provide a 3D perspective map of the altitude of the layer centroid. Near-IR photographs of the OH layer are taken at two sites separated by a 645 km distance. Each photograph is processed in order to provide a satellite view of the layer. When superposed, the two views present a common diamond-shaped area. Pairs of matched points that correspond to a physical emissive point in the common area are identified in calculating a normalized cross-correlation coefficient (NCC). This method is suitable for obtaining 3D representations in the case of low-contrast objects. An observational campaign was conducted in July 2006 in Peru. The images were taken simultaneously at Cerro Cosmos (12°09‧08.2″ S, 75°33‧49.3″ W, altitude 4630 m) close to Huancayo and Cerro Verde Tellolo (16°33‧17.6″ S, 71°39‧59.4″ W, altitude 2272 m) close to Arequipa. 3D maps of the layer surface were retrieved and compared with pseudo-relief intensity maps of the same region. The mean altitude of the emission barycenter is located at 86.3 km on July 26. Comparable relief wavy features appear in the 3D and intensity maps. It is shown that the vertical amplitude of the wave system varies as exp (Δz/2H) within the altitude range Δz = 83.5-88.0 km, H being the scale height. The oscillatory kinetic energy at the altitude of the OH layer is comprised between 3 × 10-4 and 5.4 × 10-4 J/m3, which is 2-3 times smaller than the values derived from partial radio wave at 52°N latitude.

  17. Encapsulation layer design and scalability in encapsulated vertical 3D RRAM.

    PubMed

    Yu, Muxi; Fang, Yichen; Wang, Zongwei; Chen, Gong; Pan, Yue; Yang, Xue; Yin, Minghui; Yang, Yuchao; Li, Ming; Cai, Yimao; Huang, Ru

    2016-05-20

    Here we propose a novel encapsulated vertical 3D RRAM structure with each resistive switching cell encapsulated by dielectric layers, contributing to both the reliability improvement of individual cells and thermal disturbance reduction of adjacent cells due to the effective suppression of unwanted oxygen vacancy diffusion. In contrast to the traditional vertical 3D RRAM, encapsulated bar-electrodes are adopted in the proposed structure substituting the previous plane-electrodes, thus encapsulated resistive switching cells can be naturally formed by simply oxidizing the tip of the metal bar-electrodes. In this work, TaO x -based 3D RRAM devices with SiO2 and Si3N4 as encapsulation layers are demonstrated, both showing significant advantages over traditional unencapsulated vertical 3D RRAM. Furthermore, it was found thermal conductivity and oxygen blocking ability are two key parameters of the encapsulation layer design influencing the scalability of vertical 3D RRAM. Experimental and simulation data show that oxygen blocking ability is more critical for encapsulation layers in the relatively large scale, while thermal conductivity becomes dominant as the stacking layers scale to the sub-10 nm regime. Finally, based on the notable impacts of the encapsulation layer on 3D RRAM scaling, an encapsulation material with both excellent oxygen blocking ability and high thermal conductivity such as AlN is suggested to be highly desirable to maximize the advantages of the proposed encapsulated structure. The findings in this work could pave the way for reliable ultrahigh-density storage applications in the big data era. PMID:27044065

  18. Encapsulation layer design and scalability in encapsulated vertical 3D RRAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Muxi; Fang, Yichen; Wang, Zongwei; Chen, Gong; Pan, Yue; Yang, Xue; Yin, Minghui; Yang, Yuchao; Li, Ming; Cai, Yimao; Huang, Ru

    2016-05-01

    Here we propose a novel encapsulated vertical 3D RRAM structure with each resistive switching cell encapsulated by dielectric layers, contributing to both the reliability improvement of individual cells and thermal disturbance reduction of adjacent cells due to the effective suppression of unwanted oxygen vacancy diffusion. In contrast to the traditional vertical 3D RRAM, encapsulated bar-electrodes are adopted in the proposed structure substituting the previous plane-electrodes, thus encapsulated resistive switching cells can be naturally formed by simply oxidizing the tip of the metal bar-electrodes. In this work, TaO x -based 3D RRAM devices with SiO2 and Si3N4 as encapsulation layers are demonstrated, both showing significant advantages over traditional unencapsulated vertical 3D RRAM. Furthermore, it was found thermal conductivity and oxygen blocking ability are two key parameters of the encapsulation layer design influencing the scalability of vertical 3D RRAM. Experimental and simulation data show that oxygen blocking ability is more critical for encapsulation layers in the relatively large scale, while thermal conductivity becomes dominant as the stacking layers scale to the sub-10 nm regime. Finally, based on the notable impacts of the encapsulation layer on 3D RRAM scaling, an encapsulation material with both excellent oxygen blocking ability and high thermal conductivity such as AlN is suggested to be highly desirable to maximize the advantages of the proposed encapsulated structure. The findings in this work could pave the way for reliable ultrahigh-density storage applications in the big data era.

  19. Microwave dielectric characterisation of 3D-printed BaTiO3/ABS polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Castles, F; Isakov, D; Lui, A; Lei, Q; Dancer, C E J; Wang, Y; Janurudin, J M; Speller, S C; Grovenor, C R M; Grant, P S

    2016-01-01

    3D printing is used extensively in product prototyping and continues to emerge as a viable option for the direct manufacture of final parts. It is known that dielectric materials with relatively high real permittivity-which are required in important technology sectors such as electronics and communications-may be 3D printed using a variety of techniques. Among these, the fused deposition of polymer composites is particularly straightforward but the range of dielectric permittivities available through commercial feedstock materials is limited. Here we report on the fabrication of a series of composites composed of various loadings of BaTiO3 microparticles in the polymer acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), which may be used with a commercial desktop 3D printer to produce printed parts containing user-defined regions with high permittivity. The microwave dielectric properties of printed parts with BaTiO3 loadings up to 70 wt% were characterised using a 15 GHz split post dielectric resonator and had real relative permittivities in the range 2.6-8.7 and loss tangents in the range 0.005-0.027. Permittivities were reproducible over the entire process, and matched those of bulk unprinted materials, to within ~1%, suggesting that the technique may be employed as a viable manufacturing process for dielectric composites. PMID:26940381

  20. Microwave dielectric characterisation of 3D-printed BaTiO3/ABS polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Castles, F; Isakov, D; Lui, A; Lei, Q; Dancer, C E J; Wang, Y; Janurudin, J M; Speller, S C; Grovenor, C R M; Grant, P S

    2016-03-04

    3D printing is used extensively in product prototyping and continues to emerge as a viable option for the direct manufacture of final parts. It is known that dielectric materials with relatively high real permittivity-which are required in important technology sectors such as electronics and communications-may be 3D printed using a variety of techniques. Among these, the fused deposition of polymer composites is particularly straightforward but the range of dielectric permittivities available through commercial feedstock materials is limited. Here we report on the fabrication of a series of composites composed of various loadings of BaTiO3 microparticles in the polymer acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), which may be used with a commercial desktop 3D printer to produce printed parts containing user-defined regions with high permittivity. The microwave dielectric properties of printed parts with BaTiO3 loadings up to 70 wt% were characterised using a 15 GHz split post dielectric resonator and had real relative permittivities in the range 2.6-8.7 and loss tangents in the range 0.005-0.027. Permittivities were reproducible over the entire process, and matched those of bulk unprinted materials, to within ~1%, suggesting that the technique may be employed as a viable manufacturing process for dielectric composites.

  1. Microwave dielectric characterisation of 3D-printed BaTiO3/ABS polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castles, F.; Isakov, D.; Lui, A.; Lei, Q.; Dancer, C. E. J.; Wang, Y.; Janurudin, J. M.; Speller, S. C.; Grovenor, C. R. M.; Grant, P. S.

    2016-03-01

    3D printing is used extensively in product prototyping and continues to emerge as a viable option for the direct manufacture of final parts. It is known that dielectric materials with relatively high real permittivity—which are required in important technology sectors such as electronics and communications—may be 3D printed using a variety of techniques. Among these, the fused deposition of polymer composites is particularly straightforward but the range of dielectric permittivities available through commercial feedstock materials is limited. Here we report on the fabrication of a series of composites composed of various loadings of BaTiO3 microparticles in the polymer acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), which may be used with a commercial desktop 3D printer to produce printed parts containing user-defined regions with high permittivity. The microwave dielectric properties of printed parts with BaTiO3 loadings up to 70 wt% were characterised using a 15 GHz split post dielectric resonator and had real relative permittivities in the range 2.6–8.7 and loss tangents in the range 0.005–0.027. Permittivities were reproducible over the entire process, and matched those of bulk unprinted materials, to within ~1%, suggesting that the technique may be employed as a viable manufacturing process for dielectric composites.

  2. Microwave dielectric characterisation of 3D-printed BaTiO3/ABS polymer composites

    PubMed Central

    Castles, F.; Isakov, D.; Lui, A.; Lei, Q.; Dancer, C. E. J.; Wang, Y.; Janurudin, J. M.; Speller, S. C.; Grovenor, C. R. M.; Grant, P. S.

    2016-01-01

    3D printing is used extensively in product prototyping and continues to emerge as a viable option for the direct manufacture of final parts. It is known that dielectric materials with relatively high real permittivity—which are required in important technology sectors such as electronics and communications—may be 3D printed using a variety of techniques. Among these, the fused deposition of polymer composites is particularly straightforward but the range of dielectric permittivities available through commercial feedstock materials is limited. Here we report on the fabrication of a series of composites composed of various loadings of BaTiO3 microparticles in the polymer acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), which may be used with a commercial desktop 3D printer to produce printed parts containing user-defined regions with high permittivity. The microwave dielectric properties of printed parts with BaTiO3 loadings up to 70 wt% were characterised using a 15 GHz split post dielectric resonator and had real relative permittivities in the range 2.6–8.7 and loss tangents in the range 0.005–0.027. Permittivities were reproducible over the entire process, and matched those of bulk unprinted materials, to within ~1%, suggesting that the technique may be employed as a viable manufacturing process for dielectric composites. PMID:26940381

  3. Solar cell with silicon oxynitride dielectric layer

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, Michael; Smith, David D

    2015-04-28

    Solar cells with silicon oxynitride dielectric layers and methods of forming silicon oxynitride dielectric layers for solar cell fabrication are described. For example, an emitter region of a solar cell includes a portion of a substrate having a back surface opposite a light receiving surface. A silicon oxynitride (SiO.sub.xN.sub.y, 0dielectric layer is disposed on the back surface of the portion of the substrate. A semiconductor layer is disposed on the silicon oxynitride dielectric layer.

  4. 3D Simulations for a Micron-Scale, Dielectric-Based Acceleration Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder, R. B.; Travish, G.; Xu Jin; Rosenzweig, J. B.

    2009-01-22

    An experimental program to demonstrate a dielectric, slab-symmetric accelerator structure has been underway for the past two years. These resonant devices are driven by a side-coupled 800-nm laser and can be configured to maintain the field profile necessary for synchronous acceleration and focusing of relativistic or nonrelativistic particles. We present 3D simulations of various versions of the structure geometry, including a metal-walled structure relevant to ongoing cold tests on resonant properties, and an all-dielectric structure to be constructed for a proof-of-principle acceleration experiment.

  5. 3D LDV Measurements in Oscillatory Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mier, J. M.; Garcia, M. H.

    2012-12-01

    The oscillatory boundary layer represents a particular case of unsteady wall-bounded flows in which fluid particles follow a periodic sinusoidal motion. Unlike steady boundary layer flows, the oscillatory flow regime and bed roughness character change in time along the period for every cycle, a characteristic that introduces a high degree of complexity in the analysis of these flows. Governing equations can be derived from the general Navier-Stokes equations for the motion of fluids, from which the exact solution for the laminar oscillatory boundary layer is obtained (also known as the 2nd Stokes problem). No exact solution exists for the turbulent case, thus, understanding of the main flow characteristics comes from experimental work. Several researchers have reported experimental work in oscillatory boundary layers since the 1960's; however, larger scale facilities and the development of newer measurement techniques with improved temporal and spatial resolution in recent years provides a unique opportunity to achieve a better understanding about this type of flows. Several experiments were performed in the Large Oscillatory Water and Sediment Tunnel (LOWST) facility at the Ven Te Chow Hydrosystems Laboratory, for a range of Reynolds wave numbers between 6x10^4 < Rew < 6x10^6 over a flat and smooth bottom. A 3D Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) system was used to measure instantaneous flow velocities with a temporal resolution up to ~ 1,000 Hz. It was mounted on a 3-axis traverse with a spatial resolution of 0.01 mm in all three directions. The closest point to the bottom was measured at z = 0.2 mm (z+ ≈ 4), which allowed to capture boundary layer features with great detail. In order to achieve true 3D measurements, 2 probes were used on a perpendicular configuration, such that u and w components were measured from a probe on the side of the flume and v component was measured from a probe pointing down through and access window on top of the flume. The top probe

  6. High thermal conductivity lossy dielectric using a multi layer configuration

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Kiggans, Jr., James O.

    2003-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for loss dielectrics. A loss dielectric includes at least one high dielectric loss layer and at least one high thermal conductivity-electrically insulating layer adjacent the at least one high dielectric loss layer. A method of manufacturing a loss dielectric includes providing at least one high dielectric loss layer and providing at least one high thermal conductivity-electrically insulating layer adjacent the at least one high dielectric loss layer. The systems and methods provide advantages because the loss dielectrics are less costly and more environmentally friendly than the available alternatives.

  7. 3D-Printed Broadband Dielectric Tube Terahertz Waveguide with Anti-Reflection Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Dominik Walter; Leonhardt, Rainer

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate broadband, low loss, and close-to-zero dispersion guidance of terahertz (THz) radiation in a dielectric tube with an anti-reflection structure (AR-tube waveguide) in the frequency range from 0.2 to 1.0 THz. The anti-reflection structure (ARS) consists of close-packed cones in a hexagonal lattice arranged on the outer surface of the tube cladding. The feature size of the ARS is in the order of the wavelength between 0.2 and 1.0 THz. The waveguides are fabricated with the versatile and cost efficient 3D-printing method. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) measurements as well as 3D finite-difference time-domain simulations (FDTD) are performed to extensively characterize the AR-tube waveguides. Spectrograms, attenuation spectra, effective phase refractive indices, and the group-velocity dispersion parameters β 2 of the AR-tube waveguides are presented. Both the experimental and numerical results confirm the extended bandwidth and smaller group-velocity dispersion of the AR-tube waveguide compared to a low loss plain dielectric tube THz waveguide. The AR-tube waveguide prototypes show an attenuation spectrum close to the theoretical limit given by the infinite cladding tube waveguide.

  8. 3D-Printed Broadband Dielectric Tube Terahertz Waveguide with Anti-Reflection Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Dominik Walter; Leonhardt, Rainer

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate broadband, low loss, and close-to-zero dispersion guidance of terahertz (THz) radiation in a dielectric tube with an anti-reflection structure (AR-tube waveguide) in the frequency range from 0.2 to 1.0 THz. The anti-reflection structure (ARS) consists of close-packed cones in a hexagonal lattice arranged on the outer surface of the tube cladding. The feature size of the ARS is in the order of the wavelength between 0.2 and 1.0 THz. The waveguides are fabricated with the versatile and cost efficient 3D-printing method. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) measurements as well as 3D finite-difference time-domain simulations (FDTD) are performed to extensively characterize the AR-tube waveguides. Spectrograms, attenuation spectra, effective phase refractive indices, and the group-velocity dispersion parameters β 2 of the AR-tube waveguides are presented. Both the experimental and numerical results confirm the extended bandwidth and smaller group-velocity dispersion of the AR-tube waveguide compared to a low loss plain dielectric tube THz waveguide. The AR-tube waveguide prototypes show an attenuation spectrum close to the theoretical limit given by the infinite cladding tube waveguide.

  9. Analysis of hybrid dielectric-plasmonic slot waveguide structures with 3D Fourier Modal Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ctyroky, J.; Kwiecien, P.; Richter, I.

    2013-03-01

    Recently, plasmonic waveguides have been intensively studied as promising basic building blocks for the construction of extremely compact photonic devices with subwavelength characteristic dimensions. A number of different types of plasmonic waveguide structures have been recently proposed, theoretically analyzed, and their properties experimentally verified. The fundamental trade-off in the design of plasmonic waveguides for potential application in information technologies lies in the contradiction between their mode field confinement and propagation loss: the higher confinement, the higher loss, and vice versa. Various definitions of figures of merit of plasmonic waveguides have been also introduced for the characterization of their properties with a single quantity. In this contribution, we theoretically analyze one specific type of a plasmonic waveguide - the hybrid dielectric-loaded plasmonic waveguide, or - as we call it in this paper - the hybrid dielectric-plasmonic slot waveguide, which exhibits very strong field confinement combined with acceptable losses allowing their application in some integrated plasmonic devices. In contrast to the structures analyzed previously, our structure makes use of a single low-index dielectric only. We first define the effective area of this waveguide type, and using waveguide parameters close to the optimum we analyze several waveguide devices as directional couplers, multimode interference couplers (MMI), and the Mach-Zehnder interferometer based on the MMI couplers. For the full-vector 3D analysis of these structures, we use modelling tools developed in-house on the basis of the Fourier Modal Method (FMM). Our results thus serve to a dual purpose: they confirm that (i) these structures represent promising building blocks of plasmonic devices, and (ii) our FMM codes are capable of efficient 3D vector modelling of plasmonic waveguide devices.

  10. Layer-by-layer assembly of 3D tissue constructs with functionalized graphene

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Su Ryon; Aghaei-Ghareh-Bolagh, Behnaz; Gao, Xiguang; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Jung, Sung Mi; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza; Kim, Sang Bok; Kim, Sun Min; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Tang, Xiaowu (Shirley); Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials have been considered as promising candidates to mimic certain structure and function of native extracellular matrix materials for tissue engineering. Significant progress has been made in fabricating carbon nanoparticle-incorporated cell culture substrates, but limited studies have been reported on the development of three-dimensional (3D) tissue constructs using these nanomaterials. Here, we present a novel approach to engineer 3D multi-layered constructs using layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of cells separated with self-assembled graphene oxide (GO)-based thin films. The GO-based structures are shown to serve as cell adhesive sheets that effectively facilitate the formation of multi-layer cell constructs with interlayer connectivity. By controlling the amount of GO deposited in forming the thin films, the thickness of the multi-layer tissue constructs could be tuned with high cell viability. Specifically, this approach could be useful for creating dense and tightly connected cardiac tissues through the co-culture of cardiomyocytes and other cell types. In this work, we demonstrated the fabrication of stand-alone multi-layer cardiac tissues with strong spontaneous beating behavior and programmable pumping properties. Therefore, this LbL-based cell construct fabrication approach, utilizing GO thin films formed directly on cell surfaces, has great potential in engineering 3D tissue structures with improved organization, electrophysiological function, and mechanical integrity. PMID:25419209

  11. Aerosol based direct-write micro-additive fabrication method for sub-mm 3D metal-dielectric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Taibur; Renaud, Luke; Heo, Deuk; Renn, Michael; Panat, Rahul

    2015-10-01

    The fabrication of 3D metal-dielectric structures at sub-mm length scale is highly important in order to realize low-loss passives and GHz wavelength antennas with applications in wearable and Internet-of-Things (IoT) devices. The inherent 2D nature of lithographic processes severely limits the available manufacturing routes to fabricate 3D structures. Further, the lithographic processes are subtractive and require the use of environmentally harmful chemicals. In this letter, we demonstrate an additive manufacturing method to fabricate 3D metal-dielectric structures at sub-mm length scale. A UV curable dielectric is dispensed from an Aerosol Jet system at 10-100 µm length scale and instantaneously cured to build complex 3D shapes at a length scale  <1 mm. A metal nanoparticle ink is then dispensed over the 3D dielectric using a combination of jetting action and tilted dispense head, also using the Aerosol Jet technique and at a length scale 10-100 µm, followed by the nanoparticle sintering. Simulation studies are carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of using such structures as mm-wave antennas. The manufacturing method described in this letter opens up the possibility of fabricating an entirely new class of custom-shaped 3D structures at a sub-mm length scale with potential applications in 3D antennas and passives.

  12. 3D nanopore shape control by current-stimulus dielectric breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Cuifeng; Zhang, Yuechuan; Feng, Yanxiao; Zhou, Daming; Wang, Deqiang; Xiang, Yinxiao; Zhou, Wenyuan; Chen, Yongsheng; Du, Chunlei; Tian, Jianguo

    2016-08-01

    We propose a simple and cost-effect method, current-stimulus dielectric breakdown, to manipulate the 3D shapes of the nanochannels in 20-nm-thick SiNx membranes. Besides the precise control of nanopore size, the cone orientation can be determined by the pulse polarity. The cone angle of nanopores can be systematically tuned by simply changing the stimulus pulse waveform, allowing the gradual shape control from conical to obconical. After they are formed, the cone angle of these nanopores can be further tuned in a certain range by adjusting the widening pulse. Such size and 3D shape controllable abiotic nanopores can construct a constriction in the nanochannel and hence produce a sub-nm "sensing zone" to suit any desired bio-sensing or precise DNA sequencing. Using these conical nanopores, 20-nt ssDNA composed of homopolymers (poly(dA)20, poly(dC)20, and poly(dT)20) can be clearly differentiated by their ionic current signals.

  13. Multi-layered nanocomposite dielectrics for high density organic memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Moonyeong; Chung, Kyungwha; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Kim, Dong Ha; Kim, Choongik

    2015-01-01

    We fabricated organic memory devices with metal-pentacene-insulator-silicon structure which contain double dielectric layers comprising 3D pattern of Au nanoparticles (Au NPs) and block copolymer (PS-b-P2VP). The role of Au NPs is to charge/discharge carriers upon applied voltage, while block copolymer helps to form highly ordered Au NP patterns in the dielectric layer. Double-layered nanocomposite dielectrics enhanced the charge trap density (i.e., trapped charge per unit area) by Au NPs, resulting in increase of the memory window (ΔVth).

  14. Characterization, fabrication, and analysis of soft dielectric elastomer actuators capable of complex 3D deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, William

    Inspired by nature, the development of soft actuators has drawn large attention to provide higher flexibility and allow adaptation to more complex environment. This thesis is focused on utilizing electroactive polymers as active materials to develop soft planar dielectric elastomer actuators capable of complex 3D deformation. The potential applications of such soft actuators are in flexible robotic arms and grippers, morphing structures and flapping wings for micro aerial vehicles. The embraces design for a freestanding actuator utilizes the constrained deformation imposed by surface stiffeners on an electroactive membrane to avert the requirement of membrane pre-stretch and the supporting frames. The proposed design increases the overall actuator flexibility and degrees-of-freedom. Actuator design, fabrication, and performance are presented for different arrangement of stiffeners. Digital images correlation technique were utilized to evaluate the in-plane finite strain components, in order to elucidate the role of the stiffeners in controlling the three dimensional deformation. It was found that a key controlling factor was the localized deformation near the stiffeners, while the rest of the membrane would follow through. A detailed finite element modeling framework was developed with a user-material subroutine, built into the ABAQUS commercial finite element package. An experimentally calibrated Neo-Hookean based material model that coupled the applied electrical field to the actuator mechanical deformation was employed. The numerical model was used to optimize different geometrical features, electrode layup and stacking sequence of actuators. It was found that by splitting the stiffeners into finer segments, the force-stroke characteristics of actuator were able to be adjusted with stiffener configuration, while keeping the overall bending stiffness. The efficacy of actuators could also be greatly improved by increasing the stiffener periodicity. The developed

  15. 2D and 3D multipactor modeling in dielectric-loaded accelerator structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyn, Oleksandr; Nusinovich, Gregory; Antonsen, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    Multipactor (MP) is known as the avalanche growth of the number of secondary electrons emitted from a solid surface exposed to an RF electric field under vacuum conditions. MP is a severe problem in modern rf systems and, therefore, theoretical and experimental studies of MP are of great interest to the researchers working in various areas of physics and engineering. In this work we present results of MP studies in dielectric-loaded accelerator (DLA) structures. First, we show simulation results obtained with the use of the 2D self-consistent MP model (O. V. Sinitsyn, et. al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 16, 073102 (2009)) and compare those to experimental ones obtained during recent extensive studies of DLA structures performed by Argonne National Laboratory, Naval Research Laboratory, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Euclid TechLabs (C. Jing, et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., vol. 38, pp. 1354-1360 (2010)). Then we present some new results of 3D analysis of MP which include studies of particle trajectories and studies of MP development at the early stage.

  16. 3D dependence of the dielectric dispersion in a BaTiO3 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novik, V. K.; Lotonov, A. M.; Gavrilova, N. D.

    2013-08-01

    The 3D dependences ɛ'(log f, T) and tanδ(log f, T) of a perfect BaTiO3 single crystal grown by the Remeika method have been studied in the ranges f = 1-2 × 107 Hz and T = -80-130°C. These dependences characterize a transition from the paraelectric phase (121.5°C) as a near-antiferroelectric transition followed by the transition to the tetragonal phase at ˜79.5°C. According to a number of signs, the range 121.5-79.5°C corresponds to a metastable phase typical of first-order phase transitions. The unexpected result of this work has been discussed with invoking the hypothesis on the BaTiO3 structure in the paraelectric phase, according to which it consists of three antiferroelectric states oriented along the crystallographic axes. Using the dielectric properties of BaTiO3 as an example, the method of direct correct determination of the temperatures of the structural transformations from the anomaly of tanδ(log f, T) has also been demonstrated.

  17. Template-Free 3D Microprinting of Metals Using a Force-Controlled Nanopipette for Layer-by-Layer Electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Hirt, Luca; Ihle, Stephan; Pan, Zhijian; Dorwling-Carter, Livie; Reiser, Alain; Wheeler, Jeffrey M; Spolenak, Ralph; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-03-23

    A novel 3D printing method for voxel-by-voxel metal printing is presented. Hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers are used to locally supply metal ions in an electrochemical cell, enabling a localized electroplating reaction. By exploiting the deflection feedback of these probes, electrochemical 3D metal printing is, for the first time, demonstrated in a layer-by-layer fashion, enabling the fabrication of arbitrary-shaped geometries.

  18. Template-Free 3D Microprinting of Metals Using a Force-Controlled Nanopipette for Layer-by-Layer Electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Hirt, Luca; Ihle, Stephan; Pan, Zhijian; Dorwling-Carter, Livie; Reiser, Alain; Wheeler, Jeffrey M; Spolenak, Ralph; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-03-23

    A novel 3D printing method for voxel-by-voxel metal printing is presented. Hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers are used to locally supply metal ions in an electrochemical cell, enabling a localized electroplating reaction. By exploiting the deflection feedback of these probes, electrochemical 3D metal printing is, for the first time, demonstrated in a layer-by-layer fashion, enabling the fabrication of arbitrary-shaped geometries. PMID:26783090

  19. Height-dependent transition from 3-D to 2-D turbulence in the hurricane boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, David; Zhang, Jun A.

    2013-04-01

    Here we show, from in situ aircraft measurements in the hurricane boundary layer, a height-dependent transition of the flow from 3-D to 2-D turbulence. This marks a fundamental change in the energy dynamics of the hurricane boundary layer due to the fact that in 3-D, energy flows downscale from larger to smaller scales, whereas in 2-D, it flows upscale, from smaller to larger scales. These results represent the first measurement of the 2-D upscale energy flux in the atmosphere and also the first to characterize the transition from 3-D to 2-D. It is shown that the large-scale parent vortex may gain energy directly from small scales in tropical cyclones.

  20. A 3D insight on the catalytic nanostructuration of few-layer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Melinte, G.; Florea, I.; Moldovan, S.; Janowska, I.; Baaziz, W.; Arenal, R.; Wisnet, A.; Scheu, C.; Begin-Colin, S.; Begin, D.; Pham-Huu, C.; Ersen, O.

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic cutting of few-layer graphene is nowadays a hot topic in materials research due to its potential applications in the catalysis field and the graphene nanoribbons fabrication. We show here a 3D analysis of the nanostructuration of few-layer graphene by iron-based nanoparticles under hydrogen flow. The nanoparticles located at the edges or attached to the steps on the FLG sheets create trenches and tunnels with orientations, lengths and morphologies defined by the crystallography and the topography of the carbon substrate. The cross-sectional analysis of the 3D volumes highlights the role of the active nanoparticle identity on the trench size and shape, with emphasis on the topographical stability of the basal planes within the resulting trenches and channels, no matter the obstacle encountered. The actual study gives a deep insight on the impact of nanoparticles morphology and support topography on the 3D character of nanostructures built up by catalytic cutting. PMID:24916201

  1. Effect of thin gate dielectrics and gate materials on simulated device characteristics of 3D double gate JNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidya, A.; Krishnan, V.; Baishya, S.; Lenka, T. R.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a novel Silicon based three dimensional (3D) double-gate Junctionless Nanowire Transistor (JNT) of 20 nm gate length is proposed. The device characteristics such as gate characteristics and drain characteristics are studied with the help of Sentaurus TCAD by using different gate materials such as Al, Ti, n+ Polysilicon, Au and using different ultra thin gate dielectrics such as SiO2, Si3N4 and HfO2. The effect of various work functions and dielectrics on the threshold voltage of the JNT is also analysed. From the TCAD simulation results it is observed that high-K material (HfO2) as gate dielectric shows better drain characteristics with respect to others. The JNT with Al as gate material gives better current characteristics with respect to others. It is also analysed that under flat-band condition the driving of drain current does not directly depend on the gate-oxide capacitance but depends upon the channel doping concentrations. Thus by choosing the proper gate material and gate dielectric combinations, the desired device characteristics could be obtained for JNT.

  2. A Dielectric-Filled Waveguide Antenna Element for 3D Imaging Radar in High Temperature and Excessive Dust Conditions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ding; Li, Zhiping; Chen, Xianzhong; Wang, Zhengpeng; Wu, Jianhua

    2016-08-22

    Three-dimensional information of the burden surface in high temperature and excessive dust industrial conditions has been previously hard to obtain. This paper presents a novel microstrip-fed dielectric-filled waveguide antenna element which is resistant to dust and high temperatures. A novel microstrip-to-dielectric-loaded waveguide transition was developed. A cylinder and cuboid composite structure was employed at the terminal of the antenna element, which improved the return loss performance and reduced the size. The proposed antenna element was easily integrated into a T-shape multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) imaging radar system and tested in both the laboratory environment and real blast furnace environment. The measurement results show that the proposed antenna element works very well in industrial 3D imaging radar.

  3. A Dielectric-Filled Waveguide Antenna Element for 3D Imaging Radar in High Temperature and Excessive Dust Conditions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ding; Li, Zhiping; Chen, Xianzhong; Wang, Zhengpeng; Wu, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional information of the burden surface in high temperature and excessive dust industrial conditions has been previously hard to obtain. This paper presents a novel microstrip-fed dielectric-filled waveguide antenna element which is resistant to dust and high temperatures. A novel microstrip-to-dielectric-loaded waveguide transition was developed. A cylinder and cuboid composite structure was employed at the terminal of the antenna element, which improved the return loss performance and reduced the size. The proposed antenna element was easily integrated into a T-shape multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) imaging radar system and tested in both the laboratory environment and real blast furnace environment. The measurement results show that the proposed antenna element works very well in industrial 3D imaging radar. PMID:27556469

  4. A Dielectric-Filled Waveguide Antenna Element for 3D Imaging Radar in High Temperature and Excessive Dust Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ding; Li, Zhiping; Chen, Xianzhong; Wang, Zhengpeng; Wu, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional information of the burden surface in high temperature and excessive dust industrial conditions has been previously hard to obtain. This paper presents a novel microstrip-fed dielectric-filled waveguide antenna element which is resistant to dust and high temperatures. A novel microstrip-to-dielectric-loaded waveguide transition was developed. A cylinder and cuboid composite structure was employed at the terminal of the antenna element, which improved the return loss performance and reduced the size. The proposed antenna element was easily integrated into a T-shape multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) imaging radar system and tested in both the laboratory environment and real blast furnace environment. The measurement results show that the proposed antenna element works very well in industrial 3D imaging radar. PMID:27556469

  5. Patterning process exploration of metal 1 layer in 7nm node with 3D patterning flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Weimin; Ciofi, Ivan; Saad, Yves; Matagne, Philippe; Bachmann, Michael; Oulmane, Mohamed; Gillijns, Werner; Lucas, Kevin; Demmerle, Wolfgang; Schmoeller, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    In 7mn node (N7), the logic design requires the critical poly pitch (CPP) of 42-45nm and metal 1 (M1) pitch of 28- 32nm. Such high pattern density pushes the 193 immersion lithography solution toward its limit and also brings extremely complex patterning scenarios. The N7 M1 layer may require a self-aligned quadruple patterning (SAQP) with triple litho-etch (LE3) block process. Therefore, the whole patterning process flow requires multiple exposure+etch+deposition processes and each step introduces a particular impact on the pattern profiles and the topography. In this study, we have successfully integrated a simulation tool that enables emulation of the whole patterning flow with realistic process-dependent 3D profile and topology. We use this tool to study the patterning process variations of N7 M1 layer including the overlay control, the critical dimension uniformity (CDU) budget and the lithographic process window (PW). The resulting 3D pattern structure can be used to optimize the process flow, verify design rules, extract parasitics, and most importantly, simulate the electric field and identify hot spots for dielectric reliability. As an example application, we will report extractions of maximum electric field at M1 tipto- tip which is one of the most critical patterning locations and we will demonstrate the potential of this approach for investigating the impact of process variations on dielectric reliability. We will also present simulations of an alternative M1 patterning flow, with a single exposure block using extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) and analyze its advantages compared to the LE3 block approach.

  6. Understanding and Improving the Quality of Inter-Layer Interfaces in FDM 3-D Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duranty, Edward; Spradlin, Brandon; Stark, Madeline; Dadmun, Mark

    We have studied the effect of thermal history and material diffusion on inter-filament bonding in FDM 3D printed parts and developed methods to improve interlayer adhesion in 3D printed samples. The available thermal energy during the FDM print environment was determined quantitatively by tracking the temperature of the bottom most printed layer using a thermocouple attached to the print bed. The role of the thermal history of the filaments during the deposition process on the quality of inter-layer bonding in an FDM ABS part was monitored using a T-peel test and an innovative sample design. Additionally, the interfacial adhesion between 3D printed layers was improved by the addition of a chemical cross-linking agent 4,4 '-diaminodiphenylmethane (DADPM). These studies have increased our understanding of the importance of the complex thermal history of a filament in the 3D printing process and its impact on the interfaces that form during the fused deposition modeling print process. Furthermore, the chemical crosslinking process demonstrates a potential method to covalently link layers in FDM printed parts, improving the bulk strength of the part. The insight provided in this work may aid in the development of techniques that can produce FDM parts that could be used as replacement parts in structural applications, or as completely standalone products.

  7. Finite Element Code For 3D-Hydraulic Fracture Propagation Equations (3-layer).

    1992-03-24

    HYFRACP3D is a finite element program for simulation of a pseudo three-dimensional fracture geometries with a two-dimensional planar solution. The model predicts the height, width and winglength over time for a hydraulic fracture propagating in a three-layered system of rocks with variable rock mechanics properties.

  8. Fabrication of a Layered Microstructured Polycaprolactone Construct for 3-D Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Sumona; Isenberg, Brett C.; Hodis, Eran; Leach, Jennie B.; Desai, Tejal A.; Wong, Joyce Y.

    2009-01-01

    Successful artificial tissue scaffolds support regeneration by promoting cellular organization as well as appropriate mechanical and biological functionality. We have previously shown in vitro that 2-D substrates with micron-scale grooves (5 μm deep, 18 μm wide, with 12 μm spacing) can induce cell orientation and ECM alignment. Here, we have transferred this microtopography onto biodegradable polycaprolactone (PCL) thin films. We further developed a technique to layer these cellularized microtextured scaffolds into a 3-D tissue construct. A surface modification technique was used to attach photoreactive acrylate groups on the PCL scaffold surface onto which polyethylene glycol (PEG-DA) -diacrylate gel could be photopolymerized. PEG-DA serves as an adhesive layer between PCL scaffolds, resulting in a VSMC-seeded layered 3-D composite structure that is highly organized and structurally stable. The PCL surface modification chemistry was confirmed via XPS, and the maintenance of cell number and orientation on the modified PCL scaffolds was demonstrated using colorometric and imaging techniques. Cell number and orientation were also investigated after cells were cultured in the layered 3-D configuration. Such 3-D tissue mimics fabricated with precise cellular organization will enable the systematic testing of the effects of cellular orientation on the functional and mechanical properties of tissue engineered blood vessels. PMID:18854127

  9. Monitoring adipose-derived stem cells within 3D carrier by combined dielectric spectroscopy and spectral domain optical coherence topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnaninchi, P. O.

    2010-02-01

    Monitoring non-invasively the cellular events in three dimensional carriers is a major challenge for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine that prevents time-lapsed studies over large population of sample. The potential of optical coherence tomography has been demonstrated to assess tissue formation within porous matrices. In this study we explore the combination of dielectric spectroscopy (DS) and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) to quality assess ADSCs loaded in three dimensional carriers. A SDOCT (930nm, FWHM 90nm) was combined to an open ended coaxial probe connected to material analyser, and broadband measurements between 20MHz and 1GHz were synchronized with Labview. Both ADSCs maintained in undifferentiated state within 3D carrier and induced towards osteoblasts were monitored with this multimodality technique and their DS spectra were acquired at high cell concentration simultaneously to 3D imaging. This multimodality technique will be instrumental to assess non-invasively cell loaded carriers for cell therapy.

  10. Effect of density gradients in confined supersonic shear layers. Part 2: 3-D modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peroomian, Oshin; Kelly, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of basic flow density gradients on the supersonic wall modes were investigated in Part 1 of this analysis. In that investigation only the 2-D modes were studied. Tam and Hu investigated the 3-D modes in a confined vortex sheet and reported that the first 2-D Class A mode (A01) had the highest growth rate compared to all other 2-D and 3-D modes present in the vortex sheet for that particular set of flow patterns. They also showed that this result also held true for finite thickness shear layers with delta(sub w) less than 0.125. For free shear layers, Sandham and Reynolds showed that the 3-D K-H mode became the dominant mode for M(sub c) greater than 0.6. Jackson and Grosch investigated the effect of crossflow and obliqueness on the slow and fast odes present in a M(sub c) greater than 1 environment and showed that for certain combination of crossflow and wave angles the growth rates could be increased by up to a factor of 2 with respect to the 2-D case. The case studied here is a confined shear layer shown in Part 1. All solution procedures and basic low profiles are the same as in Part 1. The effect of density gradients on the 3-D modes present in the density ratios considered in Part 1 are investigated.

  11. CFL3D Contribution to the AIAA Supersonic Shock Boundary Layer Interaction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper documents the CFL3D contribution to the AIAA Supersonic Shock Boundary Layer Interaction Workshop, held in Orlando, Florida in January 2010. CFL3D is a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code. Four shock boundary layer interaction cases are computed using a one-equation turbulence model widely used for other aerodynamic problems of interest. Two of the cases have experimental data available at the workshop, and two of the cases do not. The effect of grid, flux scheme, and thin-layer approximation are investigated. Comparisons are made to the available experimental data. All four cases exhibit strong three-dimensional behavior in and near the interaction regions, resulting from influences of the tunnel side-walls.

  12. Proton exchange membrane micro fuel cells on 3D porous silicon gas diffusion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouassi, S.; Gautier, G.; Thery, J.; Desplobain, S.; Borella, M.; Ventura, L.; Laurent, J.-Y.

    2012-10-01

    Since the 90's, porous silicon has been studied and implemented in many devices, especially in MEMS technology. In this article, we present a new approach to build miniaturized proton exchange membrane micro-fuel cells using porous silicon as a hydrogen diffusion layer. In particular, we propose an innovative process to build micro fuel cells from a “corrugated iron like” 3D structured porous silicon substrates. This structure is able to increase up to 40% the cell area keeping a constant footprint on the silicon wafer. We propose here a process route to perform electrochemically 3D porous gas diffusion layers and to deposit fuel cell active layers on such substrates. The prototype peak power performance was measured to be 90 mW cm-2 in a “breathing configuration” at room temperature. These performances are less than expected if we compare with a reference 2D micro fuel cell. Actually, the active layer deposition processes are not fully optimized but this prototype demonstrates the feasibility of these 3D devices.

  13. Engineering multi-layered skeletal muscle tissue by using 3D microgrooved collagen scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shangwu; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2015-12-01

    Preparation of three-dimensional (3D) micropatterned porous scaffolds remains a great challenge for engineering of highly organized tissues such as skeletal muscle tissue and cardiac tissue. Two-dimensional (2D) micropatterned surfaces with periodic features (several nanometers to less than 100 μm) are commonly used to guide the alignment of muscle myoblasts and myotubes and lead to formation of pre-patterned cell sheets. However, cell sheets from 2D patterned surfaces have limited thickness, and harvesting the cell sheets for implantation is inconvenient and can lead to less alignment of myotubes. 3D micropatterned scaffolds can promote cell alignment and muscle tissue formation. In this study, we developed a novel type of 3D porous collagen scaffolds with concave microgrooves that mimic muscle basement membrane to engineer skeletal muscle tissue. Highly aligned and multi-layered muscle bundle tissues were engineered by controlling the size of microgrooves and cell seeding concentration. Myoblasts in the engineered muscle tissue were well-aligned and had high expression of myosin heavy chain and synthesis of muscle extracellular matrix. The microgrooved collagen scaffolds could be used to engineer organized multi-layered muscle tissue for implantation to repair/restore the function of diseased tissues or be used to investigate the cell-cell interaction in 3D microscale topography.

  14. 3D outflow jets originating from turbulence in the reconnection current layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Keizo

    2016-07-01

    Satellite observations in the Earth's magnetosphere and in solar flares have suggested that the reconnection outflow jets are fully three dimensional, consisting of a series of narrow channels. The jet structure is important in evaluating the energy and flux transport in the reconnection process. Previous theoretical models based on fluid simulations have relied on patchy reconnection where reconnection takes place predominantly in patchy portions of the current layer. The problem of the previous models is that the gross reconnection rate is much smaller than that in the 2D reconnection case. The present study shows a large-scale 3D PIC simulation revealing that the 3D outflow jets are generated through the 3D flux ropes formed in the turbulent electron current layer around the x-line. Reconnection proceeds almost uniformly along the x-line, so that the gross reconnection rate is comparable to that in the 2D reconnection case. The flux ropes and resultant outflow channels have a typical current-aligned scale provided by the wavelength of an electron shear mode that is much larger than the typical kinetic scales. It is found that the structure of the 3D outflow jets obtained in the simulation is consistent with the bursty bulk flow observed in the Earth's magnetotail.

  15. 3D multi-layered fibrous cellulose structure using an electrohydrodynamic process for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minseong; Kim, GeunHyung

    2015-11-01

    Micro/nanofibrous structures have been applied widely in various tissue-engineering applications because the topological structures are similar to the extracellular matrix (ECM), which encourages a high degree of cell adhesion and growth. However, it has been difficult to produce a three-dimensional (3D) fibrous structure using controllable macro-pores. Recently, cellulose has been considered a high-potential natural-origin biomaterial, but its use in 3D biomedical structures has been limited due to its narrow processing window. Here, we suggest a new 3D cellulose scaffold consisting of multi-layered struts made of submicron-sized entangled fibers that were fabricated using an electrohydrodynamic direct jet (EHDJ) process that is spin-printing. By optimizing processing conditions (electric field strength, cellulose feeding rate, and distance between nozzle and target), we can achieve a multi-layered cellulose structure consisting of the cylindrically entangled cellulose fibers. To compare the properties of the fabricated 3D cellulose structure, we used a PCL fibrous scaffold, which has a similar fibrous morphology and pore geometry, as a control. The physical and in vitro biocompatibilities of both fibrous scaffolds were assessed using human dermal fibroblasts, and the cellulose structure showed higher cell adhesion and metabolic activities compared with the control. These results suggest the EHDJ process to be an effective fabricating tool for tissue engineering and the cellulose scaffold has high potential as a tissue regenerative material.

  16. 3D printed broadband transformation optics based all-dielectric microwave lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Jianjia; Nawaz Burokur, Shah; Piau, Gérard-Pascal; de Lustrac, André

    2016-04-01

    Quasi-conformal transformation optics is applied to design electromagnetic devices for focusing and collimating applications at microwave frequencies. Two devices are studied and conceived by solving Laplace’s equation that describes the deformation of a medium in a space transformation. As validation examples, material parameters of two different lenses are derived from the analytical solutions of Laplace’s equation. The first lens is applied to produce an overall directive in-phase emission from an array of sources conformed on a cylindrical structure. The second lens allows deflecting a directive beam to an off-normal direction. Full-wave simulations are performed to verify the functionality of the calculated lenses. Prototypes presenting a graded refractive index are fabricated through three-dimensional polyjet printing using solely dielectric materials. Experimental measurements carried out show very good agreement with numerical simulations, thereby validating the proposed lenses. Such easily realizable designs open the way to low-cost all-dielectric microwave lenses for beam forming and collimation.

  17. A simple method for fabricating multi-layer PDMS structures for 3D microfluidic chips.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengying; Wu, Jinbo; Wang, Limu; Xiao, Kang; Wen, Weijia

    2010-05-01

    We report a simple methodology to fabricate PDMS multi-layer microfluidic chips. A PDMS slab was surface-treated by trichloro (1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyl) silane, and acts as a reusable transferring layer. Uniformity of the thickness of the patterned PDMS layer and the well-alignment could be achieved due to the transparency and proper flexibility of this transferring layer. Surface treatment results are confirmed by XPS and contact angle testing, while bonding forces between different layers were measured for better understanding of the transferring process. We have also designed and fabricated a few simple types of 3D PDMS chip, especially one consisting of 6 thin layers (each with thickness of 50 mum), to demonstrate the potential utilization of this technique. 3D fluorescence images were taken by a confocal microscope to illustrate the spatial characters of essential parts. This fabrication method is confirmed to be fast, simple, repeatable, low cost and possible to be mechanized for mass production.

  18. The 3-D Navier-Stokes analysis of crossing, glancing shocks/turbulent boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, D. R.

    1991-01-01

    Three dimensional viscous flow analysis is performed for a configuration where two crossing and glancing shocks interact with a turbulent boundary layer. A time marching 3-D full Navier-Stokes code, called PARC3D, is used to compute the flow field, and the solution is compared to the experimental data obtained at the NASA Lewis Research Center's 1 x 1 ft supersonic wind tunnel facility. The study is carried out as part of the continuing code assessment program in support of the generic hypersonic research at NASA Lewis. Detailed comparisons of static pressure fields and oil flow patterns are made with the corresponding solution on the wall containing the shock/boundary layer interaction in an effort to validate the code for hypersonic inlet applications.

  19. 3-D Navier-Stokes analysis of crossing, glancing shocks/turbulent boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, D. R.

    1991-01-01

    Three dimensional viscous flow analysis is performed for a configuration where two crossing and glancing shocks interact with a turbulent boundary layer. A time marching 3-D full Navier-Stokes code, called PARC3D, is used to compute the flow field, and the solution is compared to the experimental data obtained at the NASA Lewis Research Center's 1 x 1 ft supersonic wind tunnel facility. The study is carried out as part of the continuing code assessment program in support of the generic hypersonic research at NASA Lewis. Detailed comparisons of static pressure fields and oil flow patterns are made with the corresponding solution on the wall containing the shock/boundary layer interaction in an effort to validate the code for hypersonic inlet applications.

  20. 3D printing of layered brain-like structures using peptide modified gellan gum substrates.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Rodrigo; Stevens, Leo; Thompson, Brianna C; Gilmore, Kerry J; Gorkin, Robert; Stewart, Elise M; in het Panhuis, Marc; Romero-Ortega, Mario; Wallace, Gordon G

    2015-10-01

    The brain is an enormously complex organ structured into various regions of layered tissue. Researchers have attempted to study the brain by modeling the architecture using two dimensional (2D) in vitro cell culturing methods. While those platforms attempt to mimic the in vivo environment, they do not truly resemble the three dimensional (3D) microstructure of neuronal tissues. Development of an accurate in vitro model of the brain remains a significant obstacle to our understanding of the functioning of the brain at the tissue or organ level. To address these obstacles, we demonstrate a new method to bioprint 3D brain-like structures consisting of discrete layers of primary neural cells encapsulated in hydrogels. Brain-like structures were constructed using a bio-ink consisting of a novel peptide-modified biopolymer, gellan gum-RGD (RGD-GG), combined with primary cortical neurons. The ink was optimized for a modified reactive printing process and developed for use in traditional cell culturing facilities without the need for extensive bioprinting equipment. Furthermore the peptide modification of the gellan gum hydrogel was found to have a profound positive effect on primary cell proliferation and network formation. The neural cell viability combined with the support of neural network formation demonstrated the cell supportive nature of the matrix. The facile ability to form discrete cell-containing layers validates the application of this novel printing technique to form complex, layered and viable 3D cell structures. These brain-like structures offer the opportunity to reproduce more accurate 3D in vitro microstructures with applications ranging from cell behavior studies to improving our understanding of brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26231917

  1. 3D printing of layered brain-like structures using peptide modified gellan gum substrates.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Rodrigo; Stevens, Leo; Thompson, Brianna C; Gilmore, Kerry J; Gorkin, Robert; Stewart, Elise M; in het Panhuis, Marc; Romero-Ortega, Mario; Wallace, Gordon G

    2015-10-01

    The brain is an enormously complex organ structured into various regions of layered tissue. Researchers have attempted to study the brain by modeling the architecture using two dimensional (2D) in vitro cell culturing methods. While those platforms attempt to mimic the in vivo environment, they do not truly resemble the three dimensional (3D) microstructure of neuronal tissues. Development of an accurate in vitro model of the brain remains a significant obstacle to our understanding of the functioning of the brain at the tissue or organ level. To address these obstacles, we demonstrate a new method to bioprint 3D brain-like structures consisting of discrete layers of primary neural cells encapsulated in hydrogels. Brain-like structures were constructed using a bio-ink consisting of a novel peptide-modified biopolymer, gellan gum-RGD (RGD-GG), combined with primary cortical neurons. The ink was optimized for a modified reactive printing process and developed for use in traditional cell culturing facilities without the need for extensive bioprinting equipment. Furthermore the peptide modification of the gellan gum hydrogel was found to have a profound positive effect on primary cell proliferation and network formation. The neural cell viability combined with the support of neural network formation demonstrated the cell supportive nature of the matrix. The facile ability to form discrete cell-containing layers validates the application of this novel printing technique to form complex, layered and viable 3D cell structures. These brain-like structures offer the opportunity to reproduce more accurate 3D in vitro microstructures with applications ranging from cell behavior studies to improving our understanding of brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Encapsulation methods and dielectric layers for organic electrical devices

    DOEpatents

    Blum, Yigal D; Chu, William Siu-Keung; MacQueen, David Brent; Shi, Yijan

    2013-07-02

    The disclosure provides methods and materials suitable for use as encapsulation barriers and dielectric layers in electronic devices. In one embodiment, for example, there is provided an electroluminescent device or other electronic device with a dielectric layer comprising alternating layers of a silicon-containing bonding material and a ceramic material. The methods provide, for example, electronic devices with increased stability and shelf-life. The invention is useful, for example, in the field of microelectronic devices.

  3. Dielectric and infrared properties of SrTiO3 single crystal doped by 3d (V, Mn, Fe, Ni) and 4f (Nd, Sm, Er) ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maletic, S.; Maletic, D.; Petronijevic, I.; Dojcilovic, J.; M. Popovic, D.

    2014-02-01

    In this study, the effects of doping by 3d (V, Mn, Fe, Ni) and 4f (Nd, Sm, Er) ions on dielectric and infrared properties of SrTiO3 (STO) single crystals are investigated. It is well known that doping of the SrTiO3 can change the dielectric properties of the STO from an insulator to an n-type semiconductor, and even to a metallic conductor. Dielectric and infrared (IR) properties of the undoped STO and doped STO single crystals are analyzed using dielectric spectroscopy (80 kHz-5 MHz), transmission (200 cm-1-4000 cm-1), and reflection spectroscopy (50 cm-1-2000 cm-1). It is found that doping by the 3d ions reduces the value of dielectric permittivity, but the trend of temperature dependence of the dielectric permittivity remains almost unchanged. On the other hand, dielectric spectroscopy measurements for samples doped by 4f ions show the anomalous behaviors of the dielectric permittivity at temperatures around the temperature of the structural phase transition. There are two fractures of temperature dependences of inverse dielectric permittivity ɛr-1(T). Transmittance spectroscopy measurements show that there are differences in the shape of the spectrum in the mid-IR region between the undoped STO and the one doped by 4f ions. The differences in the reflectance spectrum between the STO:Nd and STO are analyzed in detail.

  4. Polymer-Based Mesh as Supports for Multi-layered 3D Cell Culture and Assays

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Karen A.; Park, Kyeng Min; Mosadegh, Bobak; Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Mazzeo, Aaron; Ngo, Phil M.; Whitesides, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture systems can mimic certain aspects of the cellular microenvironment found in vivo, but generation, analysis and imaging of current model systems for 3D cellular constructs and tissues remain challenging. This work demonstrates a 3D culture system – Cells-in-Gels-in-Mesh (CiGiM) – that uses stacked sheets of polymer-based mesh to support cells embedded in gels to form tissue-like constructs; the stacked sheets can be disassembled by peeling the sheets apart to analyze cultured cells—layer-by-layer—within the construct. The mesh sheets leave openings large enough for light to pass through with minimal scattering, and thus allowing multiple options for analysis—(i) using straightforward analysis by optical light microscopy, (ii) by high-resolution analysis with fluorescence microscopy, or (iii) with a fluorescence gel scanner. The sheets can be patterned into separate zones with paraffin film-based decals, in order to conduct multiple experiments in parallel; the paraffin-based decal films also block lateral diffusion of oxygen effectively. CiGiM simplifies the generation and analysis of 3D culture without compromising throughput, and quality of the data collected: it is especially useful in experiments that require control of oxygen levels, and isolation of adjacent wells in a multi-zone format. PMID:24095253

  5. 3D Printing of Human Tissue Mimics via Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Polymer/Hydrogel Biopapers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringeisen, Bradley

    2015-03-01

    The foundations of tissue engineering were built on two fundamental areas of research: cells and scaffolds. Multipotent cells and their derivatives are traditionally randomly seeded into sophisticated polymer or hydrogel scaffolds, ultimately with the goal of forming a tissue-like material through cell differentiation and cell-material interactions. One problem with this approach is that no matter how complex or biomimetic the scaffold is, the cells are still homogeneously distributed throughout this three dimensional (3D) material. Natural tissue is inherently heterogeneous on both a microscopic and macroscopic level. It also contains different types of cells in close proximity, extracellular matrix, voids, and a complex vascularized network. Recently developed 3D cell and organ printers may be able to enhance traditional tissue engineering experiments by building scaffolds layer-by-layer that are crafted to mimic the microscopic and macroscopic structure of natural tissue or organs. Over the past decade, my laboratory has developed a capillary-free, live cell printer termed biological laser printing, or BioLP. We find that printed cells do not express heat shock protein and retain >99% viability. Printed cells also incur no DNA strand fracture and preserve their ability to differentiate. Recent work has used a layer-by-layer approach, stacking sheets of hybrid polymer/hydrogel biopapers in conjunction with live cell printing to create 3D tissue structures. Our specific work is now focused on the blood-brain-barrier and air-lung interface and will be described during the presentation.

  6. Topologic connection between 2-D layered structures and 3-D diamond structures for conventional semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    When coming to identify new 2D materials, our intuition would suggest us to look from layered instead of 3D materials. However, since graphite can be hypothetically derived from diamond by stretching it along its [111] axis, many 3D materials can also potentially be explored as new candidates for 2D materials. Using a density functional theory, we perform a systematic study over the common Group IV, III–V, and II–VI semiconductors along different deformation paths to reveal new structures that are topologically connected to but distinctly different from the 3D parent structure. Specifically, we explore two major phase transition paths, originating respectively from wurtzite and NiAs structure, by applying compressive and tensile strain along the symmetry axis, and calculating the total energy changes to search for potential metastable states, as well as phonon spectra to examine the structural stability. Each path is found to further split into two branches under tensile strain–low buckled and high buckled structures, which respectively lead to a low and high buckled monolayer structure. Most promising new layered or planar structures identified include BeO, GaN, and ZnO on the tensile strain side, Ge, Si, and GaP on the compressive strain side. PMID:27090430

  7. Topologic connection between 2-D layered structures and 3-D diamond structures for conventional semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    When coming to identify new 2D materials, our intuition would suggest us to look from layered instead of 3D materials. However, since graphite can be hypothetically derived from diamond by stretching it along its [111] axis, many 3D materials can also potentially be explored as new candidates for 2D materials. Using a density functional theory, we perform a systematic study over the common Group IV, III-V, and II-VI semiconductors along different deformation paths to reveal new structures that are topologically connected to but distinctly different from the 3D parent structure. Specifically, we explore two major phase transition paths, originating respectively from wurtzite and NiAs structure, by applying compressive and tensile strain along the symmetry axis, and calculating the total energy changes to search for potential metastable states, as well as phonon spectra to examine the structural stability. Each path is found to further split into two branches under tensile strain-low buckled and high buckled structures, which respectively lead to a low and high buckled monolayer structure. Most promising new layered or planar structures identified include BeO, GaN, and ZnO on the tensile strain side, Ge, Si, and GaP on the compressive strain side. PMID:27090430

  8. Topologic connection between 2-D layered structures and 3-D diamond structures for conventional semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-04-01

    When coming to identify new 2D materials, our intuition would suggest us to look from layered instead of 3D materials. However, since graphite can be hypothetically derived from diamond by stretching it along its [111] axis, many 3D materials can also potentially be explored as new candidates for 2D materials. Using a density functional theory, we perform a systematic study over the common Group IV, III–V, and II–VI semiconductors along different deformation paths to reveal new structures that are topologically connected to but distinctly different from the 3D parent structure. Specifically, we explore two major phase transition paths, originating respectively from wurtzite and NiAs structure, by applying compressive and tensile strain along the symmetry axis, and calculating the total energy changes to search for potential metastable states, as well as phonon spectra to examine the structural stability. Each path is found to further split into two branches under tensile strain–low buckled and high buckled structures, which respectively lead to a low and high buckled monolayer structure. Most promising new layered or planar structures identified include BeO, GaN, and ZnO on the tensile strain side, Ge, Si, and GaP on the compressive strain side.

  9. Atomically thin layered NiFe double hydroxides assembled 3D microspheres with promoted electrochemical performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaomin; Zai, Jiantao; Liu, Yuanyuan; He, Xiaobo; Xiang, Shijie; Ma, Zifeng; Qian, Xuefeng

    2016-09-01

    LDHs in atomic thickness (mono-/bi-layers) usually exhibit novel physicochemical properties, especially in surface-dependent energy storage and catalysis areas. However, the thickness of the commonly reported 2D LDHs is in nanoscale and the bottom-up synthesis of atomically thin LDHs is rarely reported. Herein, high-quality atomically thin layered NiFe-LDHs assembled 3D microspheres were synthesized via a rational designed reaction system, where the formation of atomically thin building blocks was controlled by the synergetic effects of released carbonate anions and butanol. Furthermore, the complexant and solvents played important effects on the process of coprecipitation and the assembling of LDHs. Due to the nature of atomically thin LDHs nanosheets and unique 3D hierarchical structures, the obtained microspheres exhibited excellent electrocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction (OER) activity in alkaline medium with an onset overpotential (0.435 V, which is lower than that of common LDHs) and good durability. The as-prepared 3D NiFe-LDHs microspheres were also firstly used as supercapacitor materials and displayed a high specific capacitance of 1061 F g-1 at the current density of 1 A g-1.

  10. Vortex instabilities in 3D boundary layers: The relationship between Goertler and crossflow vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassom, Andrew; Hall, Philip

    1990-01-01

    The inviscid and viscous stability problems are addressed for a boundary layer which can support both Goertler and crossflow vortices. The change in structure of Goertler vortices is found when the parameter representing the degree of three-dimensionality of the basic boundary layer flow under consideration is increased. It is shown that crossflow vortices emerge naturally as this parameter is increased and ultimately become the only possible vortex instability of the flow. It is shown conclusively that at sufficiently large values of the crossflow there are no unstable Goertler vortices present in a boundary layer which, in the zero crossflow case, is centrifugally unstable. The results suggest that in many practical applications Goertler vortices cannot be a cause of transition because they are destroyed by the 3-D nature of the basic state. In swept wing flows the Goertler mechanism is probably not present for typical angles of sweep of about 20 degrees. Some discussion of the receptivity problem for vortex instabilities in weakly 3-D boundary layers is given; it is shown that inviscid modes have a coupling coefficient marginally smaller than those of the fastest growing viscous modes discussed recently by Denier, Hall, and Seddougui (1990). However the fact that the growth rates of the inviscid modes are the largest in most situations means that they are probably the most likely source of transition.

  11. Fast Numerical Algorithms for 3-D Scattering from PEC and Dielectric Random Rough Surfaces in Microwave Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lisha

    We present fast and robust numerical algorithms for 3-D scattering from perfectly electrical conducting (PEC) and dielectric random rough surfaces in microwave remote sensing. The Coifman wavelets or Coiflets are employed to implement Galerkin's procedure in the method of moments (MoM). Due to the high-precision one-point quadrature, the Coiflets yield fast evaluations of the most off-diagonal entries, reducing the matrix fill effort from O(N2) to O( N). The orthogonality and Riesz basis of the Coiflets generate well conditioned impedance matrix, with rapid convergence for the conjugate gradient solver. The resulting impedance matrix is further sparsified by the matrix-formed standard fast wavelet transform (SFWT). By properly selecting multiresolution levels of the total transformation matrix, the solution precision can be enhanced while matrix sparsity and memory consumption have not been noticeably sacrificed. The unified fast scattering algorithm for dielectric random rough surfaces can asymptotically reduce to the PEC case when the loss tangent grows extremely large. Numerical results demonstrate that the reduced PEC model does not suffer from ill-posed problems. Compared with previous publications and laboratory measurements, good agreement is observed.

  12. Clusters, molecular layers, and 3D crystals of water on Ni(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Thürmer, Konrad; Nie, Shu; Bartelt, Norman C.; Feibelman, Peter J.

    2014-11-14

    We examined the growth and stability of ice layers on Ni(111) up to ∼7 molecular layers (ML) thick using scanning tunneling microscopy. At low coverage, films were comprised of ∼1 nm wide two-dimensional (2D) clusters. Only above ∼0.5 ML did patches of continuous 2D layers emerge, coexisting with the clusters until the first ML was complete. The structure of the continuous layer is clearly different from that of the 2D clusters. Subsequently, a second molecular layer grew on top of the first. 3D crystallites started to form only after this 2nd ML was complete. 2D clusters re-appeared when thicker films were partially evaporated, implying that these clusters represent the equilibrium configuration at low coverage. Binding energies and image simulations computed with density functional theory suggest that the 2D clusters are partially dissociated and surrounded by H adatoms. The complete 2D layer contains only intact water molecules because of the lack of favorable binding sites for H atoms. We propose molecular structures for the 2D layer that are composed of the same pentagon-heptagon binding motif and water density observed on Pt(111). The similarity of the water structures on Pt and Ni suggests a general prescription for generating low-energy configurations on close-packed metal substrates.

  13. High thick layer-by-layer 3D multiscale fibrous scaffolds for enhanced cell infiltration and it's potential in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Shalumon, K T; Chennazhi, K P; Nair, Shantikumar V; Jayakumar, R

    2013-12-01

    This work explains the fabrication and potential applicability of high thick three dimensional (3-D) electrospun multiscale fibrous scaffolds in tissue engineering by focusing on the possible fabrication techniques. Multiscale fibrous scaffold of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) was fabricated by combining nano and micro fibers in optimum concentrations. Finely chopped multiscale fibers were allowed to undergo compression, freeze-drying, resin embedding, cryo-grinding and layering techniques to make 3D scaffolds and the layer-by-layer method was found to be most suitable for 3-D scaffold fabrication. Cell studies in layered 3D scaffolds were performed using MG 63 cells and infiltration was observed using SEM and confocal microscope. Since the layered high thick 3D scaffold perfectly complies with the requirements, this could be proposed as one of the suitable methods for constructing 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. PMID:24266265

  14. Intra-retinal layer segmentation of 3D optical coherence tomography using coarse grained diffusion map

    PubMed Central

    Kafieh, Raheleh; Rabbani, Hossein; Abramoff, Michael D.; Sonka, Milan

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful and noninvasive method for retinal imaging. In this paper, we introduce a fast segmentation method based on a new variant of spectral graph theory named diffusion maps. The research is performed on spectral domain (SD) OCT images depicting macular and optic nerve head appearance. The presented approach does not require edge-based image information in localizing most of boundaries and relies on regional image texture. Consequently, the proposed method demonstrates robustness in situations of low image contrast or poor layer-to-layer image gradients. Diffusion mapping applied to 2D and 3D OCT datasets is composed of two steps, one for partitioning the data into important and less important sections, and another one for localization of internal layers. In the first step, the pixels/voxels are grouped in rectangular/cubic sets to form a graph node. The weights of the graph are calculated based on geometric distances between pixels/voxels and differences of their mean intensity. The first diffusion map clusters the data into three parts, the second of which is the area of interest. The other two sections are eliminated from the remaining calculations. In the second step, the remaining area is subjected to another diffusion map assessment and the internal layers are localized based on their textural similarities. The proposed method was tested on 23 datasets from two patient groups (glaucoma and normals). The mean unsigned border positioning errors (mean ± SD) was 8.52 ± 3.13 and 7.56 ± 2.95 μm for the 2D and 3D methods, respectively. PMID:23837966

  15. Turbulent boundary layer over 2D and 3D large-scale wavy walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamed, Ali M.; Kamdar, Arpeet; Castillo, Luciano; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2015-10-01

    An experimental investigation of the flow over two- and three-dimensional large-scale wavy walls was performed using high-resolution planar particle image velocimetry in a refractive-index-matching (RIM) channel. The 2D wall is described by a sinusoidal wave in the streamwise direction with amplitude to wavelength ratio a/λx = 0.05. The 3D wall is defined with an additional wave superimposed on the 2D wall in the spanwise direction with a/λy = 0.1. The flow over these walls was characterized at Reynolds numbers of 4000 and 40 000, based on the bulk velocity and the channel half height. Flow measurements were performed in a wall-normal plane for the two cases and in wall-parallel planes at three heights for the 3D wavy wall. Instantaneous velocity fields and time-averaged turbulence quantities reveal strong coupling between large-scale topography and the turbulence dynamics near the wall. Turbulence statistics show the presence of a well-structured shear layer that enhances the turbulence for the 2D wavy wall, whereas the 3D wall exhibits different flow dynamics and significantly lower turbulence levels. It is shown that the 3D surface limits the dynamics of the spanwise turbulent vortical structures, leading to reduced turbulence production and turbulent stresses and, consequently, lower average drag (wall shear stress). The likelihood of recirculation bubbles, levels and spatial distribution of turbulence, and rate of the turbulent kinetic energy production are shown to be severely affected when a single spanwise mode is superimposed on the 2D sinusoidal wall. Differences of one and two order of magnitudes are found in the turbulence levels and Reynolds shear stress at the low Reynolds number for the 2D and 3D cases. These results highlight the sensitivity of the flow to large-scale topographic modulations; in particular the levels and production of turbulent kinetic energy as well as the wall shear stress.

  16. 3D quantification of microclimate volume in layered clothing for the prediction of clothing insulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yejin; Hong, Kyunghi; Hong, Sung-Ae

    2007-05-01

    Garment fit and resultant air volume is a crucial factor in thermal insulation, and yet, it has been difficult to quantify the air volume of clothing microclimate and relate it to the thermal insulation value just using the information on the size of clothing pattern without actual 3D volume measurement in wear condition. As earlier methods for the computation of air volume in clothing microclimate, vacuum over suit and circumference model have been used. However, these methods have inevitable disadvantages in terms of cost or accuracy due to the limitations of measurement equipment. In this paper, the phase-shifting moiré topography was introduced as one of the 3D scanning tools to measure the air volume of clothing microclimate quantitatively. The purpose of this research is to adopt a non-contact image scanning technology, phase-shifting moiré topography, to ascertain relationship between air volume and insulation value of layered clothing systems in wear situations where the 2D fabric creates new conditions in 3D spaces. The insulation of vests over shirts as a layered clothing system was measured with a thermal manikin in the environmental condition of 20 degrees C, 65% RH and air velocity of 0.79 m/s. As the pattern size increased, the insulation of the clothing system was increased. But beyond a certain limit, the insulation started to decrease due to convection and ventilation, which is more apparent when only the vest was worn over the torso of manikin. The relationship between clothing air volume and insulation was difficult to predict with a single vest due to the extreme openings which induced active ventilation. But when the vest was worn over the shirt, the effects of thickness of the fabrics on insulation were less pronounced compared with that of air volume. In conclusion, phase-shifting moiré topography was one of the efficient and accurate ways of quantifying air volume and its distribution across the clothing microclimate. It is also noted

  17. 3-D water vapor field in the atmospheric boundary layer observed with scanning differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Späth, Florian; Behrendt, Andreas; Muppa, Shravan Kumar; Metzendorf, Simon; Riede, Andrea; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) water vapor data of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are required to improve our understanding of land-atmosphere exchange processes. For this purpose, the scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) was developed as well as new analysis tools and visualization methods. The instrument determines 3-D fields of the atmospheric water vapor number density with a temporal resolution of a few seconds and a spatial resolution of up to a few tens of meters. We present three case studies from two field campaigns. In spring 2013, the UHOH DIAL was operated within the scope of the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) in western Germany. HD(CP)2 stands for High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction and is a German research initiative. Range-height indicator (RHI) scans of the UHOH DIAL show the water vapor heterogeneity within a range of a few kilometers up to an altitude of 2 km and its impact on the formation of clouds at the top of the ABL. The uncertainty of the measured data was assessed for the first time by extending a technique to scanning data, which was formerly applied to vertical time series. Typically, the accuracy of the DIAL measurements is between 0.5 and 0.8 g m-3 (or < 6 %) within the ABL even during daytime. This allows for performing a RHI scan from the surface to an elevation angle of 90° within 10 min. In summer 2014, the UHOH DIAL participated in the Surface Atmosphere Boundary Layer Exchange (SABLE) campaign in southwestern Germany. Conical volume scans were made which reveal multiple water vapor layers in three dimensions. Differences in their heights in different directions can be attributed to different surface elevation. With low-elevation scans in the surface layer, the humidity profiles and gradients can be related to different land cover such as maize, grassland, and forest as well as different surface layer

  18. Turbulent boundary layer over 2D and 3D large-scale wavy walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, Leonardo P.; Hamed, Ali M.; Castillo, Luciano

    2015-11-01

    In this work, an experimental investigation of the developing and developed flow over two- and three-dimensional large-scale wavy walls was performed using high-resolution planar particle image velocimetry in a refractive-index-matching flume. The 2D wall is described by a sinusoidal wave in the streamwise direction with amplitude to wavelength ratio a/ λx = 0.05. The 3D wall is defined with an additional wave superimposed on the 2D wall in the spanwise direction with a/ λy = 0.1. The flow was characterized at Reynolds numbers of 4000 and 40000, based on the bulk velocity and the flume half height. Instantaneous velocity fields and time-averaged turbulence quantities reveal strong coupling between large-scale topography and the turbulence dynamics near the wall. Turbulence statistics show the presence of a well-structured shear layer that enhances the turbulence for the 2D wavy wall, whereas the 3D wall exhibits different flow dynamics and significantly lower turbulence levels, particularly for which shows about 30% reduction. The likelihood of recirculation bubbles, levels and spatial distribution of turbulence, and the rate of the turbulent kinetic energy production are shown to be severely affected when a single spanwise mode is superimposed on the 2D wall. POD analysis was also performed to further understand distinctive features of the flow structures due to surface topography.

  19. Experimental Investigation of the Near Wall Flow Structure of a Low Reynolds Number 3-D Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, J. L.; Simpson, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    Laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) measurements and hydrogen bubble flow visualization techniques were used to examine the near-wall flow structure of 2D and 3D turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) over a range of low Reynolds numbers. The goals of this research were (1) an increased understanding of the flow physics in the near wall region of turbulent boundary layers,(2) to observe and quantify differences between 2D and 3D TBL flow structures, and (3) to document Reynolds number effects for 3D TBLs. The LDV data have provided results detailing the turbulence structure of the 2D and 3D TBLs. These results include mean Reynolds stress distributions, flow skewing results, and U and V spectra. Effects of Reynolds number for the 3D flow were also examined. Comparison to results with the same 3D flow geometry but at a significantly higher Reynolds number provided unique insight into the structure of 3D TBLs. While the 3D mean and fluctuating velocities were found to be highly dependent on Reynolds number, a previously defined shear stress parameter was discovered to be invariant with Reynolds number. The hydrogen bubble technique was used as a flow visualization tool to examine the near-wall flow structure of 2D and 3D TBLs. Both the quantitative and qualitative results displayed larger turbulent fluctuations with more highly concentrated vorticity regions for the 2D flow.

  20. Gate oxide damage reduction using a protective dielectric layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Calvin T.; Weling, Milind G.

    1994-08-01

    Gate oxide damage from charge entering through the top surface of the gate electrode during plasma ashing, ion implantation, and LDD spacer oxide etching was measured using antenna structures. Significant charge damage to the 9.0 nm-thick gate oxide was detected for each of these processes. The damage was reduced by using a protective dielectric layer, in this case a thermally deposited TEOS oxide, over the polycide gate electrode before gate definition. The dielectric appears to block charge penetration into the antenna. Damage can be reduced further by increasing the thickness of the dielectric layer; for a sufficiently thick layer (about 150 nm), charge entering through the top surface of the antenna was effectively eliminated.

  1. Experimentally excellent beaming in a two-layer dielectric structure

    DOE PAGES

    Tasolamprou, Anna C.; Zhang, Lei; Kafesaki, Maria; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2014-09-15

    We demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically that a two-layer dielectric structure can provide collimation and enhanced transmission of a Gaussian beam passing through it. This is due to formation of surface localized states along the layered structure and the coupling of these states to outgoing propagating waves. As a result, a system of multiple cascading two-layers can sustain the beaming for large propagation distances.

  2. 3D Dynamics of Freshwater Lenses in the Near-Surface Layer of the Tropical Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, Alexander; Dean, Cayla

    2015-04-01

    Convective rains in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) produce lenses of freshened water on the ocean surface. These lenses are localized in space and typically involve both salinity and temperature anomalies. Due to significant density anomalies, strong pressure gradients develop, which result in lateral spreading of freshwater lenses in a form resembling gravity currents. Gravity currents inherently involve three-dimensional dynamics. As a type of organized structure, gravity currents in the upper layer of the ocean may also interact with, and be shaped by, the ambient oceanic environment and atmospheric conditions. Among the important factors are the background stratification, wind stress, wind/wave mixing and spatially coherent organized motions in the near-surface layer of the ocean. Under certain conditions, a resonant interaction between a propagating freshwater lens and internal waves in the underlying pycnocline (e.g., barrier layer) may develop, whereas interaction with wind stress may produce an asymmetry in the freshwater lens and associated mixing. These two types of interactions working in concert may explain the series of sharp frontal interfaces, which have been observed in association with freshwater lenses during TOGA COARE. In this work, we have conducted a series of numerical experiments using computational fluid dynamics tools. These numerical simulations were designed to elucidate the relationship between vertical mixing and horizontal advection of salinity under various environmental conditions and potential impact on the Aquarius and SMOS satellite image formation. Available near-surface data from field experiments served as a guidance for numerical simulations. The results of this study indicate that 3D dynamics of freshwater lenses are essential within a certain range of wind/wave conditions and the freshwater influx in the surface layer of the ocean.

  3. Electric double layer of anisotropic dielectric colloids under electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, M.; Wu, H.; Luijten, E.

    2016-07-01

    Anisotropic colloidal particles constitute an important class of building blocks for self-assembly directed by electrical fields. The aggregation of these building blocks is driven by induced dipole moments, which arise from an interplay between dielectric effects and the electric double layer. For particles that are anisotropic in shape, charge distribution, and dielectric properties, calculation of the electric double layer requires coupling of the ionic dynamics to a Poisson solver. We apply recently proposed methods to solve this problem for experimentally employed colloids in static and time-dependent electric fields. This allows us to predict the effects of field strength and frequency on the colloidal properties.

  4. Temperature Dependence of Surface Layering in a Dielectric Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Mo,H.; Kewalramani, S.; Evmenenko, G.; Kim, K.; Ehrlich, S.; Dutta, P.

    2007-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the density oscillations (layers) at the free surface of tetrakis(2-ethylhexoxy)silane, a nonmetallic molecular liquid, was investigated using x-ray reflectivity. Below {approx}215K , the layer parameters weakly vary with temperature, if at all. Above this temperature, the layer spacings and intrinsic layer widths increase continuously, until there is no identifiable layering above 230K . This transition occurs at T/{Tc}{approx}0.23 , a temperature region that is usually accessible in metallic liquids but is preempted by freezing in many dielectric liquids.

  5. Vortex lines in layered superconductors. I. From 3D to 2D behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, D.

    1994-02-01

    The fundamental aspects of vortices in layered superconductors (natural or artificial multilayered materials) are reviewed, focusing on the role of anisotropy and very short coherence lengths. These materials divide into three classes, with increasing T_c's : chalcogenides, organic superconductors and high-T_c copper oxides. The first part of the paper summarizes the quantitative features of the vortex lattice, due to the incorporation of anisotropy in the 3D Ginzburg-Landau or London descriptions : anisotropy of critical fields and vortex lattice, elastic coefficients and melting. This kind of model describes most of the properties of moderately anisotropic compounds as Y : 123. The second part concerns the Josephson-coupled layered systems and identifies in which regimes vortices exhibit a quasi-2D character. Qualitatively new features as Josephson vortices, 2D vortices, Kosterlitz-Thouless transition and lock-in of vortices are reviewed. This analysis is adapted to compounds as Bi : 2212 or multilayers, but also to Y : 123 for some aspects. On passe en revue les aspects fondamentaux des vortex dans les supraconducteurs lamellaires (naturels ou superréseaux artificiels), en mettant l'accent sur le rôle de l'anisotropie et des très courtes longueurs de cohérence. Ces composés se divisent en trois classes, de T_c croissants : chalcogénures, supraconducteurs organiques et oxydes de cuivre à haut T_c. La première partie de l'article résume les aspects quantitatifs dus à l'incorporation de l'anisotropie dans les descriptions 3D Ginzburg-Landau ou London du réseau de vortex.: anisotropie des champs critiques et du réseau de vortex, coefficients élastiques et fusion. Ce type de modèle décrit une grande partie des propriétés des composés modérément anisotropes tels que Y : 123. La seconde partie concerne les systèmes lamellaires à couplage Josephson et identifie dans quels régimes les vortex présentent un caractère quasi-2D. Des effets

  6. Advanced optical interference filters based on metal and dielectric layers.

    PubMed

    Begou, Thomas; Lemarchand, Fabien; Lumeau, Julien

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the design and the fabrication of an advanced optical interference filter based on metal and dielectric layers. This filter respects the specifications of the 2016 OIC manufacturing problem contest. We study and present all the challenges and solutions that allowed achieving a low deviation between the fabricated prototype and the target. PMID:27607695

  7. Data-driven inversion of 3D GPR data for layered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slob, E. C.

    2013-12-01

    The number of GPR applications is large and still increasing. In several applications fixed-offset measurements can be sufficient and many dedicated imaging and inversion methods have been developed. Because there is insufficient amounts of data, these are necessarily model-driven schemes. For problems where quantitative information is needed, usually it is better to record multi-offset and possibly multicomponent data. Even for this data inversion is usually model-driven. This means the inverse problem is formulated as an iterative forward modeling problem and is solved by minimizing the amplitude difference between modeled and measured data. The model is modified such that data computed from the model fits the measured data. The information in the measured data itself is not used, except as a measure of the model data fit. For multi-offset multicomponent data a data-driven scheme is here developed to perform full waveform inversion of 3D ground-penetrating radar reflection data acquired on the surface of a layered medium. For data-driven models to work well, the data has to be properly sampled. The advantage is that no model information is necessary to carry out the inversion. The inversion is carried out in three steps. First the data is decomposed into up- and downgoing wave modes. In a layered earth the two modes are separable and are treated separately. This step provides the reflection response of the layered medium. For 3D waves in a layered medium this requires knowledge of the horizontal electric and magnetic field components. If the data is properly sampled the solution is unique. The second step consists of wave field synthesis, where the reflection response is used to construct a focusing wave field that can focus in a virtual receiver position at any depth level. At this stage of the process the depth level is only known in terms of one-way travel time. This is the intercept time in the slowness domain obtained directly from the data. A virtual

  8. Mobility controlled linear magnetoresistance with 3D anisotropy in a layered graphene pallet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Li, Peng; He, Xin; Li, Jun; Wen, Yan; Ren, Wencai; Cheng, Hui-ming; Yang, Yang; Al-Hadeethi, Yas F.; Zhang, Xixiang

    2016-10-01

    A bulk sample of pressed graphene sheets was prepared under hydraulic pressure (~150 MPa). The cross-section of the sample demonstrates a layered structure, which leads to 3D electrical transport properties with anisotropic mobility. The electrical transport properties of the sample were measured over a wide temperature (2-400 K) and magnetic field (-140 ~\\text{kOe}≤slant H≤slant 140 ~\\text{kOe} ) range. The magnetoresistance measured at a fixed temperature can be described by R≤ft(H,θ \\right)=R≤ft({{\\varepsilon}θ}H,0\\right) with {{\\varepsilon}θ}={≤ft({{\\cos}2}θ +{{γ-2}{{\\sin}2}θ \\right)}1/2} , where γ is the mobility anisotropy constant and θ is the angle between the normal of the sample plane and the magnetic field. The large linear magnetoresistance (up to 36.9% at 400 K and 140 kOe) observed at high fields is ascribed to a classical magnetoresistance caused by mobility fluctuation ( Δ μ ). The magnetoresistance value at 140 kOe was related to the average mobility ≤ft(< μ > \\right) because of the condition Δ μ << μ > . The carrier concentration remained constant and the temperature-dependent resistivity was proportional to the average mobility, as verified by Kohler’s rule. Anisotropic dephasing length was deduced from weak localization observed at low temperatures.

  9. Multigrid direct numerical simulation of the whole process of flow transition in 3-D boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chaoqun; Liu, Zhining

    1993-01-01

    A new technology was developed in this study which provides a successful numerical simulation of the whole process of flow transition in 3-D boundary layers, including linear growth, secondary instability, breakdown, and transition at relatively low CPU cost. Most other spatial numerical simulations require high CPU cost and blow up at the stage of flow breakdown. A fourth-order finite difference scheme on stretched and staggered grids, a fully implicit time marching technique, a semi-coarsening multigrid based on the so-called approximate line-box relaxation, and a buffer domain for the outflow boundary conditions were all used for high-order accuracy, good stability, and fast convergence. A new fine-coarse-fine grid mapping technique was developed to keep the code running after the laminar flow breaks down. The computational results are in good agreement with linear stability theory, secondary instability theory, and some experiments. The cost for a typical case with 162 x 34 x 34 grid is around 2 CRAY-YMP CPU hours for 10 T-S periods.

  10. Boundary Layer Control of Rotating Convection Systems: the Transition from 2D to 3D Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Eric; Stellmach, S.; Noir, J.; Hansen, U.; Aurnou, J.

    2008-09-01

    Recent studies have reproduced the patterns of zonal flow and thermal emission on the Giant Planets using deep convection models. For example, it has been shown that the fundamental differences between the winds of the Ice Giants, Uranus and Neptune, and the Gas Giants, Jupiter and Saturn, may be explained by the breakdown of the influence of rotation on convection. Here, we present results from a coupled suite of laboratory experiments and numerical simulations of rotating convection which span a broad range of parameter space. We observe distinct transitions from rotationally controlled, quasi-2D dynamics to strongly 3D, non-rotating style convection. We quantify the boundary between these two regimes as a function of the Rayleigh and Ekman numbers. The transition is not determined, as long assumed, by the convective Rossby number, but instead is controlled by boundary layer dynamics. It may then be easier than previously thought for convection systems to break free from the constraints of rotation. We are presently investigating how this transition correlates with zonal flows and magnetic field generation on the Giant Planets. Funding provided by NSF Geophysics Program (EAR/IF) and NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program.

  11. Lithological Controls on 3D Fold Geometry in Mechanically Layered Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, M. A.; Jones, R. R.; Rock, G.

    2010-12-01

    Folding and thrusting are key processes in accommodating shortening in evolving orogens. In the outer parts of mountain belts, the combination of tectonism and sedimentation often leads to viable petroleum systems where folds trap migrating hydrocarbons. A key aspect of the success of these traps is the 3D fold geometry, which must prevent up-plunge hydrocarbon escape. Fold shapes in a multilayered system are governed by the fold mechanism, and the rheology of the layers. In sedimentary environments where laterally heterogeneous thicknesses of interbedded carbonates, clastics, and evaporates may be present, predicting the sub-surface geometry of structures is challenging. We present field data combined with satellite and seismic interpretation from the Zagros fold and thrust belt of SE Turkey where Neogene shortening has affected an Ordovician to Miocene aged sedimentary pile comprising shales, sandstones, carbonates and minor evaporites. Miocene carbonates capping the sequence allow 3D fold geometries to be ascertained at surface with a high degree of confidence, whilst the underlying ~1km of shales and mudstones allows folds to develop that depart substantially from standard “text-book” geometries. Beneath these incompetent units a further 1.7km of carbonates and clastics overlie Ordovician shales up to 1.5km thick. In relatively low strain sections asymmetric, angular, kink-like folds form long wavelength structures and thrust faults rarely reach the surface. With increasing strain, the wavelength/amplitude ratio decreases and thrusts cut through the fold limbs. Folds are interpreted to detach above a thick sequence of Ordovician shales. They originate by buckling of the competent units within the two weaker horizons, with initial perturbations probably provided by sedimentary heterogeneities. As the folds amplify, thrusts form in the more competent units above the shale. These then propagate upwards with fold amplification dominated by fault-tip

  12. Estimation of uncertainties in geological 3D raster layer models as integral part of modelling procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maljers, Denise; den Dulk, Maryke; ten Veen, Johan; Hummelman, Jan; Gunnink, Jan; van Gessel, Serge

    2016-04-01

    The Geological Survey of the Netherlands (GSN) develops and maintains subsurface models with regional to national coverage. These models are paramount for petroleum exploration in conventional reservoirs, for understanding the distribution of unconventional reservoirs, for mapping geothermal aquifers, for the potential to store carbon, or for groundwater- or aggregate resources. Depending on the application domain these models differ in depth range, scale, data used, modelling software and modelling technique. Depth uncertainty information is available for the Geological Survey's 3D raster layer models DGM Deep and DGM Shallow. These models cover different depth intervals and are constructed using different data types and different modelling software. Quantifying the uncertainty of geological models that are constructed using multiple data types as well as geological expert-knowledge is not straightforward. Examples of geological expert-knowledge are trend surfaces displaying the regional thickness trends of basin fills or steering points that are used to guide the pinching out of geological formations or the modelling of the complex stratal geometries associated with saltdomes and saltridges. This added a-priori knowledge, combined with the assumptions underlying kriging (normality and second-order stationarity), makes the kriging standard error an incorrect measure of uncertainty for our geological models. Therefore the methods described below were developed. For the DGM Deep model a workflow has been developed to assess uncertainty by combining precision (giving information on the reproducibility of the model results) and accuracy (reflecting the proximity of estimates to the true value). This was achieved by centering the resulting standard deviations around well-tied depths surfaces. The standard deviations are subsequently modified by three other possible error sources: data error, structural complexity and velocity model error. The uncertainty workflow

  13. Rapid and low-cost prototyping of 3D nanostructures with multi-layer hydrogen silsesquioxane scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Leo T; Fan, Li; Wang, Jian; Xuan, Yi; Qi, Minghao

    2013-12-20

    A layer-by-layer (LBL) method can generate or approximate any three-dimensional (3D) structure, and has been the approach for the manufacturing of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices. However, its high cost precludes the fabrication of anything other than CMOS-compatible devices, and general 3D nanostructures have been difficult to prototype in academia and small businesses, due to the lack of expensive facility and state-of-the-art tools. It is proposed and demonstrated that a novel process that can rapidly fabricate high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures at low cost, without requiring specialized equipment. An individual layer is realized through electron-beam lithography patterning of hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) resist, followed by planarization via spinning SU-8 resist and etch-back. A 4-layer silicon inverse woodpile photonic crystal with a period of 650 nm and a 7-layer HSQ scaffold with a period of 300 nm are demonstrated. This process provides a versatile and accessible solution to the fabrication of highly complex 3D nanostructures.

  14. Electrical conduction mechanisms in PbSe and PbS nano crystals 3D matrix layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbell, Matan; Hechster, Elad; Sarusi, Gabby

    2016-02-01

    A simulation study and measurements of the electrical conductance in a PbSe and PbS spherical Nano-crystal 3D matrix layer was carried out focusing on its dependences of Nano-crystal size distribution and size gradient along the layer thickness (z-direction). The study suggests a new concept of conductance enhancement by utilizing a size gradient along the layer thickness from mono-layer to the next mono-layer of the Nano-crystals, in order to create a gradient of the energy levels and thus improve directional conductance in this direction. A Monte Carlo simulation of the charge carriers path along the layer thickness of the Nano-crystals 3D matrix using the Miller-Abrahams hopping model was performed. We then compared the conductance characteristics of the gradual size 3D matrix layer to a constant-sized 3D matrix layer that was used as a reference in the simulation. The numerical calculations provided us with insights into the actual conductance mechanism of the PbSe and PbS Nano-crystals 3D matrix and explained the discrepancies in actual conductance and the variability in measured mobilities published in the literature. It is found that the mobility and thus conductance are dependent on a critical electrical field generated between two adjacent nano-crystals. Our model explains the conductance dependents on the: Cathode-Anode distance, the distance between the adjacent nano-crystals in the 3D matrix layer and the size distribution along the current direction. Part of the model (current-voltage dependence) was validated using a current-voltage measurements taken on a constant size normal distribution nano-crystals PbS layer (330nm thick) compared with the predicted I-V curves. It is shown that under a threshold bias, the current is very low, while after above a threshold bias the conductance is significantly increased due to increase of hopping probability. Once reaching the maximum probability the current tend to level-off reaching the maximal conductance

  15. Characterizing microscale aluminum composite layer properties on silicon solar cells with hybrid 3D scanning force measurements

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sung-Kuk; Choi, Beomjoon; Chung, Haseung; Shin, Seungwon; Song, Hee-eun; Seo, Jung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a novel technique to estimate the mechanical properties of the aluminum composite layer on silicon solar cells by using a hybrid 3-dimensional laser scanning force measurement (3-D LSFM) system. The 3-D LSFM system measures the material properties of sub-layers constituting a solar cell. This measurement is critical for realizing high-efficient ultra-thin solar cells. The screen-printed aluminum layer, which significantly affects the bowing phenomenon, is separated from the complete solar cell by removing the silicon (Si) layer with deep reactive ion etching. An elastic modulus of ~15.1 GPa and a yield strength of ~35.0 MPa for the aluminum (Al) composite layer were obtained by the 3-D LSFM system. In experiments performed for 6-inch Si solar cells, the bowing distances decreased from 12.02 to 1.18 mm while the Si layer thicknesses increased from 90 to 190 μm. These results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions for ultra-thin Si thickness (90 μm) based on the obtained Al composite layer properties. PMID:26948248

  16. Characterizing microscale aluminum composite layer properties on silicon solar cells with hybrid 3D scanning force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Sung-Kuk; Choi, Beomjoon; Chung, Haseung; Shin, Seungwon; Song, Hee-Eun; Seo, Jung Hwan

    2016-03-01

    This article presents a novel technique to estimate the mechanical properties of the aluminum composite layer on silicon solar cells by using a hybrid 3-dimensional laser scanning force measurement (3-D LSFM) system. The 3-D LSFM system measures the material properties of sub-layers constituting a solar cell. This measurement is critical for realizing high-efficient ultra-thin solar cells. The screen-printed aluminum layer, which significantly affects the bowing phenomenon, is separated from the complete solar cell by removing the silicon (Si) layer with deep reactive ion etching. An elastic modulus of ~15.1 GPa and a yield strength of ~35.0 MPa for the aluminum (Al) composite layer were obtained by the 3-D LSFM system. In experiments performed for 6-inch Si solar cells, the bowing distances decreased from 12.02 to 1.18 mm while the Si layer thicknesses increased from 90 to 190 μm. These results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions for ultra-thin Si thickness (90 μm) based on the obtained Al composite layer properties.

  17. Characterizing microscale aluminum composite layer properties on silicon solar cells with hybrid 3D scanning force measurements.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sung-Kuk; Choi, Beomjoon; Chung, Haseung; Shin, Seungwon; Song, Hee-eun; Seo, Jung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a novel technique to estimate the mechanical properties of the aluminum composite layer on silicon solar cells by using a hybrid 3-dimensional laser scanning force measurement (3-D LSFM) system. The 3-D LSFM system measures the material properties of sub-layers constituting a solar cell. This measurement is critical for realizing high-efficient ultra-thin solar cells. The screen-printed aluminum layer, which significantly affects the bowing phenomenon, is separated from the complete solar cell by removing the silicon (Si) layer with deep reactive ion etching. An elastic modulus of ~15.1 GPa and a yield strength of ~35.0 MPa for the aluminum (Al) composite layer were obtained by the 3-D LSFM system. In experiments performed for 6-inch Si solar cells, the bowing distances decreased from 12.02 to 1.18 mm while the Si layer thicknesses increased from 90 to 190 μm. These results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions for ultra-thin Si thickness (90 μm) based on the obtained Al composite layer properties. PMID:26948248

  18. Characterizing microscale aluminum composite layer properties on silicon solar cells with hybrid 3D scanning force measurements.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sung-Kuk; Choi, Beomjoon; Chung, Haseung; Shin, Seungwon; Song, Hee-eun; Seo, Jung Hwan

    2016-03-07

    This article presents a novel technique to estimate the mechanical properties of the aluminum composite layer on silicon solar cells by using a hybrid 3-dimensional laser scanning force measurement (3-D LSFM) system. The 3-D LSFM system measures the material properties of sub-layers constituting a solar cell. This measurement is critical for realizing high-efficient ultra-thin solar cells. The screen-printed aluminum layer, which significantly affects the bowing phenomenon, is separated from the complete solar cell by removing the silicon (Si) layer with deep reactive ion etching. An elastic modulus of ~15.1 GPa and a yield strength of ~35.0 MPa for the aluminum (Al) composite layer were obtained by the 3-D LSFM system. In experiments performed for 6-inch Si solar cells, the bowing distances decreased from 12.02 to 1.18 mm while the Si layer thicknesses increased from 90 to 190 μm. These results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions for ultra-thin Si thickness (90 μm) based on the obtained Al composite layer properties.

  19. Analysis of thin baked-on silicone layers by FTIR and 3D-Laser Scanning Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Funke, Stefanie; Matilainen, Julia; Nalenz, Heiko; Bechtold-Peters, Karoline; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Friess, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Pre-filled syringes (PFS) and auto-injection devices with cartridges are increasingly used for parenteral administration. To assure functionality, silicone oil is applied to the inner surface of the glass barrel. Silicone oil migration into the product can be minimized by applying a thin but sufficient layer of silicone oil emulsion followed by thermal bake-on versus spraying-on silicone oil. Silicone layers thicker than 100nm resulting from regular spray-on siliconization can be characterized using interferometric profilometers. However, the analysis of thin silicone layers generated by bake-on siliconization is more challenging. In this paper, we have evaluated Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy after solvent extraction and a new 3D-Laser Scanning Microscopy (3D-LSM) to overcome this challenge. A multi-step solvent extraction and subsequent FTIR spectroscopy enabled to quantify baked-on silicone levels as low as 21-325μg per 5mL cartridge. 3D-LSM was successfully established to visualize and measure baked-on silicone layers as thin as 10nm. 3D-LSM was additionally used to analyze the silicone oil distribution within cartridges at such low levels. Both methods provided new, highly valuable insights to characterize the siliconization after processing, in order to achieve functionality.

  20. A novel power UMOSFET with a variable K dielectric layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Lan, Hao; Cao, Fei; Liu, Yun-Tao; Shao, Lei

    2012-06-01

    A novel split-gate power UMOSFET with a variable K dielectric layer is proposed. This device shows a 36.2% reduction in the specific on-state resistance at a breakdown voltage of 115 V, as compared with the SGE-UMOS device. Numerical simulation results indicate that the proposed device features high performance with an improved figure of merit of Qg × RON and BV2/RON, as compared with the previous power UMOSFET.

  1. Atomic layer deposition HfO2 capping layer effect on porous low dielectric constant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yi-Lung; Kao, Kai-Chieh; Huang, Chi-Jia; Chen, Giin-Shan; Fang, Jau-Shiung

    2015-11-01

    Low dielectric constant (low-k) materials are used as inter-level insulators between copper (Cu) conductors to improve the characteristics of integrated circuits. This work proposes a new method for improving the characteristics of porous low-k dielectric film by capping it with an HfO2 film by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Experimental results revealed that capping a porous low-k dielectric film with a ∼1.0 nm-thick HfO2 film increases its dielectric constant from 2.56 to 2.65 because the pores in the surface of the film are sealed by Hf precursors. The leakage current density and reliability of the porous low-k dielectrics are greatly improved. The HfO2 capping film also increased resistances against Cu diffusion and damage by oxygen plasma. Therefore, this ALD-deposited HfO2 capping film can be used as a pore-sealing layer and a Cu barrier layer for the porous low-k dielectric film in the future advanced technologies.

  2. 3D homogeneity study in PMMA layers using a Fourier domain OCT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briones-R., Manuel de J.; Torre-Ibarra, Manuel H. De La; Tavera, Cesar G.; Luna H., Juan M.; Mendoza-Santoyo, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    Micro-metallic particles embedded in polymers are now widely used in several industrial applications in order to modify the mechanical properties of the bulk. A uniform distribution of these particles inside the polymers is highly desired for instance, when a biological backscattering is simulated or a bio-framework is designed. A 3D Fourier domain optical coherence tomography system to detect the polymer's internal homogeneity is proposed. This optical system has a 2D camera sensor array that records a fringe pattern used to reconstruct with a single shot the tomographic image of the sample. The system gathers the full 3D tomographic and optical phase information during a controlled deformation by means of a motion linear stage. This stage avoids the use of expensive tilting stages, which in addition are commonly controlled by piezo drivers. As proof of principle, a series of different deformations were proposed to detect the uniform or non-uniform internal deposition of copper micro particles. The results are presented as images coming from the 3D tomographic micro reconstruction of the samples, and the 3D optical phase information that identifies the in-homogeneity regions within the Poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) volume.

  3. Estimating 3D variation in active-layer thickness beneath arctic streams using ground-penetrating radar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brosten, T.R.; Bradford, J.H.; McNamara, J.P.; Gooseff, M.N.; Zarnetske, J.P.; Bowden, W.B.; Johnston, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    We acquired three-dimensional (3D) ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data across three stream sites on the North Slope, AK, in August 2005, to investigate the dependence of thaw depth on channel morphology. Data were migrated with mean velocities derived from multi-offset GPR profiles collected across a stream section within each of the 3D survey areas. GPR data interpretations from the alluvial-lined stream site illustrate greater thaw depths beneath riffle and gravel bar features relative to neighboring pool features. The peat-lined stream sites indicate the opposite; greater thaw depths beneath pools and shallower thaw beneath the connecting runs. Results provide detailed 3D geometry of active-layer thaw depths that can support hydrological studies seeking to quantify transport and biogeochemical processes that occur within the hyporheic zone.

  4. Implementation of wall boundary conditions for transpiration in F3D thin-layer Navier-Stokes code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, M.; Martin, F. W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical boundary conditions for mass injection/suction at the wall are incorporated in the thin-layer Navier-Stokes code, F3D. The accuracy of the boundary conditions and the code is assessed by a detailed comparison of the predictions of velocity distributions and skin-friction coefficients with exact similarity solutions for laminar flow over a flat plate with variable blowing/suction, and measurements for turbulent flow past a flat plate with uniform blowing. In laminar flow, F3D predictions for friction coefficient compare well with exact similarity solution with and without suction, but produces large errors at moderate-to-large values of blowing. A slight Mach number dependence of skin-friction coefficient due to blowing in turbulent flow is computed by F3D code. Predicted surface pressures for turbulent flow past an airfoil with mass injection are in qualitative agreement with measurements for a flat plate.

  5. The fabrication of double layer tubular vascular tissue engineering scaffold via coaxial electrospinning and its 3D cell coculture.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lin; Cao, Jie; Chen, Lamei; Geng, Xue; Zhang, Ai-Ying; Guo, Lian-Rui; Gu, Yong-Quan; Feng, Zeng-Guo

    2015-12-01

    A continuous electrospinning technique was applied to fabricate double layer tubular tissue engineering vascular graft (TEVG) scaffold. The luminal layer was made from poly(ɛ-caprolac-tone)(PCL) ultrafine fibers via common single axial electrospinning followed by the outer layer of core-shell structured nanofibers via coaxial electrospinning. For preparing the outer layernano-fibers, the PCL was electrospun into the shell and both bovine serum albumin (BSA) and tetrapeptide val-gal-pro-gly (VAPG) were encapsulated into the core. The core-shell structure in the outer layer fibers was observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM). The in vitro release tests exhibited the sustainable release behavior of BSA and VAPG so that they provided a better cell growth environment in the interior of tubular scaffold wall. The in vitro culture of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) demonstrated their potential to penetrate into the scaffold wall for the 3D cell culture. Subsequently, 3D cell coculture was conducted. First, SMCs were seeded on the luminal surface of the scaffold and cultured for 5 days, and then endothelial cells (ECs) were also seeded on the luminal surface and cocultured with SMCs for another 2 days. After stained with antibodies, 3D cell distribution on the scaffold was revealed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) where ECs were mainly located on the luminal surface whereas SMCs penetrated into the surface and distributed inside the scaffold wall. This double layer tubular scaffold with 3D cell distribution showed the promise to develop it into a novel TEVG for clinical trials in the near future.

  6. Bandwidth Enhancement of Cylindrical Dielectric Resonator Antenna Using Thin Dielectric Layer Fed by Resonating Slot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Nipun K.; Das, Soma; Vishwakarma, Dinesh K.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper Cylindrical Dielectric Resonator Antenna (CDRA) has been designed for X-band frequency range applications with slot feeding. Bandwidth of designed cylindrical dielectric resonator antenna has been enhanced by making the slot to be resonating and inserting very thin low permittivity dielectric layer between the slot and CDRA. Resonating slot excites the closely spaced HEM11δ and HEM21δ mode inside the antenna as well as provides the resonance at the upper side of desired X-band. Low profile low permittivity layer provides the excellent matching of these modes and shift the HEM21δ mode to higher frequency side at 11.25 GHz with better impedance matching. By combining all of three resonances, nearly 85 % increment in impedance Bandwidth has been obtained with reference to non resonating slot excited CDRA. Fractional impedance bandwidth for proposed design is 48 % and average Gain of 6 dB with more than 92 % radiation efficiency has been shown by the antenna throughout the desired band with broadside pattern.

  7. CMP Control of Multi-Layer Inter-Layer Dielectrics (ILD) using X-ray Reflectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, Ross E.; Porter, Hethel; Gallegos, Jesus; O'Dell, Jeremy; Agnihotri, Dileep

    2007-09-26

    Thin sacrificial films are used as cap layer in the back-end semiconductor processing for protecting the bulk porous inter-layer low-k dielectric during the CMP process. The existing optical measurement techniques struggle to separate these thin films from the bulk low-k due to very similar optical coefficients. Glancing angle x-ray reflectivity is well suited for separation of thin sacrificial film and bulk dielectric film as x-ray reflectivity depends strongly on changes in electron densities for two materials. This paper discusses the x-ray reflectivity technique and its applications for measurement of low-k stack and sacrificial oxide post CMP.

  8. Layer-by-Layer Assembled 2D Montmorillonite Dielectrics for Solution-Processed Electronics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian; Liu, Xiaolong; Geier, Michael L; McMorrow, Julian J; Jariwala, Deep; Beck, Megan E; Huang, Wei; Marks, Tobin J; Hersam, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Layer-by-layer assembled 2D montmorillonite nanosheets are shown to be high-performance, solution-processed dielectrics. These scalable and spatially uniform sub-10 nm thick dielectrics yield high areal capacitances of ≈600 nF cm(-2) and low leakage currents down to 6 × 10(-9) A cm(-2) that enable low voltage operation of p-type semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube and n-type indium gallium zinc oxide field-effect transistors. PMID:26514248

  9. Damage evaluation in graphene underlying atomic layer deposition dielectrics

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaohui; Reckinger, Nicolas; Poncelet, Olivier; Louette, Pierre; Ureña, Ferran; Idrissi, Hosni; Turner, Stuart; Cabosart, Damien; Colomer, Jean-François; Raskin, Jean-Pierre; Hackens, Benoit; Francis, Laurent A.

    2015-01-01

    Based on micro-Raman spectroscopy (μRS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we study the structural damage incurred in monolayer (1L) and few-layer (FL) graphene subjected to atomic-layer deposition of HfO2 and Al2O3 upon different oxygen plasma power levels. We evaluate the damage level and the influence of the HfO2 thickness on graphene. The results indicate that in the case of Al2O3/graphene, whether 1L or FL graphene is strongly damaged under our process conditions. For the case of HfO2/graphene, μRS analysis clearly shows that FL graphene is less disordered than 1L graphene. In addition, the damage levels in FL graphene decrease with the number of layers. Moreover, the FL graphene damage is inversely proportional to the thickness of HfO2 film. Particularly, the bottom layer of twisted bilayer (t-2L) has the salient features of 1L graphene. Therefore, FL graphene allows for controlling/limiting the degree of defect during the PE-ALD HfO2 of dielectrics and could be a good starting material for building field effect transistors, sensors, touch screens and solar cells. Besides, the formation of Hf-C bonds may favor growing high-quality and uniform-coverage dielectric. HfO2 could be a suitable high-K gate dielectric with a scaling capability down to sub-5-nm for graphene-based transistors. PMID:26311131

  10. Damage evaluation in graphene underlying atomic layer deposition dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaohui; Reckinger, Nicolas; Poncelet, Olivier; Louette, Pierre; Ureña, Ferran; Idrissi, Hosni; Turner, Stuart; Cabosart, Damien; Colomer, Jean-François; Raskin, Jean-Pierre; Hackens, Benoit; Francis, Laurent A

    2015-08-27

    Based on micro-Raman spectroscopy (μRS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we study the structural damage incurred in monolayer (1L) and few-layer (FL) graphene subjected to atomic-layer deposition of HfO2 and Al2O3 upon different oxygen plasma power levels. We evaluate the damage level and the influence of the HfO2 thickness on graphene. The results indicate that in the case of Al2O3/graphene, whether 1L or FL graphene is strongly damaged under our process conditions. For the case of HfO2/graphene, μRS analysis clearly shows that FL graphene is less disordered than 1L graphene. In addition, the damage levels in FL graphene decrease with the number of layers. Moreover, the FL graphene damage is inversely proportional to the thickness of HfO2 film. Particularly, the bottom layer of twisted bilayer (t-2L) has the salient features of 1L graphene. Therefore, FL graphene allows for controlling/limiting the degree of defect during the PE-ALD HfO2 of dielectrics and could be a good starting material for building field effect transistors, sensors, touch screens and solar cells. Besides, the formation of Hf-C bonds may favor growing high-quality and uniform-coverage dielectric. HfO2 could be a suitable high-K gate dielectric with a scaling capability down to sub-5-nm for graphene-based transistors.

  11. A fast and accurate method to predict 2D and 3D aerodynamic boundary layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijleveld, H. A.; Veldman, A. E. P.

    2014-12-01

    A quasi-simultaneous interaction method is applied to predict 2D and 3D aerodynamic flows. This method is suitable for offshore wind turbine design software as it is a very accurate and computationally reasonably cheap method. This study shows the results for a NACA 0012 airfoil. The two applied solvers converge to the experimental values when the grid is refined. We also show that in separation the eigenvalues remain positive thus avoiding the Goldstein singularity at separation. In 3D we show a flow over a dent in which separation occurs. A rotating flat plat is used to show the applicability of the method for rotating flows. The shown capabilities of the method indicate that the quasi-simultaneous interaction method is suitable for design methods for offshore wind turbine blades.

  12. Comparison between measured turbine stage performance and the predicted performance using quasi-3D flow and boundary layer analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R. J.; Haas, J. E.; Katsanis, T.

    1984-01-01

    A method for calculating turbine stage performance is described. The usefulness of the method is demonstrated by comparing measured and predicted efficiencies for nine different stages. Comparisons are made over a range of turbine pressure ratios and rotor speeds. A quasi-3D flow analysis is used to account for complex passage geometries. Boundary layer analyses are done to account for losses due to friction. Empirical loss models are used to account for incidence, secondary flow, disc windage, and clearance losses.

  13. A dielectric study on colloidal silica nanoparticle Layer-by-Layer assemblies on polycarbonate.

    PubMed

    Carosio, Federico; Banet, Laurent; Freebody, Nicola; Reading, Martin; Agnel, Serge; Castellon, Jerome; Vaughan, Alun S; Malucelli, Giulio

    2013-10-15

    This study focuses on the dielectrical characterization of polycarbonate films coated with silica nanoparticle bilayers assembled through the Layer-by-Layer (LbL) technique. This is the first attempt of dielectric characterization performed on LbL-treated plastic substrates. To this aim, LbL coatings consisting of oppositely charged colloidal silica have been built on a polymeric substrate (polycarbonate). Then, dielectric features such as space charge accumulation, electrical voltage breakdown, and resistance to corona discharge (through laser ablation) have demonstrated that the colloidal silica nanoparticle assemblies can influence the nature of the trapped space charges and affect the resistance of polycarbonate to corona discharge, changing the distribution of the laser energy on impact.

  14. EM modelling of arbitrary shaped anisotropic dielectric objects using an efficient 3D leapfrog scheme on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gansen, A.; Hachemi, M. El; Belouettar, S.; Hassan, O.; Morgan, K.

    2016-09-01

    The standard Yee algorithm is widely used in computational electromagnetics because of its simplicity and divergence free nature. A generalization of the classical Yee scheme to 3D unstructured meshes is adopted, based on the use of a Delaunay primal mesh and its high quality Voronoi dual. This allows the problem of accuracy losses, which are normally associated with the use of the standard Yee scheme and a staircased representation of curved material interfaces, to be circumvented. The 3D dual mesh leapfrog-scheme which is presented has the ability to model both electric and magnetic anisotropic lossy materials. This approach enables the modelling of problems, of current practical interest, involving structured composites and metamaterials.

  15. Aerodynamic heating on 3-D bodies including the effects of entropy-layer swallowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejarnette, F. R.; Hamilton, H. H.

    1974-01-01

    A relatively simple method was developed previously (authors, 1973) for calculating laminar, transitional, and turbulent heating rates on three-dimensional bodies in hypersonic flows. This method was shown to yield reasonably accurate results for laminar heating on blunted circular and elliptical cones and an earlier version of the space shuttle vehicle. As the boundary layer along the surface grows, more and more of the inviscid-flow mass is entrained into the boundary layer, and the streamlines which passed through the nearly normal portion of the bow shock wave are 'swallowed' by the boundary layer. This phenomenon is often referred to as entropy-layer or streamline swallowing, and it can have a significant effect on the calculated heating rates. An approximate, yet simple, method for including the effects of entropy-layer swallowing in the heating-rate calculations is given.

  16. CMUTs with high-K atomic layer deposition dielectric material insulation layer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Toby; Tekes, Coskun; Degertekin, F

    2014-12-01

    Use of high-κ dielectric, atomic layer deposition (ALD) materials as an insulation layer material for capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) is investigated. The effect of insulation layer material and thickness on CMUT performance is evaluated using a simple parallel plate model. The model shows that both high dielectric constant and the electrical breakdown strength are important for the dielectric material, and significant performance improvement can be achieved, especially as the vacuum gap thickness is reduced. In particular, ALD hafnium oxide (HfO2) is evaluated and used as an improvement over plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silicon nitride (Six)Ny)) for CMUTs fabricated by a low-temperature, complementary metal oxide semiconductor transistor-compatible, sacrificial release method. Relevant properties of ALD HfO2) such as dielectric constant and breakdown strength are characterized to further guide CMUT design. Experiments are performed on parallel fabricated test CMUTs with 50-nm gap and 16.5-MHz center frequency to measure and compare pressure output and receive sensitivity for 200-nm PECVD Six)Ny) and 100-nm HfO2) insulation layers. Results for this particular design show a 6-dB improvement in receiver output with the collapse voltage reduced by one-half; while in transmit mode, half the input voltage is needed to achieve the same maximum output pressure.

  17. CMUTs with High-K Atomic Layer Deposition Dielectric Material Insulation Layer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Toby; Tekes, Coskun; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2014-01-01

    Use of high-κ dielectric, atomic layer deposition (ALD) materials as an insulation layer material for capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) is investigated. The effect of insulation layer material and thickness on CMUT performance is evaluated using a simple parallel plate model. The model shows that both high dielectric constant and the electrical breakdown strength are important for the dielectric material, and significant performance improvement can be achieved, especially as the vacuum gap thickness is reduced. In particular, ALD hafnium oxide (HfO2) is evaluated and used as an improvement over plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silicon nitride (SixNy) for CMUTs fabricated by a low-temperature, complementary metal oxide semiconductor transistor-compatible, sacrificial release method. Relevant properties of ALD HfO2 such as dielectric constant and breakdown strength are characterized to further guide CMUT design. Experiments are performed on parallel fabricated test CMUTs with 50-nm gap and 16.5-MHz center frequency to measure and compare pressure output and receive sensitivity for 200-nm PECVD SixNy and 100-nm HfO2 insulation layers. Results for this particular design show a 6-dB improvement in receiver output with the collapse voltage reduced by one-half; while in transmit mode, half the input voltage is needed to achieve the same maximum output pressure. PMID:25474786

  18. Development of Leaky Wave Antennas for Layered Ridge Dielectric Waveguide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    1993-01-01

    The millimeter wave, especially above 100 GHz, and the submillimeter wave frequency spectrum offers the possibility for narrow-beam, high-resolution antennas which are critical for high definition radars required for space debris tracking, airport ground avoidance radars, and missile tracking. In addition, the frequency which most atmospheric constituents may be detected lie in this part of the frequency spectrum. Therefore, the development of electronic components for millimeter/submillimeter wave passive sensors is required for environmental monitoring of the Earth's atmosphere. Typical microwave transmission lines such as microstrip and coplanar waveguide rely on two or more electrical conductors to concentrate and guide the electromagnetic energy. Unfortunately, the surface resistance of the conductors increases as the square root of frequency. In addition, the circuit dimensions must be decreased with increasing frequency to maintain a single mode transmission line which further increases the conductor loss. An alternative family of transmission lines are formed from two or more insulating materials and rely on the differences in the permittivities between the two materials to guide the wave. No metal conductors are required although some dielectric waveguides do utilize a metallic ground plane to facilitate the interconnections of active electrical elements or to reduce the transmission line size. Examples of such transmission lines are image guides, insulated image guides, trapped image guides, ridge guide, and layered ridge dielectric waveguide (LRDW). Although most dielectric waveguides have dimensions on the order of lambda to provide sufficient field confinement, the LRDW has been shown to provide good field confinement for electrically small lines. This offers an advantage in circuit integration. It has been shown that a periodic array of metallic strips placed either along or on top of a dielectric waveguide forms an effective radiator. This antenna is

  19. Correlation between magnetic properties of layered ferromagnetic/dielectric material and tunable microwave device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salahun, Erwan; Quéffélec, Patrick; Tanné, Gérard; Adenot, Anne-Lise; Acher, Olivier

    2002-04-01

    Layered dielectric / ferromagnetic materials are extensively explored for microwave applications. Indeed, these materials combine the large saturation magnetization of ferromagnetic material with the low loss of dielectrics. Here, our aim was to integrate a layered ferromagnetic composite in a microwave propagation structure since the main advantage of such a material is the large impedance for one polarization. Thus, in order to predict the transmission response of the device, we carried out an electromagnetic analysis to determine how the field pattern of a microstrip line and the microwave-induced demagnetizing fields disturb the material behavior. We also explored the use of the propagation structure in two dc magnetic field-dependent devices: a tunable band stop filter and a magnetic switch. The stop-band function presented a large tunability of more than 50% with a minimal insertion loss of 3 dB when 250 Oe field was applied. Moreover, a magnetic switch using a dc field perpendicular to the easy axis of the ferromagnetic material was manufactured.

  20. Elliptical metallic hollow fiber inner-coated with non-uniform dielectric layer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoli; Yu, Zhuzheng; Tu, Xuecou; Chen, Jian; Argyros, Alexander; Kuhlmey, Boris T; Shi, Yiwei

    2015-08-24

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of an elliptical hollow fiber inner coated with a silver layer and a dielectric layer for polarization maintaining and low loss transmission of terahertz (THz) radiation. The primary purpose of adding the dielectric layer is to prevent the silver layer from oxidation. The thickness of the dielectric layer is non-uniform owing to the surface tension of the coating, which was initially applied as a liquid. Transmission loss and polarization maintenance are experimentally characterized. Effects of the dielectric layer on transmission properties are analyzed by comparing the fiber to Ag-only fiber. Results show that a dielectric layer with thickness less than λ/10 can effectively decreases the power distributed on the metal surface and thus can practically reduce loss resulting from roughness of the silver layer. Bending effects on transmission loss and polarization maintenance are also investigated.

  1. Modeling of single pulse 3-D energy deposition profiles inside dielectrics upon fs laser irradiation with complex beam wavefronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyo, J.; Galván-Sosa, M.; Ruiz de la Cruz, A.; Grace, E. J.; Ferrer, A.; Siegel, J.; Solis, J.

    2014-05-01

    Nonlinear laser processing of dielectrics with ultrafast lasers has been extensively studied over the last years and successfully applied to the production of photonics and micro-fluidic devices. Still, problems related to the presence of strong optical nonlinearities make it difficult to optimize the spatial intensity distribution in the focal region (SIDFR) in some cases. Methods providing a rapid estimate of the latter, even approximately, can be of great help for optimizing processing strategies and in other applications conditioned by nonlinear propagation like spatial soliton shaping. We have developed a numerical method for estimating the SIDFR inside a dielectric material, considering nonlinear absorption, nonlinear refraction and spherical aberration for laser beams with arbitrarily shaped wavefront. It is based on a generalized adaptive fast-Fourier evolver and has been successfully tested for flat wavefronts in subsurface processing. In this work we demonstrate its applicability to complex wavefronts, like those that can be generated with spatial light modulators (SLM). For this purpose the beam wavefront is described using Zernike polynomials before being propagated inside the material for different depths, pulse parameters. The results obtained show that under certain conditions, nonlinearities can be not only controlled and pre-compensated but also exploited for producing tailored SIDFRs.

  2. Electromagnetic resonances of solar-selective absorbers with nanoparticle arrays embedded in a dielectric layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Atsushi; Kawamata, Tomoaki

    2016-11-01

    We numerically investigate a solar-selective absorber with tungsten core-shell nanoparticle arrays embedded in an SiO2 layer. The 3D full-wave finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations are performed to investigate the geometric effects of different types of solar-selective absorbers. Consequently, broadband light absorption was achieved with either a tungsten nanoparticle array or a tungsten core-shell nanoparticle array because of the strong electric field enhancement in the gap between the core nanoparticles. The solar performance of the proposed structure is shown for high-efficiency solar light absorption. This study enhances understanding of the light absorption mechanism of metallic nanoparticle/dielectric composite and facilitates the design of high-efficiency solar-selective absorbers.

  3. Numerical solutions of the compressible 3-D boundary-layer equations for aerospace configurations with emphasis on LFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Julius E.; Iyer, Venkit; Radwan, Samir

    1987-01-01

    The application of stability theory in Laminar Flow Control (LFC) research requires that density and velocity profiles be specified throughout the viscous flow field of interest. These profile values must be as numerically accurate as possible and free of any numerically induced oscillations. Guidelines for the present research project are presented: develop an efficient and accurate procedure for solving the 3-D boundary layer equation for aerospace configurations; develop an interface program to couple selected 3-D inviscid programs that span the subsonic to hypersonic Mach number range; and document and release software to the LFC community. The interface program was found to be a dependable approach for developing a user friendly procedure for generating the boundary-layer grid and transforming an inviscid solution from a relatively coarse grid to a sufficiently fine boundary-layer grid. The boundary-layer program was shown to be fourth-order accurate in the direction normal to the wall boundary and second-order accurate in planes parallel to the boundary. The fourth-order accuracy allows accurate calculations with as few as one-fifth the number of grid points required for conventional second-order schemes.

  4. Improving the dielectric properties of an electrowetting-on-dielectric microfluidic device with a low-pressure chemical vapor deposited Si3N4 dielectric layer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hsien-Hua; Chung, Lung-Yuan; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2015-03-01

    Dielectric breakdown is a common problem in a digital microfluidic system, which limits its application in chemical or biomedical applications. We propose a new fabrication of an electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) device using Si3N4 deposited by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) as a dielectric layer. This material exhibits a greater relative permittivity, purity, uniformity, and biocompatibility than polymeric films. These properties also increase the breakdown voltage of a dielectric layer and increase the stability of an EWOD system when applied in biomedical research. Medium droplets with mouse embryos were manipulated in this manner. The electrical properties of the Si3N4 dielectric layer-breakdown voltage, refractive index, relative permittivity, and variation of contact angle with input voltage-were investigated and compared with a traditional Si3N4 dielectric layer deposited as a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition to confirm the potential of LPCVD Si3N4 applied as the dielectric layer of an EWOD digital microfluidic system.

  5. Preventing Electrical Shorts in Parallel-Plate Capacitors with Single-Printed Dielectric Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvat, Maša; Vidmar, Tjaša; Maček, Marijan; Klanjšek Gunde, Marta

    2015-07-01

    Double-printing of dielectric layers is commonly used to prevent electrical shorts in parallel-plate capacitors, but this increases the thickness of the dielectric layer and diminishes the corresponding capacitance. Double-printing also complicates the production process and increases production costs. In this paper, it is demonstrated that capacitors with single-printed dielectric layers are without shorts if the layer is completely polymerized. Therefore, electrical shorts could also be related to the state of polymerization in a defect-free dielectric layer. To demonstrate this, the electrical functionality of capacitors with single-printed dielectric layers was studied in terms of intrinsic properties of the ultraviolet (UV) curable dielectric layer, which were varied according to the curing energy. The chemical structure of the cured layer was analyzed with infrared spectroscopy to obtain the appearance of polymerizable groups and crosslinks within the polymer structure. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to measure the glass transition temperature of the dielectric material. It increases rapidly with UV curing until the polymerization is completed, whereas a small increase with further curing confirms crosslinking of the polymer. The influence of structuring effects within a dielectric layer in the presence of electrical shorts between electrodes is discussed. This research confirms that a completely polymerized layer forms a barrier to leakage and helps to prevent the formation of conductive paths between electrodes. Therefore, a connection between the structure of polymerized layer and its electrical properties is highly reasonable.

  6. Optimised 3D surface measurement of hydroxyapatite layers using adapted white light scanning interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecheva, Emilia; Montgomery, Paul; Montaner, Denis; Pramatarova, Lilyana; Zanev, Zenko

    2006-09-01

    Biomineralization is intensively studied at present due to its importance in the formation of bones, teeth, cartilage, etc. Hydroxyapatite is one of the most common natural biomaterials and the primary structural component of bones and teeth. We have grown bio-like hydroxyapatite layers in-vitro on stainless steel, silicon and silica glass by using a biomimetic approach (immersion in a supersaturated aqueous solution resembling the ion composition of human blood plasma). Using classical techniques such as stylus profiling, AFM or SEM, it was found difficult, destructive or time-consuming to measure the topography, thickness and profile of the heterogeneous, thick and rough hydroxyapatite layers. White light scanning interferometry, on the other hand, has been found to be particularly useful for analyzing such bio-like layers, requiring no sample preparation and being rapid and non-destructive. The results have shown a typical layer thickness of up to 20 μm and a rms roughness of 4 μm. The hydroxyapatite presents nonetheless a challenge for this technique because of its semi-translucence, high roughness and the presence of cavities within its volume. This results in varying qualities of fringe pattern depending on the area, ranging from classical fringes on smooth surfaces, to complex speckle-like fringes on rough surfaces, to multiple fringe signals along the optical axis in the presence of buried layers. In certain configurations this can affect the measurement precision. In this paper we present the latest results for optimizing the measurement conditions in order to reduce such errors and to provide additional useful information concerning the layer.

  7. One-layer microfluidic device for hydrodynamic 3D self-flow-focusing operating in low flow speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daghighi, Yasaman; Gnyawali, Vaskar; Strohm, Eric M.; Tsai, Scott S. H.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrodynamic 3D flow-focusing techniques in microfluidics are categorized as (a) sheathless techniques which require high flow rates and long channels, resulting in high operating cost and high flow rates which are inappropriate for applications with flow rate limitations, and (b) sheath-flow based techniques which usually require excessive sheath flow rate to achieve hydrodynamic 3D flow-focusing. Many devices based on these principles use complicated fabrication methods to create multi-layer microchannels. We have developed a sheath-flow based microfluidic device that is capable of hydrodynamic 3D self-flow-focusing. In this device the main flow (black ink) in a low speed, and a sheath flow, enter through two inlets and enter a 180 degree curved channel (300 × 300 μm cross-section). Main flow migrates outwards into the sheath-flow due to centrifugal effects and consequently, vertical focusing is achieved at the end of the curved channel. Then, two other sheath flows horizontally confine the main flow to achieve horizontal focusing. Thus, the core flow is three-dimensionally focused at the center of the channel at the downstream. Using centrifugal force for 3D flow-focusing in a single-layer fabricated microchannel has been previously investigated by few groups. However, their demonstrated designs required high flow speed (>1 m/s) which is not suitable for many applications that live biomedical specie are involved. Here, we introduce a new design which is operational in low flow speed (<0.05 m/s) and is suitable for applications involving live cells. This microfluidic device can be used in detecting, counting and isolating cells in many biomedical applications.

  8. Regional application of multi-layer artificial neural networks in 3-D ionosphere tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari Razin, Mir Reza; Voosoghi, Behzad

    2016-08-01

    Tomography is a very cost-effective method to study physical properties of the ionosphere. In this paper, residual minimization training neural network (RMTNN) is used in voxel-based tomography to reconstruct of 3-D ionosphere electron density with high spatial resolution. For numerical experiments, observations collected at 37 GPS stations from Iranian permanent GPS network (IPGN) are used. A smoothed TEC approach was used for absolute STEC recovery. To improve the vertical resolution, empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) obtained from international reference ionosphere 2012 (IRI-2012) used as object function in training neural network. Ionosonde observations is used for validate reliability of the proposed method. Minimum relative error for RMTNN is 1.64% and maximum relative error is 15.61%. Also root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.17 × 1011 (electrons/m3) is computed for RMTNN which is less than RMSE of IRI2012. The results show that RMTNN has higher accuracy and compiles speed than other ionosphere reconstruction methods.

  9. Hierarchical self-assembly of hexagonal single-crystal nanosheets into 3D layered superlattices with high conductivity.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yulun; Shen, Yuhua; Yang, Liangbao; Han, Bin; Huang, Fangzhi; Li, Shikuo; Chu, Zhuwang; Xie, Anjian

    2012-06-21

    While the number of man-made nano superstructures realized by self-assembly is growing in recent years, assemblies of conductive polymer nanocrystals, especially for superlattices, are still a significant challenge, not only because of the simplicity of the shape of the nanocrystal building blocks and their interactions, but also because of the poor control over these parameters in the fabrication of more elaborate nanocrystals. Here, we firstly report a facile and general route to a new generation of 3D layered superlattices of polyaniline doped with CSA (PANI-CSA) and show how PANI crystallize and self-assemble, in a suitable single solution environment. In cyclohexane, 1D amorphous nanofibers transformed to 1D nanorods as building blocks, and then to 2D single-crystal nanosheets with a hexagonal phase, and lastly to 3D ordered layered superlattices with the narrowest polydispersity value (M(w)/M(n) = 1.47). Remarkably, all the instructions for the hierarchical self-assembly are encoded in the layered shape in other non-polar solvents (hexane, octane) and their conductivity in the π-π stacking direction is improved to about 50 S cm(-1), which is even higher than that of the highest previously reported value (16 S cm(-1)). The method used in this study is greatly expected to be readily scalable to produce superlattices of conductive polymers with high quality and low cost. PMID:22609947

  10. Hierarchical self-assembly of hexagonal single-crystal nanosheets into 3D layered superlattices with high conductivity.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yulun; Shen, Yuhua; Yang, Liangbao; Han, Bin; Huang, Fangzhi; Li, Shikuo; Chu, Zhuwang; Xie, Anjian

    2012-06-21

    While the number of man-made nano superstructures realized by self-assembly is growing in recent years, assemblies of conductive polymer nanocrystals, especially for superlattices, are still a significant challenge, not only because of the simplicity of the shape of the nanocrystal building blocks and their interactions, but also because of the poor control over these parameters in the fabrication of more elaborate nanocrystals. Here, we firstly report a facile and general route to a new generation of 3D layered superlattices of polyaniline doped with CSA (PANI-CSA) and show how PANI crystallize and self-assemble, in a suitable single solution environment. In cyclohexane, 1D amorphous nanofibers transformed to 1D nanorods as building blocks, and then to 2D single-crystal nanosheets with a hexagonal phase, and lastly to 3D ordered layered superlattices with the narrowest polydispersity value (M(w)/M(n) = 1.47). Remarkably, all the instructions for the hierarchical self-assembly are encoded in the layered shape in other non-polar solvents (hexane, octane) and their conductivity in the π-π stacking direction is improved to about 50 S cm(-1), which is even higher than that of the highest previously reported value (16 S cm(-1)). The method used in this study is greatly expected to be readily scalable to produce superlattices of conductive polymers with high quality and low cost.

  11. Improving the dielectric properties of an electrowetting-on-dielectric microfluidic device with a low-pressure chemical vapor deposited Si3N4 dielectric layer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hsien-Hua; Chung, Lung-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Dielectric breakdown is a common problem in a digital microfluidic system, which limits its application in chemical or biomedical applications. We propose a new fabrication of an electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) device using Si3N4 deposited by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) as a dielectric layer. This material exhibits a greater relative permittivity, purity, uniformity, and biocompatibility than polymeric films. These properties also increase the breakdown voltage of a dielectric layer and increase the stability of an EWOD system when applied in biomedical research. Medium droplets with mouse embryos were manipulated in this manner. The electrical properties of the Si3N4 dielectric layer—breakdown voltage, refractive index, relative permittivity, and variation of contact angle with input voltage—were investigated and compared with a traditional Si3N4 dielectric layer deposited as a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition to confirm the potential of LPCVD Si3N4 applied as the dielectric layer of an EWOD digital microfluidic system. PMID:25825614

  12. Mixing Layer Excitation by Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Richard; Little, Jesse

    2012-11-01

    The response of a mixing layer with velocity ratio 0.28 to perturbations near the high-speed side (U2=11 m/s, ReL = 0.26 × 106) of its origin from dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators is studied experimentally. Both alternating current (ac) and nanosecond (ns) pulse driven plasma are investigated in an effort to clarify the mechanisms associated with each technique as well as the more general physics associated with flow control via momentum-based versus thermal actuation. Ac-DBD plasma actuators, which function through electrohydrodynamic effects, are found to generate an increase in mixing layer momentum thickness that is strongly dependent on forcing frequency. Results are qualitatively similar to previous archival literature on the topic employing oscillating flaps. Ns-DBD plasma, which is believed to function through thermal effects, has no measureable influence on the mixing layer profile at similar forcing conditions. In the context of previous archival literature, these results suggest different physical mechanisms govern active control via ac- and ns-DBD plasma actuation and more generally, momentum versus thermal perturbations. Further investigation of these phenomena will be provided through variation of the boundary/mixing layer properties and forcing parameters in the context of spatially and temporally resolved experimental data. Supported by: AFOSR and Raytheon Missile Systems.

  13. Coupling Between Microstrip Lines Embedded in Polyimide Layers for 3D-MMICs on Si

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Tentzeris, Emmanouil M.; Papapolymerou, John

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional circuits built upon multiple layers of polyimide are required for constructing Si/SiGe monolithic microwave/millimeter-wave integrated circuits on CMOS (low resistivity) Si wafers. However, the closely spaced transmission lines are susceptible to high levels of coupling, which degrades circuit performance. In this paper, Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) analysis and measured characteristics of novel shielding structures that significantly reduce coupling between embedded microstrip lines are presented.

  14. Phase-retrieved optical projection tomography for 3D imaging through scattering layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancora, Daniele; Di Battista, Diego; Giasafaki, Georgia; Psycharakis, Stylianos; Liapis, Evangelos; Zacharopoulos, Athanasios; Zacharakis, Giannis

    2016-03-01

    Recently great progress has been made in biological and biomedical imaging by combining non-invasive optical methods, novel adaptive light manipulation and computational techniques for intensity-based phase recovery and three dimensional image reconstruction. In particular and in relation to the work presented here, Optical Projection Tomography (OPT) is a well-established technique for imaging mostly transparent absorbing biological models such as C. Elegans and Danio Rerio. On the contrary, scattering layers like the cocoon surrounding the Drosophila during the pupae stage constitutes a challenge for three dimensional imaging through such a complex structure. However, recent studies enabled image reconstruction through scattering curtains up to few transport mean free paths via phase retrieval iterative algorithms allowing to uncover objects hidden behind complex layers. By combining these two techniques we explore the possibility to perform a three dimensional image reconstruction of fluorescent objects embedded between scattering layers without compromising its structural integrity. Dynamical cross correlation registration was implemented for the registration process due to translational and flipping ambiguity of the phase retrieval problem, in order to provide the correct aligned set of data to perform the back-projection reconstruction. We have thus managed to reconstruct a hidden complex object between static scattering curtains and compared with the effective reconstruction to fully understand the process before the in-vivo biological implementation.

  15. Optical properties of silica fibers and layered dielectric mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, D.W.; Farnum, E.H.; Clinard, F.W. Jr.; Bennett, B.L.; Portis, A.M.

    1996-04-01

    Radioluminescence (RL) from virgin and neutron-irradiated (10{sup 23} n-m{sup -2}) silica fibers has been measured in the temperature interval 4 to 300 K. Unirradiated specimens exhibit a decrease in RL intensity with increasing temperature such that the intensity is extremely weak at room temperature. The luminescence is well described by a barrier-limited exciton mechanism. in contrast, the heavily-irradiated samples show an increase in RL with elevated temperatures such that the intensity at room temperature is about twice that measured at 4 K. Neutron irradiation presumably produces many luminescence centers that act as radiative sites for exciton decay. Absolute specular reflectance of a series of neutron irradiated, layered dielectric mirrors was also measured. In addition to structural damage that has already been reported, we typically found approximately 10% reduction in the reflectance following irradiation. These results suggest that neither fibers nor dielectric mirrors are well suited for use near the high radiation area of the ITER plasma.

  16. Active millimeter wave detection of concealed layers of dielectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowring, N. J.; Baker, J. G.; Rezgui, N. D.; Southgate, M.; Alder, J. F.

    2007-04-01

    Extensive work has been published on millimetre wave active and passive detection and imaging of metallic objects concealed under clothing. We propose and demonstrate a technique for revealing the depth as well as the outline of partially transparent objects, which is especially suited to imaging layer materials such as explosives and drugs. The technique uses a focussed and scanned FMCW source, swept through many GHz to reveal this structure. The principle involved is that a parallel sided dielectric slab produces reflections at both its upper and lower surfaces, acting as a Fabry-Perot interferometer. This produces a pattern of alternating reflected peaks and troughs in frequency space. Fourier or Burg transforming this pattern into z-space generates a peak at the thickness of the irradiated sample. It could be argued that though such a technique may work for single uniform slabs of dielectric material, it will give results of little or no significance when the sample both scatters the incident radiation and gives erratic reflectivities due to its non-uniform thickness and permittivity . We show results for a variety of materials such as explosive simulants, powder and drugs, both alone and concealed under clothing or in a rucksack, which display strongly directional reflectivities at millimeter wavelengths, and whose location is well displayed by a varying thickness parameter as the millimetre beam is scanned across the target. With this system we find that samples can easily be detected at standoff distances of at least 4.6m.

  17. Implementation of a 3D mixing layer code on parallel computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, K.; Thakur, R.; Dang, T.; Bogucz, E.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes our progress and experience in the development of a Computational-Fluid-Dynamics code on parallel computers to simulate three-dimensional spatially-developing mixing layers. In this initial study, the three-dimensional time-dependent Euler equations are solved using a finite-volume explicit time-marching algorithm. The code was first programmed in Fortran 77 for sequential computers. The code was then converted for use on parallel computers using the conventional message-passing technique, while we have not been able to compile the code with the present version of HPF compilers.

  18. Inkjet printing of carbon supported platinum 3-D catalyst layers for use in fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, André D.; Kim, Edward Y.; Humes, Virgil P.; Kizuka, Jeremy; Thompson, Levi T.

    We present a method of using inkjet printing (IJP) to deposit catalyst materials onto gas diffusion layers (GDLs) that are made into membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) for polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEMFC). Existing ink deposition methods such as spray painting or screen printing are not well suited for ultra low (<0.5 mg Pt cm -2) loadings. The IJP method can be used to deposit smaller volumes of water based catalyst ink solutions with picoliter precision provided the solution properties are compatible with the cartridge design. By optimizing the dispersion of the ink solution we have shown that this technique can be successfully used with catalysts supported on different carbon black (i.e. XC-72R, Monarch 700, Black Pearls 2000, etc.). Our ink jet printed MEAs with catalyst loadings of 0.020 mg Pt cm -2 have shown Pt utilizations in excess of 16,000 mW mg -1 Pt which is higher than our traditional screen printed MEAs (800 mW mg -1 Pt). As a further demonstration of IJP versatility, we present results of a graded distribution of Pt/C catalyst structure using standard Johnson Matthey (JM) catalyst. Compared to a continuous catalyst layer of JM Pt/C (20% Pt), the graded catalyst structure showed enhanced performance.

  19. Creating photo-realistic works in a 3D scene using layers styles to create an animation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramescu, A. M.

    2015-11-01

    Creating realist objects in a 3D scene is not an easy work. We have to be very careful to make the creation very detailed. If we don't know how to make these photo-realistic works, by using the techniques and a good reference photo we can create an amazing amount of detail and realism. For example, in this article there are some of these detailed methods from which we can learn the techniques necessary to make beautiful and realistic objects in a scene. More precisely, in this paper, we present how to create a 3D animated scene, mainly using the Pen Tool and Blending Options. Indeed, this work is based on teaching some simple ways of using the Layer Styles to create some great shadows, lights, textures and a realistic sense of 3 Dimension. The present work involves also showing how some interesting ways of using the illuminating and rendering options can create a realistic effect in a scene. Moreover, this article shows how to create photo realistic 3D models from a digital image. The present work proposes to present how to use Illustrator paths, texturing, basic lighting and rendering, how to apply textures and how to parent the building and objects components. We also propose to use this proposition to recreate smaller details or 3D objects from a 2D image. After a critic art stage, we are able now to present in this paper the architecture of a design method that proposes to create an animation. The aim is to create a conceptual and methodological tutorial to address this issue both scientifically and in practice. This objective also includes proposing, on strong scientific basis, a model that gives the possibility of a better understanding of the techniques necessary to create a realistic animation.

  20. Curing behavior and reaction kinetics of binder resins for 3D-printing investigated by dielectric analysis (DEA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möginger, B.; Kehret, L.; Hausnerova, B.; Steinhaus, J.

    2016-05-01

    3D-Printing is an efficient method in the field of additive manufacturing. In order to optimize the properties of manufactured parts it is essential to adapt the curing behavior of the resin systems with respect to the requirements. Thus, effects of resin composition, e.g. due to different additives such as thickener and curing agents, on the curing behavior have to be known. As the resin transfers from a liquid to a solid glass the time dependent ion viscosity was measured using DEA with flat IDEX sensors. This allows for a sensitive measurement of resin changes as the ion viscosity changes two to four decades. The investigated resin systems are based on the monomers styrene and HEMA. To account for the effects of copolymerization in the calculation of the reaction kinetics it was assumed that the reaction can be considered as a homo-polymerization having a reaction order n≠1. Then the measured ion viscosity curves are fitted with the solution of the reactions kinetics - the time dependent degree of conversion (DC-function) - for times exceeding the initiation phase representing the primary curing. The measured ion viscosity curves can nicely be fitted with the DC-function and the determined fit parameters distinguish distinctly between the investigated resin compositions.

  1. Highly sensitive flexible pressure sensors with microstructured rubber dielectric layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannsfeld, Stefan C. B.; Tee, Benjamin C.-K.; Stoltenberg, Randall M.; Chen, Christopher V. H.-H.; Barman, Soumendra; Muir, Beinn V. O.; Sokolov, Anatoliy N.; Reese, Colin; Bao, Zhenan

    2010-10-01

    The development of an electronic skin is critical to the realization of artificial intelligence that comes into direct contact with humans, and to biomedical applications such as prosthetic skin. To mimic the tactile sensing properties of natural skin, large arrays of pixel pressure sensors on a flexible and stretchable substrate are required. We demonstrate flexible, capacitive pressure sensors with unprecedented sensitivity and very short response times that can be inexpensively fabricated over large areas by microstructuring of thin films of the biocompatible elastomer polydimethylsiloxane. The pressure sensitivity of the microstructured films far surpassed that exhibited by unstructured elastomeric films of similar thickness, and is tunable by using different microstructures. The microstructured films were integrated into organic field-effect transistors as the dielectric layer, forming a new type of active sensor device with similarly excellent sensitivity and response times.

  2. 3D polyaniline porous layer anchored pillared graphene sheets: enhanced interface joined with high conductivity for better charge storage applications.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Pandiaraj; Anothumakkool, Bihag; Kurungot, Sreekumar

    2015-04-15

    Here, we report synthesis of a 3-dimensional (3D) porous polyaniline (PANI) anchored on pillared graphene (G-PANI-PA) as an efficient charge storage material for supercapacitor applications. Benzoic acid (BA) anchored graphene, having spatially separated graphene layers (G-Bz-COOH), was used as a structure controlling support whereas 3D PANI growth has been achieved by a simple chemical oxidation of aniline in the presence of phytic acid (PA). The BA groups on G-Bz-COOH play a critical role in preventing the restacking of graphene to achieve a high surface area of 472 m(2)/g compared to reduced graphene oxide (RGO, 290 m(2)/g). The carboxylic acid (-COOH) group controls the rate of polymerization to achieve a compact polymer structure with micropores whereas the chelating nature of PA plays a crucial role to achieve the 3D growth pattern of PANI. This type of controlled interplay helps G-PANI-PA to achieve a high conductivity of 3.74 S/cm all the while maintaining a high surface area of 330 m(2)/g compared to PANI-PA (0.4 S/cm and 60 m(2)/g). G-PANI-PA thus conceives the characteristics required for facile charge mobility during fast charge-discharge cycles, which results in a high specific capacitance of 652 F/g for the composite. Owing to the high surface area along with high conductivity, G-PANI-PA displays a stable specific capacitance of 547 F/g even with a high mass loading of 3 mg/cm(2), an enhanced areal capacitance of 1.52 F/cm(2), and a volumetric capacitance of 122 F/cm(3). The reduced charge-transfer resistance (RCT) of 0.67 Ω displayed by G-PANI-PA compared to pure PANI (0.79 Ω) stands out as valid evidence of the improved charge mobility achieved by the system by growing the 3D PANI layer along the spatially separated layers of the graphene sheets. The low RCT helps the system to display capacitance retention as high as 65% even under a high current dragging condition of 10 A/g. High charge/discharge rates and good cycling stability are the other

  3. 3D polyaniline porous layer anchored pillared graphene sheets: enhanced interface joined with high conductivity for better charge storage applications.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Pandiaraj; Anothumakkool, Bihag; Kurungot, Sreekumar

    2015-04-15

    Here, we report synthesis of a 3-dimensional (3D) porous polyaniline (PANI) anchored on pillared graphene (G-PANI-PA) as an efficient charge storage material for supercapacitor applications. Benzoic acid (BA) anchored graphene, having spatially separated graphene layers (G-Bz-COOH), was used as a structure controlling support whereas 3D PANI growth has been achieved by a simple chemical oxidation of aniline in the presence of phytic acid (PA). The BA groups on G-Bz-COOH play a critical role in preventing the restacking of graphene to achieve a high surface area of 472 m(2)/g compared to reduced graphene oxide (RGO, 290 m(2)/g). The carboxylic acid (-COOH) group controls the rate of polymerization to achieve a compact polymer structure with micropores whereas the chelating nature of PA plays a crucial role to achieve the 3D growth pattern of PANI. This type of controlled interplay helps G-PANI-PA to achieve a high conductivity of 3.74 S/cm all the while maintaining a high surface area of 330 m(2)/g compared to PANI-PA (0.4 S/cm and 60 m(2)/g). G-PANI-PA thus conceives the characteristics required for facile charge mobility during fast charge-discharge cycles, which results in a high specific capacitance of 652 F/g for the composite. Owing to the high surface area along with high conductivity, G-PANI-PA displays a stable specific capacitance of 547 F/g even with a high mass loading of 3 mg/cm(2), an enhanced areal capacitance of 1.52 F/cm(2), and a volumetric capacitance of 122 F/cm(3). The reduced charge-transfer resistance (RCT) of 0.67 Ω displayed by G-PANI-PA compared to pure PANI (0.79 Ω) stands out as valid evidence of the improved charge mobility achieved by the system by growing the 3D PANI layer along the spatially separated layers of the graphene sheets. The low RCT helps the system to display capacitance retention as high as 65% even under a high current dragging condition of 10 A/g. High charge/discharge rates and good cycling stability are the other

  4. 3d transition metal doped Zn0.95 Tm 0.05O (Tm = Mn, Co, Ni, Cu): structure, microstructure, Raman, dielectric constant and magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Dinesh; Dwivedi, Sonam

    2015-10-01

    We present the structural, microstructural, optical, dielectric, and magnetic behavior of 3d transition metal (Tm) doped Zn0.95 Tm 0.05O (Tm = Mn, Co, Ni, Cu) diluted magnetic semiconducting samples as synthesized by solid-state route reaction method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern infers that the sample of Zn0.95 TM 0.05O (Tm = Mn, Co, Ni, Cu) is in single-phase wurtzite structure (hexagonal phase, P63 mc). The average particle size obtained for different compositions of Zn0.95 TM 0.05O (TM = Mn, Co, Ni, Cu) are 0.499, 0.517, 0.568, and 0.572 μm, respectively. Ni-doped ZnO has obtained the lowest band gap (˜3.1 eV) as compared to other transition metal (Tm = Mn, Co, Cu) ion-doped ZnO. The effect of Tm ions substitution on dielectric constant, and loss tangent, is also studied at room temperature in a wide range of frequencies between 50 Hz-1 MHz. The dielectric parameters were enhanced by the replacement of Zn ions with transition metal ions. Room temperature magnetization-magnetic field (M-H) measurements show the paramagnetic behavior of Zn0.95Mn0.05O and Zn0.95Cu0.05O, diamagnetic characteristic of Zn0.95Co0.05O, and ferromagnetic response of Zn0.95Ni0.05O. In Zn0.95Ni0.05O samples the saturation occurs at 2 kOe, while the small value of coercive field is about 100 Oe at room temperature and is attributed to the soft nature of Zn0.95Ni0.05O.

  5. Mechanochemical and thermal formation of 1H-benzotriazole coordination polymers and complexes of 3d-transition metals with intriguing dielectric properties.

    PubMed

    Brede, Franziska A; Mühlbach, Friedrich; Sextl, Gerhard; Müller-Buschbaum, Klaus

    2016-07-14

    Liquid-assisted grinding (LAG) reactions have been successfully applied to achieve a series of complexes and coordination polymers based on divalent 3d-transition metal chlorides (TM chlorides) and the aromatic ligand 1H-benzotriazole (BtzH). The obtained substances were investigated via single crystal X-ray, powder X-ray determination and simultaneous DTA/TG analysis as model compounds for structural and chemical influences on their dielectric properties. Depending on the synthesis method, different constitutions and structures are observed. Two polymorphous forms of the 1D polymer [MnCl2(BtzH)2] (1 and 2) as well as the complexes [ZnCl2(BtzH)2]·BtzH (3) and [CoCl2(BtzH)2]·BtzH (4) have been obtained as phase-pure bulk substances via the mechanochemical LAG route, and even single crystals are available. For comparison, thermal reactions were also carried out and have led to the formation of the neutral complexes: [CoCl2(BtzH)2] (5) and [CoCl2(BtzH)4]·4BtzH (6), [ZnCl2(BtzH)2] (7) and the anionic complex BtzH2[CoCl3BtzH] (8). In addition, thermal treatment of 3 yields the benzotriazolium salt {(BtzH)2H}Cl (9). The transition metal compounds were additionally analysed regarding their dielectric properties by frequency-dependent as well as temperature-dependent permittivity investigations. It is intriguing that compounds 1 and 3 show remarkably low dielectric constants and loss factors up to 50 °C highlighting them as potential "low-k materials".

  6. CVS Filtering of 3D Turbulent Mixing Layers Using Orthogonal Wavelets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Kai; Farge, Marie; Pellegrino, Giulio; Rogers, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Coherent Vortex Simulation (CVS) filtering has been applied to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) data of forced and unforced time-developing turbulent mixing layers. CVS filtering splits the turbulent flow into two orthogonal parts, one corresponding to coherent vortices and the other to incoherent background flow. We have shown that the coherent vortices can be represented by few wavelet modes and that these modes are sufficient to reproduce the vorticity probability distribution function (PDF) and the energy spectrum over the entire inertial range. The remaining incoherent background flow is homogeneous, has small amplitude, and is uncorrelated. These results are compared with those obtained for the same compression rate using large eddy simulation (LES) filtering. In contrast to the incoherent background flow of CVS filtering, the LES subgrid scales have a much larger amplitude and are correlated, which makes their statistical modeling more difficult.

  7. A 3D micro-laser anemometer for boundary layer studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, N. A.; Elder, R. L.; Forster, C. P.; Jones, J. D. C.

    A miniature sized instrument called the 'three-dimensional microlaser Doppler anemometer' has been developed at Cranfield Institute of Technology, primarily intended for boundary layer measurements in centrifugal compressors but retaining all the features of other conventional laser Doppler anemometers. It has a high spatial resolution (80 micron cube) and uses oblique back-scatter to enable velocity measurements in all three dimensions. An optical head is remotely connected via fiber optic cables to the laser, photomultiplier tubes and signal processing equipment. In this paper, the design objectives, design philosophy and commissioning of the instrument are described. The mathematics of these dimensional measurements and the results of a test to demonstrate the instrument are also presented.

  8. Skin-Friction Measurements in a 3-D, Supersonic Shock-Wave/Boundary-Layer Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wideman, J. K.; Brown, J. L.; Miles, J. B.; Ozcan, O.

    1994-01-01

    The experimental documentation of a three-dimensional shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction in a nominal Mach 3 cylinder, aligned with the free-stream flow, and 20 deg. half-angle conical flare offset 1.27 cm from the cylinder centerline. Surface oil flow, laser light sheet illumination, and schlieren were used to document the flow topology. The data includes surface-pressure and skin-friction measurements. A laser interferometric skin friction data. Included in the skin-friction data are measurements within separated regions and three-dimensional measurements in highly-swept regions. The skin-friction data will be particularly valuable in turbulence modeling and computational fluid dynamics validation.

  9. Unsteady symmetry-plane boundary layer and 3-D unsteady separation. Part 1: High incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K. C.; Fan, Z. Q.

    1982-01-01

    The symmetry-plane laminar boundary layer of an impulsively-started ellipsoid of revolution at high incidence is solved to shed light on some basic characteristics of three dimensional, unsteady flows. The governing equations are formally similar to those for the 3-dimensional, steady case, so the same method of solution and computer programs previously developed were employed in the present work. The most important result obtained is concerned with the meridional skin friction c(fu). The zero-c(fu) point (at which c(fu) vanishes) does not, as expected, move forward as time increases, instead it remains over the rear body. As t approaches infinity, it jumps to the front nose. This implies that there is no flow separation over the symmetry-plane at finite times. In the meanwhile, it is argued that separation must occur on two sides of the body. This situation leads us to propose a new unsteady separation sequence, i.e. an open type separation prevails at earlier times, while a closed type of separation occurs only at the steady-state condition. This sequence presents a sharp contrast to the conventional notion of unsteady separation which consists of a series of closed separations only. Furthermore, this sequence with the time as the parameter is found to be similar to that for previously-studied steady flows with varying incidences.

  10. Hierarchical self-assembly of hexagonal single-crystal nanosheets into 3D layered superlattices with high conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yulun; Shen, Yuhua; Yang, Liangbao; Han, Bin; Huang, Fangzhi; Li, Shikuo; Chu, Zhuwang; Xie, Anjian

    2012-05-01

    While the number of man-made nano superstructures realized by self-assembly is growing in recent years, assemblies of conductive polymer nanocrystals, especially for superlattices, are still a significant challenge, not only because of the simplicity of the shape of the nanocrystal building blocks and their interactions, but also because of the poor control over these parameters in the fabrication of more elaborate nanocrystals. Here, we firstly report a facile and general route to a new generation of 3D layered superlattices of polyaniline doped with CSA (PANI-CSA) and show how PANI crystallize and self-assemble, in a suitable single solution environment. In cyclohexane, 1D amorphous nanofibers transformed to 1D nanorods as building blocks, and then to 2D single-crystal nanosheets with a hexagonal phase, and lastly to 3D ordered layered superlattices with the narrowest polydispersity value (Mw/Mn = 1.47). Remarkably, all the instructions for the hierarchical self-assembly are encoded in the layered shape in other non-polar solvents (hexane, octane) and their conductivity in the π-π stacking direction is improved to about 50 S cm-1, which is even higher than that of the highest previously reported value (16 S cm-1). The method used in this study is greatly expected to be readily scalable to produce superlattices of conductive polymers with high quality and low cost.While the number of man-made nano superstructures realized by self-assembly is growing in recent years, assemblies of conductive polymer nanocrystals, especially for superlattices, are still a significant challenge, not only because of the simplicity of the shape of the nanocrystal building blocks and their interactions, but also because of the poor control over these parameters in the fabrication of more elaborate nanocrystals. Here, we firstly report a facile and general route to a new generation of 3D layered superlattices of polyaniline doped with CSA (PANI-CSA) and show how PANI crystallize and

  11. Tissue Engineering: Construction of a Multicellular 3D Scaffold for the Delivery of Layered Cell Sheets

    PubMed Central

    Turner, William S.; Sandhu, Nabjot; McCloskey, Kara E.

    2014-01-01

    Many tissues, such as the adult human hearts, are unable to adequately regenerate after damage.2,3 Strategies in tissue engineering propose innovations to assist the body in recovery and repair. For example, TE approaches may be able to attenuate heart remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI) and possibly increase total heart function to a near normal pre-MI level.4 As with any functional tissue, successful regeneration of cardiac tissue involves the proper delivery of multiple cell types with environmental cues favoring integration and survival of the implanted cell/tissue graft. Engineered tissues should address multiple parameters including: soluble signals, cell-to-cell interactions, and matrix materials evaluated as delivery vehicles, their effects on cell survival, material strength, and facilitation of cell-to-tissue organization. Studies employing the direct injection of graft cells only ignore these essential elements.2,5,6 A tissue design combining these ingredients has yet to be developed. Here, we present an example of integrated designs using layering of patterned cell sheets with two distinct types of biological-derived materials containing the target organ cell type and endothelial cells for enhancing new vessels formation in the “tissue”. Although these studies focus on the generation of heart-like tissue, this tissue design can be applied to many organs other than heart with minimal design and material changes, and is meant to be an off-the-shelf product for regenerative therapies. The protocol contains five detailed steps. A temperature sensitive Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAAM) is used to coat tissue culture dishes. Then, tissue specific cells are cultured on the surface of the coated plates/micropattern surfaces to form cell sheets with strong lateral adhesions. Thirdly, a base matrix is created for the tissue by combining porous matrix with neovascular permissive hydrogels and endothelial cells. Finally, the cell sheets are lifted

  12. Cross linking molecular systems to form ultrathin dielectric layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Danqin

    Dehydrogenation leads to cross linking of polymer or polymer like formation in very different systems: self-assembled monolayers and in closo -carboranes leading to the formation of semiconducting and dielectric boron carbide. We find evidence of intermolecular interactions for a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formed from a large molecular adsorbate, [1,1';4',1"-terphenyl]-4,4"-dimethanethiol, from the dispersion of the molecular orbitals with changing the wave vector k and from the changes with temperature. With the formation self assembled molecular (SAM) layer, the molecular orbitals hybridize to electronic bands, with indications of significant band dispersion of the unoccupied molecular orbitals. Although organic adsorbates and thin films are generally regarded as "soft" materials, the effective Debye temperature, indicative of the dynamic motion of the lattice normal to the surface, can be very high, e.g. in the multilayer film formed from [1,1'-biphenyl]-4,4'-dimethanethiol (BPDMT). Depending on molecular orientation, the effective Debye temperature can be comparable to that of graphite due to the 'stiffness' of the benzene rings, but follows the expected Debye-Waller behavior for the core level photoemission intensities with temperature. This is not always the case. We find that a monomolecular film formed from [1,1';4',1"-terphenyl]-4,4"-dimethanethiol deviates from Debye-Waller temperature behavior and is likely caused by temperature dependent changes in molecular orientation. We also find evidence for the increase in dielectric character with polymerization (cross-linking) in spite of the decrease in the HOMO-LUMO gap upon irradiation of TPDMT. The changes in the HOMO-LUMO gap, with cross-linking, are roughly consistent with the band dispersion. The decomposition and cross-linking processes are also accompanied by changes in molecular orientation. The energetics of the three isomeric carborane cage compounds [ closo-1,2-orthocarborane, closo-1

  13. Investigation on dielectric properties of atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dielectric films

    SciTech Connect

    Yıldız, Dilber Esra; Yıldırım, Mert; Gökçen, Muharrem

    2014-05-15

    Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/p-Si Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) were fabricated using atomic layer deposition technique in order to investigate dielectric properties of SBDs. For this purpose, admittance measurements were conducted at room temperature between −1 V and 3 V in the frequency range of 10 kHz and 1 MHz. In addition to the investigation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} morphology using atomic force microscope, dielectric parameters; such as dielectric constant (ε′), dielectric loss (ε″), dielectric loss tangent (tan δ), and real and imaginary parts of dielectric modulus (M′ and M″, respectively), were calculated and effect of frequency on these parameters of Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/p-Si SBDs was discussed. Variations in these parameters at low frequencies were associated with the effect of interface states in low frequency region. Besides dielectric parameters, ac electrical conductivity of these SBDs was also investigated.

  14. Fast and memory-efficient LOGISMOS graph search for intraretinal layer segmentation of 3D macular OCT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyungmoo; Zhang, Li; Abramoff, Michael D.; Sonka, Milan

    2015-03-01

    Image segmentation is important for quantitative analysis of medical image data. Recently, our research group has introduced a 3-D graph search method which can simultaneously segment optimal interacting surfaces with respect to the cost function in volumetric images. Although it provides excellent segmentation accuracy, it is computationally demanding (both CPU and memory) to simultaneously segment multiple surfaces from large volumetric images. Therefore, we propose a new, fast, and memory-efficient graph search method for intraretinal layer segmentation of 3-D macular optical coherence tomograpy (OCT) scans. The key idea is to reduce the size of a graph by combining the nodes with high costs based on the multiscale approach. The new approach requires significantly less memory and achieves significantly faster processing speeds (p < 0.01) with only small segmentation differences compared to the original graph search method. This paper discusses sub-optimality of this approach and assesses trade-off relationships between decreasing processing speed and increasing segmentation differences from that of the original method as a function of employed scale of the underlying graph construction.

  15. 3D Dynamics of the Near-Surface Layer of the Ocean in the Presence of Freshwater Influx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, C.; Soloviev, A.

    2015-12-01

    Freshwater inflow due to convective rains or river runoff produces lenses of freshened water in the near surface layer of the ocean. These lenses are localized in space and typically involve both salinity and temperature anomalies. Due to significant density anomalies, strong pressure gradients develop, which result in lateral spreading of freshwater lenses in a form resembling gravity currents. Gravity currents inherently involve three-dimensional dynamics. The gravity current head can include the Kelvin-Helmholtz billows with vertical density inversions. In this work, we have conducted a series of numerical experiments using computational fluid dynamics tools. These numerical simulations were designed to elucidate the relationship between vertical mixing and horizontal advection of salinity under various environmental conditions and potential impact on the pollution transport including oil spills. The near-surface data from the field experiments in the Gulf of Mexico during the SCOPE experiment were available for validation of numerical simulations. In particular, we observed a freshwater layer within a few-meter depth range and, in some cases, a density inversion at the edge of the freshwater lens, which is consistent with the results of numerical simulations. In conclusion, we discuss applicability of these results to the interpretation of Aquarius and SMOS sea surface salinity satellite measurements. The results of this study indicate that 3D dynamics of the near-surface layer of the ocean are essential in the presence of freshwater inflow.

  16. The 3D Structure of Flux Tubes That Admit Flute Instability in the Scrape-Off-Layer (SOL) of Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hironori

    2014-10-01

    A severe reduction in size down to an ion gyro-radius scale, commonly known as ``squeezing,'' in a lateral dimension of the cross section of a flux tube is traditionally thought to inhibit the occurrence of the flute instability in the Scrape-off-Layer of a diverted tokamak by isolating the main volume of the flux tube from its ends at electrically conducting target plates. A study reported here in the 3D flux tube structure reveals the absence of squeezing for a flux tube that is sufficiently large in its toroidal extent (small toroidal harmonic number n) and located in a layer of low field-line shear around the ``sweet spot'' (about mid-way between the primary and secondary separatrices). The low-shear layer does not hence inhibit the flute instability through the squeezing mechanism, and may thus restore the flute instability, among the most virulent in the magnetized plasma, to the ranks of candidate electrostatic instabilities thought to underlie the turbulence in the SOL in tokamaks. Variations along the flux tube of geometrical characteristics including the cross section will be calculated to develop criteria for the absence of squeezing. Supported in part by the US DOE under DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  17. Self-assembled 3D flower-like Ni2+-Fe3+ layered double hydroxides and their calcined products.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ting; Tang, Yiwen; Jia, Zhiyong; Li, Dawei; Hu, Xiaoyan; Li, Bihui; Luo, Lijuan

    2009-11-25

    This paper describes a facile solvothermal method to synthesize self-assembled three-dimensional (3D) Ni2+-Fe3+ layered double hydroxides (LDHs). Flower-like Ni2+-Fe3+ LDHs constructed of thin nanopetals were obtained using ethylene glycol (EG) as a chelating reagent and urea as a hydrolysis agent. The reaction mechanism and self-assembly process are discussed. After calcinating the as-prepared LDHs at 450 degrees C in nitrogen gas, porous NiO/NiFe2O4 nanosheets were obtained. This work resulted in the development of a simple, cheap, and effective route for the fabrication of large area Ni2+-Fe3+ LDHs as well as porous NiO/NiFe2O4 nanosheets. PMID:19858561

  18. Determination of the spatial TDR-sensor characteristics in strong dispersive subsoil using 3D-FEM frequency domain simulations in combination with microwave dielectric spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Norman; Trinks, Eberhard; Kupfer, Klaus

    2007-04-01

    The spatial sensor characteristics of a 6 cm TDR flat band cable sensor section was simulated with finite element modelling (high frequency structure simulator—HFSS) under certain conditions: (i) in direct contact with the surrounding material (air, water of different salinities, different synthetic and natural soils (sand-silt-clay mixtures)), (ii) with consideration of a defined gap of different size filled with air or water and (iii) the cable sensor pressed at a borehole-wall. The complex dielectric permittivity ɛsstarf(ω, τi) or complex electrical conductivity σsstarf(ω, τi) = iωɛsstarf(ω, τi) of the investigated saturated and unsaturated soils was examined in the frequency range 50 MHz-20 GHz at room temperature and atmospheric pressure with a HP8720D-network analyser. Three soil-specific relaxation processes are assumed to act in the investigated frequency-temperature-pressure range: one primary α-process (main water relaxation) and two secondary (α', β)-processes due to clay-water-ion interactions (bound water relaxation and the Maxwell-Wagner effect). The dielectric relaxation behaviour of every process is described with the use of a simple fractional relaxation model. 3D finite element simulation is performed with a λ/3 based adaptive mesh refinement at a solution frequency of 1 MHz, 10 MHz, 0.1 GHz, 1 GHz and 12.5 GHz. The electromagnetic field distribution, S-parameter and step responses were examined. The simulation adequately reproduces the spatial and temporal electrical and magnetic field distribution. High-lossy soils cause, as a function of increasing gravimetric water content and bulk density, an increase in TDR signal rise time as well as a strong absorption of multiple reflections. An air or water gap works as a quasi-waveguide, i.e. the influence of the surrounding medium is strongly reduced. Appropriate TDR-travel-time distortions can be quantified.

  19. Rupture force of adsorbed self-assembled surfactant layers. Effect of the dielectric exchange force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teschke, O.; Ceotto, G.; de Souza, E. F.

    2001-08-01

    The tip applied force necessary to obtain tip/substrate contact, i.e., rupture force between adsorbed layers of self-assembled surfactant films and atomic force microscope (AFM) tips in water has been measured. A substantial contribution of this rupture force is due to the dielectric exchange force (DEF). The DEF model is in agreement with the observation that the surfactant layer rupture forces are smaller in the thickest layers, where the compactness of the adsorbed film results in the smallest values of the dielectric permittivity. Within experimental accuracy a dielectric permittivity value of ˜4 for bilayers and of ˜36 for monolayers is found.

  20. 3D spin-flop transition in enhanced 2D layered structure single crystalline TlCo2Se2.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z; Xia, Z-C; Wei, M; Yang, J-H; Chen, B; Huang, S; Shang, C; Wu, H; Zhang, X-X; Huang, J-W; Ouyang, Z-W

    2016-10-01

    The enhanced 2D layered structure single crystalline TlCo2Se2 has been successfully fabricated, which exhibits field-induced 3D spin-flop phase transitions. In the case of the magnetic field parallel to the c-axis (B//c), the applied magnetic field induces the evolution of the noncollinear helical magnetic coupling into a ferromagnetic (FM) state with all the magnetization of the Co ion parallel to the c-axis. A striking variation of the field-induced strain within the ab-plane is noticed in the magnetic field region of 20-30 T. In the case of the magnetic field perpendicular to the c-axis (B  ⊥  c), the inter-layer helical antiferromagnetic (AFM) coupling may transform to an initial canted AFM coupling, and then part of it transforms to an intermediate metamagnetic phase with the alignment of two-up-one-down Co magnetic moments and finally to an ultimate FM coupling in higher magnetic fields. The robust noncollinear AFM magnetic coupling is completely destroyed above 30 T. In combination with the measurements of magnetization, magnetoresistance and field-induced strain, a complete magnetic phase diagram of the TlCo2Se2 single crystal has been depicted, demonstrating complex magnetic structures even though the crystal geometry itself gives no indication of the magnetic frustration. PMID:27485370

  1. 3D spin-flop transition in enhanced 2D layered structure single crystalline TlCo2Se2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Z.; Xia, Z.-C.; Wei, M.; Yang, J.-H.; Chen, B.; Huang, S.; Shang, C.; Wu, H.; Zhang, X.-X.; Huang, J.-W.; Ouyang, Z.-W.

    2016-10-01

    The enhanced 2D layered structure single crystalline TlCo2Se2 has been successfully fabricated, which exhibits field-induced 3D spin-flop phase transitions. In the case of the magnetic field parallel to the c-axis (B//c), the applied magnetic field induces the evolution of the noncollinear helical magnetic coupling into a ferromagnetic (FM) state with all the magnetization of the Co ion parallel to the c-axis. A striking variation of the field-induced strain within the ab-plane is noticed in the magnetic field region of 20-30 T. In the case of the magnetic field perpendicular to the c-axis (B  ⊥  c), the inter-layer helical antiferromagnetic (AFM) coupling may transform to an initial canted AFM coupling, and then part of it transforms to an intermediate metamagnetic phase with the alignment of two-up-one-down Co magnetic moments and finally to an ultimate FM coupling in higher magnetic fields. The robust noncollinear AFM magnetic coupling is completely destroyed above 30 T. In combination with the measurements of magnetization, magnetoresistance and field-induced strain, a complete magnetic phase diagram of the TlCo2Se2 single crystal has been depicted, demonstrating complex magnetic structures even though the crystal geometry itself gives no indication of the magnetic frustration.

  2. Layered CU-based electrode for high-dielectric constant oxide thin film-based devices

    DOEpatents

    Auciello, Orlando

    2010-05-11

    A layered device including a substrate; an adhering layer thereon. An electrical conducting layer such as copper is deposited on the adhering layer and then a barrier layer of an amorphous oxide of TiAl followed by a high dielectric layer are deposited to form one or more of an electrical device such as a capacitor or a transistor or MEMS and/or a magnetic device.

  3. Constraints on 3D fault and fracture distribution in layered volcanic- volcaniclastic sequences from terrestrial LIDAR datasets: Faroe Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raithatha, Bansri; McCaffrey, Kenneth; Walker, Richard; Brown, Richard; Pickering, Giles

    2013-04-01

    Hydrocarbon reservoirs commonly contain an array of fine-scale structures that control fluid flow in the subsurface, such as polyphase fracture networks and small-scale fault zones. These structures are unresolvable using seismic imaging and therefore outcrop-based studies have been used as analogues to characterize fault and fracture networks and assess their impact on fluid flow in the subsurface. To maximize recovery and enhance production, it is essential to understand the geometry, physical properties, and distribution of these structures in 3D. Here we present field data and terrestrial LIDAR-derived 3D, photo-realistic virtual outcrops of fault zones at a range of displacement scales (0.001- 4.5 m) within a volcaniclastic sand- and basaltic lava unit sequence in the Faroe Islands. Detailed field observations were used to constrain the virtual outcrop dataset, and a workflow has been developed to build a discrete fracture network (DFN) models in GOCAD® from these datasets. Model construction involves three main stages: (1) Georeferencing and processing of LIDAR datasets; (2) Structural interpretation to discriminate between faults, fractures, veins, and joint planes using CAD software and RiSCAN Pro; and (3) Building a 3D DFN in GOCAD®. To test the validity of this workflow, we focus here on a 4.5 m displacement strike-slip fault zone that displays a complex polymodal fracture network in the inter-layered basalt-volcaniclastic sequence, which is well-constrained by field study. The DFN models support our initial field-based hypothesis that fault zone geometry varies with increasing displacement through volcaniclastic units. Fracture concentration appears to be greatest in the upper lava unit, decreases into the volcaniclastic sediments, and decreases further into the lower lava unit. This distribution of fractures appears to be related to the width of the fault zone and the amount of fault damage on the outcrop. For instance, the fault zone is thicker in

  4. 3D effects of edge magnetic field configuration on divertor/scrape-off layer transport and optimization possibilities for a future reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Xu, Y.; Ida, K.; Corre, Y.; Feng, Y.; Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Tabares, F. L.; Evans, T. E.; Coenen, J. W.; Liang, Y.; Bader, A.; Itoh, K.; Yamada, H.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Ciraolo, G.; Tafalla, D.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Guo, H. Y.; Cui, Z. Y.; Reiter, D.; Asakura, N.; Wenzel, U.; Morita, S.; Ohno, N.; Peterson, B. J.; Masuzaki, S.

    2015-10-01

    This paper assesses the three-dimensional (3D) effects of the edge magnetic field structure on divertor/scrape-off layer transport, based on an inter-machine comparison of experimental data and on the recent progress of 3D edge transport simulation. The 3D effects are elucidated as a consequence of competition between transports parallel (\\parallel ) and perpendicular (\\bot ) to the magnetic field, in open field lines cut by divertor plates, or in magnetic islands. The competition has strong impacts on divertor functions, such as determination of the divertor density regime, impurity screening and detachment control. The effects of magnetic perturbation on the edge electric field and turbulent transport are also discussed. Parameterization to measure the 3D effects on the edge transport is attempted for the individual divertor functions. Based on the suggested key parameters, an operation domain of the 3D divertor configuration is discussed for future devices.

  5. Aerosol-Jet-Printing silicone layers and electrodes for stacked dielectric elastomer actuators in one processing device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitelshöfer, Sebastian; Göttler, Michael; Schmidt, Philip; Treffer, Philipp; Landgraf, Maximilian; Franke, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    In this contribution we present recent findings of our efforts to qualify the so called Aerosol-Jet-Printing process as an additive manufacturing approach for stacked dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA). With the presented system we are able to print the two essential structural elements dielectric layer and electrode in one machine. The system is capable of generating RTV-2 silicone layers made of Wacker Elastosil P 7670. Therefore, two aerosol streams of both precursor components A and B are generated in parallel and mixed in one printing nozzle that is attached to a 4-axis kinematic. At maximum speed the printing of one circular Elastosil layer with a calculated thickness of 10 μm and a diameter of 1 cm takes 12 seconds while the process keeps stable for 4.5 hours allowing a quite high overall material output and the generation of numerous silicone layers. By adding a second printing nozzle and the infrastructure to generate a third aerosol, the system is also capable of printing inks with conductive particles in parallel to the silicone. We have printed a reduced graphene oxide (rGO) ink prepared in our lab to generate electrodes on VHB 4905, Elastosil foils and finally on Aerosol-Jet-Printed Elastosil layers. With rGO ink printed on Elastosil foil, layers with a 4-point measured sheet resistance as low as 4 kΩ can be realized leaving room for improving the electrode printing time, which at the moment is not as good as the quite good time-frame for printing the silicone layers. Up to now we have used the system to print a fully functional two-layer stacked DEA to demonstrate the principle of continuously 3D printing actuators.

  6. Multigrid mapping and box relaxation for simulation of the whole process of flow transition in 3-D boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Liu, Z.

    1994-12-31

    A new multilevel technology was developed in this study which provides a successful numerical simulation for the whole process of flow transition in 3-D flat plate boundary layers, including linear growth, secondary instability, breakdown, and transition on a relatively coarse grid with low CPU cost. A fourth-order finite difference scheme on stretched and staggered grids, a fully implicit time-marching technique, a semi-coarsening multigrid based on the so-called approximate line-box relaxation, and a buffer domain for the outflow boundary conditions were all employed for high-order accuracy, good stability, and fast convergence. A new fine-coarse-fine grid mapping technique was developed to catch the large eddies and represent main roles of small eddies to keep the code running after the laminar flow breaks down. The computational results are in good agreement with linear stability theory, secondary instability theory, and some experiments. The computation also reproduced the K-type and C-type transition observed by laboratory experiments. The CPU cost for a typical case is around 2-9 CRAY-YMP hours.

  7. 3D-nanoarchitectured Pd/Ni catalysts prepared by atomic layer deposition for the electrooxidation of formic acid.

    PubMed

    Assaud, Loïc; Monyoncho, Evans; Pitzschel, Kristina; Allagui, Anis; Petit, Matthieu; Hanbücken, Margrit; Baranova, Elena A; Santinacci, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensionally (3D) nanoarchitectured palladium/nickel (Pd/Ni) catalysts, which were prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on high-aspect-ratio nanoporous alumina templates are investigated with regard to the electrooxidation of formic acid in an acidic medium (0.5 M H2SO4). Both deposition processes, Ni and Pd, with various mass content ratios have been continuously monitored by using a quartz crystal microbalance. The morphology of the Pd/Ni systems has been studied by electron microscopy and shows a homogeneous deposition of granularly structured Pd onto the Ni substrate. X-ray diffraction analysis performed on Ni and NiO substrates revealed an amorphous structure, while the Pd coating crystallized into a fcc lattice with a preferential orientation along the [220]-direction. Surface chemistry analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed both metallic and oxide contributions for the Ni and Pd deposits. Cyclic voltammetry of the Pd/Ni nanocatalysts revealed that the electrooxidation of HCOOH proceeds through the direct dehydrogenation mechanism with the formation of active intermediates. High catalytic activities are measured for low masses of Pd coatings that were generated by a low number of ALD cycles, probably because of the cluster size effect, electronic interactions between Pd and Ni, or diffusion effects.

  8. 3D-nanoarchitectured Pd/Ni catalysts prepared by atomic layer deposition for the electrooxidation of formic acid

    PubMed Central

    Assaud, Loïc; Monyoncho, Evans; Pitzschel, Kristina; Allagui, Anis; Petit, Matthieu; Hanbücken, Margrit

    2014-01-01

    Summary Three-dimensionally (3D) nanoarchitectured palladium/nickel (Pd/Ni) catalysts, which were prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on high-aspect-ratio nanoporous alumina templates are investigated with regard to the electrooxidation of formic acid in an acidic medium (0.5 M H2SO4). Both deposition processes, Ni and Pd, with various mass content ratios have been continuously monitored by using a quartz crystal microbalance. The morphology of the Pd/Ni systems has been studied by electron microscopy and shows a homogeneous deposition of granularly structured Pd onto the Ni substrate. X-ray diffraction analysis performed on Ni and NiO substrates revealed an amorphous structure, while the Pd coating crystallized into a fcc lattice with a preferential orientation along the [220]-direction. Surface chemistry analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed both metallic and oxide contributions for the Ni and Pd deposits. Cyclic voltammetry of the Pd/Ni nanocatalysts revealed that the electrooxidation of HCOOH proceeds through the direct dehydrogenation mechanism with the formation of active intermediates. High catalytic activities are measured for low masses of Pd coatings that were generated by a low number of ALD cycles, probably because of the cluster size effect, electronic interactions between Pd and Ni, or diffusion effects. PMID:24605281

  9. Liver Tumor Segmentation from MR Images Using 3D Fast Marching Algorithm and Single Hidden Layer Feedforward Neural Network.

    PubMed

    Le, Trong-Ngoc; Bao, Pham The; Huynh, Hieu Trung

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Our objective is to develop a computerized scheme for liver tumor segmentation in MR images. Materials and Methods. Our proposed scheme consists of four main stages. Firstly, the region of interest (ROI) image which contains the liver tumor region in the T1-weighted MR image series was extracted by using seed points. The noise in this ROI image was reduced and the boundaries were enhanced. A 3D fast marching algorithm was applied to generate the initial labeled regions which are considered as teacher regions. A single hidden layer feedforward neural network (SLFN), which was trained by a noniterative algorithm, was employed to classify the unlabeled voxels. Finally, the postprocessing stage was applied to extract and refine the liver tumor boundaries. The liver tumors determined by our scheme were compared with those manually traced by a radiologist, used as the "ground truth." Results. The study was evaluated on two datasets of 25 tumors from 16 patients. The proposed scheme obtained the mean volumetric overlap error of 27.43% and the mean percentage volume error of 15.73%. The mean of the average surface distance, the root mean square surface distance, and the maximal surface distance were 0.58 mm, 1.20 mm, and 6.29 mm, respectively. PMID:27597960

  10. Liver Tumor Segmentation from MR Images Using 3D Fast Marching Algorithm and Single Hidden Layer Feedforward Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Our objective is to develop a computerized scheme for liver tumor segmentation in MR images. Materials and Methods. Our proposed scheme consists of four main stages. Firstly, the region of interest (ROI) image which contains the liver tumor region in the T1-weighted MR image series was extracted by using seed points. The noise in this ROI image was reduced and the boundaries were enhanced. A 3D fast marching algorithm was applied to generate the initial labeled regions which are considered as teacher regions. A single hidden layer feedforward neural network (SLFN), which was trained by a noniterative algorithm, was employed to classify the unlabeled voxels. Finally, the postprocessing stage was applied to extract and refine the liver tumor boundaries. The liver tumors determined by our scheme were compared with those manually traced by a radiologist, used as the “ground truth.” Results. The study was evaluated on two datasets of 25 tumors from 16 patients. The proposed scheme obtained the mean volumetric overlap error of 27.43% and the mean percentage volume error of 15.73%. The mean of the average surface distance, the root mean square surface distance, and the maximal surface distance were 0.58 mm, 1.20 mm, and 6.29 mm, respectively. PMID:27597960

  11. Positional isomerism-driven two 3D pillar-layered metal-organic frameworks: Syntheses, topological structures and photoluminescence properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yayong; Zhao, Siwei; Ma, Haoran; Han, Yi; Liu, Kang; Wang, Lei

    2016-06-01

    Two novel three-dimensional (3D) pillar-layered metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), namely [Zn2(μ2-OH)(boaba)(1,4-bmimb)]n (1) and {[Zn5K2(μ2-H2O)2(boaba)4(1,2-bmimb)2(H2O)2]·H2O}n (2), were prepared by hydrothermal reactions (H3boaba=3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid; 1,4-bmimb=1,4-bis((2-methyl-1H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl)benzene; 1,2-bmimb =1,2-bis((2-methyl-1H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl)benzene). Notably, 1 exhibits a (3,5)-connected binodal (63)(69·8)-gra net with binuclear [Zn2(μ2-OH)(COO)]2+ clusters, while 2 shows a novel (4,4,5,9)-connected 4-nodal net constructed from the unique Zn(II)-K(I) heterometal rod-like substructures. The results indicate that the disposition of the 2-methylimidazolyl groups of bis(imidazole) ligands have a significant effect on structural diversity. Moreover, the photoluminescence properties of 1 and 2 have been investigated.

  12. 3D-nanoarchitectured Pd/Ni catalysts prepared by atomic layer deposition for the electrooxidation of formic acid.

    PubMed

    Assaud, Loïc; Monyoncho, Evans; Pitzschel, Kristina; Allagui, Anis; Petit, Matthieu; Hanbücken, Margrit; Baranova, Elena A; Santinacci, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensionally (3D) nanoarchitectured palladium/nickel (Pd/Ni) catalysts, which were prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on high-aspect-ratio nanoporous alumina templates are investigated with regard to the electrooxidation of formic acid in an acidic medium (0.5 M H2SO4). Both deposition processes, Ni and Pd, with various mass content ratios have been continuously monitored by using a quartz crystal microbalance. The morphology of the Pd/Ni systems has been studied by electron microscopy and shows a homogeneous deposition of granularly structured Pd onto the Ni substrate. X-ray diffraction analysis performed on Ni and NiO substrates revealed an amorphous structure, while the Pd coating crystallized into a fcc lattice with a preferential orientation along the [220]-direction. Surface chemistry analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed both metallic and oxide contributions for the Ni and Pd deposits. Cyclic voltammetry of the Pd/Ni nanocatalysts revealed that the electrooxidation of HCOOH proceeds through the direct dehydrogenation mechanism with the formation of active intermediates. High catalytic activities are measured for low masses of Pd coatings that were generated by a low number of ALD cycles, probably because of the cluster size effect, electronic interactions between Pd and Ni, or diffusion effects. PMID:24605281

  13. Whispering gallery mode nanodisk resonator based on layered metal-dielectric waveguide.

    PubMed

    Lou, Fei; Yan, Min; Thylen, Lars; Qiu, Min; Wosinski, Lech

    2014-04-01

    This paper proposes a layered metal-dielectric waveguide consisting of a stack of alternating metal and dielectric films which enables an ultracompact mode confinement. The properties of whispering gallery modes supported by disk resonators based on such waveguides are investigated for achieving a large Purcell factor. We show that by stacking three layers of 10 nm thick silver with two layers of 50 nm dielectric layers (of refractive index n) in sequence, the disk radius can be as small as 61 nm ∼λ(0)/(7n) and the mode volume is only 0.0175(λ(0)/(2n))(3). When operating at 40 K, the cavity's Q-factor can be ~670; Purcell factor can be as large as 2.3×10(4), which is more than five times larger than that achievable in a metal-dielectric-metal disk cavity in the same condition. When more dielectric layers with smaller thicknesses are used, even more compact confinement can be achieved. For example, the radius of a cavity consisting of seven dielectric-layer waveguide can be shrunk down to λ(0)/(13.5n), corresponding to a mode volume of 0.005λ(0)/(2n))(3), and Purcell factor can be enhanced to 7.3×10(4) at 40 K. The influence of parameters like thicknesses of dielectric and metal films, cavity size, and number of dielectric layers is also comprehensively studied. The proposed waveguide and nanodisk cavity provide an alternative for ultracompact light confinement, and can find applications where a strong light-matter interaction is necessary.

  14. Highly Sensitive, Flexible, and Wearable Pressure Sensor Based on a Giant Piezocapacitive Effect of Three-Dimensional Microporous Elastomeric Dielectric Layer.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Donguk; Lee, Tae-Ik; Shim, Jongmin; Ryu, Seunghwa; Kim, Min Seong; Kim, Seunghwan; Kim, Taek-Soo; Park, Inkyu

    2016-07-01

    We report a flexible and wearable pressure sensor based on the giant piezocapacitive effect of a three-dimensional (3-D) microporous dielectric elastomer, which is capable of highly sensitive and stable pressure sensing over a large tactile pressure range. Due to the presence of micropores within the elastomeric dielectric layer, our piezocapacitive pressure sensor is highly deformable by even very small amounts of pressure, leading to a dramatic increase in its sensitivity. Moreover, the gradual closure of micropores under compression increases the effective dielectric constant, thereby further enhancing the sensitivity of the sensor. The 3-D microporous dielectric layer with serially stacked springs of elastomer bridges can cover a much wider pressure range than those of previously reported micro-/nanostructured sensing materials. We also investigate the applicability of our sensor to wearable pressure-sensing devices as an electronic pressure-sensing skin in robotic fingers as well as a bandage-type pressure-sensing device for pulse monitoring at the human wrist. Finally, we demonstrate a pressure sensor array pad for the recognition of spatially distributed pressure information on a plane. Our sensor, with its excellent pressure-sensing performance, marks the realization of a true tactile pressure sensor presenting highly sensitive responses to the entire tactile pressure range, from ultralow-force detection to high weights generated by human activity. PMID:27286001

  15. Highly Sensitive, Flexible, and Wearable Pressure Sensor Based on a Giant Piezocapacitive Effect of Three-Dimensional Microporous Elastomeric Dielectric Layer.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Donguk; Lee, Tae-Ik; Shim, Jongmin; Ryu, Seunghwa; Kim, Min Seong; Kim, Seunghwan; Kim, Taek-Soo; Park, Inkyu

    2016-07-01

    We report a flexible and wearable pressure sensor based on the giant piezocapacitive effect of a three-dimensional (3-D) microporous dielectric elastomer, which is capable of highly sensitive and stable pressure sensing over a large tactile pressure range. Due to the presence of micropores within the elastomeric dielectric layer, our piezocapacitive pressure sensor is highly deformable by even very small amounts of pressure, leading to a dramatic increase in its sensitivity. Moreover, the gradual closure of micropores under compression increases the effective dielectric constant, thereby further enhancing the sensitivity of the sensor. The 3-D microporous dielectric layer with serially stacked springs of elastomer bridges can cover a much wider pressure range than those of previously reported micro-/nanostructured sensing materials. We also investigate the applicability of our sensor to wearable pressure-sensing devices as an electronic pressure-sensing skin in robotic fingers as well as a bandage-type pressure-sensing device for pulse monitoring at the human wrist. Finally, we demonstrate a pressure sensor array pad for the recognition of spatially distributed pressure information on a plane. Our sensor, with its excellent pressure-sensing performance, marks the realization of a true tactile pressure sensor presenting highly sensitive responses to the entire tactile pressure range, from ultralow-force detection to high weights generated by human activity.

  16. TECHNICAL NOTE: Design and development of electromagnetic absorbers with carbon fiber composites and matching dielectric layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neo, C. P.; Varadan, V. K.

    2001-10-01

    Radar absorbing materials are designed and developed with carbon fibers and suitable matching layers. Complex permittivities of carbon fiber composite are predicted on the basis that the modulus of permittivity obeys a logarithmic law of mixtures and the dielectric loss tangents are related through a linear law of mixtures. Linear regression analysis performed on the data points provides the constants which are used to predict the effective permittivities of carbon fiber composite at different frequencies. Using the free space measurement system, complex permittivities of the lossy dielectric at different frequencies are obtained. These complex permittivities are used to predict the reflectivity of a thin lossy dielectric layer on carbon fiber composite substrate. The predicted results agree quite well with the measured data. It is interesting to note that the thin lossy dielectric layer, about 0.03 mm thick, has helped to reduce the reflectivity of the 5.2 mm thick carbon fiber composite considerably.

  17. Contribution of Dielectric Screening to the Total Capacitance of Few-Layer Graphene Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Cheng; Jiang, De-en

    2016-03-01

    We apply joint density functional theory (JDFT), which treats the electrode/electrolyte interface self-consistently, to an electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC) based on few-layer graphene electrodes. The JDFT approach allows us to quantify a third contribution to the total capacitance beyond quantum capacitance (CQ) and EDL capacitance (CEDL). This contribution arises from the dielectric screening of the electric field by the surface of the few-layer graphene electrode, and we therefore term it the dielectric capacitance (CDielec). We find that CDielec becomes significant in affecting the total capacitance when the number of graphene layers in the electrode is more than three. Our investigation sheds new light on the significance of the electrode dielectric screening on the capacitance of few-layer graphene electrodes. PMID:26884129

  18. Contribution of dielectric screening to the total capacitance of few-layer graphene electrodes

    DOE PAGES

    Zhan, Cheng; Jiang, De-en

    2016-02-17

    We apply joint density functional theory (JDFT), which treats the electrode/electrolyte interface self-consistently, to an electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC) based on few-layer graphene electrodes. The JDFT approach allows us to quantify a third contribution to the total capacitance beyond quantum capacitance (CQ) and EDL capacitance (CEDL). This contribution arises from the dielectric screening of the electric field by the surface of the few-layer graphene electrode, and we therefore term it the dielectric capacitance (CDielec). We find that CDielec becomes significant in affecting the total capacitance when the number of graphene layers in the electrode is more than three. In conclusion,more » our investigation sheds new light on the significance of the electrode dielectric screening on the capacitance of few-layer graphene electrodes.« less

  19. Oblique incidence of semi-guided waves on step-like folds in planar dielectric slabs: Lossless vertical interconnects in 3D integrated photonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, Andre; Alhaddad, Samer; Hammer, Manfred; Förstner, Jens

    2016-02-01

    Semi-guided light propagation across linear folds of slab waveguides is being considered. Radiation losses vanish beyond certain critical angles of incidence, as can be understood by arguments resembling Snell's law. One thus realizes lossless propagation through 90-degree corner configurations, where the remaining guided waves are still subject to pronounced reflection and polarization conversion. A step-like system of two of these sharp corners can then be viewed as a system akin to a Fabry-Perot interferometer, with two partial reflectors at a distance given by the vertical separation of the slab cores. The respective resonance effect enables full transmission of semiguided, laterally plane waves through the step structures. One obtains a configuration that optically connects guiding layers at different elevation levels in a 3-D integrated optical chip, without radiation losses, over large distances, and reasonably broadband. We show rigorous quasi-analytical results for typical high-contrast Si/SiO2 structures. Although the full-transmission effect requires a symmetric system, here realized by slab waveguides with a silicon core sandwiched between thick silica substrate and cover layers, simulations for configurations with air cover show that a certain asymmetry can well be afforded.

  20. Mapping the 3-D extent of the Northern Lobe of the Bushveld layered mafic intrusion from geophysical data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, Carol A.; Bedrosian, Paul A.; Cole, Janine; Khoza, Tshepo David; Webb, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    Geophysical models image the 3D geometry of the mafic portion of the Bushveld Complex north of the Thabazimbi-Murchison Lineament (TML), critical for understanding the origin of the world's largest layered mafic intrusion and platinum group element deposits. The combination of the gravity and magnetic data with recent seismic, MT, borehole and rock property measurements powerfully constrains the models. The intrusion north of the TML is generally shallowly buried (generally <1500 m) with a modeled area of ∼160 km × ∼125 km. The modeled thicknesses are not well constrained but vary from ∼<1000 to >12,000 m, averaging ∼4000 m. A feeder, suggested by a large modeled thickness (>10,000 m) and funnel shape, for Lower Zone magmas could have originated near the intersection of NS and NE trending TML faults under Mokopane. The TML has been thought to be the feeder zone for the entire Bushveld Complex but the identification of local feeders and/or dikes in the TML in the models is complicated by uncertainties on the syn- and post-Bushveld deformation history. However, modeled moderately thick high density material near the intersection of faults within the central and western TML may represent feeders for parts of the Bushveld Complex if deformation was minimal. The correspondence of flat, high resistivity and density regions reflect the sill-like geometry of the Bushveld Complex without evidence for feeders north of Mokopane. Magnetotelluric models indicate that the Transvaal sedimentary basin underlies much of the Bushveld Complex north of the TML, further than previously thought and important because the degree of reaction and assimilation of the Transvaal rocks with the mafic magmas resulted in a variety of mineralization zones.

  1. Seed-layer mediated orientation evolution in dielectric Bi-Zn-Ti-Nb-O thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Young; Noh, Jun Hong; Lee, Sangwook; Yoon, Sung-Hun; Cho, Chin Moo; Hong, Kug Sun; Jung, Hyun Suk; Lee, Jung-Kun

    2007-12-01

    Highly (hhh)-oriented pyrochlore Bi-Zn-Ti-Nb-O (BZTN) thin films were fabricated via metal-organic decomposition using orientation template layers. The preferred orientation was ascribed to the interfacial layer, the lattice parameter of which is similar to BZTN. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy supported that the interfacial layer consists of Bi and Pt. The (hhh)-oriented thin films exhibited a highly insulating nature enabling feasible applications in electronic devices, particularly voltage tunable application. The BZTN thin films did not show any apparent dielectric anisotropy and the slightly enhanced dielectric properties were discussed in connection to the internal stress and the grain boundary effect.

  2. THE ONSET OF ELECTRICAL BREAKDOWN IN DUST LAYERS: II. EFFECTIVE DIELECTRIC CONSTANT AND LOCAL FIELD ENHANCEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Part 1 of the work has shown that electrical breakdown in dust layers obeys Paschen's Law, but occurs at applied field values which appear too small to initiate the breakdown. In this paper the authors show how an effective dielectric constant characterizing the dust layer can be...

  3. Organic solvent-based graphene oxide liquid crystals: a facile route toward the next generation of self-assembled layer-by-layer multifunctional 3D architectures.

    PubMed

    Jalili, Rouhollah; Aboutalebi, Seyed Hamed; Esrafilzadeh, Dorna; Konstantinov, Konstantin; Moulton, Simon E; Razal, Joselito M; Wallace, Gordon G

    2013-05-28

    We introduce soft self-assembly of ultralarge liquid crystalline (LC) graphene oxide (GO) sheets in a wide range of organic solvents overcoming the practical limitations imposed on LC GO processing in water. This expands the number of known solvents which can support amphiphilic self-assembly to ethanol, acetone, tetrahydrofuran, N-dimethylformamide, N-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidone, and a number of other organic solvents, many of which were not known to afford solvophobic self-assembly prior to this report. The LC behavior of the as-prepared GO sheets in organic solvents has enabled us to disperse and organize substantial amounts of aggregate-free single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs, up to 10 wt %) without compromise in LC properties. The as-prepared LC GO-SWNT dispersions were employed to achieve self-assembled layer-by-layer multifunctional 3D hybrid architectures comprising SWNTs and GO with unrivalled superior mechanical properties (Young's modulus in excess of 50 GPa and tensile strength of more than 500 MPa).

  4. Thickness-Dependent Dielectric Constant of Few-Layer In₂Se₃ Nanoflakes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Pak, Alexander J; Liu, Yingnan; Zhou, Yu; Wu, Xiaoyu; Zhu, Yihan; Lin, Min; Han, Yu; Ren, Yuan; Peng, Hailin; Tsai, Yu-Hao; Hwang, Gyeong S; Lai, Keji

    2015-12-01

    The dielectric constant or relative permittivity (ε(r)) of a dielectric material, which describes how the net electric field in the medium is reduced with respect to the external field, is a parameter of critical importance for charging and screening in electronic devices. Such a fundamental material property is intimately related to not only the polarizability of individual atoms but also the specific atomic arrangement in the crystal lattice. In this Letter, we present both experimental and theoretical investigations on the dielectric constant of few-layer In2Se3 nanoflakes grown on mica substrates by van der Waals epitaxy. A nondestructive microwave impedance microscope is employed to simultaneously quantify the number of layers and local electrical properties. The measured ε(r) increases monotonically as a function of the thickness and saturates to the bulk value at around 6-8 quintuple layers. The same trend of layer-dependent dielectric constant is also revealed by first-principles calculations. Our results of the dielectric response, being ubiquitously applicable to layered 2D semiconductors, are expected to be significant for this vibrant research field.

  5. Characteristics of Spontaneous Emission of Polarized Atoms in Metal Dielectric Multiple Layer Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li-Ming; Gu, Ben-Yuan; Zhou, Yun-Song

    2007-11-01

    The spontaneous emission (SE) progress of polarized atoms in a stratified structure of air-dielectric(D0)-metal(M)-dielectric(D1)-air can be controlled effectively by changing the thickness of the D1 layer and rotating the polarized direction of atoms. It is found that the normalized SE rate of atoms located inside the D0 layer crucially depends on the atomic position and the thickness of the D1 layer. When the atom is located near the D0-M interface, the normalized atomic SE rate as a function of the atomic position is abruptly onset for the thin D1 layer. However, with the increasing thickness of the D1 layer, the corresponding curve profile exhibits plateau and stays nearly unchanged. The substantial change of the SE rate stems from the excitation of the surface plasmon polaritons in metal-dielectric interface, and the feature crucially depends on the thickness of D1 layer. If atoms are positioned near the D0-air interface, the substantial variation of the normalized SE rate appears when rotating the polarized direction of atoms. These findings manifest that the atomic SE processes can be flexibly controlled by altering the thickness of the dielectric layer D1 or rotating the orientation of the polarization of atoms.

  6. Frequency selective reflection and transmission at a layer composed of a periodic dielectric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertoni, Henry L.; Cheo, Li-Hsiang S.; Tamir, Theodor

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using a periodic dielectric layer, composed of alternating bars having dielectric constants epsilon sub 1 and epsilon sub 2, as a frequency selective subreflector in order to permit feed separation in large aperture reflecting antenna systems was examined. For oblique incidence, it is found that total transmission and total reflection can be obtained at different frequencies for proper choices of epsilon sub 1, epsilon 2, and the geometric parameters. The frequencies of total reflection and transmission can be estimated from wave phenomena occurring in a layer of uniform dielectric constant equal to the average for the periodic layers. About some of the frequencies of total transmission, the bandwidth for 90% transmission is found to be 40%. However, the bandwidth for 90% reflection is always found to be much narrower; the greatest value found being 2.5%.

  7. Studies of Low-Current Back-Discharge in Point-Plane Geometry with Dielectric Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Jaworek, Anatol; Rajch, Eryk; Krupa, Andrzej; Czech, Tadeusz; Lackowski, Marcin

    2006-01-15

    The paper presents results of spectroscopic investigations of back-discharges generated in the point-plane electrode geometry in ambient air at atmospheric pressure, with the plane electrode covered with a dielectric layer. Fly ash from an electrostatic precipitator of a coal-fired power plant was used as the dielectric layer in these investigations. The discharges for positive and negative polarities of the needle electrode were studied by measuring optical emission spectra at two regions of the discharge: near the needle electrode and dielectric layer surface. The visual forms of the discharge were recorded and correlated with the current-voltage characteristics and optical emission spectra. The back-arc discharge was of particular interest in these studies due to its detrimental effects it causes in electrostatic precipitators.

  8. Layered nano-gratings by electron beam writing to form 3-level diffractive optical elements for 3D phase-offset holographic lithography.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Liang Leon; Herman, Peter R

    2015-12-21

    A multi-level nanophotonic structure is a major goal in providing advanced optical functionalities as found in photonic crystals and metamaterials. A three-level nano-grating phase mask has been fabricated in an electron-beam resist (ma-N) to meet the requirement of holographic generation of a diamond-like 3D nanostructure in photoresist by a single exposure step. A 2D mask with 600 nm periodicity is presented for generating first order diffracted beams with a preferred π/2 phase shift on the X- and Y-axes and with sufficient 1(st) order diffraction efficiency of 3.5% at 800 nm wavelength for creating a 3D periodic nanostructure in SU-8 photoresist. The resulting 3D structure is anticipated to provide an 8% complete photonic band gap (PBG) upon silicon inversion. A thin SiO2 layer was used to isolate the grating layers and multiple spin-coating steps served to planarize the final resist layer. A reversible soft coating (aquaSAVE) was introduced to enable SEM inspection and verification of each insulating grating layer. This e-beam lithographic method is extensible to assembling multiple layers of a nanophotonic structure.

  9. Effect of Layer Thickness and Printing Orientation on Mechanical Properties and Dimensional Accuracy of 3D Printed Porous Samples for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Farzadi, Arghavan; Solati-Hashjin, Mehran; Asadi-Eydivand, Mitra; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2014-01-01

    Powder-based inkjet 3D printing method is one of the most attractive solid free form techniques. It involves a sequential layering process through which 3D porous scaffolds can be directly produced from computer-generated models. 3D printed products' quality are controlled by the optimal build parameters. In this study, Calcium Sulfate based powders were used for porous scaffolds fabrication. The printed scaffolds of 0.8 mm pore size, with different layer thickness and printing orientation, were subjected to the depowdering step. The effects of four layer thicknesses and printing orientations, (parallel to X, Y and Z), on the physical and mechanical properties of printed scaffolds were investigated. It was observed that the compressive strength, toughness and Young's modulus of samples with 0.1125 and 0.125 mm layer thickness were more than others. Furthermore, the results of SEM and μCT analyses showed that samples with 0.1125 mm layer thickness printed in X direction have more dimensional accuracy and significantly close to CAD software based designs with predefined pore size, porosity and pore interconnectivity. PMID:25233468

  10. Effect of layer thickness and printing orientation on mechanical properties and dimensional accuracy of 3D printed porous samples for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Farzadi, Arghavan; Solati-Hashjin, Mehran; Asadi-Eydivand, Mitra; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2014-01-01

    Powder-based inkjet 3D printing method is one of the most attractive solid free form techniques. It involves a sequential layering process through which 3D porous scaffolds can be directly produced from computer-generated models. 3D printed products' quality are controlled by the optimal build parameters. In this study, Calcium Sulfate based powders were used for porous scaffolds fabrication. The printed scaffolds of 0.8 mm pore size, with different layer thickness and printing orientation, were subjected to the depowdering step. The effects of four layer thicknesses and printing orientations, (parallel to X, Y and Z), on the physical and mechanical properties of printed scaffolds were investigated. It was observed that the compressive strength, toughness and Young's modulus of samples with 0.1125 and 0.125 mm layer thickness were more than others. Furthermore, the results of SEM and μCT analyses showed that samples with 0.1125 mm layer thickness printed in X direction have more dimensional accuracy and significantly close to CAD software based designs with predefined pore size, porosity and pore interconnectivity.

  11. Dielectric Mismatch Mediates Carrier Mobility in Organic-Intercalated Layered TiS2.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chunlei; Kodama, Yumi; Kondo, Mami; Sasai, Ryo; Qian, Xin; Gu, Xiaokun; Koga, Kenji; Yabuki, Kazuhisa; Yang, Ronggui; Koumoto, Kunihito

    2015-10-14

    The dielectric constant is a key parameter that determines both optical and electronic properties of materials. It is desirable to tune electronic properties though dielectric engineering approach. Here, we present a systematic approach to tune carrier mobilities of hybrid inorganic/organic materials where layered two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenide TiS2 is electrochemically intercalated with polar organic molecules. By manipulating the dielectric mismatch using polar organic molecules with different dielectric constants, ranging from 10 to 41, the electron mobility of the TiS2 layers was changed three times due to the dielectric screening of the Coulomb-impurity scattering processes. Both the overall thermal conductivity and the lattice thermal conductivity were also found to decrease with an increasing dielectric mismatch. The enhanced electrical mobility along with the decreased thermal conductivity together gave rise to a significantly improved thermoelectric figure of merit of the hybrid inorganic/organic materials at room temperature, which might find applications in wearable electronics.

  12. Two layer flow of thin leaky dielectric films between electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovina, Elizaveta; Craster, Richard; Papageorgiou, Demetrios

    2014-11-01

    The flow of two viscous conducting fluids between two electrodes is investigated. The fluids are assumed to be leaky dielectrics and two nonlinear coupled evolution equations are derived for the moving interface and the interfacial charge. These are solved numerically for three different cases in which the magnitude of the ratios of electric conductivities and permittivities is varied. A linear stability analysis indicates that electrical forces destabilize the system. These predictions are confirmed by numerical results which show that increasing the ratios of conductivities and permittivities leads to traveling waves that grow in amplitude.

  13. Influence of a dielectric layer on photon emission induced by a scanning tunneling microscope.

    PubMed

    Tao, X; Dong, Z C; Yang, J L; Luo, Y; Hou, J G; Aizpurua, J

    2009-02-28

    We investigate theoretically the influence of a dielectric layer on light emission induced by a scanning tunneling microscope through a combined approach of classical electrodynamics and first-principles calculations. The modification of the junction geometry upon the insertion of a dielectric layer is treated first by using the density functional theory to calculate the effective potential along the surface normal and then by solving a one-dimensional Schrodinger equation to obtain the exact distance between the tip and the substrate for a given current and bias voltage. The modified external field with the inclusion of a dielectric layer is evaluated by using the Fresnel formula. The local-field enhancement factor and radiated power are calculated by the boundary element method for two typical systems, W-tip/C(60)/Au(111) and W-tip/Al(2)O(3)/NiAl(110). The calculated results indicate that the insertion of a dielectric layer tends to reduce the light emission intensity considerably but hardly changes the spectral profile with no substantial peak shifts with respect to the layer-free situation, in agreement with experimental observations. The suppression of the radiated power is mainly due to the increase in the tip-metal separation and the resultant reduction in the electromagnetic coupling between the tip and metal substrate.

  14. Improvement of metal gate/high-k dielectric CMOSFETs characteristics by atomic layer etching of high-k gate dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, K. S.; Park, C.; Kang, C. Y.; Park, C. S.; Park, B. J.; Kim, Y. W.; Lee, B. H.; Lee, Jack C.; Bersuker, G.; Kirsch, P.; Jammy, R.; Yeom, G. Y.

    2013-04-01

    Atomic layer etching (ALE) has been applied to the high-k dielectric patterning in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (CMOSFETs), and its electrical characteristics were compared with those etched by conventional etching such as wet etching (WE) or reactive ion etching (RIE). The CMOSFET etched by the ALE showed the improvement of the off-state leakage current (Ioff), which was mainly attributed to the decreased perimeter component of the gate leakage current (IG) particularly, at the low field region. The better electrical characteristics are due to the low trap density at the edge of gate oxides in the S/D region of CMOSFETs.

  15. Enhanced dielectric properties from barium strontium titanate films with strontium titanate buffer layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, M. W.; Ngo, E.; Hubbard, C.; Hirsch, S. G.; Ivill, M.; Sarney, W. L.; Zhang, J.; Alpay, S. P.

    2013-10-01

    In order to enhance the permittivity and tunability of the dielectric component, a thin film dielectric composite consisting of a radio frequency sputtered SrTiO3 (STO) buffer layer and metalorganic solution deposited Mg-doped BaxSr1-xTiO3 (Mg-BST) thin film overgrowth was developed using affordable industry standard processes and materials. The effect of the STO buffer layer thickness on the dielectric response of the heterostructure was investigated. Our results demonstrate that the composite film heterostructure, evaluated in the metal-insulator-metal configuration Pt/STO/Mg-BST/Pt on sapphire substrate, with the thinner (9-17 nm) STO buffer layers possessed enhanced permittivity (ɛr ˜ 491) with respect to the thicker 41 nm buffer layer (ɛr ˜ 360) and that of a control Mg-BST film without a STO buffer layer (ɛr ˜ 380). Additionally, the composite film with the thinner buffer layers were shown to have low losses (tan δ ˜ 0.02), low leakage characteristics (J = 7.0 × 10-9 A/cm2), high breakdown voltage (VBR > 10 V), a large grain microstructure (˜125 nm), and smooth pin-hole free surfaces. The enhanced permittivity of the composite dielectric film resulted from three major factors: (i) the template-effect of the thin STO buffer layer on the thicker Mg-BST over-layer film to achieve a large grain microstructure, (ii) the low viscosity of the metallo-organic solution deposition (MOSD) solution, which ensured heterogeneous nucleation of the Mg-BST overgrowth film on the surface of the STO buffer layer, and (iii) minimization of the low permittivity grain boundary phase (TiO2-x phase). The dielectric response of the BST can be explained using a thermodynamic model taking into account interlayer electrostatic and electromechanical interactions. Additionally, Mg doping of the BST enabled low loss and low leakage characteristics of the heterostructure. The large permittivity, low loss, low leakage characteristics, and defect free surfaces of the composite

  16. Control of Evaporation Behavior of an Inkjet-Printed Dielectric Layer Using a Mixed-Solvent System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hak Soon; Kang, Byung Ju; Oh, Je Hoon

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the evaporation behavior and the resulting morphology of inkjet-printed dielectric layers were controlled using a mixed-solvent system to fabricate uniform poly-4-vinylphenol (PVP) dielectric layers without any pinholes. The mixed-solvent system consisted of two different organic solvents: 1-hexanol and ethanol. The effects of inkjet-printing variables such as overlap condition, substrate temperature, and different printing sequences (continuous and interlacing printing methods) on the inkjet-printed dielectric layer were also investigated. Increasing volume fraction of ethanol (VFE) is likely to reduce the evaporation rate gradient and the drying time of the inkjet-printed dielectric layer; this diminishes the coffee stain effect and thereby improves the uniformity of the inkjet-printed dielectric layer. However, the coffee stain effect becomes more severe with an increase in the substrate temperature due to the enhanced outward convective flow. The overlap condition has little effect on the evaporation behavior of the printed dielectric layer. In addition, the interlacing printing method results in either a stronger coffee stain effect or wavy structures of the dielectric layers depending on the VFE of the PVP solution. All-inkjet-printed capacitors without electrical short circuiting can be successfully fabricated using the optimized PVP solution (VFE = 0.6); this indicates that the mixed-solvent system is expected to play an important role in the fabrication of high-quality inkjet-printed dielectric layers in various printed electronics applications.

  17. Building continental-scale 3D subsurface layers in the Digital Crust project: constrained interpolation and uncertainty estimation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yulaeva, E.; Fan, Y.; Moosdorf, N.; Richard, S. M.; Bristol, S.; Peters, S. E.; Zaslavsky, I.; Ingebritsen, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Digital Crust EarthCube building block creates a framework for integrating disparate 3D/4D information from multiple sources into a comprehensive model of the structure and composition of the Earth's upper crust, and to demonstrate the utility of this model in several research scenarios. One of such scenarios is estimation of various crustal properties related to fluid dynamics (e.g. permeability and porosity) at each node of any arbitrary unstructured 3D grid to support continental-scale numerical models of fluid flow and transport. Starting from Macrostrat, an existing 4D database of 33,903 chronostratigraphic units, and employing GeoDeepDive, a software system for extracting structured information from unstructured documents, we construct 3D gridded fields of sediment/rock porosity, permeability and geochemistry for large sedimentary basins of North America, which will be used to improve our understanding of large-scale fluid flow, chemical weathering rates, and geochemical fluxes into the ocean. In this talk, we discuss the methods, data gaps (particularly in geologically complex terrain), and various physical and geological constraints on interpolation and uncertainty estimation.

  18. Linear and nonlinear instability and ligament dynamics in 3D laminar two-layer liquid/liquid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ó Náraigh, Lennon; Valluri, Prashant; Scott, David; Bethune, Iain; Spelt, Peter

    2013-11-01

    We consider the linear and nonlinear stability of two-phase density-matched but viscosity contrasted fluids subject to laminar Poiseuille flow in a channel, paying particular attention to the formation of three-dimensional waves. The Orr-Sommerfeld-Squire analysis is used along with DNS of the 3D two-phase Navier-Stokes equations using our newly launched TPLS Solver (http://edin.ac/10cRKzS). For the parameter regimes considered, we demonstrate the existence of two distinct mechanisms whereby 3D waves enter the system, and dominate at late time. There exists a direct route, whereby 3D waves are amplified by the standard linear mechanism; for certain parameter classes, such waves grow at a rate less than but comparable to that of most-dangerous two-dimensional mode. Additionally, there is a weakly nonlinear route, whereby a purely spanwise wave couples to a streamwise mode and grows exponentially. We demonstrate these mechanisms in isolation and in concert. Consideration is also given to the ultimate state of these waves: persistent three-dimensional nonlinear waves are stretched and distorted by the base flow, thereby producing regimes of ligaments, ``sheets,'' or ``interfacial turbulence.'' HECToR RAP/dCSE Project e174, HPC-Europa 2.

  19. 3D Rheological Modeling of NW Intraplate Europe, Deciphering Spatial Integrated strength patterns, Mechanical Strong Layering and EET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beekman, F.; Hardebol, N.; Cloetingh, S.; Tesauro, M.

    2006-12-01

    Better understanding of 3D rheological heterogeneity of the European Lithosphere provide the key to tie the recorded intraplate deformation pattern to stress fields transmitted into plate interior from plate boundary forces. The first order strain patterns result from stresses transmitted through the European lithosphere that is marked by a patchwork of high strength variability from inherited structural and compositional heterogeneities and upper mantle thermal perturbations. As the lithospheric rheology depends primarily on its spatial structure, composition and thermal estate, the 3D strength model for the European lithosphere relies on a 3D compositional model that yields the compositional heterogeneities and an iteratively calculated thermal cube using Fouriers law for heat conduction. The accurate appraisal of spatial strength variability results from proper mapping and integration of the geophysical compositional and thermal input parameters. Therefore, much attention has been paid to a proper description of first order structural and tectonic features that facilitate compilation of the compositional and thermal input models. As such, the 3D strength model reflects the thermo-mechanical structure inherited from the Europeans polyphase deformation history. Major 3D spatial mechanical strength variability has been revealed. The East-European and Fennoscandian Craton to the NE exhibit high strength (30-50 1012 N/m) from low mantle temperatures and surface heatflow of 35-60 mW/m2 while central and western Europe reflect a polyphase Phanerozoic thermo- tectonic history. Here, regions with high rigidity are formed primarily by patches of thermally stabilized Variscan Massifs (e.g. Rhenish, Armorican, Bohemian, and Iberian Massif) with low heatflow and lithospheric thickness values (50-65 mW/m2; 110-150 km) yielding strengths of ~15-25 1012 N/m. In contrast, major axis of weakened lithosphere coincides with Cenozoic Rift System (e.g. Upper and Lower Rhine Grabens

  20. Maximal light-energy transfer through a dielectric/metal-layered electrode on a photoactive device.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Park, Q-Han

    2014-01-27

    We report the fabrication of an optimized low reflective dielectric/metal-layered electrode that provides significant electrical conductivity and light transparency in the near-infrared wavelength regime. By making the metal film thickness thick enough and choosing a proper dielectric layer with a certain thickness, we show that our suggested electrode significantly reduces the light reflection while preserving high electrical conductivity. We demonstrate our optimized electrodes present a highly conductive surface with a sheet resistance of 5.2 Ω/sq and a high light transmittance of near 85% in the near-infrared regime. We also apply our optimized electrode to thin-film organic photovoltaic devices and show the electrode helps in absorbing light energy inside an active layer. We believe that this simple but powerful layered electrode will pave the way for designing transparent electrodes on photoactive devices.

  1. DNA-nucleobases: gate dielectric/passivation layer for flexible GFET-based sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Adrienne D.; Ouchen, Fahima; Kim, Steve S.; Elhamri, Said; Naik, Rajesh R.; Grote, James

    2015-09-01

    The main goal of this research was to maintain the bulk charge carrier mobility of graphene, after deposition of the gate dielectric layer used for making transistor devices. The approach was introducing a thin film of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) nucleobase purine guanine, deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD), onto layers of graphene that were transferred onto various flexible substrates. Several test platforms were fabricated with guanine as a standalone gate dielectric, as the control, and guanine as a passivation layer between the graphene and PMMA. It was found that the bulk charge carrier mobility of graphene was best maintained and most stable using guanine as a passivation layer between the graphene and PMMA. Other transport properties, such as charge carrier concentration, conductivity type and electrical resistivity were investigated as well. This is an important first step to realizing high performance graphene-based transistors that have potential use in bio and environmental sensors, computer-processing and electronics.

  2. Electrical Double Layer Capacitance in a Graphene-embedded Al2O3 Gate Dielectric

    PubMed Central

    Ki Min, Bok; Kim, Seong K.; Jun Kim, Seong; Ho Kim, Sung; Kang, Min-A; Park, Chong-Yun; Song, Wooseok; Myung, Sung; Lim, Jongsun; An, Ki-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Graphene heterostructures are of considerable interest as a new class of electronic devices with exceptional performance in a broad range of applications has been realized. Here, we propose a graphene-embedded Al2O3 gate dielectric with a relatively high dielectric constant of 15.5, which is about 2 times that of Al2O3, having a low leakage current with insertion of tri-layer graphene. In this system, the enhanced capacitance of the hybrid structure can be understood by the formation of a space charge layer at the graphene/Al2O3 interface. The electrical properties of the interface can be further explained by the electrical double layer (EDL) model dominated by the diffuse layer. PMID:26530817

  3. A novel method of fabricating laminated silicone stack actuators with pre-strained dielectric layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinitt, Andrew D.; Conn, Andrew T.

    2014-03-01

    In recent studies, stack based Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEAs) have been successfully used in haptic feedback and sensing applications. However, limitations in the fabrication method, and materials used to con- struct stack actuators constrain their force and displacement output per unit volume. This paper focuses on a fabrication process enabling a stacked elastomer actuator to withstand the high tensile forces needed for high power applications, such as mimetics for mammalian muscle contraction (i.e prostheses), whilst requiring low voltage for thickness-mode contractile actuation. Spun elastomer layers are bonded together in a pre-strained state using a conductive adhesive filler, forming a Laminated Inter-Penetrating Network (L-IPN) with repeatable and uniform electrode thickness. The resulting structure utilises the stored strain energy of the dielectric elas- tomer to compress the cured electrode composite material. The method is used to fabricate an L-IPN example, which demonstrated that the bonded L-IPN has high tensile strength normal to the lamination. Additionally, the uniformity and retained dielectric layer pre-strain of the L-IPN are confirmed. The described method is envisaged to be used in a semi-automated assembly of large-scale multi-layer stacks of pre-strained dielectric layers possessing a tensile strength in the range generated by mammalian muscle.

  4. Process for 3D chip stacking

    DOEpatents

    Malba, V.

    1998-11-10

    A manufacturable process for fabricating electrical interconnects which extend from a top surface of an integrated circuit chip to a sidewall of the chip using laser pantography to pattern three dimensional interconnects. The electrical interconnects may be of an L-connect or L-shaped type. The process implements three dimensional (3D) stacking by moving the conventional bond or interface pads on a chip to the sidewall of the chip. Implementation of the process includes: (1) holding individual chips for batch processing, (2) depositing a dielectric passivation layer on the top and sidewalls of the chips, (3) opening vias in the dielectric, (4) forming the interconnects by laser pantography, and (5) removing the chips from the holding means. The process enables low cost manufacturing of chips with bond pads on the sidewalls, which enables stacking for increased performance, reduced space, and higher functional per unit volume. 3 figs.

  5. Process for 3D chip stacking

    DOEpatents

    Malba, Vincent

    1998-01-01

    A manufacturable process for fabricating electrical interconnects which extend from a top surface of an integrated circuit chip to a sidewall of the chip using laser pantography to pattern three dimensional interconnects. The electrical interconnects may be of an L-connect or L-shaped type. The process implements three dimensional (3D) stacking by moving the conventional bond or interface pads on a chip to the sidewall of the chip. Implementation of the process includes: 1) holding individual chips for batch processing, 2) depositing a dielectric passivation layer on the top and sidewalls of the chips, 3) opening vias in the dielectric, 4) forming the interconnects by laser pantography, and 5) removing the chips from the holding means. The process enables low cost manufacturing of chips with bond pads on the sidewalls, which enables stacking for increased performance, reduced space, and higher functional per unit volume.

  6. Atomic layer deposition of dielectrics on graphene using reversibly physisorbed ozone.

    PubMed

    Jandhyala, Srikar; Mordi, Greg; Lee, Bongki; Lee, Geunsik; Floresca, Carlo; Cha, Pil-Ryung; Ahn, Jinho; Wallace, Robert M; Chabal, Yves J; Kim, Moon J; Colombo, Luigi; Cho, Kyeongjae; Kim, Jiyoung

    2012-03-27

    Integration of graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs) requires the ability to grow or deposit high-quality, ultrathin dielectric insulators on graphene to modulate the channel potential. Here, we study a novel and facile approach based on atomic layer deposition through ozone functionalization to deposit high-κ dielectrics (such as Al(2)O(3)) without breaking vacuum. The underlying mechanisms of functionalization have been studied theoretically using ab initio calculations and experimentally using in situ monitoring of transport properties. It is found that ozone molecules are physisorbed on the surface of graphene, which act as nucleation sites for dielectric deposition. The physisorbed ozone molecules eventually react with the metal precursor, trimethylaluminum to form Al(2)O(3). Additionally, we successfully demonstrate the performance of dual-gated GFETs with Al(2)O(3) of sub-5 nm physical thickness as a gate dielectric. Back-gated GFETs with mobilities of ~19,000 cm(2)/(V·s) are also achieved after Al(2)O(3) deposition. These results indicate that ozone functionalization is a promising pathway to achieve scaled gate dielectrics on graphene without leaving a residual nucleation layer.

  7. Thickness Reconstruction of Layers by 3D Geometrical Model to Characterize Caledonian Tectonic Complex and Data in Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukass, J.; Saks, T.; Popovs, K.

    2012-04-01

    In present study we attempt to verify the 3D geological model, which has been built on a variety of heterogeneous data sources for the Baltic Basin (BB). Data describing the displacement along the faults and associated thickness changes of the syntectonic strata is sparse and reflects only regional relevance (Brangulis & Konsins 2002). Borehole logs provide most reliable and comprehensive data source for reconstructing the structural geology of the Latvia sedimentary cover as sufficient quality seismic data is available only for the local scale structures. Based on the thickness analysis of the boreholes rough resolution 3D geological tectonic block model was developed to deconstruct the geological structure of the Latvia Caledonian sedimentary sequence. MOSYS modeling system was used for the geological structure modeling, developed within the PUMA project (Sennikovs et al, 2011). Algorithmic genetic approach was applied to interpolate data of well logs as strata volume and sequentially to reconstruct the post-deformation situation. This approach allows modifying model construction in any step and all processes are fully documented and are repeatable. Geometrical model consists of 33 tectonic blocks bordered by the faults which were distributed by interpreting displacement amount of the blocks along the faults providing an opportunity to characterize common tectonic evolution. The study results indicate insignificant thickness change of the Ordovician and Silurian strata along the faults suggesting that major slip event along the faults occurred during the late Silurian and early Devonian, and some secondary fault reactivation during the middle Devonian Narva time. Uplift of the territory during this time is confirmed by the presence of the regional unconformity. Constructed rough resolution 3D geometrical model suggests shortening along the horizontal axis approximately 10 - 20% but most of the shortening has occurred in the central-west part of Latvia where it

  8. Effect of practical layered dielectric loads on SAR patterns from dual concentric conductor microstrip antennas.

    PubMed

    Rossetto, F; Stauffer, P R; Manfrini, V; Diederich, C J; Biffi Gentili, G

    1998-01-01

    Radiation patterns of 2 and 4cm square Dual Concentric Conductor (DCC) microstrip antennas were studied theoretically with Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) analysis and compared with experimental measurements of power deposition (SAR) in layered lossy dielectric loads. Single and array configurations were investigated with 915 MHz excitation applied across either one, two or four sides, or four corners of the square apertures. FDTD simulations were carried out for realistic models of a muscle tissue load coupled to the DCC antennas with a 5 mm thick bolus of either distilled water or low loss Silicone Oil. This study characterizes the effect on SAR of adding three additional thin dielectric layers which are necessary for clinical use of the applicator. These layers consist of a 0.1 mm thick dielectric coating on the array surface to provide electrical isolation of DCC apertures, and 0.15 mm thick plastic layers above and below the bolus to contain the liquid. Experimental measurements of SAR in a plane 1 cm deep in muscle phantom agree well with theoretical FDTD simulations in the multi-layered tissue models. These studies reveal significant changes in SAR for applicator configurations involving low dielectric constant (Er) layers on either side of a high Er water bolus layer. Prominent changes include a broadening and centring of the SAR under each aperture as well as increased SAR penetration in muscle. No significant differences are noted between the simple and complete load configurations for the low Er Silicone Oil bolus. Both theoretical and measured data demonstrate relatively uniform SAR distributions with > 50% of maximum SAR extending to the perimeter of single and multi-aperture array configurations of DCC applicators when using a thin 5 mm water or Silicone Oil bolus.

  9. 3D Global PIC simulation of Alfvenic transition layers at the cusp outer boundary during IMF rotations from north to south

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, D. S.; Lembege, B.; Esmaeili, A.; Nishikawa, K.

    2013-12-01

    Statistical experimental observations of the cusp boundaries from CLUSTER mission made by Lavraud et al. (2005) have clearly evidenced the presence of a transition layer inside the magnetosheath near the outer boundary of the cusp. This layer characterized by Log(MA)~ 1 allows a transition from super-Alfvenic to sub-Alfvenic bulk flow from the exterior to the interior side of the outer cusp and has been mainly observed experimentally under northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The role of this layer is important in order to understand the flow variations (and later the entry and precipitation of particles) when penetrating the outer boundary of the cusp. In order to analyze this layer, a large 3D PIC simulation of the global solar wind-terrestrial magnetosphere interaction have been performed, and the attention has been focused on the cusp region and its nearby surrounding during IMF rotation from north to south. Present results retrieve quite well the presence of this layer within the meridian plane for exactly northward IMF, but its location differs in the sense that it is located slightly below the X reconnection region associated to the nearby magnetopause (above the outer boundary of the cusp). In order to clarify this question, an extensive study has been performed as follows: (i) a 3D mapping of this transition layer in order to analyze more precisely the thickness, the location and the spatial extension of this layer on the magnetosphere flanks for a fixed Northward IMF configuration; (ii) a parametric study in order to analyze the impact of the IMF rotation from north to south on the persistence and the main features of this transition layer. The locations of this transition layer slightly radially expand and shrink during the IMF rotation and the thickness of the layer increases during the rotation. We show how these transition layers render the flow from super to sub Alfvenic and allow the particles enter into the magnetic cusp region. Alfven

  10. Gigahertz Dielectric Polarization of Substitutional Single Niobium Atoms in Defective Graphitic Layers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Guo, Junjie; Guan, Pengfei; Qin, Gaowu; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2015-10-01

    We synthesize two Nb/C composites with an order of magnitude difference in the density of single niobium atoms substituted into defective graphitic layers. The concentration and sites of single Nb atoms are identified using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory. Comparing the experimental complex permittivity spectra reveals that a representative dielectric resonance at ∼16  GHz originates from the intrinsic polarization of single Nb atom sites, which is confirmed by theoretical simulations. The single-atom dielectric resonance represents the physical limit of the electromagnetic response of condensed matter, and thus might open up a new avenue for designing electromagnetic wave absorption materials. Single-atom resonance also has important implications in understanding the correlation between the macroscopic dielectric behaviors and the atomic-scale structural origin. PMID:26551823

  11. Phase Modulator with Terahertz Optical Bandwidth Formed by Multi-Layered Dielectric Stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S. (Inventor); Fork, Richard L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An optical phase modulator includes a bandpass multilayer stack, formed by a plurality of dielectric layers, preferably of GaAs and AlAs, and having a transmission function related to the refractive index of the layers of the stack, for receiving an optical input signal to be phase modulated. A phase modulator device produces a nonmechanical change in the refractive index of each layer of the stack by, e.g., the injection of free carrier, to provide shifting of the transmission function so as to produce phase modulation of the optical input signal and to thereby produce a phase modulated output signal.

  12. Nonorthogonal {{sp}}^{3}{{d}}^{5} tight-binding parameterization of single-layer phosphorene under biaxial strain and application to FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehyun; Seo, Jumbeom; Oh, Jung Hyun; Shin, Mincheol

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a new set of {{sp}}3{{d}}5 tight-binding (TB) parameters for single-layer phosphorene within the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) scheme. For this, we develop the numerical algorithm to find the NRL TB parameters fitted to ab initio results. It is shown that the proposed NRL TB parameters successfully reproduce the band structure of a single-layer phosphorene, and even under biaxial or uniaxial strain, they appropriately describe the effects, such as modification of anisotropic effective masses and band gap. Via the top-of-the-barrier model, we also investigate the performance of single-layer phosphorene FETs under biaxial strain with the NRL TB Hamiltonian and find that the results are well in accordance with those of previous studies.

  13. Nonorthogonal {{sp}}^{3}{{d}}^{5} tight-binding parameterization of single-layer phosphorene under biaxial strain and application to FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehyun; Seo, Jumbeom; Oh, Jung Hyun; Shin, Mincheol

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a new set of {{sp}}3{{d}}5 tight-binding (TB) parameters for single-layer phosphorene within the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) scheme. For this, we develop the numerical algorithm to find the NRL TB parameters fitted to ab initio results. It is shown that the proposed NRL TB parameters successfully reproduce the band structure of a single-layer phosphorene, and even under biaxial or uniaxial strain, they appropriately describe the effects, such as modification of anisotropic effective masses and band gap. Via the top-of-the-barrier model, we also investigate the performance of single-layer phosphorene FETs under biaxial strain with the NRL TB Hamiltonian and find that the results are well in accordance with those of previous studies.

  14. A 3D complex containing novel 2D Cu{sup II}-azido layers: Structure, magnetic properties and effects of 'Non-innocent' reagent

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xue-Miao; Guo, Qian; Zhao, Jiong-Peng; Liu, Fu-Chen

    2012-12-15

    A novel copper-azido coordination polymer, [Cu{sub 2}(N{sub 3}){sub 3}(L)]{sub n} (1, HL=pyrazine-2-carboxylic acid), has been synthesized by hydrothermal reaction with 'Non-innocent' reagent in the aqueous solution. In the reaction system, Cu{sup II} ions are avoided to reduce to Cu{sup I} ions due to the existence of Nd{sup III}. It is found that the complex is a 3D structure based on two double EO azido bridged trimmers and octahedron Cu{sup II} ions, in which the azide ligands take on EO and {mu}{sub 1,1,3} mode to form Cu{sup II}-azido 2D layers, furthermore L ligands pillar 2D layers into an infinite 3D framework with the Schlaefli symbol of {l_brace}4;6{sup 2}{r_brace}4{l_brace}4{sup 2};6{sup 12};8{sup 10};10{sup 4}{r_brace}{l_brace}4{sup 2};6{sup 4}{r_brace}. Magnetic studies revealed that the interactions between the Cu{sup II} ions in the trimmer are ferromagnetic for the Cu-N-Cu angle nearly 98 Degree-Sign , while the interactions between the trimmer and octahedron Cu{sup II} ion are antiferromgantic and result in an antiferromagnetic state. - Graphical abstract: A 3D complex containing novel 2D Cu{sup II}-azido layers, [Cu{sub 2}(N{sub 3}){sub 3}(L)]{sub n} (HL=pyrazine-2-carboxylic acid), was synthesized by hydrothermal reaction and exhibit interesting structure and magnetic properties. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 'Non-innocent' reagents plays a key role in the process of formation of this complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2D layer is formed only by Cu{sup II} ions and azido ligands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pyrazine-2-carboxylate ligands reinforce 2D layers and pillar them into an infinite 3D framework. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic study indicates that alternating FM-AF coupling exists in the complex.

  15. Tunable Dipole Surface Plasmon Resonances of Silver Nanoparticles by Cladding Dielectric Layers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaotong; Li, Dabing; Sun, Xiaojuan; Li, Zhiming; Song, Hang; Jiang, Hong; Chen, Yiren

    2015-07-28

    The tunability of surface plasmon resonance can enable the highest degree of localised surface plasmon enhancement to be achieved, based on the emitting or absorbing wavelength. In this article, tunable dipole surface plasmon resonances of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are realized by modification of the SiO2 dielectric layer thicknesses. SiO2 layers both beneath and over the Ag NPs affected the resonance wavelengths of local surface plasmons (LSPs). By adjusting the SiO2 thickness beneath the Ag NPs from 5 nm to 20 nm, the dipole surface plasmon resonances shifted from 470 nm to 410 nm. Meanwhile, after sandwiching the Ag NPs by growing SiO2 before NPs fabrication and then overcoating the NPs with various SiO2 thicknesses from 5 nm to 20 nm, the dipole surface plasmon resonances changed from 450 nm to 490 nm. The SiO2 cladding dielectric layer can tune the Ag NP surface charge, leading to a change in the effective permittivity of the surrounding medium, and thus to a blueshift or redshift of the resonance wavelength. Also, the quadrupole plasmon resonances were suppressed by the SiO2 cladding layer because the dielectric SiO2 can suppress level splitting of surface plasmon resonances caused by the Ag NP coupling effect.

  16. Electrical and Mechanical Properties of Through-Silicon Vias and Bonding Layers in Stacked Wafers for 3D Integrated Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Byoung-Joon; Lee, Ho-Young; Joo, Young-Chang

    2012-02-01

    Thermal stress issues in a three-dimensional (3D) stacked wafer system were examined using finite-element analysis of the stacked wafers. This paper elucidates the effects of the bonding dimensions on mechanical failure and the keep-away zone, where devices cannot be located because of the stress in the Si. The key factors in decreasing the thermal strain were the bonding diameter and thickness. When the bonding diameter decreased from 40 μm to 12 μm, the equivalent strain decreased by 83%. It is noteworthy that the keep-away zone also decreased from 17 μm to zero when the bonding diameter decreased from 40 μm to 12 μm. When the bonding thickness doubled, the equivalent strain decreased by 44%. The effects of the dimensions and arrangement of through-silicon vias (TSV) were also analyzed. Small TSV diameter and pitch are important to decrease the equivalent strain, especially when the amount of Cu per unit volume is fixed. When the TSV diameter and pitch decreased fourfold, the equivalent strain decreased by 70%. The effects of TSV height and the number of die stacks were not significant, because the underfill acted as a buffer against thermal strain.

  17. Numerical simulation of heat transfer and flow structure in 3-D turbulent boundary layer with imbedded longitudinal vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, J.Y.; Ryou, H.S.

    1997-03-01

    Heat transfer characteristics and flow structure in turbulent flows through a flat plate three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer containing built-in vortex generators have been analyzed by means of the space marching Crank-Nicolson finite difference method. The method solves the slender flow approximation of the steady three-dimensional Navier-Stokes and energy equations. This study used the eddy diffusivity model and standard {kappa}-{epsilon} model to predict heat transfer and flow field in the turbulent flow with imbedded longitudinal vortex. The results show boundary layer distortion due to vortices, such as strong spanwise flow divergence and boundary layer thinning. The heat transfer and skin friction show relatively good results in comparison with experimental data. The vortex core moves slightly away from the wall and grows slowly; consequently, the vortex influences the flow over a very long distance downstream. The enhancement of the heat transfer in the vicinity of the wall is due to the increasing spanwise separation of the vortices as they develop in the streamwise direction.

  18. Two- or three-layered box-models versus fine 3D models for coastal ecological modelling? A comparative study in the English Channel (Western Europe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ménesguen, Alain; Cugier, Philippe; Loyer, Sophie; Vanhoutte-Brunier, Alice; Hoch, Thierry; Guillaud, Jean-François; Gohin, Francis

    2007-01-01

    The general trend in ecosystem modelling is to improve the spatial resolution by shifting from rough box-models to fine 3D models. Despite the continuous speeding-up of computing, 3D models involving numerous state variables may remain intractable, especially for parameter calibration, when processes with long half-life periods (i.e, from years to decades) are introduced, such as the behaviour of organic matter in sediment and population dynamics of benthic species. In these cases, a first approach can be provided by fast-running box-models, if they take into account the most crucial hydrodynamic properties of the system. In a macrotidal shelf sea such as the English Channel, the long-term horizontal transport can be summarized by the tidal residual circulation, and the vertical stratification can be sketched by a two- or three-layered integral model. This paper compares the results obtained in the English Channel area by the same biogeochemical equations of pelagic primary production, coupled to 1) a two-layered box-model 2) a three-layered box-model (i.e., with an intermediate cline layer between surface and bottom ones) and 3) a fine-gridded 3D model. Comparison is focused firstly on thermal stratification and summer dinoflagellate blooms in the north-western Channel and secondly on the haline stratification and the sequence of blooms obtained in the eutrophicated Seine river plume. Comparison shows that box-models act as low-pass filters which reproduce correctly the weekly mean time-course, but greatly reduce the variance locally observed in a tide-oscillating plume region. As far as global characteristics are concerned, such as the annual primary production, or the percentage of variation in annual production after reducing the nutrient loadings, the box and 3D models gave very similar results. This conclusion reinforces the usefulness of using box-models as a first approach in long-term processes, for which a long transient phase is expected before reaching

  19. Small is beautiful: the unusual transformation of nanocrystalline layered α-zirconium phosphate into a new 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Pica, Monica; Vivani, Riccardo; Donnadio, Anna; Troni, Elisabetta; Fop, Sacha; Casciola, Mario

    2015-09-21

    Nanosized α-zirconium phosphate, α-ZrP, undergoes a phase transition at 120 °C, which is not observed with microcrystalline α-ZrP in the same conditions, and which leads to a new 3D phase. The new compound, with formula Zr(HPO4)2 (τ'-ZrP), consists of cubelike nanoparticles and has a tetragonal unit cell (space group P43212, a = 7.955 Å, c = 10.744 Å). The structure of τ'-ZrP is in close relationship with that of the already known τ-ZrP. Both structures are made of packed chains of eight-membered rings, composed of Zr atoms connected to bridging HPO4 groups. The main difference between the two structures concerns the different orientation of the uncoordinated P-OH groups, pointing into the channels. The in situ XRPD analysis on nanosized α-ZrP, performed at 120 °C as a function of time, provided information about the kinetics of the formation of τ'-ZrP, showing that the α-ZrP phase is directly transformed into τ'-ZrP. Moreover, τ'-ZrP is converted into α-ZrP at room temperature in the presence of water vapor. It was proved that the free phosphoric acid, which is originally present in small amounts in nanosized α-ZrP and τ'-ZrP, is necessary for the interconversion between the two phases. As a matter of fact, the removal of phosphoric acid, by washing α-ZrP and τ'-ZrP with anhydrous ethanol, inhibits the above conversion.

  20. 3D Modeling of influence of oxygenated inflows on biogeochemical structure of redox-layer of enclosed seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podymov, O.

    2009-04-01

    In this study we used a coupled hydrophysical-biogeochemical model. Biogeochemical processes were described with O-N-S-P-Mn-Fe ROLM model (Yakushev et al, 2007), designed to study processes of organic matter (OM) formation and decay, reduction and oxidation of species of nitrogen, sulphur, manganese and iron, transformation of phosphorus species. Phytoplankton, zooplankton and bacteria were also parameterized and divided into four groups according to their relation to particular energy source and to OM transformation. Hydrophysical processes where described with 3D General Estuarine Transport Model (Burchard et al, 2004). We modeled the influence of oxygenated intrusions on the vertical biogeochemical structure of the central Gotland Sea. The model simulations demonstrate that a complete ventilation of the Gotland Deep bottom water caused by massive inflows of oxygenated North Sea water led to substantial changes of the vertical biogeochemical structure within this basin. During the inflow events large amounts of iron and manganese precipitate and discharge from the water column. In this phase redox reactions are accelerated and growth of bacteria leads to an increase of particulate matter content and consecutive particle sedimentation. An unbalanced structure of water column exists during the period of reestablishment of anoxic conditions. Its appearance is related to the absence of Mn species that play the dominant role in the oxidation-reduction reactions at the pelagic redox interfaces. This unbalanced structure can serve as a biotope for a development of untypical microbial redox-cline reactions (i.e. anammox). According to the model simulations the duration of the reestablishment period for a steady state of biogeochemistry after a complete flushing is about 1.5 years.

  1. Improved nonlinear slot waveguides using dielectric buffer layers: properties of TM waves.

    PubMed

    Elsawy, Mahmoud M R; Renversez, Gilles

    2016-04-01

    We propose an improved version of the symmetric metal slot waveguides with a Kerr-type nonlinear dielectric core adding linear dielectric buffer layers between the metal regions and the core. Using a finite element method to compute the stationary nonlinear modes, we provide the full phase diagrams of its main transverse magnetic modes as a function of the total power, buffer layer, and core thicknesses that are more complex than the ones of the simple nonlinear metal slot. We show that these modes can exhibit spatial transitions toward specific modes of the new structure as a function of power. We also demonstrate that, for the main modes, the losses are reduced compared to the previous structures, and that they can now decrease with power. Finally, we describe the stability properties of the main stationary solutions using nonlinear FDTD simulations. PMID:27192282

  2. Development and evaluation of a LOR-based image reconstruction with 3D system response modeling for a PET insert with dual-layer offset crystal design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuezhu; Stortz, Greg; Sossi, Vesna; Thompson, Christopher J.; Retière, Fabrice; Kozlowski, Piotr; Thiessen, Jonathan D.; Goertzen, Andrew L.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we present a method of 3D system response calculation for analytical computer simulation and statistical image reconstruction for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatible positron emission tomography (PET) insert system that uses a dual-layer offset (DLO) crystal design. The general analytical system response functions (SRFs) for detector geometric and inter-crystal penetration of coincident crystal pairs are derived first. We implemented a 3D ray-tracing algorithm with 4π sampling for calculating the SRFs of coincident pairs of individual DLO crystals. The determination of which detector blocks are intersected by a gamma ray is made by calculating the intersection of the ray with virtual cylinders with radii just inside the inner surface and just outside the outer-edge of each crystal layer of the detector ring. For efficient ray-tracing computation, the detector block and ray to be traced are then rotated so that the crystals are aligned along the X-axis, facilitating calculation of ray/crystal boundary intersection points. This algorithm can be applied to any system geometry using either single-layer (SL) or multi-layer array design with or without offset crystals. For effective data organization, a direct lines of response (LOR)-based indexed histogram-mode method is also presented in this work. SRF calculation is performed on-the-fly in both forward and back projection procedures during each iteration of image reconstruction, with acceleration through use of eight-fold geometric symmetry and multi-threaded parallel computation. To validate the proposed methods, we performed a series of analytical and Monte Carlo computer simulations for different system geometry and detector designs. The full-width-at-half-maximum of the numerical SRFs in both radial and tangential directions are calculated and compared for various system designs. By inspecting the sinograms obtained for different detector geometries, it can be seen that the DLO crystal

  3. Coupling Between Microstrip Lines with Finite Width Ground Plane Embedded in Polyimide Layers for 3D-MMICs on Si

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Dalton, Edan; Tentzeris, Emmanouil M.; Papapolymerou, John; Williams, W. Dan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional circuits built upon multiple layers of polyimide are required for constructing Si/SiGe monolithic microwave/millimeter-wave integrated circuits on complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) (low resistivity) Si wafers. Thin film microstrip lines (TFMS) with finite width ground planes embedded in the polyimide are often used. However, the closely spaced TFMS lines are susceptible to high levels of coupling, which degrades circuit performance. In this paper, Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) analysis and experimental measurements are used to show that the ground planes must be connected by via holes to reduce coupling in both the forward and backward directions.

  4. The dynamic coupling of a third-generation wave model and a 3D hydrodynamic model through boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M. Y.; Li, Y. S.

    1997-08-01

    A third-generation wind wave model based on the energy balance equation taking into account the effects of time-varying currents and coupled dynamically with a semi-implicit three-dimensional hydrodynamic model incorporating the influences of time- and space-varying vertical eddy viscosity, bottom topography and wave-current interactions is presented in this paper. The wave model is synchronously coupled with the three-dimensional hydrodynamic model through the surface atmospheric turbulent boundary layer and the bottom boundary layer. The theory of Janssen (1991) (in Journal of Physical Oceanography21, 1631-1642) is used to incorporate the effects of waves on the surface boundary layer, while the theory of Grant and Maddsen (1979) [in Journal of Geophysical Research (Oceans)84, 1797-1808], which was used by Signell et al. (1990) (in Journal of Geophysical Research95, 9671-9678) on the bottom boundary layer for constant waves, is modified for the inclusion of time-varying waves. The mutual influences between waves and currents are investigated through an idealized continental shelf case and hindcastings of storm events in the sea area adjacent to Hong Kong in the northern South China Sea. Calculations are compared with other computed results and observations. Calculations show that the wave-dependent surface stress incorporated in the three-dimensional hydrodynamic model has significant impact on water surface velocities and surface elevations (over 10% higher). The inclusion of wave-dependent bottom stress also shows some effects; however, in the presence of the wave-dependent surface stress, its effect on surge levels becomes negligible. The effect of currents on waves amounts to the reduction of the significant wave height by about 8% and less for wave mean periods. However, the inclusion of the wave-dependent bottom stress in the three-dimensional hydrodynamic model has little effect on wave characteristics whether or not the wave-dependent surface stress is

  5. Dielectric Properties of Layered ZnTa2O6/Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Chang Jun; Kim, Eung Soo

    2012-11-01

    The effects of ZnTa2O6 content and layered structure on the dielectric properties of ZnTa2O6/poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) composites were investigated at microwave frequency. With increasing ZnTa2O6 content, the dielectric constant (K) and dielectric loss (tan δ) of the composites increased due to the K values of the individual components and the microstructure. For the composites with layered structures, tan δ was dependent on the internal strain of the composites. Several types of theoretical models were employed to predict the effective K of the composites and the predicted values were compared with experimental data. The temperature coefficient of resonant frequency (TCF) was also discussed as it characterises the thermal stability of the composites. Typically, K of 4.24, tan δ of 1.36 ×10-3 and, TCF of 4.75 ppm/°C were obtained for the single layered PTFE composites with 0.2 volume fraction (Vf) of ZnTa2O6.

  6. Dielectric constant estimation of the uppermost Basal Unit layer in the martian Boreales Scopuli region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauro, Sebastian E.; Mattei, Elisabetta; Soldovieri, Francesco; Pettinelli, Elena; Orosei, Roberto; Vannaroni, Giuliano

    2012-05-01

    An electromagnetic inversion model has been applied to echoes from the subsurface sounding Shallow Radar (SHARAD) to retrieve the dielectric properties of the uppermost Basal Unit (BU) beneath the North Polar Layered Deposits of Mars. SHARAD data have been carefully selected to satisfy the assumption of the inversion model which requires a stratigraphy consisting of mostly plane parallel layers. The resulting values of the dielectric constant have been interpreted in terms of a variable percentage of dust in an ice-dust mixture through the use of a mixing model for dielectric properties. The resulting dust content exceeds 65%, reaching perhaps 95%, depending on the permittivity values assumed for the dust. Such a concentration is higher than that obtained by Selvans et al. (Selvans, M.M., Plaut, J.J., Aharonson, O. [2010]. J. Geophys. Res, 115, E09003). This discrepancy could be justified considering that our observations refer to the uppermost BU layer, whereas Selvans et al. (Selvans, M.M., Plaut, J.J., Aharonson, O. [2010]. J. Geophys. Res, 115, E09003) probed the BU full thickness. Moreover, if the BU is considered spatially inhomogeneous, with very different dust content and thickness (Tanaka, K.L., Skinner, J.A., Fortezzo, C.M., Herkenhoff, K.E., Rodriguez, J.A.P., Bourke, M.C., Kolb, E.J., Okubo, C.H. [2008]. Icarus, 196, 318-358), the discrepancy could be furtherly reconciled.

  7. Mechanochemical Synthesis of 3d Transition-Metal-1,2,4-Triazole Complexes as Precursors for Microwave-Assisted and Thermal Conversion to Coordination Polymers with a High Influence on the Dielectric Properties.

    PubMed

    Brede, Franziska A; Heine, Johanna; Sextl, Gerhard; Müller-Buschbaum, Klaus

    2016-02-18

    The complexes [MCl2 (TzH)4] (M=Mn (1), Fe (2); TzH=1,2,4-1H-triazole) and [ZnCl2 (TzH)2] (3) have been obtained by mechanochemical reactions of the corresponding divalent metal chloride and 1,2,4-1H-triazole. They were successfully used as precursors for the formation of coordination polymers either by a microwave-assisted reaction or by thermal conversion. For manganese, the conversion directly yielded 1∞ [MnCl2 TzH] (4), whereas for the iron-containing precursor, 1∞ [FeCl2 TzH] (6), was formed via the intermediate coordination polymer 1∞ [FeCl(TzH)2]Cl (5). For cobalt, the isotypic polymer 1∞ [CoCl(TzH)2]Cl (7) was obtained, but exclusively by a microwave-induced reaction directly from CoCl2 . The crystal structures were resolved from single crystals and powders. The dielectric properties were determined and revealed large differences in permittivity between the precursor complexes and the rigid chain-like coordination polymers. Whereas the monomeric complexes exhibit very different dielectric behaviour, depending on the transition metal, from "low-k" to "high-k" with the permittivity ranging from 4.3 to >100 for frequencies of up to 1000 Hz, the coordination polymers and complexes with strong intermolecular interactions are all close to "low-k" materials with very low dielectric constants up to 50 °C. Therefore, the conversion procedures can be used to deliberately influence the dielectric properties from complex to polymer and for different 3d transition-metal ions.

  8. Scattering from a random layer embedded with dielectric needles. [for applications to coniferous vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eom, H. J.; Fung, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Intensity scattering from a random layer imbedded with small dielectric needles is studied for applications to coniferous vegetation. The phase matrix of a thin needle whose length may be appreciable compared to the incident wavelength is presented. The effects of needle orientation on scattering is taken into account by averaging the phase function over angles of orientation. The backscattering coefficient from the layer is computed by solving the radiative transfer equation. The effects of operating frequency, orientation and size of a needle on like- and cross-backscattering are demonstrated. It was found that in backscattering angular trends are mainly controlled by the orientation of the needles.

  9. Integrating proximal soil sensing techniques and terrain indexes to generate 3D maps of soil restrictive layers in the Palouse region, Washington, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggio, Matteo; Brown, David J.; Gasch, Caley K.; Brooks, Erin S.; Yourek, Matt A.

    2015-04-01

    In the Palouse region of eastern Washington and northern Idaho (USA), spatially discontinuous restrictive layers impede rooting growth and water infiltration. Consequently, accurate maps showing the depth and spatial extent of these restrictive layers are essential for watershed hydrologic modeling appropriate for precision agriculture. In this presentation, we report on the use of a Visible and Near-Infrared (VisNIR) penetrometer fore optic to construct detailed maps of three wheat fields in the Palouse region. The VisNIR penetrometer was used to deliver in situ soil reflectance to an Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD, Boulder, CO, USA) spectrometer and simultaneously acquire insertion force. With a hydraulic push-type soil coring systems for insertion (e.g. Giddings), we collected soil spectra and insertion force data along 41m x 41m grid points (2 fields) and 50m x 50m grid points (1 field) to ≈80cm depth, in addition to interrogation points at 36 representative instrumented locations per field. At each of the 36 instrumented locations, two soil cores were extracted for laboratory determination of clay content and bulk density. We developed calibration models of soil clay content and bulk density with spectra and insertion force collected in situ, using partial least squares regression 2 (PLSR2). Applying spline functions, we delineated clay and bulk density profiles at each points (grid and 24 locations). The soil profiles were then used as inputs in a regression-kriging model with terrain indexes and ECa data (derived from an EM38 field survey, Geonics, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada) as covariates to generate 3D soil maps. Preliminary results show that the VisNIR penetrometer can capture the spatial patterns of restrictive layers. Work is ongoing to evaluate the prediction accuracy of penetrometer-derived 3D clay content and restriction layer maps.

  10. Transverse surface waves in a layered structure with a functionally graded piezoelectric substrate and a hard dielectric layer.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zheng-Hua; Jin, Feng; Lu, Tianjian; Kishimoto, Kikuo

    2009-03-01

    As to an ideally layered structure with a functionally graded piezoelectric substrate (material parameters change continuously along the thickness direction) and a hard dielectric layer, the existence and propagation behavior of transverse surface waves is studied by analytical technique. The dispersion equations for the existence of the transverse surface waves with respect to phase velocity are obtained for electrically open and short circuit conditions, respectively. A detailed investigation of the effect of gradient coefficient on dispersion relation, electromechanical coupling factor and penetration depth is carried out. It is found by numerical examples that adjusting gradient coefficient makes the electromechanical coupling factor of the transverse surface waves achieve quite high values at some appropriate ratio values of the layer thickness to the wavelength, and at the same time, the penetration depth can be reduced to the same order as the wavelength.

  11. Enhancement of Thermal Conductance at Metal-Dielectric Interfaces Using Subnanometer Metal Adhesion Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Minyoung; Freedman, Justin P.; Liang, Hongliang Joe; Chow, Cheng-Ming; Sokalski, Vincent M.; Bain, James A.; Malen, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    We show that the use of subnanometer adhesion layers significantly enhances the thermal interface conductance at metal-dielectric interfaces. A metal-dielectric interface between Au and sapphire (Al2O3) is considered using Cu (low optical loss) and Cr (high optical loss) as adhesion layers. To enable high throughput measurements, each adhesion layer is deposited as a wedge such that a continuous range of thicknesses could be sampled. Our measurements of thermal interface conductance at the metal-Al2O3 interface made using frequency-domain thermoreflectance show that a 1-nm-thick adhesion layer of Cu or Cr is sufficient to enhance the thermal interface conductance by more than a factor of 2 or 4, respectively, relative to the pure Au/Al2O3 interface. The enhancement agrees with the diffuse-mismatch-model-based predictions of accumulated thermal conductance versus adhesion-layer thickness assuming that it contributes phonons with wavelengths less than its thickness, while those with longer wavelengths transmit directly from the Au.

  12. Scrape-off layer modeling of radiative divertor and high heat flux experiments on D3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, R. B.; Petrie, T. W.; Hill, D. N.

    1992-03-01

    We use a new multispecies 1-D fluid code, NEWT-1D, to model DIII-D scrape-off layer (SOL) behavior during radiative divertor and high heat flux experiments. The separatrix location and the width of the SOL are uncertain, and affect the comparison of the data in important ways. The model agrees with many of the experimental measurements for a particular prescription for the separatrix location. The model cannot explain the recent data on the separatrix T(sub i) with a conventional picture of ion and electron power flows across the separatrix. Radial transport of particles and heat in some form is required to explain the peak heat flux data before and after gas puffing. For argon puffing in the private flux region, entrainment is poor in the steady state. The calculations suggest that strike point argon puffing in a slot divertor geometry results in substantially better entrainment. Self-consistent, steady-state solutions with radiated powers up to 80 percent of the SOL power input are obtained in 1-D. We discuss significant radial effects which warrant the development of a code which can treat strongly radiating impurities in 2-D geometries.

  13. Long-range wetting transparency on top of layered metal-dielectric substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noginov, M. A.; Barnakov, Yuri A.; Liberman, Vladimir; Prayakarao, Srujana; Bonner, Carl E.; Narimanov, Evgenii E.

    2016-06-01

    It has been recently shown that scores of physical and chemical phenomena (including spontaneous emission, scattering and Förster energy transfer) can be controlled by nonlocal dielectric environments provided by metamaterials with hyperbolic dispersion and simpler metal/dielectric structures. At this time, we have researched van der Waals interactions and experimentally studied wetting of several metallic, dielectric and composite multilayered substrates. We have found that the wetting angle of water on top of MgF2 is highly sensitive to the thickness of the MgF2 layer and the nature of the underlying substrate that could be positioned as far as ~100 nm beneath the water/MgF2 interface. We refer to this phenomenon as long range wetting transparency. The latter effect cannot be described in terms of the most basic model of dispersion van der Waals-London forces based on pair-wise summation of dipole-dipole interactions across an interface or a gap separating the two media. We infer that the experimentally observed gradual change of the wetting angle with increase of the thickness of the MgF2 layer can possibly be explained by the distance dependence of the Hamaker function (describing the strength of interaction), which originates from retardation of electromagnetic waves at the distances comparable to a wavelength.

  14. Long-range wetting transparency on top of layered metal-dielectric substrates.

    PubMed

    Noginov, M A; Barnakov, Yuri A; Liberman, Vladimir; Prayakarao, Srujana; Bonner, Carl E; Narimanov, Evgenii E

    2016-01-01

    It has been recently shown that scores of physical and chemical phenomena (including spontaneous emission, scattering and Förster energy transfer) can be controlled by nonlocal dielectric environments provided by metamaterials with hyperbolic dispersion and simpler metal/dielectric structures. At this time, we have researched van der Waals interactions and experimentally studied wetting of several metallic, dielectric and composite multilayered substrates. We have found that the wetting angle of water on top of MgF2 is highly sensitive to the thickness of the MgF2 layer and the nature of the underlying substrate that could be positioned as far as ~100 nm beneath the water/MgF2 interface. We refer to this phenomenon as long range wetting transparency. The latter effect cannot be described in terms of the most basic model of dispersion van der Waals-London forces based on pair-wise summation of dipole-dipole interactions across an interface or a gap separating the two media. We infer that the experimentally observed gradual change of the wetting angle with increase of the thickness of the MgF2 layer can possibly be explained by the distance dependence of the Hamaker function (describing the strength of interaction), which originates from retardation of electromagnetic waves at the distances comparable to a wavelength. PMID:27324650

  15. Conductance of a single electron transistor with a retarded dielectric layer in the gate capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalov, O. G.; Chtchelkatchev, N. M.; Fedorov, S. A.; Beloborodov, I. S.

    2015-11-01

    We study the conductance of a single electron transistor (SET) with a ferroelectric (or dielectric) layer placed in the gate capacitor. We assume that the ferroelectric (FE) has a retarded response with arbitrary relaxation time. We show that in the case of "fast" but still retarded response of the FE (dielectric) layer an additional contribution to the Coulomb blockade effect appears leading to the suppression of the SET conductance. We take into account fluctuations of the FE (dielectric) polarization using Monte Carlo simulations. For "fast" FE, these fluctuations partially suppress the additional Coulomb blockade effect. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we study the transition from "fast" to "slow" FE. For high temperatures, the peak value of the SET conductance is almost independent of the FE relaxation time. For temperatures close to the FE Curie temperature, the conductance peak value nonmonotonically depends on the FE relaxation time. A maximum appears when the FE relaxation time is of the order of the SET discharging time. Below the Curie point the conductance peak value decreases with increasing the FE relaxation time. The conductance shows the hysteresis behavior for any FE relaxation time at temperatures below the FE transition point. We show that conductance hysteresis is robust against FE internal fluctuations.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of hexagonal boron nitride film as a dielectric layer for graphene devices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Kang; Hsu, Allen; Jia, Xiaoting; Kim, Soo Min; Shi, Yumeng; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomas; Kong, Jing

    2012-10-23

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a promising material as a dielectric layer or substrate for two-dimensional electronic devices. In this work, we report the synthesis of large-area h-BN film using atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition on a copper foil, followed by Cu etching and transfer to a target substrate. The growth rate of h-BN film at a constant temperature is strongly affected by the concentration of borazine as a precursor and the ambient gas condition such as the ratio of hydrogen and nitrogen. h-BN films with different thicknesses can be achieved by controlling the growth time or tuning the growth conditions. Transmission electron microscope characterization reveals that these h-BN films are polycrystalline, and the c-axis of the crystallites points to different directions. The stoichiometry ratio of boron and nitrogen is close to 1:1, obtained by electron energy loss spectroscopy. The dielectric constant of h-BN film obtained by parallel capacitance measurements (25 μm(2) large areas) is 2-4. These CVD-grown h-BN films were integrated as a dielectric layer in top-gated CVD graphene devices, and the mobility of the CVD graphene device (in the few thousands cm(2)/(V·s) range) remains the same before and after device integration. PMID:22970651

  17. In situ Plasma Exposure for Improved Interfaces in Atomic Layer Deposited Dielectrics on GaSb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppalt, Laura; Cleveland, Erin; Champlain, James; Boos, Brad; Prokes, Sharka; Bennett, Brian

    2015-09-01

    Among compound semiconductors, GaSb possesses one of the highest hole mobilities, making it a promising candidate for p-channel devices for III-V-based MOS technologies. However, the requirement of a low-defect interface between the GaSb device layer and gate dielectric represents a formidable hurdle to full MOS implementation. Native oxidation of the GaSb surface typically results in a highly defective interface, trapping charge and preventing free Fermi level movement. Wet chemical approaches to removing the native oxide often lead to mixed, irreproducible results and fail to prevent rapid reoxidation upon atmospheric exposure. As an alternative to wet chemical treatments, we have investigated the use of in-situ H2/Ar plasma for improving the interface between GaSb and atomic layer deposited (ALD) dielectrics. We have found that by exposing the native-oxide-covered GaSb to mild H2/Ar plasma immediately prior to ALD of high-k dielectrics, one can decrease the density of interface states by two orders of magnitude, unpinning the Fermi level and enabling carrier modulation. The effectiveness of the treatment can be tuned by varying the RF plasma power, the plasma exposure time, or the substrate temperature during exposure, with higher powers, longer exposures, and higher temperatures (up to 300C) resulting in improved electrical interfaces.

  18. Long-range wetting transparency on top of layered metal-dielectric substrates

    PubMed Central

    Noginov, M. A.; Barnakov, Yuri A.; Liberman, Vladimir; Prayakarao, Srujana; Bonner, Carl E.; Narimanov, Evgenii E.

    2016-01-01

    It has been recently shown that scores of physical and chemical phenomena (including spontaneous emission, scattering and Förster energy transfer) can be controlled by nonlocal dielectric environments provided by metamaterials with hyperbolic dispersion and simpler metal/dielectric structures. At this time, we have researched van der Waals interactions and experimentally studied wetting of several metallic, dielectric and composite multilayered substrates. We have found that the wetting angle of water on top of MgF2 is highly sensitive to the thickness of the MgF2 layer and the nature of the underlying substrate that could be positioned as far as ~100 nm beneath the water/MgF2 interface. We refer to this phenomenon as long range wetting transparency. The latter effect cannot be described in terms of the most basic model of dispersion van der Waals-London forces based on pair-wise summation of dipole-dipole interactions across an interface or a gap separating the two media. We infer that the experimentally observed gradual change of the wetting angle with increase of the thickness of the MgF2 layer can possibly be explained by the distance dependence of the Hamaker function (describing the strength of interaction), which originates from retardation of electromagnetic waves at the distances comparable to a wavelength. PMID:27324650

  19. Al2O3 as a suitable substrate and a dielectric layer for n-layer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Arunima K.; Hennig, Richard G.; Davydov, Albert V.; Tavazza, Francesca

    2015-08-01

    Sapphire (α-Al2O3) is a common substrate for the growth of single- to few-layer MoS2 films, and amorphous aluminium oxide serves as a high-κ dielectric gate oxide for MoS2 based transistors. Using density-functional theory calculations with a van der Waals functional, we investigate the structural, energetic, and electronic properties of n-layer MoS2 (n = 1and 3) on the α-Al2O3 (0001) surface. Our results show that the sapphire stabilizes single-layer and tri-layer MoS2, while having a negligible effect on the structure, band gap, and electron effective masses of MoS2. This combination of a strong energetic stabilization and weak perturbation of the electronic properties shows that α-Al2O3 can serve as an ideal substrate for depositing ultra-thin MoS2 layers and can also serve as a passivation or gate-oxide layer for MoS2 based devices.

  20. Software to compute elastostatic Green's functions for sources in 3D homogeneous elastic layers above a (visco)elastic halfspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, A. M.; Segall, P.

    2012-12-01

    We describe software, in development, to calculate elastostatic displacement Green's functions and their derivatives for point and polygonal dislocations in three-dimensional homogeneous elastic layers above an elastic or a viscoelastic halfspace. The steps to calculate a Green's function for a point source at depth zs are as follows. 1. A grid in wavenumber space is chosen. 2. A six-element complex rotated stress-displacement vector x is obtained at each grid point by solving a two-point boundary value problem (2P-BVP). If the halfspace is viscoelastic, the solution is inverse Laplace transformed. 3. For each receiver, x is propagated to the receiver depth zr (often zr = 0) and then, 4, inverse Fourier transformed, with the Fourier component corresponding to the receiver's horizontal position. 5. The six elements are linearly combined into displacements and their derivatives. The dominant work is in step 2. The grid is chosen to represent the wavenumber-space solution with as few points as possible. First, the wavenumber space is transformed to increase sampling density near 0 wavenumber. Second, a tensor-product grid of Chebyshev points of the first kind is constructed in each quadrant of the transformed wavenumber space. Moment-tensor-dependent symmetries further reduce work. The numerical solution of the 2P-BVP problem in step 2 involves solving a linear equation A x = b. Half of the elements of x are of geophysical interest; the subset depends on whether zr ≤ zs. Denote these \\hat x. As wavenumber k increases, \\hat x can become inaccurate in finite precision arithmetic for two reasons: 1. The condition number of A becomes too large. 2. The norm-wise relative error (NWRE) in \\hat x is large even though it is small in x. To address this problem, a number of researchers have used determinants to obtain x. This may be the best approach for 6-dimensional or smaller 2P-BVP, where the combinatorial increase in work is still moderate. But there is an alternative

  1. Understanding the interfacial layer dynamics of polymer nanocomposites from broadband dielectric spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Robert; Cheng, Shiwang; Sokolov, Alexei

    Polymer nanocomposites show many advanced mechanical, thermal, optical, and transport properties mainly due to the vast interfacial area between the polymer matrix and nanoparticles. Recent studies show that there is an interfacial polymer layer with structure and dynamics that are different from the bulk polymer, and that contributes to the advanced macroscopic properties. It has been shown that broadband dielectric spectroscopy provides good method to study the interfacial dynamics in nanocomposites. However, current dielectric spectroscopy studies ignore the heterogeneous nature of polymer nanocomposites. Models based on a simple superposition of bulk polymer and interfacial layer spectra, or those that assume the interfacial layer is dynamically ``dead'' are inaccurate. In this talk, the prevailing methods in the literature will be compared with an accurate method accounting for the heterogeneity of the nanocomposites. Different nanocomposites with well-dispersed nanoparticles will be used as examples. The analysis clearly shows that the width and the amplitude of the relaxation peaks are affected by the data analysis. Thus accurate quantitative conclusions on properties and thickness of the interfacial layer can be achieved only using heterogeneous models.

  2. Nickel–cobalt layered double hydroxide ultrathin nanoflakes decorated on graphene sheets with a 3D nanonetwork structure as supercapacitive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Tao; Li, Ruiyi; Li, Zaijun

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: The microwave heating reflux approach was developed for the fabrication of nickel–cobalt layered double hydroxide ultrathin nanoflakes decorated on graphene sheets, in which ammonia and ethanol were used as the precipitator and medium for the synthesis. The obtained composite shows a 3D flowerclusters morphology with nanonetwork structure and largely enhanced supercapacitive performance. - Highlights: • The paper reported the microwave synthesis of nickel–cobalt layered double hydroxide/graphene composite. • The novel synthesis method is rapid, green, efficient and can be well used to the mass production. • The as-synthesized composite offers a 3D flowerclusters morphology with nanonetwork structure. • The composite offers excellent supercapacitive performance. • This study provides a promising route to design and synthesis of advanced graphene-based materials with the superiorities of time-saving and cost-effective characteristics. - Abstract: The study reported a novel microwave heating reflux method for the fabrication of nickel–cobalt layered double hydroxide ultrathin nanoflakes decorated on graphene sheets (GS/NiCo-LDH). Ammonia and ethanol were employed as precipitant and reaction medium for the synthesis, respectively. The resulting GS/NiCo-LDH offers a 3D flowerclusters morphology with nanonetwork structure. Due to the greatly enhanced rate of electron transfer and mass transport, the GS/NiCo-LDH electrode exhibits excellent supercapacitive performances. The maximum specific capacitance was found to be 1980.7 F g{sup −1} at the current density of 1 A g{sup −1}. The specific capacitance can remain 1274.7 F g{sup −1} at the current density of 15 A g{sup −1} and it has an increase of about 2.9% after 1500 cycles. Moreover, the study also provides a promising approach for the design and synthesis of metallic double hydroxides/graphene hybrid materials with time-saving and cost-effective characteristics, which can be

  3. The Effect of Layered Target on the Efficiency of Projectile Impacts as a Mean for Asteroid Deflection: Laboratory Impact Experiments at Varied Gravitational Acceleration Combined with 3D Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormö, J.; Housen, K. R.; Wünnemann, K.; Rossi, A. P.; Collins, G.; Melero-Asensio, I.

    2016-08-01

    Target layering strongly affects the efficiency of the cratering and material ejection, which in turn affect the momentum transfer to the targeted object. We are analyzing this with a combination of impact experiments at varied G and 3D simulation.

  4. Validation of the RPLUS3D Code for Supersonic Inlet Applications Involving Three-Dimensional Shock Wave-Boundary Layer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code, RPLUS3D, which was developed for the reactive propulsive flows of ramjets and scramjets, was validated for glancing shock wave-boundary layer interactions. Both laminar and turbulent flows were studied. A supersonic flow over a wedge mounted on a flat plate was numerically simulated. For the laminar case, the static pressure distribution, velocity vectors, and particle traces on the flat plate were obtained. For turbulent flow, both the Baldwin-Lomax and Chien two-equation turbulent models were used. The static pressure distributions, pitot pressure, and yaw angle profiles were computed. In addition, the velocity vectors and particle traces on the flat plate were also obtained from the computed solution. Overall, the computed results for both laminar and turbulent cases compared very well with the experimentally obtained data.

  5. Quantifying the impact of mechanical layering and underthrusting on the dynamics of the modern India-Asia collisional system with 3-D numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechmann, S. M.; Schmalholz, S. M.; Hetényi, G.; May, D. A.; Kaus, B. J. P.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of mechanical layering and the strength of the Indian lower crust on the dynamics of the modern India-Asia collisional system are studied using 3-D thermomechanical modeling. The model includes an Indian oceanic domain, Indian continental domain, and an Asian continental domain. Each domain consists of four layers: upper/lower crust, and upper/lower lithospheric mantle. The Tarim and Sichuan Basins are modeled as effectively rigid blocks and the Quetta-Chaman and Sagaing strike-slip faults as vertical weak zones. The geometry, densities, and viscosities are constrained by geophysical data sets (CRUST2.0, gravity, and seismology). Both static (no horizontal movement of model boundaries) and dynamic scenarios (indentation) are modeled. It is demonstrated that 3-D viscosity distributions resulting from typical creep flow laws and temperature fields generate realistic surface velocities. Lateral variations in the gravitational potential energy cause locally significant tectonic overpressure (i.e., difference between pressure and lithostatic pressure) in a mechanically strong Indian lower crust (up to ~500 MPa for the static scenario and ~800 MPa for the dynamic scenario). Different density distributions in the lithosphere as well as different viscosities (3 orders of magnitude) in the Indian lower crust cause only minor differences in the surface velocity field. This result suggests that surface velocities alone are insufficient to infer the state of mechanical coupling of the lithosphere. Model results are in agreement with GPS velocities for Indian lower crustal viscosities of 1021-1024 Pa s, for a strong Quetta-Chaman Fault (1022 Pa s) and a weak Sagaing Fault (1020 Pa s).

  6. Effect of dielectric spacer layers and substrate on SERS with Au nanoparticle arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Briber, Robert M.; Rabin, Oded

    2015-03-01

    The optical response of a plasmonic nanostructure is often highly dependent on the nature of the underlying substrate. To study the effect of the substrate on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), a series of SERS substrates were fabricated consisting of a hexagonal array of Au nanoparticles self assembled on block copolymer films, a silicon oxide (dielectric) layer and a silicon substrate or an Au substrate. The inter-particle distance and the dielectric layer thickness were controlled. The SERS Enhancement Factors (EF) were calculated by comparing the Raman spectra of 4-aminothiophenol adsorbed on the surface of the Au nanoparticles and in a standard solution. The SERS EF were found to be strongly affected by the inter-particle distance and silicon oxide thickness. Changing the inter-particle spacing induced a 102 variation in the EF, changing the oxide thickness increased EF values by an factor of 10, and changing substrate from Si to Au increased EF by a factor of 10. Maximal enhancement factors were found with oxide layer thicknesses between 30 nm and 50 nm beneath the 30 nm polymer film with Au substrates. This geometry both improved the resonance condition with the probe laser and reduced the absorption by the substrate. This work illustrates that optimization of plasmonic-based sensors should consider both the metallic and the surrounding structures. The Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics (IREAP), University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742.

  7. Solid solution trends that impact electrical design of submicron layers in dielectric capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, Roni D.

    It is predictable that future thin layer multilayer dielectrics and thin films embedded capacitors will require higher field and higher reliability performance. This thesis explores the fundamental factors that would limit the high field and reliability performance in thin layer dielectrics based on BaTiO3. Those factors have different origins: On one side, the nature of the metal-dielectric interface was shown to affect the high field dielectric properties of capacitive structures. In addition to that, the intrinsic bulk properties of BaTiO3 based solid solutions affect the high field properties of thin dielectric layers depending on composition and annealing conditions. Both effects were investigated in this study. The temperature dependence of the electrical leakage current density of chemical solution deposited BaTiO3 films on high purity Ni foils was investigated as function of the underlying Ni microstructure. The electrical properties were then characterized on capacitors with and without the presence of Ni grain boundaries. When a Ni grain boundary from the substrate was present in the capacitor used during the electrical measurements, the loss tangent of the capacitor rose rapidly for dc biases exceeding ˜25kV/cm. The critical bias increases to ˜100kV/cm when no substrate grain boundaries are included in the capacitor. In addition, the capacitance-voltage curves are much more symmetric when grain boundaries are absent. This disparity in the electrical behavior was analyzed in terms of the mechanisms of charge conduction across the Ni-dielectric interface. While a reverse biased Schottky emission mechanism dominates the current in areas free of Ni grain boundaries, the Schottky barrier at the cathode is less effective when Ni grain boundaries are present due to local enhancement of the electric field. This, leads to a larger leakage current dominated by the forward biased Schottky barrier at the anode. In addition to the interface influence, the

  8. Grain size dependence of dielectric relaxation in cerium oxide as high-k layer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cerium oxide (CeO2) thin films used liquid injection atomic layer deposition (ALD) for deposition and ALD procedures were run at substrate temperatures of 150°C, 200°C, 250°C, 300°C, and 350°C, respectively. CeO2 were grown on n-Si(100) wafers. Variations in the grain sizes of the samples are governed by the deposition temperature and have been estimated using Scherrer analysis of the X-ray diffraction patterns. The changing grain size correlates with the changes seen in the Raman spectrum. Strong frequency dispersion is found in the capacitance-voltage measurement. Normalized dielectric constant measurement is quantitatively utilized to characterize the dielectric constant variation. The relationship extracted between grain size and dielectric relaxation for CeO2 suggests that tuning properties for improved frequency dispersion can be achieved by controlling the grain size, hence the strain at the nanoscale dimensions. PMID:23587419

  9. Interface Engineering for Atomic Layer Deposited Alumina Gate Dielectric on SiGe Substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangliang; Guo, Yuzheng; Hassan, Vinayak Vishwanath; Tang, Kechao; Foad, Majeed A; Woicik, Joseph C; Pianetta, Piero; Robertson, John; McIntyre, Paul C

    2016-07-27

    Optimization of the interface between high-k dielectrics and SiGe substrates is a challenging topic due to the complexity arising from the coexistence of Si and Ge interfacial oxides. Defective high-k/SiGe interfaces limit future applications of SiGe as a channel material for electronic devices. In this paper, we identify the surface layer structure of as-received SiGe and Al2O3/SiGe structures based on soft and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. As-received SiGe substrates have native SiOx/GeOx surface layers, where the GeOx-rich layer is beneath a SiOx-rich surface. Silicon oxide regrows on the SiGe surface during Al2O3 atomic layer deposition, and both SiOx and GeOx regrow during forming gas anneal in the presence of a Pt gate metal. The resulting mixed SiOx-GeOx interface layer causes large interface trap densities (Dit) due to distorted Ge-O bonds across the interface. In contrast, we observe that oxygen-scavenging Al top gates decompose the underlying SiOx/GeOx, in a selective fashion, leaving an ultrathin SiOx interfacial layer that exhibits dramatically reduced Dit. PMID:27345195

  10. Monochromatic filter with multiple manipulation approaches by the layered all-dielectric patch array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoshan; Liu, Guiqiang; Fu, Guolan; Liu, Mulin; Liu, Zhengqi

    2016-03-01

    Monochromatic filtering with ultra-narrowband and high spectral contrast is desirable for wide applications in display, image, and other optoelectronics. However, owing to the inherent omhic losses in the metallic materials, a broadband spectrum with a low Q-factor down to 10 inevitably limits the device performance. Herein, we for the first time theoretically propose and demonstrate an ultra-narrowband color-filtering platform based on the layered all-dielectric meta-material (LADM), which consists of a triple-layer high/low/high-index dielectrics cavity structure. Owing to the lossless dielectric materials used, sharp resonances with the bandwidth down to sub-10 nm are observed in the sub-wavelength LADM-based filters. A spectral Q-factor of 361.6 is achieved, which is orders of magnitude larger than that of the plasmonic resonators. Moreover, for the other significant factor for evaluation of filtering performance, the spectral contrast reaches 94.5%. These optical properties are the main results of the excitation of the resonant modes in the LADMs. Furthermore, polarization-manipulated light filtering is realized in this LADM. The classical Malus law is also confirmed in the reflective spectrum by tuning the polarization state. More interestingly and importantly, the filtering phenomenon shows novel features of the wavelength-independent and tunable resonant intensity for the reflective spectrum when the LADM-based filter is illuminated under an oblique state. High scalability of the sharp reflective spectrum is obtained by tuning the structural parameters. A single-wavelength reflective filtering window is also achieved in the visible frequencies. These features hold promise for the LADM-based filter with wide applications in color engineering, displaying, imaging, etc.

  11. The jump-into-contact effect in biased AFM probes on dielectric films and its application to quantify the dielectric permittivity of thin layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revilla, Reynier I.

    2016-07-01

    The jump-into-contact (JIC) phenomenon in biased atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes on dielectric films is studied. The influence of the film thickness on the position at which the AFM tip collapses irreversibly into the sample surface was theoretically analyzed using a widely accepted analytical expression of the probe-sample electrostatic interaction force. It was demonstrated that for relatively high values of voltage (V > 10-20 V) applied between the probe and the substrate the cantilever deflection at the JIC is independent of the dielectric film thickness for thin-ultrathin layers (h < 10-50 nm). Under the same conditions the z-piezo distance at the JIC follows approximately a linear behavior with the film thickness. Based on this effect an empirical model was formulated to estimate the dielectric permittivity of thin/ultrathin dielectric films using the jump-into-contact distance. The procedure was successfully applied on thin PVD-SiO2 films, obtaining good agreement with a dielectric constant value previously reported for the same material.

  12. The jump-into-contact effect in biased AFM probes on dielectric films and its application to quantify the dielectric permittivity of thin layers.

    PubMed

    Revilla, Reynier I

    2016-07-01

    The jump-into-contact (JIC) phenomenon in biased atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes on dielectric films is studied. The influence of the film thickness on the position at which the AFM tip collapses irreversibly into the sample surface was theoretically analyzed using a widely accepted analytical expression of the probe-sample electrostatic interaction force. It was demonstrated that for relatively high values of voltage (V > 10-20 V) applied between the probe and the substrate the cantilever deflection at the JIC is independent of the dielectric film thickness for thin-ultrathin layers (h < 10-50 nm). Under the same conditions the z-piezo distance at the JIC follows approximately a linear behavior with the film thickness. Based on this effect an empirical model was formulated to estimate the dielectric permittivity of thin/ultrathin dielectric films using the jump-into-contact distance. The procedure was successfully applied on thin PVD-SiO2 films, obtaining good agreement with a dielectric constant value previously reported for the same material.

  13. The jump-into-contact effect in biased AFM probes on dielectric films and its application to quantify the dielectric permittivity of thin layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revilla, Reynier I.

    2016-07-01

    The jump-into-contact (JIC) phenomenon in biased atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes on dielectric films is studied. The influence of the film thickness on the position at which the AFM tip collapses irreversibly into the sample surface was theoretically analyzed using a widely accepted analytical expression of the probe–sample electrostatic interaction force. It was demonstrated that for relatively high values of voltage (V > 10–20 V) applied between the probe and the substrate the cantilever deflection at the JIC is independent of the dielectric film thickness for thin–ultrathin layers (h < 10–50 nm). Under the same conditions the z–piezo distance at the JIC follows approximately a linear behavior with the film thickness. Based on this effect an empirical model was formulated to estimate the dielectric permittivity of thin/ultrathin dielectric films using the jump-into-contact distance. The procedure was successfully applied on thin PVD–SiO2 films, obtaining good agreement with a dielectric constant value previously reported for the same material.

  14. The jump-into-contact effect in biased AFM probes on dielectric films and its application to quantify the dielectric permittivity of thin layers.

    PubMed

    Revilla, Reynier I

    2016-07-01

    The jump-into-contact (JIC) phenomenon in biased atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes on dielectric films is studied. The influence of the film thickness on the position at which the AFM tip collapses irreversibly into the sample surface was theoretically analyzed using a widely accepted analytical expression of the probe-sample electrostatic interaction force. It was demonstrated that for relatively high values of voltage (V > 10-20 V) applied between the probe and the substrate the cantilever deflection at the JIC is independent of the dielectric film thickness for thin-ultrathin layers (h < 10-50 nm). Under the same conditions the z-piezo distance at the JIC follows approximately a linear behavior with the film thickness. Based on this effect an empirical model was formulated to estimate the dielectric permittivity of thin/ultrathin dielectric films using the jump-into-contact distance. The procedure was successfully applied on thin PVD-SiO2 films, obtaining good agreement with a dielectric constant value previously reported for the same material. PMID:27199351

  15. Sub-wavelength imaging using silver-dielectric metamaterial layered prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolarek, Marcin; Pastuszczak, Anna; Pniewski, Jacek; Kotyński, Rafał

    2010-12-01

    In this paper we study the propagation of light through silver-dielectric metamaterial layered prism which operates in the canalization regime. The prism is illuminated with TM-polarized light and is designed using the effective medium theory as strongly anisotropic and impedance matched to air. The structure has an infinite value of the effective permittivity in the direction perpendicular to layer surfaces. Therefore it is able to couple a broad spectrum of incident spatial frequencies, including evanescent waves, into propagating modes. As a result, subwavelength resolution at the output interface of the structure is observed. Further the device is characterised with the transfer matrix method (TMM), and investigated with Finite Difference Time Domain method (FDTD). Two parameters of the prism are studied, namely the angle of incidence and the apex angle, to obtain the best resolution.

  16. Enhanced environmental stability induced by effective polarization of a polar dielectric layer in a trilayer dielectric system of organic field-effect transistors: a quantitative study.

    PubMed

    Subbarao, Nimmakayala V V; Gedda, Murali; Iyer, Parameswar K; Goswami, Dipak K

    2015-01-28

    We report a concept fabrication method that helps to improve the performance and stability of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) based organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) in ambient. The devices were fabricated using a trilayer dielectric system that contains a bilayer polymer dielectrics consisting of a hydrophobic thin layer of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) on poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) or poly(4-vinylphenol) (PVP) or polystyrene (PS) with Al2O3 as a third layer. We have explored the peculiarities in the device performance (i.e., superior performance under ambient humidity), which are caused due to the polarization of dipoles residing in the polar dielectric material. The anomalous behavior of the bias-stress measured under vacuum has been explained successfully by a stretched exponential function modified by adding a time dependent dipole polarization term. The OFET with a dielectric layer of PVA or PVP containing hydroxyl groups has shown enhanced characteristics and remains highly stable without any degradation even after 300 days in ambient with three times enhancement in carrier mobility (0.015 cm(2)·V(-1)·s(-1)) compared to vacuum. This has been attributed to the enhanced polarization of hydroxyl groups in the presence of absorbed water molecules at the CuPc/PMMA interface. In addition, a model has been proposed based on the polarization of hydroxyl groups to explain the enhanced stability in these devices. We believe that this general method using a trilayer dielectric system can be extended to fabricate other OFETs with materials that are known to show high performances under vacuum but degrade under ambient conditions. PMID:25552195

  17. Dielectric properties of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate thin films with and without ZrO2 insertion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shanshan; Ma, Beihai; Narayanan, Manoj; Tong, Sheng; Koritala, Rachel E.; Hu, Zhongqiang; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    2013-05-01

    The dielectric properties of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) thin films on platinized silicon (Pt/Si) with and without ZrO2 insertion layers were investigated in the temperature range from 20 °C to 300 °C. Permittivity, dielectric loss tangent, and tunability were reduced for the samples with ZrO2 insertion layers compared to those without the layers. Additionally, the permittivity was less dependent on frequency over the broad temperature range studied (20-300 °C). The leakage current behavior of the PLZT films with and without ZrO2 insertion layers was also investigated, and on the basis of those results, a probable conduction mechanism has been suggested. The improved electrical properties in the PLZT with ZrO2 layers are attributed to the ZrO2 layer blocking the mobile ionic defects and reducing free charge carriers to transport.

  18. From 1D-Multi-Layer-Conductivity-Inversion to Pseudo-3D-Imaging of Quantified Electromagnetic Induction Data Acquired at a Heterogeneous Test Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hebel, Christian; Rudolph, Sebastian; Huisman, Johan A.; van der Kruk, Jan; Vereecken, Harry

    2013-04-01

    three different coil offsets in HCP and VCP measurement modes. This resulted in six high spatial resolution data sets of approximately 60000 measurements with different sensing depths. A 5 m block-kriging was applied to all six data sets to re-grid the sampling points on the same regular grid. For each grid node, the six measured apparent conductivities were used in a three-layer inversion. The three-layer inversion results of electrical conductivity thus obtained were used to derive a three-dimensional (3D) model of subsurface heterogeneity, which clearly indicated lateral and vertical conductivity changes of the subsurface that are related to changes in soil texture and soil water content.

  19. High-Mobility 6,13-Bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) Pentacene Transistors Using Solution-Processed Polysilsesquioxane Gate Dielectric Layers.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yu; Nakahara, Yoshio; Michiura, Daisuke; Uno, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Ichiro

    2016-04-01

    Polysilsesquioxane (PSQ) is a low-temperature curable polymer that is compatible with low-cost plastic substrates. We cured PSQ gate dielectric layers by irradiation with ultraviolet light at ~60 °C, and used them for 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS-pentacene) thin film transistors (TFTs). The fabricated TFTs have shown the maximum and average hole mobility of 1.3 and 0.78 ± 0.3 cm2V-1s-1, which are comparable to those of the previously reported transistors using single-crystalline TIPS-pentacene micro-ribbons for their active layers and thermally oxidized SiO2 for their gate dielectric layers. Itis therefore demonstrated that PSQ is a promising polymer gate dielectric material for low-cost organic TFTs. PMID:27451616

  20. Biocompatible/Degradable Silk Fibroin:Poly(Vinyl Alcohol)-Blended Dielectric Layer Towards High-Performance Organic Field-Effect Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Xinming; Huang, Wei; Yang, Xin; Han, Shijiao; Li, Lu; Yu, Junsheng

    2016-10-01

    Biocompatible silk fibroin (SF):poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) blends were prepared as the dielectric layers of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). Compared with those with pure SF dielectric layer, an optimal threshold voltage of ~0 V, high on/off ratio of ~104, and enhanced field-effect mobility of 0.22 cm2/Vs of OFETs were obtained by carefully controlling the weight ratio of SF:PVA blends to 7:5. Through the morphology characterization of dielectrics and organic semiconductors by utilizing atom force microscopy and electrical characterization of the devices, the performance improvement of OFETs with SF:PVA hybrid gate dielectric layers were attributed to the smooth and homogeneous morphology of blend dielectrics. Furthermore, due to lower charge carrier trap density, the OFETs based on SF:PVA-blended dielectric exhibited a higher bias stability than those based on pure SF dielectric.

  1. Wave attenuation and mode dispersion in a waveguide coated with lossy dielectric material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. S.; Chuang, S. L.; Lee, S. W.; Lo, Y. T.

    1984-01-01

    The modal attenuation constants in a cylindrical waveguide coated with a lossy dielectric material are studied as functions of frequency, dielectric constant, and thickness of the dielectric layer. A dielectric material best suited for a large attenuation is suggested. Using Kirchhoff's approximation, the field attenuation in a coated waveguide which is illuminated by a normally incident plane wave is also studied. For a circular guide which has a diameter of two wavelengths and is coated with a thin lossy dielectric layer (omega sub r = 9.1 - j2.3, thickness = 3% of the radius), a 3 dB attenuation is achieved within 16 diameters.

  2. The impact of the thermal conductivity of a dielectric layer on the self-heating effect of a graphene transistor.

    PubMed

    Pan, T S; Gao, M; Huang, Z L; Zhang, Y; Feng, Xue; Lin, Y

    2015-08-28

    The self-heating effect of a graphene transistor on the transport properties was studied. Different dielectric layers, SiO2 and AlN, which have different thermal conductivities, were used to tune the thermal dissipation of the graphene transistor. An obvious change in channel resistance and a shift of charge neutrality point were observed during the operation of the transistor with SiO2, while the change is slight when AlN is the dielectric layer. This observation is considered to be related to the temperature determined desorption rate of p-type dopants in graphene.

  3. Spurious phenomena occurring during current measurement on ultra-thin dielectric layers: From electro-thermal effects to surface damage

    SciTech Connect

    Grandfond, A.; Gautier, B.; Militaru, L.; Albertini, D.; Descamps-Mandine, A.

    2014-04-07

    In this paper, the conduction properties of dielectric ultra-thin layers are studied using atomic force microscopy. Especially, the conductive-atomic force microscope allows to measure the leakage current at the nanoscale and to study the degradation mechanisms locally. Nonetheless, the dielectric layer seems to be damaged by a technique's specific phenomenon: hillocks appear when a positive tip bias is applied on different dielectrics. In this paper, the formation of these hillocks is studied. Contrary to what is observed during the dielectric breakdown, the conductivity is reduced after hillocks formation which occurs after the dielectric breakdown. Moreover, we have observed the formation of cavities in the silicon substrate linked to the formation of hillocks, which is not compatible with a swelling process (as dielectric breakdown induced epitaxy). We propose that these results may be explained by an electro-thermal effect due to the large dissipated energy, maybe combined with the oxidation of the substrate. Finally, the interdependence of measurements is demonstrated during serial acquisition.

  4. Architecturing hierarchical function layers on self-assembled viral templates as 3D nano-array electrodes for integrated Li-ion microbatteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yihang; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Yujie; Luo, Yanting; Xu, Yunhua; Brown, Adam; Culver, James N; Lundgren, Cynthia A; Xu, Kang; Wang, Yuan; Wang, Chunsheng

    2013-01-01

    This work enables an elegant bottom-up solution to engineer 3D microbattery arrays as integral power sources for microelectronics. Thus, multilayers of functional materials were hierarchically architectured over tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) templates that were genetically modified to self-assemble in a vertical manner on current-collectors, so that optimum power and energy densities accompanied with excellent cycle-life could be achieved on a minimum footprint. The resultant microbattery based on self-aligned LiFePO(4) nanoforests of shell-core-shell structure, with precise arrangement of various auxiliary material layers including a central nanometric metal core as direct electronic pathway to current collector, delivers excellent energy density and stable cycling stability only rivaled by the best Li-ion batteries of conventional configurations, while providing rate performance per foot-print and on-site manufacturability unavailable from the latter. This approach could open a new avenue for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) applications, which would significantly benefit from the concept that electrochemically active components be directly engineered and fabricated as an integral part of the integrated circuit (IC). PMID:23252613

  5. High-performance hybrid supercapacitor with 3D hierarchical porous flower-like layered double hydroxide grown on nickel foam as binder-free electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Luojiang; Hui, Kwun Nam; San Hui, Kwan; Lee, Haiwon

    2016-06-01

    The synthesis of layered double hydroxide (LDH) as electroactive material has been well reported; however, fabricating an LDH electrode with excellent electrochemical performance at high current density remains a challenge. In this paper, we report a 3D hierarchical porous flower-like NiAl-LDH grown on nickel foam (NF) through a liquid-phase deposition method as a high-performance binder-free electrode for energy storage. With large ion-accessible surface area as well as efficient electron and ion transport pathways, the prepared LDH-NF electrode achieves high specific capacity (1250 C g-1 at 2 A g-1 and 401 C g-1 at 50 A g-1) after 5000 cycles of activation at 20 A g-1 and high cycling stability (76.7% retention after another 5000 cycles at 50 A g-1), which is higher than those of most previously reported NiAl-LDH-based materials. Moreover, a hybrid supercapacitor with LDH-NF as the positive electrode and porous graphene nanosheet coated on NF (GNS-NF) as the negative electrode, delivers high energy density (30.2 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 800 W kg-1) and long cycle life, which outperforms the other devices reported in the literature. This study shows that the prepared LDH-NF electrode offers great potential in energy storage device applications.

  6. Improved Gate Dielectric Deposition and Enhanced Electrical Stability for Single-Layer MoS2 MOSFET with an AlN Interfacial Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Qingkai; Li, Baikui; Hua, Mengyuan; Zhang, Zhaofu; Lan, Feifei; Xu, Yongkuan; Yan, Ruyue; Chen, Kevin J.

    2016-06-01

    Transistors based on MoS2 and other TMDs have been widely studied. The dangling-bond free surface of MoS2 has made the deposition of high-quality high-k dielectrics on MoS2 a challenge. The resulted transistors often suffer from the threshold voltage instability induced by the high density traps near MoS2/dielectric interface or inside the gate dielectric, which is detrimental for the practical applications of MoS2 metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). In this work, by using AlN deposited by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) as an interfacial layer, top-gate dielectrics as thin as 6 nm for single-layer MoS2 transistors are demonstrated. The AlN interfacial layer not only promotes the conformal deposition of high-quality Al2O3 on the dangling-bond free MoS2, but also greatly enhances the electrical stability of the MoS2 transistors. Very small hysteresis (ΔVth) is observed even at large gate biases and high temperatures. The transistor also exhibits a low level of flicker noise, which clearly originates from the Hooge mobility fluctuation instead of the carrier number fluctuation. The observed superior electrical stability of MoS2 transistor is attributed to the low border trap density of the AlN interfacial layer, as well as the small gate leakage and high dielectric strength of AlN/Al2O3 dielectric stack.

  7. Improved Gate Dielectric Deposition and Enhanced Electrical Stability for Single-Layer MoS2 MOSFET with an AlN Interfacial Layer

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Qingkai; Li, Baikui; Hua, Mengyuan; Zhang, Zhaofu; Lan, Feifei; Xu, Yongkuan; Yan, Ruyue; Chen, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Transistors based on MoS2 and other TMDs have been widely studied. The dangling-bond free surface of MoS2 has made the deposition of high-quality high-k dielectrics on MoS2 a challenge. The resulted transistors often suffer from the threshold voltage instability induced by the high density traps near MoS2/dielectric interface or inside the gate dielectric, which is detrimental for the practical applications of MoS2 metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). In this work, by using AlN deposited by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) as an interfacial layer, top-gate dielectrics as thin as 6 nm for single-layer MoS2 transistors are demonstrated. The AlN interfacial layer not only promotes the conformal deposition of high-quality Al2O3 on the dangling-bond free MoS2, but also greatly enhances the electrical stability of the MoS2 transistors. Very small hysteresis (ΔVth) is observed even at large gate biases and high temperatures. The transistor also exhibits a low level of flicker noise, which clearly originates from the Hooge mobility fluctuation instead of the carrier number fluctuation. The observed superior electrical stability of MoS2 transistor is attributed to the low border trap density of the AlN interfacial layer, as well as the small gate leakage and high dielectric strength of AlN/Al2O3 dielectric stack. PMID:27279454

  8. Improved Gate Dielectric Deposition and Enhanced Electrical Stability for Single-Layer MoS2 MOSFET with an AlN Interfacial Layer.

    PubMed

    Qian, Qingkai; Li, Baikui; Hua, Mengyuan; Zhang, Zhaofu; Lan, Feifei; Xu, Yongkuan; Yan, Ruyue; Chen, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Transistors based on MoS2 and other TMDs have been widely studied. The dangling-bond free surface of MoS2 has made the deposition of high-quality high-k dielectrics on MoS2 a challenge. The resulted transistors often suffer from the threshold voltage instability induced by the high density traps near MoS2/dielectric interface or inside the gate dielectric, which is detrimental for the practical applications of MoS2 metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). In this work, by using AlN deposited by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) as an interfacial layer, top-gate dielectrics as thin as 6 nm for single-layer MoS2 transistors are demonstrated. The AlN interfacial layer not only promotes the conformal deposition of high-quality Al2O3 on the dangling-bond free MoS2, but also greatly enhances the electrical stability of the MoS2 transistors. Very small hysteresis (ΔVth) is observed even at large gate biases and high temperatures. The transistor also exhibits a low level of flicker noise, which clearly originates from the Hooge mobility fluctuation instead of the carrier number fluctuation. The observed superior electrical stability of MoS2 transistor is attributed to the low border trap density of the AlN interfacial layer, as well as the small gate leakage and high dielectric strength of AlN/Al2O3 dielectric stack.

  9. Improved Gate Dielectric Deposition and Enhanced Electrical Stability for Single-Layer MoS2 MOSFET with an AlN Interfacial Layer.

    PubMed

    Qian, Qingkai; Li, Baikui; Hua, Mengyuan; Zhang, Zhaofu; Lan, Feifei; Xu, Yongkuan; Yan, Ruyue; Chen, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Transistors based on MoS2 and other TMDs have been widely studied. The dangling-bond free surface of MoS2 has made the deposition of high-quality high-k dielectrics on MoS2 a challenge. The resulted transistors often suffer from the threshold voltage instability induced by the high density traps near MoS2/dielectric interface or inside the gate dielectric, which is detrimental for the practical applications of MoS2 metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). In this work, by using AlN deposited by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) as an interfacial layer, top-gate dielectrics as thin as 6 nm for single-layer MoS2 transistors are demonstrated. The AlN interfacial layer not only promotes the conformal deposition of high-quality Al2O3 on the dangling-bond free MoS2, but also greatly enhances the electrical stability of the MoS2 transistors. Very small hysteresis (ΔVth) is observed even at large gate biases and high temperatures. The transistor also exhibits a low level of flicker noise, which clearly originates from the Hooge mobility fluctuation instead of the carrier number fluctuation. The observed superior electrical stability of MoS2 transistor is attributed to the low border trap density of the AlN interfacial layer, as well as the small gate leakage and high dielectric strength of AlN/Al2O3 dielectric stack. PMID:27279454

  10. Effect of solution combusted TiO2 nanopowder within commercial BaTiO3 dielectric layer on the photoelectric properties for AC powder electroluminescence devices.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung; Choi, Gil Rak; Kim, Youn Cheol; Lee, Jae Chun; Lee, Ju Hyeon

    2013-05-01

    A unique synthesis method was developed, which is called solution combustion method (SCM). TiO2 nanopowder was synthesized by this method. This SCM TiO2 nanopowder (-35 nm) was added to the dielectric layer of AC powder electroluminescence (EL) device. The dielectric layer was made of commercial BaTiO3 powder (-1.2 microm) and binding polymer. 0, 5, 10 and 15 wt% of SCM TiO2 nanopowder was added to the dielectric layer during fabrication of AC powder EL device respectively. Dielectric constant of these four kinds of dielectric layers was measured. The brightness and current density of AC powder EL device were also measured. When 10 wt% of SCM TiO2 nanopowder was added, dielectric constant and brightness were increased by 30% and 101% respectively. Furthermore, the current density was decreased by 71%. This means that the brightness was double and the power consumption was one third.

  11. Geometry influence on the transmission spectra of dielectric single layers of spheres with different compactness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andueza, A.; Echeverría, R.; Morales, P.; Sevilla, J.

    2010-06-01

    The transmission of spectra of different dielectric spheres single layer arrangements has been measured. High dielectric permittivity (ɛ =7) spheres of several millimeters of diameter were used to build the samples whose transmission was measured in the microwave range. The behavior of lattices arranged in square and triangular geometries have been compared in a number of different compactness cases. The same patterns measured have also been calculated by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Spectra from different geometrical arrangements of the same compactness (measured with the same filling fraction value) are very similar in some cases. Based on the level of similarity we propose three compactness regions. The high compactness region, where the structure effect is important, presents spectra clearly different for the two geometries. In a medium compactness region spectra are almost identical, suggesting a dominant effect of single sphere effects. Finally, in the low compactness region, the spectra from the two geometrical configurations diverge again as the Bragg diffraction values are approached.

  12. Three novel organic-inorganic complexes based on decavanadate [V10O28]6- units: special water layers, open 3D frameworks and yellow/blue luminescences.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wentao; Jiang, Feilong; Zhou, Youfu; Xiong, Kecai; Chen, Lian; Yang, Ming; Feng, Rui; Hong, Maochun

    2012-07-01

    Three unusual polyoxovanadate-based inorganic-organic hybrid complexes, [Zn(Im)(2)(DMF)(2)](2)[H(2)V(10)O(28)]·Im·DMF (1), [Zn(3)(Htrz)(6)(H(2)O)(6)][V(10)O(28)]·10H(2)O·Htrz (2) and {[Zn(3)(trz)(3)(H(2)O)(4)(DMF)](2)[V(10)O(28)]·4H(2)O}(n) (3) (Im = imidazole, Htrz = 1,2,4-triazole, DMF = N,N'-dimethylammonium) have been synthesized at room temperature via evaporative crystallization, and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Complex 1 shows the structure of a discrete [V(10)O(28)](6-) cluster grafted by two [Zn(Im)(2)(DMF)(2)](2+) fragments through two bridged oxygen atoms, representing a rarely observed coordination mode. Complex 2 consists of a linear trinuclear Zn(II) unit bridging six Htrz ligands and a [V(10)O(28)](6-) cluster as the counter anion, where the extensive hydrogen-bonding interactions lead to {Zn(3)-V(10)}(SMF) and a special water layer involving (H(2)O)(36) rings, and consequently forms a unique 3D metal-organic-water supramolecular network. Complex 3 can be described as a 3,4-connected fsc-type network, and is the first example of open coordination 3D framework based on [V(10)O(28)](6-) and the other two different secondary building units, involving mononuclear and binuclear Zn(II)-Htrz motifs. The optical properties of complexes 1-3 in the solid state are investigated at room temperature. The results show that complexes 1 and 3 emit intense blue luminescences attributed to the ligands, while complex 2 exhibits an infrequent fluorescent property, emitting both blue and yellow luminescences at 472 and 603 nm simultaneously. Furthermore, powder X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analyses of 1-3 are also investigated, which demonstrate their high purities and thermal stabilities.

  13. Compressibility effects on the non-linear receptivity of boundary layers to dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denison, Marie F. C.

    The reduction of drag and aerodynamic heating caused by boundary layer transition is of central interest for the development of hypersonic vehicles. Receptivity to flow perturbation in the form of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) wave growth often determines the first stage of the transition process, which can be delayed by depositing specific excitations into the boundary layer. Weakly ionized Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) actuators are being investigated as possible sources of such excitations, but little is known today about their interaction with high-speed flows. In this framework, the first part of the thesis is dedicated to a receptivity study of laminar compressible boundary layers over a flat plate by linear stability analysis following an adjoint operator formulation, under DBD representative excitations assumed independent of flow conditions. The second part of the work concentrates on the development of a coupled plasma-Navier and Stokes solver targeted at the study of supersonic flow and compressibility effects on DBD forcing and non-parallel receptivity. The linear receptivity study of quasi-parallel compressible flows reveals several interesting features such as a significant shift of the region of maximum receptivity deeper into the flow at high Mach number and strong wave amplitude reduction compared to incompressible flows. The response to DBD relevant excitation distributions and to variations of the base flow conditions and system length scales follows these trends. Observed absolute amplitude changes and relative sensitivity modifications between source types are related to the evolution of the offset between forcing peak profile and relevant adjoint mode maximum. The analysis highlights the crucial importance of designing and placing the actuator in a way that matches its force field to the position of maximum boundary layer receptivity for the specific flow conditions of interest. In order to address the broad time and length scale spectrum

  14. Investigation of Ultraviolet Light Curable Polysilsesquioxane Gate Dielectric Layers for Pentacene Thin Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Shibao, Hideto; Nakahara, Yoshio; Uno, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Ichiro

    2016-04-01

    Polysilsesquioxane (PSQ) comprising 3-methacryloxypropyl groups was investigated as an ultraviolet (UV)-light curable gate dielectric-material for pentacene thin film transistors (TFTs). The surface of UV-light cured PSQ films was smoother than that of thermally cured ones, and the pentacene layers deposited on the UV-Iight cured PSQ films consisted of larger grains. However, carrier mobility of the TFTs using the UV-light cured PSQ films was lower than that of the TFTs using the thermally cured ones. It was shown that the cross-linker molecules, which were only added to the UV-light cured PSQ films, worked as a major mobility-limiting factor for the TFTs.

  15. Dielectric Barrier Discharge Ionization in Characterization of Organic Compounds Separated on Thin-Layer Chromatography Plates

    PubMed Central

    Cegłowski, Michał; Smoluch, Marek; Babij, Michał; Gotszalk, Teodor; Silberring, Jerzy; Schroeder, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    A new method for on-spot detection and characterization of organic compounds resolved on thin layer chromatography (TLC) plates has been proposed. This method combines TLC with dielectric barrier discharge ionization (DBDI), which produces stable low-temperature plasma. At first, the compounds were separated on TLC plates and then their mass spectra were directly obtained with no additional sample preparation. To obtain good quality spectra the center of a particular TLC spot was heated from the bottom to increase volatility of the compound. MS/MS analyses were also performed to additionally characterize all analytes. The detection limit of proposed method was estimated to be 100 ng/spot of compound. PMID:25170762

  16. Investigation of Ultraviolet Light Curable Polysilsesquioxane Gate Dielectric Layers for Pentacene Thin Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Shibao, Hideto; Nakahara, Yoshio; Uno, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Ichiro

    2016-04-01

    Polysilsesquioxane (PSQ) comprising 3-methacryloxypropyl groups was investigated as an ultraviolet (UV)-light curable gate dielectric-material for pentacene thin film transistors (TFTs). The surface of UV-light cured PSQ films was smoother than that of thermally cured ones, and the pentacene layers deposited on the UV-Iight cured PSQ films consisted of larger grains. However, carrier mobility of the TFTs using the UV-light cured PSQ films was lower than that of the TFTs using the thermally cured ones. It was shown that the cross-linker molecules, which were only added to the UV-light cured PSQ films, worked as a major mobility-limiting factor for the TFTs. PMID:27451626

  17. OPTIMIZING A PORTABLE MICROWAVE INTERFERENCE SCANNING SYSTEM FOR NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING OF MULTI-LAYERED DIELECTRIC MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, K. F. Jr.; Little, J. R. Jr.; Ellingson, W. A.; Green, W.

    2010-02-22

    The projected microwave energy pattern, wave guide geometry, positioning methods and process variables have been optimized for use of a portable, non-contact, lap-top computer-controlled microwave interference scanning system on multi-layered dielectric materials. The system can be used in situ with one-sided access and has demonstrated capability of damage detection on composite ceramic armor. Specimens used for validation included specially fabricated surrogates, and ballistic impact-damaged specimens. Microwave data results were corroborated with high resolution direct-digital x-ray imaging. Microwave interference scanning detects cracks, laminar features and material properties variations. This paper presents the details of the system, the optimization steps and discusses results obtained.

  18. Vacuum ultraviolet photochemical selective area atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalker, P. R.; Marshall, P. A.; Dawson, K.; Brunell, I. F.; Sutcliffe, C. J.; Potter, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the photochemical atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 thin films and the use of this process to achieve area-selective film deposition. A shuttered vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source is used to excite molecular oxygen and trimethyl aluminum to deposit films at 60°C. In-situ QCM and post-deposition ellipsometric measurements both show that the deposition rate is saturative as a function of irradiation time. Selective area deposition was achieved by projecting the VUV light through a metalized magnesium fluoride photolithographic mask and the selectivity of deposition on the illuminated and masked regions of the substrate is a logarithmic function of the UV exposure time. The Al2O3 films exhibit dielectric constants of 8 - 10 at 1 MHz after forming gas annealing, similar to films deposited by conventional thermal ALD.

  19. Raman spectra of high- κ dielectric layers investigated with micro-Raman spectroscopy comparison with silicon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Borowicz, P; Taube, A; Rzodkiewicz, W; Latek, M; Gierałtowska, S

    2013-01-01

    Three samples with dielectric layers from high- κ dielectrics, hafnium oxide, gadolinium-silicon oxide, and lanthanum-lutetium oxide on silicon substrate were studied by Raman spectroscopy. The results obtained for high- κ dielectrics were compared with spectra recorded for silicon dioxide. Raman spectra suggest the similarity of gadolinium-silicon oxide and lanthanum-lutetium oxide to the bulk nondensified silicon dioxide. The temperature treatment of hafnium oxide shows the evolution of the structure of this material. Raman spectra recorded for as-deposited hafnium oxide are similar to the results obtained for silicon dioxide layer. After thermal treatment especially at higher temperatures (600°C and above), the structure of hafnium oxide becomes similar to the bulk non-densified silicon dioxide.

  20. Approximate analytical solution for waveguide excitation of a plane dielectric layer by a Gaussian beam at frustrated total internal reflection.

    PubMed

    Serdyuk, Vladimir; Rudnitsky, Anton

    2015-05-01

    We present an approximate 2D asymptotic analytic theory of light field excitation in a plane thin dielectric layer under conditions of frustrated total internal reflection, when an inclined Gaussian beam, falling from a triangular prism, excites a decaying field in air spacing between a prism and a plane dielectric. Ignoring the radiation scattering on the sharp edges of a prism, we have obtained the formulas that allow us to compute spatial structures of an electromagnetic field in every point of space and to estimate the integral efficiency of waveguide mode excitation in a plane dielectric layer and the total energy of a reflected beam. It is shown that the width of an initial Gaussian beam has an effect on waveguide mode intensity. PMID:26366908

  1. Approximate analytical solution for waveguide excitation of a plane dielectric layer by a Gaussian beam at frustrated total internal reflection.

    PubMed

    Serdyuk, Vladimir; Rudnitsky, Anton

    2015-05-01

    We present an approximate 2D asymptotic analytic theory of light field excitation in a plane thin dielectric layer under conditions of frustrated total internal reflection, when an inclined Gaussian beam, falling from a triangular prism, excites a decaying field in air spacing between a prism and a plane dielectric. Ignoring the radiation scattering on the sharp edges of a prism, we have obtained the formulas that allow us to compute spatial structures of an electromagnetic field in every point of space and to estimate the integral efficiency of waveguide mode excitation in a plane dielectric layer and the total energy of a reflected beam. It is shown that the width of an initial Gaussian beam has an effect on waveguide mode intensity.

  2. V -shaped switching ferroelectric liquid crystal structure stabilized by dielectric surface layers.

    PubMed

    Hammarquist, A; D'Havé, K; Matuszczyk, M; Clark, N A; Maclennan, J E; Rudquist, P

    2008-03-01

    The " V -shaped switching" mode in high polarization ferroelectric liquid crystals was studied with the aim of stabilizing the monostable bookshelf structure with the spontaneous polarization parallel to the glass plates. The director field in such cells was confirmed to be sensitive to both the liquid crystal properties and the cell parameters. In cells with only polyimide alignment layers, hysteresis free switching was never obtained, with bistable and asymmetric monostable structures compromising the zero-field dark state and preventing an ideal, hysteresis-free analog response. By incorporating a SiO(2) layer between the ITO electrode and the polyimide, the undesired states were suppressed and essentially hysteresis-free switching was obtained for driving frequencies in the range 0.2-200 Hz . Cells rubbed only on one side give more uniform alignment than cells rubbed on both sides but their inherent asymmetry shifts the long-term dark state away from 0 V and causes the response to gray level voltage modulation to be slightly asymmetric. The formation of different types of states as a function of the values of the surface parameters, and the observed stabilization of the V -shaped switching structure by the dielectric surface layers, are in good agreement with an earlier analysis by Copic [Phys. Rev. E 65, 021701 (2002)].

  3. Effects of annealing conditions on the dielectric properties of solution-processed Al2O3 layers for indium-zinc-tin-oxide thin-film transistors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Kwang-Ho; Park, Sung Kyu

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, the effects of annealing conditions on the dielectric properties of solution-processed aluminum oxide (Al2O3) layers for indium-zinc-tin-oxide (IZTO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) have been investigated. The dielectric properties of Al2O3 layers such as leakage current density and dielectric strength were largely affected by their annealing conditions. In particular, oxygen partial pressure in rapid thermal annealing, and the temperature profile of hot plate annealing had profound effects on the dielectric properties. From a refractive index analysis, the enhanced dielectric properties of Al2O3 gate dielectrics can be attributed to higher film density depending on the annealing conditions. With the low-temperature-annealed Al2O3 gate dielectric at 350 degrees C, solution-processed IZTO TFTs with a field-effect mobility of approximately 2.2 cm2/Vs were successfully fabricated. PMID:24245333

  4. High carrier mobility of CoPc wires based field-effect transistors using bi-layer gate dielectric

    SciTech Connect

    Gedda, Murali; Obaidulla, Sk. Md.; Subbarao, Nimmakayala V. V.; Goswami, Dipak K.

    2013-11-15

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and anodized Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers were used as bi-layer gate for the fabrication of cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) wire base field-effect transistors (OFETs). CoPc wires were grown on SiO{sub 2} surfaces by organic vapor phase deposition method. These devices exhibit a field-effect carrier mobility (μ{sub EF}) value of 1.11 cm{sup 2}/Vs. The high carrier mobility for CoPc molecules is attributed to the better capacitive coupling between the channel of CoPc wires and the gate through organic-inorganic dielectric layer. Our measurements also demonstrated the way to determine the thicknesses of the dielectric layers for a better process condition of OFETs.

  5. Doping of a dielectric layer as a new alternative for increasing sensitivity of the contactless conductivity detection in microchips.

    PubMed

    Lima, Renato Sousa; Segato, Thiago Pinotti; Gobbi, Angelo Luiz; Coltro, Wendell Karlos Tomazelli; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2011-12-21

    This communication describes a new procedure to increase the sensitivity of C(4)D in PDMS/glass microchips. The method consists in doping the insulating layer (PDMS) over the electrodes with nanoparticles of TiO(2), increasing thus its dielectric constant. The experimental protocol is simple, inexpensive, and fast.

  6. Electrochemical and bio-sensing platform based on a novel 3D Cu nano-flowers/layered MoS₂ composite.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoyun; Ni, Yongnian; Kokot, Serge

    2016-05-15

    A novel 3D nano-flower-like Cu/multi-layer molybdenum disulfide composite (CuNFs/MoS2) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) has been successfully constructed. It was a highly sensitive and selective non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and glucose biosensor. The morphology of the obtained CuNFs-MoS2 nano-particles was investigated with the use of a scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The physicochemical properties of the modified electrode were characterized at each of the construction stages with the use of an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) techniques. The new sensor combined the advantages of MoS2 and CuNFs, and exhibited high electro-catalytic activity toward H2O2 and glucose. Quantitative analysis of H2O2 and glucose was carried out with the use of the amperometric i-t method. Linear ranges were obtained between 0.04-1.88 μM and 1.88-35.6 μM for H2O2 and 1-20 μM and 20-70 μM for glucose, and their corresponding limits of detection (LOD) were 0.021 μM and 0.32 μM. This novel sensor was successfully applied for the quantitative analysis of H2O2 in tap water and glucose in human serum samples. PMID:26773372

  7. Electrochemical and bio-sensing platform based on a novel 3D Cu nano-flowers/layered MoS₂ composite.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoyun; Ni, Yongnian; Kokot, Serge

    2016-05-15

    A novel 3D nano-flower-like Cu/multi-layer molybdenum disulfide composite (CuNFs/MoS2) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) has been successfully constructed. It was a highly sensitive and selective non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and glucose biosensor. The morphology of the obtained CuNFs-MoS2 nano-particles was investigated with the use of a scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The physicochemical properties of the modified electrode were characterized at each of the construction stages with the use of an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) techniques. The new sensor combined the advantages of MoS2 and CuNFs, and exhibited high electro-catalytic activity toward H2O2 and glucose. Quantitative analysis of H2O2 and glucose was carried out with the use of the amperometric i-t method. Linear ranges were obtained between 0.04-1.88 μM and 1.88-35.6 μM for H2O2 and 1-20 μM and 20-70 μM for glucose, and their corresponding limits of detection (LOD) were 0.021 μM and 0.32 μM. This novel sensor was successfully applied for the quantitative analysis of H2O2 in tap water and glucose in human serum samples.

  8. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology. PMID:26028997

  9. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology.

  10. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  11. Parametric Dielectric Map of the Martian North Polar Layered Deposits in Support of the MARSIS and SHARAD data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosmidis, J.; Heggy, E.; Clifford, S. M.

    2007-12-01

    Laboratory dielectric characterizations of Ice-dust mixtures are crucial for the quantitative analysis of radar sounding data as for the case of the MARSIS and SHARAD experiments. Understanding the range of the dielectric properties of the Martian northmen Polar layer deposits as well as their geographical an vertical distribution result in a better topographical mapping of the basement material below the northern polar cap and help constrain the ambiguities on the identification of layering and any potential subglaciar melting. In order to achieve this task, we constructed first order modeled maps of the surface dielectric properties oh the NPLD. We first used the recent Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) thermal inertia observations in order to derive a map of the dust mass fraction in the ice at the top of the permanent cap. Then we used parametric laboratory measurements of the dielectric properties of Martian polar ice analogs with various temperatures, radar frequencies and mass fractions and compositions of dust in order to obtain the parametric dielectric maps. Thermal inertia maps have been derived from recent TES observations of the surface temperatures of Mars taken over three Mars-years from orbit 1583 to 24346. Laboratory dielectric characterization of ice-dust mixtures has been performed using TES dust calibration samples provided by the ARES group at NASA JSC. Our Maps suggest that surface dielectric properties of the northern Polar cap ranges from 2.72 to 3.23 in the 2-20 MHz band for a dust inclusion typical of Martian basalt. Parametric maps of loss tangent, penetration depth for several dust types will be presented at the conference.

  12. Seeding Atomic Layer Deposition of High-k Dielectrics on Epitaxial Graphene with Organic Self-assembled Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Alaboson, Justice M. P.; Wang, Qing Hua; Emery, Jonathan D.; Lipson, Albert L.; Bedzyk, Michael J.; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Pellin, Michael J.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2011-06-28

    The development of high-performance graphene-based nanoelectronics requires the integration of ultrathin and pinhole-free high-k dielectric films with graphene at the wafer scale. Here, we demonstrate that self-assembled monolayers of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) act as effective organic seeding layers for atomic layer deposition (ALD) of HfO₂ and Al₂O₃ on epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001). The PTCDA is deposited via sublimation in ultrahigh vacuum and shown to be highly ordered with low defect density by molecular-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy. Whereas identical ALD conditions lead to incomplete and rough dielectric deposition on bare graphene, the chemical functionality provided by the PTCDA seeding layer yields highly uniform and conformal films. The morphology and chemistry of the dielectric films are characterized by atomic force microscopy, ellipsometry, cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, while high-resolution X-ray reflectivity measurements indicate that the underlying graphene remains intact following ALD. Using the PTCDA seeding layer, metal-oxide-graphene capacitors fabricated with a 3 nm Al₂O₃ and 10 nm HfO₂ dielectric stack show high capacitance values of ~700 nF/cm² and low leakage currents of ~5 × 10{sup –9} A/cm² at 1 V applied bias. These results demonstrate the viability of sublimated organic self-assembled monolayers as seeding layers for high-k dielectric films in graphene-based nanoelectronics.

  13. Atomic layer chemical vapor deposition of ZrO2-based dielectric films: Nanostructure and nanochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, S. K.; Wang, C.-G.; Tang, D.; Kim, M. J.; Carpenter, R. W.; Werkhoven, C.; Shero, E.

    2003-04-01

    A 4 nm layer of ZrOx (targeted x˜2) was deposited on an interfacial layer (IL) of native oxide (SiO, t˜1.2 nm) surface on 200 mm Si wafers by a manufacturable atomic layer chemical vapor deposition technique at 300 °C. Some as-deposited layers were subjected to a postdeposition, rapid thermal annealing at 700 °C for 5 min in flowing oxygen at atmospheric pressure. The experimental x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy results showed that a multiphase and heterogeneous structure evolved, which we call the Zr-O/IL/Si stack. The as-deposited Zr-O layer was amorphous ZrO2-rich Zr silicate containing about 15% by volume of embedded ZrO2 nanocrystals, which transformed to a glass nanoceramic (with over 90% by volume of predominantly tetragonal-ZrO2 (t-ZrO2) and monoclinic-ZrO2 (m-ZrO2) nanocrystals) upon annealing. The formation of disordered amorphous regions within some of the nanocrystals, as well as crystalline regions with defects, probably gave rise to lattice strains and deformations. The interfacial layer (IL) was partitioned into an upper SiO2-rich Zr silicate and the lower SiOx. The latter was substoichiometric and the average oxidation state increased from Si0.86+ in SiO0.43 (as-deposited) to Si1.32+ in SiO0.66 (annealed). This high oxygen deficiency in SiOx was indicative of the low mobility of oxidizing specie in the Zr-O layer. The stacks were characterized for their dielectric properties in the Pt/{Zr-O/IL}/Si metal oxide-semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAP) configuration. The measured equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) was not consistent with the calculated EOT using a bilayer model of ZrO2 and SiO2, and the capacitance in accumulation (and therefore, EOT and kZr-O) was frequency dispersive, trends well documented in literature. This behavior is qualitatively explained in terms of the multilayer nanostructure and nanochemistry that

  14. Atomic Layer Deposited Thin Films for Dielectrics, Semiconductor Passivation, and Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Runshen

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) utilizes sequential precursor gas pulses to deposit one monolayer or sub-monolayer of material per cycle based on its self-limiting surface reaction, which offers advantages, such as precise thickness control, thickness uniformity, and conformality. ALD is a powerful means of fabricating nanoscale features in future nanoelectronics, such as contemporary sub-45 nm metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors, photovoltaic cells, near- and far-infrared detectors, and intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells. High dielectric constant, kappa, materials have been recognized to be promising candidates to replace traditional SiO2 and SiON, because they enable good scalability of sub-45 nm MOSFET (metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor) without inducing additional power consumption and heat dissipation. In addition to high dielectric constant, high-kappa materials must meet a number of other requirements, such as low leakage current, high mobility, good thermal and structure stability with Si to withstand high-temperature source-drain activation annealing. In this thesis, atomic layer deposited Er2O3 doped TiO2 is studied and proposed as a thermally stable amorphous high-kappa dielectric on Si substrate. The stabilization of TiO2 in its amorphous state is found to achieve a high permittivity of 36, a hysteresis voltage of less than 10 mV, and a low leakage current density of 10-8 A/cm-2 at -1 MV/cm. In III-V semiconductors, issues including unsatisfied dangling bonds and native oxides often result in inferior surface quality that yields non-negligible leakage currents and degrades the long-term performance of devices. The traditional means for passivating the surface of III-V semiconductors are based on the use of sulfide solutions; however, that only offers good protection against oxidation for a short-term (i.e., one day). In this work, in order to improve the chemical passivation efficacy of III-V semiconductors

  15. Flexible FETs using ultrathin Si microwires embedded in solution processed dielectric and metal layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S.; Yogeswaran, N.; Taube, W.; Lorenzelli, L.; Dahiya, R.

    2015-12-01

    This work presents a novel manufacturing route for obtaining high performance bendable field effect transistors (FET) by embedding silicon (Si) microwires (2.5 μm thick) in layers of solution-processed dielectric and metallic layers. The objective of this study is to explore heterogeneous integration of Si with polymers and to exploit the benefits of both microelectronics and printing technologies. Arrays of Si microwires are developed on silicon on insulator (SOI) wafers and transfer printed to polyimide (PI) substrate through a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) carrier stamp. Following the transfer printing of Si microwires, two different processing steps were developed to obtain top gate top contact and back gate top contact FETs. Electrical characterizations indicate devices having mobility as high as 117.5 cm2 V-1 s-1. The fabricated devices were also modeled using SILVACO Atlas. Simulation results show a trend in the electrical response similar to that of experimental results. In addition, a cyclic test was performed to demonstrate the reliability and mechanical robustness of the Si μ-wires on flexible substrates.

  16. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  17. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  18. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  19. Facile synthesis of 3D few-layered MoS2 coated TiO2 nanosheet core-shell nanostructures for stable and high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Biao; Zhao, Naiqin; Guo, Lichao; He, Fang; Shi, Chunsheng; He, Chunnian; Li, Jiajun; Liu, Enzuo

    2015-07-01

    Uniform transition metal sulfide deposition on a smooth TiO2 surface to form a coating structure is a well-known challenge, caused mainly due to their poor affinities. Herein, we report a facile strategy for fabricating mesoporous 3D few-layered (<4 layers) MoS2 coated TiO2 nanosheet core-shell nanocomposites (denoted as 3D FL-MoS2@TiO2) by a novel two-step method using a smooth TiO2 nanosheet as a template and glucose as a binder. The core-shell structure has been systematically examined and corroborated by transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. It is found that the resultant 3D FL-MoS2@TiO2 as a lithium-ion battery anode delivers an outstanding high-rate capability with an excellent cycling performance, relating to the unique structure of 3D FL-MoS2@TiO2. The 3D uniform coverage of few-layered (<4 layers) MoS2 onto the TiO2 can remarkably enhance the structure stability and effectively shortens the transfer paths of both lithium ions and electrons, while the strong synergistic effect between MoS2 and TiO2 can significantly facilitate the transport of ions and electrons across the interfaces, especially in the high-rate charge-discharge process. Moreover, the facile fabrication strategy can be easily extended to design other oxide/carbon-sulfide/oxide core-shell materials for extensive applications.Uniform transition metal sulfide deposition on a smooth TiO2 surface to form a coating structure is a well-known challenge, caused mainly due to their poor affinities. Herein, we report a facile strategy for fabricating mesoporous 3D few-layered (<4 layers) MoS2 coated TiO2 nanosheet core-shell nanocomposites (denoted as 3D FL-MoS2@TiO2) by a novel two-step method using a smooth TiO2 nanosheet as a template and glucose as a binder. The core-shell structure has been systematically examined and corroborated by transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy

  20. Assembly of a high-dielectric constant thin TiOx layer directly on H-terminated semiconductor diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing; Liu, Jiangwei; Sang, Liwen; Liao, Meiyong; Coathup, David; Imura, Masataka; Shi, Baogui; Gu, Changzhi; Koide, Yasuo; Ye, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    A high-dielectric constant (high-k) TiOx thin layer was fabricated on hydrogen-terminated diamond (H-diamond) surface by low temperature oxidation of a thin titanium layer in ambient air. The metallic titanium layer was deposited by sputter deposition. The dielectric constant of the resultant TiOx was calculated to be around 12. The capacitance density of the metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) based on the TiOx/H-diamond was as high as 0.75 μF/cm2 contributed from the high-k value and the very thin thickness of the TiOx layer. The leakage current was lower than 10-13 A at reverse biases and 10-7A at the forward bias of -2 V. The MOS field-effect transistor based on the high-k TiOx/H-diamond was demonstrated. The utilization of the high-k TiOx with a very thin thickness brought forward the features of an ideally low subthreshold swing slope of 65 mV per decade and improved drain current at low gate voltages. The advantages of the utilization high-k dielectric for diamond metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors are anticipated.

  1. Boosting the Transparency of Thin Layers by Coatings of Opposing Susceptibility: How Metals Help See Through Dielectrics

    PubMed Central

    Shakhs, Mohammed Al; Augusto, Lucian; Markley, Loïc; Chau, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a hypothesis that a very thin layer can be made more transparent by adding a thin coating with susceptibility of opposing sign. Two experimental tests backed by a theoretical model support this hypothesis. First, we show that the visible and near-infrared transmission through a semi-transparent silver film can be enhanced by up to ~70% and spectrally tailored depending on the type and thickness of the dielectric coating. Material types explored as dielectric coating layers include conventional metal oxides (titanium dioxide) and lesser-explored elemental semiconductors (undoped silicon, p-type silicon, and germanium). Second, and more surprisingly, we show that coating a 50-nm-thick silicon nitride membrane with a 10-nm-thick silver layer can modestly enhance the transmission by up to 6 ± 1% in the blue part of the spectrum. Transmission enhancements are observed for three silver-coated membranes in different configurations. Thinner silver coatings are theoretically capable of enhancement factors greater than 10%, but implementation is restricted by challenges in making smooth and continuous silver films below 10 nm in thickness. This study is important because it is the first demonstration of reciprocity with respect to the transmission enhancements achieved by combining thin metallic and dielectric layers. PMID:26860979

  2. Boosting the Transparency of Thin Layers by Coatings of Opposing Susceptibility: How Metals Help See Through Dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Al Shakhs, Mohammed; Augusto, Lucian; Markley, Loïc; Chau, Kenneth J

    2016-02-10

    We propose a hypothesis that a very thin layer can be made more transparent by adding a thin coating with susceptibility of opposing sign. Two experimental tests backed by a theoretical model support this hypothesis. First, we show that the visible and near-infrared transmission through a semi-transparent silver film can be enhanced by up to ~70% and spectrally tailored depending on the type and thickness of the dielectric coating. Material types explored as dielectric coating layers include conventional metal oxides (titanium dioxide) and lesser-explored elemental semiconductors (undoped silicon, p-type silicon, and germanium). Second, and more surprisingly, we show that coating a 50-nm-thick silicon nitride membrane with a 10-nm-thick silver layer can modestly enhance the transmission by up to 6 ± 1% in the blue part of the spectrum. Transmission enhancements are observed for three silver-coated membranes in different configurations. Thinner silver coatings are theoretically capable of enhancement factors greater than 10%, but implementation is restricted by challenges in making smooth and continuous silver films below 10 nm in thickness. This study is important because it is the first demonstration of reciprocity with respect to the transmission enhancements achieved by combining thin metallic and dielectric layers.

  3. Integration of atomic layer deposited high-k dielectrics on GaSb via hydrogen plasma exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppalt, Laura B.; Cleveland, Erin R.; Champlain, James G.; Bennett, Brian R.; Prokes, Sharka M.

    2014-12-01

    In this letter we report the efficacy of a hydrogen plasma pretreatment for integrating atomic layer deposited (ALD) high-k dielectric stacks with device-quality p-type GaSb(001) epitaxial layers. Molecular beam eptiaxy-grown GaSb surfaces were subjected to a 30 minute H2/Ar plasma treatment and subsequently removed to air. High-k HfO2 and Al2O3/HfO2 bilayer insulating films were then deposited via ALD and samples were processed into standard metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors. The quality of the semiconductor/dielectric interface was probed by current-voltage and variable-frequency admittance measurements. Measurement results indicate that the H2-plamsa pretreatment leads to a low density of interface states nearly independent of the deposited dielectric material, suggesting that pre-deposition H2-plasma exposure, coupled with ALD of high-k dielectrics, may provide an effective means for achieving high-quality GaSb MOS structures for advanced Sb-based digital and analog electronics.

  4. Integration of atomic layer deposited high-k dielectrics on GaSb via hydrogen plasma exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppalt, Laura B. Cleveland, Erin R.; Champlain, James G.; Bennett, Brian R.; Prokes, Sharka M.

    2014-12-15

    In this letter we report the efficacy of a hydrogen plasma pretreatment for integrating atomic layer deposited (ALD) high-k dielectric stacks with device-quality p-type GaSb(001) epitaxial layers. Molecular beam eptiaxy-grown GaSb surfaces were subjected to a 30 minute H{sub 2}/Ar plasma treatment and subsequently removed to air. High-k HfO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/HfO{sub 2} bilayer insulating films were then deposited via ALD and samples were processed into standard metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors. The quality of the semiconductor/dielectric interface was probed by current-voltage and variable-frequency admittance measurements. Measurement results indicate that the H{sub 2}-plamsa pretreatment leads to a low density of interface states nearly independent of the deposited dielectric material, suggesting that pre-deposition H{sub 2}-plasma exposure, coupled with ALD of high-k dielectrics, may provide an effective means for achieving high-quality GaSb MOS structures for advanced Sb-based digital and analog electronics.

  5. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  6. Environmentally friendly power generator based on moving liquid dielectric and double layer effect

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, D. H.; Nguyen, T. C.; Nguyen, P. D.; Abeyrathne, C. D.; Hossain, Md. S.; Evans, R.; Skafidas, E.

    2016-01-01

    An electrostatic power generator converts mechanical energy to electrical energy by utilising the principle of variable capacitance. This change in capacitance is usually achieved by varying the gap or overlap between two parallel metallic plates. This paper proposes a novel electrostatic micro power generator where the change in capacitance is achieved by the movement of an aqueous solution of NaCl. A significant change in capacitance is achieved due to the higher than air dielectric constant of water and the Helmholtz double layer capacitor formed by ion separation at the electrode interfaces. The proposed device has significant advantages over traditional electrostatic devices which include low bias voltage and low mechanical frequency of operation. This is critical if the proposed device is to have utility in harvesting power from the environment. A figure of merit exceeding 10000(108μW)/(mm2HzV2) which is two orders of magnitude greater than previous devices, is demonstrated for a prototype operating at a bias voltage of 1.2 V and a droplet frequency of 6 Hz. Concepts are presented for large scale power harvesting. PMID:27255577

  7. Electrical behavior of atomic layer deposited high quality SiO{sub 2} gate dielectric

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, Sangram K.; Tanyi, Ekembu K.; Skuza, Jonathan R.; Xiao, Bo; Pradhan, Aswini K.

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive and systematic electrical studies were performed on fabrication of high quality SiO{sub 2} thin films MOS capacitor using the robust, novel, and simple atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique using highly reactive ozone and tris (dimethylamino) silane (TDMAS) precursors. Ideal capacitance–voltage curve exhibits a very small frequency dispersion and hysteresis behavior of the SiO{sub 2} MOS capacitor grown at 1 s TDMAS pulse, suggesting excellent interfacial quality and purity of the film as probed using x-ray photoelectron studies. The flat-band voltage of the device shifted from negative toward positive voltage axis with increase of TDMAS pulses from 0.2 to 2 s. Based on an equivalent oxide thickness point of view, all SiO{sub 2} films have gate leakage current density of (5.18 × 10{sup −8} A/cm{sup 2}) as well as high dielectric break down fields of more than (∼10 MV/cm), which is better and comparable to that of thermally grown SiO{sub 2} at temperatures above 800 °C. These appealing electrical properties of ALD grown SiO{sub 2} thin films enable its potential applications such as high-quality gate insulators for thin film MOS transistors, as well as insulators for sensor and nanostructures on nonsilicon substrates.

  8. Environmentally friendly power generator based on moving liquid dielectric and double layer effect.

    PubMed

    Huynh, D H; Nguyen, T C; Nguyen, P D; Abeyrathne, C D; Hossain, Md S; Evans, R; Skafidas, E

    2016-06-03

    An electrostatic power generator converts mechanical energy to electrical energy by utilising the principle of variable capacitance. This change in capacitance is usually achieved by varying the gap or overlap between two parallel metallic plates. This paper proposes a novel electrostatic micro power generator where the change in capacitance is achieved by the movement of an aqueous solution of NaCl. A significant change in capacitance is achieved due to the higher than air dielectric constant of water and the Helmholtz double layer capacitor formed by ion separation at the electrode interfaces. The proposed device has significant advantages over traditional electrostatic devices which include low bias voltage and low mechanical frequency of operation. This is critical if the proposed device is to have utility in harvesting power from the environment. A figure of merit exceeding 10000(10(8)μW)/(mm(2)HzV(2)) which is two orders of magnitude greater than previous devices, is demonstrated for a prototype operating at a bias voltage of 1.2 V and a droplet frequency of 6 Hz. Concepts are presented for large scale power harvesting.

  9. Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy of hyperfine layers on surfaces of semiconductors and dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruzinov, S. N.; Tolstoy, V. P.

    1988-02-01

    Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy of film son surfaces of transparent or weakly absorbing semiconductor and dielectric substrates is analyzed theoretically, the purpose being to establish the conditions for maximum sensitivity of this method. The absorption factor, namely the relative change of the reflection coefficient upon formation of a film on the substrate surface, is selected as the sensitivity criterion. The analysis is based on exact relations, one for a homogeneous isotopic absorbing film between substrate and ambient medium with plane-parallel boundaries and one for a reflecting layer with the possibility of multiple reflections taken into account. Calculations have been programmed on a computer for up to 60 nm thick SiO2 films on various substrates and infrared radiation within the 8 to 11 gmm waveband. The results indicate that the dependence of the absorption factor on the radiation wavelength and on the film thickness is different with the radiation s-polarized than with the radiation p-polarized. Calculations have also yielded the dispersion of optical constants characterizing a SiO2 film. According to these results, infrared spectroscopy is most sensitive to films on substrates with a small refractive index and when done with p-polarized radiation incident at exactly or approximately the Brewster angle for a determination of their presence and their composition respectively, also when no multiple reflections occur.

  10. Environmentally friendly power generator based on moving liquid dielectric and double layer effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, D. H.; Nguyen, T. C.; Nguyen, P. D.; Abeyrathne, C. D.; Hossain, Md. S.; Evans, R.; Skafidas, E.

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic power generator converts mechanical energy to electrical energy by utilising the principle of variable capacitance. This change in capacitance is usually achieved by varying the gap or overlap between two parallel metallic plates. This paper proposes a novel electrostatic micro power generator where the change in capacitance is achieved by the movement of an aqueous solution of NaCl. A significant change in capacitance is achieved due to the higher than air dielectric constant of water and the Helmholtz double layer capacitor formed by ion separation at the electrode interfaces. The proposed device has significant advantages over traditional electrostatic devices which include low bias voltage and low mechanical frequency of operation. This is critical if the proposed device is to have utility in harvesting power from the environment. A figure of merit exceeding 10000(108μW)/(mm2HzV2) which is two orders of magnitude greater than previous devices, is demonstrated for a prototype operating at a bias voltage of 1.2 V and a droplet frequency of 6 Hz. Concepts are presented for large scale power harvesting.

  11. Shim3d Helmholtz Solution Package

    2009-01-29

    This suite of codes solves the Helmholtz Equation for the steady-state propagation of single-frequency electromagnetic radiation in an arbitrary 2D or 3D dielectric medium. Materials can be either transparent or absorptive (including metals) and are described entirely by their shape and complex dielectric constant. Dielectric boundaries are assumed to always fall on grid boundaries and the material within a single grid cell is considered to be uniform. Input to the problem is in the formmore » of a Dirichlet boundary condition on a single boundary, and may be either analytic (Gaussian) in shape, or a mode shape computed using a separate code (such as the included eigenmode solver vwave20), and written to a file. Solution is via the finite difference method using Jacobi iteration for 3D problems or direct matrix inversion for 2D problems. Note that 3D problems that include metals will require different iteration parameters than described in the above reference. For structures with curved boundaries not easily modeled on a rectangular grid, the auxillary codes helmholtz11(2D), helm3d (semivectoral), and helmv3d (full vectoral) are provided. For these codes the finite difference equations are specified on a topological regular triangular grid and solved using Jacobi iteration or direct matrix inversion as before. An automatic grid generator is supplied.« less

  12. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  13. The impact of non-local buoyancy flux on the convective boundary layer development as simulated by a 3-D TKE-based subgrid mixing scheme in a mesoscale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Bao, Jian-Wen; Chen, Baode

    2016-04-01

    This presentation highlights a study in which a series of dry convective boundary layer (CBL) simulations are carried out using a generalized 3-dimensional (3-D) TKE-based parameterization scheme of sub-grid turbulent mixing in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The simulated characteristics of dry CBL are analyzed for the purpose of evaluating this scheme in comparison with a commonly-used scheme for sub-grid turbulent mixing in NWP models (i.e., the Mellor-Yamada 1.5-order TKE scheme). The same surface layer scheme is used in all the simulations so that only the sensitivity of the WRF model to different parameterizations of the sub-grid turbulent mixing above the surface layer is examined. The effect of horizontal grid resolution on the simulated CBL is also examined by running the model with grid sizes of 200, 400 m, 600 m, 1 km and 3 km. We will first compare the characteristics of the simulated CBL using the two schemes with the WRF LES dataset. We will then illustrate the importance of including the non-local component in the vertical buoyancy specification in the 3-D TKE-based scheme. Finally, comparing the results from the simulations against coarse-grained WRF LES dataset, we will show the feasibility and advantage of replacing conventional planetary boundary layer parameterization schemes with a scale-aware 3-D TKE-based scheme in the WRF model.

  14. Dielectric response of double layered perovskite Sr3MnTiO7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowki, S.; Sahu, B.; Singh, A. K.; Mohapatra, N.

    2016-05-01

    The results of dielectric and resistivity measurements on the Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) type compound Sr3MnTiO7 (SMTO) is presented here. The dielectric response of the compound was recorded in the temperature range 10-300 K with the probing frequency from 500 Hz-5 MHz. We observe a broad anomaly at ~ 200 K in the temperature dependence of dissipation factor (tanδ) and corresponding change in slope in the dielectric constant ɛr'(T) which may be attributed to a difference in the conduction mechanism below and above 200 K. The overall dielectric dispersion of SMTO resembles to that of the double perovskites Sr2MnTiO6 and La2NiMnO6 which follows the modified Debye relaxation equation. This indicates a relaxor type dielectric behavior of SMTO may be due to the contribution of grain boundary effects.

  15. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  16. Possible influence of layer deformation and chiral segregation on dielectric modes in the dark conglomerate liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Deepa G; Selvaraj, Radhika; Kapanipathaiya, Sadashiva B; Ramarao, Pratibha

    2015-03-16

    Dielectric spectroscopy is used to investigate the structure, molecular dynamics, and relaxation phenomena in electric-field-induced switchable dark conglomerate (DC) phases in a bent-core liquid crystal. The DC phases are obtained by applying a high-frequency ac electric field in the B1rev phase or by cooling under a dc or an ac field from the isotropic phase. Although the DC phases exhibit good electro-optic switching properties, the dielectric parameters are different from those observed in typical lamellar SmCP phases and similar to those obtained in a non-switchable DC phase. We therefore propose that the dielectric response and reduced intensity of the relaxation modes may be a general feature in DC phases and may owe its origin to the deformed layer structure in which certain molecular motions are impeded. Further, we find that in the field-induced DC phases derived from the isotropic phase, the dielectric modes are affected by chiral segregation promoted by the applied field.

  17. Tailorable 3D microfabrication for photonic applications: two-polymer microtransfer molding (proceedings paper)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; kim, Chang-Hwan; Constant, Kristen; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2006-02-28

    For photonic devices, extending beyond the planar regime to the third dimension can allow a higher degree of integration and novel functionalities for applications such as photonic crystals and integrated optical circuits. Although conventional photolithography can achieve both high quality and structural control, it is still costly and slow for three-dimensional (3D) fabrication. Moreover, as diverse functional polymers emerge, there is potential to develop new techniques for quick and economical fabrication of 3D structures. We present a 3D microfabrication technique based on the soft lithographic technique, called two-polymer microtransfer molding (2P-{micro}TM) to accomplish low cost, high structural fidelity and tailorable 3D microfabrication for polymers. Using 2P-{micro}TM, highly layered polymeric microstructures are achievable by stacking planar structures layer by layer. For increased processing control, the surface chemistry of the polymers is characterized as a function of changing ultraviolet dosage to optimize yield in layer transfer. We discuss the application of the 2P-{micro}TM to build polymer templates for woodpile photonic crystals, and demonstrate methods for converting the polymer templates to dielectric and metallic photonic crystal structures. Finally, we will show that 2P-{micro}TM is promising for fabricating 3D polymeric optical waveguides.

  18. Melt front propagation in dielectrics upon femtosecond laser irradiation: Formation dynamics of a heat-affected layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Lechuga, Mario; Solis, Javier; Siegel, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Several studies in dielectrics have reported the presence of a thin heat-affected layer underneath the ablation crater produced by femtosecond laser irradiation. In this work, we present a time-resolved microscopy technique that is capable of monitoring the formation dynamics of this layer and apply it to the study of a phosphate glass exposed to single pulses below the ablation threshold. A few nanoseconds after laser excitation, a melt front interface can be detected, which propagates into the bulk, gradually slowing down its speed. By means of image analysis combined with optical modeling, we are able to determine the temporal evolution of the layer thickness and its refractive index. Initially, a strong transient decrease in the refractive index is observed, which partially recovers afterwards. The layer resolidifies after approximately 1 μs after excitation, featuring a maximum thickness of several hundreds of nanometers.

  19. A general Poisson-Boltzmann model with position-dependent dielectric permittivity for electric double layer analysis.

    PubMed

    Le, Guigao; Zhang, Junfeng

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a general Poisson-Boltzmann model for electric double layer (EDL) analysis with the position dependence of dielectric permittivity considered. This model provides physically reasonable property profiles in the EDL region, and it is then utilized to investigate the depletion layer effect on EDL structure and interaction near hydrophobic surfaces. Our results show that both the electric potential and the interaction pressure between surfaces decrease due to the lower permittivity in the depletion layer. The reduction becomes more profound at larger variation magnitude and range. This trend is in general agreement with that observed from the previous stepwise model; however, that model has overestimated the influence of permittivity variation effect. For the thin depletion layer and the relative thick EDL, our calculation indicates that the permittivity variation effect on EDL usually can be neglected. Furthermore, our model can be readily extended to study the permittivity variation in EDL due to ion accumulation and hydration in the EDL region.

  20. Recent developments in multi-layer flat knitting technology for waste free production of complex shaped 3D-reinforcing structures for composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trümper, W.; Lin, H.; Callin, T.; Bollengier, Q.; Cherif, C.; Krzywinski, S.

    2016-07-01

    Constantly increasing prices for raw materials and energy as well as the current discourse on the reduction of CO2-emissions places a special emphasis on the advantages of lightweight constructions and its resource conserving production methods. Fibre-reinforced composites are already seeing a number of applications in automobile, energy and mechanical engineering. Future applications within the named areas require greater material and energy efficiency and therefore manufacturing methods for textile preforms and lightweight constructions enabling an optimal arrangement of the reinforcing fibres while in the same time limiting waste to a minimum. One manufacturing method for textile reinforced preforms fulfilling quite many of the named requirements is the multilayer weft knitting technology. Multilayer weft knitted fabrics containing straight reinforcing yarns at least in two directions. The arrangement of these yarns is fixed by the loop yarn. Used yarn material in each knitting row is adaptable e. g. according to the load requirements or for the local integration of sensors. Draping properties of these fabrics can be varied within a great range and through this enabling draping of very complex shaped 3D-preforms without wrinkles from just one uncut fabric. The latest developments at ITM are concentrating on the development of a full production chain considering the 3D-CAD geometry, the load analysis, the generation of machine control programs as well as the development of technology and machines to enable the manufacturing of innovative net shape 3D-multilayer weft knitted fabrics such as complex shaped spacer fabrics and tubular fabrics with biaxial reinforcement.

  1. Simulation and evaluation of dielectric and magnetoelectric properties of diphasic and layered ferroic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsiao-Yuan

    The present demand in the development of tunable devices and meta-materials require better understanding of the composite systems. Ferroelectric based composites with solubility or impurities doped interstitially satisfied the specific condition necessary for applications of e.g. frequency, bias, temperature, etc. On the other hand, many composite materials using coupling phenomena have been reported to have their effective properties surpassing the natural materials. The improvement of the properties of composite materials lies on the better understanding of their coupling effects. Conventional science tries to derive theories based on observation and materials characterizations. Taken advantage of the rapid growing computer technology, one used to say "impossible to be measured" or "impossible to see" can now be virtually characterized and visualized by simulation models. In this thesis, computer models of dielectric properties, piezoelectricity, magnetostriction and magnetoelectricity were constructed and verified. And subsequently the materials of interest were simulated and discussed. First, a three dimensional finite element model on dielectric properties of two phases or materials mixture was constructed. The effective permittivity and tan(delta) of Ba0.5Sr0.5 TiO3:MgO composite were simulated and compared with the experimental results. Structural design parameters concepts such as layers stacking, geometry effect, and effect of size of inclusion were visualized and then discussed. Subsequently, dielectric properties of Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO 3:MgO composite were examined changing their volume fraction using Monte Carlo simulation. The type of connectivity of the Ba0.5Sr 0.5TiO3:MgO composite was also discussed. On the other hand, finite element method with Monte Carlo simulation was conducted for the composition (x)Pb0.2Sr0.8TiO3:(1-x)MgO from x=0 to 1 in the paraelectric phase (from -50°C to 200°C), and the results were computed and compared with the experimental

  2. 7-Octenyltrichrolosilane/trimethyaluminum hybrid dielectrics fabricated by molecular-atomic layer deposition on ZnO thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jie; Lee, Mingun; Lucero, Antonio T.; Cheng, Lanxia; Ha, Min-Woo; Kim, Jiyoung

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of 7-octenytrichlorosilane (7-OTS)/trimethylaluminum (TMA) organic-inorganic hybrid films using molecular-atomic layer deposition (MALD). The properties of 7-OTS/TMA hybrid films are extensively investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and electrical measurements. Our results suggest that uniform and smooth amorphous hybrid thin films with excellent insulating properties are obtained using the MALD process. Films have a relatively high dielectric constant of approximately 5.0 and low leakage current density. We fabricate zinc oxide (ZnO) based thin film transistors (TFTs) using 7-OTS/TMA hybrid material as a back gate dielectric with the top ZnO channel layer deposited in-situ via MALD. The ZnO TFTs exhibit a field effect mobility of approximately 0.43 cm2 V-1 s-1, a threshold voltage of approximately 1 V, and an on/off ratio of approximately 103 under low voltage operation (from -3 to 9 V). This work demonstrates an organic-inorganic hybrid gate dielectric material potentially useful in flexible electronics application.

  3. ZrO2 Layer Thickness Dependent Electrical and Dielectric Properties of BST/ZrO2/BST Multilayer Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, S. K.; Misra, D.; Agrawal, D. C.; Mohapatra, Y. N.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, high K materials play an important role in microelectronic devices such as capacitors, memory devices, and microwave devices. Now a days ferroelectric barium strontium titanate [Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}TiO{sub 3}, (BST)] thin film is being actively investigated for applications in dynamic random access memories (DRAM), field effect transistor (FET), and tunable devices because of its properties such as high dielectric constant, low leakage current, low dielectric loss, and high dielectric breakdown strength. Several approaches have been used to optimize the dielectric and electrical properties of BST thin films such as doping, graded compositions, and multilayer structures. We have found that inserting a ZrO{sub 2} layer in between two BST layers results in a significant reduction in dielectric constant, loss tangent, and leakage current in the multilayer thin films. Also it is shown that the properties of multilayer structure are found to depend strongly on the sublayer thicknesses. In this work the effect of ZrO{sub 2} layer thickness on the dielectric, ferroelectric as well as electrical properties of BST/ZrO{sub 2}/BST multilayer structure is studied. The multilayer Ba{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}TiO{sub 3}/ZrO{sub 2}/Ba{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}TiO{sub 3} film is deposited by a sol-gel process on the platinized Si substrate. The thickness of the middle ZrO{sub 2} layer is varied while keeping the top and bottom BST layer thickness as fixed. It is observed that the dielectric constant, dielectric loss tangent, and leakage current of the multilayer films reduce with the increase of ZrO{sub 2} layer thickness and hence suitable for memory device applications. The ferroelectric properties of the multilayer film also decrease with the ZrO{sub 2} layer thickness.

  4. A method to fabricate disconnected silver nanostructures in 3D.

    PubMed

    Vora, Kevin; Kang, SeungYeon; Mazur, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The standard nanofabrication toolkit includes techniques primarily aimed at creating 2D patterns in dielectric media. Creating metal patterns on a submicron scale requires a combination of nanofabrication tools and several material processing steps. For example, steps to create planar metal structures using ultraviolet photolithography and electron-beam lithography can include sample exposure, sample development, metal deposition, and metal liftoff. To create 3D metal structures, the sequence is repeated multiple times. The complexity and difficulty of stacking and aligning multiple layers limits practical implementations of 3D metal structuring using standard nanofabrication tools. Femtosecond-laser direct-writing has emerged as a pre-eminent technique for 3D nanofabrication.(1,2) Femtosecond lasers are frequently used to create 3D patterns in polymers and glasses.(3-7) However, 3D metal direct-writing remains a challenge. Here, we describe a method to fabricate silver nanostructures embedded inside a polymer matrix using a femtosecond laser centered at 800 nm. The method enables the fabrication of patterns not feasible using other techniques, such as 3D arrays of disconnected silver voxels.(8) Disconnected 3D metal patterns are useful for metamaterials where unit cells are not in contact with each other,(9) such as coupled metal dot(10,11)or coupled metal rod(12,13) resonators. Potential applications include negative index metamaterials, invisibility cloaks, and perfect lenses. In femtosecond-laser direct-writing, the laser wavelength is chosen such that photons are not linearly absorbed in the target medium. When the laser pulse duration is compressed to the femtosecond time scale and the radiation is tightly focused inside the target, the extremely high intensity induces nonlinear absorption. Multiple photons are absorbed simultaneously to cause electronic transitions that lead to material modification within the focused region. Using this approach, one can

  5. A case study on pseudo 3-D Chirp sub-bottom profiler (SBP) survey for the detection of a fault trace in shallow sedimentary layers at gas hydrate site in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Jun; Koo, Nam-Hyung; Cheong, Snons; Kim, Jung-Ki; Chun, Jong-Hwa; Shin, Sung-Ryul; Riedel, Michael; Lee, Ho-Young

    2016-10-01

    A pseudo 3-D Chirp sub-bottom profiler (SBP) survey was conducted to define the extension of a fault that was previously identified on low-resolution 2-D seismic data with an emphasis on the shallow sedimentary layers and to determine if the fault extends to the seafloor. The geophysical survey was conducted as part of an environmental impact assessment for a proposed gas hydrate production test in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea. The Chirp SBP raw data were acquired over an area of 1 km × 1 km with an average line spacing of 20 m. To produce a 3-D Chirp SBP volume, we developed an optimal processing sequence that was divided into two steps. The first phase of 2-D data processing included a sweep signature estimation, correlation, deconvolution, swell effect correction, and migration. The second phase of 3-D data processing was composed of a bin design, bin gathering of the final processed 2-D data set, amplitude normalization, and residual statics correction. The 3-D Chirp SBP volume provides enhanced imaging especially due to the residual static processing using a moving average method and shows better continuity of the sedimentary layers and consistency of the reflection events than the individual 2-D lines. Deformation of the seafloor as a result of the fault was detected, and the fault offset increases in the deeper sedimentary layers. We also determined that the fault strikes northwest-southeast. However, the shallow sub-seafloor sediments have high porosities and therefore do not exhibit brittle fault-behavior but rather deform continuously due to fault movement.

  6. Three-Dimensional Boundary-Layer program (BL3D) for swept subsonic or supersonic wings with application to laminar flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, Venkit

    1993-01-01

    The theory, formulation, and solution of three-dimensional, compressible attached laminar flows, applied to swept wings in subsonic or supersonic flow are discussed. Several new features and modifications to an earlier general procedure described in NASA CR 4269, Jan. 1990 are incorporated. Details of interfacing the boundary-layer computation with solution of the inviscid Euler equations are discussed. A description of the computer program, complete with user's manual and example cases, is also included. Comparison of solutions with Navier-Stokes computations with or without boundary-layer suction is given. Output of solution profiles and derivatives required in boundary-layer stability analysis is provided.

  7. Formation of a Refracted Electromagnetic Wave at the Output from a Plane-Parallel Dielectric Layer and Interference Nature of Fermat's Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averbukh, B. B.; Averbukh, I. B.

    2015-04-01

    It is shown that a transition layer representing a spatial region in which field propagation is analogous to refraction in an inhomogeneous medium exists after a dielectric layer. In this region located within the near field zone the direction of the wave vector of the transmitted field varies smoothly, and with increasing distance from the layer, approaches to that of the wave incident on the layer. It is shown that such behavior of the field and occurrence of the transition layer are caused by the interference of the incident wave field and the fields of secondary sources excited in the dielectric by the incident wave field. It is shown that the refraction of the field in a homogeneous medium after the dielectric corresponds to Fermat's principle, and the interference nature of Fermat's principle is justified.

  8. Atomic layer deposition of a high-k dielectric on MoS2 using trimethylaluminum and ozone.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lanxia; Qin, Xiaoye; Lucero, Antonio T; Azcatl, Angelica; Huang, Jie; Wallace, Robert M; Cho, Kyeongjae; Kim, Jiyoung

    2014-08-13

    We present an Al2O3 dielectric layer on molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), deposited using atomic layer deposition (ALD) with ozone/trimethylaluminum (TMA) and water/TMA as precursors. The results of atomic force microscopy and low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy show that using TMA and ozone as precursors leads to the formation of uniform Al2O3 layers, in contrast to the incomplete coverage we observe when using TMA/H2O as precursors. Our Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicate minimal variations in the MoS2 structure after ozone treatment at 200 °C, suggesting its excellent chemical resistance to ozone.

  9. Nucleation and growth of dielectric films on III-V semiconductors during atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados Alpizar, Bernal

    In order to continue with metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS) transistor scaling and to reduce the power density, the channel should be replaced with a material having a higher electron mobility, such as a III-V semiconductor. However, the integration of III-V's is a challenge because these materials oxidize rapidly when exposed to air and the native oxide produced is characterized by a high density of defects. Deposition of high-k materials on III-V semiconductors using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) reduces the thickness of these oxides, improving the semiconductor/oxide interface quality and the transistor electrical characteristics. In this work, ALD is used to deposit two dielectrics, Al 2O3 and TiO2, on two III-V materials, GaAs and InGaAs, and in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and in-situ thermal programmed desorption (TPD) are used for interface characterization. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching of GaAs(100) and brief reoxidation in air produces a 9.0 ±1.6 Å-thick oxide overlayer containing 86% As oxides. The oxides are removed by 1 s pulses of trimethylaluminum (TMA) or TiCl4. TMA removes the oxide overlayer while depositing a 7.5 ± 1.6 Å thick aluminum oxide. The reaction follows a ligand exchange mechanism producing nonvolatile Al-O species that remain on the surface. TiCl4 exposure removes the oxide overlayer in the temperature range 89°C to 300°C, depositing approximately 0.04 monolayer of titanium oxide for deposition temperatures from 89°C to 135°C, but no titanium oxide is present from 170 °C to 230 °C. TiCl4 forms a volatile oxychloride product and removes O from the surface while leaving Cl atoms adsorbed to an elemental As layer, chemically passivating the surface. The native oxide of In0.53Ga0.47As(100) is removed using liquid HF and gas phase HF before deposition of Al2O3 using TMA and H2O at 170 °C. An aluminium oxide film with a thickness of 7.2 ± 1.2 Å and 7.3 ± 1.2 Å is deposited during the first pulse of TMA on

  10. High-Performance Organic Field-Effect Transistors with Dielectric and Active Layers Printed Sequentially by Ultrasonic Spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Ming; Sanjib, Das; Chen, Jihua; Keum, Jong Kahk; Ivanov, Ilia N; Gu, Gong; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2013-01-01

    High-performance, flexible organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are reported with PVP dielectric and TIPS-PEN active layers sequentially deposited by ultrasonic spray-coating on plastic substrate. OFETs fabricated in ambient air with a bottom-gate/top-contact geometry are shown to achieve on/off ratios of >104 and mobilities as high as 0.35 cm2/Vs. These rival the characteristics of the best solution-processible small molecule FETs fabricated by other fabrication methods such as drop casting and ink-jet printing.

  11. Electrical double layer at dielectric liquid/solid interface. Space charge measurements using the thermal step methods

    SciTech Connect

    Toureille, A.; Touchard, G.; Richardson, T.

    1996-12-31

    The experimental evidence of the Electrical Double Layer (EDL) at the Dielectric Liquid-Solid Interface is an important question: first, it is a fundamental problem which has given several physical models and then numerous industrial applications concerns electrical engineering (transformers, wet cables and capacitors). The Thermal Step Technique, recently, has shown its great sensitivity to measure space charge in several geometries in particular in cables. So this method has been tried here to verify the assumptions made in models established few years ago.

  12. A high capacity 3D steganography algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chao, Min-Wen; Lin, Chao-hung; Yu, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Tong-Yee

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a very high-capacity and low-distortion 3D steganography scheme. Our steganography approach is based on a novel multilayered embedding scheme to hide secret messages in the vertices of 3D polygon models. Experimental results show that the cover model distortion is very small as the number of hiding layers ranges from 7 to 13 layers. To the best of our knowledge, this novel approach can provide much higher hiding capacity than other state-of-the-art approaches, while obeying the low distortion and security basic requirements for steganography on 3D models.

  13. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  14. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  15. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  16. GTD analysis of airborne antennas radiating in the presence of lossy dielectric layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojas-Teran, R. G.; Burnside, W. D.

    1981-01-01

    The patterns of monopole or aperture antennas mounted on a perfectly conducting convex surface radiating in the presence of a dielectric or metal plate are computed. The geometrical theory of diffraction is used to analyze the radiating system and extended here to include diffraction by flat dielectric slabs. Modified edge diffraction coefficients valid for wedges whose walls are lossy or lossless thin dielectric or perfectly conducting plates are developed. The width of the dielectric plates cannot exceed a quarter of a wavelength in free space, and the interior angle of the wedge is assumed to be close to 0 deg or 180 deg. Systematic methods for computing the individual components of the total high frequency field are discussed. The accuracy of the solutions is demonstrated by comparisons with measured results, where a 2 lambda by 4 lambda prolate spheroid is used as the convex surface. A jump or kink appears in the calculated pattern when higher order terms that are important are not included in the final solution. The most immediate application of the results presented here is in the modelling of structures such as aircraft which are composed of nonmetallic parts that play a significant role in the pattern.

  17. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a suitable substrate and a dielectric layer for n-layer MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Arunima K. Davydov, Albert V.; Tavazza, Francesca; Hennig, Richard G.

    2015-08-03

    Sapphire (α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is a common substrate for the growth of single- to few-layer MoS{sub 2} films, and amorphous aluminium oxide serves as a high-κ dielectric gate oxide for MoS{sub 2} based transistors. Using density-functional theory calculations with a van der Waals functional, we investigate the structural, energetic, and electronic properties of n-layer MoS{sub 2} (n = 1and 3) on the α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0001) surface. Our results show that the sapphire stabilizes single-layer and tri-layer MoS{sub 2}, while having a negligible effect on the structure, band gap, and electron effective masses of MoS{sub 2}. This combination of a strong energetic stabilization and weak perturbation of the electronic properties shows that α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} can serve as an ideal substrate for depositing ultra-thin MoS{sub 2} layers and can also serve as a passivation or gate-oxide layer for MoS{sub 2} based devices.

  18. 3D stability analysis of Rayleigh-Bénard convection of a liquid metal layer in the presence of a magnetic field—effect of wall electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimopoulos, Dimitrios; Pelekasis, Nikos A.

    2014-10-01

    Rayleigh-Bénard stability of a liquid metal layer of rectangular cross section is examined in the presence of a strong magnetic field that is aligned with the horizontal direction of the cross section. The latter is much longer than the vertical direction and the cross section assumes a large aspect ratio. The side walls are treated as highly conducting. Linear stability analysis is performed allowing for three-dimensional instabilities that develop along the longitudinal direction. The finite element methodology is employed for the discretization of the stability analysis formulation while accounting for the electrical conductivity of the cavity walls. The Arnoldi method provides the dominant eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the problem. In order to facilitate parallel implementation of the numerical solution at large Hartmann numbers, Ha, domain decomposition is employed along the horizontal direction of the cross section. As the Hartmann number increases a real eigenvalue emerges as the dominant unstable eigenmode, signifying the onset of thermal convection, whose major vorticity component in the core of the layer is aligned with the direction of the magnetic field. Its wavelength along the longitudinal direction of the layer is on the order of twice its height and increases as Ha increases. The critical Grashof was obtained for large Ha and it was seen to scale like Ha 2 signifying the balance between buoyancy and Lorentz forces. For well conducting side walls, the nature of the emerging flow pattern is determined by the combined conductivity of Hartmann walls and Hartmann layers, cH + Ha -1. When poor conducting Hartmann walls are considered, cH ≪ 1, the critical eigensolution is characterized by well defined Hartmann and side layers. The side layers are characterized by fast fluid motion in the magnetic field direction as a result of the electromagnetic pumping in the vicinity of the Hartmann walls. Increasing the electrical conductivity of the Hartmann

  19. Intensity modulated optical transmission in a non-linear dielectric environment with an embedded mono-layer transition metal dichalcogenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Parijat; Bellotti, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    We study the optical behavior of an arrangement in which the interface between a linear and non-linear dielectric media is covered by an embedded mono-layer of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC). The optical behavior is qualitatively obtained through transmission and reflection coefficients which are a function of the third order non-linear susceptibility of the Kerr-type dielectric and the inter-band optical conductivity of the TMDC mono-layer. The inter-band optical conductivity of the TMDC mono-layer is calculated using the Kubo formalism from the linear response theory. In particular, we theoretically demonstrate that the optical response of this structure can be switched between the total internal reflection and a normal transmission regime by controlling the intensity of the incident radiation. The reflection and transmission functions are shown to be amenable to further control by altering the inter-band optical conductivity of the embedded TMDC mono-layer. The optical conductivity is directly related to its energy dispersion. We specifically choose two TMDC mono-layers, MoS2 and WSe2, which have nearly identical dispersion parameters apart from a much stronger spin-orbit coupling in the latter. The stronger spin-orbit coupling in WSe2 does not significantly alter the inter-band optical conductivity to manifest as an enhanced reflection spectrum. However, we find that application of an external perturbation such as strain could be effectively used to modulate the overall optical response. We conclude by discussing briefly the phenomenon of optical bistability which arises in materials exhibiting optical non-linearity via an intensity-dependent refractive index.

  20. Electrical characteristics of Au/n-GaAs structures with thin and thick SiO{sub 2} dielectric layer

    SciTech Connect

    Altuntas, H.; Altindal, S.; Corekci, S.; Ozturk, M. K.; Ozcelik, S.

    2011-10-15

    The aim of this study, to explain effects of the SiO{sub 2} insulator layer thickness on the electrical properties of Au/n-GaAs Shottky barrier diodes (SBDs). Thin (60 A) and thick (250 A) SiO{sub 2} insulator layers were deposited on n-type GaAs substrates using the plasma enganced chemical vapour deposition technique. The current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics have been carried out at room temperature. The main electrical parameters, such as ideality factor (n), zero-bias barrier height ({phi}{sub Bo}), series resistance (R{sub s}), leakage current, and interface states (N{sub ss}) for Au/SiO{sub 2}/n-GaAs SBDs have been investigated. Surface morphologies of the SiO{sub 2} dielectric layer was analyzed using atomic force microscopy. The results show that SiO{sub 2} insulator layer thickness very affects the main electrical parameters. Au/n-GaAs SBDs with thick SiO{sub 2} insulator layer have low leakage current level, small ideality factor, and low interface states. Thus, Au/n-GaAs SBDs with thick SiO{sub 2} insulator layer shows better diode characteristics than other.

  1. The role of salt layers in the hangingwall deformation of kinked-planar extensional faults: Insights from 3D analogue models and comparison with the Parentis Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, O.; Roca, E.; Vendeville, B. C.

    2014-12-01

    Using an analogue modelling approach, this work investigates the role played by salt in the hangingwall deformation of an extensional fault. Models' set-up included a wooden block simulating the footwall of different kinked-planar fault geometries flattening at depth. Above these faults, the hangingwall was modelled using only sand or sand overlain by pre- or syn-kinematic silicone putty. Regardless of the stage at which was deposited, the silicone appears as an efficient decoupling level that changes the deformation mode of the overlying sand layers. Above the silicone layers, the rollover panels only continue to develop up to the welding of the underlying silicone. Afterwards, they do not grow anymore and all shearing induced by the underlying fault bends is accommodated along the tilted silicone layer that acts as an extensional shear band. Further fault slip produces near-horizontal growth stratal geometries that can be easily misinterpreted as a syn-rift/post-rift boundary. In addition, the differential sedimentary loading of syn-kinematic layers triggers the upslope silicone flow from the hangingwall depocenters towards the rollover shoulders. This migration results in the formation of silicone welds at the rollover limbs and the growth of gentle silicone-cored anticlines above or near the rollover shoulder that are locally pierced by diapirs and walls. These experimental results fit with the Parentis Basin structure that, formed from the motion of lithosphere-scale kinked-planar extensional faults, includes salt inflated anticlines above their rollover shoulders and an intra-Albian unconformity interpreted now as syn-kinematic.

  2. A model for transition by attachment-line contamination and an examination of cross-flow instability in 3-D boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, I. R.; Poll, D. I. A.

    A model for predicting the development of intermittent turbulence in a boundary layer flow downstream of a large 2-D circular trip on an attachment-line was produced. It gives good predictions of intermittency at any point in the flow. Stability calculations were performed for the Falkner-Skan-Cooke family of boundary layers using linear stability theory. A relationship for the minimum critical Reynolds number and the height of the inflection point in the profile is identified. This correlation gives good agreement with the stability characteristics for boundary layer profiles typical of those occurring on suction wings. A discrepancy in previous empirical relations between skin friction and Reynolds number in fully developed turbulent flow on an attachment-line is discovered. To investigate this an experiment was undertaken using Preston tubes and a Pitot tube with the Clauser Chart method. An accurate correlation of skin friction on an attachment-line was determined from the experimental data. Small diameter Preston tubes underestimate skin friction on an attachment-line to the order of 10 percent which is not inconsistent with a reduction of the effective measurement height, possibly due to vortex shedding in the divergent flow at the mouth of the tube.

  3. Venus in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, J. J.

    1993-08-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  4. 3D reservoir visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Van, B.T.; Pajon, J.L.; Joseph, P. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper shows how some simple 3D computer graphics tools can be combined to provide efficient software for visualizing and analyzing data obtained from reservoir simulators and geological simulations. The animation and interactive capabilities of the software quickly provide a deep understanding of the fluid-flow behavior and an accurate idea of the internal architecture of a reservoir.

  5. Interpenetration of a 3D Icosahedral M@Ni12 (M=Al, Ga) Framework with Porphyrin-Reminiscent Boron Layers in MNi9 B8.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qiang; Wagner, Frank R; Ormeci, Alim; Prots, Yurii; Burkhardt, Ulrich; Schmidt, Marcus; Schnelle, Walter; Grin, Yuri; Leithe-Jasper, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Two ternary borides MNi9 B8 (M=Al, Ga) were synthesized by thermal treatment of mixtures of the elements. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction data reveal AlNi9 B8 and GaNi9 B8 crystallizing in a new type of structure within the space group Cmcm and the lattice parameters a=7.0896(3) Å, b=8.1181(3) Å, c=10.6497(4) Å and a=7.0897(5) Å, b=8.1579(4) Å, c=10.6648(7) Å, respectively. The boron atoms build up two-dimensional layers, which consist of puckered [B16 ] rings with two tailing B atoms, whereas the M atoms reside in distorted vertices-condensed [Ni12 ] icosahedra, which form a three-dimensional framework interpenetrated by boron porphyrin-reminiscent layers. An unusual local arrangement resembling a giant metallo-porphyrin entity is formed by the [B16 ] rings, which, due to their large annular size of approximately 8 Å, chelate four of the twelve icosahedral Ni atoms. An analysis of the chemical bonding by means of the electron localizability approach reveals strong covalent B-B interactions and weak Ni-Ni interactions. Multi-center dative B-Ni interaction occurs between the Al-Ni framework and the boron layers. In agreement with the chemical bonding analysis and band structure calculations, AlNi9 B8 is a Pauli-paramagnetic metal. PMID:26418894

  6. Reduction of aerodynamic friction drag of moving bodies using a Microwave-Dielectric-Barrier-Discharge actuator controlling the boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, Thiery

    2015-11-01

    A new plasma device named M-DBD (Microwave Dielectric Barrier Discharge) is used for controlling the boundary layer in order to reduce the drag force. A compact resonant UHF structure comprising a resonant element in the form of a quarter-wave antenna creates a mini-plasma insulated from the UHF electrodes by mica sheets. Additional electrodes induce an electric field in the plasma and transiently move the ions of the plasma. The high collision rate with the neutral molecules induce the global transient flow of the neutral gas. The temporal variation of the applied electric field is chosen in order to obtain a modification of the local boundary layer. First tests using an array of M-DBD plasma actuators are underway (see Patent ref. WO 2014111469 A1).

  7. Formulation of reduced surface integral equations for the electromagnetic wave scattering from three-dimensional layered dielectric bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciric, I. R.

    2008-08-01

    A reduction procedure is developed for an arbitrarily shaped layered dielectric body using for each interface a single unknown function to which the classical surface electric and magnetic currents are related by some surface operators. These operators and single functions are determined recursively from one interface to the next. This allows us to derive the field everywhere from the solution of a surface integral equation in only one vector function relative to only the interface between the layered body and the source region. Since the reduction operators are independent of the structure of the outside region and of the given field source, and also invariant under translation and rotation, the analysis of the three-dimensional electromagnetic wave scattering and propagation for systems of multilayered or/and multiply nested dielectric bodies based on reduced single integral equations is substantially more efficient than that based on existing coupled integral equation formulations using electric and magnetic currents on all the interfaces, especially for configurations with identical such bodies arbitrarily located and oriented with respect to each other.

  8. High-Tc superconducting rectangular microstrip patch covered with a dielectric layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedra, Sami; Fortaki, Tarek

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a full-wave method to calculate the resonant characteristics of rectangular microstrip antenna with and without dielectric cover, to explain the difference of performance with temperature between superconducting and normal conducting antenna. Especially the characteristics of high temperature superconducting (HTS) antenna were almost ideal around the critical temperature (Tc). The dyadic Green's functions of the considered structure are efficiently determined in the vector Fourier transform domain. The effect of the superconductivity of the patch is taken into account using the concept of the complex resistive boundary condition. The computed results are found to be in good agreement with results obtained using other methods. Also, the effects of the superstrate on the resonant frequency and bandwidth of rectangular microstrip patch in a substrate-superstrate configuration are investigated. This type of configuration can be used for wider bandwidth by proper selection of superstrate thickness and its dielectric constants.

  9. Electronic, Mechanical, and Dielectric Properties of Two-Dimensional Atomic Layers of Noble Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, Pooja; Kumar, Jagdish; Kumar, Arun; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2016-08-01

    We present density functional theory-based electronic, mechanical, and dielectric properties of monolayers and bilayers of noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu, and Pt) taken with graphene-like hexagonal structure. The Au, Ag, and Pt bilayers stabilize in AA-stacked configuration, while the Cu bilayer favors the AB stacking pattern. The quantum ballistic conductance of the noble-metal mono- and bilayers is remarkably increased compared with their bulk counterparts. Among the studied systems, the tensile strength is found to be highest for the Pt monolayer and bilayer. The noble metals in mono- and bilayer form show distinctly different electron energy loss spectra and reflectance spectra due to the quantum confinement effect on going from bulk to the monolayer limit. Such tunability of the electronic and dielectric properties of noble metals by reducing the degrees of freedom of electrons offers promise for their use in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics applications.

  10. Effect of Carbon in the Dielectric Fluid and Workpieces on the Characteristics of Recast Layers Machined by Electrical Discharge Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muttamara, Apiwat; Kanchanomai, Chaosuan

    2016-06-01

    Electrical discharge machining (EDM) is a popular non-traditional machining technique that is usually performed in kerosene. Carbon from the kerosene is mixed into the recast layer during EDM, increasing its hardness. EDM can be performed in deionized water, which causes decarburization. We studied the effects of carbon in the dielectric fluid and workpiece on the characteristics of recast layers. Experiments were conducted using gray cast iron and mild steel workpieces in deionized water or kerosene under identical operating conditions. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the recast layer formed on gray iron was rougher than that produced on mild steel. Moreover, the dispersion of graphite flakes in the gray iron seemed to cause subsurface cracks, even when EDM was performed in deionized water. Dendritic structures and iron carbides were found in the recast layer of gray iron treated in deionized water. Kerosene caused more microcracks to form and increased surface roughness compared with deionized water. The microcrack length per unit area of mild steel treated in deionized water was greater than that treated in kerosene, but the cracks formed in kerosene were wider. The effect of the diffusion of carbon during cooling on the characteristics of the recast layer was discussed.

  11. Precise Measurement of the Thickness of a Dielectric Layer on a Metal Surface by Use of a Modified Otto Optical Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneoka, Yoshiki; Nishigaki, Kentaro; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Iwata, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    We propose a modified method for thickness measurement of a dielectric coating layer on metal based on Otto optical configuration (O-configuration). This method enables us to estimate the coating thickness that typically ranges from several tens of nanometers to more than one micrometer with precision less than a few nanometers. The common method to measure the thickness of dielectric coating layer is to utilize the frustrated total-internal reflection. In order to measure the thickness of several tens of nanometers, one can apply the surface-plasmon-resonance (SPR) phenomenon generated by the p-polarized light. For thickness larger than one hundred nanometers, a metal-clad leaky-waveguide (MCLW) mode generated by the p- or the s-polarized light can be employed without significant changes to the optical setup. The numerical and experimental verifications of the modified O-configuration reveals its effectiveness for precise measurement of moderately-thick dielectric coating layer on the metal.

  12. 3D rapid mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaksson, Folke; Borg, Johan; Haglund, Leif

    2008-04-01

    In this paper the performance of passive range measurement imaging using stereo technique in real time applications is described. Stereo vision uses multiple images to get depth resolution in a similar way as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) uses multiple measurements to obtain better spatial resolution. This technique has been used in photogrammetry for a long time but it will be shown that it is now possible to do the calculations, with carefully designed image processing algorithms, in e.g. a PC in real time. In order to get high resolution and quantitative data in the stereo estimation a mathematical camera model is used. The parameters to the camera model are settled in a calibration rig or in the case of a moving camera the scene itself can be used for calibration of most of the parameters. After calibration an ordinary TV camera has an angular resolution like a theodolite, but to a much lower price. The paper will present results from high resolution 3D imagery from air to ground. The 3D-results from stereo calculation of image pairs are stitched together into a large database to form a 3D-model of the area covered.

  13. Resonant dielectric metamaterials

    DOEpatents

    Loui, Hung; Carroll, James; Clem, Paul G; Sinclair, Michael B

    2014-12-02

    A resonant dielectric metamaterial comprises a first and a second set of dielectric scattering particles (e.g., spheres) having different permittivities arranged in a cubic array. The array can be an ordered or randomized array of particles. The resonant dielectric metamaterials are low-loss 3D isotropic materials with negative permittivity and permeability. Such isotropic double negative materials offer polarization and direction independent electromagnetic wave propagation.

  14. 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jia; Yao, Hai; Mei, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims to fabricate functional tissue for applications in regenerative medicine and drug testing. More recently, 3D printing has shown great promise in tissue fabrication with a structural control from micro- to macro-scale by using a layer-by-layer approach. Whether through scaffold-based or scaffold-free approaches, the standard for 3D printed tissue engineering constructs is to provide a biomimetic structural environment that facilitates tissue formation and promotes host tissue integration (e.g., cellular infiltration, vascularization, and active remodeling). This review will cover several approaches that have advanced the field of 3D printing through novel fabrication methods of tissue engineering constructs. It will also discuss the applications of synthetic and natural materials for 3D printing facilitated tissue fabrication. PMID:26869728

  15. Accurate characterization and understanding of interface trap density trends between atomic layer deposited dielectrics and AlGaN/GaN with bonding constraint theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanan, Narayanan; Lee, Bongmook; Misra, Veena

    2015-06-15

    Many dielectrics have been proposed for the gate stack or passivation of AlGaN/GaN based metal oxide semiconductor heterojunction field effect transistors, to reduce gate leakage and current collapse, both for power and RF applications. Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is preferred for dielectric deposition as it provides uniform, conformal, and high quality films with precise monolayer control of film thickness. Identification of the optimum ALD dielectric for the gate stack or passivation requires a critical investigation of traps created at the dielectric/AlGaN interface. In this work, a pulsed-IV traps characterization method has been used for accurate characterization of interface traps with a variety of ALD dielectrics. High-k dielectrics (HfO{sub 2}, HfAlO, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) are found to host a high density of interface traps with AlGaN. In contrast, ALD SiO{sub 2} shows the lowest interface trap density (<2 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2}) after annealing above 600 °C in N{sub 2} for 60 s. The trend in observed trap densities is subsequently explained with bonding constraint theory, which predicts a high density of interface traps due to a higher coordination state and bond strain in high-k dielectrics.

  16. Taming supersymmetric defects in 3d-3d correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Dongmin; Kim, Nakwoo; Romo, Mauricio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-07-01

    We study knots in 3d Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group {SL}(N,{{C}}), in the context of its relation with 3d { N }=2 theory (the so-called 3d-3d correspondence). The defect has either co-dimension 2 or co-dimension 4 inside the 6d (2,0) theory, which is compactified on a 3-manifold \\hat{M}. We identify such defects in various corners of the 3d-3d correspondence, namely in 3d {SL}(N,{{C}}) CS theory, in 3d { N }=2 theory, in 5d { N }=2 super Yang-Mills theory, and in the M-theory holographic dual. We can make quantitative checks of the 3d-3d correspondence by computing partition functions at each of these theories. This Letter is a companion to a longer paper [1], which contains more details and more results.

  17. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  18. Dielectric Genome of van der Waals Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kirsten; Latini, Simone; Thygesen, Kristian S

    2015-07-01

    Vertical stacking of two-dimensional (2D) crystals, such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride, has recently lead to a new class of materials known as van der Waals heterostructures (vdWHs) with unique and highly tunable electronic properties. Ab initio calculations should in principle provide a powerful tool for modeling and guiding the design of vdWHs, but in their traditional form such calculations are only feasible for commensurable structures with a few layers. Here we show that the dielectric properties of realistic, incommensurable vdWHs comprising hundreds of layers can be efficiently calculated using a multiscale approach where the dielectric functions of the individual layers (the dielectric building blocks) are computed ab initio and coupled together via the long-range Coulomb interaction. We use the method to illustrate the 2D-3D transition of the dielectric function of multilayer MoS2 crystals, the hybridization of quantum plasmons in thick graphene/hBN heterostructures, and to demonstrate the intricate effect of substrate screening on the non-Rydberg exciton series in supported WS2. The dielectric building blocks for a variety of 2D crystals are available in an open database together with the software for solving the coupled electrodynamic equations.

  19. GaN MOS-HEMT Using Ultra-Thin Al2O3 Dielectric Grown by Atomic Layer Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yuan-Zheng; Hao, Yue; Feng, Qian; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Ma, Xiao-Hua; Ni, Jin-Yu

    2007-08-01

    We report a GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor high electron mobility transistor (MOS-HEMT) with atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 gate dielectric. Based on the previous work [Appl. Phys. Lett. 86 (2005) 063501] of Ye et al. by decreasing the thickness of the gate oxide to 3.5 nm and optimizing the device fabrication process, the device with maximum transconductance of 150 mS/mm is produced and discussed in comparison with the result of 100 mS/mm of Ye et al. The corresponding drain current density in the 0.8-μm-gate-length MOS-HEMT is 800 mA/mm at the gate bias of 3.0 V. The gate leakage is two orders of magnitude lower than that of the conventional AlGaN/GaN HEMT. The excellent characteristics of this novel MOS-HEMT device structure with ALD Al2O3 gate dielectric are presented.

  20. Research of the recast layer on implant surface modified by micro-current electrical discharge machining using deionized water mixed with titanium powder as dielectric solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sung-Long; Lin, Ming-Hong; Huang, Guo-Xin; Wang, Chia-Ching

    2014-08-01

    Surface modification of Ti using micro-current electrical discharge machining (MC-EDM) technology at various working parameters was conducted in the present study. A significant decrease in amount of surface cracks for modified Ti in deionized water mixed with concentration of 3 g/l Ti powder dielectric solvent was determined. Increasing the concentration of Ti powder to 6 g/l, no micro-cracks were observed on the modified Ti surfaces at current 0.1 A for short-pulse durations (≤50 μs). Moreover, the thickness of the recast layer increases with increasing current, pulse duration and concentration. Under the same working parameters, the thickness of recast layers on modified Ti enhances to approximately 4-11 μm in the concentration of 6 g/l Ti powder dielectric solvent. When Ti modified at different working parameters in deionized water mixed with Ti powder dielectric solvent, the TiO phase was observed within the recast layers. It was found that the modified Ti at current 0.1 A for 30 μs and 50 μs in a 6 g/l concentration of Ti powder dielectric solvent generates a hydrophilicity surface. Therefore, adding a suitable concentration of Ti powder into the dielectric solvent not only prevent the formation of surface cracks and micro-cracks, but also raise the wettability on the surfaces of Ti during MC-EDM modifications.

  1. Vacuum ultraviolet photochemical selective area atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Chalker, P. R. Marshall, P. A.; Dawson, K.; Brunell, I. F.; Sutcliffe, C. J.; Potter, R. J.

    2015-01-15

    We report the photochemical atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films and the use of this process to achieve area-selective film deposition. A shuttered vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source is used to excite molecular oxygen and trimethyl aluminum to deposit films at 60°C. In-situ QCM and post-deposition ellipsometric measurements both show that the deposition rate is saturative as a function of irradiation time. Selective area deposition was achieved by projecting the VUV light through a metalized magnesium fluoride photolithographic mask and the selectivity of deposition on the illuminated and masked regions of the substrate is a logarithmic function of the UV exposure time. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films exhibit dielectric constants of 8 – 10 at 1 MHz after forming gas annealing, similar to films deposited by conventional thermal ALD.

  2. Contact-free sheet resistance determination of large area graphene layers by an open dielectric loaded microwave cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Shaforost, O.; Wang, K.; Adabi, M.; Guo, Z.; Hanham, S.; Klein, N.; Goniszewski, S.; Gallop, J.; Hao, L.

    2015-01-14

    A method for contact-free determination of the sheet resistance of large-area and arbitrary shaped wafers or sheets coated with graphene and other (semi) conducting ultrathin layers is described, which is based on an open dielectric loaded microwave cavity. The sample under test is exposed to the evanescent resonant field outside the cavity. A comparison with a closed cavity configuration revealed that radiation losses have no significant influence of the experimental results. Moreover, the microwave sheet resistance results show good agreement with the dc conductivity determined by four-probe van der Pauw measurements on a set of CVD samples transferred on quartz. As an example of a practical application, correlations between the sheet resistance and deposition conditions for CVD graphene transferred on quartz wafers are described. Our method has a high potential as measurement standard for contact-free sheet resistance measurement and mapping of large area graphene samples.

  3. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  4. Recent developments in DFD (depth-fused 3D) display and arc 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suyama, Shiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu

    2015-05-01

    We will report our recent developments in DFD (Depth-fused 3D) display and arc 3D display, both of which have smooth movement parallax. Firstly, fatigueless DFD display, composed of only two layered displays with a gap, has continuous perceived depth by changing luminance ratio between two images. Two new methods, called "Edge-based DFD display" and "Deep DFD display", have been proposed in order to solve two severe problems of viewing angle and perceived depth limitations. Edge-based DFD display, layered by original 2D image and its edge part with a gap, can expand the DFD viewing angle limitation both in 2D and 3D perception. Deep DFD display can enlarge the DFD image depth by modulating spatial frequencies of front and rear images. Secondly, Arc 3D display can provide floating 3D images behind or in front of the display by illuminating many arc-shaped directional scattering sources, for example, arcshaped scratches on a flat board. Curved Arc 3D display, composed of many directional scattering sources on a curved surface, can provide a peculiar 3D image, for example, a floating image in the cylindrical bottle. The new active device has been proposed for switching arc 3D images by using the tips of dual-frequency liquid-crystal prisms as directional scattering sources. Directional scattering can be switched on/off by changing liquid-crystal refractive index, resulting in switching of arc 3D image.

  5. The effects of Bi4Ti3O12 interfacial ferroelectric layer on the dielectric properties of Au/n-Si structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gökçen, Muharrem; Yıldırım, Mert

    2015-06-01

    Au/n-Si metal-semiconductor (MS) and Au/Bi4Ti3O12/n-Si metal-ferroelectric-semiconductor (MFS) structures were fabricated and admittance measurements were held between 5 kHz and 1 MHz at room temperature so that dielectric properties of these structures could be investigated. The ferroelectric interfacial layer Bi4Ti3O12 decreased the polarization voltage by providing permanent dipoles at metal/semiconductor interface. Depending on different mechanisms, dispersion behavior was observed in dielectric constant, dielectric loss and loss tangent versus bias voltage plots of both MS and MFS structures. The real and imaginary parts of complex modulus of MFS structure take smaller values than those of MS structure, because permanent dipoles in ferroelectric layer cause a large spontaneous polarization mechanism. While the dispersion in AC conductivity versus frequency plots of MS structure was observed at high frequencies, for MFS structure it was observed at lower frequencies.

  6. Thermally-induced single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations from a 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer to a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Fan, Rui Qing; Wang, Xin Ming; Wei, Li Guo; Song, Yang; Du, Xi; Xing, Kai; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yu Lin

    2016-07-28

    In this work, a rare 2D → 3D single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation (SCSC) is observed in metal-organic coordination complexes, which is triggered by thermal treatment. The 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer [Cd(IBA)2]n (1) is irreversibly converted into a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework {[Cd(IBA)2(H2O)]·2.5H2O}n (2) (HIBA = 4-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)benzoic acid). Consideration is given to these two complexes with different interpenetrating structures and dimensionality, and their influence on photovoltaic properties are studied. Encouraged by the UV-visible absorption and HOMO-LUMO energy states matched for sensitizing TiO2, the two complexes are employed in combination with N719 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) to compensate absorption in the ultraviolet and blue-violet region, offset competitive visible light absorption of I3(-) and reducing charge the recombination of injected electrons. After co-sensitization with 1 and 2, the device co-sensitized by 1/N719 and 2/N719 to yield overall efficiencies of 7.82% and 8.39%, which are 19.94% and 28.68% higher than that of the device sensitized only by N719 (6.52%). Consequently, high dimensional interpenetrating complexes could serve as excellent co-sensitizers and have application in DSSCs. PMID:27356177

  7. Thermally-induced single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations from a 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer to a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Fan, Rui Qing; Wang, Xin Ming; Wei, Li Guo; Song, Yang; Du, Xi; Xing, Kai; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yu Lin

    2016-07-28

    In this work, a rare 2D → 3D single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation (SCSC) is observed in metal-organic coordination complexes, which is triggered by thermal treatment. The 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer [Cd(IBA)2]n (1) is irreversibly converted into a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework {[Cd(IBA)2(H2O)]·2.5H2O}n (2) (HIBA = 4-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)benzoic acid). Consideration is given to these two complexes with different interpenetrating structures and dimensionality, and their influence on photovoltaic properties are studied. Encouraged by the UV-visible absorption and HOMO-LUMO energy states matched for sensitizing TiO2, the two complexes are employed in combination with N719 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) to compensate absorption in the ultraviolet and blue-violet region, offset competitive visible light absorption of I3(-) and reducing charge the recombination of injected electrons. After co-sensitization with 1 and 2, the device co-sensitized by 1/N719 and 2/N719 to yield overall efficiencies of 7.82% and 8.39%, which are 19.94% and 28.68% higher than that of the device sensitized only by N719 (6.52%). Consequently, high dimensional interpenetrating complexes could serve as excellent co-sensitizers and have application in DSSCs.

  8. Three-dimensional patterns in dielectric barrier discharge with "H" shaped gas gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xing; Dong, Lifang; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Ying; Liu, Weibo; Fan, Weili; Pan, Yuyang

    2016-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) patterns are obtained for the first time in dielectric barrier discharge by a special designed device with "H" shaped gas gap which consists of a single gas layer gap and two double gas layer gaps. Three dimensional spatiotemporal characteristics of discharge are investigated by photomultiplier and intensified charge-coupled device camera. Results show that the discharge first generates in the single gas layer gap and the coupled filaments in the double gas layer gap present the simultaneity characteristics. The formation of 3D patterns is determined by the distribution of the effective field of the applied field and the wall charge field.

  9. 3D acoustic atmospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Finn, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a method for tomographically reconstructing spatially varying 3D atmospheric temperature profiles and wind velocity fields based. Measurements of the acoustic signature measured onboard a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) are compared to ground-based observations of the same signals. The frequency-shifted signal variations are then used to estimate the acoustic propagation delay between the UAV and the ground microphones, which are also affected by atmospheric temperature and wind speed vectors along each sound ray path. The wind and temperature profiles are modelled as the weighted sum of Radial Basis Functions (RBFs), which also allow local meteorological measurements made at the UAV and ground receivers to supplement any acoustic observations. Tomography is used to provide a full 3D reconstruction/visualisation of the observed atmosphere. The technique offers observational mobility under direct user control and the capacity to monitor hazardous atmospheric environments, otherwise not justifiable on the basis of cost or risk. This paper summarises the tomographic technique and reports on the results of simulations and initial field trials. The technique has practical applications for atmospheric research, sound propagation studies, boundary layer meteorology, air pollution measurements, analysis of wind shear, and wind farm surveys.

  10. Effect of gold subsurface layer on the surface activity and segregation in Pt/Au/Pt3M (where M = 3d transition metals) alloy catalyst from first-principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Eun; Lim, Dong-Hee; Jang, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Juhn; Yoon, Sung Pil; Han, Jonghee; Nam, Suk Woo; Hong, Seong-Ahn; Soon, Aloysius; Ham, Hyung Chul

    2015-01-01

    The effect of a subsurface hetero layer (thin gold) on the activity and stability of Pt skin surface in Pt3M system (M = 3d transition metals) is investigated using the spin-polarized density functional theory calculation. First, we find that the heterometallic interaction between the Pt skin surface and the gold subsurface in Pt/Au/Pt3M system can significantly modify the electronic structure of the Pt skin surface. In particular, the local density of states projected onto the d states of Pt skin surface near the Fermi level is drastically decreased compared to the Pt/Pt/Pt3M case, leading to the reduction of the oxygen binding strength of the Pt skin surface. This modification is related to the increase of surface charge polarization of outmost Pt skin atoms by the electron transfer from the gold subsurface atoms. Furthermore, a subsurface gold layer is found to cast the energetic barrier to the segregation loss of metal atoms from the bulk (inside) region, which can enhance the durability of Pt3M based catalytic system in oxygen reduction condition at fuel cell devices. This study highlights that a gold subsurface hetero layer can provide an additional mean to tune the surface activity toward oxygen species and in turn the oxygen reduction reaction, where the utilization of geometric strain already reaches its practical limit.

  11. Effect of gold subsurface layer on the surface activity and segregation in Pt/Au/Pt{sub 3}M (where M = 3d transition metals) alloy catalyst from first-principles

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang-Eun; Lim, Dong-Hee; Jang, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Juhn; Yoon, Sung Pil; Han, Jonghee; Nam, Suk Woo; Hong, Seong-Ahn; Soon, Aloysius E-mail: hchahm@kist.re.kr; Ham, Hyung Chul E-mail: hchahm@kist.re.kr

    2015-01-21

    The effect of a subsurface hetero layer (thin gold) on the activity and stability of Pt skin surface in Pt{sub 3}M system (M = 3d transition metals) is investigated using the spin-polarized density functional theory calculation. First, we find that the heterometallic interaction between the Pt skin surface and the gold subsurface in Pt/Au/Pt{sub 3}M system can significantly modify the electronic structure of the Pt skin surface. In particular, the local density of states projected onto the d states of Pt skin surface near the Fermi level is drastically decreased compared to the Pt/Pt/Pt{sub 3}M case, leading to the reduction of the oxygen binding strength of the Pt skin surface. This modification is related to the increase of surface charge polarization of outmost Pt skin atoms by the electron transfer from the gold subsurface atoms. Furthermore, a subsurface gold layer is found to cast the energetic barrier to the segregation loss of metal atoms from the bulk (inside) region, which can enhance the durability of Pt{sub 3}M based catalytic system in oxygen reduction condition at fuel cell devices. This study highlights that a gold subsurface hetero layer can provide an additional mean to tune the surface activity toward oxygen species and in turn the oxygen reduction reaction, where the utilization of geometric strain already reaches its practical limit.

  12. Surface participation and dielectric loss in superconducting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Axline, C.; Gao, Y. Y.; Brecht, T.; Chu, Y.; Frunzio, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2015-10-01

    We study the energy relaxation times (T1) of superconducting transmon qubits in 3D cavities as a function of dielectric participation ratios of material surfaces. This surface participation ratio, representing the fraction of electric field energy stored in a dissipative surface layer, is computed by a two-step finite-element simulation and experimentally varied by qubit geometry. With a clean electromagnetic environment and suppressed non-equilibrium quasiparticle density, we find an approximately proportional relation between the transmon relaxation rates and surface participation ratios. These results suggest dielectric dissipation arising from material interfaces is the major limiting factor for the T1 of transmons in 3D circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture. Our analysis also supports the notion of spatial discreteness of surface dielectric dissipation.

  13. Surface participation and dielectric loss in superconducting qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Axline, C.; Gao, Y. Y.; Brecht, T.; Chu, Y.; Frunzio, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2015-10-19

    We study the energy relaxation times (T{sub 1}) of superconducting transmon qubits in 3D cavities as a function of dielectric participation ratios of material surfaces. This surface participation ratio, representing the fraction of electric field energy stored in a dissipative surface layer, is computed by a two-step finite-element simulation and experimentally varied by qubit geometry. With a clean electromagnetic environment and suppressed non-equilibrium quasiparticle density, we find an approximately proportional relation between the transmon relaxation rates and surface participation ratios. These results suggest dielectric dissipation arising from material interfaces is the major limiting factor for the T{sub 1} of transmons in 3D circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture. Our analysis also supports the notion of spatial discreteness of surface dielectric dissipation.

  14. Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, David M.; Sampayan, Stephen; Slenes, Kirk; Stoller, H. M.

    2009-11-10

    A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

  15. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  16. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This area of terrain near the Sagan Memorial Station was taken on Sol 3 by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.' It stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  17. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  18. Controllable Threshold Voltage in Organic Complementary Logic Circuits with an Electron-Trapping Polymer and Photoactive Gate Dielectric Layer.

    PubMed

    Dao, Toan Thanh; Sakai, Heisuke; Nguyen, Hai Thanh; Ohkubo, Kei; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Murata, Hideyuki

    2016-07-20

    We present controllable and reliable complementary organic transistor circuits on a PET substrate using a photoactive dielectric layer of 6-[4'-(N,N-diphenylamino)phenyl]-3-ethoxycarbonylcoumarin (DPA-CM) doped into poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and an electron-trapping layer of poly(perfluoroalkenyl vinyl ether) (Cytop). Cu was used for a source/drain electrode in both the p-channel and n-channel transistors. The threshold voltage of the transistors and the inverting voltage of the circuits were reversibly controlled over a wide range under a program voltage of less than 10 V and under UV light irradiation. At a program voltage of -2 V, the inverting voltage of the circuits was tuned to be at nearly half of the supply voltage of the circuit. Consequently, an excellent balance between the high and low noise margins (NM) was produced (64% of NMH and 68% of NML), resulting in maximum noise immunity. Furthermore, the programmed circuits showed high stability, such as a retention time of over 10(5) s for the inverter switching voltage. Our findings bring about a flexible, simple way to obtain robust, high-performance organic circuits using a controllable complementary transistor inverter. PMID:27348479

  19. Effect of gradient dielectric coefficient in a functionally graded material (FGM) substrate on the propagation behavior of love waves in an FGM-piezoelectric layered structure.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaoshan; Shi, Junping; Jin, Feng

    2012-06-01

    The propagation behavior of Love waves in a layered structure that includes a functionally graded material (FGM) substrate carrying a piezoelectric thin film is investigated. Analytical solutions are obtained for both constant and gradient dielectric coefficients in the FGM substrate. Numerical results show that the gradient dielectric coefficient decreases phase velocity in any mode, and the electromechanical coupling factor significantly increases in the first- and secondorder modes. In some modes, the difference in Love waves' phase velocity between these two types of structure might be more than 1%, resulting in significant differences in frequency of the surface acoustic wave devices.

  20. Hydrogen bond network in the hydration layer of the water confined in nanotubes increasing the dielectric constant parallel along the nanotube axis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenpeng; Zhao, Hongwei

    2015-09-21

    The water confined in nanotubes has been extensively studied, because of the potential usages in drug delivery and desalination. The radial distribution of the dielectric constant parallel along the nanotube axis was obtained by molecular dynamics simulations in a carbon nanotube and a nanotube with a very small van der Waals potential. The confined water was divided into two parts, the middle part water and the hydration water. In both cases, the hydrogen bond orientation of the middle water is isotropic, while the hydrogen bonds in hydration layers are apt to parallel along the nanotube axis. Therefore, the hydration water has higher dipole correlations increasing the dielectric constant along the nanotube axis.

  1. Innovations in 3D printing: a 3D overview from optics to organs.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Carl; van Langeveld, Mark C; Donoso, Larry A

    2014-02-01

    3D printing is a method of manufacturing in which materials, such as plastic or metal, are deposited onto one another in layers to produce a three dimensional object, such as a pair of eye glasses or other 3D objects. This process contrasts with traditional ink-based printers which produce a two dimensional object (ink on paper). To date, 3D printing has primarily been used in engineering to create engineering prototypes. However, recent advances in printing materials have now enabled 3D printers to make objects that are comparable with traditionally manufactured items. In contrast with conventional printers, 3D printing has the potential to enable mass customisation of goods on a large scale and has relevance in medicine including ophthalmology. 3D printing has already been proved viable in several medical applications including the manufacture of eyeglasses, custom prosthetic devices and dental implants. In this review, we discuss the potential for 3D printing to revolutionise manufacturing in the same way as the printing press revolutionised conventional printing. The applications and limitations of 3D printing are discussed; the production process is demonstrated by producing a set of eyeglass frames from 3D blueprints. PMID:24288392

  2. Innovations in 3D printing: a 3D overview from optics to organs.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Carl; van Langeveld, Mark C; Donoso, Larry A

    2014-02-01

    3D printing is a method of manufacturing in which materials, such as plastic or metal, are deposited onto one another in layers to produce a three dimensional object, such as a pair of eye glasses or other 3D objects. This process contrasts with traditional ink-based printers which produce a two dimensional object (ink on paper). To date, 3D printing has primarily been used in engineering to create engineering prototypes. However, recent advances in printing materials have now enabled 3D printers to make objects that are comparable with traditionally manufactured items. In contrast with conventional printers, 3D printing has the potential to enable mass customisation of goods on a large scale and has relevance in medicine including ophthalmology. 3D printing has already been proved viable in several medical applications including the manufacture of eyeglasses, custom prosthetic devices and dental implants. In this review, we discuss the potential for 3D printing to revolutionise manufacturing in the same way as the printing press revolutionised conventional printing. The applications and limitations of 3D printing are discussed; the production process is demonstrated by producing a set of eyeglass frames from 3D blueprints.

  3. Atomic layer deposition of ZrO2 as gate dielectrics for AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor high electron mobility transistors on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, G.; Wang, H.; Arulkumaran, S.; Ng, G. I.; Hofstetter, R.; Li, Y.; Anand, M. J.; Ang, K. S.; Maung, Y. K. T.; Foo, S. C.

    2013-09-01

    In this Letter, the device performance of AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor high electron mobility transistors (MISHEMTs) on silicon substrate using 10-nm-thick atomic-layer-deposited ZrO2 as gate dielectrics is reported. The ZrO2 AlGaN/GaN MISHEMTs showed improved maximum drain current density (Idmax) with high peak transconductance (gmmax) as comparison to Schottky-barrier-gate HEMTs (SB-HEMTs). Also compared to SB-HEMTs, reverse gate leakage current was four orders of magnitude lower and forward gate bias extended to +7.4 V. At energy from -0.29 eV to -0.36 eV, low interface trap state density evaluated by AC conductance and "Hi-Lo frequency" methods indicates good quality of atomic-layer-deposited ZrO2 dielectric layer.

  4. DNA-base guanine as hydrogen getter and charge-trapping layer embedded in oxide dielectrics for inorganic and organic field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junyeong; Park, Ji Hoon; Lee, Young Tack; Jeon, Pyo Jin; Lee, Hee Sung; Nam, Seung Hee; Yi, Yeonjin; Lee, Younjoo; Im, Seongil

    2014-04-01

    DNA-base small molecules of guanine, cytosine, adenine, and thymine construct the DNA double helix structure with hydrogen bonding, and they possess such a variety of intrinsic benefits as natural plentitude, biodegradability, biofunctionality, low cost, and low toxicity. On the basis of these advantages, here, we report on unprecedented useful applications of guanine layer as hydrogen getter and charge trapping layer when it is embedded into a dielectric oxide of n-channel inorganic InGaZnO and p-channel organic heptazole field effect transistors (FETs). The embedded guanine layer much improved the gate stability of inorganic FETs gettering many hydrogen atoms in the gate dielectric layer of FET, and it also played as charge trapping layer to which the voltage pulse-driven charges might be injected from channel, resulting in a threshold voltage (Vth) shift of FETs. Such shift state is very ambient-stable and almost irrevocable even under a high electric-field at room temperature. So, Boolean logics are nicely demonstrated by using our FETs with the guanine-embedded dielectric. The original Vth is recovered only under high energy blue photons by opposite voltage pulse (charge-ejection), which indicates that our device is also applicable to nonvolatile photo memory.

  5. New coordination polymers from 1D chain, 2D layer to 3D framework constructed from 1,2-phenylenediacetic acid and 1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane flexible ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Xin Lingyun; Liu Guangzhen; Wang Liya

    2011-06-15

    The hydrothermal reactions of Cd, Zn, or Cu(II) acetate salts with H{sub 2}PHDA and BPP flexible ligands afford three new coordination polymers, including [Cd(PHDA)(BPP)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n}(1), [Zn(PHDA)(BPP)]{sub n}(2), and [Cu{sub 2}(PHDA){sub 2}(BPP)]{sub n}(3) (H{sub 2}PHDA=1,2-phenylenediacetic acid, BPP=1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane). The single-crystal X-ray diffractions reveal that all three complexes feature various metal carboxylate subunits extended further by the BPP ligands to form a diverse range of structures, displaying a remarked structural sensitivity to metal(II) cation. Complex 1 containing PHDA-bridged binuclear cadmium generates 1D double-stranded chain, complex 2 results in 2D{yields}2D interpenetrated (4,4) grids, and complex 3 displays a 3D self-penetrated framework with 4{sup 8}6{sup 6}8 rob topology. In addition, fluorescent analyses show that both 1 and 2 exhibit intense blue-violet photoluminescence in the solid state. - Graphical Abstract: We show diverse supramolecular frameworks based on the same ligands (PHDA and BPP) and different metal acetate salts including 1D double-stranded chain, 2D {yields} 2D twofold interpenetrated layer, and 3D self-penetration networks. Highlights: > Three metal(II = 2 /* ROMAN ) coordination polymers were synthesized using H{sub 2}PHDA and BPP. > The diversity of structures show a remarked sensitivity to metal(II) center. > Complexes show the enhancement of fluorescence compared to that of free ligand.

  6. Studies of plasmonic hot-spot translation by a metal-dielectric layered superlens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoreson, Mark D.; Nielsen, Rasmus B.; West, Paul R.; Kriesch, Arian; Liu, Zhengtong; Fang, Jieran; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Peschel, Ulf; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2011-10-01

    We have studied the ability of a lamellar near-field superlens to transfer an enhanced electromagnetic field to the far side of the lens. In this work, we have experimentally and numerically investigated superlensing in the visible range. By using the resonant hot-spot field enhancements from optical nanoantennas as sources, we investigated the translation of these sources to the far side of a layered silver-silica superlens operating in the canalization regime. Using near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM), we have observed evidence of superlens-enabled enhanced-field translation at a wavelength of about 680 nm. Specifically, we discuss our recent experimental and simulation results on the translation of hot spots using a silver-silica layered superlens design. We compare the experimental results with our numerical simulations and discuss the perspectives and limitations of our approach.

  7. Fabrication of BaTiO3-Based Dielectrics for Ultrathin-Layer Multilayer Ceramic Capacitor Application by a Modified Coating Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhibin; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Yichi; Song, Tae-Ho; Hur, Kang Heon; Li, Longtu

    2011-02-01

    The development of multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) with base metal electrode (BME) requires precise controlling of the microstructure in a very thin dielectric layer (<1 µm). In this paper, a modified coating approach for high coverage of BaTiO3 powder for further MLCC application has been developed. The well dispersed and coated BaTiO3 powders are prepared and the relative mechanism has been discussed. Furthermore, the ultrafine grained X7R dielectric ceramics were produced by both conventional mixing and modified coating methods. Compared with the conventional mixing method, the ceramics prepared by the coating approach exhibited better TCC (the temperature coefficient of capacitance) performance, with dielectric constant over 2000 and grain size below 150 nm. In addition, it is found through the coating method the content of additives can be reduced to a relatively smaller amount than that required in conventional mixing method.

  8. Magnetic Properties of 3D Printed Toroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollig, Lindsey; Otto, Austin; Hilpisch, Peter; Mowry, Greg; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany; Renewable Energy; Alternatives Lab (REAL) Team

    Transformers are ubiquitous in electronics today. Although toroidal geometries perform most efficiently, transformers are traditionally made with rectangular cross-sections due to the lower manufacturing costs. Additive manufacturing techniques (3D printing) can easily achieve toroidal geometries by building up a part through a series of 2D layers. To get strong magnetic properties in a 3D printed transformer, a composite filament is used containing Fe dispersed in a polymer matrix. How the resulting 3D printed toroid responds to a magnetic field depends on two structural factors of the printed 2D layers: fill factor (planar density) and fill pattern. In this work, we investigate how the fill factor and fill pattern affect the magnetic properties of 3D printed toroids. The magnetic properties of the printed toroids are measured by a custom circuit that produces a hysteresis loop for each toroid. Toroids with various fill factors and fill patterns are compared to determine how these two factors can affect the magnetic field the toroid can produce. These 3D printed toroids can be used for numerous applications in order to increase the efficiency of transformers by making it possible for manufacturers to make a toroidal geometry.

  9. Low-frequency dielectric properties of intrinsic and Al-doped rutile TiO2 thin films grown by the atomic layer deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassmi, M.; Pointet, J.; Gonon, P.; Bsiesy, A.; Vallée, C.; Jomni, F.

    2016-06-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy is carried out for intrinsic and aluminum-doped TiO2 rutile films which are deposited on RuO2 by the atomic layer deposition technique. Capacitance and conductance are measured in the 0.1 Hz-100 kHz range, for ac electric fields up to 1 MVrms/cm. Intrinsic films have a much lower dielectric constant than rutile crystals. This is ascribed to the presence of oxygen vacancies which depress polarizability. When Al is substituted for Ti, the dielectric constant further decreases. By considering Al-induced modification of polarizability, a theoretical relationship between the dielectric constant and the Al concentration is proposed. Al doping drastically decreases the loss in the very low frequency part of the spectrum. However, Al doping has almost no effect on the loss at high frequencies. The effect of Al doping on loss is discussed through models of hopping transport implying intrinsic oxygen vacancies and Al related centers. When increasing the ac electric field in the MVrms/cm range, strong voltage non-linearities are evidenced in undoped films. The conductance increases exponentially with the ac field and the capacitance displays negative values (inductive behavior). Hopping barrier lowering is proposed to explain high-field effects. Finally, it is shown that Al doping strongly improves the high-field dielectric behavior.

  10. Quasi-effective medium theory for multi-layered magneto-dielectric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genov, Dentcho A.; Mundru, Pattabhiraju C.

    2014-01-01

    We present a quasi-effective medium theory that determines the optical properties of multi-layered composites beyond the quasi-static limit. The proposed theory exactly reproduces the far field scattering/extinction cross sections through an iterative process in which mode-dependent quasi-effective impedances of the composite system are introduced. In the large wavelength limit our theory is consistent with the Maxwell-Garnett formalism. Possible applications in determining the hybridization particle resonances of multi-shell structures and electromagnetic cloaking are identified.

  11. Regoliths in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, John; Cheng, Andrew; Delamere, Allen; Gorevan, Steven; Korotev, Randy; McKay, David; Schmitt, Harrison; Zarnecki, John

    1996-01-01

    A planetary regolith is any layer of fragments, unconsolidated material that may or may not be textually or compositionally altered relative to underlying substrate and occurs on the outer surface of a solar system body. This includes fragmented material from volcanic, sedimentary, and meteoritic infall sources, and derived by any process (e.g. impact and all other endogenic or exogenic processes). Many measurements that can be made from orbit or from Earth-based observations provide information only about the uppermost portions of a regolith and not the underlying substrate(s). Thus an understanding of the formation processes, physical properties, composition, and evolution of planetary regoliths is essential in answering scientific questions posed by the Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration (COMPLEX). This paper provides examples of measurements required to answer these critical science questions.

  12. MoS{sub 2} functionalization for ultra-thin atomic layer deposited dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Azcatl, Angelica; McDonnell, Stephen; Santosh, K.C.; Peng, Xin; Dong, Hong; Qin, Xiaoye; Addou, Rafik; Lu, Ning; Kim, Moon J.; Cho, Kyeongjae; Wallace, Robert M.; Mordi, Greg I.; Kim, Jiyoung

    2014-03-17

    The effect of room temperature ultraviolet-ozone (UV-O{sub 3}) exposure of MoS{sub 2} on the uniformity of subsequent atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is investigated. It is found that a UV-O{sub 3} pre-treatment removes adsorbed carbon contamination from the MoS{sub 2} surface and also functionalizes the MoS{sub 2} surface through the formation of a weak sulfur-oxygen bond without any evidence of molybdenum-sulfur bond disruption. This is supported by first principles density functional theory calculations which show that oxygen bonded to a surface sulfur atom while the sulfur is simultaneously back-bonded to three molybdenum atoms is a thermodynamically favorable configuration. The adsorbed oxygen increases the reactivity of MoS{sub 2} surface and provides nucleation sites for atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The enhanced nucleation is found to be dependent on the thin film deposition temperature.

  13. Parallel CARLOS-3D code development

    SciTech Connect

    Putnam, J.M.; Kotulski, J.D.

    1996-02-01

    CARLOS-3D is a three-dimensional scattering code which was developed under the sponsorship of the Electromagnetic Code Consortium, and is currently used by over 80 aerospace companies and government agencies. The code has been extensively validated and runs on both serial workstations and parallel super computers such as the Intel Paragon. CARLOS-3D is a three-dimensional surface integral equation scattering code based on a Galerkin method of moments formulation employing Rao- Wilton-Glisson roof-top basis for triangular faceted surfaces. Fully arbitrary 3D geometries composed of multiple conducting and homogeneous bulk dielectric materials can be modeled. This presentation describes some of the extensions to the CARLOS-3D code, and how the operator structure of the code facilitated these improvements. Body of revolution (BOR) and two-dimensional geometries were incorporated by simply including new input routines, and the appropriate Galerkin matrix operator routines. Some additional modifications were required in the combined field integral equation matrix generation routine due to the symmetric nature of the BOR and 2D operators. Quadrilateral patched surfaces with linear roof-top basis functions were also implemented in the same manner. Quadrilateral facets and triangular facets can be used in combination to more efficiently model geometries with both large smooth surfaces and surfaces with fine detail such as gaps and cracks. Since the parallel implementation in CARLOS-3D is at high level, these changes were independent of the computer platform being used. This approach minimizes code maintenance, while providing capabilities with little additional effort. Results are presented showing the performance and accuracy of the code for some large scattering problems. Comparisons between triangular faceted and quadrilateral faceted geometry representations will be shown for some complex scatterers.

  14. MRI Volume Fusion Based on 3D Shearlet Decompositions

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Chang; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Xue Gang; Huang, Qi Hong

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays many MRI scans can give 3D volume data with different contrasts, but the observers may want to view various contrasts in the same 3D volume. The conventional 2D medical fusion methods can only fuse the 3D volume data layer by layer, which may lead to the loss of interframe correlative information. In this paper, a novel 3D medical volume fusion method based on 3D band limited shearlet transform (3D BLST) is proposed. And this method is evaluated upon MRI T2* and quantitative susceptibility mapping data of 4 human brains. Both the perspective impression and the quality indices indicate that the proposed method has a better performance than conventional 2D wavelet, DT CWT, and 3D wavelet, DT CWT based fusion methods. PMID:24817880

  15. Electrical conduction and dielectric relaxation properties of AlN thin films grown by hollow-cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altuntas, Halit; Bayrak, Turkan; Kizir, Seda; Haider, Ali; Biyikli, Necmi

    2016-07-01

    In this study, aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films were deposited at 200 °C, on p-type silicon substrates utilizing a capacitively coupled hollow-cathode plasma source integrated atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor. The structural properties of AlN were characterized by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, by which we confirmed the hexagonal wurtzite single-phase crystalline structure. The films exhibited an optical band edge around ˜5.7 eV. The refractive index and extinction coefficient of the AlN films were measured via a spectroscopic ellipsometer. In addition, to investigate the electrical conduction mechanisms and dielectric properties, Al/AlN/p-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitor structures were fabricated, and current density-voltage and frequency dependent (7 kHz-5 MHz) dielectric constant measurements (within the strong accumulation region) were performed. A peak of dielectric loss was observed at a frequency of 3 MHz and the Cole-Davidson empirical formula was used to determine the relaxation time. It was concluded that the native point defects such as nitrogen vacancies and DX centers formed with the involvement of Si atoms into the AlN layers might have influenced the electrical conduction and dielectric relaxation properties of the plasma-assisted ALD grown AlN films.

  16. Electrical conduction and dielectric relaxation properties of AlN thin films grown by hollow-cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altuntas, Halit; Bayrak, Turkan; Kizir, Seda; Haider, Ali; Biyikli, Necmi

    2016-07-01

    In this study, aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films were deposited at 200 °C, on p-type silicon substrates utilizing a capacitively coupled hollow-cathode plasma source integrated atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor. The structural properties of AlN were characterized by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, by which we confirmed the hexagonal wurtzite single-phase crystalline structure. The films exhibited an optical band edge around ∼5.7 eV. The refractive index and extinction coefficient of the AlN films were measured via a spectroscopic ellipsometer. In addition, to investigate the electrical conduction mechanisms and dielectric properties, Al/AlN/p-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitor structures were fabricated, and current density–voltage and frequency dependent (7 kHz–5 MHz) dielectric constant measurements (within the strong accumulation region) were performed. A peak of dielectric loss was observed at a frequency of 3 MHz and the Cole–Davidson empirical formula was used to determine the relaxation time. It was concluded that the native point defects such as nitrogen vacancies and DX centers formed with the involvement of Si atoms into the AlN layers might have influenced the electrical conduction and dielectric relaxation properties of the plasma-assisted ALD grown AlN films.

  17. Optical response in nanostructured thin metal films with dielectric over-layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G. B.; Maaroof, A. I.

    2004-12-01

    Thin metal films which contain nano-size pores yield higher than expected transmittance and larger than expected times for transmission of near infra red radiation. An optically equivalent layer with complex refractive index (n*, k*) can model measured specular transmittance and reflectance, when scattering is weak. The way surface plasmon effects impact on these measured indices is considered. A strongly elevated n* is linked to trad the time for a surface plasmon to re-radiate and hence delay transmission times, and reduced imaginary part k*, to resonant channelling via voids. Measurement of n* thus allows an estimate of trad. The sensitivity of (n*, k*) to surface effects is illustrated using an insulating overlayer to modify the surface states. Resultant measured changes in n*, k* are substantial. Results are for two nanostructured metal systems characterised with 400,000× scanning electron microscopy.

  18. Detection of deep-subwavelength dielectric layers at terahertz frequencies using semiconductor plasmonic resonators.

    PubMed

    Berrier, Audrey; Albella, Pablo; Poyli, M Ameen; Ulbricht, Ronald; Bonn, Mischa; Aizpurua, Javier; Rivas, Jaime Gómez

    2012-02-27

    Plasmonic bowtie antennas made of doped silicon can operate as plasmonic resonators at terahertz (THz) frequencies and provide large field enhancement close to their gap. We demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically that the field confinement close to the surface of the antenna enables the detection of ultrathin (100 nm) inorganic films, about 3750 times thinner than the free space wavelength. Based on model calculations, we conclude that the detection sensitivity and its variation with the thickness of the deposited layer are related to both the decay of the local THz field profile around the antenna and the local field enhancement in the gap of the bowtie antenna. This large field enhancement has the potential to improve the detection limits of plasmon-based biological and chemical sensors. PMID:22418310

  19. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  20. Fabrication of 3D core-shell multiwalled carbon nanotube@RuO2 lithium-ion battery electrodes through a RuO2 atomic layer deposition process.

    PubMed

    Gregorczyk, Keith E; Kozen, Alexander C; Chen, Xinyi; Schroeder, Marshall A; Noked, Malachi; Cao, Anyuan; Hu, Liangbing; Rubloff, Gary W

    2015-01-27

    Pushing lithium-ion battery (LIB) technology forward to its fundamental scaling limits requires the ability to create designer heterostructured materials and architectures. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has recently been applied to advanced nanostructured energy storage devices due to the wide range of available materials, angstrom thickness control, and extreme conformality over high aspect ratio nanostructures. A class of materials referred to as conversion electrodes has recently been proposed as high capacity electrodes. RuO2 is considered an ideal conversion material due to its high combined electronic and ionic conductivity and high gravimetric capacity, and as such is an excellent material to explore the behavior of conversion electrodes at nanoscale thicknesses. We report here a fully characterized atomic layer deposition process for RuO2, electrochemical cycling data for ALD RuO2, and the application of the RuO2 to a composite carbon nanotube electrode scaffold with nucleation-controlled RuO2 growth. A growth rate of 0.4 Å/cycle is found between ∼ 210-240 °C. In a planar configuration, the resulting RuO2 films show high first cycle electrochemical capacities of ∼ 1400 mAh/g, but the capacity rapidly degrades with charge/discharge cycling. We also fabricated core/shell MWCNT/RuO2 heterostructured 3D electrodes, which show a 50× increase in the areal capacity over their planar counterparts, with an areal lithium capacity of 1.6 mAh/cm(2).

  1. Broadband and high efficiency metal multi-layer dielectric grating based on non-quarter-wave coatings as a reflective mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Fei; Kong, Wei-Jin; Yun, Mao-Jin; Liu, Jun-Hai; Sun, Xin

    2012-09-01

    This article deals with designing a broadband and high efficiency metal multi-layer dielectric grating (MMDG) used to compress and stretch an ultrashort laser pulse. The diffraction characteristics of the MMDG are analysed by using the rigorous coupled-wave method. The multi-layer dielectric used as the reflective mirror is made up of non-quarter-wave coatings. Taking the diffraction efficiency of the -1 order as the value of merit function, the parameters such as groove depth, residual thickness, duty cycle, and reflective mirror are optimized to obtain broadband and high diffraction efficiency. The optimized MMDG shows an ultra-broadband working spectrum with the average efficiency exceeding 97% over 160 nm wavelength centred at 1053 nm and TE polarization. The optimized MMDG should be useful for chirped pulse amplification.

  2. Scoops3D: software to analyze 3D slope stability throughout a digital landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, Mark E.; Christian, Sarah B.; Brien, Dianne L.; Henderson, Scott T.

    2015-01-01

    The computer program, Scoops3D, evaluates slope stability throughout a digital landscape represented by a digital elevation model (DEM). The program uses a three-dimensional (3D) method of columns approach to assess the stability of many (typically millions) potential landslides within a user-defined size range. For each potential landslide (or failure), Scoops3D assesses the stability of a rotational, spherical slip surface encompassing many DEM cells using a 3D version of either Bishop’s simplified method or the Ordinary (Fellenius) method of limit-equilibrium analysis. Scoops3D has several options for the user to systematically and efficiently search throughout an entire DEM, thereby incorporating the effects of complex surface topography. In a thorough search, each DEM cell is included in multiple potential failures, and Scoops3D records the lowest stability (factor of safety) for each DEM cell, as well as the size (volume or area) associated with each of these potential landslides. It also determines the least-stable potential failure for the entire DEM. The user has a variety of options for building a 3D domain, including layers or full 3D distributions of strength and pore-water pressures, simplistic earthquake loading, and unsaturated suction conditions. Results from Scoops3D can be readily incorporated into a geographic information system (GIS) or other visualization software. This manual includes information on the theoretical basis for the slope-stability analysis, requirements for constructing and searching a 3D domain, a detailed operational guide (including step-by-step instructions for using the graphical user interface [GUI] software, Scoops3D-i) and input/output file specifications, practical considerations for conducting an analysis, results of verification tests, and multiple examples illustrating the capabilities of Scoops3D. Easy-to-use software installation packages are available for the Windows or Macintosh operating systems; these packages

  3. Antenna with Dielectric Having Geometric Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, Kenneth L. (Inventor); Elliott, Holly A. (Inventor); Cravey, Robin L. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Ghose, Sayata (Inventor); Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Smith, Jr., Joseph G. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An antenna includes a ground plane, a dielectric disposed on the ground plane, and an electrically-conductive radiator disposed on the dielectric. The dielectric includes at least one layer of a first dielectric material and a second dielectric material that collectively define a dielectric geometric pattern, which may comprise a fractal geometry. The radiator defines a radiator geometric pattern, and the dielectric geometric pattern is geometrically identical, or substantially geometrically identical, to the radiator geometric pattern.

  4. Improved thermal stability and electrical properties of atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2}/AlN high-k gate dielectric stacks on GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Yan-Qiang; Li, Xin; Zhu, Lin; Cao, Zheng-Yi; Wu, Di; Li, Ai-Dong

    2015-01-15

    The thermal stability and electrical properties of atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2}/AlN high-k gate dielectric stacks on GaAs were investigated. Compared to HfO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate dielectric, significant improvements in interfacial quality as well as electrical characteristics after postdeposition annealing are confirmed by constructing HfO{sub 2}/AlN dielectric stacks. The chemical states were carefully explored by the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which indicates the AlN layers effectively prevent from the formation of defective native oxides at elevated temperatures. In addition, it is found that NH{sub 3} plasma during AlN plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition also has the self-cleaning effect as Al(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} in removing native oxides. The passivating AlN layers suppress the formation of interfacial oxide and trap charge, leading to the decrease of capacitance equivalent thickness after annealing. Moreover, HfO{sub 2}/AlN/GaAs sample has a much lower leakage current density of 2.23 × 10{sup −4} A/cm{sup 2} than HfO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaAs sample of 2.58 × 10{sup −2} A/cm{sup 2}. For the HfO{sub 2}/AlN/GaAs sample annealed at 500 °C, it has a lowest interface trap density value of 2.11 × 10{sup 11} eV{sup −1} cm{sup −2}. These results indicate that adopting HfO{sub 2}/AlN dielectric stacks may be a promising approach for the realization of high quality GaAs-based transistor devices.

  5. In-situ surface and interface study of atomic oxygen modified carbon containing porous low-κ dielectric films for barrier layer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogan, J.; Lundy, R.; P. McCoy, A.; O'Connor, R.; Byrne, C.; Walsh, L.; Casey, P.; Hughes, G.

    2016-09-01

    The surface treatment of ultralow-κ dielectric layers by exposure to atomic oxygen is presented as a potential mechanism to modify the chemical composition of the dielectric surface to facilitate copper diffusion barrier layer formation. High carbon content, low-κ dielectric films of varying porosity were exposed to atomic oxygen treatments at room temperature, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies reveal both the depletion of carbon and the incorporation of oxygen at the surface. Subsequent dynamic water contact angle measurements show that the chemically modified surfaces become more hydrophilic after treatment, suggesting that the substrates have become more "SiO2-like" at the near surface region. This treatment is shown to be thermally stable up to 400 °C. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy elemental profiles confirm the localised removal of carbon from the surface region. Manganese (≈1 nm) was subsequently deposited on the modified substrates and thermally annealed to form surface localized MnSiO3 based barrier layers. The energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy elemental maps show that the atomic oxygen treatments facilitate the formation of a continuous manganese silicate barrier within dense low-k films, but significant manganese diffusion is observed in the case of porous substrates, negatively impacting the formation of a discrete barrier layer. Ultimately, the atomic oxygen treatment proves effective in modifying the surface of non-porous dielectrics while continuing to facilitate barrier formation. However, in the case of high porosity films, diffusion of manganese into the bulk film remains a critical issue.

  6. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  7. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  8. Self assembled structures for 3D integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Madhav

    Three dimensional (3D) micro-scale structures attached to a silicon substrate have various applications in microelectronics. However, formation of 3D structures using conventional micro-fabrication techniques are not efficient and require precise control of processing parameters. Self assembly is a method for creating 3D structures that takes advantage of surface area minimization phenomena. Solder based self assembly (SBSA), the subject of this dissertation, uses solder as a facilitator in the formation of 3D structures from 2D patterns. Etching a sacrificial layer underneath a portion of the 2D pattern allows the solder reflow step to pull those areas out of the substrate plane resulting in a folded 3D structure. Initial studies using the SBSA method demonstrated low yields in the formation of five different polyhedra. The failures in folding were primarily attributed to nonuniform solder deposition on the underlying metal pads. The dip soldering method was analyzed and subsequently refined. A modified dip soldering process provided improved yield among the polyhedra. Solder bridging referred as joining of solder deposited on different metal patterns in an entity influenced the folding mechanism. In general, design parameters such as small gap-spacings and thick metal pads were found to favor solder bridging for all patterns studied. Two types of soldering: face and edge soldering were analyzed. Face soldering refers to the application of solder on the entire metal face. Edge soldering indicates application of solder only on the edges of the metal face. Mechanical grinding showed that face soldered SBSA structures were void free and robust in nature. In addition, the face soldered 3D structures provide a consistent heat resistant solder standoff height that serve as attachments in the integration of dissimilar electronic technologies. Face soldered 3D structures were developed on the underlying conducting channel to determine the thermo-electric reliability of

  9. Development of 3D photonic crystals using sol-gel process for high power laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, F.; Dieudonné, E.; Bertussi, B.; Vallé, K.; Belleville, P.; Mallejac, N.; Enoch, S.; Sanchez, C.

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional photonic crystals (PCs) are periodic materials with a modulated refractive index on a length scale close to the light wavelength. This optical property allows the preparation of specific optical components like highly reflective mirrors. Moreover, these structured materials are known to have a high laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) in the sub-nanosecond range compared to multi-layered dielectric mirrors. This property is obtained because only one high LIDT material (silica) is used. The second material used in the layer stack is replaced by air. In this work, we present the development of 3D PCs with narrow-sized colloidal silica particles, prepared by sol-gel process and deposited with Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Different syntheses routes have been investigated and compared regarding the optical properties of the PCs. Finally a numerical model based on an ideal opal network including defect influence is used to explain these experimental results.

  10. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  11. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  12. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  13. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  14. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible.

  15. bioWeb3D: an online webGL 3D data visualisation tool

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Data visualization is critical for interpreting biological data. However, in practice it can prove to be a bottleneck for non trained researchers; this is especially true for three dimensional (3D) data representation. Whilst existing software can provide all necessary functionalities to represent and manipulate biological 3D datasets, very few are easily accessible (browser based), cross platform and accessible to non-expert users. Results An online HTML5/WebGL based 3D visualisation tool has been developed to allow biologists to quickly and easily view interactive and customizable three dimensional representations of their data along with multiple layers of information. Using the WebGL library Three.js written in Javascript, bioWeb3D allows the simultaneous visualisation of multiple large datasets inputted via a simple JSON, XML or CSV file, which can be read and analysed locally thanks to HTML5 capabilities. Conclusions Using basic 3D representation techniques in a technologically innovative context, we provide a program that is not intended to compete with professional 3D representation software, but that instead enables a quick and intuitive representation of reasonably large 3D datasets. PMID:23758781

  16. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  17. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery. PMID:26657435

  18. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  19. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  20. Dielectric properties of novel composites prepared with few layered graphene (FLG)-lithium triniobate (LiNb{sub 3}O{sub 8})

    SciTech Connect

    Tumuluri, Anil; Raju, K. C. James; Marka, Sandeep Kumar; Srikanth, V. V. S. S.

    2015-08-28

    Lithium triniobate (LiNb{sub 3}O{sub 8}) has been prepared using microwave assisted combustion synthesis at a low temperature of 400 °C. Graphite oxide is synthesized using Hummers method and thereafter it is thermally exfoliated at 500 and 700 °C to obtain two samples of Few Layered Graphene (FLG). Then, FLG-LiNb{sub 3}O{sub 8} composites prepared through a simple ultra-sonication assisted solution mixing process. The obtained samples are named as FLN5 and FLN7 based on the temperature used to obtain FLG. Low frequency dielectric measurements are recorded for both the samples and the measured dielectric constant is observed to be more for FLN5 (250 at 60 Hz) than FLN7 (115 at 60 Hz) whilst the dielectric loss is less in case of FLN5 (1.525 at 60 Hz). The enhancement in dielectric properties for FLN5 is explained in terms of polarization in FLG-LiNb{sub 3}O{sub 8} composites.

  1. The consequences of air flow on the distribution of aqueous species during dielectric barrier discharge treatment of thin water layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Wei; Lietz, Amanda M.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-10-01

    The desired outcomes of wet tissue treatment by dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) strongly depend on the integrated fluences of reactive species incident onto the tissue, which are determined by power, frequency and treatment time. The reactivity produced by such plasmas is often expected to be proportional to treatment time due to the accumulation of radicals in the liquid over the tissue. However, one of the typically uncontrolled parameters in DBD treatment of liquids and tissue is gas flow, which could affect the delivery of plasma produced radicals to the tissue. Gas flow can redistribute long-lived, plasma produced gas phase species prior to solvating in the liquid, while not greatly affecting the solvation of short-lived species. Gas flow can therefore potentially be a control mechanism for tailoring the fluences of reactive species to the tissue. In this paper, we report on a computational investigation of the consequences of gas flow on treatment of liquid layers covering tissue by atmospheric DBDs by up to 100 pulses. We found that gas flow (through residence time of the gas) can control the production of gas phase species requiring many collisions to form, such as reactive nitrogen species (RNS). The resulting solvation of the RNS in turn controls the production of aqueous species such as \\text{NO}\\text{3aq}- and \\text{ONOO}\\text{aq}- (aq denotes an aqueous species). With the exception of O3 and O3aq, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are less sensitive to gas flow, and so OHaq and H2O2aq, are determined primarily by discharge properties.

  2. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  3. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  4. Charge injection in thin dielectric layers by atomic force microscopy: influence of geometry and material work function of the AFM tip on the injection process.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve-Faure, C; Makasheva, K; Boudou, L; Teyssedre, G

    2016-06-17

    Charge injection and retention in thin dielectric layers remain critical issues for the reliability of many electronic devices because of their association with a large number of failure mechanisms. To overcome this drawback, a deep understanding of the mechanisms leading to charge injection close to the injection area is needed. Even though the charge injection is extensively studied and reported in the literature to characterize the charge storage capability of dielectric materials, questions about charge injection mechanisms when using atomic force microscopy (AFM) remain open. In this paper, a thorough study of charge injection by using AFM in thin plasma-processed amorphous silicon oxynitride layers with properties close to that of thermal silica layers is presented. The study considers the impact of applied voltage polarity, work function of the AFM tip coating and tip curvature radius. A simple theoretical model was developed and used to analyze the obtained experimental results. The electric field distribution is computed as a function of tip geometry. The obtained experimental results highlight that after injection in the dielectric layer the charge lateral spreading is mainly controlled by the radial electric field component independently of the carrier polarity. The injected charge density is influenced by the nature of electrode metal coating (work function) and its geometry (tip curvature radius). The electron injection is mainly ruled by the Schottky injection barrier through the field electron emission mechanism enhanced by thermionic electron emission. The hole injection mechanism seems to differ from the electron one depending on the work function of the metal coating. Based on the performed analysis, it is suggested that for hole injection by AFM, pinning of the metal Fermi level with the metal-induced gap states in the studied silicon oxynitride layers starts playing a role in the injection mechanisms. PMID:27158768

  5. Charge injection in thin dielectric layers by atomic force microscopy: influence of geometry and material work function of the AFM tip on the injection process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villeneuve-Faure, C.; Makasheva, K.; Boudou, L.; Teyssedre, G.

    2016-06-01

    Charge injection and retention in thin dielectric layers remain critical issues for the reliability of many electronic devices because of their association with a large number of failure mechanisms. To overcome this drawback, a deep understanding of the mechanisms leading to charge injection close to the injection area is needed. Even though the charge injection is extensively studied and reported in the literature to characterize the charge storage capability of dielectric materials, questions about charge injection mechanisms when using atomic force microscopy (AFM) remain open. In this paper, a thorough study of charge injection by using AFM in thin plasma-processed amorphous silicon oxynitride layers with properties close to that of thermal silica layers is presented. The study considers the impact of applied voltage polarity, work function of the AFM tip coating and tip curvature radius. A simple theoretical model was developed and used to analyze the obtained experimental results. The electric field distribution is computed as a function of tip geometry. The obtained experimental results highlight that after injection in the dielectric layer the charge lateral spreading is mainly controlled by the radial electric field component independently of the carrier polarity. The injected charge density is influenced by the nature of electrode metal coating (work function) and its geometry (tip curvature radius). The electron injection is mainly ruled by the Schottky injection barrier through the field electron emission mechanism enhanced by thermionic electron emission. The hole injection mechanism seems to differ from the electron one depending on the work function of the metal coating. Based on the performed analysis, it is suggested that for hole injection by AFM, pinning of the metal Fermi level with the metal-induced gap states in the studied silicon oxynitride layers starts playing a role in the injection mechanisms.

  6. Charge injection in thin dielectric layers by atomic force microscopy: influence of geometry and material work function of the AFM tip on the injection process.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve-Faure, C; Makasheva, K; Boudou, L; Teyssedre, G

    2016-06-17

    Charge injection and retention in thin dielectric layers remain critical issues for the reliability of many electronic devices because of their association with a large number of failure mechanisms. To overcome this drawback, a deep understanding of the mechanisms leading to charge injection close to the injection area is needed. Even though the charge injection is extensively studied and reported in the literature to characterize the charge storage capability of dielectric materials, questions about charge injection mechanisms when using atomic force microscopy (AFM) remain open. In this paper, a thorough study of charge injection by using AFM in thin plasma-processed amorphous silicon oxynitride layers with properties close to that of thermal silica layers is presented. The study considers the impact of applied voltage polarity, work function of the AFM tip coating and tip curvature radius. A simple theoretical model was developed and used to analyze the obtained experimental results. The electric field distribution is computed as a function of tip geometry. The obtained experimental results highlight that after injection in the dielectric layer the charge lateral spreading is mainly controlled by the radial electric field component independently of the carrier polarity. The injected charge density is influenced by the nature of electrode metal coating (work function) and its geometry (tip curvature radius). The electron injection is mainly ruled by the Schottky injection barrier through the field electron emission mechanism enhanced by thermionic electron emission. The hole injection mechanism seems to differ from the electron one depending on the work function of the metal coating. Based on the performed analysis, it is suggested that for hole injection by AFM, pinning of the metal Fermi level with the metal-induced gap states in the studied silicon oxynitride layers starts playing a role in the injection mechanisms.

  7. Optically bifacial thin-film wire-grid polarizers with nano-patterns of a graded metal-dielectric composite layer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Hyuk; Song, Young-Woo; Hwang, Kyu H; Lee, Joon-Gu; Ha, Jaeheung; Zang, Dong-Sik

    2008-10-13

    We report on the concept of a thin film wire-grid polarizer (WGP) with optically dual characteristics by introducing a nano-patterned graded metal-dielectric composite-material layer. The Ti-SiO(2) composite layer with a depth profile of a gradually-varied composition ratio shows an absorptive feature due to the elimination of an optical interface between a metal and a glass substrate, while the metal side of the WGP gives a reflective character. The unprecedented optically-bifacial thin-film WGP with the 144 nm-period straight-line patterns of a 100 nm-thick Ti-SiO(2) composite layer and a 185 nm-thick Al layer shows the exceptionally low reflectance below 15 % from the absorptive side and the high polarization extinction ratio (PER) of over 500 at 550 nm, which is acceptable for use as various display applications such as AMOLEDs and LCDs.

  8. Medium energy ion scattering for the high depth resolution characterisation of high-k dielectric layers of nanometer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, J. A.; Reading, M. A.; Bailey, P.; Noakes, T. Q. C.; Adelmann, C.; Popovici, M.; Tielens, H.; Conard, T.; de Gendt, S.; van Elshocht, S.

    2013-09-01

    Medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) using, typically, 100-200 keV H+ or He+ ions derives it ability to characterise nanolayers from the fact that the energy after backscattering depends (i) on the elastic energy loss suffered in a single collision with a target atom and (ii) on the inelastic energy losses on its incoming and outgoing trajectories. From the former the mass of the atom can be determined and from the latter its depth. Thus MEIS yields depth dependent compositional and structural information, with high depth resolution (sub-nm near the surface) and good sensitivity for all but the lighter masses. It is particularly well suited for the depth analysis of high-k multilayers of nanometer thickness. Accurate quantification of the depth distributions of atomic species can be obtained using suitable spectrum simulation. In the present paper, important aspects of MEIS including quantification, depth resolution and spectrum simulation are briefly discussed. The capabilities of the technique in terms of the high depth resolution layer compositional and structural information it yields, is illustrated with reference to the detailed characterisation of a range of high-k nanolayer and multilayer structures for current microelectronic devices or those still under development: (i) HfO2 and HfSiOx for gate dielectric applications, including a TiN/Al2O3/HfO2/SiO2/Si structure, (ii) TiN/SrTiO3/TiN and (iii) TiO2/Ru/TiN multilayer structures for metal-insulator-metal capacitors (MIMcaps) in DRAM applications. The unique information provided by the technique is highlighted by its clear capability to accurately quantify the composition profiles and thickness of nanolayers and complex multilayers as grown, and to identify the nature and extent of atom redistribution (e.g. intermixing, segregation) during layer deposition, annealing and plasma processing. The ability makes it a valuable tool in the development of the nanostructures that will become increasingly important as

  9. Surface reactions during the atomic layer deposition of high-kappa dielectrics on III-V semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Liwang

    The quality of the dielectric/semiconductor interface is one of the most critical parameters for the fabrication of high-speed and low-power-consumption III-V semiconductor based metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), as it determines the device performance. This dissertation contains investigations of the deposition and interface of binary oxide films on GaAs(100) and InAs(100) surfaces aiming at understanding the removal of the surface native oxides during certain atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes. To accomplish that, two complementary experimental approaches have been used. Initially, films were deposited in a conventional ALD reactor and characterized ex situ using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The systems examined were Ta2O 5 on GaAs(100) surfaces from pentakis(dimethylamino) tantalum (Ta(N(CH 3)2)5, PDMAT) and TiO2 on GaAs(100) and InAs(100) surfaces from tetrakis(dimethylamino) titanium (Ti(N(CH 3)2)4, TDMAT). For these systems, deposition at the optimal ALD temperature resulted in practically sharp interfaces. Indium oxides were found to diffuse through ~ 6 nm of TiO2 film and accumulate on the topmost film layer. For the ALD of Ta2O5 on GaAs(100) surfaces, native oxide removal was enhanced at deposition temperatures above the ALD window; for ALD of TiO2 on both GaAs(100) and InAs(100) surfaces, native oxide removal was enhanced as the deposition temperatures increased up to 250 A°C, while oxidation of the interface was observed for deposition above 300 A°C due to the formation of noncontinuous films. To elucidate the surface reactions occurring during the deposition, an in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy apparatus was constructed and used to investigate the surface reactions during the ALD of TiO2 and HfO2 on GaAs(100) surfaces. The

  10. Complex light in 3D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Christophe; Delrot, Paul; Loterie, Damien; Morales Delgado, Edgar; Modestino, Miguel; Psaltis, Demetri

    2016-03-01

    3D printing as a tool to generate complicated shapes from CAD files, on demand, with different materials from plastics to metals, is shortening product development cycles, enabling new design possibilities and can provide a mean to manufacture small volumes cost effectively. There are many technologies for 3D printing and the majority uses light in the process. In one process (Multi-jet modeling, polyjet, printoptical©), a printhead prints layers of ultra-violet curable liquid plastic. Here, each nozzle deposits the material, which is then flooded by a UV curing lamp to harden it. In another process (Stereolithography), a focused UV laser beam provides both the spatial localization and the photo-hardening of the resin. Similarly, laser sintering works with metal powders by locally melting the material point by point and layer by layer. When the laser delivers ultra-fast focused pulses, nonlinear effects polymerize the material with high spatial resolution. In these processes, light is either focused in one spot and the part is made by scanning it or the light is expanded and covers a wide area for photopolymerization. Hence a fairly "simple" light field is used in both cases. Here, we give examples of how "complex light" brings additional level of complexity in 3D printing.

  11. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  12. In situ atomic layer nitridation on the top and down regions of the amorphous and crystalline high-K gate dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Meng-Chen; Lee, Min-Hung; Kuo, Chin-Lung; Lin, Hsin-Chih; Chen, Miin-Jang

    2016-11-01

    Amorphous and crystalline ZrO2 gate dielectrics treated with in situ atomic layer nitridation on the top and down regions (top and down nitridation, abbreviated as TN and DN) were investigated. In a comparison between the as-deposited amorphous DN and TN samples, the DN sample has a lower leakage current density (Jg) of ∼7 × 10-4 A/cm2 with a similar capacitance equivalent thickness (CET) of ∼1.53 nm, attributed to the formation of SiOxNy in the interfacial layer (IL). The post-metallization annealing (PMA) leads to the transformation of ZrO2 from the amorphous to the crystalline tetragonal/cubic phase, resulting in an increment of the dielectric constant. The PMA-treated TN sample exhibits a lower CET of 1.22 nm along with a similar Jg of ∼1.4 × 10-5 A/cm2 as compared with the PMA-treated DN sample, which can be ascribed to the suppression of IL regrowth. The result reveals that the nitrogen engineering in the top and down regions has a significant impact on the electrical characteristics of amorphous and crystalline ZrO2 gate dielectrics, and the nitrogen incorporation at the top of crystalline ZrO2 is an effective approach to scale the CET and Jg, as well as to improve the reliability.

  13. Significance of the double-layer capacitor effect in polar rubbery dielectrics and exceptionally stable low-voltage high transconductance organic transistors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Lee, Wen-Ya; Kong, Desheng; Pfattner, Raphael; Schweicher, Guillaume; Nakajima, Reina; Lu, Chien; Mei, Jianguo; Lee, Tae Hoon; Wu, Hung-Chin; Lopez, Jeffery; Diao, Ying; Gu, Xiaodan; Himmelberger, Scott; Niu, Weijun; Matthews, James R; He, Mingqian; Salleo, Alberto; Nishi, Yoshio; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-01-01

    Both high gain and transconductance at low operating voltages are essential for practical applications of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). Here, we describe the significance of the double-layer capacitance effect in polar rubbery dielectrics, even when present in a very low ion concentration and conductivity. We observed that this effect can greatly enhance the OFET transconductance when driven at low voltages. Specifically, when the polar elastomer poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (e-PVDF-HFP) was used as the dielectric layer, despite a thickness of several micrometers, we obtained a transconductance per channel width 30 times higher than that measured for the same organic semiconductors fabricated on a semicrystalline PVDF-HFP with a similar thickness. After a series of detailed experimental investigations, we attribute the above observation to the double-layer capacitance effect, even though the ionic conductivity is as low as 10(-10) S/cm. Different from previously reported OFETs with double-layer capacitance effects, our devices showed unprecedented high bias-stress stability in air and even in water. PMID:26658331

  14. Significance of the double-layer capacitor effect in polar rubbery dielectrics and exceptionally stable low-voltage high transconductance organic transistors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Lee, Wen-Ya; Kong, Desheng; Pfattner, Raphael; Schweicher, Guillaume; Nakajima, Reina; Lu, Chien; Mei, Jianguo; Lee, Tae Hoon; Wu, Hung-Chin; Lopez, Jeffery; Diao, Ying; Gu, Xiaodan; Himmelberger, Scott; Niu, Weijun; Matthews, James R.; He, Mingqian; Salleo, Alberto; Nishi, Yoshio; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-01-01

    Both high gain and transconductance at low operating voltages are essential for practical applications of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). Here, we describe the significance of the double-layer capacitance effect in polar rubbery dielectrics, even when present in a very low ion concentration and conductivity. We observed that this effect can greatly enhance the OFET transconductance when driven at low voltages. Specifically, when the polar elastomer poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (e-PVDF-HFP) was used as the dielectric layer, despite a thickness of several micrometers, we obtained a transconductance per channel width 30 times higher than that measured for the same organic semiconductors fabricated on a semicrystalline PVDF-HFP with a similar thickness. After a series of detailed experimental investigations, we attribute the above observation to the double-layer capacitance effect, even though the ionic conductivity is as low as 10–10 S/cm. Different from previously reported OFETs with double-layer capacitance effects, our devices showed unprecedented high bias-stress stability in air and even in water. PMID:26658331

  15. Significance of the double-layer capacitor effect in polar rubbery dielectrics and exceptionally stable low-voltage high transconductance organic transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Lee, Wen-Ya; Kong, Desheng; Pfattner, Raphael; Schweicher, Guillaume; Nakajima, Reina; Lu, Chien; Mei, Jianguo; Lee, Tae Hoon; Wu, Hung-Chin; Lopez, Jeffery; Diao, Ying; Gu, Xiaodan; Himmelberger, Scott; Niu, Weijun; Matthews, James R.; He, Mingqian; Salleo, Alberto; Nishi, Yoshio; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-12-01

    Both high gain and transconductance at low operating voltages are essential for practical applications of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). Here, we describe the significance of the double-layer capacitance effect in polar rubbery dielectrics, even when present in a very low ion concentration and conductivity. We observed that this effect can greatly enhance the OFET transconductance when driven at low voltages. Specifically, when the polar elastomer poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (e-PVDF-HFP) was used as the dielectric layer, despite a thickness of several micrometers, we obtained a transconductance per channel width 30 times higher than that measured for the same organic semiconductors fabricated on a semicrystalline PVDF-HFP with a similar thickness. After a series of detailed experimental investigations, we attribute the above observation to the double-layer capacitance effect, even though the ionic conductivity is as low as 10-10 S/cm. Different from previously reported OFETs with double-layer capacitance effects, our devices showed unprecedented high bias-stress stability in air and even in water.

  16. Effects of annealing on electrical performance of multilayer MoS2 transistors with atomic layer deposited HfO2 gate dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Ming; Xu, Jingping; Liu, Lu; Lai, Pui-To; Tang, Wing-Man

    2016-09-01

    Atomic layer deposited HfO2 annealed in different ambients (N2, O2, and NH3) is used to replace SiO2 as a gate dielectric for fabricating back-gated multilayer MoS2 transistors. Excellent electrical properties such as a mobility of 15.1 cm2/(V·s), an on/off ratio exceeding 107, and a hysteresis of 0.133 V are achieved for samples annealed in NH3 at 400 °C for 10 min. This is caused by the NH3 annealing passivation effects that reduce defective states in the HfO2 dielectric and the interface. The capacitance equivalent thickness is only 7.85 nm, which is quite small for a back-gated MoS2 transistor and is conducive to the scaling down of the device.

  17. Spatially resolved 3D noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefner, David P.; Preece, Bradley L.; Doe, Joshua M.; Burks, Stephen D.

    2016-05-01

    When evaluated with a spatially uniform irradiance, an imaging sensor exhibits both spatial and temporal variations, which can be described as a three-dimensional (3D) random process considered as noise. In the 1990s, NVESD engineers developed an approximation to the 3D power spectral density (PSD) for noise in imaging systems known as 3D noise. In this correspondence, we describe how the confidence intervals for the 3D noise measurement allows for determination of the sampling necessary to reach a desired precision. We then apply that knowledge to create a smaller cube that can be evaluated spatially across the 2D image giving the noise as a function of position. The method presented here allows for both defective pixel identification and implements the finite sampling correction matrix. In support of the reproducible research effort, the Matlab functions associated with this work can be found on the Mathworks file exchange [1].

  18. Autofocus for 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Elkin, Forest

    2008-04-01

    Three dimensional (3D) autofocus remains a significant challenge for the development of practical 3D multipass radar imaging. The current 2D radar autofocus methods are not readily extendable across sensor passes. We propose a general framework that allows a class of data adaptive solutions for 3D auto-focus across passes with minimal constraints on the scene contents. The key enabling assumption is that portions of the scene are sparse in elevation which reduces the number of free variables and results in a system that is simultaneously solved for scatterer heights and autofocus parameters. The proposed method extends 2-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) methods to an arbitrary number of passes allowing the consideration of scattering from multiple height locations. A specific case from the proposed autofocus framework is solved and demonstrates autofocus and coherent multipass 3D estimation across the 8 passes of the "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set" X-Band radar data.

  19. Accepting the T3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, D.O.; Pope, S.C.; DeLapp, J.G.

    1994-10-01

    In April, a 128 PE Cray T3D was installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Advanced Computing Laboratory as part of the DOE`s High-Performance Parallel Processor Program (H4P). In conjunction with CRI, the authors implemented a 30 day acceptance test. The test was constructed in part to help them understand the strengths and weaknesses of the T3D. In this paper, they briefly describe the H4P and its goals. They discuss the design and implementation of the T3D acceptance test and detail issues that arose during the test. They conclude with a set of system requirements that must be addressed as the T3D system evolves.

  20. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  1. Facile synthesis 3D flexible core-shell graphene/glass fiber via chemical vapor deposition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Direct deposition of graphene layers on the flexible glass fiber surface to form the three-dimensional (3D) core-shell structures is offered using a two-heating reactor chemical vapor deposition system. The two-heating reactor is utilized to offer sufficient, well-proportioned floating C atoms and provide a facile way for low-temperature deposition. Graphene layers, which are controlled by changing the growth time, can be grown on the surface of wire-type glass fiber with the diameter from 30 nm to 120 um. The core-shell graphene/glass fiber deposition mechanism is proposed, suggesting that the 3D graphene films can be deposited on any proper wire-type substrates. These results open a facile way for direct and high-efficiency deposition of the transfer-free graphene layers on the low-temperature dielectric wire-type substrates. PACS 81.05.U-; 81.07.-b; 81.15.Gh PMID:25170331

  2. Bottom-up Fabrication of Multilayer Stacks of 3D Photonic Crystals from Titanium Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Kubrin, Roman; Pasquarelli, Robert M; Waleczek, Martin; Lee, Hooi Sing; Zierold, Robert; do Rosário, Jefferson J; Dyachenko, Pavel N; Montero Moreno, Josep M; Petrov, Alexander Yu; Janssen, Rolf; Eich, Manfred; Nielsch, Kornelius; Schneider, Gerold A

    2016-04-27

    A strategy for stacking multiple ceramic 3D photonic crystals is developed. Periodically structured porous films are produced by vertical convective self-assembly of polystyrene (PS) microspheres. After infiltration of the opaline templates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of titania and thermal decomposition of the polystyrene matrix, a ceramic 3D photonic crystal is formed. Further layers with different sizes of pores are deposited subsequently by repetition of the process. The influence of process parameters on morphology and photonic properties of double and triple stacks is systematically studied. Prolonged contact of amorphous titania films with warm water during self-assembly of the successive templates is found to result in exaggerated roughness of the surfaces re-exposed to ALD. Random scattering on rough internal surfaces disrupts ballistic transport of incident photons into deeper layers of the multistacks. Substantially smoother interfaces are obtained by calcination of the structure after each infiltration, which converts amorphous titania into the crystalline anatase before resuming the ALD infiltration. High quality triple stacks consisting of anatase inverse opals with different pore sizes are demonstrated for the first time. The elaborated fabrication method shows promise for various applications demanding broadband dielectric reflectors or titania photonic crystals with a long mean free path of photons. PMID:27045887

  3. Bottom-up Fabrication of Multilayer Stacks of 3D Photonic Crystals from Titanium Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Kubrin, Roman; Pasquarelli, Robert M; Waleczek, Martin; Lee, Hooi Sing; Zierold, Robert; do Rosário, Jefferson J; Dyachenko, Pavel N; Montero Moreno, Josep M; Petrov, Alexander Yu; Janssen, Rolf; Eich, Manfred; Nielsch, Kornelius; Schneider, Gerold A

    2016-04-27

    A strategy for stacking multiple ceramic 3D photonic crystals is developed. Periodically structured porous films are produced by vertical convective self-assembly of polystyrene (PS) microspheres. After infiltration of the opaline templates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of titania and thermal decomposition of the polystyrene matrix, a ceramic 3D photonic crystal is formed. Further layers with different sizes of pores are deposited subsequently by repetition of the process. The influence of process parameters on morphology and photonic properties of double and triple stacks is systematically studied. Prolonged contact of amorphous titania films with warm water during self-assembly of the successive templates is found to result in exaggerated roughness of the surfaces re-exposed to ALD. Random scattering on rough internal surfaces disrupts ballistic transport of incident photons into deeper layers of the multistacks. Substantially smoother interfaces are obtained by calcination of the structure after each infiltration, which converts amorphous titania into the crystalline anatase before resuming the ALD infiltration. High quality triple stacks consisting of anatase inverse opals with different pore sizes are demonstrated for the first time. The elaborated fabrication method shows promise for various applications demanding broadband dielectric reflectors or titania photonic crystals with a long mean free path of photons.

  4. Multizone Paper Platform for 3D Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Derda, Ratmir; Hong, Estrella; Mwangi, Martin; Mammoto, Akiko; Ingber, Donald E.; Whitesides, George M.

    2011-01-01

    In vitro 3D culture is an important model for tissues in vivo. Cells in different locations of 3D tissues are physiologically different, because they are exposed to different concentrations of oxygen, nutrients, and signaling molecules, and to other environmental factors (temperature, mechanical stress, etc). The majority of high-throughput assays based on 3D cultures, however, can only detect the average behavior of cells in the whole 3D construct. Isolation of cells from specific regions of 3D cultures is possible, but relies on low-throughput techniques such as tissue sectioning and micromanipulation. Based on a procedure reported previously (“cells-in-gels-in-paper” or CiGiP), this paper describes a simple method for culture of arrays of thin planar sections of tissues, either alone or stacked to create more complex 3D tissue structures. This procedure starts with sheets of paper patterned with hydrophobic regions that form 96 hydrophilic zones. Serial spotting of cells suspended in extracellular matrix (ECM) gel onto the patterned paper creates an array of 200 micron-thick slabs of ECM gel (supported mechanically by cellulose fibers) containing cells. Stacking the sheets with zones aligned on top of one another assembles 96 3D multilayer constructs. De-stacking the layers of the 3D culture, by peeling apart the sheets of paper, “sections” all 96 cultures at once. It is, thus, simple to isolate 200-micron-thick cell-containing slabs from each 3D culture in the 96-zone array. Because the 3D cultures are assembled from multiple layers, the number of cells plated initially in each layer determines the spatial distribution of cells in the stacked 3D cultures. This capability made it possible to compare the growth of 3D tumor models of different spatial composition, and to examine the migration of cells in these structures. PMID:21573103

  5. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Chae, Michael P; Rozen, Warren M; McMenamin, Paul G; Findlay, Michael W; Spychal, Robert T; Hunter-Smith, David J

    2015-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, was once the province of industry to fabricate models from a computer-aided design (CAD) in a layer-by-layer manner. The early adopters in clinical practice have embraced the medical imaging-guided 3D-printed biomodels for their ability to provide tactile feedback and a superior appreciation of visuospatial relationship between anatomical structures. With increasing accessibility, investigators are able to convert standard imaging data into a CAD file using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography, multijet modeling, selective laser sintering, binder jet technique, and fused deposition modeling. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without outsourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. In this review, existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative esthetics are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, developing

  6. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Michael P.; Rozen, Warren M.; McMenamin, Paul G.; Findlay, Michael W.; Spychal, Robert T.; Hunter-Smith, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, was once the province of industry to fabricate models from a computer-aided design (CAD) in a layer-by-layer manner. The early adopters in clinical practice have embraced the medical imaging-guided 3D-printed biomodels for their ability to provide tactile feedback and a superior appreciation of visuospatial relationship between anatomical structures. With increasing accessibility, investigators are able to convert standard imaging data into a CAD file using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography, multijet modeling, selective laser sintering, binder jet technique, and fused deposition modeling. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without outsourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. In this review, existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative esthetics are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, developing

  7. Light shaping along 3D curves and particle manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, José A.; Alieva, Tatiana

    2015-03-01

    We present a non-iterative holographic technique for efficient and versatile laser beam shaping along arbitrary 3D curves. Light beams with intensity shaped for several 3D curves: Tilted ring, Viviani's curve, Archimedean spiral, and trefoil-knotted curve have been experimentally generated and applied for optical trapping of micrometer-sized dielectric particles. The high intensity gradients and independent phase control prescribed along the curve make this kind of laser trap attractive for multiple particle manipulation and allow for forward and backward motion to the light source. Indeed, different configurations of tractor beam traps are experimentally demonstrated. This technique can also be applied for laser micro-machining.

  8. 3D coaxial out-of-plane metallic antennas for filtering and multi-spectral imaging in the infrared range.

    PubMed

    Jacassi, Andrea; Bozzola, Angelo; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Tantussi, Francesco; De Angelis, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We fabricated and investigated a new configuration of 3D coaxial metallic antennas working in the infrared which combines the strong lateral light scattering of vertical plasmonic structures with the selective spectral transmission of 2D arrays of coaxial apertures. The coaxial structures are fabricated with a top-down method based on a template of hollow 3D antennas. Each antenna has a multilayer radial structure consisting of dielectric and metallic materials not achievable in a 2D configuration. A planar metallic layer is inserted normally to the antennas. The outer dielectric shell of the antenna defines a nanometric gap between the horizontal plane and the vertical walls. Thanks to this aperture, light can tunnel to the other side of the plane, and be transmitted to the far field in a set of resonances. These are investigated with finite-elements electromagnetic calculations and with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. The spectral position of the resonances can be tuned by changing the lattice period and/or the antenna length. Thanks to the strong scattering provided by the 3D geometry, the transmission peaks possess a high signal-to-noise ratio even when the illuminated area is less than 2 × 2 times the operation wavelength. This opens new possibilities for multispectral imaging in the IR with wavelength-scale spatial resolution. PMID:27345517

  9. 3D coaxial out-of-plane metallic antennas for filtering and multi-spectral imaging in the infrared range.

    PubMed

    Jacassi, Andrea; Bozzola, Angelo; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Tantussi, Francesco; De Angelis, Francesco

    2016-06-27

    We fabricated and investigated a new configuration of 3D coaxial metallic antennas working in the infrared which combines the strong lateral light scattering of vertical plasmonic structures with the selective spectral transmission of 2D arrays of coaxial apertures. The coaxial structures are fabricated with a top-down method based on a template of hollow 3D antennas. Each antenna has a multilayer radial structure consisting of dielectric and metallic materials not achievable in a 2D configuration. A planar metallic layer is inserted normally to the antennas. The outer dielectric shell of the antenna defines a nanometric gap between the horizontal plane and the vertical walls. Thanks to this aperture, light can tunnel to the other side of the plane, and be transmitted to the far field in a set of resonances. These are investigated with finite-elements electromagnetic calculations and with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. The spectral position of the resonances can be tuned by changing the lattice period and/or the antenna length. Thanks to the strong scattering provided by the 3D geometry, the transmission peaks possess a high signal-to-noise ratio even when the illuminated area is less than 2 × 2 times the operation wavelength. This opens new possibilities for multispectral imaging in the IR with wavelength-scale spatial resolution.

  10. 3D coaxial out-of-plane metallic antennas for filtering and multi-spectral imaging in the infrared range

    PubMed Central

    Jacassi, Andrea; Bozzola, Angelo; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Tantussi, Francesco; De Angelis, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We fabricated and investigated a new configuration of 3D coaxial metallic antennas working in the infrared which combines the strong lateral light scattering of vertical plasmonic structures with the selective spectral transmission of 2D arrays of coaxial apertures. The coaxial structures are fabricated with a top-down method based on a template of hollow 3D antennas. Each antenna has a multilayer radial structure consisting of dielectric and metallic materials not achievable in a 2D configuration. A planar metallic layer is inserted normally to the antennas. The outer dielectric shell of the antenna defines a nanometric gap between the horizontal plane and the vertical walls. Thanks to this aperture, light can tunnel to the other side of the plane, and be transmitted to the far field in a set of resonances. These are investigated with finite-elements electromagnetic calculations and with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. The spectral position of the resonances can be tuned by changing the lattice period and/or the antenna length. Thanks to the strong scattering provided by the 3D geometry, the transmission peaks possess a high signal-to-noise ratio even when the illuminated area is less than 2 × 2 times the operation wavelength. This opens new possibilities for multispectral imaging in the IR with wavelength-scale spatial resolution. PMID:27345517

  11. Three wafer stacking for 3D integration.

    SciTech Connect

    Greth, K. Douglas; Ford, Christine L.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.; Shinde, Subhash L.; Timon, Robert P.; Bauer, Todd M.; Hetherington, Dale Laird; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony

    2011-11-01

    Vertical wafer stacking will enable a wide variety of new system architectures by enabling the integration of dissimilar technologies in one small form factor package. With this LDRD, we explored the combination of processes and integration techniques required to achieve stacking of three or more layers. The specific topics that we investigated include design and layout of a reticle set for use as a process development vehicle, through silicon via formation, bonding media, wafer thinning, dielectric deposition for via isolation on the wafer backside, and pad formation.

  12. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  13. Remote 3D Medical Consultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Greg; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry; Cairns, Bruce; Mayer-Patel, Ketan; Yang, Ruigang; State, Andrei; Towles, Herman; Ilie, Adrian; Krishnan, Srinivas; Söderholm, Hanna M.

    Two-dimensional (2D) video-based telemedical consultation has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years. Two issues that seem to arise in most relevant case studies are the difficulty associated with obtaining the desired 2D camera views, and poor depth perception. To address these problems we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to synthesize a spatially continuous range of dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and events. The 3D views can be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote viewers with fixed displays or mobile devices such as a personal digital assistant (PDA). The viewpoints could be specified manually or automatically via user head or PDA tracking, giving the remote viewer virtual head- or hand-slaved (PDA-based) remote cameras for mono or stereo viewing. We call this idea remote 3D medical consultation (3DMC). In this article we motivate and explain the vision for 3D medical consultation; we describe the relevant computer vision/graphics, display, and networking research; we present a proof-of-concept prototype system; and we present some early experimental results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical consultation could offer benefits over conventional 2D televideo.

  14. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  15. 3D technology for intelligent trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipton, Ronald

    2010-10-01

    At Super-LHC luminosity it is expected that the standard suite of level 1 triggers for CMS will saturate. Information from the tracker will be needed to reduce trigger rates to satisfy the level 1 bandwidth. Tracking trigger modules which correlate information from closely-spaced sensor layers to form an on-detector momentum filter are being developed by several groups. We report on a trigger module design which utilizes three dimensional integrated circuit technology incorporating chips which are connected both to the top and bottom sensor, providing the ability to filter information locally. A demonstration chip, the VICTR, has been submitted to the Chartered/Tezzaron two-tier 3D run coordinated by Fermilab. We report on the 3D design concept, the status of the VICTR chip and associated sensor integration utilizing oxide bonding.

  16. 3D Technology for intelligent trackers

    SciTech Connect

    Lipton, Ronald; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    At Super-LHC luminosity it is expected that the standard suite of level 1 triggers for CMS will saturate. Information from the tracker will be needed to reduce trigger rates to satisfy the level 1 bandwidth. Tracking trigger modules which correlate information from closely-spaced sensor layers to form an on-detector momentum filter are being developed by several groups. We report on a trigger module design which utilizes three dimensional integrated circuit technology incorporating chips which are connected both to the top and bottom sensor, providing the ability to filter information locally. A demonstration chip, the VICTR, has been submitted to the Chartered/Tezzaron two-tier 3D run coordinated by Fermilab. We report on the 3D design concept, the status of the VICTR chip and associated sensor integration utilizing oxide bonding.

  17. σ-π molecular dielectric multilayers for low-voltage organic thin-film transistors

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Myung-Han; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J.

    2005-01-01

    Very thin (2.3-5.5 nm) self-assembled organic dielectric multilayers have been integrated into organic thin-film transistor structures to achieve sub-1-V operating characteristics. These new dielectrics are fabricated by means of layer-by-layer solution phase deposition of molecular silicon precursors, resulting in smooth, nanostructurally well defined, strongly adherent, thermally stable, virtually pinhole-free, organosiloxane thin films having exceptionally large electrical capacitances (up to ≈2,500 nF·cm-2), excellent insulating properties (leakage current densities as low as 10-9 A·cm-2), and single-layer dielectric constant (k)of ≈16. These 3D self-assembled multilayers enable organic thin-film transistor function at very low source-drain, gate, and threshold voltages (<1 V) and are compatible with a broad variety of vapor- or solution-deposited p- and n-channel organic semiconductors. PMID:15781860

  18. USM3D Predictions of Supersonic Nozzle Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Melissa B.; Elmiligui, Alaa A.; Campbell, Richard L.; Nayani, Sudheer N.

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on the NASA Tetrahedral Unstructured Software System CFD code (USM3D) capability to predict supersonic plume flow. Previous studies, published in 2004 and 2009, investigated USM3D's results versus historical experimental data. This current study continued that comparison however focusing on the use of the volume souring to capture the shear layers and internal shock structure of the plume. This study was conducted using two benchmark axisymmetric supersonic jet experimental data sets. The study showed that with the use of volume sourcing, USM3D was able to capture and model a jet plume's shear layer and internal shock structure.

  19. 3D-Printed Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony K; Huynh, Wilson; Horowitz, Lisa F; Folch, Albert

    2016-03-14

    The advent of soft lithography allowed for an unprecedented expansion in the field of microfluidics. However, the vast majority of PDMS microfluidic devices are still made with extensive manual labor, are tethered to bulky control systems, and have cumbersome user interfaces, which all render commercialization difficult. On the other hand, 3D printing has begun to embrace the range of sizes and materials that appeal to the developers of microfluidic devices. Prior to fabrication, a design is digitally built as a detailed 3D CAD file. The design can be assembled in modules by remotely collaborating teams, and its mechanical and fluidic behavior can be simulated using finite-element modeling. As structures are created by adding materials without the need for etching or dissolution, processing is environmentally friendly and economically efficient. We predict that in the next few years, 3D printing will replace most PDMS and plastic molding techniques in academia.

  20. Surface band bending and band alignment of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited dielectrics on Ga- and N-face gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jialing; Eller, Brianna S.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2014-09-01

    The effects of surface pretreatment, dielectric growth, and post deposition annealing on interface electronic structure and polarization charge compensation of Ga- and N-face bulk GaN were investigated. The cleaning process consisted of an ex-situ wet chemical NH4OH treatment and an in-situ elevated temperature NH3 plasma process to remove carbon contamination, reduce oxygen coverage, and potentially passivate N-vacancy related defects. After the cleaning process, carbon contamination decreased below the x-ray photoemission spectroscopy detection limit, and the oxygen coverage stabilized at ˜1 monolayer on both Ga- and N-face GaN. In addition, Ga- and N-face GaN had an upward band bending of 0.8 ± 0.1 eV and 0.6 ± 0.1 eV, respectively, which suggested the net charge of the surface states and polarization bound charge was similar on Ga- and N-face GaN. Furthermore, three dielectrics (HfO2, Al2O3, and SiO2) were prepared by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition on Ga- or N-face GaN and annealed in N2 ambient to investigate the effect of the polarization charge on the interface electronic structure and band offsets. The respective valence band offsets of HfO2, Al2O3, and SiO2 with respect to Ga- and N-face GaN were 1.4 ± 0.1, 2.0 ± 0.1, and 3.2 ± 0.1 eV, regardless of dielectric thickness. The corresponding conduction band offsets were 1.0 ± 0.1, 1.3 ± 0.1, and 2.3 ± 0.1 eV, respectively. Experimental band offset results were consistent with theoretical calculations based on the charge neutrality level model. The trend of band offsets for dielectric/GaN interfaces was related to the band gap and/or the electronic part of the dielectric constant. The effect of polarization charge on band offset was apparently screened by the dielectric-GaN interface states.

  1. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  2. Sequential lateral solidification of silicon thin films on low-k dielectrics for low temperature integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carta, Fabio; Gates, Stephen M.; Limanov, Alexander B.; Hlaing, Htay; Im, James S.; Edelstein, Daniel C.; Kymissis, Ioannis

    2014-12-01

    We present the excimer laser crystallization of amorphous silicon on a low dielectric constant (low-k) insulator for very large scale integration monolithic 3D integration and demonstrate that low dielectric constant materials are suitable substrates for 3D integration through laser crystallization of silicon thin films. We crystallized 100 nm amorphous silicon on top of SiO2 and SiCOH (low-k) dielectrics, at different material thicknesses (1 μm, 0.75 μm, and 0.5 μm). The amorphous silicon crystallization on low-k dielectric requires 35% less laser energy than on an SiO2 dielectric. This difference is related to the thermal conductivity of the two materials, in agreement with one dimensional simulations of the crystallization process. We analyzed the morphology of the material through defect-enhanced microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis. SEM micrographs show that polycrystalline silicon is characterized by micron-long grains with an average width of 543 nm for the SiO2 sample and 570 nm for the low-k samples. Comparison of the Raman spectra does not show any major difference in film quality for the two different dielectrics, and polycrystalline silicon peaks are closely placed around 517 cm-1. From X-ray diffraction analysis, the material crystallized on SiO2 shows a preferential (111) crystal orientation. In the SiCOH case, the 111 peak strength decreases dramatically and samples do not show preferential crystal orientation. A 1D finite element method simulation of the crystallization process on a back end of line structure shows that copper (Cu) damascene interconnects reach a temperature of 70 °C or lower with a 0.5 μm dielectric layer between the Cu and the molten Si layer, a favorable condition for monolithic 3D integration.

  3. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  4. SNL3dFace

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial featuresmore » of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.« less

  5. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  6. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  7. 2D/3D Monte Carlo Feature Profile Simulator FPS-3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Paul

    2010-11-01

    Numerical simulation of etching/deposition profiles is important for semiconductor industry, as it allows analysis and prediction of the outcome of materials processing on a micron and sub-micron scale. The difficulty, however, is in making such a simulator a reliable, general, and easy to use tool applicable to different situations, for example, with different ratios of ion to neutral fluxes, different chemistries, different energies of incoming particles, and different angular and energy dependencies for surface reactions, without recompiling the code each time when the parameters change. The FPS-3D simulator [1] does not need recompilation when the features, materials, gases, or plasma are changed -- modifications to input, chemistry, and flux files are enough. The code allows interaction of neutral low-energy species with the surface mono-layer, while considering finite penetration depth into the volume for fast particles and ions. The FPS-3D code can simulate etching and deposition processes, both for 2D and 3D geometries. FPS-3D is using an advanced graphics package from HFS for presenting real-time process and profile evolution. The presentation will discuss the FPS-3D code with examples for different process conditions. The author is thankful to Drs. S.-Y. Kang of TEL TDC and P. Miller of HFS for valuable discussions. [4pt] [1] P. Moroz, URP.00101, GEC, Saratoga, NY, 2009.

  8. 3D Band Diagram and Photoexcitation of 2D–3D Semiconductor Heterojunctions

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Bo; Shi, Gang; Lei, Sidong; He, Yongmin; Gao, Weilu; Gong, Yongji; Ye, Gonglan; Zhou, Wu; Keyshar, Kunttal; Hao, Ji; et al

    2015-08-17

    The emergence of a rich variety of two-dimensional (2D) layered semiconductor materials has enabled the creation of atomically thin heterojunction devices. Junctions between atomically thin 2D layers and 3D bulk semiconductors can lead to junctions that are fundamentally electronically different from the covalently bonded conventional semiconductor junctions. In this paper, we propose a new 3D band diagram for the heterojunction formed between n-type monolayer MoS2 and p-type Si, in which the conduction and valence band-edges of the MoS2 monolayer are drawn for both stacked and in-plane directions. This new band diagram helps visualize the flow of charge carriers inside themore » device in a 3D manner. Our detailed wavelength-dependent photocurrent measurements fully support the diagrams and unambiguously show that the band alignment is type I for this 2D-3D heterojunction. Photogenerated electron–hole pairs in the atomically thin monolayer are separated and driven by an external bias and control the “on/off” states of the junction photodetector device. Finally, two photoresponse regimes with fast and slow relaxation are also revealed in time-resolved photocurrent measurements, suggesting the important role played by charge trap states.« less

  9. 3D Band Diagram and Photoexcitation of 2D–3D Semiconductor Heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bo; Shi, Gang; Lei, Sidong; He, Yongmin; Gao, Weilu; Gong, Yongji; Ye, Gonglan; Zhou, Wu; Keyshar, Kunttal; Hao, Ji; Dong, Pei; Ge, Liehui; Lou, Jun; Kono, Junichiro; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2015-08-17

    The emergence of a rich variety of two-dimensional (2D) layered semiconductor materials has enabled the creation of atomically thin heterojunction devices. Junctions between atomically thin 2D layers and 3D bulk semiconductors can lead to junctions that are fundamentally electronically different from the covalently bonded conventional semiconductor junctions. In this paper, we propose a new 3D band diagram for the heterojunction formed between n-type monolayer MoS2 and p-type Si, in which the conduction and valence band-edges of the MoS2 monolayer are drawn for both stacked and in-plane directions. This new band diagram helps visualize the flow of charge carriers inside the device in a 3D manner. Our detailed wavelength-dependent photocurrent measurements fully support the diagrams and unambiguously show that the band alignment is type I for this 2D-3D heterojunction. Photogenerated electron–hole pairs in the atomically thin monolayer are separated and driven by an external bias and control the “on/off” states of the junction photodetector device. Finally, two photoresponse regimes with fast and slow relaxation are also revealed in time-resolved photocurrent measurements, suggesting the important role played by charge trap states.

  10. Atomic layer deposition of crystalline SrHfO{sub 3} directly on Ge (001) for high-k dielectric applications

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, Martin D.; Ngo, Thong Q.; Ekerdt, John G.; Hu, Chengqing; Jiang, Aiting; Yu, Edward T.; Lu, Sirong; Smith, David J.; Posadas, Agham; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-02-07

    The current work explores the crystalline perovskite oxide, strontium hafnate, as a potential high-k gate dielectric for Ge-based transistors. SrHfO{sub 3} (SHO) is grown directly on Ge by atomic layer deposition and becomes crystalline with epitaxial registry after post-deposition vacuum annealing at ∼700 °C for 5 min. The 2 × 1 reconstructed, clean Ge (001) surface is a necessary template to achieve crystalline films upon annealing. The SHO films exhibit excellent crystallinity, as shown by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The SHO films have favorable electronic properties for consideration as a high-k gate dielectric on Ge, with satisfactory band offsets (>2 eV), low leakage current (<10{sup −5} A/cm{sup 2} at an applied field of 1 MV/cm) at an equivalent oxide thickness of 1 nm, and a reasonable dielectric constant (k ∼ 18). The interface trap density (D{sub it}) is estimated to be as low as ∼2 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2 }eV{sup −1} under the current growth and anneal conditions. Some interfacial reaction is observed between SHO and Ge at temperatures above ∼650 °C, which may contribute to increased D{sub it} value. This study confirms the potential for crystalline oxides grown directly on Ge by atomic layer deposition for advanced electronic applications.

  11. Physisorbed-precursor-assisted atomic layer deposition of reliable ultrathin dielectric films on inert graphene surfaces for low-power electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Seong-Jun; Kim, Hyo Won; Heo, Jinseong; Lee, Min-Hyun; Song, Hyun Jae; Ku, JiYeon; Lee, Yunseong; Cho, Yeonchoo; Jeon, Woojin; Suh, Hwansoo; Hwang, Sungwoo; Park, Seongjun

    2016-09-01

    Among the most fundamental challenges encountered in the successful incorporation of graphene in silicon-based electronics is the conformal growth of ultrathin dielectric films, especially those with thicknesses lower than 5 nm, on chemically inert graphene surfaces. Here, we present physisorbed-precursor-assisted atomic layer deposition (pALD) as an extremely robust method for fabricating such films. Using atomic-scale characterisation, it is confirmed that conformal and intact ultrathin Al2O3 films can be synthesised on graphene by pALD. The mechanism underlying the pALD process is identified through first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. Further, this novel deposition technique is used to fabricate two types of wafer-scale devices. It is found that the incorporation of a 5 nm-thick pALD Al2O3 gate dielectric film improves the performance of metal-oxide-graphene field-effect transistors to a greater extent than does the incorporation of a conventional ALD Al2O3 film. We also employ a 5 nm-thick pALD HfO2 film as a highly scalable dielectric layer with a capacitance equivalent oxide thickness of 1 nm in graphene-based tunnelling field-effect transistors fabricated on a glass wafer and achieve a subthreshold swing of 30 mV/dec. This significant improvement in switching allows for the low-voltage operation of an inverter within 0.5 V of both the drain and the gate voltages, thus paving the way for low-power electronics.

  12. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  13. Personalized development of human organs using 3D printing technology.

    PubMed

    Radenkovic, Dina; Solouk, Atefeh; Seifalian, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    3D printing is a technique of fabricating physical models from a 3D volumetric digital image. The image is sliced and printed using a specific material into thin layers, and successive layering of the material produces a 3D model. It has already been used for printing surgical models for preoperative planning and in constructing personalized prostheses for patients. The ultimate goal is to achieve the development of functional human organs and tissues, to overcome limitations of organ transplantation created by the lack of organ donors and life-long immunosuppression. We hypothesized a precision medicine approach to human organ fabrication using 3D printed technology, in which the digital volumetric data would be collected by imaging of a patient, i.e. CT or MRI images followed by mathematical modeling to create a digital 3D image. Then a suitable biocompatible material, with an optimal resolution for cells seeding and maintenance of cell viability during the printing process, would be printed with a compatible printer type and finally implanted into the patient. Life-saving operations with 3D printed implants were already performed in patients. However, several issues need to be addressed before translational application of 3D printing into clinical medicine. These are vascularization, innervation, and financial cost of 3D printing and safety of biomaterials used for the construct. PMID:26826637

  14. Personalized development of human organs using 3D printing technology.

    PubMed

    Radenkovic, Dina; Solouk, Atefeh; Seifalian, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    3D printing is a technique of fabricating physical models from a 3D volumetric digital image. The image is sliced and printed using a specific material into thin layers, and successive layering of the material produces a 3D model. It has already been used for printing surgical models for preoperative planning and in constructing personalized prostheses for patients. The ultimate goal is to achieve the development of functional human organs and tissues, to overcome limitations of organ transplantation created by the lack of organ donors and life-long immunosuppression. We hypothesized a precision medicine approach to human organ fabrication using 3D printed technology, in which the digital volumetric data would be collected by imaging of a patient, i.e. CT or MRI images followed by mathematical modeling to create a digital 3D image. Then a suitable biocompatible material, with an optimal resolution for cells seeding and maintenance of cell viability during the printing process, would be printed with a compatible printer type and finally implanted into the patient. Life-saving operations with 3D printed implants were already performed in patients. However, several issues need to be addressed before translational application of 3D printing into clinical medicine. These are vascularization, innervation, and financial cost of 3D printing and safety of biomaterials used for the construct.

  15. Study on the formation of self-assembled monolayers on sol-gel processed hafnium oxide as dielectric layers.

    PubMed

    Ting, Guy G; Acton, Orb; Ma, Hong; Ka, Jae Won; Jen, Alex K-Y

    2009-02-17

    High dielectric constant (k) metal oxides such as hafnium oxide (HfO2) have gained significant interest due to their applications in microelectronics. In order to study and control the surface properties of hafnium oxide, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of four different long aliphatic molecules with binding groups of phosphonic acid, carboxylic acid, and catechol were formed and characterized. Surface modification was performed to improve the interface between metal oxide and top deposited materials as well as to create suitable dielectric properties, that is, leakage current and capacitance densities, which are important in organic thin film transistors. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, contact angle goniometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and simple metal-HfO2-SAM-metal devices were used to characterize the surfaces before and after SAM modification on sol-gel processed hafnium oxide. The alkylphosphonic acid provided the best monolayer formation on sol-gel processed hafnium oxide to generate a well-packed, ultrathin dielectric exhibiting a low leakage current density of 2x10(-8) A/cm2 at an applied voltage of -2.0 V and high capacitance density of 0.55 microF/cm2 at 10 kHz. Dialkylcatechol showed similar characteristics and the potential for using the catechol SAMs to modify HfO2 surfaces. In addition, the integration of this alkylphosphonic acid SAM/hafnium oxide hybrid dielectric into pentacene-based thin film transistors yields low-voltage operation within 1.5 V and improved performance over bare hafnium oxide.

  16. The stability of two layer dielectric-electrolyte micro-flow subjected to an external electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demekhin, E. A.; Ganchenko, G. S.; Navarkar, A.; Amiroudine, S.

    2016-09-01

    The two-phase microflow of conductive (electrolyte) and non-conductive (dielectric) viscous liquids bounded by two solid walls in an external electric field is scrutinized. The lower solid wall, which is adjoined to the electrolyte, is a charged dielectric surface; the upper wall which bounds the dielectric is insulated. The problem has a steady one-dimensional (1D) solution. The theoretical results for a plug-like velocity profile are successfully compared with available theoretical and experimental data from the literature. The linear stability of the steady-state flow is investigated numerically with spectral Galerkin's method for solving linearized eigenvalue problem. This method was successfully applied for related problem of electroosmosis of ultrathin film. The numerical analysis provides insights on the coexistence of long and short-wave instabilities. The influence of control parameters such as the ratio of the viscosities of both liquids and the ratio of the channel heights on the stability of one-dimensional flow was investigated for different values of external electric field. The influence of an external pressure gradient on the flow stability is also investigated. The experimental facts established by other authors, according to which the system destabilizes if the electroosmotic flow is oppositely directed to the external pressure gradient, is confirmed in this work. Otherwise stabilization takes place.

  17. A Kagomé layer-based 3D Mn(II) framework showing coexistence of spin-canting, spin-frustration, field-induced metamagnetic and spin-flop transitions.

    PubMed

    Yang, En-Cui; Liu, Zhong-Yi; Li, Ya-Ling; Wang, Jing-Yi; Zhao, Xiao-Jun

    2011-09-14

    A novel 3D Mn(II) coordination framework with Kagomé sublattice, [Mn(3)(py)(2)(nip)(2)](n) (py(-) = 2-((1H-tetrazol-5-yl)methyl)pyridine and nip(2-) = 5-nitroisophathalate), was in situ solvothermally synthesized and shows the coexistence of spin-canting, spin-frustration as well as field-induced metamagnetic and spin-flop transitions at 2.9 K.

  18. Forensic 3D scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles Q.; Small, Daniel E.; Peters, Ralph R.; Rigdon, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a fieldable prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  19. 3D Printable Graphene Composite.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-08

    In human being's history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today's personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite's linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C(-1) from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  20. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  1. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  2. 3D light scanning macrography.

    PubMed

    Huber, D; Keller, M; Robert, D

    2001-08-01

    The technique of 3D light scanning macrography permits the non-invasive surface scanning of small specimens at magnifications up to 200x. Obviating both the problem of limited depth of field inherent to conventional close-up macrophotography and the metallic coating required by scanning electron microscopy, 3D light scanning macrography provides three-dimensional digital images of intact specimens without the loss of colour, texture and transparency information. This newly developed technique offers a versatile, portable and cost-efficient method for the non-invasive digital and photographic documentation of small objects. Computer controlled device operation and digital image acquisition facilitate fast and accurate quantitative morphometric investigations, and the technique offers a broad field of research and educational applications in biological, medical and materials sciences. PMID:11489078

  3. Dielectric elastomer-based laser beam pointing method with ultraviolet and visible wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Tomohiko; Wang, Lihui; Ishikawa, Masatoshi

    2016-03-01

    We report a novel method to manipulate the direction of a laser beam by controlling the thickness of a dielectric elastomer. The system is controlled by applying different voltages to multi-layers of dielectric elastomers without mechanical movement. We employed laser beams with different wavelengths to test the proposed system, and the experimental results showed that it has an excellent transmittance profile in the ultraviolet and visible wavelength bands, and that we achieved high-precision control in the micrometer range. The results show the feasibility of this technique for laser applications that require high positional accuracy, such as laser cutting, drilling machines, and 3D printing.

  4. Adaptive interrogation for 3D-PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, Matteo; Ianiro, Andrea; Scarano, Fulvio

    2013-02-01

    A method to adapt the shape and orientation of interrogation volumes for 3D-PIV motion analysis is introduced, aimed to increase the local spatial resolution. The main application of this approach is the detailed analysis of complex 3D and vortex-dominated flows that exhibit high vorticity in confined regions like shear layers and vortex filaments. The adaptive criterion is based on the analysis of the components of the local velocity gradient tensor, which returns the level of anisotropy of velocity spatial fluctuations. The principle to increase the local spatial resolution is based on the deformation of spherical isotropic interrogation regions, obtained by means of Gaussian weighting, into ellipsoids, with free choice of the principal axes and their directions. The interrogation region is contracted in the direction of the maximum velocity variation and elongated in the minimum one in order to maintain a constant interrogation volume. The adaptivity technique for three-dimensional PIV data takes advantage of the 3D topology of the flow, allowing increasing the spatial resolution not only in the case of shear layers, but also for vortex filaments, which is not possible for two-dimensional measurement in the plane normal to the vortex axis. The definition of the ellipsoidal interrogation region semi-axes is based on the singular values and singular directions of the local velocity gradient tensor as obtained by the singular values decomposition technique (SVD). The working principle is verified making use of numerical simulations of a shear layer and of a vortex filament. The application of the technique to data from a Tomo-PIV experiment conducted on a round jet, shows that the resolution of the shear layer at the jet exit can be considerably improved and an increase of about 25% in the vorticity peak is attained when the adaptive approach is applied. On the other hand, the peak vorticity description in the core of vortex rings is only slightly improved with

  5. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  6. [Real time 3D echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Bauer, F; Shiota, T; Thomas, J D

    2001-07-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients. PMID:11494630

  7. DYNA3D. Explicit 3-d Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.; Englemann, B.E. )

    1993-11-30

    DYNA3D is an explicit, three-dimensional, finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic response of inelastic solids and structures. DYNA3D contains 30 material models and 10 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, Blatz-Ko rubber, high explosive burn, hydrodynamic without deviatoric stresses, elastoplastic hydrodynamic, temperature-dependent elastoplastic, isotropic elastoplastic, isotropic elastoplastic with failure, soil and crushable foam with failure, Johnson/Cook plasticity model, pseudo TENSOR geological model, elastoplastic with fracture, power law isotropic plasticity, strain rate dependent plasticity, rigid, thermal orthotropic, composite damage model, thermal orthotropic with 12 curves, piecewise linear isotropic plasticity, inviscid two invariant geologic cap, orthotropic crushable model, Moonsy-Rivlin rubber, resultant plasticity, closed form update shell plasticity, and Frazer-Nash rubber model. The hydrodynamic material models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 10 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, tabulated, and TENSOR pore collapse. DYNA3D generates three binary output databases. One contains information for complete states at infrequent intervals; 50 to 100 states is typical. The second contains information for a subset of nodes and elements at frequent intervals; 1,000 to 10,000 states is typical. The last contains interface data for contact surfaces.

  8. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer themore » second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.« less

  9. Effect of Stacking Layers on the Microwave Dielectric Properties of (Li0.5Sm0.5)TiO3/CaTiO3 Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byoung Duk; Lee, Hong Ryul; Yoon, Ki Hyun; Kang, Dong Heon

    2005-03-01

    Effect of stacking layers on the microwave dielectric properties of the (Li0.5Sm0.5)TiO3/CaTiO3 (LSTO/CTO) thin films prepared by the metalorganic solution deposition technique (MOSD) was investigated. The dielectric constant (K), dielectric loss (\\tanδ) and temperature coefficient of dielectric constant (TCK) of CaTiO3 films measured at 6 GHz were 160, 0.003 and -1340 ppm/°C, respectively. In contrast, the (Li0.5Sm0.5)TiO3 films showed K of 35, \\tanδ of 0.001 and TCK of +320 ppm/°C. As the thickness of CTO layer in the LSTO/CTO films increased, K increased and TCK changed from positive values to negative values by dielectric mixing rule. Especially, LSTO(200 nm)/CTO(200 nm) films exhibited TCK of +10 ppm/°C, indicating temperature stability. The \\tanδ of LSTO/CTO films increased with increasing the thickness of CTO layer. This result was attributed to the fact that the stresses were induced by the higher thermal-expansion coefficient of CTO than that of LSTO. Also, as compared with LSTO(200 nm)/CTO(200 nm) film, the K and \\textit{TCK} of LSTO(100 nm)/CTO(200 nm)/LSTO(100 nm) film were not changed, but the dielectric loss increased. This result indicated that the dielectric loss was affected by the number of interfaces between CTO and LSTO layers.

  10. 3D Printing technologies for drug delivery: a review.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; Smyth, Hugh

    2016-01-01

    With the FDA approval of the first 3D printed tablet, Spritam®, there is now precedence set for the utilization of 3D printing for the preparation of drug delivery systems. The capabilities for dispensing low volumes with accuracy, precise spatial control and layer-by-layer assembly allow for the preparation of complex compositions and geometries. The high degree of flexibility and control with 3D printing enables the preparation of dosage forms with multiple active pharmaceutical ingredients with complex and tailored release profiles. A unique opportunity for this technology for the preparation of personalized doses to address individual patient needs. This review will highlight the 3D printing technologies being utilized for the fabrication of drug delivery systems, as well as the formulation and processing parameters for consideration. This article will also summarize the range of dosage forms that have been prepared using these technologies, specifically over the last 10 years.

  11. 3D printed quantum dot light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong Lin; Tamargo, Ian A; Kim, Hyoungsoo; Johnson, Blake N; Gupta, Maneesh K; Koh, Tae-Wook; Chin, Huai-An; Steingart, Daniel A; Rand, Barry P; McAlpine, Michael C

    2014-12-10

    Developing the ability to 3D print various classes of materials possessing distinct properties could enable the freeform generation of active electronics in unique functional, interwoven architectures. Achieving seamless integration of diverse materials with 3D printing is a significant challenge that requires overcoming discrepancies in material properties in addition to ensuring that all the materials are compatible with the 3D printing process. To date, 3D printing has been limited to specific plastics, passive conductors, and a few biological materials. Here, we show that diverse classes of materials can be 3D printed and fully integrated into device components with active properties. Specifically, we demonstrate the seamless interweaving of five different materials, including (1) emissive semiconducting inorganic nanoparticles, (2) an elastomeric matrix, (3) organic polymers as charge transport layers, (4) solid and liquid metal leads, and (5) a UV-adhesive transparent substrate layer. As a proof of concept for demonstrating the integrated functionality of these materials, we 3D printed quantum dot-based light-emitting diodes (QD-LEDs) that exhibit pure and tunable color emission properties. By further incorporating the 3D scanning of surface topologies, we demonstrate the ability to conformally print devices onto curvilinear surfaces, such as contact lenses. Finally, we show that novel architectures that are not easily accessed using standard microfabrication techniques can be constructed, by 3D printing a 2 × 2 × 2 cube of encapsulated LEDs, in which every component of the cube and electronics are 3D printed. Overall, these results suggest that 3D printing is more versatile than has been demonstrated to date and is capable of integrating many distinct classes of materials.

  12. 3D printed quantum dot light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong Lin; Tamargo, Ian A; Kim, Hyoungsoo; Johnson, Blake N; Gupta, Maneesh K; Koh, Tae-Wook; Chin, Huai-An; Steingart, Daniel A; Rand, Barry P; McAlpine, Michael C

    2014-12-10

    Developing the ability to 3D print various classes of materials possessing distinct properties could enable the freeform generation of active electronics in unique functional, interwoven architectures. Achieving seamless integration of diverse materials with 3D printing is a significant challenge that requires overcoming discrepancies in material properties in addition to ensuring that all the materials are compatible with the 3D printing process. To date, 3D printing has been limited to specific plastics, passive conductors, and a few biological materials. Here, we show that diverse classes of materials can be 3D printed and fully integrated into device components with active properties. Specifically, we demonstrate the seamless interweaving of five different materials, including (1) emissive semiconducting inorganic nanoparticles, (2) an elastomeric matrix, (3) organic polymers as charge transport layers, (4) solid and liquid metal leads, and (5) a UV-adhesive transparent substrate layer. As a proof of concept for demonstrating the integrated functionality of these materials, we 3D printed quantum dot-based light-emitting diodes (QD-LEDs) that exhibit pure and tunable color emission properties. By further incorporating the 3D scanning of surface topologies, we demonstrate the ability to conformally print devices onto curvilinear surfaces, such as contact lenses. Finally, we show that novel architectures that are not easily accessed using standard microfabrication techniques can be constructed, by 3D printing a 2 × 2 × 2 cube of encapsulated LEDs, in which every component of the cube and electronics are 3D printed. Overall, these results suggest that 3D printing is more versatile than has been demonstrated to date and is capable of integrating many distinct classes of materials. PMID:25360485

  13. CFL3D User's Manual (Version 5.0)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krist, Sherrie L.; Biedron, Robert T.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    1998-01-01

    This document is the User's Manual for the CFL3D computer code, a thin-layer Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver for structured multiple-zone grids. Descriptions of the code's input parameters, non-dimensionalizations, file formats, boundary conditions, and equations are included. Sample 2-D and 3-D test cases are also described, and many helpful hints for using the code are provided.

  14. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    <