Science.gov

Sample records for 3d discrete element

  1. Discrete elements for 3D microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Krisna C; Thompson, Bryant; Malmstadt, Noah

    2014-10-21

    Microfluidic systems are rapidly becoming commonplace tools for high-precision materials synthesis, biochemical sample preparation, and biophysical analysis. Typically, microfluidic systems are constructed in monolithic form by means of microfabrication and, increasingly, by additive techniques. These methods restrict the design and assembly of truly complex systems by placing unnecessary emphasis on complete functional integration of operational elements in a planar environment. Here, we present a solution based on discrete elements that liberates designers to build large-scale microfluidic systems in three dimensions that are modular, diverse, and predictable by simple network analysis techniques. We develop a sample library of standardized components and connectors manufactured using stereolithography. We predict and validate the flow characteristics of these individual components to design and construct a tunable concentration gradient generator with a scalable number of parallel outputs. We show that these systems are rapidly reconfigurable by constructing three variations of a device for generating monodisperse microdroplets in two distinct size regimes and in a high-throughput mode by simple replacement of emulsifier subcircuits. Finally, we demonstrate the capability for active process monitoring by constructing an optical sensing element for detecting water droplets in a fluorocarbon stream and quantifying their size and frequency. By moving away from large-scale integration toward standardized discrete elements, we demonstrate the potential to reduce the practice of designing and assembling complex 3D microfluidic circuits to a methodology comparable to that found in the electronics industry.

  2. Finite-element-based discretization and regularization strategies for 3-D inverse electrocardiography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dafang; Kirby, Robert M; Johnson, Chris R

    2011-06-01

    We consider the inverse electrocardiographic problem of computing epicardial potentials from a body-surface potential map. We study how to improve numerical approximation of the inverse problem when the finite-element method is used. Being ill-posed, the inverse problem requires different discretization strategies from its corresponding forward problem. We propose refinement guidelines that specifically address the ill-posedness of the problem. The resulting guidelines necessitate the use of hybrid finite elements composed of tetrahedra and prism elements. Also, in order to maintain consistent numerical quality when the inverse problem is discretized into different scales, we propose a new family of regularizers using the variational principle underlying finite-element methods. These variational-formed regularizers serve as an alternative to the traditional Tikhonov regularizers, but preserves the L(2) norm and thereby achieves consistent regularization in multiscale simulations. The variational formulation also enables a simple construction of the discrete gradient operator over irregular meshes, which is difficult to define in traditional discretization schemes. We validated our hybrid element technique and the variational regularizers by simulations on a realistic 3-D torso/heart model with empirical heart data. Results show that discretization based on our proposed strategies mitigates the ill-conditioning and improves the inverse solution, and that the variational formulation may benefit a broader range of potential-based bioelectric problems.

  3. On domain decomposition preconditioner of BPS type for finite element discretizations of 3D elliptic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneev, V. G.

    2012-09-01

    BPS is a well known an efficient and rather general domain decomposition Dirichlet-Dirichlet type preconditioner, suggested in the famous series of papers Bramble, Pasciak and Schatz (1986-1989). Since then, it has been serving as the origin for the whole family of domain decomposition Dirichlet-Dirichlet type preconditioners-solvers as for h so hp discretizations of elliptic problems. For its original version, designed for h discretizations, the named authors proved the bound O(1 + log2 H/ h) for the relative condition number under some restricting conditions on the domain decomposition and finite element discretization. Here H/ h is the maximal relation of the characteristic size H of a decomposition subdomain to the mesh parameter h of its discretization. It was assumed that subdomains are images of the reference unite cube by trilinear mappings. Later similar bounds related to h discretizations were proved for more general domain decompositions, defined by means of coarse tetrahedral meshes. These results, accompanied by the development of some special tools of analysis aimed at such type of decompositions, were summarized in the book of Toselli and Widlund (2005). This paper is also confined to h discretizations. We further expand the range of admissible domain decompositions for constructing BPS preconditioners, in which decomposition subdomains can be convex polyhedrons, satisfying some conditions of shape regularity. We prove the bound for the relative condition number with the same dependence on H/ h as in the bound given above. Along the way to this result, we simplify the proof of the so called abstract bound for the relative condition number of the domain decomposition preconditioner. In the part, related to the analysis of the interface sub-problem preconditioning, our technical tools are generalization of those used by Bramble, Pasciak and Schatz.

  4. An overset mesh approach for 3D mixed element high-order discretizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazell, Michael J.; Sitaraman, Jayanarayanan; Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    2016-10-01

    A parallel high-order Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is used to solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in an overset mesh framework. The DG solver has many capabilities including: hp-adaption, curved cells, support for hybrid, mixed-element meshes, and moving meshes. Combining these capabilities with overset grids allows the DG solver to be used in problems with bodies in relative motion and in a near-body off-body solver strategy. The overset implementation is constructed to preserve the design accuracy of the baseline DG discretization. Multiple simulations are carried out to validate the accuracy and performance of the overset DG solver. These simulations demonstrate the capability of the high-order DG solver to handle complex geometry and large scale parallel simulations in an overset framework.

  5. Plane shear flows of frictionless spheres: Kinetic theory and 3D soft-sphere discrete element method simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vescovi, D.; Berzi, D.; Richard, P.

    2014-05-15

    We use existing 3D Discrete Element simulations of simple shear flows of spheres to evaluate the radial distribution function at contact that enables kinetic theory to correctly predict the pressure and the shear stress, for different values of the collisional coefficient of restitution. Then, we perform 3D Discrete Element simulations of plane flows of frictionless, inelastic spheres, sheared between walls made bumpy by gluing particles in a regular array, at fixed average volume fraction and distance between the walls. The results of the numerical simulations are used to derive boundary conditions appropriated in the cases of large and small bumpiness. Those boundary conditions are, then, employed to numerically integrate the differential equations of Extended Kinetic Theory, where the breaking of the molecular chaos assumption at volume fraction larger than 0.49 is taken into account in the expression of the dissipation rate. We show that the Extended Kinetic Theory is in very good agreement with the numerical simulations, even for coefficients of restitution as low as 0.50. When the bumpiness is increased, we observe that some of the flowing particles are stuck in the gaps between the wall spheres. As a consequence, the walls are more dissipative than expected, and the flows resemble simple shear flows, i.e., flows of rather constant volume fraction and granular temperature.

  6. The Combined Finite-Discrete Element Method applied to the Study of Rock Fracturing Behavior in 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rougier, Esteban; Bradley, Christopher R.; Broom, Scott T.; Knight, Earl E.; Munjiza, Ante; Sussman, Aviva J.; Swift, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    Since its introduction the combined finite-discrete element method (FEM/DEM), has become an excellent tool to address a wide range of problems involving fracturing and fragmentation of solids. Within the context of rock mechanics, the FEM/DEM method has been applied to many complex industrial problems such as block caving, deep mining techniques, rock blasting, seismic waves, packing problems, rock crushing problems, etc. In the real world most of the problems involving fracture and fragmentation of solids are three dimensional problems. With the aim of addressing these problems an improved 2D/3D FEM/DEM capability has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). These capabilities include state of the art 3D contact detection, contact interaction, constitutive material models, and fracture models. In this paper, Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) Brazilian experiments are simulated using this improved 2D/3D FEM/DEM approach which is implemented in LANL's MUNROU (Munjiza-Rougier) code. The results presented in this work show excellent agreement with both the SHPB experiments and previous 2D numerical simulations performed by other FEM/DEM research groups.

  7. Numerical Simulation of 3D particulate flow by Coupling Multi-Fluid Model with Discrete Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liancheng; Morita, Koji; Tagami, Hirotaka; Tobita, Yoshiharu

    2014-06-01

    The postulated core disruptive accidents (CDAs) are regarded as particular difficulties in the safety analysis of liquid-metal fast reactors (LMFRs). In CDAs, the motions and interactions of solid particles, such as refrozen fuels, disrupted pellets, etc., not only dominate fundamental behaviors of multiphase flows, but also drastically influence the process of CDAs. The fast reactor safety analysis code, SIMMER-IV, which is a 3D, multi-velocity-field, multiphase, multicomponent, Eulerian, fluid dynamics code coupled with a fuel-pin model and a space- and energy-dependent neutron kinetics model, was successfully applied to a series of CDA assessments. However, strong interactions among solid particles as well as particle characteristics in multiphase flows with rich solid particles were not taken into consideration for fluid-dynamics models of SIMMER-IV. In this article, a hybrid method for multiphase flow analysis is developed by coupling the discrete element method (DEM) with the multi-fluid model of SIMMER-IV. In the coupling algorithm, motions of liquid and gas phases are solved by a time-factorization (time-splitting) method. For the solid phases, contacts among particles and interactions with fluid phases are considered through DEM. Numerical simulations of dam-break behavior with rich solid particles show reasonable agreements with corresponding experimental results. It is expected that SIMMER-IV coupled with DEM could provide a promising and useful computational tool for complicated multiphase-flow phenomena with high concentration of solid particles.

  8. Assessment of entrainment and deposition for a potential landslide in Lushan area, central Taiwan by 3D discrete element simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C.; Tang, C.; Hu, J.; Chan, Y.; Chi, C.

    2011-12-01

    The subtropical climate and annual average about four typhoons, combined with frequent earthquakes trigger the landslide hazards in mountainous area in Taiwan. The potential Lushan landslide area is located at a famous hotspring district of Nantou County in central Taiwan which slides frequently due to heavy rainfall during pouring rain or typhoon seasons. Lushan landslide demonstrates a typical deep-seated (up to 80 meters) creep deformation of a slate rock slope with high dip angles. Under the weathering effects, the slide surface is currently extending to the lower slope was formed by the coalescing of the joints on the upper eastern slope as well as the interface between the sandy slate and the slate on the upper western slope. In this study, we simulate the process of Lushan landslide by using PFC3D, which is conducted by adopting the 3D granular discrete element method. In this simulation, we assume the whole sliding block as an inhomogeneous layer of weaken slate. We extrapolate the slip plane depth according to the result of borehole, TDR and RIF profiles. The main landslide area is about 18 hectares and the volume is about 9 million cubic meters, which is filled with 30 thousand ball elements. The topography is represented by 25,620 wall elements based on the 5m digital elevation model. We set 9 monitoring balls on surface to monitor the velocity and run-out path. According to the field work, we defined the weak planes by the strike and dip of cleavage and joint. From our results, the run-out zone is about 40 hectares. The debris will cover whole Lushan hotspring district in 20 seconds and all rock mass will almost stop after 150 seconds. The predicted maximum velocity is about 40m/s. According to the velocity profile, we can see three and four times accelerations from monitored particles. The collision of particles during sliding and complex terrain explains the fluctuation of velocity profile with time. The numerical results of this study will provide

  9. The birth of a dinosaur footprint: Subsurface 3D motion reconstruction and discrete element simulation reveal track ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Locomotion over deformable substrates is a common occurrence in nature. Footprints represent sedimentary distortions that provide anatomical, functional, and behavioral insights into trackmaker biology. The interpretation of such evidence can be challenging, however, particularly for fossil tracks recovered at bedding planes below the originally exposed surface. Even in living animals, the complex dynamics that give rise to footprint morphology are obscured by both foot and sediment opacity, which conceals animal–substrate and substrate–substrate interactions. We used X-ray reconstruction of moving morphology (XROMM) to image and animate the hind limb skeleton of a chicken-like bird traversing a dry, granular material. Foot movement differed significantly from walking on solid ground; the longest toe penetrated to a depth of ∼5 cm, reaching an angle of 30° below horizontal before slipping backward on withdrawal. The 3D kinematic data were integrated into a validated substrate simulation using the discrete element method (DEM) to create a quantitative model of limb-induced substrate deformation. Simulation revealed that despite sediment collapse yielding poor quality tracks at the air–substrate interface, subsurface displacements maintain a high level of organization owing to grain–grain support. Splitting the substrate volume along “virtual bedding planes” exposed prints that more closely resembled the foot and could easily be mistaken for shallow tracks. DEM data elucidate how highly localized deformations associated with foot entry and exit generate specific features in the final tracks, a temporal sequence that we term “track ontogeny.” This combination of methodologies fosters a synthesis between the surface/layer-based perspective prevalent in paleontology and the particle/volume-based perspective essential for a mechanistic understanding of sediment redistribution during track formation. PMID:25489092

  10. The birth of a dinosaur footprint: subsurface 3D motion reconstruction and discrete element simulation reveal track ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Falkingham, Peter L; Gatesy, Stephen M

    2014-12-23

    Locomotion over deformable substrates is a common occurrence in nature. Footprints represent sedimentary distortions that provide anatomical, functional, and behavioral insights into trackmaker biology. The interpretation of such evidence can be challenging, however, particularly for fossil tracks recovered at bedding planes below the originally exposed surface. Even in living animals, the complex dynamics that give rise to footprint morphology are obscured by both foot and sediment opacity, which conceals animal-substrate and substrate-substrate interactions. We used X-ray reconstruction of moving morphology (XROMM) to image and animate the hind limb skeleton of a chicken-like bird traversing a dry, granular material. Foot movement differed significantly from walking on solid ground; the longest toe penetrated to a depth of ∼5 cm, reaching an angle of 30° below horizontal before slipping backward on withdrawal. The 3D kinematic data were integrated into a validated substrate simulation using the discrete element method (DEM) to create a quantitative model of limb-induced substrate deformation. Simulation revealed that despite sediment collapse yielding poor quality tracks at the air-substrate interface, subsurface displacements maintain a high level of organization owing to grain-grain support. Splitting the substrate volume along "virtual bedding planes" exposed prints that more closely resembled the foot and could easily be mistaken for shallow tracks. DEM data elucidate how highly localized deformations associated with foot entry and exit generate specific features in the final tracks, a temporal sequence that we term "track ontogeny." This combination of methodologies fosters a synthesis between the surface/layer-based perspective prevalent in paleontology and the particle/volume-based perspective essential for a mechanistic understanding of sediment redistribution during track formation.

  11. Adapting Data Processing To Compare Model and Experiment Accurately: A Discrete Element Model and Magnetic Resonance Measurements of a 3D Cylindrical Fluidized Bed.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Christopher M; Holland, Daniel J; Scott, Stuart A; Dennis, John S

    2013-12-18

    Discrete element modeling is being used increasingly to simulate flow in fluidized beds. These models require complex measurement techniques to provide validation for the approximations inherent in the model. This paper introduces the idea of modeling the experiment to ensure that the validation is accurate. Specifically, a 3D, cylindrical gas-fluidized bed was simulated using a discrete element model (DEM) for particle motion coupled with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to describe the flow of gas. The results for time-averaged, axial velocity during bubbling fluidization were compared with those from magnetic resonance (MR) experiments made on the bed. The DEM-CFD data were postprocessed with various methods to produce time-averaged velocity maps for comparison with the MR results, including a method which closely matched the pulse sequence and data processing procedure used in the MR experiments. The DEM-CFD results processed with the MR-type time-averaging closely matched experimental MR results, validating the DEM-CFD model. Analysis of different averaging procedures confirmed that MR time-averages of dynamic systems correspond to particle-weighted averaging, rather than frame-weighted averaging, and also demonstrated that the use of Gaussian slices in MR imaging of dynamic systems is valid. PMID:24478537

  12. Adapting Data Processing To Compare Model and Experiment Accurately: A Discrete Element Model and Magnetic Resonance Measurements of a 3D Cylindrical Fluidized Bed

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Discrete element modeling is being used increasingly to simulate flow in fluidized beds. These models require complex measurement techniques to provide validation for the approximations inherent in the model. This paper introduces the idea of modeling the experiment to ensure that the validation is accurate. Specifically, a 3D, cylindrical gas-fluidized bed was simulated using a discrete element model (DEM) for particle motion coupled with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to describe the flow of gas. The results for time-averaged, axial velocity during bubbling fluidization were compared with those from magnetic resonance (MR) experiments made on the bed. The DEM-CFD data were postprocessed with various methods to produce time-averaged velocity maps for comparison with the MR results, including a method which closely matched the pulse sequence and data processing procedure used in the MR experiments. The DEM-CFD results processed with the MR-type time-averaging closely matched experimental MR results, validating the DEM-CFD model. Analysis of different averaging procedures confirmed that MR time-averages of dynamic systems correspond to particle-weighted averaging, rather than frame-weighted averaging, and also demonstrated that the use of Gaussian slices in MR imaging of dynamic systems is valid. PMID:24478537

  13. Modeling slope failure by the 3D discrete element method: A case study of the dip slope at the Huafan University campus in northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, C. H.; Chan, Y. C.; Jeng, C. J.; Hsieh, Y. C.

    2015-12-01

    Slope failure is a widely observed phenomenon in hill and mountainous areas in Taiwan, which is characterized by high erosion rates (up to 60 mm/yr) due to its climatic and geographical conditions. Slope failure events easily occur after intense rainfall, especially resulting from typhoons and accordingly cause a great loss of human lives and property. At the northern end of the Western Foothill belt in northern Taiwan, Huafan University campus (121.692448˚ E, 24.980724˚ N ) is founded on a dip slope, ~20˚ toward southwest, being composed of early Miocene alternations of sandstone and shale. Data from continuous monitoring over the years by means of inclinometers and groundwater gauges reveal that creep of 6-10 mm of the slope occurred when precipitation exceeded 300 mm during typhoons' striking. In addition, extension cracks on the ground are also found within and on the edge of the campus. Furthermore, potential slip surfaces are detected shown by rock cores to exist 10 and 30 m in depth as well. To understand the kinematic behaviors of the rock slope failure beneath the university campus, a 3D discrete element mothed is applied in this study. Results of the modeling indicate that creeping is the primary behavior pattern when the friction coefficient reduces owing to rise of groundwater during rainstorms. However, rapid slip may take place under influences of earthquake with large magnitude. Suggestions for preventing the slope creep are to construct catchpits to drainage runoff and lower the groundwater table and ground anchors through the slip surfaces to stabilize the slide blocks.

  14. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  15. Discrete Element Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J; Johnson, S

    2007-12-03

    The Distinct Element Method (also frequently referred to as the Discrete Element Method) (DEM) is a Lagrangian numerical technique where the computational domain consists of discrete solid elements which interact via compliant contacts. This can be contrasted with Finite Element Methods where the computational domain is assumed to represent a continuum (although many modern implementations of the FEM can accommodate some Distinct Element capabilities). Often the terms Discrete Element Method and Distinct Element Method are used interchangeably in the literature, although Cundall and Hart (1992) suggested that Discrete Element Methods should be a more inclusive term covering Distinct Element Methods, Displacement Discontinuity Analysis and Modal Methods. In this work, DEM specifically refers to the Distinct Element Method, where the discrete elements interact via compliant contacts, in contrast with Displacement Discontinuity Analysis where the contacts are rigid and all compliance is taken up by the adjacent intact material.

  16. 3D unstructured mesh discontinuous finite element hydro

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, M.K.; Kershaw, D.S.; Shaw, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    The authors present detailed features of the ICF3D hydrodynamics code used for inertial fusion simulations. This code is intended to be a state-of-the-art upgrade of the well-known fluid code, LASNEX. ICF3D employs discontinuous finite elements on a discrete unstructured mesh consisting of a variety of 3D polyhedra including tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. The authors discussed details of how the ROE-averaged second-order convection was applied on the discrete elements, and how the C++ coding interface has helped to simplify implementing the many physics and numerics modules within the code package. The author emphasized the virtues of object-oriented design in large scale projects such as ICF3D.

  17. The Mutual Effect of Reciprocally Moving Geokhod and Geological Environment Studied by the Discrete Element Method in Software PFC3D 5.00

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, V. Yu.; Kust, T. S.; Dronov, A. A.; Beloglazov, I. I.; Ikonnikov, D. A.

    2016-08-01

    A numerical experiment procedure of geokhod traverse in the geological environment, based on software PFC3D 5.00 is presented in the paper; the interpretation of numerical experiment results is provided.

  18. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer

    1992-02-01

    TOPAZ3D is a three-dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ3D can be used to solve for the steady-state or transient temperature field on three-dimensional geometries. Material properties may be temperature-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functionalmore » representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. TOPAZ3D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.« less

  19. 3D imaging of nanomaterials by discrete tomography.

    PubMed

    Batenburg, K J; Bals, S; Sijbers, J; Kübel, C; Midgley, P A; Hernandez, J C; Kaiser, U; Encina, E R; Coronado, E A; Van Tendeloo, G

    2009-05-01

    The field of discrete tomography focuses on the reconstruction of samples that consist of only a few different materials. Ideally, a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of such a sample should contain only one grey level for each of the compositions in the sample. By exploiting this property in the reconstruction algorithm, either the quality of the reconstruction can be improved significantly, or the number of required projection images can be reduced. The discrete reconstruction typically contains fewer artifacts and does not have to be segmented, as it already contains one grey level for each composition. Recently, a new algorithm, called discrete algebraic reconstruction technique (DART), has been proposed that can be used effectively on experimental electron tomography datasets. In this paper, we propose discrete tomography as a general reconstruction method for electron tomography in materials science. We describe the basic principles of DART and show that it can be applied successfully to three different types of samples, consisting of embedded ErSi(2) nanocrystals, a carbon nanotube grown from a catalyst particle and a single gold nanoparticle, respectively. PMID:19269094

  20. Discrete Method of Images for 3D Radio Propagation Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Roman

    2016-09-01

    Discretization by rasterization is introduced into the method of images (MI) in the context of 3D deterministic radio propagation modeling as a way to exploit spatial coherence of electromagnetic propagation for fine-grained parallelism. Traditional algebraic treatment of bounding regions and surfaces is replaced by computer graphics rendering of 3D reflections and double refractions while building the image tree. The visibility of reception points and surfaces is also resolved by shader programs. The proposed rasterization is shown to be of comparable run time to that of the fundamentally parallel shooting and bouncing rays. The rasterization does not affect the signal evaluation backtracking step, thus preserving its advantage over the brute force ray-tracing methods in terms of accuracy. Moreover, the rendering resolution may be scaled back for a given level of scenario detail with only marginal impact on the image tree size. This allows selection of scene optimized execution parameters for faster execution, giving the method a competitive edge. The proposed variant of MI can be run on any GPU that supports real-time 3D graphics.

  1. 3D imaging of semiconductor components by discrete laminography

    SciTech Connect

    Batenburg, K. J.; Palenstijn, W. J.; Sijbers, J.

    2014-06-19

    X-ray laminography is a powerful technique for quality control of semiconductor components. Despite the advantages of nondestructive 3D imaging over 2D techniques based on sectioning, the acquisition time is still a major obstacle for practical use of the technique. In this paper, we consider the application of Discrete Tomography to laminography data, which can potentially reduce the scanning time while still maintaining a high reconstruction quality. By incorporating prior knowledge in the reconstruction algorithm about the materials present in the scanned object, far more accurate reconstructions can be obtained from the same measured data compared to classical reconstruction methods. We present a series of simulation experiments that illustrate the potential of the approach.

  2. Diffractive optical element for creating visual 3D images.

    PubMed

    Goncharsky, Alexander; Goncharsky, Anton; Durlevich, Svyatoslav

    2016-05-01

    A method is proposed to compute and synthesize the microrelief of a diffractive optical element to produce a new visual security feature - the vertical 3D/3D switch effect. The security feature consists in the alternation of two 3D color images when the diffractive element is tilted up/down. Optical security elements that produce the new security feature are synthesized using electron-beam technology. Sample optical security elements are manufactured that produce 3D to 3D visual switch effect when illuminated by white light. Photos and video records of the vertical 3D/3D switch effect of real optical elements are presented. The optical elements developed can be replicated using standard equipment employed for manufacturing security holograms. The new optical security feature is easy to control visually, safely protected against counterfeit, and designed to protect banknotes, documents, ID cards, etc. PMID:27137530

  3. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    TAURUS is an interactive post-processing application supporting visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. TAURUS provides the ability to display deformed geometries and contours or fringes of a large number of derived results on meshes consisting of beam, plate, shell, and solid type finite elements. Time history plotting is also available.

  4. Linking continuum mechanics and 3D discrete dislocation simulations

    SciTech Connect

    El-Azab, A. A.; Fivel, M.

    1998-10-18

    A technique is developed for linking the methods of discrete dislocation dynamics simulation and finite element to treat elasto-plasticity problems. The overall formulation views the plastically deforming crystal as an elastic crystal with continuously changing dislocation microstructure which is tracked by the numerical dynamics simulation. The FEM code needed in this regard is based on linear elasticity only. This formulation presented here is focused on a continuous updating of the outer shape of the crystal, for possible regeneration of the FEM mesh, and adjustment of the surface geometry, in particular the surface normal. The method is expected to be potentially applicable to the nano- indentation experiments, where the zone around the indenter-crystal contact undergoes significant permanent deformation, the rigorous determination of which is very important to the calculation of the indentation print area and in turn, the surface hardness. Furthermore, the technique is expected to account for the plastic history of the surface displacement under the indenter. Other potential applications are mentioned in the text.

  5. 3D printed impedance elements by micro-dispensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles Dominguez, Ubaldo

    Micro-dispensing allows electric circuits to be "3D printed," which can be used to give 3D printed systems electronic and electromagnetic functionality. The focus of this thesis is using micro-dispensing to fabricate capacitors and inductors. 3D printed impedance elements are capable of being more easily embedded, can be used to create structural electronics, and will have extensive applications in antennas, metamaterials, frequency selective surfaces, and more. This is the first known effort to print and measure impedance elements by micro-dispensing which holds great potential for manufacturing multi-material devices.

  6. Shared Memory Parallelism for 3D Cartesian Discrete Ordinates Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, Salli; Dutka-Malen, Ivan; Plagne, Laurent; Ponçot, Angélique; Ramet, Pierre

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the design and the performance of DOMINO, a 3D Cartesian SN solver that implements two nested levels of parallelism (multicore+SIMD) on shared memory computation nodes. DOMINO is written in C++, a multi-paradigm programming language that enables the use of powerful and generic parallel programming tools such as Intel TBB and Eigen. These two libraries allow us to combine multi-thread parallelism with vector operations in an efficient and yet portable way. As a result, DOMINO can exploit the full power of modern multi-core processors and is able to tackle very large simulations, that usually require large HPC clusters, using a single computing node. For example, DOMINO solves a 3D full core PWR eigenvalue problem involving 26 energy groups, 288 angular directions (S16), 46 × 106 spatial cells and 1 × 1012 DoFs within 11 hours on a single 32-core SMP node. This represents a sustained performance of 235 GFlops and 40:74% of the SMP node peak performance for the DOMINO sweep implementation. The very high Flops/Watt ratio of DOMINO makes it a very interesting building block for a future many-nodes nuclear simulation tool.

  7. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Particle-Reinforced Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, H.; Lissenden, C. J.

    2002-01-01

    Deformation in particle-reinforced aluminum has been simulated using three distinct types of finite element model: a three-dimensional repeating unit cell, a three-dimensional multi-particle model, and two-dimensional multi-particle models. The repeating unit cell model represents a fictitious periodic cubic array of particles. The 3D multi-particle (3D-MP) model represents randomly placed and oriented particles. The 2D generalized plane strain multi-particle models were obtained from planar sections through the 3D-MP model. These models were used to study the tensile macroscopic stress-strain response and the associated stress and strain distributions in an elastoplastic matrix. The results indicate that the 2D model having a particle area fraction equal to the particle representative volume fraction of the 3D models predicted the same macroscopic stress-strain response as the 3D models. However, there are fluctuations in the particle area fraction in a representative volume element. As expected, predictions from 2D models having different particle area fractions do not agree with predictions from 3D models. More importantly, it was found that the microscopic stress and strain distributions from the 2D models do not agree with those from the 3D-MP model. Specifically, the plastic strain distribution predicted by the 2D model is banded along lines inclined at 45 deg from the loading axis while the 3D model prediction is not. Additionally, the triaxial stress and maximum principal stress distributions predicted by 2D and 3D models do not agree. Thus, it appears necessary to use a multi-particle 3D model to accurately predict material responses that depend on local effects, such as strain-to-failure, fracture toughness, and fatigue life.

  8. 3D elemental sensitive imaging by full-field XFCT.

    PubMed

    Deng, Biao; Du, Guohao; Zhou, Guangzhao; Wang, Yudan; Ren, Yuqi; Chen, Rongchang; Sun, Pengfei; Xie, Honglan; Xiao, Tiqiao

    2015-05-21

    X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) is a stimulated emission tomography modality that maps the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of elements. Generally, XFCT is done by scanning a pencil-beam across the sample. This paper presents a feasibility study of full-field XFCT (FF-XFCT) for 3D elemental imaging. The FF-XFCT consists of a pinhole collimator and X-ray imaging detector with no energy resolution. A prototype imaging system was set up at the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) for imaging the phantom. The first FF-XFCT experimental results are presented. The cadmium (Cd) and iodine (I) distributions were reconstructed. The results demonstrate FF-XFCT is fit for 3D elemental imaging and the sensitivity of FF-XFCT is higher than a conventional CT system.

  9. Beam and Truss Finite Element Verification for DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbun, H J

    2007-07-16

    The explicit finite element (FE) software program DYNA3D has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to simulate the dynamic behavior of structures, systems, and components. This report focuses on verification of beam and truss element formulations in DYNA3D. An efficient protocol has been developed to verify the accuracy of these structural elements by generating a set of representative problems for which closed-form quasi-static steady-state analytical reference solutions exist. To provide as complete coverage as practically achievable, problem sets are developed for each beam and truss element formulation (and their variants) in all modes of loading and physical orientation. Analyses with loading in the elastic and elastic-plastic regimes are performed. For elastic loading, the FE results are within 1% of the reference solutions for all cases. For beam element bending and torsion loading in the plastic regime, the response is heavily dependent on the numerical integration rule chosen, with higher refinement yielding greater accuracy (agreement to within 1%). Axial loading in the plastic regime produces accurate results (agreement to within 0.01%) for all integration rules and element formulations. Truss elements are also verified to provide accurate results (within 0.01%) for elastic and elastic-plastic loading. A sample problem to verify beam element response in ParaDyn, the parallel version DYNA3D, is also presented.

  10. Higher Order Lagrange Finite Elements In M3D

    SciTech Connect

    J. Chen; H.R. Strauss; S.C. Jardin; W. Park; L.E. Sugiyama; G. Fu; J. Breslau

    2004-12-17

    The M3D code has been using linear finite elements to represent multilevel MHD on 2-D poloidal planes. Triangular higher order elements, up to third order, are constructed here in order to provide M3D the capability to solve highly anisotropic transport problems. It is found that higher order elements are essential to resolve the thin transition layer characteristic of the anisotropic transport equation, particularly when the strong anisotropic direction is not aligned with one of the Cartesian coordinates. The transition layer is measured by the profile width, which is zero for infinite anisotropy. It is shown that only higher order schemes have the ability to make this layer converge towards zero when the anisotropy gets stronger and stronger. Two cases are considered. One has the strong transport direction partially aligned with one of the element edges, the other doesn't have any alignment. Both cases have the strong transport direction misaligned with the grid line by some angles.

  11. Application of edge-based finite elements and vector ABCs in 3D scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Jin, J. M.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    A finite element absorbing boundary condition (FE-ABC) solution of the scattering by arbitrary 3-D structures is considered. The computational domain is discretized using edge-based tetrahedral elements. In contrast to the node-based elements, edge elements can treat geometries with sharp edges, are divergence-less, and easily satisfy the field continuity condition across dielectric interfaces. They do, however, lead to a higher unknown count but this is balanced by the greater sparsity of the resulting finite element matrix. Thus, the computation time required to solve such a system iteratively with a given degree of accuracy is less than the traditional node-based approach. The purpose is to examine the derivation and performance of the ABC's when applied to 2-D and 3-D problems and to discuss the specifics of our FE-ABC implementation.

  12. Development of discrete gas kinetic scheme for simulation of 3D viscous incompressible and compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L. M.; Shu, C.; Wang, Y.; Sun, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The sphere function-based gas kinetic scheme (GKS), which was presented by Shu and his coworkers [23] for simulation of inviscid compressible flows, is extended to simulate 3D viscous incompressible and compressible flows in this work. Firstly, we use certain discrete points to represent the spherical surface in the phase velocity space. Then, integrals along the spherical surface for conservation forms of moments, which are needed to recover 3D Navier-Stokes equations, are approximated by integral quadrature. The basic requirement is that these conservation forms of moments can be exactly satisfied by weighted summation of distribution functions at discrete points. It was found that the integral quadrature by eight discrete points on the spherical surface, which forms the D3Q8 discrete velocity model, can exactly match the integral. In this way, the conservative variables and numerical fluxes can be computed by weighted summation of distribution functions at eight discrete points. That is, the application of complicated formulations resultant from integrals can be replaced by a simple solution process. Several numerical examples including laminar flat plate boundary layer, 3D lid-driven cavity flow, steady flow through a 90° bending square duct, transonic flow around DPW-W1 wing and supersonic flow around NACA0012 airfoil are chosen to validate the proposed scheme. Numerical results demonstrate that the present scheme can provide reasonable numerical results for 3D viscous flows.

  13. Parallel 3D Mortar Element Method for Adaptive Nonconforming Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Huiyu; Mavriplis, Catherine; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biswas, Rupak

    2004-01-01

    High order methods are frequently used in computational simulation for their high accuracy. An efficient way to avoid unnecessary computation in smooth regions of the solution is to use adaptive meshes which employ fine grids only in areas where they are needed. Nonconforming spectral elements allow the grid to be flexibly adjusted to satisfy the computational accuracy requirements. The method is suitable for computational simulations of unsteady problems with very disparate length scales or unsteady moving features, such as heat transfer, fluid dynamics or flame combustion. In this work, we select the Mark Element Method (MEM) to handle the non-conforming interfaces between elements. A new technique is introduced to efficiently implement MEM in 3-D nonconforming meshes. By introducing an "intermediate mortar", the proposed method decomposes the projection between 3-D elements and mortars into two steps. In each step, projection matrices derived in 2-D are used. The two-step method avoids explicitly forming/deriving large projection matrices for 3-D meshes, and also helps to simplify the implementation. This new technique can be used for both h- and p-type adaptation. This method is applied to an unsteady 3-D moving heat source problem. With our new MEM implementation, mesh adaptation is able to efficiently refine the grid near the heat source and coarsen the grid once the heat source passes. The savings in computational work resulting from the dynamic mesh adaptation is demonstrated by the reduction of the the number of elements used and CPU time spent. MEM and mesh adaptation, respectively, bring irregularity and dynamics to the computer memory access pattern. Hence, they provide a good way to gauge the performance of computer systems when running scientific applications whose memory access patterns are irregular and unpredictable. We select a 3-D moving heat source problem as the Unstructured Adaptive (UA) grid benchmark, a new component of the NAS Parallel

  14. Phase-Accuracy Comparisons and Improved Far-Field Estimates for 3-D Edge Elements on Tetrahedral Meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monk, Peter; Parrott, Kevin

    2001-07-01

    Edge-element methods have proved very effective for 3-D electromagnetic computations and are widely used on unstructured meshes. However, the accuracy of standard edge elements can be criticised because of their low order. This paper analyses discrete dispersion relations together with numerical propagation accuracy to determine the effect of tetrahedral shape on the phase accuracy of standard 3-D edge-element approximations in comparison to other methods. Scattering computations for the sphere obtained with edge elements are compared with results obtained with vertex elements, and a new formulation of the far-field integral approximations for use with edge elements is shown to give improved cross sections over conventional formulations.

  15. 3D Finite Element Trajectory Code with Adaptive Meshing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, Lawrence; Bui, Thuc; Vogler, William; Bauer, Andy; Shephard, Mark; Beal, Mark; Tran, Hien

    2004-11-01

    Beam Optics Analysis, a new, 3D charged particle program is available and in use for the design of complex, 3D electron guns and charged particle devices. The code reads files directly from most CAD and solid modeling programs, includes an intuitive Graphical User Interface (GUI), and a robust mesh generator that is fully automatic. Complex problems can be set up, and analysis initiated in minutes. The program includes a user-friendly post processor for displaying field and trajectory data using 3D plots and images. The electrostatic solver is based on the standard nodal finite element method. The magnetostatic field solver is based on the vector finite element method and is also called during the trajectory simulation process to solve for self magnetic fields. The user imports the geometry from essentially any commercial CAD program and uses the GUI to assign parameters (voltages, currents, dielectric constant) and designate emitters (including work function, emitter temperature, and number of trajectories). The the mesh is generated automatically and analysis is performed, including mesh adaptation to improve accuracy and optimize computational resources. This presentation will provide information on the basic structure of the code, its operation, and it's capabilities.

  16. Elemental concentration distribution in human fingernails - A 3D study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda-Vargas, C. A.; Mars, J. A.; Gihwala, D.

    2012-02-01

    The verification of pathologies has normally been based on analysis of blood (serum and plasma), and physiological tissue. Recently, nails and in particular human fingernails have become an important medium for pathological studies, especially those of environmental origin. The analytical technique of PIXE has been used extensively in the analysis of industrial samples and human tissue specimens. The application of the analytical technique to nails has been mainly to bulk samples. In this study we use micro-PIXE and -RBS, as both complementary and supplementary, to determine the elemental concentration distribution of human fingernails of individuals. We report on the 3D quantitative elemental concentration distributions (QECDs) of various elements that include C, N and O as major elements (10-20%), P, S, Cl, K and Ca as minor elements (1-10%) and Fe, Mn, Zn, Ti, Na, Mg, Cu, Ni, Cr, Rb, Br, Sr and Se as trace elements (less than 1%). For PIXE and RBS the specimens were bombarded with a 3 MeV proton beam. To ascertain any correlations in the quantitative elemental concentration distributions, a linear traverse analysis was performed across the width of the nail. Elemental distribution correlations were also obtained.

  17. Shell Element Verification & Regression Problems for DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Zywicz, E

    2008-02-01

    A series of quasi-static regression/verification problems were developed for the triangular and quadrilateral shell element formulations contained in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's explicit finite element program DYNA3D. Each regression problem imposes both displacement- and force-type boundary conditions to probe the five independent nodal degrees of freedom employed in the targeted formulation. When applicable, the finite element results are compared with small-strain linear-elastic closed-form reference solutions to verify select aspects of the formulations implementation. Although all problems in the suite depict the same geometry, material behavior, and loading conditions, each problem represents a unique combination of shell formulation, stabilization method, and integration rule. Collectively, the thirty-six new regression problems in the test suite cover nine different shell formulations, three hourglass stabilization methods, and three families of through-thickness integration rules.

  18. Finite element solver for 3-D compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.; Reddy, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    The space shuttle main engine (SSME) has extremely complex internal flow structure. The geometry of the flow domain is three-dimensional with complicated topology. The flow is compressible, viscous, and turbulent with large gradients in flow quantities and regions of recirculations. The analysis of the flow field in SSME involves several tedious steps. One is the geometrical modeling of the particular zone of the SSME being studied. Accessing the geometry definition, digitalizing it, and developing surface interpolations suitable for an interior grid generator require considerable amount of manual labor. There are several types of grid generators available with some general-purpose finite element programs. An efficient and robust computational scheme for solving 3D Navier-Stokes equations has to be implemented. Post processing software has to be adapted to visualize and analyze the computed 3D flow field. The progress made in a project to develop software for the analysis of the flow is discussed. The technical approach to the development of the finite element scheme and the relaxation procedure are discussed. The three dimensional finite element code for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is listed.

  19. 2D-3D hybrid stabilized finite element method for tsunami runup simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takase, S.; Moriguchi, S.; Terada, K.; Kato, J.; Kyoya, T.; Kashiyama, K.; Kotani, T.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) hybrid stabilized finite element method that enables us to predict a propagation process of tsunami generated in a hypocentral region, which ranges from offshore propagation to runup to urban areas, with high accuracy and relatively low computational costs. To be more specific, the 2D shallow water equation is employed to simulate the propagation of offshore waves, while the 3D Navier-Stokes equation is employed for the runup in urban areas. The stabilized finite element method is utilized for numerical simulations for both of the 2D and 3D domains that are independently discretized with unstructured meshes. The multi-point constraint and transmission methods are applied to satisfy the continuity of flow velocities and pressures at the interface between the resulting 2D and 3D meshes, since neither their spatial dimensions nor node arrangements are consistent. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed hybrid method to simulate tsunami behavior, including offshore propagation and runup to urban areas, with substantially lower computation costs in comparison with full 3D computations.

  20. Geometrically-compatible 3-D Monte Carlo and discrete-ordinates methods

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, J.E.; Wareing, T.A.; McGhee, J.M.; Evans, T.M.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this project was two-fold. The first purpose was to develop a deterministic discrete-ordinates neutral-particle transport scheme for unstructured tetrahedral spatial meshes, and implement it in a computer code. The second purpose was to modify the MCNP Monte Carlo radiation transport code to use adjoint solutions from the tetrahedral-mesh discrete-ordinates code to reduce the statistical variance of Monte Carlo solutions via a weight-window approach. The first task has resulted in a deterministic transport code that is much more efficient for modeling complex 3-D geometries than any previously existing deterministic code. The second task has resulted in a powerful new capability for dramatically reducing the cost of difficult 3-D Monte Carlo calculations.

  1. Toward Verification of USM3D Extensions for Mixed Element Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Frink, Neal T.; Ding, Ejiang; Parlette, Edward B.

    2013-01-01

    The unstructured tetrahedral grid cell-centered finite volume flow solver USM3D has been recently extended to handle mixed element grids composed of hexahedral, prismatic, pyramidal, and tetrahedral cells. Presently, two turbulence models, namely, baseline Spalart-Allmaras (SA) and Menter Shear Stress Transport (SST), support mixed element grids. This paper provides an overview of the various numerical discretization options available in the newly enhanced USM3D. Using the SA model, the flow solver extensions are verified on three two-dimensional test cases available on the Turbulence Modeling Resource website at the NASA Langley Research Center. The test cases are zero pressure gradient flat plate, planar shear, and bump-inchannel. The effect of cell topologies on the flow solution is also investigated using the planar shear case. Finally, the assessment of various cell and face gradient options is performed on the zero pressure gradient flat plate case.

  2. 3D Chemical and Elemental Imaging by STXM Spectrotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Karunakaran, C.; Prange, A.; Franz, B.; Harkness, T.; Lu, Y.; Obst, M.; Hormes, J.

    2011-09-01

    Spectrotomography based on the scanning transmission x-ray microscope (STXM) at the 10ID-1 spectromicroscopy beamline of the Canadian Light Source was used to study two selected unicellular microorganisms. Spatial distributions of sulphur globules, calcium, protein, and polysaccharide in sulphur-metabolizing bacteria (Allochromatium vinosum) were determined at the S 2p, C 1s, and Ca 2p edges. 3D chemical mapping showed that the sulphur globules are located inside the bacteria with a strong spatial correlation with calcium ions (it is most probably calcium carbonate from the medium; however, with STXM the distribution and localization in the cell can be made visible, which is very interesting for a biologist) and polysaccharide-rich polymers, suggesting an influence of the organic components on the formation of the sulphur and calcium deposits. A second study investigated copper accumulating in yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) treated with copper sulphate. 3D elemental imaging at the Cu 2p edge showed that Cu(II) is reduced to Cu(I) on the yeast cell wall. A novel needle-like wet cell sample holder for STXM spectrotomography studies of fully hydrated samples is discussed.

  3. 3D Chemical and Elemental Imaging by STXM Spectrotomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Karunakaran, C.; Lu, Y.; Hormes, J.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Prange, A.; Franz, B.; Harkness, T.; Obst, M.

    2011-09-09

    Spectrotomography based on the scanning transmission x-ray microscope (STXM) at the 10ID-1 spectromicroscopy beamline of the Canadian Light Source was used to study two selected unicellular microorganisms. Spatial distributions of sulphur globules, calcium, protein, and polysaccharide in sulphur-metabolizing bacteria (Allochromatium vinosum) were determined at the S 2p, C 1s, and Ca 2p edges. 3D chemical mapping showed that the sulphur globules are located inside the bacteria with a strong spatial correlation with calcium ions (it is most probably calcium carbonate from the medium; however, with STXM the distribution and localization in the cell can be made visible, which is very interesting for a biologist) and polysaccharide-rich polymers, suggesting an influence of the organic components on the formation of the sulphur and calcium deposits. A second study investigated copper accumulating in yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) treated with copper sulphate. 3D elemental imaging at the Cu 2p edge showed that Cu(II) is reduced to Cu(I) on the yeast cell wall. A novel needle-like wet cell sample holder for STXM spectrotomography studies of fully hydrated samples is discussed.

  4. ATHENA 3D: A finite element code for ultrasonic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, C.; Rupin, F.; Fouquet, T.; Chassignole, B.

    2014-04-01

    The understanding of wave propagation phenomena requires use of robust numerical models. 3D finite element (FE) models are generally prohibitively time consuming. However, advances in computing processor speed and memory allow them to be more and more competitive. In this context, EDF R&D developed the 3D version of the well-validated FE code ATHENA2D. The code is dedicated to the simulation of wave propagation in all kinds of elastic media and in particular, heterogeneous and anisotropic materials like welds. It is based on solving elastodynamic equations in the calculation zone expressed in terms of stress and particle velocities. The particularity of the code relies on the fact that the discretization of the calculation domain uses a Cartesian regular 3D mesh while the defect of complex geometry can be described using a separate (2D) mesh using the fictitious domains method. This allows combining the rapidity of regular meshes computation with the capability of modelling arbitrary shaped defects. Furthermore, the calculation domain is discretized with a quasi-explicit time evolution scheme. Thereby only local linear systems of small size have to be solved. The final step to reduce the computation time relies on the fact that ATHENA3D has been parallelized and adapted to the use of HPC resources. In this paper, the validation of the 3D FE model is discussed. A cross-validation of ATHENA 3D and CIVA is proposed for several inspection configurations. The performances in terms of calculation time are also presented in the cases of both local computer and computation cluster use.

  5. GPU accelerated simulations of 3D deterministic particle transport using discrete ordinates method

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Chunye; Liu Jie; Chi Lihua; Huang Haowei; Fang Jingyue; Gong Zhenghu

    2011-07-01

    Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), originally developed for real-time, high-definition 3D graphics in computer games, now provides great faculty in solving scientific applications. The basis of particle transport simulation is the time-dependent, multi-group, inhomogeneous Boltzmann transport equation. The numerical solution to the Boltzmann equation involves the discrete ordinates (S{sub n}) method and the procedure of source iteration. In this paper, we present a GPU accelerated simulation of one energy group time-independent deterministic discrete ordinates particle transport in 3D Cartesian geometry (Sweep3D). The performance of the GPU simulations are reported with the simulations of vacuum boundary condition. The discussion of the relative advantages and disadvantages of the GPU implementation, the simulation on multi GPUs, the programming effort and code portability are also reported. The results show that the overall performance speedup of one NVIDIA Tesla M2050 GPU ranges from 2.56 compared with one Intel Xeon X5670 chip to 8.14 compared with one Intel Core Q6600 chip for no flux fixup. The simulation with flux fixup on one M2050 is 1.23 times faster than on one X5670.

  6. Improved Convergence and Robustness of USM3D Solutions on Mixed Element Grids (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Frink, Neal T.

    2015-01-01

    Several improvements to the mixed-element USM3D discretization and defect-correction schemes have been made. A new methodology for nonlinear iterations, called the Hierarchical Adaptive Nonlinear Iteration Scheme (HANIS), has been developed and implemented. It provides two additional hierarchies around a simple and approximate preconditioner of USM3D. The hierarchies are a matrix-free linear solver for the exact linearization of Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) equations and a nonlinear control of the solution update. Two variants of the new methodology are assessed on four benchmark cases, namely, a zero-pressure gradient flat plate, a bump-in-channel configuration, the NACA 0012 airfoil, and a NASA Common Research Model configuration. The new methodology provides a convergence acceleration factor of 1.4 to 13 over the baseline solver technology.

  7. A least-squares finite element method for 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, T. L.; Hou, Lin-Jun; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation is applied to three-dimensional steady incompressible Navier-Stokes problems. This method can accommodate equal-order interpolations, and results in symmetric, positive definite algebraic system. An additional compatibility equation, i.e., the divergence of vorticity vector should be zero, is included to make the first-order system elliptic. The Newton's method is employed to linearize the partial differential equations, the LSFEM is used to obtain discretized equations, and the system of algebraic equations is solved using the Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient method which avoids formation of either element or global matrices (matrix-free) to achieve high efficiency. The flow in a half of 3D cubic cavity is calculated at Re = 100, 400, and 1,000 with 50 x 52 x 25 trilinear elements. The Taylor-Gortler-like vortices are observed at Re = 1,000.

  8. 3D finite element modeling of sliding wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buentello Hernandez, Rodolfo G.

    Wear is defined as "the removal of material volume through some mechanical process between two surfaces". There are many mechanical situations that can induce wear and each can involve many wear mechanisms. This research focuses on the mechanical wear due to dry sliding between two surfaces. Currently there is a need to identify and compare materials that would endure sliding wear under severe conditions such as high velocities. The high costs associated with the field experimentation of systems subject to high-speed sliding, has prevented the collection of the necessary data required to fully characterize this phenomena. Simulating wear through Finite Elements (FE) would enable its prediction under different scenarios and would reduce experimentation costs. In the aerospace, automotive and weapon industries such a model can aid in material selection, design and/or testing of systems subjected to wear in bearings, gears, brakes, gun barrels, slippers, locomotive wheels, or even rocket test tracks. The 3D wear model presented in this dissertation allows one to reasonably predict high-speed sliding mechanical wear between two materials. The model predictions are reasonable, when compared against those measured on a sled slipper traveling over the Holloman High Speed Tests Track. This slipper traveled a distance of 5,816 meters in 8.14 seconds and reached a maximum velocity of 1,530 m/s.

  9. Discrete elements method of neutral particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    A new discrete elements (L/sub N/) transport method is derived and compared to the discrete ordinates S/sub N/ method, theoretically and by numerical experimentation. The discrete elements method is more accurate than discrete ordinates and strongly ameliorates ray effects for the practical problems studied. The discrete elements method is shown to be more cost effective, in terms of execution time with comparable storage to attain the same accuracy, for a one-dimensional test case using linear characteristic spatial quadrature. In a two-dimensional test case, a vacuum duct in a shield, L/sub N/ is more consistently convergent toward a Monte Carlo benchmark solution than S/sub N/, using step characteristic spatial quadrature. An analysis of the interaction of angular and spatial quadrature in xy-geometry indicates the desirability of using linear characteristic spatial quadrature with the L/sub N/ method.

  10. [Research on the 3D discrete fluorescence spectrum technique for differentiation of phytoplankton population].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shan-shan; Su, Rong-guo; Duan, Ya-li; Song, Zhi-jie; Wang, Xiu-lin

    2011-03-01

    The present research was targeted to develop a fluorescence analyser for phytoplankton population which uses a series of LEDs as the light source. So the 3D discrete fluorescence spectra with 12 excitation wavelengths (400, 430, 450, 460,470, 490, 500, 510, 525, 550, 570 and 590 nm) were determined by fluorescence spectrophotometer for 43 phytoplankton species. Then, the wavelet, Daubechies-7 (Db7), and Bayes Classifier were applied to extract the characteristics for each classes from the 3D discrete fluorescence spectra. Lastly, the fluorescence differentiation method for phytoplankton populations was established by multivariate linear regression and non-negative least squares, which could differentiate phytoplankton populations at the levels of both divisions and genus. This method was tested: for simulatively mixed samples(the dominant species accounted for 70%, 80%, 90% and 100% of the gross biomass, respectively) from 32 red tide algal species, and the correct discrimination rates at the level of genus were 67.5%, 75.8%, 81.4% and 79.4%, respectively. For simulatively mixed samples (the dominant divisions algae accounted for 50%, 75% and 100% of the gross biomass, respectively) from 43 algal species, the discrimination rates at the level of division were 95.2%, 99.7% and 91.9% with average relative content of 38.1%, 63.2% and 90.5%, respectively. PMID:21595229

  11. Stabilized finite elements for 3D reactive flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braack, M.; Richter, Th.

    2006-07-01

    Objective of this work is the numerical solution of chemically reacting flows in three dimensions described by detailed reaction mechanism. The contemplated problems include, e.g. burners with 3D geometry. Contrary to the usual operator splitting method the equations are treated fully coupled with a Newton solver. This leads to the necessity of the solution of large linear non-symmetric, indefinite systems. Due to the complexity of the regarded problems we combine a variety of numerical methods, as there are goal-oriented adaptive mesh refinement, a parallel multigrid solver for the linear systems and economical stabilization techniques for the stiff problems.By blocking the solution components for every ansatz function and applying special matrix structures for each block of degrees of freedom, we can significantly reduce the required memory effort without worsening the convergence. Considering the Galerkin formulation of the regarded problems this is established by using lumping of the mass matrix and the chemical source terms. However, this technique is not longer feasible for standard stabilized finite elements as for instance Galerkin least squares techniques or streamline diffusion. Those stabilized schemes are well established for Navier-Stokes flows but for reactive flows, they introduce many further couplings into the system compared to Galerkin formulations. In this work, we discuss this issue in connection with combustion in more detail and propose the local projection stabilization technique for reactive flows. Beside the robustness of the arising linear systems we are able to maintain the problem-adapted matrix structures presented above. Finally, we will present numerical results for the proposed methods. In particular, we simulate a methane burner with a detailed reaction system involving 15 chemical species and 84 elementary reactions.

  12. Discrete Element Modelling of Floating Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffey, Samantha; Liang, Qiuhua; Parkin, Geoff; Large, Andy; Rouainia, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    schemes. The results show that the tool is able to adequately replicate water depth and depth-averaged velocity of a dam-break wave, as well as velocity and displacement of floating cylindrical elements, thus validating its shock capturing capabilities and the coupling technique applied for this simple test case. Future development of the tool will incorporate a 2D hydrodynamic scheme and a 3D discrete element scheme in order to model the more complex processes associated with debris transport.

  13. A 3D Frictional Segment-to-Segment Contact Method for Large Deformations and Quadratic Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M; Laursen, T; Solberg, J

    2004-04-01

    Node-on-segment contact is the most common form of contact used today but has many deficiencies ranging from potential locking to non-smooth behavior with large sliding. Furthermore, node-on-segment approaches are not at all applicable to higher order discretizations (e.g. quadratic elements). In a previous work, [3, 4] we developed a segment-to-segment contact approach for eight node hexahedral elements based on the mortar method that was applicable to large deformation mechanics. The approach proved extremely robust since it eliminated the over-constraint that caused 'locking' and provided smooth force variations in large sliding. Here, we extend this previous approach to treat frictional contact problems. In addition, the method is extended to 3D quadratic tetrahedrals and hexahedrals. The proposed approach is then applied to several challenging frictional contact problems that demonstrate its effectiveness.

  14. An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Discretization of MHD on 3D Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Rieben, R N; White, D A; Wallin, B K; Solberg, J M

    2006-06-12

    We present an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) discretization of the equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) on unstructured hexahedral grids. The method is formulated using an operator-split approach with three distinct phases: electromagnetic diffusion, Lagrangian motion, and Eulerian advection. The resistive magnetic dynamo equation is discretized using a compatible mixed finite element method with a 2nd order accurate implicit time differencing scheme which preserves the divergence-free nature of the magnetic field. At each discrete time step, electromagnetic force and heat terms are calculated and coupled to the hydrodynamic equations to compute the Lagrangian motion of the conducting materials. By virtue of the compatible discretization method used, the invariants of Lagrangian MHD motion are preserved in a discrete sense. When the Lagrangian motion of the mesh causes significant distortion, that distortion is corrected with a relaxation of the mesh, followed by a 2nd order monotonic remap of the electromagnetic state variables. The remap is equivalent to Eulerian advection of the magnetic flux density with a fictitious mesh relaxation velocity. The magnetic advection is performed using a novel variant of constrained transport (CT) that is valid for unstructured hexahedral grids with arbitrary mesh velocities. The advection method maintains the divergence free nature of the magnetic field and is second order accurate in regions where the solution is sufficiently smooth. For regions in which the magnetic field is discontinuous (e.g. MHD shocks) the method is limited using a novel variant of algebraic flux correction (AFC) which is local extremum diminishing (LED) and divergence preserving. Finally, we verify each stage of the discretization via a set of numerical experiments.

  15. A 2-D Interface Element for Coupled Analysis of Independently Modeled 3-D Finite Element Subdomains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1998-01-01

    Over the past few years, the development of the interface technology has provided an analysis framework for embedding detailed finite element models within finite element models which are less refined. This development has enabled the use of cascading substructure domains without the constraint of coincident nodes along substructure boundaries. The approach used for the interface element is based on an alternate variational principle often used in deriving hybrid finite elements. The resulting system of equations exhibits a high degree of sparsity but gives rise to a non-positive definite system which causes difficulties with many of the equation solvers in general-purpose finite element codes. Hence the global system of equations is generally solved using, a decomposition procedure with pivoting. The research reported to-date for the interface element includes the one-dimensional line interface element and two-dimensional surface interface element. Several large-scale simulations, including geometrically nonlinear problems, have been reported using the one-dimensional interface element technology; however, only limited applications are available for the surface interface element. In the applications reported to-date, the geometry of the interfaced domains exactly match each other even though the spatial discretization within each domain may be different. As such, the spatial modeling of each domain, the interface elements and the assembled system is still laborious. The present research is focused on developing a rapid modeling procedure based on a parametric interface representation of independently defined subdomains which are also independently discretized.

  16. Animation Strategies for Smooth Transformations Between Discrete Lods of 3d Building Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kada, Martin; Wichmann, Andreas; Filippovska, Yevgeniya; Hermes, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    The cartographic 3D visualization of urban areas has experienced tremendous progress over the last years. An increasing number of applications operate interactively in real-time and thus require advanced techniques to improve the quality and time response of dynamic scenes. The main focus of this article concentrates on the discussion of strategies for smooth transformation between two discrete levels of detail (LOD) of 3D building models that are represented as restricted triangle meshes. Because the operation order determines the geometrical and topological properties of the transformation process as well as its visual perception by a human viewer, three different strategies are proposed and subsequently analyzed. The simplest one orders transformation operations by the length of the edges to be collapsed, while the other two strategies introduce a general transformation direction in the form of a moving plane. This plane either pushes the nodes that need to be removed, e.g. during the transformation of a detailed LOD model to a coarser one, towards the main building body, or triggers the edge collapse operations used as transformation paths for the cartographic generalization.

  17. Incorporating Discrete Irregular Fracture Zone Networks into 3D Paleohydrogeologic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normani, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    Dual continuum computational models which include both porous media and discrete fracture zones are valuable tools in assessing groundwater migration and pathways in fractured rock systems. Fracture generation models can produce stochastic realizations of fracture networks which honor geological structures and fracture propagation behaviors. Surface lineament traces can be propagated to depth based on fracture zone statistics to produce representations of geological structures in rock. The generated discrete, complex and irregular fracture zone networks, represented as a triangulated mesh, are embedded using orthogonal quadrilateral elements within a three-dimensional hexahedral finite element mesh. A detailed coupled density-dependent paleohydrogeologic groundwater analysis of a hypothetical 104 km2 portion of the Canadian Shield has been conducted using the discrete-fracture dual continuum finite element model FRAC3DVS to investigate the characterization of large-scale fracture zone networks on groundwater and tracer movement during a 120,000 year paleoclimate cycle. Permeability reduction due to permafrost was also applied. Time series data for the depth of permafrost, along with ice thickness and lake depth, were provided by the University of Toronto (UofT) Glacial Systems Model. The crystalline rock between fracture zones was assigned properties characteristic of those reported for the Canadian Shield. Total dissolved solids concentrations of 300 g/L are encountered at depth. Surface water features and a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) were used in a GIS framework to define the watershed boundaries at surface water divides and to populate the finite element mesh. This work will illustrate the long-term evolution and stability of the geosphere and groundwater systems to external perturbations caused by glaciation through the use of performance measures such as Mean Life Expectancy and the migration of a unit tracer to depth over a paleoclimate cycle.

  18. Schur-decomposition for 3D matrix equations and its application in solving radiative discrete ordinates equations discretized by Chebyshev collocation spectral method

    SciTech Connect

    Li Benwen Tian Shuai; Sun Yasong; Hu, Zhang-Mao

    2010-02-20

    The Schur-decomposition for three-dimensional matrix equations is developed and used to directly solve the radiative discrete ordinates equations which are discretized by Chebyshev collocation spectral method. Three methods, say, the spectral methods based on 2D and 3D matrix equation solvers individually, and the standard discrete ordinates method, are presented. The numerical results show the good accuracy of spectral method based on direct solvers. The CPU time cost comparisons against the resolutions between these three methods are made using MATLAB and FORTRAN 95 computer languages separately. The results show that the CPU time cost of Chebyshev collocation spectral method with 3D Schur-decomposition solver is the least, and almost only one thirtieth to one fiftieth CPU time is needed when using the spectral method with 3D Schur-decomposition solver compared with the standard discrete ordinates method.

  19. Parallel 3D Finite Element Numerical Modelling of DC Electron Guns

    SciTech Connect

    Prudencio, E.; Candel, A.; Ge, L.; Kabel, A.; Ko, K.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; /SLAC

    2008-02-04

    In this paper we present Gun3P, a parallel 3D finite element application that the Advanced Computations Department at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is developing for the analysis of beam formation in DC guns and beam transport in klystrons. Gun3P is targeted specially to complex geometries that cannot be described by 2D models and cannot be easily handled by finite difference discretizations. Its parallel capability allows simulations with more accuracy and less processing time than packages currently available. We present simulation results for the L-band Sheet Beam Klystron DC gun, in which case Gun3P is able to reduce simulation time from days to some hours.

  20. Efficient global wave propagation adapted to 3-D structural complexity: a pseudo-spectral/spectral-element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Kuangdai; Nissen-Meyer, Tarje; van Driel, Martin

    2016-09-01

    We present a new, computationally efficient numerical method to simulate global seismic wave propagation in realistic 3-D Earth models. We characterize the azimuthal dependence of 3-D wavefields in terms of Fourier series, such that the 3-D equations of motion reduce to an algebraic system of coupled 2-D meridian equations, which is then solved by a 2-D spectral element method (SEM). Computational efficiency of such a hybrid method stems from lateral smoothness of 3-D Earth models and axial singularity of seismic point sources, which jointly confine the Fourier modes of wavefields to a few lower orders. We show novel benchmarks for global wave solutions in 3-D structures between our method and an independent, fully discretized 3-D SEM with remarkable agreement. Performance comparisons are carried out on three state-of-the-art tomography models, with seismic period ranging from 34s down to 11s. It turns out that our method has run up to two orders of magnitude faster than the 3-D SEM, featured by a computational advantage expanding with seismic frequency.

  1. Quasi-heterogeneous efficient 3-D discrete ordinates CANDU calculations using Attila

    SciTech Connect

    Preeti, T.; Rulko, R.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, 3-D quasi-heterogeneous large scale parallel Attila calculations of a generic CANDU test problem consisting of 42 complete fuel channels and a perpendicular to fuel reactivity device are presented. The solution method is that of discrete ordinates SN and the computational model is quasi-heterogeneous, i.e. fuel bundle is partially homogenized into five homogeneous rings consistently with the DRAGON code model used by the industry for the incremental cross-section generation. In calculations, the HELIOS-generated 45 macroscopic cross-sections library was used. This approach to CANDU calculations has the following advantages: 1) it allows detailed bundle (and eventually channel) power calculations for each fuel ring in a bundle, 2) it allows the exact reactivity device representation for its precise reactivity worth calculation, and 3) it eliminates the need for incremental cross-sections. Our results are compared to the reference Monte Carlo MCNP solution. In addition, the Attila SN method performance in CANDU calculations characterized by significant up scattering is discussed. (authors)

  2. Discrete element modelling of bedload transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyer, A.; Frey, P.

    2011-12-01

    Discrete element modelling (DEM) has been widely used in solid mechanics and in granular physics. In this type of modelling, each individual particle is taken into account and intergranular interactions are modelled with simple laws (e.g. Coulomb friction). Gravity and contact forces permit to solve the dynamical behaviour of the system. DEM is interesting to model configurations and access to parameters not directly available in laboratory experimentation, hence the term "numerical experimentations" sometimes used to describe DEM. DEM was used to model bedload transport experiments performed at the particle scale with spherical glass beads in a steep and narrow flume. Bedload is the larger material that is transported on the bed on stream channels. It has a great geomorphic impact. Physical processes ruling bedload transport and more generally coarse-particle/fluid systems are poorly known, arguably because granular interactions have been somewhat neglected. An existing DEM code (PFC3D) already computing granular interactions was used. We implemented basic hydrodynamic forces to model the fluid interactions (buoyancy, drag, lift). The idea was to use the minimum number of ingredients to match the experimental results. Experiments were performed with one-size and two-size mixtures of coarse spherical glass beads entrained by a shallow turbulent and supercritical water flow down a steep channel with a mobile bed. The particle diameters were 4 and 6mm, the channel width 6.5mm (about the same width as the coarser particles) and the channel inclination was typically 10%. The water flow rate and the particle rate were kept constant at the upstream entrance and adjusted to obtain bedload transport equilibrium. Flows were filmed from the side by a high-speed camera. Using image processing algorithms made it possible to determine the position, velocity and trajectory of both smaller and coarser particles. Modelled and experimental particle velocity and concentration depth

  3. Vector algorithms for geometrically nonlinear 3D finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, John D.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms for geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis are presented which exploit the vector processing capability of the VPS-32, which is closely related to the CYBER 205. By manipulating vectors (which are long lists of numbers) rather than individual numbers, very high processing speeds are obtained. Long vector lengths are obtained without extensive replication or reordering by storage of intermediate results in strategic patterns at all stages of the computations. Comparisons of execution times with those from programs using either scalar or other vector programming techniques indicate that the algorithms presented are quite efficient.

  4. Finite Element Analysis of Mechanical Properties of 3D Four-directional Rectangular Braided Composites—Part 2: Validation of the 3D Finite Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dian-Sen; Fang, Dai-Ning; Lu, Zi-Xing; Yang, Zhen-Yu; Jiang, Nan

    2010-08-01

    In the first part of the work, we have established a new parameterized three-dimensional (3D) finite element model (FEM) which precisely simulated the spatial configuration of the braiding yarns and considered the cross-section deformation as well as the surface contact relationship between the yarns. This paper presents a prediction of the effective elastic properties and the meso-scale mechanical response of 3D braided composites to verify the validation of the FEM. The effects of the braiding parameters on the mechanical properties are investigated in detail. By analyzing the deformation and stress nephogram of the model, a reasonable overall stress field is provided and the results well support the strength prediction. The results indicate it is convenient to predict all the elastic constants of 3D braided composites with different parameters simultaneously using the FEM. Moreover, the FEM can successfully predict the meso-scale mechanical response of 3D braided composites containing periodical structures.

  5. Time-stepping stability of continuous and discontinuous finite-element methods for 3-D wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, W. A.; Zhebel, E.; Minisini, S.

    2014-02-01

    We analyse the time-stepping stability for the 3-D acoustic wave equation, discretized on tetrahedral meshes. Two types of methods are considered: mass-lumped continuous finite elements and the symmetric interior-penalty discontinuous Galerkin method. Combining the spatial discretization with the leap-frog time-stepping scheme, which is second-order accurate and conditionally stable, leads to a fully explicit scheme. We provide estimates of its stability limit for simple cases, namely, the reference element with Neumann boundary conditions, its distorted version of arbitrary shape, the unit cube that can be partitioned into six tetrahedra with periodic boundary conditions and its distortions. The Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy stability limit contains an element diameter for which we considered different options. The one based on the sum of the eigenvalues of the spatial operator for the first-degree mass-lumped element gives the best results. It resembles the diameter of the inscribed sphere but is slightly easier to compute. The stability estimates show that the mass-lumped continuous and the discontinuous Galerkin finite elements of degree 2 have comparable stability conditions, whereas the mass-lumped elements of degree one and three allow for larger time steps.

  6. BOPACE 3-D (the Boeing Plastic Analysis Capability for 3-dimensional Solids Using Isoparametric Finite Elements)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.; Straayer, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The BOPACE 3-D is a finite element computer program, which provides a general family of three-dimensional isoparametric solid elements, and includes a new algorithm for improving the efficiency of the elastic-plastic-creep solution procedure. Theoretical, user, and programmer oriented sections are presented to describe the program.

  7. A 3D, finite element model for baroclinic circulation on the Vancouver Island continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Foreman, M.G.G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a 3-dimensional model of the barotropic and baroclinic circulation on the continental shelf west of Vancouver Island, Canada. A previous study with a 2D barotropic model and field data revealed that several tidal constituents have a significant baroclinic component (the K1 in particular). Thus we embarked on another study with a 3D model to study the baroclinic effects on the residual and several selected tidal constituents. The 3D model uses a harmonic expansion in time and a finite element discretization in space. All nonlinear terms are retained, including quadratic bottom stress, advection and wave transport (continuity nonlinearity). The equations are solved as a global and a local problem, where the global problem is the solution of the wave equation formulation of the shallow water equations, and the local problem is the solution of the momentum equation for the vertical velocity profile. These equations are coupled to the advection-diffusion equation for density so that density gradient forcing is included in the momentum equations. However, the study presented here describes diagnostic calculations for the baroclinic residual circulation only. The model is sufficiently efficient that it encourages sensitivity testing with a large number of model runs. In this sense, the model is akin to an extension of analytical solutions to the domain of irregular geometry and bottom topography where this parameter space can be explored in some detail. In particular, the consequences of the sigma coordinate system used by the model are explored. Test cases using an idealized representation of the continental shelf, shelf break and shelf slope, lead to an estimation of the velocity errors caused by interpolation errors inherent in the sigma coordinate system. On the basis of these estimates, the computational grid used in the 2D model is found to have inadequate resolution. Thus a new grid is generated with increased

  8. A feasibility study of a 3-D finite element solution scheme for aeroengine duct acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrahamson, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The advantage from development of a 3-D model of aeroengine duct acoustics is the ability to analyze axial and circumferential liner segmentation simultaneously. The feasibility of a 3-D duct acoustics model was investigated using Galerkin or least squares element formulations combined with Gaussian elimination, successive over-relaxation, or conjugate gradient solution algorithms on conventional scalar computers and on a vector machine. A least squares element formulation combined with a conjugate gradient solver on a CDC Star vector computer initially appeared to have great promise, but severe difficulties were encountered with matrix ill-conditioning. These difficulties in conditioning rendered this technique impractical for realistic problems.

  9. Analytical 3-D p-element for quadrilateral plates—Part 1: Thick isotropic plate structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, B.; Leung, A. Y. T.; Li, Q. S.; Lu, J. W. Z.; Zhang, X. C.

    2007-06-01

    An analytical three-dimensional (3-D) p-version element for the vibration analysis of arbitrary quadrilateral thick plates is presented. With the additional hierarchical shape functions and analytically integrated element matrices, the computed accuracy is considerably improved. The computed natural frequencies of cantilever and simply supported square plates show that the convergence rate of the present element is very fast with respect to the number of hierarchical terms and it can predict very accurate modes. The element is applicable to the free vibration analysis of quadrilateral, polygonal plates as well as 3-D space structures. The continuous wavelet transform (CWT) is applied for the identification of damping ratios. Based on the Rayleigh damping model, the damped vibration response is obtained. A simple experiment is performed to verify the predicted vibration responses. The results show that the proposed element is also efficient for the vibration response analysis of plates.

  10. NIKE3D: an implicit, finite-deformation, finite element code for analyzing the static and dynamic response of three-dimensional solids

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1981-01-01

    A user's manual is provided for NIKE3D, a fully implicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the large deformation static and dynamic response of inelastic solids. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node constant pressure solid elements. Bandwidth minimization is optional. Post-processors for NIKE3D include GRAPE for plotting deformed shapes and stress contours and DYNAP for plotting time histories.

  11. BEST3D user's manual: Boundary Element Solution Technology, 3-Dimensional Version 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical basis and programming strategy utilized in the construction of the computer program BEST3D (boundary element solution technology - three dimensional) and detailed input instructions are provided for the use of the program. An extensive set of test cases and sample problems is included in the manual and is also available for distribution with the program. The BEST3D program was developed under the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Section Components contract (NAS3-23697). The overall objective of this program was the development of new computer programs allowing more accurate and efficient three-dimensional thermal and stress analysis of hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. The BEST3D program allows both linear and nonlinear analysis of static and quasi-static elastic problems and transient dynamic analysis for elastic problems. Calculation of elastic natural frequencies and mode shapes is also provided.

  12. Finite element analysis of 3D elastic-plastic frictional contact problem for Cosserat materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Xie, Z. Q.; Chen, B. S.; Zhang, H. W.

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop a finite element model for 3D elastic-plastic frictional contact problem of Cosserat materials. Because 3D elastic-plastic frictional contact problems belong to the unspecified boundary problems with nonlinearities in both material and geometric forms, a large number of calculations are needed to obtain numerical results with high accuracy. Based on the parametric variational principle and the corresponding quadratic programming method for numerical simulation of frictional contact problems, a finite element model is developed for 3D elastic-plastic frictional contact analysis of Cosserat materials. The problems are finally reduced to linear complementarity problems (LCP). Numerical examples show the feasibility and importance of the developed model for analyzing the contact problems of structures with materials which have micro-polar characteristics.

  13. The Use of Direct Solver in Vector Finite Element Modeling for Calculating 3-D Magnetotelluric Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prihantoro, Rudy; Sutarno, Doddy; Nurhasan

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we seek numerical solution of 3-D Magnetotelluric (MT) using edge- based finite element method. This approach is a variant of standard finite element method and commonly referred as vector finite-element (VFE) method. Nonphysical solutions usually occurred when the solution is sought using standard finite element which is a node based element. Vector finite element attempt to overcome those nonphysical solutions by using the edges of the element as vector basis. The proposed approach on solving second order Maxwell differential equation of 3-D MT is using direct solver rather than iterative method. Therefore, divergence correction to accelerate the rate of convergence for its iterative solution is no longer needed. The utilization of direct solver has been verified previously for correctness by comparing the resulting solution to those given by analytical solution, as well as the solution come from the other numerical methods, for earth layered model, 2-D models and COMMEMI 3D-2 model. In this work, further verification resulted from recent comparison model of Dublin Test Model 1 (DTM1) is presented.

  14. Modeling Three-Phase Compositional Flow on Complex 3D Unstructured Grids with Higher-Order Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, J.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Most problems of interest in hydrogeology and subsurface energy resources involve complex heterogeneous geological formations. Such domains are most naturally represented in numerical reservoir simulations by unstructured computational grids. Finite element methods are a natural choice to describe fluid flow on unstructured meshes, because the governing equations can be readily discretized for any grid-element geometry. In this work, we consider the challenging problem of fully compositional three-phase flow in 3D unstructured grids, discretized by tetrahedra, prisms, or hexahedra, and compare to simulations on 3D structured grids. We employ a combination of mixed hybrid finite element methods to solve for the pressure and flux fields in a fractional flow formulation, and higher-order discontinuous Galerkin methods for the mass transport equations. These methods are well suited to simulate flow in heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, because they provide a globally continuous pressure and flux field, while allowing for sharp discontinuities in the phase properties, such as compositions and saturations. The increased accuracy from using higher-order methods improves the modeling of highly non-linear flow, such as gravitational and viscous fingering. We present several numerical examples to study convergence rates and the (lack of) sensitivity to gridding/mesh orientation, and mesh quality. These examples consider gravity depletion, water and gas injection in oil saturated subsurface reservoirs with species exchange between up to three fluid phases. The examples demonstrate the wide applicability of our chosen finite element methods in the study of challenging multiphase flow problems in porous, geometrically complex, subsurface media.

  15. The three-dimensional elemental distribution based on the surface topography by confocal 3D-XRF analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Longtao; Qin, Min; Wang, Kai; Lin, Xue; Peng, Shiqi; Sun, Tianxi; Liu, Zhiguo

    2016-09-01

    Confocal three-dimensional micro-X-ray fluorescence (3D-XRF) is a good surface analysis technology widely used to analyse elements and elemental distributions. However, it has rarely been applied to analyse surface topography and 3D elemental mapping in surface morphology. In this study, a surface adaptive algorithm using the progressive approximation method was designed to obtain surface topography. A series of 3D elemental mapping analyses in surface morphology were performed in laboratories to analyse painted pottery fragments from the Majiayao Culture (3300-2900 BC). To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, sample surface topography and 3D elemental mapping were simultaneously obtained. Besides, component and depth analyses were also performed using synchrotron radiation confocal 3D-XRF and tabletop confocal 3D-XRF, respectively. The depth profiles showed that the sample has a layered structure. The 3D elemental mapping showed that the red pigment, black pigment, and pottery coat contain a large amount of Fe, Mn, and Ca, respectively. From the 3D elemental mapping analyses at different depths, a 3D rendering was obtained, clearly showing the 3D distributions of the red pigment, black pigment, and pottery coat. Compared with conventional 3D scanning, this method is time-efficient for analysing 3D elemental distributions and hence especially suitable for samples with non-flat surfaces.

  16. Finite-element simulation of flanging in the deform 3D software package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vostrov, V. N.; Kononov, P. V.

    2016-05-01

    The results of a finite element simulation of the rolling of cylindrical workpieces using the DEFORM 3D software package are presented. The curve of the limiting plasticity of L63 brass that corresponds to various schemes of the state of stress in a workpiece is plotted. The deformation paths of the characteristic regions in a rolled part are calculated.

  17. Finite Element Code For 3D-Hydraulic Fracture Propagation Equations (3-layer).

    1992-03-24

    HYFRACP3D is a finite element program for simulation of a pseudo three-dimensional fracture geometries with a two-dimensional planar solution. The model predicts the height, width and winglength over time for a hydraulic fracture propagating in a three-layered system of rocks with variable rock mechanics properties.

  18. 3D finite element analysis of porous Ti-based alloy prostheses.

    PubMed

    Mircheski, Ile; Gradišar, Marko

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, novel designs of porous acetabular cups are created and tested with 3D finite element analysis (FEA). The aim is to develop a porous acetabular cup with low effective radial stiffness of the structure, which will be near to the architectural and mechanical behavior of the natural bone. For the realization of this research, a 3D-scanner technology was used for obtaining a 3D-CAD model of the pelvis bone, a 3D-CAD software for creating a porous acetabular cup, and a 3D-FEA software for virtual testing of a novel design of the porous acetabular cup. The results obtained from this research reveal that a porous acetabular cup from Ti-based alloys with 60 ± 5% porosity has the mechanical behavior and effective radial stiffness (Young's modulus in radial direction) that meet and exceed the required properties of the natural bone. The virtual testing with 3D-FEA of a novel design with porous structure during the very early stage of the design and the development of orthopedic implants, enables obtaining a new or improved biomedical implant for a relatively short time and reduced price.

  19. Finite Element Analysis of Thermo-Mechanical Properties of 3D Braided Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li-li; Xu, Guo-dong; Cheng, Su; Lu, Xia-mei; Zeng, Tao

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a modified finite element model (FEM) to investigate the thermo-mechanical properties of three-dimensional (3D) braided composite. The effective coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) and the meso-scale mechanical response of 3D braided composites are predicted. The effects of the braiding angle and fiber volume fraction on the effective CTE are evaluated. The results are compared to the experimental data available in the literature to demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of the present method. The tensile stress distributions of the representative volume element (RVE) are also outlined. It is found that the stress of the braiding yarn has a significant increase with temperature rise; on the other hand, the temperature change has an insignificant effect on the stress of the matrix. In addition, a rapid decrease in the tensile strength of 3D braided composites is observed with the increase in temperature. It is revealed that the thermal conditions have a significant effect on the strength of 3D braided composites. The present method provides an effective tool to predict the stresses of 3D braided composites under thermo-mechanical loading.

  20. Extraction of "best fit circles" on 3D meshes based on discrete curvatures: application to impact craters detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beguet, Florian; Bali, Sarah; Christoff, Nicole; Jorda, Laurent; Viseur, Sophie; Bouley, Sylvain; Manolova, Agata; Mari, Jean-Luc

    2016-04-01

    Impact craters is a typical feature observed at the surface of most bodies in the solar system: terrestrial planets, their satellites, asteroids and even possibly cometary nuclei exhibit impact craters. Their spatial density yields the estimation of the age of the surface, a key parameter required for subsequent geological studies. With the development of interplanetary missions, a large number of solar system objects have been mapped at a high spatial resolution, emphasizing the need for new automatic methods of crater detection and counting. In this work, we present such a method using a new approach based on the analysis of reconstructed 3D meshes instead of 2D images. The robust extraction of feature areas on surface objects embedded in 3D, like circular shapes, is a challenging problem. Classical approaches generally rely on image processing and template matching on a 2D flat projection of the 3D object (for instance a high-resolution picture). In this paper, we propose a full 3D method that mainly relies on curvature analysis. Mean and Gaussian curvatures are estimated on the surface. They are used to label vertices that belong to concave parts corresponding to specific pits on the surface. Centers are located in the targeted surface regions, corresponding to potential crater features. Then "best fit circles" are extracted, based on the rims of the circular shapes. They consist in closed lines exclusively composed of edges of the initial mesh. This approach has been applied to the detection of craters on the asteroid Vesta. Keywords: geometric modeling, 3D meshes, shape recognition, mesh processing, discrete curvatures, asteroids, crater detection, geology, geomorphology.

  1. surf3d: A 3-D finite-element program for the analysis of surface and corner cracks in solids subjected to mode-1 loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A computer program, surf3d, that uses the 3D finite-element method to calculate the stress-intensity factors for surface, corner, and embedded cracks in finite-thickness plates with and without circular holes, was developed. The cracks are assumed to be either elliptic or part eliptic in shape. The computer program uses eight-noded hexahedral elements to model the solid. The program uses a skyline storage and solver. The stress-intensity factors are evaluated using the force method, the crack-opening displacement method, and the 3-D virtual crack closure methods. In the manual the input to and the output of the surf3d program are described. This manual also demonstrates the use of the program and describes the calculation of the stress-intensity factors. Several examples with sample data files are included with the manual. To facilitate modeling of the user's crack configuration and loading, a companion program (a preprocessor program) that generates the data for the surf3d called gensurf was also developed. The gensurf program is a three dimensional mesh generator program that requires minimal input and that builds a complete data file for surf3d. The program surf3d is operational on Unix machines such as CRAY Y-MP, CRAY-2, and Convex C-220.

  2. Mixed-hybrid and vertex-discontinuous-Galerkin finite element modeling of multiphase compositional flow on 3D unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, Joachim; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2016-06-01

    Problems of interest in hydrogeology and hydrocarbon resources involve complex heterogeneous geological formations. Such domains are most accurately represented in reservoir simulations by unstructured computational grids. Finite element methods accurately describe flow on unstructured meshes with complex geometries, and their flexible formulation allows implementation on different grid types. In this work, we consider for the first time the challenging problem of fully compositional three-phase flow in 3D unstructured grids, discretized by any combination of tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. We employ a mass conserving mixed hybrid finite element (MHFE) method to solve for the pressure and flux fields. The transport equations are approximated with a higher-order vertex-based discontinuous Galerkin (DG) discretization. We show that this approach outperforms a face-based implementation of the same polynomial order. These methods are well suited for heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, because they provide globally continuous pressure and flux fields, while allowing for sharp discontinuities in compositions and saturations. The higher-order accuracy improves the modeling of strongly non-linear flow, such as gravitational and viscous fingering. We review the literature on unstructured reservoir simulation models, and present many examples that consider gravity depletion, water flooding, and gas injection in oil saturated reservoirs. We study convergence rates, mesh sensitivity, and demonstrate the wide applicability of our chosen finite element methods for challenging multiphase flow problems in geometrically complex subsurface media.

  3. Generation of Random Particle Packings for Discrete Element Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, S.; Weatherley, D.; Ayton, T.

    2012-04-01

    An important step in the setup process of Discrete Element Model (DEM) simulations is the generation of a suitable particle packing. There are quite a number of properties such a granular material specimen should ideally have, such as high coordination number, isotropy, the ability to fill arbitrary bounding volumes and the absence of locked-in stresses. An algorithm which is able to produce specimens fulfilling these requirements is the insertion based sphere packing algorithm originally proposed by Place and Mora, 2001 [2] and extended in this work. The algorithm works in two stages. First a number of "seed" spheres are inserted into the bounding volume. In the second stage the gaps between the "seed" spheres are filled by inserting new spheres in a way so they have D+1 (i.e. 3 in 2D, 4 in 3D) touching contacts with either other spheres or the boundaries of the enclosing volume. Here we present an implementation of the algorithm and a systematic statistical analysis of the generated sphere packings. The analysis of the particle radius distribution shows that they follow a power-law with an exponent ≈ D (i.e. ≈3 for a 3D packing and ≈2 for 2D). Although the algorithm intrinsically guarantees coordination numbers of at least 4 in 3D and 3 in 2D, the coordination numbers realized in the generated packings can be significantly higher, reaching beyond 50 if the range of particle radii is sufficiently large. Even for relatively small ranges of particle sizes (e.g. Rmin = 0.5Rmax) the maximum coordination number may exceed 10. The degree of isotropy of the generated sphere packing is also analysed in both 2D and 3D, by measuring the distribution of orientations of vectors joining the centres of adjacent particles. If the range of particle sizes is small, the packing algorithm yields moderate anisotropy approaching that expected for a face-centred cubic packing of equal-sized particles. However, once Rmin < 0.3Rmax a very high degree of isotropy is demonstrated in

  4. Application of 3D X-ray CT data sets to finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, P.L.; Martz, H.E.; Brand, H.R.; Hollerbach, K.

    1995-08-31

    Finite Element Modeling (FEM) is becoming more important as industry drives toward concurrent engineering. A fundamental hindrance to fully exploiting the power of FEM is the human effort required to acquire complex part geometry, particularly as-built geometry, as a FEM mesh. Many Quantitative Non Destructive Evaluation (QNDE) techniques that produce three-dimensional (3D) data sets provide a substantial reduction in the effort required to apply FEM to as-built parts. This paper describes progress at LLNL on the application of 3D X-ray computed tomography (CT) data sets to more rapidly produce high-quality FEM meshes of complex, as-built geometries. Issues related to the volume segmentation of the 3D CT data as well as the use of this segmented data to tailor generic hexahedral FEM meshes to part specific geometries are discussed. The application of these techniques to FEM analysis in the medical field is reported here.

  5. Algorithms for Accurate and Fast Plotting of Contour Surfaces in 3D Using Hexahedral Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Chandan; Saini, Jaswinder Singh

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, Fast and accurate algorithms for the generation of contour surfaces in 3D are described using hexahedral elements which are popular in finite element analysis. The contour surfaces are described in the form of groups of boundaries of contour segments and their interior points are derived using the contour equation. The locations of contour boundaries and the interior points on contour surfaces are as accurate as the interpolation results obtained by hexahedral elements and thus there are no discrepancies between the analysis and visualization results.

  6. Global localization of 3D anatomical structures by pre-filtered Hough forests and discrete optimization.

    PubMed

    Donner, René; Menze, Bjoern H; Bischof, Horst; Langs, Georg

    2013-12-01

    The accurate localization of anatomical landmarks is a challenging task, often solved by domain specific approaches. We propose a method for the automatic localization of landmarks in complex, repetitive anatomical structures. The key idea is to combine three steps: (1) a classifier for pre-filtering anatomical landmark positions that (2) are refined through a Hough regression model, together with (3) a parts-based model of the global landmark topology to select the final landmark positions. During training landmarks are annotated in a set of example volumes. A classifier learns local landmark appearance, and Hough regressors are trained to aggregate neighborhood information to a precise landmark coordinate position. A non-parametric geometric model encodes the spatial relationships between the landmarks and derives a topology which connects mutually predictive landmarks. During the global search we classify all voxels in the query volume, and perform regression-based agglomeration of landmark probabilities to highly accurate and specific candidate points at potential landmark locations. We encode the candidates' weights together with the conformity of the connecting edges to the learnt geometric model in a Markov Random Field (MRF). By solving the corresponding discrete optimization problem, the most probable location for each model landmark is found in the query volume. We show that this approach is able to consistently localize the model landmarks despite the complex and repetitive character of the anatomical structures on three challenging data sets (hand radiographs, hand CTs, and whole body CTs), with a median localization error of 0.80 mm, 1.19 mm and 2.71 mm, respectively. PMID:23664450

  7. Global localization of 3D anatomical structures by pre-filtered Hough Forests and discrete optimization

    PubMed Central

    Donner, René; Menze, Bjoern H.; Bischof, Horst; Langs, Georg

    2013-01-01

    The accurate localization of anatomical landmarks is a challenging task, often solved by domain specific approaches. We propose a method for the automatic localization of landmarks in complex, repetitive anatomical structures. The key idea is to combine three steps: (1) a classifier for pre-filtering anatomical landmark positions that (2) are refined through a Hough regression model, together with (3) a parts-based model of the global landmark topology to select the final landmark positions. During training landmarks are annotated in a set of example volumes. A classifier learns local landmark appearance, and Hough regressors are trained to aggregate neighborhood information to a precise landmark coordinate position. A non-parametric geometric model encodes the spatial relationships between the landmarks and derives a topology which connects mutually predictive landmarks. During the global search we classify all voxels in the query volume, and perform regression-based agglomeration of landmark probabilities to highly accurate and specific candidate points at potential landmark locations. We encode the candidates’ weights together with the conformity of the connecting edges to the learnt geometric model in a Markov Random Field (MRF). By solving the corresponding discrete optimization problem, the most probable location for each model landmark is found in the query volume. We show that this approach is able to consistently localize the model landmarks despite the complex and repetitive character of the anatomical structures on three challenging data sets (hand radiographs, hand CTs, and whole body CTs), with a median localization error of 0.80 mm, 1.19 mm and 2.71 mm, respectively. PMID:23664450

  8. Discrete Element Modeling of Triboelectrically Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Calle, Carlos I.; Weitzman, Peter S.; Curry, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Tribocharging of particles is common in many processes including fine powder handling and mixing, printer toner transport and dust extraction. In a lunar environment with its high vacuum and lack of water, electrostatic forces are an important factor to consider when designing and operating equipment. Dust mitigation and management is critical to safe and predictable performance of people and equipment. The extreme nature of lunar conditions makes it difficult and costly to carry out experiments on earth which are necessary to better understand how particles gather and transfer charge between each other and with equipment surfaces. DEM (Discrete Element Modeling) provides an excellent virtual laboratory for studying tribocharging of particles as well as for design of devices for dust mitigation and for other purposes related to handling and processing of lunar regolith. Theoretical and experimental work has been performed pursuant to incorporating screened Coulombic electrostatic forces into EDEM, a commercial DEM software package. The DEM software is used to model the trajectories of large numbers of particles for industrial particulate handling and processing applications and can be coupled with other solvers and numerical models to calculate particle interaction with surrounding media and force fields. While simple Coulombic force between two particles is well understood, its operation in an ensemble of particles is more complex. When the tribocharging of particles and surfaces due to frictional contact is also considered, it is necessary to consider longer range of interaction of particles in response to electrostatic charging. The standard DEM algorithm accounts for particle mechanical properties and inertia as a function of particle shape and mass. If fluid drag is neglected, then particle dynamics are governed by contact between particles, between particles and equipment surfaces and gravity forces. Consideration of particle charge and any tribocharging and

  9. Discrete element modelling of subglacial sediment deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, A. D.; Egholm, D. L.; Piotrowski, J. A.; Tulaczyk, S.

    2012-04-01

    Soft, deformable sediments are often present under glaciers. Subglacial sediments deform under the differential load of the ice, and this causes the overlying glacier to accelerate its motion. Understanding the rheology of subglacial sediment is therefore important for models of glacial dynamics. Previous studies of the mechanical behaviour of subglacial sediments have primarily relied on analytical considerations and laboratory shearing experiments. As a novel approach, the Discrete Element Method (DEM) is used to explore the highly nonlinear dynamics of a granular bed that is exposed to stress conditions comparable to subglacial environments. The numerical approach allows close monitoring of the mechanical and rheological behaviour under a range of conditions. Of special interest is bed shear strength, strain distribution and -localization, mode of deformation, and role of effective normal pressure during shearing. As a calibration benchmark, results from laboratory ring-shear experiments on granular material are compared to similar numerical experiments. The continuously recorded stress dynamics in the laboratory shear experiments are compared to DEM experiments, and the micro-mechanical parameters in the contact model of the DEM code are calibrated to match the macroscopic Mohr-Coulomb failure criteria parameters, constrained from successive laboratory shear tests under a range of normal pressures. The data-parallel nature of the basic DEM formulation makes the problem ideal for utilizing the high arithmetic potential of modern general-purpose GPUs. Using the Nvidia Cuda C toolkit, the algorithm is formulated for spherical particles in three dimensions with a soft-body contact model. Scene rendering is performed using a custom Cuda ray-tracing algorithm. Efforts on optimization of the particle algorithm are discussed, and future plans of expansion are presented.

  10. The 3D folding of metazoan genomes correlates with the association of similar repetitive elements

    PubMed Central

    Cournac, Axel; Koszul, Romain; Mozziconacci, Julien

    2016-01-01

    The potential roles of the numerous repetitive elements found in the genomes of multi-cellular organisms remain speculative. Several studies have suggested a role in stabilizing specific 3D genomic contacts. To test this hypothesis, we exploited inter-chromosomal contacts frequencies obtained from Hi-C experiments and show that the folding of the human, mouse and Drosophila genomes is associated with a significant co-localization of several specific repetitive elements, notably many elements of the SINE family. These repeats tend to be the oldest ones and are enriched in transcription factor binding sites. We propose that the co-localization of these repetitive elements may explain the global conservation of genome folding observed between homologous regions of the human and mouse genome. Taken together, these results support a contribution of specific repetitive elements in maintaining and/or reshaping genome architecture over evolutionary times. PMID:26609133

  11. Melting points and chemical bonding properties of 3d transition metal elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahara, Wataru

    2014-08-01

    The melting points of 3d transition metal elements show an unusual local minimal peak at manganese across Period 4 in the periodic table. The chemical bonding properties of scandium, titanium, vanadium, chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel and copper are investigated by the DV-Xα cluster method. The melting points are found to correlate with the bond overlap populations. The chemical bonding nature therefore appears to be the primary factor governing the melting points.

  12. Isoparametric 3-D Finite Element Mesh Generation Using Interactive Computer Graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayrak, C.; Ozsoy, T.

    1985-01-01

    An isoparametric 3-D finite element mesh generator was developed with direct interface to an interactive geometric modeler program called POLYGON. POLYGON defines the model geometry in terms of boundaries and mesh regions for the mesh generator. The mesh generator controls the mesh flow through the 2-dimensional spans of regions by using the topological data and defines the connectivity between regions. The program is menu driven and the user has a control of element density and biasing through the spans and can also apply boundary conditions, loads interactively.

  13. Content-Adaptive Finite Element Mesh Generation of 3-D Complex MR Volumes for Bioelectromagnetic Problems.

    PubMed

    Lee, W; Kim, T-S; Cho, M; Lee, S

    2005-01-01

    In studying bioelectromagnetic problems, finite element method offers several advantages over other conventional methods such as boundary element method. It allows truly volumetric analysis and incorporation of material properties such as anisotropy. Mesh generation is the first requirement in the finite element analysis and there are many different approaches in mesh generation. However conventional approaches offered by commercial packages and various algorithms do not generate content-adaptive meshes, resulting in numerous elements in the smaller volume regions, thereby increasing computational load and demand. In this work, we present an improved content-adaptive mesh generation scheme that is efficient and fast along with options to change the contents of meshes. For demonstration, mesh models of the head from a volume MRI are presented in 2-D and 3-D.

  14. Discrete elements method of neutral particle transport. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, K.A.

    1983-10-01

    A new 'discrete elements' (LN) transport method is derived and compared to the discrete ordinates SN method, theoretically and by numerical experimentation. The discrete elements method is more accurate than discrete ordinates and strongly ameliorates ray effects for the practical problems studied. The discrete elements method is shown to be more cost effective in terms of execution time with comparable storage to attain the same accuracy, for a one-dimensional test case using linear characteristic spatial quadrature. In a two-dimensional test case, a vacuum duct in a shield, LN is more consistently convergent toward a Monte Carlo benchmark solution than SN, using step characteristic spatial quadrature. An analysis of the interaction of angular and spatial quadrature in xy-geometry indicates the desirability of using linear characteristic spatial quadrature with the LN method. The discrete elements method is based on discretizing the Boltzmann equation over a set of elements of angle. The zeroth and first angular moments of the directional flux, over each element, are estimated by numerical quadrature and yield a flux-weighted average streaming direction for the element. (Data for this estimation are fluxes in fixed directions calculated as in SN.)

  15. Discrete-element modelling and smoothed particle hydrodynamics: potential in the environmental sciences.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Paul W; Prakash, Mahesh

    2004-09-15

    Particle-based simulation methods, such as the discrete-element method and smoothed particle hydrodynamics, have specific advantages in modelling complex three-dimensional (3D) environmental fluid and particulate flows. The theory of both these methods and their relative advantages compared with traditional methods will be discussed. Examples of 3D flows on realistic topography illustrate the environmental application of these methods. These include the flooding of a river valley as a result of a dam collapse, coastal inundation by a tsunami, volcanic lava flow and landslides. Issues related to validation and quality data availability are also discussed. PMID:15306427

  16. OPTIMIZATION OF 3-D IMAGE-GUIDED NEAR INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY USING BOUNDARY ELEMENT METHOD

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Subhadra; Carpenter, Colin; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2010-01-01

    Multimodality imaging systems combining optical techniques with MRI/CT provide high-resolution functional characterization of tissue by imaging molecular and vascular biomarkers. To optimize these hybrid systems for clinical use, faster and automatable algorithms are required for 3-D imaging. Towards this end, a boundary element model was used to incorporate tissue boundaries from MRI/CT into image formation process. This method uses surface rendering to describe light propagation in 3-D using diffusion equation. Parallel computing provided speedup of up to 54% in time of computation. Simulations showed that location of NIRS probe was crucial for quantitatively accurate estimation of tumor response. A change of up to 61% was seen between cycles 1 and 3 in monitoring tissue response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:20523751

  17. Finite volume and finite element methods applied to 3D laminar and turbulent channel flows

    SciTech Connect

    Louda, Petr; Příhoda, Jaromír; Sváček, Petr; Kozel, Karel

    2014-12-10

    The work deals with numerical simulations of incompressible flow in channels with rectangular cross section. The rectangular cross section itself leads to development of various secondary flow patterns, where accuracy of simulation is influenced by numerical viscosity of the scheme and by turbulence modeling. In this work some developments of stabilized finite element method are presented. Its results are compared with those of an implicit finite volume method also described, in laminar and turbulent flows. It is shown that numerical viscosity can cause errors of same magnitude as different turbulence models. The finite volume method is also applied to 3D turbulent flow around backward facing step and good agreement with 3D experimental results is obtained.

  18. Justification for a 2D versus 3D fingertip finite element model during static contact simulations.

    PubMed

    Harih, Gregor; Tada, Mitsunori; Dolšak, Bojan

    2016-10-01

    The biomechanical response of a human hand during contact with various products has not been investigated in details yet. It has been shown that excessive contact pressure on the soft tissue can result in discomfort, pain and also cumulative traumatic disorders. This manuscript explores the benefits and limitations of a simplified two-dimensional vs. an anatomically correct three-dimensional finite element model of a human fingertip. Most authors still use 2D FE fingertip models due to their simplicity and reduced computational costs. However we show that an anatomically correct 3D FE fingertip model can provide additional insight into the biomechanical behaviour. The use of 2D fingertip FE models is justified when observing peak contact pressure values as well as displacement during the contact for the given studied cross-section. On the other hand, an anatomically correct 3D FE fingertip model provides a contact pressure distribution, which reflects the fingertip's anatomy.

  19. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Special finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, S.

    1988-01-01

    This annual status report presents the results of work performed during the fourth year of the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Section Components program (NASA Contract NAS3-23697). The objective of the program is to produce a series of new computer codes permitting more accurate and efficient 3-D analysis of selected hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades and turbine vanes. The computer codes embody a progression of math models and are streamlined to take advantage of geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of material response that distinguish each group of selected components. Volume 1 of this report discusses the special finite element models developed during the fourth year of the contract.

  20. Design and verification of diffractive optical elements for speckle generation of 3-D range sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Pei-Qin; Shih, Hsi-Fu; Chen, Jenq-Shyong; Wang, Yi-Shiang

    2016-09-01

    The optical projection using speckles is one of the structured light methods that have been applied to three-dimensional (3-D) range sensors. This paper investigates the design and fabrication of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) for generating the light field with uniformly distributed speckles. Based on the principles of computer generated holograms, the iterative Fourier transform algorithm was adopted for the DOE design. It was used to calculate the phase map for diffracting the incident laser beam into a goal pattern with distributed speckles. Four patterns were designed in the study. Their phase maps were first examined by a spatial light modulator and then fabricated on glass substrates by microfabrication processes. Finally, the diffraction characteristics of the fabricated devices were verified. The experimental results show that the proposed methods are applicable to the DOE design of 3-D range sensors. Furthermore, any expected diffraction area and speckle density could be possibly achieved according to the relations presented in the paper.

  1. Spectral Element Modeling of 3D Site Effects in the Alpine Valley of Grenoble, France.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaljub, E.; Cornou, C.; Gueguen, P.; Causse, M.; Komatitsch, D.

    2004-12-01

    Sitting on top of a 3D Y-shaped basin filled mostly with late quaternary deposits, the city of Grenoble (French Alps) is subject to strong amplification of seismic motion (see the SISMOVALP web site). In order to assess the magnitude and 3D complexity of these site effects, we propose a spectral element modeling approach previously applied to the prediction of strong ground motion in the Los Angeles sedimentary basin (Komatitstch et al., 2004). The spectral element method naturally accounts for depth variations of the free surface and of internal interfaces, such as the contact between the sediments and the bedrock. It is also well suited to model the propagation of surface waves generated at the basin edges. The 3D spectral element mesh honors the stiff surface topography of the mountains surrounding the city, as well as the bedrock depth obtained from extensive gravimetric measurements. In the basin, we use a generic 1D velocity model derived from geophysical measurements performed in a deep borehole that reached the substratum at 550 m depth in 1999. Results and comparison to data are shown in the time and frequency domain for small-size (Mw=2.5 and Mw=3.5) local events recorded in the past years. Then, a Mw=5.5 strike-slip event is simulated on the eastern border of the basin along the Belledonne fault, and the results are compared to those obtained by the method of Empirical Green Functions. References: http://www-lgit.obs.ujf-grenoble.fr/sismovalp/ Simulations of ground motion in the Los Angeles basin based upon the spectral- element method, Dimitri Komatitsch, Qinya Liu, Jeroen Tromp, Peter Süss, Christiane Stidham and John H. Shaw, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, vol. 94, p 187-206 (2004).

  2. Setting up virgin stress conditions in discrete element models

    PubMed Central

    Rojek, J.; Karlis, G.F.; Malinowski, L.J.; Beer, G.

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, a methodology for setting up virgin stress conditions in discrete element models is proposed. The developed algorithm is applicable to discrete or coupled discrete/continuum modeling of underground excavation employing the discrete element method (DEM). Since the DEM works with contact forces rather than stresses there is a need for the conversion of pre-excavation stresses to contact forces for the DEM model. Different possibilities of setting up virgin stress conditions in the DEM model are reviewed and critically assessed. Finally, a new method to obtain a discrete element model with contact forces equivalent to given macroscopic virgin stresses is proposed. The test examples presented show that good results may be obtained regardless of the shape of the DEM domain. PMID:27087731

  3. 3D elemental sensitive imaging using transmission X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yijin; Meirer, Florian; Wang, Junyue; Requena, Guillermo; Williams, Phillip; Nelson, Johanna; Mehta, Apurva; Andrews, Joy C; Pianetta, Piero

    2012-09-01

    Determination of the heterogeneous distribution of metals in alloy/battery/catalyst and biological materials is critical to fully characterize and/or evaluate the functionality of the materials. Using synchrotron-based transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM), it is now feasible to perform nanoscale-resolution imaging over a wide X-ray energy range covering the absorption edges of many elements; combining elemental sensitive imaging with determination of sample morphology. We present an efficient and reliable methodology to perform 3D elemental sensitive imaging with excellent sample penetration (tens of microns) using hard X-ray TXM. A sample of an Al-Si piston alloy is used to demonstrate the capability of the proposed method. PMID:22349401

  4. 3D elemental sensitive imaging using transmission X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yijin; Meirer, Florian; Wang, Junyue; Requena, Guillermo; Williams, Phillip; Nelson, Johanna; Mehta, Apurva; Andrews, Joy C; Pianetta, Piero

    2012-09-01

    Determination of the heterogeneous distribution of metals in alloy/battery/catalyst and biological materials is critical to fully characterize and/or evaluate the functionality of the materials. Using synchrotron-based transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM), it is now feasible to perform nanoscale-resolution imaging over a wide X-ray energy range covering the absorption edges of many elements; combining elemental sensitive imaging with determination of sample morphology. We present an efficient and reliable methodology to perform 3D elemental sensitive imaging with excellent sample penetration (tens of microns) using hard X-ray TXM. A sample of an Al-Si piston alloy is used to demonstrate the capability of the proposed method.

  5. Automatic procedure for realistic 3D finite element modelling of human brain for bioelectromagnetic computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristovich, K. Y.; Khan, S. H.

    2010-07-01

    Realistic computer modelling of biological objects requires building of very accurate and realistic computer models based on geometric and material data, type, and accuracy of numerical analyses. This paper presents some of the automatic tools and algorithms that were used to build accurate and realistic 3D finite element (FE) model of whole-brain. These models were used to solve the forward problem in magnetic field tomography (MFT) based on Magnetoencephalography (MEG). The forward problem involves modelling and computation of magnetic fields produced by human brain during cognitive processing. The geometric parameters of the model were obtained from accurate Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data and the material properties - from those obtained from Diffusion Tensor MRI (DTMRI). The 3D FE models of the brain built using this approach has been shown to be very accurate in terms of both geometric and material properties. The model is stored on the computer in Computer-Aided Parametrical Design (CAD) format. This allows the model to be used in a wide a range of methods of analysis, such as finite element method (FEM), Boundary Element Method (BEM), Monte-Carlo Simulations, etc. The generic model building approach presented here could be used for accurate and realistic modelling of human brain and many other biological objects.

  6. A modular numerical method for implicit 0D/3D coupling in cardiovascular finite element simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Mahdi Esmaily; Vignon-Clementel, Irene E.; Figliola, Richard; Marsden, Alison L.; Modeling Of Congenital Hearts Alliance (Mocha) Investigators

    2013-07-01

    Implementation of boundary conditions in cardiovascular simulations poses numerical challenges due to the complex dynamic behavior of the circulatory system. The use of elaborate closed-loop lumped parameter network (LPN) models of the heart and the circulatory system as boundary conditions for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations can provide valuable global dynamic information, particularly for patient specific simulations. In this paper, the necessary formulation for coupling an arbitrary LPN to a finite element Navier-Stokes solver is presented. A circuit analogy closed-loop LPN is solved numerically, and pressure and flow information is iteratively passed between the 0D and 3D domains at interface boundaries, resulting in a time-implicit scheme. For Neumann boundaries, an implicit method, regardless of the LPN, is presented to achieve the desired stability and convergence properties. Numerical procedures for passing flow and pressure information between the 0D and 3D domains are described, and implicit, semi-implicit, and explicit quasi-Newton formulations are compared. The issue of divergence in the presence of backflow is addressed via a stabilized boundary formulation. The requirements for coupling Dirichlet boundary conditions are also discussed and this approach is compared in detail to that of the Neumann coupled boundaries. Having the option to select between Dirichlet and Neumann coupled boundary conditions increases the flexibility of current framework by allowing a wide range of components to be used at the 3D-0D interface.

  7. Finite Element Analysis of Meniscal Anatomical 3D Scaffolds: Implications for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, L; Lambers, F.M; Wilson, W; van Donkelaar, C.C; de Wijn, JR; Huiskesb, R; van Blitterswijk, C.A

    2007-01-01

    Solid Free-Form Fabrication (SFF) technologies allow the fabrication of anatomical 3D scaffolds from computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patients’ dataset. These structures can be designed and fabricated with a variable, interconnected and accessible porous network, resulting in modulable mechanical properties, permeability, and architecture that can be tailored to mimic a specific tissue to replace or regenerate. In this study, we evaluated whether anatomical meniscal 3D scaffolds with matching mechanical properties and architecture are beneficial for meniscus replacement as compared to meniscectomy. After acquiring CT and MRI of porcine menisci, 3D fiber-deposited (3DF) scaffolds were fabricated with different architectures by varying the deposition pattern of the fibers comprising the final structure. The mechanical behaviour of 3DF scaffolds with different architectures and of porcine menisci was measured by static and dynamic mechanical analysis and the effect of these tissue engineering templates on articular cartilage was assessed by finite element analysis (FEA) and compared to healthy conditions or to meniscectomy. Results show that 3DF anatomical menisci scaffolds can be fabricated with pore different architectures and with mechanical properties matching those of natural menisci. FEA predicted a beneficial effect of meniscus replacement with 3D scaffolds in different mechanical loading conditions as compared to meniscectomy. No influence of the internal scaffold architecture was found on articular cartilage damage. Although FEA predictions should be further confirmed by in vitro and in vivo experiments, this study highlights meniscus replacement by SFF anatomical scaffolds as a potential alternative to meniscectomy. PMID:19662124

  8. Fully 3D-Printed Preconcentrator for Selective Extraction of Trace Elements in Seawater.

    PubMed

    Su, Cheng-Kuan; Peng, Pei-Jin; Sun, Yuh-Chang

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we used a stereolithographic 3D printing technique and polyacrylate polymers to manufacture a solid phase extraction preconcentrator for the selective extraction of trace elements and the removal of unwanted salt matrices, enabling accurate and rapid analyses of trace elements in seawater samples when combined with a quadrupole-based inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. To maximize the extraction efficiency, we evaluated the effect of filling the extraction channel with ordered cuboids to improve liquid mixing. Upon automation of the system and optimization of the method, the device allowed highly sensitive and interference-free determination of Mn, Ni, Zn, Cu, Cd, and Pb, with detection limits comparable with those of most conventional methods. The system's analytical reliability was further confirmed through analyses of reference materials and spike analyses of real seawater samples. This study suggests that 3D printing can be a powerful tool for building multilayer fluidic manipulation devices, simplifying the construction of complex experimental components, and facilitating the operation of sophisticated analytical procedures for most sample pretreatment applications.

  9. Fully 3D-Printed Preconcentrator for Selective Extraction of Trace Elements in Seawater.

    PubMed

    Su, Cheng-Kuan; Peng, Pei-Jin; Sun, Yuh-Chang

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we used a stereolithographic 3D printing technique and polyacrylate polymers to manufacture a solid phase extraction preconcentrator for the selective extraction of trace elements and the removal of unwanted salt matrices, enabling accurate and rapid analyses of trace elements in seawater samples when combined with a quadrupole-based inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. To maximize the extraction efficiency, we evaluated the effect of filling the extraction channel with ordered cuboids to improve liquid mixing. Upon automation of the system and optimization of the method, the device allowed highly sensitive and interference-free determination of Mn, Ni, Zn, Cu, Cd, and Pb, with detection limits comparable with those of most conventional methods. The system's analytical reliability was further confirmed through analyses of reference materials and spike analyses of real seawater samples. This study suggests that 3D printing can be a powerful tool for building multilayer fluidic manipulation devices, simplifying the construction of complex experimental components, and facilitating the operation of sophisticated analytical procedures for most sample pretreatment applications. PMID:26101898

  10. 3D elemental distribution images by XRFμCT at LNLS—Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, G. R.; Rocha, H. S.; Calza, C.; Anjos, M. J.; Lima, I.; Pérez, C. A.; Lopes, R. T.

    2011-10-01

    An X-ray Transmission Microtomography (CT) system combined with an X-ray Fluorescence Microtomography (XRFμCT) system was implemented in the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), Campinas, Brazil. The main objective of this work is to determine the elemental distribution in biological samples (breast, prostate and lung samples) in order to verify the concentration of some elements correlated with characteristics and pathology of each tissue observed by the transmission CT. The experiments were performed at the X-Ray Fluorescence beamline (D09B-XRF) of the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory, Campinas, Brazil. A quasi-monochromatic beam produced by a multilayer monochromator was used as an incident beam. The sample was placed on a high precision goniometer and translation stages that allow its rotation as well as translation perpendicular to the beam. The fluorescence photons were collected with an energy dispersive HPGe detector placed at 90° to the incident beam, while transmitted photons were detected with a fast Na(Tl) scintillation counter placed behind the sample on the beam direction. The CT images were reconstructed using a filtered back-projection algorithm and the XRFμCT were reconstructed using a filtered back-projection algorithm with absorption corrections. The 3D images were reconstructed using the 3D-DOCTOR software.

  11. 3D Functional Elements Deep Inside Silicon with Nonlinear Laser Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokel, Onur; Turnali, Ahmet; Ergecen, Emre; Pavlov, Ihor; Ilday, Fatih Omer

    Functional optical and electrical elements fabricated on silicon (Si) constitute fundamental building blocks of electronics and Si-photonics. However, since the highly successful established lithography are geared towards surface processing, elements embedded inside Si simply do not exist. Here, we present a novel direct-laser writing method for positioning buried functional elements inside Si wafers. This new phenomenon is distinct from previous work, in that the surface of Si is not modified. By exploiting nonlinear interactions of a focused laser, permanent refractive index changes are induced inside Si. The imprinted index contrast is then used to demonstrate a plethora of functional elements and capabilities embedded inside Si. In particular, we demonstrate the first functional optical element inside Si, the first information-storage capability inside Si, creation of high-resolution subsurface holograms, buried multilevel structures, and complex 3D architectures in Si, none of which is currently possible with other methods. This new approach complements available techniques by taking advantage of the real estate under Si, and therefore can pave the way for creating entirely new multilevel devices through electronic-photonic integration.

  12. Least-squares finite element solution of 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, Tsung-Liang; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1992-01-01

    Although significant progress has been made in the finite element solution of incompressible viscous flow problems. Development of more efficient methods is still needed before large-scale computation of 3D problems becomes feasible. This paper presents such a development. The most popular finite element method for the solution of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is the classic Galerkin mixed method based on the velocity-pressure formulation. The mixed method requires the use of different elements to interpolate the velocity and the pressure in order to satisfy the Ladyzhenskaya-Babuska-Brezzi (LBB) condition for the existence of the solution. On the other hand, due to the lack of symmetry and positive definiteness of the linear equations arising from the mixed method, iterative methods for the solution of linear systems have been hard to come by. Therefore, direct Gaussian elimination has been considered the only viable method for solving the systems. But, for three-dimensional problems, the computer resources required by a direct method become prohibitively large. In order to overcome these difficulties, a least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) has been developed. This method is based on the first-order velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation. In this paper the LSFEM is extended for the solution of three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations written in the following first-order quasi-linear velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation.

  13. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1989-01-01

    The user options available for running the MHOST finite element analysis package is described. MHOST is a solid and structural analysis program based on the mixed finite element technology, and is specifically designed for 3-D inelastic analysis. A family of 2- and 3-D continuum elements along with beam and shell structural elements can be utilized, many options are available in the constitutive equation library, the solution algorithms and the analysis capabilities. The outline of solution algorithms is discussed along with the data input and output, analysis options including the user subroutines and the definition of the finite elements implemented in the program package.

  14. A Piecewise Linear Finite Element Discretization of the Diffusion Equation for Arbitrary Polyhedral Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T S; Adams, M L; Yang, B; Zika, M R

    2005-07-15

    We develop a piecewise linear (PWL) Galerkin finite element spatial discretization for the multi-dimensional radiation diffusion equation. It uses piecewise linear weight and basis functions in the finite element approximation, and it can be applied on arbitrary polygonal (2D) or polyhedral (3D) grids. We show that this new PWL method gives solutions comparable to those from Palmer's finite-volume method. However, since the PWL method produces a symmetric positive definite coefficient matrix, it should be substantially more computationally efficient than Palmer's method, which produces an asymmetric matrix. We conclude that the Galerkin PWL method is an attractive option for solving diffusion equations on unstructured grids.

  15. 3D finite element model of the diabetic neuropathic foot: a gait analysis driven approach.

    PubMed

    Guiotto, Annamaria; Sawacha, Zimi; Guarneri, Gabriella; Avogaro, Angelo; Cobelli, Claudio

    2014-09-22

    Diabetic foot is an invalidating complication of diabetes that can lead to foot ulcers. Three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis (FEA) allows characterizing the loads developed in the different anatomical structures of the foot in dynamic conditions. The aim of this study was to develop a subject specific 3D foot FE model (FEM) of a diabetic neuropathic (DNS) and a healthy (HS) subject, whose subject specificity can be found in term of foot geometry and boundary conditions. Kinematics, kinetics and plantar pressure (PP) data were extracted from the gait analysis trials of the two subjects with this purpose. The FEM were developed segmenting bones, cartilage and skin from MRI and drawing a horizontal plate as ground support. Materials properties were adopted from previous literature. FE simulations were run with the kinematics and kinetics data of four different phases of the stance phase of gait (heel strike, loading response, midstance and push off). FEMs were then driven by group gait data of 10 neuropathic and 10 healthy subjects. Model validation focused on agreement between FEM-simulated and experimental PP. The peak values and the total distribution of the pressures were compared for this purpose. Results showed that the models were less robust when driven from group data and underestimated the PP in each foot subarea. In particular in the case of the neuropathic subject's model the mean errors between experimental and simulated data were around the 20% of the peak values. This knowledge is crucial in understanding the aetiology of diabetic foot.

  16. Extended volume and surface scatterometer for optical characterization of 3D-printed elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannenberg, Florian; Uebeler, Denise; Weiß, Jürgen; Pescoller, Lukas; Weyer, Cornelia; Hahlweg, Cornelius

    2015-09-01

    The use of 3d printing technology seems to be a promising way for low cost prototyping, not only of mechanical, but also of optical components or systems. It is especially useful in applications where customized equipment repeatedly is subject to immediate destruction, as in experimental detonics and the like. Due to the nature of the 3D-printing process, there is a certain inner texture and therefore inhomogeneous optical behaviour to be taken into account, which also indicates mechanical anisotropy. Recent investigations are dedicated to quantification of optical properties of such printed bodies and derivation of corresponding optimization strategies for the printing process. Beside mounting, alignment and illumination means, also refractive and reflective elements are subject to investigation. The proposed measurement methods are based on an imaging nearfield scatterometer for combined volume and surface scatter measurements as proposed in previous papers. In continuation of last year's paper on the use of near field imaging, which basically is a reflective shadowgraph method, for characterization of glossy surfaces like printed matter or laminated material, further developments are discussed. The device has been extended for observation of photoelasticity effects and therefore homogeneity of polarization behaviour. A refined experimental set-up is introduced. Variation of plane of focus and incident angle are used for separation of various the images of the layers of the surface under test, cross and parallel polarization techniques are applied. Practical examples from current research studies are included.

  17. 3D finite element model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing middle ear functions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuelin; Gan, Rong Z

    2016-10-01

    Chinchilla is a commonly used animal model for research of sound transmission through the ear. Experimental measurements of the middle ear transfer function in chinchillas have shown that the middle ear cavity greatly affects the tympanic membrane (TM) and stapes footplate (FP) displacements. However, there is no finite element (FE) model of the chinchilla ear available in the literature to characterize the middle ear functions with the anatomical features of the chinchilla ear. This paper reports a recently completed 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear based on X-ray micro-computed tomography images of a chinchilla bulla. The model consisted of the ear canal, TM, middle ear ossicles and suspensory ligaments, and the middle ear cavity. Two boundary conditions of the middle ear cavity wall were simulated in the model as the rigid structure and the partially flexible surface, and the acoustic-mechanical coupled analysis was conducted with these two conditions to characterize the middle ear function. The model results were compared with experimental measurements reported in the literature including the TM and FP displacements and the middle ear input admittance in chinchilla ear. An application of this model was presented to identify the acoustic role of the middle ear septa-a unique feature of chinchilla middle ear cavity. This study provides the first 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing the middle ear functions through the acoustic-mechanical coupled FE analysis.

  18. 3D finite element model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing middle ear functions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuelin; Gan, Rong Z

    2016-10-01

    Chinchilla is a commonly used animal model for research of sound transmission through the ear. Experimental measurements of the middle ear transfer function in chinchillas have shown that the middle ear cavity greatly affects the tympanic membrane (TM) and stapes footplate (FP) displacements. However, there is no finite element (FE) model of the chinchilla ear available in the literature to characterize the middle ear functions with the anatomical features of the chinchilla ear. This paper reports a recently completed 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear based on X-ray micro-computed tomography images of a chinchilla bulla. The model consisted of the ear canal, TM, middle ear ossicles and suspensory ligaments, and the middle ear cavity. Two boundary conditions of the middle ear cavity wall were simulated in the model as the rigid structure and the partially flexible surface, and the acoustic-mechanical coupled analysis was conducted with these two conditions to characterize the middle ear function. The model results were compared with experimental measurements reported in the literature including the TM and FP displacements and the middle ear input admittance in chinchilla ear. An application of this model was presented to identify the acoustic role of the middle ear septa-a unique feature of chinchilla middle ear cavity. This study provides the first 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing the middle ear functions through the acoustic-mechanical coupled FE analysis. PMID:26785845

  19. Scattering of elastic waves by an arbitrary shaped 3-D planar crack using the Indirect Boundary Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viveros, U.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Luzon, F.

    2001-12-01

    The scattering of elastic waves by various types of cracks is an important engineering problem. From a physical point of view the question that arises is up to what degree will a local perturbation in a medium modifies the scattered wave field. For instance, in the seismic monitoring to enhance oil recovery (due to extensive presence of cracks and cavities) a crucial problem is to determine zones where there are physical property changes. Modelling such highly heterogeneous media is critical to increased production from oil and gas. In order to study scattering effects caused by arbitrary-shaped cracks a simplified indirect boundary element method (BEM) is used to compute the seismic response of a 3-D crack under incident elastic P and S waves. The method is based on the integral representation for scattered elastic waves using single layer boundary sources. This approach is called indirect BEM in the literature as the sources strengths should be obtained as an intermediate step. Scattered waves are constructed at the boundaries from which they radiate. Therefore, this method can be regarded as a numerical realization of Huygens' principle. Boundary conditions lead to a system of integral for boundary sources. A simplified discretization scheme is used. It is based on the approximate rectification of the surfaces involved using circles for the numerical and analytical integration of the exact Green's function for the unbounded elastic space. Radiation patterns for penny-shaped and croissant-shaped cracks are explored. The scattering effects of the elastic waves in a homogeneous isotropic infinite elastic medium with a 3-D crack are displayed in both frequency and time domains.

  20. 3D Dynamic Finite Element Analysis of the Nonuniform Residual Stress in Ultrasonic Impact Treatment Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shengsun; Guo, Chaobo; Wang, Dongpo; Wang, Zhijiang

    2016-09-01

    The nonuniform distributions of the residual stress were simulated by a 3D finite element model to analyze the elastic-plastic dynamic ultrasonic impact treatment (UIT) process of multiple impacts on the 2024 aluminum alloy. The evolution of the stress during the impact process was discussed. The successive impacts during the UIT process improve the uniformity of the plastic deformation and decrease the maximum compressive residual stress beneath the former impact indentations. The influences of different controlled parameters, including the initial impact velocity, pin diameter, pin tip, device moving, and offset distances, on the residual stress distributions were analyzed. The influences of the controlled parameters on the residual stress distributions are apparent in the offset direction due to the different surface coverage in different directions. The influences can be used to understand the UIT process and to obtain the desired residual stress by optimizing the controlled parameters.

  1. A 3D finite element ALE method using an approximate Riemann solution

    DOE PAGES

    Chiravalle, V. P.; Morgan, N. R.

    2016-08-09

    Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian finite volume methods that solve a multidimensional Riemann-like problem at the cell center in a staggered grid hydrodynamic (SGH) arrangement have been proposed. This research proposes a new 3D finite element arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian SGH method that incorporates a multidimensional Riemann-like problem. Here, two different Riemann jump relations are investigated. A new limiting method that greatly improves the accuracy of the SGH method on isentropic flows is investigated. A remap method that improves upon a well-known mesh relaxation and remapping technique in order to ensure total energy conservation during the remap is also presented. Numerical details and test problemmore » results are presented.« less

  2. 3D finite element analysis on esthetic indirect dental restorations under thermal and mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Cornacchia, Tulimar P M; Las Casas, Estevam B; Cimini, Carlos Alberto; Peixoto, Rodrigo G

    2010-11-01

    Thermo-mechanical finite element analyses in 3-D models are described for determination of the stress levels due to thermal and mechanical loads in a healthy and restored tooth. Transient thermo-mechanical analysis simulating the ingestion of cold and hot drinks was performed to determine the temperature distribution in the models of the teeth, followed by linear elastic stress analyses. The thermal loads were applied on the occlusal and lingual surfaces. Subsequently, coupled variation of the temperature and mastication loading was considered. The vertical loading was distributed at occlusal points, adding up to 180 N. Maximum stresses were verified in resin restoration under thermal loads. When studying coupled effect of mechanical loading with that arising from thermal effects, higher tensile stress values occurred in porcelain restorations, especially at the restoration-dentin interface. Regions of high tensile stress were detected and their possible clinical significance with respect to restoration damage and microleakage were discussed.

  3. The Wavelet Element Method. Part 2; Realization and Additional Features in 2D and 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, Claudio; Tabacco, Anita; Urban, Karsten

    1998-01-01

    The Wavelet Element Method (WEM) provides a construction of multiresolution systems and biorthogonal wavelets on fairly general domains. These are split into subdomains that are mapped to a single reference hypercube. Tensor products of scaling functions and wavelets defined on the unit interval are used on the reference domain. By introducing appropriate matching conditions across the interelement boundaries, a globally continuous biorthogonal wavelet basis on the general domain is obtained. This construction does not uniquely define the basis functions but rather leaves some freedom for fulfilling additional features. In this paper we detail the general construction principle of the WEM to the 1D, 2D and 3D cases. We address additional features such as symmetry, vanishing moments and minimal support of the wavelet functions in each particular dimension. The construction is illustrated by using biorthogonal spline wavelets on the interval.

  4. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Special finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, S.

    1987-01-01

    This Annual Status Report presents the results of work performed during the third year of the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Section Components program (NASA Contract NAS3-23697). The objective of the program is to produce a series of new computer codes that permit more accurate and efficient three-dimensional analysis of selected hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. The computer codes embody a progression of mathematical models and are streamlined to take advantage of geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of material response that distinguish each group of selected components. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume 1 describes effort performed under Task 4B, Special Finite Element Special Function Models, while Volume 2 concentrates on Task 4C, Advanced Special Functions Models.

  5. A NURBS-based generalized finite element scheme for 3D simulation of heterogeneous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safdari, Masoud; Najafi, Ahmad R.; Sottos, Nancy R.; Geubelle, Philippe H.

    2016-08-01

    A 3D NURBS-based interface-enriched generalized finite element method (NIGFEM) is introduced to solve problems with complex discontinuous gradient fields observed in the analysis of heterogeneous materials. The method utilizes simple structured meshes of hexahedral elements that do not necessarily conform to the material interfaces in heterogeneous materials. By avoiding the creation of conforming meshes used in conventional FEM, the NIGFEM leads to significant simplification of the mesh generation process. To achieve an accurate solution in elements that are crossed by material interfaces, the NIGFEM utilizes Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS) to enrich the solution field locally. The accuracy and convergence of the NIGFEM are tested by solving a benchmark problem. We observe that the NIGFEM preserves an optimal rate of convergence, and provides additional advantages including the accurate capture of the solution fields in the vicinity of material interfaces and the built-in capability for hierarchical mesh refinement. Finally, the use of the NIGFEM in the computational analysis of heterogeneous materials is discussed.

  6. 3D Finite Element Study on: Bar Splinted Implants Supporting Partial Denture in the Reconstructed Mandible

    PubMed Central

    El-Anwar, Mohamed; Ghali, Rami; Aboelnagga, Mona

    2016-01-01

    AIM: This study aimed to estimate the stress patterns induced by the masticatory loads on a removable prosthesis supported and retained by bar splinted implants placed in the reconstructed mandible with two different clip materials and without clip, in the fibula-jaw bone and prosthesis using finite element analysis. METHODS: Two 3D finite element models were constructed, that models components were modeled on commercial CAD/CAM software then assembled into finite element package. Vertical loads were applied simulating the masticatory forces unilaterally in the resected site and bilaterally in the central fossa of the lower first molar as 100N (tension and compression). Analysis was based on the assumption full osseointegration between different types of bones, and between implants and fibula while fixing the top surface of the TMJ in place. RESULTS: The metallic bar connecting the three implants is insensitive to the clips material. Its supporting implants showed typical behavior with maximum stress values at the neck region. Fibula and jaw bone showed stresses within physiologic, while clips material effect seems to be very small due to its relatively small size. CONCLUSION: Switching loading force direction from tensile to compression did-not change the stresses and deformations distribution, but reversed their sign from positive to negative. PMID:27275353

  7. A detailed 3D finite element analysis of the peeling behaviour of a gecko spatula.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Roger A; Holl, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed finite element analysis of the adhesion of a gecko spatula. The gecko spatulae form the tips of the gecko foot hairs that transfer the adhesional and frictional forces between substrate and foot. The analysis is based on a parameterised description of the 3D geometry of the spatula that only requires 12 parameters. The adhesion is described by a nonlinear computational contact formulation that accounts for the van der Waals interaction between spatula and substrate. The spatula adhesion model is implemented using an enriched contact finite element formulation recently developed by the first author. The finite element model is then used to simulate the peeling behaviour of the gecko spatula under applied vertical and rotational loading for various model parameters. Variations of the material stiffness, adhesional strength and range, stiction, spatula size and spatula inclination are considered to account for the natural variation of spatula properties. The study demonstrates that the spatula can function over a wide range of conditions. The computed pull-off forces are in agreement with experimental results reported in the literature. The study also examines the energy required for the spatula pull-off. The proposed model is ideal to study the influence of substrate roughness on the spatula adhesion, as is finally demonstrated.

  8. 3D finite element model of RF heating: novel nonablative cutaneous therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Linda; Pope, Karl A.

    2003-06-01

    This study presents a finite element model of a non-ablative RF tissue heating system for dermatological applications. The Thermage ThermaCool TC System consists of a capacitively coupled treatment tip, handpiece, RF generator, and cryogen delivery system. Various electrode geometries were created to generate uniform thermal profiles at specific depths in the tissue. The optimal thermal treatment depth for a clinical indication is influenced by factors such as tissue thickness for a given anatomical location, the desired target for heating in that tissue, and anesthesia factors. Electrodes of ¼, 1, and 1½cm2 area were evaluated for depth of treatment. A 3D multi-physics finite element model was developed to simulate RF heating in tissue. The program coupled electrical and thermal models to predict the electric field produced and the consequent heating. The electrical portion of the model was verified using an electric field mapping system. The thermal section of the model was confirmed via thermocouple measurements for cooling and infrared imaging measurements for RF heating. The FEM model produced electrical and thermal predictions that were verified with experimental measurements. The finite element model shows significant potential as a predictive R&D tool to assist in RF electrode design and reduce product development time.

  9. Improved MAGIC gel for higher sensitivity and elemental tissue equivalent 3D dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Xuping; Reese, Timothy G.; Crowley, Elizabeth M.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Polymer-based gel dosimeter (MAGIC type) is a preferable phantom material for PET range verification of proton beam therapy. However, improvement in elemental tissue equivalency (specifically O/C ratio) is very desirable to ensure realistic time-activity measurements. Methods: Glucose and urea was added to the original MAGIC formulation to adjust the O/C ratio. The dose responses of the new formulations were tested with MRI transverse relaxation rate (R2) measurements. Results: The new ingredients improved not only the elemental composition but also the sensitivity of the MAGIC gel. The O/C ratios of our new gels agree with that of soft tissue within 1%. The slopes of dose response curves were 1.6-2.7 times larger with glucose. The melting point also increased by 5 deg. C. Further addition of urea resulted in a similar slope but with an increased intercept and a decreased melting point. Conclusions: Our improved MAGIC gel formulations have higher sensitivity and better elemental tissue equivalency for 3D dosimetry applications involving nuclear reactions.

  10. Analysis of corner cracks at hole by a 3-D weight function method with stresses from finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, W.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Sutton, M. A.; Wu, X. R.; Shivakumar, K. N.

    1995-01-01

    Stress intensity factors for quarter-elliptical corner cracks emanating from a circular hole are determined using a 3-D weight function method combined with a 3-D finite element method. The 3-D finite element method is used to analyze uncracked configuration and provide stress distribution in the region where crack is to occur. Using this stress distribution as input, the 3-D weight function method is used to determine stress intensity factors. Three different loading conditions, i.e. remote tension, remote bending and wedge loading, are considered for a wide range in geometrical parameters. The significance in using 3-D uncracked stress distribution and the difference between single and double corner cracks are studied. Typical crack opening displacements are also provided. Comparisons are made with solutions available in the literature.

  11. XUV spectra of 2nd transition row elements: identification of 3d-4p and 3d-4f transition arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokasani, Ragava; Long, Elaine; Maguire, Oisin; Sheridan, Paul; Hayden, Patrick; O'Reilly, Fergal; Dunne, Padraig; Sokell, Emma; Endo, Akira; Limpouch, Jiri; O'Sullivan, Gerry

    2015-12-01

    The use of laser produced plasmas (LPPs) in extreme ultraviolet/soft x-ray lithography and metrology at 13.5 nm has been widely reported and recent research efforts have focused on developing next generation sources for lithography, surface morphology, patterning and microscopy at shorter wavelengths. In this paper, the spectra emitted from LPPs of the 2nd transition row elements from yttrium (Z = 39) to palladium (Z = 46), with the exception of zirconium (Z = 40) and technetium (Z = 43), produced by two Nd:YAG lasers which delivered up to 600 mJ in 7 ns and 230 mJ in 170 ps, respectively, are reported. Intense emission was observed in the 2-8 nm spectral region resulting from unresolved transition arrays (UTAs) due to 3d-4p, 3d-4f and 3p-3d transitions. These transitions in a number of ion stages of yttrium, niobium, ruthenium and rhodium were identified by comparison with results from Cowan code calculations and previous studies. The theoretical data were parameterized using the UTA formalism and the mean wavelength and widths were calculated and compared with experimental results.

  12. Finite element methods of analysis for 3D inviscid compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peraire, Jaime

    1990-01-01

    The applicants have developed a finite element based approach for the solution of three-dimensional compressible flows. The procedure enables flow solutions to be obtained on tetrahedral discretizations of computational domains of complex form. A further development was the incorporation of a solution adaptive mesh strategy in which the adaptivity is achieved by complete remeshing of the solution domain. During the previous year, the applicants were working with the Advanced Aerodynamics Concepts Branch at NASA Ames Research Center with an implementation of the basic meshing and solution procedure. The objective of the work to be performed over this twelve month period was the transfer of the adaptive mesh technology and also the undertaking of basic research into alternative flow algorithms for the Euler equations on unstructured meshes.

  13. A methodology to mesh mesoscopic representative volume element of 3D interlock woven composites impregnated with resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Manh Hung; Cauvin, Ludovic; Rassineux, Alain

    2016-04-01

    We present a new numerical methodology to build a Representative Volume Element (RVE) of a wide range of 3D woven composites in order to determine the mechanical behavior of the fabric unit cell by a mesoscopic approach based on a 3D finite element analysis. Emphasis is put on the numerous difficulties of creating a mesh of these highly complex weaves embedded in a resin. A conforming mesh at the numerous interfaces between yarns is created by a multi-quadtree adaptation technique, which makes it possible thereafter to build an unstructured 3D mesh of the resin with tetrahedral elements. The technique is not linked with any specific tool, but can be carried out with the use of any 2D and 3D robust mesh generators.

  14. Performance analysis of high quality parallel preconditioners applied to 3D finite element structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kolotilina, L.; Nikishin, A.; Yeremin, A.

    1994-12-31

    The solution of large systems of linear equations is a crucial bottleneck when performing 3D finite element analysis of structures. Also, in many cases the reliability and robustness of iterative solution strategies, and their efficiency when exploiting hardware resources, fully determine the scope of industrial applications which can be solved on a particular computer platform. This is especially true for modern vector/parallel supercomputers with large vector length and for modern massively parallel supercomputers. Preconditioned iterative methods have been successfully applied to industrial class finite element analysis of structures. The construction and application of high quality preconditioners constitutes a high percentage of the total solution time. Parallel implementation of high quality preconditioners on such architectures is a formidable challenge. Two common types of existing preconditioners are the implicit preconditioners and the explicit preconditioners. The implicit preconditioners (e.g. incomplete factorizations of several types) are generally high quality but require solution of lower and upper triangular systems of equations per iteration which are difficult to parallelize without deteriorating the convergence rate. The explicit type of preconditionings (e.g. polynomial preconditioners or Jacobi-like preconditioners) require sparse matrix-vector multiplications and can be parallelized but their preconditioning qualities are less than desirable. The authors present results of numerical experiments with Factorized Sparse Approximate Inverses (FSAI) for symmetric positive definite linear systems. These are high quality preconditioners that possess a large resource of parallelism by construction without increasing the serial complexity.

  15. A 3D discontinuous Galerkin finite-element method for teleseismic modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    monteiller, vadim; Beller, Stephen; Nolet, Guust; Operto, Stephane; Virieux, Jean

    2014-05-01

    The massive development of dense seismic arrays and the rapide increase in computing capacity allow today to consider application of full waveform inversion of teleseismic data for high-resolution lithospheric imaging. We present an hybrid numerical method that allows for the modelling of short period telesismic waves in 3D lithospheric target with the discontinuous Galerkin finite elements method, opennig the possibility to perform waveform inversion of seismograms recorded by dense regional broadband arrays. In order to reduce the computational cost of the forward-problem, we developed a method that relies on multi-core parallel computing and computational-domain reduction. We defined two nested levels for parallelism based on MPI library, which are managed by two MPI communicators. Firstly, we use a domain partitionning strategy, assigning one subdomain to one cpu and, secondly we distribute telesismic sources on different copies of the partitioned domain. However, despite the supercomputer ability, the forward-problem remains expensive for telesismic configuration especially when 3D numerical methods are considered. In order to perform the forward problem in a reasonable amount of time, we reduce the computational domain in which full waveform modelling is performed. We defined a 3D regional domain located below the seismological network that is embeded in a background homogeneous or axisymetric model, in which the seismic wavefield can be computed efficiently. The background wavefield is used to compute the full wavefield in the 3D regional domain using the so-called total-field/scattered-field technique (Alterman & Karal (1968),Taflove & Hagness (2005)), which relies on the decomposition of the wavefield into a background and a scattered wavefields. The computational domain is subdivided intro three subdomains: an outer domain formed by the perfectly-mathed absorbing layers, an intermediate zone in which only the outgoing wavefield scattered by the

  16. A Multi-Compartment 3-D Finite Element Model of Rectocele and Its Interaction with Cystocele

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jiajia; Chen, Luyun; Fenner, Dee E.; Ashton-Miller, James A.; DeLancey, John O. L.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a subject-specific 3-D finite element model to understand the mechanics underlying formation of female pelvic organ prolapse, specifically a rectocele and its interaction with a cystocele. The model was created from MRI 3-D geometry of a healthy 45 year-old multiparous woman. It included anterior and posterior vaginal walls, levator ani muscle, cardinal and uterosacral ligaments, anterior and posterior arcus tendineus fascia pelvis, arcus tendineus levator ani, perineal body, perineal membrane and anal sphincter. Material properties were mostly from the literature. Tissue impairment was modeled as decreased tissue stiffness based on previous clinical studies. Model equations were solved using Abaqus v 6.11. The sensitivity of anterior and posterior vaginal wall geometry was calculated for different combinations tissue impairments under increasing intraabdominal pressure. Prolapse size was reported as POP-Q point at point Bp for rectocele and point Ba for cystocele. Results show that a rectocele resulted from impairments of the levator ani and posterior compartment support. For 20% levator and 85% posterior support impairments, simulated rectocele size (at POP-Q point: Bp) increased 0.29 mm/cm H2O without apical impairment and 0.36 mm/cm H2O with 60% apical impairment, as intraabdominal pressures increased from 0 to 150 cm H2O. Apical support impairment could result in the development of either a cystocele or rectocele. Simulated repair of posterior compartment support decreased rectocele but increased a preexisting cystocele. We conclude that development of rectocele and cystocele depend on the presence of anterior, posterior, levator and/or or apical support impairments, as well as the interaction of the prolapse with the opposing compartment. PMID:25757664

  17. A multi-compartment 3-D finite element model of rectocele and its interaction with cystocele.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiajia; Chen, Luyun; Fenner, Dee E; Ashton-Miller, James A; DeLancey, John O L

    2015-06-25

    We developed a subject-specific 3-D finite element model to understand the mechanics underlying formation of female pelvic organ prolapse, specifically a rectocele and its interaction with a cystocele. The model was created from MRI 3-D geometry of a healthy 45 year-old multiparous woman. It included anterior and posterior vaginal walls, levator ani muscle, cardinal and uterosacral ligaments, anterior and posterior arcus tendineus fascia pelvis, arcus tendineus levator ani, perineal body, perineal membrane and anal sphincter. Material properties were mostly from the literature. Tissue impairment was modeled as decreased tissue stiffness based on previous clinical studies. Model equations were solved using Abaqus v 6.11. The sensitivity of anterior and posterior vaginal wall geometry was calculated for different combinations tissue impairments under increasing intraabdominal pressure. Prolapse size was reported as pelvic organ prolapse quantification system (POP-Q) point at point Bp for rectocele and point Ba for cystocele. Results show that a rectocele resulted from impairments of the levator ani and posterior compartment support. For 20% levator and 85% posterior support impairments, simulated rectocele size (at POP-Q point: Bp) increased 0.29 mm/cm H2O without apical impairment and 0.36 mm/cm H2O with 60% apical impairment, as intraabdominal pressures increased from 0 to 150 cm H2O. Apical support impairment could result in the development of either a cystocele or rectocele. Simulated repair of posterior compartment support decreased rectocele but increased a preexisting cystocele. We conclude that development of rectocele and cystocele depend on the presence of anterior, posterior, levator and/or or apical support impairments, as well as the interaction of the prolapse with the opposing compartment.

  18. A multi-compartment 3-D finite element model of rectocele and its interaction with cystocele.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiajia; Chen, Luyun; Fenner, Dee E; Ashton-Miller, James A; DeLancey, John O L

    2015-06-25

    We developed a subject-specific 3-D finite element model to understand the mechanics underlying formation of female pelvic organ prolapse, specifically a rectocele and its interaction with a cystocele. The model was created from MRI 3-D geometry of a healthy 45 year-old multiparous woman. It included anterior and posterior vaginal walls, levator ani muscle, cardinal and uterosacral ligaments, anterior and posterior arcus tendineus fascia pelvis, arcus tendineus levator ani, perineal body, perineal membrane and anal sphincter. Material properties were mostly from the literature. Tissue impairment was modeled as decreased tissue stiffness based on previous clinical studies. Model equations were solved using Abaqus v 6.11. The sensitivity of anterior and posterior vaginal wall geometry was calculated for different combinations tissue impairments under increasing intraabdominal pressure. Prolapse size was reported as pelvic organ prolapse quantification system (POP-Q) point at point Bp for rectocele and point Ba for cystocele. Results show that a rectocele resulted from impairments of the levator ani and posterior compartment support. For 20% levator and 85% posterior support impairments, simulated rectocele size (at POP-Q point: Bp) increased 0.29 mm/cm H2O without apical impairment and 0.36 mm/cm H2O with 60% apical impairment, as intraabdominal pressures increased from 0 to 150 cm H2O. Apical support impairment could result in the development of either a cystocele or rectocele. Simulated repair of posterior compartment support decreased rectocele but increased a preexisting cystocele. We conclude that development of rectocele and cystocele depend on the presence of anterior, posterior, levator and/or or apical support impairments, as well as the interaction of the prolapse with the opposing compartment. PMID:25757664

  19. A multiscale 3D finite element analysis of fluid/solute transport in mechanically loaded bone

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lixia; Pei, Shaopeng; Lucas Lu, X; Wang, Liyun

    2016-01-01

    The transport of fluid, nutrients, and signaling molecules in the bone lacunar–canalicular system (LCS) is critical for osteocyte survival and function. We have applied the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) approach to quantify load-induced fluid and solute transport in the LCS in situ, but the measurements were limited to cortical regions 30–50 μm underneath the periosteum due to the constrains of laser penetration. With this work, we aimed to expand our understanding of load-induced fluid and solute transport in both trabecular and cortical bone using a multiscaled image-based finite element analysis (FEA) approach. An intact murine tibia was first re-constructed from microCT images into a three-dimensional (3D) linear elastic FEA model, and the matrix deformations at various locations were calculated under axial loading. A segment of the above 3D model was then imported to the biphasic poroelasticity analysis platform (FEBio) to predict load-induced fluid pressure fields, and interstitial solute/fluid flows through LCS in both cortical and trabecular regions. Further, secondary flow effects such as the shear stress and/or drag force acting on osteocytes, the presumed mechano-sensors in bone, were derived using the previously developed ultrastructural model of Brinkman flow in the canaliculi. The material properties assumed in the FEA models were validated against previously obtained strain and FRAP transport data measured on the cortical cortex. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of this computational approach in estimating the fluid flux in the LCS and the cellular stimulation forces (shear and drag forces) for osteocytes in any cortical and trabecular bone locations, allowing further studies of how the activation of osteocytes correlates with in vivo functional bone formation. The study provides a promising platform to reveal potential cellular mechanisms underlying the anabolic power of exercises and physical activities in

  20. Exponential convergence through linear finite element discretization of stratified subdomains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guddati, Murthy N.; Druskin, Vladimir; Vaziri Astaneh, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Motivated by problems where the response is needed at select localized regions in a large computational domain, we devise a novel finite element discretization that results in exponential convergence at pre-selected points. The key features of the discretization are (a) use of midpoint integration to evaluate the contribution matrices, and (b) an unconventional mapping of the mesh into complex space. Named complex-length finite element method (CFEM), the technique is linked to Padé approximants that provide exponential convergence of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann maps and thus the solution at specified points in the domain. Exponential convergence facilitates drastic reduction in the number of elements. This, combined with sparse computation associated with linear finite elements, results in significant reduction in the computational cost. The paper presents the basic ideas of the method as well as illustration of its effectiveness for a variety of problems involving Laplace, Helmholtz and elastodynamics equations.

  1. FERM3D: A finite element R-matrix electron molecule scattering code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonzani, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    FERM3D is a three-dimensional finite element program, for the elastic scattering of a low energy electron from a general polyatomic molecule, which is converted to a potential scattering problem. The code is based on tricubic polynomials in spherical coordinates. The electron-molecule interaction is treated as a sum of three terms: electrostatic, exchange, and polarization. The electrostatic term can be extracted directly from ab initio codes ( GAUSSIAN 98 in the work described here), while the exchange term is approximated using a local density functional. A local polarization potential based on density functional theory [C. Lee, W. Yang, R.G. Parr, Phys. Rev. B 37 (1988) 785] describes the long range attraction to the molecular target induced by the scattering electron. Photoionization calculations are also possible and illustrated in the present work. The generality and simplicity of the approach is important in extending electron-scattering calculations to more complex targets than it is possible with other methods. Program summaryTitle of program:FERM3D Catalogue identifier:ADYL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYL_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested:Intel Xeon, AMD Opteron 64 bit, Compaq Alpha Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested:HP Tru64 Unix v5.1, Red Hat Linux Enterprise 3 Programming language used:Fortran 90 Memory required to execute with typical data:900 MB (neutral CO 2), 2.3 GB (ionic CO 2), 1.4 GB (benzene) No. of bits in a word:32 No. of processors used:1 Has the code been vectorized?:No No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:58 383 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:561 653 Distribution format:tar.gzip file CPC Program library subprograms used:ADDA, ACDP Nature of physical problem:Scattering of an

  2. 3-D inversion of magnetotelluric data using unstructured tetrahedral elements: applicability to data affected by topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, Yoshiya

    2015-08-01

    A 3-D magnetotelluric (MT) inversion code using unstructured tetrahedral elements has been developed in order to correct the topographic effect by directly incorporating it into computational grids. The electromagnetic field and response functions get distorted at the observation sites of MT surveys because of the undulating surface topography, and without correcting this distortion, the subsurface structure can be misinterpreted. Of the two methods proposed to correct the topographic effect, the method incorporating topography explicitly in the inversion is applicable to a wider range of surveys. For forward problems, it has been shown that the finite element method using unstructured tetrahedral elements is useful for the incorporation of topography. Therefore, this paper shows the applicability of unstructured tetrahedral elements in MT inversion using the newly developed code. The inversion code is capable of using the impedance tensor, the vertical magnetic transfer function (VMTF), and the phase tensor as observational data, and it estimates the subsurface resistivity values and the distortion tensor of each observation site. The forward part of the code was verified using two test models, one incorporating topographic effect and one without, and the verifications showed that the results were almost the same as those of previous works. The developed inversion code was then applied to synthetic data from a MT survey, and was verified as being able to recover the resistivity structure as well as other inversion codes. Finally, to confirm its applicability to the data affected by topography, inversion was performed using the synthetic data of the model that included two overlapping mountains. In each of the cases using the impedance tensor, the VMTF and the phase tensor, by including the topography in the mesh, the subsurface resistivity was determined more proficiently than in the case using the flat-surface mesh. Although the locations of the anomalies were

  3. Nonnegative Anisotropic Group Cross Sections: A Hybrid Monte Carlo-Discrete Elements-Discrete Ordinates Approach

    SciTech Connect

    DelGrande, J. Mark; Mathews, Kirk A.

    2001-09-15

    Conventional discrete ordinates transport calculations often produce negative fluxes due to unphysical negative scattering cross sections and/or as artifacts of spatial differencing schemes such as diamond difference. Inherently nonnegative spatial methods, such as the nonlinear, exponential characteristic spatial quadrature, eliminate negative fluxes while providing excellent accuracy, presuming the group-to-group, ordinate-to-ordinate cross sections are all nonnegative. A hybrid approach is introduced in which the flow from spatial cell to spatial cell uses discrete ordinates spatial quadratures, while anisotropic scattering of flux from one energy-angle bin (energy group and discrete element of solid angle) to another such bin is modeled using a Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the bin-to-bin cross sections. The directional elements tile the sphere of directions; the ordinates for the spatial quadrature are at the centroids of the elements. The method is developed and contrasted with previous schemes for positive cross sections. An algorithm for evaluating the Monte Carlo (MC)-discrete elements (MC-DE) cross sections is described, and some test cases are presented. Transport calculations using MC-DE cross sections are compared with calculations using conventional cross sections and with MCNP calculations. In this testing, the new method is about as accurate as the conventional approach, and often is more accurate. The exponential characteristic spatial quadrature, using the MC-DE cross sections, is shown to provide useful results where linear characteristic and spherical harmonics provide negative scalar fluxes in every cell in a region.

  4. A package for 3-D unstructured grid generation, finite-element flow solution and flow field visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Paresh; Pirzadeh, Shahyar; Loehner, Rainald

    1990-01-01

    A set of computer programs for 3-D unstructured grid generation, fluid flow calculations, and flow field visualization was developed. The grid generation program, called VGRID3D, generates grids over complex configurations using the advancing front method. In this method, the point and element generation is accomplished simultaneously, VPLOT3D is an interactive, menudriven pre- and post-processor graphics program for interpolation and display of unstructured grid data. The flow solver, VFLOW3D, is an Euler equation solver based on an explicit, two-step, Taylor-Galerkin algorithm which uses the Flux Corrected Transport (FCT) concept for a wriggle-free solution. Using these programs, increasingly complex 3-D configurations of interest to aerospace community were gridded including a complete Space Transportation System comprised of the space-shuttle orbitor, the solid-rocket boosters, and the external tank. Flow solutions were obtained on various configurations in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flow regimes.

  5. CMAS 3D, a new program to visualize and project major elements compositions in the CMAS system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, L.; Ouillon, N.; Chazot, G.; Kornprobst, J.; Boivin, P.

    2009-06-01

    CMAS 3D, developed in MATLAB ®, is a program to support visualization of major element chemical data in three dimensions. Such projections are used to discuss correlations, metamorphic reactions and the chemical evolution of rocks, melts or minerals. It can also project data into 2D plots. The CMAS 3D interface makes it easy to use, and does not require any knowledge of Matlab ® programming. CMAS 3D uses data compiled in a Microsoft Excel™ spreadsheet. Although useful for scientific research, the program is also a powerful tool for teaching.

  6. Asymmetric Outer Bow Length and Cervical Headgear Force System: 3D Analysis Using Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Geramy, Allahyar; Hassanpour, Mehdi; Emadian Razavi, Elham sadat

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study sought to assess distal and lateral forces and moments of asymmetric headgears by variable outer bow lengths. Materials and Methods: Four 3D finite element method (FEM) models of a cervical headgear attached to the maxillary first molars were designed in SolidWorks 2010 software and transferred to ANSYS Workbench ver. 11 software. Models contained the first molars, their periodontal ligament (PDL), cancellous and cortical bones, a mesiodistal slice of the maxillae and the headgear. Models were the same except for the outer bow length in headgears. The headgear was symmetric in model 1. In models 2 to 4, the headgears were asymmetric in length with differences of 5mm, 10mm and 15mm, respectively. A 2.5 N force in horizontal plane was applied and the loading manner of each side of the outer bow was calculated trigonometrically using data from a volunteer. Results: The 15mm difference in outer bow length caused the greatest difference in lateral (=0.21 N) and distal (= 1.008 N) forces and also generated moments (5.044 N.mm). Conclusion: As the difference in outer bow length became greater, asymmetric effects increased. Greater distal force in the longer arm side was associated with greater lateral force towards the shorter arm side and more net yawing moment. Clinical Relevance: A difference range of 1mm to 15 mm of length in cervical headgear can be considered as a safe length of outer bow shortening in clinical use. PMID:26622275

  7. A new 3D finite element model of the IEC 60318-1 artificial ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Agustín; Barham, Richard; Ruiz, Mariano; López, Juan Manuel; DeArcas, Guillermo; Recuero, Manuel

    2008-08-01

    The artificial ear specified in IEC 60318-1 is used for the measurement of headphones and has been designed to present an acoustic load equivalent to that of normal human ears. In this respect it is specified in terms of an acoustical impedance, and modelled by a lumped parameter approach. However, this has some inherent frequency limitations and becomes less valid as the acoustic wavelength approaches the characteristic dimensions within the device. In addition, when sound propagates through structures such as narrow tubes, annular slits or over sharp corners, noticeable thermal and viscous effects take place causing further departure from the lumped parameter model. A new numerical model has therefore been developed, which gives proper consideration to the aforementioned effects. Both kinds of losses can be simulated by means of the LMS Virtual Lab acoustic software which facilitates finite and boundary element modelling of the whole artificial ear. A full 3D model of the artificial ear has therefore been developed based on key dimensional data found in IEC 60318-1. The model has been used to calculate the acoustical impedance, and the results compared with the corresponding data determined from the lumped parameter model. The numerical simulation of the artificial ear has been shown to provide realistic results, and is a powerful tool for developing a detailed understanding of the device. It is also proving valuable in the revision of IEC 60318-1 that is currently in progress.

  8. Finite element modeling of a 3D coupled foot-boot model.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Tian-Xia; Teo, Ee-Chon; Yan, Ya-Bo; Lei, Wei

    2011-12-01

    Increasingly, musculoskeletal models of the human body are used as powerful tools to study biological structures. The lower limb, and in particular the foot, is of interest because it is the primary physical interaction between the body and the environment during locomotion. The goal of this paper is to adopt the finite element (FE) modeling and analysis approaches to create a state-of-the-art 3D coupled foot-boot model for future studies on biomechanical investigation of stress injury mechanism, foot wear design and parachute landing fall simulation. In the modeling process, the foot-ankle model with lower leg was developed based on Computed Tomography (CT) images using ScanIP, Surfacer and ANSYS. Then, the boot was represented by assembling the FE models of upper, insole, midsole and outsole built based on the FE model of the foot-ankle, and finally the coupled foot-boot model was generated by putting together the models of the lower limb and boot. In this study, the FE model of foot and ankle was validated during balance standing. There was a good agreement in the overall patterns of predicted and measured plantar pressure distribution published in literature. The coupled foot-boot model will be fully validated in the subsequent works under both static and dynamic loading conditions for further studies on injuries investigation in military and sports, foot wear design and characteristics of parachute landing impact in military.

  9. 3D finite element simulation of effects of deflection rate on energy absorption for TRIP steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Asuka; Pham, Hang; Iwamoto, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Recently, with the requirement of lighter weight and more safety for a design of automobile, energy absorption capability of structural materials has become important. TRIP (Transformation-induced Plasticity) steel is expected to apply to safety members because of excellent energy absorption capability and ductility. Past studies proved that such excellent characteristics in TRIP steel are dominated by strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT) during plastic deformation. Because SIMT strongly depends on deformation rate and temperature, an investigation of the effects of deformation rate and temperature on energy absorption in TRIP is essential. Although energy absorption capability of material can be estimated by J-integral experimentally by using pre-cracked specimen, it is difficult to determine volume fraction of martensite and temperature rise during the crack extension. In addition, their effects on J-integral, especially at high deformation rate in experiment might be quite hard. Thus, a computational prediction needs to be performed. In this study, bending deformation behavior of pre-cracked specimen until the onset point of crack extension are predicted by 3D finite element simulation based on the transformation kinetics model proposed by Iwamoto et al. (1998). It is challenged to take effects of temperature, volume fraction of martensite and deformation rate into account. Then, the mechanism for higher energy absorption characteristic will be discussed.

  10. A thermographic approach for surface crack depth evaluation through 3D finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basheer, Mohammed; PV, Nithin; Ravindran, Parag; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2015-03-01

    Laser Thermography has been reported earlier by several researchers as a tool for detecting surface breaking cracks in metals. A high energy laser (pulsed Nd-YAG) was used to produce a highly localized thermal spot from which heat diffuses (predominantly) in the radial direction. The crack that is perpendicular to the surface and close to this thermal spot will perturb the lateral heat flow and this disturbance can be observed by an IR camera. The laser spot is then scanned over a region to map the crack; this allows remote imaging of crack morphology even in elevated temperatures. The present study involves a 3D finite element simulation using COMSOL Multiphysics as a tool to simulate the thermal flow from a pulsed laser source in the proximity of a crack. The modeling helped to understand the various parameters affecting the thermal images of laser heated spots. The influence of depth of the crack on temperature changes across the crack and the relationship between crack depth and temperature changes due to the crack was simulated and subsequently validated experimentally.

  11. The numerical integration and 3-D finite element formulation of a viscoelastic model of glass

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, R.S.

    1994-08-01

    The use of glasses is widespread in making hermetic, insulating seals for many electronic components. Flat panel displays and fiber optic connectors are other products utilizing glass as a structural element. When glass is cooled from sealing temperatures, residual stresses are generated due to mismatches in thermal shrinkage created by the dissimilar material properties of the adjoining materials. Because glass is such a brittle material at room temperature, tensile residual stresses must be kept small to ensure durability and avoid cracking. Although production designs and the required manufacturing process development can be deduced empirically, this is an expensive and time consuming process that does not necessarily lead to an optimal design. Agile manufacturing demands that analyses be used to reduce development costs and schedules by providing insight and guiding the design process through the development cycle. To make these gains, however, viscoelastic models of glass must be available along with the right tool to use them. A viscoelastic model of glass can be used to simulate the stress and volume relaxation that occurs at elevated temperatures as the molecular structure of the glass seeks to equilibrate to the state of the supercooled liquid. The substance of the numerical treatment needed to support the implementation of the model in a 3-D finite element program is presented herein. An accurate second-order, central difference integrator is proposed for the constitutive equations, and numerical solutions are compared to those obtained with other integrators. Inherent convergence problems are reviewed and fixes are described. The resulting algorithms are generally applicable to the broad class of viscoelastic material models. First-order error estimates are used as a basis for developing a scheme for automatic time step controls, and several demonstration problems are presented to illustrate the performance of the methodology.

  12. Nonconforming mortar element methods: Application to spectral discretizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maday, Yvon; Mavriplis, Cathy; Patera, Anthony

    1988-01-01

    Spectral element methods are p-type weighted residual techniques for partial differential equations that combine the generality of finite element methods with the accuracy of spectral methods. Presented here is a new nonconforming discretization which greatly improves the flexibility of the spectral element approach as regards automatic mesh generation and non-propagating local mesh refinement. The method is based on the introduction of an auxiliary mortar trace space, and constitutes a new approach to discretization-driven domain decomposition characterized by a clean decoupling of the local, structure-preserving residual evaluations and the transmission of boundary and continuity conditions. The flexibility of the mortar method is illustrated by several nonconforming adaptive Navier-Stokes calculations in complex geometry.

  13. Validating 3D Seismic Velocity Models Using the Spectral Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maceira, M.; Rowe, C. A.; Allen, R. M.; Obrebski, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    As seismic instrumentation, data storage and dissemination and computational power improve, seismic velocity models attempt to resolve smaller structures and cover larger areas. However, it is unclear how accurate these velocity models are and, while the best models available are used for event determination, it is difficult to put uncertainties on seismic event parameters. Model validation is typically done using resolution tests that assume the imaging theory used is accurate and thus only considers the impact of the data coverage on resolution. We present the results of a more rigorous approach to model validation via full three-dimensional waveform propagation using Spectral Element Methods (SEM). This approach makes no assumptions about the theory used to generate the models but require substantial computational resources. We first validate 3D tomographic models for the Western USA generated using both ray-theoretical and finite-frequency methods. The Dynamic North America (DNA) Models of P- and S- velocity structure (DNA09-P and DNA09-S) use teleseismic body-wave traveltime residuals recorded at over 800 seismic stations provided by the Earthscope USArray and regional seismic networks. We performed systematic computations of synthetics for the dataset used to generate the DNA models. Direct comparison of these synthetic seismograms to the actual observations allows us to accurately assess and validate the models. Implementation of the method for a densely instrumented region such as that covered by the DNA model provides a useful testbed for the validation methods that we will subsequently apply to other, more challenging study areas.

  14. Coupled 2D-3D finite element method for analysis of a skin panel with a discontinuous stiffener

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. T.; Lotts, C. G.; Davis, D. D., Jr.; Krishnamurthy, T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a computationally efficient analysis method which was used to predict detailed stress states in a typical composite compression panel with a discontinuous hat stiffener. A global-local approach was used. The global model incorporated both 2D shell and 3D brick elements connected by newly developed transition elements. Most of the panel was modeled with 2D elements, while 3D elements were employed to model the stiffener flange and the adjacent skin. Both linear and geometrically nonlinear analyses were performed on the global model. The effect of geometric nonlinearity induced by the eccentric load path due to the discontinuous hat stiffener was significant. The local model used a fine mesh of 3D brick elements to model the region at the end of the stiffener. Boundary conditions of the local 3D model were obtained by spline interpolation of the nodal displacements from the global analysis. Detailed in-plane and through-the-thickness stresses were calculated in the flange-skin interface near the end of the stiffener.

  15. A piecewise linear finite element discretization of the diffusion equation for arbitrary polyhedral grids

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Teresa S. Adams, Marvin L. Yang, Brian Zika, Michael R.

    2008-04-01

    We develop a piecewise linear (PWL) Galerkin finite element spatial discretization for the multi-dimensional radiation diffusion equation. It uses recently introduced piecewise linear weight and basis functions in the finite element approximation and it can be applied on arbitrary polygonal (2D) or polyhedral (3D) grids. We first demonstrate some analytical properties of the PWL method and perform a simple mode analysis to compare the PWL method with Palmer's vertex-centered finite-volume method and with a bilinear continuous finite element method. We then show that this new PWL method gives solutions comparable to those from Palmer's. However, since the PWL method produces a symmetric positive-definite coefficient matrix, it should be substantially more computationally efficient than Palmer's method, which produces an asymmetric matrix. We conclude that the Galerkin PWL method is an attractive option for solving diffusion equations on unstructured grids.

  16. Identification of micro parameters for discrete element simulation of agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palis, Stefan; Antonyuk, Sergiy; Dosta, Maksym; Heinrich, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    The mechanical behaviour of solid particles like agglomerates, granules or crystals strongly depends on their micro structure, e.g. structural defects and porosity. In order to model the mechanical behaviour of these inhomogeneous media the discrete element method has been proven to be an appropriate tool. The model parameters used are typically micro parameters like bond stiffness, particle-particle contact stiffness, strength of the bonds. Due to the lack of general methods for a direct micro parameter determination, normally laborious parameter adaptation has to be done in order to fit experiment and simulation. In this contribution a systematic and automatic way for parameter adaptation using real experiments is proposed. Due to the fact, that discrete element models are typically systems of differential equations of very high order, gradient based methods are not suitable. Hence, the focus will be on derivative free methods.

  17. The Evolution of Fracture Systems in Rocks with Veins: Insights from 3D Discrete Element Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgo, S.; Urai, J. L.; Abe, S.

    2014-12-01

    Observations from natural vein systems suggest that preexisting veins can strongly influence orientation, continuity and connectivity of fractures in a rock even in cases where the orientation of the veins is incompatible with the orientation of the stress field. We present a numerical method to model cycles of fracturing and sealing in a rotating stress field to simulate such systems, for different strength ratios of host rock and vein. We study a layered model under vertical stress and uniaxial horizontal extension. This represents common conditions in sedimentary basins with layers of varying composition. The model with fractures that form during the first deformation phase is sealed and deformed again in a different direction to model the effect of a changing horizontal stress field. We find different types of fracture interaction with veins, depending on the strength contrast between veins and host rock and amount of rotation. The crack-seal and crack-jump mechanisms ensue naturally from the models as a result of the strength of the vein material relative to the host rock. Weak veins localize fracturing and reactivate, even in high misorientation to the extension direction. Connecting fractures between reactivated veins form at a higher angle to the veins than expected. In these systems, the connectivity of the fracture network is dramatically increased. Veins stronger than the host rock have less influence on the new fractures. Most fractures crosscut the veins by the step-over mechanism. Deflection occurs for favorable vein orientations but the deflection length is very short. The results are in good agreement with natural crack seal vein networks found in carbonate rocks of the Oman Mountains. We find that preexisting veins can change the fracture behavior of a rock in a way that new fractures do not necessarily align with the principle extension direction and form a highly connected network with reactivated veins that dramatically enhances lateral hydraulic conductivity of the rock. The results allow formulating constitutive rules for the fracture behavior of rocks with veins that can be used to make predictions on the orientation and connectivity of fracture networks on a reservoir scale to use in THMC models. Furthermore they have implications for paleostress analysis based on crack seal vein networks.

  18. SIMULATIONS OF 2D AND 3D THERMOCAPILLARY FLOWS BY A LEAST-SQUARES FINITE ELEMENT METHOD. (R825200)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical results for time-dependent 2D and 3D thermocapillary flows are presented in this work. The numerical algorithm is based on the Crank-Nicolson scheme for time integration, Newton's method for linearization, and a least-squares finite element method, together with a matri...

  19. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 3: Systems' manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1989-01-01

    The internal structure is discussed of the MHOST finite element program designed for 3-D inelastic analysis of gas turbine hot section components. The computer code is the first implementation of the mixed iterative solution strategy for improved efficiency and accuracy over the conventional finite element method. The control structure of the program is covered along with the data storage scheme and the memory allocation procedure and the file handling facilities including the read and/or write sequences.

  20. TH-E-BRE-01: A 3D Solver of Linear Boltzmann Transport Equation Based On a New Angular Discretization Method with Positivity for Photon Dose Calculation Benchmarked with Geant4

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, X; Gao, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The Linear Boltzmann Transport Equation (LBTE) solved through statistical Monte Carlo (MC) method provides the accurate dose calculation in radiotherapy. This work is to investigate the alternative way for accurately solving LBTE using deterministic numerical method due to its possible advantage in computational speed from MC. Methods: Instead of using traditional spherical harmonics to approximate angular scattering kernel, our deterministic numerical method directly computes angular scattering weights, based on a new angular discretization method that utilizes linear finite element method on the local triangulation of unit angular sphere. As a Result, our angular discretization method has the unique advantage in positivity, i.e., to maintain all scattering weights nonnegative all the time, which is physically correct. Moreover, our method is local in angular space, and therefore handles the anisotropic scattering well, such as the forward-peaking scattering. To be compatible with image-guided radiotherapy, the spatial variables are discretized on the structured grid with the standard diamond scheme. After discretization, the improved sourceiteration method is utilized for solving the linear system without saving the linear system to memory. The accuracy of our 3D solver is validated using analytic solutions and benchmarked with Geant4, a popular MC solver. Results: The differences between Geant4 solutions and our solutions were less than 1.5% for various testing cases that mimic the practical cases. More details are available in the supporting document. Conclusion: We have developed a 3D LBTE solver based on a new angular discretization method that guarantees the positivity of scattering weights for physical correctness, and it has been benchmarked with Geant4 for photon dose calculation.

  1. FUN3D Manual: 12.7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2015-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.7, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  2. FUN3D Manual: 13.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bill; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2016-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 13.0, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  3. FUN3D Manual: 12.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, William L.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2015-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.6, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  4. FUN3D Manual: 12.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, William L.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2014-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.5, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational uid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables ecient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  5. FUN3D Manual: 12.9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2016-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.9, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  6. FUN3D Manual: 12.8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2015-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.8, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  7. Parallel Finite Element Solution of 3D Rayleigh-Benard-Marangoni Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, G. F.; McLay, R.; Bicken, G.; Barth, B.; Pehlivanov, A.

    1999-01-01

    A domain decomposition strategy and parallel gradient-type iterative solution scheme have been developed and implemented for computation of complex 3D viscous flow problems involving heat transfer and surface tension effects. Details of the implementation issues are described together with associated performance and scalability studies. Representative Rayleigh-Benard and microgravity Marangoni flow calculations and performance results on the Cray T3D and T3E are presented. The work is currently being extended to tightly-coupled parallel "Beowulf-type" PC clusters and we present some preliminary performance results on this platform. We also describe progress on related work on hierarchic data extraction for visualization.

  8. Analysis of surface cracks at hole by a 3-D weight function method with stresses from finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, W.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Sutton, M. A.; Shivakumar, K. N.; Wu, X. R.

    1995-01-01

    Parallel with the work in Part-1, stress intensity factors for semi-elliptical surface cracks emanating from a circular hole are determined. The 3-D weight function method with the 3D finite element solutions for the uncracked stress distribution as in Part-1 is used for the analysis. Two different loading conditions, i.e. remote tension and wedge loading, are considered for a wide range in geometrical parameters. Both single and double surface cracks are studied and compared with other solutions available in the literature. Typical crack opening displacements are also provided.

  9. MRCK_3D contact detonation algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Rougier, Esteban; Munjiza, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale Combined Finite-Discrete Element Methods (FEM-DEM) and Discrete Element Methods (DEM) simulations involving contact of a large number of separate bod ies need an efficient, robust and flexible contact detection algorithm. In this work the MRCK-3D search algorithm is outlined and its main CPU perfonnances are evaluated. One of the most important aspects of this newly developed search algorithm is that it is applicable to systems consisting of many bodies of different shapes and sizes.

  10. Meshing Preprocessor for the Mesoscopic 3D Finite Element Simulation of 2D and Interlock Fabric Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendling, A.; Daniel, J. L.; Hivet, G.; Vidal-Sallé, E.; Boisse, P.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulation is a powerful tool to predict the mechanical behavior and the feasibility of composite parts. Among the available numerical approaches, as far as woven reinforced composites are concerned, 3D finite element simulation at the mesoscopic scale leads to a good compromise between realism and complexity. At this scale, the fibrous reinforcement is modeled by an interlacement of yarns assumed to be homogeneous that have to be accurately represented. Among the numerous issues induced by these simulations, the first one consists in providing a representative meshed geometrical model of the unit cell at the mesoscopic scale. The second one consists in enabling a fast data input in the finite element software (contacts definition, boundary conditions, elements reorientation, etc.) so as to obtain results within reasonable time. Based on parameterized 3D CAD modeling tool of unit-cells of dry fabrics already developed, this paper presents an efficient strategy which permits an automated meshing of the models with 3D hexahedral elements and to accelerate of several orders of magnitude the simulation data input. Finally, the overall modeling strategy is illustrated by examples of finite element simulation of the mechanical behavior of fabrics.

  11. Comparison of Gap Elements and Contact Algorithm for 3D Contact Analysis of Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibel, G. D.; Tiku, K.; Kumar, A.; Handschuh, R.

    1994-01-01

    Three dimensional stress analysis of spiral bevel gears in mesh using the finite element method is presented. A finite element model is generated by solving equations that identify tooth surface coordinates. Contact is simulated by the automatic generation of nonpenetration constraints. This method is compared to a finite element contact analysis conducted with gap elements.

  12. Thermal conductivity calculation of bio-aggregates based materials using finite and discrete element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennec, Fabienne; Alzina, Arnaud; Tessier-Doyen, Nicolas; Naitali, Benoit; Smith, David S.

    2012-11-01

    This work is about the calculation of thermal conductivity of insulating building materials made from plant particles. To determine the type of raw materials, the particle sizes or the volume fractions of plant and binder, a tool dedicated to calculate the thermal conductivity of heterogeneous materials has been developped, using the discrete element method to generate the volume element and the finite element method to calculate the homogenized properties. A 3D optical scanner has been used to capture plant particle shapes and convert them into a cluster of discret elements. These aggregates are initially randomly distributed but without any overlap, and then fall down in a container due to the gravity force and collide with neighbour particles according to a velocity Verlet algorithm. Once the RVE is built, the geometry is exported in the open-source Salome-Meca platform to be meshed. The calculation of the effective thermal conductivity of the heterogeneous volume is then performed using a homogenization technique, based on an energy method. To validate the numerical tool, thermal conductivity measurements have been performed on sunflower pith aggregates and on packed beds of the same particles. The experimental values have been compared satisfactorily with a batch of numerical simulations.

  13. A shell element for computing 3D eddy currents -- Applications to transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Guerin, C.; Tanneau, G.; Meunier, G.; Labie, P.; Ngnegueu, T.; Sacotte, M.

    1995-05-01

    A skin depth-independent shell element to model thin conducting sheets is described in a finite element context. This element takes into account the field variation through depth due to skin effect. The finite element formulation is first described, then boundary conditions at the edge of conducting shells and the possibility of describing non conducting line gaps and holes are discussed. Finally, a computation of an earthing transformer model with an aluminium shield modelled with shell elements is presented.

  14. 3D element imaging using NSECT for the detection of renal cancer: a simulation study in MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana, R. S.; Agasthya, G. A.; Yoriyaz, H.; Kapadia, A. J.

    2013-09-01

    This work describes a simulation study investigating the application of neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT) for noninvasive 3D imaging of renal cancer in vivo. Using MCNP5 simulations, we describe a method of diagnosing renal cancer in the body by mapping the 3D distribution of elements present in tumors using the NSECT technique. A human phantom containing the kidneys and other major organs was modeled in MCNP5. The element composition of each organ was based on values reported in literature. The two kidneys were modeled to contain elements reported in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and healthy kidney tissue. Simulated NSECT scans were executed to determine the 3D element distribution of the phantom body. Elements specific to RCC and healthy kidney tissue were then analyzed to identify the locations of the diseased and healthy kidneys and generate tomographic images of the tumor. The extent of the RCC lesion inside the kidney was determined using 3D volume rendering. A similar procedure was used to generate images of each individual organ in the body. Six isotopes were studied in this work—32S, 12C, 23Na, 14N, 31P and 39K. The results demonstrated that through a single NSECT scan performed in vivo, it is possible to identify the location of the kidneys and other organs within the body, determine the extent of the tumor within the organ, and to quantify the differences between cancer and healthy tissue-related isotopes with p ≤ 0.05. All of the images demonstrated appropriate concentration changes between the organs, with some discrepancy observed in 31P, 39K and 23Na. The discrepancies were likely due to the low concentration of the elements in the tissue that were below the current detection sensitivity of the NSECT technique.

  15. Discrete Element Method Simulation of Nonlinear Viscoelastic Stress Wave Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhiping; Horie, Y.; Wang, Wenqiang

    2002-07-01

    A DEM(Discrete Element Method) simulation of nonlinear viscoelastic stress wave problems is carried out. The interaction forces among elements are described using a model in which neighbor elements are linked by a nonlinear spring and a certain number of Maxwell components in parallel. By making use of exponential relaxation moduli, it is shown that numerical computation of the convolution integral does not require storing and repeatedly calculating strain history, so that the computational cost is dramatically reduced. To validate the viscoelastic DM2 code1, stress wave propagation in a Maxwell rod with one end subjected to a constant stress loading is simulated. Results excellently fit those from the characteristics calculation. The code is then used to investigate the problem of meso-scale damage in a plastic-bonded explosive under shock loading. Results not only show "compression damage", but also reveal a complex damage evolution. They demonstrate a unique capability of DEM in modeling heterogeneous materials.

  16. Sand Production Modeling Using Superquadric Discrete Elements and Coupling of Fluid Flow and Particle Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Preece, D.S. Perkins, E.D.

    1999-02-10

    Techniques for modeling oil well sand production have been developed using the formulations for superquadric discrete elements and Darcy fluid flow. Discrete element models are generated using the new technique of particle cloning. Discrete element sources and sinks allow simulation of sand production from the initial state through the transition to an equilibrium state where particles are created and removed at the same rate.

  17. Self-assembly of the first discrete 3d-4f-4f triple-stranded helicate.

    PubMed

    Riis-Johannessen, Thomas; Bernardinelli, Gérald; Filinchuk, Yaroslav; Clifford, Sarah; Dalla Favera, Natalia; Piguet, Claude

    2009-06-15

    The connection of an additional bidentate chelating unit at the extremity of a segmental bis-tridentate ligand in L5 provides an unprecedented sequence of binding sites for the self-assembly of heterometallic 3d-4f triple-stranded helicates. Thorough thermodynamic and structural investigations in acetonitrile show the formation of intricate mixtures of complexes when a single type of metal (3d or 4f) is reacted with L5. However, the situation is greatly simplified when Zn(II) (3d-block) and Lu(III) (4f-block) are simultaneously coordinated to L5, thus leading to only two identified species: the target C(3)-symmetrical trinuclear triple-stranded d-f-f helicate HHH-[ZnLu(2)(L5)(3)](8+) and a tetranuclear double-stranded complex [Zn(2)Lu(2)(L5)(2)](10+). Interestingly, the removal of Zn(II) from the former triple-helical complex has only a minor effect on the coordination of Lu(III), and translational autodiffusion coefficients show a simple reduction of the length of the molecular rigid cylinder from L = 2.7 nm in HHH-[ZnLu(2)(L5)(3)](8+) to L = 2.3 nm in HHH-[Lu(2)(L5)(3)](6+). Finally, the complete thermodynamic picture provides five novel stability macroconstants containing information about short-range (ca. 9 A) and long-range (ca. 18 A) intramolecular intermetallic d-f and f-f interactions. PMID:19499959

  18. iBem3D, a three-dimensional iterative boundary element method using angular dislocations for modeling geologic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maerten, F.; Maerten, L.; Pollard, D. D.

    2014-11-01

    Most analytical solutions to engineering or geological problems are limited to simple geometries. For example, analytical solutions have been found to solve for stresses around a circular hole in a plate. To solve more complex problems, mathematicians and engineers have developed powerful computer-aided numerical methods, which can be categorized into two main types: differential methods and integral methods. The finite element method (FEM) is a differential method that was developed in the 1950s and is one of the most commonly used numerical methods today. Since its development, other differential methods, including the boundary element method (BEM), have been developed to solve different types of problems. The purpose of this paper is to describe iBem3D, formally called Poly3D, a C++ and modular 3D boundary element computer program based on the theory of angular dislocations for modeling three-dimensional (3D) discontinuities in an elastic, heterogeneous, isotropic whole- or half-space. After 20 years and more than 150 scientific publications, we present in detail the formulation behind this method, its enhancements over the years as well as some important applications in several domains of the geosciences. The main advantage of using this formulation, for describing geological objects such as faults, resides in the possibility of modeling complex geometries without gaps and overlaps between adjacent triangular dislocation elements, which is a significant shortcoming for models using rectangular dislocation elements. Reliability, speed, simplicity, and accuracy are enhanced in the latest version of the computer code. Industrial applications include subseismic fault modeling, fractured reservoir modeling, interpretation and validation of fault connectivity and reservoir compartmentalization, depleted area and fault reactivation, and pressurized wellbore stability. Academic applications include earthquake and volcano monitoring, hazard mitigation, and slope

  19. A Review of Discrete Element Method Research on Particulate Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, A. A.; Elektorowicz, M.

    2016-07-01

    This paper summarizes research done using the Discrete Element Method (DEM) and explores new trends in its use on Particulate systems. The rationale for using DEM versus the traditional continuum-based approach is explained first. Then, DEM application is explored in terms of geotechnical engineering and mining engineering materials, since particulate media are mostly associated with these two disciplines. It is concluded that no research to date had addressed the issue of using the DEM to model the strength and weathering characteristics of peaty soil-slag-Portland cement-fly ash combinations.

  20. Discrete Element Modeling (DEM) of Triboelectrically Charged Particles: Revised Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Calle, Carlos I.; Curry, D. R.; Weitzman, P. S.

    2008-01-01

    In a previous work, the addition of basic screened Coulombic electrostatic forces to an existing commercial discrete element modeling (DEM) software was reported. Triboelectric experiments were performed to charge glass spheres rolling on inclined planes of various materials. Charge generation constants and the Q/m ratios for the test materials were calculated from the experimental data and compared to the simulation output of the DEM software. In this paper, we will discuss new values of the charge generation constants calculated from improved experimental procedures and data. Also, planned work to include dielectrophoretic, Van der Waals forces, and advanced mechanical forces into the software will be discussed.

  1. From discrete elements to continuum fields: Extension to bidisperse systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunuguntla, Deepak R.; Thornton, Anthony R.; Weinhart, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Micro-macro transition methods can be used to, both, calibrate and validate continuum models from discrete data obtained via experiments or simulations. These methods generate continuum fields such as density, momentum, stress, etc., from discrete data, i.e. positions, velocity, orientations and forces of individual elements. Performing this micro-macro transition step is especially challenging for non-uniform or dynamic situations. Here, we present a general method of performing this transition, but for simplicity we will restrict our attention to two-component scenarios. The mapping technique, presented here, is an extension to the micro-macro transition method, called coarse-graining, for unsteady two-component flows and can be easily extended to multi-component systems without any loss of generality. This novel method is advantageous; because, by construction the obtained macroscopic fields are consistent with the continuum equations of mass, momentum and energy balance. Additionally, boundary interaction forces can be taken into account in a self-consistent way and thus allow for the construction of continuous stress fields even within one element radius of the boundaries. Similarly, stress and drag forces can also be determined for individual constituents of a multi-component mixture, which is critical for several continuum applications, e.g. mixture theory-based segregation models. Moreover, the method does not require ensemble-averaging and thus can be efficiently exploited to investigate static, steady and time-dependent flows. The method presented in this paper is valid for any discrete data, e.g. particle simulations, molecular dynamics, experimental data, etc.; however, for the purpose of illustration we consider data generated from discrete particle simulations of bidisperse granular mixtures flowing over rough inclined channels. We show how to practically use our coarse-graining extension for both steady and unsteady flows using our open-source coarse

  2. 3D controlled-source electromagnetic modeling in anisotropic medium using edge-based finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hongzhu; Xiong, Bin; Han, Muran; Zhdanov, Michael

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a linear edge-based finite element method for numerical modeling of 3D controlled-source electromagnetic data in an anisotropic conductive medium. We use a nonuniform rectangular mesh in order to capture the rapid change of diffusive electromagnetic field within the regions of anomalous conductivity and close to the location of the source. In order to avoid the source singularity, we solve Maxwell's equation with respect to anomalous electric field. The nonuniform rectangular mesh can be transformed to hexahedral mesh in order to simulate the bathymetry effect. The sparse system of finite element equations is solved using a quasi-minimum residual method with a Jacobian preconditioner. We have applied the developed algorithm to compute a typical MCSEM response over a 3D model of a hydrocarbon reservoir located in both isotropic and anisotropic mediums. The modeling results are in a good agreement with the solutions obtained by the integral equation method.

  3. On a 3-D singularity element for computation of combined mode stress intensities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atluri, S. N.; Kathiresan, K.

    1976-01-01

    A special three-dimensional singularity element is developed for the computation of combined modes 1, 2, and 3 stress intensity factors, which vary along an arbitrarily curved crack front in three dimensional linear elastic fracture problems. The finite element method is based on a displacement-hybrid finite element model, based on a modified variational principle of potential energy, with arbitrary element interior displacements, interelement boundary displacements, and element boundary tractions as variables. The special crack-front element used in this analysis contains the square root singularity in strains and stresses, where the stress-intensity factors K(1), K(2), and K(3) are quadratically variable along the crack front and are solved directly along with the unknown nodal displacements.

  4. A 4-point in-situ method to locate a discrete gamma-ray source in 3-D space.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jong-In; Choi, Hee-Yeoul; Yun, Ju-Yong

    2010-02-01

    The determination of the source position (x,y,z) of a discrete gamma-ray source using peak count rates from four measurement points was studied. We derived semi-empirical formulas to find the position under the condition to neglect attenuation effects by obstacles between the target source and the detector. To validate the methodology, we performed the locating experiments for a (137)Cs small volume source placed at 10 different positions on the floor of a laboratory using the formulas derived in this study. In this study, a portable HPGe gamma spectrometry system with a virtual point detector concept was used. The calculation results for the source positions were compared with reference values measured with a rule. The applicability of the methodology was estimated based on the differences of the results. PMID:19932029

  5. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    SciTech Connect

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; Gable, Carl W.; Karra, Satish

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates mass balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.

  6. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    DOE PAGES

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; Gable, Carl W.; Karra, Satish

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates massmore » balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.« less

  7. Discrete-element modeling of particulate aerosol flows

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, J.S.

    2009-03-20

    A multiple-time step computational approach is presented for efficient discrete-element modeling of aerosol flows containing adhesive solid particles. Adhesive aerosol particulates are found in numerous dust and smoke contamination problems, including smoke particle transport in the lungs, particle clogging of heat exchangers in construction vehicles, industrial nanoparticle transport and filtration systems, and dust fouling of electronic systems and MEMS components. Dust fouling of equipment is of particular concern for potential human occupation on dusty planets, such as Mars. The discrete-element method presented in this paper can be used for prediction of aggregate structure and breakup, for prediction of the effect of aggregate formation on the bulk fluid flow, and for prediction of the effects of small-scale flow features (e.g., due to surface roughness or MEMS patterning) on the aggregate formation. After presentation of the overall computational structure, the forces and torques acting on the particles resulting from fluid motion, particle-particle collision, and adhesion under van der Waals forces are reviewed. The effect of various parameters of normal collision and adhesion of two particles are examined in detail. The method is then used to examine aggregate formation and particle clogging in pipe and channel flow.

  8. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Spider Non-isothermal Forging Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Ling; Wei, Wei; Wei, Kun Xia; Alexandrov, Igor V.; Hu, Jing

    2016-06-01

    The differences of effective stress, effective strain, velocity field, and the load-time curves between the spider isothermal and non-isothermal forging processes are investigated by making full use of 3D FEA, and verified by the production experiment of spider forging. Effective stress is mainly concentrated on the pin, and becomes lower closer to the front of the pin. The maximum effective strain in the non-isothermal forging is lower than that in the isothermal. The great majority of strain in the non-isothermal forging process is 1.76, which is larger than the strain of 1.31 in the isothermal forging. The maximum load required in the isothermal forging is higher than that in the non-isothermal. The maximum experimental load and deformation temperature in the spider production are in good agreement with those in the non-isothermal FEA. The results indicate that the non-isothermal 3D FEA results can guide the design of the spider forging process.

  9. Salt as a 3D element in structural modelling - example from the Central European Basin System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maystrenko, Y. P.; Scheck-Wenderoth, M.; Bayer, U.

    2010-12-01

    The Central European Basin System (CEBS) covers the northern part of Central and Western Europe and contains up to 12 km of Permian to Cenozoic deposits. Initiated in the Early Permian, the Central European Basin System accumulated Lower Permian clastics overlain by significant amount of Upper Permian (Zechstein) salt. Post-Permian differentiation of the basin system was controlled by several phases of tectonic activity. These tectonic phases not only provoked regional shifts in subsidence and erosion but also triggered movements of the Upper Permian (Zechstein) salt. Salt rise strongly influenced the Meso-Cenozoic structural evolution in terms of mechanical decoupling of the sedimentary cover from its basement. As a result of several phases of salt tectonics, the CEBS displays a wide variety of salt structures (walls, diapirs and pillows). In order to investigate the interaction of salt movements, deposition and tectonics, the 3D structural model of the CEBS has been constructed covering the entire salt basin (Northern and Southern Permian basins). Seismic interpretation and 3D backstripping have been used to investigate both the present-day structure and the evolution of the CEBS. 3D backstripping includes 3D salt redistribution in response to the changing load conditions in the salt cover. The results of 3D modelling of salt movements and seismic data indicate that the primary initiation of salt movements occurred during the Triassic. The Triassic regional extensional event initiated a phase of salt movements within the coeval depocenters of the CEBS, such as the Glueckstadt Graben, the Horn Graben, the Fjerritslev Trough and the adjacent Himmerland Graben in Denmark, as well as the Polish Basin. The Early Triassic (Buntsandstein) and the Late Triassic (Middle-Late Keuper) extensional events triggered strongest salt movements within the central part of the Glueckstadt Graben. During the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous, major erosion regionally truncated the study

  10. Energy Dispersive X-ray Tomography for 3D Elemental Mapping of Individual Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Thomas J. A.; Lewis, Edward A.; Haigh, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy within the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) provides accurate elemental analysis with high spatial resolution, and is even capable of providing atomically resolved elemental maps. In this technique, a highly focused electron beam is incident upon a thin sample and the energy of emitted X-rays is measured in order to determine the atomic species of material within the beam path. This elementally sensitive spectroscopy technique can be extended to three dimensional tomographic imaging by acquiring multiple spectrum images with the sample tilted along an axis perpendicular to the electron beam direction. Elemental distributions within single nanoparticles are often important for determining their optical, catalytic and magnetic properties. Techniques such as X-ray tomography and slice and view energy dispersive X-ray mapping in the scanning electron microscope provide elementally sensitive three dimensional imaging but are typically limited to spatial resolutions of > 20 nm. Atom probe tomography provides near atomic resolution but preparing nanoparticle samples for atom probe analysis is often challenging. Thus, elementally sensitive techniques applied within the scanning transmission electron microscope are uniquely placed to study elemental distributions within nanoparticles of dimensions 10-100 nm. Here, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy within the STEM is applied to investigate the distribution of elements in single AgAu nanoparticles. The surface segregation of both Ag and Au, at different nanoparticle compositions, has been observed. PMID:27403838

  11. An implicit finite element method for discrete dynamic fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Jobie M. Gerken

    1999-12-01

    A method for modeling the discrete fracture of two-dimensional linear elastic structures with a distribution of small cracks subject to dynamic conditions has been developed. The foundation for this numerical model is a plane element formulated from the Hu-Washizu energy principle. The distribution of small cracks is incorporated into the numerical model by including a small crack at each element interface. The additional strain field in an element adjacent to this crack is treated as an externally applied strain field in the Hu-Washizu energy principle. The resulting stiffness matrix is that of a standard plane element. The resulting load vector is that of a standard plane element with an additional term that includes the externally applied strain field. Except for the crack strain field equations, all terms of the stiffness matrix and load vector are integrated symbolically in Maple V so that fully integrated plane stress and plane strain elements are constructed. The crack strain field equations are integrated numerically. The modeling of dynamic behavior of simple structures was demonstrated within acceptable engineering accuracy. In the model of axial and transverse vibration of a beam and the breathing mode of vibration of a thin ring, the dynamic characteristics were shown to be within expected limits. The models dominated by tensile forces (the axially loaded beam and the pressurized ring) were within 0.5% of the theoretical values while the shear dominated model (the transversely loaded beam) is within 5% of the calculated theoretical value. The constant strain field of the tensile problems can be modeled exactly by the numerical model. The numerical results should therefore, be exact. The discrepancies can be accounted for by errors in the calculation of frequency from the numerical results. The linear strain field of the transverse model must be modeled by a series of constant strain elements. This is an approximation to the true strain field, so some

  12. Interactive 3D Visualization: An Important Element in Dealing with Increasing Data Volumes and Decreasing Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, L.; Reed, B.; Mayer, L.

    2002-12-01

    Recent years have seen remarkable advances in sonar technology, positioning capabilities, and computer processing power that have revolutionized the way we image the seafloor. The US Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) has updated its survey vessels and launches to the latest generation of technology and now possesses a tremendous ocean observing and mapping capability. However, the systems produce massive amounts of data that must be validated prior to inclusion in various bathymetry, hydrography, and imagery products. The key to meeting the challenge of the massive data volumes was to change the approach that required every data point be viewed. This was achieved with the replacement of the traditional line-by-line editing approach with an automated cleaning module, and an area-based editor. The approach includes a unique data structure that enables the direct access to the full resolution data from the area based view, including a direct interface to target files and imagery snippets from mosaic and full resolution imagery. The increased data volumes to be processed also offered tremendous opportunities in terms of visualization and analysis, and interactive 3D presentation of the complex multi-attribute data provided a natural complement to the area based processing. If properly geo-referenced and treated, the complex data sets can be presented in a natural and intuitive manner that allows the integration of multiple components each at their inherent level of resolution and without compromising the quantitative nature of the data. Artificial sun-illumination, shading, and 3-D rendering are used with digital bathymetric data to form natural looking and easily interpretable, yet quantitative, landscapes that allow the user to rapidly identify the data requiring further processing or analysis. Color can be used to represent depth or other parameters (like backscatter, quality factors or sediment properties), which can be draped over the DTM, or high resolution

  13. Development and testing of stable, invariant, isoparametric curvilinear 2- and 3-D hybrid-stress elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Punch, E. F.; Atluri, S. N.

    1984-01-01

    Linear and quadratic Serendipity hybrid-stress elements are examined in respect of stability, coordinate invariance, and optimality. A formulation based upon symmetry group theory successfully addresses these issues in undistorted geometries and is fully detailed for plane elements. The resulting least-order stable invariant stress polynomials can be applied as astute approximations in distorted cases through a variety of tensor components and variational principles. A distortion sensitivity study for two- and three-dimensional elements provides favorable numerical comparisons with the assumed displacement method.

  14. A Dielectric-Filled Waveguide Antenna Element for 3D Imaging Radar in High Temperature and Excessive Dust Conditions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ding; Li, Zhiping; Chen, Xianzhong; Wang, Zhengpeng; Wu, Jianhua

    2016-08-22

    Three-dimensional information of the burden surface in high temperature and excessive dust industrial conditions has been previously hard to obtain. This paper presents a novel microstrip-fed dielectric-filled waveguide antenna element which is resistant to dust and high temperatures. A novel microstrip-to-dielectric-loaded waveguide transition was developed. A cylinder and cuboid composite structure was employed at the terminal of the antenna element, which improved the return loss performance and reduced the size. The proposed antenna element was easily integrated into a T-shape multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) imaging radar system and tested in both the laboratory environment and real blast furnace environment. The measurement results show that the proposed antenna element works very well in industrial 3D imaging radar.

  15. A Dielectric-Filled Waveguide Antenna Element for 3D Imaging Radar in High Temperature and Excessive Dust Conditions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ding; Li, Zhiping; Chen, Xianzhong; Wang, Zhengpeng; Wu, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional information of the burden surface in high temperature and excessive dust industrial conditions has been previously hard to obtain. This paper presents a novel microstrip-fed dielectric-filled waveguide antenna element which is resistant to dust and high temperatures. A novel microstrip-to-dielectric-loaded waveguide transition was developed. A cylinder and cuboid composite structure was employed at the terminal of the antenna element, which improved the return loss performance and reduced the size. The proposed antenna element was easily integrated into a T-shape multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) imaging radar system and tested in both the laboratory environment and real blast furnace environment. The measurement results show that the proposed antenna element works very well in industrial 3D imaging radar. PMID:27556469

  16. A Dielectric-Filled Waveguide Antenna Element for 3D Imaging Radar in High Temperature and Excessive Dust Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ding; Li, Zhiping; Chen, Xianzhong; Wang, Zhengpeng; Wu, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional information of the burden surface in high temperature and excessive dust industrial conditions has been previously hard to obtain. This paper presents a novel microstrip-fed dielectric-filled waveguide antenna element which is resistant to dust and high temperatures. A novel microstrip-to-dielectric-loaded waveguide transition was developed. A cylinder and cuboid composite structure was employed at the terminal of the antenna element, which improved the return loss performance and reduced the size. The proposed antenna element was easily integrated into a T-shape multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) imaging radar system and tested in both the laboratory environment and real blast furnace environment. The measurement results show that the proposed antenna element works very well in industrial 3D imaging radar. PMID:27556469

  17. High sensitivity and high resolution element 3D analysis by a combined SIMS-SPM instrument.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Yves; Wirtz, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Using the recently developed SIMS-SPM prototype, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) data was combined with topographical data from the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) module for five test structures in order to obtain accurate chemical 3D maps: a polystyrene/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PS/PVP) polymer blend, a nickel-based super-alloy, a titanium carbonitride-based cermet, a reticle test structure and Mg(OH)2 nanoclusters incorporated inside a polymer matrix. The examples illustrate the potential of this combined approach to track and eliminate artefacts related to inhomogeneities of the sputter rates (caused by samples containing various materials, different phases or having a non-flat surface) and inhomogeneities of the secondary ion extraction efficiencies due to local field distortions (caused by topography with high aspect ratios). In this respect, this paper presents the measured relative sputter rates between PVP and PS as well as in between the different phases of the TiCN cermet. PMID:26171285

  18. High sensitivity and high resolution element 3D analysis by a combined SIMS-SPM instrument.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Yves; Wirtz, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Using the recently developed SIMS-SPM prototype, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) data was combined with topographical data from the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) module for five test structures in order to obtain accurate chemical 3D maps: a polystyrene/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PS/PVP) polymer blend, a nickel-based super-alloy, a titanium carbonitride-based cermet, a reticle test structure and Mg(OH)2 nanoclusters incorporated inside a polymer matrix. The examples illustrate the potential of this combined approach to track and eliminate artefacts related to inhomogeneities of the sputter rates (caused by samples containing various materials, different phases or having a non-flat surface) and inhomogeneities of the secondary ion extraction efficiencies due to local field distortions (caused by topography with high aspect ratios). In this respect, this paper presents the measured relative sputter rates between PVP and PS as well as in between the different phases of the TiCN cermet.

  19. GENSURF: A mesh generator for 3D finite element analysis of surface and corner cracks in finite thickness plates subjected to mode-1 loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.

    1992-01-01

    A computer program that generates three-dimensional (3D) finite element models for cracked 3D solids was written. This computer program, gensurf, uses minimal input data to generate 3D finite element models for isotropic solids with elliptic or part-elliptic cracks. These models can be used with a 3D finite element program called surf3d. This report documents this mesh generator. In this manual the capabilities, limitations, and organization of gensurf are described. The procedures used to develop 3D finite element models and the input for and the output of gensurf are explained. Several examples are included to illustrate the use of this program. Several input data files are included with this manual so that the users can edit these files to conform to their crack configuration and use them with gensurf.

  20. Confocal (micro)-XRF for 3D anlaysis of elements distribution in hot environmental particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bielewski, M; Eriksson, M; Himbert, J; Simon, R; Betti, M; Hamilton, T F

    2007-11-27

    Studies on the fate and transport of radioactive contaminates in the environment are often constrained by a lack of knowledge on the elemental distribution and general behavior of particulate bound radionuclides contained in hot particles. A number of hot particles were previously isolated from soil samples collected at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands and characterized using non-destructive techniques [1]. The present investigation at HASYLAB is a part of larger research program at ITU regarding the characterization of environmental radioactive particles different locations and source-terms. Radioactive particles in the environment are formed under a number of different release scenarios and, as such, their physicochemical properties may provide a basis for identifying source-term specific contamination regimes. Consequently, studies on hot particles are not only important in terms of studying the elemental composition and geochemical behavior of hot particles but may also lead to advances in assessing the long-term impacts of radioactive contamination on the environment. Six particles isolated from soil samples collected at the Marshall Islands were studied. The element distribution in the particles was determined by confocal {micro}-XRF analysis using the ANKA FLUO beam line. The CRL (compound refractive lens) was used to focus the exciting beam and the polycapillary half lens to collimate the detector. The dimensions of confocal spot were measured by 'knife edge scanning' method with thin gold structure placed at Si wafer. The values of 3.1 x 1.4 x 18.4 {micro}m were achieved if defined as FWHMs of measured L?intensity profiles and when the19.1 keV exciting radiation was used. The collected XRF spectra were analyzed offline with AXIL [2] software to obtain net intensities of element characteristic lines.Further data processing and reconstruction of element distribution was done with the software 'R' [3] dedicated for statistical

  1. Stress analysis of 3D complex geometries using the scaled boundary polyhedral finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi, Hossein; Saputra, Albert; Song, Chongmin

    2016-08-01

    While dominating the numerical stress analysis of solids, the finite element method requires a mesh to conform to the surface of the geometry. Thus the mesh generation of three dimensional complex structures often require tedious human interventions. In this paper, we present a formulation for arbitrary polyhedral elements based on the scaled boundary finite element method, which reduces the difficulties in automatic mesh generation. We also propose a simple method to generate polyhedral meshes with local refinements. The mesh generation method is based on combining an octree mesh with surfaces defined using signed distance functions. Through several numerical examples, we verify the results, study the convergence behaviour and depict the many advantages and capabilities of the presented method. This contribution is intended to assist us to eventually frame a set of numerical methods and associated tools for the full automation of the engineering analysis where minimal human interaction is needed.

  2. Simulation of 3D tumor cell growth using nonlinear finite element method.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shoubing; Yan, Yannan; Tang, Liqun; Meng, Junping; Jiang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel parallel computing framework for a nonlinear finite element method (FEM)-based cell model and apply it to simulate avascular tumor growth. We derive computation formulas to simplify the simulation and design the basic algorithms. With the increment of the proliferation generations of tumor cells, the FEM elements may become larger and more distorted. Then, we describe a remesh and refinement processing of the distorted or over large finite elements and the parallel implementation based on Message Passing Interface to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the simulation. We demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the FEM model and the parallelization methods in simulations of early tumor growth. PMID:26213205

  3. 3-d finite element model development for biomechanics: a software demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K.; Hollister, A.M.; Ashby, E.

    1997-03-01

    Finite element analysis is becoming an increasingly important part of biomechanics and orthopedic research, as computational resources become more powerful, and data handling algorithms become more sophisticated. Until recently, tools with sufficient power did not exist or were not accessible to adequately model complicated, three-dimensional, nonlinear biomechanical systems. In the past, finite element analyses in biomechanics have often been limited to two-dimensional approaches, linear analyses, or simulations of single tissue types. Today, we have the resources to model fully three-dimensional, nonlinear, multi-tissue, and even multi-joint systems. The authors will present the process of developing these kinds of finite element models, using human hand and knee examples, and will demonstrate their software tools.

  4. Stress analysis of 3D complex geometries using the scaled boundary polyhedral finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi, Hossein; Saputra, Albert; Song, Chongmin

    2016-10-01

    While dominating the numerical stress analysis of solids, the finite element method requires a mesh to conform to the surface of the geometry. Thus the mesh generation of three dimensional complex structures often require tedious human interventions. In this paper, we present a formulation for arbitrary polyhedral elements based on the scaled boundary finite element method, which reduces the difficulties in automatic mesh generation. We also propose a simple method to generate polyhedral meshes with local refinements. The mesh generation method is based on combining an octree mesh with surfaces defined using signed distance functions. Through several numerical examples, we verify the results, study the convergence behaviour and depict the many advantages and capabilities of the presented method. This contribution is intended to assist us to eventually frame a set of numerical methods and associated tools for the full automation of the engineering analysis where minimal human interaction is needed.

  5. DYNA3D Finite Element Analysis of Steam Explosion Loads on a Pedestal Wall Design

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, C R

    2007-01-18

    The objective of this brief report is to document the ESBWR pedestal wall finite element analyses that were performed as a quick turnaround effort in July 2005 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and describe the assumptions and failure criteria used for these analyses [Ref 4]. The analyses described within are for the pedestal wall design that included an internal steel liner. The goal of the finite element analyses was to assist in determining the load carrying capacity of the ESBWR pedestal wall subjected to an impulsive pressure generated by a steam explosion.

  6. Predicting the behavior of microfluidic circuits made from discrete elements

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Krisna C.; Thompson, Bryant; Iqbal, Danish; Malmstadt, Noah

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic devices can be used to execute a variety of continuous flow analytical and synthetic chemistry protocols with a great degree of precision. The growing availability of additive manufacturing has enabled the design of microfluidic devices with new functionality and complexity. However, these devices are prone to larger manufacturing variation than is typical of those made with micromachining or soft lithography. In this report, we demonstrate a design-for-manufacturing workflow that addresses performance variation at the microfluidic element and circuit level, in context of mass-manufacturing and additive manufacturing. Our approach relies on discrete microfluidic elements that are characterized by their terminal hydraulic resistance and associated tolerance. Network analysis is employed to construct simple analytical design rules for model microfluidic circuits. Monte Carlo analysis is employed at both the individual element and circuit level to establish expected performance metrics for several specific circuit configurations. A protocol based on osmometry is used to experimentally probe mixing behavior in circuits in order to validate these approaches. The overall workflow is applied to two application circuits with immediate use at on the bench-top: series and parallel mixing circuits that are modularly programmable, virtually predictable, highly precise, and operable by hand. PMID:26516059

  7. High sensitivity and high resolution element 3D analysis by a combined SIMS–SPM instrument

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Summary Using the recently developed SIMS–SPM prototype, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) data was combined with topographical data from the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) module for five test structures in order to obtain accurate chemical 3D maps: a polystyrene/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PS/PVP) polymer blend, a nickel-based super-alloy, a titanium carbonitride-based cermet, a reticle test structure and Mg(OH)2 nanoclusters incorporated inside a polymer matrix. The examples illustrate the potential of this combined approach to track and eliminate artefacts related to inhomogeneities of the sputter rates (caused by samples containing various materials, different phases or having a non-flat surface) and inhomogeneities of the secondary ion extraction efficiencies due to local field distortions (caused by topography with high aspect ratios). In this respect, this paper presents the measured relative sputter rates between PVP and PS as well as in between the different phases of the TiCN cermet. PMID:26171285

  8. Orthodontic intrusion of maxillary incisors: a 3D finite element method study

    PubMed Central

    Saga, Armando Yukio; Maruo, Hiroshi; Argenta, Marco André; Maruo, Ivan Toshio; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In orthodontic treatment, intrusion movement of maxillary incisors is often necessary. Therefore, the objective of this investigation is to evaluate the initial distribution patterns and magnitude of compressive stress in the periodontal ligament (PDL) in a simulation of orthodontic intrusion of maxillary incisors, considering the points of force application. Methods: Anatomic 3D models reconstructed from cone-beam computed tomography scans were used to simulate maxillary incisors intrusion loading. The points of force application selected were: centered between central incisors brackets (LOAD 1); bilaterally between the brackets of central and lateral incisors (LOAD 2); bilaterally distal to the brackets of lateral incisors (LOAD 3); bilaterally 7 mm distal to the center of brackets of lateral incisors (LOAD 4). Results and Conclusions: Stress concentrated at the PDL apex region, irrespective of the point of orthodontic force application. The four load models showed distinct contour plots and compressive stress values over the midsagittal reference line. The contour plots of central and lateral incisors were not similar in the same load model. LOAD 3 resulted in more balanced compressive stress distribution. PMID:27007765

  9. Determining Trajectory of Triboelectrically Charged Particles, Using Discrete Element Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory is participating in an Innovative Partnership Program (IPP) project with an industry partner to modify a commercial off-the-shelf simulation software product to treat the electrodynamics of particulate systems. Discrete element modeling (DEM) is a numerical technique that can track the dynamics of particle systems. This technique, which was introduced in 1979 for analysis of rock mechanics, was recently refined to include the contact force interaction of particles with arbitrary surfaces and moving machinery. In our work, we endeavor to incorporate electrostatic forces into the DEM calculations to enhance the fidelity of the software and its applicability to (1) particle processes, such as electrophotography, that are greatly affected by electrostatic forces, (2) grain and dust transport, and (3) the study of lunar and Martian regoliths.

  10. Edge-based finite elements and vector ABCs applied to 3D scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Jin, J. M.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    An edge based finite element formulation with vector absorbing boundary conditions is presented for scattering by composite structures having boundaries satisfying impedance and/or transition conditions. Remarkably accurate results are obtained by placing the mesh a small fraction of a wavelength away from the scatterer.

  11. Visualization methods for high-resolution, transient, 3-D, finite element situations

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M.A.

    1995-01-10

    Scientific visualization is the process whereby numerical data is transformed into a visual form to augment the process of discovery and understanding. Visualizing the data generated by large-scale, transient, three-dimensional finite element simulations poses many challenges due to geometric complexity, the presence of multiple materials and multiple element types, and the inherent unstructured nature of the meshes. In this paper, the direct use of finite element data structures, nodal assembly procedures, and element interpolants for volumetric adaptive surface extraction, surface rendering, vector grids and particle tracing is discussed. A brief description of a {open_quotes}direct-to-disk{close_quotes} animation system is presented, and case studies which demonstrate the use of isosurfaces, vector plots, cutting planes, reference surfaces and particle tracing are then discussed in the context of several case studies for transient incompressible viscous flow, and acoustic fluid-structure interaction simulations. An overview of the implications of massively parallel computers on visualization is presented to highlight the issues in parallel visualization methodology, algorithms. data locality and the ultimate requirements for temporary and archival data storage and network bandwidth.

  12. Finite element method for accurate 3D simulation of plasmonic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Sven; Zschiedrich, Lin; Pomplun, Jan; Schmidt, Frank

    2010-02-01

    Optical properties of hybrid plasmonic waveguides and of low-Q cavities, formed by waveguides of finite length are investigated numerically. These structures are of interest as building-blocks of plasmon lasers. We use a time-harmonic finite-element package including a propagation-mode solver, a resonance-mode solver and a scattering solver for studying various properties of the system. Numerical convergence of all used methods is demonstrated.

  13. A 3D finite element simulation model for TBM tunnelling in soft ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, Thomas; Meschke, Günther

    2004-12-01

    A three-dimensional finite element simulation model for shield-driven tunnel excavation is presented. The model takes into account all relevant components of the construction process (the soil and the ground water, the tunnel boring machine with frictional contact to the soil, the hydraulic jacks, the tunnel lining and the tail void grouting). The paper gives a detailed description of the model components and the stepwise procedure to simulate the construction process. The soil and the grout material are modelled as saturated porous media using a two-field finite element formulation. This allows to take into account the groundwater, the grouting pressure and the fluid interaction between the soil and slurry at the cutting face and between the soil and grout around the tail void. A Cam-Clay plasticity model is used to describe the material behaviour of cohesive soils. The cementitious grouting material in the tail void is modelled as an ageing elastic material with time-dependent stiffness and permeability. To allow for an automated computation of arbitrarily long and also curvilinear driving paths with suitable finite element meshes, the simulation procedure has been fully automated. The simulation of a tunnel advance in soft cohesive soil below the ground water table is presented and the results are compared with measurements taken from the literature. Copyright

  14. A Spectral Element Ocean Model on the Cray T3D: the interannual variability of the Mediterranean Sea general circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molcard, A. J.; Pinardi, N.; Ansaloni, R.

    A new numerical model, SEOM (Spectral Element Ocean Model, (Iskandarani et al, 1994)), has been implemented in the Mediterranean Sea. Spectral element methods combine the geometric flexibility of finite element techniques with the rapid convergence rate of spectral schemes. The current version solves the shallow water equations with a fifth (or sixth) order accuracy spectral scheme and about 50.000 nodes. The domain decomposition philosophy makes it possible to exploit the power of parallel machines. The original MIMD master/slave version of SEOM, written in F90 and PVM, has been ported to the Cray T3D. When critical for performance, Cray specific high-performance one-sided communication routines (SHMEM) have been adopted to fully exploit the Cray T3D interprocessor network. Tests performed with highly unstructured and irregular grid, on up to 128 processors, show an almost linear scalability even with unoptimized domain decomposition techniques. Results from various case studies on the Mediterranean Sea are shown, involving realistic coastline geometry, and monthly mean 1000mb winds from the ECMWF's atmospheric model operational analysis from the period January 1987 to December 1994. The simulation results show that variability in the wind forcing considerably affect the circulation dynamics of the Mediterranean Sea.

  15. Analysis of Composite Skin-Stiffener Debond Specimens Using Volume Elements and a Shell/3D Modeling Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Minguet, Pierre J.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The debonding of a skin/stringer specimen subjected to tension was studied using three-dimensional volume element modeling and computational fracture mechanics. Mixed mode strain energy release rates were calculated from finite element results using the virtual crack closure technique. The simulations revealed an increase in total energy release rate in the immediate vicinity of the free edges of the specimen. Correlation of the computed mixed-mode strain energy release rates along the delamination front contour with a two-dimensional mixed-mode interlaminar fracture criterion suggested that in spite of peak total energy release rates at the free edge the delamination would not advance at the edges first. The qualitative prediction of the shape of the delamination front was confirmed by X-ray photographs of a specimen taken during testing. The good correlation between prediction based on analysis and experiment demonstrated the efficiency of a mixed-mode failure analysis for the investigation of skin/stiffener separation due to delamination in the adherents. The application of a shell/3D modeling technique for the simulation of skin/stringer debond in a specimen subjected to three-point bending is also demonstrated. The global structure was modeled with shell elements. A local three-dimensional model, extending to about three specimen thicknesses on either side of the delamination front was used to capture the details of the damaged section. Computed total strain energy release rates and mixed-mode ratios obtained from shell/3D simulations were in good agreement with results obtained from full solid models. The good correlations of the results demonstrated the effectiveness of the shell/3D modeling technique for the investigation of skin/stiffener separation due to delamination in the adherents.

  16. First principle study of AlX (X=3d, 4d, 5d elements and Lu) dimer.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Yifang; Wang, Jianchuan; Hou, Yuhua; Zhong, Xiaping; Du, Yong; Feng, Yuanping

    2008-02-21

    The ground state equilibrium bond length, harmonic vibrational frequency, and dissociation energy of AlX (X=3d,4d,5d elements and Lu) dimers are investigated by density functional method B3LYP. The present results are in good agreement with the available experimental and other theoretical values except the dissociation energy of AlCr. The present calculations show that the late transition metal can combine strongly with aluminum compared with the former transition metal. The present calculation also indicates that it is more reasonable to replace La with Lu in the Periodic Table and that the bonding strengths of zinc, cadmium, and mercury with aluminum are very weak.

  17. Development of a 3D finite element model evaluating air-coupled ultrasonic measurements of nonlinear Rayleigh waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrig, Matthias P.; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2016-02-01

    This research presents a 3D numerical finite element (FE) model which, previously developed, precisely simulates non-contact, air-coupled measurements of nonlinear Rayleigh wave propagation. The commercial FE-solver ABAQUS is used to perform the simulations. First, frequency dependent pressure wave attenuation is investigated numerically to reconstruct the sound pressure distribution along the active surface of the non-contact receiver. Second, constitutive law and excitation source properties are optimized to match nonlinear ultrasonic experimental data. Finally, the FE-model data are fit with analytical solutions showing a good agreement and thus, indicating the significance of the study performed.

  18. Interactive editing of 3D geological structures and tectonic history sketching via a rigid element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Gautier; Caumon, Guillaume; Jessell, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Numerical models of geological structures are generally built with a geometrical approach, which lacks an explicit representation of the deformation history and may lead to incompatible structures. We advocate that the deformation history should be investigated and represented from the very first steps of the modelling process, provided that a series of rapid, interactive or automated, deformation tools are available for local editing, forward modelling and restoration. In this paper, we define the specifications of such tools and emphasise the need for rapidity and robustness. We briefly review the different applications of deformation tools in geomodelling and the existing deformation algorithms. We select a deformation algorithm based on rigid elements, first presented in the Computer Graphics community, which we refer to as Reed. It is able to rapidly deform any kind of geometrical object, including points, lines or volumes, with an approximated mechanical behaviour. The objects to be deformed are embedded in rigid cells whose displacement is optimised by minimising a global cost function with respect to displacement boundary conditions. This cost function measures the difference in displacement between neighbouring elements. The embedded objects are then deformed based on their original position with respect to the rigid elements. We present the basis of our implementation of this algorithm and highlight its ability to fulfil the specifications we defined. Its application to geomodelling specific problems is illustrated through the construction of a synthetic structural model of multiply deformed layers with a forward modelling approach. A special boundary condition adapted to restore large folds is also presented and applied to the large anticline of Han-sur-Lesse, Belgium, which demonstrates the ability of this method to efficiently perform a volumetric restoration without global projections.

  19. Probabilistic Fatigue Damage Prognosis Using a Surrogate Model Trained Via 3D Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, Patrick E.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Newman, John A.; Leser, William P.; Warner, James E.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing inverse uncertainty quantification techniques, structural health monitoring can be integrated with damage progression models to form probabilistic predictions of a structure's remaining useful life. However, damage evolution in realistic structures is physically complex. Accurately representing this behavior requires high-fidelity models which are typically computationally prohibitive. In the present work, a high-fidelity finite element model is represented by a surrogate model, reducing computation times. The new approach is used with damage diagnosis data to form a probabilistic prediction of remaining useful life for a test specimen under mixed-mode conditions.

  20. Solution of 3D inverse scattering problems by combined inverse equivalent current and finite element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kılıç, Emre Eibert, Thomas F.

    2015-05-01

    An approach combining boundary integral and finite element methods is introduced for the solution of three-dimensional inverse electromagnetic medium scattering problems. Based on the equivalence principle, unknown equivalent electric and magnetic surface current densities on a closed surface are utilized to decompose the inverse medium problem into two parts: a linear radiation problem and a nonlinear cavity problem. The first problem is formulated by a boundary integral equation, the computational burden of which is reduced by employing the multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM). Reconstructed Cauchy data on the surface allows the utilization of the Lorentz reciprocity and the Poynting's theorems. Exploiting these theorems, the noise level and an initial guess are estimated for the cavity problem. Moreover, it is possible to determine whether the material is lossy or not. In the second problem, the estimated surface currents form inhomogeneous boundary conditions of the cavity problem. The cavity problem is formulated by the finite element technique and solved iteratively by the Gauss–Newton method to reconstruct the properties of the object. Regularization for both the first and the second problems is achieved by a Krylov subspace method. The proposed method is tested against both synthetic and experimental data and promising reconstruction results are obtained.

  1. Topology optimization of 3D compliant actuators by a sequential element rejection and admission method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansola, R.; Veguería, E.; Alonso, C.; Querin, O. M.

    2016-03-01

    This work presents a sequential element rejection and admission (SERA) method for optimum topology design of three dimensional compliant actuators. The proposed procedure has been successfully applied to several topology optimization problems, but most investigations for compliant devices design have been focused on planar systems. This investigation aims to progress on this line, where a generalization of the method for three dimensional topology optimization is explored. The methodology described in this work is useful for the synthesis of high performance flexure based micro and nano manipulation applications demanding for both sensing and control of motion and force trajectories. In this case the goal of the topology optimization problem is to design an actuator that transfers work from the input point to the output port in a structurally efficient way. Here we will use the classical formulation where the displacement performed on a work piece modelled by a spring is maximized. The technique implemented works with two separate criteria for the rejection and admission of elements to efficiently achieve the optimum design and overcomes problems encountered by other evolutionary methods when dealing with compliant mechanisms design. The use of the algorithm is demonstrated through several numerical examples.

  2. Towards increased speed computations in 3D moving eddy current finite element modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, N.; Rodger, D.; Coles, P.C.; Street, S.; Leonard, P.J.

    1995-11-01

    Attractive and drag forces on such devices as magnetically levitated (MAGLEV) vehicles and magnetic bearings are crucially dependent on induced eddy currents. Here, a finite element scheme used to model eddy current problems with motional velocity is described here. The formulation is a variation on the A {minus} {psi} method. An additional Minkowski-transformation term is required to take into account the velocity. However, computational instability arises when the velocity increases to the point that the first order velocity terms severely dominate the second order diffusion terms. The method presented here uses upwinding to help regain stability. An additional degree of stability is inserted at higher speeds by using a lower speed result as an initial vector. This leads to a reduced permeability in saturated regions which counter-balances to some extent the increase in velocity. The method is validated by experimental measurement.

  3. A Simulation of crustal deformation around sourthwest Japan using 3D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oma, T.; Ito, T.; Sasajima, R.

    2015-12-01

    In southwest Japan, the Philippine Sea plate is subducting beneath the Amurian plate at the Nankai Trough. Megathrust earthquakes have been occurred with recurrence intervals of about 100-150 years. Previous studies have estimated co-seismic slip distribution at the 1944 Tokankai and the 1946 Nankai earthquakes and interplate plate coupling along the Nankai Trough. Many of previous studies employed a homogeneous elastic half space or elastic and viscoelastic layers structure. However, these assumptions as mentioned above are inadequate, since inhomogeneous structure is exceled in the real earth result from subducting plate. Therefore, in order to estimate the effect of inhomogeneous structure on the crustal deformation, we calculate crustal deformation due to Megathrust earthquake using 3-dimensional Finite Element Method (FEM). We use FEM software PyLith v2.1. In this study, we construct a finite element mesh with the region of 3000km(SW) × 2300km(NS) × 400km(depth) cover Japanese Islands, using Cubit 13.0. This mesh is considered topography, the Philippine Sea plate, the Pacific plate, Moho discontinuity, and curvature of the earth. In order to examine differences of surface displacement between inhomogeneous and homogeneous structures, we use co-seismic slip distribution of the 1944 and 1946 earthquakes estimated by Sagiya and Thatcher (1999). In result, surface elastic response under inhomogeneous structure becomes 30% larger than it's homogeneous structure at the Muroto cape. This difference indicates that co-seismic slip or plate coupling distribution estimated from Green's function under an assumption of homogeneous structure is overestimated. Then, we calculate viscoelastic response assuming Maxwell rheology model and viscosity as 1×1019. As a result, predicted horizontal velocity of viscoelastic response due to the events corresponds to 10 % of observed present deformation. It suggest that spatial pattern of plate coupling might be change when we

  4. A Review of Discrete Element Method (DEM) Particle Shapes and Size Distributions for Lunar Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John E.; Metzger, Philip T.; Wilkinson, R. Allen

    2010-01-01

    As part of ongoing efforts to develop models of lunar soil mechanics, this report reviews two topics that are important to discrete element method (DEM) modeling the behavior of soils (such as lunar soils): (1) methods of modeling particle shapes and (2) analytical representations of particle size distribution. The choice of particle shape complexity is driven primarily by opposing tradeoffs with total number of particles, computer memory, and total simulation computer processing time. The choice is also dependent on available DEM software capabilities. For example, PFC2D/PFC3D and EDEM support clustering of spheres; MIMES incorporates superquadric particle shapes; and BLOKS3D provides polyhedra shapes. Most commercial and custom DEM software supports some type of complex particle shape beyond the standard sphere. Convex polyhedra, clusters of spheres and single parametric particle shapes such as the ellipsoid, polyellipsoid, and superquadric, are all motivated by the desire to introduce asymmetry into the particle shape, as well as edges and corners, in order to better simulate actual granular particle shapes and behavior. An empirical particle size distribution (PSD) formula is shown to fit desert sand data from Bagnold. Particle size data of JSC-1a obtained from a fine particle analyzer at the NASA Kennedy Space Center is also fitted to a similar empirical PSD function.

  5. Direct Determination of 3D Distribution of Elemental Composition in Single Semiconductor Nanoislands by Scanning Auger Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomaryov, Semyon S.; Yukhymchuk, Volodymyr O.; Lytvyn, Peter M.; Valakh, Mykhailo Ya

    2016-02-01

    An application of scanning Auger microscopy with ion etching technique and effective compensation of thermal drift of the surface analyzed area is proposed for direct local study of composition distribution in the bulk of single nanoislands. For GexSi1 - x-nanoislands obtained by MBE of Ge on Si-substrate gigantic interdiffusion mixing takes place both in the open and capped nanostructures. Lateral distributions of the elemental composition as well as concentration-depth profiles were recorded. 3D distribution of the elemental composition in the d-cluster bulk was obtained using the interpolation approach by lateral composition distributions in its several cross sections and concentration-depth profile. It was shown that there is a germanium core in the nanoislands of both nanostructure types, which even penetrates the substrate. In studied nanostructures maximal Ge content in the nanoislands may reach about 40 at.%.

  6. A new 3D finite element model of the IEC 60318-1 artificial ear: II. Experimental and numerical validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Agustín; Barham, Richard; Ruiz, Mariano; López, Juan Manuel; De Arcas, Guillermo; Alonso, Jesus

    2012-12-01

    In part I, the feasibility of using three-dimensional (3D) finite elements (FEs) to model the acoustic behaviour of the IEC 60318-1 artificial ear was studied and the numerical approach compared with classical lumped elements modelling. It was shown that by using a more complex acoustic model that took account of thermo-viscous effects, geometric shapes and dimensions, it was possible to develop a realistic model. This model then had clear advantages in comparison with the models based on equivalent circuits using lumped parameters. In fact results from FE modelling produce a better understanding about the physical phenomena produced inside ear simulator couplers, facilitating spatial and temporal visualization of the sound fields produced. The objective of this study (part II) is to extend the investigation by validating the numerical calculations against measurements on an ear simulator conforming to IEC 60318-1. For this purpose, an appropriate commercially available device is taken and a complete 3D FE model developed for it. The numerical model is based on key dimensional data obtained with a non-destructive x-ray inspection technique. Measurements of the acoustic transfer impedance have been carried out on the same device at a national measurement institute using the method embodied in IEC 60318-1. Having accounted for the actual device dimensions, the thermo-viscous effects inside narrow slots and holes and environmental conditions, the results of the numerical modelling were found to be in good agreement with the measured values.

  7. Determination of mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers for compounds of the 3d transition elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, Demet; Boydaş, Elif; Cömert, Esra

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine mass attenuation coefficient (μm) and effective atomic number (Zeff) for some compounds of the 3d transition elements such as CoO, CoF2, CoF3, Cr2O3, CrF2, CrF3, FeO, Fe2O3, MnO2, TiO2, V2O3, VF3, V2O5, VF4 and ZnO at 19.63 and 22.10 keV photon energies by using an HPGe detector with a resolution of 182 eV at 5.9 keV. The experimental results of μm are compared with the theoretical results. Also, effective atomic numbers of compounds of the 3d transition elements have been determined by using experimental and theoretical mass attenuation coefficients. The agreement of measured values of effective atomic numbers with theoretical calculations is quite satisfactory.

  8. 3D finite element simulation of non-crimp fabric composites ultrasonic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Saffari, N.; Fromme, P.

    2012-05-01

    Composite materials offer many advantages for aerospace applications, e.g., good strength to weight ratio. Different types of composites, such as non-crimp fabrics (NCF), are currently being investigated as they offer reduced manufacturing costs and improved damage tolerance as compared to traditional pre-impregnated composite materials. NCF composites are made from stitched fiber bundles (tows), which typically have a width and thickness of less than a millimeter. This results in strongly inhomogeneous and anisotropic material properties. Different types of manufacturing imperfections, such as porosity, resin pockets, tow crimp and misalignment can lead to reduced material strength and thus to defects following excessive loads or impact, e.g., fracture and delaminations. The ultrasonic non-destructive testing of NCF composites is difficult, as the tow size is comparable to the wavelength, leading to multiple scattering in this inherently three-dimensional structure. For typical material properties and geometry of an NCF composite, a full three-dimensional Finite Element (FE) model has been developed in ABAQUS. The propagation of longitudinal ultrasonic waves has been simulated and the effect of multiple scattering at the fiber tows investigated. The influence of porosity in the epoxy matrix as a typical manufacturing defect on the ultrasonic wave propagation and attenuation has been studied.

  9. Simulation of ultrasonic NCF composites testing using 3D finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Saffari, N.; Fromme, P.

    2012-04-01

    Composite materials offer many advantages for aerospace applications, e.g., good strength to weight ratio. Different types of composites, such as non-crimp fabrics (NCF), are currently being investigated as they offer reduced manufacturing costs and improved damage tolerance as compared to traditional pre-impregnated composite materials. NCF composites are made from stitched fiber bundles (tows), which typically have a width and thickness in the order of millimeter. This results in strongly inhomogeneous and anisotropic material properties. Different types of manufacturing imperfections, such as porosity, resin pockets, tow crimp and misalignment can lead to reduced material strength and thus to defects following excessive loads or impact, e.g. fracture and delaminations. The ultrasonic non-destructive testing of NCF composites is difficult, as the tow size is comparable to the wavelength, leading to multiple scattering in this inherently three-dimensional structure. For typical material properties and geometry of an NCF composite, a full three-dimensional Finite Element (FE) model has been developed in ABAQUS. The propagation of longitudinal ultrasonic waves has been simulated and the effect of multiple scattering at the fiber tows investigated. The effect of porosity as a typical manufacturing imperfection has been considered. The potential for the detection and quantification of such defects is discussed based on the observed influence on the ultrasonic wave propagation and attenuation.

  10. Laboratory and 3-D-distinct element analysis of failure mechanism of slope under external surcharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, N.; Cheng, Y. M.

    2014-09-01

    Landslide is a major disaster resulting in considerable loss of human lives and property damages in hilly terrain in Hong Kong, China and many other countries. The factor of safety and the critical slip surface for slope stabilization are the main considerations for slope stability analysis in the past, while the detailed post-failure conditions of the slopes have not been considered in sufficient details. There are however increasing interest on the consequences after the initiation of failure which includes the development and propagation of the failure surfaces, the amount of failed mass and runoff and the affected region. To assess the development of slope failure in more details and to consider the potential danger of slopes after failure has initiated, the slope stability problem under external surcharge is analyzed by the distinct element method (DEM) and laboratory model test in the present research. A more refined study about the development of failure, microcosmic failure mechanism and the post-failure mechanism of slope will be carried out. The numerical modeling method and the various findings from the present work can provide an alternate method of analysis of slope failure which can give additional information not available from the classical methods of analysis.

  11. Bone stress and strain modification in diastema closure: 3D analysis using finite element method.

    PubMed

    Geramy, Allahyar; Bouserhal, Joseph; Martin, Domingo; Baghaeian, Pedram

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the stress and strain distribution in the alveolar bone between two central incisors in the process of diastema closure with a constant force. A 3-dimensional computer modeling based on finite element techniques was used for this purpose. A model of an anterior segment of the mandible containing cortical bone, spongy bone, gingivae, PDL and two central incisors with a bracket in the labial surface of each tooth were designed. The von Mises stress and strain was evaluated in alveolar bone along a path of nodes defined in a cresto-apical direction in the midline between two teeth. It was observed that stress and strain of alveolar bone increased in midline with a constant force to close the diastema regardless of the type of movement in gradual steps of diastema closure, however the stress was higher in the tipping movement than the bodily so it can be suggested that a protocol of force system modification should be introduced to compensate for the stress and strain changes caused by the reduced distance to avoid the unwanted stress alteration during the diastema closure. PMID:26277458

  12. DynEarthSol3D: An Efficient and Flexible Unstructured Finite Element Method to Study Long-Term Tectonic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, E.; Choi, E.; Lavier, L. L.; Calo, V. M.

    2013-12-01

    Many tectonic problems treat the lithosphere as a compressible elastic material, which can also flow viscously or break in a brittle fashion depending on the stress level applied and the temperature conditions. We present a flexible methodology to address the resulting complex material response, which imposes severe challenges on the discretization and rheological models used. This robust, adaptive, multidimensional, finite element method solves the momentum balance and the heat equation in Lagrangian form with unstructured simplicial mesh (triangles in 2D and tetrahedra in 3D). The mesh locking problem is avoided by using averaged volumetric strain rate to update the stress. The solver uses contingent mesh adaptivity in places where shear strain is focused (localization) during remeshing. A simple scheme of mesh coarsening is employed to prevent tiny elements during remeshing. Lagrangian markers are used to track multiple compositions of rocks. The code is parallelized via OpenMP with graph coloring. We detail the solver and verify it in a number of benchmark problems against analytic and numerical solutions from the literature.

  13. Simulating hydroplaning of submarine landslides by quasi 3D depth averaged finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Blasio, Fabio; Battista Crosta, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    G.B. Crosta, H. J. Chen, and F.V. De Blasio Dept. Of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano Bicocca, Milano, Italy Klohn Crippen Berger, Calgary, Canada Subaqueous debris flows/submarine landslides, both in the open ocean as well as in fresh waters, exhibit extremely high mobility, quantified by a ratio between vertical to horizontal displacement of the order 0.01 or even much less. It is possible to simulate subaqueous debris flows with small-scale experiments along a flume or a pool using a cohesive mixture of clay and sand. The results have shown a strong enhancement of runout and velocity compared to the case in which the same debris flow travels without water, and have indicated hydroplaning as a possible explanation (Mohrig et al. 1998). Hydroplaning is started when the snout of the debris flow travels sufficiently fast. This generates lift forces on the front of the debris flow exceeding the self-weight of the sediment, which so begins to travel detached from the bed, literally hovering instead of flowing. Clearly, the resistance to flow plummets because drag stress against water is much smaller than the shear strength of the material. The consequence is a dramatic increase of the debris flow speed and runout. Does the process occur also for subaqueous landslides and debris flows in the ocean, something twelve orders of magnitude larger than the experimental ones? Obviously, no experiment will ever be capable to replicate this size, one needs to rely on numerical simulations. Results extending a depth-integrated numerical model for debris flows (Imran et al., 2001) indicate that hydroplaning is possible (De Blasio et al., 2004), but more should be done especially with alternative numerical methodologies. In this work, finite element methods are used to simulate hydroplaning using the code MADflow (Chen, 2014) adopting a depth averaged solution. We ran some simulations on the small scale of the laboratory experiments, and secondly

  14. Discrete element crowd model for pedestrian evacuation through an exit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lin; Jian, Ma; Siuming, Lo

    2016-03-01

    A series of accidents caused by crowds within the last decades evoked a lot of scientific interest in modeling the movement of pedestrian crowds. Based on the discrete element method, a granular dynamic model, in which the human body is simplified as a self-driven sphere, is proposed to simulate the characteristics of crowd flow through an exit. In this model, the repulsive force among people is considered to have an anisotropic feature, and the physical contact force due to body deformation is quantified by the Hertz contact model. The movement of the human body is simulated by applying the second Newton’s law. The crowd flow through an exit at different desired velocities is studied and simulation results indicated that crowd flow exhibits three distinct states, i.e., smooth state, transition state and phase separation state. In the simulation, the clogging phenomenon occurs more easily when the desired velocity is high and the exit may as a result be totally blocked at a desired velocity of 1.6 m/s or above, leading to faster-to-frozen effect. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 71473207, 51178445, and 71103148), the Research Grant Council, Government of Hong Kong, China (Grant No. CityU119011), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. 2682014CX103 and 2682014RC05).

  15. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Theoretical manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1991-01-01

    Formulations and algorithms implemented in the MHOST finite element program are discussed. The code uses a novel concept of the mixed iterative solution technique for the efficient 3-D computations of turbine engine hot section components. The general framework of variational formulation and solution algorithms are discussed which were derived from the mixed three field Hu-Washizu principle. This formulation enables the use of nodal interpolation for coordinates, displacements, strains, and stresses. Algorithmic description of the mixed iterative method includes variations for the quasi static, transient dynamic and buckling analyses. The global-local analysis procedure referred to as the subelement refinement is developed in the framework of the mixed iterative solution, of which the detail is presented. The numerically integrated isoparametric elements implemented in the framework is discussed. Methods to filter certain parts of strain and project the element discontinuous quantities to the nodes are developed for a family of linear elements. Integration algorithms are described for linear and nonlinear equations included in MHOST program.

  16. Electronic structure of trioxide, oxoperoxide, oxosuperoxide, and ozonide clusters of the 3d elements: density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Uzunova, Ellie L

    2011-03-01

    The trioxide clusters with stoichiometry MO3, and the structural isomers with side-on and end-on bonded oxygen atoms, are studied by DFT with the B1LYP functional. For the first half of the 3d elements row (Sc to Cr), pyramidal or distorted pyramidal structures dominate among the trioxide and oxoperoxide ground states, while the remaining elements form planar trioxides, oxoperoxides, oxosuperoxides, and ozonides. Low-lying trioxide clusters are formed by Ti, V, Cr, and Mn, among which the distorted pyramidal VO3 in the (2)A'' state, the pyramidal CrO3 in the (1)A1 state, and the planar MnO3 in the (2)A1' state are global minima. With the exception of the middle-row elements Mn, Fe, and Co, the magnetic moment of the ground-state clusters is formed with a major contribution from unpaired electrons located at the oxygen atoms. The stability of trioxides and oxoperoxides toward release of molecular oxygen is significantly higher for Sc, Ti, and V than for the remaining elements of the row. A trend of increasing the capability to dissociate one oxygen molecule is observed from Cr to Cu, with the exception of OFe(O2) being more reactive than OCo(O2). A gradual increase of reactivity from Ti to Cu is observed for the complete fragmentation reaction M + O + O2.

  17. Experimental validation of 3D printed patient-specific implants using digital image correlation and finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Sutradhar, Alok; Park, Jaejong; Carrau, Diana; Miller, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    With the dawn of 3D printing technology, patient-specific implant designs are set to have a paradigm shift. A topology optimization method in designing patient-specific craniofacial implants has been developed to ensure adequate load transfer mechanism and restore the form and function of the mid-face. Patient-specific finite element models are used to design these implants and to validate whether they are viable for physiological loading such as mastication. Validation of these topology optimized finite element models using mechanical testing is a critical step. Instead of inserting the implants into a cadaver or patient, we embed the implants into the computer-aided skull model of a patient and, fuse them together to 3D print the complete skull model with the implant. Masticatory forces are applied in the molar region to simulate chewing and measure the stress-strain trajectory. Until recently, strain gages have been used to measure strains for validation. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) method is a relatively new technique for full-field strain measurement which provides a continuous deformation field data. The main objective of this study is to validate the finite element model of patient-specific craniofacial implants against the strain data from the DIC obtained during the mastication simulation and show that the optimized shapes provide adequate load-transfer mechanism. Patient-specific models are obtained from CT scans. The principal maximum and minimum strains are compared. The computational and experimental approach to designing patient-specific implants proved to be a viable technique for mid-face craniofacial reconstruction. PMID:24992729

  18. 3D discrete angiogenesis dynamic model and stochastic simulation for the assessment of blood perfusion coefficient and impact on heat transfer between nanoparticles and malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Yifat, Jonathan; Gannot, Israel

    2015-03-01

    Early detection of malignant tumors plays a crucial role in the survivability chances of the patient. Therefore, new and innovative tumor detection methods are constantly searched for. Tumor-specific magnetic-core nano-particles can be used with an alternating magnetic field to detect and treat tumors by hyperthermia. For the analysis of the method effectiveness, the bio-heat transfer between the nanoparticles and the tissue must be carefully studied. Heat diffusion in biological tissue is usually analyzed using the Pennes Bio-Heat Equation, where blood perfusion plays an important role. Malignant tumors are known to initiate an angiogenesis process, where endothelial cell migration from neighboring vasculature eventually leads to the formation of a thick blood capillary network around them. This process allows the tumor to receive its extensive nutrition demands and evolve into a more progressive and potentially fatal tumor. In order to assess the effect of angiogenesis on the bio-heat transfer problem, we have developed a discrete stochastic 3D model & simulation of tumor-induced angiogenesis. The model elaborates other angiogenesis models by providing high resolution 3D stochastic simulation, capturing of fine angiogenesis morphological features, effects of dynamic sprout thickness functions, and stochastic parent vessel generator. We show that the angiogenesis realizations produced are well suited for numerical bio-heat transfer analysis. Statistical study on the angiogenesis characteristics was derived using Monte Carlo simulations. According to the statistical analysis, we provide analytical expression for the blood perfusion coefficient in the Pennes equation, as a function of several parameters. This updated form of the Pennes equation could be used for numerical and analytical analyses of the proposed detection and treatment method.

  19. 3D discrete angiogenesis dynamic model and stochastic simulation for the assessment of blood perfusion coefficient and impact on heat transfer between nanoparticles and malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Yifat, Jonathan; Gannot, Israel

    2015-03-01

    Early detection of malignant tumors plays a crucial role in the survivability chances of the patient. Therefore, new and innovative tumor detection methods are constantly searched for. Tumor-specific magnetic-core nano-particles can be used with an alternating magnetic field to detect and treat tumors by hyperthermia. For the analysis of the method effectiveness, the bio-heat transfer between the nanoparticles and the tissue must be carefully studied. Heat diffusion in biological tissue is usually analyzed using the Pennes Bio-Heat Equation, where blood perfusion plays an important role. Malignant tumors are known to initiate an angiogenesis process, where endothelial cell migration from neighboring vasculature eventually leads to the formation of a thick blood capillary network around them. This process allows the tumor to receive its extensive nutrition demands and evolve into a more progressive and potentially fatal tumor. In order to assess the effect of angiogenesis on the bio-heat transfer problem, we have developed a discrete stochastic 3D model & simulation of tumor-induced angiogenesis. The model elaborates other angiogenesis models by providing high resolution 3D stochastic simulation, capturing of fine angiogenesis morphological features, effects of dynamic sprout thickness functions, and stochastic parent vessel generator. We show that the angiogenesis realizations produced are well suited for numerical bio-heat transfer analysis. Statistical study on the angiogenesis characteristics was derived using Monte Carlo simulations. According to the statistical analysis, we provide analytical expression for the blood perfusion coefficient in the Pennes equation, as a function of several parameters. This updated form of the Pennes equation could be used for numerical and analytical analyses of the proposed detection and treatment method. PMID:24462603

  20. ZIP3D: An elastic and elastic-plastic finite-element analysis program for cracked bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    ZIP3D is an elastic and an elastic-plastic finite element program to analyze cracks in three dimensional solids. The program may also be used to analyze uncracked bodies or multi-body problems involving contacting surfaces. For crack problems, the program has several unique features including the calculation of mixed-mode strain energy release rates using the three dimensional virtual crack closure technique, the calculation of the J integral using the equivalent domain integral method, the capability to extend the crack front under monotonic or cyclic loading, and the capability to close or open the crack surfaces during cyclic loading. The theories behind the various aspects of the program are explained briefly. Line-by-line data preparation is presented. Input data and results for an elastic analysis of a surface crack in a plate and for an elastic-plastic analysis of a single-edge-crack-tension specimen are also presented.

  1. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Some Structural Modified PC Sleeper with the Vibration Characteristics between Sleeper and Ballast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Hirotaka; Urakawa, Fumihiro; Aikawa, Akira; Namura, Akira

    The vibration of concrete sleepers is an important factor engendering track deterioration. In this paper, we created a three-dimensional finite element model to reproduce a prestressed concrete (PC) sleeper in detail, expressing influence of ballast layers with a 3D spring series and dampers to reproduce their vibration and dynamic characteristics. Determination of these parameters bases on the experimental modal analysis using an impact excitation technique for PC sleepers by adjusting the accelerance between the analytical results and experimental results. Furthermore, we compared the difference of these characteristics between normal sleepers and those with some structural modifications. Analytical results clarified that such means as sleeper width extension and increased sleeper thickness will influence the reduction of ballasted track vibration as improvements of PC sleepers.

  2. 3D Finite Element Modelling of Cutting Forces in Drilling Fibre Metal Laminates and Experimental Hole Quality Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giasin, Khaled; Ayvar-Soberanis, Sabino; French, Toby; Phadnis, Vaibhav

    2016-07-01

    Machining Glass fibre aluminium reinforced epoxy (GLARE) is cumbersome due to distinctively different mechanical and thermal properties of its constituents, which makes it challenging to achieve damage-free holes with the acceptable surface quality. The proposed work focuses on the study of the machinability of thin (~2.5 mm) GLARE laminate. Drilling trials were conducted to analyse the effect of feed rate and spindle speed on the cutting forces and hole quality. The resulting hole quality metrics (surface roughness, hole size, circularity error, burr formation and delamination) were assessed using surface profilometry and optical scanning techniques. A three dimensional (3D) finite-element (FE) model of drilling GLARE laminate was also developed using ABAQUS/Explicit to help understand the mechanism of drilling GLARE. The homogenised ply-level response of GLARE laminate was considered in the FE model to predict cutting forces in the drilling process.

  3. Experimental Investigation and 3D Finite Element Prediction of Temperature Distribution during Travelling Heat Sourced from Oxyacetylene Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar Alkali, Adam; Lenggo Ginta, Turnad; Majdi Abdul-Rani, Ahmad

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a 3D transient finite element modelling of the workpiece temperature field produced during the travelling heat sourced from oxyacetylene flame. The proposed model was given in terms of preheat-only test applicable during thermally enhanced machining using the oxyacetylene flame as a heat source. The FEA model as well as the experimental test investigated the surface temperature distribution on 316L stainless steel at scanning speed of 100mm/min, 125mm/min 160mm/min, 200mm/min and 250mm/min. The parametric properties of the heat source maintained constant are; lead distance Ld =10mm, focus height Fh=7.5mm, oxygen gas pressure Poxy=15psi and acetylene gas pressure Pacty=25psi. An experimental validation of the temperature field induced on type 316L stainless steel reveal that temperature distribution increases when the travelling speed decreases.

  4. 3D Finite Element Model for Writing Long-Period Fiber Gratings by CO2 Laser Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, João M. P.; Nespereira, Marta; Abreu, Manuel; Rebordão, José

    2013-01-01

    In the last years, mid-infrared radiation emitted by CO2 lasers has become increasing popular as a tool in the development of long-period fiber gratings. However, although the development and characterization of the resulting sensing devices have progressed quickly, further research is still necessary to consolidate functional models, especially regarding the interaction between laser radiation and the fiber's material. In this paper, a 3D finite element model is presented to simulate the interaction between laser radiation and an optical fiber and to determine the resulting refractive index change. Dependence with temperature of the main parameters of the optical fiber materials (with special focus on the absorption of incident laser radiation) is considered, as well as convection and radiation losses. Thermal and residual stress analyses are made for a standard single mode fiber, and experimental results are presented. PMID:23941908

  5. Finite Element Analysis of 2.5D Woven Composites, Part I: Microstructure and 3D Finite Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jian; Wen, Weidong; Cui, Haitao; Zhang, Hongjian; Xu, Ying

    2016-02-01

    A new parameterized finite element model, called the Full-cell model, has been established based on the practical microstructure of 2.5D angle-interlock woven composites. This model considering the surface layer structure can predict the mechanical properties and estimate the structural performance such as the fiber volume fraction and inclination angle. According to introducing a set of periodic boundary condition, a reasonable overall stress field and periodic deformation are obtained. Furthermore, the model investigates the relationships among the woven parameters and elastic moduli, and shows the structural variation along with the corresponding woven parameters. Comparing the results calculated by FEM with the experiments, the veracity of calculation and reasonability based on the Full-cell model are confirmed. In the meantime, the predicted results based on the Full-cell model are more closed to the test results compared to those based on the Inner-cell model.

  6. Algebraic multigrid preconditioning within parallel finite-element solvers for 3-D electromagnetic modelling problems in geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldan, Jelena; Puzyrev, Vladimir; de la Puente, Josep; Houzeaux, Guillaume; Cela, José María

    2014-06-01

    We present an elaborate preconditioning scheme for Krylov subspace methods which has been developed to improve the performance and reduce the execution time of parallel node-based finite-element (FE) solvers for 3-D electromagnetic (EM) numerical modelling in exploration geophysics. This new preconditioner is based on algebraic multigrid (AMG) that uses different basic relaxation methods, such as Jacobi, symmetric successive over-relaxation (SSOR) and Gauss-Seidel, as smoothers and the wave front algorithm to create groups, which are used for a coarse-level generation. We have implemented and tested this new preconditioner within our parallel nodal FE solver for 3-D forward problems in EM induction geophysics. We have performed series of experiments for several models with different conductivity structures and characteristics to test the performance of our AMG preconditioning technique when combined with biconjugate gradient stabilized method. The results have shown that, the more challenging the problem is in terms of conductivity contrasts, ratio between the sizes of grid elements and/or frequency, the more benefit is obtained by using this preconditioner. Compared to other preconditioning schemes, such as diagonal, SSOR and truncated approximate inverse, the AMG preconditioner greatly improves the convergence of the iterative solver for all tested models. Also, when it comes to cases in which other preconditioners succeed to converge to a desired precision, AMG is able to considerably reduce the total execution time of the forward-problem code-up to an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the tests have confirmed that our AMG scheme ensures grid-independent rate of convergence, as well as improvement in convergence regardless of how big local mesh refinements are. In addition, AMG is designed to be a black-box preconditioner, which makes it easy to use and combine with different iterative methods. Finally, it has proved to be very practical and efficient in the

  7. Simulation of Powder Layer Deposition in Additive Manufacturing Processes Using the Discrete Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Herbold, E. B.; Walton, O.; Homel, M. A.

    2015-10-26

    This document serves as a final report to a small effort where several improvements were added to a LLNL code GEODYN-­L to develop Discrete Element Method (DEM) algorithms coupled to Lagrangian Finite Element (FE) solvers to investigate powder-­bed formation problems for additive manufacturing. The results from these simulations will be assessed for inclusion as the initial conditions for Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) simulations performed with ALE3D. The algorithms were written and performed on parallel computing platforms at LLNL. The total funding level was 3-­4 weeks of an FTE split amongst two staff scientists and one post-­doc. The DEM simulations emulated, as much as was feasible, the physical process of depositing a new layer of powder over a bed of existing powder. The DEM simulations utilized truncated size distributions spanning realistic size ranges with a size distribution profile consistent with realistic sample set. A minimum simulation sample size on the order of 40-­particles square by 10-­particles deep was utilized in these scoping studies in order to evaluate the potential effects of size segregation variation with distance displaced in front of a screed blade. A reasonable method for evaluating the problem was developed and validated. Several simulations were performed to show the viability of the approach. Future investigations will focus on running various simulations investigating powder particle sizing and screen geometries.

  8. An analysis of the mechanical parameters used for finite element compression of a high-resolution 3D breast phantom

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Christina M. L.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Segars, W. Paul; Veress, Alexander I.; Dobbins, James T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The authors previously introduced a methodology to generate a realistic three-dimensional (3D), high-resolution, computer-simulated breast phantom based on empirical data. One of the key components of such a phantom is that it provides a means to produce a realistic simulation of clinical breast compression. In the current study, they have evaluated a finite element (FE) model of compression and have demonstrated the effect of a variety of mechanical properties on the model using a dense mesh generated from empirical breast data. While several groups have demonstrated an effective compression simulation with lower density finite element meshes, the presented study offers a mesh density that is able to model the morphology of the inner breast structures more realistically than lower density meshes. This approach may prove beneficial for multimodality breast imaging research, since it provides a high level of anatomical detail throughout the simulation study. Methods: In this paper, the authors describe methods to improve the high-resolution performance of a FE compression model. In order to create the compressible breast phantom, dedicated breast CT data was segmented and a mesh was generated with 4-noded tetrahedral elements. Using an explicit FE solver to simulate breast compression, several properties were analyzed to evaluate their effect on the compression model including: mesh density, element type, density, and stiffness of various tissue types, friction between the skin and the compression plates, and breast density. Following compression, a simulated projection was generated to demonstrate the ability of the compressible breast phantom to produce realistic simulated mammographic images. Results: Small alterations in the properties of the breast model can change the final distribution of the tissue under compression by more than 1 cm; which ultimately results in different representations of the breast model in the simulated images. The model

  9. 3D Quantification of Wall Shear Stress and Oscillatory Shear Index Using a Finite-Element Method in 3D CINE PC-MRI Data of the Thoracic Aorta.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Julio; Urbina, Jesus; Valverde, Israel; Tejos, Cristian; Irarrazaval, Pablo; Andia, Marcelo E; Uribe, Sergio; Hurtado, Daniel E

    2016-06-01

    Several 2D methods have been proposed to estimate WSS and OSI from PC-MRI, neglecting the longitudinal velocity gradients that typically arise in cardiovascular flow, particularly on vessel geometries whose cross section and centerline orientation strongly vary in the axial direction. Thus, the contribution of longitudinal velocity gradients remains understudied. In this work, we propose a 3D finite-element method for the quantification of WSS and OSI from 3D-CINE PC-MRI that accounts for both in-plane and longitudinal velocity gradients. We demonstrate the convergence and robustness of the method on cylindrical geometries using a synthetic phantom based on the Poiseuille flow equation. We also show that, in the presence of noise, the method is both stable and accurate. Using computational fluid dynamics simulations, we show that the proposed 3D method results in more accurate WSS estimates than those obtained from a 2D analysis not considering out-of-plane velocity gradients. Further, we conclude that for irregular geometries the accurate prediction of WSS requires the consideration of longitudinal gradients in the velocity field. Additionally, we compute 3D maps of WSS and OSI for 3D-CINE PC-MRI data sets from an aortic phantom and sixteen healthy volunteers and two patients. The OSI values show a greater dispersion than WSS, which is strongly dependent on the PC-MRI resolution. We envision that the proposed 3D method will improve the estimation of WSS and OSI from 3D-CINE PC-MRI images, allowing for more accurate estimates in vessels with pathologies that induce high longitudinal velocity gradients, such as coarctations and aneurisms.

  10. An elastic/viscoelastic finite element analysis method for crustal deformation using a 3-D island-scale high-fidelity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichimura, Tsuyoshi; Agata, Ryoichiro; Hori, Takane; Hirahara, Kazuro; Hashimoto, Chihiro; Hori, Muneo; Fukahata, Yukitoshi

    2016-07-01

    As a result of the accumulation of high-resolution observation data, 3-D high-fidelity crustal structure data for large domains are becoming available. However, it has been difficult to use such data to perform elastic/viscoelastic crustal deformation analyses in large domains with quality assurance of the numerical simulation that guarantees convergence of the numerical solution with respect to the discretization size because the costs of analysis are significantly high. This paper proposes a method of constructing a high-fidelity crustal structure finite element (FE) model using high-fidelity crustal structure data and fast FE analysis to reduce the costs of analysis (based on automatic FE model generation for parallel computation, OpenMP/MPI hybrid parallel computation on distributed memory computers, a geometric multigrid, variable preconditioning and multiple precision arithmetic). Using the proposed methods, we construct 10 billion degree-of-freedom high-fidelity crustal structure FE models for the entire Japan, and conduct elastic/viscoelastic crustal deformation analysis using this model with enough high accuracy of the numerical simulation.

  11. Mixed finite element - discontinuous finite volume element discretization of a general class of multicontinuum models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Baier, Ricardo; Lunati, Ivan

    2016-10-01

    We present a novel discretization scheme tailored to a class of multiphase models that regard the physical system as consisting of multiple interacting continua. In the framework of mixture theory, we consider a general mathematical model that entails solving a system of mass and momentum equations for both the mixture and one of the phases. The model results in a strongly coupled and nonlinear system of partial differential equations that are written in terms of phase and mixture (barycentric) velocities, phase pressure, and saturation. We construct an accurate, robust and reliable hybrid method that combines a mixed finite element discretization of the momentum equations with a primal discontinuous finite volume-element discretization of the mass (or transport) equations. The scheme is devised for unstructured meshes and relies on mixed Brezzi-Douglas-Marini approximations of phase and total velocities, on piecewise constant elements for the approximation of phase or total pressures, as well as on a primal formulation that employs discontinuous finite volume elements defined on a dual diamond mesh to approximate scalar fields of interest (such as volume fraction, total density, saturation, etc.). As the discretization scheme is derived for a general formulation of multicontinuum physical systems, it can be readily applied to a large class of simplified multiphase models; on the other, the approach can be seen as a generalization of these models that are commonly encountered in the literature and employed when the latter are not sufficiently accurate. An extensive set of numerical test cases involving two- and three-dimensional porous media are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the method (displaying an optimal convergence rate), the physics-preserving properties of the mixed-primal scheme, as well as the robustness of the method (which is successfully used to simulate diverse physical phenomena such as density fingering, Terzaghi's consolidation

  12. 3D finite element analysis of immediate loading of single wide versus double implants for replacing mandibular molar

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Shrikar R.; Karthikeyan, I.; Gaddale, Reetika

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this finite element study was to compare the stresses, strains, and displacements of double versus single implant in immediate loading for replacing mandibular molar. Materials and Methods: Two 3D FEM (finite element method) models were made to simulate implant designs. The first model used 5-mm-wide diameter implant to support a single molar crown. The second model used 3.75-3.75 double implant design. Anisotropic properties were assigned to bone model. Each model was analyzed with single force magnitude (100 N) in vertical axis. Results: This FEM study suggested that micromotion can be controlled better for double implants compared to single wide-diameter implants. The Von Mises stress for double implant showed 74.44% stress reduction compared to that of 5-mm implant. The Von Mises elastic strain was reduced by 61% for double implant compared to 5-mm implant. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, when the mesiodistal space for artificial tooth is more than 12.5 mm, under immediate loading, the double implant support should be considered. PMID:24554890

  13. A two-scale model for frictional cracks in 3D fractured brittle media with the extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Borja, R. I.

    2009-12-01

    Stress concentration induced by the heterogeneity in brittle geomaterials is generally considered as the driving force in the evolution of the microstructure (such as the crack and pore microstructure). Specifically, modeling heterogeneity is key to properly predicting the nucleation, coalescence and propagation of micro-cracks in brittle solids. In this paper, we propose a two-scale model for frictional cracks in fractured brittle media. The major crack in the study domain is modeled at a macro level, while the micro-cracks are modeled at a finer scale. The macro-scale behavior is described by a standard boundary value problem. The finer-scale problem is modeled using the notion of representative elementary volume (REV) consisting of a solid volume with distributed micro-cracks. Periodic boundary condition and small strain formulation are assumed in the finer-scale analysis. The scale bridging mechanism is borrowed from the standard homogenization technique. The proposed model is implemented with the extended finite element method. The macro stress at each Gauss point in the finite element formulation is computed as the volume average of finer-scale stresses in each corresponding REV. The macro tangent operator is computed using a perturbation method. For 3D problems, six independent linear perturbation analyses are carried out for each numerical integration point. Our numerical examples capture the nucleation and coalescence of micro-cracks, which can be used to infer the potential propagation direction of the major crack.

  14. PDE-based geophysical modelling using finite elements: examples from 3D resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaa, R.; Gross, L.; du Plessis, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present a general finite-element solver, escript, tailored to solve geophysical forward and inverse modeling problems in terms of partial differential equations (PDEs) with suitable boundary conditions. Escript’s abstract interface allows geoscientists to focus on solving the actual problem without being experts in numerical modeling. General-purpose finite element solvers have found wide use especially in engineering fields and find increasing application in the geophysical disciplines as these offer a single interface to tackle different geophysical problems. These solvers are useful for data interpretation and for research, but can also be a useful tool in educational settings. This paper serves as an introduction into PDE-based modeling with escript where we demonstrate in detail how escript is used to solve two different forward modeling problems from applied geophysics (3D DC resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics). Based on these two different cases, other geophysical modeling work can easily be realized. The escript package is implemented as a Python library and allows the solution of coupled, linear or non-linear, time-dependent PDEs. Parallel execution for both shared and distributed memory architectures is supported and can be used without modifications to the scripts.

  15. The effect of thread design on stress distribution in a solid screw implant: a 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Eraslan, Oğuz; Inan, Ozgür

    2010-08-01

    The biomechanical behavior of implant thread plays an important role on stresses at implant-bone interface. Information about the effect of different thread profiles upon the bone stresses is limited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of different implant thread designs on stress distribution characteristics at supporting structures. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) stress-analysis method was used. Four types of 3D mathematical models simulating four different thread-form configurations for a solid screw implant was prepared with supporting bone structure. V-thread (1), buttress (2), reverse buttress (3), and square thread designs were simulated. A 100-N static axial occlusal load was applied to occlusal surface of abutment to calculate the stress distributions. Solidworks/Cosmosworks structural analysis programs were used for FE modeling/analysis. The analysis of the von Mises stress values revealed that maximum stress concentrations were located at loading areas of implant abutments and cervical cortical bone regions for all models. Stress concentration at cortical bone (18.3 MPa) was higher than spongious bone (13.3 MPa), and concentration of first thread (18 MPa) was higher than other threads (13.3 MPa). It was seen that, while the von Mises stress distribution patterns at different implant thread models were similar, the concentration of compressive stresses were different. The present study showed that the use of different thread form designs did not affect the von Mises concentration at supporting bone structure. However, the compressive stress concentrations differ by various thread profiles.

  16. 2D resistivity inversion using conjugate gradients for a finite element discretization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolozo, C. A.; Santos, F. M.; Porsani, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    In this work we present a DC 2D inversion algorithm using conjugate gradients relaxation to solve the maximum likelihood inverse equations. We apply, according to Zhang (1995), the maximum likelihood inverse theory developed by Tarantola and Valette (1982) to our 2D resistivity inversion. This algorithm was chosen to this research because it doesn't need to calculate the field's derivatives. Since conjugate gradient techniques only need the results of the sensitivity matrix à or its transpose ÃT multiplying a vector, the actual computation of the sensitivity matrix are not performed, according to the methodology described in Zhang (1995). In Zhang (1995), the terms Ãx and ÃTy, are dependent of the stiffness matrix K and its partial derivative ∂K⁄∂ρ. The inversion methodology described in Zhang (1995) is for the case of 3D electrical resistivity by finite differences discretization. So it was necessary to make a series of adjustments to obtain a satisfactory result for 2D electrical inversion using finite element method. The difference between the modeling of 3D resistivity with finite difference and the 2D finite element method are in the integration variable, used in the 2D case. In the 2D case the electrical potential are initially calculated in the transformed domain, including the stiffness matrix, and only in the end is transformed in Cartesian domain. In the case of 3D, described by Zhang (1995) this is done differently, the calculation is done directly in the Cartesian domain. In the literature was not found any work describing how to deal with this problem. Because the calculations of Ãx and ÃTy must be done without having the real stiffness matrix, the adaptation consist in calculate the stiffness matrix and its partial derivative using a set of integration variables. We transform those matrix in the same form has in the potential case, but with different sets of variables. The results will be presented and are very promising.

  17. A discrete element modelling approach for block impacts on trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toe, David; Bourrier, Franck; Olmedo, Ignatio; Berger, Frederic

    2015-04-01

    These past few year rockfall models explicitly accounting for block shape, especially those using the Discrete Element Method (DEM), have shown a good ability to predict rockfall trajectories. Integrating forest effects into those models still remain challenging. This study aims at using a DEM approach to model impacts of blocks on trees and identify the key parameters controlling the block kinematics after the impact on a tree. A DEM impact model of a block on a tree was developed and validated using laboratory experiments. Then, key parameters were assessed using a global sensitivity analyse. Modelling the impact of a block on a tree using DEM allows taking into account large displacements, material non-linearities and contacts between the block and the tree. Tree stems are represented by flexible cylinders model as plastic beams sustaining normal, shearing, bending, and twisting loading. Root soil interactions are modelled using a rotation stiffness acting on the bending moment at the bottom of the tree and a limit bending moment to account for tree overturning. The crown is taken into account using an additional mass distribute uniformly on the upper part of the tree. The block is represented by a sphere. The contact model between the block and the stem consists of an elastic frictional model. The DEM model was validated using laboratory impact tests carried out on 41 fresh beech (Fagus Sylvatica) stems. Each stem was 1,3 m long with a diameter between 3 to 7 cm. Wood stems were clamped on a rigid structure and impacted by a 149 kg charpy pendulum. Finally an intensive simulation campaign of blocks impacting trees was done to identify the input parameters controlling the block kinematics after the impact on a tree. 20 input parameters were considered in the DEM simulation model : 12 parameters were related to the tree and 8 parameters to the block. The results highlight that the impact velocity, the stem diameter, and the block volume are the three input

  18. 3-D imaging using row-column-addressed arrays with integrated apodization - part i: apodization design and line element beamforming.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Thomsen, Erik Vilain; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2015-05-01

    This paper investigates the effect of transducerintegrated apodization in row-column-addressed arrays and presents a beamforming approach specific for such arrays. Row-column addressing 2-D arrays greatly reduces the number of active channels needed to acquire a 3-D volume. A disadvantage of row-column-addressed arrays is an apparent ghost effect in the point spread function caused by edge waves. This paper investigates the origin of the edge waves and the effect of introducing an integrated apodization to reduce the ghost echoes. The performance of a λ/2-pitch 5-MHz 128 + 128 row-column-addressed array with different apodizations is simulated. A Hann apodization is shown to decrease imaging performance away from the center axis of the array because of a decrease in main lobe amplitude. Instead, a static roll-off apodization region located at the ends of the line elements is proposed. In simulations, the peak ghost echo intensity of a scatterer at (x,y, z) = (8, 3, 30) mm was decreased by 43 dB by integrating roll-off apodization into the array. The main lobe was unaffected by the apodization. Simulations of a 3-mm-diameter anechoic blood vessel at 30 mm depth showed that applying the transducer-integrated apodization increased the apparent diameter of the vessel from 2.0 mm to 2.4 mm, corresponding to an increase from 67% to 80% of the true vessel diameter. The line element beamforming approach is shown to be essential for achieving correct time-of-flight calculations, and hence avoid geometrical distortions. In Part II of this work, experimental results from a capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer with integrated roll-off apodization are given to validate the effect of integrating apodization into the line elements. PMID:25974918

  19. Encapsulated discrete octameric water cluster, 1D water tape, and 3D water aggregate network in diverse MOFs based on bisimidazolium ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ruo-Bing; Pi, Min; Jiang, Shuang-Shuang; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Jin, Chuan-Ming

    2014-08-01

    Four new metal-organic frameworks, [Zn(2-mBIM)2(SO3CF3)2·(H2O)4] (1), [Zn(BMIE)(1,4-BDC)]·(H2O)3 (2), [Cd(BIM)2(OH)(H2O)2(PF6)]·(H2O)4 (3), and [Cd(PA-BIM)2 (ClO4)2]·11.33H2O (4) (2-mBIM = bis(2-methylimidazol-1-yl)methane, BMIE = 1,2-bis[1-(2-methylimidazole)-diethoxy]ethane, BIM = bis(imidazol-1-yl)methane, and PA-BIM = 1,1-bis [(2-phenylazo)imidazol-1-yl]methane) have been prepared and structurally characterized. Complex 1 exhibits an infinite 1D cationic beaded-chain structure, which encapsulated discrete octameric water clusters that are comprised of a chair-like hexameric water cluster with two extra water molecules dangling on two diagonal vertices of the chair. Complex 2 forms a 1D infinite zigzag metal-organic chain structure with a 1D T4(0)A(4) water tape. Complexes 3 show a 2D grid-like sheet structure with the 1D water tape T4(0)A(0)2(0) motif. Complex 4 is a porous 3D MOF with tetrahedron-coordinated Cd(II) centers and trans-conformation PA-BIM ligands. These holes are occupied by a fascinating three-dimensional water clathrate network, which consists of cage-shaped structural tetradecameric water cluster (H2O)14 units and six independent bridged water molecules. The results suggest that the bisimidazolium ligands and anions play crucial roles in the formation of the different host structures and different guest water aggregations. Additionally, the thermal stabilities and photoluminescence spectra of the complexes have been discussed.

  20. The Distributed Lambda (?) Model (DLM): A 3-D, Finite-Element Muscle Model Based on Feldman's ? Model; Assessment of Orofacial Gestures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazari, Mohammad Ali; Perrier, Pascal; Payan, Yohan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors aimed to design a distributed lambda model (DLM), which is well adapted to implement three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element descriptions of muscles. Method: A muscle element model was designed. Its stress-strain relationships included the active force-length characteristics of the ? model along the muscle fibers, together…

  1. DYNA3D: A nonlinear, explicit, three-dimensional finite element code for solid and structural mechanics, User manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.; Engelmann, B.E.

    1993-11-01

    This report is the User Manual for the 1993 version of DYNA3D, and also serves as a User Guide. DYNA3D is a nonlinear, explicit, finite element code for analyzing the transient dynamic response of three-dimensional solids and structures. The code is fully vectorized and is available on several computer platforms. DYNA3D includes solid, shell, beam, and truss elements to allow maximum flexibility in modeling physical problems. Many material models are available to represent a wide range of material behavior, including elasticity, plasticity, composites, thermal effects, and rate dependence. In addition, DYNA3D has a sophisticated contact interface capability, including frictional sliding and single surface contact. Rigid materials provide added modeling flexibility. A material model driver with interactive graphics display is incorporated into DYNA3D to permit accurate modeling of complex material response based on experimental data. Along with the DYNA3D Example Problem Manual, this document provides the information necessary to apply DYNA3D to solve a wide range of engineering analysis problems.

  2. Object-oriented philosophy in designing adaptive finite-element package for 3D elliptic deferential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhengyong, R.; Jingtian, T.; Changsheng, L.; Xiao, X.

    2007-12-01

    Although adaptive finite-element (AFE) analysis is becoming more and more focused in scientific and engineering fields, its efficient implementations are remain to be a discussed problem as its more complex procedures. In this paper, we propose a clear C++ framework implementation to show the powerful properties of Object-oriented philosophy (OOP) in designing such complex adaptive procedure. In terms of the modal functions of OOP language, the whole adaptive system is divided into several separate parts such as the mesh generation or refinement, a-posterior error estimator, adaptive strategy and the final post processing. After proper designs are locally performed on these separate modals, a connected framework of adaptive procedure is formed finally. Based on the general elliptic deferential equation, little efforts should be added in the adaptive framework to do practical simulations. To show the preferable properties of OOP adaptive designing, two numerical examples are tested. The first one is the 3D direct current resistivity problem in which the powerful framework is efficiently shown as only little divisions are added. And then, in the second induced polarization£¨IP£©exploration case, new adaptive procedure is easily added which adequately shows the strong extendibility and re-usage of OOP language. Finally we believe based on the modal framework adaptive implementation by OOP methodology, more advanced adaptive analysis system will be available in future.

  3. Finite element simulation and analytical modeling of 3D multi scale diffusion in nanocomposites with permeable stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, A.; Maffezzoli, A.

    2016-01-01

    This work is aimed to study the mass transport in 3D nanocomposites, characterized by the presence of permeable lamellar stacks, by means of finite element (FE) analysis. To this purpose, a geometric model was developed, based on a random distribution of non-interpenetrating stacks, each one made of regularly spaced platelets, which are considered representative of an intercalated nanocomposite. The morphological features of the stacks are the number of lamellae and the thickness of lamellar galleries, which determine the thickness, and therefore the aspect ratio. FE simulation results showed the relevance of diffusion within stack, and therefore the unsuitableness of the assumption of stack impermeability. The diffusion behavior of nanocomposites made of permeable stacks was modeled by considering the probability of collision of diffusing particles on the stack surface. For a random orientation of stacks, the developed analytical model showed an excellent agreement with the FE simulation results. It was shown that other analytical models found in literature are not able to capture the dependence of diffusivity on the morphology of intercalated nanocomposites. The developed analytical model allowed estimating the error arising from the assumption of impermeable stacks in the estimation of nanofiller aspect ratio from experimental diffusivity data.

  4. 3D modeling of the total electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation using the boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, F. S.; Lancaster, J. L.; Fox, P. T.

    2009-06-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) delivers highly localized brain stimulations via non-invasive externally applied magnetic fields. This non-invasive, painless technique provides researchers and clinicians with a unique tool capable of stimulating both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However, a complete analysis of the macroscopic electric fields produced by TMS has not yet been performed. In this paper, we addressed the importance of the secondary E-field created by surface charge accumulation during TMS using the boundary element method (BEM). 3D models were developed using simple head geometries in order to test the model and compare it with measured values. The effects of tissue geometry, size and conductivity were also investigated. Finally, a realistically shaped head model was used to assess the effect of multiple surfaces on the total E-field. Secondary E-fields have the greatest impact at areas in close proximity to each tissue layer. Throughout the head, the secondary E-field magnitudes typically range from 20% to 35% of the primary E-field's magnitude. The direction of the secondary E-field was generally in opposition to the primary E-field; however, for some locations, this was not the case (i.e. going from high to low conductivity tissues). These findings show that realistically shaped head geometries are important for accurate modeling of the total E-field.

  5. 3D finite element and experimental study of the size requirements for measuring toughness on tempered martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, P.; Spätig, P.

    2009-06-01

    The fracture properties of the tempered martensitic steel Eurofer97, which is among the main candidates for fusion power plant structural applications, were studied with two sizes of pre-cracked compact specimens (0.35T C(T) and 0.87T C(T)). The fracture toughness behavior was characterized within the temperature range -80 to -40 °C. The ductile-to-brittle transition reference temperature, as defined in the ASTM standard E1921, was around T0 ≈ -75 °C. At -60 °C, it was found that two sets of toughness data obtained with 0.35T and 0.87T C(T) specimens are not consistent with the size adjustments recommended in the ASTM standard. It was then shown that the underlying reason of this inconsistency is an inappropriate specimen size limit of the ASTM standard for this type of steel. From published fracture toughness data on the tempered martensitic steel F82H steel, similar results were also highlighted. 3D finite elements simulations of the compact specimens were performed to compare the stresses and deformations at the onset of fracture. A local approach model based on the attainment of a critical stress and a critical volume was used to study the constraint loss phenomenon. Within the framework of this model, the strong toughness increase by reducing the specimen size could be satisfactorily explained.

  6. Examination of Buoyancy-Reduction Effect in Induction-Heating Cookers by Using 3D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonetsu, Daigo; Tanaka, Kazufumi; Hara, Takehisa

    In recent years, induction-heating (IH) cookers that can be used to heat nonmagnetic metals such as aluminum have been produced. Occasionally, a light pan moves on a glass plate due to buoyancy when heated by an IH cooker. In some IH cookers, an aluminum plate is mounted between the glass plate and the coil in order to reduce the buoyancy effect. The objective of this research is to evaluate the buoyancy-reduction effect and the heating effect of buoyancy-reduction plates. Eddy current analysis is carried out by 3D finite element method, and the electromagnetic force and the heat distribution on the heating plate are calculated. After this calculation is performed, the temperature distribution of the heating plate is calculated by heat transfer analysis. It is found that the shape, area, and the position of the buoyancy reduction plate strongly affect the buoyancy and the heat distribution. The impact of the shape, area, and position of the buoyancy reduction plate was quantified. The phenomena in the heating were elucidated qualitatively.

  7. 3D finite element analysis of a metallic sphere scatterer comparison of first and second order vector absorbing boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanellopoulos, V. N.; Webb, J. P.

    1993-03-01

    A 3D vector analysis of plane wave scattering by a metallic sphere using finite elements and Absorbing Boundary Conditions (ABCs) is presented. The ABCs are applied on the outer surface that truncates the infinitely extending domain. Mixed order curvilinear covariantprojection elements are used to avoid spurious corruptions. The second order ABC is superior to the first at no extra computational cost. The errors due to incomplete absorption decrease as the outer surface is moved further away from the scatterer. An error of about 1% in near-field values was obtained with the second order ABC, when the outer surface was less than half a wavelength from the scatterer. Une analyse tridimensionnelle vectorielle de la diffusion d'onde plane sur une sphère métallique utilisant des éléments finis et des Conditions aux Limites Absorbantes (CLA) est présentée. Les CLA sont appliquées sur la surface exteme tronquant le domaine s'étendant à l'infini. Des éléments curvilignes mixtes utilisant des projections covariantes sont utilisés pour éviter des solutions parasites. La CLA de second ordre est supérieure à celle de premier ordre sans effort de calcul additionnel. Les erreurs dues à l'absorption incomplète décroissent à mesure que l'on déplace la surface externe à une distance croissante du diffuseur. Un taux d'erreur d'environ 1 % dans les valeurs du champ proche a été obtenu avec les CLA de second ordre lorsque la surface externe était placée à une distance inférieure à une demi-longueur de la source de diffusion.

  8. Mechanism of formation of wiggly compaction bands in porous sandstone: 2. Numerical simulation using discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun; Pollard, David D.; Gu, Kai; Shi, Bin

    2015-12-01

    Wiggly compaction bands in porous aeolian sandstone vary from chevron shape to wavy shape to nearly straight. In some outcrops these variations occur along a single band. A bonded close-packed discrete element model is used to investigate what mechanical properties control the formation of wiggly compaction bands (CBs). To simulate the volumetric yielding failure of porous sandstone, a discrete element shrinks when the force state of one of its bonds reaches the yielding cap defined by the failure force and the aspect ratio (k) of the yielding ellipse. A Matlab code "MatDEM3D" has been developed on the basis of this enhanced discrete element method. Mechanical parameters of elements are chosen according to the elastic properties and the strengths of porous sandstone. In numerical simulations, the failure angle between the band segment and maximum principle stress decreases from 90° to approximately 45° as k increases from 0.5 to 2, and compaction bands vary from straight to chevron shape. With increasing strain, subsequent compaction occurs inside or beside compacted elements, which leads to further compaction and thickening of bands. The simulations indicate that a greater yielding stress promotes chevron CBs, and a greater cement strength promotes straight CBs. Combined with the microscopic analysis introduced in the companion paper, we conclude that the shape of wiggly CBs is controlled by the mechanical properties of sandstone, including the aspect ratio of the yielding ellipse, the critical yielding stress, and the cement strength, which are determined primarily by petrophysical attributes, e.g., grain sorting, porosity, and cementation.

  9. A Piecewise Bi-Linear Discontinuous Finite Element Spatial Discretization of the Sn Transport Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T S; Chang, J H; Warsa, J S; Adams, M L

    2010-12-22

    We present a new spatial discretization of the discrete-ordinates transport equation in two-dimensional Cartesian (X-Y) geometry for arbitrary polygonal meshes. The discretization is a discontinuous finite element method (DFEM) that utilizes piecewise bi-linear (PWBL) basis functions, which are formally introduced in this paper. We also present a series of numerical results on quadrilateral and polygonal grids and compare these results to a variety of other spatial discretizations that have been shown to be successful on these grid types. Finally, we note that the properties of the PWBL basis functions are such that the leading-order piecewise bi-linear discontinuous finite element (PWBLD) solution will satisfy a reasonably accurate diffusion discretization in the thick diffusion limit, making the PWBLD method a viable candidate for many different classes of transport problems.

  10. Rn3D: A finite element code for simulating gas flow and radon transport in variably saturated, nonisothermal porous media. User`s manual, Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Holford, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a user`s manual for the Rn3D finite element code. Rn3D was developed to simulate gas flow and radon transport in variably saturated, nonisothermal porous media. The Rn3D model is applicable to a wide range of problems involving radon transport in soil because it can simulate either steady-state or transient flow and transport in one-, two- or three-dimensions (including radially symmetric two-dimensional problems). The porous materials may be heterogeneous and anisotropic. This manual describes all pertinent mathematics related to the governing, boundary, and constitutive equations of the model, as well as the development of the finite element equations used in the code. Instructions are given for constructing Rn3D input files and executing the code, as well as a description of all output files generated by the code. Five verification problems are given that test various aspects of code operation, complete with example input files, FORTRAN programs for the respective analytical solutions, and plots of model results. An example simulation is presented to illustrate the type of problem Rn3D is designed to solve. Finally, instructions are given on how to convert Rn3D to simulate systems other than radon, air, and water.

  11. 3-D UNSTRUCTURED HEXAHEDRAL-MESH Sn TRANSPORT METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    J. MOREL; J. MCGHEE; ET AL

    2000-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). We have developed a method for solving the neutral-particle transport equation on 3-D unstructured hexahedral meshes using a S{sub n} discretization in angle in conjunction with a discontinuous finite-element discretization in space and a multigroup discretization in energy. Previous methods for solving this equation in 3-D have been limited to rectangular meshes. The unstructured-mesh method that we have developed is far more efficient for solving problems with complex 3-D geometric features than rectangular-mesh methods. In spite of having to make several compromises in our spatial discretization technique and our iterative solution technique, our method has been found to be both accurate and efficient for a broad class of problems.

  12. 3D Finite Element Modelling for the investigation of the cavity effect in extensometric rock-deformation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kis, M.; Detzky, G.; Koppán, A.

    2012-04-01

    phenomenon in general. Authors calculated the deformations of a simple-geometry 3D cavity, which is caused by variable gravity loads. Dependence of the cavity effect on changing of distinct elastic properties in categorized models has been investigated. Authors introduced qualifying parameter fields calculated using the results of the FE modelling (nodal displacements as a model answer for the gravity load), in order to characterize the effect. Modelling results can be used as an estimation not only for the absolute cavity effect rate of the intended arrangement, furthermore the sensitivity of the given system against a particular geometric property. As an application example finite element modelling were carried out in order to estimate the influence of the complicated cavity system surrounding the "Budapest-Matyashegy" Gravity and Geodynamical Observatory of the Eotvos Lorand Geophysical Institute of Hungary.

  13. Normal fault growth above pre-existing structures: insights from discrete element modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrona, Thilo; Finch, Emma; Bell, Rebecca; Jackson, Christopher; Gawthorpe, Robert; Phillips, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In extensional systems, pre-existing structures such as shear zones may affect the growth, geometry and location of normal faults. Recent seismic reflection-based observations from the North Sea suggest that shear zones not only localise deformation in the host rock, but also in the overlying sedimentary succession. While pre-existing weaknesses are known to localise deformation in the host rock, their effect on deformation in the overlying succession is less well understood. Here, we use 3-D discrete element modelling to determine if and how kilometre-scale shear zones affect normal fault growth in the overlying succession. Discrete element models use a large number of interacting particles to describe the dynamic evolution of complex systems. The technique has therefore been applied to describe fault and fracture growth in a variety of geological settings. We model normal faulting by extending a 60×60×30 km crustal rift-basin model including brittle and ductile interactions and gravitation and isostatic forces by 30%. An inclined plane of weakness which represents a pre-existing shear zone is introduced in the lower section of the upper brittle layer at the start of the experiment. The length, width, orientation and dip of the weak zone are systematically varied between experiments to test how these parameters control the geometric and kinematic development of overlying normal fault systems. Consistent with our seismic reflection-based observations, our results show that strain is indeed localised in and above these weak zones. In the lower brittle layer, normal faults nucleate, as expected, within the zone of weakness and control the initiation and propagation of neighbouring faults. Above this, normal faults nucleate throughout the overlying strata where their orientations are strongly influenced by the underlying zone of weakness. These results challenge the notion that overburden normal faults simply form due to reactivation and upwards propagation of pre

  14. A 3-D finite-element computation of eddy currents and losses in laminated iron cores allowing for electric and magnetic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, V.C.; Meunier, G.; Foggia, A.

    1995-05-01

    A 3-D scheme based on the Finite Element Method, which takes electric and magnetic anisotropy into consideration, has been developed for computing eddy-current losses caused by stray magnetic fields in laminated iron cores of large transformers and generators. The model is applied to some laminated iron-core samples and compared with equivalent solid-iron cases.

  15. Application of Plenoptic PIV for 3D Velocity Measurements Over Roughness Elements in a Refractive Index Matched Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurow, Brian; Johnson, Kyle; Kim, Taehoon; Blois, Gianluca; Best, Jim; Christensen, Ken

    2014-11-01

    The application of Plenoptic PIV in a Refractive Index Matched (RIM) facility housed at Illinois is presented. Plenoptic PIV is an emerging 3D diagnostic that exploits the light-field imaging capabilities of a plenoptic camera. Plenoptic cameras utilize a microlens array to measure the position and angle of light rays captured by the camera. 3D/3C velocity fields are determined through application of the MART algorithm for volume reconstruction and a conventional 3D cross-correlation PIV algorithm. The RIM facility is a recirculating tunnel with a 62.5% aqueous solution of sodium iodide used as the working fluid. Its resulting index of 1.49 is equal to that of acrylic. Plenoptic PIV was used to measure the 3D velocity field of a turbulent boundary layer flow over a smooth wall, a single wall-mounted hemisphere and a full array of hemispheres (i.e. a rough wall) with a k/ δ ~ 4.6. Preliminary time averaged and instantaneous 3D velocity fields will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1235726.

  16. Electronic structure of oxide, peroxide, and superoxide clusters of the 3d elements: A comparative density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunova, Ellie L.; Mikosch, Hans; Nikolov, Georgi St.

    2008-03-01

    The 3d-element transition metal dioxide MO2, peroxide M(O2), and superoxide MOO clusters (M=Sc-Zn), are studied by density functional theory with the B1LYP functional. The reliability of the methods and basis sets employed was tested by a reinvestigation of the monoxides, for which a database of experimental data is available. The global minima on the M+O2 potential energy surfaces correspond to dioxide structure, the only exception being CuOO, with a superoxide structure. All Zn dioxygen clusters are thermodynamically unstable-their ground states lie higher than the dissociation limit to Zn+O2. Our calculations are in favor of the high-spin configurations for the FeO2, CoO2, and NiO2 ground states, which are still a subject of extensive theoretical and experimental studies. These assignments are confirmed by the coupled-cluster method, CCSD(T), except for NiO2. Based on the existence of a stable NiO2 monoanion in a 4B1 state, however, it can be concluded that NiO2 in its 5A1 state should also be stable. The vibrational frequencies are calculated for clusters entrapped in the cubic cell of solid Ar matrix and compared with those obtained for gas-phase clusters. The matrix has no influence on the vibrations of the monoxides and most of the dioxides; however, Co and Ni-dioxoclusters interact strongly with the atoms from the noble gas matrix. The most intense frequencies in the IR spectra are shifted to lower energies and the ordering of the low-lying electronic states by stability is also reversed. According to the electrostatic potential maps, the oxygen atoms in the peroxides are more nucleophilic than those in the dioxides and superoxides. The terminal oxygen atom in superoxides is more nucleophilic than its M-bonded oxygen atom, though charge distribution analysis predicts a smaller negative charge on the terminal oxygen. TiO2 is the only dioxide in which nucleophilic character in the vicinity of the metal cation is induced.

  17. Multi-scale simulation method with coupled finite/discrete element model and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiwu; Liu, Zhenyu; Tan, Jianrong; Qiu, Chan; Chen, Fengbei

    2013-07-01

    The existing research on continuous structure is usually analyzed with finite element method (FEM) and granular medium with discrete element method (DEM), but there are few researches on the coupling interaction between continuous structure and discrete medium. To the issue of this coupling interaction, a multi-scale simulation method with coupled finite/discrete element model is put forward, in their respective domains of discrete and finite elements, the nodes follow force law and motion law of their own method, and on the their interaction interface, the touch type between discrete and finite elements is distinguished as two types: full touch and partial touch, the interaction force between them is calculated with linear elastic model. For full touch, the contact force is proportional to the overlap distance between discrete element and finite element patch. For partial touch, first the finite element patch is extended on all sides indefinitely to be a complete plane, the full contact force can be obtained with the touch type between discrete element and plane being viewed as full touch, then the full overlap area between them and the actual overlap area between discrete element and finite element patch are computed, the actual contact force is obtained by scaling the full contact force with a factor η which is determined by the ratio of the actual overlap area to the full overlap area. The contact force is equivalent to the finite element nodes and the force and displacement on the nodes can be computed, so the ideal simulation results can be got. This method has been used to simulate the cutter disk of the earth pressure balance shield machine (EPBSM) made in North Heavy Industry (NHI) with its excavation diameter of 6.28 m cutting and digging the sandy clay layer. The simulation results show that as the gradual increase of excavating depth of the cutter head, the maximum stress occurs at the roots of cutters on the cutter head, while for the soil, the

  18. A simple discrete-element-model of Brazilian test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sumanta; Stroisz, Anna; Pradhan, Srutarshi

    2016-05-01

    We present a statistical model which is able to capture some interesting features exhibited in the Brazilian test of rock samples. The model is based on elements which break irreversibly when the force experienced by the elements exceed their own load capacity. If an element breaks the load capacity of the neighboring elements are decreased by a certain amount, assuming weakening effect around the defected zone. From the model we numerically investigate the stress-strain behavior, the strength of the system, how it scales with the system size and also its fluctuation for both uniform and Weibull distribution of breaking thresholds in the system. To check the validity of our statistical model we perform few Brazilian tests on Sandstone and Chalk samples. The stress-strain curve from model results agree qualitatively well with the lab-test data. Also, the damage profile right at the point when the stress-strain curve reaches its maximum is seen to mimic the crack patterns observed in our Brazilian test experiments.

  19. 3-D and quasi-2-D discrete element modeling of grain commingling in a bucket elevator boot system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unwanted grain commingling impedes new quality-based grain handling systems and has proven to be an expensive and time consuming issue to study experimentally. Experimentally validated models may reduce the time and expense of studying grain commingling while providing additional insight into detail...

  20. Partition of the contact force network obtained in discrete element simulations of element tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xin; O'Sullivan, Catherine; Hanley, Kevin J.; Kwok, Chung-Yee

    2016-01-01

    The transmission of stress within a granular material composed of rigid spheres is explored using the discrete element method. The contribution of contacts to both deviatoric stress and structural anisotropy is investigated. The influences of five factors are considered: inter-particle friction coefficient, loading regime, packing density, contact model, and boundary conditions. The data generated indicate that using the above-average normal contact force criterion to decompose the contact force network into two subsets with distinct contributions to stress transmission and structural anisotropy is not robust. The characteristic normal contact forces marking the transition from negative to positive contribution to the overall deviatoric stress and structural anisotropy are not unique values but vary during shearing. Once the critical state is attained (i.e., once shearing continues at a constant deviator stress and solid fraction), the characteristic normal contact force remains approximately constant and this critical state characteristic normal force is observed to decrease with increasing inter-particle friction. The characteristic normal contact force considering the contribution to deviatoric stress has a power-law relationship with the mean effective stress at the critical state.

  1. Stress Analysis of a Class II MO-Restored Tooth Using a 3D CT-Based Finite Element Model

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yiu Pong; Tang, Chak Yin; Gao, Bo

    2012-01-01

    A computational method has been developed for stress analysis of a restored tooth so that experimental effort can be minimized. The objectives of this study include (i) developing a method to create a 3D FE assembly model for a restored tooth based on CT images and (ii) conducting stress analysis of the restored tooth using the 3D FE model established. To build up a solid computational model of a tooth, a method has been proposed to construct a 3D model from 2D CT-scanned images. Facilitated with CAD tools, the 3D tooth model has been virtually incorporated with a Class II MO restoration. The tooth model is triphasic, including the enamel, dentin, and pulp phases. To mimic the natural constraint on the movement of the tooth model, its corresponding mandible model has also been generated. The relative high maximum principal stress values were computed at the surface under loading and in the marginal region of the interface between the restoration and the tooth phases. PMID:22844287

  2. Analytical finite element matrix elements and global matrix assembly for hierarchical 3-D vector basis functions within the hybrid finite element boundary integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Wang, K.; Li, H.; Eibert, T. F.

    2014-11-01

    A hybrid higher-order finite element boundary integral (FE-BI) technique is discussed where the higher-order FE matrix elements are computed by a fully analytical procedure and where the gobal matrix assembly is organized by a self-identifying procedure of the local to global transformation. This assembly procedure applys to both, the FE part as well as the BI part of the algorithm. The geometry is meshed into three-dimensional tetrahedra as finite elements and nearly orthogonal hierarchical basis functions are employed. The boundary conditions are implemented in a strong sense such that the boundary values of the volume basis functions are directly utilized within the BI, either for the tangential electric and magnetic fields or for the asssociated equivalent surface current densities by applying a cross product with the unit surface normals. The self-identified method for the global matrix assembly automatically discerns the global order of the basis functions for generating the matrix elements. Higher order basis functions do need more unknowns for each single FE, however, fewer FEs are needed to achieve the same satisfiable accuracy. This improvement provides a lot more flexibility for meshing and allows the mesh size to raise up to λ/3. The performance of the implemented system is evaluated in terms of computation time, accuracy and memory occupation, where excellent results with respect to precision and computation times of large scale simulations are found.

  3. Discrete element thermomechanical modelling of rock cutting with valuation of tool wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojek, Jerzy

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents a thermomechanical discrete element model of rock cutting process. The thermomechanical formulation of the discrete element method considers mechanical and thermal phenomena and their reciprocal influence. The thermal model developed for transient heat conduction problems takes into account conductive heat transfer at the contact between particles and convection on the free surface. The thermal and mechanical problems are coupled by consideration of: (1) heat generated due to friction which is calculated in the mechanical problem and passed to the thermal solution, (2) influence of thermal expansion on mechanical interaction between particles. Estimation of temperature dependent wear has been included into the contact model. The coupled problem is solved using the staggered scheme.The thermomechanical algorithm has been implemented in a discrete element program and applied to simulation of rock cutting with single pick of a dredge cutter head. Numerical results confirm good performance of the developed algorithm.

  4. Discrete-Roughness-Element-Enhanced Swept-Wing Natural Laminar Flow at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, Mujeeb; Liao, Wei; Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear parabolized stability equations and secondary-instability analyses are used to provide a computational assessment of the potential use of the discrete-roughness-element technology for extending swept-wing natural laminar flow at chord Reynolds numbers relevant to transport aircraft. Computations performed for the boundary layer on a natural-laminar-flow airfoil with a leading-edge sweep angle of 34.6 deg, freestream Mach number of 0.75, and chord Reynolds numbers of 17 × 10(exp 6), 24 × 10(exp 6), and 30 × 10(exp 6) suggest that discrete roughness elements could delay laminar-turbulent transition by about 20% when transition is caused by stationary crossflow disturbances. Computations show that the introduction of small-wavelength stationary crossflow disturbances (i.e., discrete roughness element) also suppresses the growth of most amplified traveling crossflow disturbances.

  5. FEMFLOW3D; a finite-element program for the simulation of three-dimensional aquifers; version 1.0

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durbin, Timothy J.; Bond, Linda D.

    1998-01-01

    This document also includes model validation, source code, and example input and output files. Model validation was performed using four test problems. For each test problem, the results of a model simulation with FEMFLOW3D were compared with either an analytic solution or the results of an independent numerical approach. The source code, written in the ANSI x3.9-1978 FORTRAN standard, and the complete input and output of an example problem are listed in the appendixes.

  6. Level set discrete element method for three-dimensional computations with triaxial case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Reid; Andò, Edward; Viggiani, Gioacchino; Andrade, José E.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we outline the level set discrete element method (LS-DEM) which is a discrete element method variant able to simulate systems of particles with arbitrary shape using level set functions as a geometric basis. This unique formulation allows seamless interfacing with level set-based characterization methods as well as computational ease in contact calculations. We then apply LS-DEM to simulate two virtual triaxial specimens generated from XRCT images of experiments and demonstrate LS-DEM's ability to quantitatively capture and predict stress-strain and volume-strain behavior observed in the experiments.

  7. Siku: A Sea Ice Discrete Element Method Model on a Spherical Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulchitsky, A. V.; Hutchings, J. K.; Johnson, J.

    2014-12-01

    Offshore oil and gas exploration and production activities in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas can be significantly and adversely affected by sea ice. In the event of an oil spill, sea ice complicates the tracking of ice/oil trajectories and can hinder cleanup operations. There is a need for a sea ice dynamics model that can accurately simulate ice pack deformation and failure to improve the ability to track ice/oil trajectories and support oil response operations. A discrete element method (DEM) model, where each ice floe is represented by discrete elements that are initially bonded (frozen) together will be used to address the difficulty continuum modeling approaches have with representing discrete phenomena in sea ice, such as the formation of leads and ridges. Each discrete element in the DEM is a rigid body driven by environmental forcing (wind, current and Coriolis forces) and interaction forces with other discrete elements (compression, shear, tension, bond rupture and regrowth). We introduce a new DEM model ``Siku'', currently under development, to simulate ice drift of an ice floe on a spherical Earth. We will present initial free-drift results. Siku is focused on improving sea ice interaction mechanics and providing an accurate geometrical representation needed for basin scale and regional simulations. Upon completion, Siku will be an open source GNU GPL licensed user friendly program with embedded python capability for setting up simulations "scenarios" and coupling with other models to provide forcing fields. We use a unique quaternion representation for position and orientation of polygon sea-ice elements that use a second order integration scheme of sea-ice element motion on the Earth's sphere that does not depend on the location of the element and, hence, avoids numerical problems near the pole.

  8. Towards an integrated numerical simulator for crack-seal vein microstructure: Coupling phase-field with the Discrete Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgo, Simon; Ankit, Kumar; Nestler, Britta; Urai, Janos L.

    2016-04-01

    Crack-seal veins form in a complex interplay of coupled thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical processes. Their formation and cyclic growth involves brittle fracturing and dilatancy, phases of increased fluid flow and the growth of crystals that fill the voids and reestablish the mechanical strength. Existing numerical models of vein formation focus on selected aspects of the coupled process. Until today, no model exists that is able to use a realistic representation of the fracturing AND sealing processes, simultaneously. To address this challenge, we propose the bidirectional coupling of two numerical methods that have proven themselves as very powerful to model the fundamental processes acting in crack-seal systems: Phase-field and the Discrete Element Method (DEM). The phase-field Method was recently successfully extended to model the precipitation of quartz crystals from an aqueous solution and applied to model the sealing of a vein over multiple opening events (Ankit et al., 2013; Ankit et al., 2015a; Ankit et al., 2015b). The advantage over former, purely kinematic approaches is that in phase-field, the crystal growth is modeled based on thermodynamic and kinetic principles. Different driving forces for microstructure evolution, such as chemical bulk free energy, interfacial energy, elastic strain energy and different transport processes, such as mass diffusion and advection, can be coupled and the effect on the evolution process can be studied in 3D. The Discrete Element Method was already used in several studies to model the fracturing of rocks and the incremental growth of veins by repeated fracturing (Virgo et al., 2013; Virgo et al., 2014). Materials in DEM are represented by volumes of packed spherical particles and the response to the material to stress is modeled by interaction of the particles with their nearest neighbours. For rocks, in 3D, the method provides a realistic brittle failure behaviour. Exchange Routines are being developed that

  9. a Discrete Element Model for the Study of Fracture Behaviour and Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-Torres, S.; Pedroso, D.; Li, L.; Williams, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    Numerical simulation of fracture problems is difficult to achieve using techniques such as the Finite Element Method (FEM), since a fracture problem is of a discrete nature and the FEM is formulated for continuous systems. In contrast, methods based on discrete elements are better-suited for studying the fracture problems and several approaches can be found in the literature. However, these methods use spherical elements, which limit representations of real fractures. It has been shown that in order to obtain a realistic fracture pattern a large number of spheres are needed, therefore increasing the computation time. In the present work, an alternative method is presented based on the spheropolyhedra technique recently introduced to the Discrete Element Method (DEM) to simulate particles of any shape. Particles are then represented by constitutive elements (for example, tetrahedra) with no internal voids, something that cannot be achieved with collections of spheres. The elements interact with each other by means of elastic forces representing bonds between particles. In order to represent the fracture process, these forces have a validity threshold based on a critical strain, beyond which the bond disappears and the force is no longer applied to the elements. Simulations of the popular Brazilian indirect tensile test and the triaxial test to reproduce the failure surfaces are carried out and serve as a validation for the model. The method opens new ways to study complex fracture phenomena.

  10. A new positive-definite regularization of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations discretized with Q1/P0 finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, Yuzuru

    2003-03-01

    A new regularization method is proposed for the Galerkin approximation of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with Q1/P0 element, by newly introducing a square-type linear form into the variational divergence-free constraint regularized with the global pressure jump (GPJ) method. The addition of the square-type linear form is intended to eliminate the hydrostatic pressure mode appearing in confined flows, and to make the discretized matrix positive definite and then non-singular without the pressure pegging trick. Effects of the free parameters for the regularization on the solutions are numerically examined with a 2-D driven cavity flow problem. Furthermore, the convergences in the conjugate gradient iteration for the solution of the pressure Poisson equation are compared among the mixed method, the GPJ method and the present method for both leaky and non-leaky 3-D driven cavity flows. Finally, the non-leaky 3-D cavity flows at different Re numbers are solved to compare with the literature data and to demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method.

  11. A non-conforming 3D spherical harmonic transport solver

    SciTech Connect

    Van Criekingen, S.

    2006-07-01

    A new 3D transport solver for the time-independent Boltzmann transport equation has been developed. This solver is based on the second-order even-parity form of the transport equation. The angular discretization is performed through the expansion of the angular neutron flux in spherical harmonics (PN method). The novelty of this solver is the use of non-conforming finite elements for the spatial discretization. Such elements lead to a discontinuous flux approximation. This interface continuity requirement relaxation property is shared with mixed-dual formulations such as the ones based on Raviart-Thomas finite elements. Encouraging numerical results are presented. (authors)

  12. Study of the tsunamigenic rupture process of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake using a 3D Finite Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Fabrizio; Trasatti, Elisa; Lorito, Stefano; Piromallo, Claudia; Piatanesi, Alessio; Cocco, Massimo; Murphy, Shane; Tonini, Roberto; Volpe, Manuela; Brizuela, Beatriz

    2016-04-01

    The study of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake revealed some new aspects in the rupture process of a megathrust event. Indeed, despite its magnitude Mw 9.0, this earthquake was characterized by a spatially limited rupture area and, contrary to the common view that the shallow portion of the subduction interface mainly experiences aseismic slip, the seismic rupture propagated onto the Japan trench with very large slip (> 50 m). Starting from slip distributions obtained by joint inversion of tsunami and geodetic data, we discuss the sensitivity of the tsunami impact predictions to the complexity of the modelling strategy. We use numerical tools ranging from a homogeneous half-space dislocation model (considering only vertical sea-floor displacement and tsunami propagation in the linear shallow-water approximation) to the more complex 3D-FEM model (with heterogeneous elastic parameters derived from 3D seismic tomography), including horizontal displacement and non-hydrostatic dispersive tsunami modeling. This research is funded by the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 603839 (Project ASTARTE - Assessment, Strategy and Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe)

  13. Applications of discrete element method in modeling of grain postharvest operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grain kernels are finite and discrete materials. Although flowing grain can behave like a continuum fluid at times, the discontinuous behavior exhibited by grain kernels cannot be simulated solely with conventional continuum-based computer modeling such as finite-element or finite-difference methods...

  14. Particle models for discrete element modeling of bulk grain properties of wheat kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent research has shown the potential of discrete element method (DEM) in simulating grain flow in bulk handling systems. Research has also revealed that simulation of grain flow with DEM requires establishment of appropriate particle models for each grain type. This research completes the three-p...

  15. Characterizing accuracy of total hemoglobin recovery using contrast-detail analysis in 3D image-guided near infrared spectroscopy with the boundary element method

    PubMed Central

    Ghadyani, Hamid R.; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2010-01-01

    The quantification of total hemoglobin concentration (HbT) obtained from multi-modality image-guided near infrared spectroscopy (IG-NIRS) was characterized using the boundary element method (BEM) for 3D image reconstruction. Multi-modality IG-NIRS systems use a priori information to guide the reconstruction process. While this has been shown to improve resolution, the effect on quantitative accuracy is unclear. Here, through systematic contrast-detail analysis, the fidelity of IG-NIRS in quantifying HbT was examined using 3D simulations. These simulations show that HbT could be recovered for medium sized (20mm in 100mm total diameter) spherical inclusions with an average error of 15%, for the physiologically relevant situation of 2:1 or higher contrast between background and inclusion. Using partial 3D volume meshes to reduce the ill-posed nature of the image reconstruction, inclusions as small as 14mm could be accurately quantified with less than 15% error, for contrasts of 1.5 or higher. This suggests that 3D IG-NIRS provides quantitatively accurate results for sizes seen early in treatment cycle of patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy when the tumors are larger than 30mm. PMID:20720975

  16. Combined magnetic vector-scalar potential finite element computation of 3D magnetic field and performance of modified Lundell alternators in Space Station applications. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ren H.

    1991-01-01

    A method of combined use of magnetic vector potential (MVP) based finite element (FE) formulations and magnetic scalar potential (MSP) based FE formulations for computation of three-dimensional (3D) magnetostatic fields is developed. This combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method leads to considerable reduction by nearly a factor of 3 in the number of unknowns in comparison to the number of unknowns which must be computed in global MVP based FE solutions. This method allows one to incorporate portions of iron cores sandwiched in between coils (conductors) in current-carrying regions. Thus, it greatly simplifies the geometries of current carrying regions (in comparison with the exclusive MSP based methods) in electric machinery applications. A unique feature of this approach is that the global MSP solution is single valued in nature, that is, no branch cut is needed. This is again a superiority over the exclusive MSP based methods. A Newton-Raphson procedure with a concept of an adaptive relaxation factor was developed and successfully used in solving the 3D-FE problem with magnetic material anisotropy and nonlinearity. Accordingly, this combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method is most suited for solution of large scale global type magnetic field computations in rotating electric machinery with very complex magnetic circuit geometries, as well as nonlinear and anisotropic material properties.

  17. Can the modeling for simplification of a dental implant surface affect the accuracy of 3D finite element analysis?

    PubMed

    Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Cruz, Ronaldo Silva; de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Almeida, Daniel Augusto de Faria; Verri, Ana Caroline Gonçales; Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido de Araújo; Santiago Júnior, Joel Ferreira; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess stress/strain of different implant modeling simplifications by 3D-FEA. Three variation of external hexagon implant (Ø3.75 × 10 mm) supporting one molar crown were simulated: A (no threads); B (slightly threads simplification); C (original design). 200 N (axial) and 100 N (oblique) were applied. Cortical bone was evaluated by maximum principal stress and microstrain qualitatively and quantitatively (ANOVA and Tukey post hoc (p < 0.05)). Higher stress levels (p < 0.05) were observed in model A. Models B and C presented similar stress transmission. It was possible to conclude that slightly simplification should be used for studies evaluating stress transferring for bone tissue.

  18. Application of an enhanced discrete element method to oil and gas drilling processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubach, Pere Andreu; Arrufat, Ferran; Ring, Lev; Gandikota, Raju; Zárate, Francisco; Oñate, Eugenio

    2016-03-01

    The authors present results on the use of the discrete element method (DEM) for the simulation of drilling processes typical in the oil and gas exploration industry. The numerical method uses advanced DEM techniques using a local definition of the DEM parameters and combined FEM-DEM procedures. This paper presents a step-by-step procedure to build a DEM model for analysis of the soil region coupled to a FEM model for discretizing the drilling tool that reproduces the drilling mechanics of a particular drill bit. A parametric study has been performed to determine the model parameters in order to maintain accurate solutions with reduced computational cost.

  19. Quantitative 3D elemental analysis inside plant roots by means of synchrotron confocal micro X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzano, R.; Vekemans, B.; Tomasi, N.; Spagnuolo, M.; Schoonjans, T.; Vincze, L.; Pinton, R.; Cesco, S.; Ruggiero, P.

    2009-04-01

    The knowledge of the distribution and concentration of elements within plants is a fundamental step to better understand how these plants uptake specific elements from the medium of growth and how they manage acquisition and compartmentalisation of nutrients as well as toxic metals. For some elements, either nutrients or toxicants, it can be of relevance to know their concentration level within microscopic volumes in plant organs, where they are stored or accumulated. Usually, this type of microscopic analysis requires complex cutting procedures and extensive sample manipulations. In this research, the technique of synchrotron micro X-ray fluorescence in the confocal mode was applied to image the distribution of elements in selected key-planes of tomato roots without the need of any sample preparation, except washing and freeze-drying. Using this method, a first polycapillary lens focussed the X-ray beam with an energy of 12.4 keV down to a 20 µm beam that is penetrating the sample, and a second polycapillary half-lens, that was positioned at the detection side at 90 degrees to the first polycapillary, could then restrict further the view on this irradiated volume to a defined microscopic volume (typically 20x20x20 µm3) from which the induced fluorescent radiation is finally collected by the energy dispersive detector. In this way, it was possible to investigate the concentration levels of some elements such as K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn within the roots of tomato plants. The quantification was performed by means of a dedicated XRF Fundamental Parameter (FP) method in order to calculate the concentrations of trace elements within the analysed plants. Utilizing fundamental atomic parameters, the applied FP method is taking into account the influence of sample self-absorption and especially the specific detection processes by the polycapillary lens. Quantification was assessed and validated by using different standards: NIST SRM 1573a (trace elements in tomato leaves

  20. Population responses to contour integration: early encoding of discrete elements and late perceptual grouping.

    PubMed

    Gilad, Ariel; Meirovithz, Elhanan; Slovin, Hamutal

    2013-04-24

    The neuronal mechanisms underlying perceptual grouping of discrete, similarly oriented elements are not well understood. To investigate this, we measured neural population responses using voltage-sensitive dye imaging in V1 of monkeys trained on a contour-detection task. By mapping the contour and background elements onto V1, we could study their neural processing. Population response early in time showed activation patches corresponding to the contour/background individual elements. However, late increased activity in the contour elements, along with suppressed activity in the background elements, enabled us to visualize in single trials a salient continuous contour "popping out" from a suppressed background. This modulated activity in the contour and in background extended beyond the cortical representation of individual contour or background elements. Finally, the late modulation was correlated with behavioral performance of contour saliency and the monkeys' perceptual report. Thus, opposing responses in the contour and background may underlie perceptual grouping in V1.

  1. Free Tools and Strategies for the Generation of 3D Finite Element Meshes: Modeling of the Cardiac Structures

    PubMed Central

    Pavarino, E.; Neves, L. A.; Machado, J. M.; de Godoy, M. F.; Shiyou, Y.; Momente, J. C.; Zafalon, G. F. D.; Pinto, A. R.; Valêncio, C. R.

    2013-01-01

    The Finite Element Method is a well-known technique, being extensively applied in different areas. Studies using the Finite Element Method (FEM) are targeted to improve cardiac ablation procedures. For such simulations, the finite element meshes should consider the size and histological features of the target structures. However, it is possible to verify that some methods or tools used to generate meshes of human body structures are still limited, due to nondetailed models, nontrivial preprocessing, or mainly limitation in the use condition. In this paper, alternatives are demonstrated to solid modeling and automatic generation of highly refined tetrahedral meshes, with quality compatible with other studies focused on mesh generation. The innovations presented here are strategies to integrate Open Source Software (OSS). The chosen techniques and strategies are presented and discussed, considering cardiac structures as a first application context. PMID:23762031

  2. Free Tools and Strategies for the Generation of 3D Finite Element Meshes: Modeling of the Cardiac Structures.

    PubMed

    Pavarino, E; Neves, L A; Machado, J M; de Godoy, M F; Shiyou, Y; Momente, J C; Zafalon, G F D; Pinto, A R; Valêncio, C R

    2013-01-01

    The Finite Element Method is a well-known technique, being extensively applied in different areas. Studies using the Finite Element Method (FEM) are targeted to improve cardiac ablation procedures. For such simulations, the finite element meshes should consider the size and histological features of the target structures. However, it is possible to verify that some methods or tools used to generate meshes of human body structures are still limited, due to nondetailed models, nontrivial preprocessing, or mainly limitation in the use condition. In this paper, alternatives are demonstrated to solid modeling and automatic generation of highly refined tetrahedral meshes, with quality compatible with other studies focused on mesh generation. The innovations presented here are strategies to integrate Open Source Software (OSS). The chosen techniques and strategies are presented and discussed, considering cardiac structures as a first application context. PMID:23762031

  3. Calculations of non-gray gas radiative heat transfer by coupling the discrete ordinates method with the Leckner model in 3D rectangular enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathi Azarkhavarani, M. E.; Hosseini Abardeh, R.; Rahmani, M.

    2016-11-01

    In this study a new approach for radiation heat flux calculations by coupling the discrete ordinates method with the Leckner global model is introduced. The aim is to analyze the radiative heat transfer problem within a three-dimensional enclosure filled with non-gray gas mixture of {H}2{O} and {C}{O}2. A computer code developed by this approach is applied to radiative calculations in three groups of well-known test cases published previously; considering homogeneous and inhomogeneous isothermal and non-isothermal participating media. All results are compared with well-known calculations based on statistical narrow band model. Also a new series of predictions for a medium with non-black walls and various mixture of {H}2{O} and {C}{O}2 is performed to demonstrate the applicability of the Leckner model. The effect of different compositions of {H}2{O} and {C}{O}2 on the radiative transfer within modern combustors is also examined. Based on the results obtained, it is believed that the discrete ordinates method coupled with the Leckner global model despite of its inherent simplicity and low computational cost is sufficiently accurate. For its convenient use, this method is suitable for a wide range of engineering calculations of participating media as well as for its link to previously written computational fluid dynamics codes.

  4. Calculations of non-gray gas radiative heat transfer by coupling the discrete ordinates method with the Leckner model in 3D rectangular enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathi Azarkhavarani, M. E.; Hosseini Abardeh, R.; Rahmani, M.

    2015-12-01

    In this study a new approach for radiation heat flux calculations by coupling the discrete ordinates method with the Leckner global model is introduced. The aim is to analyze the radiative heat transfer problem within a three-dimensional enclosure filled with non-gray gas mixture of H2O and CO2 . A computer code developed by this approach is applied to radiative calculations in three groups of well-known test cases published previously; considering homogeneous and inhomogeneous isothermal and non-isothermal participating media. All results are compared with well-known calculations based on statistical narrow band model. Also a new series of predictions for a medium with non-black walls and various mixture of H2O and CO2 is performed to demonstrate the applicability of the Leckner model. The effect of different compositions of H2O and CO2 on the radiative transfer within modern combustors is also examined. Based on the results obtained, it is believed that the discrete ordinates method coupled with the Leckner global model despite of its inherent simplicity and low computational cost is sufficiently accurate. For its convenient use, this method is suitable for a wide range of engineering calculations of participating media as well as for its link to previously written computational fluid dynamics codes.

  5. CFL3D, FUN3d, and NSU3D Contributions to the Fifth Drag Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Laflin, Kelly R.; Chaffin, Mark S.; Powell, Nicholas; Levy, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Results presented at the Fifth Drag Prediction Workshop using CFL3D, FUN3D, and NSU3D are described. These are calculations on the workshop provided grids and drag adapted grids. The NSU3D results have been updated to reflect an improvement to skin friction calculation on skewed grids. FUN3D results generated after the workshop are included for custom participant generated grids and a grid from a previous workshop. Uniform grid refinement at the design condition shows a tight grouping in calculated drag, where the variation in the pressure component of drag is larger than the skin friction component. At this design condition, A fine-grid drag value was predicted with a smaller drag adjoint adapted grid via tetrahedral adaption to a metric and mixed-element subdivision. The buffet study produced larger variation than the design case, which is attributed to large differences in the predicted side-of-body separation extent. Various modeling and discretization approaches had a strong impact on predicted side-of-body separation. This large wing root separation bubble was not observed in wind tunnel tests indicating that more work is necessary in modeling wing root juncture flows to predict experiments.

  6. Component mode synthesis methods applied to 3D heterogeneous core calculations, using the mixed dual finite element solver MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Guerin, P.; Baudron, A. M.; Lautard, J. J.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes a new technique for determining the pin power in heterogeneous core calculations. It is based on a domain decomposition with overlapping sub-domains and a component mode synthesis technique for the global flux determination. Local basis functions are used to span a discrete space that allows fundamental global mode approximation through a Galerkin technique. Two approaches are given to obtain these local basis functions: in the first one (Component Mode Synthesis method), the first few spatial eigenfunctions are computed on each sub-domain, using periodic boundary conditions. In the second one (Factorized Component Mode Synthesis method), only the fundamental mode is computed, and we use a factorization principle for the flux in order to replace the higher order Eigenmodes. These different local spatial functions are extended to the global domain by defining them as zero outside the sub-domain. These methods are well-fitted for heterogeneous core calculations because the spatial interface modes are taken into account in the domain decomposition. Although these methods could be applied to higher order angular approximations - particularly easily to a SPN approximation - the numerical results we provide are obtained using a diffusion model. We show the methods' accuracy for reactor cores loaded with UOX and MOX assemblies, for which standard reconstruction techniques are known to perform poorly. Furthermore, we show that our methods are highly and easily parallelizable. (authors)

  7. Unified viscoelasticity: Applying discrete element models to soft tissues with two characteristic times.

    PubMed

    Anssari-Benam, Afshin; Bucchi, Andrea; Bader, Dan L

    2015-09-18

    Discrete element models have often been the primary tool in investigating and characterising the viscoelastic behaviour of soft tissues. However, studies have employed varied configurations of these models, based on the choice of the number of elements and the utilised formation, for different subject tissues. This approach has yielded a diverse array of viscoelastic models in the literature, each seemingly resulting in different descriptions of viscoelastic constitutive behaviour and/or stress-relaxation and creep functions. Moreover, most studies do not apply a single discrete element model to characterise both stress-relaxation and creep behaviours of tissues. The underlying assumption for this disparity is the implicit perception that the viscoelasticity of soft tissues cannot be described by a universal behaviour or law, resulting in the lack of a unified approach in the literature based on discrete element representations. This paper derives the constitutive equation for different viscoelastic models applicable to soft tissues with two characteristic times. It demonstrates that all possible configurations exhibit a unified and universal behaviour, captured by a single constitutive relationship between stress, strain and time as: σ+Aσ̇+Bσ¨=Pε̇+Qε¨. The ensuing stress-relaxation G(t) and creep J(t) functions are also unified and universal, derived as [Formula: see text] and J(t)=c2+(ε0-c2)e(-PQt)+σ0Pt, respectively. Application of these relationships to experimental data is illustrated for various tissues including the aortic valve, ligament and cerebral artery. The unified model presented in this paper may be applied to all tissues with two characteristic times, obviating the need for employing varied configurations of discrete element models in preliminary investigation of the viscoelastic behaviour of soft tissues.

  8. Unified viscoelasticity: Applying discrete element models to soft tissues with two characteristic times.

    PubMed

    Anssari-Benam, Afshin; Bucchi, Andrea; Bader, Dan L

    2015-09-18

    Discrete element models have often been the primary tool in investigating and characterising the viscoelastic behaviour of soft tissues. However, studies have employed varied configurations of these models, based on the choice of the number of elements and the utilised formation, for different subject tissues. This approach has yielded a diverse array of viscoelastic models in the literature, each seemingly resulting in different descriptions of viscoelastic constitutive behaviour and/or stress-relaxation and creep functions. Moreover, most studies do not apply a single discrete element model to characterise both stress-relaxation and creep behaviours of tissues. The underlying assumption for this disparity is the implicit perception that the viscoelasticity of soft tissues cannot be described by a universal behaviour or law, resulting in the lack of a unified approach in the literature based on discrete element representations. This paper derives the constitutive equation for different viscoelastic models applicable to soft tissues with two characteristic times. It demonstrates that all possible configurations exhibit a unified and universal behaviour, captured by a single constitutive relationship between stress, strain and time as: σ+Aσ̇+Bσ¨=Pε̇+Qε¨. The ensuing stress-relaxation G(t) and creep J(t) functions are also unified and universal, derived as [Formula: see text] and J(t)=c2+(ε0-c2)e(-PQt)+σ0Pt, respectively. Application of these relationships to experimental data is illustrated for various tissues including the aortic valve, ligament and cerebral artery. The unified model presented in this paper may be applied to all tissues with two characteristic times, obviating the need for employing varied configurations of discrete element models in preliminary investigation of the viscoelastic behaviour of soft tissues. PMID:26232814

  9. Comparison of 2D Finite Element Modeling Assumptions with Results From 3D Analysis for Composite Skin-Stiffener Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isbelle L.; OBrien, T. Kevin; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of two-dimensional finite element modeling assumptions on the debonding prediction for skin-stiffener specimens was investigated. Geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses using two-dimensional plane-stress and plane-strain elements as well as three different generalized plane strain type approaches were performed. The computed skin and flange strains, transverse tensile stresses and energy release rates were compared to results obtained from three-dimensional simulations. The study showed that for strains and energy release rate computations the generalized plane strain assumptions yielded results closest to the full three-dimensional analysis. For computed transverse tensile stresses the plane stress assumption gave the best agreement. Based on this study it is recommended that results from plane stress and plane strain models be used as upper and lower bounds. The results from generalized plane strain models fall between the results obtained from plane stress and plane strain models. Two-dimensional models may also be used to qualitatively evaluate the stress distribution in a ply and the variation of energy release rates and mixed mode ratios with delamination length. For more accurate predictions, however, a three-dimensional analysis is required.

  10. Application of the control volume mixed finite element method to a triangular discretization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naff, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    A two-dimensional control volume mixed finite element method is applied to the elliptic equation. Discretization of the computational domain is based in triangular elements. Shape functions and test functions are formulated on the basis of an equilateral reference triangle with unit edges. A pressure support based on the linear interpolation of elemental edge pressures is used in this formulation. Comparisons are made between results from the standard mixed finite element method and this control volume mixed finite element method. Published 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. ?? 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Simulation of the enhancement factor from an individual 3D hemisphere-on-post field emitter by using finite elements method.

    PubMed

    Roveri, D S; Sant'Anna, G M; Bertan, H H; Mologni, J F; Alves, M A R; Braga, E S

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a 3D computational framework for evaluating electrostatic properties of a single field emitter characterized by the hemisphere-on-post geometry. Numerical simulations employed the finite elements method by using Ansys-Maxwell software. Extensive parametric simulations were focused on the threshold distance from which the emitter field enhancement factor (γ) becomes independent from the anode-substrate gap (G). This investigation allowed demonstrating that the ratio between G and the emitter height (h) is a reliable reference for a broad range of emitter dimensions; furthermore, results permitted establishing G/h ≥ 2.2 as the threshold condition for setting the anode without affecting γ.

  12. A 3D finite-element computation of eddy currents and losses in the stator end laminations of large synchronous machines

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, V.C.; Meunier, G.; Foggia, A.

    1996-05-01

    Eddy current losses due to axial fluxes are computed in the stator end laminations of a salient-pole synchronous machine at open-circuit operating condition. The calculation is carried out with the aid of a 3D finite-element package which uses a linear T-{phi} formulation. The domain spans a full pole pitch of the machine. The flux densities computed in the end region at points outside the stator core are compared with experimental measurements. The results and the limitations of the model are discussed.

  13. Biomechanical influence of crown-to-implant ratio on stress distribution over internal hexagon short implant: 3-D finite element analysis with statistical test.

    PubMed

    Ramos Verri, Fellippo; Santiago Junior, Joel Ferreira; de Faria Almeida, Daniel Augusto; de Oliveira, Guilherme Bérgamo Brandão; de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Marques Honório, Heitor; Noritomi, Pedro Yoshito; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2015-01-01

    The study of short implants is relevant to the biomechanics of dental implants, and research on crown increase has implications for the daily clinic. The aim of this study was to analyze the biomechanical interactions of a singular implant-supported prosthesis of different crown heights under vertical and oblique force, using the 3-D finite element method. Six 3-D models were designed with Invesalius 3.0, Rhinoceros 3D 4.0, and Solidworks 2010 software. Each model was constructed with a mandibular segment of bone block, including an implant supporting a screwed metal-ceramic crown. The crown height was set at 10, 12.5, and 15 mm. The applied force was 200 N (axial) and 100 N (oblique). We performed an ANOVA statistical test and Tukey tests; p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. The increase of crown height did not influence the stress distribution on screw prosthetic (p>0.05) under axial load. However, crown heights of 12.5 and 15 mm caused statistically significant damage to the stress distribution of screws and to the cortical bone (p<0.001) under oblique load. High crown to implant (C/I) ratio harmed microstrain distribution on bone tissue under axial and oblique loads (p<0.001). Crown increase was a possible deleterious factor to the screws and to the different regions of bone tissue.

  14. Discrete element simulation of powder compaction in cold uniaxial pressing with low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojek, Jerzy; Nosewicz, Szymon; Jurczak, Kamila; Chmielewski, Marcin; Bochenek, Kamil; Pietrzak, Katarzyna

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents numerical studies of powder compaction in cold uniaxial pressing. The powder compaction in this work is considered as an initial stage of a hot pressing process so it is realized with relatively low pressure (up to 50 MPa). Hence the attention has been focused on the densification mechanisms at this range of pressure and models suitable for these conditions. The discrete element method employing spherical particles has been used in the numerical studies. Numerical simulations have been performed for two different contact models—the elastic Hertz-Mindlin-Deresiewicz model and the plastic Storåkers model. Numerical results have been compared with the results of laboratory tests of the die compaction of the NiAl powder. Comparisons have shown that the discrete element method is capable to represent properly the densification mechanisms by the particle rearrangement and particle deformation.

  15. Contact Mechanics of Naturally Occurring Grains: Experiments and Discrete Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, David M.; Hopkins, Mark A.

    2009-06-01

    Application of the discrete element method to engineering problems involving naturally occurring granular materials requires knowledge of the contact mechanics of the particles and a realistic treatment of particle shapes. This paper presents results from on-going work that addresses these two fundamental issues of granular media mechanics. Grain-scale laboratory experiments are being conducted to provide the needed contact relationships. A concurrent discrete element modeling effort is under way to implement the experimentally determined contact relationships and employ realistic particle shapes. The experiments determine the stiffness and frictional behavior of normal and sliding contacts of observed for spherical specimens of gneiss. Stiffness in the normal mode is seen to range from 0.1 to 15 MN m-1 depending on force level. Shear stiffness is on the order of the normal stiffness, but only for relatively low shear force levels (or shear deformations). Frictional energy losses are observed to varying degrees under virtually all experimental conditions. The discrete element modeling effort simulates the triaxial response of the spherical grains enclosed in a membrane and implements the experimentally determined contact relationships for normal and sliding contact behavior. Inclusion of the full frictional behavior prior to macroscopic sliding is under development. Some aspects of the simulations of the triaxial deformation of spherical grains of gneiss are presented and compared with the grain-scale experimental data. The simulations are seen to capture the key features of the experimental observations.

  16. Spiral waves are stable in discrete element models of two-dimensional homogeneous excitable media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, A. B.; Chernyak, Y. B.; Cohen, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    The spontaneous breakup of a single spiral wave of excitation into a turbulent wave pattern has been observed in both discrete element models and continuous reaction-diffusion models of spatially homogeneous 2D excitable media. These results have attracted considerable interest, since spiral breakup is thought to be an important mechanism of transition from the heart rhythm disturbance ventricular tachycardia to the fatal arrhythmia ventricular fibrillation. It is not known whether this process can occur in the absence of disease-induced spatial heterogeneity of the electrical properties of the ventricular tissue. Candidate mechanisms for spiral breakup in uniform 2D media have emerged, but the physical validity of the mechanisms and their applicability to myocardium require further scrutiny. In this letter, we examine the computer simulation results obtained in two discrete element models and show that the instability of each spiral is an artifact resulting from an unphysical dependence of wave speed on wave front curvature in the medium. We conclude that spiral breakup does not occur in these two models at the specified parameter values and that great care must be exercised in the representation of a continuous excitable medium via discrete elements.

  17. Back Analysis of the 2014 San Leo Landslide Using Combined Terrestrial Laser Scanning and 3D Distinct Element Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spreafico, Margherita Cecilia; Francioni, Mirko; Cervi, Federico; Stead, Doug; Bitelli, Gabriele; Ghirotti, Monica; Girelli, Valentina Alena; Lucente, Claudio Corrado; Tini, Maria Alessandra; Borgatti, Lisa

    2016-06-01

    Landslides of the lateral spreading type, involving brittle geological units overlying ductile terrains, are a common occurrence in the sandstone and limestone plateaux of the northern Apennines of Italy. The edges of these plateaux are often the location of rapid landslide phenomena, such as rock slides, rock falls and topples. In this paper, we present a back analysis of a recent landslide (February 2014), involving the north-eastern sector of the San Leo rock slab (northern Apennines, Emilia-Romagna Region) which is a representative example of this type of phenomena. The aquifer hosted in the fractured slab, due to its relatively higher secondary permeability in comparison to the lower clayey units leads to the development of perennial and ephemeral springs at the contact between the two units. The related piping erosion phenomena, together with slope processes in the clay-shales have led to the progressive undermining of the slab, eventually predisposing large-scale landslides. Stability analyses were conducted coupling terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and distinct element methods (DEMs). TLS point clouds were analysed to determine the pre- and post-failure geometry, the extension of the detachment area and the joint network characteristics. The block dimensions in the landslide deposit were mapped and used to infer the spacing of the discontinuities for insertion into the numerical model. Three-dimensional distinct element simulations were conducted, with and without undermining of the rock slab. The analyses allowed an assessment of the role of the undermining, together with the presence of an almost vertical joint set, striking sub-parallel to the cliff orientation, on the development of the slope instability processes. Based on the TLS and on the numerical simulation results, an interpretation of the landslide mechanism is proposed.

  18. A time series generalized functional model based method for vibration-based damage precise localization in structures consisting of 1D, 2D, and 3D elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaris, C. S.; Sakellariou, J. S.; Fassois, S. D.

    2016-06-01

    This study focuses on the problem of vibration-based damage precise localization via data-based, time series type, methods for structures consisting of 1D, 2D, or 3D elements. A Generalized Functional Model Based method is postulated based on an expanded Vector-dependent Functionally Pooled ARX (VFP-ARX) model form, capable of accounting for an arbitrary structural topology. The FP model's operating parameter vector elements are properly constrained to reflect any given topology. Damage localization is based on operating parameter vector estimation within the specified topology, so that the location estimate and its uncertainty bounds are statistically optimal. The method's effectiveness is experimentally demonstrated through damage precise localization on a laboratory spatial truss structure using various damage scenarios and a single pair of random excitation - vibration response signals in a low and limited frequency bandwidth.

  19. Efficacy of adding a supporting implant in stress distribution of long-span fixed partial dentures: a 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Shurbaji Mozayek, Rami; Allaf, Mirza; B Abuharb, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background. Long span is seen in many clinical situations. Treatmentplanning options of these cases are difficult and may require FPD, RPD or ISP. Each option has its own disadvantages, including mechanical problems, patient comfort and cost. This article will evaluate the stress distribution of a different treatment option, which consists of adding a single sup-porting implant to the FPD by using 3D finite element analysis. Methods. Three models, each consisting of 5 units, were created as follows: 1. Tooth Pontic Pontic Pontic Tooth; 2. Tooth Pontic Implant Pontic Tooth; 3. Tooth Pontic Pontic Implant Tooth. An axial force was applied to the prostheses by using 3D finite element method and stresses were evaluated. Results. The maximum stress was found in the prostheses in all the models; the highest stress values in all the shared components of the models were almost similar. Stress in implants was lower in the second model than the third one. Conclusion. Adding a supporting implant in long-span FPD has no advantages while it has the disadvantages of complicating treatment and the complications that may occur to the implant and surrounding bone. PMID:27429723

  20. Analysis of shear wave propagation derived from MR elastography in 3D thigh skeletal muscle using subject specific finite element model.

    PubMed

    Dao, Tien Tuan; Pouletaut, Philippe; Charleux, Fabrice; Tho, Marie-Christine Ho Ba; Bensamoun, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a subject specific finite element model derived from MRI images to numerically analyze the MRE (magnetic resonance elastography) shear wave propagation within skeletal thigh muscles. A sagittal T2 CUBE MRI sequence was performed on the 20-cm thigh segment of a healthy male subject. Skin, adipose tissue, femoral bone and 11 muscles were manually segmented in order to have 3D smoothed solid and meshed models. These tissues were modeled with different constitutive laws. A transient modal dynamics analysis was applied to simulate the shear wave propagation within the thigh tissues. The effects of MRE experimental parameters (frequency, force) and the muscle material properties (shear modulus: C10) were analyzed through the simulated shear wave displacement within the vastus medialis muscle. The results showed a plausible range of frequencies (from 90Hz to 120 Hz), which could be used for MRE muscle protocol. The wave amplitude increased with the level of the force, revealing the importance of the boundary condition. Moreover, different shear displacement patterns were obtained as a function of the muscle mechanical properties. The present study is the first to analyze the shear wave propagation in skeletal muscles using a 3D subject specific finite element model. This study could be of great value to assist the experimenters in the set-up of MRE protocols. PMID:25570875

  1. A 3D immersed finite element method with non-homogeneous interface flux jump for applications in particle-in-cell simulations of plasma-lunar surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Daoru; Wang, Pu; He, Xiaoming; Lin, Tao; Wang, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by the need to handle complex boundary conditions efficiently and accurately in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, this paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) linear immersed finite element (IFE) method with non-homogeneous flux jump conditions for solving electrostatic field involving complex boundary conditions using structured meshes independent of the interface. This method treats an object boundary as part of the simulation domain and solves the electric field at the boundary as an interface problem. In order to resolve charging on a dielectric surface, a new 3D linear IFE basis function is designed for each interface element to capture the electric field jump on the interface. Numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the optimal convergence rates in L2 and H1 norms of the IFE solution. This new IFE method is integrated into a PIC method for simulations involving charging of a complex dielectric surface in a plasma. A numerical study of plasma-surface interactions at the lunar terminator is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the new method.

  2. Efficacy of adding a supporting implant in stress distribution of long-span fixed partial dentures: a 3D finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shurbaji Mozayek, Rami; Allaf, Mirza; B. Abuharb, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background. Long span is seen in many clinical situations. Treatmentplanning options of these cases are difficult and may require FPD, RPD or ISP. Each option has its own disadvantages, including mechanical problems, patient comfort and cost. This article will evaluate the stress distribution of a different treatment option, which consists of adding a single sup-porting implant to the FPD by using 3D finite element analysis. Methods. Three models, each consisting of 5 units, were created as follows: 1. Tooth Pontic Pontic Pontic Tooth; 2. Tooth Pontic Implant Pontic Tooth; 3. Tooth Pontic Pontic Implant Tooth. An axial force was applied to the prostheses by using 3D finite element method and stresses were evaluated. Results. The maximum stress was found in the prostheses in all the models; the highest stress values in all the shared components of the models were almost similar. Stress in implants was lower in the second model than the third one. Conclusion. Adding a supporting implant in long-span FPD has no advantages while it has the disadvantages of complicating treatment and the complications that may occur to the implant and surrounding bone. PMID:27429723

  3. Efficient combination of a 3D Quasi-Newton inversion algorithm and a vector dual-primal finite element tearing and interconnecting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voznyuk, I.; Litman, A.; Tortel, H.

    2015-08-01

    A Quasi-Newton method for reconstructing the constitutive parameters of three-dimensional (3D) penetrable scatterers from scattered field measurements is presented. This method is adapted for handling large-scale electromagnetic problems while keeping the memory requirement and the time flexibility as low as possible. The forward scattering problem is solved by applying the finite-element tearing and interconnecting full-dual-primal (FETI-FDP2) method which shares the same spirit as the domain decomposition methods for finite element methods. The idea is to split the computational domain into smaller non-overlapping sub-domains in order to simultaneously solve local sub-problems. Various strategies are proposed in order to efficiently couple the inversion algorithm with the FETI-FDP2 method: a separation into permanent and non-permanent subdomains is performed, iterative solvers are favorized for resolving the interface problem and a marching-on-in-anything initial guess selection further accelerates the process. The computational burden is also reduced by applying the adjoint state vector methodology. Finally, the inversion algorithm is confronted to measurements extracted from the 3D Fresnel database.

  4. Development of Femoral Head Interior Supporting Device and 3D Finite Element Analysis of its Application in the Treatment of Femoral Head Avascular Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Dongmin; Ye, Ming; Li, Xinfa; Yang, Lifeng

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to develop and perform the 3D finite element analysis of a femoral head interior supporting device (FHISD). Material/Methods The 3D finite element model was developed to analyze the surface load of femoral head and analyze the stress and strain of the femoral neck, using the normal femoral neck, decompressed bone graft, and FHISD-implanted bone graft models. Results The stress in the normal model concentrated around the femoral calcar, with displacement of 0.3556±0.1294 mm. In the decompressed bone graft model, the stress concentrated on the femur calcar and top and lateral sides of femoral head, with the displacement larger than the normal (0.4163±0.1310 mm). In the FHISD-implanted bone graft model, the stress concentrated on the segment below the lesser trochanter superior to the femur, with smaller displacement than the normal (0.1856±0.0118 mm). Conclusions FHISD could effectively maintain the biomechanical properties of the femoral neck. PMID:26010078

  5. Enhancement of the excitation efficiency of a torsional wave PPM EMAT array for pipe inspection by optimizing the element number of the array based on 3-D FEM.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yugang; Wu, Xinjun; Sun, Pengfei; Li, Jian

    2015-02-03

    Electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) can generate non-dispersive T(0,1) mode guided waves in a metallic pipe for nondestructive testing (NDT) by using a periodic permanent magnet (PPM) EMAT circular array. In order to enhance the excitation efficiency of the sensor, the effects of varying the number of elements of the array on the excitation efficiency is studied in this paper. The transduction process of the PPM EMAT array is studied based on 3-D finite element method (FEM). The passing signal amplitude of the torsional wave is obtained to represent the excitation efficiency of the sensor. Models with different numbers of elements are established and the results are compared to obtain an optimal element number. The simulation result is verified by experiments. It is shown that after optimization, the amplitudes of both the passing signal and defect signal with the optimal element number are increased by 29%, which verifies the feasibility of this optimal method. The essence of the optimization is to find the best match between the static magnetic field and the eddy current field in a limited circumferential space to obtain the maximum circumferential Lorentz force.

  6. Enhancement of the Excitation Efficiency of a Torsional Wave PPM EMAT Array for Pipe Inspection by Optimizing the Element Number of the Array Based on 3-D FEM

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yugang; Wu, Xinjun; Sun, Pengfei; Li, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) can generate non-dispersive T(0,1) mode guided waves in a metallic pipe for nondestructive testing (NDT) by using a periodic permanent magnet (PPM) EMAT circular array. In order to enhance the excitation efficiency of the sensor, the effects of varying the number of elements of the array on the excitation efficiency is studied in this paper. The transduction process of the PPM EMAT array is studied based on 3-D finite element method (FEM). The passing signal amplitude of the torsional wave is obtained to represent the excitation efficiency of the sensor. Models with different numbers of elements are established and the results are compared to obtain an optimal element number. The simulation result is verified by experiments. It is shown that after optimization, the amplitudes of both the passing signal and defect signal with the optimal element number are increased by 29%, which verifies the feasibility of this optimal method. The essence of the optimization is to find the best match between the static magnetic field and the eddy current field in a limited circumferential space to obtain the maximum circumferential Lorentz force. PMID:25654722

  7. Syntheses, structures and photocatalytic properties of five new praseodymium-antimony oxochlorides: from discrete clusters to 3D inorganic-organic hybrid racemic compounds.

    PubMed

    Zou, Guo-Dong; Wang, Ze-Ping; Song, Ying; Hu, Bing; Huang, Xiao-Ying

    2014-07-14

    Five novel praseodymium-antimony oxochloride (Pr-Sb-O-Cl) cluster-based compounds, namely (2-MepyH)2[Fe(1,10-phen)3]2[Pr4Sb12O18Cl14.6(OH)2.4(Hsal)]·H2O (1), (2-MepyH)2[Fe(1,10-phen)3]4{[Pr4Sb12O18Cl13.5(OH)0.5](bcpb)2[Pr4Sb12O18Cl13.5(OH)0.5]}·42H2O (2), (3-MepyH)2[Fe(1,10-phen)3]{[Pr4Sb12O18Cl13(H2O)2](bcpb)}·2(3-Mepy)·3H2O (3), [Fe(1,10-phen)3]2{[Pr4Sb12O18Cl10(H2O)2](bcpb)2}·3(3-Mepy)·13H2O (4), and (2-MepyH)6[Fe(1,10-phen)3]10{[Pr4Sb12O18Cl13(OH)2]2[Pr4Sb12O18Cl9][Pr4Sb12O18Cl9(OH)2]2(Hpdc)10(pdc)2}·110H2O (5) (2-Mepy = 2-methylpyridine, 3-Mepy = 3-methylpyridine, 1,10-phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, H2sal = salicylic acid, H3bcpb = 3,5-bis(4-carboxyphenoxy)benzoic acid, H3pdc = 3,5-pyrazoledicarboxylic acid) have been solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Compound 1 is the first zero-dimensional (0D) Pr-Sb-O-Cl cluster decorated by an organic ligand. Compounds 2-4 are constructed from the same H3bcpb ligands but adopt different structures: 2 represents a rare example of a one-dimensional (1D) nanotubular structure based on high-nuclearity clusters; 3 exhibits a two-dimensional (2D) mono-layered structure, in which left-handed and right-handed helical chains are alternately arranged, while 4 features a double-layered structure with an unprecedented (3,3,6)-connected 3-nodal topological net. Compound 5 is a unique three-dimensional (3D) 2-fold interpenetrating racemic compound, simultaneously containing three kinds of Pr-Sb-O-Cl-pdc clusters. UV-light photocatalytic H2 evolution activity was observed for compound 3 with Pt as a co-catalyst and MeOH as a sacrificial electron donor. In addition, the magnetic properties of compounds 1 and 5 are also studied.

  8. Syntheses, structures and photocatalytic properties of five new praseodymium-antimony oxochlorides: from discrete clusters to 3D inorganic-organic hybrid racemic compounds.

    PubMed

    Zou, Guo-Dong; Wang, Ze-Ping; Song, Ying; Hu, Bing; Huang, Xiao-Ying

    2014-07-14

    Five novel praseodymium-antimony oxochloride (Pr-Sb-O-Cl) cluster-based compounds, namely (2-MepyH)2[Fe(1,10-phen)3]2[Pr4Sb12O18Cl14.6(OH)2.4(Hsal)]·H2O (1), (2-MepyH)2[Fe(1,10-phen)3]4{[Pr4Sb12O18Cl13.5(OH)0.5](bcpb)2[Pr4Sb12O18Cl13.5(OH)0.5]}·42H2O (2), (3-MepyH)2[Fe(1,10-phen)3]{[Pr4Sb12O18Cl13(H2O)2](bcpb)}·2(3-Mepy)·3H2O (3), [Fe(1,10-phen)3]2{[Pr4Sb12O18Cl10(H2O)2](bcpb)2}·3(3-Mepy)·13H2O (4), and (2-MepyH)6[Fe(1,10-phen)3]10{[Pr4Sb12O18Cl13(OH)2]2[Pr4Sb12O18Cl9][Pr4Sb12O18Cl9(OH)2]2(Hpdc)10(pdc)2}·110H2O (5) (2-Mepy = 2-methylpyridine, 3-Mepy = 3-methylpyridine, 1,10-phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, H2sal = salicylic acid, H3bcpb = 3,5-bis(4-carboxyphenoxy)benzoic acid, H3pdc = 3,5-pyrazoledicarboxylic acid) have been solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Compound 1 is the first zero-dimensional (0D) Pr-Sb-O-Cl cluster decorated by an organic ligand. Compounds 2-4 are constructed from the same H3bcpb ligands but adopt different structures: 2 represents a rare example of a one-dimensional (1D) nanotubular structure based on high-nuclearity clusters; 3 exhibits a two-dimensional (2D) mono-layered structure, in which left-handed and right-handed helical chains are alternately arranged, while 4 features a double-layered structure with an unprecedented (3,3,6)-connected 3-nodal topological net. Compound 5 is a unique three-dimensional (3D) 2-fold interpenetrating racemic compound, simultaneously containing three kinds of Pr-Sb-O-Cl-pdc clusters. UV-light photocatalytic H2 evolution activity was observed for compound 3 with Pt as a co-catalyst and MeOH as a sacrificial electron donor. In addition, the magnetic properties of compounds 1 and 5 are also studied. PMID:24869770

  9. Finite element solution of 3-D turbulent Navier-Stokes equations for propeller-driven slender bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Russell Hicks

    1987-12-01

    Three-dimensional turbulent flow over the aft end of a slender propeller driven body with the wake from a slender, planar appendage was calculated for 4 configurations. The finite element method in the form of the weak Galerkin formulation with the penalty method was used to solve the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The actual code was FIDAP, modified with a propeller body force and turbulence model, used for the solution. The turbulence model included an Inner Layer Integrated TKE model, and Outer Layer mixing length model, and a Planar Wake model. No separate boundary layer method was used for the body, rather modifications to the Integrated TKE model were made to account for the primary effects of the surface boundary layer on the flow. The flow was calculated at two levels of thrust and corresponding swirl, selfpropelled and 100 percent overthrust, as well as with selfpropelled thrust but no torque simulating an ideal rotor stator combination. Also, the selfpropelled case was calculated with a simplified turbulence model using only the Inner Layer and Planar Wake model. The results compared favorably with experiments.

  10. Cranial performance in the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) as revealed by high-resolution 3-D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Karen; Wroe, Stephen; Clausen, Philip; McHenry, Colin; D'Amore, Domenic C; Rayfield, Emily J; Cunningham, Eleanor

    2008-06-01

    The Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) displays a unique hold and pull-feeding technique. Its delicate 'space-frame' skull morphology differs greatly from that apparent in most living large prey specialists and is suggestive of a high degree of optimization, wherein use of materials is minimized. Here, using high-resolution finite element modelling based on dissection and in vivo bite and pull data, we present results detailing the mechanical performance of the giant lizard's skull. Unlike most modern predators, V. komodoensis applies minimal input from the jaw muscles when butchering prey. Instead it uses series of actions controlled by postcranial muscles. A particularly interesting feature of the performance of the skull is that it reveals considerably lower overall stress when these additional extrinsic forces are added to those of the jaw adductors. This remarkable reduction in stress in response to additional force is facilitated by both internal and external bone anatomy. Functional correlations obtained from these analyses also provide a solid basis for the interpretation of feeding ecology in extinct species, including dinosaurs and sabre-tooth cats, with which V. komodoensis shares various cranial and dental characteristics.

  11. Laboratory and 3-D distinct element analysis of the failure mechanism of a slope under external surcharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, N.; Cheng, Y. M.

    2015-01-01

    Landslide is a major disaster resulting in considerable loss of human lives and property damages in hilly terrain in Hong Kong, China and many other countries. The factor of safety and the critical slip surface for slope stabilization are the main considerations for slope stability analysis in the past, while the detailed post-failure conditions of the slopes have not been considered in sufficient detail. There is however increasing interest in the consequences after the initiation of failure that includes the development and propagation of the failure surfaces, the amount of failed mass and runoff and the affected region. To assess the development of slope failure in more detail and to consider the potential danger of slopes after failure has initiated, the slope stability problem under external surcharge is analyzed by the distinct element method (DEM) and a laboratory model test in the present research. A more refined study about the development of failure, microcosmic failure mechanisms and the post-failure mechanisms of slopes will be carried out. The numerical modeling method and the various findings from the present work can provide an alternate method of analysis of slope failure, which can give additional information not available from the classical methods of analysis.

  12. Cranial performance in the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) as revealed by high-resolution 3-D finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Karen; Wroe, Stephen; Clausen, Philip; McHenry, Colin; D’Amore, Domenic C; Rayfield, Emily J; Cunningham, Eleanor

    2008-01-01

    The Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) displays a unique hold and pull-feeding technique. Its delicate ‘space-frame’ skull morphology differs greatly from that apparent in most living large prey specialists and is suggestive of a high degree of optimization, wherein use of materials is minimized. Here, using high-resolution finite element modelling based on dissection and in vivo bite and pull data, we present results detailing the mechanical performance of the giant lizard's skull. Unlike most modern predators, V. komodoensis applies minimal input from the jaw muscles when butchering prey. Instead it uses series of actions controlled by postcranial muscles. A particularly interesting feature of the performance of the skull is that it reveals considerably lower overall stress when these additional extrinsic forces are added to those of the jaw adductors. This remarkable reduction in stress in response to additional force is facilitated by both internal and external bone anatomy. Functional correlations obtained from these analyses also provide a solid basis for the interpretation of feeding ecology in extinct species, including dinosaurs and sabre-tooth cats, with which V. komodoensis shares various cranial and dental characteristics. PMID:18510503

  13. Stress analysis of a complete maxillary denture under various drop impact conditions: a 3D finite element study.

    PubMed

    Sunbuloglu, Emin

    2015-01-01

    Complete maxillary dentures are one of the most economic and easy ways of treatment for edentulous patients and are still widely used. However, their survival rate is slightly above three years. It is presumed that the failure reasons are not only due to normal fatigue but also emerge from damage based on unavoidable improper usage. Failure types other than long-term fatigue, such as over-deforming, also influence the effective life span of dentures. A hypothesis is presumed, stating that the premature/unexpected failures may be initiated by impact on dentures, which can be related to dropping them on the ground or other effects such as biting crispy food. Thus, the behavior of a complete maxillary denture under impact loading due to drop on a rigid surface was investigated using the finite element method utilizing explicit time integration and a rate-sensitive elastoplastic material model of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Local permanent deformations have been observed along with an emphasis on frenulum region of the denture, regardless of the point of impact. Contact stresses at the tooth-denture base were also investigated. The spread of energy within the structure via wave propagation is seen to play a critical role in this fact. Stress-wave propagation is also seen to be an important factor that decreases the denture's fatigue life.

  14. Cranial performance in the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) as revealed by high-resolution 3-D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Karen; Wroe, Stephen; Clausen, Philip; McHenry, Colin; D'Amore, Domenic C; Rayfield, Emily J; Cunningham, Eleanor

    2008-06-01

    The Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) displays a unique hold and pull-feeding technique. Its delicate 'space-frame' skull morphology differs greatly from that apparent in most living large prey specialists and is suggestive of a high degree of optimization, wherein use of materials is minimized. Here, using high-resolution finite element modelling based on dissection and in vivo bite and pull data, we present results detailing the mechanical performance of the giant lizard's skull. Unlike most modern predators, V. komodoensis applies minimal input from the jaw muscles when butchering prey. Instead it uses series of actions controlled by postcranial muscles. A particularly interesting feature of the performance of the skull is that it reveals considerably lower overall stress when these additional extrinsic forces are added to those of the jaw adductors. This remarkable reduction in stress in response to additional force is facilitated by both internal and external bone anatomy. Functional correlations obtained from these analyses also provide a solid basis for the interpretation of feeding ecology in extinct species, including dinosaurs and sabre-tooth cats, with which V. komodoensis shares various cranial and dental characteristics. PMID:18510503

  15. Dynamic pulse buckling of cylindrical shells under axial impact: A comparison of 2D and 3D finite element calculations with experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    A series of tests investigating dynamic pulse buckling of a cylindrical shell under axial impact is compared to several 2D and 3D finite element simulations of the event. The purpose of the work is to investigate the performance of various analysis codes and element types on a problem which is applicable to radioactive material transport packages, and ultimately to develop a benchmark problem to qualify finite element analysis codes for the transport package design industry. Four axial impact tests were performed on 4 in-diameter, 8 in-long, 304 L stainless steel cylinders with a 3/16 in wall thickness. The cylinders were struck by a 597 lb mass with an impact velocity ranging from 42.2 to 45.1 ft/sec. During the impact event, a buckle formed at each end of the cylinder, and one of the two buckles became unstable and collapsed. The instability occurred at the top of the cylinder in three tests and at the bottom in one test. Numerical simulations of the test were performed using the following codes and element types: PRONTO2D with axisymmetric four-node quadrilaterals; PRONTO3D with both four-node shells and eight-node hexahedrons; and ABAQUS/Explicit with axisymmetric two-node shells and four-node quadrilaterals, and 3D four-node shells and eight-node hexahedrons. All of the calculations are compared to the tests with respect to deformed shape and impact load history. As in the tests, the location of the instability is not consistent in all of the calculations. However, the calculations show good agreement with impact load measurements with the exception of an initial load spike which is proven to be the dynamic response of the load cell to the impact. Finally, the PRONIT02D calculation is compared to the tests with respect to strain and acceleration histories. Accelerometer data exhibited good qualitative agreement with the calculations. The strain comparisons show that measurements are very sensitive to gage placement.

  16. Strain-rate sensitivity of foam materials: A numerical study using 3D image-based finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yongle; Li, Q. M.; Withers, P. J.

    2015-09-01

    Realistic simulations are increasingly demanded to clarify the dynamic behaviour of foam materials, because, on one hand, the significant variability (e.g. 20% scatter band) of foam properties and the lack of reliable dynamic test methods for foams bring particular difficulty to accurately evaluate the strain-rate sensitivity in experiments; while on the other hand numerical models based on idealised cell structures (e.g. Kelvin and Voronoi) may not be sufficiently representative to capture the actual structural effect. To overcome these limitations, the strain-rate sensitivity of the compressive and tensile properties of closed-cell aluminium Alporas foam is investigated in this study by means of meso-scale realistic finite element (FE) simulations. The FE modelling method based on X-ray computed tomography (CT) image is introduced first, as well as its applications to foam materials. Then the compression and tension of Alporas foam at a wide variety of applied nominal strain-rates are simulated using FE model constructed from the actual cell geometry obtained from the CT image. The stain-rate sensitivity of compressive strength (collapse stress) and tensile strength (0.2% offset yield point) are evaluated when considering different cell-wall material properties. The numerical results show that the rate dependence of cell-wall material is the main cause of the strain-rate hardening of the compressive and tensile strengths at low and intermediate strain-rates. When the strain-rate is sufficiently high, shock compression is initiated, which significantly enhances the stress at the loading end and has complicated effect on the stress at the supporting end. The plastic tensile wave effect is evident at high strain-rates, but shock tension cannot develop in Alporas foam due to the softening associated with single fracture process zone occurring in tensile response. In all cases the micro inertia of individual cell walls subjected to localised deformation is found to

  17. Discrete element modelling of large scale particle systems—I: exact scaling laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y. T.; Owen, D. R. J.

    2014-06-01

    The discrete element method has emerged as a powerful predictive tool for the numerical modelling of many scientific and engineering problems involving discrete and discontinuous phenomena. There are nevertheless computational challenges to resolve before industrial scale applications can be effectively simulated. This multi-part paper aims to address some of the theoretical and computational issues central to achieving this goal. In the first part of this paper, a simple but generic theoretical framework is established for the development of a comprehensive set of scaling conditions, under which a scaled discrete element model can exactly reproduce the mechanical behaviour of a physical model. In particular, three basic physical quantities and their scale factors can be freely chosen. A special selection leads to a unique set of scale factors governing an exact scaling, which also gives rise to the requirement that all the interaction laws employed in a scaled model be scale-invariant. The subsequent examination reveals that most commonly used interaction laws, if all material (mechanical and physical) properties are treated as constant, do not possess such a feature and therefore cannot be directly employed in a scaled model. The problem can be solved by treating the scaled particles as pseudo-particles and by properly scaling the interaction laws. The resulting scaled interaction laws become scale-invariant and thus can be used in a scaled model.

  18. Mesoscale dynamic coupling of finite- and discrete-element methods for fluid-particle interactions.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, S; Yazdchi, K; Luding, S

    2014-08-01

    A new method for two-way fluid-particle coupling on an unstructured mesoscopically coarse mesh is presented. In this approach, we combine a (higher order) finite-element method (FEM) on the moving mesh for the fluid with a soft sphere discrete-element method for the particles. The novel feature of the proposed scheme is that the FEM mesh is a dynamic Delaunay triangulation based on the positions of the moving particles. Thus, the mesh can be multi-purpose: it provides (i) a framework for the discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations, (ii) a simple tool for detecting contacts between moving particles, (iii) a basis for coarse-graining or upscaling, and (iv) coupling with other physical fields (temperature, electromagnetic, etc.). This approach is suitable for a wide range of dilute and dense particulate flows, because the mesh resolution adapts with particle density in a given region. Two-way momentum exchange is implemented using semi-empirical drag laws akin to other popular approaches; for example, the discrete particle method, where a finite-volume solver on a coarser, fixed grid is used. We validate the methodology with several basic test cases, including single- and double-particle settling with analytical and empirical expectations, and flow through ordered and random porous media, when compared against finely resolved FEM simulations of flow through fixed arrays of particles. PMID:24982251

  19. Finite Elements Analysis of a Composite Semi-Span Test Article With and Without Discrete Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Jegley, Dawn C. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    AS&M Inc. performed finite element analysis, with and without discrete damage, of a composite semi-span test article that represents the Boeing 220-passenger transport aircraft composite semi-span test article. A NASTRAN bulk data file and drawings of the test mount fixtures and semi-span components were utilized to generate the baseline finite element model. In this model, the stringer blades are represented by shell elements, and the stringer flanges are combined with the skin. Numerous modeling modifications and discrete source damage scenarios were applied to the test article model throughout the course of the study. This report details the analysis method and results obtained from the composite semi-span study. Analyses were carried out for three load cases: Braked Roll, LOG Down-Bending and 2.5G Up-Bending. These analyses included linear and nonlinear static response, as well as linear and nonlinear buckling response. Results are presented in the form of stress and strain plots. factors of safety for failed elements, buckling loads and modes, deflection prediction tables and plots, and strainage prediction tables and plots. The collected results are presented within this report for comparison to test results.

  20. Discontinuous finite volume element discretization for coupled flow-transport problems arising in models of sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürger, Raimund; Kumar, Sarvesh; Ruiz-Baier, Ricardo

    2015-10-01

    The sedimentation-consolidation and flow processes of a mixture of small particles dispersed in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds numbers can be described by a nonlinear transport equation for the solids concentration coupled with the Stokes problem written in terms of the mixture flow velocity and the pressure field. Here both the viscosity and the forcing term depend on the local solids concentration. A semi-discrete discontinuous finite volume element (DFVE) scheme is proposed for this model. The numerical method is constructed on a baseline finite element family of linear discontinuous elements for the approximation of velocity components and concentration field, whereas the pressure is approximated by piecewise constant elements. The unique solvability of both the nonlinear continuous problem and the semi-discrete DFVE scheme is discussed, and optimal convergence estimates in several spatial norms are derived. Properties of the model and the predicted space accuracy of the proposed formulation are illustrated by detailed numerical examples, including flows under gravity with changing direction, a secondary settling tank in an axisymmetric setting, and batch sedimentation in a tilted cylindrical vessel.

  1. Discrete adaptive zone light elements (DAZLE): a new approach to adaptive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, Robert L.; Escuti, Michael J.

    2007-09-01

    New advances in Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulators (LCSLM) offer opportunities for large adaptive optics in the midwave infrared spectrum. A light focusing adaptive imaging system, using the zero-order diffraction state of a polarizer-free liquid crystal polarization grating modulator to create millions of high transmittance apertures, is envisioned in a system called DAZLE (Discrete Adaptive Zone Light Elements). DAZLE adaptively selects large sets of LCSLM apertures using the principles of coded masks, embodied in a hybrid Discrete Fresnel Zone Plate (DFZP) design. Issues of system architecture, including factors of LCSLM aperture pattern and adaptive control, image resolution and focal plane array (FPA) matching, and trade-offs between filter bandwidths, background photon noise, and chromatic aberration are discussed.

  2. A modular, partitioned, discrete element framework for industrial grain distribution systems with rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, Guillermo; Mukherjee, Debanjan; Celigueta, Miguel Angel; Zohdi, Tarek I.; Onate, Eugenio

    2015-11-01

    A modular discrete element framework is presented for large-scale simulations of industrial grain-handling systems. Our framework enables us to simulate a markedly larger number of particles than previous studies, thereby allowing for efficient and more realistic process simulations. This is achieved by partitioning the particle dynamics into distinct regimes based on their contact interactions, and integrating them using different time-steps, while exchanging phase-space data between them. The framework is illustrated using numerical experiments based on fertilizer spreader applications. The model predictions show very good qualitative and quantitative agreement with available experimental data. Valuable insights are developed regarding the role of lift vs drag forces on the particle trajectories in-flight, and on the role of geometric discretization errors for surface meshing in governing the emergent behavior of a system of particles.

  3. A 3-D finite-element model for computation of temperature profiles and regions of thermal damage during focused ultrasound surgery exposures.

    PubMed

    Meaney, P M; Clarke, R L; ter Haar, G R; Rivens, I H

    1998-11-01

    Although there have been numerous models implemented for modeling thermal diffusion effects during focused ultrasound surgery (FUS), most have limited themselves to representing simple situations for which analytical solutions and the use of cylindrical geometries sufficed. For modeling single lesion formation and the heating patterns from a single exposure, good results were achieved in comparison with experimental results for predicting lesion size, shape and location. However, these types of approaches are insufficient when considering the heating of multiple sites with FUS exposures when the time interval between exposures is short. In such cases, the heat dissipation patterns from initial exposures in the lesion array formation can play a significant role in the heating patterns for later exposures. Understanding the effects of adjacent lesion formation, such as this, requires a three-dimensional (3-D) representation of the bioheat equation. Thus, we have developed a 3-D finite-element representation for modeling the thermal diffusion effects during FUS exposures in clinically relevant tissue volumes. The strength of this approach over past methods is its ability to represent arbitrarily shaped 3-D situations. Initial simulations have allowed calculation of the temperature distribution as a function of time for adjacent FUS exposures in excised bovine liver, with the individually computed point temperatures comparing favorably with published measurements. In addition to modeling these temperature distributions, the model was implemented in conjunction with an algorithm for calculating the thermal dose as a way of predicting lesion shape. Although used extensively in conventional hyperthermia applications, this thermal dose criterion has only been applied in a limited number of simulations in FUS for comparison with experimental measurements. In this study, simulations were run for focal depths 2 and 3 cm below the surface of pig's liver, using multiple

  4. 3D-finite element analyses of cusp movements in a human upper premolar, restored with adhesive resin-based composites.

    PubMed

    Ausiello, P; Apicella, A; Davidson, C L; Rengo, S

    2001-10-01

    The combination of diverse materials and complex geometry makes stress distribution analysis in teeth very complicated. Simulation in a computerized model might enable a study of the simultaneous interaction of the many variables. A 3D solid model of a human maxillary premolar was prepared and exported into a 3D-finite element model (FEM). Additionally, a generic class II MOD cavity preparation and restoration was simulated in the FEM model by a proper choice of the mesh volumes. A validation procedure of the FEM model was executed based on a comparison of theoretical calculations and experimental data. Different rigidities were assigned to the adhesive system and restorative materials. Two different stress conditions were simulated: (a) stresses arising from the polymerization shrinkage and (b) stresses resulting from shrinkage stress in combination with vertical occlusal loading. Three different cases were analyzed: a sound tooth, a tooth with a class II MOD cavity, adhesively restored with a high (25 GPa) and one with a low (12.5GPa) elastic modulus composite. The cusp movements induced by polymerization stress and (over)-functional occlusal loading were evaluated. While cusp displacement was higher for the more rigid composites due to the pre-stressing from polymerization shrinkage, cusp movements turned out to be lower for the more flexible composites in case the restored tooth which was stressed by the occlusal loading. This preliminary study by 3D FEA on adhesively restored teeth with a class II MOD cavity indicated that Young's modulus values of the restorative materials play an essential role in the success of the restoration. Premature failure due to stresses arising from polymerization shrinkage and occlusal loading can be prevented by proper selection and combination of materials. PMID:11522306

  5. Investigation and optimization of a finite element simulation of transducer array systems for 3D ultrasound computer tomography with respect to electrical impedance characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohout, B.; Pirinen, J.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2012-03-01

    The established standard screening method to detect breast cancer is X-ray mammography. However X-ray mammography often has low contrast for tumors located within glandular tissue. A new approach is 3D Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT), which is expected to detect small tumors at an early stage. This paper describes the development, improvement and the results of Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations of the Transducer Array System (TAS) used in our 3D USCT. The focus of this work is on researching the influence of meshing and material parameters on the electrical impedance curves. Thereafter, these findings are used to optimize the simulation model. The quality of the simulation was evaluated by comparing simulated impedance characteristics with measured data of the real TAS. The resulting FEM simulation model is a powerful tool to analyze and optimize transducer array systems applied for USCT. With this simulation model, the behavior of TAS for different geometry modifications was researched. It provides a means to understand the acoustical performances inside of any ultrasound transducer represented by its electrical impedance characteristic.

  6. A high-order staggered finite-element vertical discretization for non-hydrostatic atmospheric models

    DOE PAGES

    Guerra, Jorge E.; Ullrich, Paul A.

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric modeling systems require economical methods to solve the non-hydrostatic Euler equations. Two major differences between hydrostatic models and a full non-hydrostatic description lies in the vertical velocity tendency and numerical stiffness associated with sound waves. In this work we introduce a new arbitrary-order vertical discretization entitled the staggered nodal finite-element method (SNFEM). Our method uses a generalized discrete derivative that consistently combines the discontinuous Galerkin and spectral element methods on a staggered grid. Our combined method leverages the accurate wave propagation and conservation properties of spectral elements with staggered methods that eliminate stationary (2Δx) modes. Furthermore, high-order accuracy alsomore » eliminates the need for a reference state to maintain hydrostatic balance. In this work we demonstrate the use of high vertical order as a means of improving simulation quality at relatively coarse resolution. We choose a test case suite that spans the range of atmospheric flows from predominantly hydrostatic to nonlinear in the large-eddy regime. Our results show that there is a distinct benefit in using the high-order vertical coordinate at low resolutions with the same robust properties as the low-order alternative.« less

  7. A high-order staggered finite-element vertical discretization for non-hydrostatic atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Jorge E.; Ullrich, Paul A.

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric modeling systems require economical methods to solve the non-hydrostatic Euler equations. Two major differences between hydrostatic models and a full non-hydrostatic description lies in the vertical velocity tendency and numerical stiffness associated with sound waves. In this work we introduce a new arbitrary-order vertical discretization entitled the staggered nodal finite-element method (SNFEM). Our method uses a generalized discrete derivative that consistently combines the discontinuous Galerkin and spectral element methods on a staggered grid. Our combined method leverages the accurate wave propagation and conservation properties of spectral elements with staggered methods that eliminate stationary (2Δx) modes. Furthermore, high-order accuracy also eliminates the need for a reference state to maintain hydrostatic balance. In this work we demonstrate the use of high vertical order as a means of improving simulation quality at relatively coarse resolution. We choose a test case suite that spans the range of atmospheric flows from predominantly hydrostatic to nonlinear in the large-eddy regime. Our results show that there is a distinct benefit in using the high-order vertical coordinate at low resolutions with the same robust properties as the low-order alternative.

  8. Prediction of Fracture Behavior in Rock and Rock-like Materials Using Discrete Element Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsaga, T.; Young, P.

    2009-05-01

    The study of fracture initiation and propagation in heterogeneous materials such as rock and rock-like materials are of principal interest in the field of rock mechanics and rock engineering. It is crucial to study and investigate failure prediction and safety measures in civil and mining structures. Our work offers a practical approach to predict fracture behaviour using discrete element models. In this approach, the microstructures of materials are presented through the combination of clusters of bonded particles with different inter-cluster particle and bond properties, and intra-cluster bond properties. The geometry of clusters is transferred from information available from thin sections, computed tomography (CT) images and other visual presentation of the modeled material using customized AutoCAD built-in dialog- based Visual Basic Application. Exact microstructures of the tested sample, including fractures, faults, inclusions and void spaces can be duplicated in the discrete element models. Although the microstructural fabrics of rocks and rock-like structures may have different scale, fracture formation and propagation through these materials are alike and will follow similar mechanics. Synthetic material provides an excellent condition for validating the modelling approaches, as fracture behaviours are known with the well-defined composite's properties. Calibration of the macro-properties of matrix material and inclusions (aggregates), were followed with the overall mechanical material responses calibration by adjusting the interfacial properties. The discrete element model predicted similar fracture propagation features and path as that of the real sample material. The path of the fractures and matrix-inclusion interaction was compared using computed tomography images. Initiation and fracture formation in the model and real material were compared using Acoustic Emission data. Analysing the temporal and spatial evolution of AE events, collected during the

  9. Exact geometry solid-shell element based on a sampling surfaces technique for 3D stress analysis of doubly-curved composite shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, G. M.; Mamontov, A. A.; Plotnikova, S. V.; Mamontov, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    A hybrid-mixed ANS four-node shell element by using the sampling surfaces (SaS) technique is developed. The SaS formulation is based on choosing inside the nth layer In not equally spaced SaS parallel to the middle surface of the shell in order to introduce the displacements of these surfaces as basic shell variables. Such choice of unknowns with the consequent use of Lagrange polynomials of degree In - 1 in the thickness direction for each layer permits the presentation of the layered shell formulation in a very compact form. The SaS are located inside each layer at Chebyshev polynomial nodes that allows one to minimize uniformly the error due to the Lagrange interpolation. To implement the efficient analytical integration throughout the element, the enhanced ANS method is employed. The proposed hybrid-mixed four-node shell element is based on the Hu-Washizu variational equation and exhibits a superior performance in the case of coarse meshes. It could be useful for the 3D stress analysis of thick and thin doubly-curved shells since the SaS formulation gives the possibility to obtain numerical solutions with a prescribed accuracy, which asymptotically approach the exact solutions of elasticity as the number of SaS tends to infinity.

  10. High-resolution high-sensitivity elemental imaging by secondary ion mass spectrometry: from traditional 2D and 3D imaging to correlative microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirtz, T.; Philipp, P.; Audinot, J.-N.; Dowsett, D.; Eswara, S.

    2015-10-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) constitutes an extremely sensitive technique for imaging surfaces in 2D and 3D. Apart from its excellent sensitivity and high lateral resolution (50 nm on state-of-the-art SIMS instruments), advantages of SIMS include high dynamic range and the ability to differentiate between isotopes. This paper first reviews the underlying principles of SIMS as well as the performance and applications of 2D and 3D SIMS elemental imaging. The prospects for further improving the capabilities of SIMS imaging are discussed. The lateral resolution in SIMS imaging when using the microprobe mode is limited by (i) the ion probe size, which is dependent on the brightness of the primary ion source, the quality of the optics of the primary ion column and the electric fields in the near sample region used to extract secondary ions; (ii) the sensitivity of the analysis as a reasonable secondary ion signal, which must be detected from very tiny voxel sizes and thus from a very limited number of sputtered atoms; and (iii) the physical dimensions of the collision cascade determining the origin of the sputtered ions with respect to the impact site of the incident primary ion probe. One interesting prospect is the use of SIMS-based correlative microscopy. In this approach SIMS is combined with various high-resolution microscopy techniques, so that elemental/chemical information at the highest sensitivity can be obtained with SIMS, while excellent spatial resolution is provided by overlaying the SIMS images with high-resolution images obtained by these microscopy techniques. Examples of this approach are given by presenting in situ combinations of SIMS with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), helium ion microscopy (HIM) and scanning probe microscopy (SPM).

  11. Coupled discrete element and smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the die filling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breinlinger, Thomas; Kraft, Torsten

    2015-08-01

    Die filling is an important part of the powder compaction process chain, where defects in the final part can be introduced—or prevented. Simulation of this process is therefore a goal for many part producers and has been studied by some researchers already. In this work, we focus on the influence of the surrounding air on the powder flow. We demonstrate the implementing and coupling of the discrete element method for the granular powder and the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method for the gas flow. Application of the method to the die filling process is demonstrated.

  12. Discrete Element Method Simulation of a Boulder Extraction From an Asteroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulchitsky, Anton K.; Johnson, Jerome B.; Reeves, David M.; Wilkinson, Allen

    2014-01-01

    The force required to pull 7t and 40t polyhedral boulders from the surface of an asteroid is simulated using the discrete element method considering the effects of microgravity, regolith cohesion and boulder acceleration. The connection between particle surface energy and regolith cohesion is estimated by simulating a cohesion sample tearing test. An optimal constant acceleration is found where the peak net force from inertia and cohesion is a minimum. Peak pulling forces can be further reduced by using linear and quadratic acceleration functions with up to a 40% reduction in force for quadratic acceleration.

  13. Coupled discrete element and smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the die filling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breinlinger, Thomas; Kraft, Torsten

    2016-11-01

    Die filling is an important part of the powder compaction process chain, where defects in the final part can be introduced—or prevented. Simulation of this process is therefore a goal for many part producers and has been studied by some researchers already. In this work, we focus on the influence of the surrounding air on the powder flow. We demonstrate the implementing and coupling of the discrete element method for the granular powder and the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method for the gas flow. Application of the method to the die filling process is demonstrated.

  14. Preliminary discrete element modeling of a falling particle curtain for CSP central tower receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanino, R.; Ho, C. K.; Romano, D.; Savoldi, L.

    2016-05-01

    Current methods used to simulate the curtain thickness in a falling particle receiver lead to a poor agreement with the experiments. Here the Discrete Element Method (DEM) is proposed to address the problem, including both the top hopper and the interactions between particles in the model. Some first promising results are presented, showing an acceptable agreement between simulation and experiment for an ad-hoc set of input parameters. A sensitivity study provides a first assessment of the effects of the main input parameters of the model (boundary conditions at the release, particle Young's modulus, restitution coefficients and effective particle diameter) on the predicted curtain thickness.

  15. A minimal coupled fluid-discrete element model for bedload transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurin, R.; Chauchat, J.; Chareyre, B.; Frey, P.

    2015-11-01

    A minimal Lagrangian two-phase model to study turbulent bedload transport focusing on the granular phase is presented and validated with experiments. The model intends to describe bedload transport of massive particles in fully rough flows at relatively low Shields numbers, for which no suspension occurs. A discrete element method for the granular phase is coupled with a one dimensional volume-averaged two-phase momentum equation for the fluid phase. The coupling between the discrete granular phase and the continuous fluid phase is discussed, and a consistent averaging formulation adapted to bedload transport is introduced. An original simple discrete random walk model is proposed to account for the fluid velocity fluctuations. The model is compared with experiments considering both classical sediment transport rate as a function of the Shields number, and depth profiles of solid velocity, volume fraction, and transport rate density, from existing bedload transport experiments in inclined flume. The results successfully reproduce the classical 3/2 power law, and more importantly describe well the depth profiles of the granular phase, showing that the model is able to reproduce the particle scale mechanisms. From a sensitivity analysis, it is shown that the fluctuation model allows to reproduce a realistic critical Shields number, and that the influence of the granular parameters on the macroscopic results is weak. Nevertheless, the analysis of the corresponding depth profiles reveals an evolution of the depth structure of the granular phase with varying restitution and friction coefficients, which denotes the non-trivial underlying physical mechanisms.

  16. A 2D Electromechanical Model of Human Atrial Tissue Using the Discrete Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Brocklehurst, Paul; Adeniran, Ismail; Yang, Dongmin; Sheng, Yong; Zhang, Henggui; Ye, Jianqiao

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac tissue is a syncytium of coupled cells with pronounced intrinsic discrete nature. Previous models of cardiac electromechanics often ignore such discrete properties and treat cardiac tissue as a continuous medium, which has fundamental limitations. In the present study, we introduce a 2D electromechanical model for human atrial tissue based on the discrete element method (DEM). In the model, single-cell dynamics are governed by strongly coupling the electrophysiological model of Courtemanche et al. to the myofilament model of Rice et al. with two-way feedbacks. Each cell is treated as a viscoelastic body, which is physically represented by a clump of nine particles. Cell aggregations are arranged so that the anisotropic nature of cardiac tissue due to fibre orientations can be modelled. Each cell is electrically coupled to neighbouring cells, allowing excitation waves to propagate through the tissue. Cell-to-cell mechanical interactions are modelled using a linear contact bond model in DEM. By coupling cardiac electrophysiology with mechanics via the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, the DEM model successfully simulates the conduction of cardiac electrical waves and the tissue's corresponding mechanical contractions. The developed DEM model is numerically stable and provides a powerful method for studying the electromechanical coupling problem in the heart. PMID:26583141

  17. A Piecewise Linear Discontinuous Finite Element Spatial Discretization of the Transport Equation in 2D Cylindrical Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T S; Adams, M L; Chang, J H

    2008-10-01

    We present a new spatial discretization of the discrete-ordinates transport equation in two-dimensional cylindrical (RZ) geometry for arbitrary polygonal meshes. This discretization is a discontinuous finite element method that utilizes the piecewise linear basis functions developed by Stone and Adams. We describe an asymptotic analysis that shows this method to be accurate for many problems in the thick diffusion limit on arbitrary polygons, allowing this method to be applied to radiative transfer problems with these types of meshes. We also present numerical results for multiple problems on quadrilateral grids and compare these results to the well-known bi-linear discontinuous finite element method.

  18. 3-D magnetotelluric inversion including topography using deformed hexahedral edge finite elements and direct solvers parallelized on SMP computers - Part I: forward problem and parameter Jacobians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordy, M.; Wannamaker, P.; Maris, V.; Cherkaev, E.; Hill, G.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm, which we call HexMT, for 3-D simulation and inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) responses using deformable hexahedral finite elements that permit incorporation of topography. Direct solvers parallelized on symmetric multiprocessor (SMP), single-chassis workstations with large RAM are used throughout, including the forward solution, parameter Jacobians and model parameter update. In Part I, the forward simulator and Jacobian calculations are presented. We use first-order edge elements to represent the secondary electric field (E), yielding accuracy O(h) for E and its curl (magnetic field). For very low frequencies or small material admittivities, the E-field requires divergence correction. With the help of Hodge decomposition, the correction may be applied in one step after the forward solution is calculated. This allows accurate E-field solutions in dielectric air. The system matrix factorization and source vector solutions are computed using the MKL PARDISO library, which shows good scalability through 24 processor cores. The factorized matrix is used to calculate the forward response as well as the Jacobians of electromagnetic (EM) field and MT responses using the reciprocity theorem. Comparison with other codes demonstrates accuracy of our forward calculations. We consider a popular conductive/resistive double brick structure, several synthetic topographic models and the natural topography of Mount Erebus in Antarctica. In particular, the ability of finite elements to represent smooth topographic slopes permits accurate simulation of refraction of EM waves normal to the slopes at high frequencies. Run-time tests of the parallelized algorithm indicate that for meshes as large as 176 × 176 × 70 elements, MT forward responses and Jacobians can be calculated in ˜1.5 hr per frequency. Together with an efficient inversion parameter step described in Part II, MT inversion problems of 200-300 stations are computable with total run times

  19. A discrete element and ray framework for rapid simulation of acoustical dispersion of microscale particulate agglomerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohdi, T. I.

    2016-03-01

    In industry, particle-laden fluids, such as particle-functionalized inks, are constructed by adding fine-scale particles to a liquid solution, in order to achieve desired overall properties in both liquid and (cured) solid states. However, oftentimes undesirable particulate agglomerations arise due to some form of mutual-attraction stemming from near-field forces, stray electrostatic charges, process ionization and mechanical adhesion. For proper operation of industrial processes involving particle-laden fluids, it is important to carefully breakup and disperse these agglomerations. One approach is to target high-frequency acoustical pressure-pulses to breakup such agglomerations. The objective of this paper is to develop a computational model and corresponding solution algorithm to enable rapid simulation of the effect of acoustical pulses on an agglomeration composed of a collection of discrete particles. Because of the complex agglomeration microstructure, containing gaps and interfaces, this type of system is extremely difficult to mesh and simulate using continuum-based methods, such as the finite difference time domain or the finite element method. Accordingly, a computationally-amenable discrete element/discrete ray model is developed which captures the primary physical events in this process, such as the reflection and absorption of acoustical energy, and the induced forces on the particulate microstructure. The approach utilizes a staggered, iterative solution scheme to calculate the power transfer from the acoustical pulse to the particles and the subsequent changes (breakup) of the pulse due to the particles. Three-dimensional examples are provided to illustrate the approach.

  20. Combined Finite-Discrete Element Method for Simulation of Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chengzeng; Zheng, Hong; Sun, Guanhua; Ge, Xiurun

    2016-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is widely used in the exploitation of unconventional gas (such as shale gas).Thus, the study of hydraulic fracturing is of particular importance for petroleum industry. The combined finite-discrete element method (FDEM) proposed by Munjiza is an innovative numerical technique to capture progressive damage and failure processes in rock. However, it cannot model the fracturing process of rock driven by hydraulic pressure. In this study, we present a coupled hydro-mechanical model based on FDEM for the simulation of hydraulic fracturing in complex fracture geometries, where an algorithm for updating hydraulic fracture network is proposed. The algorithm can carry out connectivity searches for arbitrarily complex fracture networks. Then, we develop a new combined finite-discrete element method numerical code (Y-flow) for the simulation of hydraulic fracturing. Finally, several verification examples are given, and the simulation results agree well with the analytical or experimental results, indicating that the newly developed numerical code can capture hydraulic fracturing process correctly and effectively.

  1. Insight into the dynamics of granular column collapse using Discrete Element Methods and laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Hugo; Mangeney, Anne; Farin, Maxime; Richard, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The mechanical behavior of granular flows is still an open issue. In particular, quantitative agreement between the detailed dynamics of the flow and laboratory experiments is necessary to better constrain the performance and limits of the models. We propose here to compare quantitatively the flow profiles and the force during granular column collapse simulated using Discrete Element Models and laboratory experiments. These small scale experiments are performed with dry granular material released initially from a cylinder on a sloping plane. The flow profiles and the acoustic signal generated by the granular impacts and stresses on the plane are recorded systematically [Farin et al., 2015]. These experiments are simulated using the Discrete Element Method Modys [Richard et al., 2000]. We show that the effect of the removing gate should be taken into account in the model in order to quantatively reproduce the flow dynamics. Furthermore we compare the simulated and observed acoustic signals that are generated by the fluctuating stresses exerted by the grains on the substrate in different frequency bands. [1] P. Richard et Luc Oger. 2000 Etude de la géométrie de milieux granulaires modèles tridimensionnels par simulation numérique. [2] Farin, M., Mangeney, A., Toussaint, R., De Rosny, J., Shapiro, N., Dewez, T., Hibert, C., Mathon, C., Sedan, O., Berger. 2015, Characterization of rockfalls from seismic signal: insights from laboratory experiments

  2. Prediction of Residual Stress Distributions in Welded Sections of P92 Pipes with Small Diameter and Thick Wall based on 3D Finite Element Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaowei; Gong, Jianming; Zhao, Yanping; Wang, Yanfei

    2015-05-01

    This study used ABAQUS finite element (FE) software to investigate the residual stress distributions of P92 welded pipes in both the as-weld and post weld heat treated (PWHT) condition. Sequential coupling quasi-static thermo-mechanical in conjunction with moving double ellipsoidal heat source and an element add/remove technique to simulate deposition of new weld material, are combined in the 3D FE analysis. To validate the simulation results, the residual stresses in axial direction at the surface of pipe were measured by X-ray diffraction technique and compared with the results of FE analysis. Detailed characteristic distributions of the residual stresses are discussed. Results show that the FE model can predict the residual stress distributions satisfactorily. Highest residual stresses on the outer surface are found in the last weld bead to be deposited. And the highest tensile residual stress for the full welded section take place in heat affected zone (HAZ) near the middle thickness. Larger residual sstress can be found around the welding start point along the pipe circumference. Comparison of heat treated specimen and untreated specimen illustrates that PWHT has a strong effect on the residual stress field.

  3. Slip Distribution of the 2011 Tohoku-oki Earthquake obtained by Geodetic and Tsunami Data and with a 3-D Finite Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, F.; Trasatti, E.; Lorito, S.; Ito, Y.; Piatanesi, A.; Lanucara, P.; Hirata, K.; D'Agostino, N.; Cocco, M.

    2012-12-01

    The rupture process of the Great 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake has been particularly well studied by using an unprecedented collection of geophysical data. There is a general agreement among the different source models obtained by modeling seismological, geodetic and tsunami data. A slip patch of nearly 40÷50 meters has been imaged and located around and up-dip from the hypocenter by most of published models, while some differences exist in the slip pattern retrieved at shallow depths near the trench, likely due to the different resolving power of distinct data sets and to the adopted fault geometry. It is well known that the modeling of great subduction earthquakes requires the use of 3-D structural models in order to properly account for the effects of topography, bathymetry and the geometrical variations of the plate interface as well as for the effects of elastic contrasts between the subducting plate and the continental lithosphere. In this study we build a 3-D Finite Element (FE) model of the Tohoku-oki area in order to infer the slip distribution of the 2011 earthquake by performing a joint inversion of geodetic (GPS and seafloor observations) and tsunami (ocean bottom pressure sensors, DART and GPS buoys) data. The FE model is used to compute the geodetic and tsunami Green's functions. In order to understand how geometrical and elastic heterogeneities control the inferred slip distribution of the Tohoku-oki earthquake, we compare the slip patterns obtained using both homogeneous and heterogeneous structural models. The goal of this study is to better constrain the slip distribution and the maximum slip amplitudes. In particular, we aim to focus on the rupture process in the shallower part of the fault plane and near the trench, which is crucial to model the tsunami data and to assess the tsunamigenic potential of earthquakes in this region.

  4. Combination of finite element modeling and optimization for the study of lumbar spine biomechanics considering the 3D thorax-pelvis orientation.

    PubMed

    Ezquerro, Francisco; Simón, Antonio; Prado, María; Pérez, Ana

    2004-01-01

    A model of the lumbar spine capable of taking into account realistic loads derived from human activity would be of great benefit in studying its normal biomechanical functioning as well as its in vivo behavior in injured and surgically altered states. This paper proposes a method to analyze the mechanical response of the lumbar spine subjected to loads derived from human activity, combining a non-linear finite element model (FEM) and an optimization-based force predicting algorithm. Loads borne by the lumbar spine at the T12-L1 level (joint loads) are first predicted with the optimization algorithm and then applied to the FEM, while a boundary condition prescribing the relative L1-sacrum rotation is imposed onto the FEM to account for three-dimensional physiological thorax-pelvis orientation. The prescribed rotation is achieved through the application of moments on L1. To account for the effect of these moments on lumbar joint loads, an iteration between the optimization technique and the FEM computation has been carried out. This method provides two main benefits over previous studies: first, it allows for the application of any 3D loading condition while considering the real 3D rotation measured between the thorax and the pelvis, and second, it makes it possible to estimate the moments that must be applied on L1 in order to maintain this rotation, taking them into account when predicting joint loads. As an example application of the method, results are presented for the lumbar spine mechanical response at the time of peak T12-L1 joint force during walking.

  5. Discrete Element Modeling Results of Proppant Rearrangement in the Cooke Conductivity Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Earl Mattson; Hai Huang; Michael Conway; Lisa O'Connell

    2014-02-01

    The study of propped fracture conductivity began in earnest with the development of the Cooke cell which later became part of the initial API standard. Subsequent developments included a patented multicell design to conduct 4 tests in a press at the same time. Other modifications have been used by various investigators. Recent studies by the Stim-Lab proppant consortium have indicated that the flow field across a Cooke proppant conductivity testing cell may not be uniform as initially believed which resulted is significantly different conductivity results. Post test analysis of low temperature metal alloy injections at the termination of proppant testing prior to the release of the applied stress suggest that higher flow is to be expected along the sides and top of the proppant pack than compared to the middle of the pack. To evaluate these experimental findings, a physics-based two-dimensional (2-D) discrete element model (DEM) was developed and applied to simulate proppant rearrangement during stress loading in the Cooke conductivity cell and the resulting porosity field. Analysis of these simulations are critical to understanding the impact of modification to the testing cell as well as understanding key proppant conductivity issues such as how these effects are manifested in proppant concentration testing results. The 2-D DEM model was constructed to represent a realistic cross section of the Cooke cell with a distribution of four material properties, three that represented the Cooke cell (steel, sandstone,square rings), and one representing the proppant. In principle, Cooke cell materials can be approximated as assemblies of independent discrete elements (particles) of various sizes and material properties that interact via cohesive interactions, repulsive forces, and frictional forces. The macroscopic behavior can then be modeled as the collective behavior of many interacting discrete elements. This DEM model is particularly suitable for modeling proppant

  6. A parameter-free dynamic alternative to hyper-viscosity for coupled transport equations: Application to the simulation of 3D squall lines using spectral elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marras, Simone; Giraldo, Francis X.

    2015-02-01

    The stabilization of high order spectral elements to solve the transport equations for tracers in the atmosphere remains an active topic of research among atmospheric modelers. This paper builds on our previous work on variational multiscale stabilization (VMS) and discontinuity capturing (DC) (Marras et al. (2012) [7]) and shows the applicability of VMS+DC to realistic atmospheric problems that involve physics coupling with phase change in the simulation of 3D deep convection. We show that the VMS+DC approach is a robust technique that can damp the high order modes characterizing the spectral element solution of complex coupled transport problems. The method has important properties that techniques of more common use often lack: 1) it is free of a user-defined parameter, 2) it is anisotropic in that it only acts along the flow direction, 3) it is numerically consistent, and 4) it can improve the monotonicity of high-order spectral elements. The proposed method is assessed by comparing the results against those obtained with a fourth-order hyper-viscosity programmed in the same code. The main conclusion that arises is that tuning can be fully avoided without loss of accuracy if the dissipative scheme is properly designed. Finally, the cost of parallel communication is that of a second order operator which means that fewer communications are required by VMS+DC than by a hyper-viscosity method; fewer communications translate into a faster and more scalable code, which is of vital importance as we approach the exascale range of computing.

  7. Discrete element modeling of rock deformation, fracture network development and permeability evolution under hydraulic stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shouchun Deng; Robert Podgorney; Hai Huang

    2011-02-01

    Key challenges associated with the EGS reservoir development include the ability to reliably predict hydraulic fracturing and the deformation of natural fractures as well as estimating permeability evolution of the fracture network with time. We have developed a physics-based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by coupling a discrete element model (DEM) for fracturing with a network flow model. In DEM model, solid rock is represented by a network of discrete elements (often referred as particles) connected by various types of mechanical bonds such as springs, elastic beams or bonds that have more complex properties (such as stress-dependent elastic constants). Fracturing is represented explicitly as broken bonds (microcracks), which form and coalesce into macroscopic fractures when external and internal load is applied. The natural fractures are represented by a series of connected line segments. Mechanical bonds that intersect with such line segments are removed from the DEM model. A network flow model using conjugate lattice to the DEM network is developed and coupled with the DEM. The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which therefore deforms the mechanical bonds and breaks them if the deformation reaches a prescribed threshold value. Such deformation/fracturing in turn changes the permeability of the flow network, which again changes the evolution of fluid pressure, intimately coupling the two processes. The intimate coupling between fracturing/deformation of fracture networks and fluid flow makes the meso-scale DEM- network flow simulations necessary in order to accurately evaluate the permeability evolution, as these methods have substantial advantages over conventional continuum mechanical models of elastic rock deformation. The challenges that must be overcome to simulate EGS reservoir stimulation, preliminary results, progress to date and near future research directions and opportunities will be

  8. The development of a robust, efficient solver for spectral and spectral-element time discretizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundis, Nathan L.

    This work examines alternative time discretizations for the Euler equations and methods for the robust and efficient solution of these discretizations. Specifically, the time-spectral method (TS), quasi-periodic time-spectral method (BDFTS), and spectral-element method in time (SEMT) are derived and examined in detail. For the two time-spectral based methods, focus is given to expanding these methods for more complicated problems than have been typically solved by other authors, including problems with spectral content in a large number of harmonics, gust response problems, and aeroelastic problems. To solve these more complicated problems, it was necessary to implement the flexible variant of the Generalized Minimal Residual method (FGMRES), utilizing the full second-order accurate spatial Jacobian, complete temporal coupling of the chosen time discretization, and fully-implicit coupling of the aeroelastic equations in the cases where they are needed. The FGMRES solver developed utilizes a block-colored Gauss-Seidel (BCGS) preconditioner augmented by a defect-correction process to increase its effectiveness. Exploration of more efficient preconditioners for the FGMRES solver is an anticipated topic for future work in this field. It was a logical extension to apply this already developed FGMRES solver to the spectral-element method in time, which has some advantages over the spectral methods already discussed. Unlike purely-spectral methods, SEMT allows for bothh- and p-refinement. This property could allow for element clustering around areas of sharp gradients and discontinuities, which in turn could make SEMT more efficient than TS for periodic problems that contain these sharp gradients and would require many time instances to produce a precise solution using the TS method. As such, a preliminary investigation of the SEMT method applied to the Euler equations is conducted and some areas for needed improvement in future work are identified. In this work, it is

  9. A semi-discrete finite element method for a class of time-fractional diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Sun, HongGuang; Chen, Wen; Sze, K Y

    2013-05-13

    As fractional diffusion equations can describe the early breakthrough and the heavy-tail decay features observed in anomalous transport of contaminants in groundwater and porous soil, they have been commonly used in the related mathematical descriptions. These models usually involve long-time-range computation, which is a critical obstacle for their application; improvement of computational efficiency is of great significance. In this paper, a semi-discrete method is presented for solving a class of time-fractional diffusion equations that overcome the critical long-time-range computation problem. In the procedure, the spatial domain is discretized by the finite element method, which reduces the fractional diffusion equations to approximate fractional relaxation equations. As analytical solutions exist for the latter equations, the burden arising from long-time-range computation can effectively be minimized. To illustrate its efficiency and simplicity, four examples are presented. In addition, the method is used to solve the time-fractional advection-diffusion equation characterizing the bromide transport process in a fractured granite aquifer. The prediction closely agrees with the experimental data, and the heavy-tail decay of the anomalous transport process is well represented. PMID:23547234

  10. A semi-discrete finite element method for a class of time-fractional diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Sun, HongGuang; Chen, Wen; Sze, K Y

    2013-05-13

    As fractional diffusion equations can describe the early breakthrough and the heavy-tail decay features observed in anomalous transport of contaminants in groundwater and porous soil, they have been commonly used in the related mathematical descriptions. These models usually involve long-time-range computation, which is a critical obstacle for their application; improvement of computational efficiency is of great significance. In this paper, a semi-discrete method is presented for solving a class of time-fractional diffusion equations that overcome the critical long-time-range computation problem. In the procedure, the spatial domain is discretized by the finite element method, which reduces the fractional diffusion equations to approximate fractional relaxation equations. As analytical solutions exist for the latter equations, the burden arising from long-time-range computation can effectively be minimized. To illustrate its efficiency and simplicity, four examples are presented. In addition, the method is used to solve the time-fractional advection-diffusion equation characterizing the bromide transport process in a fractured granite aquifer. The prediction closely agrees with the experimental data, and the heavy-tail decay of the anomalous transport process is well represented.

  11. Mixed-finite element and finite volume discretization for heavy brine simulations in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzia, A.; Putti, M.

    2002-10-01

    Recently, a new theory of high-concentration brine transport in groundwater has been developed. This approach is based on two nonlinear mass conservation equations, one for the fluid (flow equation) and one for the salt (transport equation), both having nonlinear diffusion terms. In this paper, we present and analyze a numerical technique for the solution of such a model. The approach is based on the mixed hybrid finite element method for the discretization of the diffusion terms in both the flow and transport equations, and a high-resolution TVD finite volume scheme for the convective term. This latter technique is coupled to the discretized diffusive flux by means of a time-splitting approach. A commonly used benchmark test (Elder problem) is used to verify the robustness and nonoscillatory behavior of the proposed scheme and to test the validity of two different formulations, one based on using pressure head [psi] and concentration c as dependent variables, and one using pressure p and mass fraction [omega] as dependent variables. It is found that the latter formulation gives more accurate and reliable results, in particular, at large times. The numerical model is then compared against a semi-analytical solution and the results of a laboratory test. These tests are used to verify numerically the performance and robustness of the proposed numerical scheme when high-concentration gradients (i.e., the double nonlinearity) are present.

  12. Discrete element method model and damping performance of bean bag dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Tianning; Wang, Xiaopeng; Li, Yinggang

    2014-11-01

    Bean bag dampers (BBDs) have been widely applied in engineering to attenuate the vibration of a structural system, but the theoretical analysis on BBDs has been scarcely reported because of their nonlinear damping performance and complex mechanism. In this work, a three-dimensional model of a BBD was established based on the discrete element method (DEM); its flexible boundary was discretized. The model was verified by comparing simulation with test data. Based on the model, the selection of proper particle diameter on the flexible boundary of the BBD was discussed first, and then the effects of internal particle size of the BBD, the BBD's tightness and the gap between BBD and the inner wall of its enclosure on the energy dissipation capacity were studied. Moreover, the filling ratio of BBD (total internal particles' volume/the flexible boundary's capacity) was defined to quantitatively describe the tightness of BBD, and the effects of the internal particle size, the natural frequency of primary system and the enclosure size on the optimum tightness of the BBD were also considered. The results can be used as a guide in the design of BBDs.

  13. First-principles study of site occupancy of 3d, 4d and 5d transition-metal elements in L10TiAl

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Chao

    2008-01-01

    Using a statistical-mechanical Wagner-Schottky model parametrized by first-principles density-functional (DFT-GGA) calculations on 32-atom supercells, we predict the lattice site occupancy of 3d (Ti-Cu), 4d (Zr-Ag) and 5d (Hf-Au) transition-metal elements in L10 TiAl intermetallic compound as a function of both alloy composition and temperature. The effects of local atomic relaxations, anisotropic lattice distortions, as well as magnetism on point defect energetics are fully taken into account. Our calculations show that, at all alloy compositions and temperatures, Zr and Hf consistently show a preference for the Ti sublattice, while Co, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Re, Os, Ir, Pt and Au consistently show a preference for the Al sublattice. In contrast, the site preference of V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ta and W strongly depend on both alloy stoichiometry and temperature. Our calculated results compare favorably with the existing theoretical and experimental studies in the literature.

  14. A framework for grand scale parallelization of the combined finite discrete element method in 2d

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Z.; Rougier, E.; Knight, E. E.; Munjiza, A.

    2014-09-01

    Within the context of rock mechanics, the Combined Finite-Discrete Element Method (FDEM) has been applied to many complex industrial problems such as block caving, deep mining techniques (tunneling, pillar strength, etc.), rock blasting, seismic wave propagation, packing problems, dam stability, rock slope stability, rock mass strength characterization problems, etc. The reality is that most of these were accomplished in a 2D and/or single processor realm. In this work a hardware independent FDEM parallelization framework has been developed using the Virtual Parallel Machine for FDEM, (V-FDEM). With V-FDEM, a parallel FDEM software can be adapted to different parallel architecture systems ranging from just a few to thousands of cores.

  15. Discrete-element model for the interaction between ocean waves and sea ice

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Pan, Wenxiao

    2012-01-05

    We present a discrete element method (DEM) model to simulate the mechanical behavior of sea ice in response to ocean waves. The wave/ice interaction can potentially lead to the fracture and fragmentation of sea ice depending on the wave amplitude and period. The fracture behavior of sea ice is explicitly modeled by a DEM method, where sea ice is modeled by densely packed spherical particles with finite size. These particles are bonded together at their contact points through mechanical bonds that can sustain both tensile & compressive forces and moments. Fracturing can be naturally represented by the sequential breaking of mechanical bonds. For a given amplitude and period of incident ocean wave, the model provides information for the spatial distribution and time evolution of stress and micro-fractures and the fragment size distribution. We demonstrate that the fraction of broken bonds,, increases with increasing wave amplitude. In contrast, the ice fragment size decreases with increasing amplitude.

  16. A hybrid mortar virtual element method for discrete fracture network simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetto, Matías Fernando; Berrone, Stefano; Borio, Andrea; Pieraccini, Sandra; Scialò, Stefano

    2016-02-01

    The most challenging issue in performing underground flow simulations in Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN) is to effectively tackle the geometrical difficulties of the problem. In this work we put forward a new application of the Virtual Element Method combined with the Mortar method for domain decomposition: we exploit the flexibility of the VEM in handling polygonal meshes in order to easily construct meshes conforming to the traces on each fracture, and we resort to the mortar approach in order to "weakly" impose continuity of the solution on intersecting fractures. The resulting method replaces the need for matching grids between fractures, so that the meshing process can be performed independently for each fracture. Numerical results show optimal convergence and robustness in handling very complex geometries.

  17. Mechanical behavior modeling of sand-rubber chips mixtures using discrete element method (DEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidgahee, Danial Rezazadeh; Hosseininia, Ehsan Seyedi

    2013-06-01

    Rubber shreds in mixture with sandy soils are widely used in geotechnical purposes due to their specific controlled compressibility characteristics and light weight. Various studies have been carried out for sand or rubber chips content in order to restrain the compressibility of the mass in different structures such as backfills, road embankments, etc. Considering different rubber contents, sand-rubber mixtures can be made which lead mechanical properties of the blend to go through changes. The aim of this paper is to study the effect of adding different rubber portions on the global engineering properties of the mixtures. This study is performed by using Discrete Element Method (DEM). The simulations showed that adding rubber up to a particular fraction can improve maximum bearing stress characteristics comparing to sand alone masses. Taking the difference between sand and rubber stiffness into account, the result interpretation can be developed to other soft and rigid particle mixtures such as powders or polymers.

  18. Discrete element simulation of dense granular flow in a modified Couette cell.

    SciTech Connect

    Lechman, Jeremy B.; Grest, Gary Stephen

    2005-02-01

    Large-scale three dimensional Discrete Element simulations of granular flow in a modified split-bottom Couette cell for packs of up to 180,000 mono-disperse spheres are presented and compared with experiments. We find that the velocity profiles collapse onto a universal curve not only at the surface but also in the bulk of the pack until slip between layers becomes significant. In agreement with experiment, we find similar relations between the cell geometry and parameters involved in rescaling the velocities at the surface and in the bulk. Likewise, a change in the shape of the shear zone is observed as predicted for tall packs once the center of the shear zone is correctly defined; although the transition does not appear to be first order. Finally, the effect of cohesion is considered as a means to test the theoretical predictions.

  19. Dynamical systems model and discrete element simulations of a tapped granular column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, A. D.; Blackmore, D.; Tricoche, X. M.; Urban, K.; Zuo, L.

    2013-06-01

    We present an approximate dynamical systems model for the mass center trajectory of a tapped column of N uniform, inelastic, spheres (diameter d), in which collisional energy loss is governed by the Walton-Braun linear loading-unloading soft interaction. Rigorous analysis of the model, akin to the equations for the motion of a single bouncing ball on a vibrating plate, reveals a parameter γ≔2aω2(1+e)/g that gauges the dynamical regimes and their transitions. In particular, we find bifurcations from periodic to chaotic dynamics that depend on frequency ω, amplitude a/d of the tap. Dynamics predicted by the model are also qualitatively observed in discrete element simulations carried out over a broad range of the tap parameters.

  20. Discrete Element Method simulations of the saturation of aeolian sand transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pähtz, Thomas; Omeradžić, Amir; Carneiro, Marcus V.; Araújo, Nuno A. M.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2015-03-01

    The saturation length of aeolian sand transport (Ls), characterizing the distance needed by wind-blown sand to adapt to changes in the wind shear, is essential for accurate modeling of the morphodynamics of Earth's sandy landscapes and for explaining the formation and shape of sand dunes. In the last decade, it has become a widely accepted hypothesis that Ls is proportional to the characteristic distance needed by transported particles to reach the wind speed (the "drag length"). Here we challenge this hypothesis. From extensive numerical Discrete Element Method simulations, we find that, for medium and strong winds, Ls∝Vs2/g, where Vs is the saturated value of the average speed of sand particles traveling above the surface and g is the gravitational constant. We show that this proportionality is consistent with a recent analytical model, in which the drag length is just one of four similarly important length scales relevant for sand transport saturation.

  1. A discontinuous Galerkin finite element discretization of the Euler equations for compressible and incompressible fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Pesch, L. Vegt, J.J.W. van der

    2008-05-10

    Using the generalized variable formulation of the Euler equations of fluid dynamics, we develop a numerical method that is capable of simulating the flow of fluids with widely differing thermodynamic behavior: ideal and real gases can be treated with the same method as an incompressible fluid. The well-defined incompressible limit relies on using pressure primitive or entropy variables. In particular entropy variables can provide numerical methods with attractive properties, e.g. fulfillment of the second law of thermodynamics. We show how a discontinuous Galerkin finite element discretization previously used for compressible flow with an ideal gas equation of state can be extended for general fluids. We also examine which components of the numerical method have to be changed or adapted. Especially, we investigate different possibilities of solving the nonlinear algebraic system with a pseudo-time iteration. Numerical results highlight the applicability of the method for various fluids.

  2. Simulation of the hydraulic fracture process in two dimensions using a discrete element method.

    PubMed

    Torres, Sergio Andres Galindo; Castaño, Jose Daniel Muñoz

    2007-06-01

    We introduce a discrete element simulation for the hydraulic fracture process in a petroleum well which takes into account the elastic behavior of the rock and the Mohr-Coulomb fracture criterium. The rock is modeled as an array of Voronoi polygons joined by elastic beams, which are submitted to tectonical stresses and the hydrostatic pressure of the fracturing fluid. The fluid pressure is treated like that of a hydraulic column. The simulation reproduces well the time and dimensions of real fracture processes. We also include an analysis of the fracturing fluid loss due to the permeability of the rock which is useful in an efficiency analysis of the treatment. The model is a first step for future applications in the petroleum industry.

  3. Discrete element method study of fuel relocation and dispersal during loss-of-coolant accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govers, K.; Verwerft, M.

    2016-09-01

    The fuel fragmentation, relocation and dispersal (FFRD) during LOCA transients today retain the attention of the nuclear safety community. The fine fragmentation observed at high burnup may, indeed, affect the Emergency Core Cooling System performance: accumulation of fuel debris in the cladding ballooned zone leads to a redistribution of the temperature profile, while dispersal of debris might lead to coolant blockage or to debris circulation through the primary circuit. This work presents a contribution, by discrete element method, towards a mechanistic description of the various stages of FFRD. The fuel fragments are described as a set of interacting particles, behaving as a granular medium. The model shows qualitative and quantitative agreement with experimental observations, such as the packing efficiency in the balloon, which is shown to stabilize at about 55%. The model is then applied to study fuel dispersal, for which experimental parametric studies are both difficult and expensive.

  4. Effect of type of luting agents on stress distribution in the bone surrounding implants supporting a three-unit fixed dental prosthesis: 3D finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Ehsan; Abedian, Alireza; Iranmanesh, Pedram; Khazaei, Saber

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osseointegration of dental implants is influenced by many biomechanical factors that may be related to stress distribution. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of type of luting agent on stress distribution in the bone surrounding implants, which support a three-unit fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) using finite element (FE) analysis. Materials and Methods: A 3D FE model of a three-unit FDP was designed replacing the maxillary first molar with maxillary second premolar and second molar as the abutments using CATIA V5R18 software and analyzed with ABAQUS/CAE 6.6 version. The model was consisted of 465108 nodes and 86296 elements and the luting agent thickness was considered 25 μm. Three load conditions were applied on eight points in each functional cusp in horizontal (57.0 N), vertical (200.0 N) and oblique (400.0 N, θ = 120°) directions. Five different luting agents were evaluated. All materials were assumed to be linear elastic, homogeneous, time independent and isotropic. Results: For all luting agent types, the stress distribution pattern in the cortical bone, connectors, implant and abutment regions was almost uniform among the three loads. Furthermore, the maximum von Mises stress of the cortical bone was at the palatal side of second premolar. Likewise, the maximum von Mises stress in the connector region was in the top and bottom of this part. Conclusion: Luting agents transfer the load to cortical bone and different types of luting agents do not affect the pattern of load transfer. PMID:25709676

  5. Investigation of the surface generation mechanism of mechanical polishing engineering ceramics using discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xuesong

    2014-09-01

    Machining technology about ceramics has been developed very fast over recent years due to the growing industrial demand of higher machining accuracy and better surface quality of ceramic elements, while the nature of hard and brittle ceramics makes it difficult to acquire damage-free and ultra-smooth surface. Ceramic bulk can be treated as an assemblage of discrete particles bonded together randomly as the micro-structure of ceramics consists of crystal particles and pores, and the inter-granular fracture of the ceramics can be naturally represented by the separation of particles due to breakage of bonds. Discrete element method (DEM) provides a promising approach for constructing an effective model to describe the tool-workpiece interaction and can serve as a predicting simulation tool in analyzing the complicated surface generation mechanism and is employed in this research to simulate the mechanical polishing process of ceramics and surface integrity. In this work, a densely packed particle assembly system of the polycrystalline Si3N4 has been generated using bonded-particle model to represent the ceramic workpiece numerically. The simulation results justify that the common critical depth of cut cannot be used as the effective parameters for evaluating brittle to ductile transformation in ceramic polishing process. Therefore, a generalized criterion of defining the range of ductile regime machining has been developed based on the numerical results. Furthermore, different distribution of pressure chain is observed with different depth of cut which ought to have intense relationship with special structure of ceramics. This study also justified the advantage of DEM model in its capability of revealing the mechanical behaviors of ceramics at micro-scale.

  6. Ga, Ca, and 3d transition element (Cr through Zn) partitioning among spinel-lherzolite phases from the Lanzo massif, Italy: Analytical results and crystal chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Wogelius, R.A.; Fraser, D.G.

    1994-06-01

    Ultramafic rocks exposed in Lanzo massif, Italy is a record of mantle geochemistry, melting, sub-solidus re-equilibration. Plagioclase(+ spinel)-lherzolite samples were analyzed by Scanning Proton Microscopy, other techniques. Previous work postulated partial melting events and a two-stage sub-solidus cooling history; this paper notes Ga enrichment on spinel-clinopyroxene grain boundaries, high Ga and transition element content of spinel, and pyroxene zonation in Ca and Al. Trace element levels in olivine and orthopyroxene are also presented. Zoning trends are interpreted as due to diffusion during cooling. Olivine-clinopyroxene Cr and Ca exchange as well as clinopyroxene and spinel zonation trends indicate that the massif experienced at least two sub-solidus cooling episodes, one at 20 kbar to 1000 C and one at 8 kbar <750C. Ga levels in cores of Lanzo high-Cr spinels are high (82-66 ppM) relative to other mantle spinels (66-40 ppM), indicating enrichment. Ga content of ultramafic spinels apparently increases with Cr content; this may be due to: increased Ga solubility stemming from crystal chemical effects and/or higher Ga activities in associated silicate melts. Thus, during melting, high-Cr residual spinel may tend to buffer solid-phase Ga level. These spinels are not only rich in Ga and Cr (max 26.37 el. wt %), but also in Fe (max 21.07 el. wt %), Mn (max 3400 ppM), and Zn (max 2430 ppM). These enrichments are again due to melt extraction and partitioning into spinel structure. Low Ni (min 1050 ppM) levels are due to unsuccessful competition of Ni with Cr for octahedral structural sites caused by crystal field. Comparisons of change in partitioning vs Cr content among several 3d transition elements for spinels from Lanzo, other localities allow us to separate crystal field effects from bulk chemical effects and to show that in typical assemblages, inversion of olivine-spinel partition coefficient for Ni from <1 to >1 should occur at 11% el. wt. Cr in spinel.

  7. A new discrete-element approach for the assessment of the seismic resistance of composite reinforced concrete-masonry buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Calio, I.; Cannizzaro, F.; Marletta, M.; Panto, B.; D'Amore, E.

    2008-07-08

    In the present study a new discrete-element approach for the evaluation of the seismic resistance of composite reinforced concrete-masonry structures is presented. In the proposed model, unreinforced masonry panels are modelled by means of two-dimensional discrete-elements, conceived by the authors for modelling masonry structures, whereas the reinforced concrete elements are modelled by lumped plasticity elements interacting with the masonry panels through nonlinear interface elements. The proposed procedure was adopted for the assessment of the seismic response of a case study confined-masonry building which was conceived to be a typical representative of a wide class of residential buildings designed to the requirements of the 1909 issue of the Italian seismic code and widely adopted in the aftermath of the 1908 earthquake for the reconstruction of the cities of Messina and Reggio Calabria.

  8. FUN3D Manual: 12.4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2014-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.4, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixedelement unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  9. The semi-discrete Galerkin finite element modelling of compressible viscous flow past an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A method is developed to solve the two-dimensional, steady, compressible, turbulent boundary-layer equations and is coupled to an existing Euler solver for attached transonic airfoil analysis problems. The boundary-layer formulation utilizes the semi-discrete Galerkin (SDG) method to model the spatial variable normal to the surface with linear finite elements and the time-like variable with finite differences. A Dorodnitsyn transformed system of equations is used to bound the infinite spatial domain thereby permitting the use of a uniform finite element grid which provides high resolution near the wall and automatically follows boundary-layer growth. The second-order accurate Crank-Nicholson scheme is applied along with a linearization method to take advantage of the parabolic nature of the boundary-layer equations and generate a non-iterative marching routine. The SDG code can be applied to any smoothly-connected airfoil shape without modification and can be coupled to any inviscid flow solver. In this analysis, a direct viscous-inviscid interaction is accomplished between the Euler and boundary-layer codes, through the application of a transpiration velocity boundary condition. Results are presented for compressible turbulent flow past NACA 0012 and RAE 2822 airfoils at various freestream Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers, and angles of attack. All results show good agreement with experiment, and the coupled code proved to be a computationally-efficient and accurate airfoil analysis tool.

  10. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  11. A comparison of 1D analytical model and 3D finite element analysis with experiments for a rosen-type piezoelectric transformer.

    PubMed

    Boukazouha, F; Poulin-Vittrant, G; Tran-Huu-Hue, L P; Bavencoffe, M; Boubenider, F; Rguiti, M; Lethiecq, M

    2015-07-01

    This article is dedicated to the study of Piezoelectric Transformers (PTs), which offer promising solutions to the increasing need for integrated power electronics modules within autonomous systems. The advantages offered by such transformers include: immunity to electromagnetic disturbances; ease of miniaturisation for example, using conventional micro fabrication processes; and enhanced performance in terms of voltage gain and power efficiency. Central to the adequate description of such transformers is the need for complex analytical modeling tools, especially if one is attempting to include combined contributions due to (i) mechanical phenomena owing to the different propagation modes which differ at the primary and secondary sides of the PT; and (ii) electrical phenomena such as the voltage gain and power efficiency, which depend on the electrical load. The present work demonstrates an original one-dimensional (1D) analytical model, dedicated to a Rosen-type PT and simulation results are successively compared against that of a three-dimensional (3D) Finite Element Analysis (COMSOL Multiphysics software) and experimental results. The Rosen-type PT studied here is based on a single layer soft PZT (P191) with corresponding dimensions 18 mm × 3 mm × 1.5 mm, which operated at the second harmonic of 176 kHz. Detailed simulational and experimental results show that the presented 1D model predicts experimental measurements to within less than 10% error of the voltage gain at the second and third resonance frequency modes. Adjustment of the analytical model parameters is found to decrease errors relative to experimental voltage gain to within 1%, whilst a 2.5% error on the output admittance magnitude at the second resonance mode were obtained. Relying on the unique assumption of one-dimensionality, the present analytical model appears as a useful tool for Rosen-type PT design and behavior understanding.

  12. Preliminary 3-D finite element analyses of the triggering mechanism of an occasional reactivation of a large landslide in stiff clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lollino, Piernicola; Fazio, Nunzio Luciano; Vennari, Carmela; Parise, Mario

    2015-04-01

    In December 2013 a large landslide occurred along a clay slope located at the south-western outskirts of the Montescaglioso village (Basilicata, Southern Italy) as a consequence of intense and prolonged rainfalls that presumably caused a significant increment of the pore water pressures in the slope. The slope is formed of stiff clays belonging to the formation of the Subappennine Blue Clays, which are over-consolidated and characterized by medium plasticity. According to aerial photos dating back to 1950s, the slope was already affected by previous landslide processes, so that the examined landslide process can be classified as an occasional reactivation according to the well-known classification of Cruden & Varnes (1996). Also, during the last decades several man-made actions in the area resulted in strong changes in the original water surface network that could have played some role in the slope reactivation. Based on displacement data, obtained from a monitoring system installed few days after the phenomenon, and still in function, at present the landslide does not show relevant signs of activity. Preliminary 2-D and 3-D finite element analyses have been carried out to investigate the factors that controlled the mechanism of reactivation of the landslide. The numerical model has been setup based on the available topographical, geological and geomorphological information, the geotechnical properties of the involved soils and the information concerning the piezometric regime in the slope. The results indicate that the mobilized shear strength of the clays ranges between the typical post-peak and residual values for this type of material and confirmed that the strong increment of the pore water pressures in the slope induced by the exceptional rainfalls occurred in the previous days can be identified as the main triggering factor of the reactivation.

  13. Development of a 3D finite element acoustic model to predict the sound reduction index of stud based double-leaf walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, A.; Wang, C. J.; Yahiaoui, K.; Mynors, D. J.; Morgan, T.; Nguyen, V. B.; English, M.

    2014-11-01

    Building standards incorporating quantitative acoustical criteria to ensure adequate sound insulation are now being implemented. Engineers are making great efforts to design acoustically efficient double-wall structures. Accordingly, efficient simulation models to predict the acoustic insulation of double-leaf wall structures are needed. This paper presents the development of a numerical tool that can predict the frequency dependent sound reduction index R of stud based double-leaf walls at one-third-octave band frequency range. A fully vibro-acoustic 3D model consisting of two rooms partitioned using a double-leaf wall, considering the structure and acoustic fluid coupling incorporating the existing fluid and structural solvers are presented. The validity of the finite element (FE) model is assessed by comparison with experimental test results carried out in a certified laboratory. Accurate representation of the structural damping matrix to effectively predict the R values are studied. The possibilities of minimising the simulation time using a frequency dependent mesh model was also investigated. The FEA model presented in this work is capable of predicting the weighted sound reduction index Rw along with A-weighted pink noise C and A-weighted urban noise Ctr within an error of 1 dB. The model developed can also be used to analyse the acoustically induced frequency dependent geometrical behaviour of the double-leaf wall components to optimise them for best acoustic performance. The FE modelling procedure reported in this paper can be extended to other building components undergoing fluid-structure interaction (FSI) to evaluate their acoustic insulation.

  14. TH-C-12A-08: New Compact 10 MV S-Band Linear Accelerator: 3D Finite-Element Design and Monte Carlo Dose Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Baillie, D; St Aubin, J; Fallone, B; Steciw, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To design a new compact S-band linac waveguide capable of producing a 10 MV x-ray beam, while maintaining the length (27.5 cm) of current 6 MV waveguides. This will allow higher x-ray energies to be used in our linac-MRI systems with the same footprint. Methods: Finite element software COMSOL Multiphysics was used to design an accelerator cavity matching one published in an experiment breakdown study, to ensure that our modeled cavities do not exceed the threshold electric fields published. This cavity was used as the basis for designing an accelerator waveguide, where each cavity of the full waveguide was tuned to resonate at 2.997 GHz by adjusting the cavity diameter. The RF field solution within the waveguide was calculated, and together with an electron-gun phase space generated using Opera3D/SCALA, were input into electron tracking software PARMELA to compute the electron phase space striking the x-ray target. This target phase space was then used in BEAM Monte Carlo simulations to generate percent depth doses curves for this new linac, which were then used to re-optimize the waveguide geometry. Results: The shunt impedance, Q-factor, and peak-to-mean electric field ratio were matched to those published for the breakdown study to within 0.1% error. After tuning the full waveguide, the peak surface fields are calculated to be 207 MV/m, 13% below the breakdown threshold, and a d-max depth of 2.42 cm, a D10/20 value of 1.59, compared to 2.45 cm and 1.59, respectively, for the simulated Varian 10 MV linac and brehmsstrahlung production efficiency 20% lower than a simulated Varian 10 MV linac. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the design of a functional 27.5 cm waveguide producing 10 MV photons with characteristics similar to a Varian 10 MV linac.

  15. A 3D finite element-based model order reduction method for parametric resonance and whirling analysis of anisotropic rotor-bearing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Wang, Yu; Zi, Yanyang; He, Zhengjia

    2015-12-01

    A generalized and efficient model for rotating anisotropic rotor-bearing systems is presented in this paper with full considerations of the system's anisotropy in stiffness, inertia and damping. Based on the 3D finite element model and the model order reduction method, the effects of anisotropy in shaft and bearings on the forced response and whirling of anisotropic rotor-bearing systems are systematically investigated. First, the coefficients of journal bearings are transformed from the fixed frame to the rotating one. Due to the anisotropy in shaft and bearings, the motion is governed by differential equations with periodically time-variant coefficients. Then, a free-interface complex component mode synthesis (CMS) method is employed to generate efficient reduced-order models (ROM) for the periodically time-variant systems. In order to solve the obtained equations, a variant of Hill's method for systems with multiple harmonic excitations is developed. Four dimensionless parameters are defined to quantify the types and levels of anisotropy of bearings. Finally, the effects of the four types of anisotropy on the forced response and whirl orbits are studied. Numerical results show that the anisotropy of bearings in stiffness splits the sole resonant peak into two isolated ones, but the anisotropy of bearings in damping coefficients mainly affect the response amplitudes. Moreover, the whirl orbits become much more complex when the shaft and bearings are both anisotropic. In addition, the cross-coupling stiffness coefficients of bearings significantly affect the dynamic behaviors of the systems and cannot be neglected, though they are often much smaller than the principle stiffness terms.

  16. Gaussian-2 (G2) theory for third-row elements: A systematic study of the effect of the 3d orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Brian J.; Radom, Leo

    1998-09-01

    The importance of the inclusion of the 3d orbitals on third-row atoms in the correlation space in G2 theory has been systematically examined through calculations on the third-row G2 test set. Compared with standard G2, this G2(d) approach gives better agreement with experiment for the evaluation of ionization energies, a slightly poorer agreement for atomization energies, and much the same agreement for the very small sub-set of electron affinities and proton affinities. Overall, there is only slightly better agreement with experiment. However, when mixing of the 3d orbitals of the third-row atom with valence orbitals on the adjacent atoms is strong, inclusion of the 3d orbitals in the correlation space becomes a prerequisite to obtaining reliable results. Standard G2 theory is unsuitable in these circumstances. Similar conclusions pertain for the more economical G2(MP2)(d) method and for the full G2(QCI)(d) method. Inclusion of the 3d orbitals in the correlation space greatly increases the computer time required for a G2 calculation so some simple additive corrections to the G2 energy to approximate the effect of this inclusion have been investigated. These additivity methods generally underestimate the effect of the 3d orbitals but give reasonable agreement with the full G2(d) calculations in most cases. They cannot be used, however, in situations where the 3d orbital mixing is strong.

  17. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  18. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  19. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  20. A New Discrete Element Analysis Method for Predicting Hip Joint Contact Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Christine L.; Maas, Steve A.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.; Ellis, Benjamin J.; Peters, Christopher L.; Anderson, Andrew E.

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying cartilage contact stress is paramount to understanding hip osteoarthritis. Discrete element analysis (DEA) is a computationally efficient method to estimate cartilage contact stresses. Previous applications of DEA have underestimated cartilage stresses and yielded unrealistic contact patterns because they assumed constant cartilage thickness and/or concentric joint geometry. The study objectives were to: 1) develop a DEA model of the hip joint with subject-specific bone and cartilage geometry, 2) validate the DEA model by comparing DEA predictions to those of a validated finite element analysis (FEA) model, and 3) verify both the DEA and FEA models with a linear-elastic boundary value problem. Springs representing cartilage in the DEA model were given lengths equivalent to the sum of acetabular and femoral cartilage thickness and joint space in the FEA model. Material properties and boundary/loading conditions were equivalent. Walking, descending, and ascending stairs were simulated. Solution times for DEA and FEA models were ~7 seconds and ~65 minutes, respectively. Irregular, complex contact patterns predicted by DEA were in excellent agreement with FEA. DEA contact areas were 7.5%, 9.7% and 3.7% less than FEA for walking, descending stairs, and ascending stairs, respectively. DEA models predicted higher peak contact stresses (9.8–13.6 MPa) and average contact stresses (3.0–3.7 MPa) than FEA (6.2–9.8 and 2.0–2.5 MPa, respectively). DEA overestimated stresses due to the absence of the Poisson’s effect and a direct contact interface between cartilage layers. Nevertheless, DEA predicted realistic contact patterns when subject-specific bone geometry and cartilage thickness were used. This DEA method may have application as an alternative to FEA for pre-operative planning of joint-preserving surgery such as acetabular reorientation during peri-acetabular osteotomy. PMID:23453394

  1. Discrete Element Models of the Micromechanics of Sedimentary Rock: The Role of Organization vs. Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutt, D. F.; McPherson, B. J.

    2001-12-01

    The micromechanics of sedimentary rock deformation are a fundamental aspect of many research fields, ranging from geotechnical engineering to petroleum recovery and hazardous waste disposal. Laboratory triaxial tests yield information concerning macroscopic behaviors but are not capable of quantifying micromechanical processes such as microcracking and localization. Thus, to quantify micromechanical processes we employed the discrete element method (DEM) of rock deformation, calibrated with triaxial test results. This DEM simulates rock using rigid disc shaped particles bonded at contacts between particles. Previous studies demonstrated that this type of DEM can qualitatively and quantitatively mimic macroscopic behaviors of triaxial tests. An important conclusion of these studies is that a number of particles must be bonded together with higher bond strengths than the surrounding particles to achieve a steeper strength envelope of rocks. This process, termed clustering, is the focus of this study. We hypothesize that since clusters posses a more complicated geometry, they may increase failure strength at elevated confining pressures by interlocking and creating a higher apparent friction. An alternative hypothesis is that the clusters change force chain development by allowing chains to persist longer in specimens. This ultimately causes failure to occur at higher strengths compared to unclustered material. A systematic study comparing effects of cluster shape, particle friction, and force chain development was undertaken. Several model simulations with various cluster shapes and sizes were compared with each other as well as single particle models with high friction coefficients (>1). Preliminary results suggest that the organization of the particle clusters play a key role in increasing the strength envelope. Particle friction coefficients needed to increase slopes of the strength envelopes are well beyond those of geological materials measured in the laboratory

  2. Optimizing the Pipe Diameter of the Pipe Belt Conveyor Based on Discrete Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yong-cun; Wang, Shuang; Hu, Kun; Li, De-yong

    2016-03-01

    In order to increase the transport volume of the pipe belt conveyor and reduce lateral pressure of the supporting roller set, this study aims to optimize the pipe diameter of the pipe belt conveyor. A mechanical model of the pipe belt conveyor with six supporting roller sets in the belt bearing section was built based on the infinitesimal method, and the formula for calculating the lateral pressure of each supporting roller was deduced on the basis of reasonable assumption. Simulated analysis was carried out on the operation process of the pipe belt conveyor by using the discrete element method. The result showed that, when the other conditions were certain, as the pipe diameter increased, the average lateral pressure of the supporting roller set increased, with a gradually decreasing increment, which was consistent with the calculated result of the theoretical formula. An optimized pipe diameter under the current conditions was obtained by fitting the curve of the formula for calculating the transport volume of the pipe belt conveyor and its simulation curve. It provided a certain reference value for improving the transport efficiency and prolonging the service life of the pipe belt conveyor.

  3. Discrete element simulation of charging and mixed layer formation in the ironmaking blast furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Tamoghna; Saxén, Henrik

    2015-11-01

    The burden distribution in the ironmaking blast furnace plays an important role for the operation as it affects the gas flow distribution, heat and mass transfer, and chemical reactions in the shaft. This work studies certain aspects of burden distribution by small-scale experiments and numerical simulation by the discrete element method (DEM). Particular attention is focused on the complex layer-formation process and the problems associated with estimating the burden layer distribution by burden profile measurements. The formation of mixed layers is studied, and a computational method for estimating the extent of the mixed layer, as well as its voidage, is proposed and applied on the results of the DEM simulations. In studying a charging program and its resulting burden distribution, the mixed layers of coke and pellets were found to show lower voidage than the individual burden layers. The dynamic evolution of the mixed layer during the charging process is also analyzed. The results of the study can be used to gain deeper insight into the complex charging process of the blast furnace, which is useful in the design of new charging programs and for mathematical models that do not consider the full behavior of the particles in the burden layers.

  4. Discrete element modelling (DEM) input parameters: understanding their impact on model predictions using statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Z.; Wilkinson, S. K.; Stitt, E. H.; Marigo, M.

    2015-09-01

    Selection or calibration of particle property input parameters is one of the key problematic aspects for the implementation of the discrete element method (DEM). In the current study, a parametric multi-level sensitivity method is employed to understand the impact of the DEM input particle properties on the bulk responses for a given simple system: discharge of particles from a flat bottom cylindrical container onto a plate. In this case study, particle properties, such as Young's modulus, friction parameters and coefficient of restitution were systematically changed in order to assess their effect on material repose angles and particle flow rate (FR). It was shown that inter-particle static friction plays a primary role in determining both final angle of repose and FR, followed by the role of inter-particle rolling friction coefficient. The particle restitution coefficient and Young's modulus were found to have insignificant impacts and were strongly cross correlated. The proposed approach provides a systematic method that can be used to show the importance of specific DEM input parameters for a given system and then potentially facilitates their selection or calibration. It is concluded that shortening the process for input parameters selection and calibration can help in the implementation of DEM.

  5. Intersecting dilated convex polyhedra method for modeling complex particles in discrete element method

    PubMed Central

    Nye, Ben; Kulchitsky, Anton V; Johnson, Jerome B

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a new method for representing concave polyhedral particles in a discrete element method as unions of convex dilated polyhedra. This method offers an efficient way to simulate systems with a large number of (generally concave) polyhedral particles. The method also allows spheres, capsules, and dilated triangles to be combined with polyhedra using the same approach. The computational efficiency of the method is tested in two different simulation setups using different efficiency metrics for seven particle types: spheres, clusters of three spheres, clusters of four spheres, tetrahedra, cubes, unions of two octahedra (concave), and a model of a computer tomography scan of a lunar simulant GRC-3 particle. It is shown that the computational efficiency of the simulations degrades much slower than the increase in complexity of the particles in the system. The efficiency of the method is based on the time coherence of the system, and an efficient and robust distance computation method between polyhedra as particles never intersect for dilated particles. PMID:26300584

  6. Characterization of high order spatial discretizations and lumping techniques for discontinuous finite element SN transport

    SciTech Connect

    Maginot, P. G.; Ragusa, J. C.; Morel, J. E.

    2013-07-01

    We examine several possible methods of mass matrix lumping for discontinuous finite element discrete ordinates transport using a Lagrange interpolatory polynomial trial space. Though positive outflow angular flux is guaranteed with traditional mass matrix lumping in a purely absorbing 1-D slab cell for the linear discontinuous approximation, we show that when used with higher degree interpolatory polynomial trial spaces, traditional lumping does yield strictly positive outflows and does not increase in accuracy with an increase in trial space polynomial degree. As an alternative, we examine methods which are 'self-lumping'. Self-lumping methods yield diagonal mass matrices by using numerical quadrature restricted to the Lagrange interpolatory points. Using equally-spaced interpolatory points, self-lumping is achieved through the use of closed Newton-Cotes formulas, resulting in strictly positive outflows in pure absorbers for odd power polynomials in 1-D slab geometry. By changing interpolatory points from the traditional equally-spaced points to the quadrature points of the Gauss-Legendre or Lobatto-Gauss-Legendre quadratures, it is possible to generate solution representations with a diagonal mass matrix and a strictly positive outflow for any degree polynomial solution representation in a pure absorber medium in 1-D slab geometry. Further, there is no inherent limit to local truncation error order of accuracy when using interpolatory points that correspond to the quadrature points of high order accuracy numerical quadrature schemes. (authors)

  7. Discrete-element model for the interaction between ocean waves and sea ice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhijie; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M; Pan, Wenxiao

    2012-01-01

    We present a discrete-element method (DEM) model to simulate the mechanical behavior of sea ice in response to ocean waves. The interaction of ocean waves and sea ice potentially can lead to the fracture and fragmentation of sea ice depending on the wave amplitude and period. The fracture behavior of sea ice explicitly is modeled by a DEM method where sea ice is modeled by densely packed spherical particles with finite sizes. These particles are bonded together at their contact points through mechanical bonds that can sustain both tensile and compressive forces and moments. Fracturing naturally can be represented by the sequential breaking of mechanical bonds. For a given amplitude and period of incident ocean waves, the model provides information for the spatial distribution and time evolution of stress and microfractures and the fragment size distribution. We demonstrate that the fraction of broken bonds α increases with increasing wave amplitude. In contrast, the ice fragment size l decreases with increasing amplitude. This information is important for the understanding of the breakup of individual ice floes and floe fragment size.

  8. Study on small-strain behaviours of methane hydrate sandy sediments using discrete element method

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Yanxin; Cheng Yipik; Xu Xiaomin; Soga, Kenichi

    2013-06-18

    Methane hydrate bearing soil has attracted increasing interest as a potential energy resource where methane gas can be extracted from dissociating hydrate-bearing sediments. Seismic testing techniques have been applied extensively and in various ways, to detect the presence of hydrates, due to the fact that hydrates increase the stiffness of hydrate-bearing sediments. With the recognition of the limitations of laboratory and field tests, wave propagation modelling using Discrete Element Method (DEM) was conducted in this study in order to provide some particle-scale insights on the hydrate-bearing sandy sediment models with pore-filling and cementation hydrate distributions. The relationship between shear wave velocity and hydrate saturation was established by both DEM simulations and analytical solutions. Obvious differences were observed in the dependence of wave velocity on hydrate saturation for these two cases. From the shear wave velocity measurement and particle-scale analysis, it was found that the small-strain mechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sandy sediments are governed by both the hydrate distribution patterns and hydrate saturation.

  9. Efficient implementation of superquadric particles in Discrete Element Method within an open-source framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podlozhnyuk, Alexander; Pirker, Stefan; Kloss, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Particle shape representation is a fundamental problem in the Discrete Element Method (DEM). Spherical particles with well known contact force models remain popular in DEM due to their relative simplicity in terms of ease of implementation and low computational cost. However, in real applications particles are mostly non-spherical, and more sophisticated particle shape models, like superquadric shape, must be introduced in DEM. The superquadric shape can be considered as an extension of spherical or ellipsoidal particles and can be used for modeling of spheres, ellipsoids, cylinder-like and box(dice)-like particles just varying five shape parameters. In this study we present an efficient C++ implementation of superquadric particles within the open-source and parallel DEM package LIGGGHTS. To reduce computational time several ideas are employed. In the particle-particle contact detection routine we use the minimum bounding spheres and the oriented bounding boxes to reduce the number of potential contact pairs. For the particle-wall contact an accurate analytical solution was found. We present all necessary mathematics for the contact detection and contact force calculation. The superquadric DEM code implementation was verified on test cases such as angle of repose and hopper/silo discharge. The simulation results are in good agreement with experimental data and are presented in this paper. We show adequacy of the superquadric shape model and robustness of the implemented superquadric DEM code.

  10. Numerical sedimentation particle-size analysis using the Discrete Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, R.; Pérez-Aparicio, J. L.; Gómez-Hernández, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    Sedimentation tests are widely used to determine the particle size distribution of a granular sample. In this work, the Discrete Element Method interacts with the simulation of flow using the well known one-way-coupling method, a computationally affordable approach for the time-consuming numerical simulation of the hydrometer, buoyancy and pipette sedimentation tests. These tests are used in the laboratory to determine the particle-size distribution of fine-grained aggregates. Five samples with different particle-size distributions are modeled by about six million rigid spheres projected on two-dimensions, with diameters ranging from 2.5 ×10-6 m to 70 ×10-6 m, forming a water suspension in a sedimentation cylinder. DEM simulates the particle's movement considering laminar flow interactions of buoyant, drag and lubrication forces. The simulation provides the temporal/spatial distributions of densities and concentrations of the suspension. The numerical simulations cannot replace the laboratory tests since they need the final granulometry as initial data, but, as the results show, these simulations can identify the strong and weak points of each method and eventually recommend useful variations and draw conclusions on their validity, aspects very difficult to achieve in the laboratory.

  11. Computer simulations of particle-bubble interactions and particle sliding using Discrete Element Method.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, R; Ata, S; Wanless, E J; Moreno-Atanasio, R

    2012-09-01

    Three dimensional Discrete Element Method (DEM) computer simulations have been carried out to analyse the kinetics of collision of multiple particles against a stationary bubble and the sliding of the particles over the bubble surface. This is the first time that a computational analysis of the sliding time and particle packing arrangements of multiple particles on the surface of a bubble has been carried out. The collision kinetics of monodisperse (33 μm in radius) and polydisperse (12-33 μm in radius) particle systems have been analysed in terms of the time taken by 10%, 50% and 100% of the particles to collide against the bubble. The dependencies of these collision times on the strength of hydrophobic interactions follow relationships close to power laws. However, minimal sensitivity of the collision times to particle size was found when linear and square relationships of the hydrophobic force with particles radius were considered. The sliding time for single particles has corroborated published theoretical expressions. Finally, a good qualitative comparison with experiments has been observed with respect to the particle packing at the bottom of the bubble after sliding demonstrating the usefulness of computer simulations in the studies of particle-bubble systems.

  12. Computational Study of Laminar Flow Control on a Subsonic Swept Wing Using Discrete Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Streett, Craig L.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of parabolized stability equations and secondary instability theory has been applied to a low-speed swept airfoil model with a chord Reynolds number of 7.15 million, with the goals of (i) evaluating this methodology in the context of transition prediction for a known configuration for which roughness based crossflow transition control has been demonstrated under flight conditions and (ii) of analyzing the mechanism of transition delay via the introduction of discrete roughness elements (DRE). Roughness based transition control involves controlled seeding of suitable, subdominant crossflow modes, so as to weaken the growth of naturally occurring, linearly more unstable crossflow modes. Therefore, a synthesis of receptivity, linear and nonlinear growth of stationary crossflow disturbances, and the ensuing development of high frequency secondary instabilities is desirable to understand the experimentally observed transition behavior. With further validation, such higher fidelity prediction methodology could be utilized to assess the potential for crossflow transition control at even higher Reynolds numbers, where experimental data is currently unavailable.

  13. Simulation of growth normal fault sandbox tests using the 2D discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Sheng-Shin; Lin, Ming-Lang; Huang, Wen-Chao; Nien, Wei-Tung; Liu, Huan-Chi; Chan, Pei-Chen

    2015-01-01

    A fault slip can cause the deformation of shallow soil layers and destroy infrastructures. The Shanchiao Fault on the west side of the Taipei Basin is one such fault. The activities of the Shanchiao Fault have caused the quaternary sediment beneath the Taipei Basin to become deformed, damaging structures, traffic construction, and utility lines in the area. Data on geological drilling and dating have been used to determine that a growth fault exists in the Shanchiao Fault. In an experiment, a sandbox model was built using noncohesive sandy soil to simulate the existence of a growth fault in the Shanchiao Fault and forecast the effect of the growth fault on shear-band development and ground differential deformation. The experimental results indicated that when a normal fault contains a growth fault at the offset of the base rock, the shear band develops upward beside the weak side of the shear band of the original-topped soil layer, and surfaces considerably faster than that of the single-topped layer. The offset ratio required is approximately one-third that of the single-cover soil layer. In this study, a numerical simulation of the sandbox experiment was conducted using a discrete element method program, PFC2D, to simulate the upper-covering sand layer shear-band development pace and the scope of a growth normal fault slip. The simulation results indicated an outcome similar to that of the sandbox experiment, which can be applied to the design of construction projects near fault zones.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Dry Granular Flow Impacting a Rigid Wall Using the Discrete Element Method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fengyuan; Fan, Yunyun; Liang, Li; Wang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a clump model based on Discrete Element Method. The clump model was more close to the real particle than a spherical particle. Numerical simulations of several tests of dry granular flow impacting a rigid wall flowing in an inclined chute have been achieved. Five clump models with different sphericity have been used in the simulations. By comparing the simulation results with the experimental results of normal force on the rigid wall, a clump model with better sphericity was selected to complete the following numerical simulation analysis and discussion. The calculation results of normal force showed good agreement with the experimental results, which verify the effectiveness of the clump model. Then, total normal force and bending moment of the rigid wall and motion process of the granular flow were further analyzed. Finally, comparison analysis of the numerical simulations using the clump model with different grain composition was obtained. By observing normal force on the rigid wall and distribution of particle size at the front of the rigid wall at the final state, the effect of grain composition on the force of the rigid wall has been revealed. It mainly showed that, with the increase of the particle size, the peak force at the retaining wall also increase. The result can provide a basis for the research of relevant disaster and the design of protective structures. PMID:27513661

  15. Borehole Breakouts Induced in Arkosic Sandstones and a Discrete Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Moon, T.; Haimson, B. C.

    2016-04-01

    A series of laboratory drilling experiments were conducted on two arkosic sandstones (Tenino and Tablerock) under polyaxial far-field stress conditions (σ h ≠ σ H ≠ σ v ). V-shaped breakouts, aligned with the σ h direction and revealing stress-dependent dimensions (width and length), were observed in the sandstones. The microscale damage pattern leading to the breakouts, however, is different between the two, which is attributed to the difference in their cementation. The dominant micromechanism in Tenino sandstone is intergranular microcracking occurring in clay minerals filling the spaces between clastic grains. On the other hand, intra- and transgranular microcracking taking place in the grain itself prevails in Tablerock sandstone. To capture the grain-scale damage and reproduce the failure localization observed around the borehole in the laboratory, we used a discrete element (DE) model in which a grain breakage algorithm was implemented. The microparameters needed in the numerical model were calibrated by running material tests and comparing the macroscopic responses of the model to the ones measured in the laboratory. It is shown that DE modeling is capable of simulating the microscale damage of the rock and replicating the localized damage zone observed in the laboratory. In addition, the numerically induced breakout width is determined at a very early stage of the damage localization and is not altered for the rest of the failure process.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Dry Granular Flow Impacting a Rigid Wall Using the Discrete Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fengyuan; Fan, Yunyun; Liang, Li; Wang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a clump model based on Discrete Element Method. The clump model was more close to the real particle than a spherical particle. Numerical simulations of several tests of dry granular flow impacting a rigid wall flowing in an inclined chute have been achieved. Five clump models with different sphericity have been used in the simulations. By comparing the simulation results with the experimental results of normal force on the rigid wall, a clump model with better sphericity was selected to complete the following numerical simulation analysis and discussion. The calculation results of normal force showed good agreement with the experimental results, which verify the effectiveness of the clump model. Then, total normal force and bending moment of the rigid wall and motion process of the granular flow were further analyzed. Finally, comparison analysis of the numerical simulations using the clump model with different grain composition was obtained. By observing normal force on the rigid wall and distribution of particle size at the front of the rigid wall at the final state, the effect of grain composition on the force of the rigid wall has been revealed. It mainly showed that, with the increase of the particle size, the peak force at the retaining wall also increase. The result can provide a basis for the research of relevant disaster and the design of protective structures. PMID:27513661

  17. Discrete element simulation of charging and mixed layer formation in the ironmaking blast furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Tamoghna; Saxén, Henrik

    2016-11-01

    The burden distribution in the ironmaking blast furnace plays an important role for the operation as it affects the gas flow distribution, heat and mass transfer, and chemical reactions in the shaft. This work studies certain aspects of burden distribution by small-scale experiments and numerical simulation by the discrete element method (DEM). Particular attention is focused on the complex layer-formation process and the problems associated with estimating the burden layer distribution by burden profile measurements. The formation of mixed layers is studied, and a computational method for estimating the extent of the mixed layer, as well as its voidage, is proposed and applied on the results of the DEM simulations. In studying a charging program and its resulting burden distribution, the mixed layers of coke and pellets were found to show lower voidage than the individual burden layers. The dynamic evolution of the mixed layer during the charging process is also analyzed. The results of the study can be used to gain deeper insight into the complex charging process of the blast furnace, which is useful in the design of new charging programs and for mathematical models that do not consider the full behavior of the particles in the burden layers.

  18. Two-dimensional discrete element models of debris avalanches: Parameterization and the reproducibility of experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banton, J.; Villard, P.; Jongmans, D.; Scavia, C.

    2009-11-01

    Application of the discrete element method (DEM) to model avalanches of granular materials requires determining the correct geometric and rheological parameters for and between the particles as well as for the basal surface. The use of spherical (circular in 2-D) particles enhances particle rolling, yielding excessive runout values. The solution usually adopted to correct this effect is to introduce a drag force which artificially slows down the particle velocities. The aim of this study is to test the capability of the DEM to simulate well-controlled unsteady channelized granular flows, considering the measured properties of the particles and of the basal surface which naturally contribute to dissipate energy. We first performed a parametrical analysis on a simple 2-D model in order to estimate the influence of particle shape, friction parameters, and restitution coefficients on the dynamics of the flow and on the deposit geometry. We then simulated three channelized laboratory experiments performed with two materials and two bed linings. Using the geometrical layout and the values of the mechanical parameters provided by the authors, we obtained a remarkable agreement between the observed and 2-D simulated deposit shapes for the three experiments. Also, the computed mass evolution with time was very consistent with the experimental snapshots in all cases. These results highlight the capability of the DEM technique for modeling avalanche of granular material when the particle shape as well as the friction and restitution coefficients are properly considered.

  19. Modeling the Interaction Between Hydraulic and Natural Fractures Using Dual-Lattice Discrete Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jing; Huang, Hai; Deo, Milind

    2015-10-01

    The interaction between hydraulic fractures (HF) and natural fractures (NF) will lead to complex fracture networks due to the branching and merging of natural and hydraulic fractures in unconventional reservoirs. In this paper, a newly developed hydraulic fracturing simulator based on discrete element method is used to predict the generation of complex fracture network in the presence of pre-existing natural fractures. By coupling geomechanics and reservoir flow within a dual lattice system, this simulator can effectively capture the poro-elastic effects and fluid leakoff into the formation. When HFs are intercepting single or multiple NFs, complex mechanisms such as direct crossing, arresting, dilating and branching can be simulated. Based on the model, the effects of injected fluid rate and viscosity, the orientation and permeability of NFs and stress anisotropy on the HF-NF interaction process are investigated. Combined impacts from multiple parameters are also examined in the paper. The numerical results show that large values of stress anisotropy, intercepting angle, injection rate and viscosity will impede the opening of NFs.

  20. A discrete element based simulation framework to investigate particulate spray deposition processes

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Debanjan Zohdi, Tarek I.

    2015-06-01

    This work presents a computer simulation framework based on discrete element method to analyze manufacturing processes that comprise a loosely flowing stream of particles in a carrier fluid being deposited on a target surface. The individual particulate dynamics under the combined action of particle collisions, fluid–particle interactions, particle–surface contact and adhesive interactions is simulated, and aggregated to obtain global system behavior. A model for deposition which incorporates the effect of surface energy, impact velocity and particle size, is developed. The fluid–particle interaction is modeled using appropriate spray nozzle gas velocity distributions and a one-way coupling between the phases. It is found that the particle response times and the release velocity distribution of particles have a combined effect on inter-particle collisions during the flow along the spray. It is also found that resolution of the particulate collisions close to the target surface plays an important role in characterizing the trends in the deposit pattern. Analysis of the deposit pattern using metrics defined from the particle distribution on the target surface is provided to characterize the deposition efficiency, deposit size, and scatter due to collisions.

  1. Shale Fracture Analysis using the Combined Finite-Discrete Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, J. W.; Lei, Z.; Rougier, E.; Knight, E. E.; Viswanathan, H.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (hydrofrac) is a successful method used to extract oil and gas from highly carbonate rocks like shale. However, challenges exist for industry experts estimate that for a single $10 million dollar lateral wellbore fracking operation, only 10% of the hydrocarbons contained in the rock are extracted. To better understand how to improve hydrofrac recovery efficiencies and to lower its costs, LANL recently funded the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project: "Discovery Science of Hydraulic Fracturing: Innovative Working Fluids and Their Interactions with Rocks, Fractures, and Hydrocarbons". Under the support of this project, the LDRD modeling team is working with the experimental team to understand fracture initiation and propagation in shale rocks. LANL's hybrid hydro-mechanical (HM) tool, the Hybrid Optimization Software Suite (HOSS), is being used to simulate the complex fracture and fragment processes under a variety of different boundary conditions. HOSS is based on the combined finite-discrete element method (FDEM) and has been proven to be a superior computational tool for multi-fracturing problems. In this work, the comparison of HOSS simulation results to triaxial core flooding experiments will be presented.

  2. Discrete element modeling of boudinage: Insights on rock rheology, matrix flow, and evolution of geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Steffen; Urai, Janos L.

    2012-01-01

    We use discrete element model simulations to model the full boudinage process from initial fracturing of intact material to post-fracture flow of material into gaps between fragments and to investigate the role which the material properties of the weak and strong layers play in this process. The models are deformed in 2D plane strain under a range of confining stresses, in coaxial bulk flow. Results show that the material properties, i.e. Mohr-Coulomb or quasi-viscous for the matrix and elastic-brittle for the competent layer, lead to the development of natural looking boudin morphologies and deformation patterns in the matrix. The details of the matrix rheology only have a minor influence on the morphology of the boudins. By varying the material properties of the competent layer between fully brittle and semi-ductile we obtain a wide range of deformation patterns ranging from pinch-and-swell structures to a variety of boudin types including drawn, shear band and straight sided torn boudins. In a number of models we observe rotation of the boudin blocks despite the applied deformation being purely coaxial. These rotations are generally related to asymmetrical (rhombic) boudin shapes. Some features observed in natural boudins such as concave block faces or the formation of veins between fragments are not modeled because pore fluids are not yet included in our model.

  3. Deformation of forearcs caused by subduction of aseismic ridges: The role of ridge orientation and convergence direction investigated with 3D finite-element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeumann, Stefanie; Hampel, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Subduction of aseismic oceanic ridges causes considerable deformation of the forearc region. To investigate the role of ridge orientation relative to the margin and convergence direction on the style of forearc deformation, we developed a series of 3D finite-elemente models, in which a rigid oceanic plate carrying the model ridge subducts beneath a deformable forearc wedge. Experiments were carried out for angles of 30°, 60° and 90° between the ridge axis and the trench and for different convergence directions. In the experiments, in which the ridge axis is parallel to the convergence direction, the ridge is stationary; in all other experiments, the ridge migrates along the margin and thus affects different regions of the forearc. Our results show that the ridge indents and uplifts the forearc in all models. For obliquely subducting ridges the displacement and strain fields become highly asymmetric regardless if the ridge is stationary or migrates along the forearc. Only if the ridge is stationary and oriented perpendicular to the margin, the deformation is symmetric relative to the ridge axis. Stationary ridges show uplift only above the ridge tip, whereas a migrating ridge causes a wave of uplift above the leading flank of the ridge followed by subsidence above the trailing flank. Horizontal strain components show domains of both extension and shortening, with extension occurring above the ridge tip and shortening above the ridge flanks. To compare our results with natural case studies, we computed additional models reflecting the setting of the stationary Cocos Ridge subducting beneath southern Costa Rica and of the Nazca Ridge, which migrates along the Peruvian margin. The results of these adjusted models are in good agreement with field observations. For the model of the Cocos Ridge the highest degree of shortening occurs normal to the margin, which coincides with the location of a thrust belt in the forearc of Costa Rica with its maximum shortening inboard

  4. Patient-specific geometrical modeling of orthopedic structures with high efficiency and accuracy for finite element modeling and 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huajun; Xiang, Chunling; Zeng, Canjun; Ouyang, Hanbin; Wong, Kelvin Kian Loong; Huang, Wenhua

    2015-12-01

    We improved the geometrical modeling procedure for fast and accurate reconstruction of orthopedic structures. This procedure consists of medical image segmentation, three-dimensional geometrical reconstruction, and assignment of material properties. The patient-specific orthopedic structures reconstructed by this improved procedure can be used in the virtual surgical planning, 3D printing of real orthopedic structures and finite element analysis. A conventional modeling consists of: image segmentation, geometrical reconstruction, mesh generation, and assignment of material properties. The present study modified the conventional method to enhance software operating procedures. Patient's CT images of different bones were acquired and subsequently reconstructed to give models. The reconstruction procedures were three-dimensional image segmentation, modification of the edge length and quantity of meshes, and the assignment of material properties according to the intensity of gravy value. We compared the performance of our procedures to the conventional procedures modeling in terms of software operating time, success rate and mesh quality. Our proposed framework has the following improvements in the geometrical modeling: (1) processing time: (femur: 87.16 ± 5.90 %; pelvis: 80.16 ± 7.67 %; thoracic vertebra: 17.81 ± 4.36 %; P < 0.05); (2) least volume reduction (femur: 0.26 ± 0.06 %; pelvis: 0.70 ± 0.47, thoracic vertebra: 3.70 ± 1.75 %; P < 0.01) and (3) mesh quality in terms of aspect ratio (femur: 8.00 ± 7.38 %; pelvis: 17.70 ± 9.82 %; thoracic vertebra: 13.93 ± 9.79 %; P < 0.05) and maximum angle (femur: 4.90 ± 5.28 %; pelvis: 17.20 ± 19.29 %; thoracic vertebra: 3.86 ± 3.82 %; P < 0.05). Our proposed patient-specific geometrical modeling requires less operating time and workload, but the orthopedic structures were generated at a higher rate of success as compared with the conventional method. It is expected to benefit the surgical planning of orthopedic

  5. Nonlinear Acceleration of a Continuous Finite Element Discretization of the Self-Adjoint Angular Flux Form of the Transport Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Sanchez; Cristian Rabiti; Yaqi Wang

    2013-11-01

    Nonlinear acceleration of a continuous finite element (CFE) discretization of the transport equation requires a modification of the transport solution in order to achieve local conservation, a condition used in nonlinear acceleration to define the stopping criterion. In this work we implement a coarse-mesh finite difference acceleration for a CFE discretization of the second-order self-adjoint angular flux (SAAF) form of the transport equation and use a postprocessing to enforce local conservation. Numerical results are given for one-group source calculations of one-dimensional slabs. We also give a novel formal derivation of the boundary conditions for the SAAF.

  6. DSI3D-RCS: Theory manual

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, N.; Steich, D.; Cook, G.; Eme, B.

    1995-03-16

    The DSI3D-RCS code is designed to numerically evaluate radar cross sections on complex objects by solving Maxwell`s curl equations in the time-domain and in three space dimensions. The code has been designed to run on the new parallel processing computers as well as on conventional serial computers. The DSI3D-RCS code is unique for the following reasons: Allows the use of unstructured non-orthogonal grids, allows a variety of cell or element types, reduces to be the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method when orthogonal grids are used, preserves charge or divergence locally (and globally), is conditionally stable, is non-dissipative, is accurate for non-orthogonal grids. This method is derived using a Discrete Surface Integration (DSI) technique. As formulated, the DSI technique can be used with essentially arbitrary unstructured grids composed of convex polyhedral cells. This implementation of the DSI algorithm allows the use of unstructured grids that are composed of combinations of non-orthogonal hexahedrons, tetrahedrons, triangular prisms and pyramids. This algorithm reduces to the conventional FDTD method when applied on a structured orthogonal hexahedral grid.

  7. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  8. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  9. Evolution of stress-induced borehole breakout in inherently anisotropic rock: Insights from discrete element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, K.; Kwok, C. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to better understand the mechanisms controlling the initiation, propagation, and ultimate pattern of borehole breakouts in shale formation when drilled parallel with and perpendicular to beddings. A two-dimensional discrete element model is constructed to explicitly represent the microstructure of inherently anisotropic rocks by inserting a series of individual smooth joints into an assembly of bonded rigid discs. Both isotropic and anisotropic hollow square-shaped samples are generated to represent the wellbores drilled perpendicular to and parallel with beddings at reduced scale. The isotropic model is validated by comparing the stress distribution around borehole wall and along X axis direction with analytical solutions. Effects of different factors including the particle size distribution, borehole diameter, far-field stress anisotropy, and rock anisotropy are systematically evaluated on the stress distribution and borehole breakout propagation. Simulation results reveal that wider particle size distribution results in the local stress perturbations which cause localization of cracks. Reduction of borehole diameter significantly alters the crack failure from tensile to shear and raises the critical pressure. Rock anisotropy plays an important role on the stress state around wellbore which lead to the formation of preferred cracks under hydrostatic stress. Far-field stress anisotropy plays a dominant role in the shape of borehole breakout when drilled perpendicular to beddings while a secondary role when drilled parallel with beddings. Results from this study can provide fundamental insights on the underlying particle-scale mechanisms for previous findings in laboratory and field on borehole stability in anisotropic rock.

  10. Discrete Element Modeling of Stick-Slip Instability and Induced Microseismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaei, Cyrus; Hazzard, Jim; Chalaturnyk, Rick

    2016-03-01

    Using Particle Flow Code, a discrete element model is presented in this paper that allows direct modeling of stick-slip behavior in pre-existing weak planes such as joints, beddings, and faults. The model is used to simulate a biaxial sliding experiment from literature on a saw-cut specimen of Sierra granite with a single fault. The fault is represented by the smooth-joint contact model. Also, an algorithm is developed to record the stick-slip induced microseismic events along the fault. Once the results compared well with laboratory data, a parametric study was conducted to investigate the evolution of the model's behavior due to varying factors such as resolution of the model, particle elasticity, fault coefficient of friction, fault stiffness, and normal stress. The results show a decrease in shear strength of the fault in the models with smaller particles, smaller coefficient of friction of the fault, harder fault surroundings, softer faults, and smaller normal stress on the fault. Also, a higher rate of displacement was observed for conditions resulting in smaller shear strength. An increase in b-values was observed by increasing the resolution or decreasing the normal stress on the fault, while b-values were not sensitive to changes in elasticity of the fault or its surrounding region. A larger number of recorded events were observed for the models with finer particles, smaller coefficient of friction of the fault, harder fault surroundings, harder fault, and smaller normal stress on the fault. The results suggest that it is possible for the two ends of a fault to be still while there are patches along the fault undergoing stick-slips. Such local stick-slips seem to provide a softer surrounding for their neighbor patches facilitating their subsequent stick-slips.

  11. Investigation of Crack Propagation in Rock using Discrete Sphero-Polyhedral Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behraftar, S.; Galindo-torres, S. A.; Scheuermann, A.; Li, L.; Williams, D.

    2014-12-01

    In this study a micro-mechanical model is developed to study the fracture propagation process in rocks. The model is represented by an array of bonded particles simulated by the Discrete Sphero-Polyhedral Element Model (DSEM), which was introduced by the authors previously and has been shown to be a suitable technique to model rock [1]. It allows the modelling of particles of general shape, with no internal porosity. The motivation behind using this technique is the desire to microscopically investigate the fracture propagation process and study the relationship between the microscopic and macroscopic behaviour of rock. The DSEM method is used to model the Crack Chevron Notch Brazilian Disc (CCNBD) test suggested by the International Society of Rock Mechanics (ISRM) for determining the fracture toughness of rock specimens. CCNBD samples with different crack inclination angles, are modelled to investigate their fracture mode. The Crack Mouth Opening Displacement (CMOD) is simulated and the results are validated using experimental results obtained from a previous study [2]. Fig. 1 shows the simulated and experimental results of crack propagation for different inclination angles of CCNBD specimens. The DSEM method can be used to predict crack trajectory and quantify crack propagation during loading. References: 1. Galindo-Torres, S. A., et al. "Breaking processes in three-dimensional bonded granular materials with general shapes." Computer Physics Communications 183.2 (2012): 266-277. 2. Erarslan, N., and D. J. Williams. "Mixed-mode fracturing of rocks under static and cyclic loading." Rock mechanics and rock engineering 46.5 (2013): 1035-1052.

  12. Utilizing the Discrete Element Method for the Modeling of Viscosity in Concentrated Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Kroupa, Martin; Vonka, Michal; Soos, Miroslav; Kosek, Juraj

    2016-08-23

    The rheological behavior of concentrated suspensions is a complicated problem because it originates in the collective motion of particles and their interaction with the surrounding fluid. For this reason, it is difficult to accurately model the effect of various system parameters on the viscosity even for highly simplified systems. We model the viscosity of a hard-sphere suspension subjected to high shear rates using the dynamic discrete element method (DEM) in three spatial dimensions. The contact interaction between particles was described by the Hertz model of elastic spheres (soft-sphere model), and the interaction of particles with flow was accounted for by the two-way coupling approach. The hydrodynamic interaction between particles was described by the lubrication theory accounting for the slip on particle surfaces. The viscosity in a simple-shear model was evaluated from the force balance on the wall. The obtained results are in close agreement with literature data for systems with hard spheres. Namely, the viscosity is shown to be independent of shear rate and primary particle size for monodisperse suspensions. In accordance with theory and experimental data, the viscosity grows rapidly with particle volume fraction. We show that this rheological behavior is predominantly caused by the lubrication forces. A novel approach based on the slip of water on a particle surface was developed to overcome the divergent behavior of lubrication forces. This approach was qualitatively validated with literature data from AFM measurements using a colloidal probe. The model presented in this work represents a new, robust, and versatile approach to the modeling of viscosity in suspensions with the possibility to include various interaction models and study their effect on viscosity. PMID:27479150

  13. Discrete Element Modeling of the Mobilization of Coarse Gravel Beds by Finer Gravel Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. M.; Tan, D.

    2012-12-01

    Recent research has shown that the addition of fine gravel particles to a coarse bed will mobilize the coarser bed, and that the effect is sufficiently strong that a pulse of fine gravel particles can mobilize an impacted coarser bed. Recent flume experiments have demonstrated that the degree of bed mobilization by finer particles is primarily dependent on the particle size ratio of the coarse and fine particles, rather than absolute size of either particle, provided both particles are sufficiently large. However, the mechanism behind the mobilization is not understood. It has previously been proposed that the mechanism is driven by a combination of geometric effects and hydraulic effects. For example, it has been argued that smaller particles fill in gaps along the bed, resulting in a smoother bed over which the larger particles are less likely to be disentrained and a reduced near-bed flow velocity and subsequent increased drag on protruding particles. Altered near-bed turbulence has also been cited as playing an important role. We perform simulations using the discrete element method with one-way fluid-solid coupling to conduct simulations of mobilization of a gravel bed by fine gravel particles. By independently and artificially controlling average and fluctuating velocity profiles, we systematically investigate the relative role that may be played by particle-particle interactions, average near-bed velocity profiles, and near-bed turbulence statistics. The simulations indicate that the relative importance of these mechanisms changes with the degree of mobilization of the bed. For higher bed mobility similar to bed sheets, particle-particle interactions, plays a significant role in an apparent rheology in the bed sheets, not unlike that observed in a dense granular flow of particles of different sizes. For conditions closer to a critical shear stress for bedload transport, the near-bed velocity profiles and turbulence statistics become increasingly important.

  14. Fish Passage though Hydropower Turbines: Simulating Blade Strike using the Discrete Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ

    2014-12-08

    mong the hazardous hydraulic conditions affecting anadromous and resident fish during their passage though turbine flows, two are believed to cause considerable injury and mortality: collision on moving blades and decompression. Several methods are currently available to evaluate these stressors in installed turbines, i.e. using live fish or autonomous sensor devices, and in reduced-scale physical models, i.e. registering collisions from plastic beads. However, a priori estimates with computational modeling approaches applied early in the process of turbine design can facilitate the development of fish-friendly turbines. In the present study, we evaluated the frequency of blade strike and nadir pressure environment by modeling potential fish trajectories with the Discrete Element Method (DEM) applied to fish-like composite particles. In the DEM approach, particles are subjected to realistic hydraulic conditions simulated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and particle-structure interactions—representing fish collisions with turbine blades—are explicitly recorded and accounted for in the calculation of particle trajectories. We conducted transient CFD simulations by setting the runner in motion and allowing for better turbulence resolution, a modeling improvement over the conventional practice of simulating the system in steady state which was also done here. While both schemes yielded comparable bulk hydraulic performance, transient conditions exhibited a visual improvement in describing flow variability. We released streamtraces (steady flow solution) and DEM particles (transient solution) at the same location from where sensor fish (SF) have been released in field studies of the modeled turbine unit. The streamtrace-based results showed a better agreement with SF data than the DEM-based nadir pressures did because the former accounted for the turbulent dispersion at the intake but the latter did not. However, the DEM-based strike frequency is more

  15. Coupled discrete element modeling of fluid injection into dense granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fengshou; Damjanac, Branko; Huang, Haiying

    2013-06-01

    The coupled displacement process of fluid injection into a dense granular medium is investigated numerically using a discrete element method (DEM) code PFC2D® coupled with a pore network fluid flow scheme. How a dense granular medium behaves in response to fluid injection is a subject of fundamental and applied research interests to better understand subsurface processes such as fluid or gas migration and formation of intrusive features as well as engineering applications such as hydraulic fracturing and geological storage in unconsolidated formations. The numerical analysis is performed with DEM executing the mechanical calculation and the network model solving the Hagen-Poiseuille equation between the pore spaces enclosed by chains of particles and contacts. Hydromechanical coupling is realized by data exchanging at predetermined time steps. The numerical results show that increase in the injection rate and the invading fluid viscosity and decrease in the modulus and permeability of the medium result in fluid flow behaviors displaying a transition from infiltration-governed to infiltration-limited and the granular medium responses evolving from that of a rigid porous medium to localized failure leading to the development of preferential paths. The transition in the fluid flow and granular medium behaviors is governed by the ratio between the characteristic times associated with fluid injection and hydromechanical coupling. The peak pressures at large injection rates when fluid leakoff is limited compare well with those from the injection experiments in triaxial cells in the literature. The numerical analysis also reveals intriguing tip kinematics field for the growth of a fluid channel, which may shed light on the occurrence of the apical inverted-conical features in sandstone and magma intrusion in unconsolidated formations.

  16. Utilizing the Discrete Element Method for the Modeling of Viscosity in Concentrated Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Kroupa, Martin; Vonka, Michal; Soos, Miroslav; Kosek, Juraj

    2016-08-23

    The rheological behavior of concentrated suspensions is a complicated problem because it originates in the collective motion of particles and their interaction with the surrounding fluid. For this reason, it is difficult to accurately model the effect of various system parameters on the viscosity even for highly simplified systems. We model the viscosity of a hard-sphere suspension subjected to high shear rates using the dynamic discrete element method (DEM) in three spatial dimensions. The contact interaction between particles was described by the Hertz model of elastic spheres (soft-sphere model), and the interaction of particles with flow was accounted for by the two-way coupling approach. The hydrodynamic interaction between particles was described by the lubrication theory accounting for the slip on particle surfaces. The viscosity in a simple-shear model was evaluated from the force balance on the wall. The obtained results are in close agreement with literature data for systems with hard spheres. Namely, the viscosity is shown to be independent of shear rate and primary particle size for monodisperse suspensions. In accordance with theory and experimental data, the viscosity grows rapidly with particle volume fraction. We show that this rheological behavior is predominantly caused by the lubrication forces. A novel approach based on the slip of water on a particle surface was developed to overcome the divergent behavior of lubrication forces. This approach was qualitatively validated with literature data from AFM measurements using a colloidal probe. The model presented in this work represents a new, robust, and versatile approach to the modeling of viscosity in suspensions with the possibility to include various interaction models and study their effect on viscosity.

  17. Approach to failure in a discrete element model of the compressive failure of porous rocks (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, F.; Varga, I.; Lennartz-Sassinek, S.; Main, I. G.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate how a porous rock sample approaches failure under uniaxial compression. Computer simulations are carried out in the framework of a discrete element model (DEM) which takes into account both the microstructure of the material and the dynamics of local fracturing, revealing much more detail and observation bandwidth in then granular mechanics than possible during standard laboratory tests. The synthetic sample is generated by sedimentation of randomly-sized spherical particles with a log-normal size distribution inside a cylindrical container. The cohesive interaction of particles is represented by beam elements that break when overstressed. The breaking rule takes into account both stretching and shear of particle contacts. When particles not connected by a beam come into contact their interaction is described by the Hertz contact law. The time evolution of the system is generated by molecular dynamics simulations in three dimensions. Computer simulations showed that under strain controlled uniaxial loading of the system micro-cracks initially nucleate in an uncorrelated way all over the sample. As loading proceeds localization occurs, i.e. the damage concentrates into a narrow damage band. Inside the damage band the material is crushed, into a poorly sorted mixture of fine powder and larger fragments with a power-law mass distribution, as observed in fault wear products (gouge) in natural and laboratory faults. Dynamic bursts of radiated energy, analogous to acoustic emissions observed in laboratory experiments, are identified as correlated trails of local fracture emerging as the consequence of stress redistribution. Characteristic quantities of burst such as size/rupture area, released elastic energy, and duration proved to have power law probability-size distributions over a broad range. The energy and duration of bursts have power law dependence on the rupture area created. As the system approaches macroscopic failure consecutive bursts become

  18. Quantitative Reconstructions of 3D Chemical Nanostructures in Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Rueda-Fonseca, P; Robin, E; Bellet-Amalric, E; Lopez-Haro, M; Den Hertog, M; Genuist, Y; André, R; Artioli, A; Tatarenko, S; Ferrand, D; Cibert, J

    2016-03-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry is used to extract a quantitative 3D composition profile of heterostructured nanowires. The analysis of hypermaps recorded along a limited number of projections, with a preliminary calibration of the signal associated with each element, is compared to the intensity profiles calculated for a model structure with successive shells of circular, elliptic, or faceted cross sections. This discrete tomographic technique is applied to II-VI nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy, incorporating ZnTe and CdTe and their alloys with Mn and Mg, with typical size down to a few nanometers and Mn or Mg content as low as 10%.

  19. 3D-Printed Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony K; Huynh, Wilson; Horowitz, Lisa F; Folch, Albert

    2016-03-14

    The advent of soft lithography allowed for an unprecedented expansion in the field of microfluidics. However, the vast majority of PDMS microfluidic devices are still made with extensive manual labor, are tethered to bulky control systems, and have cumbersome user interfaces, which all render commercialization difficult. On the other hand, 3D printing has begun to embrace the range of sizes and materials that appeal to the developers of microfluidic devices. Prior to fabrication, a design is digitally built as a detailed 3D CAD file. The design can be assembled in modules by remotely collaborating teams, and its mechanical and fluidic behavior can be simulated using finite-element modeling. As structures are created by adding materials without the need for etching or dissolution, processing is environmentally friendly and economically efficient. We predict that in the next few years, 3D printing will replace most PDMS and plastic molding techniques in academia.

  20. Layered nano-gratings by electron beam writing to form 3-level diffractive optical elements for 3D phase-offset holographic lithography.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Liang Leon; Herman, Peter R

    2015-12-21

    A multi-level nanophotonic structure is a major goal in providing advanced optical functionalities as found in photonic crystals and metamaterials. A three-level nano-grating phase mask has been fabricated in an electron-beam resist (ma-N) to meet the requirement of holographic generation of a diamond-like 3D nanostructure in photoresist by a single exposure step. A 2D mask with 600 nm periodicity is presented for generating first order diffracted beams with a preferred π/2 phase shift on the X- and Y-axes and with sufficient 1(st) order diffraction efficiency of 3.5% at 800 nm wavelength for creating a 3D periodic nanostructure in SU-8 photoresist. The resulting 3D structure is anticipated to provide an 8% complete photonic band gap (PBG) upon silicon inversion. A thin SiO2 layer was used to isolate the grating layers and multiple spin-coating steps served to planarize the final resist layer. A reversible soft coating (aquaSAVE) was introduced to enable SEM inspection and verification of each insulating grating layer. This e-beam lithographic method is extensible to assembling multiple layers of a nanophotonic structure.

  1. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  2. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  3. Influence of mobile shale on thrust faults: Insights from discrete element simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, S. L.; Morgan, J. K.

    2013-12-01

    We use two-dimensional discrete element method (DEM) simulations to study the effects of a two-layer mechanical stratigraphy on a gravitationally collapsing passive margin. The system consists of an upslope sedimentary wedge, overlying an extensional zone that is linked at depth with a downslope fold and thrust belt. The behavior of the system is dependent on the material properties and thickness of the competent units. The models are initially composed of a mobile shale unit overlain by a pre-delta unit. In DEM materials, the bulk rheology of the granular material is a product of the particle interactions, depending on a range of parameters, including friction and elastic moduli. Natural mobile shales underlying deltas are presumed to be viscous, and are therefore represented in DEM as very weak non-cohesive particles. The unbonded particles respond to loading by moving to areas of lower stress, i.e. out from beneath a growing sediment wedge. The bulk motion of the particles therefore flows away from the upslope extensional zone. Apparent viscosity is introduced in DEM materials due to time dependent numerical parameters such as viscous damping of particle motions. We characterized this apparent viscosity of this mobile shale unit with a series of shear box tests, with varying shear strain rates. The mobile shale particles have a viscosity of about 108 Pa*s, which is low for mobile shale. The low viscosity of our numerical materials can be compensated for by scaling time in our models, because the simulations are driven by sedimentary loading. By increasing the sedimentation rate by many orders of magnitude, we can approximate the natural values of shear stress in our simulations. Results are compared with the Niger Delta type locale for shale tectonics. The simulations succeed in creating an overall linked extensional-contractional system, as well as creating individual structures such as popups and intersecting forethrusts and backthrusts. In addition, toe

  4. Automated quadrilateral surface discretization method and apparatus usable to generate mesh in a finite element analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Blacker, Teddy D.

    1994-01-01

    An automatic quadrilateral surface discretization method and apparatus is provided for automatically discretizing a geometric region without decomposing the region. The automated quadrilateral surface discretization method and apparatus automatically generates a mesh of all quadrilateral elements which is particularly useful in finite element analysis. The generated mesh of all quadrilateral elements is boundary sensitive, orientation insensitive and has few irregular nodes on the boundary. A permanent boundary of the geometric region is input and rows are iteratively layered toward the interior of the geometric region. Also, an exterior permanent boundary and an interior permanent boundary for a geometric region may be input and the rows are iteratively layered inward from the exterior boundary in a first counter clockwise direction while the rows are iteratively layered from the interior permanent boundary toward the exterior of the region in a second clockwise direction. As a result, a high quality mesh for an arbitrary geometry may be generated with a technique that is robust and fast for complex geometric regions and extreme mesh gradations.

  5. A finite element technique for a system of fully-discrete time-dependent Joule heating equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Pius W. M.

    2016-06-01

    A system of decoupled nonlinear fully-discrete time-dependent Joule heating equation is studied. Instead of the traditional technique of combining the Euler and the finite element methods, we design a reliable scheme consisting of coupling the Non-standard finite difference in the time space and finite element method in the space variables. We prove for the optimal rate of convergence of the solution of the said scheme in both the H1 as well as the L2-norms. Furthermore, we show that the scheme under study preserves the properties of the exact solution. Numerical experiments are provided to confirm our theoretical analysis.

  6. Constraining the parameters of the EAP sea ice rheology from satellite observations and discrete element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamados, Michel; Heorton, Harry; Feltham, Daniel; Muir, Alan; Baker, Steven

    2016-04-01

    The new elastic-plastic anisotropic (EAP) rheology that explicitly accounts for the sub-continuum anisotropy of the sea ice cover has been implemented into the latest version of the Los Alamos sea ice model CICE. The EAP rheology is widely used in the climate modeling scientific community (i.e. CPOM stand alone, RASM high resolution regional ice-ocean model, MetOffice fully coupled model). Early results from sensitivity studies (Tsamados et al, 2013) have shown the potential for an improved representation of the observed main sea ice characteristics with a substantial change of the spatial distribution of ice thickness and ice drift relative to model runs with the reference visco-plastic (VP) rheology. The model contains one new prognostic variable, the local structure tensor, which quantifies the degree of anisotropy of the sea ice, and two parameters that set the time scale of the evolution of this tensor. Observations from high resolution satellite SAR imagery as well as numerical simulation results from a discrete element model (DEM, see Wilchinsky, 2010) have shown that these individual floes can organize under external wind and thermal forcing to form an emergent isotropic sea ice state (via thermodynamic healing, thermal cracking) or an anisotropic sea ice state (via Coulombic failure lines due to shear rupture). In this work we use for the first time in the context of sea ice research a mathematical metric, the Tensorial Minkowski functionals (Schroeder-Turk, 2010), to measure quantitatively the degree of anisotropy and alignment of the sea ice at different scales. We apply the methodology on the GlobICE Envisat satellite deformation product (www.globice.info), on a prototype modified version of GlobICE applied on Sentinel-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery and on the DEM ice floe aggregates. By comparing these independent measurements of the sea ice anisotropy as well as its temporal evolution against the EAP model we are able to constrain the

  7. The Effect of Loading Rate on Hydraulic Fracturing in Synthetic Granite - a Discrete Element Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomac, I.; Gutierrez, M.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracture initiation and propagation from a borehole in hard synthetic rock is modeled using the two dimensional Discrete Element Method (DEM). DEM uses previously established procedure for modeling the strength and deformation parameters of quasi-brittle rocks with the Bonded Particle Model (Itasca, 2004). A series of simulations of laboratory tests on granite in DEM serve as a reference for synthetic rock behavior. Fracturing is enabled by breaking parallel bonds between DEM particles as a result of the local stress state. Subsequent bond breakage induces fracture propagation during a time-stepping procedure. Hydraulic fracturing occurs when pressurized fluid induces hoop stresses around the wellbore which cause rock fracturing and serves for geo-reservoir permeability enhancement in oil, gas and geothermal industries. In DEM, a network of fluid pipes and reservoirs is used for mathematical calculation of fluid flow through narrow channels between DEM particles, where the hydro-mechanical coupling is fully enabled. The fluid flow calculation is superimposed with DEM stress-strain calculation at each time step. As a result, the fluid pressures during borehole pressurization in hydraulic fracturing, as well as, during the fracture propagation from the borehole, can be simulated. The objective of this study is to investigate numerically a hypothesis that fluid pressurization rate, or the fluid flow rate, influences upon character, shape and velocity of fracture propagation in rock. The second objective is to better understand and define constraints which are important for successful fracture propagation in quasi-brittle rock from the perspective of flow rate, fluid density, viscosity and compressibility relative to the rock physical properties. Results from this study indicate that not only too high fluid flow rates cause fracture arrest and multiple fracture branching from the borehole, but also that the relative compressibility of fracturing fluid and

  8. DISCRETE ELEMENT MODELING OF BLADE–STRIKE FREQUENCY AND SURVIVAL OF FISH PASSING THROUGH HYDROKINETIC TURBINES

    SciTech Connect

    Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2014-04-17

    Evaluating the consequences from blade-strike of fish on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbine blades is essential for incorporating environmental objectives into the integral optimization of machine performance. For instance, experience with conventional hydroelectric turbines has shown that innovative shaping of the blade and other machine components can lead to improved designs that generate more power without increased impacts to fish and other aquatic life. In this work, we used unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of turbine flow and discrete element modeling (DEM) of particle motion to estimate the frequency and severity of collisions between a horizontal axis MHK tidal energy device and drifting aquatic organisms or debris. Two metrics are determined with the method: the strike frequency and survival rate estimate. To illustrate the procedure step-by-step, an exemplary case of a simple runner model was run and compared against a probabilistic model widely used for strike frequency evaluation. The results for the exemplary case showed a strong correlation between the two approaches. In the application case of the MHK turbine flow, turbulent flow was modeled using detached eddy simulation (DES) in conjunction with a full moving rotor at full scale. The CFD simulated power and thrust were satisfactorily comparable to experimental results conducted in a water tunnel on a reduced scaled (1:8.7) version of the turbine design. A cloud of DEM particles was injected into the domain to simulate fish or debris that were entrained into the turbine flow. The strike frequency was the ratio of the count of colliding particles to the crossing sample size. The fish length and approaching velocity were test conditions in the simulations of the MHK turbine. Comparisons showed that DEM-based frequencies tend to be greater than previous results from Lagrangian particles and probabilistic models, mostly because the DEM scheme accounts for both the geometric

  9. A study of the rheology of planar granular flow of dumbbells using discrete element method simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Sandip; Khakhar, D. V.

    2016-10-01

    Granular materials handled in industries are typically non-spherical in shape and understanding the flow of such materials is important. The steady flow of mono-disperse, frictional, inelastic dumbbells in two-dimensions is studied by soft sphere, discrete element method simulations for chute flow and shear cell flow. The chute flow data are in the dense flow regime, while the shear cell data span a wide range of solid fractions. Results of a detailed parametric study for both systems are presented. In chute flow, increase in the aspect ratio of the dumbbells results in significant slowing of the flow at a fixed inclination and in the shear cell it results in increase in the shear stress and pressure for a fixed shear rate. The flow is well-described by the μ-I scaling for inertial numbers as high as I = 1, corresponding to solid fractions as low as ϕ = 0.3, where μ is the effective friction (the ratio of shear stress to pressure) and I is the inertial number (a dimensionless shear rate scaled with the time scale obtained from the local pressure). For a fixed inertial number, the effective friction increases by 60%-70% when aspect ratio is increased from 1.0 (sphere) to 1.9. At low values of the inertial number, there is little change in the solid fraction with aspect ratio of the dumbbells, whereas at high values of the inertial number, there is a significant increase in solid fraction with increase in aspect ratio. The dense flow data are well-described by the Jop-Forterre-Pouliquen model [P. Jop et al., Nature 441, 727-730 (2006)] with the model parameters dependent on the dumbbell aspect ratio. The variation of μ with I over the extended range shows a maximum in the range I ∈ (0.4, 0.5), while the solid fraction shows a faster than linear decrease with inertial number. A modified version of the JFP model for μ(I) and a power law model for ϕ(I) is shown to describe the combined data over the extended range of I.

  10. A new meso-scale discrete element model to study deposit differences in tsunamis and storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, W.; Weiss, R.

    2014-12-01

    A fundamental question in tsunami and storm studies is how to differentiate their deposits, which is key to the understanding of past events. Currently, there is no consistent differences due to wide variability of causative forces, topography, sediment source and post-depositional changes. One avenue to resolve these issues can potentially be numerical modeling. Conventional depth-averaged models help us learn general interactions between flow and sediments, but fail to reproduce small-scale depositional structures. We present a new meso-scale sediment transport model. The goal is to advance our knowledge of characteristic differences between storm and tsunami deposits and their relationship with the hydrodynamic processes in tsunamis and storms. Our transport model is based on the Discrete Element Method (DEM). While it is ideal to model every single sediment grains, contemporary computational power will be quickly exhausted due to the scale of interest. Therefore we employ the meso-scale method where a particle represents a group of grains. The volume of each particle is determined dynamically based on pickup rate from the bed and transport rate at the boundaries. During transport, it is assumed that the particle does not change. The motion of particles is governed by Newton's Second Law, with wave motion superimposed on its settling velocities. Hindered settling is implemented to allow interactions between particles through changes of local sediment concentration. Particles are deposited when they reach the bed, and merged into the top layer. Deposits consist of layers that are of the same constant thickness. Bed avalanching could occur where slope exceeds a certain threshold. The Nonlinear Shallow Water Equation (NSWE) is employed to model hydrodynamics. The system of NSWE is solved with a second-order upwind FVM numerical scheme. Wetting and drying is also implemented to handle inundation. In order to couple the depth integrated NSWE with DEM, a velocity

  11. Theoretical study of inverted sandwich type complexes of 4d transition metal elements: interesting similarities to and differences from 3d transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Yusaku I; Nakao, Yoshihide; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi

    2012-03-01

    Inverted sandwich type complexes (ISTCs) of 4d metals, (μ-η(6):η(6)-C(6)H(6))[M(DDP)](2) (DDPH = 2-{(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)amino}-4-{(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imino}pent-2-ene; M = Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Tc), were investigated with density functional theory (DFT) and MRMP2 methods, where a model ligand AIP (AIPH = (Z)-1-amino-3-imino-prop-1-ene) was mainly employed. When going to Nb (group V) from Y (group III) in the periodic table, the spin multiplicity of the ground state increases in the order singlet, triplet, and quintet for M = Y, Zr, and Nb, respectively, like 3d ISTCs reported recently. This is interpreted with orbital diagram and number of d electrons. However, the spin multiplicity decreases to either singlet or triplet in ISTC of Mo (group VI) and to triplet in ISTC of Tc (group VII), where MRMP2 method is employed because the DFT method is not useful here. These spin multiplicities are much lower than the septet of ISTC of Cr and the nonet of that of Mn. When going from 3d to 4d, the position providing the maximum spin multiplicity shifts to group V from group VII. These differences arise from the size of the 4d orbital. Because of the larger size of the 4d orbital, the energy splitting between two d(δ) orbitals of M(AIP) and that between the d(δ) and d(π) orbitals are larger in the 4d complex than in the 3d complex. Thus, when occupation on the d(δ) orbital starts, the low spin state becomes ground state, which occurs at group VI. Hence, the ISTC of Nb (group V) exhibits the maximum spin multiplicity.

  12. 3D mechanical analysis of aeronautical plain bearings: Validation of a finite element model from measurement of displacement fields by digital volume correlation and optical scanning tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germaneau, A.; Peyruseigt, F.; Mistou, S.; Doumalin, P.; Dupré, J.-C.

    2010-06-01

    On Airbus aircraft, spherical plain bearings are used on many components; in particular to link engine to pylon or pylon to wing. Design of bearings is based on contact pressure distribution on spherical surfaces. To determine this distribution, a 3D analysis of the mechanical behaviour of aeronautical plain bearing is presented in this paper. A numerical model has been built and validated from a comparison with 3D experimental measurements of kinematic components. For that, digital volume correlation (DVC) coupled with optical scanning tomography (OST) is employed to study the mechanical response of a plain bearing model made in epoxy resin. Experimental results have been compared with the ones obtained from the simulated model. This comparison enables us to study the influence of various boundary conditions to build the FE model. Some factors have been highlighted like the fitting behaviour which can radically change contact pressure distribution. This work shows the contribution of a representative mechanical environment to study precisely mechanical response of aeronautical plain bearings.

  13. Explicit 3-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    2000-11-07

    DYNA3D is a nonlinear explicit finite element code for analyzing 3-D structures and solid continuum. The code is vectorized and available on several computer platforms. The element library includes continuum, shell, beam, truss and spring/damper elements to allow maximum flexibility in modeling physical problems. Many materials are available to represent a wide range of material behavior, including elasticity, plasticity, composites, thermal effects and rate dependence. In addition, DYNA3D has a sophisticated contact interface capability, includingmore » frictional sliding, single surface contact and automatic contact generation.« less

  14. A Posteriori Bounds for Linear-Functional Outputs of Crouzeix-Raviart Finite Element Discretizations of the Incompressible Stokes Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patera, Anthony T.; Paraschivoiu, Marius

    1998-01-01

    We present a finite element technique for the efficient generation of lower and upper bounds to outputs which are linear functionals of the solutions to the incompressible Stokes equations in two space dimensions; the finite element discretization is effected by Crouzeix-Raviart elements, the discontinuous pressure approximation of which is central to our approach. The bounds are based upon the construction of an augmented Lagrangian: the objective is a quadratic "energy" reformulation of the desired output; the constraints are the finite element equilibrium equations (including the incompressibility constraint), and the intersubdomain continuity conditions on velocity. Appeal to the dual max-min problem for appropriately chosen candidate Lagrange multipliers then yields inexpensive bounds for the output associated with a fine-mesh discretization; the Lagrange multipliers are generated by exploiting an associated coarse-mesh approximation. In addition to the requisite coarse-mesh calculations, the bound technique requires solution only of local subdomain Stokes problems on the fine-mesh. The method is illustrated for the Stokes equations, in which the outputs of interest are the flowrate past, and the lift force on, a body immersed in a channel.

  15. Application of Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) to validate a Discrete Element Method (DEM) model of granular flow and mixing in the Turbula mixer.

    PubMed

    Marigo, M; Davies, M; Leadbeater, T; Cairns, D L; Ingram, A; Stitt, E H

    2013-03-25

    The laboratory-scale Turbula mixer comprises a simple cylindrical vessel that moves with a complex, yet periodic 3D motion comprising of rotation, translation and inversion. Arising from this complexity, relatively few studies to obtain fundamental understanding of particle motion and mixing mechanisms have been reported. Particle motion within a cylindrical vessel of a Turbula mixer has been measured for 2mm glass spheres using Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) in a 2l blending mixing vessel at 50% fill level. These data are compared to results from Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations previously published by the authors. PEPT mixing experiments, using a single particle tracer, gave qualitatively similar trends to the DEM predictions for axial and radial dispersion as well as for the axial displacement statistics at different operational speeds. Both experimental and simulation results indicate a minimum mixing efficiency at ca. 46 rpm. The occupancy plots also show a non-linear relationship with the operating speed. These results add further evidence to a transition between two flow and mixing regimes. Despite the similarity in overall flow and mixing behaviour measured and predicted, including the mixing speed at which the flow behaviour transition occurs, a systematic offset between measured and predicted result is observed. PMID:23376506

  16. Comparison of different precondtioners for nonsymmtric finite volume element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mishev, I.D.

    1996-12-31

    We consider a few different preconditioners for the linear systems arising from the discretization of 3-D convection-diffusion problems with the finite volume element method. Their theoretical and computational convergence rates are compared and discussed.

  17. Static & Dynamic Response of 3D Solids

    1996-07-15

    NIKE3D is a large deformations 3D finite element code used to obtain the resulting displacements and stresses from multi-body static and dynamic structural thermo-mechanics problems with sliding interfaces. Many nonlinear and temperature dependent constitutive models are available.

  18. Discrete element method based scale-up model for material synthesis using ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhanam, Priya Radhi

    Mechanical milling is a widely used technique for powder processing in various areas. In this work, a scale-up model for describing this ball milling process is developed. The thesis is a combination of experimental and modeling efforts. Initially, Discrete Element Model (DEM) is used to describe energy transfer from milling tools to the milled powder for shaker, planetary, and attritor mills. The rolling and static friction coefficients are determined experimentally. Computations predict a quasisteady rate of energy dissipation, E d, for each experimental configuration. It is proposed that the milling dose defined as a product of Ed and milling time, t, divided by the mass of milled powder, mp characterizes the milling progress independently of the milling device or milling conditions used. Once the milling dose is determined for one experimental configuration, it can be used to predict the milling time required to prepare the same material in any milling configuration, for which Ed is calculated. The concept is validated experimentally for DEM describing planetary and shaker mills. For attritor, the predicted Ed includes substantial contribution from milling tool interaction events with abnormally high forces (>103 N). The energy in such events is likely dissipated to heat or plastically deform milling tools rather than refine material. Indeed, DEM predictions for the attritor correlate with experiments when such events are ignored in the analysis. With an objective of obtaining real-time indicators of milling progress, power, torque, and rotation speed of the impeller of an attritor mill are measured during preparation of metal matrix composite powders in the subsequent portion of this thesis. Two material systems are selected and comparisons made between in-situ parameters and experimental milling progress indicators. It is established that real-time measurements can certainly be used to describe milling progress. However, they need to be interpreted carefully

  19. Cone penetration and bevameter geotechnical tests in lunar regolith simulants: discrete element method analysis and experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulchitsky, A. V.; Johnson, J.; Duvoy, P.; Wilkinson, A.; Creager, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    For in situ resource utilization on the Moon, asteroids, Mars, or other space body it is necessary to be able to simulate the interaction of mobile platforms and excavation machines with the regolith for engineering design, planning, and operations. For accurate simulations, tools designed to measure regolith properties will need to be deployed and interpreted. Two such tools are the penetrometer, used to measure a soil strength index as a function of depth, and the bevameter, used to characterize regolith surface properties of strength, friction and sinkage. The penetrometer interrogates regolith properties from the surface to a depth limited only by the capabilities of the instrument to penetrate the regolith while a bevameter interrogates only the upper few centimeters needed to describe a mobility platform's traction and sinkage. Interpretation of penetrometer and bevameter data can be difficult, especially on low gravity objects. We use the discrete element method (DEM) model to simulate the large regolith deformations and failures associated with the tests to determine regolith properties. The DEM simulates granular material behavior using large aggregates of distinct particles. Realistic physics of particle-particle interaction introduces many granular specific phenomena such as interlocking and force chain formation that cannot be represented using continuum methods. In this work, experiments using a cone penetrometer test (CPT) and bevameter on lunar simulants JSC-1A and GRC-1 were performed at NASA Glenn Research Center. These tests were used to validate the physics in the COUPi DEM model. COUPi is a general physical DEM code being developed to model machine/regolith interactions as part of a NASA Lunar Science Institute sponsored project on excavation and mobility modeling. The experimental results were used in this work to build an accurate model to simulate the lunar regolith. The CPT consists of driving an instrumented cone with opening angle of 60

  20. Novel method of manufacturing hydrogen storage materials combining with numerical analysis based on discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuzhe

    High efficiency hydrogen storage method is significant in development of fuel cell vehicle. Seeking for a high energy density material as the fuel becomes the key of wide spreading fuel cell vehicle. LiBH4 + MgH 2 system is a strong candidate due to their high hydrogen storage density and the reaction between them is reversible. However, LiBH4 + MgH 2 system usually requires the high temperature and hydrogen pressure for hydrogen release and uptake reaction. In order to reduce the requirements of this system, nanoengineering is the simple and efficient method to improve the thermodynamic properties and reduce kinetic barrier of reaction between LiBH4 and MgH2. Based on ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the previous study has indicated that the reaction between LiBH4 and MgH2 can take place at temperature near 200°C or below. However, the predictions have been shown to be inconsistent with many experiments. Therefore, it is the first time that our experiment using ball milling with aerosol spraying (BMAS) to prove the reaction between LiBH4 and MgH2 can happen during high energy ball milling at room temperature. Through this BMAS process we have found undoubtedly the formation of MgB 2 and LiH during ball milling of MgH2 while aerosol spraying of the LiBH4/THF solution. Aerosol nanoparticles from LiBH 4/THF solution leads to form Li2B12H12 during BMAS process. The Li2B12H12 formed then reacts with MgH2 in situ during ball milling to form MgB 2 and LiH. Discrete element modeling (DEM) is a useful tool to describe operation of various ball milling processes. EDEM is software based on DEM to predict power consumption, liner and media wear and mill output. In order to further improve the milling efficiency of BMAS process, EDEM is conducted to make analysis for complicated ball milling process. Milling speed and ball's filling ratio inside the canister as the variables are considered to determine the milling efficiency. The average and maximum

  1. Numerical investigations on flow dynamics of prismatic granular materials using the discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, W.; Weatherley, D.; Wruck, B.; Chitombo, G. P.

    2012-04-01

    The flow dynamics of granular materials is of broad interest in both the geosciences (e.g. landslides, fault zone evolution, and brecchia pipe formation) and many engineering disciplines (e.g chemical engineering, food sciences, pharmaceuticals and materials science). At the interface between natural and human-induced granular media flow, current underground mass-mining methods are trending towards the induced failure and subsequent gravitational flow of large volumes of broken rock, a method known as cave mining. Cave mining relies upon the undercutting of a large ore body, inducement of fragmentation of the rock and subsequent extraction of ore from below, via hopper-like outlets. Design of such mines currently relies upon a simplified kinematic theory of granular flow in hoppers, known as the ellipsoid theory of mass movement. This theory assumes that the zone of moving material grows as an ellipsoid above the outlet of the silo. The boundary of the movement zone is a shear band and internal to the movement zone, the granular material is assumed to have a uniformly high bulk porosity compared with surrounding stagnant regions. There is however, increasing anecdotal evidence and field measurements suggesting this theory fails to capture the full complexity of granular material flow within cave mines. Given the practical challenges obstructing direct measurement of movement both in laboratory experiments and in-situ, the Discrete Element Method (DEM [1]) is a popular alternative to investigate granular media flow. Small-scale DEM studies (c.f. [3] and references therein) have confirmed that movement within DEM silo flow models matches that predicted by ellipsoid theory, at least for mono-disperse granular material freely outflowing at a constant rate. A major draw-back of these small-scale DEM studies is that the initial bulk porosity of the simulated granular material is significantly higher than that of broken, prismatic rock. In this investigation, more

  2. Quantitative 3-D Elemental Mapping by LA-ICP-MS of a Basaltic Clast from the Hanford 300 Area, Washington, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Peng; Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.; Liu, Chongxuan; Zachara, John M.

    2012-03-01

    Laser ablation with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to measure elemental concentrations at the 100 {micro}m scale in a 3-dimensional manner in a basalt sample collected from the Hanford 300 Area in south-central Washington State. A modified calibration method was developed to quantify the LA-ICP-MS signal response using a constant-sum mass fraction of eight major elements; the method produced reasonable concentration measurements for both major and trace elements when compared to a standard basalt sample with known concentrations. 3-dimensional maps (stacked 2-D contour layers, each measuring 2100 {micro}m x 2100 {micro}m) show relatively uniform concentration with depth for intrinsic elements such as Si, Na, and Sr. However, U and Cu accumulation were observed near the rock surface, consistent with the site's release history of these pollutants. U and Cu show substantial heterogeneity in their concentration distributions in horizontal slices, while the intrinsic elements are essentially uniformly distributed. From measured U concentrations of this work and reported mass fractions, cobbles and gravels were estimated to contain from 0.6% to 7.5% of the contaminant U, implicating the coarse fraction as a long-term release source.

  3. Form finding and analysis of extensible membranes attached to 2-D and 3-D frames intended for micro air vehicles via experimentally validated finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abudaram, Yaakov Jack

    This work is concerned with a new method to apply consistent and known pretension to silicone rubber membranes intended for micro air vehicles as well as an understanding in the science of developed pre-tension in membranes constrained by 2- D and 3-D frames and structures. Pre-tension has a marked effect on the static and dynamic response of membrane wings and controls the overall deflections, as such control and measurement of the membrane pre-tension is important. Two different 2-D frame geometries were fabricated to evaluate the technique. For open-cell frames, the pretension was not uniform, whereas it was for closed-cell frames. Results show developed full-field stress and strain fields as a function of membrane attachment temperature and frame geometry along with experimental iterations to prove repeatability. The membranes can be stretched to a specific pretension according to the temperature at which it adheres to frames. Strain fields in membranes attached to 3-D frames at various temperatures are modeled through FEA utilizing Abaqus to be able to predict the developed membrane deformations, stresses, and strains. Rigid frames with various curvatures are built via appropriate molds and then adhered to silicone rubber membranes and elevated to various temperatures to achieve different pre-strains for experimental validation. Additional experiments are conducted for more complex frame geometries involving both convex and concave topologies embedded within frames. Results are then compared with the Abaqus outputs to validate the accuracy of the FEA model. Highly compliant wings have been used for MAV platforms, where the wing structure is determined by some combination of carbon fiber composites and a membrane skin, adhered in between the layers of composite material. Another new technique of attaching membranes firmly on wing structures is introduced, which involves the application of a technology known as corona treatment coupled with another method of

  4. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  5. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  6. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  7. Synchrotron X-ray 2D and 3D Elemental Imaging of CdSe/ZnS Quantum dot Nanoparticles in Daphnia Magna

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, B.; Pace, H; Lanzirotti, A; Smith, R; Ranville, J

    2009-01-01

    The potential toxicity of nanoparticles to aquatic organisms is of interest given that increased commercialization will inevitably lead to some instances of inadvertent environmental exposures. Cadmium selenide quantum dots (QDs) capped with zinc sulfide are used in the semiconductor industry and in cellular imaging. Their small size (<10 nm) suggests that they may be readily assimilated by exposed organisms. We exposed Daphnia magna to both red and green QDs and used synchrotron X-ray fluorescence to study the distribution of Zn and Se in the organism over a time period of 36 h. The QDs appeared to be confined to the gut, and there was no evidence of further assimilation into the organism. Zinc and Se fluorescence signals were highly correlated, suggesting that the QDs had not dissolved to any extent. There was no apparent difference between red or green QDs, i.e., there was no effect of QD size. 3D tomography confirmed that the QDs were exclusively in the gut area of the organism. It is possible that the QDs aggregated and were therefore too large to cross the gut wall.

  8. Numerical Analysis of Three-Dimensional Cervical Behaviors in Posterior-Oblique Car Collisions Using 3-D Human Whole Body Finite Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yu-Bong; Jung, Duk-Young; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Yoshino, Nobuyuki; Tsutsumi, Sadami; Ikeuchi, Ken

    Whiplash injuries are most common disorders in rear-end car accidents, while the injury mechanism is yet unknown. Many numerical and experimental approaches have conducted to investigate the cervical behaviors with solely two-dimensional analyses in the sagittal plane. In real accidents, however, as impacts may affect several directions, the cervical behaviors should be evaluated three-dimensionally. Therefore, we evaluated the cervical behaviors under assumption of the posterior-oblique impacts depending on the impact angles with 3-D FE analysis. In addition, we analyzed the stresses occurred in the facet joints considering the relationship with a whiplash disorders. The cervical behaviors showed complex motion combined with axial torsion and lateral bending. The bending angle peaked in the impact at the angle of 15°, and the peak compressive and shear stress on the facet cartilage at C6-C7 increased by 11% and 14%. In the impact at the angle of 30°, the torsion angle peaked at C2-C3, the peak shear stress in the facet cartilage increased by 27%. It showed that the torsion and lateral bending affected the cervical behaviors, and caused the increase of peak stresses on the soft tissues. It is assumed as one of important causes of whiplash injury.

  9. Venus in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, J. J.

    1993-08-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  10. 3D reservoir visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Van, B.T.; Pajon, J.L.; Joseph, P. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper shows how some simple 3D computer graphics tools can be combined to provide efficient software for visualizing and analyzing data obtained from reservoir simulators and geological simulations. The animation and interactive capabilities of the software quickly provide a deep understanding of the fluid-flow behavior and an accurate idea of the internal architecture of a reservoir.

  11. Effect of Implant Height Differences on Different Attachment Types and Peri-Implant Bone in Mandibular Two-Implant Overdentures: 3D Finite Element Study.

    PubMed

    Ozan, Oguz; Ramoglu, Serhat

    2015-06-01

    Implant-supported overdentures with self-aligning attachment systems are preferred to improve the stability and retention of complete dentures. The positioning of the implant attachments is a very important aspect of two-implant overdentures in obtaining better stress distribution. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare two different attachment systems in a two-implant overdenture by evaluating the stress distributions in peri-implant bone and stresses on the attachments with positioning at different height levels using the 3D FEA method. Six models with ball attachments and 6 models with locator attachments-totaling 12 models (including 2 controls)-with the left implant positioned unilaterally at different height levels were subjected to 3 loading conditions (anterior, right posterior, and left posterior). Data for Von Misses stresses were produced numerically, color coded, and compared among the models for attachments and peri-implant cortical bone. The configurations in which implants presented 3 mm height differences in the bone level showed the most successful results in the peri-implant bone. When stresses on the attachments were compared, greater stress values were obtained from the ball attachments. As a conclusion, the configurations with a considerable (3 mm) height difference between quadrants of the mandible in the anterior segment showed the most successful results in the peri-implant bone. On the contrary, peak stress values around the implant observed from the models with less (1 mm) bone height difference may require leveling of the bone during surgery. However, these findings should be corroborated with clinical studies.

  12. A stabilized mixed finite element method for shear-rate dependent non-Newtonian fluids: 3D benchmark problems and application to blood flow in bifurcating arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwack, JaeHyuk; Masud, Arif

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a stabilized mixed finite element method for shear-rate dependent fluids. The nonlinear viscosity field is a function of the shear-rate and varies uniformly in space and in time. The stabilized form is developed via application of Variational Multiscale (VMS) framework to the underlying generalized Navier-Stokes equation. Linear and quadratic tetrahedral and hexahedral elements are employed with equal-order interpolations for the velocity and pressure fields. A variety of benchmark problems are solved to assess the stability and accuracy properties of the resulting method. The method is then applied to non-Newtonian shear-rate dependent flows in bifurcating artery geometry, and significant non-Newtonian fluid effects are observed. A comparative study of the proposed method shows that the additional computational costs due to the nonlinear shear-rate dependent viscosity are only ten percent more than the computational cost for a Newtonian model.

  13. Energetic evaluation of possible interstitial compound formation of BaSi2 with 2p-, 3s-, and 3d-elements using first-principle calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Yoji; Sohma, Mitsugu; Suemasu, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    The energy changes in the formation of interstitially doped BaSi2, caused by doping with Na, Mg, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, B, C, N, O, F, and Ne, are calculated using the Perdew-Wang generalized gradient approximations of the density functional theory. It is predicted that the majority of the elements, apart from Na, Mg, Zn, and Ne, are capable of forming interstitially doped compounds with BaSi2, if these elements are provided as an isolated atom. However, the energetic stabilities of the standard states of these elements (metals, diatomic gases, etc.) exceed the energy gain accompanying the formation of the interstitial compounds and, therefore, the conventional diffusion method using metals or gaseous source materials cannot produce the interstitial compounds. From the energetic perspective, B, C, N, O, and F appear to be favorably inserted into the BaSi2 lattice, but the observed behavior of B-implanted BaSi2 suggests that substitution of B for Si may occur.

  14. 3D modeling of satellite spectral images, radiation budget and energy budget of urban landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastellu-Etchegorry, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    DART EB is a model that is being developed for simulating the 3D (3 dimensional) energy budget of urban and natural scenes, possibly with topography and atmosphere. It simulates all non radiative energy mechanisms (heat conduction, turbulent momentum and heat fluxes, water reservoir evolution, etc.). It uses DART model (Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer) for simulating radiative mechanisms: 3D radiative budget of 3D scenes and their remote sensing images expressed in terms of reflectance or brightness temperature values, for any atmosphere, wavelength, sun/view direction, altitude and spatial resolution. It uses an innovative multispectral approach (ray tracing, exact kernel, discrete ordinate techniques) over the whole optical domain. This paper presents two major and recent improvements of DART for adapting it to urban canopies. (1) Simulation of the geometry and optical characteristics of urban elements (houses, etc.). (2) Modeling of thermal infrared emission by vegetation and urban elements. The new DART version was used in the context of the CAPITOUL project. For that, districts of the Toulouse urban data base (Autocad format) were translated into DART scenes. This allowed us to simulate visible, near infrared and thermal infrared satellite images of Toulouse districts. Moreover, the 3D radiation budget was used by DARTEB for simulating the time evolution of a number of geophysical quantities of various surface elements (roads, walls, roofs). Results were successfully compared with ground measurements of the CAPITOUL project.

  15. Superplastic forming using NIKE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M.

    1996-12-04

    The superplastic forming process requires careful control of strain rates in order to avoid strain localizations. A load scheduler was developed and implemented into the nonlinear finite element code NIKE3D to provide strain rate control during forming simulation and process schedule output. Often the sheets being formed in SPF are very thin such that less expensive membrane elements can be used as opposed to shell elements. A large strain membrane element was implemented into NIKE3D to assist in SPF process modeling.

  16. Discrete Element Framework for Modelling Extracellular Matrix, Deformable Cells and Subcellular Components

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Bruce S.; Wong, Kelvin K. L.; Joldes, Grand R.; Rich, Addison J.; Tan, Chin Wee; Burgess, Antony W.; Smith, David W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for modelling biological tissues based on discrete particles. Cell components (e.g. cell membranes, cell cytoskeleton, cell nucleus) and extracellular matrix (e.g. collagen) are represented using collections of particles. Simple particle to particle interaction laws are used to simulate and control complex physical interaction types (e.g. cell-cell adhesion via cadherins, integrin basement membrane attachment, cytoskeletal mechanical properties). Particles may be given the capacity to change their properties and behaviours in response to changes in the cellular microenvironment (e.g., in response to cell-cell signalling or mechanical loadings). Each particle is in effect an ‘agent’, meaning that the agent can sense local environmental information and respond according to pre-determined or stochastic events. The behaviour of the proposed framework is exemplified through several biological problems of ongoing interest. These examples illustrate how the modelling framework allows enormous flexibility for representing the mechanical behaviour of different tissues, and we argue this is a more intuitive approach than perhaps offered by traditional continuum methods. Because of this flexibility, we believe the discrete modelling framework provides an avenue for biologists and bioengineers to explore the behaviour of tissue systems in a computational laboratory. PMID:26452000

  17. Laminar-Turbulent Transition Behind Discrete Roughness Elements in a High-Speed Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei; Wu, Minwei; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Edwards, Jack R., Jr.; Kegerise, Michael; King, Rudolph

    2010-01-01

    Computations are performed to study the flow past an isolated roughness element in a Mach 3.5, laminar, flat plate boundary layer. To determine the effects of the roughness element on the location of laminar-turbulent transition inside the boundary layer, the instability characteristics of the stationary wake behind the roughness element are investigated over a range of roughness heights. The wake flow adjacent to the spanwise plane of symmetry is characterized by a narrow region of increased boundary layer thickness. Beyond the near wake region, the centerline streak is surrounded by a pair of high-speed streaks with reduced boundary layer thickness and a secondary, outer pair of lower-speed streaks. Similar to the spanwise periodic pattern of streaks behind an array of regularly spaced roughness elements, the above wake structure persists over large distances and can sustain strong enough convective instabilities to cause an earlier onset of transition when the roughness height is sufficiently large. Time accurate computations are performed to clarify additional issues such as the role of the nearfield of the roughness element during the generation of streak instabilities, as well as to reveal selected details of their nonlinear evolution. Effects of roughness element shape on the streak amplitudes and the interactions between multiple roughness elements aligned along the flow direction are also investigated.

  18. Effects of pre-existing discontinuities on the residual strength of rock mass - Insight from a discrete element method simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, F. Q.; Kang, H. P.

    2016-04-01

    When rock failure is unavoidable, the designer of engineering structures must know and account for the residual strength of the rock mass. This is particularly relevant in underground coal mine openings. Pre-existing discontinuities play an important role in the mechanical behavior of rock masses and thus it is important to understand the effects of such pre-existing discontinuities on the residual strength. For this purpose, the present study demonstrates a numerical analysis using a discrete element method simulation. The numerical results indicate that fracture intensity has no significant influence on the residual strength of jointed rock masses, independent of confining conditions. As confining pressures increase, both peak and residual strengths increase, with residual strength increasing at a faster rate. The finding was further demonstrated by analyzing documented laboratory compressive test data from a variety of rocks along with field data from coal pillars. A comprehensive interpretation of the finding was conducted using a cohesion-weakening-friction-strengthening (CWFS) model. The effect of rock bolts on rock mass strength was also evaluated by using a discrete element method model which suggested that rock bolts can significantly increases residual strength but have limited effect on increasing the peak strength of rock masses.

  19. DYNA3D. Explicit 3-d Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.; Englemann, B.E. )

    1993-11-30

    DYNA3D is an explicit, three-dimensional, finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic response of inelastic solids and structures. DYNA3D contains 30 material models and 10 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, Blatz-Ko rubber, high explosive burn, hydrodynamic without deviatoric stresses, elastoplastic hydrodynamic, temperature-dependent elastoplastic, isotropic elastoplastic, isotropic elastoplastic with failure, soil and crushable foam with failure, Johnson/Cook plasticity model, pseudo TENSOR geological model, elastoplastic with fracture, power law isotropic plasticity, strain rate dependent plasticity, rigid, thermal orthotropic, composite damage model, thermal orthotropic with 12 curves, piecewise linear isotropic plasticity, inviscid two invariant geologic cap, orthotropic crushable model, Moonsy-Rivlin rubber, resultant plasticity, closed form update shell plasticity, and Frazer-Nash rubber model. The hydrodynamic material models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 10 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, tabulated, and TENSOR pore collapse. DYNA3D generates three binary output databases. One contains information for complete states at infrequent intervals; 50 to 100 states is typical. The second contains information for a subset of nodes and elements at frequent intervals; 1,000 to 10,000 states is typical. The last contains interface data for contact surfaces.

  20. 3-D transient analysis of pebble-bed HTGR by TORT-TD/ATTICA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Seubert, A.; Sureda, A.; Lapins, J.; Buck, M.; Bader, J.; Laurien, E.

    2012-07-01

    As most of the acceptance criteria are local core parameters, application of transient 3-D fine mesh neutron transport and thermal hydraulics coupled codes is mandatory for best estimate evaluations of safety margins. This also applies to high-temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR). Application of 3-D fine-mesh transient transport codes using few energy groups coupled with 3-D thermal hydraulics codes becomes feasible in view of increasing computing power. This paper describes the discrete ordinates based coupled code system TORT-TD/ATTICA3D that has recently been extended by a fine-mesh diffusion solver. Based on transient analyses for the PBMR-400 design, the transport/diffusion capabilities are demonstrated and 3-D local flux and power redistribution effects during a partial control rod withdrawal are shown. (authors)

  1. SB3D User Manual, Santa Barbara 3D Radiative Transfer Model

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hirok, William

    1999-01-01

    SB3D is a three-dimensional atmospheric and oceanic radiative transfer model for the Solar spectrum. The microphysics employed in the model are the same as used in the model SBDART. It is assumed that the user of SB3D is familiar with SBDART and IDL. SB3D differs from SBDART in that computations are conducted on media in three-dimensions rather than a single column (i.e. plane-parallel), and a stochastic method (Monte Carlo) is employed instead of a numerical approach (Discrete Ordinates) for estimating a solution to the radiative transfer equation. Because of these two differences between SB3D and SBDART, the input and running of SB3D is more unwieldy and requires compromises between model performance and computational expense. Hence, there is no one correct method for running the model and the user must develop a sense to the proper input and configuration of the model.

  2. 3D rapid mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaksson, Folke; Borg, Johan; Haglund, Leif

    2008-04-01

    In this paper the performance of passive range measurement imaging using stereo technique in real time applications is described. Stereo vision uses multiple images to get depth resolution in a similar way as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) uses multiple measurements to obtain better spatial resolution. This technique has been used in photogrammetry for a long time but it will be shown that it is now possible to do the calculations, with carefully designed image processing algorithms, in e.g. a PC in real time. In order to get high resolution and quantitative data in the stereo estimation a mathematical camera model is used. The parameters to the camera model are settled in a calibration rig or in the case of a moving camera the scene itself can be used for calibration of most of the parameters. After calibration an ordinary TV camera has an angular resolution like a theodolite, but to a much lower price. The paper will present results from high resolution 3D imagery from air to ground. The 3D-results from stereo calculation of image pairs are stitched together into a large database to form a 3D-model of the area covered.

  3. 3-D thermal analysis using finite difference technique with finite element model for improved design of components of rocket engine turbomachines for Space Shuttle Main Engine SSME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Kiho D.; Ip, Shek-Se P.

    1988-01-01

    Three-dimensional finite element models were generated and transferred into three-dimensional finite difference models to perform transient thermal analyses for the SSME high pressure fuel turbopump's first stage nozzles and rotor blades. STANCOOL was chosen to calculate the heat transfer characteristics (HTCs) around the airfoils, and endwall effects were included at the intersections of the airfoils and platforms for the steady-state boundary conditions. Free and forced convection due to rotation effects were also considered in hollow cores. Transient HTCs were calculated by taking ratios of the steady-state values based on the flow rates and fluid properties calculated at each time slice. Results are presented for both transient plots and three-dimensional color contour isotherm plots; they were also converted into universal files to be used for FEM stress analyses.

  4. Effect of attachment types and number of implants supporting mandibular overdentures on stress distribution: a computed tomography-based 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Arat Bilhan, Selda; Baykasoglu, Cengiz; Bilhan, Hakan; Kutay, Omer; Mugan, Ata

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to calculate stresses in bone tissue surrounding uncoupled and splinted implants that are induced by a bite force applied to the mandible and to determine whether the number of mandibular overdenture supporting implants in mandibular bone influence the stress distribution. A human adult edentulous mandible retrieved from a formalin fixed cadaver was used to define the geometry of finite element (FE) model and the FE model was verified with experimental measurements. Following the FE model validation, three different biting situations were simulated for the 2-, 3- and 4-implant retentive anchor as well as bar attachment overdentures under vertical loading of 100 N. As a result of the analyses, it was concluded that an increment in implant number and the splinted attachment type tended to cause lower stresses and the use of two single attachments seems to be a safe and sufficient solution for the treatment of mandibular edentulism with overdentures.

  5. X-ray-absorption near-edge structure of 3d transition elements in tetrahedral coordination: The effect of bond-length variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, A.; Fritsch, E.; Calas, G.; Petiau, J.

    1985-09-01

    The x-ray-absorption near-edge structure (XANES) of transition elements in tetrahedral coordination in crystals and glasses has been studied. We have identified the XANES features in the continuum that can be assigned to multiple scattering within the first coordination shell. The energy positions Er of the XANES peaks in the continuum follow the rule (Er-Eb)d2= const, where Eb is the energy of the prepeak, defined as the first core excitation to the bound antibonding state of T2 symmetry, and d is the interatomic distance. This plot allows us to determine the tetrahedral coordination of a vanadium impurity in a SiO2 glass and to get an estimation of the vanadium-oxygen distance (1.77+/-0.05 Å).

  6. Implementation of 3-D isoparametric finite elements on supercomputer for the formulation of recursive dynamical equations of multi-body systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shareef, N. H.; Amirouche, F. M. L.

    1991-01-01

    A computational algorithmic procedure is developed and implemented for the dynamic analysis of a multibody system with rigid/flexible interconnected bodies. The algorithm takes into consideration the large rotation/translation and small elastic deformations associated with the rigid-body degrees of freedom and the flexibility of the bodies in the system respectively. Versatile three-dimensional isoparametric brick elements are employed for the modeling of the geometric configurations of the bodies. The formulation of the recursive dynamical equations of motion is based on the recursive Kane's equations, strain energy concepts, and the techniques of component mode synthesis. In order to minimize CPU-intensive matrix multiplication operations and speed up the execution process, the concepts of indexed arrays is utilized in the formulation of the equations of motion. A spin-up maneuver of a space robot with three flexible links carrying a solar panel is used as an illustrative example.

  7. Application of the incomplete Cholesky factorization preconditioned Krylov subspace method to the vector finite element method for 3-D electromagnetic scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Huang, Ting-Zhu; Jing, Yan-Fei; Zhang, Yong

    2010-02-01

    The incomplete Cholesky (IC) factorization preconditioning technique is applied to the Krylov subspace methods for solving large systems of linear equations resulted from the use of edge-based finite element method (FEM). The construction of the preconditioner is based on the fact that the coefficient matrix is represented in an upper triangular compressed sparse row (CSR) form. An efficient implementation of the IC factorization is described in detail for complex symmetric matrices. With some ordering schemes our IC algorithm can greatly reduce the memory requirement as well as the iteration numbers. Numerical tests on harmonic analysis for plane wave scattering from a metallic plate and a metallic sphere coated by a lossy dielectric layer show the efficiency of this method.

  8. Seismic evaluation of lead caves using no-tension discrete model with interface elements

    SciTech Connect

    Khaleel, M.A.; Deibler, J.E.; Koontz, D.A.

    1995-07-01

    This paper investigates quasi-static behavior of lead cave walls radiation shields made by stacking lead bricks. The bricks have high stiffness, whereas the joints are weak and incapable of supporting tension. Global behavior of this kind of wall is strongly influenced by size friction coefficient of the brick elements. The general finite element code ANSYS was used for the analysis of the lead caves. A series of 2-D models that spanned the range of height-to-width aspect ratios of the cave wall were constructed. Two types of contact elements were incorporated in the model. The point-to-point contact element was used to represent contact in the horizontal direction. This element permits either compression in the direction normal to the surfaces or opening of a gap. The point-to-surface contact element was chosen to represent contact in the vertical direction. This element allows sliding in addition to the compression or gap formation normal to the surface. A series of static analyses were performed for each model. A l-g. vertical acceleration representing gravity was applied. The lateral acceleration was increased until the solution would not converge. This acceleration is defined as the critical lateral acceleration. This was achieved with a set of load steps with increasing lateral load. The critical acceleration was found to depend on the wall aspect ratio. For a wall with an aspect ratio up to three, the maximum acceleration is above the required 0.1 g. The wall failure mechanisms were also identified based on the numerical results. The two failure modes are the rotation and loss of interlocking among the blocks or silding of upper layers of the wall.

  9. Molecular characterization of the short interspersed repetitive element SIRE in the six discrete typing units (DTUs) of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Pavia, Paula X; Thomas, M Carmen; López, Manuel C; Puerta, Concepción J

    2012-10-01

    Repetitive sequences constitute an important proportion of the Trypanosoma cruzi genome; hence, they have been used as molecular markers and as amplification targets to identify the parasite presence via PCR. In this study, a molecular characterization of the SIRE repetitive element was performed in the six discrete typing units (DTUs) of T. cruzi. The results evidenced that this element, located in multiple chromosomes, was interspersed in the genome of all DTUs of the parasite. The presence of several motifs implicated in element insertion, duplication, and functionality suggests that SIRE could be an active element in the parasite genome. Of interest, there were SIRE specific Alu I fragments that allowed to discriminate DTU I from the others DTUs. Moreover, an UPGMA phenetic tree constructed from fragment sharing Southern blot data showed that T. cruzi I isolates conform a cluster separated from the T. cruzi II-VI isolates. When the relative number of SIRE copies was determined, a variation from 105 to 2,000 copies per haploid genome was observed among the different isolates without kept a DTU-relationship. In all, these findings suggest that SIRE sequence is a good target for parasite DNA amplification. PMID:22750455

  10. JAC3D -- A three-dimensional finite element computer program for the nonlinear quasi-static response of solids with the conjugate gradient method; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Biffle, J.H.

    1993-02-01

    JAC3D is a three-dimensional finite element program designed to solve quasi-static nonlinear mechanics problems. A set of continuum equations describes the nonlinear mechanics involving large rotation and strain. A nonlinear conjugate gradient method is used to solve the equation. The method is implemented in a three-dimensional setting with various methods for accelerating convergence. Sliding interface logic is also implemented. An eight-node Lagrangian uniform strain element is used with hourglass stiffness to control the zero-energy modes. This report documents the elastic and isothermal elastic-plastic material model. Other material models, documented elsewhere, are also available. The program is vectorized for efficient performance on Cray computers. Sample problems described are the bending of a thin beam, the rotation of a unit cube, and the pressurization and thermal loading of a hollow sphere.