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Sample records for 3d dose distributions

  1. Proton Depth Dose Distribution: 3-D Calculation of Dose Distributions from Solar Flare Irradiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    distributions in the transverse plane intersecting isocenter are presented for each of the 3 solar flare event. in all 3 exposure geometries. In all 3...calculation con- figurations the maximum predicted",dose occurred on the surface of the head. The dose at the isocenter of the head relative ’to the...for all 3 cases ire: 1. All isodose distributions are displayed relative to a normalization dose of 100 centigray at the isocenter in the absence of

  2. A graphical user interface for calculation of 3D dose distribution using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, J. C. L.; Leung, M. K. K.

    2008-02-01

    A software graphical user interface (GUI) for calculation of 3D dose distribution using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is developed using MATLAB. This GUI (DOSCTP) provides a user-friendly platform for DICOM CT-based dose calculation using EGSnrcMP-based DOSXYZnrc code. It offers numerous features not found in DOSXYZnrc, such as the ability to use multiple beams from different phase-space files, and has built-in dose analysis and visualization tools. DOSCTP is written completely in MATLAB, with integrated access to DOSXYZnrc and CTCREATE. The program function may be divided into four subgroups, namely, beam placement, MC simulation with DOSXYZnrc, dose visualization, and export. Each is controlled by separate routines. The verification of DOSCTP was carried out by comparing plans with different beam arrangements (multi-beam/photon arc) on an inhomogeneous phantom as well as patient CT between the GUI and Pinnacle3. DOSCTP was developed and verified with the following features: (1) a built-in voxel editor to modify CT-based DOSXYZnrc phantoms for research purposes; (2) multi-beam placement is possible, which cannot be achieved using the current DOSXYZnrc code; (3) the treatment plan, including the dose distributions, contours and image set can be exported to a commercial treatment planning system such as Pinnacle3 or to CERR using RTOG format for plan evaluation and comparison; (4) a built-in RTOG-compatible dose reviewer for dose visualization and analysis such as finding the volume of hot/cold spots in the 3D dose distributions based on a user threshold. DOSCTP greatly simplifies the use of DOSXYZnrc and CTCREATE, and offers numerous features that not found in the original user-code. Moreover, since phase-space beams can be defined and generated by the user, it is a particularly useful tool to carry out plans using specifically designed irradiators/accelerators that cannot be found in the Linac library of commercial treatment planning systems.

  3. 3D dose distribution measurements in brachytherapy using radiochromic gel dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šolc, J.; Sochor, V.; Kačur, M.; Šmoldasová, J.

    2010-07-01

    The paper informs about the joint research project "Increasing cancer treatment efficacy using 3D brachytherapy" which is a three-year project carried out in cooperation with European national metrology institutes and co-funded by the European Community's Seventh Framework Program for research and technological development. The goal of the project is to improve the measurement and standardization of dose-to-water rate by brachytherapy (BT) sources. The paper gives a summary of the individual parts of the whole project and describes in more detail the task of the Czech Metrology Institute: the determination of spatial distribution of dose-to-water by BT sources using radiochromic gel dosimeters, including a new gel with suppressed diffusion. The response of irradiated gels is evaluated using the optical cone beam computed tomography (CT) technique. The characteristics of the optical CT scanner are discussed with respect to CCD camera performance and light source. The optimized composition of the new gel and its dosimetric properties are highlighted. The results show that the radiochromic gels are convenient for measuring the 3D distribution of dose-to-water and could be an alternative to current methods of dose distribution measurements.

  4. Dose distribution and mapping with 3D imaging presentation in intraoral and panoramic examinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Huang, Yung-Hui; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Lee, Jason J. S.

    2011-10-01

    In current medical imaging applications, high quality images not only provide more diagnostic value for anatomic delineation but also offer functional information for treatment direction. However, this approach would potentially subscribe higher radiation dose in dental radiographies, which has been putatively associated with low-birth-weight during pregnancy, which affects the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis or thereby directly affects the reproductive organs. The aim of this study was to apply the high resolution 3-D image mapping technique to evaluate radiation doses from the following aspects: (1) verifying operating parameters of dental X-ray units, (2) measuring the leakage radiations and (3) mapping dose with 3-D radiographic imaging to evaluate dose distribution in head and neck regions. From the study results, we found that (1) leakage radiation from X-ray units was about 21.31±15.24 mR/h (<100 mR/h), (2) error of actual tube voltage for 60 kVp setting was from 0.2% to 6.5%, with an average of 2.5% (<7%) and (3) the error of exposure time for a 0.5-1.5 s setting was within 0.7-8.5%, with an average of 7.3% (<10%) error as well. Our 3-D dose mapping demonstrated that dose values were relatively lower in soft tissues and higher in bone surfaces compared with other investigations. Multiple causes could contribute to these variations, including irradiation geometry, image equipment and type of technique applied, etc. From the results, we also observed that larger accumulated doses were presented in certain critical organs, such as salivary gland, thyroid gland and bone marrow. Potential biological affects associated with these findings warrant further investigation.

  5. 3D dose and TCP distribution for radionuclide therapy in nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, M.; Malano, F.; Pérez, P.

    2010-08-01

    A common feature to any radiant therapy is that lesion and health tissue dosimetry provides relevant information for treatment optimization along with dose-efficacy and dose-complication correlation studies. Nowadays, different radionuclide therapies are commonly available, assessing both systemic and loco-regional approach and using different alfa-, beta-and gamma-emitting isotopes and binding molecules. It is well established, that specific dosimetric approaches become necessary according to each therapy modality. Sometimes, observed activity distribution can be satisfactory represented by simple geometrical models. However, Monte Carlo techniques are capable of better approaches, therefore becoming sometimes the only way to get dosimetric data since the patient-specific situation can not be adequately represented by conventional dosimetry techniques. Therefore, due to strong limitations of traditional and standard methods, this work concentrates on the development of a dedicated and novel calculation system in order to assess the dose distribution within the irradiated patient. However, physical dose may not be enough information in order to establish real deterministic biological/metabolic effects; therefore complementary radiobiological models have been suitably introduced with the aim of performing realistic 3D dose as well as corresponding Tumor Control Probability distribution calculation.

  6. A novel time dependent gamma evaluation function for dynamic 2D and 3D dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Podesta, Mark; Persoon, Lucas C G G; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-10-21

    Modern external beam radiotherapy requires detailed verification and quality assurance so that confidence can be placed on both the delivery of a single treatment fraction and on the consistency of delivery throughout the treatment course. To verify dose distributions, a comparison between prediction and measurement must be made. Comparisons between two dose distributions are commonly performed using a Gamma evaluation which is a calculation of two quantities on a pixel by pixel basis; the dose difference, and the distance to agreement. By providing acceptance criteria (e.g. 3%, 3 mm), the function will find the most appropriate match within its two degrees of freedom. For complex dynamic treatments such as IMRT or VMAT it is important to verify the dose delivery in a time dependent manner and so a gamma evaluation that includes a degree of freedom in the time domain via a third parameter, time to agreement, is presented here. A C++ (mex) based gamma function was created that could be run on either CPU and GPU computing platforms that would allow a degree of freedom in the time domain. Simple test cases were created in both 2D and 3D comprising of simple geometrical shapes with well-defined boundaries varying over time. Changes of varying magnitude in either space or time were introduced and repeated gamma analyses were performed varying the criteria. A clinical VMAT case was also included, artificial air bubbles of varying size were introduced to a patient geometry, along with shifts of varying magnitude in treatment time. For all test cases where errors in distance, dose or time were introduced, the time dependent gamma evaluation could accurately highlight the errors.The time dependent gamma function presented here allows time to be included as a degree of freedom in gamma evaluations. The function allows for 2D and 3D data sets which are varying over time to be compared using appropriate criteria without penalising minor offsets of subsequent radiation fields

  7. A novel time dependent gamma evaluation function for dynamic 2D and 3D dose distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podesta, Mark; CGG Persoon, Lucas; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-10-01

    Modern external beam radiotherapy requires detailed verification and quality assurance so that confidence can be placed on both the delivery of a single treatment fraction and on the consistency of delivery throughout the treatment course. To verify dose distributions, a comparison between prediction and measurement must be made. Comparisons between two dose distributions are commonly performed using a Gamma evaluation which is a calculation of two quantities on a pixel by pixel basis; the dose difference, and the distance to agreement. By providing acceptance criteria (e.g. 3%, 3 mm), the function will find the most appropriate match within its two degrees of freedom. For complex dynamic treatments such as IMRT or VMAT it is important to verify the dose delivery in a time dependent manner and so a gamma evaluation that includes a degree of freedom in the time domain via a third parameter, time to agreement, is presented here. A C++ (mex) based gamma function was created that could be run on either CPU and GPU computing platforms that would allow a degree of freedom in the time domain. Simple test cases were created in both 2D and 3D comprising of simple geometrical shapes with well-defined boundaries varying over time. Changes of varying magnitude in either space or time were introduced and repeated gamma analyses were performed varying the criteria. A clinical VMAT case was also included, artificial air bubbles of varying size were introduced to a patient geometry, along with shifts of varying magnitude in treatment time. For all test cases where errors in distance, dose or time were introduced, the time dependent gamma evaluation could accurately highlight the errors. The time dependent gamma function presented here allows time to be included as a degree of freedom in gamma evaluations. The function allows for 2D and 3D data sets which are varying over time to be compared using appropriate criteria without penalising minor offsets of subsequent radiation

  8. 3D dose distribution calculation in a voxelized human phantom by means of Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Abella, V; Miró, R; Juste, B; Verdú, G

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to provide the reconstruction of a real human voxelized phantom by means of a MatLab program and the simulation of the irradiation of such phantom with the photon beam generated in a Theratron 780 (MDS Nordion) (60)Co radiotherapy unit, by using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle), version 5. The project results in 3D dose mapping calculations inside the voxelized antropomorphic head phantom. The program provides the voxelization by first processing the CT slices; the process follows a two-dimensional pixel and material identification algorithm on each slice and three-dimensional interpolation in order to describe the phantom geometry via small cubic cells, resulting in an MCNP input deck format output. Dose rates are calculated by using the MCNP5 tool FMESH, superimposed mesh tally, which gives the track length estimation of the particle flux in units of particles/cm(2). Furthermore, the particle flux is converted into dose by using the conversion coefficients extracted from the NIST Physical Reference Data. The voxelization using a three-dimensional interpolation technique in combination with the use of the FMESH tool of the MCNP Monte Carlo code offers an optimal simulation which results in 3D dose mapping calculations inside anthropomorphic phantoms. This tool is very useful in radiation treatment assessments, in which voxelized phantoms are widely utilized. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical examples of 3D dose distribution reconstruction, based on the actual MLC leaves movement, for dynamic treatment techniques

    PubMed Central

    Osewski, Wojciech; Dolla, Łukasz; Radwan, Michał; Szlag, Marta; Rutkowski, Roman; Smolińska, Barbara; Ślosarek, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Aim To present practical examples of our new algorithm for reconstruction of 3D dose distribution, based on the actual MLC leaf movement. Background DynaLog and RTplan files were used by DDcon software to prepare a new RTplan file for dose distribution reconstruction. Materials and methods Four different clinically relevant scenarios were used to assess the feasibility of the proposed new approach: (1) Reconstruction of whole treatment sessions for prostate cancer; (2) Reconstruction of IMRT verification treatment plan; (3) Dose reconstruction in breast cancer; (4) Reconstruction of interrupted arc and complementary plan for an interrupted VMAT treatment session of prostate cancer. The applied reconstruction method was validated by comparing reconstructed and measured fluence maps. For all statistical analysis, the U Mann–Whitney test was used. Results In the first two and the fourth cases, there were no statistically significant differences between the planned and reconstructed dose distribution (p = 0.910, p = 0.975, p = 0.893, respectively). In the third case the differences were statistically significant (p = 0.015). Treatment plan had to be reconstructed. Conclusion Developed dose distribution reconstruction algorithm presents a very useful QA tool. It provides means for 3D dose distribution verification in patient volume and allows to evaluate the influence of actual MLC leaf motion on the dose distribution. PMID:25337416

  10. Verification of 3D Dose Distributions of a Beta-Emitting Radionuclide Using PRESAGE^ Dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowder, Mandi; Grant, Ryan; Ibbott, Geoff; Wendt, Richard

    2010-11-01

    Liquid Brachytherapy involves the direct administration of a beta-emitting radioactive solution into the selected tissue. The solution does not migrate from the injection point and uses the limited range of beta particles to produce a three-dimensional dose distribution. We simulated distributions by beta-dose kernels and validated those estimates by irradiating PRESAGE^ polyurethane dosimeters that measure the three-dimensional dose distributions by a change in optical density that is proportional to dose. The dosimeters were injected with internal beta-emitting radionuclide yttrium-90, exposed for 5.75 days, imaged with optical tomography, and analyzed with radiotherapy software. Dosimeters irradiated with an electron beam to 2 or 3 Gy were used for calibration. The shapes and dose distributions in the PRESAGE^ dosimeters were consistent with the predicted dose kernels. Our experiments have laid the groundwork for future application to individualized patient therapy by ultimately designing a treatment plan that conforms to the shape of any appropriate tumor.

  11. Gamma Knife 3-D dose distribution near the area of tissue inhomogeneities by normoxic gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Isbakan, Fatih; Uelgen, Yekta; Bilge, Hatice; Ozen, Zeynep; Agus, Onur; Buyuksarac, Bora

    2007-05-15

    The accuracy of the Leksell GammaPlan registered , the dose planning system of the Gamma Knife Model-B, was evaluated near tissue inhomogeneities, using the gel dosimetry method. The lack of electronic equilibrium around the small-diameter gamma beams can cause dose calculation errors in the neighborhood of an air-tissue interface. An experiment was designed to investigate the effects of inhomogeneity near the paranosal sinuses cavities. The homogeneous phantom was a spherical glass balloon of 16 cm diameter, filled with MAGIC gel; i.e., the normoxic polymer gel. Two hollow PVC balls of 2 cm radius, filled with N{sub 2} gas, represented the air cavities inside the inhomogeneous phantom. For dose calibration purposes, 100 ml gel-containing vials were irradiated at predefined doses, and then scanned in a MR unit. Linearity was observed between the delivered dose and the reciprocal of the T2 relaxation time constant of the gel. Dose distributions are the results of a single shot of irradiation, obtained by collimating all 201 cobalt sources to a known target in the phantom. Both phantoms were irradiated at the same dose level at the same coordinates. Stereotactic frames and fiducial markers were attached to the phantoms prior to MR scanning. The dose distribution predicted by the Gamma Knife planning system was compared with that of the gel dosimetry. As expected, for the homogeneous phantom the isodose diameters measured by the gel dosimetry and the GammaPlan registered differed by 5% at most. However, with the inhomogeneous phantom, the dose maps in the axial, coronal and sagittal planes were spatially different. The diameters of the 50% isodose curves differed 43% in the X axis and 32% in the Y axis for the Z=90 mm axial plane; by 44% in the X axis and 24% in the Z axis for the Y=90 mm coronal plane; and by 32% in the Z axis and 42% in the Y axis for the X=92 mm sagittal plane. The lack of ability of the GammaPlan registered to predict the rapid dose fall off, due

  12. The prediction of transmitted dose distributions using a 3D treatment planning system.

    PubMed

    Reich, P; Bezak, E; Mohammadi, M; Fog, L

    2006-03-01

    Patient dose verification is becoming increasingly important with the advent of new complex radiotherapy techniques such as conformal radiotherapy (CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). An electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has potential application for in vivo dosimetry. In the current work, an EPID has been modelled using a treatment planning system (TPS) to predict transmitted dose maps. A thin slab of RW3 material used to initially represent the EPID. A homogeneous RW3 phantom and the thin RW3 slab placed at a clinical distance away from the phantom were scanned using a CT simulator. The resulting CT images were transferred via DICOM to the TPS and the density of the CT data corresponding to the thin RW3 slab was changed to 1 g/cm3. Transmitted dose maps (TDMs) in the modelled EPID were calculated by the TPS using the collapsed-cone (C-C) convolution superposition (C/S) algorithm. A 6 MV beam was used in the simulation to deliver 300 MU to the homogenous phantom using an isocentric and SSD (source-to-surface) technique. The phantom thickness was varied and the calculated TDMs in the modelled EPID were compared with corresponding measurements obtained from a calibrated scanning liquid-filled ionisation chamber (SLIC) EPID. The two TDMs were compared using the gamma evaluation technique of Low et al. The predicted and measured TDMs agree to within 2 % (averaged over all phantom thicknesses) on the central beam axis. More than 90 % of points in the dose maps (excluding field edges) produce a gamma index less than or equal to 1, for dose difference (averaged over all phantom thicknesses), and distance-to-agreement criteria of 4 %, 3.8 mm, respectively. In addition, the noise level on the central axis in the predicted dose maps is less than 0.1 %. We found that phantom thickness changes of approximately 1 mm, which correspond to dose changes on the central beam axis of less than 0.6 %, can be detected in the predicted transmitted dose distributions.

  13. Optimal angular dose distribution to acquire 3D and extra 2D images for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Ye-Seul; Lee, Haeng-Hwa; Gang, Won-Suk; Kim, Hee-Joung; Choi, Young-Wook; Choi, JaeGu

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the optimal non-uniform angular dose distribution to improve the quality of the 3D reconstructed images and to acquire extra 2D projection images. In this analysis, 7 acquisition sets were generated by using four different values for the number of projections (11, 15, 21, and 29) and total angular range (±14°, ±17.5°, ±21°, and ±24.5° ). For all acquisition sets, the zero-degree projection was used as the 2D image that was close to that of standard conventional mammography (CM). Exposures used were 50, 100, 150, and 200 mR for the zero-degree projection, and the remaining dose was distributed over the remaining projection angles. To quantitatively evaluate image quality, we computed the CNR (contrast-to-noise ratio) and the ASF (artifact spread function) for the same radiation dose. The results indicate that, for microcalcifications, acquisition sets with approximately 4 times higher exposure on the zero-degree projection than the average exposure for the remaining projection angles yielded higher CNR values and were 3% higher than the uniform distribution. However, very high dose concentrations toward the zero-degree projection may reduce the quality of the reconstructed images due to increasing noise in the peripheral views. The zero-degree projection of the non-uniform dose distribution offers a 2D image similar to that of standard CM, but with a significantly lower radiation dose. Therefore, we need to evaluate the diagnostic potential of extra 2D projection image when diagnose breast cancer by using 3D images with non-uniform angular dose distributions.

  14. Evaluation of the respiratory motion influence in the 3D dose distribution of IMRT breast radiation therapy treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizar, J. C.; Santos, L. F.; Brandão, F. C.; Volpato, K. C.; Guimarães, F. S.; Pavoni, J. F.

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to evaluate the motion influence in the tridimensional dose distribution due to respiratory for IMRT breast planning technique. To simulate the breathing movement an oscillating platform was used. To simulate the breast, MAGIC-f phantoms were used. CT images of a static phantom were obtained and the IMRT treatment was planned based on them. One phantom was irradiated static in the platform and two other phantoms were irradiated while oscillating in the platform with amplitudes of 0.34 cm and 1.22 cm, the fourth phantom was used as reference in the MRI acquisition. The percentage of points approved in the 3D global gamma analyses (3%/3mm) when comparing the dose distribution of the static phantom with the oscillating ones was 91% for the 0.34cm amplitude and 62% for the 1.22 cm amplitude. Considering this result, the differences found in the dosimetric analyses for the oscillating amplitude of 0.34cm could be considered acceptable in a real treatment. The isodose distribution analyses showed a decrease of dose in the anterior breast region and an increase of dose on the posterior breast region, being these differences most pronounced for large amplitude motion.

  15. A computerized framework for monitoring four-dimensional dose distributions during stereotactic body radiation therapy using a portal dose image-based 2D/3D registration approach.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Takahiro; Arimura, Hidetaka; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Asumi; Hirose, Taka-Aki; Honda, Hiroshi; Umezu, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Hirata, Hideki

    2015-03-01

    A computerized framework for monitoring four-dimensional (4D) dose distributions during stereotactic body radiation therapy based on a portal dose image (PDI)-based 2D/3D registration approach has been proposed in this study. Using the PDI-based registration approach, simulated 4D "treatment" CT images were derived from the deformation of 3D planning CT images so that a 2D planning PDI could be similar to a 2D dynamic clinical PDI at a breathing phase. The planning PDI was calculated by applying a dose calculation algorithm (a pencil beam convolution algorithm) to the geometry of the planning CT image and a virtual water equivalent phantom. The dynamic clinical PDIs were estimated from electronic portal imaging device (EPID) dynamic images including breathing phase data obtained during a treatment. The parameters of the affine transformation matrix were optimized based on an objective function and a gamma pass rate using a Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm. The proposed framework was applied to the EPID dynamic images of ten lung cancer patients, which included 183 frames (mean: 18.3 per patient). The 4D dose distributions during the treatment time were successfully obtained by applying the dose calculation algorithm to the simulated 4D "treatment" CT images. The mean±standard deviation (SD) of the percentage errors between the prescribed dose and the estimated dose at an isocenter for all cases was 3.25±4.43%. The maximum error for the ten cases was 14.67% (prescribed dose: 1.50Gy, estimated dose: 1.72Gy), and the minimum error was 0.00%. The proposed framework could be feasible for monitoring the 4D dose distribution and dose errors within a patient's body during treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A comparative study of dose distribution of PBT, 3D-CRT and IMRT for pediatric brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Daichi; Mizumoto, Masashi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Fukushima, Hiroko; Fukushima, Takashi; Terunuma, Toshiyuki; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2017-02-22

    It was reported that proton beam therapy (PBT) reduced the normal brain dose compared with X-ray therapy for pediatric brain tumors. We considered whether there was not the condition that PBT was more disadvantageous than intensity modulated photon radiotherapy (IMRT) and 3D conventional radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for treatment of pediatric brain tumors about the dose reduction for the normal brain when the tumor location or tumor size were different. The subjects were 12 patients treated with PBT at our institute, including 6 cases of ependymoma treated by local irradiation and 6 cases of germinoma treated by irradiation of all four cerebral ventricles. IMRT and 3D-CRT treatment plans were made for these 12 cases, with optimization using the same planning conditions as those for PBT. Model cases were also compared using sphere targets with different diameters or locations in the brain, and the normal brain doses with PBT, IMRT and 3D-CRT were compared using the same planning conditions. PBT significantly reduced the average dose to normal brain tissue compared to 3D-CRT and IMRT in all cases. There was no difference between 3D-CRT and IMRT. The average normal brain doses for PBT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT were 5.1-34.8% (median 14.9%), 11.0-48.5% (23.8%), and 11.5-53.1% (23.5%), respectively, in ependymoma cases; and 42.3-61.2% (48.9%), 54.5-74.0% (62.8%), and 56.3-72.1% (61.2%), respectively, in germinoma cases. In the model cases, PBT significantly reduced the average normal brain dose for larger tumors and for tumors located at the periphery of the brain. PBT reduces the average dose to normal brain tissue, compared with 3D-CRT and IMRT. The effect is higher for a tumor that is larger or located laterally.

  17. 3D dose computation algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knöös, T.

    2017-05-01

    The calculation of absorbed dose within patients during external photon beam radiotherapy is reviewed. This includes the modelling of the radiation source i.e. in most cases a linear accelerator (beam modelling) and examples of dose calculation algorithms applied within the patient i.e. the dose engine. For the first part - the beam modelling, the different sources in the treatment head as target, filters and collimators etc are discussed as well as their importance for the photon and electron fluence reaching the patient. The consequences of removing the flattening filter, which several vendors now have made commercially available, is also shown. The pros and cons regarding different dose engines ability to consider density changes within the patient will is covered (type a and b models). Engines covered are, for example, pencil-beam models, collapsed cone superposition/-convolution models and combinations of these, as well as a glimpse on Monte Carlo methods for radiotherapy. The different models’ ability to calculate dose to medium (tissue) and or water is. Finally, the role of commissioning data especially measurements in today’s model based dose calculation is presented.

  18. Differences in 3D dose distributions due to calculation method of voxel S-values and the influence of image blurring in SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacilio, Massimiliano; Amato, Ernesto; Lanconelli, Nico; Basile, Chiara; Torres, Leonel Alberto; Botta, Francesca; Ferrari, Mahila; Cornejo Diaz, Nestor; Coca Perez, Marco; Fernández, María; Lassmann, Michael; Vergara Gil, Alex; Cremonesi, Marta

    2015-03-01

    This study compares 3D dose distributions obtained with voxel S values (VSVs) for soft tissue, calculated by several methods at their current state-of-the-art, varying the degree of image blurring. The methods were: 1) convolution of Dose Point Kernel (DPK) for water, using a scaling factor method; 2) an analytical model (AM), fitting the deposited energy as a function of the source-target distance; 3) a rescaling method (RSM) based on a set of high-resolution VSVs for each isotope; 4) local energy deposition (LED). VSVs calculated by direct Monte Carlo simulations were assumed as reference. Dose distributions were calculated considering spheroidal clusters with various sizes (251, 1237 and 4139 voxels of 3 mm size), uniformly filled with 131I, 177Lu, 188Re or 90Y. The activity distributions were blurred with Gaussian filters of various widths (6, 8 and 12 mm). Moreover, 3D-dosimetry was performed for 10 treatments with 90Y derivatives. Cumulative Dose Volume Histograms (cDVHs) were compared, studying the differences in D95%, D50% or Dmax (ΔD95%, ΔD50% and ΔDmax) and dose profiles. For unblurred spheroidal clusters, ΔD95%, ΔD50% and ΔDmax were mostly within some percents, slightly higher for 177Lu with DPK (8%) and RSM (12%) and considerably higher for LED (ΔD95% up to 59%). Increasing the blurring, differences decreased and also LED yielded very similar results, but D95% and D50% underestimations between 30-60% and 15-50%, respectively (with respect to 3D-dosimetry with unblurred distributions), were evidenced. Also for clinical images (affected by blurring as well), cDVHs differences for most methods were within few percents, except for slightly higher differences with LED, and almost systematic for dose profiles with DPK (-1.2%), AM (-3.0%) and RSM (4.5%), whereas showed an oscillating trend with LED. The major concern for 3D-dosimetry on clinical SPECT images is more strongly represented by image blurring than by differences among the VSVs

  19. Differences in 3D dose distributions due to calculation method of voxel S-values and the influence of image blurring in SPECT.

    PubMed

    Pacilio, Massimiliano; Amato, Ernesto; Lanconelli, Nico; Basile, Chiara; Torres, Leonel Alberto; Botta, Francesca; Ferrari, Mahila; Diaz, Nestor Cornejo; Perez, Marco Coca; Fernández, María; Lassmann, Michael; Gil, Alex Vergara; Cremonesi, Marta

    2015-03-07

    This study compares 3D dose distributions obtained with voxel S values (VSVs) for soft tissue, calculated by several methods at their current state-of-the-art, varying the degree of image blurring. The methods were: 1) convolution of Dose Point Kernel (DPK) for water, using a scaling factor method; 2) an analytical model (AM), fitting the deposited energy as a function of the source-target distance; 3) a rescaling method (RSM) based on a set of high-resolution VSVs for each isotope; 4) local energy deposition (LED). VSVs calculated by direct Monte Carlo simulations were assumed as reference. Dose distributions were calculated considering spheroidal clusters with various sizes (251, 1237 and 4139 voxels of 3 mm size), uniformly filled with (131)I, (177)Lu, (188)Re or (90)Y. The activity distributions were blurred with Gaussian filters of various widths (6, 8 and 12 mm). Moreover, 3D-dosimetry was performed for 10 treatments with (90)Y derivatives. Cumulative Dose Volume Histograms (cDVHs) were compared, studying the differences in D95%, D50% or Dmax (ΔD95%, ΔD50% and ΔDmax) and dose profiles.For unblurred spheroidal clusters, ΔD95%, ΔD50% and ΔDmax were mostly within some percents, slightly higher for (177)Lu with DPK (8%) and RSM (12%) and considerably higher for LED (ΔD95% up to 59%). Increasing the blurring, differences decreased and also LED yielded very similar results, but D95% and D50% underestimations between 30-60% and 15-50%, respectively (with respect to 3D-dosimetry with unblurred distributions), were evidenced. Also for clinical images (affected by blurring as well), cDVHs differences for most methods were within few percents, except for slightly higher differences with LED, and almost systematic for dose profiles with DPK (-1.2%), AM (-3.0%) and RSM (4.5%), whereas showed an oscillating trend with LED.The major concern for 3D-dosimetry on clinical SPECT images is more strongly represented by image blurring than by differences among the VSVs

  20. Comparison between Monte Carlo simulation and measurement with a 3D polymer gel dosimeter for dose distributions in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuta, T.; Maeyama, T.; Ishikawa, K. L.; Fukunishi, N.; Fukasaku, K.; Takagi, S.; Noda, S.; Himeno, R.; Hayashi, S.

    2015-08-01

    In this research, we used a 135 MeV/nucleon carbon-ion beam to irradiate a biological sample composed of fresh chicken meat and bones, which was placed in front of a PAGAT gel dosimeter, and compared the measured and simulated transverse-relaxation-rate (R2) distributions in the gel dosimeter. We experimentally measured the three-dimensional R2 distribution, which records the dose induced by particles penetrating the sample, by using magnetic resonance imaging. The obtained R2 distribution reflected the heterogeneity of the biological sample. We also conducted Monte Carlo simulations using the PHITS code by reconstructing the elemental composition of the biological sample from its computed tomography images while taking into account the dependence of the gel response on the linear energy transfer. The simulation reproduced the experimental distal edge structure of the R2 distribution with an accuracy under about 2 mm, which is approximately the same as the voxel size currently used in treatment planning.

  1. Comparison of 3D dose distributions for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources with normoxic polymer gel dosimetry and treatment planning system.

    PubMed

    Senkesen, Oznur; Tezcanli, Evrim; Buyuksarac, Bora; Ozbay, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Radiation fluence changes caused by the dosimeter itself and poor spatial resolution may lead to lack of 3-dimensional (3D) information depending on the features of the dosimeter and quality assurance of dose distributions for high-dose rate (HDR) iridium-192 ((192)Ir) brachytherapy sources is challenging and experimental dosimetry methods used for brachytherapy sources are limited. In this study, we investigated 3D dose distributions of (192)Ir brachytherapy sources for irradiation with single and multiple dwell positions using a normoxic gel dosimeter and compared them with treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. For dose calibration purposes, 100-mL gel-containing vials were irradiated at predefined doses and then scanned in an magnetic resonance (MR) imaging unit. Gel phantoms prepared in 2 spherical glasses were irradiated with (192)Ir for the calculated dwell positions, and MR scans of the phantoms were obtained. The images were analyzed with MATLAB software. Dose distributions and profiles derived with 1-mm resolution were compared with TPS calculations. Linearity was observed between the delivered dose and the reciprocal of the T2 relaxation time constant of the gel. The x-, y-, and z-axes were defined as the sagittal, coronal, and axial planes, respectively, the sagittal and axial planes were defined parallel to the long axis of the source while the coronal plane was defined horizontally to the long axis of the source. The differences between measured and calculated profile widths of 3-cm source length and point source for 70%, 50%, and 30% isodose lines were evaluated at 3 dose levels using 18 profiles of comparison. The calculations for 3-cm source length revealed a difference of > 3mm in 1 coordinate at 50% profile width on the sagittal plane and 3 coordinates at 70% profile width and 2 coordinates at 50% and 30% profile widths on the axial plane. Calculations on the coronal plane for 3-cm source length showed > 3-mm difference in 1 coordinate at

  2. Comparison of 3D dose distributions for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources with normoxic polymer gel dosimetry and treatment planning system

    SciTech Connect

    Senkesen, Oznur; Tezcanli, Evrim; Buyuksarac, Bora; Ozbay, Ismail

    2014-10-01

    Radiation fluence changes caused by the dosimeter itself and poor spatial resolution may lead to lack of 3-dimensional (3D) information depending on the features of the dosimeter and quality assurance of dose distributions for high–dose rate (HDR) iridium-192 ({sup 192}Ir) brachytherapy sources is challenging and experimental dosimetry methods used for brachytherapy sources are limited. In this study, we investigated 3D dose distributions of {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources for irradiation with single and multiple dwell positions using a normoxic gel dosimeter and compared them with treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. For dose calibration purposes, 100-mL gel-containing vials were irradiated at predefined doses and then scanned in an magnetic resonance (MR) imaging unit. Gel phantoms prepared in 2 spherical glasses were irradiated with {sup 192}Ir for the calculated dwell positions, and MR scans of the phantoms were obtained. The images were analyzed with MATLAB software. Dose distributions and profiles derived with 1-mm resolution were compared with TPS calculations. Linearity was observed between the delivered dose and the reciprocal of the T2 relaxation time constant of the gel. The x-, y-, and z-axes were defined as the sagittal, coronal, and axial planes, respectively, the sagittal and axial planes were defined parallel to the long axis of the source while the coronal plane was defined horizontally to the long axis of the source. The differences between measured and calculated profile widths of 3-cm source length and point source for 70%, 50%, and 30% isodose lines were evaluated at 3 dose levels using 18 profiles of comparison. The calculations for 3-cm source length revealed a difference of > 3 mm in 1 coordinate at 50% profile width on the sagittal plane and 3 coordinates at 70% profile width and 2 coordinates at 50% and 30% profile widths on the axial plane. Calculations on the coronal plane for 3-cm source length showed > 3-mm difference in 1

  3. A 3D isodose manipulation tool for interactive dose shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamerling, C. P.; Ziegenhein, P.; Heinrich, H.; Oelfke, U.

    2014-03-01

    The interactive dose shaping (IDS) planning paradigm aims to perform interactive local dose adaptations of an IMRT plan without compromising already established valuable dose features in real-time. In this work we introduce an interactive 3D isodose manipulation tool which enables local modifications of a dose distribution intuitively by direct manipulation of an isodose surface. We developed an in-house IMRT TPS framework employing an IDS engine as well as a 3D GUI for dose manipulation and visualization. In our software an initial dose distribution can be interactively modified through an isodose surface manipulation tool by intuitively clicking on an isodose surface. To guide the user interaction, the position of the modification is indicated by a sphere while the mouse cursor hovers the isodose surface. The sphere's radius controls the locality of the modification. The tool induces a dose modification as a direct change of dose in one or more voxels, which is incrementally obtained by fluence adjustments. A subsequent recovery step identifies voxels with violated dose features and aims to recover their original dose. We showed a proof of concept study for the proposed tool by adapting the dose distribution of a prostate case (9 beams, coplanar). Single dose modifications take less than 2 seconds on an actual desktop PC.

  4. A software tool for 3D dose verification and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa'd, M. Al; Graham, J.; Liney, G. P.

    2013-06-01

    The main recent developments in radiotherapy have focused on improved treatment techniques in order to generate further significant improvements in patient prognosis. There is now an internationally recognised need to improve 3D verification of highly conformal radiotherapy treatments. This is because of the very high dose gradients used in modern treatment techniques, which can result in a small error in the spatial dose distribution leading to a serious complication. In order to gain the full benefits of using 3D dosimetric technologies (such as gel dosimetry), it is vital to use 3D evaluation methods and algorithms. We present in this paper a software solution that provides a comprehensive 3D dose evaluation and analysis. The software is applied to gel dosimetry, which is based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a read-out method. The software can also be used to compare any two dose distributions, such as two distributions planned using different methods of treatment planning systems, or different dose calculation algorithms.

  5. The use of gel dosimetry to measure the 3D dose distribution of a 90Sr/90Y intravascular brachytherapy seed.

    PubMed

    Massillon-Jl, G; Minniti, R; Mitch, M G; Maryanski, M J; Soares, C G

    2009-03-21

    Absorbed dose distributions in 3D imparted by a single (90)Sr/(90)Y beta particle seed source of the type used for intravascular brachytherapy were investigated. A polymer gel dosimetry medium was used as a dosemeter and phantom, while a special high-resolution laser CT scanner with a spatial resolution of 100 microm in all dimensions was used to quantify the data. We have measured the radial dose function, g(L)(r), observing that g(L)(r) increases to a maximum value and then decreases as the distance from the seed increases. This is in good agreement with previous data obtained with radiochromic film and thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs), even if the TLDs underestimate the dose at distances very close to the seed. Contrary to the measurements, g(L)(r) calculated through Monte Carlo simulations and reported previously steadily decreases without a local maximum as a function of the distance from the seed. At distances less than 1.5 mm, differences of more than 20% are observed between the measurements and the Monte Carlo calculations. This difference could be due to a possible underestimation of the energy absorbed into the seed core and encapsulation in the Monte Carlo simulation, as a consequence of the unknown precise chemical composition of the core and its respective density for this seed. The results suggest that g(L)(r) can be measured very close to the seed with a relative uncertainty of about 1% to 2%. The dose distribution is isotropic only at distances greater than or equal to 2 mm from the seed and is almost symmetric, independent of the depth. This study indicates that polymer gel coupled with the special small format laser CT scanner are valid and accurate methods for measuring the dose distribution at distances close to an intravascular brachytherapy seed.

  6. Real-time 3D dose imaging in water phantoms: reconstruction from simultaneous EPID-Cherenkov 3D imaging (EC3D)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruza, P.; Andreozzi, J. M.; Gladstone, D. J.; Jarvis, L. A.; Rottmann, J.; Pogue, B. W.

    2017-05-01

    Combination of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) transmission imaging with frontal Cherenkov imaging enabled real-time 3D dosimetry of clinical X-ray beams in water phantoms. The EPID provides a 2D transverse distribution of attenuation which can be back-projected to estimate accumulated dose, while the Cherenkov image provides an accurate lateral view of the dose versus depth. Assuming homogeneous density and composition of the phantom, both images can be linearly combined into a true 3D distribution of the deposited dose. We describe the algorithm for volumetric dose reconstruction, and demonstrate the results of a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) 3D dosimetry.

  7. SU-E-T-35: An Investigation of the Accuracy of Cervical IMRT Dose Distribution Using 2D/3D Ionization Chamber Arrays System and Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Yang, J; Liu, H; Liu, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to compare the verification results of three solutions (2D/3D ionization chamber arrays measurement and Monte Carlo simulation), the results will help make a clinical decision as how to do our cervical IMRT verification. Methods: Seven cervical cases were planned with Pinnacle 8.0m to meet the clinical acceptance criteria. The plans were recalculated in the Matrixx and Delta4 phantom with the accurate plans parameters. The plans were also recalculated by Monte Carlo using leaf sequences and MUs for individual plans of every patient, Matrixx and Delta4 phantom. All plans of Matrixx and Delta4 phantom were delivered and measured. The dose distribution of iso slice, dose profiles, gamma maps of every beam were used to evaluate the agreement. Dose-volume histograms were also compared. Results: The dose distribution of iso slice and dose profiles from Pinnacle calculation were in agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation, Matrixx and Delta4 measurement. A 95.2%/91.3% gamma pass ratio was obtained between the Matrixx/Delta4 measurement and Pinnacle distributions within 3mm/3% gamma criteria. A 96.4%/95.6% gamma pass ratio was obtained between the Matrixx/Delta4 measurement and Monte Carlo simulation within 2mm/2% gamma criteria, almost 100% gamma pass ratio within 3mm/3% gamma criteria. The DVH plot have slightly differences between Pinnacle and Delta4 measurement as well as Pinnacle and Monte Carlo simulation, but have excellent agreement between Delta4 measurement and Monte Carlo simulation. Conclusion: It was shown that Matrixx/Delta4 and Monte Carlo simulation can be used very efficiently to verify cervical IMRT delivery. In terms of Gamma value the pass ratio of Matrixx was little higher, however, Delta4 showed more problem fields. The primary advantage of Delta4 is the fact it can measure true 3D dosimetry while Monte Carlo can simulate in patients CT images but not in phantom.

  8. RHOCUBE: 3D density distributions modeling code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikutta, Robert; Agliozzo, Claudia

    2016-11-01

    RHOCUBE models 3D density distributions on a discrete Cartesian grid and their integrated 2D maps. It can be used for a range of applications, including modeling the electron number density in LBV shells and computing the emission measure. The RHOCUBE Python package provides several 3D density distributions, including a powerlaw shell, truncated Gaussian shell, constant-density torus, dual cones, and spiralling helical tubes, and can accept additional distributions. RHOCUBE provides convenient methods for shifts and rotations in 3D, and if necessary, an arbitrary number of density distributions can be combined into the same model cube and the integration ∫ dz performed through the joint density field.

  9. 3D Spray Droplet Distributions in Sneezes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Techet, Alexandra; Scharfman, Barry; Bourouiba, Lydia

    2015-11-01

    3D spray droplet clouds generated during human sneezing are investigated using the Synthetic Aperture Feature Extraction (SAFE) method, which relies on light field imaging (LFI) and synthetic aperture (SA) refocusing computational photographic techniques. An array of nine high-speed cameras are used to image sneeze droplets and tracked the droplets in 3D space and time (3D + T). An additional high-speed camera is utilized to track the motion of the head during sneezing. In the SAFE method, the raw images recorded by each camera in the array are preprocessed and binarized, simplifying post processing after image refocusing and enabling the extraction of feature sizes and positions in 3D + T. These binary images are refocused using either additive or multiplicative methods, combined with thresholding. Sneeze droplet centroids, radii, distributions and trajectories are determined and compared with existing data. The reconstructed 3D droplet centroids and radii enable a more complete understanding of the physical extent and fluid dynamics of sneeze ejecta. These measurements are important for understanding the infectious disease transmission potential of sneezes in various indoor environments.

  10. Use of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to facilitate real-time 3D graphic presentation of the patient skin-dose distribution during fluoroscopic interventional procedures

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Vijay; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a dose-tracking system (DTS) that calculates the radiation dose to the patient’s skin in real-time by acquiring exposure parameters and imaging-system-geometry from the digital bus on a Toshiba Infinix C-arm unit. The cumulative dose values are then displayed as a color map on an OpenGL-based 3D graphic of the patient for immediate feedback to the interventionalist. Determination of those elements on the surface of the patient 3D-graphic that intersect the beam and calculation of the dose for these elements in real time demands fast computation. Reducing the size of the elements results in more computation load on the computer processor and therefore a tradeoff occurs between the resolution of the patient graphic and the real-time performance of the DTS. The speed of the DTS for calculating dose to the skin is limited by the central processing unit (CPU) and can be improved by using the parallel processing power of a graphics processing unit (GPU). Here, we compare the performance speed of GPU-based DTS software to that of the current CPU-based software as a function of the resolution of the patient graphics. Results show a tremendous improvement in speed using the GPU. While an increase in the spatial resolution of the patient graphics resulted in slowing down the computational speed of the DTS on the CPU, the speed of the GPU-based DTS was hardly affected. This GPU-based DTS can be a powerful tool for providing accurate, real-time feedback about patient skin-dose to physicians while performing interventional procedures. PMID:24027616

  11. Use of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to facilitate real-time 3D graphic presentation of the patient skin-dose distribution during fluoroscopic interventional procedures.

    PubMed

    Rana, Vijay; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R

    2012-02-23

    We have developed a dose-tracking system (DTS) that calculates the radiation dose to the patient's skin in real-time by acquiring exposure parameters and imaging-system-geometry from the digital bus on a Toshiba Infinix C-arm unit. The cumulative dose values are then displayed as a color map on an OpenGL-based 3D graphic of the patient for immediate feedback to the interventionalist. Determination of those elements on the surface of the patient 3D-graphic that intersect the beam and calculation of the dose for these elements in real time demands fast computation. Reducing the size of the elements results in more computation load on the computer processor and therefore a tradeoff occurs between the resolution of the patient graphic and the real-time performance of the DTS. The speed of the DTS for calculating dose to the skin is limited by the central processing unit (CPU) and can be improved by using the parallel processing power of a graphics processing unit (GPU). Here, we compare the performance speed of GPU-based DTS software to that of the current CPU-based software as a function of the resolution of the patient graphics. Results show a tremendous improvement in speed using the GPU. While an increase in the spatial resolution of the patient graphics resulted in slowing down the computational speed of the DTS on the CPU, the speed of the GPU-based DTS was hardly affected. This GPU-based DTS can be a powerful tool for providing accurate, real-time feedback about patient skin-dose to physicians while performing interventional procedures.

  12. Use of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to facilitate real-time 3D graphic presentation of the patient skin-dose distribution during fluoroscopic interventional procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Vijay; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a dose-tracking system (DTS) that calculates the radiation dose to the patient's skin in realtime by acquiring exposure parameters and imaging-system-geometry from the digital bus on a Toshiba Infinix C-arm unit. The cumulative dose values are then displayed as a color map on an OpenGL-based 3D graphic of the patient for immediate feedback to the interventionalist. Determination of those elements on the surface of the patient 3D-graphic that intersect the beam and calculation of the dose for these elements in real time demands fast computation. Reducing the size of the elements results in more computation load on the computer processor and therefore a tradeoff occurs between the resolution of the patient graphic and the real-time performance of the DTS. The speed of the DTS for calculating dose to the skin is limited by the central processing unit (CPU) and can be improved by using the parallel processing power of a graphics processing unit (GPU). Here, we compare the performance speed of GPU-based DTS software to that of the current CPU-based software as a function of the resolution of the patient graphics. Results show a tremendous improvement in speed using the GPU. While an increase in the spatial resolution of the patient graphics resulted in slowing down the computational speed of the DTS on the CPU, the speed of the GPU-based DTS was hardly affected. This GPU-based DTS can be a powerful tool for providing accurate, real-time feedback about patient skin-dose to physicians while performing interventional procedures.

  13. Dose fractionation theorem in 3-D reconstruction (tomography)

    SciTech Connect

    Glaeser, R.M.

    1997-02-01

    It is commonly assumed that the large number of projections for single-axis tomography precludes its application to most beam-labile specimens. However, Hegerl and Hoppe have pointed out that the total dose required to achieve statistical significance for each voxel of a computed 3-D reconstruction is the same as that required to obtain a single 2-D image of that isolated voxel, at the same level of statistical significance. Thus a statistically significant 3-D image can be computed from statistically insignificant projections, as along as the total dosage that is distributed among these projections is high enough that it would have resulted in a statistically significant projection, if applied to only one image. We have tested this critical theorem by simulating the tomographic reconstruction of a realistic 3-D model created from an electron micrograph. The simulations verify the basic conclusions of high absorption, signal-dependent noise, varying specimen contrast and missing angular range. Furthermore, the simulations demonstrate that individual projections in the series of fractionated-dose images can be aligned by cross-correlation because they contain significant information derived from the summation of features from different depths in the structure. This latter information is generally not useful for structural interpretation prior to 3-D reconstruction, owing to the complexity of most specimens investigated by single-axis tomography. These results, in combination with dose estimates for imaging single voxels and measurements of radiation damage in the electron microscope, demonstrate that it is feasible to use single-axis tomography with soft X-ray microscopy of frozen-hydrated specimens.

  14. Three-Dimensional (3D) Distribution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-11

    witnessed by ongoing efforts in both Afghanistan and Iraq , must turn distribution challenges into opportunities by mastering Three-Dimensional (3D...sustainment. 5 Joint Logistics Functions •Supply •Services •Maintenance •Transportation • Health Service Support •General Engineering Joint Personnel...Maintenance •Transportation • Health Service Support •Explosive Ordinance Disposal •Human Resource Support •Legal Support •Religious Support •Financial

  15. 3D measurement of absolute radiation dose in grid therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapp, J. V.; Warrington, A. P.; Partridge, M.; Philps, A.; Leach, M. O.; Webb, S.

    2004-01-01

    Spatially fractionated radiotherapy through a grid is a concept which has a long history and was routinely used in orthovoltage radiation therapy in the middle of last century to minimize damage to the skin and subcutaneous tissue. With the advent of megavoltage radiotherapy and its skin sparing effects the use of grids in radiotherapy declined in the 1970s. However there has recently been a revival of the technique for use in palliative treatments with a single fraction of 10 to 20 Gy. In this work the absolute 3D dose distribution in a grid irradiation is measured for photons using a combination of film and gel dosimetry.

  16. A graphical user interface (GUI) toolkit for the calculation of three-dimensional (3D) multi-phase biological effective dose (BED) distributions including statistical analyses.

    PubMed

    Kauweloa, Kevin I; Gutierrez, Alonso N; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Niko; Mavroidis, Panayiotis

    2016-07-01

    A toolkit has been developed for calculating the 3-dimensional biological effective dose (BED) distributions in multi-phase, external beam radiotherapy treatments such as those applied in liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and in multi-prescription treatments. This toolkit also provides a wide range of statistical results related to dose and BED distributions. MATLAB 2010a, version 7.10 was used to create this GUI toolkit. The input data consist of the dose distribution matrices, organ contour coordinates, and treatment planning parameters from the treatment planning system (TPS). The toolkit has the capability of calculating the multi-phase BED distributions using different formulas (denoted as true and approximate). Following the calculations of the BED distributions, the dose and BED distributions can be viewed in different projections (e.g. coronal, sagittal and transverse). The different elements of this toolkit are presented and the important steps for the execution of its calculations are illustrated. The toolkit is applied on brain, head & neck and prostate cancer patients, who received primary and boost phases in order to demonstrate its capability in calculating BED distributions, as well as measuring the inaccuracy and imprecision of the approximate BED distributions. Finally, the clinical situations in which the use of the present toolkit would have a significant clinical impact are indicated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Low Dose, Low Energy 3d Image Guidance during Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. J.; Marchant, T.; Amer, A.; Sharrock, P.; Price, P.; Burton, D.

    2006-04-01

    Patient kilo-voltage X-ray cone beam volumetric imaging for radiotherapy was first demonstrated on an Elekta Synergy mega-voltage X-ray linear accelerator. Subsequently low dose, reduced profile reconstruction imaging was shown to be practical for 3D geometric setup registration to pre-treatment planning images without compromising registration accuracy. Reconstruction from X-ray profiles gathered between treatment beam deliveries was also introduced. The innovation of zonal cone beam imaging promises significantly reduced doses to patients and improved soft tissue contrast in the tumour target zone. These developments coincided with the first dynamic 3D monitoring of continuous body topology changes in patients, at the moment of irradiation, using a laser interferometer. They signal the arrival of low dose, low energy 3D image guidance during radiotherapy itself.

  18. A CCD-based optical CT scanner for high-resolution 3D imaging of radiation dose distributions: equipment specifications, optical simulations and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Doran, S J; Koerkamp, K K; Bero, M A; Jenneson, P; Morton, E J; Gilboy, W B

    2001-12-01

    Methods based on magnetic resonance imaging for the measurement of three-dimensional distributions of radiation dose are highly developed. However, relatively little work has been done on optical computed tomography (OCT). This paper describes a new OCT scanner based on a broad beam light source and a two-dimensional charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. A number of key design features are discussed including the light source; the scanning tank, turntable and stepper motor control; the diffuser screen onto which images are projected and the detector. It is shown that the non-uniform pixel sensitivity of the low-cost CCD detector used and the granularity of the diffuser screen lead to a serious ring artefact in the reconstructed images. Methods are described for eliminating this. The problems arising from reflection and refraction at the walls of the gel container are explained. Optical ray-tracing simulations are presented for cylindrical containers with a variety of radii and verified experimentally. Small changes in the model parameters lead to large variations in the signal intensity observed in the projection data. The effect of imperfect containers on data quality is discussed and a method based on a 'correction scan' is shown to be successful in correcting many of the related image artefacts. The results of two tomography experiments are presented. In the first experiment, a radiochromic Fricke gel sample was exposed four times in different positions to a 100 kVp x-ray beam perpendicular to the plane of imaging. Images of absorbed dose with slice thickness of 140 microm were acquired. with 'true' in-plane resolution of 560 x 560 microm2 at the edge of the 72 mm field of view and correspondingly higher resolution at the centre. The nominal doses measured correlated well with the known exposure times. The second experiment demonstrated the well known phenomenon of diffusion in the dosemeter gels and yielded a value of (0.12 +/- 0.02) mm2 s(-1) for the diffusion

  19. WE-AB-303-07: Computational Monitoring Framework of Four-Dimensional Dose Distributions During Treatment Time Based On a 2D/3D Registration with Adaptive Transformation Parameters in Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamoto, T; Arimura, H; Nakamura, K; Honda, H; Hirata, H; Shioyama, Y; Hirose, TA; Umezu, Y; Nakamura, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop a computational framework for monitoring four-dimensional (4D) dose distributions during treatment time based on a 2D/3D registration with adaptive transformation parameters (ATPs) in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: The 4D dose distributions during the SBRT were calculated by applying a pencil beam convolution (PBC) algorithm to simulated 4D-computed tomography (CT) images during treatment time (hereinafter referred to as “treatment” 4D-CT images). The “treatment” 4D-CT images were derived by deforming 3D planning CT images by using transformation parameters so that 2D planning portal dose images (PDIs) can resemble 2D dynamic clinical PDIs in each frame, which were derived from electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images. The transformation parameters were optimized by the Levenberg- Marquardt (LM) algorithm. The optimized transformation parameters in a certain frame were adaptively employed as initial transformation parameters for optimization of the parameters in the consecutive frame. Gamma pass rates (3mm/3%) between dynamic clinical PDIs and dynamic “treatment” PDIs derived from the “treatment” 4D-CT images were measured for comparing the proposed frameworks without and with the ATPs. These proposed frameworks were applied to the EPID dynamic images (40 frames) of two patients with lung cancer, who underwent the SBRT. Results: Gamma pass rates without and with the ATPs were 83.01±4.42% and 89.31±3.18% on average, respectively (p<0.05). Moreover, percentage errors between prescribed doses and estimated doses at an isocenter by the proposed frameworks without and with the ATPs were 10.67±5.66% and 6.34±0.47% on average, respectively (p<0.05). Conclusion: The proposed framework with ATPs could be useful to ensure the quality of the SBRT by monitoring 4D dose distributions during treatment time.

  20. 3D-printed applicators for high dose rate brachytherapy: Dosimetric assessment at different infill percentage.

    PubMed

    Ricotti, Rosalinda; Vavassori, Andrea; Bazani, Alessia; Ciardo, Delia; Pansini, Floriana; Spoto, Ruggero; Sammarco, Vittorio; Cattani, Federica; Baroni, Guido; Orecchia, Roberto; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja

    2016-12-01

    Dosimetric assessment of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy applicators, printed in 3D with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) at different infill percentage. A low-cost, desktop, 3D printer (Hamlet 3DX100, Hamlet, Dublin, IE) was used for manufacturing simple HDR applicators, reproducing typical geometries in brachytherapy: cylindrical (common in vaginal treatment) and flat configurations (generally used to treat superficial lesions). Printer accuracy was investigated through physical measurements. The dosimetric consequences of varying the applicator's density by tuning the printing infill percentage were analysed experimentally by measuring depth dose profiles and superficial dose distribution with Gafchromic EBT3 films (International Specialty Products, Wayne, NJ). Dose distributions were compared to those obtained with a commercial superficial applicator. Measured printing accuracy was within 0.5mm. Dose attenuation was not sensitive to the density of the material. Surface dose distribution comparison of the 3D printed flat applicators with respect to the commercial superficial applicator showed an overall passing rate greater than 94% for gamma analysis with 3% dose difference criteria, 3mm distance-to-agreement criteria and 10% dose threshold. Low-cost 3D printers are a promising solution for the customization of the HDR brachytherapy applicators. However, further assessment of 3D printing techniques and regulatory materials approval are required for clinical application. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dose Verification of Stereotactic Radiosurgery Treatment for Trigeminal Neuralgia with Presage 3D Dosimetry System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Thomas, A.; Newton, J.; Ibbott, G.; Deasy, J.; Oldham, M.

    2010-11-01

    Achieving adequate verification and quality-assurance (QA) for radiosurgery treatment of trigeminal-neuralgia (TGN) is particularly challenging because of the combination of very small fields, very high doses, and complex irradiation geometries (multiple gantry and couch combinations). TGN treatments have extreme requirements for dosimetry tools and QA techniques, to ensure adequate verification. In this work we evaluate the potential of Presage/Optical-CT dosimetry system as a tool for the verification of TGN distributions in high-resolution and in 3D. A TGN treatment was planned and delivered to a Presage 3D dosimeter positioned inside the Radiological-Physics-Center (RPC) head and neck IMRT credentialing phantom. A 6-arc treatment plan was created using the iPlan system, and a maximum dose of 80Gy was delivered with a Varian Trilogy machine. The delivered dose to Presage was determined by optical-CT scanning using the Duke Large field-of-view Optical-CT Scanner (DLOS) in 3D, with isotropic resolution of 0.7mm3. DLOS scanning and reconstruction took about 20minutes. 3D dose comparisons were made with the planning system. Good agreement was observed between the planned and measured 3D dose distributions, and this work provides strong support for the viability of Presage/Optical-CT as a highly useful new approach for verification of this complex technique.

  2. Is it sensible to 'deform' dose? 3D experimental validation of dose-warping

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, U. J.; Taylor, M. L.; Supple, J. R.; Smith, R. L.; Dunn, L.; Kron, T.; Franich, R. D.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Strategies for dose accumulation in deforming anatomy are of interest in radiotherapy. Algorithms exist for the deformation of dose based on patient image sets, though these are sometimes contentious because not all such image calculations are constrained by physical laws. While tumor and organ motion has been a key area of study for a considerable amount of time, deformation is of increasing interest. In this work, we demonstrate a full 3D experimental validation of results from a range of dose deformation algorithms available in the public domain. Methods: We recently developed the first tissue-equivalent, full 3D deformable dosimetric phantom-'DEFGEL.' To assess the accuracy of dose-warping based on deformable image registration (DIR), we have measured doses in undeformed and deformed states of the DEFGEL dosimeter and compared these to planned doses and warped doses. In this way we have directly evaluated the accuracy of dose-warping calculations for 11 different algorithms. We have done this for a range of stereotactic irradiation schemes and types and magnitudes of deformation. Results: The original Horn and Schunck algorithm is shown to be the best performing of the 11 algorithms trialled. Comparing measured and dose-warped calculations for this method, it is found that for a 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 mm{sup 2} square field, {gamma}{sub 3%/3mm}= 99.9%; for a 20 Multiplication-Sign 20 mm{sup 2} cross-shaped field, {gamma}{sub 3%/3mm}= 99.1%; and for a multiple dynamic arc (0.413 cm{sup 3} PTV) treatment adapted from a patient treatment plan, {gamma}{sub 3%/3mm}= 95%. In each case, the agreement is comparable to-but consistently {approx}1% less than-comparison between measured and calculated (planned) dose distributions in the absence of deformation. The magnitude of the deformation, as measured by the largest displacement experienced by any voxel in the volume, has the greatest influence on the accuracy of the warped dose distribution. Considering

  3. SU-E-T-04: 3D Dose Based Patient Compensator QA Procedure for Proton Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, W; Reyhan, M; Zhang, M; Davis, R; Jabbour, S; Khan, A; Yue, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In proton double-scattering radiotherapy, compensators are the essential patient specific devices to contour the distal dose distribution to the tumor target. Traditional compensator QA is limited to checking the drilled surface profiles against the plan. In our work, a compensator QA process was established that assess the entire compensator including its internal structure for patient 3D dose verification. Methods: The fabricated patient compensators were CT scanned. Through mathematical image processing and geometric transformations, the CT images of the proton compensator were combined with the patient simulation CT images into a new series of CT images, in which the imaged compensator is placed at the planned location along the corresponding beam line. The new CT images were input into the Eclipse treatment planning system. The original plan was calculated to the combined CT image series without the plan compensator. The newly computed patient 3D dose from the combined patientcompensator images was verified against the original plan dose. Test plans include the compensators with defects intentionally created inside the fabricated compensators. Results: The calculated 3D dose with the combined compensator and patient CT images reflects the impact of the fabricated compensator to the patient. For the test cases in which no defects were created, the dose distributions were in agreement between our method and the corresponding original plans. For the compensator with the defects, the purposely changed material and a purposely created internal defect were successfully detected while not possible with just the traditional compensator profiles detection methods. Conclusion: We present here a 3D dose verification process to qualify the fabricated proton double-scattering compensator. Such compensator detection process assesses the patient 3D impact of the fabricated compensator surface profile as well as the compensator internal material and structure changes

  4. Development of a patient-specific 3D dose evaluation program for QA in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Suk; Chang, Kyung Hwan; Cao, Yuan Jie; Shim, Jang Bo; Yang, Dae Sik; Park, Young Je; Yoon, Won Sup; Kim, Chul Yong

    2015-03-01

    We present preliminary results for a 3-dimensional dose evaluation software system ( P DRESS, patient-specific 3-dimensional dose real evaluation system). Scanned computed tomography (CT) images obtained by using dosimetry were transferred to the radiation treatment planning system (ECLIPSE, VARIAN, Palo Alto, CA) where the intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) nasopharynx plan was designed. We used a 10 MV photon beam (CLiX, VARIAN, Palo Alto, CA) to deliver the nasopharynx treatment plan. After irradiation, the TENOMAG dosimeter was scanned using a VISTA ™ scanner. The scanned data were reconstructed using VistaRecon software to obtain a 3D dose distribution of the optical density. An optical-CT scanner was used to readout the dose distribution in the gel dosimeter. Moreover, we developed the P DRESS by using Flatform, which were developed by our group, to display the 3D dose distribution by loading the DICOM RT data which are exported from the radiotherapy treatment plan (RTP) and the optical-CT reconstructed VFF file, into the independent P DRESS with an ioniz ation chamber and EBT film was used to compare the dose distribution calculated from the RTP with that measured by using a gel dosimeter. The agreement between the normalized EBT, the gel dosimeter and RTP data was evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative methods, such as the isodose distribution, dose difference, point value, and profile. The profiles showed good agreement between the RTP data and the gel dosimeter data, and the precision of the dose distribution was within ±3%. The results from this study showed significantly discrepancies between the dose distribution calculated from the treatment plan and the dose distribution measured by a TENOMAG gel and by scanning with an optical CT scanner. The 3D dose evaluation software system ( P DRESS, patient specific dose real evaluation system), which were developed in this study evaluates the accuracies of the three-dimensional dose

  5. 3D delivered dose assessment using a 4DCT-based motion model

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weixing; Hurwitz, Martina H.; Williams, Christopher L.; Dhou, Salam; Berbeco, Ross I.; Seco, Joao; Mishra, Pankaj; Lewis, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to develop a clinically feasible method of calculating actual delivered dose distributions for patients who have significant respiratory motion during the course of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods: A novel approach was proposed to calculate the actual delivered dose distribution for SBRT lung treatment. This approach can be specified in three steps. (1) At the treatment planning stage, a patient-specific motion model is created from planning 4DCT data. This model assumes that the displacement vector field (DVF) of any respiratory motion deformation can be described as a linear combination of some basis DVFs. (2) During the treatment procedure, 2D time-varying projection images (either kV or MV projections) are acquired, from which time-varying “fluoroscopic” 3D images of the patient are reconstructed using the motion model. The DVF of each timepoint in the time-varying reconstruction is an optimized linear combination of basis DVFs such that the 2D projection of the 3D volume at this timepoint matches the projection image. (3) 3D dose distribution is computed for each timepoint in the set of 3D reconstructed fluoroscopic images, from which the total effective 3D delivered dose is calculated by accumulating deformed dose distributions. This approach was first validated using two modified digital extended cardio-torso (XCAT) phantoms with lung tumors and different respiratory motions. The estimated doses were compared to the dose that would be calculated for routine 4DCT-based planning and to the actual delivered dose that was calculated using “ground truth” XCAT phantoms at all timepoints. The approach was also tested using one set of patient data, which demonstrated the application of our method in a clinical scenario. Results: For the first XCAT phantom that has a mostly regular breathing pattern, the errors in 95% volume dose (D95) are 0.11% and 0.83%, respectively for 3D fluoroscopic images

  6. 3D delivered dose assessment using a 4DCT-based motion model

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Weixing; Hurwitz, Martina H.; Williams, Christopher L.; Dhou, Salam; Berbeco, Ross I.; Mishra, Pankaj E-mail: jhlewis@lroc.harvard.edu; Lewis, John H. E-mail: jhlewis@lroc.harvard.edu; Seco, Joao

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to develop a clinically feasible method of calculating actual delivered dose distributions for patients who have significant respiratory motion during the course of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods: A novel approach was proposed to calculate the actual delivered dose distribution for SBRT lung treatment. This approach can be specified in three steps. (1) At the treatment planning stage, a patient-specific motion model is created from planning 4DCT data. This model assumes that the displacement vector field (DVF) of any respiratory motion deformation can be described as a linear combination of some basis DVFs. (2) During the treatment procedure, 2D time-varying projection images (either kV or MV projections) are acquired, from which time-varying “fluoroscopic” 3D images of the patient are reconstructed using the motion model. The DVF of each timepoint in the time-varying reconstruction is an optimized linear combination of basis DVFs such that the 2D projection of the 3D volume at this timepoint matches the projection image. (3) 3D dose distribution is computed for each timepoint in the set of 3D reconstructed fluoroscopic images, from which the total effective 3D delivered dose is calculated by accumulating deformed dose distributions. This approach was first validated using two modified digital extended cardio-torso (XCAT) phantoms with lung tumors and different respiratory motions. The estimated doses were compared to the dose that would be calculated for routine 4DCT-based planning and to the actual delivered dose that was calculated using “ground truth” XCAT phantoms at all timepoints. The approach was also tested using one set of patient data, which demonstrated the application of our method in a clinical scenario. Results: For the first XCAT phantom that has a mostly regular breathing pattern, the errors in 95% volume dose (D95) are 0.11% and 0.83%, respectively for 3D fluoroscopic images

  7. MO-FG-303-03: Demonstration of Universal Knowledge-Based 3D Dose Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, S; Moore, K L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate a knowledge-based 3D dose prediction methodology that can accurately predict achievable radiotherapy distributions. Methods: Using previously treated plans as input, an artificial neural network (ANN) was trained to predict 3D dose distributions based on 14 patient-specific anatomical parameters including the distance (r) to planning target volume (PTV) boundary, organ-at-risk (OAR) boundary distances, and angular position ( θ,φ). 23 prostate and 49 stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) cases with ≥1 nearby OARs were studied. All were planned with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to prescription doses of 81Gy for prostate and 12–30Gy for SRS. Site-specific ANNs were trained using all prostate 23 plans and using a 24 randomly-selected subset for the SRS model. The remaining 25 SRS plans were used to validate the model. To quantify predictive accuracy, the dose difference between the clinical plan and prediction were calculated on a voxel-by-voxel basis δD(r,θ,φ)=Dclin(r,θ,φ)-Dpred(r, θ,φ). Grouping voxels by boundary distance, the mean <δ Dr>=(1/N)Σ -θ,φ D(r,θ,φ) and inter-quartile range (IQR) quantified the accuracy of this method for deriving DVH estimations. The standard deviation (σ) of δ D quantified the 3D dose prediction error on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Results: The ANNs were highly accurate in predictive ability for both prostate and SRS plans. For prostate, <δDr> ranged from −0.8% to +0.6% (max IQR=3.8%) over r=0–32mm, while 3D dose prediction accuracy averaged from σ=5–8% across the same range. For SRS, from r=0–34mm the training set <δDr> ranged from −3.7% to +1.5% (max IQR=4.4%) while the validation set <δDr> ranged from −2.2% to +5.8% (max IQR=5.3%). 3D dose prediction accuracy averaged σ=2.5% for the training set and σ=4.0% over the same interval. Conclusion: The study demonstrates this technique’s ability to predict achievable 3D dose distributions for VMAT SRS and prostate. Future

  8. Experimental validation of a commercial 3D dose verification system for intensity-modulated arc therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggula, Ramesh; Lorenz, Friedlieb; Mueller, Lutz; Birkner, Mattias; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Stieler, Florian; Steil, Volker; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2010-10-01

    We validate the dosimetric performance of COMPASS®, a novel 3D quality assurance system for verification of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans that can correlate the delivered dose to the patient's anatomy, taking into account the tissue inhomogeneity. The accuracy of treatment delivery was assessed by the COMPASS® for 12 VMAT plans, and the resulting assessments were evaluated using an ionization chamber and film measurements. Dose-volume relationships were evaluated by the COMPASS® for three additional treatment plans and these were used to verify the accuracy of treatment planning dose calculations. The results matched well between COMPASS® and measurements for the ionization chamber (<=3%) and film (73-99% for gamma(3%/3 mm) < 1 and 98-100% for gamma(5%/5 mm) < 1) for the phantom plans. Differences in dose-volume statistics for the average dose to the PTV were within 2.5% for three treatment plans. For the structures located in the low-dose region, a maximum difference of <9% was observed. In its current implementation, the system could measure the delivered dose with sufficient accuracy and could project the 3D dose distribution directly on the patient's anatomy. Slight deviations were found for large open fields. These could be minimized by improving the COMPASS® in-built beam model.

  9. A new dosimeter formulation for deformable 3D dose verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høye, E. M.; Skyt, P. S.; Yates, E. S.; Muren, L. P.; Petersen, J. B. B.; Balling, P.

    2015-01-01

    We present the characteristics of a new silicone-based radiochromic dosimeter containing the leuco-malachite green (LMG) dye. The dose response as well as the dose-rate and photon-energy dependence of the dosimeter were characterized. To optimise the dose response, different concentrations of the chemical components were investigated. The dose response was found to decrease exponentially as a function of time after irradiation. A cylindrical dosimeter was produced and irradiated with a volumetric modulated arc therapy plan; the standard deviation between measured and calculated dose was 5% of the total dose.

  10. Recovering 3D particle size distributions from 2D sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Olson, Daniel M.

    2017-03-01

    We discuss different ways to convert observed, apparent particle size distributions from 2D sections (thin sections, SEM maps on planar surfaces, etc.) into true 3D particle size distributions. We give a simple, flexible, and practical method to do this; show which of these techniques gives the most faithful conversions; and provide (online) short computer codes to calculate both 2D-3D recoveries and simulations of 2D observations by random sectioning. The most important systematic bias of 2D sectioning, from the standpoint of most chondrite studies, is an overestimate of the abundance of the larger particles. We show that fairly good recoveries can be achieved from observed size distributions containing 100-300 individual measurements of apparent particle diameter.

  11. Calculation of Dose Deposition in 3D Voxels by Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    The biological response to high-LET radiation is very different from low-LET radiation, and can be partly attributed to the energy deposition by the radiation. Several experiments, notably detection of gamma-H2AX foci by immunofluorescence, has revealed important differences in the nature and in the spatial distribution of double-strand breaks (DSB) induced by low- and high-LET radiations. Many calculations, most of which are based on amorphous track models with radial dose, have been combined with chromosome models to calculate the number and distribution of DSB within nuclei and chromosome aberrations. In this work, the Monte-Carlo track structure simulation code RITRACKS have been used to calculate directly the energy deposition in voxels (3D pixels). A cubic volume of 5 micrometers of side was irradiated by 1) 450 (1)H+ ions of 300 MeV (LET is approximately 0.3 keV/micrometer) and 2) by 1 (56)Fe26+ ion of 1 GeV/amu (LET is approximately 150 keV/micrometer). In both cases, the dose deposited in the volume is approximately 1 Gy. All energy deposition events are recorded and dose is calculated in voxels of 20 micrometers of side. The voxels are then visualized in 3D by using a color scale to represent the intensity of the dose in a voxel. This simple approach has revealed several important points which may help understand experimental observations. In both simulations, voxels which receive low dose are the most numerous, and those corresponding to electron track ends received a dose which is in the higher range. The dose voxels are distributed randomly and scattered uniformly within the volume irradiated by low-LET radiation. The distribution of the voxels shows major differences for the (56)Fe26+ ion. The track structure can still be seen, and voxels with much higher dose are found in the region corresponding to the track "core". These high-dose voxels are not found in the low-LET irradiation simulation and may be responsible for DSB that are more difficult to

  12. 3D Dose Verification Using Tomotherapy CT Detector Array

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Ke; Jones, Ryan; Yang Wensha; Saraiya, Siddharth; Schneider, Bernard; Chen Quan; Sobering, Geoff; Olivera, Gustavo; Read, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a three-dimensional dose verification method based on the exit dose using the onboard detector of tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study included 347 treatment fractions from 24 patients, including 10 prostate, 5 head and neck (HN), and 9 spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) cases. Detector sonograms were retrieved and back-projected to calculate entrance fluence, which was then forward-projected on the CT images to calculate the verification dose, which was compared with ion chamber and film measurement in the QA plans and with the planning dose in patient plans. Results: Root mean square (RMS) errors of 2.0%, 2.2%, and 2.0% were observed comparing the dose verification (DV) and the ion chamber measured point dose in the phantom plans for HN, prostate, and spinal SBRT patients, respectively. When cumulative dose in the entire treatment is considered, for HN patients, the error of the mean dose to the planning target volume (PTV) varied from 1.47% to 5.62% with a RMS error of 3.55%. For prostate patients, the error of the mean dose to the prostate target volume varied from -5.11% to 3.29%, with a RMS error of 2.49%. The RMS error of maximum doses to the bladder and the rectum were 2.34% (-4.17% to 2.61%) and 2.64% (-4.54% to 3.94%), respectively. For the nine spinal SBRT patients, the RMS error of the minimum dose to the PTV was 2.43% (-5.39% to 2.48%). The RMS error of maximum dose to the spinal cord was 1.05% (-2.86% to 0.89%). Conclusions: An excellent agreement was observed between the measurement and the verification dose. In the patient treatments, the agreement in doses to the majority of PTVs and organs at risk is within 5% for the cumulative treatment course doses. The dosimetric error strongly depends on the error in multileaf collimator leaf opening time with a sensitivity correlating to the gantry rotation period.

  13. Performance of a commercial optical CT scanner and polymer gel dosimeters for 3-D dose verification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Wuu, Cheng-Shie; Maryanski, Marek J

    2004-11-01

    Performance analysis of a commercial three-dimensional (3-D) dose mapping system based on optical CT scanning of polymer gels is presented. The system consists of BANG 3 polymer gels (MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT), OCTOPUS laser CT scanner (MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT), and an in-house developed software for optical CT image reconstruction and 3-D dose distribution comparison between the gel, film measurements and the radiation therapy treatment plans. Various sources of image noise (digitization, electronic, optical, and mechanical) generated by the scanner as well as optical uniformity of the polymer gel are analyzed. The performance of the scanner is further evaluated in terms of the reproducibility of the data acquisition process, the uncertainties at different levels of reconstructed optical density per unit length and the effects of scanning parameters. It is demonstrated that for BANG 3 gel phantoms held in cylindrical plastic containers, the relative dose distribution can be reproduced by the scanner with an overall uncertainty of about 3% within approximately 75% of the radius of the container. In regions located closer to the container wall, however, the scanner generates erroneous optical density values that arise from the reflection and refraction of the laser rays at the interface between the gel and the container. The analysis of the accuracy of the polymer gel dosimeter is exemplified by the comparison of the gel/OCT-derived dose distributions with those from film measurements and a commercial treatment planning system (Cadplan, Varian Corporation, Palo Alto, CA) for a 6 cm x 6 cm single field of 6 MV x rays and a 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) plan. The gel measurements agree with the treatment plans and the film measurements within the "3%-or-2 mm" criterion throughout the usable, artifact-free central region of the gel volume. Discrepancies among the three data sets are analyzed.

  14. Performance of a commercial optical CT scanner and polymer gel dosimeters for 3-D dose verification

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Wuu, C.-S.; Maryanski, Marek J.

    2004-11-01

    Performance analysis of a commercial three-dimensional (3-D) dose mapping system based on optical CT scanning of polymer gels is presented. The system consists of BANG{sup reg}3 polymer gels (MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT), OCTOPUS{sup TM} laser CT scanner (MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT), and an in-house developed software for optical CT image reconstruction and 3-D dose distribution comparison between the gel, film measurements and the radiation therapy treatment plans. Various sources of image noise (digitization, electronic, optical, and mechanical) generated by the scanner as well as optical uniformity of the polymer gel are analyzed. The performance of the scanner is further evaluated in terms of the reproducibility of the data acquisition process, the uncertainties at different levels of reconstructed optical density per unit length and the effects of scanning parameters. It is demonstrated that for BANG{sup registered}3 gel phantoms held in cylindrical plastic containers, the relative dose distribution can be reproduced by the scanner with an overall uncertainty of about 3% within approximately 75% of the radius of the container. In regions located closer to the container wall, however, the scanner generates erroneous optical density values that arise from the reflection and refraction of the laser rays at the interface between the gel and the container. The analysis of the accuracy of the polymer gel dosimeter is exemplified by the comparison of the gel/OCT-derived dose distributions with those from film measurements and a commercial treatment planning system (Cadplan, Varian Corporation, Palo Alto, CA) for a 6 cmx6 cm single field of 6 MV x rays and a 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) plan. The gel measurements agree with the treatment plans and the film measurements within the '3%-or-2 mm' criterion throughout the usable, artifact-free central region of the gel volume. Discrepancies among the three data sets are analyzed.

  15. EPID-guided 3D dose verification of lung SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Aristophanous, M.; Rottmann, J.; Court, L. E.; Berbeco, R. I.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of utilizing tumor tracks from electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images taken during treatment to verify the delivered dose. Methods: The proposed method is based on a computation of the delivered fluence by utilizing the planned fluence and the tumor motion track for each field. A phantom study was designed to assess the feasibility of the method. The CIRS dynamic thorax phantom was utilized with a realistic soft resin tumor, modeled after a real patient tumor. The dose calculated with the proposed method was compared to direct measurements taken with 15 metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) inserted in small fissures made in the tumor model. The phantom was irradiated with the tumor static and moved with different range of motions and setup errors. EPID images were recorded throughout all deliveries and the tumor model was tracked post-treatment with in-house developed software. The planned fluence for each field was convolved with the tumor motion tracks to obtain the delivered fluence. Utilizing the delivered fluence from each field, the delivered dose was calculated. The estimated delivered dose was compared to the dose directly measured with the MOSFETs. The feasibility of the proposed method was also demonstrated on a real lung cancer patient, treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy. Results: The calculation of delivered dose with the delivered fluence method was in good agreement with the MOSFET measurements, with average differences ranging from 0.8% to 8.3% depending on the proximity of a dose gradient. For the patient treatment, the planned and delivered dose volume histograms were compared and verified the overall good coverage of the target volume. Conclusions: The delivered fluence method was applied successfully on phantom and clinical data and its accuracy was evaluated. Verifying each treatment fraction may enable correction strategies that can be applied during the course of

  16. 3D Game Content Distributed Adaptation in Heterogeneous Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morán, Francisco; Preda, Marius; Lafruit, Gauthier; Villegas, Paulo; Berretty, Robert-Paul

    2007-12-01

    Most current multiplayer 3D games can only be played on a single dedicated platform (a particular computer, console, or cell phone), requiring specifically designed content and communication over a predefined network. Below we show how, by using signal processing techniques such as multiresolution representation and scalable coding for all the components of a 3D graphics object (geometry, texture, and animation), we enable online dynamic content adaptation, and thus delivery of the same content over heterogeneous networks to terminals with very different profiles, and its rendering on them. We present quantitative results demonstrating how the best displayed quality versus computational complexity versus bandwidth tradeoffs have been achieved, given the distributed resources available over the end-to-end content delivery chain. Additionally, we use state-of-the-art, standardised content representation and compression formats (MPEG-4 AFX, JPEG 2000, XML), enabling deployment over existing infrastructure, while keeping hooks to well-established practices in the game industry.

  17. Multicellular dosimetric chain for molecular radiotherapy exemplified with dose simulations on 3D cell spheroids.

    PubMed

    Reijonen, Vappu; Kanninen, Liisa K; Hippeläinen, Eero; Lou, Yan-Ru; Salli, Eero; Sofiev, Alexey; Malinen, Melina; Paasonen, Timo; Yliperttula, Marjo; Kuronen, Antti; Savolainen, Sauli

    2017-08-01

    Absorbed radiation dose-response relationships are not clear in molecular radiotherapy (MRT). Here, we propose a voxel-based dose calculation system for multicellular dosimetry in MRT. We applied confocal microscope images of a spherical cell aggregate i.e. a spheroid, to examine the computation of dose distribution within a tissue from the distribution of radiopharmaceuticals. A confocal microscope Z-stack of a human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 spheroid was segmented using a support-vector machine algorithm and a watershed function. Heterogeneity in activity uptake was simulated by selecting a varying amount of the cell nuclei to contain (111)In, (125)I, or (177)Lu. Absorbed dose simulations were carried out using vxlPen, a software application based on the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE. We developed a schema for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry. The schema utilizes a partially supervised segmentation method for cell-level image data together with a novel main program for voxel-based radiation dose simulations. We observed that for (177)Lu, radiation cross-fire enabled full dose coverage even if the radiopharmaceutical had accumulated to only 60% of the spheroid cells. This effect was not found with (111)In and (125)I. Using these Auger/internal conversion electron emitters seemed to guarantee that only the cells with a high enough activity uptake will accumulate a lethal amount of dose, while neighboring cells are spared. We computed absorbed radiation dose distributions in a 3D-cultured cell spheroid with a novel multicellular dosimetric chain. Combined with pharmacological studies in different tissue models, our cell-level dosimetric calculation method can clarify dose-response relationships for radiopharmaceuticals used in MRT. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 3D Hail Size Distribution Interpolation/Extrapolation Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John

    2013-01-01

    Radar data can usually detect hail; however, it is difficult for present day radar to accurately discriminate between hail and rain. Local ground-based hail sensors are much better at detecting hail against a rain background, and when incorporated with radar data, provide a much better local picture of a severe rain or hail event. The previous disdrometer interpolation/ extrapolation algorithm described a method to interpolate horizontally between multiple ground sensors (a minimum of three) and extrapolate vertically. This work is a modification to that approach that generates a purely extrapolated 3D spatial distribution when using a single sensor.

  19. Semi-3D dosimetry of high dose rate brachytherapy using a novel Gafchromic EBT3 film-array water phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, A. L.; Nisbet, A.; Bradley, D. A.

    2013-06-01

    There is a need to modernise clinical brachytherapy dosimetry measurement beyond traditional point dose verification to enable appropriate quality control within 3D treatment environments. This is to keep pace with the 3D clinical and planning approaches which often include significant patient-specific optimisation away from 'standard loading patterns'. A multi-dimension measurement system is required to provide assurance of the complex 3D dose distributions, to verify equipment performance, and to enable quality audits. However, true 3D dose measurements around brachytherapy applicators are often impractical due to their complex shapes and the requirement for close measurement distances. A solution utilising an array of radiochromic film (Gafchromic EBT3) positioned within a water filled phantom is presented. A calibration function for the film has been determined over 0 to 90Gy dose range using three colour channel analysis (FilmQAPro software). Film measurements of the radial dose from a single HDR source agree with TPS and Monte Carlo calculations within 5 % up to 50 mm from the source. Film array measurements of the dose distribution around a cervix applicator agree with TPS calculations generally within 4 mm distance to agreement. The feasibility of film array measurements for semi-3D dosimetry in clinical HDR applications is demonstrated.

  20. The feasibility assessment of radiation dose of movement 3D NIPAM gel by magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chih-Ming; Leung, Joseph Hang; Ng, Yu-Bun; Cheng, Chih-Wu; Sun, Jung-Chang; Lin, Ping-Chin; Hsieh, Bor-Tsung

    2015-11-01

    NIPAM dosimeter is widely accepted and recommended for its 3D distribution and accuracy in dose absorption. Up to the moment, most research works on dose measurement are based on a fixed irradiation target without the consideration of the effect from physiological motion. We present a study to construct a respiratory motion simulating patient anatomical and dosimetry model for the study of dosimetic effect of organ motion. The dose on fixed and motion targets was measured by MRI after a dose adminstration of 1, 2, 5, 8, and 10 Gy from linear accelerator. Comparison of two situations is made. The average sensitivity of fixed NIPAM was 0.1356 s-1/Gy with linearity R2=0.998. The average sensitivity of movement NIPAM was 0.1366 s-1/Gy with linearity R2=0.998 both having only 0.001 of the sensitivity difference. The difference between the two based on dose rate dependency, position and depth was not significant. There was thus no apparent impact on NIPAM dosimeter from physiological motion. The high sensitivity, linearity and stability of NIPAM dosimeter proved to be an ideal apparatus in the dose measurement in these circumstances.

  1. 3D crack aperture distribution from a nuclear imaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardini, Paul; Kuva, Jukka; Siitari-Kauppi, Marja; Bonnet, Marine; Hellmuth, Karl-Heinz

    2017-04-01

    Cracks in solid rocks are multi-scale entities because of their spatial, length and aperture distributions. Aperture distributions of cracks are not well known because their full aperture range (<0.1 µm to >1 mm) is not accessible using common imaging techniques, such as SEM or X-Ray computed micro-tomography. Knowing the aperture distribution or cracks is, however, highly relevant to understanding flow in rocks. In crystalline rocks the lack of knowledge about the crack aperture distribution keeps us from a clear understanding of the relationships of porosity and permeability. A nuclear imaging method based on the full saturation of connected rock porosity by a 14C-doped resin (the 14-C PMMA method) allows detecting the connected microcrack network using autoradiography. Even if cracks are detected only on 2D sections, an estimate of the 3D aperture distribution of these cracks is possible. To this end, a set of "artificial crack" standards was prepared and investigated. These standards consisted of a PMMA layer of known thickness between two glass plates. Analysis of experimental autoradiographic profiles around these artificial cracks allows determination of their aperture. This methodology was then applied to different rock samples, mainly granitic ones.

  2. Difference in performance between 3D and 4D CBCT for lung imaging: a dose and image quality analysis.

    PubMed

    Thengumpallil, Sheeba; Smith, Kathleen; Monnin, Pascal; Bourhis, Jean; Bochud, François; Moeckli, Raphaël

    2016-11-08

    The study was to describe and to compare the performance of 3D and 4D CBCT imaging modalities by measuring and analyzing the delivered dose and the image quality. The 3D (Chest) and 4D (Symmetry) CBCT Elekta XVI lung IGRT protocols were analyzed. Dose profiles were measured with TLDs inside a dedicated phantom. The dosimetric indicator cone-beam dose index (CBDI) was evaluated. The image quality analysis was performed by assessing the contrast transfer function (CTF), the noise power spectrum (NPS) and the noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ). Artifacts were also evaluated by simulating irregular breathing variations. The two imaging modalities showed different dose distributions within the phantom. At the center, the 3D CBCT delivered twice the dose of the 4D CBCT. The CTF was strongly reduced by motion compared to static conditions, resulting in a CTF reduction of 85% for the 3D CBCT and 65% for the 4D CBCT. The amplitude of the NPS was two times higher for the 4D CBCT than for the 3D CBCT. In the presence of motion, the NEQ of the 4D CBCT was 50% higher than the 3D CBCT. In the presence of breathing irregularities, the 4D CBCT protocol was mainly affected by view-aliasing artifacts, which were typically cone-beam artifacts, while the 3D CBCT protocol was mainly affected by duplication artifacts. The results showed that the 4D CBCT ensures a reasonable dose and better image quality when mov-ing targets are involved compared to 3D CBCT. Therefore, 4D CBCT is a reliable imaging modality for lung free-breathing radiation therapy.

  3. Scalable Multi-Platform Distribution of Spatial 3d Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimke, J.; Hagedorn, B.; Döllner, J.

    2013-09-01

    Virtual 3D city models provide powerful user interfaces for communication of 2D and 3D geoinformation. Providing high quality visualization of massive 3D geoinformation in a scalable, fast, and cost efficient manner is still a challenging task. Especially for mobile and web-based system environments, software and hardware configurations of target systems differ significantly. This makes it hard to provide fast, visually appealing renderings of 3D data throughout a variety of platforms and devices. Current mobile or web-based solutions for 3D visualization usually require raw 3D scene data such as triangle meshes together with textures delivered from server to client, what makes them strongly limited in terms of size and complexity of the models they can handle. In this paper, we introduce a new approach for provisioning of massive, virtual 3D city models on different platforms namely web browsers, smartphones or tablets, by means of an interactive map assembled from artificial oblique image tiles. The key concept is to synthesize such images of a virtual 3D city model by a 3D rendering service in a preprocessing step. This service encapsulates model handling and 3D rendering techniques for high quality visualization of massive 3D models. By generating image tiles using this service, the 3D rendering process is shifted from the client side, which provides major advantages: (a) The complexity of the 3D city model data is decoupled from data transfer complexity (b) the implementation of client applications is simplified significantly as 3D rendering is encapsulated on server side (c) 3D city models can be easily deployed for and used by a large number of concurrent users, leading to a high degree of scalability of the overall approach. All core 3D rendering techniques are performed on a dedicated 3D rendering server, and thin-client applications can be compactly implemented for various devices and platforms.

  4. Elemental concentration distribution in human fingernails - A 3D study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda-Vargas, C. A.; Mars, J. A.; Gihwala, D.

    2012-02-01

    The verification of pathologies has normally been based on analysis of blood (serum and plasma), and physiological tissue. Recently, nails and in particular human fingernails have become an important medium for pathological studies, especially those of environmental origin. The analytical technique of PIXE has been used extensively in the analysis of industrial samples and human tissue specimens. The application of the analytical technique to nails has been mainly to bulk samples. In this study we use micro-PIXE and -RBS, as both complementary and supplementary, to determine the elemental concentration distribution of human fingernails of individuals. We report on the 3D quantitative elemental concentration distributions (QECDs) of various elements that include C, N and O as major elements (10-20%), P, S, Cl, K and Ca as minor elements (1-10%) and Fe, Mn, Zn, Ti, Na, Mg, Cu, Ni, Cr, Rb, Br, Sr and Se as trace elements (less than 1%). For PIXE and RBS the specimens were bombarded with a 3 MeV proton beam. To ascertain any correlations in the quantitative elemental concentration distributions, a linear traverse analysis was performed across the width of the nail. Elemental distribution correlations were also obtained.

  5. Joint distributed source-channel coding for 3D videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma, Veronica; Cancellaro, Michela; Neri, Alessandro

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a distributed joint source-channel 3D video coding system. Our aim is the design of an efficient coding scheme for stereoscopic video communication over noisy channels that preserves the perceived visual quality while guaranteeing a low computational complexity. The drawback in using stereo sequences is the increased amount of data to be transmitted. Several methods are being used in the literature for encoding stereoscopic video. A significantly different approach respect to traditional video coding has been represented by Distributed Video Coding (DVC), which introduces a flexible architecture with the design of low complex video encoders. In this paper we propose a novel method for joint source-channel coding in a distributed approach. We choose turbo code for our application and study the new setting of distributed joint source channel coding of a video. Turbo code allows to send the minimum amount of data while guaranteeing near channel capacity error correcting performance. In this contribution, the mathematical framework will be fully detailed and tradeoff among redundancy and perceived quality and quality of experience will be analyzed with the aid of numerical experiments.

  6. Distributed deformation and block rotation in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Oona; Nur, Amos; Estevez, Raul

    1990-01-01

    The authors address how block rotation and complex distributed deformation in the Earth's shallow crust may be explained within a stationary regional stress field. Distributed deformation is characterized by domains of sub-parallel fault-bounded blocks. In response to the contemporaneous activity of neighboring domains some domains rotate, as suggested by both structural and paleomagnetic evidence. Rotations within domains are achieved through the contemporaneous slip and rotation of the faults and of the blocks they bound. Thus, in regions of distributed deformation, faults must remain active in spite of their poor orientation in the stress field. The authors developed a model that tracks the orientation of blocks and their bounding faults during rotation in a 3D stress field. In the model, the effective stress magnitudes of the principal stresses (sigma sub 1, sigma sub 2, and sigma sub 3) are controlled by the orientation of fault sets in each domain. Therefore, adjacent fault sets with differing orientations may be active and may display differing faulting styles, and a given set of faults may change its style of motion as it rotates within a stationary stress regime. The style of faulting predicted by the model depends on a dimensionless parameter phi = (sigma sub 2 - sigma sub 3)/(sigma sub 1 - sigma sub 3). Thus, the authors present a model for complex distributed deformation and complex offset history requiring neither geographical nor temporal changes in the stress regime. They apply the model to the Western Transverse Range domain of southern California. There, it is mechanically feasible for blocks and faults to have experienced up to 75 degrees of clockwise rotation in a phi = 0.1 strike-slip stress regime. The results of the model suggest that this domain may first have accommodated deformation along preexisting NNE-SSW faults, reactivated as normal faults. After rotation, these same faults became strike-slip in nature.

  7. Comparison of different approaches of estimating effective dose from reported exposure data in 3D imaging with interventional fluoroscopy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Hansson, Jonny; Bâth, Magnus

    2014-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging with interventional fluoroscopy systems is today a common examination. The examination includes acquisition of two-dimensional projection images, used to reconstruct section images of the patient. The aim of the present study was to investigate the difference in resulting effective dose obtained using different levels of complexity in calculations of effective doses from these examinations. In the study the Siemens Artis Zeego interventional fluoroscopy system (Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) was used. Images of anthropomorphic chest and pelvis phantoms were acquired. The exposure values obtained were used to calculate the resulting effective doses from the examinations, using the computer software PCXMC (STUK, Helsinki, Finland). The dose calculations were performed using three different methods: 1. using individual exposure values for each projection image, 2. using the mean tube voltage and the total DAP value, evenly distributed over the projection images, and 3. using the mean kV and the total DAP value, evenly distributed over smaller selection of projection images. The results revealed that the difference in resulting effective dose between the first two methods was smaller than 5%. When only a selection of projection images were used in the dose calculations the difference increased to over 10%. Given the uncertainties associated with the effective dose concept, the results indicate that dose calculations based on average exposure values distributed over a smaller selection of projection angles can provide reasonably accurate estimations of the radiation doses from 3D imaging using interventional fluoroscopy systems.

  8. CARd-3D: Carbon Distribution in 3D Structure Program for Globular Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ekambaram, Rajasekaran; Kannaiyan, Akila; Marimuthu, Vijayasarathy; Swaminathan, Vinobha Chinnaiah; Renganathan, Senthil; Perumal, Ananda Gopu

    2014-01-01

    Spatial arrangement of carbon in protein structure is analyzed here. Particularly, the carbon fractions around individual atoms are compared. It is hoped that it follows the principle of 31.45% carbon around individual atoms. The results reveal that globular protein's atoms follow this principle. A comparative study on monomer versus dimer reveal that carbon is better distributed in dimeric form than in its monomeric form. Similar study on solid versus liquid structures reveals that the liquid (NMR) structure has better carbon distribution over the corresponding solid (X-Ray) structure. The carbon fraction distributions in fiber and toxin protein are compared. Fiber proteins follow the principle of carbon fraction distribution. At the same time it has another broad spectrum of carbon distribution than in globular proteins. The toxin protein follows an abnormal carbon fraction distribution. The carbon fraction distribution plays an important role in deciding the structure and shape of proteins. It is hoped to help in understanding the protein folding and function.

  9. Optimal matching of 3D film-measured and planned doses for intensity-modulated radiation therapy quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dongho; Yoon, Myonggeun; Park, Sung Yong; Park, Dong Hyun; Lee, Se Byeong; Kim, Dae Yong; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2007-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is one of the most complex applications of radiotherapy that requires patient-specific quality assurance (QA). Here, we describe a novel method of 3-dimensional (3D) dose-verification using 12 acrylic slabs in a 3D phantom (30 x 30 x 12 cm(3)) with extended dose rate (EDR2) films, which is both faster than conventionally used methods, and clinically useful. With custom-written software modules written in Microsoft Excel Visual Basic Application, the measured and planned dose distributions for the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes were superimposed by matching their origins, and the point doses were compared at all matched positions. Then, an optimization algorithm was used to correct the detected setup errors. The results show that this optimization method significantly reduces the average maximum dose difference by 7.73% and the number of points showing dose differences of more than 5% by 8.82% relative to the dose differences without an optimization. Our results indicate that the dose difference was significantly decreased with optimization and this optimization method is statistically reliable and effective. The results of 3D optimization are discussed in terms of various patient-specific QA data obtained from statistical analyses.

  10. Evaluation of low-dose limits in 3D-2D rigid registration for surgical guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uneri, A.; Wang, A. S.; Otake, Y.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Khanna, A. J.; Gallia, G. L.; Gokaslan, Z. L.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-09-01

    An algorithm for intensity-based 3D-2D registration of CT and C-arm fluoroscopy is evaluated for use in surgical guidance, specifically considering the low-dose limits of the fluoroscopic x-ray projections. The registration method is based on a framework using the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA-ES) to identify the 3D patient pose that maximizes the gradient information similarity metric. Registration performance was evaluated in an anthropomorphic head phantom emulating intracranial neurosurgery, using target registration error (TRE) to characterize accuracy and robustness in terms of 95% confidence upper bound in comparison to that of an infrared surgical tracking system. Three clinical scenarios were considered: (1) single-view image + guidance, wherein a single x-ray projection is used for visualization and 3D-2D guidance; (2) dual-view image + guidance, wherein one projection is acquired for visualization, combined with a second (lower-dose) projection acquired at a different C-arm angle for 3D-2D guidance; and (3) dual-view guidance, wherein both projections are acquired at low dose for the purpose of 3D-2D guidance alone (not visualization). In each case, registration accuracy was evaluated as a function of the entrance surface dose associated with the projection view(s). Results indicate that images acquired at a dose as low as 4 μGy (approximately one-tenth the dose of a typical fluoroscopic frame) were sufficient to provide TRE comparable or superior to that of conventional surgical tracking, allowing 3D-2D guidance at a level of dose that is at most 10% greater than conventional fluoroscopy (scenario #2) and potentially reducing the dose to approximately 20% of the level in a conventional fluoroscopically guided procedure (scenario #3).

  11. Evaluation of low-dose limits in 3D-2D rigid registration for surgical guidance.

    PubMed

    Uneri, A; Wang, A S; Otake, Y; Kleinszig, G; Vogt, S; Khanna, A J; Gallia, G L; Gokaslan, Z L; Siewerdsen, J H

    2014-09-21

    An algorithm for intensity-based 3D-2D registration of CT and C-arm fluoroscopy is evaluated for use in surgical guidance, specifically considering the low-dose limits of the fluoroscopic x-ray projections. The registration method is based on a framework using the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA-ES) to identify the 3D patient pose that maximizes the gradient information similarity metric. Registration performance was evaluated in an anthropomorphic head phantom emulating intracranial neurosurgery, using target registration error (TRE) to characterize accuracy and robustness in terms of 95% confidence upper bound in comparison to that of an infrared surgical tracking system. Three clinical scenarios were considered: (1) single-view image+guidance, wherein a single x-ray projection is used for visualization and 3D-2D guidance; (2) dual-view image+guidance, wherein one projection is acquired for visualization, combined with a second (lower-dose) projection acquired at a different C-arm angle for 3D-2D guidance; and (3) dual-view guidance, wherein both projections are acquired at low dose for the purpose of 3D-2D guidance alone (not visualization). In each case, registration accuracy was evaluated as a function of the entrance surface dose associated with the projection view(s). Results indicate that images acquired at a dose as low as 4 μGy (approximately one-tenth the dose of a typical fluoroscopic frame) were sufficient to provide TRE comparable or superior to that of conventional surgical tracking, allowing 3D-2D guidance at a level of dose that is at most 10% greater than conventional fluoroscopy (scenario #2) and potentially reducing the dose to approximately 20% of the level in a conventional fluoroscopically guided procedure (scenario #3).

  12. Feasibility of RACT for 3D dose measurement and range verification in a water phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Alsanea, Fahed; Moskvin, Vadim; Stantz, Keith M.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to establish the feasibility of using radiation-induced acoustics to measure the range and Bragg peak dose from a pulsed proton beam. Simulation studies implementing a prototype scanner design based on computed tomographic methods were performed to investigate the sensitivity to proton range and integral dose. Methods: Derived from thermodynamic wave equation, the pressure signals generated from the dose deposited from a pulsed proton beam with a 1 cm lateral beam width and a range of 16, 20, and 27 cm in water using Monte Carlo methods were simulated. The resulting dosimetric images were reconstructed implementing a 3D filtered backprojection algorithm and the pressure signals acquired from a 71-transducer array with a cylindrical geometry (30 × 40 cm) rotated over 2π about its central axis. Dependencies on the detector bandwidth and proton beam pulse width were performed, after which, different noise levels were added to the detector signals (using 1 μs pulse width and a 0.5 MHz cutoff frequency/hydrophone) to investigate the statistical and systematic errors in the proton range (at 20 cm) and Bragg peak dose (of 1 cGy). Results: The reconstructed radioacoustic computed tomographic image intensity was shown to be linearly correlated to the dose within the Bragg peak. And, based on noise dependent studies, a detector sensitivity of 38 mPa was necessary to determine the proton range to within 1.0 mm (full-width at half-maximum) (systematic error < 150 μm) for a 1 cGy Bragg peak dose, where the integral dose within the Bragg peak was measured to within 2%. For existing hydrophone detector sensitivities, a Bragg peak dose of 1.6 cGy is possible. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that computed tomographic scanner based on ionizing radiation-induced acoustics can be used to verify dose distribution and proton range with centi-Gray sensitivity. Realizing this technology into the clinic has the potential to significantly

  13. Radiation dose reduction for coronary artery calcium scoring at 320-detector CT with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D.

    PubMed

    Tatsugami, Fuminari; Higaki, Toru; Fukumoto, Wataru; Kaichi, Yoko; Fujioka, Chikako; Kiguchi, Masao; Yamamoto, Hideya; Kihara, Yasuki; Awai, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    To assess the possibility of reducing the radiation dose for coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring by using adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR 3D) on a 320-detector CT scanner. Fifty-four patients underwent routine- and low-dose CT for CAC scoring. Low-dose CT was performed at one-third of the tube current used for routine-dose CT. Routine-dose CT was reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and low-dose CT was reconstructed with AIDR 3D. We compared the calculated Agatston-, volume-, and mass scores of these images. The overall percentage difference in the Agatston-, volume-, and mass scores between routine- and low-dose CT studies was 15.9, 11.6, and 12.6%, respectively. There were no significant differences in the routine- and low-dose CT studies irrespective of the scoring algorithms applied. The CAC measurements of both imaging modalities were highly correlated with respect to the Agatston- (r = 0.996), volume- (r = 0.996), and mass score (r = 0.997; p < 0.001, all); the Bland-Altman limits of agreement scores were -37.4 to 51.4, -31.2 to 36.4 and -30.3 to 40.9%, respectively, suggesting that AIDR 3D was a good alternative for FBP. The mean effective radiation dose for routine- and low-dose CT was 2.2 and 0.7 mSv, respectively. The use of AIDR 3D made it possible to reduce the radiation dose by 67% for CAC scoring without impairing the quantification of coronary calcification.

  14. A fast numerical method for calculating the 3D proton dose profile in a single-ring wobbling spreading system.

    PubMed

    Riazi, Z; Afarideh, H; Sadighi-Bonabi, R

    2011-09-01

    Based on the determination of protons fluence at the phantom's surface, a 3D dose distribution is calculated inside a water phantom using a fast method. The dose contribution of secondary particles, originating from inelastic nuclear interactions, is also taken into account. This is achieved by assuming that 60% of the energy transferred to secondary particles is locally absorbed. Secondary radiation delivers approximately 16.8% of the total dose in the plateau region of the Bragg curve for monoenergetic protons of energy 190 MeV. The physical dose beyond the Bragg peak is obtained for a proton beam of 190 MeV using a Geant4 simulation. It is found that the dose beyond the Bragg peak is <0.02% of the maximum dose and is mainly delivered by protons produced via reactions of the secondary neutrons. The relative dose profile is also calculated by simulation of the proposed beam line in Geant4 code. The dose profile produced by our method agrees, within 2%, with the results predicted by the Fermi Eyges distribution function and the results of the Geant4 simulation. It is expected that the fast numerical approach proposed herein may be utilised in 3D deterministic treatment planning programs, to model proton propagation in order to analyse the effect of modifying the beam line.

  15. Quantitative quality measure based on light wave distribution to access 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yuji; Okuyama, Fumio

    2011-02-01

    There are a lot of three-dimensional (3D) displaying methods such as stereoscopy, integral photography, holography, etc. These technologies have different 3D vision properties and 3D image qualities. Conventionally, biological responsiveness is measured by using an actual 3D display in order to evaluate image qualities of 3D displaying method. It is required quantitative quality measure for 3D images for quantitative evaluation, which are useful for comparing 3D image quality and a design of a new display system. In this paper, we propose quality measures for 3D images named volume signal to noise ratio (VSNR), which is a three-dimensionally extended signal to noise ratio (SNR). A 3D display produces light wave distributions in 3D space, which makes observers view 3D image illusions. The VSNR measures error of light wave distributions between generated by actual objects and produced by a 3D display. The light wave distribution is including various factors for 3D perception of human such as resolution of reconstructed images, visual fields, motion parallax, and depth of field. The VSNR evaluates these 3D perception factors totally. We were carried out the experiments to certificate the efficiency of the VSNR. 3D images represented electro-holographic display and integral photographic displays were evaluated by the VSNR. The results indicated that the electro-holographic display has better quality than integral photographic display, but speckle noise deteriorates the 3D image quality.

  16. Experimental pencil beam kernels derivation for 3D dose calculation in flattening filter free modulated fields.

    PubMed

    Azcona, Juan Diego; Barbés, Benigno; Wang, Lilie; Burguete, Javier

    2016-01-07

    This paper presents a method to obtain the pencil-beam kernels that characterize a megavoltage photon beam generated in a flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerator (linac) by deconvolution from experimental measurements at different depths. The formalism is applied to perform independent dose calculations in modulated fields. In our previous work a formalism was developed for ideal flat fluences exiting the linac's head. That framework could not deal with spatially varying energy fluences, so any deviation from the ideal flat fluence was treated as a perturbation. The present work addresses the necessity of implementing an exact analysis where any spatially varying fluence can be used such as those encountered in FFF beams. A major improvement introduced here is to handle the actual fluence in the deconvolution procedure. We studied the uncertainties associated to the kernel derivation with this method. Several Kodak EDR2 radiographic films were irradiated with a 10 MV FFF photon beam from two linacs from different vendors, at the depths of 5, 10, 15, and 20cm in polystyrene (RW3 water-equivalent phantom, PTW Freiburg, Germany). The irradiation field was a 50mm diameter circular field, collimated with a lead block. The 3D kernel for a FFF beam was obtained by deconvolution using the Hankel transform. A correction on the low dose part of the kernel was performed to reproduce accurately the experimental output factors. Error uncertainty in the kernel derivation procedure was estimated to be within 0.2%. Eighteen modulated fields used clinically in different treatment localizations were irradiated at four measurement depths (total of fifty-four film measurements). Comparison through the gamma-index to their corresponding calculated absolute dose distributions showed a number of passing points (3%, 3mm) mostly above 99%. This new procedure is more reliable and robust than the previous one. Its ability to perform accurate independent dose calculations was

  17. Experimental pencil beam kernels derivation for 3D dose calculation in flattening filter free modulated fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diego Azcona, Juan; Barbés, Benigno; Wang, Lilie; Burguete, Javier

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method to obtain the pencil-beam kernels that characterize a megavoltage photon beam generated in a flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerator (linac) by deconvolution from experimental measurements at different depths. The formalism is applied to perform independent dose calculations in modulated fields. In our previous work a formalism was developed for ideal flat fluences exiting the linac’s head. That framework could not deal with spatially varying energy fluences, so any deviation from the ideal flat fluence was treated as a perturbation. The present work addresses the necessity of implementing an exact analysis where any spatially varying fluence can be used such as those encountered in FFF beams. A major improvement introduced here is to handle the actual fluence in the deconvolution procedure. We studied the uncertainties associated to the kernel derivation with this method. Several Kodak EDR2 radiographic films were irradiated with a 10 MV FFF photon beam from two linacs from different vendors, at the depths of 5, 10, 15, and 20cm in polystyrene (RW3 water-equivalent phantom, PTW Freiburg, Germany). The irradiation field was a 50mm diameter circular field, collimated with a lead block. The 3D kernel for a FFF beam was obtained by deconvolution using the Hankel transform. A correction on the low dose part of the kernel was performed to reproduce accurately the experimental output factors. Error uncertainty in the kernel derivation procedure was estimated to be within 0.2%. Eighteen modulated fields used clinically in different treatment localizations were irradiated at four measurement depths (total of fifty-four film measurements). Comparison through the gamma-index to their corresponding calculated absolute dose distributions showed a number of passing points (3%, 3mm) mostly above 99%. This new procedure is more reliable and robust than the previous one. Its ability to perform accurate independent dose calculations was

  18. Efficient and reliable 3D dose quality assurance for IMRT by combining independent dose calculations with measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, R.; Wauben, D. J. L.; Godart, J.; Langendijk, J. A.; Veld, A. A. van't; Korevaar, E. W.; Groot, M. de

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Advanced radiotherapy treatments require appropriate quality assurance (QA) to verify 3D dose distributions. Moreover, increase in patient numbers demand efficient QA-methods. In this study, a time efficient method that combines model-based QA and measurement-based QA was developed; i.e., the hybrid-QA. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the model-based QA and to evaluate time efficiency of the hybrid-QA method. Methods: Accuracy of the model-based QA was determined by comparison of COMPASS calculated dose with Monte Carlo calculations for heterogeneous media. In total, 330 intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans were evaluated based on the mean gamma index (GI) with criteria of 3%/3mm and classification of PASS (GI {<=} 0.4), EVAL (0.4 < GI > 0.6), and FAIL (GI {>=} 0.6). Agreement between model-based QA and measurement-based QA was determined for 48 treatment plans, and linac stability was verified for 15 months. Finally, time efficiency improvement of the hybrid-QA was quantified for four representative treatment plans. Results: COMPASS calculated dose was in agreement with Monte Carlo dose, with a maximum error of 3.2% in heterogeneous media with high density (2.4 g/cm{sup 3}). Hybrid-QA results for IMRT treatment plans showed an excellent PASS rate of 98% for all cases. Model-based QA was in agreement with measurement-based QA, as shown by a minimal difference in GI of 0.03 {+-} 0.08. Linac stability was high with an average GI of 0.28 {+-} 0.04. The hybrid-QA method resulted in a time efficiency improvement of 15 min per treatment plan QA compared to measurement-based QA. Conclusions: The hybrid-QA method is adequate for efficient and accurate 3D dose verification. It combines time efficiency of model-based QA with reliability of measurement-based QA and is suitable for implementation within any radiotherapy department.

  19. SU-E-T-460: Isoeffective Dose Display (EQD2) for Composite Plan of Radiosurgery and Conventional 3D Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y; Yuan, J; Woods, C; Machtay, M; Wessels, B

    2012-06-01

    Direct addition of doses between plans with different fractionation fails to provide accurate dose-response information to anticipate clinical outcome. To combine different fractionation patterns, first-order biological model correction for dose-rate must be included. Moreover, 3-D isoeffect patterns of the combined doses must be displayed so that overlap area to elegant volumes can be avoided. The linear quadratic (LQ) model and biologically effective dose (BED) method were used to produce a combined plan in equivalent 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) for radiosurgery and conventional 3D radiotherapy. For patients with multiple courses of radiotherapy, dose distributions of the prior and boost treatment plans were converted to BED. The fraction size specified by the prescription was applied globally for each BED calculation, α/β ratio of 10 and 2.5 was used for early and late effect, respectively. Image registration with CT or MR was performed for initial and boost plans. The registration information was applied to dose distributions to obtain the composite EQD2. As a demonstration of this method, two patients were selected who had combined treatments from substantially different modalities. A patient with liver cancer initially received radiotherapy of 30 Gy/10 Fx and re-irradiation with CyberKnife radiosurgery (15 Gy/1 Fx). The combined plan showed that the PTV received EQD2 of 63.8 Gy. Another patient had brain metastasis treated with GammaKnife of 18 Gy (50% isodose) followed by conventional 3D whole brain radiation of 30 Gy/10 Fx. The minimal combined tumor EQD2 was 74.5 Gy. Early and late calculated responses showed that all critical organ doses were within tolerance. For patients receiving radiation with different fractionation schemes, combined isoeffective dose distributions were calculated and displayed. In both cases, crucial information regarding 3-D dose distributions assisted the physicians in determining whether tolerance limits of overlap areas of retreated

  20. WE-D-BRA-04: Online 3D EPID-Based Dose Verification for Optimum Patient Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Spreeuw, H; Rozendaal, R; Olaciregui-Ruiz, I; Mans, A; Mijnheer, B; Herk, M van; Gonzalez, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an online 3D dose verification tool based on EPID transit dosimetry to ensure optimum patient safety in radiotherapy treatments. Methods: A new software package was developed which processes EPID portal images online using a back-projection algorithm for the 3D dose reconstruction. The package processes portal images faster than the acquisition rate of the portal imager (∼ 2.5 fps). After a portal image is acquired, the software seeks for “hot spots” in the reconstructed 3D dose distribution. A hot spot is in this study defined as a 4 cm{sup 3} cube where the average cumulative reconstructed dose exceeds the average total planned dose by at least 20% and 50 cGy. If a hot spot is detected, an alert is generated resulting in a linac halt. The software has been tested by irradiating an Alderson phantom after introducing various types of serious delivery errors. Results: In our first experiment the Alderson phantom was irradiated with two arcs from a 6 MV VMAT H&N treatment having a large leaf position error or a large monitor unit error. For both arcs and both errors the linac was halted before dose delivery was completed. When no error was introduced, the linac was not halted. The complete processing of a single portal frame, including hot spot detection, takes about 220 ms on a dual hexacore Intel Xeon 25 X5650 CPU at 2.66 GHz. Conclusion: A prototype online 3D dose verification tool using portal imaging has been developed and successfully tested for various kinds of gross delivery errors. The detection of hot spots was proven to be effective for the timely detection of these errors. Current work is focused on hot spot detection criteria for various treatment sites and the introduction of a clinical pilot program with online verification of hypo-fractionated (lung) treatments.

  1. Panthere V2: Multipurpose Simulation Software for 3D Dose Rate Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penessot, Gaël; Bavoil, Éléonore; Wertz, Laurent; Malouch, Fadhel; Visonneau, Thierry; Dubost, Julien

    2017-09-01

    PANTHERE is a multipurpose radiation protection software developed by EDF to calculate gamma dose rates in complex 3D environments. PANTHERE takes a key role in the EDF ALARA process, enabling to predict dose rates and to organize and optimize operations in high radiation environments. PANTHERE is also used for nuclear waste characterization, transport of nuclear materials, etc. It is used in most of the EDF engineering units and their design service providers and industrial partners.

  2. An investigation of low-dose 3D scout scans for computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Juliana; Gang, Grace J.; Mathews, Aswin; Stayman, J. Webster

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: Commonly 2D scouts or topograms are used prior to CT scan acquisition. However, low-dose 3D scouts could potentially provide additional information for more effective patient positioning and selection of acquisition protocols. We propose using model-based iterative reconstruction to reconstruct low exposure tomographic data to maintain image quality in both low-dose 3D scouts and reprojected topograms based on those 3D scouts. Methods: We performed tomographic acquisitions on a CBCT test-bench using a range of exposure settings from 16.6 to 231.9 total mAs. Both an anthropomorphic phantom and a 32 cm CTDI phantom were scanned. The penalized-likelihood reconstructions were made using Matlab and CUDA libraries and reconstruction parameters were tuned to determine the best regularization strength and delta parameter. RMS error between reconstructions and the highest exposure reconstruction were computed, and CTDIW values were reported for each exposure setting. RMS error for reprojected topograms were also computed. Results: We find that we are able to produce low-dose (0.417 mGy) 3D scouts that show high-contrast and large anatomical features while maintaining the ability to produce traditional topograms. Conclusions: We demonstrated that iterative reconstruction can mitigate noise in very low exposure CT acquisitions to enable 3D CT scout. Such additional 3D information may lead to improved protocols for patient positioning and acquisition refinements as well as a number of advanced dose reduction strategies that require localization of anatomical features and quantities that are not provided by simple 2D topograms.

  3. Breast Radiation Dose With CESM Compared With 2D FFDM and 3D Tomosynthesis Mammography.

    PubMed

    James, Judy R; Pavlicek, William; Hanson, James A; Boltz, Thomas F; Patel, Bhavika K

    2017-02-01

    We aimed to compare radiation dose received during contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) using high- and low-energy projections with radiation dose received during 2D full field digital mammography (FFDM) and 3D tomosynthesis on phantoms and patients with varying breast thickness and density. A single left craniocaudal projection was chosen to determine the doses for 6214 patients who underwent 2D FFDM, 3662 patients who underwent 3D tomosynthesis, and 173 patients who underwent CESM in this retrospective study. Dose measurements were also collected in phantoms with composition mimicking nondense and dense breast tissue. Average glandular dose (AGD) ± SD was 3.0 ± 1.1 mGy for CESM exposures at a mean breast thickness of 63 mm. At this thickness, the dose was 2.1 mGy from 2D FFDM and 2.5 mGy from 3D tomosynthesis. The nondense phantom had a mean AGD of 1.0 mGy with 2D FFDM, 1.3 mGy with 3D tomosynthesis, and 1.6 mGy with CESM. The dense breast phantom had a mean AGD of 1.3 mGy with 2D FFDM, 1.4 mGy with 3D tomosynthesis, and 2.1 mGy with CESM. At a compressed thickness of 4.5 cm, radiation exposure from CESM was approximately 25% higher in dense breast phantoms than in nondense breast phantoms. The dose in the dense phantom at a compressed thickness of 6 cm was approximately 42% higher than the dose in the nondense phantom at a compressed thickness of 4.5 cm. CESM was found to increase AGD at a mean breast thickness of 63 mm by approximately 0.9 mGy and 0.5 mGy compared with 2D FFDM and 3D tomosynthesis, respectively. Of note, CESM provides a standard image (similar to 2D FFDM) that is obtained using the low-energy projection. Overall, the AGD from CESM falls below the dose limit of 3 mGy set by Mammography Quality Standards Act regulations.

  4. Effect of ROI filtering in 3D cone-beam rotational angiography on organ dose and effective dose in cerebral investigations.

    PubMed

    Göpfert, Fabian; Schmidt, Ralph; Wulff, Jörg; Zink, Klemens

    2015-03-08

    The assessment of intracranial aneurysms is increasingly performed using three-dimensional cone-beam rotational angiography (3D CBRA). To reduce the dose to the patient during 3D CBRA procedures, filtered region-of-interest imaging (FROI) is presented in literature to be an effective technique as the dose in regions of low interest is reduced, while high image quality is preserved in the ROI. The purpose of this study was to quantify the benefit of FROI imaging during a typical 3D CBRA procedure in a patient's head region. A cone-beam rotational angiography unit (Infinix) was modeled in GMctdospp, an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo software, which calculates patient dose distributions in rotational computed tomography. Kodak Lanex, a gadolinium compound, was chosen to be the ROI filter material. The adult female ICRP reference phantom was integrated in GMctdospp to calculate organ and effective doses in simulations of FROI-CBRA examinations. During the Monte Carlo simulations, different parameters as the ROI filter thickness, the ROI opening size, the tube voltage, and the isocenter position were varied. The results showed that the reduction in dose clearly depends on these parameters. Comparing the reduction in organ dose in standard 3D CBRA and FROI-CBRA, a maximum reduction of about 60%-80% could be achieved with a small sized ROI filter and about 40%-70% of the dose could be saved using a ROI filter with a large opening. Further we could show that dose reduction strongly depends on filter thickness, the location of the organ in the radiated area, and the position of the isocenter. As a consequence, dose reduction partially differs from theoretically calculated values by a factor up to 1.6. The effective dose could be reduced to a minimum of about 40%. Due to the fact that standard 3D CBRA is only used for the assessment of aneurysms at present and, thus, most of the patient dose originates from the aneurysm treatment (with 2D techniques) itself, the dose reduction

  5. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 01: 3D Pre-treatment Dose Verification for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Asuni, G; Beek, T van; Van Utyven, E; McCowan, P; McCurdy, B.M.C.

    2014-08-15

    Radical treatment techniques such as stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) are becoming popular and they involve delivery of large doses in fewer fractions. Due to this feature of SBRT, a high-resolution, pre-treatment dose verification method that makes use of a 3D patient representation would be appropriate. Such a technique will provide additional information about dose delivered to the target volume(s) and organs-at-risk (OARs) in the patient volume compared to 2D verification methods. In this work, we investigate an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based pre-treatment QA method which provides an accurate reconstruction of the 3D-dose distribution in the patient model. Customized patient plans are delivered ‘in air’ and the portal images are collected using the EPID in cine mode. The images are then analysed to determine an estimate of the incident energy fluence. This is then passed to a collapsed-cone convolution dose algorithm which reconstructs a 3D patient dose estimate on the CT imaging dataset. To date, the method has been applied to 5 SBRT patient plans. Reconstructed doses were compared to those calculated by the TPS. Reconstructed mean doses were mostly within 3% of those in the TPS. DVHs of target volumes and OARs compared well. The Chi pass rates using 3%/3mm in the high dose region are greater than 97% in all cases. These initial results demonstrate clinical feasibility and utility of a robust, efficient, effective and convenient pre-treatment QA method using EPID. Research sponsored in part by Varian Medical Systems.

  6. SU-E-T-801: Verification of Dose Information Passed Through 3D-Printed Products

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, S; Yoon, M; Kim, D; Chung, W; Chung, M; Shin, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: When quality assurance (QA) of patient treatment beam is performed, homogeneous water equivalent phantom which has different structure from patient’s internal structure is normally used. In these days, it is possible to make structures which have same shapes of human organs with commercialization of 3D-printer. As a Result, structures with same shape of human organs made by 3D-printer could be used to test qualification of treatment beam with greater accuracy than homogeneous water phantom. In this study, we estimated the dose response of 3D-printer materials to test the probability as a humanoid phantom or new generation of compensator tool. Methods: The rectangular products with variety densities (50%, 75% and 100%) were made to verify their characteristics. The products for experiment group and solid water phantom and air for control group with 125 cubic centimeters were put on solid water phantom with enough thickness. CT image of two products were acquired to know their HU values and to know about their radiologic characteristics. 6MV beams with 500MU were exposed for each experiment. Doses were measured behind the 3D-printed products. These measured doses were compared to the results taken by TPS. Results: Absorbed dose penetrated from empty air is normalized to 100%. Doses measured from 6MV photon beams penetrated from 50%, 75% and 100% products were 99%, 96% and 84%, respectively. HU values of 50%, 75% and 100% products are about −910, −860 and −10. Conclusion: 3D-printer can produce structures which have similar characteristics with human organ. These results would be used to make similar phantoms with patient information. This work was supported by the Nuclear Safety Research Program (Grant No. 1305033 and 1403019) of the Korea Radiation Safety Foundation and the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission and Radiation Technology Development Program (2013M2A2A4027117) of the Republic of Korea.

  7. High-dose radiotherapy in inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer: Comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, dynamic IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bree, Ingrid de; Hinsberg, Marieelle G.E. van; Veelen, Lieneke R. van

    2012-01-01

    Conformal 3D radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with chemotherapy for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to the preferable high dose is often not achievable because of dose-limiting organs. This reduces the probability of regional tumor control. Therefore, the surplus value of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, specifically volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]) and dynamic IMRT (d-IMRT) has been investigated. RA and d-IMRT plans were compared with 3D-CRT treatment plans for 20 patients eligible for concurrent high-dose chemoradiotherapy, in whom a dose of 60 Gy was not achievable. Comparison of dose delivery in the target volume and organs at risk was carried out by evaluating 3D dose distributions and dose-volume histograms. Quality of the dose distribution was assessed using the inhomogeneity and conformity index. For most patients, a higher dose to the target volume can be delivered using RA or d-IMRT; in 15% of the patients a dose {>=}60 Gy was possible. Both IMRT techniques result in a better conformity of the dose (p < 0.001). There are no significant differences in homogeneity of dose in the target volume. IMRT techniques for NSCLC patients allow higher dose to the target volume, thus improving regional tumor control.

  8. SU-E-J-200: A Dosimetric Analysis of 3D Versus 4D Image-Based Dose Calculation for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, M; Rouabhi, O; Flynn, R; Xia, J; Bayouth, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric difference between 3D and 4Dweighted dose calculation using patient specific respiratory trace and deformable image registration for stereotactic body radiation therapy in lung tumors. Methods: Two dose calculation techniques, 3D and 4D-weighed dose calculation, were used for dosimetric comparison for 9 lung cancer patients. The magnitude of the tumor motion varied from 3 mm to 23 mm. Breath-hold exhale CT was used for 3D dose calculation with ITV generated from the motion observed from 4D-CT. For 4D-weighted calculation, dose of each binned CT image from the ten breathing amplitudes was first recomputed using the same planning parameters as those used in the 3D calculation. The dose distribution of each binned CT was mapped to the breath-hold CT using deformable image registration. The 4D-weighted dose was computed by summing the deformed doses with the temporal probabilities calculated from their corresponding respiratory traces. Dosimetric evaluation criteria includes lung V20, mean lung dose, and mean tumor dose. Results: Comparing with 3D calculation, lung V20, mean lung dose, and mean tumor dose using 4D-weighted dose calculation were changed by −0.67% ± 2.13%, −4.11% ± 6.94% (−0.36 Gy ± 0.87 Gy), −1.16% ± 1.36%(−0.73 Gy ± 0.85 Gy) accordingly. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that conventional 3D dose calculation method may overestimate the lung V20, MLD, and MTD. The absolute difference between 3D and 4D-weighted dose calculation in lung tumor may not be clinically significant. This research is supported by Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc and Iowa Center for Research By Undergraduates.

  9. Improving Low-dose Cardiac CT Images based on 3D Sparse Representation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Luyao; Hu, Yining; Chen, Yang; Yin, Xindao; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is a reliable and accurate tool for diagnosis of coronary artery diseases and is also frequently used in surgery guidance. Low-dose scans should be considered in order to alleviate the harm to patients caused by X-ray radiation. However, low dose CT (LDCT) images tend to be degraded by quantum noise and streak artifacts. In order to improve the cardiac LDCT image quality, a 3D sparse representation-based processing (3D SR) is proposed by exploiting the sparsity and regularity of 3D anatomical features in CCT. The proposed method was evaluated by a clinical study of 14 patients. The performance of the proposed method was compared to the 2D spares representation-based processing (2D SR) and the state-of-the-art noise reduction algorithm BM4D. The visual assessment, quantitative assessment and qualitative assessment results show that the proposed approach can lead to effective noise/artifact suppression and detail preservation. Compared to the other two tested methods, 3D SR method can obtain results with image quality most close to the reference standard dose CT (SDCT) images. PMID:26980176

  10. Improving Low-dose Cardiac CT Images based on 3D Sparse Representation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Luyao; Hu, Yining; Chen, Yang; Yin, Xindao; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2016-03-16

    Cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is a reliable and accurate tool for diagnosis of coronary artery diseases and is also frequently used in surgery guidance. Low-dose scans should be considered in order to alleviate the harm to patients caused by X-ray radiation. However, low dose CT (LDCT) images tend to be degraded by quantum noise and streak artifacts. In order to improve the cardiac LDCT image quality, a 3D sparse representation-based processing (3D SR) is proposed by exploiting the sparsity and regularity of 3D anatomical features in CCT. The proposed method was evaluated by a clinical study of 14 patients. The performance of the proposed method was compared to the 2D spares representation-based processing (2D SR) and the state-of-the-art noise reduction algorithm BM4D. The visual assessment, quantitative assessment and qualitative assessment results show that the proposed approach can lead to effective noise/artifact suppression and detail preservation. Compared to the other two tested methods, 3D SR method can obtain results with image quality most close to the reference standard dose CT (SDCT) images.

  11. Improving Low-dose Cardiac CT Images based on 3D Sparse Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Luyao; Hu, Yining; Chen, Yang; Yin, Xindao; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is a reliable and accurate tool for diagnosis of coronary artery diseases and is also frequently used in surgery guidance. Low-dose scans should be considered in order to alleviate the harm to patients caused by X-ray radiation. However, low dose CT (LDCT) images tend to be degraded by quantum noise and streak artifacts. In order to improve the cardiac LDCT image quality, a 3D sparse representation-based processing (3D SR) is proposed by exploiting the sparsity and regularity of 3D anatomical features in CCT. The proposed method was evaluated by a clinical study of 14 patients. The performance of the proposed method was compared to the 2D spares representation-based processing (2D SR) and the state-of-the-art noise reduction algorithm BM4D. The visual assessment, quantitative assessment and qualitative assessment results show that the proposed approach can lead to effective noise/artifact suppression and detail preservation. Compared to the other two tested methods, 3D SR method can obtain results with image quality most close to the reference standard dose CT (SDCT) images.

  12. 3D dose reconstruction for narrow beams using ion chamber array measurements.

    PubMed

    Schombourg, Karin; Bochud, François O; Mirimanoff, René-Olivier; Moeckli, Raphaël

    2012-06-01

    3D dose reconstruction is a verification of the delivered absorbed dose. Our aim was to describe and evaluate a 3D dose reconstruction method applied to phantoms in the context of narrow beams. A solid water phantom and a phantom containing a bone-equivalent material were irradiated on a 6 MV linac. The transmitted dose was measured by using one array of a 2D ion chamber detector. The dose reconstruction was obtained by an iterative algorithm. A phantom set-up error and organ interfraction motion were simulated to test the algorithm sensitivity. In all configurations convergence was obtained within three iterations. A local reconstructed dose agreement of at least 3% / 3mm with respect to the planned dose was obtained, except in a few points of the penumbra. The reconstructed primary fluences were consistent with the planned ones, which validates the whole reconstruction process. The results validate our method in a simple geometry and for narrow beams. The method is sensitive to a set-up error of a heterogeneous phantom and interfraction heterogeneous organ motion. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  13. Deformable 3D-2D registration for CT and its application to low dose tomographic fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Flach, Barbara; Brehm, Marcus; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-12-21

    Many applications in medical imaging include image registration for matching of images from the same or different modalities. In the case of full data sampling, the respective reconstructed images are usually of such a good image quality that standard deformable volume-to-volume (3D-3D) registration approaches can be applied. But research in temporal-correlated image reconstruction and dose reductions increases the number of cases where rawdata are available from only few projection angles. Here, deteriorated image quality leads to non-acceptable deformable volume-to-volume registration results. Therefore a registration approach is required that is robust against a decreasing number of projections defining the target position. We propose a deformable volume-to-rawdata (3D-2D) registration method that aims at finding a displacement vector field maximizing the alignment of a CT volume and the acquired rawdata based on the sum of squared differences in rawdata domain. The registration is constrained by a regularization term in accordance with a fluid-based diffusion. Both cost function components, the rawdata fidelity and the regularization term, are optimized in an alternating manner. The matching criterion is optimized by a conjugate gradient descent for nonlinear functions, while the regularization is realized by convolution of the vector fields with Gaussian kernels. We validate the proposed method and compare it to the demons algorithm, a well-known 3D-3D registration method. The comparison is done for a range of 4-60 target projections using datasets from low dose tomographic fluoroscopy as an application example. The results show a high correlation to the ground truth target position without introducing artifacts even in the case of very few projections. In particular the matching in the rawdata domain is improved compared to the 3D-3D registration for the investigated range. The proposed volume-to-rawdata registration increases the robustness regarding sparse

  14. Deformable 3D-2D registration for CT and its application to low dose tomographic fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flach, Barbara; Brehm, Marcus; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Many applications in medical imaging include image registration for matching of images from the same or different modalities. In the case of full data sampling, the respective reconstructed images are usually of such a good image quality that standard deformable volume-to-volume (3D-3D) registration approaches can be applied. But research in temporal-correlated image reconstruction and dose reductions increases the number of cases where rawdata are available from only few projection angles. Here, deteriorated image quality leads to non-acceptable deformable volume-to-volume registration results. Therefore a registration approach is required that is robust against a decreasing number of projections defining the target position. We propose a deformable volume-to-rawdata (3D-2D) registration method that aims at finding a displacement vector field maximizing the alignment of a CT volume and the acquired rawdata based on the sum of squared differences in rawdata domain. The registration is constrained by a regularization term in accordance with a fluid-based diffusion. Both cost function components, the rawdata fidelity and the regularization term, are optimized in an alternating manner. The matching criterion is optimized by a conjugate gradient descent for nonlinear functions, while the regularization is realized by convolution of the vector fields with Gaussian kernels. We validate the proposed method and compare it to the demons algorithm, a well-known 3D-3D registration method. The comparison is done for a range of 4-60 target projections using datasets from low dose tomographic fluoroscopy as an application example. The results show a high correlation to the ground truth target position without introducing artifacts even in the case of very few projections. In particular the matching in the rawdata domain is improved compared to the 3D-3D registration for the investigated range. The proposed volume-to-rawdata registration increases the robustness regarding sparse

  15. A flexible-dose dispenser for immediate and extended release 3D printed tablets.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Katarzyna; Isreb, Abdullah; Alhnan, Mohamed A

    2015-10-01

    The advances in personalised medicine increased the demand for a fast, accurate and reliable production method of tablets that can be digitally controlled by healthcare staff. A flexible dose tablet system is presented in this study that proved to be suitable for immediate and extended release tablets with a realistic drug loading and an easy-to-swallow tablet design. The method bridges the affordable and digitally controlled Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) 3D printing with a standard pharmaceutical manufacturing process, Hot Melt Extrusion (HME). The reported method was compatible with three methacrylic polymers (Eudragit RL, RS and E) as well as a cellulose-based one (hydroxypropyl cellulose, HPC SSL). The use of a HME based pharmaceutical filament preserved the linear relationship between the mass and printed volume and was utilized to digitally control the dose via an input from computer software with dose accuracy in the range of 91-95%. Higher resolution printing quality doubled the printing time, but showed a little effect on in vitro release pattern of theophylline and weight accuracy. Physical characterization studies indicated that the majority of the model drug (theophylline) in the 3D printed tablet exists in a crystal form. Owing to the small size, ease of use and the highly adjustable nature of FDM 3D printers, the method holds promise for future individualised treatment.

  16. 3D concentration distributions of ion implants in amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günzler, R.; Weiser, M.; Kalbitz, S.

    1992-01-01

    Spatial distributions of implanted ions have been derived from depth profiles of implants at varied incidence angle by applying tomographic techniques. To this end we have developed a new version of an algorithm known as simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT), which covers the experimental concentration range of about three decades. In addition, the finite depth resolution of the nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) is accounted for in our computer program. In this way, we have reconstructed the three-dimensional implantation distributions of 0.15 MeV 1H, 1.5 and 6 MeV 15N, and 4 MeV 30Si in amorphized Ge layers. The agreement with TRIM calculations is reasonable: 10% ± 0.5% for the first and 10% ± 5% for the second range moments. Consequences of the longitudinal and lateral tailing for ion beam applications to large scale integration problems are discussed.

  17. Sigmoid Dose Using 3D Imaging in Cervical-Cancer Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Caroline L.; Racine, Marie-Lynn; Cormack, Robert A.; O'Farrell, Desmond A.; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose To evaluate the proximity, variance, predictors of dose, and complications to the sigmoid in cervical-cancer brachytherapy using 3D planning. Materials and Methods Over 36 months, 50 patients were treated for cervical cancer with either low-dose-rate (LDR) or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The distance from the central tandem to the sigmoid, the D0.1cc and the D2cc to the sigmoid, rectum and bladder doses, and toxicity were analyzed. Results The median sigmoid EQD2 D0.1cc and D2cc were 84 Gy and 68.3 Gy for HDR versus 71.1 Gy and 65.9 Gy for LDR (p=0.02 and 0.98, respectively). Twenty percent of the HDR fractions required manipulation of the superior dwell positions to decrease the sigmoid dose. The median distance from the sigmoid to the tandem was 1.7 cm (range [rg], 0.1 – 6.16 cm) for HDR and 2.7 cm (rg, 1.17 – 4.52 cm) for LDR; from the sigmoid to the 100% isodose region the median distances were – 0.1 cm (rg, -1.4 – 2.5 cm) and 0.44 cm (rg. -0.73 – 5.2 cm), respectively. The proximity of the sigmoid to the tandem is significantly related to sigmoid dose (p<0.0001). Within-patient (among-fraction) variation in sigmoid-to-tandem distance during HDR was substantial (coefficient of variation = 40%). No grade 3-4 sigmoid toxicity was seen after a median 31-month follow-up period. Conclusions 3D imaging in cervical cancer brachytherapy shows the sigmoid in close proximity to the tandem. The sigmoid to tandem distance varies substantially between fractions, indicating the importance of sigmoid dose-volume evaluation with each fraction. PMID:19665244

  18. a Distributed Online 3D-LIDAR Mapping System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmiemann, J.; Harms, H.; Schattenberg, J.; Becker, M.; Batzdorfer, S.; Frerichs, L.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we are presenting work done within the joint development project ANKommEn. It deals with the development of a highly automated robotic system for fast data acquisition in civil disaster scenarios. One of the main requirements is a versatile system, hence the concept embraces a machine cluster consisting of multiple fundamentally different robotic platforms. To cover a large variety of potential deployment scenarios, neither the absolute amount of participants, nor the precise individual layout of each platform shall be restricted within the conceptual design. Thus leading to a variety of special requirements, like onboard and online data processing capabilities for each individual participant and efficient data exchange structures, allowing reliable random data exchange between individual robots. We are demonstrating the functionality and performance by means of a distributed mapping system evaluated with real world data in a challenging urban and rural indoor/outdoor scenarios.

  19. Exploring Drug Dosing Regimens In Vitro Using Real-Time 3D Spheroid Tumor Growth Assays.

    PubMed

    Lal-Nag, Madhu; McGee, Lauren; Titus, Steven A; Brimacombe, Kyle; Michael, Sam; Sittampalam, Gurusingham; Ferrer, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Two-dimensional monolayer cell proliferation assays for cancer drug discovery have made the implementation of large-scale screens feasible but only seem to reflect a simplified view that oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes are the genetic drivers of cancer cell proliferation. However, there is now increased evidence that the cellular and physiological context in which these oncogenic events occur play a key role in how they drive tumor growth in vivo and, therefore, in how tumors respond to drug treatments. In vitro 3D spheroid tumor models are being developed to better mimic the physiology of tumors in vivo, in an attempt to improve the predictability and efficiency of drug discovery for the treatment of cancer. Here we describe the establishment of a real-time 3D spheroid growth, 384-well screening assay. The cells used in this study constitutively expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP), which enabled the real-time monitoring of spheroid formation and the effect of chemotherapeutic agents on spheroid size at different time points of sphere growth and drug treatment. This real-time 3D spheroid assay platform represents a first step toward the replication in vitro of drug dosing regimens being investigated in vivo. We hope that further development of this assay platform will allow the investigation of drug dosing regimens, efficacy, and resistance before preclinical and clinical studies.

  20. Introduction of novel 3D-printed superficial applicators for high-dose-rate skin brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Jones, Emma-Louise; Tonino Baldion, Anna; Thomas, Christopher; Burrows, Tom; Byrne, Nick; Newton, Victoria; Aldridge, Sarah

    Custom-made surface mold applicators often allow more flexibility when carrying out skin brachytherapy, particularly for small treatment areas with high surface obliquity. They can, however, be difficult to manufacture, particularly if there is a lack of experience in superficial high-dose-rate brachytherapy techniques or with limited resources. We present a novel method of manufacturing superficial brachytherapy applicators utilizing three-dimensional (3D)-printing techniques. We describe the treatment planning process and the process of applicator manufacture. The treatment planning process, with the introduction of a pre-plan, allows for an "ideal" catheter arrangement within an applicator to be determined, exploiting varying catheter orientations, heights, and curvatures if required. The pre-plan arrangement is then 3D printed to the exact specifications of the pre-plan applicator design. This results in improved target volume coverage and improved sparing of organs at risk. Using a pre-plan technique for ideal catheter placement followed by automated 3D-printed applicator manufacture has greatly improved the entire process of superficial high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment. We are able to design and manufacture flexible, well-fitting, superior quality applicators resulting in a more efficient and improved patient pathway and patient experience. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. OpenPET: a novel open-type PET system for 3D dose verification in particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaya, T.

    2017-01-01

    The OpenPET is the world’s first open-type 3D PET scanner for PET image-guided particle therapy such as in situ dose verification and direct tumour tracking. Even with a full-ring geometry, the OpenPET has an open gap between its two detector rings through which the treatment beam passes. Following the initial proposal of the dual-ring OpenPET (DROP), the single-ring OpenPET (SROP) was also proposed as a more efficient geometry than DROP in terms of manufacturing cost and sensitivity. A small SROP prototype was developed and feasibility of visualizing a 3D distribution of beam stopping positions inside a phantom was shown with the help of radioisotope particle beams, used as primary beams. Following these results, a full-size whole-body SROP prototype was developed.

  2. Displaying 3D radiation dose on endoscopic video for therapeutic assessment and surgical guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jimmy; Hope, Andrew J.; Cho, B. C. John; Sharpe, Michael B.; Dickie, Colleen I.; DaCosta, Ralph S.; Jaffray, David A.; Weersink, Robert A.

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a method to register and display 3D parametric data, in particular radiation dose, on two-dimensional endoscopic images. This registration of radiation dose to endoscopic or optical imaging may be valuable in assessment of normal tissue response to radiation, and visualization of radiated tissues in patients receiving post-radiation surgery. Electromagnetic sensors embedded in a flexible endoscope were used to track the position and orientation of the endoscope allowing registration of 2D endoscopic images to CT volumetric images and radiation doses planned with respect to these images. A surface was rendered from the CT image based on the air/tissue threshold, creating a virtual endoscopic view analogous to the real endoscopic view. Radiation dose at the surface or at known depth below the surface was assigned to each segment of the virtual surface. Dose could be displayed as either a colorwash on this surface or surface isodose lines. By assigning transparency levels to each surface segment based on dose or isoline location, the virtual dose display was overlaid onto the real endoscope image. Spatial accuracy of the dose display was tested using a cylindrical phantom with a treatment plan created for the phantom that matched dose levels with grid lines on the phantom surface. The accuracy of the dose display in these phantoms was 0.8-0.99 mm. To demonstrate clinical feasibility of this approach, the dose display was also tested on clinical data of a patient with laryngeal cancer treated with radiation therapy, with estimated display accuracy of ˜2-3 mm. The utility of the dose display for registration of radiation dose information to the surgical field was further demonstrated in a mock sarcoma case using a leg phantom. With direct overlay of radiation dose on endoscopic imaging, tissue toxicities and tumor response in endoluminal organs can be directly correlated with the actual tissue dose, offering a more nuanced assessment of normal tissue

  3. Displaying 3D radiation dose on endoscopic video for therapeutic assessment and surgical guidance.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jimmy; Hope, Andrew J; Cho, B C John; Sharpe, Michael B; Dickie, Colleen I; DaCosta, Ralph S; Jaffray, David A; Weersink, Robert A

    2012-10-21

    We have developed a method to register and display 3D parametric data, in particular radiation dose, on two-dimensional endoscopic images. This registration of radiation dose to endoscopic or optical imaging may be valuable in assessment of normal tissue response to radiation, and visualization of radiated tissues in patients receiving post-radiation surgery. Electromagnetic sensors embedded in a flexible endoscope were used to track the position and orientation of the endoscope allowing registration of 2D endoscopic images to CT volumetric images and radiation doses planned with respect to these images. A surface was rendered from the CT image based on the air/tissue threshold, creating a virtual endoscopic view analogous to the real endoscopic view. Radiation dose at the surface or at known depth below the surface was assigned to each segment of the virtual surface. Dose could be displayed as either a colorwash on this surface or surface isodose lines. By assigning transparency levels to each surface segment based on dose or isoline location, the virtual dose display was overlaid onto the real endoscope image. Spatial accuracy of the dose display was tested using a cylindrical phantom with a treatment plan created for the phantom that matched dose levels with grid lines on the phantom surface. The accuracy of the dose display in these phantoms was 0.8-0.99 mm. To demonstrate clinical feasibility of this approach, the dose display was also tested on clinical data of a patient with laryngeal cancer treated with radiation therapy, with estimated display accuracy of ∼2-3 mm. The utility of the dose display for registration of radiation dose information to the surgical field was further demonstrated in a mock sarcoma case using a leg phantom. With direct overlay of radiation dose on endoscopic imaging, tissue toxicities and tumor response in endoluminal organs can be directly correlated with the actual tissue dose, offering a more nuanced assessment of normal tissue

  4. SU-E-T-511: Do Presage 3D Dosimeters Show Dose Fractionation Sensitivity?

    SciTech Connect

    Klawikowski, S; Alqathami, M; Ibbott, G; Adamovics, J; Benning, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether Presage 3D polymer dosimeter dose response is sensitive to dose delivery fractionation. Bang gels have demonstrated a dose fractionation related dependence in which a single 400 cGy irradiation would produce a different detector response than four 100 cGy irradiations even if delivered closely in time to one another. Such a fractional dependent response in Presage would be detrimental for measuring multi-beam irradiations. Methods: Two separate batches of Presage were poured into cuvettes, and a third batch was molded into cuvette shaped blocks. A total of 37 cuvettes/blocks were irradiated in a Cobalt-60 irradiator to 400 cGy within solid water phantoms in either one, eight, or sixteen fractions. Another group of 15 cuvettes were also kept unirradiated and used for background subtraction between the pre-scan and post-scan results. The times between fractional deliveries were held constant at 30 seconds and the Cobalt irradiator dose rate was 49 cGy/min. Each Presage batch has a separate dose sensitivity and therefore fractionation response comparisons were only performed within the same batch. The cuvettes were first pre-scanned the day prior to irradiation and post-scanned the day after irradiation. Other than approximately 3 hours warming time prior to each irradiation and optical density measurement the cuvettes were stored in a refrigerator. All cuvettes were stored in a lightless environment throughout manufacturing and testing. The cuvettes’ optical densities were optically measured at 632 nm with a spectrophotometer. Results: No noticeable dose fractionation dependence was detected for any of the three independent batches of Presage for either the eight or sixteen fraction irradiation schemes. Conclusion: These results indicate using Presage 3D dosimeters to measure multi-beam photon irradiations common in IMRT, Gamma Knife, and Cyberknife treatment delivery schemes. Presage dosimeters are made by and trademarked by Heuris

  5. 3-D Distribution of Retained Colloids in Unsaturated Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, V. L.; Perez-Reche, F. J.; Holzner, M.; Kinzelbach, W. K.; Otten, W.

    2013-12-01

    It is well accepted that colloid transport processes in porous media differ substantially between water saturated and unsaturated conditions. Differences are frequently ascribed to colloid immobilization by association with interfaces with the gas, as well as to restrictions of the liquid medium through which colloids are transported. Such factors depend on interfacial conditions provided by the water saturation of the porous medium. Yet, the current understanding of the importance of colloid retention at gas interfaces is based on observations of single pores or two-dimensional pore network representations, leaving open the question of their statistical significance when all pores in the medium are considered. In order to address this question, column experiments were performed using a model porous medium of glass beads through which colloidal silver particles were transported for conditions of varying water content. X-ray microtomography was subsequently employed as a non-destructive imaging technique to obtain pore-scale information of the entire column regarding: i) the presence and distribution of the four main locations where colloids can become retained (interfaces with the liquid-solid, gas-liquid and gas-solid, and the bulk liquid), ii) deposition profiles of colloids along the column classified by the available retention location, iii) morphological characteristics of the deposited colloidal aggregates, and iv) channel widths of 3-dimensional pore-water network representations. The results presented provide, for the first time, a direct statistical evaluation on the significance of colloid retention by attachment to the liquid-solid, gas-liquid, gas-solid interfaces, and by straining in the bulk liquid. Additionally, an effective-pore structure characteristic is proposed to improve predictions of mass removal by straining under various water saturations. A) Unsaturated conditions. B) Saturated conditions. Left: Tomograph slice illustrating with false

  6. Measurement of carbon ion microdosimetric distributions with ultrathin 3D silicon diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, F.; Fleta, C.; Esteban, S.; Quirion, D.; Pellegrini, G.; Lozano, M.; Prezado, Y.; Dos Santos, M.; Guardiola, C.; Montarou, G.; Prieto-Pena, J.; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2016-06-01

    The commissioning of an ion beam for hadrontherapy requires the evaluation of the biologically weighted effective dose that results from the microdosimetric properties of the therapy beam. The spectra of the energy imparted at cellular and sub-cellular scales are fundamental to the determination of the biological effect of the beam. These magnitudes are related to the microdosimetric distributions of the ion beam at different points along the beam path. This work is dedicated to the measurement of microdosimetric spectra at several depths in the central axis of a 12C beam with an energy of 94.98 AMeV using a novel 3D ultrathin silicon diode detector. Data is compared with Monte Carlo calculations providing an excellent agreement (deviations are less than 2% for the most probable lineal energy value) up to the Bragg peak. The results show the feasibility to determine with high precision the lineal energy transfer spectrum of a hadrontherapy beam with these silicon devices.

  7. Measurement of carbon ion microdosimetric distributions with ultrathin 3D silicon diodes.

    PubMed

    Gómez, F; Fleta, C; Esteban, S; Quirion, D; Pellegrini, G; Lozano, M; Prezado, Y; Dos Santos, M; Guardiola, C; Montarou, G; Prieto-Pena, J; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2016-06-07

    The commissioning of an ion beam for hadrontherapy requires the evaluation of the biologically weighted effective dose that results from the microdosimetric properties of the therapy beam. The spectra of the energy imparted at cellular and sub-cellular scales are fundamental to the determination of the biological effect of the beam. These magnitudes are related to the microdosimetric distributions of the ion beam at different points along the beam path. This work is dedicated to the measurement of microdosimetric spectra at several depths in the central axis of a (12)C beam with an energy of 94.98 AMeV using a novel 3D ultrathin silicon diode detector. Data is compared with Monte Carlo calculations providing an excellent agreement (deviations are less than 2% for the most probable lineal energy value) up to the Bragg peak. The results show the feasibility to determine with high precision the lineal energy transfer spectrum of a hadrontherapy beam with these silicon devices.

  8. Dose reduction in chest CT: comparison of the adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D, adaptive iterative dose reduction, and filtered back projection reconstruction techniques.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yoshitake; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Tanami, Yutaka; Sugiura, Hiroaki; Abe, Takayuki; Kuribayashi, Sachio

    2012-12-01

    To assess the effectiveness of adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR) and AIDR 3D in improving the image quality in low-dose chest CT (LDCT). Fifty patients underwent standard-dose chest CT (SDCT) and LDCT simultaneously, performed under automatic exposure control with noise index of 19 and 38 (for a 2-mm slice thickness), respectively. The SDCT images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (SDCT-FBP images), and the LDCT images with FBP, AIDR and AIDR 3D (LDCT-FBP, LDCT-AIDR and LDCT-AIDR 3D images, respectively). On all the 200 lung and 200 mediastinal image series, objective image noise and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured in several regions, and two blinded radiologists independently assessed the subjective image quality. Wilcoxon's signed rank sum test with Bonferroni's correction was used for the statistical analyses. The mean dose reduction in LDCT was 64.2% as compared with the dose in SDCT. LDCT-AIDR 3D images showed significantly reduced objective noise and significantly increased SNR in all regions as compared to the SDCT-FBP, LDCT-FBP and LDCT-AIDR images (all, P ≤ 0.003). In all assessments of the image quality, LDCT-AIDR 3D images were superior to LDCT-AIDR and LDCT-FBP images. The overall diagnostic acceptability of both the lung and mediastinal LDCT-AIDR 3D images was comparable to that of the lung and mediastinal SDCT-FBP images. AIDR 3D is superior to AIDR. Intra-individual comparisons between SDCT and LDCT suggest that AIDR 3D allows a 64.2% reduction of the radiation dose as compared to SDCT, by substantially reducing the objective image noise and increasing the SNR, while maintaining the overall diagnostic acceptability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A Bayesian mixture model relating dose to critical organs and functional complication in 3D conformal radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Timothy D; Taylor, Jeremy M G; Ten Haken, Randall K; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2005-10-01

    A goal of cancer radiation therapy is to deliver maximum dose to the target tumor while minimizing complications due to irradiation of critical organs. Technological advances in 3D conformal radiation therapy has allowed great strides in realizing this goal; however, complications may still arise. Critical organs may be adjacent to tumors or in the path of the radiation beam. Several mathematical models have been proposed that describe the relationship between dose and observed functional complication; however, only a few published studies have successfully fit these models to data using modern statistical methods which make efficient use of the data. One complication following radiation therapy of head and neck cancers is the patient's inability to produce saliva. Xerostomia (dry mouth) leads to high susceptibility to oral infection and dental caries and is, in general, unpleasant and an annoyance. We present a dose-damage-injury model that subsumes any of the various mathematical models relating dose to damage. The model is a nonlinear, longitudinal mixed effects model where the outcome (saliva flow rate) is modeled as a mixture of a Dirac measure at zero and a gamma distribution whose mean is a function of time and dose. Bayesian methods are used to estimate the relationship between dose delivered to the parotid glands and the observational outcome-saliva flow rate. A summary measure of the dose-damage relationship is modeled and assessed by a Bayesian chi(2) test for goodness-of-fit.

  10. 3D iterative full and half scan reconstruction in CT architectures with distributed sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iatrou, M.; De Man, B.; Beque, D.; Yin, Z.; Khare, K.; Benson, T. M.

    2008-03-01

    In 3 rd generation CT systems projection data, generated by X-rays emitted from a single source and passing through the imaged object, are acquired by a single detector covering the entire field of view (FOV). Novel CT system architectures employing distributed sources [1,2] could extend the axial coverage, while removing cone-beam artifacts and improving spatial resolution and dose. The sources can be distributed in plane and/or in the longitudinal direction. We investigate statistical iterative reconstruction of multi-axial data, acquired with simulated CT systems with multiple sources distributed along the in-plane and longitudinal directions. The current study explores the feasibility of 3D iterative Full and Half Scan reconstruction methods for CT systems with two different architectures. In the first architecture the sources are distributed in the longitudinal direction, and in the second architecture the sources are distributed both longitudinally and trans-axially. We used Penalized Weighted Least Squares Transmission Reconstruction (PWLSTR) and incorporated a projector-backprojector model matching the simulated architectures. The proposed approaches minimize artifacts related to the proposed geometries. The reconstructed images show that the investigated architectures can achieve good image quality for very large coverage without severe cone-beam artifacts.

  11. Evaluation of the systematic error in using 3D dose calculation in scanning beam proton therapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Heng; Liu, Wei; Park, Peter; Matney, Jason; Liao, Zhongxing; Chang, Joe; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Yupeng; Zhu, Ronald X

    2014-09-08

    The objective of this study was to evaluate and understand the systematic error between the planned three-dimensional (3D) dose and the delivered dose to patient in scanning beam proton therapy for lung tumors. Single-field and multifield optimized scanning beam proton therapy plans were generated for ten patients with stage II-III lung cancer with a mix of tumor motion and size. 3D doses in CT datasets for different respiratory phases and the time-weighted average CT, as well as the four-dimensional (4D) doses were computed for both plans. The 3D and 4D dose differences for the targets and different organs at risk were compared using dose-volume histogram (DVH) and voxel-based techniques, and correlated with the extent of tumor motion. The gross tumor volume (GTV) dose was maintained in all 3D and 4D doses, using the internal GTV override technique. The DVH and voxel-based techniques are highly correlated. The mean dose error and the standard deviation of dose error for all target volumes were both less than 1.5% for all but one patient. However, the point dose difference between the 3D and 4D doses was up to 6% for the GTV and greater than 10% for the clinical and planning target volumes. Changes in the 4D and 3D doses were not correlated with tumor motion. The planning technique (single-field or multifield optimized) did not affect the observed systematic error. In conclusion, the dose error in 3D dose calculation varies from patient to patient and does not correlate with lung tumor motion. Therefore, patient-specific evaluation of the 4D dose is important for scanning beam proton therapy for lung tumors.

  12. Predicting Heart Dose in Breast Cancer Patients Who Received 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wollschläger, Daniel; Karle, Heiko; Stockinger, Marcus; Bartkowiak, Detlef; Bührdel, Sandra; Merzenich, Hiltrud; Wiegel, Thomas; Schmidberger, Heinz; Blettner, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac late effects are a major health concern for long-term survivors after radiotherapy for breast cancer. Large cohort studies to better understand the exact dose-response relationship require individual estimates of radiation dose to the heart. To predict individual cardiac dose from information that is typically available for all members of a retrospective epidemiological cohort study, 774 female breast cancer patients treated with megavoltage tangential field radiotherapy in 1998-2008 were examined. All dose distributions were calculated using Eclipse with the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) for photon fields and the electron Monte Carlo algorithm for electron boost fields. Based on individual dose volume histograms, the authors calculated absorbed dose in the complete heart as well as in six functional substructures. Statistical models were developed to predict absorbed dose using only covariate information from patients' clinical records on tumor location, patient anatomy and radiotherapy prescription. The out-of-sample prediction error for mean heart dose was 54% (coefficient of variation). The prediction error in functional substructures ranged from 49-68% for mean dose and from 52-86% for extreme dose. The authors conclude that based on a patient sample with exact heart dosimetry, it is possible to use clinical information alone to predict absorbed heart dose in the remaining cohort with a quantified error suitable for dose-response analyses of cardiac late effects.

  13. Analysis of the 3D distribution of stacked self-assembled quantum dots by electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The 3D distribution of self-assembled stacked quantum dots (QDs) is a key parameter to obtain the highest performance in a variety of optoelectronic devices. In this work, we have measured this distribution in 3D using a combined procedure of needle-shaped specimen preparation and electron tomography. We show that conventional 2D measurements of the distribution of QDs are not reliable, and only 3D analysis allows an accurate correlation between the growth design and the structural characteristics. PMID:23249477

  14. Image quality and effective dose of a robotic flat panel 3D C-arm vs computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Michael; Fischer, Eric; Gebhard, Florian; Richter, Peter H

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effective dose and corresponding image quality of different imaging protocols of a robotic 3D flat panel C-arm in comparison to computed tomography (CT). Dose measurements were performed using a Rando-Alderson Phantom. The phantom was exposed to different scanning protocols of the 3D C-arm and the CT. Pedicle screws were inserted in a fresh swine cadaver. Images were obtained using the same scanning protocols. At the thoracolumbar junction, the effective dose was comparable for 3D high-dose protocols, with (4.4 mSv) and without (4.3 mSv) collimation and routine CT (5 mSv), as well as a dose-reduction CT (4.0 mSv). A relevant reduction was achieved with the 3D low-dose protocol (1.0 mSv). Focusing on Th6, a similar reduction with the 3D low-dose protocol was achieved. The image quality of the 3D protocols using titanium screws was rated as 'good' by all viewers, with excellent correlation. Modern intra-operative 3D-C-arms produce images of CT-like quality with low-dose radiation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. 3D-printed surface mould applicator for high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Mark; Lasso, Andras; Cumming, Ian; Rankin, Adam; Falkson, Conrad B.; Schreiner, L. John; Joshi, Chandra; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    In contemporary high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment of superficial tumors, catheters are placed in a wax mould. The creation of current wax models is a difficult and time consuming proces.The irradiation plan can only be computed post-construction and requires a second CT scan. In case no satisfactory dose plan can be created, the mould is discarded and the process is repeated. The objective of this work was to develop an automated method to replace suboptimal wax moulding. We developed a method to design and manufacture moulds that guarantee to yield satisfactory dosimetry. A 3D-printed mould with channels for the catheters designed from the patient's CT and mounted on a patient-specific thermoplastic mesh mask. The mould planner was implemented as an open-source module in the 3D Slicer platform. Series of test moulds were created to accommodate standard brachytherapy catheters of 1.70mm diameter. A calibration object was used to conclude that tunnels with a diameter of 2.25mm, minimum 12mm radius of curvature, and 1.0mm open channel gave the best fit for this printer/catheter combination. Moulds were created from the CT scan of thermoplastic mesh masks of actual patients. The patient-specific moulds have been visually verified to fit on the thermoplastic meshes. The masks were visually shown to fit onto the thermoplastic meshes, next the resulting dosimetry will have to be compared with treatment plans and dosimetry achieved with conventional wax moulds in order to validate our 3D printed moulds.

  16. Optical laser scanning of a leucodye micelle gel: preliminary results of a 3D dose verification of an IMRT treatment for a brain tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, J.; De Deene, Y.

    2013-06-01

    In the present study an in-house developed leucodye micelle gel was used in combination with an in-house developed optical laser scanner for the 3D dose verification of an IMRT treatment of a pituitary adenoma. In an initial prospective study, a gel measured depth dose distribution of a square 6 MV photon beam was compared with an ion chamber measurement. In a second experiment, the gel and scanner were used to verify a clinical dose distribution on a recently installed linear accelerator. The calibration procedure is identified as the major source of dose deviations.

  17. SU-E-T-616: Plan Quality Assessment of Both Treatment Planning System Dose and Measurement-Based 3D Reconstructed Dose in the Patient

    SciTech Connect

    Olch, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Systematic radiotherapy plan quality assessment promotes quality improvement. Software tools can perform this analysis by applying site-specific structure dose metrics. The next step is to similarly evaluate the quality of the dose delivery. This study defines metrics for acceptable doses to targets and normal organs for a particular treatment site and scores each plan accordingly. The input can be the TPS or the measurement-based 3D patient dose. From this analysis, one can determine whether the delivered dose distribution to the patient receives a score which is comparable to the TPS plan score, otherwise replanning may be indicated. Methods: Eleven neuroblastoma patient plans were exported from Eclipse to the Quality Reports program. A scoring algorithm defined a score for each normal and target structure based on dose-volume parameters. Each plan was scored by this algorithm and the percentage of total possible points was obtained. Each plan also underwent IMRT QA measurements with a Mapcheck2 or ArcCheck. These measurements were input into the 3DVH program to compute the patient 3D dose distribution which was analyzed using the same scoring algorithm as the TPS plan. Results: The mean quality score for the TPS plans was 75.37% (std dev=14.15%) compared to 71.95% (std dev=13.45%) for the 3DVH dose distribution. For 3/11 plans, the 3DVH-based quality score was higher than the TPS score, by between 0.5 to 8.4 percentage points. Eight/11 plans scores decreased based on IMRT QA measurements by 1.2 to 18.6 points. Conclusion: Software was used to determine the degree to which the plan quality score differed between the TPS and measurement-based dose. Although the delivery score was generally in good agreement with the planned dose score, there were some that improved while there was one plan whose delivered dose quality was significantly less than planned. This methodology helps evaluate both planned and delivered dose quality. Sun Nuclear Corporation has

  18. Incorporation of gantry angle correction for 3D dose prediction in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sumida, Iori; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Kizaki, Hisao; Aboshi, Keiko; Tsujii, Mari; Yamada, Yuji; Yagi, Masashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Pretreatment dose verification with beam-by-beam analysis for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is commonly performed with a gantry angle of 0° using a 2D diode detector array. Any changes in multileaf collimator (MLC) position between the actual treatment gantry angle and 0° may result in deviations from the planned dose. We evaluated the effects of MLC positioning errors between the actual treatment gantry angles and nominal gantry angles. A gantry angle correction (GAC) factor was generated by performing a non-gap test at various gantry angles using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). To convert pixel intensity to dose at the MLC abutment positions, a non-gap test was performed using an EPID and a film at 0° gantry angle. We then assessed the correlations between pixel intensities and doses. Beam-by-beam analyses for 15 prostate IMRT cases as patient-specific quality assurance were performed with a 2D diode detector array at 0° gantry angle to determine the relative dose error for each beam. The resulting relative dose error with or without GAC was added back to the original dose grid for each beam. We compared the predicted dose distributions with or without GAC for film measurements to validate GAC effects. A gamma pass rate with a tolerance of 2%/2 mm was used to evaluate these dose distributions. The gamma pass rate with GAC was higher than that without GAC (P = 0.01). The predicted dose distribution improved with GAC, although the dosimetric effect to a patient was minimal. PMID:25742866

  19. Incorporation of gantry angle correction for 3D dose prediction in intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Iori; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Kizaki, Hisao; Aboshi, Keiko; Tsujii, Mari; Yamada, Yuji; Yagi, Masashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-05-01

    Pretreatment dose verification with beam-by-beam analysis for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is commonly performed with a gantry angle of 0° using a 2D diode detector array. Any changes in multileaf collimator (MLC) position between the actual treatment gantry angle and 0° may result in deviations from the planned dose. We evaluated the effects of MLC positioning errors between the actual treatment gantry angles and nominal gantry angles. A gantry angle correction (GAC) factor was generated by performing a non-gap test at various gantry angles using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). To convert pixel intensity to dose at the MLC abutment positions, a non-gap test was performed using an EPID and a film at 0° gantry angle. We then assessed the correlations between pixel intensities and doses. Beam-by-beam analyses for 15 prostate IMRT cases as patient-specific quality assurance were performed with a 2D diode detector array at 0° gantry angle to determine the relative dose error for each beam. The resulting relative dose error with or without GAC was added back to the original dose grid for each beam. We compared the predicted dose distributions with or without GAC for film measurements to validate GAC effects. A gamma pass rate with a tolerance of 2%/2 mm was used to evaluate these dose distributions. The gamma pass rate with GAC was higher than that without GAC (P = 0.01). The predicted dose distribution improved with GAC, although the dosimetric effect to a patient was minimal.

  20. Three dimensional (3D) distribution calculation of chlorophyll in rice based on infrared imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zong-nan; Xie, Jing; Zhang, Jian

    2014-11-01

    Chlorophyll content and distribution in leaf can reflect the plant health and nutrient status of the plant indirectly. It is meaningful to monitor the 3D distribution of chlorophyll in plant science. It can be done by the method in this paper: Firstly, the chlorophyll contents at different point in leaf are measured with the SPAD-502 chlorophyll meter, and the RGN images composed by the channel R, G and NIR are captured with the imaging system. Secondly, the 3D model is built from the RGN images and the RGN texture map containing all the information of R, G and NIR is generated. Thirdly, the regression model between chlorophyll content and color characteristics is established. Finally, the 3D distribution of chlorophyll in rice is captured by mapping the 2D distribution map of chlorophyll calculated by the regression model to the 3D model. This methodology achieves the combination of phenotype and physiology, it can calculated the 3D distribution of chlorophyll in rice well. The color characteristic g is good indicator of chlorophyll content which can be used to measure the 3D distribution of chlorophyll quickly. Moreover, the methodology can be used to high throughout analyze the rice.

  1. SU-E-T-192: Commissioning of a Commercial 3D Dose Calculation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Langen, K; Guerrero, M; Xu, H; Zhou, J; Zhang, B; Chen, S; Killefer, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To commission a commercial software package (CSP) that is used as secondary dose calculation check. The CSP uses an independent golden data beam model. However, some parameters can be modified to generate a customer specific model. Plan comparisons and point dose measurements were performed to test if and to what extent the beam model needed adjustment to optimize results. Methods: Beam parameter configurations were compared between the CSP and both TPS. Twelve phantom test plans ranging from simple to complex were generated in two treatment planning systems (TPS). Tests included small field, off axis, EDW, IMRT and VMAT plans. For each plan a point dose was measured to establish ground truth. Lastly, patient plans were compared for both TPS systems and the CSP. Results: Beam parameters agreed within 2%. The output factors for small fields were changed for the 15 MV beam by 2 and 1.5 % for the 1 cm and 2 cm field sizes, respectively. For the 6 MV beam output factors were adjusted by 3−0.8% for field sizes ranging from 1 to 5 cm. The MLC dynamic leaf gap was adjusted by 1.5 mm for 18 MV beam. Differences between the CSP and the TPS were noted in the built-up region. These differences affected the gamma pass rate in the surface region, however this effect is reduced with increasing number of beam angles and does not affect point dose calculations at depth. All IMRT and VMAT plans agreed with the CSP using a gamma pass rate of 95% (3%, 3mm). Conclusion: The CSP is used to verify point doses for all 3D plans generated in our clinic for the last 6 months. No point dose mismatches were encountered since the CSP was implemented. Next, the CSP will be adapted for secondary checks of all IMRT plans. KL had a beta tester agreement with Mobius Medical for an in-kind equipment and software loan.

  2. Improvement of image quality and dose management in CT fluoroscopy by iterative 3D image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Grosser, Oliver S; Wybranski, Christian; Kupitz, Dennis; Powerski, Maciej; Mohnike, Konrad; Pech, Maciej; Amthauer, Holger; Ricke, Jens

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the influence of an iterative CT reconstruction algorithm (IA), newly available for CT-fluoroscopy (CTF), on image noise, readers' confidence and effective dose compared to filtered back projection (FBP). Data from 165 patients (FBP/IA = 82/74) with CTF in the thorax, abdomen and pelvis were included. Noise was analysed in a large-diameter vessel. The impact of reconstruction and variables (e.g. X-ray tube current I) influencing noise and effective dose were analysed by ANOVA and a pairwise t-test with Bonferroni-Holm correction. Noise and readers' confidence were evaluated by three readers. Noise was significantly influenced by reconstruction, I, body region and circumference (all p ≤ 0.0002). IA reduced the noise significantly compared to FBP (p = 0.02). The effect varied for body regions and circumferences (p ≤ 0.001). The effective dose was influenced by the reconstruction, body region, interventional procedure and I (all p ≤ 0.02). The inter-rater reliability for noise and readers' confidence was good (W ≥ 0.75, p < 0.0001). Noise and readers' confidence were significantly better in AIDR-3D compared to FBP (p ≤ 0.03). Generally, IA yielded a significant reduction of the median effective dose. The CTF reconstruction by IA showed a significant reduction in noise and effective dose while readers' confidence increased. • CTF is performed for image guidance in interventional radiology. • Patient exposure was estimated from DLP documented by the CT. • Iterative CT reconstruction is appropriate to reduce image noise in CTF. • Using iterative CT reconstruction, the effective dose was significantly reduced in abdominal interventions.

  3. A 2D 3D registration with low dose radiographic system for in vivo kinematic studies.

    PubMed

    Jerbi, T; Burdin, V; Stindel, E; Roux, C

    2011-01-01

    The knowledge of the poses and the positions of the knee bones and prostheses is of a great interest in the orthopedic and biomechanical applications. In this context, we use an ultra low dose bi-planar radiographic system called EOS to acquire two radiographs of the studied bones in each position. In this paper, we develop a new method for 2D 3D registration based on the frequency domain to determine the poses and the positions during quasi static motion analysis for healthy and prosthetic knees. Data of two healthy knees and four knees with unicompartimental prosthesis performing three different poses (full extension, 30° and 60° of flexion) were used in this work. The results we obtained are in concordance with the clinical accuracy and with the accuracy reported in other previous studies.

  4. RayXpert V1: 3D software for the gamma dose rate calculation by Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyrard, P. F.; Pourrouquet, P.; Dossat, C.; Thomas, J. C.; Chatry, N.; Lavielle, D.; Chatry, C.

    2014-06-01

    RayXpert has been developed to ease the access to the power and accuracy of the 3D Monte Carlo method in the field of gamma dose rate estimate. Optimization methods have been implemented to address dose calculation behind thick 3D structures. At the same time, the engineering interface makes all the preprocessing tasks (modeling, material settings,…) faster using predefined tables and push button features.

  5. Gray and multigroup radiation transport through 3D binary stochastic media with different sphere radii distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Olson, Gordon Lee

    2016-12-06

    Here, gray and multigroup radiation is transported through 3D media consisting of spheres randomly placed in a uniform background. Comparisons are made between using constant radii spheres and three different distributions of sphere radii. Because of the computational cost of 3D calculations, only the lowest angle order, n=1, is tested. If the mean chord length is held constant, using different radii distributions makes little difference. This is true for both gray and multigroup solutions. 3D transport solutions are compared to 2D and 1D solutions with the same mean chord lengths. 2D disk and 3D sphere media give solutions that aremore » nearly identical while 1D slab solutions are fundamentally different.« less

  6. Gray and multigroup radiation transport through 3D binary stochastic media with different sphere radii distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Gordon Lee

    2016-12-06

    Here, gray and multigroup radiation is transported through 3D media consisting of spheres randomly placed in a uniform background. Comparisons are made between using constant radii spheres and three different distributions of sphere radii. Because of the computational cost of 3D calculations, only the lowest angle order, n=1, is tested. If the mean chord length is held constant, using different radii distributions makes little difference. This is true for both gray and multigroup solutions. 3D transport solutions are compared to 2D and 1D solutions with the same mean chord lengths. 2D disk and 3D sphere media give solutions that are nearly identical while 1D slab solutions are fundamentally different.

  7. Gray and multigroup radiation transport through 3D binary stochastic media with different sphere radii distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Gordon L.

    2017-03-01

    Gray and multigroup radiation is transported through 3D media consisting of spheres randomly placed in a uniform background. Comparisons are made between using constant radii spheres and three different distributions of sphere radii. Because of the computational cost of 3D calculations, only the lowest angle order, n=1, is tested. If the mean chord length is held constant, using different radii distributions makes little difference. This is true for both gray and multigroup solutions. 3D transport solutions are compared to 2D and 1D solutions with the same mean chord lengths. 2D disk and 3D sphere media give solutions that are nearly identical while 1D slab solutions are fundamentally different.

  8. 3D detection of obstacle distribution in walking guide system for the blind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Myoung-Jong; Yu, Kee-Ho

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, the concept of a walking guide system with tactile display is introduced, and experiments of 3-D obstacle detection and tactile perception are carried out and analyzed. The algorithm of 3-D obstacle detection and the method of mapping the generated obstacle map and the tactile display device for the walking guide system are proposed. The experiment of the 3-D detection for the obstacle position using ultrasonic sensors is performed and estimated. Some design guidelines for a tactile display device that can display obstacle distribution is discussed.

  9. Monte Carlo calculation of conversion coefficients for dose estimation in mammography based on a 3D detailed breast model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjing; Qiu, Rui; Ren, Li; Liu, Huan; Wu, Zhen; Li, Chunyan; Niu, Yantao; Li, Junli

    2017-06-01

    At present, the Chinese specification for testing of quality control in x-ray mammography is based on a simple breast model, and does not consider the glandular tissue distribution in the breast. In order to more precisely estimate the mean glandular dose (MGD) in mammography for Chinese women, a three-dimensional (3D) detailed breast model based on realistic structures in the breast and Chinese female breast parameters was built and applied in this study. To characterize the Chinese female breast, Chinese female breast parameters including breast size, compressed breast thickness (CBT), and glandular content were investigated in this study. A mathematical model with the detailed breast structures was constructed based on the Chinese female breast parameters. The mathematical model was then converted to a voxel model with voxels. The voxel model was compressed in craniocaudal (CC) view to obtain a deformation model. The compressed breast model was combined with the Chinese reference adult female whole-body voxel phantom (CRAF) to study the effects of backscatter from the female body. Monte Carlo simulations of the glandular dose in mammography were performed with Geant 4. The glandular tissue dose conversion coefficients for breasts with different glandular contents (5%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% glandularity) and CBTs (3 cm, 4 cm, 5 cm, and 6 cm) were calculated, respectively, at various x-ray tube voltages (25 kV, 28 kV, 30 kV, 32 kV, and 35 kV) for various target/filter combinations (Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh, Rh/Rh, and W/Rh). A series of glandular tissue dose conversion coefficients for dose estimation in mammography were calculated. The conversion coefficients calculated in this study were compared with those estimated with the simple breast model. A discrepancy of 5.4-38.0% was observed. This was consistent with the results obtained from the realistic breast models in the literature. A 3D detailed breast model with realistic structures in the breast was constructed

  10. Study of a non-diffusing radiochromic gel dosimeter for 3D radiation dose imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Craig Michael

    2000-12-01

    This thesis investigates the potential of a new radiation gel dosimeter, based on nitro-blue tetrazolium (NBTZ) suspended in a gelatin mold. Unlike all Fricke based gel dosimeters this dosimeter does not suffer from diffusive loss of image stability. Images are obtained by an optical tomography method. Nitro blue tetrazolium is a common biological indicator that when irradiated in an aqueous medium undergoes reduction to a highly colored formazan, which has an absorbance maximum at 525nm. Tetrazolium is water soluble while the formazan product is insoluble. The formazan product sticks to the gelatin matrix and the dose image is maintained for three months. Methods to maximize the sensitivity of the system were evaluated. It was found that a chemical detergent, Triton X-100, in combination with sodium formate, increased the dosimeter sensitivity significantly. An initial G-value of formazan production for a dosimeter composed of 1mM NBTZ, gelatin, and water was on the order of 0.2. The addition of Triton and formate produced a G-value in excess of 5.0. The effects of NBTZ, triton, formate, and gel concentration were all investigated. All the gels provided linear dose vs. absorbance plots for doses from 0 to >100 Gy. It was determined that gel concentration had minimal if any effect on sensitivity. Sensitivity increased slightly with increasing NBTZ concentration. Triton and formate individually and together provided moderate to large increases in dosimeter sensitivity. The dosimeter described in this work can provide stable 3D radiation dose images for all modalities of radiation therapy equipment. Methods to increase sensitivity are developed and discussed.

  11. 3D dose reconstruction of pretreatment verification plans using multiple 2D planes from the OCTAVIUS/Seven29 phantom array.

    PubMed

    Calvo, O; Stathakis, S; Gutiérrez, A N; Esquivel, C; Papanikolaou, N

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate 3D dose reconstruction of pretreatment verification plans using multiple 2D planes acquired from the OCTAVIUS phantom and the Seven29 detector array. Eight VMAT patient treatment plans of different sites were delivered onto the OCTAVIUS phantom. The plans span a variety of tumor site locations from low to high plan complexity. A patient specific quality assurance (QA) plan was created and delivered for each of the 8 patients using the OCTAVIUS phantom in which the Seven29 detector array was placed. Each plan was delivered four times by rotating the phantom in 45° increments along its longitudinal axis. The treatment plans were delivered using a Novalis Tx with the HD120 MLC. Each of the four corresponding planar doses was exported as a text file for further analysis. An in-house MATLAB code was used to process the planar dose information. A cylindrical geometry-based, linear interpolation method was utilized to generate the measured 3D dose reconstruction. The TPS calculated volumetric dose was exported and compared against the measured reconstructed volumetric dose. Dose difference, dose area histograms (DAH), isodose lines, profiles, 2D and 3D gamma were used for evaluation. The interpolation method shows good agreement (<2%) between the planned dose distributions in the high dose region but shows discrepancies in the low dose region. Horizontal profiles, dose area histograms and isodose lines show good agreement for the sagittal and coronal planes but demonstrate slight discrepancies in the transverse plane. The 3D gamma index average was 92.4% for all patients when a 5%/5 mm gamma passing rate criteria was employed but dropped to <80.1% on average when parameters were reduced to 2%/2 mm. A simple cylindrical geometry-based, linear interpolation method is able to predict good agreement in the high dose region between the reconstructed volumetric dose and the planned volumetric dose. It is important to mention that the

  12. Assessment of intraoperative 3D imaging alternatives for IOERT dose estimation.

    PubMed

    García-Vázquez, Verónica; Marinetto, Eugenio; Guerra, Pedro; Valdivieso-Casique, Manlio Fabio; Calvo, Felipe Ángel; Alvarado-Vásquez, Eduardo; Sole, Claudio Vicente; Vosburgh, Kirby Gannett; Desco, Manuel; Pascau, Javier

    2017-09-01

    Intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) involves irradiation of an unresected tumour or a post-resection tumour bed. The dose distribution is calculated from a preoperative computed tomography (CT) study acquired using a CT simulator. However, differences between the actual IOERT field and that calculated from the preoperative study arise as a result of patient position, surgical access, tumour resection and the IOERT set-up. Intraoperative CT imaging may then enable a more accurate estimation of dose distribution. In this study, we evaluated three kilovoltage (kV) CT scanners with the ability to acquire intraoperative images. Our findings indicate that current IOERT plans may be improved using data based on actual anatomical conditions during radiation. The systems studied were two portable systems ("O-arm", a cone-beam CT [CBCT] system, and "BodyTom", a multislice CT [MSCT] system) and one CBCT integrated in a conventional linear accelerator (LINAC) ("TrueBeam"). TrueBeam and BodyTom showed good results, as the gamma pass rates of their dose distributions compared to the gold standard (dose distributions calculated from images acquired with a CT simulator) were above 97% in most cases. The O-arm yielded a lower percentage of voxels fulfilling gamma criteria owing to its reduced field of view (which left it prone to truncation artefacts). Our results show that the images acquired using a portable CT or even a LINAC with on-board kV CBCT could be used to estimate the dose of IOERT and improve the possibility to evaluate and register the treatment administered to the patient. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  13. Angular distribution of Auger electrons due to 3d-shell impact ionization of krypton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1977-01-01

    Cross sections for electron impact ionization of krypton due to ejection of a 3d-shell electron have been calculated using screened hydrogenic and Hartree-Slater wavefunctions for the target atom. While the total ionization cross sections in the two approximations are within 10% of each other, the Auger electron angular distribution, related to cross sections for specific magnetic quantum numbers of the 3d electrons, are widely different in the two approximations. The angular distribution due to the Hartree-Slater approximation is in excellent agreement with measurement. The physical reason for the discrepancies in the two approximations is explained.

  14. Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction Using Three Dimensional Processing (AIDR3D) Improves Chest CT Image Quality and Reduces Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Miyara, Tetsuhiro; Honda, Osamu; Kamiya, Hisashi; Murata, Kiyoshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Moriya, Hiroshi; Koyama, Mitsuhiro; Noma, Satoshi; Kamiya, Ayano; Tanaka, Yuko; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the advantages of Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction using Three Dimensional Processing (AIDR3D) for image quality improvement and dose reduction for chest computed tomography (CT). Methods Institutional Review Boards approved this study and informed consent was obtained. Eighty-eight subjects underwent chest CT at five institutions using identical scanners and protocols. During a single visit, each subject was scanned using different tube currents: 240, 120, and 60 mA. Scan data were converted to images using AIDR3D and a conventional reconstruction mode (without AIDR3D). Using a 5-point scale from 1 (non-diagnostic) to 5 (excellent), three blinded observers independently evaluated image quality for three lung zones, four patterns of lung disease (nodule/mass, emphysema, bronchiolitis, and diffuse lung disease), and three mediastinal measurements (small structure visibility, streak artifacts, and shoulder artifacts). Differences in these scores were assessed by Scheffe's test. Results At each tube current, scans using AIDR3D had higher scores than those without AIDR3D, which were significant for lung zones (p<0.0001) and all mediastinal measurements (p<0.01). For lung diseases, significant improvements with AIDR3D were frequently observed at 120 and 60 mA. Scans with AIDR3D at 120 mA had significantly higher scores than those without AIDR3D at 240 mA for lung zones and mediastinal streak artifacts (p<0.0001), and slightly higher or equal scores for all other measurements. Scans with AIDR3D at 60 mA were also judged superior or equivalent to those without AIDR3D at 120 mA. Conclusion For chest CT, AIDR3D provides better image quality and can reduce radiation exposure by 50%. PMID:25153797

  15. 3D inpatient dose reconstruction from the PET-CT imaging of {sup 90}Y microspheres for metastatic cancer to the liver: Feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Fourkal, E.; Veltchev, I.; Lin, M.; Meyer, J.; Koren, S.; Doss, M.; Yu, J. Q.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The introduction of radioembolization with microspheres represents a significant step forward in the treatment of patients with metastatic disease to the liver. This technique uses semiempirical formulae based on body surface area or liver and target volumes to calculate the required total activity for a given patient. However, this treatment modality lacks extremely important information, which is the three-dimensional (3D) dose delivered by microspheres to different organs after their administration. The absence of this information dramatically limits the clinical efficacy of this modality, specifically the predictive power of the treatment. Therefore, the aim of this study is to develop a 3D dose calculation technique that is based on the PET imaging of the infused microspheres.Methods: The Fluka Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the voxel dose kernel for {sup 90}Y source with voxel size equal to that of the PET scan. The measured PET activity distribution was converted to total activity distribution for the subsequent convolution with the voxel dose kernel to obtain the 3D dose distribution. In addition, dose-volume histograms were generated to analyze the dose to the tumor and critical structures.Results: The 3D inpatient dose distribution can be reconstructed from the PET data of a patient scanned after the infusion of microspheres. A total of seven patients have been analyzed so far using the proposed reconstruction method. Four patients underwent treatment with SIR-Spheres for liver metastases from colorectal cancer and three patients were treated with Therasphere for hepatocellular cancer. A total of 14 target tumors were contoured on post-treatment PET-CT scans for dosimetric evaluation. Mean prescription activity was 1.7 GBq (range: 0.58–3.8 GBq). The resulting mean maximum measured dose to targets was 167 Gy (range: 71–311 Gy). Mean minimum dose to 70% of target (D70) was 68 Gy (range: 25–155 Gy). Mean minimum dose to 90% of target

  16. 3D inpatient dose reconstruction from the PET-CT imaging of 90Y microspheres for metastatic cancer to the liver: feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Fourkal, E; Veltchev, I; Lin, M; Koren, S; Meyer, J; Doss, M; Yu, J Q

    2013-08-01

    The introduction of radioembolization with microspheres represents a significant step forward in the treatment of patients with metastatic disease to the liver. This technique uses semiempirical formulae based on body surface area or liver and target volumes to calculate the required total activity for a given patient. However, this treatment modality lacks extremely important information, which is the three-dimensional (3D) dose delivered by microspheres to different organs after their administration. The absence of this information dramatically limits the clinical efficacy of this modality, specifically the predictive power of the treatment. Therefore, the aim of this study is to develop a 3D dose calculation technique that is based on the PET imaging of the infused microspheres. The Fluka Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the voxel dose kernel for 90Y source with voxel size equal to that of the PET scan. The measured PET activity distribution was converted to total activity distribution for the subsequent convolution with the voxel dose kernel to obtain the 3D dose distribution. In addition, dose-volume histograms were generated to analyze the dose to the tumor and critical structures. The 3D inpatient dose distribution can be reconstructed from the PET data of a patient scanned after the infusion of microspheres. A total of seven patients have been analyzed so far using the proposed reconstruction method. Four patients underwent treatment with SIR-Spheres for liver metastases from colorectal cancer and three patients were treated with Therasphere for hepatocellular cancer. A total of 14 target tumors were contoured on post-treatment PET-CT scans for dosimetric evaluation. Mean prescription activity was 1.7 GBq (range: 0.58-3.8 GBq). The resulting mean maximum measured dose to targets was 167 Gy (range: 71-311 Gy). Mean minimum dose to 70% of target (D70) was 68 Gy (range: 25-155 Gy). Mean minimum dose to 90% of target (D90) was 53 Gy (range: 13-125 Gy). A

  17. Efficient implementation of the 3D-DDA ray traversal algorithm on GPU and its application in radiation dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Kai; Chen, Danny Z; Hu, X Sharon; Zhou, Bo

    2012-12-01

    The three-dimensional digital differential analyzer (3D-DDA) algorithm is a widely used ray traversal method, which is also at the core of many convolution∕superposition (C∕S) dose calculation approaches. However, porting existing C∕S dose calculation methods onto graphics processing unit (GPU) has brought challenges to retaining the efficiency of this algorithm. In particular, straightforward implementation of the original 3D-DDA algorithm inflicts a lot of branch divergence which conflicts with the GPU programming model and leads to suboptimal performance. In this paper, an efficient GPU implementation of the 3D-DDA algorithm is proposed, which effectively reduces such branch divergence and improves performance of the C∕S dose calculation programs running on GPU. The main idea of the proposed method is to convert a number of conditional statements in the original 3D-DDA algorithm into a set of simple operations (e.g., arithmetic, comparison, and logic) which are better supported by the GPU architecture. To verify and demonstrate the performance improvement, this ray traversal method was integrated into a GPU-based collapsed cone convolution∕superposition (CCCS) dose calculation program. The proposed method has been tested using a water phantom and various clinical cases on an NVIDIA GTX570 GPU. The CCCS dose calculation program based on the efficient 3D-DDA ray traversal implementation runs 1.42 ∼ 2.67× faster than the one based on the original 3D-DDA implementation, without losing any accuracy. The results show that the proposed method can effectively reduce branch divergence in the original 3D-DDA ray traversal algorithm and improve the performance of the CCCS program running on GPU. Considering the wide utilization of the 3D-DDA algorithm, various applications can benefit from this implementation method.

  18. Virtual patient 3D dose reconstruction using in air EPID measurements and a back-projection algorithm for IMRT and VMAT treatments.

    PubMed

    Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Rozendaal, Roel; van Oers, René F M; Mijnheer, Ben; Mans, Anton

    2017-05-01

    At our institute, a transit back-projection algorithm is used clinically to reconstruct in vivo patient and in phantom 3D dose distributions using EPID measurements behind a patient or a polystyrene slab phantom, respectively. In this study, an extension to this algorithm is presented whereby in air EPID measurements are used in combination with CT data to reconstruct 'virtual' 3D dose distributions. By combining virtual and in vivo patient verification data for the same treatment, patient-related errors can be separated from machine, planning and model errors. The virtual back-projection algorithm is described and verified against the transit algorithm with measurements made behind a slab phantom, against dose measurements made with an ionization chamber and with the OCTAVIUS 4D system, as well as against TPS patient data. Virtual and in vivo patient dose verification results are also compared. Virtual dose reconstructions agree within 1% with ionization chamber measurements. The average γ-pass rate values (3% global dose/3mm) in the 3D dose comparison with the OCTAVIUS 4D system and the TPS patient data are 98.5±1.9%(1SD) and 97.1±2.9%(1SD), respectively. For virtual patient dose reconstructions, the differences with the TPS in median dose to the PTV remain within 4%. Virtual patient dose reconstruction makes pre-treatment verification based on deviations of DVH parameters feasible and eliminates the need for phantom positioning and re-planning. Virtual patient dose reconstructions have additional value in the inspection of in vivo deviations, particularly in situations where CBCT data is not available (or not conclusive). Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Patient-Specific 3D Pretreatment and Potential 3D Online Dose Verification of Monte Carlo-Calculated IMRT Prostate Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Boggula, Ramesh; Jahnke, Lennart; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Fast and reliable comprehensive quality assurance tools are required to validate the safety and accuracy of complex intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for prostate treatment. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the COMPASS system for both off-line and potential online procedures for the verification of IMRT treatment plans. Methods and Materials: COMPASS has a dedicated beam model and dose engine, it can reconstruct three-dimensional dose distributions on the patient anatomy based on measured fluences using either the MatriXX two-dimensional (2D) array (offline) or a 2D transmission detector (T2D) (online). For benchmarking the COMPASS dose calculation, various dose-volume indices were compared against Monte Carlo-calculated dose distributions for five prostate patient treatment plans. Gamma index evaluation and absolute point dose measurements were also performed in an inhomogeneous pelvis phantom using extended dose range films and ion chamber for five additional treatment plans. Results: MatriXX-based dose reconstruction showed excellent agreement with the ion chamber (<0.5%, except for one treatment plan, which showed 1.5%), film ({approx}100% pixels passing gamma criteria 3%/3 mm) and mean dose-volume indices (<2%). The T2D based dose reconstruction showed good agreement as well with ion chamber (<2%), film ({approx}99% pixels passing gamma criteria 3%/3 mm), and mean dose-volume indices (<5.5%). Conclusion: The COMPASS system qualifies for routine prostate IMRT pretreatment verification with the MatriXX detector and has the potential for on-line verification of treatment delivery using T2D.

  20. Modeling 3D soil and sediment distributions for assessing catchment structure and hydrological feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Thomas; Brück, Yasemine; Hinz, Christoph; Gerke, Horst H.

    2015-04-01

    Structural heterogeneity, namely the spatial distribution of soils and sediments (represented by mineral particles), characterizes catchment hydrological behavior. In natural catchments, local geology and the specific geomorphic processes determine the characteristics and spatial distribution of structures. In constructed catchments, structural features are determined primarily by the construction processes and the geological origin of the parent material. Objectives are scenarios of 3D catchment structures in form of complete 3D description of soil hydraulic properties generated from the knowledge of the formation processes. The constructed hydrological catchment 'Hühnerwasser' (Lower Lusatia, Brandenburg, Germany) was used for the calibration and validation of model results due to its well-known conditions. For the modelling of structural features, a structure generator was used to model i) quasi-deterministic sediment distributions using input data from a geological model of the parent material excavation site; ii) sediment distributions that are conditioned to measurement data from soil sampling; and iii) stochastic component sediment distributions. All three approaches allow a randomization within definable limits. Furthermore, the spoil cone / spoil ridge orientation, internal layering, surface compaction and internal spoil cone compaction were modified. These generated structural models were incorporated in a gridded 3D volume model constructed with the GOCAD software. For selected scenarios, the impact of structure variation was assessed by hydrological modelling with HYDRUS 2D/3D software. For that purpose, 3D distributions of soil hydraulic properties were estimated based on generated sediment properties using adapted pedotransfer functions. Results from the hydrological model were compared them to measured discharges from the catchment. The impact of structural feature variation on flow behaviour was analysed by comparing different simulation scenarios

  1. Identifying ultrasensitive HGF dose-response functions in a 3D mammalian system for synthetic morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Senthivel, Vivek Raj; Sturrock, Marc; Piedrafita, Gabriel; Isalan, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear responses to signals are widespread natural phenomena that affect various cellular processes. Nonlinearity can be a desirable characteristic for engineering living organisms because it can lead to more switch-like responses, similar to those underlying the wiring in electronics. Steeper functions are described as ultrasensitive, and can be applied in synthetic biology by using various techniques including receptor decoys, multiple co-operative binding sites, and sequential positive feedbacks. Here, we explore the inherent non-linearity of a biological signaling system to identify functions that can potentially be exploited using cell genome engineering. For this, we performed genome-wide transcription profiling to identify genes with ultrasensitive response functions to Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF). We identified 3,527 genes that react to increasing concentrations of HGF, in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, grown as cysts in 3D collagen cell culture. By fitting a generic Hill function to the dose-responses of these genes we obtained a measure of the ultrasensitivity of HGF-responsive genes, identifying a subset with higher apparent Hill coefficients (e.g. MMP1, TIMP1, SNORD75, SNORD86 and ERRFI1). The regulatory regions of these genes are potential candidates for future engineering of synthetic mammalian gene circuits requiring nonlinear responses to HGF signalling. PMID:27982133

  2. EPID-based dosimetry and its relation to other 2D and 3D dose measurement techniques in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijnheer, B.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper I will summarize the possibilities and limitations of different 2D and 3D dosimetry techniques used in radiation therapy, and evaluate these features relative to those of EPID-based techniques. After briefly discussing their characteristics, I will review the use of EPIDs for pre-treatment and in vivo dosimetry applications by separating them into transit and non-transit approaches, analysed by either forward- or backward-projection methods. I will then review the various types of 3D dosimetry systems by categorizing them into semi-3D, pseudo-3D, to which EPID-based back-projection approaches belong, and full-3D systems. All methods can in principle be used for pre-treatment 3D dose verification; the choice of a specific system depends on the aim of the measurement and the properties of the specific hard- and software. At this moment EPIDs are the only tools available for 3D in vivo dosimetry. I will conclude with revealing some trends and future developments in 3D pre-treatment and in vivo dosimetry.

  3. Assessment of Altered 3D Blood Characteristics in Aortic Disease by Velocity Distribution Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Julio; Barker, Alex J; van Ooij, Pim; Schnell, Susanne; Puthumana, Jyothy; Bonow, Robert O; Collins, Jeremy D; Carr, James C; Markl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To test the feasibility of velocity distribution analysis for identifying altered 3D flow characteristics in patients with aortic disease based on 4D flow MRI volumetric analysis. Methods Forty patients with aortic (Ao) dilation (mid ascending aortic diameter MAA=40±7 mm, age=56±17 yr, 11 females) underwent cardiovascular MRI. Four groups were retrospectively defined: mild Ao dilation (n=10, MAA<35 mm); moderate Ao dilation (n=10, 3545 mm); Ao dilation+aortic stenosis AS (n=10, MAA>35 mm and peak velocity >2.5m/s). 3D PC-MR angiograms were computed and used to obtain a 3D segmentation of the aorta which was divided into four segments: root, ascending aorta, arch, descending aorta. Radial chart displays were used to visualize multiple parameters representing segmental changes in the 3D velocity distribution associated with aortic disease. Results Changes in the velocity field and geometry between cohorts resulted in distinct hemodynamic patterns for each aortic segment. Disease progression from mild to Ao dilation+AS resulted in significant differences (P<0.05) in flow parameters across cohorts and increased radial chart size for root and ascending aorta segments by 146% and 99%, respectively. Conclusion Volumetric 4D velocity distribution analysis has the potential to identify characteristic changes in regional blood flow patterns in patients with aortic disease. PMID:25252029

  4. Detection of bladder cancer: comparison of low-dose scans with AIDR 3D and routine-dose scans with FBP on the excretory phase in CT urography

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboyama, Takahiro; Kumano, Seishi; Inada, Yuki; Koyama, Mitsuhiro; Azuma, Haruhito; Narumi, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively compare the detection of bladder cancer between low-dose scans with adaptive iterative dose reduction three dimensional projection (AIDR 3D) and routine-dose scans with filtered back projection (FBP) on the excretory phase (EP) in CT urography. Methods: 42 patients were included. Routine- and low-dose EP were performed in each patient. Routine-dose images were reconstructed with FBP, and low-dose images were reconstructed with AIDR 3D. Two radiologists scored confidence levels for the presence or absence of bladder cancer using a 5-point scale. The CT dose index of each EP was measured, and the dose reduction was calculated. Results: Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 86.4%, 95.0% and 90.5% on routine-dose scans and were 86.4%, 90.0% and 88.1% on low-dose scans, respectively. There was no significant difference (p; not significant, 1.00 and 1.00, respectively). The average CT dose index was 8.07 and 2.63 mGy on routine- and low-dose scans, and the ratio of dose reduction was 67.6%. Conclusion: The detection of bladder cancer on low-dose scans with AIDR 3D is almost equal to that on routine-dose scans with FBP on the EP, with nearly 70% dose reduction. Advances in knowledge: Using AIDR 3D, the radiation dose may be reduced on the EP in CT urography for the detection of bladder cancer. PMID:26642306

  5. Correlation of 3D volumetric positioning errors and temperature distributions: theory and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, O.; Bach, P.; Yang, J.; Wang, C.

    2006-11-01

    In a real machine shop environment and under various spindle loads, the machine thermal expansion may cause large 3D volumetric positioning errors. With an intelligent controller, it is possible to compensate these errors provide that the relations between the 3D volumetric positioning errors and the temperature distribution were measured. A laser vector measurement technique developed by Optodyne was used for a quick measurement of 3D volumetric positioning errors of a CNC machining center under various spindle loads, machine movement and ambient conditions. Correlation calculations were used to determine the key temperatures and the various positioning errors. Preliminary results showed that large machine temperature changes caused somewhat small straightness error changes but large squareness error changes. Using the measured position errors, several error maps could be generated. Compensation tables at an actual thermal state can be interpolated to achieve higher accuracy at various thermal loadings.

  6. Progressive Shape-Distribution-Encoder for Learning 3D Shape Representation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jin; Zhu, Fan; Dai, Guoxian; Shao, Ling; Fang, Yi

    2017-03-01

    Since there are complex geometric variations with 3D shapes, extracting efficient 3D shape features is one of the most challenging tasks in shape matching and retrieval. In this paper, we propose a deep shape descriptor by learning shape distributions at different diffusion time via a progressive shape-distribution-encoder (PSDE). First, we develop a shape distribution representation with the kernel density estimator to characterize the intrinsic geometry structures of 3D shapes. Then, we propose to learn a deep shape feature through an unsupervised PSDE. Specially, the unsupervised PSDE aims at modeling the complex non-linear transform of the estimated shape distributions between consecutive diffusion time. In order to characterize the intrinsic structures of 3D shapes more efficiently, we stack multiple PSDEs to form a network structure. Finally, we concatenate all neurons in the middle hidden layers of the unsupervised PSDE network to form an unsupervised shape descriptor for retrieval. Furthermore, by imposing an additional constraint on the outputs of all hidden layers, we propose a supervised PSDE to form a supervised shape descriptor. For each hidden layer, the similarity between a pair of outputs from the same class is as large as possible and the similarity between a pair of outputs from different classes is as small as possible. The proposed method is evaluated on three benchmark 3D shape data sets with large geometric variations, i.e., McGill, SHREC'10 ShapeGoogle, and SHREC'14 Human data sets, and the experimental results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method to the existing approaches.

  7. Effective radiation dose of ProMax 3D cone-beam computerized tomography scanner with different dental protocols.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xing-min; Li, Gang; Ludlow, John B; Zhang, Zu-yan; Ma, Xu-chen

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare effective doses resulting from different scan protocols for cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) using International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 1990 and 2007 calculations of dose. Average tissue-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, and effective dose for a ProMax 3D CBCT with different dental protocols were calculated using thermoluminescent dosimeter chips in a human equivalent phantom. Effective doses were derived using ICRP 1990 and the superseding 2007 recommendations. Effective doses (ICRP 2007) for default patient sizes from small to large ranged from 102 to 298 μSv. The coefficient of determination (R(2)) between tube current and effective dose (ICRP 2007) was 0.90. When scanning with lower resolution settings, the effective doses were reduced significantly (P < .05). ProMax 3D can provide a wide range of radiation dose levels. Reduction in radiation dose can be achieved when using lower settings of exposure parameters. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. WE-F-16A-06: Using 3D Printers to Create Complex Phantoms for Dose Verification, Quality Assurance, and Treatment Planning System Commissioning in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kassaee, A; Ding, X; McDonough, J; Reiche, M; Witztum, A; Teo, B

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To use 3D printers to design and construct complex geometrical phantoms for commissioning treatment planning systems, dose calculation algorithms, quality assurance (QA), dose delivery, and patient dose verifications. Methods: In radiotherapy, complex geometrical phantoms are often required for dose verification, dose delivery and calculation algorithm validation. Presently, fabrication of customized phantoms is limited due to time, expense and challenges in machining of complex shapes. In this work, we designed and utilized 3D printers to fabricate two phantoms for QA purposes. One phantom includes hills and valleys (HV) for verification of intensity modulated radiotherapy for photons, and protons (IMRT and IMPT). The other phantom includes cylindrical cavities (CC) of various sizes for dose verification of inhomogeneities. We evaluated the HV phantoms for an IMPT beam, and the CC phantom to study various inhomogeneity configurations using photon, electron, and proton beams. Gafcromic ™ films were used to quantify the dose distributions delivered to the phantoms. Results: The HV phantom has dimensions of 12 cm × 12 cm and consists of one row and one column of five peaks with heights ranging from 2 to 5 cm. The CC phantom has a size 10 cm × 14 cm and includes 6 cylindrical cavities with length of 7.2 cm and diameters ranging from 0.6 to 1.2 cm. The IMPT evaluation using the HV phantom shows good agreement as compared to the dose distribution calculated with treatment planning system. The CC phantom also shows reasonable agreements for using different algorithms for each beam modalities. Conclusion: 3D printers with submillimiter resolutions are capable of printing complex phantoms for dose verification and QA in radiotherapy. As printing costs decrease and the technology becomes widely available, phantom design and construction will be readily available to any clinic for testing geometries that were not previously feasible.

  9. Strategy and software for the statistical spatial analysis of 3D intracellular distributions.

    PubMed

    Biot, Eric; Crowell, Elizabeth; Burguet, Jasmine; Höfte, Herman; Vernhettes, Samantha; Andrey, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    The localization of proteins in specific domains or compartments in the 3D cellular space is essential for many fundamental processes in eukaryotic cells. Deciphering spatial organization principles within cells is a challenging task, in particular because of the large morphological variations between individual cells. We present here an approach for normalizing variations in cell morphology and for statistically analyzing spatial distributions of intracellular compartments from collections of 3D images. The method relies on the processing and analysis of 3D geometrical models that are generated from image stacks and that are used to build representations at progressively increasing levels of integration, ultimately revealing statistical significant traits of spatial distributions. To make this methodology widely available to end-users, we implemented our algorithmic pipeline into a user-friendly, multi-platform, and freely available software. To validate our approach, we generated 3D statistical maps of endomembrane compartments at subcellular resolution within an average epidermal root cell from collections of image stacks. This revealed unsuspected polar distribution patterns of organelles that were not detectable in individual images. By reversing the classical 'measure-then-average' paradigm, one major benefit of the proposed strategy is the production and display of statistical 3D representations of spatial organizations, thus fully preserving the spatial dimension of image data and at the same time allowing their integration over individual observations. The approach and software are generic and should be of general interest for experimental and modeling studies of spatial organizations at multiple scales (subcellular, cellular, tissular) in biological systems. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. SU-E-J-141: Activity-Equivalent Path Length Approach for the 3D PET-Based Dose Reconstruction in Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Attili, A; Vignati, A; Giordanengo, S; Kraan, A; Dalmasso, F; Battistoni, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Ion beam therapy is sensitive to uncertainties from treatment planning and dose delivery. PET imaging of induced positron emitter distributions is a practical approach for in vivo, in situ verification of ion beam treatments. Treatment verification is usually done by comparing measured activity distributions with reference distributions, evaluated in nominal conditions. Although such comparisons give valuable information on treatment quality, a proper clinical evaluation of the treatment ultimately relies on the knowledge of the actual delivered dose. Analytical deconvolution methods relating activity and dose have been studied in this context, but were not clinically applied. In this work we present a feasibility study of an alternative approach for dose reconstruction from activity data, which is based on relating variations in accumulated activity to tissue density variations. Methods: First, reference distributions of dose and activity were calculated from the treatment plan and CT data. Then, the actual measured activity data were cumulatively matched with the reference activity distributions to obtain a set of activity-equivalent path lengths (AEPLs) along the rays of the pencil beams. Finally, these AEPLs were used to deform the original dose distribution, yielding the actual delivered dose. The method was tested by simulating a proton therapy treatment plan delivering 2 Gy on a homogeneous water phantom (the reference), which was compared with the same plan delivered on a phantom containing inhomogeneities. Activity and dose distributions were were calculated by means of the FLUKA Monte Carlo toolkit. Results: The main features of the observed dose distribution in the inhomogeneous situation were reproduced using the AEPL approach. Variations in particle range were reproduced and the positions, where these deviations originated, were properly identified. Conclusions: For a simple inhomogeneous phantom the 3D dose reconstruction from PET

  11. Measurement of strain distributions in mouse femora with 3D-digital speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lianxiang; Zhang, Ping; Liu, Sheng; Samala, Praveen R.; Su, Min; Yokota, Hiroki

    2007-08-01

    Bone is a mechanosensitive tissue that adapts its mass, architecture and mechanical properties to external loading. Appropriate mechanical loads offer an effective means to stimulate bone remodeling and prevent bone loss. A role of in situ strain in bone is considered essential in enhancement of bone formation, and establishing a quantitative relationship between 3D strain distributions and a rate of local bone formation is important. Digital speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI) can achieve whole-field, non-contacting measurements of microscopic deformation for high-resolution determination of 3D strain distributions. However, the current system does not allow us to derive accurate strain distributions because of complex surface contours inherent to biological samples. Through development of a custom-made piezoelectric loading device as well as a new DSPI-based force calibration system, we built an advanced DSPI system and integrated local contour information to deformation data. Using a mouse femur in response to a knee loading modality as a model system, we determined 3D strain distributions and discussed effectiveness and limitations of the described system.

  12. DOSIS & DOSIS 3D: long-term dose monitoring onboard the Columbus Laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Matthiä, Daniel; Reitz, Günther; Burmeister, Sönke; Labrenz, Johannes; Bilski, Pawel; Horwacik, Tomasz; Twardak, Anna; Hajek, Michael; Fugger, Manfred; Hofstätter, Christina; Sihver, Lembit; Palfalvi, Jozsef K.; Szabo, Julianna; Stradi, Andrea; Ambrozova, Iva; Kubancak, Jan; Brabcova, Katerina Pachnerova; Vanhavere, Filip; Cauwels, Vanessa; Van Hoey, Olivier; Schoonjans, Werner; Parisi, Alessio; Gaza, Ramona; Semones, Edward; Yukihara, Eduardo G.; Benton, Eric R.; Doull, Brandon A.; Uchihori, Yukio; Kodaira, Satoshi; Kitamura, Hisashi; Boehme, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    The radiation environment encountered in space differs in nature from that on Earth, consisting mostly of highly energetic ions from protons up to iron, resulting in radiation levels far exceeding the ones present on Earth for occupational radiation workers. Since the beginning of the space era, the radiation exposure during space missions has been monitored with various active and passive radiation instruments. Also onboard the International Space Station (ISS), a number of area monitoring devices provide data related to the spatial and temporal variation of the radiation field in and outside the ISS. The aim of the DOSIS (2009-2011) and the DOSIS 3D (2012-ongoing) experiments was and is to measure the radiation environment within the European Columbus Laboratory of the ISS. These measurements are, on the one hand, performed with passive radiation detectors mounted at 11 locations within Columbus for the determination of the spatial distribution of the radiation field parameters and, on the other, with two active radiation detectors mounted at a fixed position inside Columbus for the determination of the temporal variation of the radiation field parameters. Data measured with passive radiation detectors showed that the absorbed dose values inside the Columbus Laboratory follow a pattern, based on the local shielding configuration of the radiation detectors, with minimum dose values observed in the year 2010 of 195-270 μGy/day and maximum values observed in the year 2012 with values ranging from 260 to 360 μGy/day. The absorbed dose is modulated by (a) the variation in solar activity and (b) the changes in ISS altitude.

  13. The research of 3D visualization techniques for the test of laser energy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lixin; Wang, Bo

    2013-07-01

    In the process of laser transmission in the atmosphere, the complexity and instability of the atmospheric composition that seriously interfere with, even change, the performance of the laser beam. The image of laser energy distribution can be captured and analyzed through infrared CCD and digital image processing technology. The basic features of laser energy density distribution, such as the location and power of the peak point and other basic parameters could be acquired; laser energy density distribution can display in real time continuous multi-frame; the 3D visualization of pseudo-color for laser energy density distribution could be displayed, that reflect the relative size and position of the energy distribution in the different regions of the laser spot, using the VC++, windows APIs and OpenGL programming. The laser energy density distribution can be observed from all angles.

  14. 3D mapping of crystallographic phase distribution using energy-selective neutron tomography.

    PubMed

    Woracek, Robin; Penumadu, Dayakar; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Hilger, Andre; Boin, Mirko; Banhart, John; Manke, Ingo

    2014-06-25

    Nondestructive 3D mapping of crystallographic phases is introduced providing distribution of phase fractions within the bulk (centimeter range) of samples with micrometer-scale resolution. The novel neutron tomography based technique overcomes critical limitations of existing techniques and offers a wide range of potential applications. It is demonstrated for steel samples exhibiting phase transformation after being subjected to tensile and torsional deformation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Electromagnetic Response Inversion for a 3D Distribution of Conductivity/Dielect

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Gregory

    2001-10-24

    NLCGCS inverts electromagnetic responses for a 3D distribution of electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity within the earth for geophysical applications using single processor computers. The software comes bundled with a graphical user interface to aid in model construction and analysis and viewing of earth images. The solution employs both dipole and finite size source configurations for harmonic oscillatory sources. A new nonlinear preconditioner is included in the solution to speed up solution convergence.

  16. A Gaussian Distribution for Refined DT Invariants and 3D Partitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    We show that the refined Donaldson-Thomas invariants of , suitably normalized, have a Gaussian distribution as limit law. Combinatorially, these numbers are given by weighted counts of 3D partitions. Our technique is to use the Hardy-Littlewood circle method to analyze the bivariate asymptotics of a q-deformation of MacMahon's function. The proof is based on that of E.M. Wright, who explored the single variable case.

  17. Quantifying the Effect of 3D Spatial Resolution on the Accuracy of Microstructural Distributions (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    Michael D. Uchic and Michael Groeber Metals Branch Structural Materials Division Megna Shah UES, Inc. Gregory Loughnane, Raghavan Srinivasan...AUTHOR(S) Michael D. Uchic and Michael Groeber (AFRL/RXCM) Megna Shah (UES, Inc.) Gregory Loughnane, Raghavan Srinivasan, and Ramana Grandhi (Wright...effect of 3D spatial resolution on the accuracy of microstructural distributions Gregory Loughnane 1 , Michael Groeber 2 , Michael Uchic 2 , Matthew

  18. Beyond the Map: Enamel Distribution Characterized from 3D Dental Topography

    PubMed Central

    Thiery, Ghislain; Lazzari, Vincent; Ramdarshan, Anusha; Guy, Franck

    2017-01-01

    Enamel thickness is highly susceptible to natural selection because thick enamel may prevent tooth failure. Consequently, it has been suggested that primates consuming stress-limited food on a regular basis would have thick-enameled molars in comparison to primates consuming soft food. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of enamel over a single tooth crown is not homogeneous, and thick enamel is expected to be more unevenly distributed in durophagous primates. Still, a proper methodology to quantitatively characterize enamel 3D distribution and test this hypothesis is yet to be developed. Unworn to slightly worn upper second molars belonging to 32 species of anthropoid primates and corresponding to a wide range of diets were digitized using high resolution microcomputed tomography. In addition, their durophagous ability was scored from existing literature. 3D average and relative enamel thickness were computed based on the volumetric reconstruction of the enamel cap. Geometric estimates of their average and relative enamel-dentine distance were also computed using 3D dental topography. Both methods gave different estimations of average and relative enamel thickness. This study also introduces pachymetric profiles, a method inspired from traditional topography to graphically characterize thick enamel distribution. Pachymetric profiles and topographic maps of enamel-dentine distance are combined to assess the evenness of thick enamel distribution. Both pachymetric profiles and topographic maps indicate that thick enamel is not significantly more unevenly distributed in durophagous species, except in Cercopithecidae. In this family, durophagous species such as mangabeys are characterized by an uneven thick enamel and high pachymetric profile slopes at the average enamel thickness, whereas non-durophagous species such as colobine monkeys are not. These results indicate that the distribution of thick enamel follows different patterns across anthropoids. Primates might

  19. 3D Mass Spectrometry Imaging Reveals a Very Heterogeneous Drug Distribution in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, S.; Morosi, L.; Veglianese, P.; Licandro, S. A.; Frapolli, R.; Zucchetti, M.; Cappelletti, G.; Falciola, L.; Pifferi, V.; Visentin, S.; D’Incalci, M.; Davoli, E.

    2016-01-01

    Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) is a widespread technique used to qualitatively describe in two dimensions the distribution of endogenous or exogenous compounds within tissue sections. Absolute quantification of drugs using MSI is a recent challenge that just in the last years has started to be addressed. Starting from a two dimensional MSI protocol, we developed a three-dimensional pipeline to study drug penetration in tumors and to develop a new drug quantification method by MALDI MSI. Paclitaxel distribution and concentration in different tumors were measured in a 3D model of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma (MPM), which is known to be a very heterogeneous neoplasm, highly resistant to different drugs. The 3D computational reconstruction allows an accurate description of tumor PTX penetration, adding information about the heterogeneity of tumor drug distribution due to the complex microenvironment. The use of an internal standard, homogenously sprayed on tissue slices, ensures quantitative results that are similar to those obtained using HPLC. The 3D model gives important information about the drug concentration in different tumor sub-volumes and shows that the great part of each tumor is not reached by the drug, suggesting the concept of pseudo-resistance as a further explanation for ineffective therapies and tumors relapse. PMID:27841316

  20. Estimating Fiber Orientation Distribution Functions in 3D-Polarized Light Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Axer, Markus; Strohmer, Sven; Gräßel, David; Bücker, Oliver; Dohmen, Melanie; Reckfort, Julia; Zilles, Karl; Amunts, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Research of the human brain connectome requires multiscale approaches derived from independent imaging methods ideally applied to the same object. Hence, comprehensible strategies for data integration across modalities and across scales are essential. We have successfully established a concept to bridge the spatial scales from microscopic fiber orientation measurements based on 3D-Polarized Light Imaging (3D-PLI) to meso- or macroscopic dimensions. By creating orientation distribution functions (pliODFs) from high-resolution vector data via series expansion with spherical harmonics utilizing high performance computing and supercomputing technologies, data fusion with Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging has become feasible, even for a large-scale dataset such as the human brain. Validation of our approach was done effectively by means of two types of datasets that were transferred from fiber orientation maps into pliODFs: simulated 3D-PLI data showing artificial, but clearly defined fiber patterns and real 3D-PLI data derived from sections through the human brain and the brain of a hooded seal. PMID:27147981

  1. Noise reduction for low-dose helical CT by 3D penalized weighted least-squares sinogram smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Li, Tianfang; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2006-03-01

    Helical computed tomography (HCT) has several advantages over conventional step-and-shoot CT for imaging a relatively large object, especially for dynamic studies. However, HCT may increase X-ray exposure significantly to the patient. This work aims to reduce the radiation by lowering the X-ray tube current (mA) and filtering the low-mA (or dose) sinogram noise. Based on the noise properties of HCT sinogram, a three-dimensional (3D) penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) objective function was constructed and an optimal sinogram was estimated by minimizing the objective function. To consider the difference of signal correlation among different direction of the HCT sinogram, an anisotropic Markov random filed (MRF) Gibbs function was designed as the penalty. The minimization of the objection function was performed by iterative Gauss-Seidel updating strategy. The effectiveness of the 3D-PWLS sinogram smoothing for low-dose HCT was demonstrated by a 3D Shepp-Logan head phantom study. Comparison studies with our previously developed KL domain PWLS sinogram smoothing algorithm indicate that the KL+2D-PWLS algorithm shows better performance on in-plane noise-resolution trade-off while the 3D-PLWS shows better performance on z-axis noise-resolution trade-off. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) studies by using channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) shows that 3D-PWLS and KL+2DPWLS algorithms have similar performance on detectability in low-contrast environment.

  2. The three-dimensional elemental distribution based on the surface topography by confocal 3D-XRF analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Longtao; Qin, Min; Wang, Kai; Lin, Xue; Peng, Shiqi; Sun, Tianxi; Liu, Zhiguo

    2016-09-01

    Confocal three-dimensional micro-X-ray fluorescence (3D-XRF) is a good surface analysis technology widely used to analyse elements and elemental distributions. However, it has rarely been applied to analyse surface topography and 3D elemental mapping in surface morphology. In this study, a surface adaptive algorithm using the progressive approximation method was designed to obtain surface topography. A series of 3D elemental mapping analyses in surface morphology were performed in laboratories to analyse painted pottery fragments from the Majiayao Culture (3300-2900 BC). To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, sample surface topography and 3D elemental mapping were simultaneously obtained. Besides, component and depth analyses were also performed using synchrotron radiation confocal 3D-XRF and tabletop confocal 3D-XRF, respectively. The depth profiles showed that the sample has a layered structure. The 3D elemental mapping showed that the red pigment, black pigment, and pottery coat contain a large amount of Fe, Mn, and Ca, respectively. From the 3D elemental mapping analyses at different depths, a 3D rendering was obtained, clearly showing the 3D distributions of the red pigment, black pigment, and pottery coat. Compared with conventional 3D scanning, this method is time-efficient for analysing 3D elemental distributions and hence especially suitable for samples with non-flat surfaces.

  3. Spatial 3D distribution of soil organic carbon under different land use types.

    PubMed

    Amirian Chakan, A; Taghizadeh-Mehrjardi, R; Kerry, R; Kumar, S; Khordehbin, S; Yusefi Khanghah, S

    2017-03-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) has been assessed in three dimension (3D) in several studies, but little is known about the combined effects of land use and soil depth on SOC stocks in semi-arid areas. This paper investigates the 3D distribution of SOC to a depth of 1 m in a 4600-ha area in southeastern Iran with different land uses under the irrigated farming (IF), dry farming (DF), orchards (Or), range plants on the Gachsaran formation (RaG), and range plants on a quaternary formation (RaQ). Predictions were made using the artificial neural networks (ANNs), regression trees (RTs), and spline functions with auxiliary covariates derived from a digital elevation model (DEM), the Landsat 8 imagery, and land use types. Correlation analysis showed that the main predictors for SOC in the topsoil were covariates derived from the imagery; however, for the lower depths, covariates derived from both the DEM and imagery were important. ANNs showed more efficiency than did RTs in predicting SOC. The results showed that 3D distribution of SOC was significantly affected by land use types. SOC stocks of soils under Or and IF were significantly higher than those under DF, RaG, and RaQ. The SOC below 30 cm accounted for about 59% of the total soil stock. Results showed that depth functions combined with digital soil mapping techniques provide a promising approach to evaluate 3D SOC distribution under different land uses in semi-arid regions and could be used to assess changes in time to determine appropriate management strategies.

  4. 360-degree 3D transvaginal ultrasound system for high-dose-rate interstitial gynaecological brachytherapy needle guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, Jessica R.; Surry, Kathleen; D'Souza, David; Leung, Eric; Fenster, Aaron

    2017-03-01

    Treatment for gynaecological cancers often includes brachytherapy; in particular, in high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy, hollow needles are inserted into the tumour and surrounding area through a template in order to deliver the radiation dose. Currently, there is no standard modality for visualizing needles intra-operatively, despite the need for precise needle placement in order to deliver the optimal dose and avoid nearby organs, including the bladder and rectum. While three-dimensional (3D) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging has been proposed for 3D intra-operative needle guidance, anterior needles tend to be obscured by shadowing created by the template's vaginal cylinder. We have developed a 360-degree 3D transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) system that uses a conventional two-dimensional side-fire TRUS probe rotated inside a hollow vaginal cylinder made from a sonolucent plastic (TPX). The system was validated using grid and sphere phantoms in order to test the geometric accuracy of the distance and volumetric measurements in the reconstructed image. To test the potential for visualizing needles, an agar phantom mimicking the geometry of the female pelvis was used. Needles were inserted into the phantom and then imaged using the 3D TVUS system. The needle trajectories and tip positions in the 3D TVUS scan were compared to their expected values and the needle tracks visualized in magnetic resonance images. Based on this initial study, 360-degree 3D TVUS imaging through a sonolucent vaginal cylinder is a feasible technique for intra-operatively visualizing needles during HDR interstitial gynaecological brachytherapy.

  5. Mechanistic and quantitative studies of bystander response in 3D tissues for low-dose radiation risk estimations

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, Sally A.

    2013-06-12

    We have used the MatTek 3-dimensional human skin model to study the gene expression response of a 3D model to low and high dose low LET radiation, and to study the radiation bystander effect as a function of distance from the site of irradiation with either alpha particles or low LET protons. We have found response pathways that appear to be specific for low dose exposures, that could not have been predicted from high dose studies. We also report the time and distance dependent expression of a large number of genes in bystander tissue. the bystander response in 3D tissues showed many similarities to that described previously in 2D cultured cells, but also showed some differences.

  6. Quantum key distribution for security guarantees over QoS-driven 3D satellite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Zhang, Xi; Chen, Genshe; Pham, Khanh; Blasch, Erik

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, quantum-based communication is emerging as a new technique for ensuring secured communications because it can guarantee absolute security between two different remote entities. Quantum communication performs the transmission and exchange of quantum information among distant nodes within a network. Quantum key distribution (QKD) is a methodology for generating and distributing random encryption keys using the principles of quantum physics. In this paper, we investigate the techniques on how to efficiently use QKD in 3D satellite networks and propose an effective method to overcome its communications-distance limitations. In order to implement secured and reliable communications over wireless satellite links, we develop a free-space quantum channel model in satellite communication networks. To enlarge the communications distances over 3D satellite networks, we propose to employ the intermediate nodes to relay the unconditional keys and guarantee the Quantum Bit Error Rate (QBER) for security requirement over 3D satellite networks. We also propose the communication model for QKD security-Quality of Service (QoS) guarantee and an adaptive cooperative routing selection scheme to optimize the throughput performance of QKD-based satellite communications networks. The obtained simulation results verify our proposed schemes.

  7. Generating 3D depletion distribution in an achromatic single-channel monolithic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallet, Clement; Lindberg, Arvid; Sirat, Gabriel Y.

    2016-02-01

    Recent developments have shown that conical diffraction by a biaxial crystal can create a vortex beam for use in 2D STED microscopy. It has been shown that this concept can be extended and also generate the depletion distributions used for 3D STED microscopy. A single beam passes through a biaxial crystal that creates two co-propagating, co-localized beams; the first one is used for lateral depletion, and the other one for axial depletion. The two beams are crossed-polarized and thus do not interfere. We will show that the 3D distribution can be made achromatic, i.e. several depletion wavelengths can travel through a common path and still be shaped into the appropriate pattern by optimizing the geometry of the system. This system enables true one-channel 3D depletion at multiple wavelengths ranging from 580nm to 770nm, thus covering most of the conventional depletion wavelengths currently used. Preliminary results of depletion PSFs will be presented and the advantages and limitations of this system will be discussed as well as the experimental considerations required to successfully obtain the desired PSFs.

  8. Accurate Automatic Detection of Densely Distributed Cell Nuclei in 3D Space

    PubMed Central

    Tokunaga, Terumasa; Kanamori, Manami; Teramoto, Takayuki; Jang, Moon Sun; Kuge, Sayuri; Ishihara, Takeshi; Yoshida, Ryo; Iino, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    To measure the activity of neurons using whole-brain activity imaging, precise detection of each neuron or its nucleus is required. In the head region of the nematode C. elegans, the neuronal cell bodies are distributed densely in three-dimensional (3D) space. However, no existing computational methods of image analysis can separate them with sufficient accuracy. Here we propose a highly accurate segmentation method based on the curvatures of the iso-intensity surfaces. To obtain accurate positions of nuclei, we also developed a new procedure for least squares fitting with a Gaussian mixture model. Combining these methods enables accurate detection of densely distributed cell nuclei in a 3D space. The proposed method was implemented as a graphical user interface program that allows visualization and correction of the results of automatic detection. Additionally, the proposed method was applied to time-lapse 3D calcium imaging data, and most of the nuclei in the images were successfully tracked and measured. PMID:27271939

  9. SU-E-T-422: Correlation Between 2D Passing Rates and 3D Dose Differences for Pretreatment VMAT QA

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, X; Xie, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) quality assurance (QA) is typically using QA methods and action levels taken from fixedbeam intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) QA methods. However, recent studies demonstrated that there is no correlation between the percent gamma passing rate (%GP) and the magnitude of dose discrepancy between the planned dose and the actual delivered dose for IMRT. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether %GP is correlated with clinical dosimetric difference for VMAT. Methods: Twenty nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients treated with dual-arc simultaneous integrated boost VMAT and 20 esophageal cancer patients treated with one-arc VMAT were enrolled in this study. Pretreatment VMAT QA was performed by a 3D diode array ArcCheck. Acceptance criteria of 2%/2mm, 3%/3mm, and 4%/4mm were applied for 2D %GP. Dose values below 10% of the per-measured normalization maximum dose were ignored.Mean DVH values obtained from 3DVH software and TPS were calculated and percentage dose differences were calculated. Statistical correlation between %GP and percent dose difference was studied by using Pearson correlation. Results: The %GP for criteria 2%/2mm, 3%/3mm, and 4%/4mm were 82.33±4.45, 93.47±2.31, 97.13±2.41, respectively. Dose differences calculated from 3DVH and TPS for beam isocenter, mean dose of PTV, maximum dose of PTV, D2 of PTV and D98 of PTV were -1.04±3.24, -0.74±1.71, 2.92±3.62, 0.89±3.29, -1.46±1.97, respectively. No correction were found between %GP and dose differences. Conclusion: There are weak correlations between the 2D %GP and dose differences calculated from 3DVH. The %GP acceptance criteria of 3%/3mm usually applied for pretreatment QA of IMRT and VMAT is not indicating strong clinical correlation with 3D dose difference. 3D dose reconstructions on patient anatomy may be necessary for physicist to predict the accuracy of delivered dose for VMAT QA.

  10. Efficient 3-D medical image registration using a distributed blackboard architecture.

    PubMed

    Tait, Roger J; Schaefer, Gerald; Hopgood, Adrian A; Zhu, Shao Ying

    2006-01-01

    A major drawback of 3-D medical image registration techniques is the performance bottleneck associated with re-sampling and similarity computation. Such bottlenecks limit registration applications in clinical situations where fast execution times are required and become particularly apparent in the case of registering 3-D data sets. In this paper a novel framework for high performance intensity-based volume registration is presented. Geometric alignment of both reference and sensed volume sets is achieved through a combination of scaling, translation, and rotation. Crucially, resampling and similarity computation is performed intelligently by a set of knowledge sources. The knowledge sources work in parallel and communicate with each other by means of a distributed blackboard architecture. Partitioning of the blackboard is used to balance communication and processing workloads. Large-scale registrations with substantial speedups, when compared with a conventional implementation, have been demonstrated.

  11. Structure in the 3D Galaxy Distribution. III. Fourier Transforming the Universe: Phase and Power Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Way, M. J.; Gazis, P. G.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of a relatively straightforward analysis of the complex 3D Fourier transform of galaxy coordinates derived from redshift surveys. Numerical demonstrations of this approach are carried out on a volume-limited sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey redshift survey. The direct unbinned transform yields a complex 3D data cube quite similar to that from the Fast Fourier Transform of finely binned galaxy positions. In both cases, deconvolution of the sampling window function yields estimates of the true transform. Simple power spectrum estimates from these transforms are roughly consistent with those using more elaborate methods. The complex Fourier transform characterizes spatial distributional properties beyond the power spectrum in a manner different from (and we argue is more easily interpreted than) the conventional multipoint hierarchy. We identify some threads of modern large-scale inference methodology that will presumably yield detections in new wider and deeper surveys.

  12. Comparison of 3D Orientation Distribution Functions Measured with Confocal Microscopy and Diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, Kurt; Janve, Vaibhav; Gao, Yurui; Stepniewska, Iwona; Landman, Bennett A; Anderson, Adam W

    2016-01-01

    The ability of diffusion MRI (dMRI) fiber tractography to non-invasively map three-dimensional (3D) anatomical networks in the human brain has made it a valuable tool in both clinical and research settings. However, there are many assumptions inherent to any tractography algorithm that can limit the accuracy of the reconstructed fiber tracts. Among them is the assumption that the diffusion-weighted images accurately reflect the underlying fiber orientation distribution (FOD) in the MRI voxel. Consequently, validating dMRI’s ability to assess the underlying fiber orientation in each voxel is critical for its use as a biomedical tool. Here, using post-mortem histology and confocal microscopy, we present a method to perform histological validation of orientation functions in 3D, which has previously been limited to two-dimensional analysis of tissue sections. We demonstrate the ability to extract the 3D FOD from confocal z-stacks, and quantify the agreement between the MRI estimates of orientation information obtained using constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD) and the true geometry of the fibers. We find an orientation error of approximately 6° in voxels containing nearly parallel fibers, and 10-11° in crossing fiber regions, and note that CSD was unable to resolve fibers crossing at angles below 60° in our dataset. This is the first time the 3D white matter orientation distribution is calculated from histology and compared to dMRI. Thus, this technique serves as a gold standard for dMRI validation studies - providing the ability to determine the extent to which the dMRI signal is consistent with the histological FOD, and to establish how well different dMRI models can predict the ground truth FOD. PMID:26804781

  13. A comparison of adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D and filtered back projection in craniocervical CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Yu, S; Zhang, L; Zheng, J; Xu, Y; Chen, Y; Song, Z

    2017-01-01

    To compare the effects of exposure parameters on image quality and radiation dose for craniocervical computed tomography angiography (CTA) using adaptive iterative dose reduction in three dimensions (AIDR 3D) and filtered back projection (FBP) algorithms. One hundred and eighty patients were divided into three groups; group A (120 kV, 300 mA, FBP), group B (100 kV, automatic mA, AIDR 3D) and group C (80kV, automatic mA, AIDR 3D). Image quality and radiation dose were evaluated for each group. For both cervical and intracranial vessels, CT attenuation, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were higher in the AIDR 3D groups. The difference in mean vascular noise was also statistically significant (p<0.001), with group B having the lowest value at 16.5±3.2 HU and group C having the highest at 19.1±2.9 HU. FBP reconstruction resulted in lower image-quality scores for the common carotid artery. Parenchymal image-quality scores also varied significantly different between groups with group C partially failing to meet the minimum standards for diagnostic use. For the middle cerebral artery, image-quality scores were significantly better in group A, although images from groups B and C also satisfied clinical diagnostic requirements. The image quality of the internal carotid artery was the best in group B. Image-quality scores between groups were not significantly different for the carotid sinus. Radiation doses in the groups using AIDR 3D were >70% lower than in the FBP group. AIDR 3D (100 kV, automatic modulation) provides optimal image quality of vascular and parenchymal tissues at significantly lower radiation doses (mSV) than FBP in craniocervical CTA. For cases in which highly accurate parenchymal assessment is not required, the tube voltage can be lowered to 80 kV to further decrease radiation dose. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Simulation of the impact of 3-D porosity distribution in metallic U-10Zr fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Di; Yacout, Abdellatif M.; Stan, Marius; Bauer, Theodore H.; Wright, Arthur E.

    2014-05-01

    Evolution of porosity generated in metallic U-Zr fuel irradiated in fast spectrum reactors leads to changes in fuel properties and impacts important phenomena such as heat transport and constituent redistribution. The porosity is generated as a result of the accumulation of fission gases and is affected by the possible bond sodium infiltration into the fuel. Typically, the impact of porosity development on properties, such as thermal conductivity, is accounted for through empirical correlations that are dependent on porosity and infiltrated sodium fractions. Currently available simulation tools make it possible to take into account fuel 3-D porosity distributions, potentially eliminating the need for such correlations. This development allows for a more realistic representation of the porosity evolution in metallic fuel and creates a framework for truly mechanistic fuel development models. In this work, COMSOL multi-physics simulation platform is used to model 3-D porosity distributions and simulate heat transport in metallic U-10Zr fuel. Available experimental data regarding microstructural evolution of fuel that was irradiated in EBR-II and associated phase stability information are used to guide the simulation. The impact of changes in porosity characteristics on material properties is estimated and the results are compared with calculated temperature distributions. The simulations demonstrate the developed capability and importance of accounting for detailed porosity distribution features for accurate fuel performance evaluation.

  15. 3D map distribution of metallic nanoparticles in whole cells using MeV ion microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vasco, M S; Alves, L C; Corregidor, V; Correia, D; Godinho, C P; Sá-Correia, I; Bettiol, A; Watt, F; Pinheiro, T

    2017-08-01

    In this work, a new tool was developed, the MORIA program that readily translates Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) output data into visual information, creating a display of the distribution of elements in a true three-dimensional (3D) environment. The program methodology is illustrated with the analysis of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, exposed to copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NP) and HeLa cells in the presence of gold nanoparticles (Au-NP), using different beam species, energies and nuclear microscopy systems. Results demonstrate that for both cell types, the NP internalization can be clearly perceived. The 3D models of the distribution of CuO-NP in S. cerevisiae cells indicate the nonuniform distribution of NP in the cellular environment and a relevant confinement of CuO-NP to the cell wall. This suggests the impenetrability of certain cellular organelles or compartments for NP. By contrast, using a high-resolution ion beam system, discretized agglomerates of Au-NP were visualized inside the HeLa cell. This is consistent with the mechanism of entry of these NPs in the cellular space by endocytosis enclosed in endosomal vesicles. This approach shows RBS to be a powerful imaging technique assigning to nuclear microscopy unparalleled potential to assess nanoparticle distribution inside the cellular volume. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  16. Influence of intrinsic and extrinsic forces on 3D stress distribution using CUDA programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räss, Ludovic; Omlin, Samuel; Podladchikov, Yuri

    2013-04-01

    In order to have a better understanding of the influence of buoyancy (intrinsic) and boundary (extrinsic) forces in a nonlinear rheology due to a power law fluid, some basics needs to be explored through 3D numerical calculation. As first approach, the already studied Stokes setup of a rising sphere will be used to calibrate the 3D model. Far field horizontal tectonic stress is applied to the sphere, which generates a vertical acceleration, buoyancy driven. This simple and known setup allows some benchmarking performed through systematic runs. The relative importance of intrinsic and extrinsic forces producing the wide variety of rates and styles of deformation, including absence of deformation and generating 3D stress patterns, will be determined. Relation between vertical motion and power law exponent will also be explored. The goal of these investigations will be to run models having topography and density structure from geophysical imaging as input, and 3D stress field as output. The stress distribution in Swiss Alps and Plateau and its implication for risk analysis is one of the perspective for this research. In fact, proximity of the stress to the failure is fundamental for risk assessment. Sensitivity of this to the accurate topography representation can then be evaluated. The developed 3D numerical codes, tuned for mid-sized cluster, need to be optimized, especially while running good resolution in full 3D. Therefor, two largely used computing platforms, MATLAB and FORTRAN 90 are explored. Starting with an easy adaptable and as short as possible MATLAB code, which is then upgraded in order to reach higher performance in simulation times and resolution. A significant speedup using the rising NVIDIA CUDA technology and resources is also possible. Programming in C-CUDA, creating some synchronization feature, and comparing the results with previous runs, helps us to investigate the new speedup possibilities allowed through GPU parallel computing. These codes

  17. 3D Drop Size Distribution Extrapolation Algorithm Using a Single Disdrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John

    2012-01-01

    Determining the Z-R relationship (where Z is the radar reflectivity factor and R is rainfall rate) from disdrometer data has been and is a common goal of cloud physicists and radar meteorology researchers. The usefulness of this quantity has traditionally been limited since radar represents a volume measurement, while a disdrometer corresponds to a point measurement. To solve that problem, a 3D-DSD (drop-size distribution) method of determining an equivalent 3D Z-R was developed at the University of Central Florida and tested at the Kennedy Space Center, FL. Unfortunately, that method required a minimum of three disdrometers clustered together within a microscale network (.1-km separation). Since most commercial disdrometers used by the radar meteorology/cloud physics community are high-cost instruments, three disdrometers located within a microscale area is generally not a practical strategy due to the limitations of these kinds of research budgets. A relatively simple modification to the 3D-DSD algorithm provides an estimate of the 3D-DSD and therefore, a 3D Z-R measurement using a single disdrometer. The basis of the horizontal extrapolation is mass conservation of a drop size increment, employing the mass conservation equation. For vertical extrapolation, convolution of a drop size increment using raindrop terminal velocity is used. Together, these two independent extrapolation techniques provide a complete 3DDSD estimate in a volume around and above a single disdrometer. The estimation error is lowest along a vertical plane intersecting the disdrometer position in the direction of wind advection. This work demonstrates that multiple sensors are not required for successful implementation of the 3D interpolation/extrapolation algorithm. This is a great benefit since it is seldom that multiple sensors in the required spatial arrangement are available for this type of analysis. The original software (developed at the University of Central Florida, 1998.- 2000) has

  18. Adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR) 3D in low dose CT abdomen-pelvis: Effects on image quality and radiation exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, W. C.; Hashim, S.; Karim, M. K. A.; Bahruddin, N. A.; Salehhon, N.; Musa, Y.

    2017-05-01

    The widespread use of computed tomography (CT) has increased the medical radiation exposure and cancer risk. We aimed to evaluate the impact of AIDR 3D in CT abdomen-pelvic examinations based on image quality and radiation dose in low dose (LD) setting compared to standard dose (STD) with filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction. We retrospectively reviewed the images of 40 patients who underwent CT abdomen-pelvic using a 80 slice CT scanner. Group 1 patients (n=20, mean age 41 ± 17 years) were performed at LD with AIDR 3D reconstruction and Group 2 patients (n=20, mean age 52 ± 21 years) were scanned with STD using FBP reconstruction. Objective image noise was assessed by region of interest (ROI) measurements in the liver and aorta as standard deviation (SD) of the attenuation value (Hounsfield Unit, HU) while subjective image quality was evaluated by two radiologists. Statistical analysis was used to compare the scan length, CT dose index volume (CTDIvol) and image quality of both patient groups. Although both groups have similar mean scan length, the CTDIvol significantly decreased by 38% in LD CT compared to STD CT (p<0.05). Objective and subjective image quality were statistically improved with AIDR 3D (p<0.05). In conclusion, AIDR 3D enables significant dose reduction of 38% with superior image quality in LD CT abdomen-pelvis.

  19. 3D distribution of interstellar medium in the Galaxy: Preparation for analysis of Gaia observations

    SciTech Connect

    Puspitarini, Lucky; Lallement, Rosine

    2015-09-30

    Accurate and detailed three-dimensional (3D) maps of Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) are still lacking. One way to obtain such 3D descriptions is to record a large set of individual absorption or reddening measurements toward target stars located at various known distances and directions. The inversion of these measurements using a tomographic method can produce spatial distribution of the ISM. Until recently absorption data were very limited and distances to the target stars are still uncertain, but the situation will greatly improve thanks to current and future massive stellar surveys from ground, and to Gaia mission. To prepare absorption data for inversion from a huge number of stellar spectra, automated tools are needed. We have developed various spectral analysis tools adapted to different type of spectra, early- or late- type star. We also have used diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) to trace IS structures and kinematics. Although we do not know yet their carriers, they can be a promising tool to trace distant interstellar clouds or Galactic arms. We present some examples of the interstellar fitting and show the potentiality of DIBs in tracing the ISM. We will also briefly show and comment the latest 3D map of the local ISM which reveal nearby cloud complexes and cavities.

  20. Stress distribution in a premolar 3D model with anisotropic and isotropic enamel.

    PubMed

    Munari, Laís S; Cornacchia, Tulimar P M; Moreira, Allyson N; Gonçalves, Jason B; De Las Casas, Estevam B; Magalhães, Cláudia S

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the areas of stress concentration in a three-dimensional (3D) premolar tooth model with anisotropic or isotropic enamel using the finite element method. A computed tomography was imported to an image processing program to create the tooth model which was exported to a 3D modeling program. The mechanical properties and loading conditions were prescribed in Abaqus. In order to evaluate stresses, axial and oblique loads were applied simulating realistic conditions. Compression stress was observed on the side of load application, and tensile stress was observed on the opposite side. Tensile stress was concentrated mainly in the cervical region and in the alveolar insertion bone. Although stress concentration analyses of the isotropic 3D models produced similar stress distribution results when compared to the anisotropic models, tensile stress values shown by anisotropic models were smaller than the isotropic models. Oblique loads resulted in higher values of tensile stresses, which concentrate mainly in the cervical area of the tooth and in the alveolar bone insertion. Anisotropic properties must be utilized in enamel stress evaluation in non-carious cervical lesions.

  1. An extension of the Saltykov method to quantify 3D grain size distributions in mylonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Sanchez, Marco A.; Llana-Fúnez, Sergio

    2016-12-01

    The estimation of 3D grain size distributions (GSDs) in mylonites is key to understanding the rheological properties of crystalline aggregates and to constraining dynamic recrystallization models. This paper investigates whether a common stereological method, the Saltykov method, is appropriate for the study of GSDs in mylonites. In addition, we present a new stereological method, named the two-step method, which estimates a lognormal probability density function describing the 3D GSD. Both methods are tested for reproducibility and accuracy using natural and synthetic data sets. The main conclusion is that both methods are accurate and simple enough to be systematically used in recrystallized aggregates with near-equant grains. The Saltykov method is particularly suitable for estimating the volume percentage of particular grain-size fractions with an absolute uncertainty of ±5 in the estimates. The two-step method is suitable for quantifying the shape of the actual 3D GSD in recrystallized rocks using a single value, the multiplicative standard deviation (MSD) parameter, and providing a precision in the estimate typically better than 5%. The novel method provides a MSD value in recrystallized quartz that differs from previous estimates based on apparent 2D GSDs, highlighting the inconvenience of using apparent GSDs for such tasks.

  2. 2-D-3-D frequency registration using a low-dose radiographic system for knee motion estimation.

    PubMed

    Jerbi, Taha; Burdin, Valerie; Leboucher, Julien; Stindel, Eric; Roux, Christian

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, a new method is presented to study the feasibility of the pose and the position estimation of bone structures using a low-dose radiographic system, the entrepreneurial operating system (designed by EOS-Imaging Company). This method is based on a 2-D-3-D registration of EOS bi-planar X-ray images with an EOS 3-D reconstruction. This technique is relevant to such an application thanks to the EOS ability to simultaneously make acquisitions of frontal and sagittal radiographs, and also to produce a 3-D surface reconstruction with its attached software. In this paper, the pose and position of a bone in radiographs is estimated through the link between 3-D and 2-D data. This relationship is established in the frequency domain using the Fourier central slice theorem. To estimate the pose and position of the bone, we define a distance between the 3-D data and the radiographs, and use an iterative optimization approach to converge toward the best estimation. In this paper, we give the mathematical details of the method. We also show the experimental protocol and the results, which validate our approach.

  3. Modeling spatial distribution of oxygen in 3d culture of islet beta-cells.

    PubMed

    McReynolds, John; Wen, Yu; Li, Xiaofei; Guan, Jianjun; Jin, Sha

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) scaffold culture of pancreatic β-cell has been proven to be able to better mimic physiological conditions in the body. However, one critical issue with culturing pancreatic β-cells is that β-cells consume large amounts of oxygen, and hence insufficient oxygen supply in the culture leads to loss of β-cell mass and functions. This becomes more significant when cells are cultured in a 3D scaffold. In this study, in order to understand the effect of oxygen tension inside a cell-laden collagen culture on β-cell proliferation, a culture model with encapsulation of an oxygen-generator was established. The oxygen-generator was made by embedding hydrogen peroxide into nontoxic polydimethylsiloxane to avoid the toxicity of a chemical reaction in the β-cell culture. To examine the effectiveness of the oxygenation enabled 3D culture, the spatial-temporal distribution of oxygen tension inside a scaffold was evaluated by a mathematical modeling approach. Our simulation results indicated that an oxygenation-aided 3D culture would augment the oxygen supply required for the β-cells. Furthermore, we identified that cell seeding density and the capacity of the oxygenator are two critical parameters in the optimization of the culture. Notably, cell-laden scaffold cultures with an in situ oxygen supply significantly improved the β-cells' biological function. These β-cells possess high insulin secretion capacity. The results obtained in this work would provide valuable information for optimizing and encouraging functional β-cell cultures. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:221-228, 2017. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  4. Reproducible 3D printed head tanks for electrical impedance tomography with realistic shape and conductivity distribution.

    PubMed

    Avery, James; Aristovich, Kirill; Low, Barney; Holder, David

    2017-05-22

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) has many promising applications in brain injury monitoring. To evaluate both instrumentation and reconstruction algorithms, experiments are first performed in head tanks. Existing methods, whilst accurate, produce a discontinuous conductivity, and are often made by hand, making it hard for other researchers to replicate. We have developed a method for constructing head tanks directly in a 3D printer. Conductivity was controlled through perforations in the skull surface, which allow for saline to pass through. Varying the diameter of the holes allowed for the conductivity to be controlled with 3% error for the target conductivity range. Taking CT and MRI segmentations as a basis, this method was employed to create an adult tank with a continuous conductivity distribution, and a neonatal tank with fontanelles. Using 3D scanning a geometric accuracy of 0.21 mm was recorded, equal to that of the precision of the 3D printer used. Differences of 6.1%  ±  6.4% (n  =  11 in 4 tanks) compared to simulations were recorded in c. 800 boundary voltages. This may be attributed to the morphology of the skulls increasing tortuosity effects and hole misalignment. Despite significant differences in errors between three repetitions of the neonatal tank, images of a realistic perturbation could still be reconstructed with different tanks used for the baseline and perturbation datasets. These phantoms can be reproduced by any researcher with access to a 'hobbyist' 3D printer in a matter of days. All design files have been released using an open source license to encourage reproduction and modification.

  5. Distributed network, wireless and cloud computing enabled 3-D ultrasound; a new medical technology paradigm.

    PubMed

    Meir, Arie; Rubinsky, Boris

    2009-11-19

    Medical technologies are indispensable to modern medicine. However, they have become exceedingly expensive and complex and are not available to the economically disadvantaged majority of the world population in underdeveloped as well as developed parts of the world. For example, according to the World Health Organization about two thirds of the world population does not have access to medical imaging. In this paper we introduce a new medical technology paradigm centered on wireless technology and cloud computing that was designed to overcome the problems of increasing health technology costs. We demonstrate the value of the concept with an example; the design of a wireless, distributed network and central (cloud) computing enabled three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound system. Specifically, we demonstrate the feasibility of producing a 3-D high end ultrasound scan at a central computing facility using the raw data acquired at the remote patient site with an inexpensive low end ultrasound transducer designed for 2-D, through a mobile device and wireless connection link between them. Producing high-end 3D ultrasound images with simple low-end transducers reduces the cost of imaging by orders of magnitude. It also removes the requirement of having a highly trained imaging expert at the patient site, since the need for hand-eye coordination and the ability to reconstruct a 3-D mental image from 2-D scans, which is a necessity for high quality ultrasound imaging, is eliminated. This could enable relatively untrained medical workers in developing nations to administer imaging and a more accurate diagnosis, effectively saving the lives of people.

  6. Temperature distributions in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell from 3-D numerical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Rainey, E. S. G.; Kavner, A.; Hernlund, J. W.

    2013-11-28

    We present TempDAC, a 3-D numerical model for calculating the steady-state temperature distribution for continuous wave laser-heated experiments in the diamond anvil cell. TempDAC solves the steady heat conduction equation in three dimensions over the sample chamber, gasket, and diamond anvils and includes material-, temperature-, and direction-dependent thermal conductivity, while allowing for flexible sample geometries, laser beam intensity profile, and laser absorption properties. The model has been validated against an axisymmetric analytic solution for the temperature distribution within a laser-heated sample. Example calculations illustrate the importance of considering heat flow in three dimensions for the laser-heated diamond anvil cell. In particular, we show that a “flat top” input laser beam profile does not lead to a more uniform temperature distribution or flatter temperature gradients than a wide Gaussian laser beam.

  7. The 3D heat flux density distribution on a novel parabolic trough wavy absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demagh, Yassine; Kabar, Yassine; Bordja, Lyes; Noui, Samira

    2016-05-01

    The non-uniform concentrated solar flux distribution on the outer surface of the absorber pipe can lead to large circumferential gradient temperature and high concentrated temperature of the absorber pipe wall, which is one of the primary causes of parabolic trough solar receiver breakdown. In this study, a novel shape of the parabolic trough absorber pipe is proposed as a solution to well homogenize the solar flux distribution, as well as, the temperature in the absorber wall. The conventional straight absorber located along the focal line of the parabola is replaced by wavy one (invention patent by Y. Demagh [1]) for which the heat flux density distribution on the outer surface varies in both axial and azimuthal directions (3D) while it varies only in the azimuthal direction on the former (2D). As far as we know, there is not previous study which has used a longitudinally wavy pipe as an absorber into the parabolic trough collector unit.

  8. 2D to 3D Evaluation of Organs at Risk Doses in Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Bok Ai; Lee, Khai Mun

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) bladder and rectum reference points doses with volumetric doses in 3D intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) for cervical cancer. Also to compare bladder, rectum and sigmoid (organs at risk, OARs) volume doses with dose constraints recommended by the (GYN) GEC-ESTRO Working Group. Material and methods A retrospective study was carried out on 10 patients with a total of 55 fractions CT-based high dose rate (HDR) ICBT. ICRU bladder (bICRU) and rectum (rICRU) points were defined according to ICRU Report 38 on the CT images and prospectively kept to less than 80% of prescription dose to Point A during real treatment planning. Post-treatment, outer wall of OARs were contoured and minimum dose to 2cc (D2cc) of the most irradiated part of the OARs was obtained from the dose-volume histogram (DVH). Total dose (external beam radiotherapy plus ICBT) were computed with ICRU point dose and D2cc and compared. Results The mean ICRU point dose and D2cc volume dose were found to be significantly different for bladder (per fraction: p = 0.000; total dose: p = 0.004) but no differences were found for rectum (per fraction: p = 0.055; total dose: p = 0.090). bICRU point dose underestimated D2cc dose with an average ratio of 1.34 ± 0.34. 3 out of 10 patients, 7 out of 10 patients, and 5 out of 10 patients exceeded the recommended dose constraint for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid, respectively. Conclusions bICRU was not representative of bladder D2cc and resulted in different total dose. rICRU was found to be similar to D2cc dose and was reliable in total dose computation. Our current institutional practice of point-based planning in ICBT resulted in significant number of patients’ OARs doses exceeded the volume constraint, because the total dose concept was not used propectively in planning. PMID:28031742

  9. Prediction of velocity distribution from pore structure in 3D porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlAdwani, M. S. K. F. S.; De Anna, P.; Juanes, R.

    2016-12-01

    Fluid flow and particle transport through porous media are determined by the geometry of the host medium itself. Despite the fundamental importance of the velocity distribution in controlling early-time and late-time transport properties (e.g., early breakthrough and superdiffusive spreading), direct relations linking velocity distribution with the statistics of pore structure in 3D porous media have not been established yet. High velocities are controlled by the formation of channels, while low velocities are dominated by stagnation zones. Recent studies have proposed phenomenological models for the distribution of high velocities including stretched exponential and power-exponential distributions but without an underlying mechanistic or statistical physics theory. Here, we investigate the relationship between the structure of the host medium and the resulting fluid flow and particle transport properties. We extend recent work on simple 2D media consisting of circular nonoverlapping disks, and consider 3D random packs of spheres. This disordered spherical-pack arrangement can be characterized geometrically by constructing a Delaunay triangulation of the disk centers: each tetrahedron defines a pore body and each triangular face defines a pore throat. We simulate flow in the exact pore geometry at low Reynolds numbers by solving the Stokes equations and imposing a no-slip boundary condition at the boundary of each sphere. We develop a theoretical model to explain the observed distribution of the low velocities. We understand flow through the porous medium as being controlled by the pore throats, and we conceptualize flow through each pore throat as a Hagen-Poiseuille flow through a pipe of irregular shape controlled by its area and its shape factor. Despite its simplicity, the analytical predictions from the model agree well with high-resolution simulations, both in terms of velocity distribution and ensuing anomalous particle spreading.

  10. A statistical approach to estimate the 3D size distribution of spheres from 2D size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kong, M.; Bhattacharya, R.N.; James, C.; Basu, A.

    2005-01-01

    Size distribution of rigidly embedded spheres in a groundmass is usually determined from measurements of the radii of the two-dimensional (2D) circular cross sections of the spheres in random flat planes of a sample, such as in thin sections or polished slabs. Several methods have been devised to find a simple factor to convert the mean of such 2D size distributions to the actual 3D mean size of the spheres without a consensus. We derive an entirely theoretical solution based on well-established probability laws and not constrained by limitations of absolute size, which indicates that the ratio of the means of measured 2D and estimated 3D grain size distribution should be r/4 (=.785). Actual 2D size distribution of the radii of submicron sized, pure Fe0 globules in lunar agglutinitic glass, determined from backscattered electron images, is tested to fit the gamma size distribution model better than the log-normal model. Numerical analysis of 2D size distributions of Fe0 globules in 9 lunar soils shows that the average mean of 2D/3D ratio is 0.84, which is very close to the theoretical value. These results converge with the ratio 0.8 that Hughes (1978) determined for millimeter-sized chondrules from empirical measurements. We recommend that a factor of 1.273 (reciprocal of 0.785) be used to convert the determined 2D mean size (radius or diameter) of a population of spheres to estimate their actual 3D size. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  11. 3D Dose reconstruction: Banding artefacts in cine mode EPID images during VMAT delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, H. C.; Greer, P. B.

    2013-06-01

    Cine (continuous) mode images obtained during VMAT delivery are heavily degraded by banding artefacts. We have developed a method to reconstruct the pulse sequence (and hence dose deposited) from open field images. For clinical VMAT fields we have devised a frame averaging strategy that greatly improves image quality and dosimetric information for three-dimensional dose reconstruction.

  12. Optimizing the Terzaghi Estimator of the 3D Distribution of Rock Fracture Orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Huiming; Huang, Lei; Juang, C. Hsein; Zhang, Junrong

    2017-08-01

    Orientation statistics are prone to bias when surveyed with the scanline mapping technique in which the observed probabilities differ, depending on the intersection angle between the fracture and the scanline. This bias leads to 1D frequency statistical data that are poorly representative of the 3D distribution. A widely accessible estimator named after Terzaghi was developed to estimate 3D frequencies from 1D biased observations, but the estimation accuracy is limited for fractures at narrow intersection angles to scanlines (termed the blind zone). Although numerous works have concentrated on accuracy with respect to the blind zone, accuracy outside the blind zone has rarely been studied. This work contributes to the limited investigations of accuracy outside the blind zone through a qualitative assessment that deploys a mathematical derivation of the Terzaghi equation in conjunction with a quantitative evaluation that uses fractures simulation and verification of natural fractures. The results show that the estimator does not provide a precise estimate of 3D distributions and that the estimation accuracy is correlated with the grid size adopted by the estimator. To explore the potential for improving accuracy, the particular grid size producing maximum accuracy is identified from 168 combinations of grid sizes and two other parameters. The results demonstrate that the 2° × 2° grid size provides maximum accuracy for the estimator in most cases when applied outside the blind zone. However, if the global sample density exceeds 0.5°-2, then maximum accuracy occurs at a grid size of 1° × 1°.

  13. Individualized 3D Reconstruction of Normal Tissue Dose for Patients With Long-term Follow-up: A Step Toward Understanding Dose Risk for Late Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Angela; Brock, Kristy K.; Sharpe, Michael B.; Moseley, Joanne L.; Craig, Tim; Hodgson, David C.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Understanding the relationship between normal tissue dose and delayed radiation toxicity is an important component of developing more effective radiation therapy. Late outcome data are generally available only for patients who have undergone 2-dimensional (2D) treatment plans. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of 3D normal tissue dosimetry derived from reconstructed 2D treatment plans in Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) patients. Methods and Materials: Three-dimensional lung, heart, and breast volumes were reconstructed from 2D planning radiographs for HL patients who received mediastinal radiation therapy. For each organ, a reference 3D organ was modified with patient-specific structural information, using deformable image processing software. Radiation therapy plans were reconstructed by applying treatment parameters obtained from patient records to the reconstructed 3D volumes. For each reconstructed organ mean dose (D{sub mean}) and volumes covered by at least 5 Gy (V{sub 5}) and 20Gy (V{sub 20}) were calculated. This process was performed for 15 patients who had both 2D and 3D planning data available to compare the reconstructed normal tissue doses with those derived from the primary CT planning data and also for 10 historically treated patients with only 2D imaging available. Results: For patients with 3D planning data, the normal tissue doses could be reconstructed accurately using 2D planning data. Median differences in D{sub mean} between reconstructed and actual plans were 0.18 Gy (lungs), -0.15 Gy (heart), and 0.30 Gy (breasts). Median difference in V{sub 5} and V{sub 20} were less than 2% for each organ. Reconstructed 3D dosimetry was substantially higher in historical mantle-field treatments than contemporary involved-field mediastinal treatments: average D{sub mean} values were 15.2 Gy vs 10.6 Gy (lungs), 27.0 Gy vs 14.3 Gy (heart), and 8.0 Gy vs 3.2 Gy (breasts). Conclusions: Three-dimensional reconstruction of absorbed dose to

  14. Individualized 3D reconstruction of normal tissue dose for patients with long-term follow-up: a step toward understanding dose risk for late toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ng, Angela; Brock, Kristy K; Sharpe, Michael B; Moseley, Joanne L; Craig, Tim; Hodgson, David C

    2012-11-15

    Understanding the relationship between normal tissue dose and delayed radiation toxicity is an important component of developing more effective radiation therapy. Late outcome data are generally available only for patients who have undergone 2-dimensional (2D) treatment plans. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of 3D normal tissue dosimetry derived from reconstructed 2D treatment plans in Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) patients. Three-dimensional lung, heart, and breast volumes were reconstructed from 2D planning radiographs for HL patients who received mediastinal radiation therapy. For each organ, a reference 3D organ was modified with patient-specific structural information, using deformable image processing software. Radiation therapy plans were reconstructed by applying treatment parameters obtained from patient records to the reconstructed 3D volumes. For each reconstructed organ mean dose (Dmean) and volumes covered by at least 5 Gy (V5) and 20 Gy (V20) were calculated. This process was performed for 15 patients who had both 2D and 3D planning data available to compare the reconstructed normal tissue doses with those derived from the primary CT planning data and also for 10 historically treated patients with only 2D imaging available. For patients with 3D planning data, the normal tissue doses could be reconstructed accurately using 2D planning data. Median differences in Dmean between reconstructed and actual plans were 0.18 Gy (lungs), -0.15 Gy (heart), and 0.30 Gy (breasts). Median difference in V5 and V20 were less than 2% for each organ. Reconstructed 3D dosimetry was substantially higher in historical mantle-field treatments than contemporary involved-field mediastinal treatments: average Dmean values were 15.2 Gy vs 10.6 Gy (lungs), 27.0 Gy vs 14.3 Gy (heart), and 8.0 Gy vs 3.2 Gy (breasts). Three-dimensional reconstruction of absorbed dose to organs at risk can be estimated accurately many years after exposure by using limited 2D data

  15. 3D global estimation and augmented reality visualization of intra-operative X-ray dose.

    PubMed

    Rodas, Nicolas Loy; Padoy, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The growing use of image-guided minimally-invasive surgical procedures is confronting clinicians and surgical staff with new radiation exposure risks from X-ray imaging devices. The accurate estimation of intra-operative radiation exposure can increase staff awareness of radiation exposure risks and enable the implementation of well-adapted safety measures. The current surgical practice of wearing a single dosimeter at chest level to measure radiation exposure does not provide a sufficiently accurate estimation of radiation absorption throughout the body. In this paper, we propose an approach that combines data from wireless dosimeters with the simulation of radiation propagation in order to provide a global radiation risk map in the area near the X-ray device. We use a multi-camera RGBD system to obtain a 3D point cloud reconstruction of the room. The positions of the table, C-arm and clinician are then used 1) to simulate the propagation of radiation in a real-world setup and 2) to overlay the resulting 3D risk-map onto the scene in an augmented reality manner. By using real-time wireless dosimeters in our system, we can both calibrate the simulation and validate its accuracy at specific locations in real-time. We demonstrate our system in an operating room equipped with a robotised X-ray imaging device and validate the radiation simulation on several X-ray acquisition setups.

  16. A coordinate transformation method for calculating the 3D light intensity distribution in ICF hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhili; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Kuixia; Chen, Xudong; Chen, Mingyu; Pu, Jixiong

    2016-06-01

    For an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) system, the light intensity distribution in the hohlraum is key to the initial plasma excitation and later laser-plasma interaction process. Based on the concept of coordinate transformation of spatial points and vector, we present a robust method with a detailed procedure that makes the calculation of the three dimensional (3D) light intensity distribution in hohlraum easily. The method is intuitive but powerful enough to solve the complex cases of random number of laser beams with arbitrary polarization states and incidence angles. Its application is exemplified in the Shenguang III Facility (SG-III) that verifies its effectiveness and it is useful for guiding the design of hohlraum structure parameter.

  17. Spatial Distribution of Yarns and Mechanical Properties in 3D Braided Tubular Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, A. S. D.

    1997-03-01

    This paper outlines a method which links the following analytically simulated events in sequence: (1) braiding of a 3D preform of tubular cross-section characterized by a set of braiding parameters defining the braiding setup and braiding steps; (2) geometric description of the yarn topology in the braided preform in explicit terms of a set of topological parameters defined by the preform shape and the braiding parameters; (3) description of the exact yarn distribution after preform consolidation with a binding matrix the values of the topological parameters are related to the exterior dimensions and surface features of the consolidated preform; and (4) forecasting the mechanical properties in the final composite via a suitable micromechanics model that takes into account the spatial yarn distribution in the composite and properties of the constituents.

  18. 3D Distribution of the Coronal Electron Density and its Evolution with Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tongjiang; Reginald, Nelson Leslie; Davila, Joseph M.; St. Cyr, Orville Chris

    2016-05-01

    The variability of the solar white-light corona and its connection to the solar activity has been studied for more than a half century. It is widely accepted that the temporal variation of the total radiance of the K-corona follows the solar cycle pattern (e.g., correlated with sunspot number). However, the origin of this variation and its relationships with regard to coronal mass ejections and the solar wind are yet to be clearly understood. We know that the COR1-A and -B instruments onboard the STEREO spacecraft have continued to perform high-cadence (5 min) polarized brightness measurements from two different vantage points over a long period of time that encompasses the solar minimum of Solar Cycle 23 to the solar maximum of Solar Cycle 24. This extended period of polarized brightness measurements can now be used to reconstruct 3D electron density distributions of the corona between the heliocentric heights of 1.5-4.0 solar radii. In this study we have constructed the 3D coronal density models for 100 Carrington rotations (CRs) from 2007 to 2014 using the spherically symmetric inversion (SSI) method. The validity of these 3D density models is verified by comparing with similar 3D density models created by other means such as tomography, MHD modeling, and 2D density distributions inverted from the polarized brightness images from LASCO/C2 instrument onboard the SOHO spacecraft. When examining the causes for the temporal variation of the global electron content we find that its increase from the solar minimum to maximum depends on changes to both the total area and mean density of coronal streamers. We also find that the global and hemispheric electron contents show quasi-periodic variations with a period of 8-9 CRs during the ascending and maximum phases of Solar Cycle 24 through wavelet analysis. In addition, we also explore any obvious relationships between temporal variation of the global electron content with the photospheric magnetic flux, total mass of

  19. Correlation of Point B and Lymph Node Dose in 3D-Planned High-Dose-Rate Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Larissa J.; Sadow, Cheryl A.; Russell, Anthony; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To compare high dose rate (HDR) point B to pelvic lymph node dose using three-dimensional-planned brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with FIGO Stage IB-IIIB cervical cancer received 70 tandem HDR applications using CT-based treatment planning. The obturator, external, and internal iliac lymph nodes (LN) were contoured. Per fraction (PF) and combined fraction (CF) right (R), left (L), and bilateral (Bil) nodal doses were analyzed. Point B dose was compared with LN dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters by paired t test and Pearson correlation coefficients. Results: Mean PF and CF doses to point B were R 1.40 Gy +- 0.14 (CF: 7 Gy), L 1.43 +- 0.15 (CF: 7.15 Gy), and Bil 1.41 +- 0.15 (CF: 7.05 Gy). The correlation coefficients between point B and the D100, D90, D50, D2cc, D1cc, and D0.1cc LN were all less than 0.7. Only the D2cc to the obturator and the D0.1cc to the external iliac nodes were not significantly different from the point B dose. Significant differences between R and L nodal DVHs were seen, likely related to tandem deviation from irregular tumor anatomy. Conclusions: With HDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer, per fraction nodal dose approximates a dose equivalent to teletherapy. Point B is a poor surrogate for dose to specific nodal groups. Three-dimensional defined nodal contours during brachytherapy provide a more accurate reflection of delivered dose and should be part of comprehensive planning of the total dose to the pelvic nodes, particularly when there is evidence of pathologic involvement.

  20. High-resolution, low-dose phase contrast X-ray tomography for 3D diagnosis of human breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunzhe; Brun, Emmanuel; Coan, Paola; Huang, Zhifeng; Sztrókay, Aniko; Diemoz, Paul Claude; Liebhardt, Susanne; Mittone, Alberto; Gasilov, Sergei; Miao, Jianwei; Bravin, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Mammography is the primary imaging tool for screening and diagnosis of human breast cancers, but ∼10–20% of palpable tumors are not detectable on mammograms and only about 40% of biopsied lesions are malignant. Here we report a high-resolution, low-dose phase contrast X-ray tomographic method for 3D diagnosis of human breast cancers. By combining phase contrast X-ray imaging with an image reconstruction method known as equally sloped tomography, we imaged a human breast in three dimensions and identified a malignant cancer with a pixel size of 92 μm and a radiation dose less than that of dual-view mammography. According to a blind evaluation by five independent radiologists, our method can reduce the radiation dose and acquisition time by ∼74% relative to conventional phase contrast X-ray tomography, while maintaining high image resolution and image contrast. These results demonstrate that high-resolution 3D diagnostic imaging of human breast cancers can, in principle, be performed at clinical compatible doses. PMID:23091003

  1. The lithospheric-scale 3D structural configuration of the North Alpine Foreland Basin constrained by gravity modelling and the calculation of the 3D load distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybycin, Anna M.; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Schneider, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The North Alpine Foreland Basin is situated in the northern front of the European Alps and extends over parts of France, Switzerland, Germany and Austria. It formed as a wedge shaped depression since the Tertiary in consequence of the Euro - Adriatic continental collision and the Alpine orogeny. The basin is filled with clastic sediments, the Molasse, originating from erosional processes of the Alps and underlain by Mesozoic sedimentary successions and a Paleozoic crystalline crust. For our study we have focused on the German part of the basin. To investigate the deep structure, the isostatic state and the load distribution of this region we have constructed a 3D structural model of the basin and the Alpine area using available depth and thickness maps, regional scale 3D structural models as well as seismic and well data for the sedimentary part. The crust (from the top Paleozoic down to the Moho (Grad et al. 2008)) has been considered as two-parted with a lighter upper crust and a denser lower crust; the partition has been calculated following the approach of isostatic equilibrium of Pratt (1855). By implementing a seismic Lithosphere-Asthenosphere-Boundary (LAB) (Tesauro 2009) the crustal scale model has been extended to the lithospheric-scale. The layer geometry and the assigned bulk densities of this starting model have been constrained by means of 3D gravity modelling (BGI, 2012). Afterwards the 3D load distribution has been calculated using a 3D finite element method. Our results show that the North Alpine Foreland Basin is not isostatically balanced and that the configuration of the crystalline crust strongly controls the gravity field in this area. Furthermore, our results show that the basin area is influenced by varying lateral load differences down to a depth of more than 150 km what allows a first order statement of the required compensating horizontal stress needed to prevent gravitational collapse of the system. BGI (2012). The International

  2. Probability distribution functions for cover used in 3-D model simulating concrete deterioration in port assets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homer, Rachel M.; Law, David W.; Molyneaux, Thomas C. K.

    2015-07-01

    In previous studies, a 1-D numerical predictive tool to simulate the salt induced corrosion of port assets in Australia has been developed into a 2-D and 3-D model based on current predictive probabilistic models. These studies use a probability distribution function based on the mean and standard deviation of the parameters for a structure incorporating surface chloride concentration, diffusion coefficient and cover. In this paper, this previous work is extended through an investigation of the distribution of actual cover by specified cover, element type and method of construction. Significant differences are found for the measured cover within structures, by method of construction, element type and specified cover. The data are not normally distributed and extreme values, usually low, are found in a number of locations. Elements cast insitu are less likely to meet the specified cover and the measured cover is more dispersed than those in elements which are precast. Individual probability distribution functions are available and are tested against the original function. Methods of combining results so that one distribution is available for a structure are formulated and evaluated. The ability to utilise the model for structures where no measurement have been taken is achieved by transposing results based on the specified cover.

  3. 3D ion velocity distribution function measurement in an electric thruster using laser induced fluorescence tomography.

    PubMed

    Elias, P Q; Jarrige, J; Cucchetti, E; Cannat, F; Packan, D

    2017-09-01

    Measuring the full ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) by non-intrusive techniques can improve our understanding of the ionization processes and beam dynamics at work in electric thrusters. In this paper, a Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) tomographic reconstruction technique is applied to the measurement of the IVDF in the plume of a miniature Hall effect thruster. A setup is developed to move the laser axis along two rotation axes around the measurement volume. The fluorescence spectra taken from different viewing angles are combined using a tomographic reconstruction algorithm to build the complete 3D (in phase space) time-averaged distribution function. For the first time, this technique is used in the plume of a miniature Hall effect thruster to measure the full distribution function of the xenon ions. Two examples of reconstructions are provided, in front of the thruster nose-cone and in front of the anode channel. The reconstruction reveals the features of the ion beam, in particular on the thruster axis where a toroidal distribution function is observed. These findings are consistent with the thruster shape and operation. This technique, which can be used with other LIF schemes, could be helpful in revealing the details of the ion production regions and the beam dynamics. Using a more powerful laser source, the current implementation of the technique could be improved to reduce the measurement time and also to reconstruct the temporal evolution of the distribution function.

  4. Applicator reconstruction in MRI 3D image-based dose planning of brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Haack, Søren; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Gelineck, John; Tanderup, Kari

    2009-05-01

    To elaborate a method for applicator reconstruction for MRI-based brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Custom-made plastic catheters with a copper sulphate solution were made for insertion in the source channels of MR-CT compatible applicators: plastic and titanium tandem ring applicators, and titanium needles. The applicators were CT and MR scanned in a phantom for accurate 3D assessment of applicator visibility and geometry. A reconstruction method was developed and evaluated in 19 patient MR examinations with ring applicator (plastic: 14, titanium: 5). MR applicator reconstruction uncertainties related to inter-observer variation were evaluated. The catheters were visible in the plastic applicator on T1-weighted images in phantom and in 14/14 clinical applications. On T2-weighted images, the catheters appeared weaker but still visible in phantom and in 13/14 MR clinical applications. In the titanium applicator, the catheters could not be separated from the artifacts from the applicator itself. However, these artifacts could be used to localize both titanium ring applicator (5/5 clinical applications) and needles (6/6 clinical applications). Standard deviations of inter-observer differences were below 2 mm in all directions. 3D applicator reconstruction based on MR imaging could be performed for plastic and titanium applicators. Plastic applicators proved well to be suited for MRI-based reconstruction. For improved practicability of titanium applicator reconstruction, development of MR applicator markers is essential. Reconstruction of titanium applicator and needles at 1.5 T MR requires geometric evaluations in phantoms before using the applicator in patients.

  5. SU-E-T-678: Response Calibration Using Electron Depth-Dose Data for MRI-Based 3D Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Y; Warmington, L; Gopishankar, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a calibration method using the depth-dose data of an electron beam for MRI-based polymer gel dosimetry. Methods: MAGAT was manufactured in-house to fill two 400mL-cylindrical phantoms and nine 22mL-glass vials. Phantom-A was irradiated along the cylinder axis with a 9MeV electron beam of 6 cm x 6 cm field size (FS). Phantom-B was irradiated with a 6MV photon beam of 3 cm x 3 cm FS by a 360-degree arc technique. Eight vials were irradiated in a water-bath to various doses with a 20 cm x 20 cm FS 6MV photon beam. All irradiated phantoms and one un-irradiated vial were scanned with a 3T MRI scanner to obtain the spin-spin relaxation rate (R2) distributions. By comparing the measured R2-to-depth data with the known depth-dose data for Phantom-A, R2-to-dose calibration data were obtained (e-beam method). Another calibration data were obtained from the 9 vials data (9-vial method). We tested two regression equations, i.e., third-order polynomial and tangent functions, and two dose normalization methods, i.e., one-point and two-point methods. Then, these two calibration methods were used to obtain the 3D dose distribution of Phantom-B and evaluated by comparing the measured data with the dose distribution from a treatment planning system. The comparison was made with gamma passing rate (2%/2mm criteria). Results: We did not observe a clear advantage of the e-beam method over the 9-vial method for the 3D dose comparison with the test case. Nevertheless, we found that the e-beam method required a smaller dose scaling for the dose comparison. Furthermore, the tangent function showed better data fitting than the polynomial function with smaller uncertainty of the estimated coefficients. Conclusions: Considering the overall superior performance, we recommend the e-beam method with the tangent function as the regression equation and one-point dose normalization for the MRI-based polymer gel dosimetry.

  6. Distribution of free gas and 3D mirror image structures beneath Sevastopol mud volcano, Black sea, from 3D high resolution wide-angle seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbenhoeft, A.; Papenberg, C. A.; Klaeschen, D.; Bialas, J.

    2016-12-01

    The goal of this study is to image the sub-seafloor structure beneath the Sevastopol mud volcano (SMV), Sorokin Trough, SE of the Crimean peninsula, Black Sea. The focus lies on structures of/within the feeder channel, the distribution of gas and gas hydrates, and their relation to fluid migration zones in sediments. This study concentrates on a 3D high resolution seismic grid (7 km x 2.5 km) recorded with 13 ocean bottom stations (OBS). The 3D nature of the experiment results from the geometry of 68 densely spaced (25/50 m) profiles, as well as the cubical configuration of the densely spaced receivers on the seafloor ( 300 m station spacing). The seismic profiles are typically longer than 6 km which results in large offsets for the reflections of the OBS. This enables the study of the seismic velocities of the sub-seafloor sediments and additionally large offset incident analysis.The 3D Kirchhoff mirror image time migration, applied to all OBS sections including all shots from all profiles, leads to a spatial image of the sub-seafloor. Here, the migration was applied with the velocity distribution of 1.49 km/s in the water column, 1.5 km/s below the seafloor (bsf) increasing to 2 km/s for the deeper sediments at 2 s bsf. Acoustic blanking occurs beneath the south-easterly located OBS and is associated with the feeder channel of the mud volcano. There, gas from depth can vertically migrate to the seafloor and on its way to the surface horizontally distribute patchily within sediment layers. High amplitude reflections are not observed as continuous reflections, but in a patchy distribution. They are associated with accumulations of gas. Also structures exist within the feeder channel of the SMV.3D mirror imaging proves to be a good tool to seismically image structures compared with 2D streamer seismics, especially steep dipping reflectors and structures which are otherwise obscured by signal scattering, i.e structures associated with fluid migration paths.

  7. Distributed snow and rock temperature modelling in steep rock walls using Alpine3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberkorn, Anna; Wever, Nander; Hoelzle, Martin; Phillips, Marcia; Kenner, Robert; Bavay, Mathias; Lehning, Michael

    2017-02-01

    In this study we modelled the influence of the spatially and temporally heterogeneous snow cover on the surface energy balance and thus on rock temperatures in two rugged, steep rock walls on the Gemsstock ridge in the central Swiss Alps. The heterogeneous snow depth distribution in the rock walls was introduced to the distributed, process-based energy balance model Alpine3D with a precipitation scaling method based on snow depth data measured by terrestrial laser scanning. The influence of the snow cover on rock temperatures was investigated by comparing a snow-covered model scenario (precipitation input provided by precipitation scaling) with a snow-free (zero precipitation input) one. Model uncertainties are discussed and evaluated at both the point and spatial scales against 22 near-surface rock temperature measurements and high-resolution snow depth data from winter terrestrial laser scans.In the rough rock walls, the heterogeneously distributed snow cover was moderately well reproduced by Alpine3D with mean absolute errors ranging between 0.31 and 0.81 m. However, snow cover duration was reproduced well and, consequently, near-surface rock temperatures were modelled convincingly. Uncertainties in rock temperature modelling were found to be around 1.6 °C. Errors in snow cover modelling and hence in rock temperature simulations are explained by inadequate snow settlement due to linear precipitation scaling, missing lateral heat fluxes in the rock, and by errors caused by interpolation of shortwave radiation, wind and air temperature into the rock walls.Mean annual near-surface rock temperature increases were both measured and modelled in the steep rock walls as a consequence of a thick, long-lasting snow cover. Rock temperatures were 1.3-2.5 °C higher in the shaded and sunny rock walls, while comparing snow-covered to snow-free simulations. This helps to assess the potential error made in ground temperature modelling when neglecting snow in steep bedrock.

  8. Local ISM 3D Distribution and Soft X-ray Background Inferences for Nearby Hot Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puspitarini, L.; Lallement, R.; Snowden, Steven L.; Vergely, J.-L.; Snowden, S.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) interstellar medium (ISM) maps can be used to locate not only interstellar (IS) clouds, but also IS bubbles between the clouds that are blown by stellar winds and supernovae, and are filled by hot gas. To demonstrate this, and to derive a clearer picture of the local ISM, we compare our recent 3D IS dust distribution maps to the ROSAT diffuse Xray background maps after removal of heliospheric emission. In the Galactic plane, there is a good correspondence between the locations and extents of the mapped nearby cavities and the soft (0.25 keV) background emission distribution, showing that most of these nearby cavities contribute to this soft X-ray emission. Assuming a constant dust to gas ratio and homogeneous 106 K hot gas filling the cavities, we modeled in a simple way the 0.25 keV surface brightness along the Galactic plane as seen from the Sun, taking into account the absorption by the mapped clouds. The data-model comparison favors the existence of hot gas in the solar neighborhood, the so-called Local Bubble (LB). The inferred mean pressure in the local cavities is found to be approx.9,400/cu cm K, in agreement with previous studies, providing a validation test for the method. On the other hand, the model overestimates the emission from the huge cavities located in the third quadrant. Using CaII absorption data, we show that the dust to CaII ratio is very small in those regions, implying the presence of a large quantity of lower temperature (non-X-ray emitting) ionized gas and as a consequence a reduction of the volume filled by hot gas, explaining at least part of the discrepancy. In the meridian plane, the two main brightness enhancements coincide well with the LB's most elongated parts and chimneys connecting the LB to the halo, but no particular nearby cavity is found towards the enhancement in the direction of the bright North Polar Spur (NPS) at high latitude. We searched in the 3D maps for the source regions of the higher energy

  9. Holographic measurement of wall stress distribution and 3D flow over a surface textured by microfibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocanegra, Humberto; Gorumlu, Seder; Aksak, Burak; Castillo, Luciano; Sheng, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Understanding how fluid flow interacts with micro-textured surfaces is crucial for a broad range of key biological processes and engineering applications including particle dispersion, pathogenic infections, and drag manipulation by surface topology. Existing methods, such as μPIV, suffers from low spatial resolution and fail to track tracer particle motion very close to a rough surface and within roughness elements. In this paper, we present a technique that combines high speed digital holographic microscopy (DHM) with a correlation based de-noising algorithm to overcome the optical interference generated by surface roughness and to capture a large number of 3D particle trajectories. It allows us to obtain a 3D velocity field with an uncertainty of 0.01% and 2D wall shear stress distribution at the resolution of ~ 65 μPa. Applying the technique to a microfluidics with a surface textured by microfibers, we find that the flow is three-dimensional and complex. While the microfibers affect the velocity flow field locally, their presence is felt globally in terms of wall shear stresses. The study of effect of microfiber patterns and flow characteristics on skin frictions are ongoing and will be reported.

  10. Dose optimization in gynecological 3D image based interstitial brachytherapy using martinez universal perineal interstitial template (MUPIT) -an institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pramod Kumar; Sharma, Praveen Kumar; Swamidas, Jamema V; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Deshpande, D. D.; Manjhi, Jayanand; Rai, D V

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the dose optimization in 3D image based gynecological interstitial brachytherapy using Martinez Universal Perineal Interstitial Template (MUPIT). Axial CT image data set of 20 patients of gynecological cancer who underwent external radiotherapy and high dose rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy using MUPIT was employed to delineate clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk (OARs). Geometrical and graphical optimization were done for optimum CTV coverage and sparing of OARs. Coverage Index (CI), dose homogeneity index (DHI), overdose index (OI), dose non-uniformity ratio (DNR), external volume index (EI), conformity index (COIN) and dose volume parameters recommended by GEC-ESTRO were evaluated. The mean CTV, bladder and rectum volume were 137 ± 47cc, 106 ± 41cc and 50 ± 25cc, respectively. Mean CI, DHI and DNR were 0.86 ± 0.03, 0.69 ± 0.11 and 0.31 ± 0.09, while the mean OI, EI, and COIN were 0.08 ± 0.03, 0.07 ± 0.05 and 0.79 ± 0.05, respectively. The estimated mean CTV D90 was 76 ± 11Gy and D100 was 63 ± 9Gy. The different dosimetric parameters of bladder D2cc, D1cc and D0.1cc were 76 ± 11Gy, 81 ± 14Gy, and 98 ± 21Gy and of rectum/recto-sigmoid were 80 ± 17Gy, 85 ± 13Gy, and 124 ± 37Gy, respectively. Dose optimization yields superior coverage with optimal values of indices. Emerging data on 3D image based brachytherapy with reporting and clinical correlation of DVH parameters outcome is enterprizing and provides definite assistance in improving the quality of brachytherapy implants. DVH parameter for urethra in gynecological implants needs to be defined further. PMID:25190999

  11. Feasibility of a Multigroup Deterministic Solution Method for 3D Radiotherapy Dose Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Vassiliev, Oleg N.; Wareing, Todd A.; Davis, Ian M.; McGhee, John; Barnett, Douglas; Horton, John L.; Gifford, Kent; Failla, Gregory; Titt, Uwe; Mourtada, Firas

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the potential of a novel deterministic solver, Attila, for external photon beam radiotherapy dose calculations. Methods and Materials Two hypothetical cases for prostate and head and neck cancer photon beam treatment plans were calculated using Attila and EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations. Open beams were modeled as isotropic photon point sources collimated to specified field sizes (100 cm SSD). The sources had a realistic energy spectrum calculated by Monte Carlo for a Varian Clinac 2100 operated in a 6MV photon mode. The Attila computational grids consisted of 106,000 elements, or 424,000 spatial degrees of freedom, for the prostate case, and 123,000 tetrahedral elements, or 492,000 spatial degrees of freedom, for the head and neck cases. Results For both cases, results demonstrate excellent agreement between Attila and EGSnrc in all areas, including the build-up regions, near heterogeneities, and at the beam penumbra. Dose agreement for 99% of the voxels was within 3% (relative point-wise difference) or 3mm distance-to-agreement criterion. Localized differences between the Attila and EGSnrc results were observed at bone and soft tissue interfaces, and are attributable to the effect of voxel material homogenization in calculating dose-to-medium in EGSnrc. For both cases, Attila calculation times were under 20 CPU minutes on a single 2.2 GHz AMD Opteron processor. Conclusions The methods in Attila have the potential to be the basis for an efficient dose engine for patient specific treatment planning, providing accuracy similar to that obtained by Monte Carlo. PMID:18722273

  12. SU-F-BRE-06: Evaluation of Patient CT Dose Reconstruction From 3D Diode Array Measurements Using Anthropomorphic Phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, M; Benhabib, S; Cardan, R; Brezovich, I; Popple, R; Faught, A; Followill, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare 3D reconstructed dose of IMRT plans from 3D diode array measurements with measurements in anthropomorphic phantoms. Methods: Six IMRT plans were created for the IROC Houston (RPC) head and neck (H and N) and lung phantoms following IROC Houston planning protocols. The plans included flattened and unflattened beam energies ranging from 6 MV to 15 MV and both static and dynamic MLC tecH and Niques. Each plan was delivered three times to the respective anthropomorphic phantom, each of which contained thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and radiochromic films (RCFs). The plans were also delivered to a Delta4 diode array (Scandidos, Uppsala, Sweden). Irradiations were done using a TrueBeam STx (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The dose in the patient was calculated by the Delta4 software, which used the diode measurements to estimate incident energy fluence and a kernel-based pencil beam algorithm to calculate dose. The 3D dose results were compared with the TLD and RCF measurements. Results: In the lung, the average difference between TLDs and Delta4 calculations was 5% (range 2%–7%). For the H and N, the average differences were 2.4% (range 0%–4.5%) and 1.1% (range 0%–2%) for the high- and low-dose targets, respectively, and 12% (range 10%-13%) for the organ-at-risk simulating the spinal cord. For the RCF and criteria of 7%/4mm, 5%/3mm, and 3%/3mm, the average gamma-index pass rates were 95.4%, 85.7%, and 76.1%, respectively for the H and N and 76.2%, 57.8%, and 49.5% for the lung. The pass-rate in the lung decreased with increasing beam energy, as expected for a pencil beam algorithm. Conclusion: The H and N phantom dose reconstruction met the IROC Houston acceptance criteria for clinical trials; however, the lung phantom dose did not, most likely due to the inaccuracy of the pencil beam algorithm in the presence of low-density inhomogeneities. Work supported by PHS grant CA10953 and CA81647 (NCI, DHHS)

  13. The distribution of 3D superconductivity near the second critical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachmar, Ayman; Nasrallah, Marwa

    2016-09-01

    We study the minimizers of the Ginzburg-Landau energy functional with a uniform magnetic field in a three dimensional bounded domain. The functional depends on two positive parameters, the Ginzburg-Landau parameter and the intensity of the applied magnetic field, and acts on complex-valued functions and vector fields. We establish a formula for the distribution of the L 2-norm of the minimizing complex-valued function (order parameter). The formula is valid in the regime where the Ginzburg-Landau parameter is large and the applied magnetic field is close to and strictly below the second critical field—the threshold value corresponding to the transition from the superconducting to the normal phase in the bulk of the sample. Earlier results are valid in 2D domains and for the L 4-norm in 3D domains.

  14. Inverse modeling of InSAR and ground leveling data for 3D volumetric strain distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo, L. A.; Glowacka, E.; Sarychikhina, O.

    2015-12-01

    Wide availability of modern Interferometric Synthetic aperture Radar (InSAR) data have made possible the extensive observation of differential surface displacements and are becoming an efficient tool for the detailed monitoring of terrain subsidence associated to reservoir dynamics, volcanic deformation and active tectonism. Unfortunately, this increasing popularity has not been matched by the availability of automated codes to estimate underground deformation, since many of them still rely on trial-error subsurface model building strategies. We posit that an efficient algorithm for the volumetric modeling of differential surface displacements should match the availability of current leveling and InSAR data and have developed an algorithm for the joint inversion of ground leveling and dInSAR data in 3D. We assume the ground displacements are originated by a stress free-volume strain distribution in a homogeneous elastic media and determined the displacement field associated to an ensemble of rectangular prisms. This formulation is then used to develop a 3D conjugate gradient inversion code that searches for the three-dimensional distribution of the volumetric strains that predict InSAR and leveling surface displacements simultaneously. The algorithm is regularized applying discontinuos first and zero order Thikonov constraints. For efficiency, the resulting computational code takes advantage of the resulting convolution integral associated to the deformation field and some basic tools for multithreading parallelization. We extensively test our algorithm on leveling and InSAR test and field data of the Northwest of Mexico and compare to some feasible geological scenarios of underground deformation.

  15. 3D Self-Potential Inversion for Monitoring DNAPL Contaminant Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsley, B. J.; Sogade, J.; Vichabian, Y.; Morgan, F. D.

    2005-05-01

    Self-potential (SP) data are collected over an area known to be contaminated with Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The field experiment consists of approximately 100 SP measurements on a surface grid and in four boreholes, and is repeated after one year. DNAPLs are known to undergo redox reactions during their degradation in the environment, which is often biologically mediated. Self-potential geophysics is employed in this study because of its sensitivity to the in-situ biochemical processes that degrade the contaminants. These reactions provide an electrochemical source that is manifested as an SP signature at the measurement locations remote from the contaminated areas. 3D inversion of the SP data is therefore needed to spatially locate the distribution of sources, which is related to contaminant presence. The inversion incorporates the 3D resistivity structure collected at the same site, and is better constrained in depth by using borehole data and regularization. Ground truth information taken after the first field experiment provides concentration data with depth for several DNAPL species in five boreholes. There is a good correlation between the ground truth data and SP source inversion, though this comparison is limited by several factors: the difference in resolution of the ground truth and inverted data, and the dependence of the redox processes on other constituents that were not measured during the ground truthing, such as oxygen content or microbial presence. Inversion of the second year's dataset provides information on the changes in the contaminant distribution, either due to natural degradation or ongoing remediation.

  16. The ATLAS 3D project - XXIV. The intrinsic shape distribution of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijmans, Anne-Marie; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Emsellem, Eric; Krajnović, Davor; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Crocker, Alison F.; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Khochfar, Sadegh; Kuntschner, Harald; McDermid, Richard M.; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs; Young, Lisa M.

    2014-11-01

    We use the ATLAS3D sample to perform a study of the intrinsic shapes of early-type galaxies, taking advantage of the available combined photometric and kinematic data. Based on our ellipticity measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, and additional imaging from the Isaac Newton Telescope, we first invert the shape distribution of fast and slow rotators under the assumption of axisymmetry. The so-obtained intrinsic shape distribution for the fast rotators can be described with a Gaussian with a mean flattening of q = 0.25 and standard deviation σq = 0.14, and an additional tail towards rounder shapes. The slow rotators are much rounder, and are well described with a Gaussian with mean q = 0.63 and σq = 0.09. We then checked that our results were consistent when applying a different and independent method to obtain intrinsic shape distributions, by fitting the observed ellipticity distributions directly using Gaussian parametrizations for the intrinsic axis ratios. Although both fast and slow rotators are identified as early-type galaxies in morphological studies, and in many previous shape studies are therefore grouped together, their shape distributions are significantly different, hinting at different formation scenarios. The intrinsic shape distribution of the fast rotators shows similarities with the spiral galaxy population. Including the observed kinematic misalignment in our intrinsic shape study shows that the fast rotators are predominantly axisymmetric, with only very little room for triaxiality. For the slow rotators though there are very strong indications that they are (mildly) triaxial.

  17. SU-E-T-490: Independent Three-Dimensional (3D) Dose Verification of VMAT/SBRT Using EPID and Cloud Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, A; Han, B; Bush, K; Wang, L; Xing, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dosimetric verification of VMAT/SBRT is currently performed on one or two planes in a phantom with either film or array detectors. A robust and easy-to-use 3D dosimetric tool has been sought since the advent of conformal radiation therapy. Here we present such a strategy for independent 3D VMAT/SBRT plan verification system by a combined use of EPID and cloud-based Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation. Methods: The 3D dosimetric verification proceeds in two steps. First, the plan was delivered with a high resolution portable EPID mounted on the gantry, and the EPID-captured gantry-angle-resolved VMAT/SBRT field images were converted into fluence by using the EPID pixel response function derived from MC simulations. The fluence was resampled and used as the input for an in-house developed Amazon cloud-based MC software to reconstruct the 3D dose distribution. The accuracy of the developed 3D dosimetric tool was assessed using a Delta4 phantom with various field sizes (square, circular, rectangular, and irregular MLC fields) and different patient cases. The method was applied to validate VMAT/SBRT plans using WFF and FFF photon beams (Varian TrueBeam STX). Results: It was found that the proposed method yielded results consistent with the Delta4 measurements. For points on the two detector planes, a good agreement within 1.5% were found for all the testing fields. Patient VMAT/SBRT plan studies revealed similar level of accuracy: an average γ-index passing rate of 99.2± 0.6% (3mm/3%), 97.4± 2.4% (2mm/2%), and 72.6± 8.4 % ( 1mm/1%). Conclusion: A valuable 3D dosimetric verification strategy has been developed for VMAT/SBRT plan validation. The technique provides a viable solution for a number of intractable dosimetry problems, such as small fields and plans with high dose gradient.

  18. Assessing soil water storage distribution under sprinkler irrigation by coupling 3D simulations and field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Uday; Shabeeb, Ahmed; dragonetti, giovanna; Lamaddalena, Nicola; Coppola, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    This work analyzed the variability of sprinkler irrigation application over a bare soil, both in terms of water application efficiency and uniformity, by integrating and comparing the information on the irrigation depth data (ID), as measured by catch cans, soil water storage in the upper root zone, as measured by TDR probes, and a 3D simulations of water flow in soils. Three irrigation tests were performed at three different pressures (2, 3 and 4 bar). A lateral water redistribution was observed and simulated after each irrigation event by comparing spatial distributions of site-specific water application efficiency (AEs), as well as ratios of site-specific actual water storage increase (SWEs) and irrigation depth (IDs) to the water content before irrigation. Because of soil water redistribution processes, distribution uniformity based on soil storages was systematically higher than the catch can uniformity. The obvious consequence of lateral water redistribution processes was that the soil smoothing action on non-uniformity observed at the surface increased both with depth and over time. At a given depth the uniformity of soil water storages always attained the same value, whatever the pressure considered and the catch can-based uniformity coefficient. It was concluded that, for the case of random distribution of ID, the uniformity of water storages is driven by the soil behavior rather than by the irrigation system.

  19. 3D beam shape estimation based on distributed coaxial cable interferometric sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Baokai; Zhu, Wenge; Liu, Jie; Yuan, Lei; Xiao, Hai

    2017-03-01

    We present a coaxial cable interferometer based distributed sensing system for 3D beam shape estimation. By making a series of reflectors on a coaxial cable, multiple Fabry–Perot cavities are created on it. Two cables are mounted on the beam at proper locations, and a vector network analyzer (VNA) is connected to them to obtain the complex reflection signal, which is used to calculate the strain distribution of the beam in horizontal and vertical planes. With 6 GHz swept bandwidth on the VNA, the spatial resolution for distributed strain measurement is 0.1 m, and the sensitivity is 3.768 MHz mε ‑1 at the interferogram dip near 3.3 GHz. Using displacement-strain transformation, the shape of the beam is reconstructed. With only two modified cables and a VNA, this system is easy to implement and manage. Comparing to optical fiber based sensor systems, the coaxial cable sensors have the advantage of large strain and robustness, making this system suitable for structure health monitoring applications.

  20. 2D AND 3D dose verification at The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital using EPIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijnheer, Ben; Mans, Anton; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Tielenburg, Rene; Van Herk, Marcel; Vijlbrief, Ron; Stroom, Joep

    2010-11-01

    A review is given of the clinical use of EPID dosimetry in the Department of Radiation Oncology of The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital. All curative plans (almost all IMRT or VMAT) are verified with EPID dosimetry, mostly in vivo. The 2D approach for IMRT verification and the 3D method for VMAT verification are elucidated and their clinical implementation described. It has been shown that EPID dosimetry plays an important role in the total chain of verification procedures that are implemented in our department. It provides a safety net for advanced treatments such as IMRT and VMAT, as well as a full account of the dose delivered.

  1. Toward a 3D transrectal ultrasound system for verification of needle placement during high-dose-rate interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Jessica Robin; Surry, Kathleen; Leung, Eric; D'Souza, David; Fenster, Aaron

    2017-05-01

    Treatment for gynecologic cancers, such as cervical, recurrent endometrial, and vaginal malignancies, commonly includes external-beam radiation and brachytherapy. In high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy, radiation treatment is delivered via hollow needles that are typically inserted through a template on the perineum with a cylinder placed in the vagina for stability. Despite the need for precise needle placement to minimize complications and provide optimal treatment, there is no standard intra-operative image-guidance for this procedure. While some image-guidance techniques have been proposed, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, X-ray computed tomography (CT), and two-dimensional (2D) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), these techniques have not been widely adopted. In order to provide intra-operative needle visualization and localization during interstitial brachytherapy, we have developed a three-dimensional (3D) TRUS system. This study describes the 3D TRUS system and reports on the system validation and results from a proof-of-concept patient study. To obtain a 3D TRUS image, the system rotates a conventional 2D endocavity transducer through 170 degrees in 12 s, reconstructing the 2D frames into a 3D image in real-time. The geometry of the reconstruction was validated using two geometric phantoms to ensure the accuracy of the linear measurements in each of the image coordinate directions and the volumetric accuracy of the system. An agar phantom including vaginal and rectal canals, as well as a model uterus and tumor, was designed and used to test the visualization and localization of the interstitial needles under idealized conditions by comparing the needles' positions between the 3D TRUS scan and a registered MR image. Five patients undergoing HDR interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy were imaged using the 3D TRUS system following the insertion of all needles. This image was manually, rigidly registered to the clinical

  2. Method for Fast CT/SPECT-Based 3D Monte Carlo Absorbed Dose Computations in Internal Emitter Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilderman, S. J.; Dewaraja, Y. K.

    2007-02-01

    The DPM (Dose Planning Method) Monte Carlo electron and photon transport program, designed for fast computation of radiation absorbed dose in external beam radiotherapy, has been adapted to the calculation of absorbed dose in patient-specific internal emitter therapy. Because both its photon and electron transport mechanics algorithms have been optimized for fast computation in 3D voxelized geometries (in particular, those derived from CT scans), DPM is perfectly suited for performing patient-specific absorbed dose calculations in internal emitter therapy. In the updated version of DPM developed for the current work, the necessary inputs are a patient CT image, a registered SPECT image, and any number of registered masks defining regions of interest. DPM has been benchmarked for internal emitter therapy applications by comparing computed absorption fractions for a variety of organs using a Zubal phantom with reference results from the Medical Internal Radionuclide Dose (MIRD) Committee standards. In addition, the beta decay source algorithm and the photon tracking algorithm of DPM have been further benchmarked by comparison to experimental data. This paper presents a description of the program, the results of the benchmark studies, and some sample computations using patient data from radioimmunotherapy studies using 131I

  3. Dosimetry in radiotherapy using a-Si EPIDs: Systems, methods, and applications focusing on 3D patient dose estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurdy, B. M. C.

    2013-06-01

    An overview is provided of the use of amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) for dosimetric purposes in radiation therapy, focusing on 3D patient dose estimation. EPIDs were originally developed to provide on-treatment radiological imaging to assist with patient setup, but there has also been a natural interest in using them as dosimeters since they use the megavoltage therapy beam to form images. The current generation of clinically available EPID technology, amorphous-silicon (a-Si) flat panel imagers, possess many characteristics that make them much better suited to dosimetric applications than earlier EPID technologies. Features such as linearity with dose/dose rate, high spatial resolution, realtime capability, minimal optical glare, and digital operation combine with the convenience of a compact, retractable detector system directly mounted on the linear accelerator to provide a system that is well-suited to dosimetric applications. This review will discuss clinically available a-Si EPID systems, highlighting dosimetric characteristics and remaining limitations. Methods for using EPIDs in dosimetry applications will be discussed. Dosimetric applications using a-Si EPIDs to estimate three-dimensional dose in the patient during treatment will be overviewed. Clinics throughout the world are implementing increasingly complex treatments such as dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy, as well as specialized treatment techniques using large doses per fraction and short treatment courses (ie. hypofractionation and stereotactic radiosurgery). These factors drive the continued strong interest in using EPIDs as dosimeters for patient treatment verification.

  4. Disentangling Fault Scarp Geometry and Slip-Distribution in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackenzie, D.; Walker, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new and inherently 3D approach to the analysis of fault scarp geometry using high resolution topography. Recent advance in topographic measurement techniques (LiDAR and Structure from Motion) has allowed the extensive measurement of single earthquake scarps and multiple event cumulative scarps to draw conclusions about along-strike slip variation and characteristic slip. Present analysis of the resulting point clouds and digital elevation models is generally achieved by taking vertical or map view profiles of geomorphic markers across the scarp. Profiles are done at numerous locations along strike carefully chosen to avoid regions degraded by erosion/deposition. The resulting slip distributions are almost always extremely variable and "noisy", both for strike-slip and dip-slip faulting scarps and it is often unclear whether this reflects slip variation, noise/erosion, site effects or geometric variation. When observing palaeo-earthquake and even modern event scarps, the full geometry, such as the degree of oblique slip or the fault dip, is often poorly constrained. We first present the results of synthetic tests to demonstrate the introduction of significant apparent noise by simply varying terrain, fault and measurement geometry (slope angle, slope azimuth, fault dip and slip obliquity). Considering fully 3-dimensional marker surfaces (e.g. Planar or conical) we use the variation in apparent offset with terrain and measurement geometry, to constrain the slip geometry in 3D. Combining measurements windowed along strike, we show that determining the slip vector is reduced to a simple linear problem. We conclude that for scarps in regions of significant topography or with oblique slip, our method will give enhanced slip resolution while standard methods will give poor slip resolution. We test our method using a Structure from Motion pointcloud and digital elevation model covering a ~25 km stretch of a thrust fault scarp in the Kazakh Tien Shan.

  5. Inverse Planning Approach for 3-D MRI-Based Pulse-Dose Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy in Cervix Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chajon, Enrique; Dumas, Isabelle; Touleimat, Mahmoud B.Sc.; Magne, Nicolas; Coulot, Jeremy; Verstraet, Rodolfe; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Haie-Meder, Christine

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) software for the optimization of dose distribution in patients with cervix carcinoma treated with MRI-based pulsed-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients treated with a technique using a customized vaginal mold were selected. Dose-volume parameters obtained using the IPSA method were compared with the classic manual optimization method (MOM). Target volumes and organs at risk were delineated according to the Gynecological Brachytherapy Group/European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology recommendations. Because the pulsed dose rate program was based on clinical experience with low dose rate, dwell time values were required to be as homogeneous as possible. To achieve this goal, different modifications of the IPSA program were applied. Results: The first dose distribution calculated by the IPSA algorithm proposed a heterogeneous distribution of dwell time positions. The mean D90, D100, and V100 calculated with both methods did not differ significantly when the constraints were applied. For the bladder, doses calculated at the ICRU reference point derived from the MOM differed significantly from the doses calculated by the IPSA method (mean, 58.4 vs. 55 Gy respectively; p = 0.0001). For the rectum, the doses calculated at the ICRU reference point were also significantly lower with the IPSA method. Conclusions: The inverse planning method provided fast and automatic solutions for the optimization of dose distribution. However, the straightforward use of IPSA generated significant heterogeneity in dwell time values. Caution is therefore recommended in the use of inverse optimization tools with clinical relevance study of new dosimetric rules.

  6. Development of 3D ultrasound needle guidance for high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy of gynaecological cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, J.; Tessier, D.; D'Souza, D.; Leung, E.; Hajdok, G.; Fenster, A.

    2016-04-01

    High-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy is often included in standard-of-care for gynaecological cancers. Needles are currently inserted through a perineal template without any standard real-time imaging modality to assist needle guidance, causing physicians to rely on pre-operative imaging, clinical examination, and experience. While two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound (US) is sometimes used for real-time guidance, visualization of needle placement and depth is difficult and subject to variability and inaccuracy in 2D images. The close proximity to critical organs, in particular the rectum and bladder, can lead to serious complications. We have developed a three-dimensional (3D) transrectal US system and are investigating its use for intra-operative visualization of needle positions used in HDR gynaecological brachytherapy. As a proof-of-concept, four patients were imaged with post-insertion 3D US and x-ray CT. Using software developed in our laboratory, manual rigid registration of the two modalities was performed based on the perineal template's vaginal cylinder. The needle tip and a second point along the needle path were identified for each needle visible in US. The difference between modalities in the needle trajectory and needle tip position was calculated for each identified needle. For the 60 needles placed, the mean trajectory difference was 3.23 +/- 1.65° across the 53 visible needle paths and the mean difference in needle tip position was 3.89 +/- 1.92 mm across the 48 visible needles tips. Based on the preliminary results, 3D transrectal US shows potential for the development of a 3D US-based needle guidance system for interstitial gynaecological brachytherapy.

  7. Modeling 3-D permeability distribution in alluvial fans using facies architecture and geophysical acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; Gong, Huili; Dai, Zhenxue; Guo, Gaoxuan; Teatini, Pietro

    2017-02-01

    Alluvial fans are highly heterogeneous in hydraulic properties due to complex depositional processes, which make it difficult to characterize the spatial distribution of the hydraulic conductivity (K). An original methodology is developed to identify the spatial statistical parameters (mean, variance, correlation range) of the hydraulic conductivity in a three-dimensional (3-D) setting by using geological and geophysical data. More specifically, a large number of inexpensive vertical electric soundings are integrated with a facies model developed from borehole lithologic data to simulate the log10(K) continuous distributions in multiple-zone heterogeneous alluvial megafans. The Chaobai River alluvial fan in the Beijing Plain, China, is used as an example to test the proposed approach. Due to the non-stationary property of the K distribution in the alluvial fan, a multiple-zone parameterization approach is applied to analyze the conductivity statistical properties of different hydrofacies in the various zones. The composite variance in each zone is computed to describe the evolution of the conductivity along the flow direction. Consistently with the scales of the sedimentary transport energy, the results show that conductivity variances of fine sand, medium-coarse sand, and gravel decrease from the upper (zone 1) to the lower (zone 3) portion along the flow direction. In zone 1, sediments were moved by higher-energy flooding, which induces poor sorting and larger conductivity variances. The composite variance confirms this feature with statistically different facies from zone 1 to zone 3. The results of this study provide insights to improve our understanding on conductivity heterogeneity and a method for characterizing the spatial distribution of K in alluvial fans.

  8. Analysis of Annular Thermoelectric Couples with Nonuniform Temperature Distribution by Means of 3-D Multiphysics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauknecht, Andreas; Steinert, Torsten; Spengler, Carsten; Suck, Gerrit

    2013-07-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) modules with annular geometry are very attractive for waste heat recovery within the automotive world, especially when integrated as stacks into tubular heat exchangers. The required temperature difference is built up between the coolant, which flows inside an inner tube, and the exhaust gas, which flows around an outer tube. The flow pattern of the exhaust gas can be axial or circumferential, which can lead to higher heat transfer coefficients on the outer surface of the tube. However, this multidimensional construction in combination with a complex flow pattern can lead to a nonuniform heat flux. Additionally, the system experiences a nonuniform temperature distribution which consequently leads to complex conditions regarding the electrical potential. The relevant effects are investigated using a three-dimensional (3-D) numerical model implemented in the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation environment Star-CCM+. The model supports temperature-dependent characteristics of the materials, contact resistances, and parasitic effects in the TE module. Furthermore, it involves techniques to quickly find the exact maximum power point of the TE module with the given boundary conditions. Using the validated model the influence of the nonuniform temperature distribution is investigated with emphasis on the electrical output and TE efficiency.

  9. Enabling 3D-Liver Perfusion Mapping from MR-DCE Imaging Using Distributed Computing.

    PubMed

    Leporq, Benjamin; Camarasu-Pop, Sorina; Davila-Serrano, Eduardo E; Pilleul, Frank; Beuf, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    An MR acquisition protocol and a processing method using distributed computing on the European Grid Infrastructure (EGI) to allow 3D liver perfusion parametric mapping after Magnetic Resonance Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (MR-DCE) imaging are presented. Seven patients (one healthy control and six with chronic liver diseases) were prospectively enrolled after liver biopsy. MR-dynamic acquisition was continuously performed in free-breathing during two minutes after simultaneous intravascular contrast agent (MS-325 blood pool agent) injection. Hepatic capillary system was modeled by a 3-parameters one-compartment pharmacokinetic model. The processing step was parallelized and executed on the EGI. It was modeled and implemented as a grid workflow using the Gwendia language and the MOTEUR workflow engine. Results showed good reproducibility in repeated processing on the grid. The results obtained from the grid were well correlated with ROI-based reference method ran locally on a personal computer. The speed-up range was 71 to 242 with an average value of 126. In conclusion, distributed computing applied to perfusion mapping brings significant speed-up to quantification step to be used for further clinical studies in a research context. Accuracy would be improved with higher image SNR accessible on the latest 3T MR systems available today.

  10. Three-Axis Distributed Fiber Optic Strain Measurement in 3D Woven Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellucci, Matt; Klute, Sandra; Lally, Evan M.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Lowry, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in composite materials technologies have broken further from traditional designs and require advanced instrumentation and analysis capabilities. Success or failure is highly dependent on design analysis and manufacturing processes. By monitoring smart structures throughout manufacturing and service life, residual and operational stresses can be assessed and structural integrity maintained. Composite smart structures can be manufactured by integrating fiber optic sensors into existing composite materials processes such as ply layup, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. In this work optical fiber was integrated into 3D woven composite parts at a commercial woven products manufacturing facility. The fiber was then used to monitor the structures during a VARTM manufacturing process, and subsequent static and dynamic testing. Low cost telecommunications-grade optical fiber acts as the sensor using a high resolution commercial Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR) system providing distributed strain measurement at spatial resolutions as low as 2mm. Strain measurements using the optical fiber sensors are correlated to resistive strain gage measurements during static structural loading. Keywords: fiber optic, distributed strain sensing, Rayleigh scatter, optical frequency domain reflectometry

  11. Segmentation of 3D holographic images using bivariate jointly distributed region snake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshpanah, Mehdi; Javidi, Bahram

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the bivariate jointly distributed region snake method in segmentation of microorganisms in Single Exposure On- Line (SEOL) holographic microscopy images. 3D images of the microorganisms are digitally reconstructed and numerically focused from any arbitrary depth from a single recorded digital hologram without mechanical scanning. Living organisms are non-rigid and they vary in shape and size. Moreover, they often do not exhibit clear edges in digitally reconstructed SEOL holographic images. Thus, conventional segmentation techniques based on the edge map may fail to segment these images. However, SEOL holographic microscopy provides both magnitude and phase information of the sample specimen, which could be helpful in the segmentation process. In this paper, we present a statistical framework based on the joint probability distribution of magnitude and phase information of SEOL holographic microscopy images and maximum likelihood estimation of image probability density function parameters. An optimization criterion is computed by maximizing the likelihood function of the target support hypothesis. In addition, a simple stochastic algorithm has been adapted for carrying out the optimization, while several boosting techniques have been employed to enhance its performance. Finally, the proposed method is applied for segmentation of biological microorganisms in SEOL holographic images and the experimental results are presented.

  12. Treatment planning and 3D dose verification of whole brain radiation therapy with hippocampal avoidance in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, S. W.; Miles, D.; Cramer, C.; Reinsvold, M.; Kirsch, D.; Oldham, M.

    2017-05-01

    Despite increasing use of stereotactic radiosurgery, whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) continues to have a therapeutic role in a selected subset of patients. Selectively avoiding the hippocampus during such treatment (HA-WBRT) emerged as a strategy to reduce the cognitive morbidity associated with WBRT and gave rise to a recently published the phase II trial (RTOG 0933) and now multiple ongoing clinical trials. While conceptually hippocampal avoidance is supported by pre-clinical evidence showing that the hippocampus plays a vital role in memory, there is minimal pre-clinic data showing that selectively avoiding the hippocampus will reduce radiation-induced cognitive decline. Largely the lack of pre-clinical evidence can be attributed to the technical hurdles associated with delivering precise conformal treatment the rat brain. In this work we develop a novel conformal HA-WBRT technique for Wistar rats, utilizing a 225kVp micro-irradiator with precise 3D-printed radiation blocks designed to spare hippocampus while delivering whole brain dose. The technique was verified on rodent-morphic Presage® 3D dosimeters created from micro-CT scans of Wistar rats with Duke Large Field-of-View Optical Scanner (DLOS) at 1mm isotropic voxel resolution. A 4-field box with parallel opposed AP-PA and two lateral opposed fields was explored with conformal hippocampal sparing aided by 3D-printed radiation blocks. The measured DVH aligned reasonably well with that calculated from SmART Plan Monte Carlo simulations with simulated blocks for 4-field HA-WBRT with both demonstrating hippocampal sparing of 20% volume receiving less than 30% the prescription dose.

  13. Vaginal dose point reporting in cervical cancer patients treated with combined 2D/3D external beam radiotherapy and 2D/3D brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Westerveld, Henrike; Pötter, Richard; Berger, Daniel; Dankulchai, Pittaya; Dörr, Wolfgang; Sora, Mircea-Constantin; Pötter-Lang, Sarah; Kirisits, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Traditionally, vaginal dose points have been defined at the vaginal source level, thus not providing dose information for the entire vagina. Since reliable vaginal dose volume/surface histograms are unavailable, a strategy for comprehensive vaginal dose reporting for combined EBRT and BT was established and investigated. An anatomical vaginal reference point was defined at the level of the Posterior-Inferior Border of Symphysis (PIBS), plus two points ±2 cm (mid/introitus vagina). For BT extra points were selected for the upper vagina at 12/3/6/9 o'clock, at the vaginal surface and 5 mm depth. A vaginal reference length (VRL) was defined from ring centre to PIBS. Fifty-nine patients treated for cervical cancer were included in this retrospective feasibility study. The method was applicable to all patients. Total EQD2 doses at PIBS and ±2 cm were 36.7 Gy (3.1-68.2), 49.6 Gy (32.1-89.6) and 4.3 Gy (1.0-46.6). At the vaginal surface at ring level doses were respectively 266.1 Gy (67.6-814.5)/225.9 Gy (61.5-610.5) at 3/9 o'clock, and 85.1 Gy (55.4-140.3)/72.0 Gy (49.1-108.9) at 12/6 o'clock. Mean VRL on MRI was 5.6 cm (2.0-9.4). With this novel system, a comprehensive reporting of vaginal doses is feasible. The present study has demonstrated large dose variations between patients observed in all parts of the vagina, resulting from different contributions from EBRT and BT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Reconstruction of high resolution MLC leaf positions using a low resolution detector for accurate 3D dose reconstruction in IMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, R.; Godart, J.; Wauben, D. J. L.; Langendijk, J. A.; van't Veld, A. A.; Korevaar, E. W.

    2016-12-01

    In pre-treatment dose verification, low resolution detector systems are unable to identify shifts of individual leafs of high resolution multi leaf collimator (MLC) systems from detected changes in the dose deposition. The goal of this study was to introduce an alternative approach (the shutter technique) combined with a previous described iterative reconstruction method to accurately reconstruct high resolution MLC leaf positions based on low resolution measurements. For the shutter technique, two additional radiotherapy treatment plans (RT-plans) were generated in addition to the original RT-plan; one with even MLC leafs closed for reconstructing uneven leaf positions and one with uneven MLC leafs closed for reconstructing even leaf positions. Reconstructed leaf positions were then implemented in the original RT-plan for 3D dose reconstruction. The shutter technique was evaluated for a 6 MV Elekta SLi linac with 5 mm MLC leafs (Agility™) in combination with the MatriXX Evolution detector with detector spacing of 7.62 mm. Dose reconstruction was performed with the COMPASS system (v2.0). The measurement setup allowed one row of ionization chambers to be affected by two adjacent leaf pairs. Measurements were obtained for various field sizes with MLC leaf position errors ranging from 1.0 mm to 10.0 mm. Furthermore, one clinical head and neck IMRT treatment beam with MLC introduced leaf position errors of 5.0 mm was evaluated to illustrate the impact of the shutter technique on 3D dose reconstruction. Without the shutter technique, MLC leaf position reconstruction showed reconstruction errors up to 6.0 mm. Introduction of the shutter technique allowed MLC leaf position reconstruction for the majority of leafs with sub-millimeter accuracy resulting in a reduction of dose reconstruction errors. The shutter technique in combination with the iterative reconstruction method allows high resolution MLC leaf position reconstruction using low resolution

  15. Issues involved in the quantitative 3D imaging of proton doses using optical CT and chemical dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Simon; Gorjiara, Tina; Kacperek, Andrzej; Adamovics, John; Kuncic, Zdenka; Baldock, Clive

    2015-01-01

    Dosimetry of proton beams using 3D imaging of chemical dosimeters is complicated by a variation with proton linear energy transfer (LET) of the dose-response (the so-called ‘quenching effect’). Simple theoretical arguments lead to the conclusion that the total absorbed dose from multiple irradiations with different LETs cannot be uniquely determined from post-irradiation imaging measurements on the dosimeter. Thus, a direct inversion of the imaging data is not possible and the proposition is made to use a forward model based on appropriate output from a planning system to predict the 3D response of the dosimeter. In addition to the quenching effect, it is well known that chemical dosimeters have a non-linear response at high doses. To the best of our knowledge it has not yet been determined how this phenomenon is affected by LET. The implications for dosimetry of a number of potential scenarios are examined. Dosimeter response as a function of depth (and hence LET) was measured for four samples of the radiochromic plastic PRESAGE®, using an optical computed tomography readout and entrance doses of 2.0 Gy, 4.0 Gy, 7.8 Gy and 14.7 Gy, respectively. The dosimeter response was separated into two components, a single-exponential low-LET response and a LET-dependent quenching. For the particular formulation of PRESAGE® used, deviations from linearity of the dosimeter response became significant for doses above approximately 16 Gy. In a second experiment, three samples were each irradiated with two separate beams of 4 Gy in various different configurations. On the basis of the previous characterizations, two different models were tested for the calculation of the combined quenching effect from two contributions with different LETs. It was concluded that a linear superposition model with separate calculation of the quenching for each irradiation did not match the measured result where two beams overlapped. A second model, which used the concept of an

  16. 3D bone mineral density distribution and shape reconstruction of the proximal femur from a single simulated DXA image: an in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmarsh, Tristan; Humbert, Ludovic; De Craene, Mathieu; del Río Barquero, Luis M.; Fritscher, Karl; Schubert, Rainer; Eckstein, Felix; Link, Thomas; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2010-03-01

    Area Bone Mineral Density (aBMD) measured by Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) is an established criterion in the evaluation of hip fracture risk. The evaluation from these planar images, however, is limited to 2D while it has been shown that proper 3D assessment of both the shape and the Bone Mineral Density (BMD) distribution improves the fracture risk estimation. In this work we present a method to reconstruct both the 3D bone shape and 3D BMD distribution of the proximal femur from a single DXA image. A statistical model of shape and a separate statistical model of the BMD distribution were automatically constructed from a set of Quantitative Computed Tomography (QCT) scans. The reconstruction method incorporates a fully automatic intensity based 3D-2D registration process, maximizing the similarity between the DXA and a digitally reconstructed radiograph of the combined model. For the construction of the models, an in vitro dataset of QCT scans of 60 anatomical specimens was used. To evaluate the reconstruction accuracy, experiments were performed on simulated DXA images from the QCT scans of 30 anatomical specimens. Comparisons between the reconstructions and the same subject QCT scans showed a mean shape accuracy of 1.2mm, and a mean density error of 81mg/cm3. The results show that this method is capable of accurately reconstructing both the 3D shape and 3D BMD distribution of the proximal femur from DXA images used in clinical routine, potentially improving the diagnosis of osteoporosis and fracture risk assessments at a low radiation dose and low cost.

  17. Validation of a method for in vivo 3D dose reconstruction in SBRT using a new transmission detector.

    PubMed

    Nakaguchi, Yuji; Ono, Takeshi; Maruyama, Masato; Shimohigashi, Yoshinobu; Kai, Yudai

    2017-07-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) involves the delivery of substantially larger doses over fewer fractions than conventional therapy. Therefore, SBRT treatments will strongly benefit patients using vivo patient dose verification, because the impact of the fraction is large. For in vivo measurements, a commercially available quality assurance (QA) system is the COMPASS system (IBA Dosimetry, Germany). For measurements, the system uses a new transmission detector (Dolphin, IBA Dosimetry). In this study, we evaluated the method for in vivo 3D dose reconstruction for SBRT using this new transmission detector. We confirmed the accuracy of COMPASS with Dolphin for SBRT using multi leaf collimator (MLC) test patterns and clinical SBRT cases. We compared the results between the COMPASS, the treatment planning system, the Kodak EDR2 film, and the Monte Carlo (MC) calculations. MLC test patterns were set up to investigate various aspects of dose reconstruction for SBRT: (a) simple open fields (2 × 2-10 × 10 cm(2) ), (b) a square wave chart pattern, and (c) the MLC position detectability test in which the MLCs were changed slightly. In clinical cases, we carried out 6 and 8 static IMRT beams for SBRT in the lung and liver. For MLC test patterns, the differences between COMPASS and MC were around 3%. The COMPASS with the dolphin system showed sufficient resolution in SBRT. For clinical cases, COMPASS can detect small changes for the dose profile and dose-volume histogram. COMPASS also showed good agreement with MC. We can confirm the feasibility of SBRT QA using the COMPASS system with Dolphin. This method was successfully operated using the new transmission detector and verified by measurements and MC. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  18. Simulation on an optimal combustion control strategy for 3-D temperature distributions in tangentially pc-fired utility boiler furnaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi-fen; Zhou, Huai-chun

    2005-01-01

    The control of 3-D temperature distribution in a utility boiler furnace is essential for the safe, economic and clean operation of pc-fired furnace with multi-burner system. The development of the visualization of 3-D temperature distributions in pc-fired furnaces makes it possible for a new combustion control strategy directly with the furnace temperature as its goal to improve the control quality for the combustion processes. Studied in this paper is such a new strategy that the whole furnace is divided into several parts in the vertical direction, and the average temperature and its bias from the center in every cross section can be extracted from the visualization results of the 3-D temperature distributions. In the simulation stage, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code served to calculate the 3-D temperature distributions in a furnace, then a linear model was set up to relate the features of the temperature distributions with the input of the combustion processes, such as the flow rates of fuel and air fed into the furnaces through all the burners. The adaptive genetic algorithm was adopted to find the optimal combination of the whole input parameters which ensure to form an optimal 3-D temperature field in the furnace desired for the operation of boiler. Simulation results showed that the strategy could soon find the factors making the temperature distribution apart from the optimal state and give correct adjusting suggestions.

  19. Stress distribution on external hexagon implant system using 3d finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Segundo, Regênio M H; Oshima, Hugo M S; Silva, Isaac N L; Júnior, Luis H B; Mota, Eduardo G; Coelho, Luiz F B

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate strain distribution on dental implant, abutment, screw and crown virtual models in the posterior region. The analysis was performed by means of a 3D virtual model developed by the PRO-ENGINEER System (PRO-ENGINEER, PTC, Needham, MA, USA ) with an external butt joint (3i Implant Innovations, Palm Beach, Florida), square headed Gold Tite abutment retainer screw (3i Implant Innovations, Palm Beach, Florida), STA abutment (3i Implant Innovations, Palm Beach, Florida), metal infrastructure of Ag-Pd alloy and feldspatic ceramic. The standard load was 382N at 15 degree angle to the implant axis, applied at 6 mm from the implant center at different observation points on the implant-screw set. The data showed that on the implant virtual model, the highest strain concentration was found at the interface between the implant platform and the abutment, and in the middle point of the 1st screw thread internal diameter on the load application side.

  20. Three-axis distributed fiber optic strain measurement in 3D woven composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellucci, Matt; Klute, Sandra; Lally, Evan M.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Lowry, David

    2013-03-01

    Recent advancements in composite materials technologies have broken further from traditional designs and require advanced instrumentation and analysis capabilities. Success or failure is highly dependent on design analysis and manufacturing processes. By monitoring smart structures throughout manufacturing and service life, residual and operational stresses can be assessed and structural integrity maintained. Composite smart structures can be manufactured by integrating fiber optic sensors into existing composite materials processes such as ply layup, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. In this work optical fiber was integrated into 3D woven composite parts at a commercial woven products manufacturing facility. The fiber was then used to monitor the structures during a VARTM manufacturing process, and subsequent static and dynamic testing. Low cost telecommunications-grade optical fiber acts as the sensor using a high resolution commercial Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR) system providing distributed strain measurement at spatial resolutions as low as 2mm. Strain measurements using the optical fiber sensors are correlated to resistive strain gage measurements during static structural loading.

  1. Calibration of an Outdoor Distributed Camera Network with a 3D Point Cloud

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Agustín; Silva, Manuel; Teniente, Ernesto H.; Ferreira, Ricardo; Bernardino, Alexandre; Gaspar, José; Andrade-Cetto, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Outdoor camera networks are becoming ubiquitous in critical urban areas of the largest cities around the world. Although current applications of camera networks are mostly tailored to video surveillance, recent research projects are exploiting their use to aid robotic systems in people-assisting tasks. Such systems require precise calibration of the internal and external parameters of the distributed camera network. Despite the fact that camera calibration has been an extensively studied topic, the development of practical methods for user-assisted calibration that minimize user intervention time and maximize precision still pose significant challenges. These camera systems have non-overlapping fields of view, are subject to environmental stress, and are likely to suffer frequent recalibration. In this paper, we propose the use of a 3D map covering the area to support the calibration process and develop an automated method that allows quick and precise calibration of a large camera network. We present two cases of study of the proposed calibration method: one is the calibration of the Barcelona Robot Lab camera network, which also includes direct mappings (homographies) between image coordinates and world points in the ground plane (walking areas) to support person and robot detection and localization algorithms. The second case consist of improving the GPS positioning of geo-tagged images taken with a mobile device in the Facultat de Matemàtiques i Estadística (FME) patio at the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC). PMID:25076221

  2. 3D-Simulation Of Concentration Distributions Inside Large-Scale Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wischnewski, R.; Ratschow, L.; Hartge, E. U.; Werthe, J.

    With increasing size of modern CFB combustors the lateral mixing of fuels and secondary air gains more and more importance. Strong concentration gradients, which result from improper lateral mixing, can lead to operational problems, high flue gas emissions and lower boiler efficiencies. A 3D-model for the simulation of local gas and solids concentrations inside industrial-sized CFB boilers has been developed. The model is based on a macroscopic approach and considers all major mechanisms during fuel spreading and subsequent combustion of char and volatiles. Typical characteristics of modern boilers like staged combustion, a smaller cross-sectional area in the lower section of the combustion chamber and the co-combustion of additional fuels with coal can be considered. The 252 MWth combustor of Stadtwerke Duisburg AG is used for the validation of the model. A comprehensive picture of the local conditions inside the combustion chamber is achieved by the combination of local gas measurements and the three-dimensional simulation of concentration distributions.

  3. Calibration of an outdoor distributed camera network with a 3D point cloud.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Agustín; Silva, Manuel; Teniente, Ernesto H; Ferreira, Ricardo; Bernardino, Alexandre; Gaspar, José; Andrade-Cetto, Juan

    2014-07-29

    Outdoor camera networks are becoming ubiquitous in critical urban areas of the largest cities around the world. Although current applications of camera networks are mostly tailored to video surveillance, recent research projects are exploiting their use to aid robotic systems in people-assisting tasks. Such systems require precise calibration of the internal and external parameters of the distributed camera network. Despite the fact that camera calibration has been an extensively studied topic, the development of practical methods for user-assisted calibration that minimize user intervention time and maximize precision still pose significant challenges. These camera systems have non-overlapping fields of view, are subject to environmental stress, and are likely to suffer frequent recalibration. In this paper, we propose the use of a 3D map covering the area to support the calibration process and develop an automated method that allows quick and precise calibration of a large camera network. We present two cases of study of the proposed calibration method: one is the calibration of the Barcelona Robot Lab camera network, which also includes direct mappings (homographies) between image coordinates and world points in the ground plane (walking areas) to support person and robot detection and localization algorithms. The second case consist of improving the GPS positioning of geo-tagged images taken with a mobile device in the Facultat de Matemàtiques i Estadística (FME) patio at the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC).

  4. Nanoscale 3D distribution of low melt and fluid fractions in mantle rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardes, Emmanuel; Morales, Luiz; Heinrich, Wilhelm; Sifre, David; Hashim, Leila; Gaillard, Fabrice; Katharina, Marquardt

    2016-04-01

    The presence of melts or fluids in the intergranular medium of rocks strongly influences their bulk physico-chemical properties (e.g. mass transport and chemical reactivity, electrical conductivity, seismic wave velocity, etc). Actually, the effects can be so large that only small melt or fluid fractions must sometimes be involved for explaining mantle geophysical discontinuities and anomalies. The investigation of the distribution of such small fractions in the intergranular medium of mantle rocks is therefore crucial for relating them to bulk and large scale properties. However, it involves submicrometric structures which are hardly characterizable using conventional techniques. Here we present how the FIB-SEM-STEM microscope can be used to produce 3D imaging at unequalled resolution. We show that low melt and fluid fractions can form films as thin as 20 nm at olivine grain boundaries, and that they can modify the physico-chemical properties of mantle rocks by orders of magnitude. The fine relationships between films at grain boundaries, tubules at triple junctions and pockets at grain corners can be explored, and appear to be complex and to differ from usual visions.

  5. 3D reconstruction of light flux distribution on arbitrary surfaces from 2D multi-photographic images.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueli; Gao, Xinbo; Chen, Duofang; Ma, Xiaopeng; Zhao, Xiaohui; Shen, Man; Li, Xiangsi; Qu, Xiaochao; Liang, Jimin; Ripoll, Jorge; Tian, Jie

    2010-09-13

    Optical tomography can demonstrate accurate three-dimensional (3D) imaging that recovers the 3D spatial distribution and concentration of the luminescent probes in biological tissues, compared with planar imaging. However, the tomographic approach is extremely difficult to implement due to the complexity in the reconstruction of 3D surface flux distribution from multi-view two dimensional (2D) measurements on the subject surface. To handle this problem, a novel and effective method is proposed in this paper to determine the surface flux distribution from multi-view 2D photographic images acquired by a set of non-contact detectors. The method is validated with comparison experiments involving both regular and irregular surfaces. Reconstruction of the inside probes based on the reconstructed surface flux distribution further demonstrates the potential of the proposed method in its application in optical tomography.

  6. MR Elastography Studies of the 3D Force Chain Structure in Dense Granular Media: Distribution of Chain Lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanfratello, L.; Fukushima, E.

    2009-06-01

    We recently developed a novel extension of MR Elastograpy (MRE) to image the force chain structure within a dense 3D quasi-static granular assembly. Subsequently, computer codes and algorithms to determine the distribution of the force chain lengths, where a chain is taken to be a relatively straight section between branching points, were developed. Similar tools were used previously to analyze 2D photoelastic data and now have been expanded to analyze our most current 3D MRE force chain data. These investigations reveal that the distribution of the chain lengths in 3D decays exponentially, as was observed in 2D. The exponential decay of the length distribution is consistent with DEM simulation results of Peters, et al. We conclude that the decay length of this distribution is a meaningful quantitative measure that characterizes granular assemblies.

  7. Impact of patient rotational errors on target and critical structure dose in IMRT: A 3D simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumugam, S.; Xing, A.; Vial, P.; Scotti, A.; Stirton, R.; Goozee, G.; Holloway, Lois

    2013-06-01

    The impact of 3D rotational errors in patient positioning on dose delivered target volumes and critical structures in IMRT was studied. Patient rotational errors ranging from -30 to +30 was introduced to IMRT treatment plans of pelvis, head and neck and brain treatment sites and the impact of rotational error on DVH metrics was assessed. The magnitude of impact of rotational error on the error in dose delivered to the target volume and critical structures depends on the location of the structures from plan isocentre. In studied plans, a maximum percentage difference of up to -9.8(1s=13.4) % in D95 to PTV was observed for head and neck treatments. Similarly, in Brain treatments a maximum difference of up to 24.0(1s=33.0) % in maximum dose of Optic chiasm was observed. The results suggest that failure to correct patient's rotational error results in under-dosage to target volumes and over-dosage to the critical structures in some specific treatment scenarios.

  8. The effect of CT dose on glenohumeral joint congruency measurements using 3D reconstructed patient-specific bone models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalone, Emily A.; Fox, Anne-Marie V.; Kedgley, Angela E.; Jenkyn, Thomas R.; King, Graham J. W.; Athwal, George S.; Johnson, James A.; Peters, Terry M.

    2011-10-01

    The study of joint congruency at the glenohumeral joint of the shoulder using computed tomography (CT) and three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of joint surfaces is an area of significant clinical interest. However, ionizing radiation delivered to patients during CT examinations is much higher than other types of radiological imaging. The shoulder represents a significant challenge for this modality as it is adjacent to the thyroid gland and breast tissue. The objective of this study was to determine the optimal CT scanning techniques that would minimize radiation dose while accurately quantifying joint congruency of the shoulder. The results suggest that only one-tenth of the standard applied total current (mA) and a pitch ratio of 1.375:1 was necessary to produce joint congruency values consistent with that of the higher dose scans. Using the CT scanning techniques examined in this study, the effective dose applied to the shoulder to quantify joint congruency was reduced by 88.9% compared to standard clinical CT imaging techniques.

  9. Long term dose monitoring onboard the European Columbus module of the International Space Station (ISS) in the frame of the DOSIS and DOSIS 3D project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas

    The radiation environment encountered in space differs in nature from that on earth, consisting mostly of high energetic ions from protons up to iron, resulting in radiation levels far exceeding the ones present on earth for occupational radiation workers. Accurate knowledge of the physical characteristics of the space radiation field in dependence on the solar activity, the orbital parameters and the different shielding configurations of the International Space Station (ISS) is therefore needed. For the investigation of the spatial and temporal distribution of the radiation field inside the European Columbus module the experiment “Dose Distribution Inside the ISS” (DOSIS), under the project and science lead of the German Aerospace Center (DLR), was launched on July 15th 2009 with STS-127 to the ISS. The DOSIS experiment consists of a combination of “Passive Detector Packages” (PDP) distributed at eleven locations inside Columbus for the measurement of the spatial variation of the radiation field and two active Dosimetry Telescopes (DOSTELs) with a Data and Power Unit (DDPU) in a dedicated nomex pouch mounted at a fixed location beneath the European Physiology Module rack (EPM) for the measurement of the temporal variation of the radiation field parameters. The DOSIS experiment suite measured during the lowest solar minimum conditions in the space age from July 2009 to June 2011. In July 2011 the active hardware was transferred to ground for refurbishment and preparation for the follow up DOSIS 3D experiment. The hardware for DOSIS 3D was launched with Soyuz 30S to the ISS on May 15th 2012. The PDPs are replaced with each even number Soyuz flight starting with Soyuz 30S. Data from the active detectors is transferred to ground via the EPM rack which is activated once a month for this action. The presentation will give an overview of the DOSIS and DOSIS 3D experiment and focus on the results from the passive radiation detectors from the DOSIS 3D experiment

  10. Clinical experience with Mobius FX software for 3D dose verification for prostate VMAT plans and comparison with physical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez-Quino, L. A.; Huerta-Hernandez, C. I.; Rangaraj, D.

    2017-05-01

    MobiusFX, an add-on software module from Mobius Medical Systems for IMRT and VMAT QA, uses measurements in linac treatment logs to calculate and verify the 3D dose delivered to patients. In this study, 10 volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) prostate plans were planned and delivered in a Varian TrueBeam linac. The plans consisted of beams with 6 and 10 MV energy and 2 to 3 arcs per plan. The average gamma value with criterion of 3% and 3mm MobiusFX and TPS: 99.96%, 2% and 2mm MobiusFX and TPS: 98.70 %. Further comparison with ArcCheck measurements was conducted.

  11. 3-D imaging mass spectrometry of protein distributions in mouse Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1)-associated optic glioma.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David M G; Van de Plas, Raf; Rose, Kristie L; Hill, Salisha; Schey, Kevin L; Solga, Anne C; Gutmann, David H; Caprioli, Richard M

    2016-10-21

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common neurogenetic disorder, in which affected individuals develop tumors of the nervous system. Children with NF1 are particularly prone to brain tumors (gliomas) involving the optic pathway that can result in impaired vision. Since tumor formation and expansion requires a cooperative tumor microenvironment, it is important to identify the cellular and acellular components associated with glioma development and growth. In this study, we used 3-D matrix assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) to measure the distributions of multiple molecular species throughout optic nerve tissue in mice with and without glioma, and to explore their spatial relationships within the 3-D volume of the optic nerve and chiasm. 3-D IMS studies often involve extensive workflows due to the high volume of sections required to generate high quality 3-D images. Herein, we present a workflow for 3-D data acquisition and volume reconstruction using mouse optic nerve tissue. The resulting 3-D IMS data yield both molecular similarities and differences between glioma-bearing and wild-type (WT) tissues, including protein distributions localizing to different anatomical subregions.

  12. Balanced PIN-TIA photoreceiver with integrated 3 dB fiber coupler for distributed fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Shubhashish; Rajagopalan, Sruti; Lemke, Shaun; Joshi, Abhay

    2014-06-01

    We report a balanced PIN-TIA photoreceiver integrated with a 3 dB fiber coupler for distributed fiber optic sensors. This detector demonstrates -3 dB bandwidth >15 GHz and coupled conversion gain >65 V/W per photodiode through either input port of the 3 dB coupler, and can be operated at local oscillator power of +17 dBm. The combined common mode rejection of the balanced photoreceiver and the integrated 3 dB coupler is >20 dB. We also present measurement results with various optical stimuli, namely impulses, sinusoids, and pseudo-random sequences, which are relevant for time domain reflectometry, frequency domain reflectometry, and code correlation sensors, respectively.

  13. Recommendations from gynaecological (GYN) GEC ESTRO working group (II): concepts and terms in 3D image-based treatment planning in cervix cancer brachytherapy-3D dose volume parameters and aspects of 3D image-based anatomy, radiation physics, radiobiology.

    PubMed

    Pötter, Richard; Haie-Meder, Christine; Van Limbergen, Erik; Barillot, Isabelle; De Brabandere, Marisol; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Dumas, Isabelle; Erickson, Beth; Lang, Stefan; Nulens, An; Petrow, Peter; Rownd, Jason; Kirisits, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The second part of the GYN GEC ESTRO working group recommendations is focused on 3D dose-volume parameters for brachytherapy of cervical carcinoma. Methods and parameters have been developed and validated from dosimetric, imaging and clinical experience from different institutions (University of Vienna, IGR Paris, University of Leuven). Cumulative dose volume histograms (DVH) are recommended for evaluation of the complex dose heterogeneity. DVH parameters for GTV, HR CTV and IR CTV are the minimum dose delivered to 90 and 100% of the respective volume: D90, D100. The volume, which is enclosed by 150 or 200% of the prescribed dose (V150, V200), is recommended for overall assessment of high dose volumes. V100 is recommended for quality assessment only within a given treatment schedule. For Organs at Risk (OAR) the minimum dose in the most irradiated tissue volume is recommended for reporting: 0.1, 1, and 2 cm3; optional 5 and 10 cm3. Underlying assumptions are: full dose of external beam therapy in the volume of interest, identical location during fractionated brachytherapy, contiguous volumes and contouring of organ walls for >2 cm3. Dose values are reported as absorbed dose and also taking into account different dose rates. The linear-quadratic radiobiological model-equivalent dose (EQD2)-is applied for brachytherapy and is also used for calculating dose from external beam therapy. This formalism allows systematic assessment within one patient, one centre and comparison between different centres with analysis of dose volume relations for GTV, CTV, and OAR. Recommendations for the transition period from traditional to 3D image-based cervix cancer brachytherapy are formulated. Supplementary data (available in the electronic version of this paper) deals with aspects of 3D imaging, radiation physics, radiation biology, dose at reference points and dimensions and volumes for the GTV and CTV (adding to [Haie-Meder C, Pötter R, Van Limbergen E et al. Recommendations from

  14. The estimation of 3D SAR distributions in the human head from mobile phone compliance testing data for epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Wake, Kanako; Varsier, Nadège; Watanabe, Soichi; Taki, Masao; Wiart, Joe; Mann, Simon; Deltour, Isabelle; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2009-10-07

    A worldwide epidemiological study called 'INTERPHONE' has been conducted to estimate the hypothetical relationship between brain tumors and mobile phone use. In this study, we proposed a method to estimate 3D distribution of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in the human head due to mobile phone use to provide the exposure gradient for epidemiological studies. 3D SAR distributions due to exposure to an electromagnetic field from mobile phones are estimated from mobile phone compliance testing data for actual devices. The data for compliance testing are measured only on the surface in the region near the device and in a small 3D region around the maximum on the surface in a homogeneous phantom with a specific shape. The method includes an interpolation/extrapolation and a head shape conversion. With the interpolation/extrapolation, SAR distributions in the whole head are estimated from the limited measured data. 3D SAR distributions in the numerical head models, where the tumor location is identified in the epidemiological studies, are obtained from measured SAR data with the head shape conversion by projection. Validation of the proposed method was performed experimentally and numerically. It was confirmed that the proposed method provided good estimation of 3D SAR distribution in the head, especially in the brain, which is the tissue of major interest in epidemiological studies. We conclude that it is possible to estimate 3D SAR distributions in a realistic head model from the data obtained by compliance testing measurements to provide a measure for the exposure gradient in specific locations of the brain for the purpose of exposure assessment in epidemiological studies. The proposed method has been used in several studies in the INTERPHONE.

  15. The estimation of 3D SAR distributions in the human head from mobile phone compliance testing data for epidemiological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wake, Kanako; Varsier, Nadège; Watanabe, Soichi; Taki, Masao; Wiart, Joe; Mann, Simon; Deltour, Isabelle; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2009-10-01

    A worldwide epidemiological study called 'INTERPHONE' has been conducted to estimate the hypothetical relationship between brain tumors and mobile phone use. In this study, we proposed a method to estimate 3D distribution of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in the human head due to mobile phone use to provide the exposure gradient for epidemiological studies. 3D SAR distributions due to exposure to an electromagnetic field from mobile phones are estimated from mobile phone compliance testing data for actual devices. The data for compliance testing are measured only on the surface in the region near the device and in a small 3D region around the maximum on the surface in a homogeneous phantom with a specific shape. The method includes an interpolation/extrapolation and a head shape conversion. With the interpolation/extrapolation, SAR distributions in the whole head are estimated from the limited measured data. 3D SAR distributions in the numerical head models, where the tumor location is identified in the epidemiological studies, are obtained from measured SAR data with the head shape conversion by projection. Validation of the proposed method was performed experimentally and numerically. It was confirmed that the proposed method provided good estimation of 3D SAR distribution in the head, especially in the brain, which is the tissue of major interest in epidemiological studies. We conclude that it is possible to estimate 3D SAR distributions in a realistic head model from the data obtained by compliance testing measurements to provide a measure for the exposure gradient in specific locations of the brain for the purpose of exposure assessment in epidemiological studies. The proposed method has been used in several studies in the INTERPHONE.

  16. The Impact of Different Levels of Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction 3D on Image Quality of 320-Row Coronary CT Angiography: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Sarah; Rief, Matthias; Zimmermann, Elke; Martus, Peter; Schuijf, Joanne Désirée; Blobel, Jörg; Richter, Felicitas; Dewey, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was the systematic image quality evaluation of coronary CT angiography (CTA), reconstructed with the 3 different levels of adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR 3D) and compared to filtered back projection (FBP) with quantum denoising software (QDS). Methods Standard-dose CTA raw data of 30 patients with mean radiation dose of 3.2 ± 2.6 mSv were reconstructed using AIDR 3D mild, standard, strong and compared to FBP/QDS. Objective image quality comparison (signal, noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), contour sharpness) was performed using 21 measurement points per patient, including measurements in each coronary artery from proximal to distal. Results Objective image quality parameters improved with increasing levels of AIDR 3D. Noise was lowest in AIDR 3D strong (p≤0.001 at 20/21 measurement points; compared with FBP/QDS). Signal and contour sharpness analysis showed no significant difference between the reconstruction algorithms for most measurement points. Best coronary SNR and CNR were achieved with AIDR 3D strong. No loss of SNR or CNR in distal segments was seen with AIDR 3D as compared to FBP. Conclusions On standard-dose coronary CTA images, AIDR 3D strong showed higher objective image quality than FBP/QDS without reducing contour sharpness. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00967876 PMID:25945924

  17. Mapping motion from 4D-MRI to 3D-CT for use in 4D dose calculations: A technical feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Boye, Dirk; Lomax, Tony; Knopf, Antje

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Target sites affected by organ motion require a time resolved (4D) dose calculation. Typical 4D dose calculations use 4D-CT as a basis. Unfortunately, 4D-CT images have the disadvantage of being a 'snap-shot' of the motion during acquisition and of assuming regularity of breathing. In addition, 4D-CT acquisitions involve a substantial additional dose burden to the patient making many, repeated 4D-CT acquisitions undesirable. Here the authors test the feasibility of an alternative approach to generate patient specific 4D-CT data sets. Methods: In this approach motion information is extracted from 4D-MRI. Simulated 4D-CT data sets [which the authors call 4D-CT(MRI)] are created by warping extracted deformation fields to a static 3D-CT data set. The employment of 4D-MRI sequences for this has the advantage that no assumptions on breathing regularity are made, irregularities in breathing can be studied and, if necessary, many repeat imaging studies (and consequently simulated 4D-CT data sets) can be performed on patients and/or volunteers. The accuracy of 4D-CT(MRI)s has been validated by 4D proton dose calculations. Our 4D dose algorithm takes into account displacements as well as deformations on the originating 4D-CT/4D-CT(MRI) by calculating the dose of each pencil beam based on an individual time stamp of when that pencil beam is applied. According to corresponding displacement and density-variation-maps the position and the water equivalent range of the dose grid points is adjusted at each time instance. Results: 4D dose distributions, using 4D-CT(MRI) data sets as input were compared to results based on a reference conventional 4D-CT data set capturing similar motion characteristics. Almost identical 4D dose distributions could be achieved, even though scanned proton beams are very sensitive to small differences in the patient geometry. In addition, 4D dose calculations have been performed on the same patient, but using 4D-CT(MRI) data sets based on

  18. Deformable segmentation of 3D MR prostate images via distributed discriminative dictionary and ensemble learning

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yanrong; Shao, Yeqin; Gao, Yaozong; Price, True; Oto, Aytekin; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-07-15

    patches of the prostate surface and trained to adaptively capture the appearance in different prostate zones, thus achieving better local tissue differentiation. For each local region, multiple classifiers are trained based on the randomly selected samples and finally assembled by a specific fusion method. In addition to this nonparametric appearance model, a prostate shape model is learned from the shape statistics using a novel approach, sparse shape composition, which can model nonGaussian distributions of shape variation and regularize the 3D mesh deformation by constraining it within the observed shape subspace. Results: The proposed method has been evaluated on two datasets consisting of T2-weighted MR prostate images. For the first (internal) dataset, the classification effectiveness of the authors' improved dictionary learning has been validated by comparing it with three other variants of traditional dictionary learning methods. The experimental results show that the authors' method yields a Dice Ratio of 89.1% compared to the manual segmentation, which is more accurate than the three state-of-the-art MR prostate segmentation methods under comparison. For the second dataset, the MICCAI 2012 challenge dataset, the authors' proposed method yields a Dice Ratio of 87.4%, which also achieves better segmentation accuracy than other methods under comparison. Conclusions: A new magnetic resonance image prostate segmentation method is proposed based on the combination of deformable model and dictionary learning methods, which achieves more accurate segmentation performance on prostate T2 MR images.

  19. Deformable segmentation of 3D MR prostate images via distributed discriminative dictionary and ensemble learning

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanrong; Gao, Yaozong; Shao, Yeqin; Price, True; Oto, Aytekin; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    patches of the prostate surface and trained to adaptively capture the appearance in different prostate zones, thus achieving better local tissue differentiation. For each local region, multiple classifiers are trained based on the randomly selected samples and finally assembled by a specific fusion method. In addition to this nonparametric appearance model, a prostate shape model is learned from the shape statistics using a novel approach, sparse shape composition, which can model nonGaussian distributions of shape variation and regularize the 3D mesh deformation by constraining it within the observed shape subspace. Results: The proposed method has been evaluated on two datasets consisting of T2-weighted MR prostate images. For the first (internal) dataset, the classification effectiveness of the authors' improved dictionary learning has been validated by comparing it with three other variants of traditional dictionary learning methods. The experimental results show that the authors' method yields a Dice Ratio of 89.1% compared to the manual segmentation, which is more accurate than the three state-of-the-art MR prostate segmentation methods under comparison. For the second dataset, the MICCAI 2012 challenge dataset, the authors' proposed method yields a Dice Ratio of 87.4%, which also achieves better segmentation accuracy than other methods under comparison. Conclusions: A new magnetic resonance image prostate segmentation method is proposed based on the combination of deformable model and dictionary learning methods, which achieves more accurate segmentation performance on prostate T2 MR images. PMID:24989402

  20. 3D Quantitative Confocal Laser Microscopy of Ilmenite Volume Distribution in Alpe Arami Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhilov, K. N.

    2001-12-01

    The deep origin of the Alpe Arami garnet lherzolite massif in the Swiss Alps proposed by Dobrzhinetskaya et al. (Science, 1996) has been a focus of heated debate. One of the lines of evidence supporting an exhumation from more than 200 km depth includes the abundance, distribution, and orientation of magnesian ilmenite rods in the oldest generation of olivine. This argument has been disputed in terms of the abundance of ilmenite and consequently the maximum TiO2 content in the discussed olivine. In order to address this issue, we have directly measured the volume fraction of ilmenite of the oldest generation of olivine by applying confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). CLSM is a method which allows for three-dimensional imaging and quantitative volume determination by optical sectioning of the objects. The images for 3D reconstruction and measurements were acquired from petrographic thin sections in reflected laser light with 488 nm wavelength. Measurements of more than 80 olivine grains in six thin sections of our material yielded an average volume fraction of 0.31% ilmenite in the oldest generation of olivine from Alpe Arami. This translates into 0.23 wt.% TiO2 in olivine with error in determination of ±0.097 wt.%, a value significantly different from that of 0.02 to 0.03 wt.% TiO2 determined by Hacker et al. (Science, 1997) by a broad-beam microanalysis technique. During the complex geological history of the Alpe Arami massif, several events of metamorphism are recorded which all could have caused increased mobility of the mineral components. Evidence for loss of TiO2 from olivine is the tendency for high densities of ilmenite to be restricted to cores of old grains, the complete absence of ilmenite inclusions from the younger, recrystallized, generation of olivine, and reduction in ilmenite size and abundance in more serpentinized specimens. These observations suggest that only olivine grains with the highest concentrations of ilmenite are close to the

  1. Calculation of Dose Deposition in 3D Voxels by Heavy Ions and Simulation of gamma-H2AX Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, I.; Ponomarev, A. L.; Wang, M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    The biological response to high-LET radiation is different from low-LET radiation due to several factors, notably difference in energy deposition and formation of radiolytic species. Of particular importance in radiobiology is the formation of double-strand breaks (DSB), which can be detected by -H2AX foci experiments. These experiments has revealed important differences in the spatial distribution of DSB induced by low- and high-LET radiations [1,2]. To simulate -H2AX experiments, models based on amorphous track with radial dose are often combined with random walk chromosome models [3,4]. In this work, a new approach using the Monte-Carlo track structure code RITRACKS [5] and chromosome models have been used to simulate DSB formation. At first, RITRACKS have been used to simulate the irradiation of a cubic volume of 5 m by 1) 450 1H+ ions of 300 MeV (LET 0.3 keV/ m) and 2) by 1 56Fe26+ ion of 1 GeV/amu (LET 150 keV/ m). All energy deposition events are recorded to calculate dose in voxels of 20 m. The dose voxels are distributed randomly and scattered uniformly within the volume irradiated by low-LET radiation. Many differences are found in the spatial distribution of dose voxels for the 56Fe26+ ion. The track structure can be distinguished, and voxels with very high dose are found in the region corresponding to the track "core". These high-dose voxels are not found in the low-LET irradiation simulation and indicate clustered energy deposition, which may be responsible for complex DSB. In the second step, assuming that DSB will be found only in voxels where energy is deposited by the radiation, the intersection points between voxels with dose > 0 and simulated chromosomes were obtained. The spatial distribution of the intersection points is similar to -H2AX foci experiments. These preliminary results suggest that combining stochastic track structure and chromosome models could be a good approach to understand radiation-induced DSB and chromosome aberrations.

  2. Development of phantom and methodology for 3D and 4D dose intercomparisons for advanced lung radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caloz, Misael; Kafrouni, Marilyne; Leturgie, Quentin; Corde, Stéphanie; Downes, Simon; Lehmann, Joerg; Thwaites, David

    2015-01-01

    There are few reported intercomparisons or audits of combinations of advanced radiotherapy methods, particularly for 4D treatments. As part of an evaluation of the implementation of advanced radiotherapy technology, a phantom and associated methods, initially developed for in-house commissioning and QA of 4D lung treatments, has been developed further with the aim of using it for end-to-end dose intercomparison of 4D treatment planning and delivery. The respiratory thorax phantom can house moving inserts with variable speed (breathing rate) and motion amplitude. In one set-up mode it contains a small ion chamber for point dose measurements, or alternatively it can hold strips of radiochromic film to measure dose distributions. Initial pilot and feasibility measurements have been carried out in one hospital to thoroughly test the methods and procedures before using it more widely across a range of hospitals and treatment systems. Overall, the results show good agreement between measured and calculated doses and distributions, supporting the use of the phantom and methodology for multi-centre intercomparisons. However, before wider use, refinements of the method and analysis are currently underway particularly for the film measurements.

  3. A Portable 3D FFT Package for Distributed-Memory Parallel Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, H. Q.; Ferraro, R. D.; Gennery, D. B.

    1995-01-01

    A parallel algorithm for 3D FFTs is implemented as a series of local 1D FFTs combined with data transposes. This allows the use of vendor supplied (often fully optimized) sequential 1D FFTs. The FFTs are carried out in-place by using an in-place data transpose across the processors.

  4. Supporting Distributed Team Working in 3D Virtual Worlds: A Case Study in Second Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minocha, Shailey; Morse, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study into how a three-dimensional (3D) virtual world (Second Life) can facilitate socialisation and team working among students working on a team project at a distance. This models the situation in many commercial sectors where work is increasingly being conducted across time zones and between…

  5. Supporting Distributed Team Working in 3D Virtual Worlds: A Case Study in Second Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minocha, Shailey; Morse, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study into how a three-dimensional (3D) virtual world (Second Life) can facilitate socialisation and team working among students working on a team project at a distance. This models the situation in many commercial sectors where work is increasingly being conducted across time zones and between…

  6. Reduced-dose chest CT with 3D automatic exposure control vs. standard chest CT: quantitative assessment of emphysematous changes in smokers' lung parenchyma.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Hisanobu; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Yamazaki, Youichi; Matsumoto, Keiko; Onishi, Yumiko; Takenaka, Daisuke; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Nishio, Mizuho; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Murase, Kenya; Nishimura, Yoshihiro; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2012-06-01

    To determine the capability of reduced-dose chest CT with three-dimensional (3D) automatic exposure control (AEC) on quantitative assessment of emphysematous change in smoker' lung parenchyma, compared to standard chest CT. Twenty consecutive smoker patients (mean age 62.8 years) underwent CT examinations using a standard protocol (150 mAs) and a protocol with 3D-AEC. In this study, the targeted standard deviations number was set to 160. For quantitative assessment of emphysematous change in lung parenchyma in each subject using the standard protocol, a percentage of voxels less than -950 HU in the lung (%LAA(-950)) was calculated. The 3D-AEC protocol's %LAA was computed from of voxel percentages under selected threshold CT value. The differences of radiation doses between these two protocols were evaluated, and %LAAs(-950) was compared with the 3D-AEC protocol %LAAs. Mean dose length products were 780.2 ± 145.5 mGy cm (standard protocol), and 192.0 ± 95.9 (3D-AEC protocol). There was significant difference between them (paired Student's t test, p<0.00001). Meanwhile, only setting -960 HU yielded no significant difference (paired Student's t test, p=0.32) between %LAAs(-950) and 3D-AEC protocol %LAAs. In adopting the feasible threshold CT values of the 3D-AEC protocol, the 3D-AEC protocol %LAAs were significantly correlated with %LAAs(-950) (r = 0.98, p<0.001) and limits of agreement from Bland-Altman analysis was 0.52 ± 4.3%. Changing threshold CT values demonstrated that reduced-dose chest CT with 3D-AEC can substitute for the standard protocol in assessments of emphysematous change in smoker' lung parenchyma. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Properties of the prominence magnetic field and plasma distributions as obtained from 3D whole-prominence fine structure modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunár, S.; Mackay, D. H.

    2016-07-01

    Aims: We analyze distributions of the magnetic field strength and prominence plasma (temperature, pressure, plasma β, and mass) using the 3D whole-prominence fine structure model. Methods: The model combines a 3D magnetic field configuration of an entire prominence, obtained from non-linear force-free field simulations, with a detailed semi-empirically derived description of the prominence plasma. The plasma is located in magnetic dips in hydrostatic equilibrium and is distributed along multiple fine structures within the 3D magnetic model. Results: We show that in the modeled prominence, the variations of the magnetic field strength and its orientation are insignificant on scales comparable to the smallest dimensions of the observed prominence fine structures. We also show the ability of the 3D whole-prominence fine structure model to reveal the distribution of the prominence plasma with respect to its temperature within the prominence volume. This provides new insights into the composition of the prominence-corona transition region. We further demonstrate that the values of the plasma β are small throughout the majority of the modeled prominences when realistic photospheric magnetic flux distributions and prominence plasma parameters are assumed. While this is generally true, we also find that in the region with the deepest magnetic dips, the plasma β may increase towards unity. Finally, we show that the mass of the modeled prominence plasma is in good agreement with the mass of observed non-eruptive prominences.

  8. Influence of the adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D algorithm on the detectability of low-contrast lesions and radiation dose repeatability in abdominal computed tomography: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jeong Hee; Lee, Jeong Min; Hur, Bo Yun; Baek, Jeehyun; Shim, Hackjoon; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the influence of the adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR 3D) algorithm on the detectability of low-contrast focal liver lesions (FLLs) and the radiation dose repeatability of automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) in abdominal CT scans using anthropomorphic phantoms. Three different sizes of anthropomorphic phantoms, each with 4 low-contrast FLLs, were scanned on a 320-channel CT scanner using the ATCM technique and AIDR 3D, at different radiation doses: full-dose, half-dose, and quarter-dose. Scans were repeated three times and reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and AIDR 3D. Radiation dose repeatability was assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Image noise, quality, and lesion conspicuity were assessed by four reviewers and the number of invisible FLLs was compared among different radiation doses and reconstruction methods. ICCs of radiation dose among the three CT scans were excellent in all phantoms (0.99). Image noise, quality, and lesion conspicuity in the half-dose group were comparable with full-dose FBP after applying AIDR 3D in all phantoms. In small phantoms, the half-dose group reconstructed with AIDR 3D showed similar sensitivity in visualizing low-contrast FLLs compared to full-dose FBP (P = 0.77-0.84). In medium and large phantoms, AIDR 3D reduced the number of missing low-contrast FLLs [3.1% (9/288), 11.5% (33/288), respectively], compared to FBP [10.4% (30/288), 21.9% (63/288), respectively] in the full-dose group. By applying AIDR 3D, half-dose CT scans may be achievable in small-sized patients without hampering diagnostic performance, while it may improve diagnostic performance in medium- and large-sized patients without increasing the radiation dose.

  9. Mapping molecular orientational distributions for biological sample in 3D (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HE, Wei; Ferrand, Patrick; Richter, Benjamin; Bastmeyer, Martin; Brasselet, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    Measuring molecular orientation properties is very appealing for scientists in molecular and cell biology, as well as biomedical research. Orientational organization at the molecular scale is indeed an important brick to cells and tissues morphology, mechanics, functions and pathologies. Recent work has shown that polarized fluorescence imaging, based on excitation polarization tuning in the sample plane, is able to probe molecular orientational order in biological samples; however this applies only to information in 2D, projected in the sample plane. To surpass this limitation, we extended this approach to excitation polarization tuning in 3D. The principle is based on the decomposition of any arbitrary 3D linear excitation in a polarization along the longitudinal z-axis, and a polarization in the transverse xy-sample plane. We designed an interferometer with one arm generating radial polarization light (thus producing longitudinal polarization under high numerical aperture focusing), the other arm controlling a linear polarization in the transverse plane. The amplitude ratio between the two arms can vary so as to get any linear polarized excitation in 3D at the focus of a high NA objective. This technique has been characterized by polarimetry imaging at the back focal plane of the focusing objective, and modeled theoretically. 3D polarized fluorescence microscopy is demonstrated on actin stress fibers in non-flat cells suspended on synthetic polymer structures forming supporting pillars, for which heterogeneous actin orientational order could be identified. This technique shows a great potential in structural investigations in 3D biological systems, such as cell spheroids and tissues.

  10. Simulated 50 % radiation dose reduction in coronary CT angiography using adaptive iterative dose reduction in three-dimensions (AIDR3D).

    PubMed

    Chen, Marcus Y; Steigner, Michael L; Leung, Steve W; Kumamaru, Kanako K; Schultz, Kurt; Mather, Richard T; Arai, Andrew E; Rybicki, Frank J

    2013-06-01

    To compare the image quality of coronary CT angiography (CTA) studies between standard filtered back projection (FBP) and adaptive iterative dose reduction in three-dimensions (AIDR3D) reconstruction using CT noise additional software to simulate reduced radiation exposure. Images from 93 consecutive clinical coronary CTA studies were processed utilizing standard FBP, FBP with 50% simulated dose reduction (FBP50%), and AIDR3D with simulated 50% dose reduction (AIDR50%). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured within 5 regions-of-interest, and image quality for each reconstruction strategy was assessed by two independent readers using a 4-point scale. Compared to FBP, the SNR measured from the AIDR50% images was similar or higher (airway: 38.3 ± 12.7 vs. 38.5 ± 14.5, p = 0.81, fat: 5.5 ± 1.9 vs. 5.4 ± 2.0, p = 0.20, muscle: 3.2 ± 1.2 vs. 3.1 ± 1.3, p = 0.38, aorta: 22.6 ± 9.4 vs. 20.2 ± 9.7, p < 0.0001, liver: 2.7 ± 1.0 vs. 2.3 ± 1.1, p < 0.0001), while the SNR of the FBP50 % images were all lower (p values < 0.0001). The CNR measured from AIDR50% images was also higher than that from the FBP images for the aorta relative to muscle (20.5 ± 9.0 vs. 18.3 ± 9.2, p < 0.0001). The interobserver agreement in the image quality score was excellent (κ = 0.82). The quality score was significantly higher for the AIDR50% images compared to the FBP images (3.6 ± 0.6 vs. 3.3 ± 0.7, p = 0.004). Simulated radiation dose reduction applied to clinical coronary CTA images suggests that a 50% reduction in radiation dose can be achieved with adaptive iterative dose reduction software with image quality that is at least comparable to images acquired at standard radiation exposure and reconstructed with filtered back projection.

  11. 3D Imaging of Nanoparticle Distribution in Biological Tissue by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Y; Busser, B; Trichard, F; Kulesza, A; Laurent, J M; Zaun, V; Lux, F; Benoit, J M; Panczer, G; Dugourd, P; Tillement, O; Pelascini, F; Sancey, L; Motto-Ros, V

    2016-07-20

    Nanomaterials represent a rapidly expanding area of research with huge potential for future medical applications. Nanotechnology indeed promises to revolutionize diagnostics, drug delivery, gene therapy, and many other areas of research. For any biological investigation involving nanomaterials, it is crucial to study the behavior of such nano-objects within tissues to evaluate both their efficacy and their toxicity. Here, we provide the first account of 3D label-free nanoparticle imaging at the entire-organ scale. The technology used is known as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and possesses several advantages such as speed of operation, ease of use and full compatibility with optical microscopy. We then used two different but complementary approaches to achieve 3D elemental imaging with LIBS: a volume reconstruction of a sliced organ and in-depth analysis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the quantitative imaging of both endogenous and exogenous elements within entire organs and paves the way for innumerable applications.

  12. 3D Imaging of Nanoparticle Distribution in Biological Tissue by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez, Y.; Busser, B.; Trichard, F.; Kulesza, A.; Laurent, J. M.; Zaun, V.; Lux, F.; Benoit, J. M.; Panczer, G.; Dugourd, P.; Tillement, O.; Pelascini, F.; Sancey, L.; Motto-Ros, V.

    2016-07-01

    Nanomaterials represent a rapidly expanding area of research with huge potential for future medical applications. Nanotechnology indeed promises to revolutionize diagnostics, drug delivery, gene therapy, and many other areas of research. For any biological investigation involving nanomaterials, it is crucial to study the behavior of such nano-objects within tissues to evaluate both their efficacy and their toxicity. Here, we provide the first account of 3D label-free nanoparticle imaging at the entire-organ scale. The technology used is known as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and possesses several advantages such as speed of operation, ease of use and full compatibility with optical microscopy. We then used two different but complementary approaches to achieve 3D elemental imaging with LIBS: a volume reconstruction of a sliced organ and in-depth analysis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the quantitative imaging of both endogenous and exogenous elements within entire organs and paves the way for innumerable applications.

  13. Regional salt distribution from 3D data across the South Additions, offshore Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson, G.A. )

    1996-01-01

    A contiguous 3D dataset comprising 20 surveys covering over 800 OCS blocks in the offshore Louisiana South Additions region formed the primary database for a regional interpretation of top and base salt surfaces. The interpretation was performed on a 800m by 800m grid of 3D time migrated lines extracted from each survey and loaded into a single project on a workstation. After completing the interpretation the top and base salt horizons were depth converted, incorporating representative well velocity information across the study area. The use of 3D data has significantly improved interpretation confidence, particularly of the base salt, compared to 2D data, which, to date, has been the most commonly utilized regional tool. However, 2D data suffers from out-of-plane effects which can lead to erroneous interpretations of the base of salt and deep welds. A number of significant regional salt-related features and trends have been identified from the top and base salt time and depth maps. Significant identified features on the base of salt and below include keels, welds, fault zones and possible ramps which, in places, display significantly differing trends to those of the suprasalt section. The 3D data allows the mapping of feeders associated with large counter-regional fault systems down to extreme depths, in places to over 7 kms, as well as the location of feeder stock and wall locations beneath salt canopies. This has shown that many large sheets comprise several salt masses which have coalesced along suture zones, for example in the Vermilion and Ship Shoal regions.

  14. Regional salt distribution from 3D data across the South Additions, offshore Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson, G.A.

    1996-12-31

    A contiguous 3D dataset comprising 20 surveys covering over 800 OCS blocks in the offshore Louisiana South Additions region formed the primary database for a regional interpretation of top and base salt surfaces. The interpretation was performed on a 800m by 800m grid of 3D time migrated lines extracted from each survey and loaded into a single project on a workstation. After completing the interpretation the top and base salt horizons were depth converted, incorporating representative well velocity information across the study area. The use of 3D data has significantly improved interpretation confidence, particularly of the base salt, compared to 2D data, which, to date, has been the most commonly utilized regional tool. However, 2D data suffers from out-of-plane effects which can lead to erroneous interpretations of the base of salt and deep welds. A number of significant regional salt-related features and trends have been identified from the top and base salt time and depth maps. Significant identified features on the base of salt and below include keels, welds, fault zones and possible ramps which, in places, display significantly differing trends to those of the suprasalt section. The 3D data allows the mapping of feeders associated with large counter-regional fault systems down to extreme depths, in places to over 7 kms, as well as the location of feeder stock and wall locations beneath salt canopies. This has shown that many large sheets comprise several salt masses which have coalesced along suture zones, for example in the Vermilion and Ship Shoal regions.

  15. 3D image-based adapted high-dose-rate brachytherapy in cervical cancer with and without interstitial needles: measurement of applicator shift between imaging and dose delivery

    PubMed Central

    Thunberg, Per; With, Anders; Mordhorst, Louise Bohr; Persliden, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Using 3D image-guided adaptive brachytherapy for cervical cancer treatment, it often means that patients are transported and moved during the treatment procedure. The purpose of this study was to determine the intra-fractional longitudinal applicator shift in relation to the high risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) by comparing geometries at imaging and dose delivery for patients with and without needles. Material and methods Measurements were performed in 33 patients (71 fractions), where 25 fractions were without and 46 were with interstitial needles. Gold markers were placed in the lower part of the cervix as a surrogate for HR-CTV, enabling distance measurements between HR-CTV and the ring applicator. Shifts of the applicator relative to the markers were determined using planning computed tomography (CT) images used for planning, and the radiographs obtained at dose delivery. Differences in the physical D90 for HR-CTV due to applicator shifts were simulated individually in the treatment planning system to provide the relative dose variation. Results The maximum distances of the applicator shifts, in relation to the markers, were 3.6 mm (caudal), and –2.5 mm (cranial). There was a significant displacement of –0.7 mm (SD = 0.9 mm) without needles, while with needles there was no significant shift. The relative dose variation showed a significant increase in D90 HR-CTV of 1.6% (SD = 2.6%) when not using needles, and no significant dose variation was found when using needles. Conclusions The results from this study showed that there was a small longitudinal displacement of the ring applicator and a significant difference in displacement between using interstitial needles or not. PMID:28344604

  16. The Relationship between Oxygen A-band Photon Pathlength Distributions and 3D Structures of Heating Rate Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, L.; Min, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Broadband heating directly drives the global atmospheric and oceanic circulation and its vertical profiles strongly depend upon cloud three-dimensional (3D) structures. Due to the complexity of cloud 3D problems and the difficulties in observations of broadband heating rate profiles (BBHRP), there are still large uncertainties in the relationship of clouds, radiation and climate feedback. Oxygen A-band photon pathlength distributions (PPLD) contain rich information about the 3D structures of clouds and BBHRP and can be observed by both ground based and space based measurements. Therefore, it is meaningful to explore the possibility of connecting A-band PPLD and BBHRP and consequently to describe the internal relationship between them together with the cloud 3D effects on BBHRP. A 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer model is applied to simulate solar broadband heating rate profiles and oxygen A-band photon pathlength distributions of several ideal cloud fields and two typical cloud fields generated by cloud resolving model (CRM). Principal components (PCs) and the first four moments are selected to represent the vertical structures of BBHRP and PPLD, respectively. In ideal cloud fields, the moments show clear constraint to PCs of BBHRP. The results demonstrate the feasibility to describe the vertical structures of BBHRP by PPLD. The relationship between moments and PCs turns complicated in CRM cloud fields due to the composition of various 3D effects. However, detailed analysis still show that the moments, the PCs and total cloud optical depth are effective factors in defining BBHRP, especially for the vertical structures of relative low clouds. Further, a statistical fitting between the PCs and the moments by a two-layer neural network is applied to provide a quantitative representation of the linkages.

  17. Hypofractionated Dose Escalated 3D Conformal Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Outcomes from a Mono-Institutional Phase II Study.

    PubMed

    Tramacere, Francesco; Arcangeli, Stefano; Pignatelli, Antonietta; Castagna, Roberta; Portaluri, Maurizio

    2015-05-01

    (bNED) was 83% for all patients. Our study confirms that 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) remains a safe and effective method to deliver a dose-escalated hypofractionated regimen for PCa patients in all risk classes with acceptable toxicity rates and optimal biochemical control. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  18. Volumetric (3D) bladder dose parameters are more reproducible than point (2D) dose parameters in vaginal vault high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sapienza, Lucas Gomes; Flosi, Adriana; Aiza, Antonio; de Assis Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio; Chojniak, Rubens; Baiocchi, Glauco

    2016-01-01

    There is no consensus on the use of computed tomography in vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCB) planning. The purpose of this study was to prospectively determine the reproducibility of point bladder dose parameters (DICRU and maximum dose), compared with volumetric-based parameters. Twenty-two patients who were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) VCB underwent simulation by computed tomography (CT-scan) with a Foley catheter at standard tension (position A) and extra tension (position B). CT-scan determined the bladder ICRU dose point in both positions and compared the displacement and recorded dose. Volumetric parameters (D0.1cc, D1.0cc, D2.0cc, D4.0cc and D50%) and point dose parameters were compared. The average spatial shift in ICRU dose point in the vertical, longitudinal and lateral directions was 2.91 mm (range: 0.10–9.00), 12.04 mm (range: 4.50–24.50) and 2.65 mm (range: 0.60–8.80), respectively. The DICRU ratio for positions A and B was 1.64 (p < 0.001). Moreover, a decrease in Dmax was observed (p = 0.016). Tension level of the urinary catheter did not affect the volumetric parameters. Our data suggest that point parameters (DICRU and Dmax) are not reproducible and are not the ideal choice for dose reporting. PMID:27296459

  19. Multicriteria optimization of the spatial dose distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Schlaefer, Alexander; Viulet, Tiberiu; Muacevic, Alexander; Fürweger, Christoph

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Treatment planning for radiation therapy involves trade-offs with respect to different clinical goals. Typically, the dose distribution is evaluated based on few statistics and dose–volume histograms. Particularly for stereotactic treatments, the spatial dose distribution represents further criteria, e.g., when considering the gradient between subregions of volumes of interest. The authors have studied how to consider the spatial dose distribution using a multicriteria optimization approach.Methods: The authors have extended a stepwise multicriteria optimization approach to include criteria with respect to the local dose distribution. Based on a three-dimensional visualization of the dose the authors use a software tool allowing interaction with the dose distribution to map objectives with respect to its shape to a constrained optimization problem. Similarly, conflicting criteria are highlighted and the planner decides if and where to relax the shape of the dose distribution.Results: To demonstrate the potential of spatial multicriteria optimization, the tool was applied to a prostate and meningioma case. For the prostate case, local sparing of the rectal wall and shaping of a boost volume are achieved through local relaxations and while maintaining the remaining dose distribution. For the meningioma, target coverage is improved by compromising low dose conformality toward noncritical structures. A comparison of dose–volume histograms illustrates the importance of spatial information for achieving the trade-offs.Conclusions: The results show that it is possible to consider the location of conflicting criteria during treatment planning. Particularly, it is possible to conserve already achieved goals with respect to the dose distribution, to visualize potential trade-offs, and to relax constraints locally. Hence, the proposed approach facilitates a systematic exploration of the optimal shape of the dose distribution.

  20. Dosimetric validation and clinical implementation of two 3D dose verification systems for quality assurance in volumetric-modulated arc therapy techniques.

    PubMed

    Clemente-Gutiérrez, Francisco; Pérez-Vara, Consuelo

    2015-03-08

    A pretreatment quality assurance program for volumetric techniques should include redundant calculations and measurement-based verifications. The patient-specific quality assurance process must be based in clinically relevant metrics. The aim of this study was to show the commission, clinical implementation, and comparison of two systems that allow performing a 3D redundant dose calculation. In addition, one of them is capable of reconstructing the dose on patient anatomy from measurements taken with a 2D ion chamber array. Both systems were compared in terms of reference calibration data (absolute dose, output factors, percentage depth-dose curves, and profiles). Results were in good agreement for absolute dose values (discrepancies were below 0.5%) and output factors (mean differences were below 1%). Maximum mean discrepancies were located between 10 and 20 cm of depth for PDDs (-2.7%) and in the penumbra region for profiles (mean DTA of 1.5 mm). Validation of the systems was performed by comparing point-dose measurements with values obtained by the two systems for static, dynamic fields from AAPM TG-119 report, and 12 real VMAT plans for different anatomical sites (differences better than 1.2%). Comparisons between measurements taken with a 2D ion chamber array and results obtained by both systems for real VMAT plans were also performed (mean global gamma passing rates better than 87.0% and 97.9% for the 2%/2 mm and 3%/3 mm criteria). Clinical implementation of the systems was evaluated by comparing dose-volume parameters for all TG-119 tests and real VMAT plans with TPS values (mean differences were below 1%). In addition, comparisons between dose distributions calculated by TPS and those extracted by the two systems for real VMAT plans were also performed (mean global gamma passing rates better than 86.0% and 93.0% for the 2%/2 mm and 3%/ 3 mm criteria). The clinical use of both systems was successfully evaluated.

  1. In vivo surface dose measurement using GafChromic film dosimetry in breast cancer radiotherapy: comparison of 7-field IMRT, tangential IMRT and tangential 3D-CRT

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the surface dose of 7-field IMRT (7 F-IMRT), tangential beam IMRT (TB-IMRT), and tangential beam 3D-CRT (3D-CRT) of breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy by means of in vivo GafChromic film dosimetry. Material and methods Breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy of the whole breast or the chest wall were eligible for the study. Study patients were treated with a treatment plan using two different radiotherapy techniques (first patient series, 3D-CRT followed by TB-IMRT; second patient series, TB-IMRT followed by 7 F-IMRT). The surface dose was evaluated on three consecutive treatment fractions per radiotherapy technique using in vivo GafChromic film dosimetry. The paired t-test was used to assess the difference of in vivo GafChromic film readings or calculated plan parameters of the compared pairs of radiation techniques for statistical significance. Results Forty-five unselected breast cancer patients were analysed in this study. 7 F-IMRT significantly reduced the surface dose compared to TB-IMRT. Differences were greatest in the central and lateral breast or chest wall region and amounted to a dose reduction of -11.8% to -18.8%. No significant difference of the surface dose was observed between TB-IMRT and 3D-CRT. A corresponding observation was obtained for the calculated skin dose derived from dose-volume histograms. Conclusions In adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy, 7 F-IMRT offers a significantly reduced surface dose compared to TB-IMRT or 3D-CRT. PMID:25022449

  2. Sesame allergy threshold dose distribution.

    PubMed

    Dano, D; Remington, B C; Astier, C; Baumert, J L; Kruizinga, A G; Bihain, B E; Taylor, S L; Kanny, G

    2015-09-01

    Sesame is a relevant food allergen in France. Compared to other allergens there is a lack of food challenge data and more data could help sesame allergy risk management. The aim of this study is to collect more sesame challenge data and investigate the most efficient food challenge method for future studies. Records of patients at University Hospital in Nancy (France) with objective symptoms to sesame challenges were collected and combined with previously published data. An estimation of the sesame allergy population threshold was calculated based on individual NOAELs and LOAELs. Clinical dosing schemes at Nancy were investigated to see if the optimal protocol for sesame is currently used. Fourteen patients (10 M/4 F, 22 ± 14.85 years old) with objective symptoms were added to previously published data making a total of 35 sesame allergic patients. The most sensitive patient reacted to the first dose at challenge of 1.02 mg sesame protein. The ED05 ranges between 1.2 and 4.0 mg of sesame protein (Log-Normal, Log-Logistic, and Weibull models) and the ED10 between 4.2 and 6.2 mg. The optimal food challenge dosing scheme for sesame follows semi-log dose increases from 0.3 to 3000 mg protein. This article provides a valuable update to the existing clinical literature regarding sesame NOAELs and LOAELs. Establishment of a population threshold for sesame could help in increasing the credibility of precautionary labelling and decrease the costs associated with unexpected allergic reactions. Also, the use of an optimal dosing scheme would decrease time spent on diagnostic and thereafter on the economic burden of sesame allergy diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Reconstructing the 3D shape and bone mineral density distribution of the proximal femur from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Whitmarsh, Tristan; Humbert, Ludovic; De Craene, Mathieu; Del Rio Barquero, Luis M; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2011-12-01

    The accurate diagnosis of osteoporosis has gained increasing importance due to the aging of our society. Areal bone mineral density (BMD) measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is an established criterion in the diagnosis of osteoporosis. This measure, however, is limited by its two-dimensionality. This work presents a method to reconstruct both the 3D bone shape and 3D BMD distribution of the proximal femur from a single DXA image used in clinical routine. A statistical model of the combined shape and BMD distribution is presented, together with a method for its construction from a set of quantitative computed tomography (QCT) scans. A reconstruction is acquired in an intensity based 3D-2D registration process whereby an instance of the model is found that maximizes the similarity between its projection and the DXA image. Reconstruction experiments were performed on the DXA images of 30 subjects, with a model constructed from a database of QCT scans of 85 subjects. The accuracy was evaluated by comparing the reconstructions with the same subject QCT scans. The method presented here can potentially improve the diagnosis of osteoporosis and fracture risk assessment from the low radiation dose and low cost DXA devices currently used in clinical routine.

  4. 3D Imaging of Nanoparticle Distribution in Biological Tissue by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Y.; Busser, B.; Trichard, F.; Kulesza, A.; Laurent, J. M.; Zaun, V.; Lux, F.; Benoit, J. M.; Panczer, G.; Dugourd, P.; Tillement, O.; Pelascini, F.; Sancey, L.; Motto-Ros, V.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials represent a rapidly expanding area of research with huge potential for future medical applications. Nanotechnology indeed promises to revolutionize diagnostics, drug delivery, gene therapy, and many other areas of research. For any biological investigation involving nanomaterials, it is crucial to study the behavior of such nano-objects within tissues to evaluate both their efficacy and their toxicity. Here, we provide the first account of 3D label-free nanoparticle imaging at the entire-organ scale. The technology used is known as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and possesses several advantages such as speed of operation, ease of use and full compatibility with optical microscopy. We then used two different but complementary approaches to achieve 3D elemental imaging with LIBS: a volume reconstruction of a sliced organ and in-depth analysis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the quantitative imaging of both endogenous and exogenous elements within entire organs and paves the way for innumerable applications. PMID:27435424

  5. Salt distribution in the Louisiana South Additions area from 3D seismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson, G.A.

    1996-12-31

    This paper outlines some preliminary observations based on a large interpretation project that was carried out with a grid of 3D time migrated seismic data, covering over 7,500 mi{sup 2} of the South Additions region of offshore Louisiana. Depth migrated data, covering a smaller subset of the study area, was also utilized in the interpretation. Top and base of salt were interpreted and the resulting maps have identified patterns of salt and weld geometry that show some regional trends. Historically, 2D time migrated seismic has been the primary dataset of most of the published regional salt studies. This paper focuses on areas where 3D time migrated data potentially shows most improvement over 2D data, specifically in the subsalt regions. In particular, relationships between base-of-salt keels, welds, basins, regional faulting and basement architecture are investigated. A generalized model is outlined to help explain the current salt geometry in the study area and comparisons are made with recently published salt evolution models.

  6. Method for dose-reduced 3D catheter tracking on a scanning-beam digital x-ray system using dynamic electronic collimation

    PubMed Central

    Dunkerley, David A. P.; Funk, Tobias; Speidel, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy system capable of tomosynthesis-based 3D catheter tracking. This work proposes a method of dose-reduced 3D tracking using dynamic electronic collimation (DEC) of the SBDX scanning x-ray tube. Positions in the 2D focal spot array are selectively activated to create a region-of-interest (ROI) x-ray field around the tracked catheter. The ROI position is updated for each frame based on a motion vector calculated from the two most recent 3D tracking results. The technique was evaluated with SBDX data acquired as a catheter tip inside a chest phantom was pulled along a 3D trajectory. DEC scans were retrospectively generated from the detector images stored for each focal spot position. DEC imaging of a catheter tip in a volume measuring 11.4 cm across at isocenter required 340 active focal spots per frame, versus 4473 spots in full-FOV mode. The dose-area-product (DAP) and peak skin dose (PSD) for DEC versus full field-of-view (FOV) scanning were calculated using an SBDX Monte Carlo simulation code. DAP was reduced to 7.4% to 8.4% of the full-FOV value, consistent with the relative number of active focal spots (7.6%). For image sequences with a moving catheter, PSD was 33.6% to 34.8% of the full-FOV value. The root-mean-squared-deviation between DEC-based 3D tracking coordinates and full-FOV 3D tracking coordinates was less than 0.1 mm. The 3D distance between the tracked tip and the sheath centerline averaged 0.75 mm. Dynamic electronic collimation can reduce dose with minimal change in tracking performance. PMID:27375314

  7. Method for dose-reduced 3D catheter tracking on a scanning-beam digital x-ray system using dynamic electronic collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkerley, David A. P.; Funk, Tobias; Speidel, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    Scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy system capable of tomosynthesis-based 3D catheter tracking. This work proposes a method of dose-reduced 3D tracking using dynamic electronic collimation (DEC) of the SBDX scanning x-ray tube. Positions in the 2D focal spot array are selectively activated to create a regionof- interest (ROI) x-ray field around the tracked catheter. The ROI position is updated for each frame based on a motion vector calculated from the two most recent 3D tracking results. The technique was evaluated with SBDX data acquired as a catheter tip inside a chest phantom was pulled along a 3D trajectory. DEC scans were retrospectively generated from the detector images stored for each focal spot position. DEC imaging of a catheter tip in a volume measuring 11.4 cm across at isocenter required 340 active focal spots per frame, versus 4473 spots in full-FOV mode. The dose-area-product (DAP) and peak skin dose (PSD) for DEC versus full field-of-view (FOV) scanning were calculated using an SBDX Monte Carlo simulation code. DAP was reduced to 7.4% to 8.4% of the full-FOV value, consistent with the relative number of active focal spots (7.6%). For image sequences with a moving catheter, PSD was 33.6% to 34.8% of the full-FOV value. The root-mean-squared-deviation between DEC-based 3D tracking coordinates and full-FOV 3D tracking coordinates was less than 0.1 mm. The 3D distance between the tracked tip and the sheath centerline averaged 0.75 mm. Dynamic electronic collimation can reduce dose with minimal change in tracking performance.

  8. Treatment planning study of the 3D dosimetric differences between Co-60 and Ir-192 sources in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for cervix cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hayman, Orla; Muscat, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether Co-60 is equivalent to Ir-192 for HDR cervical brachytherapy, through 3D-DVH dose comparisons in standard and optimised plans. Previous studies have only considered 2D dosimetry, point dose comparisons or identical loading. Typical treatment times and economics are considered. Material and methods Plans were produced for eight cervix patients using Co-60 and Ir-192 sources, CT imaging and IU/two-channel-ring applicator (Eckert Ziegler BEBIG). The comparison was made under two conditions: (A) identical dwell positions and loading, prescribed to Point A and (B) optimised source dwells, prescribed to HR-CTV. This provided a direct comparison of inherent differences and residual differences under typical clinical plan optimisation. The DVH (target and OAR), ICRU reference points and isodose distributions were compared. Typical treatment times and source replacement costs were compared. Results Small differences (p < 0.01) in 3D dosimetry exist when using Co-60 compared to Ir-192, prescribed to Point A with identical loading patterns, particularly 3.3% increase in rectum D2cc. No significant difference was observed in this parameter when prescribing to the HR-CTV using dwell-time optimisation. There was no statistically significant difference in D90 between the two isotopes. Co-60 plans delivered consistently higher V150% (mean +4.4%, p = 0.03) and V400% (mean +11.6%, p < 0.01) compared to Ir-192 in optimised plans. Differences in physical source properties were overwhelmed by geometric effects. Conclusions Co-60 may be used as an effective alternative to Ir-192 for HDR cervix brachytherapy, producing similar plans of equivalent D90, but with logistical benefits. There is a small dose increase along the extension of the source axis when using Co-60 compared to Ir-192, leading to small rectal dose increases for identical loading patterns. This can be eliminated by planning optimisation techniques. Such optimisation may also be associated with

  9. Hybrid MV-kV 3D respiratory motion tracking during radiation therapy with low imaging dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Huagang; Li, Haiyun; Liu, Zhixiang; Nath, Ravinder; Liu, Wu

    2012-12-01

    A novel real-time adaptive MV-kV imaging framework for image-guided radiation therapy is developed to reduce the thoracic and abdominal tumor targeting uncertainty caused by respiration-induced intrafraction motion with ultra-low patient imaging dose. In our method, continuous stereoscopic MV-kV imaging is used at the beginning of a radiation therapy delivery for several seconds to measure the implanted marker positions. After this stereoscopic imaging period, the kV imager is switched off except for the times when no fiducial marker is detected in the cine-MV images. The 3D time-varying marker positions are estimated by combining the MV 2D projection data and the motion correlations between directional components of marker motion established from the stereoscopic imaging period and updated afterwards; in particular, the most likely position is assumed to be the position on the projection line that has the shortest distance to the first principal component line segment constructed from previous trajectory points. An adaptive windowed auto-regressive prediction is utilized to predict the marker position a short time later (310 ms and 460 ms in this study) to allow for tracking system latency. To demonstrate the feasibility and evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, computer simulations were performed for both arc and fixed-gantry deliveries using 66 h of retrospective tumor motion data from 42 patients treated for thoracic or abdominal cancers. The simulations reveal that using our hybrid approach, a smaller than 1.2 mm or 1.5 mm root-mean-square tracking error can be achieved at a system latency of 310 ms or 460 ms, respectively. Because the kV imaging is only used for a short period of time in our method, extra patient imaging dose can be reduced by an order of magnitude compared to continuous MV-kV imaging, while the clinical tumor targeting accuracy for thoracic or abdominal cancers is maintained. Furthermore, no additional hardware is required with the

  10. Hybrid MV-kV 3D respiratory motion tracking during radiation therapy with low imaging dose.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huagang; Li, Haiyun; Liu, Zhixiang; Nath, Ravinder; Liu, Wu

    2012-12-21

    A novel real-time adaptive MV-kV imaging framework for image-guided radiation therapy is developed to reduce the thoracic and abdominal tumor targeting uncertainty caused by respiration-induced intrafraction motion with ultra-low patient imaging dose. In our method, continuous stereoscopic MV-kV imaging is used at the beginning of a radiation therapy delivery for several seconds to measure the implanted marker positions. After this stereoscopic imaging period, the kV imager is switched off except for the times when no fiducial marker is detected in the cine-MV images. The 3D time-varying marker positions are estimated by combining the MV 2D projection data and the motion correlations between directional components of marker motion established from the stereoscopic imaging period and updated afterwards; in particular, the most likely position is assumed to be the position on the projection line that has the shortest distance to the first principal component line segment constructed from previous trajectory points. An adaptive windowed auto-regressive prediction is utilized to predict the marker position a short time later (310 ms and 460 ms in this study) to allow for tracking system latency. To demonstrate the feasibility and evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, computer simulations were performed for both arc and fixed-gantry deliveries using 66 h of retrospective tumor motion data from 42 patients treated for thoracic or abdominal cancers. The simulations reveal that using our hybrid approach, a smaller than 1.2 mm or 1.5 mm root-mean-square tracking error can be achieved at a system latency of 310 ms or 460 ms, respectively. Because the kV imaging is only used for a short period of time in our method, extra patient imaging dose can be reduced by an order of magnitude compared to continuous MV-kV imaging, while the clinical tumor targeting accuracy for thoracic or abdominal cancers is maintained. Furthermore, no additional hardware is required

  11. Quantification and Reconstruction of Initial 3D Sediment Mass Distribution in an Artificially-Created Catchment Area Using GOCAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, H. H.; Schneider, A.; Maurer, T.; Raab, T. A.

    2009-12-01

    For systems such as soils or watersheds, the initial distribution of sediment mass and composition at the starting point of the development are mostly not well-known. The development of such systems, however, has frequently been assumed to depend on boundary and initial conditions including the solid phase. Here, an experimental watershed of about 6 ha surface area was artificially-created in order to imitate an initial stage just at the beginning of the geo-ecosystem development. However, sediment homogeneity could not be achieved for this large-scale field experiment, and the 3D spatial distribution of structures and components remained uncertain. The objective of this study was to quantify and reconstruct the initial sediment distribution and the first development stages using aerial photographs, point information, and a 3D model. The watershed was made of coarse-textured sediments of quaternary origin with a low permeable clay liner as the bottom boundary. A 2D horizontal digital elevation model (DEM) of the surface and a DEM of the subsurface clay layer are used to construct a 3D triangulated numerical grid of the catchment’s initial spatial structure using the 3D-GIS software GOCAD. Physical and chemical soil properties obtained from borehole samples are assigned to this model and interpolated onto the 3D grid. The volumetric changes in space and time are quantified and related to material properties to obtain the mass changes. Correlations between terrain attributes, sediment properties, and mass changes are explored specifically in regions of differing source materials. A temporal sequence of surface DEMs is obtained from photogrammetric, high-precision ground based laser scanning and airborne laser scanning data. 3D models of elevation change are constructed from these DEMs. The processes following the initial state are mainly characterized by runoff-induced erosive mass relocations related to the distribution of surface and subsurface structures and

  12. The importance of 3D dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy has been getting progressively more complex for the past 20 years. Early radiation therapy techniques needed only basic dosimetry equipment; motorized water phantoms, ionization chambers, and basic radiographic film techniques. As intensity modulated radiation therapy and image guided therapy came into widespread practice, medical physicists were challenged with developing effective and efficient dose measurement techniques. The complex 3-dimensional (3D) nature of the dose distributions that were being delivered demanded the development of more quantitative and more thorough methods for dose measurement. The quality assurance vendors developed a wide array of multidetector arrays that have been enormously useful for measuring and characterizing dose distributions, and these have been made especially useful with the advent of 3D dose calculation systems based on the array measurements, as well as measurements made using film and portal imagers. Other vendors have been providing 3D calculations based on data from the linear accelerator or the record and verify system, providing thorough evaluation of the dose but lacking quality assurance (QA) of the dose delivery process, including machine calibration. The current state of 3D dosimetry is one of a state of flux. The vendors and professional associations are trying to determine the optimal balance between thorough QA, labor efficiency, and quantitation. This balance will take some time to reach, but a necessary component will be the 3D measurement and independent calculation of delivered radiation therapy dose distributions.

  13. Low-cost real-time 3D PC distributed-interactive-simulation (DIS) application for C4I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonthier, David L.; Veron, Harry

    1998-04-01

    A 3D Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS) application was developed and demonstrated in a PC environment. The application is capable of running in the stealth mode or as a player which includes battlefield simulations, such as ModSAF. PCs can be clustered together, but not necessarily collocated, to run a simulation or training exercise on their own. A 3D perspective view of the battlefield is displayed that includes terrain, trees, buildings and other objects supported by the DIS application. Screen update rates of 15 to 20 frames per second have been achieved with fully lit and textured scenes thus providing high quality and fast graphics. A complete PC system can be configured for under $2,500. The software runs under Windows95 and WindowsNT. It is written in C++ and uses a commercial API called RenderWare for 3D rendering. The software uses Microsoft Foundation classes and Microsoft DirectPlay for joystick input. The RenderWare libraries enhance the performance through optimization for MMX and the Pentium Pro processor. The RenderWare and the Righteous 3D graphics board from Orchid Technologies with an advertised rendering rate of up to 2 million texture mapped triangles per second. A low-cost PC DIS simulator that can partake in a real-time collaborative simulation with other platforms is thus achieved.

  14. I-125 ROPES eye plaque dosimetry: Validation of a commercial 3D ophthalmic brachytherapy treatment planning system and independent dose calculation software with GafChromic{sup ®} EBT3 films

    SciTech Connect

    Poder, Joel; Corde, Stéphanie

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to measure the dose distributions for different Radiation Oncology Physics and Engineering Services, Australia (ROPES) type eye plaques loaded with I-125 (model 6711) seeds using GafChromic{sup ®} EBT3 films, in order to verify the dose distributions in the Plaque Simulator™ (PS) ophthalmic 3D treatment planning system. The brachytherapy module of RADCALC{sup ®} was used to independently check the dose distributions calculated by PS. Correction factors were derived from the measured data to be used in PS to account for the effect of the stainless steel ROPES plaque backing on the 3D dose distribution.Methods: Using GafChromic{sup ®} EBT3 films inserted in a specially designed Solid Water™ eye ball phantom, dose distributions were measured three-dimensionally both along and perpendicular to I-125 (model 6711) loaded ROPES eye plaque's central axis (CAX) with 2 mm depth increments. Each measurement was performed in full scatter conditions both with and without the stainless steel plaque backing attached to the eye plaque, to assess its effect on the dose distributions. Results were compared to the dose distributions calculated by Plaque Simulator™ and checked independently with RADCALC{sup ®}.Results: The EBT3 film measurements without the stainless steel backing were found to agree with PS and RADCALC{sup ®} to within 2% and 4%, respectively, on the plaque CAX. Also, RADCALC{sup ®} was found to agree with PS to within 2%. The CAX depth doses measured using EBT3 film with the stainless steel backing were observed to result in a 4% decrease relative to when the backing was not present. Within experimental uncertainty, the 4% decrease was found to be constant with depth and independent of plaque size. Using a constant dose correction factor of T= 0.96 in PS, where the calculated dose for the full water scattering medium is reduced by 4% in every voxel in the dose grid, the effect of the plaque backing was accurately

  15. I-125 ROPES eye plaque dosimetry: validation of a commercial 3D ophthalmic brachytherapy treatment planning system and independent dose calculation software with GafChromic® EBT3 films.

    PubMed

    Poder, Joel; Corde, Stéphanie

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the dose distributions for different Radiation Oncology Physics and Engineering Services, Australia (ROPES) type eye plaques loaded with I-125 (model 6711) seeds using GafChromic(®) EBT3 films, in order to verify the dose distributions in the Plaque Simulator™ (PS) ophthalmic 3D treatment planning system. The brachytherapy module of RADCALC(®) was used to independently check the dose distributions calculated by PS. Correction factors were derived from the measured data to be used in PS to account for the effect of the stainless steel ROPES plaque backing on the 3D dose distribution. Using GafChromic(®) EBT3 films inserted in a specially designed Solid Water™ eye ball phantom, dose distributions were measured three-dimensionally both along and perpendicular to I-125 (model 6711) loaded ROPES eye plaque's central axis (CAX) with 2 mm depth increments. Each measurement was performed in full scatter conditions both with and without the stainless steel plaque backing attached to the eye plaque, to assess its effect on the dose distributions. Results were compared to the dose distributions calculated by Plaque Simulator™ and checked independently with RADCALC(®). The EBT3 film measurements without the stainless steel backing were found to agree with PS and RADCALC(®) to within 2% and 4%, respectively, on the plaque CAX. Also, RADCALC(®) was found to agree with PS to within 2%. The CAX depth doses measured using EBT3 film with the stainless steel backing were observed to result in a 4% decrease relative to when the backing was not present. Within experimental uncertainty, the 4% decrease was found to be constant with depth and independent of plaque size. Using a constant dose correction factor of T = 0.96 in PS, where the calculated dose for the full water scattering medium is reduced by 4% in every voxel in the dose grid, the effect of the plaque backing was accurately modeled in the planning system. Off-axis profiles

  16. Characterizing 3D grain size distributions from 2D sections in mylonites using a modified version of the Saltykov method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Sanchez, Marco; Llana-Fúnez, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    The understanding of creep behaviour in rocks requires knowledge of 3D grain size distributions (GSD) that result from dynamic recrystallization processes during deformation. The methods to estimate directly the 3D grain size distribution -serial sectioning, synchrotron or X-ray-based tomography- are expensive, time-consuming and, in most cases and at best, challenging. This means that in practice grain size distributions are mostly derived from 2D sections. Although there are a number of methods in the literature to derive the actual 3D grain size distributions from 2D sections, the most popular in highly deformed rocks is the so-called Saltykov method. It has though two major drawbacks: the method assumes no interaction between grains, which is not true in the case of recrystallised mylonites; and uses histograms to describe distributions, which limits the quantification of the GSD. The first aim of this contribution is to test whether the interaction between grains in mylonites, i.e. random grain packing, affects significantly the GSDs estimated by the Saltykov method. We test this using the random resampling technique in a large data set (n = 12298). The full data set is built from several parallel thin sections that cut a completely dynamically recrystallized quartz aggregate in a rock sample from a Variscan shear zone in NW Spain. The results proved that the Saltykov method is reliable as long as the number of grains is large (n > 1000). Assuming that a lognormal distribution is an optimal approximation for the GSD in a completely dynamically recrystallized rock, we introduce an additional step to the Saltykov method, which allows estimating a continuous probability distribution function of the 3D grain size population. The additional step takes the midpoints of the classes obtained by the Saltykov method and fits a lognormal distribution with a trust region using a non-linear least squares algorithm. The new protocol is named the two-step method. The

  17. Intensity distribution angular shaping - Practical approach for 3D optical beamforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtanowski, Jacek; Traczyk, Maciej; Zygmunt, Marek; Mierczyk, Zygmunt; Knysak, Piotr; Drozd, Tadeusz

    2014-12-01

    We present approach of optical design which enables to obtain aspheric lens shape optimized for providing the specific light power density distribution in space. Proposed method is based on the evaluation of corresponding angular intensity distribution which can be obtained by the decomposition of the desired spatial distribution into virtual light cones set and collapsing it to the equivalent angular fingerprint. Rigorous formulas have been derived to relate refractive aspheric shape and the corresponding intensity distribution which is used for lens optimization. Algorithms of modeling and optimization were implemented in Matlab© and the calculated designs were successfully tested in Zemax environment.

  18. Inhaled Aerosol Distribution in Human Airways: A Scintigraphy-Guided Study in a 3D Printed Model.

    PubMed

    Verbanck, Sylvia; Ghorbaniasl, Ghader; Biddiscombe, Martyn F; Dragojlovic, Dusica; Ricks, Nathan; Lacor, Chris; Ilsen, Bart; de Mey, Johan; Schuermans, Daniel; Underwood, S Richard; Barnes, Peter J; Vincken, Walter; Usmani, Omar S

    2016-12-01

    While it is generally accepted that inertial impaction will lead to particle loss as aerosol is being carried into the pulmonary airways, most predictive aerosol deposition models adopt the hypothesis that the inhaled particles that remain airborne will distribute according to the gas flow distribution between airways downstream. Using a 3D printed cast of human airways, we quantified particle deposition and distribution and visualized their inhaled trajectory in the human lung. The human airway cast was exposed to 6 μm monodisperse, radiolabeled aerosol particles at distinct inhaled flow rates and imaged by scintigraphy in two perpendicular planes. In addition, we also imaged the distribution of aerosol beyond the airways into the five lung lobes. The experimental aerosol deposition patterns could be mimicked by computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation in the same 3D airway geometry. It was shown that for particles with a diameter of 6 μm inhaled at flows up to 60 L/min, the aerosol distribution over both lungs and the individual five lung lobes roughly followed the corresponding distributions of gas flow. While aerosol deposition was greater in the main bronchi of the left versus right lung, distribution of deposited and suspended particles toward the right lung exceeded that of the left lung. The CFD simulations also predict that for both 3 and 6 μm particles, aerosol distribution between lung units subtending from airways in generation 5 did not match gas distribution between these units and that this effect was driven by inertial impaction. We showed combined imaging experiments and CFD simulations to systematically study aerosol deposition patterns in human airways down to generation 5, where particle deposition could be spatially linked to the airway geometry. As particles are negotiating an increasing number of airways in subsequent branching generations, CFD predicts marked deviations of aerosol distribution with respect to ventilation

  19. Exterior 3D lamb problem: Harmonic load distributed over a surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'yasov, Kh. Kh.; Kravtsov, A. V.; Kuznetsov, S. V.; Sekerzh-Zen'kovich, S. Ya.

    2016-06-01

    The solutions of the exterior Lamb problem with a distributed harmonic surface load acting on the boundary of an elastic half-space are studied. A load normal to the surface and distributed over the surface as the Poisson kernel is considered. The solution is constructed with the use of integral transforms and the finite-element method.

  20. The 3-D General Geometry PIC Software for Distributed Memory MIMD Computers; EM Software Specification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    GENERAL GEOMETRY PIC SOFTWARE FOR DISTRIBUTED MEMORY MIMD COMPUTERS : TASK 1 FINAL REPORT J W Eastwood, W... GENERAL GEOMETRY PIC SOFTWARE FOR DISTRIBUTED MEMORY MIMD COMPUTERS : TASK 1 FINAL REPORT J W Eastwood, W Arter, N J Brealey, R W Hockney September 1994... General geometry PIC for MIMD computers : Final report . Report RFFX(93)56,

  1. Out-of-field doses from pediatric craniospinal irradiations using 3D-CRT, IMRT, helical tomotherapy and electron-based therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Saint-Hubert, Marijke; Verellen, Dirk; Poels, Kenneth; Crijns, Wouter; Magliona, Federica; Depuydt, Tom; Vanhavere, Filip; Struelens, Lara

    2017-07-01

    Medulloblastoma treatment involves irradiation of the entire central nervous system, i.e. craniospinal irradiation (CSI). This is associated with the significant exposure of large volumes of healthy tissue and there is growing concern regarding treatment-associated side effects. The current study compares out-of-field organ doses in children receiving CSI through 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), helical tomotherapy (HT) and an electron-based technique, and includes radiation doses resulting from imaging performed during treatment. An extensive phantom study is performed, using an anthropomorphic phantom corresponding to a five year old child, in which organ absorbed doses are measured using thermoluminescent detectors. Additionally, the study evaluates and explores tools for calculating out-of-field patient doses using the treatment planning system (TPS) and analytical models. In our study, 3D-CRT resulted in very high doses to a limited number of organs, while it was able to spare organs such as the lungs and breast when compared to IMRT and HT. Both IMRT and HT spread the dose over more organs and were able to spare the heart, thyroid, bladder, uterus and testes when compared to 3D-CRT. The electron-based technique considerably decreased the out-of-field doses in deep-seated organs but could not avoid nearby out-of-field organs such as the lungs, ribs, adrenals, kidneys and uterus. The daily imaging dose is small compared to the treatment dose burden. The TPS error for out-of-field doses was most pronounced for organs further away from the target; nevertheless, no systematic underestimation was observed for any of the studied TPS systems. Finally, analytical modeling was most optimal for 3D-CRT although the number of organs that could be modeled was limited. To conclude, none of the techniques studied was capable of sparing all organs from out-of-field doses. Nevertheless, the electron-based technique showed the most

  2. Quasi 3D dosimetry (EPID, conventional 2D/3D detector matrices)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäck, A.

    2015-01-01

    Patient specific pretreatment measurement for IMRT and VMAT QA should preferably give information with a high resolution in 3D. The ability to distinguish complex treatment plans, i.e. treatment plans with a difference between measured and calculated dose distributions that exceeds a specified tolerance, puts high demands on the dosimetry system used for the pretreatment measurements and the results of the measurement evaluation needs a clinical interpretation. There are a number of commercial dosimetry systems designed for pretreatment IMRT QA measurements. 2D arrays such as MapCHECK® (Sun Nuclear), MatriXXEvolution (IBA Dosimetry) and OCTAVIOUS® 1500 (PTW), 3D phantoms such as OCTAVIUS® 4D (PTW), ArcCHECK® (Sun Nuclear) and Delta4 (ScandiDos) and software for EPID dosimetry and 3D reconstruction of the dose in the patient geometry such as EPIDoseTM (Sun Nuclear) and Dosimetry CheckTM (Math Resolutions) are available. None of those dosimetry systems can measure the 3D dose distribution with a high resolution (full 3D dose distribution). Those systems can be called quasi 3D dosimetry systems. To be able to estimate the delivered dose in full 3D the user is dependent on a calculation algorithm in the software of the dosimetry system. All the vendors of the dosimetry systems mentioned above provide calculation algorithms to reconstruct a full 3D dose in the patient geometry. This enables analyzes of the difference between measured and calculated dose distributions in DVHs of the structures of clinical interest which facilitates the clinical interpretation and is a promising tool to be used for pretreatment IMRT QA measurements. However, independent validation studies on the accuracy of those algorithms are scarce. Pretreatment IMRT QA using the quasi 3D dosimetry systems mentioned above rely on both measurement uncertainty and accuracy of calculation algorithms. In this article, these quasi 3D dosimetry systems and their use in patient specific pretreatment IMRT

  3. A Novel 3D Multilateration Sensor Using Distributed Ultrasonic Beacons for Indoor Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Rohan; Ramasamy, Subramanian; Gardi, Alessandro; Bieber, Chad; Silverberg, Larry; Sabatini, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Navigation and guidance systems are a critical part of any autonomous vehicle. In this paper, a novel sensor grid using 40 KHz ultrasonic transmitters is presented for adoption in indoor 3D positioning applications. In the proposed technique, a vehicle measures the arrival time of incoming ultrasonic signals and calculates the position without broadcasting to the grid. This system allows for conducting silent or covert operations and can also be used for the simultaneous navigation of a large number of vehicles. The transmitters and receivers employed are first described. Transmission lobe patterns and receiver directionality determine the geometry of transmitter clusters. Range and accuracy of measurements dictate the number of sensors required to navigate in a given volume. Laboratory experiments were performed in which a small array of transmitters was set up and the sensor system was tested for position accuracy. The prototype system is shown to have a 1-sigma position error of about 16 cm, with errors between 7 and 11 cm in the local horizontal coordinates. This research work provides foundations for the future development of ultrasonic navigation sensors for a variety of autonomous vehicle applications. PMID:27740604

  4. A Novel 3D Multilateration Sensor Using Distributed Ultrasonic Beacons for Indoor Navigation.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Rohan; Ramasamy, Subramanian; Gardi, Alessandro; Bieber, Chad; Silverberg, Larry; Sabatini, Roberto

    2016-10-08

    Navigation and guidance systems are a critical part of any autonomous vehicle. In this paper, a novel sensor grid using 40 KHz ultrasonic transmitters is presented for adoption in indoor 3D positioning applications. In the proposed technique, a vehicle measures the arrival time of incoming ultrasonic signals and calculates the position without broadcasting to the grid. This system allows for conducting silent or covert operations and can also be used for the simultaneous navigation of a large number of vehicles. The transmitters and receivers employed are first described. Transmission lobe patterns and receiver directionality determine the geometry of transmitter clusters. Range and accuracy of measurements dictate the number of sensors required to navigate in a given volume. Laboratory experiments were performed in which a small array of transmitters was set up and the sensor system was tested for position accuracy. The prototype system is shown to have a 1-sigma position error of about 16 cm, with errors between 7 and 11 cm in the local horizontal coordinates. This research work provides foundations for the future development of ultrasonic navigation sensors for a variety of autonomous vehicle applications.

  5. Light distribution in plant canopies: A comparison between 1-D multi-layer modeling approach and 3-D ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, V.; Yiwen, X.; Ellis, A.; Christensen, A.; Borkiewic, K.; Cox, D.; Hart, J.; Long, S.; Marshall-Colon, A.

    2016-12-01

    The distribution of absorbed solar radiation in the photosynthetically active region wavelength (PAR) within plant canopies plays a critical role in determining photosynthetic carbon uptake and its associated transpiration. The vertical distribution of leaf area, leaf angles, leaf absorptivity and reflectivity within the canopy, affect the distribution of PAR absorbed throughout the canopy. While the upper canopy sunlit leaves absorb most of the incoming PAR and hence contribute most towards total canopy carbon uptake, the lower canopy shaded leaves which receive mostly lower intensity diffuse PAR make significant contributions towards plant carbon uptake. Most detailed vegetation models use a 1-D vertical multi-layer approach to model the sunlight and shaded canopy leaf fractions, and quantify the direct and diffuse radiation absorbed by the respective leaf fractions. However, this approach is only applicable under canopy closure conditions, and furthermore it fails to accurately capture the effects of diurnally varying leaf angle distributions in some plant canopies. Here, we show by using a 3-D ray tracing model which uses an explicit 3-D canopy structure that enforces no conditions about canopy closure, that the effects of diurnal variation of canopy leaf angle distributions better match with observed data. Our comparative analysis performed on soybean crop canopies between 3-D ray tracing model and the multi-layer model shows that the distribution of absorbed direct PAR is not exponential while, the distribution of absorbed diffuse PAR radiation within plant canopies is exponential. These results show the multi-layer model to significantly over-predict canopy PAR absorbed, and in turn significantly overestimate photosynthetic carbon uptake by up to 13% and canopy transpiration by 7% under mid-day sun conditions as verified through our canopy chamber experiments. Our results indicate that current detailed 1-D multi-layer canopy radiation attenuation models

  6. Novel methods for estimating 3D distributions of radioactive isotopes in materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Kishimoto, A.; Nishiyama, T.; Taya, T.; Okochi, H.; Ogata, H.; Yamamoto, S.

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, various gamma-ray visualization techniques, or gamma cameras, have been proposed. These techniques are extremely effective for identifying "hot spots" or regions where radioactive isotopes are accumulated. Examples of such would be nuclear-disaster-affected areas such as Fukushima or the vicinity of nuclear reactors. However, the images acquired with a gamma camera do not include distance information between radioactive isotopes and the camera, and hence are "degenerated" in the direction of the isotopes. Moreover, depth information in the images is lost when the isotopes are embedded in materials, such as water, sand, and concrete. Here, we propose two methods of obtaining depth information of radioactive isotopes embedded in materials by comparing (1) their spectra and (2) images of incident gamma rays scattered by the materials and direct gamma rays. In the first method, the spectra of radioactive isotopes and the ratios of scattered to direct gamma rays are obtained. We verify experimentally that the ratio increases with increasing depth, as predicted by simulations. Although the method using energy spectra has been studied for a long time, an advantage of our method is the use of low-energy (50-150 keV) photons as scattered gamma rays. In the second method, the spatial extent of images obtained for direct and scattered gamma rays is compared. By performing detailed Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4, we verify that the spatial extent of the position where gamma rays are scattered increases with increasing depth. To demonstrate this, we are developing various gamma cameras to compare low-energy (scattered) gamma-ray images with fully photo-absorbed gamma-ray images. We also demonstrate that the 3D reconstruction of isotopes/hotspots is possible with our proposed methods. These methods have potential applications in the medical fields, and in severe environments such as the nuclear-disaster-affected areas in Fukushima.

  7. Automated quantitative 3D analysis of aorta size, morphology, and mural calcification distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Kurugol, Sila Come, Carolyn E.; Diaz, Alejandro A.; Ross, James C.; Washko, George R.; San Jose Estepar, Raul; Kinney, Greg L.; Black-Shinn, Jennifer L.; Hokanson, John E.; Budoff, Matthew J.

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to develop a fully automated pipeline to compute aorta morphology and calcification measures in large cohorts of CT scans that can be used to investigate the potential of these measures as imaging biomarkers of cardiovascular disease. Methods: The first step of the automated pipeline is aorta segmentation. The algorithm the authors propose first detects an initial aorta boundary by exploiting cross-sectional circularity of aorta in axial slices and aortic arch in reformatted oblique slices. This boundary is then refined by a 3D level-set segmentation that evolves the boundary to the location of nearby edges. The authors then detect the aortic calcifications with thresholding and filter out the false positive regions due to nearby high intensity structures based on their anatomical location. The authors extract the centerline and oblique cross sections of the segmented aortas and compute the aorta morphology and calcification measures of the first 2500 subjects from COPDGene study. These measures include volume and number of calcified plaques and measures of vessel morphology such as average cross-sectional area, tortuosity, and arch width. Results: The authors computed the agreement between the algorithm and expert segmentations on 45 CT scans and obtained a closest point mean error of 0.62 ± 0.09 mm and a Dice coefficient of 0.92 ± 0.01. The calcification detection algorithm resulted in an improved true positive detection rate of 0.96 compared to previous work. The measurements of aorta size agreed with the measurements reported in previous work. The initial results showed associations of aorta morphology with calcification and with aging. These results may indicate aorta stiffening and unwrapping with calcification and aging. Conclusions: The authors have developed an objective tool to assess aorta morphology and aortic calcium plaques on CT scans that may be used to provide information about the presence of cardiovascular

  8. Direct Determination of 3D Distribution of Elemental Composition in Single Semiconductor Nanoislands by Scanning Auger Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomaryov, Semyon S.; Yukhymchuk, Volodymyr O.; Lytvyn, Peter M.; Valakh, Mykhailo Ya

    2016-02-01

    An application of scanning Auger microscopy with ion etching technique and effective compensation of thermal drift of the surface analyzed area is proposed for direct local study of composition distribution in the bulk of single nanoislands. For GexSi1 - x-nanoislands obtained by MBE of Ge on Si-substrate gigantic interdiffusion mixing takes place both in the open and capped nanostructures. Lateral distributions of the elemental composition as well as concentration-depth profiles were recorded. 3D distribution of the elemental composition in the d-cluster bulk was obtained using the interpolation approach by lateral composition distributions in its several cross sections and concentration-depth profile. It was shown that there is a germanium core in the nanoislands of both nanostructure types, which even penetrates the substrate. In studied nanostructures maximal Ge content in the nanoislands may reach about 40 at.%.

  9. Assessing dose rate distributions in VMAT plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackeprang, P.-H.; Volken, W.; Terribilini, D.; Frauchiger, D.; Zaugg, K.; Aebersold, D. M.; Fix, M. K.; Manser, P.

    2016-04-01

    Dose rate is an essential factor in radiobiology. As modern radiotherapy delivery techniques such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) introduce dynamic modulation of the dose rate, it is important to assess the changes in dose rate. Both the rate of monitor units per minute (MU rate) and collimation are varied over the course of a fraction, leading to different dose rates in every voxel of the calculation volume at any point in time during dose delivery. Given the radiotherapy plan and machine specific limitations, a VMAT treatment plan can be split into arc sectors between Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine control points (CPs) of constant and known MU rate. By calculating dose distributions in each of these arc sectors independently and multiplying them with the MU rate, the dose rate in every single voxel at every time point during the fraction can be calculated. Independently calculated and then summed dose distributions per arc sector were compared to the whole arc dose calculation for validation. Dose measurements and video analysis were performed to validate the calculated datasets. A clinical head and neck, cranial and liver case were analyzed using the tool developed. Measurement validation of synthetic test cases showed linac agreement to precalculated arc sector times within  ±0.4 s and doses  ±0.1 MU (one standard deviation). Two methods for the visualization of dose rate datasets were developed: the first method plots a two-dimensional (2D) histogram of the number of voxels receiving a given dose rate over the course of the arc treatment delivery. In similarity to treatment planning system display of dose, the second method displays the dose rate as color wash on top of the corresponding computed tomography image, allowing the user to scroll through the variation over time. Examining clinical cases showed dose rates spread over a continuous spectrum, with mean dose rates hardly exceeding 100 cGy min-1 for conventional

  10. Performance of adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D integrated with automatic tube current modulation in radiation dose and image noise reduction compared with filtered-back projection for 80-kVp abdominal CT: Anthropomorphic phantom and patient study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Ming; Lin, Yang-Yu; Hsu, Ming-Yi; Hung, Chien-Fu; Liao, Ying-Lan; Tsai, Hui-Yu

    2016-09-01

    Evaluate the performance of Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction 3D (AIDR 3D) and compare with filtered-back projection (FBP) regarding radiation dosage and image quality for an 80-kVp abdominal CT. An abdominal phantom underwent four CT acquisitions and reconstruction algorithms (FBP; AIDR 3D mild, standard and strong). Sixty-three patients underwent unenhanced liver CT with FBP and standard level AIDR 3D. Further post-acquisition reconstruction with strong level AIDR 3D was made. Patients were divided into two groups (< and ≧29cm) based on the abdominal effective diameter (Deff) at T12 level. Quantitative (attenuation, noise, and signal-to-noise ratio) and qualitative (image quality, noise, sharpness, and artifact) analysis by two readers were assessed and the interobserver agreement was calculated. Strong level AIDR 3D reduced radiation dose by 72% in the phantom and 47.1% in the patient study compared with FBP. There was no difference in mean attenuations. Image noise was the lowest and signal-to-noise ratio the highest using strong level AIDR 3D in both patient groups. For Deff<29cm, image sharpness of FBP was significantly different from those of AIDR 3D (P<0.05). For Deff ≧29cm, image quality of AIDR 3D was significantly more favorable than FBP (P<0.05). Interobserver agreement was substantial. Integrated AIDR 3D allows for an automatic reduction in radiation dose and maintenance of image quality compared with FBP. Using AIDR 3D reconstruction, patients with larger abdomen circumference could be imaged at 80kVp. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Intensifying the response of distributed optical fibre sensors using 2D and 3D image restoration

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Marcelo A.; Ramírez, Jaime A.; Thévenaz, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Distributed optical fibre sensors possess the unique capability of measuring the spatial and temporal map of environmental quantities that can be of great interest for several field applications. Although existing methods for performance enhancement have enabled important progresses in the field, they do not take full advantage of all information present in the measured data, still giving room for substantial improvement over the state-of-the-art. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an approach for performance enhancement that exploits the high level of similitude and redundancy contained on the multidimensional information measured by distributed fibre sensors. Exploiting conventional image and video processing, an unprecedented boost in signal-to-noise ratio and measurement contrast is experimentally demonstrated. The method can be applied to any white-noise-limited distributed fibre sensor and can remarkably provide a 100-fold improvement in the sensor performance with no hardware modification. PMID:26927698

  12. SU-C-BRB-06: Utilizing 3D Scanner and Printer for Dummy Eye-Shield: Artifact-Free CT Images of Tungsten Eye-Shield for Accurate Dose Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J; Lee, J; Kim, H; Kim, I; Ye, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of a tungsten eye-shield on the dose distribution of a patient. Methods: A 3D scanner was used to extract the dimension and shape of a tungsten eye-shield in the STL format. Scanned data was transferred into a 3D printer. A dummy eye shield was then produced using bio-resin (3D systems, VisiJet M3 Proplast). For a patient with mucinous carcinoma, the planning CT was obtained with the dummy eye-shield placed on the patient’s right eye. Field shaping of 6 MeV was performed using a patient-specific cerrobend block on the 15 x 15 cm{sup 2} applicator. The gantry angle was 330° to cover the planning target volume near by the lens. EGS4/BEAMnrc was commissioned from our measurement data from a Varian 21EX. For the CT-based dose calculation using EGS4/DOSXYZnrc, the CT images were converted to a phantom file through the ctcreate program. The phantom file had the same resolution as the planning CT images. By assigning the CT numbers of the dummy eye-shield region to 17000, the real dose distributions below the tungsten eye-shield were calculated in EGS4/DOSXYZnrc. In the TPS, the CT number of the dummy eye-shield region was assigned to the maximum allowable CT number (3000). Results: As compared to the maximum dose, the MC dose on the right lens or below the eye shield area was less than 2%, while the corresponding RTP calculated dose was an unrealistic value of approximately 50%. Conclusion: Utilizing a 3D scanner and a 3D printer, a dummy eye-shield for electron treatment can be easily produced. The artifact-free CT images were successfully incorporated into the CT-based Monte Carlo simulations. The developed method was useful in predicting the realistic dose distributions around the lens blocked with the tungsten shield.

  13. Angular distribution of Auger electrons due to 3d-shell ionization of krypton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1977-01-01

    Cross sections for electron impact ionization of krypton due to ejection of a 3rd shell electron have been calculated using screened hydrogenic and Hartree-Slater wave functions for target atom. While the total ionization cross sections in the two approximations are within 10% of each other, the Auger electron angular distribution, related to cross sections for specific magnetic quantum numbers of the 3rd electrons, is widely different in the two approximations. The angular distribution due to Hartree-Slater approximation is in excellent agreement with measurement. The physical reason for the discrepancies in the two approximations is explained.

  14. [The reconstruction of welding arc 3D electron density distribution based on Stark broadening].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wang; Hua, Xue-Ming; Pan, Cheng-Gang; Li, Fang; Wang, Min

    2012-10-01

    The three-dimensional electron density is very important for welding arc quality control. In the present paper, Side-on characteristic line profile was collected by a spectrometer, and the lateral experimental data were approximated by a polynomial fitting. By applying an Abel inversion technique, the authors obtained the radial intensity distribution at each wavelength and thus constructed a profile for the radial positions. The Fourier transform was used to separate the Lorentz linear from the spectrum reconstructed, thus got the accurate Stark width. And we calculated the electronic density three-dimensional distribution of the TIG welding are plasma.

  15. Localised vs distributed deformation: 3D modelling of the Dead Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devès, M. H.; King, G. C.; Klinger, Y.; Agnon, A.

    2012-12-01

    The lithosphere behaves as strain softening elasto-plastic materials. In the laboratory, such materials are known to deform in a brittle or a ductile manner depending on the applied geometric boundary conditions. In the lithosphere however, the importance of boundary conditions in controlling the deformation style has been largely ignored. Under general boundary conditions, both laboratory and field observations show that only part of the deformation can localise on through going faults while the rest must remain distributed in process zones where spatially varying shear directions inhibit localisation. Conventional modelling methods use rheologies deduced from laboratory experiments that are not constrained as a function of the geometry of the applied boundary conditions. We propose an alternative modelling method based on the use of an appropriate distribution of dislocation sources to create the deformation field. This approach, because it does not rely on integrating differential equations from more or less well-constrained boundary conditions, does not require making assumptions on the parameters controlling the level and distribution of stresses within the lithosphere. It only supposes that strain accumulates linearly away from the dislocation singularities satisfying the compatibility equations. We verify that this model explains important and hitherto unexplained features of the topography of the Dead Sea region. Following the idea that strain can only localise under specific conditions as inferred from laboratory and field scale observations, we use our model of deformation to predict where deformation can localise and where it has to remain distributed. We find that 65% of the deformation in the Dead Sea region can localise on kinematically stable through-going strike-slip faults while the remaining 35% must remain distributed. Observations suggest that distributed deformation occurs at stress levels that can be ten times greater than that associated with

  16. New insights in catchment processes via distributed soil moisture measurements and 3D hydrological modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogena, H. R.; Sciuto, G.; Rosenbaum, U.; Herbst, M.; Huisman, J. A.; Vereecken, H.; Diekkrueger, B.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrological analysis is often limited by the number of data available. Usually, discharge data and only little point information concerning soil moisture status are available. This might give a good representation of the temporal variability of runoff, but it does not provide insights into the spatial dynamics of soil moisture and water fluxes within the catchment. The small forested Wüstebach catchment (~27 ha) has been instrumented with a wireless sensor network consisting of 150 nodes and more than 1200 soil moisture sensors in the framework of the Transregio32 and the Helmholtz initiative TERENO (Terrestrial Environmental Observatories) [1]. This unique data set provides a consistent picture of the hydrological status of the catchment in a high spatial and temporal resolution. We present first results of a geostatistical analysis of the data and an application of the integrated surface/subsurface 3D finite element model HydroGeoSphere model to investigate the scale dependency of the temporal dynamics of soil moisture patterns. A variogram analysis showed that the sum of the sub-scale variability and the measurement error is close to time-invariant. Wet situations showed smaller spatial variability, which is attributed to saturated soil moisture, which poses an upper limit and is typically not strongly variable in headwater catchments with relatively homogeneous soil. The spatiotemporal variability in soil moisture at 50 cm depth was significantly lower than at 5 and 20 cm. This finding indicates that the considerable variability of the top soil is buffered deeper in the soil due to root water uptake, lateral and vertical water fluxes. Topographic features showed the strongest correlation with soil moisture during dry periods, indicating that the control of topography on the soil moisture pattern depends on the soil water status. The temporal patterns of runoff discharge were reproduced by the HydroGeoSphere model in a satisfying way. The observed soil

  17. Out-of-field doses from pediatric craniospinal irradiations using 3D-CRT, IMRT, helical tomotherapy and electron-based therapy.

    PubMed

    De Saint-Hubert, Marijke; Verellen, Dirk; Poels, Kenneth; Crijns, Wouter; Magliona, Federica; Depuydt, Tom; Vanhavere, Filip; Struelens, Lara

    2017-04-11

    Medulloblastoma treatment involves irradiation of the entire central nervous system, i.e craniospinal irradiation (CSI). This is associated with significant exposure of large volumes of healthy tissue with a growing concern regarding treatment associated side effects. The current study compares out-of-field organ doses in children receiving CSI with three-dimensional-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), helical tomotherapy (HT) and an electron-based technique, including as well radiation doses resulting from imaging performed during treatment. An extensive phantom study is performed, using an anthropomorphic phantom corresponding to a 5-year old child, in which organ absorbed doses are measured using thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs). Additionally the study evaluates and explores tools for calculating out-of-field patient doses using the treatment planning system (TPS) and analytical models. In our study, 3D-CRT resulted in very high doses to a limited number of organs while it was able to spare organs such as the lungs and breast when compared to IMRT and HT. Both IMRT and HT spread the dose over more organs and were able to spare heart, thyroid, bladder, uterus and testes when compared to 3D-CRT. The electron-based technique considerably decreased the out-of-field doses in deep seated organs but cannot avoid nearby out-of-field organs such as lungs, ribs, adrenals, kidneys and uterus. Daily imaging dose is small compared to the treatment dose burden. TPS error for out-of-field doses was most pronounced for organs further away from the target nevertheless no systematic underestimation was observed for any of the studied TPS systems. Finally analytical modeling was most optimal for 3D-CRT although the number of organs that can be modeled was limited. To conclude none of the techniques studied was able to spare doses in all organs. Nevertheless the electron-based technique showed most promising for out-of-field organ dose

  18. 3D measurement of the radiation distribution in a water phantom in a hadron therapy beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opalka, L.; Granja, C.; Hartmann, B.; Jakubek, J.; Jaekel, O.; Martisikova, M.; Pospisil, S.; Solc, J.

    2012-01-01

    Hadron therapy is a highly precise radio-therapeutic method with many advantages especially in cases when the tumour is close to sensitive organs where standard treatments cannot be used. For reliable treatment planning it is necessary to have calculation tools for maximization of the dose delivered to the targeted tissue and minimization of the dose outside of it. While the main physical processes in material irradiated by hadron beams are known, in reality the processes involved are complex so that analytical computations are impossible. Thus, the planning tools to incorporate simplified models and numerical approximations and an experimental method for high precision verification of the models within phantoms is desired. The development of sensitive, high resolution and online methods for measurement of the radiation environment inside of the irradiated object is the aim of this work. Such measurements are made possible by the resolving power of the state-of-the-art pixel detector Timepix. This quantum counting imaging device is able to record the characteristic shapes of the particle traces including their energies deposited in the detector. All these data recorded for each event allow to estimate the particle type, its energy and direction of flight. Event-by-event analysis is done using pattern recognition of the characteristic traces. The objective of the experiment is the detection and characterization of secondary radiation generated by the primary therapeutic beams in tissue equivalent material (water). Measurements were performed inside of a water phantom irradiated by a carbon beam at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT).

  19. Severe Hyperbilirubinemia in an HIV-HCV-Coinfected Patient Starting the 3D Regimen That Resolved After TDM-Guided Atazanavir Dose Reduction.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Dario; Riva, Agostino; Clementi, Emilio; Milazzo, Laura; Gervasoni, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    The combination of ombitasvir, dasabuvir, and paritaprevir/ritonavir (considered as the 3D regimen) has proven to be associated with high sustained virologic response and optimal tolerability in hepatitis C virus-infected patients. Here, we describe an HIV-HCV-coinfected patient who experienced a grade 4 hyperbilirubinemia and a 2.5-fold increase in the atazanavir plasma trough concentrations few days after the start of 3D-based antiviral therapy who benefited from an atazanavir dose reduction guided by therapeutic drug monitoring.

  20. Parallel computation of the SAR distribution in a 3D human head model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walendziuk, Wojciech

    2008-01-01

    This work presents a way of parallel computation of the Specific Absorption Rate distribution. The parallel program used in the computation was based on the FDTD (Finite-Difference Time-Domain) method [1,2,3]. In order to establish communication among the computational nodes, the MPI (Message Passing Interface) standard was used [4,5,6]. The presented example of a human head numerical model was built with the use of MRI (Magnetic Resonance Image) pictures.

  1. 3-D parallel program for numerical calculation of gas dynamics problems with heat conductivity on distributed memory computational systems (CS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sofronov, I.D.; Voronin, B.L.; Butnev, O.I.

    1997-12-31

    The aim of the work performed is to develop a 3D parallel program for numerical calculation of gas dynamics problem with heat conductivity on distributed memory computational systems (CS), satisfying the condition of numerical result independence from the number of processors involved. Two basically different approaches to the structure of massive parallel computations have been developed. The first approach uses the 3D data matrix decomposition reconstructed at temporal cycle and is a development of parallelization algorithms for multiprocessor CS with shareable memory. The second approach is based on using a 3D data matrix decomposition not reconstructed during a temporal cycle. The program was developed on 8-processor CS MP-3 made in VNIIEF and was adapted to a massive parallel CS Meiko-2 in LLNL by joint efforts of VNIIEF and LLNL staffs. A large number of numerical experiments has been carried out with different number of processors up to 256 and the efficiency of parallelization has been evaluated in dependence on processor number and their parameters.

  2. 3-D density modelling of underground structures and spatial distribution of salt diapirism in the Dead Sea Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sungchan; Götze, H.-J.; Meyer, U.; Group, Desire

    2011-03-01

    A new compilation of Bouguer gravity data stemming from airborne, shipborne and terrestrial data set in the entire Dead Sea Basin (DSB) was reinterpreted by applying 3-D density modelling that incorporated independent information on other geophysical researches allowing for regional and residual filtering in the gravity field, carrying out curvature analysis and Euler deconvolution of the combined gravity field. 3-D density modelling enables us to detailed resolution of upper crustal structures from the southern to the northern subbasin below the saline Dead Sea. 3-D gravity modelling led to the identification of three salt structures, which are found beneath the Sedom area, the Lisan Peninsula and the Dead Sea. In the vicinity of the western margin of the Dead Sea, a salt diapir segment with a thickness of about 4 km has been identified at a top depth of about 2 km, which has not been recognised by any other geophysical interpretations. The thickness of the sedimentary infill overlying the basement in the DSB decreases from 14 km in the vicinity of the Lisan Peninsula to 8 km in the northern and the southern subbasins. Large negative gravity anomalies (lower than -100 × 10-5 m s-2) observed in the DSB correspond with the spatial distribution of salt diapirism with an average density of 2 100 kg m-3. The shallower microearthquakes registered in the DSB are related to the movement of salt diapir in the DSB.

  3. Comfort and pressure distribution in a human contour shaped aircraft seat (developed with 3D scans of the human body).

    PubMed

    Smulders, M; Berghman, K; Koenraads, M; Kane, J A; Krishna, K; Carter, T K; Schultheis, U

    2016-08-12

    The concept of comfort is one way for the growing airline market to differentiate and build customer loyalty. This work follows the idea that increasing the contact area between human and seat can have a positive effect on comfort [5, 6, 7]. To improve comfort, reduce weight and optimise space used, a human contour shaped seat shell and cushioning was developed. First the most common activities, the corresponding postures and seat inclination angles were defined. The imprints of these postures on a rescue mat were 3D scanned and an average human contour curve was defined. The outcome was transferred to a prototype seat that was used to test the effect on perceived comfort/discomfort and pressure distribution. The resulting human contour based prototype seat has comfort and discomfort scores comparable to a traditional seat. The prototype seat had a significantly lower average pressure between subjects' buttocks and the seat pan over a traditional seat. This study shows that it is possible to design a seat pan and backrest based on the different contours of study subjects using 3D scan technology. However, translating the 3D scans into a prototype seat also showed that this can only be seen as a first step; additionally biomechanical information and calculations are needed to create ergonomic seats. Furthermore, it is not possible to capture all different human shapes and postures and translate these into one human contour shape that fits all activities and all human sizes.

  4. Integration of GIS, Geostatistics, and 3-D Technology to Assess the Spatial Distribution of Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, M.; Tsegaye, T.; Tadesse, W.; Coleman, T. L.; Fahsi, A.

    1998-01-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of near surface soil moisture is of fundamental importance to many physical, biological, biogeochemical, and hydrological processes. However, knowledge of these space-time dynamics and the processes which control them remains unclear. The integration of geographic information systems (GIS) and geostatistics together promise a simple mechanism to evaluate and display the spatial and temporal distribution of this vital hydrologic and physical variable. Therefore, this research demonstrates the use of geostatistics and GIS to predict and display soil moisture distribution under vegetated and non-vegetated plots. The research was conducted at the Winfred Thomas Agricultural Experiment Station (WTAES), Hazel Green, Alabama. Soil moisture measurement were done on a 10 by 10 m grid from tall fescue grass (GR), alfalfa (AA), bare rough (BR), and bare smooth (BS) plots. Results indicated that variance associated with soil moisture was higher for vegetated plots than non-vegetated plots. The presence of vegetation in general contributed to the spatial variability of soil moisture. Integration of geostatistics and GIS can improve the productivity of farm lands and the precision of farming.

  5. Tracking and quantifying polymer therapeutic distribution on a cellular level using 3D dSTORM

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Jonathan M.; Zhang, Rui; Gudheti, Manasa; Yang, Jiyuan; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2016-01-01

    We used a single-molecule localization technique called direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) to quantify both colocalization and spatial distribution on a cellular level for two conceptually different N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer conjugates. Microscopy images were acquired of entire cells with resolutions as high as 25 nm revealing the nanoscale distribution of the fluorescently labeled therapeutic components. Drug-free macromolecular therapeutics consisting of two self-assembling nanoconjugates showed slight increase in nanoclusters on the cell surface with time. Additionally, dSTORM provided high resolution images of the nanoscale organization of the self-assembling conjugates at the interface between two cells. A conjugate designed for treating ovarian cancer showed that the model drug (Cy3) and polymer bound to Cy5 were colocalized at an early time point before the model drug was enzymatically cleaved from the polymer. Using spatial descriptive statistics it was found that the drug was randomly distributed after 24 h while the polymer bound dye remained in clusters. Four different fluorescent dyes were used and two different therapeutic systems were tested to demonstrate the versatility and possible general applicability of dSTORM for use in studying drug delivery systems. PMID:26855050

  6. Integration of GIS, Geostatistics, and 3-D Technology to Assess the Spatial Distribution of Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, M.; Tsegaye, T.; Tadesse, W.; Coleman, T. L.; Fahsi, A.

    1998-01-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of near surface soil moisture is of fundamental importance to many physical, biological, biogeochemical, and hydrological processes. However, knowledge of these space-time dynamics and the processes which control them remains unclear. The integration of geographic information systems (GIS) and geostatistics together promise a simple mechanism to evaluate and display the spatial and temporal distribution of this vital hydrologic and physical variable. Therefore, this research demonstrates the use of geostatistics and GIS to predict and display soil moisture distribution under vegetated and non-vegetated plots. The research was conducted at the Winfred Thomas Agricultural Experiment Station (WTAES), Hazel Green, Alabama. Soil moisture measurement were done on a 10 by 10 m grid from tall fescue grass (GR), alfalfa (AA), bare rough (BR), and bare smooth (BS) plots. Results indicated that variance associated with soil moisture was higher for vegetated plots than non-vegetated plots. The presence of vegetation in general contributed to the spatial variability of soil moisture. Integration of geostatistics and GIS can improve the productivity of farm lands and the precision of farming.

  7. Estimating the 3D Pore Size Distribution of Biopolymer Networks from Directionally Biased Data

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Nadine R.; Münster, Stefan; Metzner, Claus; Krauss, Patrick; Schürmann, Sebastian; Lange, Janina; Aifantis, Katerina E.; Friedrich, Oliver; Fabry, Ben

    2013-01-01

    The pore size of biopolymer networks governs their mechanical properties and strongly impacts the behavior of embedded cells. Confocal reflection microscopy and second harmonic generation microscopy are widely used to image biopolymer networks; however, both techniques fail to resolve vertically oriented fibers. Here, we describe how such directionally biased data can be used to estimate the network pore size. We first determine the distribution of distances from random points in the fluid phase to the nearest fiber. This distribution follows a Rayleigh distribution, regardless of isotropy and data bias, and is fully described by a single parameter—the characteristic pore size of the network. The bias of the pore size estimate due to the missing fibers can be corrected by multiplication with the square root of the visible network fraction. We experimentally verify the validity of this approach by comparing our estimates with data obtained using confocal fluorescence microscopy, which represents the full structure of the network. As an important application, we investigate the pore size dependence of collagen and fibrin networks on protein concentration. We find that the pore size decreases with the square root of the concentration, consistent with a total fiber length that scales linearly with concentration. PMID:24209841

  8. Characterization of gas hydrate distribution using conventional 3D seismic data in the Pearl River Mouth Basin, South China Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Xiujuan; Qiang, Jin; Collett, Timothy S.; Shi, Hesheng; Yang, Shengxiong; Yan, Chengzhi; Li, Yuanping; Wang, Zhenzhen; Chen, Duanxin

    2016-01-01

    A new 3D seismic reflection data volume acquired in 2012 has allowed for the detailed mapping and characterization of gas hydrate distribution in the Pearl River Mouth Basin in the South China Sea. Previous studies of core and logging data showed that gas hydrate occurrence at high concentrations is controlled by the presence of relatively coarse-grained sediment and the upward migration of thermogenic gas from the deeper sediment section into the overlying gas hydrate stability zone (BGHSZ); however, the spatial distribution of the gas hydrate remains poorly defined. We used a constrained sparse spike inversion technique to generate acoustic-impedance images of the hydrate-bearing sedimentary section from the newly acquired 3D seismic data volume. High-amplitude reflections just above the bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs) were interpreted to be associated with the accumulation of gas hydrate with elevated saturations. Enhanced seismic reflections below the BSRs were interpreted to indicate the presence of free gas. The base of the BGHSZ was established using the occurrence of BSRs. In areas absent of well-developed BSRs, the BGHSZ was calculated from a model using the inverted P-wave velocity and subsurface temperature data. Seismic attributes were also extracted along the BGHSZ that indicate variations reservoir properties and inferred hydrocarbon accumulations at each site. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the inversion of acoustic impedance of conventional 3D seismic data, along with well-log-derived rock-physics models were also used to estimate gas hydrate saturations. Our analysis determined that the gas hydrate petroleum system varies significantly across the Pearl River Mouth Basin and that variability in sedimentary properties as a product of depositional processes and the upward migration of gas from deeper thermogenic sources control the distribution of gas hydrates in this basin.

  9. Nitric oxide spatial distribution in single cultured hippocampus neurons: investigation by projection of reconstructed 3-D image and visualization technique.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Ning, Gang-Min; Kutor, John; Hong, Di-Hui; Zhang, Mu; Zheng, Xiao-Xiang

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed a non-homogeneous distribution of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in neurons. However, it is not yet clear whether the intracellular distribution of NOS represents the intracellular nitric oxide (NO) distribution. In the present study, software developed in our laboratory was applied to the reconstructed image obtained from confocal slice images in order to project the 3-D reconstructed images in any direction and to cut the neuron in different sections. This enabled the spatial distribution of NO to be visualized in any direction and section. In single neurons, NO distribution was seen to be heterogeneous. After stimulation with glutamate, the spatial changes in different areas of the neuron were different. These findings are consistent with immunocytochemical data on the intracellular localization of nNOS in hippocampus neurons, and will help to elucidate the specificity of nitric oxide signaling. Finally, the administration of SNAP and L-NAME was used to examine DAF-2 distribution in the neurons. The results showed this distribution to be homogenous; therefore, it did not account for the NO distribution results.

  10. Tumor control probability and the utility of 4D vs 3D dose calculations for stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, Gilmer; Robinson, Clifford; Lee, Percy; Morel, Delphine; Low, Daniel; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Lamb, James M.

    2015-04-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) dose calculations for lung cancer radiotherapy have been technically feasible for a number of years but have not become standard clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to determine if clinically significant differences in tumor control probability (TCP) exist between 3D and 4D dose calculations so as to inform the decision whether 4D dose calculations should be used routinely for treatment planning. Radiotherapy plans for Stage I-II lung cancer were created for 8 patients. Clinically acceptable treatment plans were created with dose calculated on the end-exhale 4D computed tomography (CT) phase using a Monte Carlo algorithm. Dose was then projected onto the remaining 9 phases of 4D-CT using the Monte Carlo algorithm and accumulated onto the end-exhale phase using commercially available deformable registration software. The resulting dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the gross tumor volume (GTV), planning tumor volume (PTV), and PTV{sub setup} were compared according to target coverage and dose. The PTV{sub setup} was defined as a volume including the GTV and a margin for setup uncertainties but not for respiratory motion. TCPs resulting from these DVHs were estimated using a wide range of alphas, betas, and tumor cell densities. Differences of up to 5 Gy were observed between 3D and 4D calculations for a PTV with highly irregular shape. When the TCP was calculated using the resulting DVHs for fractionation schedules typically used in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), the TCP differed at most by 5% between 4D and 3D cases, and in most cases, it was by less than 1%. We conclude that 4D dose calculations are not necessary for most cases treated with SBRT, but they might be valuable for irregularly shaped target volumes. If 4D calculations are used, 4D DVHs should be evaluated on volumes that include margin for setup uncertainty but not respiratory motion.

  11. Target specific delivery of anticancer drug in silk fibroin based 3D distribution model of bone-breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Subia, Bano; Dey, Tuli; Sharma, Shaily; Kundu, Subhas C

    2015-02-04

    To avoid the indiscriminating action of anticancer drugs, the cancer cell specific targeting of drug molecule becomes a preferred choice for the treatment. The successful screening of the drug molecules in 2D culture system requires further validation. The failure of target specific drug in animal model raises the issue of creating a platform in between the in vitro (2D) and in vivo animal testing. The metastatic breast cancer cells migrate and settle at different sites such as bone tissue. This work evaluates the in vitro 3D model of the breast cancer and bone cells to understand the cellular interactions in the presence of a targeted anticancer drug delivery system. The silk fibroin based cytocompatible 3D scaffold is used as in vitro 3D distribution model. Human breast adenocarcinoma and osteoblast like cells are cocultured to evaluate the efficiency of doxorubicin loaded folic acid conjugated silk fibroin nanoparticle as drug delivery system. Decreasing population of the cancer cells, which lower the levels of vascular endothelial growth factors, glucose consumption, and lactate production are observed in the drug treated coculture constructs. The drug treated constructs do not show any major impact on bone mineralization. The diminished expression of osteogenic markers such as osteocalcein and alkaline phosphatase are recorded. The result indicates that this type of silk based 3D in vitro coculture model may be utilized as a bridge between the traditional 2D and animal model system to evaluate the new drug molecule (s) or to reassay the known drug molecules or to develop target specific drug in cancer research.

  12. The anisotropy of 3D shock evolution and its connection to the longitudinal distribution of SEP properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, L.; Inhester, B.; Wei, Y.; Guo, J.; Plowman, J.; West, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    We Follow the 3D evolution of a coronal shock from its birth in the AIA field of view (FOV) to its propagation in interplanetary space till Mars. The shock structure is identified using the center-median filtering method which is applied to EUV observations including SDO/AIA and Proba2/SWAP. Then 3D shock morphology is reconstructed with the mask-fitting method (Feng et al. 2012,2013) from the triple-view observations at Earth, STEREO A and B in the FOV from EUV through coronagraph to heliospheric images. The mask-fitting method allows us to obtain a better shape of the 3D shock and calculate the anisotropy of shock evolution. The shock signals were later recorded in in-situ data by Messenger (0.39 AU), Venus Express (0.72 AU), WIND/ACE (1AU), STEREO B (1.03AU), Mars Science Laboratory (1.20AU), and Mars Express(1.52AU). These spacecraft were located at different distances and different longitudes relative to the Sun. Therefore, the corresponding in-situ data can provide further constraint on the shock dynamics along different directions on one hand, on the other hand reveal longitudinal distributions of SEPs in a wide angle of about 120 degrees. We also run ENLIL simulations based on the derived 3D shock morphology and dynamics. The magnetic field connectivity to aforementioned spacecraft and the obtained shock characteristics (e.g., shock geometry, speed, Alfven Mach number, etc.) at cobpoint can help with the understanding of the SEP properties (e.g., energy spectra) measured at different longitudes.

  13. Extended Triple-Junction Solar Cell 3D Distributed Model: Application to Chromatic Aberration-Related Losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, I.; Espinet-González, P.; Rey-Stolle, I.; Barrigón, E.; Algora, C.

    2011-12-01

    An extended 3D distributed model based on distributed circuit units for the simulation of triple-junction solar cells under realistic conditions for the light distribution has been developed. A special emphasis has been put in the capability of the model to accurately account for current mismatch and chromatic aberration effects. This model has been validated, as shown by the good agreement between experimental and simulation results, for different light spot characteristics including spectral mismatch and irradiance non-uniformities. This model is then used for the prediction of the performance of a triple-junction solar cell for a light spot corresponding to a real optical architecture in order to illustrate its suitability in assisting concentrator system analysis and design process.

  14. Curtailing patient-specific IMRT QA procedures from 2D dose error distribution.

    PubMed

    Kurosu, Keita; Sumida, Iori; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Otani, Yuki; Oda, Michio; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    A patient-specific quality assurance (QA) test is conducted to verify the accuracy of dose delivery. It generally consists of three verification processes: the absolute point dose difference, the planar dose differences at each gantry angle, and the planar dose differences by 3D composite irradiation. However, this imposes a substantial workload on medical physicists. The objective of this study was to determine whether our novel method that predicts the 3D delivered dose allows certain patient-specific IMRT QAs to be curtailed. The object was IMRT QA for the pelvic region with regard to point dose and composite planar dose differences. We compared measured doses, doses calculated in the treatment planning system, and doses predicted by in-house software. The 3D predicted dose was reconstructed from the per-field measurement by incorporating the relative dose error distribution into the original dose grid of each beam. All point dose differences between the measured and the calculated dose were within ±3%, whereas 93.3% of them between the predicted and the calculated dose were within ±3%. As for planar dose differences, the gamma passing rates between the calculated and the predicted dose were higher than those between the calculated and the measured dose. Comparison and statistical analysis revealed a correlation between the predicted and the measured dose with regard to both point dose and planar dose differences. We concluded that the prediction-based approach is an accurate substitute for the conventional measurement-based approach in IMRT QA for the pelvic region. Our novel approach will help medical physicists save time on IMRT QA.

  15. Curtailing patient-specific IMRT QA procedures from 2D dose error distribution

    PubMed Central

    Kurosu, Keita; Sumida, Iori; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Otani, Yuki; Oda, Michio; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    A patient-specific quality assurance (QA) test is conducted to verify the accuracy of dose delivery. It generally consists of three verification processes: the absolute point dose difference, the planar dose differences at each gantry angle, and the planar dose differences by 3D composite irradiation. However, this imposes a substantial workload on medical physicists. The objective of this study was to determine whether our novel method that predicts the 3D delivered dose allows certain patient-specific IMRT QAs to be curtailed. The object was IMRT QA for the pelvic region with regard to point dose and composite planar dose differences. We compared measured doses, doses calculated in the treatment planning system, and doses predicted by in-house software. The 3D predicted dose was reconstructed from the per-field measurement by incorporating the relative dose error distribution into the original dose grid of each beam. All point dose differences between the measured and the calculated dose were within ±3%, whereas 93.3% of them between the predicted and the calculated dose were within ±3%. As for planar dose differences, the gamma passing rates between the calculated and the predicted dose were higher than those between the calculated and the measured dose. Comparison and statistical analysis revealed a correlation between the predicted and the measured dose with regard to both point dose and planar dose differences. We concluded that the prediction-based approach is an accurate substitute for the conventional measurement-based approach in IMRT QA for the pelvic region. Our novel approach will help medical physicists save time on IMRT QA. PMID:26661854

  16. In vivo 3D measurement of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin distributions in the mouse cornea using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seunghun; Lee, Jun Ho; Park, Jin Hyoung; Yoon, Yeoreum; Chung, Wan Kyun; Tchah, Hungwon; Kim, Myoung Joon; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-05-01

    Moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin are fourth-generation fluoroquinolone antibiotics used in the clinic to prevent or treat ocular infections. Their pharmacokinetics in the cornea is usually measured from extracted ocular fluids or tissues, and in vivo direct measurement is difficult. In this study multiphoton microscopy (MPM), which is a 3D optical microscopic technique based on multiphoton fluorescence, was applied to the measurement of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin distribution in the cornea. Intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence properties of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin were characterized, and their distributions in mouse cornea in vivo were measured by 3D MPM imaging. Both moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin had similar multiphoton spectra, while moxifloxacin had stronger fluorescence than gatifloxacin. MPM imaging of mouse cornea in vivo showed (1) moxifloxacin had good penetration through the superficial corneal epithelium, while gatifloxacin had relatively poor penetration, (2) both ophthalmic solutions had high intracellular distribution. In vivo MPM results were consistent with previous studies. This study demonstrates the feasibility of MPM as a method for in vivo direct measurement of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin in the cornea.

  17. Observations of the 3-D distribution of interplanetary electrons and ions from solar wind plasma to low energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Anderson, K. A.; Ashford, S.; Carlson, C.; Curtis, D.; Ergun, R.; Larson, D.; McFadden, J.; McCarthy, M.; Parks, G. K.

    1995-01-01

    The 3-D Plasma and Energetic Particle instrument on the GGS Wind spacecraft (launched November 1, 1994) is designed to make measurements of the full three-dimensional distribution of suprathermal electrons and ions from solar wind plasma to low energy cosmic rays, with high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, good energy and angular resolution, and high time resolution. Three pairs of double-ended telescopes, each with two or three closely sandwiched passivated ion implanted silicon detectors measure electrons and ions from approximately 20 keV to greater than or equal to 300 keV. Four top-hat symmetrical spherical section electrostatic analyzers with microchannel plate detectors, a large and a small geometric factor analyzer for electrons and a similar pair for ions, cover from approximately 3 eV to 30 keV. We present preliminary observations of the electron and ion distributions in the absence of obvious solar impulsive events and upstream particles. The quiet time electron energy spectrum shows a smooth approximately power law fall-off extending from the halo population at a few hundred eV to well above approximately 100 keV The quiet time ion energy spectrum also shows significant fluxes over this energy range. Detailed 3-D distributions and their temporal variations will be presented.

  18. On Boundary Misorientation Distribution Functions and How to Incorporate them into 3D Models of Microstructural Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, A.W.; Holm, E.A.; Hughes, D.A.; Miodownik, M.

    1998-12-23

    The fundamental difficulties incorporating experimentally obtained-boundary disorientation distributions (BMD) into 3D microstructural models are discussed. An algorithm is described which overcomes these difficulties. The boundary misorientations are treated as a statistical ensemble which is evolved toward the desired BMD using a Monte Carlo method. The application of this algorithm to a number complex arbitrary BMDs shows that the approach is effective for both conserved and non-conserved textures. The algorithm is successfully used to create the BMDs observed in deformation microstructure containing both incidental dislocation boundaries (IDBs) and geometrically necessary boundaries (GNBs).

  19. 3D granulometry: grain-scale shape and size distribution from point cloud dataset of river environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, Philippe; Lague, Dimitri; Gourdon, Aurélie; Croissant, Thomas; Crave, Alain

    2016-04-01

    The grain-scale morphology of river sediments and their size distribution are important factors controlling the efficiency of fluvial erosion and transport. In turn, constraining the spatial evolution of these two metrics offer deep insights on the dynamics of river erosion and sediment transport from hillslopes to the sea. However, the size distribution of river sediments is generally assessed using statistically-biased field measurements and determining the grain-scale shape of river sediments remains a real challenge in geomorphology. Here we determine, with new methodological approaches based on the segmentation and geomorphological fitting of 3D point cloud dataset, the size distribution and grain-scale shape of sediments located in river environments. Point cloud segmentation is performed using either machine-learning algorithms or geometrical criterion, such as local plan fitting or curvature analysis. Once the grains are individualized into several sub-clouds, each grain-scale morphology is determined using a 3D geometrical fitting algorithm applied on the sub-cloud. If different geometrical models can be conceived and tested, only ellipsoidal models were used in this study. A phase of results checking is then performed to remove grains showing a best-fitting model with a low level of confidence. The main benefits of this automatic method are that it provides 1) an un-biased estimate of grain-size distribution on a large range of scales, from centimeter to tens of meters; 2) access to a very large number of data, only limited by the number of grains in the point-cloud dataset; 3) access to the 3D morphology of grains, in turn allowing to develop new metrics characterizing the size and shape of grains. The main limit of this method is that it is only able to detect grains with a characteristic size greater than the resolution of the point cloud. This new 3D granulometric method is then applied to river terraces both in the Poerua catchment in New-Zealand and

  20. Confocal (micro)-XRF for 3D anlaysis of elements distribution in hot environmental particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bielewski, M; Eriksson, M; Himbert, J; Simon, R; Betti, M; Hamilton, T F

    2007-11-27

    Studies on the fate and transport of radioactive contaminates in the environment are often constrained by a lack of knowledge on the elemental distribution and general behavior of particulate bound radionuclides contained in hot particles. A number of hot particles were previously isolated from soil samples collected at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands and characterized using non-destructive techniques [1]. The present investigation at HASYLAB is a part of larger research program at ITU regarding the characterization of environmental radioactive particles different locations and source-terms. Radioactive particles in the environment are formed under a number of different release scenarios and, as such, their physicochemical properties may provide a basis for identifying source-term specific contamination regimes. Consequently, studies on hot particles are not only important in terms of studying the elemental composition and geochemical behavior of hot particles but may also lead to advances in assessing the long-term impacts of radioactive contamination on the environment. Six particles isolated from soil samples collected at the Marshall Islands were studied. The element distribution in the particles was determined by confocal {micro}-XRF analysis using the ANKA FLUO beam line. The CRL (compound refractive lens) was used to focus the exciting beam and the polycapillary half lens to collimate the detector. The dimensions of confocal spot were measured by 'knife edge scanning' method with thin gold structure placed at Si wafer. The values of 3.1 x 1.4 x 18.4 {micro}m were achieved if defined as FWHMs of measured L?intensity profiles and when the19.1 keV exciting radiation was used. The collected XRF spectra were analyzed offline with AXIL [2] software to obtain net intensities of element characteristic lines.Further data processing and reconstruction of element distribution was done with the software 'R' [3] dedicated for statistical

  1. Size distributions of secondary and primary aerosols in Asia: A 3-D modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, F.; Luo, G.; Wang, Z.

    2009-12-01

    Asian aerosols have received increasing attention because of their potential health and climate effects and the rapid increasing of Asian emissions associated with accelerating economic expansion. Aerosol particles appear in the atmosphere due to either in-situ nucleation (i.e, secondary particles) or direct emissions (i.e., primary particles), and their environmental impacts depend strongly on their concentrations, sizes, compositions, and mixing states. A size-resolved (sectional) particle microphysics model with a number of computationally efficient schemes has been incorporated into a global chemistry transport model (GEOS-Chem) to simulate the number size distributions of secondary and primary particles in the troposphere (Yu and Luo, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 9, 10597-10645, 2009). The growth of nucleated particles through the condensation of sulfuric acid vapor and equilibrium uptake of nitrate, ammonium, and secondary organic aerosol is explicitly simulated, along with the coating of primary particles (dust, black carbon, organic carbon, and sea salt) by volatile components via condensation and coagulation with secondary particles. Here we look into the spatiotemporal variations of the size distributions of secondary and primary aerosols in Asia. The annual mean number concentration of the accumulation mode particles (dry diameter > ~ 100 nm) in the lower troposphere over Asia (especially China) is very high and is dominated (~70-90%) by carbonaceous primary particles (with coated condensable species). Coagulation and condensation turn the primary particles into mixed particles and on average increase the dry sizes of primary particles by a factor of ~ 2-2.5. Despite of high condensation sink, sulfuric acid vapor concentration in many parts of Asian low troposphere is very high (annual mean values above 1E7/cm3) and significant new particle formation still occurs. Secondary particles generally dominate the particles small than 100 nm and the equilibrium

  2. Sensitivity of 3D Dose Verification to Multileaf Collimator Misalignments in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Spinal Tumor.

    PubMed

    Xin-Ye, Ni; Ren, Lei; Yan, Hui; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to detect the sensitivity of Delt 4 on ordinary field multileaf collimator misalignments, system misalignments, random misalignments, and misalignments caused by gravity of the multileaf collimator in stereotactic body radiation therapy. (1) Two field sizes, including 2.00 cm (X) × 6.00 cm (Y) and 7.00 cm (X) × 6.00 cm (Y), were set. The leaves of X1 and X2 in the multileaf collimator were simultaneously opened. (2) Three cases of stereotactic body radiation therapy of spinal tumor were used. The dose of the planning target volume was 1800 cGy with 3 fractions. The 4 types to be simulated included (1) the leaves of X1 and X2 in the multileaf collimator were simultaneously opened, (2) only X1 of the multileaf collimator and the unilateral leaf were opened, (3) the leaves of X1 and X2 in the multileaf collimator were randomly opened, and (4) gravity effect was simulated. The leaves of X1 and X2 in the multileaf collimator shifted to the same direction. The difference between the corresponding 3-dimensional dose distribution measured by Delt 4 and the dose distribution in the original plan made in the treatment planning system was analyzed with γ index criteria of 3.0 mm/3.0%, 2.5 mm/2.5%, 2.0 mm/2.0%, 2.5 mm/1.5%, and 1.0 mm/1.0%. (1) In the field size of 2.00 cm (X) × 6.00 cm (Y), the γ pass rate of the original was 100% with 2.5 mm/2.5% as the statistical standard. The pass rate decreased to 95.9% and 89.4% when the X1 and X2 directions of the multileaf collimator were opened within 0.3 and 0.5 mm, respectively. In the field size of 7.00 (X) cm × 6.00 (Y) cm with 1.5 mm/1.5% as the statistical standard, the pass rate of the original was 96.5%. After X1 and X2 of the multileaf collimator were opened within 0.3 mm, the pass rate decreased to lower than 95%. The pass rate was higher than 90% within the 3 mm opening. (2) For spinal tumor, the change in the planning target volume V18 under various modes calculated using treatment planning system

  3. 3D Spatial Distribution of the Intergalactic Medium: The ESO Blues?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollinde, Emmanuel; Petitjean, Patrick; Pichon, Christophe; Colombi, Stéphane; Aracil, Bastien

    The numerous absorption lines seen in the spectra of distant quasars (the so-called Lyman-α forest) reveal the intergalactic medium (IGM) up to redshifts larger than 5. It is believed that the space distribution of the gas traces the potential wells of the dark matter. Indeed, recent numerical N-body simulations have been successful at reproducing the observed characteristics of the Lyman-α forest (e.g. [1][12][5]). The IGM is therefore seen as a smooth pervasive medium which can be used to study the spatial distribution of the mass on scales larger than the Jeans' length. This idea is reinforced by observations of multiple lines of sight. It is observed that the Lyman-α forest is fairly homogeneous on scale smaller than 100 kpc (e.g. [11]) and highly correlated on scale up to one megaparsec (e.g. [13][3]). The number of suitable multiple lines of sight is small however and the sample need to be significantly enlarged before any firm conclusion can be drawn (see Section 3.3).

  4. Toward Measuring Galactic Dense Molecular Gas Properties and 3D Distribution with Hi-GAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zetterlund, Erika; Glenn, Jason; Maloney, Phil

    2016-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory's submillimeter dust continuum survey Hi-GAL provides a powerful new dataset for characterizing the structure of the dense interstellar medium of the Milky Way. Hi-GAL observed a 2° wide strip covering the entire 360° of the Galactic plane in broad bands centered at 70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 μm, with angular resolution ranging from 10 to 40 arcseconds. We are adapting a molecular cloud clump-finding algorithm and a distance probability density function distance-determination method developed for the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) to the Hi-GAL data. Using these methods we expect to generate a database of 105 cloud clumps, derive distance information for roughly half the clumps, and derive precise distances for approximately 20% of them. With five-color photometry and distances, we will measure the cloud clump properties, such as luminosities, physical sizes, and masses, and construct a three-dimensional map of the Milky Way's dense molecular gas distribution.The cloud clump properties and the dense gas distribution will provide critical ground truths for comparison to theoretical models of molecular cloud structure formation and galaxy evolution models that seek to emulate spiral galaxies. For example, such models cannot resolve star formation and use prescriptive recipes, such as converting a fixed fraction of interstellar gas to stars at a specified interstellar medium density threshold. The models should be compared to observed dense molecular gas properties and galactic distributions.As a pilot survey to refine the clump-finding and distance measurement algorithms developed for BGPS, we have identified molecular cloud clumps in six 2° × 2° patches of the Galactic plane, including one in the inner Galaxy along the line of sight through the Molecular Ring and the termination of the Galactic bar and one toward the outer Galaxy. Distances have been derived for the inner Galaxy clumps and compared to Bolocam Galactic Plane

  5. High-Performance Computation of Distributed-Memory Parallel 3D Voronoi and Delaunay Tessellation

    SciTech Connect

    Peterka, Tom; Morozov, Dmitriy; Phillips, Carolyn

    2014-11-14

    Computing a Voronoi or Delaunay tessellation from a set of points is a core part of the analysis of many simulated and measured datasets: N-body simulations, molecular dynamics codes, and LIDAR point clouds are just a few examples. Such computational geometry methods are common in data analysis and visualization; but as the scale of simulations and observations surpasses billions of particles, the existing serial and shared-memory algorithms no longer suffice. A distributed-memory scalable parallel algorithm is the only feasible approach. The primary contribution of this paper is a new parallel Delaunay and Voronoi tessellation algorithm that automatically determines which neighbor points need to be exchanged among the subdomains of a spatial decomposition. Other contributions include periodic and wall boundary conditions, comparison of our method using two popular serial libraries, and application to numerous science datasets.

  6. 3D replicon distributions arise from stochastic initiation and domino-like DNA replication progression.

    PubMed

    Löb, D; Lengert, N; Chagin, V O; Reinhart, M; Casas-Delucchi, C S; Cardoso, M C; Drossel, B

    2016-04-07

    DNA replication dynamics in cells from higher eukaryotes follows very complex but highly efficient mechanisms. However, the principles behind initiation of potential replication origins and emergence of typical patterns of nuclear replication sites remain unclear. Here, we propose a comprehensive model of DNA replication in human cells that is based on stochastic, proximity-induced replication initiation. Critical model features are: spontaneous stochastic firing of individual origins in euchromatin and facultative heterochromatin, inhibition of firing at distances below the size of chromatin loops and a domino-like effect by which replication forks induce firing of nearby origins. The model reproduces the empirical temporal and chromatin-related properties of DNA replication in human cells. We advance the one-dimensional DNA replication model to a spatial model by taking into account chromatin folding in the nucleus, and we are able to reproduce the spatial and temporal characteristics of the replication foci distribution throughout S-phase.

  7. 3D replicon distributions arise from stochastic initiation and domino-like DNA replication progression

    PubMed Central

    Löb, D.; Lengert, N.; Chagin, V. O.; Reinhart, M.; Casas-Delucchi, C. S.; Cardoso, M. C.; Drossel, B.

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication dynamics in cells from higher eukaryotes follows very complex but highly efficient mechanisms. However, the principles behind initiation of potential replication origins and emergence of typical patterns of nuclear replication sites remain unclear. Here, we propose a comprehensive model of DNA replication in human cells that is based on stochastic, proximity-induced replication initiation. Critical model features are: spontaneous stochastic firing of individual origins in euchromatin and facultative heterochromatin, inhibition of firing at distances below the size of chromatin loops and a domino-like effect by which replication forks induce firing of nearby origins. The model reproduces the empirical temporal and chromatin-related properties of DNA replication in human cells. We advance the one-dimensional DNA replication model to a spatial model by taking into account chromatin folding in the nucleus, and we are able to reproduce the spatial and temporal characteristics of the replication foci distribution throughout S-phase. PMID:27052359

  8. The internal density distribution of comet 67P/C-G based on 3D models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorda, Laurent; Faurschou Hviid, Stubbe; Capanna, Claire; Gaskell, Robert W.; Gutiérrez, Pedro; Preusker, Frank; Scholten, Frank; Rodionov, Sergey; OSIRIS Team

    2016-10-01

    The OSIRIS camera aboard the Rosetta spacecraft observed the nucleus of comet 67P/C-G from the mapping phase in summer 2014 until now. The images have allowed the reconstruction in three-dimension of nucleus surface with stereophotogrammetry (Preusker et al., Astron. Astrophys.) and stereophotoclinometry (Jorda et al., Icarus) techniques. We use the reconstructed models to constrain the internal density distribution based on: (i) the measurement of the offset between the center of mass and the center of figure of the object, and (ii) the assumption that flat areas observed at the surface of the comet correspond to iso-gravity surfaces. The results of our analysis will be presented, and the consequences for the internal structure and formation of the nucleus of comet 67P/C-G will be discussed.

  9. The internal density distribution of comet 67P/C-G based on 3D models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorda, Laurent; Hviid, Stubbe; Capanna, Claire; Gaskell, Robert; Gutierrez, Pedro; Preusker, Frank; Rodionov, Sergey; Scholten, Frank

    2016-04-01

    The OSIRIS camera aboard the Rosetta spacecraft observed the nucleus of comet 67P/C-G from the mapping phase in summer 2014 until now. The images have allowed the reconstruction in three-dimension of nucleus surface with stereophotogrammetry (Preusker et al., Astron. Astrophys.) and stereophotoclinometry (Jorda et al., submitted to Icarus) techniques. We use the reconstructed models to constrain the internal density distribution based on: (i) the measurement of the offset between the center of mass and center of figure of the object, and (ii) the assumption that flat areas observed at the surface of the comet correspond to iso-gravity surfaces. The results of our analysis will be presented, and the consequences for the internal structure and formation of the nucleus of comet 67P/C-G will be discussed.

  10. Operator counting and eigenvalue distributions for 3D supersymmetric gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulotta, Daniel R.; Herzog, Christopher P.; Pufu, Silviu S.

    2011-11-01

    We give further support for our conjecture relating eigenvalue distributions of the Kapustin-Willett-Yaakov matrix model in the large N limit to numbers of operators in the chiral ring of the corresponding supersymmetric three-dimensional gauge theory. We show that the relation holds for non-critical R-charges and for examples with mathcal{N} = {2} instead of mathcal{N} = {3} supersymmetry where the bifundamental matter fields are nonchiral. We prove that, for non-critical R-charges, the conjecture is equivalent to a relation between the free energy of the gauge theory on a three sphere and the volume of a Sasaki manifold that is part of the moduli space of the gauge theory. We also investigate the consequences of our conjecture for chiral theories where the matrix model is not well understood.

  11. Number Density Distributions of Ultracold Bosons in 3D Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joe; Duchon, Eric; Trivedi, Nandini

    2011-03-01

    We calculate the probability, P (n) , of finding n bosons at a site and the probability of hopping in a uniform optical lattice as a function of the temperature, T , and the repulsive interaction between bosons, U / t , as a function of hopping energy. We examine the characteristic P (n) distribution for the Mott Insulator, quantum critical region and superfluid and determine its behavior across thermal and quantum phase transitions using quantum Monte Carlo. The behavior of the local kinetic energy is estimated using the probability of hopping. These results illuminate number squeezing in the Mott Insulator and the quantum critical region described in. This research was funded by The Ohio State University Physics Department's Harold McMaster Scholarship and ARO grand number W911NF-08-1-0338.

  12. 3D geostatistical modeling of fracture system in a granitic massif to characterize hydraulic properties and fracture distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Katsuaki; Kubo, Taiki; Liu, Chunxue; Masoud, Alaa; Amano, Kenji; Kurihara, Arata; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Lanyon, Bill

    2015-10-01

    This study integrates 3D models of rock fractures from different sources and hydraulic properties aimed at identifying relationships between fractures and permeability. The Tono area in central Japan, chiefly overlain by Cretaceous granite, was examined because of the availability of a unique dataset from deep borehole data at 26 sites. A geostatistical method (GEOFRAC) that can incorporate orientations of sampled data was applied to 50,900 borehole fractures for spatial modeling of fractures over a 12 km by 8 km area, to a depth of 1.5 km. GEOFRAC produced a plausible 3D fracture model, in that the orientations of simulated fractures correspond to those of the sample data and the continuous fractures appeared near a known fault. Small-scale fracture distributions with dominant orientations were also characterized around the two shafts using fracture data from the shaft walls. By integrating the 3D model of hydraulic conductivity using sequential Gaussian simulation with the GEOFRAC fractures from the borehole data, the fracture sizes and directions that strongly affect permeable features were identified. Four fracture-related elements: lineaments from a shaded 10-m DEM, GEOFRAC fractures using the borehole and shaft data, and microcracks from SEM images, were used for correlating fracture attributes at different scales. The consistency of the semivariogram models of distribution densities was identified. Using an experimental relationship between hydraulic conductivity and fracture length, the fractures that typically affect the hydraulic properties at the drift scale were surmised to be in the range 100-200 m. These results are useful for a comprehensive understanding of rock fracture systems and their hydraulic characteristics at multiple scales in a target area.

  13. On the spatial distribution of seismicity and the 3D tectonic stress field in western Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassaras, Ioannis; Kapetanidis, Vasilis; Karakonstantis, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    We analyzed a large number of focal mechanisms and relocated earthquake hypocenters to investigate the geodynamics of western Greece, the most seismically active part of the Aegean plate-boundary zone. This region was seismically activated multiple times during the last decade, providing a large amount of enhanced quality new information that was obtained by the Hellenic Unified Seismological Network (HUSN). Relocated seismicity using a double-difference method appears to be concentrated above ∼35 km depth, exhibiting spatial continuity along the convergence boundary and being clustered elsewhere. Earthquakes are confined within the accreted sediments escarpment of the down-going African plate against the un-deformed Eurasian hinterland. The data arrangement shows that Pindos constitutes a seismic boundary along which large stress heterogeneities occur. In Cephalonia no seismicity is found to be related with the offshore Cephalonia Transform Fault (CTF). Onshore, Nsbnd S crustal extension dominates, while in central and south Peloponnesus the stress field appears rotated by 90°. Shearing-stress obliquity by 30° is indicated along the major strike-slip faults, consistent with clockwise crustal rotation. Within the lower crust, the stress field appears affected by plate kinematics and distributed deformation of the lower crust and upper mantle, which guide the regional geodynamics.

  14. STRUCTURE IN THE 3D GALAXY DISTRIBUTION. II. VOIDS AND WATERSHEDS OF LOCAL MAXIMA AND MINIMA

    SciTech Connect

    Way, M. J.; Gazis, P. R.; Scargle, Jeffrey D. E-mail: PGazis@sbcglobal.net

    2015-01-20

    The major uncertainties in studies of the multi-scale structure of the universe arise not from observational errors but from the variety of legitimate definitions and detection methods for individual structures. To facilitate the study of these methodological dependencies, we have carried out 12 different analyses defining structures in various ways. This has been done in a purely geometrical way by utilizing the HOP algorithm as a unique parameter-free method of assigning groups of galaxies to local density maxima or minima. From three density estimation techniques (smoothing kernels, Bayesian blocks, and self-organizing maps) applied to three data sets (the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, the Millennium simulation, and randomly distributed points) we tabulate information that can be used to construct catalogs of structures connected to local density maxima and minima. We also introduce a void finder that utilizes a method to assemble Delaunay tetrahedra into connected structures and characterizes regions empty of galaxies in the source catalog.

  15. Direct 3D Analyses Reveal Barrel-Specific Vascular Distribution and Cross-Barrel Branching in the Mouse Barrel Cortex.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingpeng; Guo, Congdi; Chen, Shangbin; Jiang, Tao; He, Yong; Ding, Wenxiang; Yang, Zhongqin; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Whether vascular distribution is spatially specific among cortical columns is a fundamental yet controversial question. Here, we have obtained 1-μm resolution 3D datasets that cover the whole mouse barrel cortex by combining Nissl staining with micro-optical sectioning tomography to simultaneously visualize individual cells and blood vessels, including capillaries. Pinpointing layer IV of the posteromedial barrel subfield, direct 3D reconstruction and quantitative analysis showed that (1) penetrating vessels preferentially locate in the interbarrel septa/barrel wall (75.1%) rather than the barrel hollows, (2) the branches of 70% penetrating vessels only reach the neighboring but not always all the neighboring barrels and the other 30% extend beyond the neighboring barrels and may provide cross-barrel blood supply or drainage, (3) the branches of 59.6% penetrating vessels reach all the neighboring barrels, while the rest only reach part of them, and (4) the length density of microvessels in the interbarrel septa/barrel wall is lower than that in the barrel hollows with a ratio of 0.92. These results reveal that the penetrating vessels and microvessels exhibit a barrel-specific organization, whereas the branches of penetrating vessels do not, which suggests a much more complex vascular distribution pattern among cortical columns than previously thought. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Effect of 3D stall-cells on the pressure distribution of a laminar NACA64-418 wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragni, Daniele; Ferreira, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    A 3D stall-cell flow-field has been studied in a 4.8 aspect-ratio wing obtained by linear extrusion of a laminar NACA64-418 airfoil profile. The span-wise change in the velocity and pressure distribution along the wing has been quantified with respect to the development of cellular structures from 8° to 20° angle of attack. Oil-flow visualizations help localizing the regular cellular pattern in function of the angle of attack. Multi-plane stereoscopic PIV measurements obtained by traversing the entire setup along the wing span show that the flow separation is not span-wise uniform. The combination of different stereoscopic fields into a 3D volume of velocity data allows studying the global effect of the stall-cell pattern on the wing flow. Integration of the experimentally computed pressure gradient from the Navier-Stokes equation is employed to compute the span-wise distribution of the mean surface pressure. Comparison of the results with the ones obtained from pressure taps installed in the wing evidences a span-wise periodic loading on the wing. The periodic loading has maxima confined in the stream-wise direction between the location of the highest airfoil curvature and the one of the airfoil flow separation. Estimation of the periodic loading is found within 2-6 % of the sectional wing lift.

  17. Electrostatic analyzer with a 3-D instantaneous field of view for fast measurements of plasma distribution functions in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, X.; Berthomier, M.; Berthelier, J.-J.

    2017-03-01

    We describe the concept and properties of a new electrostatic optic which aims to provide a 2π sr instantaneous field of view to characterize space plasmas. It consists of a set of concentric toroidal electrodes that form a number of independent energy-selective channels. Charged particles are deflected toward a common imaging planar detector. The full 3-D distribution function of charged particles is obtained through a single energy sweep. Angle and energy resolution of the optics depends on the number of toroidal electrodes, on their radii of curvature, on their spacing, and on the angular aperture of the channels. We present the performances, as derived from numerical simulations, of an initial implementation of this concept that would fit the need of many space plasma physics applications. The proposed instrument has 192 entrance windows corresponding to eight polar channels each with 24 azimuthal sectors. The initial version of this 3-D plasma analyzer may cover energies from a few eV up to 30 keV, typically with a channel-dependent energy resolution varying from 10% to 7%. The angular acceptance varies with the direction of the incident particle from 3° to 12°. With a total geometric factor of two sensor heads reaching 0.23 cm2 sr eV/eV, this "donut" shape analyzer has enough sensitivity to allow very fast measurements of plasma distribution functions in most terrestrial and planetary environments on three-axis stabilized as well as on spinning satellites.

  18. Online measurement of dose and dose distribution at bremsstrahlung facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auslender, V. L.; Bryazgin, A. A.; Bukin, A. D.; Voronin, L. A.; Lukin, A. N.; Sidorov, A. V.

    2004-09-01

    A real-time measurement system of the spatial dose distribution is developed and realized for monitoring the bremsstrahlung flow generated on X-ray target by 5 MeV 50 kW electron accelerator. The sensors of the system consist of semiconductor diodes. The beam target and electron accelerator (ILU-10) are briefly described. The practice of using the system in the experimental and start-up procedure is included.

  19. 3D finite element analysis to detect stress distribution: spiral family implants.

    PubMed

    Danza, Matteo; Zollino, Ilaria; Paracchini, Luigi; Riccardo, Guidi; Fanali, Stefano; Carinci, Francesco

    2009-12-01

    Spiral family implants are a root-form fixtures with increasing thickness of tread. This characteristic gives a self-tapping and self-condensing bone properties to implants. To study spiral family implant inserted in different bone quality and connected with abutments of different angulations a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was performed. Once drawn the systems that were object of the study by CAD (Computer Aided Design), the FEA discretized solids composing the system in many infinitesimal little elementary solids defined finite elements. This lead to a mesh formation where the single finite elements were connected among them by nodes. For the 3 units bone-implant-abutments several thousand of tetrahedral elements having 10 parabolic nodes were employed. The biomechanical behaviour of 4.2 mm × 13 mm dental implants, connecting screw, straight and 15° and 25° angulated abutment subjected to static loads, in contact with high and poor bone quality was evaluated by FEA. A double system was analyzed: a) FY strength acting along Y axis and having 200 N intensity; b) FY and FZ couple of strengths applied along Y and Z directions and having respectively 200N and 140N intensity. The materials were considered as homogeneous, linear and isotropic. Then the FEA simulation was performed hypothesizing a linearity between loads and deformations. The lowest stress value was found in the system composed by implants and straight abutments loaded with a vertical strength, while the highest stress value were found in implants and 15° angulated abutment loaded with a angulated strength. In addition, the lower is the bone quality (i.e. D4) the higher is the distribution of the stress within the bone. Spiral family implants can be used successfully in low bone quality but a straight force is recommended.

  20. A new approach for radiosynoviorthesis: A dose-optimized planning method based on Monte Carlo simulation and synovial measurement using 3D slicer and MRI.

    PubMed

    Torres Berdeguez, Mirta Bárbara; Thomas, Sylvia; Rafful, Patricia; Arruda Sanchez, Tiago; Medeiros Oliveira Ramos, Susie; Souza Albernaz, Marta; Vasconcellos de Sá, Lidia; Lopes de Souza, Sergio Augusto; Mas Milian, Felix; Silva, Ademir Xavier da

    2017-07-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in a methodology for dose planning in radiosynoviorthesis to substitute fixed activity. Clinical practice based on fixed activity frequently does not embrace radiopharmaceutical dose optimization in patients. The aim of this paper is to propose and discuss a dose planning methodology considering the radiological findings of interest obtained by three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging combined with Monte Carlo simulation in radiosynoviorthesis treatment applied to hemophilic arthropathy. The parameters analyzed were: surface area of the synovial membrane (synovial size), synovial thickness and joint effusion obtained by 3D MRI of nine knees from nine patients on a SIEMENS AVANTO 1.5 T scanner using a knee coil. The 3D Slicer software performed both the semiautomatic segmentation and quantitation of these radiological findings. A Lucite phantom 3D MRI validated the quantitation methodology. The study used Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code version 2.6 for calculating the S-values required to set up the injected activity to deliver a 100 Gy absorbed dose at a determined synovial thickness. The radionuclides assessed were: 90Y, 32P, 188Re, 186Re, 153Sm, and 177Lu, and the present study shows their effective treatment ranges. The quantitation methodology was successfully tested, with an error below 5% for different materials. S-values calculated could provide data on the activity to be injected into the joint, considering no extra-articular leakage from joint cavity. Calculation of effective treatment range could assist with the therapeutic decision, with an optimized protocol for dose prescription in RSO. Using 3D Slicer software, this study focused on segmentation and quantitation of radiological features such as joint effusion, synovial size, and thickness, all obtained by 3D MRI in patients' knees with hemophilic arthropathy. The combination of synovial size and thickness with the parameters obtained by Monte Carlo

  1. The 3D distribution of cordierite and biotite in hornfels from the Bugaboo contact aureole (British Columbia, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidies, Fred; Petley-Ragan, Arianne; Pattison, David

    2016-04-01

    The size, abundance, shape and spatial distribution of metamorphic minerals bears important information on the rates and mechanisms of fundamental processes that take place during metamorphic crystallization. X-ray computed tomography (XR-CT) has become the method of choice to study the three-dimensional (3D) disposition of minerals in rocks as it allows investigation of relatively large sample volumes at sufficiently high resolution required for statistically meaningful analyses, and as its non-destructive fashion permits further studies such as mineral chemical, isotopic or crystallographic analyses of select grains identified through XR-CT. We present results obtained through the quantification of the 3D disposition of cordierite and biotite crystals in a hornfels from the contact aureole of the Bugaboo Batholith (British Columbia, Canada) using XR-CT and global as well as scale-dependent pattern statistics (Petley-Ragan et al., 2016). The results demonstrate a random distribution of cordierite and biotite crystal sizes for all scales across the entire rock volume studied indicative of interface-controlled prograde metamorphic reaction kinetics. We show that the common approach to approximate the shape of crystals as spherical underestimates the influence of the Strauss hard-core process on rock texture which may be misinterpreted to reflect ordering of crystal sizes by inhibition of nucleation and growth commonly associated with diffusion-controlled reaction kinetics. According to our findings, Strauss hard-core ordering develops at length scales equal to and less than the average major axis of the crystal population. This is significantly larger than what is obtained if a spherical crystal geometry would be assumed, and increases with deviation from sphericity. For the cordierite and biotite populations investigated in this research, Strauss hard-core ordering developed at length scales of up to ˜2.2 and 1.25 mm, respectively, which is almost 1 mm longer than

  2. Dose distributions in regions containing beta sources: Irregularly shaped source distributions in homogeneous media

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, B.L. )

    1991-11-01

    Methods are introduced by which dose rate distributions due to nonuniform, irregularly shaped distributions of beta emitters can be calculated using dose rate distributions for uniform, spherical source distributions. The dose rate distributions can be written in the MIRD formalism.

  3. The Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on Inflammatory Response Proteins in a 3D Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue Model

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Springer, David L.; Chaffee, Mary E.; Lien, Katie A.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Sacksteder, Colette A.

    2012-12-01

    Skin responses to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation include the induction of DNA repair, apoptosis, and stress response pathways. Additionally, numerous studies indicate that radiation exposure leads to inflammatory responses in skin cells and tissue. However, the inflammatory response of skin tissue to low dose radiation (<10 cGy) is poorly understood. In order to address this, we have utilized a reconstituted human skin tissue model (MatTek EpiDerm FT) and assessed changes in 23 cytokines twenty-four and forty eight hours following treatment of skin with either 3 or 10 cGy low-dose of radiation. Three cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-2, MIP-1α, were significantly altered in response to low dose radiation. In contrast, seven cytokines were significantly altered in response to a high radiation dose of 200 cGy (IL-2, IL-10, IL-13, IFN-γ, MIP-1α, TNF α, and VEGF) or the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-1α, IL-8, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES). Additionally, radiation induced inflammation appears to have a distinct cytokine response relative to the non-radiation induced stressor, TPA. Overall, these results indicate that there are subtle changes in the inflammatory protein levels following exposure to low dose radiation and this response is a sub-set of what is seen following a high dose in a human skin tissue model.

  4. Feasibility of low-dose single-view 3D fiducial tracking concurrent with external beam delivery.

    PubMed

    Speidel, Michael A; Wilfley, Brian P; Hsu, Annie; Hristov, Dimitre

    2012-04-01

    In external-beam radiation therapy, existing on-board x-ray imaging chains orthogonal to the delivery beam cannot recover 3D target trajectories from a single view in real-time. This limits their utility for real-time motion management concurrent with beam delivery. To address this limitation, the authors propose a novel concept for on-board imaging based on the inverse-geometry Scanning-Beam Digital X-ray (SBDX) system and evaluate its feasibility for single-view 3D intradelivery fiducial tracking. A chest phantom comprising a posterior wall, a central lung volume, and an anterior wall was constructed. Two fiducials were placed along the mediastinal ridge between the lung cavities: a 1.5 mm diameter steel sphere superiorly and a gold cylinder (2.6 mm length × 0.9 mm diameter) inferiorly. The phantom was placed on a linear motion stage that moved sinusoidally. Fiducial motion was along the source-detector (z) axis of the SBDX system with ±10 mm amplitude and a programmed period of either 3.5 s or 5 s. The SBDX system was operated at 15 frames per second, 100 kVp, providing good apparent conspicuity of the fiducials. With the stage moving, detector data were acquired and subsequently reconstructed into 15 planes with a 12 mm plane-to-plane spacing using digital tomosynthesis. A tracking algorithm was applied to the image planes for each temporal frame to determine the position of each fiducial in (x,y,z)-space versus time. A 3D time-sinusoidal motion model was fit to the measured 3D coordinates and root mean square (RMS) deviations about the fitted trajectory were calculated. Tracked motion was sinusoidal and primarily along the source-detector (z) axis. The RMS deviation of the tracked z-coordinate ranged from 0.53 to 0.71 mm. The motion amplitude derived from the model fit agreed with the programmed amplitude to within 0.28 mm for the steel sphere and within -0.77 mm for the gold seed. The model fit periods agreed with the programmed periods to within 7

  5. Comparison of the bubble size distribution in silicate foams using 2D images and 3D x-ray microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Genevieve; Baker, Don R.; Rivers, Mark L.; Allard, Emilie; Larocque, Jeffery

    2004-10-01

    Three silicate glasses were hydrated at high pressure and then heated at atmospheric pressure to exsolve the water into bubbles and create foams. The bubble size distribution in these foams was measured by x-ray microtomography on the GSECARS BM-13 beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The bubble area distributions were measured in two dimensions using the image slices produced from the microtomography and the software ImageJ. The bubble volume distributions were measured from the three-dimensional tomographic images with the BLOB3D software. We found that careful analysis of the microtomography data in both two and three dimensions was necessary to avoid the physically unrealistic, experimental artifact of identifying and counting many small bubbles whose surfaces were not defined by a septum of glass. When this artifact was avoided the foams demonstrated power-law distributions of bubble sizes in both two and three dimensions. Conversion of the power-law exponents for bubble areas measured in two dimensions to exponents for bubble volumes usually agreed with the measured three dimensional volume exponents. Furthermore, the power-law distributions for bubble volumes typically agree with multiple theories of bubble growth, all of which yield an exponent of 1 for the cumulative bubble volume distribution. The measured bubble volume distributions with exponents near 0.3 can be explained by diffusive growth as proposed by other authors, but distributions with exponents near 1.4 remain to be explained and are the subject of continuing research on the effects of water concentration and melt viscosity on foaming behavior.

  6. Isolating specific cell and tissue compartments from 3D images for quantitative regional distribution analysis using novel computer algorithms.

    PubMed

    Fenrich, Keith K; Zhao, Ethan Y; Wei, Yuan; Garg, Anirudh; Rose, P Ken

    2014-04-15

    Isolating specific cellular and tissue compartments from 3D image stacks for quantitative distribution analysis is crucial for understanding cellular and tissue physiology under normal and pathological conditions. Current approaches are limited because they are designed to map the distributions of synapses onto the dendrites of stained neurons and/or require specific proprietary software packages for their implementation. To overcome these obstacles, we developed algorithms to Grow and Shrink Volumes of Interest (GSVI) to isolate specific cellular and tissue compartments from 3D image stacks for quantitative analysis and incorporated these algorithms into a user-friendly computer program that is open source and downloadable at no cost. The GSVI algorithm was used to isolate perivascular regions in the cortex of live animals and cell membrane regions of stained spinal motoneurons in histological sections. We tracked the real-time, intravital biodistribution of injected fluorophores with sub-cellular resolution from the vascular lumen to the perivascular and parenchymal space following a vascular microlesion, and mapped the precise distributions of membrane-associated KCC2 and gephyrin immunolabeling in dendritic and somatic regions of spinal motoneurons. Compared to existing approaches, the GSVI approach is specifically designed for isolating perivascular regions and membrane-associated regions for quantitative analysis, is user-friendly, and free. The GSVI algorithm is useful to quantify regional differences of stained biomarkers (e.g., cell membrane-associated channels) in relation to cell functions, and the effects of therapeutic strategies on the redistributions of biomolecules, drugs, and cells in diseased or injured tissues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. 3-D Topo Surface Visualization of Acid-Base Species Distributions: Corner Buttes, Corner Pits, Curving Ridge Crests, and Dilution Plains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Garon C.; Hossain, Md Mainul

    2017-01-01

    Species TOPOS is a free software package for generating three-dimensional (3-D) topographic surfaces ("topos") for acid-base equilibrium studies. This upgrade adds 3-D species distribution topos to earlier surfaces that showed pH and buffer capacity behavior during titration and dilution procedures. It constructs topos by plotting…

  8. Assessment of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) lower limb measurements in adults: Comparison of micro-dose and low-dose biplanar radiographs.

    PubMed

    Rosskopf, Andrea B; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Buck, Florian M

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate reliability of 2D and 3D lower limb measurements in adults using micro-dose compared to low-dose biplanar radiographs(BPR). One hundred patients (mean 54.9 years) were examined twice using micro-dose and low-dose BPR. Length and mechanical axis of lower limbs were measured on the antero-posterior(ap) micro-dose and low-dose images by two independent readers. Femoral and tibial torsions of 50 patients were measured by two independent readers using reconstructed 3D-models based on the micro-dose and low-dose BPR. Intermethod and interreader agreements were calculated using descriptive statistics, intraclass-correlation-coefficient(ICC), and Bland-Altman analysis. Mean interreader-differences on micro-dose were 0.3 cm(range 0-1.0)/ 0.7°(0-2.9) for limb length/axis and 0.4 cm (0-1.0)/0.8°(0-3.3) on low-dose BPR. Mean intermethod-difference was 0.04 cm ± 0.2/0.04° ± 0.6 for limb length/axis. Interreader-ICC for limb length/axis was 0.999/0.991 on micro-dose and 0.999/0.987 on low-dose BPR. Interreader-ICC for micro-dose was 0.879/0.826 for femoral/ tibial torsion, for low-dose BPR was 0.924/0.909. Mean interreader-differences on micro-dose/low-dose BPR were 3°(0-13°)/2°(0°-12°) for femoral and 4°(0-18°)/3°(0°-10°) for tibial torsion. Mean intermethod-difference was -0.1° ± 5.0/-0.4° ± 2.9 for femoral/tibial torsion. Mean dose-area-product was significantly lower (9.9 times;p < 0.001) for micro-dose BPR. 2D-and 3D-measurements of lower limbs based on micro-dose BPR are reliable and provide a 10-times lower radiation dose. • Lower limb length and mechanical axis can be reliably measured with micro-dose. • Femoral and tibial torsion can be reliably assessed with micro-dose. • Micro-dose allows a huge reduction of radiation exposure.

  9. Determination of dose distributions and parameter sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Farris, W.T.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contribution of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 005) examined the contributions of numerous parameters to the uncertainty distribution of doses calculated for environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study of iodine in cow's milk and the third scoping study, which added additional pathways. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows' milk from Feeding Regime 1 as described in Calculation 001.

  10. Reduced dose to small bowel with the prone position and a belly board versus the supine position in neoadjuvant 3D conformal radiotherapy for rectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    White, Rohen; Foroudi, Farshad; Sia, Joseph; Marr, Mary Ann; Lim Joon, Daryl

    2017-06-01

    No consensus exists regarding the optimal treatment setup for neoadjuvant radiotherapy of rectal cancer using a 3D conformal (3D CRT) technique. Positioning the patient prone with a belly board aims to reduce the amount of small bowel irradiated. Twenty-five patients with locally advanced rectal cancer underwent computed tomography (CT) planning for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Patients were simulated prone with a belly board and then in the supine position. Questionnaires rating the comfort of each position were completed. 3D CRT plans were generated for both positions to a prescribed dose of 50.4 Gy in 1.8 Gy daily fractions. Dose-volume parameters in 5 Gy increments for small bowel, large bowel and bladder wall were compared. Small bowel V5 Gy, V10 Gy, V15 Gy and V20 Gy values were significantly higher in the supine position (398, 366, 245, 151 cm(3) for supine vs. 243, 213, 161, 122 cm(3) for prone respectively; P < 0.001, <0.001, <0.001 and 0.025). Large bowel V5 Gy, V10 Gy and V15 Gy values were significantly higher in the supine position (266, 209, 147 cm(3) supine, 175, 139, 108 cm(3) prone respectively; P = 0.001, <0.001, 0.003). There was a significant difference in comfort scores favouring the supine position (P = 0.015). A significant increase in small and large bowel dose was seen in the supine plans. Treatment in the prone position with a belly board may reduce toxicity when using a 3D CRT technique. Whilst both setup positions were tolerable the supine was more comfortable. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy and New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology.

  11. Modeling the crystal distribution of lead-sulfate in lead-acid batteries with 3D spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Moritz; Badeda, Julia; Sauer, Dirk Uwe

    2015-04-01

    For the reliability of lead-acid batteries it is important to have an accurate prediction of its response to load profiles. A model for the lead-sulfate growth is presented, which is embedded in a physical-chemical model with 3D spatial resolution is presented which is used for analyzing the different mechanism influencing the cell response. One import factor is the chemical dissolution and precipitation of lead-sulfate, since its dissolution speed limits the charging reaction and the accumulation of indissolvable of lead-sulfate leads to capacity degradation. The cell performance/behavior is not only determined by the amount of the sulfate but also by the radii and distribution of the crystals. The presented model can be used to for an improved understanding of the interaction of the different mechanisms.

  12. Isoparametric fitting: A method for approximating full-field experimental data distributed on any shaped 3D domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Luigi

    2016-12-01

    With the present paper, the author proposes a fitting method for approximating experimental data retrieved from any full-field technique. Unlike most of the fitting procedures, the method works on data distributed on a surface of any shape, and the mathematical model is able to take into account of both the 3D shape of the surface and of the experimental quantity to be fitted. The paper reports all the mathematical steps necessary for applying the method, which was tested on two sets of experimental data obtained by an out-of-plane speckle interferometer working in two different conditions of noise. Experimental results showed the capability of the method to work in presence of high level of noise.

  13. PDT Dose Parameters Impact Tumoricidal Durability and Cell Death Pathways in a 3D Ovarian Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Imran; Anbil, Sriram; Alagic, Nermina; Celli, Jonathan P.; Zheng, Lei Zak; Palanisami, Akilan; Glidden, Michael D.; Pogue, Brian W.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2013-01-01

    The successful implementation of photodynamic therapy (PDT)-based regimens depends on an improved understanding of the dosimetric and biological factors that govern therapeutic variability. Here, the kinetics of tumor destruction and regrowth are characterized by systematically varying benzoporphyrin derivative (BPD)-light combinations to achieve fixed PDT doses (M × J/cm2). Three endpoints were used to evaluate treatment response: 1.) Viability evaluated every 24 hours for 5 days post-PDT; 2.) Photobleaching assessed immediately post-PDT; and 3.) Caspase-3 activation determined 24-hours post-PDT. The specific BPD-light parameters used to construct a given PDT dose significantly impact not only acute cytotoxic efficacy, but also treatment durability. For each dose, PDT with 0.25 μM BPD produces the most significant and sustained reduction in normalized viability compared to 1 μM and 10 μM BPD. Percent photobleaching correlates with normalized viability for a range of PDT doses achieved within BPD concentrations. To produce a cytotoxic response with 10 μM BPD that is comparable to 0.25 μM and 1 μM BPD a reduction in irradiance from 150 mW/cm2 to 0.5 mW/cm2 is required. Activated caspase-3 does not correlate with normalized viability. The parameter-dependent durability of outcomes within fixed PDT doses provides opportunities for treatment customization and improved therapeutic planning. PMID:23442192

  14. 2D divertor heat flux distribution using a 3D heat conduction solver in National Spherical Torus Experiment.

    PubMed

    Gan, K F; Ahn, J-W; Park, J-W; Maingi, R; McLean, A G; Gray, T K; Gong, X; Zhang, X D

    2013-02-01

    The divertor heat flux footprint in tokamaks is often observed to be non-axisymmetric due to intrinsic error fields, applied 3D magnetic fields or during transients such as edge localized modes. Typically, only 1D radial heat flux profiles are analyzed; however, analysis of the full 2D divertor measurements provides opportunities to study the asymmetric nature of the deposited heat flux. To accomplish this an improved 3D Fourier analysis method has been successfully applied in a heat conduction solver (TACO) to determine the 2D heat flux distribution at the lower divertor surface in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) tokamak. This advance enables study of helical heat deposition onto the divertor. In order to account for heat transmission through poorly adhered surface layers on the divertor plate, a heat transmission coefficient, defined as the surface layer thermal conductivity divided by the thickness of the layer, was introduced to the solution of heat conduction equation. This coefficient is denoted as α and a range of values were tested in the model to ensure a reliable heat flux calculation until a specific value of α led to the constant total deposited energy in the numerical solution after the end of discharge. A comparison between 1D heat flux profiles from TACO and from a 2D heat flux calculation code, THEODOR, shows good agreement. Advantages of 2D heat flux distribution over the conventional 1D heat flux profile are also discussed, and examples of 2D data analysis in the study of striated heat deposition pattern as well as the toroidal degree of asymmetry of peak heat flux and heat flux width are demonstrated.

  15. Three-dimensional (3D) evaluation of liquid distribution in shake flask using an optical fluorescence technique.

    PubMed

    Azizan, Amizon; Büchs, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    Biotechnological development in shake flask necessitates vital engineering parameters e.g. volumetric power input, mixing time, gas liquid mass transfer coefficient, hydromechanical stress and effective shear rate. Determination and optimization of these parameters through experiments are labor-intensive and time-consuming. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) provides the ability to predict and validate these parameters in bioprocess engineering. This work provides ample experimental data which are easily accessible for future validations to represent the hydrodynamics of the fluid flow in the shake flask. A non-invasive measuring technique using an optical fluorescence method was developed for shake flasks containing a fluorescent solution with a waterlike viscosity at varying filling volume (VL = 15 to 40 mL) and shaking frequency (n = 150 to 450 rpm) at a constant shaking diameter (do = 25 mm). The method detected the leading edge (LB) and tail of the rotating bulk liquid (TB) relative to the direction of the centrifugal acceleration at varying circumferential heights from the base of the shake flask. The determined LB and TB points were translated into three-dimensional (3D) circumferential liquid distribution plots. The maximum liquid height (Hmax) of the bulk liquid increased with increasing filling volume and shaking frequency of the shaking flask, as expected. The toroidal shapes of LB and TB are clearly asymmetrical and the measured TB differed by the elongation of the liquid particularly towards the torus part of the shake flask. The 3D liquid distribution data collected at varying filling volume and shaking frequency, comprising of LB and TB values relative to the direction of the centrifugal acceleration are essential for validating future numerical solutions using CFD to predict vital engineering parameters in shake flask.

  16. 20-junction photonic power converter performance under non-uniform illumination calculated by 3D distributed circuit model (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahal, Sanmeet; Wilkins, Mathew M.; Masson, Denis P.; Fafard, Simon; Valdivia, Christopher E.; Hinzer, Karin

    2017-04-01

    Distributed circuit models (DCM) divide photovoltaic devices into discrete elementary units. Each unit is assigned an equivalent circuit based on geometry and location, with circuit parameters being fit to or extrapolated from experimental results. Interconnection of these elementary units with ohmic resistors representing lateral and vertical resistances within the layers of the device forms the complete circuit model. DCMs allow grid design optimization, simulation of chromatic aberration, luminescent coupling and analysis of power losses due to regionally specific resistances, which are not possible with simple lumped models. Previous DCMs have been limited to 1-3 junction devices, using a 2D surface model, or use of a one-diode circuit model for the cell junctions. Furthermore, a DCM can be used to simulate complex multi-junction devices with non-uniform illumination, whereas in comprehensive physics-based simulators like Synopsys TCAD Sentaurus this would require vastly greater computational resources. In this work, a parameterized 3D distributed circuit model was developed to calculate the performance of III-V solar cells and photonic power converters (PPC) with a variable number of epitaxially stacked pn junctions. We validated these calculations against published results using a similar 3D model for a 1-junction solar cell. Furthermore, experimental results from Azastra Opto's 20-junction PPC illuminated by an 845 nm diode laser are compared. These devices are designed with many pn junctions to achieve higher voltages and to operate under non-uniform illumination profiles from a laser or LED. The effect on device performance of varying both these parameters will be discussed.

  17. Effect of surface treatment on stress distribution in immediately loaded dental implants--a 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Babak; Shahrbaf, Shirin; Mirzakouchaki, Behnam; Ghalichi, Farzan; Ashtiani, Mohammed; Martin, Nicolas

    2014-04-01

    To investigate, by means of FE analysis, the effect of surface roughness treatments on the distribution of stresses at the bone-implant interface in immediately loaded mandibular implants. An accurate, high resolution, digital replica model of bone structure (cortical and trabecular components) supporting an implant was created using CT scan data and image processing software (Mimics 13.1; Materialize, Leuven, Belgium). An anatomically accurate 3D model of a mandibular-implant complex was created using a professional 3D-CAD modeller (SolidWorks, DassaultSystèmes Solid Works Corp; 2011). Finite element models were created with one of the four roughness treatments on the implant fixture surface. Of these, three were surface treated to create a uniform coating determined by the coefficient of friction (μ); these were either (1) plasma sprayed or porous-beaded (μ=1.0), (2) sandblasted (μ=0.68) or (3) polished (μ=0.4). The fourth implant had a novel two-part surface roughness consisting of a coronal polished component (μ=0.4) interfacing with the cortical bone, and a body plasma treated surface component (μ=1) interfacing with the trabecular bone. Finite element stress analysis was carried out under vertical and lateral forces. This investigation showed that the type of surface treatment on the implant fixture affects the stress at the bone-implant interface of an immediately loaded implant complex. Von Mises stress data showed that the two-part surface treatment created the better stress distribution at the implant-bone interface. The results from this FE computational analysis suggest that the proposed two-part surface treatment for IL implants creates lower stresses than single uniform treatments at the bone-implant interface, which might decrease peri-implant bone loss. Future investigations should focus on mechanical and clinical validation of these FE results. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Effect of Framework Design on Stress Distribution in Implant-Supported FPDs: A 3-D FEM Study

    PubMed Central

    Eraslan, Oguz; Inan, Ozgur; Secilmis, Asli

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The biomechanical behavior of the superstructure plays an important role in the functional longevity of dental implants. However, information about the influence of framework design on stresses transmitted to the implants and supporting tissues is limited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of framework designs on stress distribution at the supporting bone and supporting implants. Methods: In this study, the three-dimensional (3D) finite element stress analysis method was used. Three types of 3D mathematical models simulating three different framework designs for implant-supported 3-unit posterior fixed partial dentures were prepared with supporting structures. Convex (1), concave (2), and conventional (3) pontic framework designs were simulated. A 300-N static vertical occlusal load was applied on the node at the center of occlusal surface of the pontic to calculate the stress distributions. As a second condition, frameworks were directly loaded to evaluate the effect of the framework design clearly. The Solidworks/Cosmosworks structural analysis programs were used for finite element modeling/analysis. Results: The analysis of the von Mises stress values revealed that maximum stress concentrations were located at the loading areas for all models. The pontic side marginal edges of restorations and the necks of implants were other stress concentration regions. There was no clear difference among models when the restorations were loaded at occlusal surfaces. When the veneering porcelain was removed, and load was applied directly to the framework, there was a clear increase in stress concentration with a concave design on supporting implants and bone structure. Conclusions: The present study showed that the use of a concave design in the pontic frameworks of fixed partial dentures increases the von Mises stress levels on implant abutments and supporting bone structure. However, the veneering porcelain element reduces the effect of the

  19. Validation of 4D dose calculation using an independent motion monitoring by the calypso tracking system and 3D polymer gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, P.; Saito, N.; Lang, C.; Runz, A.; Johnen, W.; Witte, M.; Schmitt, D.; Karger, C. P.

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to evaluate an in-house developed 4D dose calculation algorithm that uses Calypso motion tracking data and to compare the results against 3D polymer gel dosimetry measurements. For this, a cylindrical water phantom was constructed that allows to insert (i) the polymer gel, (ii) a PinPoint ® ionization chamber and (iii) Calypso beacons™ for motion tracking. A treatment plan covering a gel flask in the center of the static phantom plus a 1 mm margin homogeneously with dose was generated. During irradiation, however, the phantom was moved periodically by means of a robot with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 2.5 cm. The results of the 4D dose calculations show good agreement with the gel-dosimetric measurements in most of the volume. Remaining small deviations have to be evaluated in further experiments. The developed experimental setup allows for 3D-dosimetric validation of 4D dose calculations algorithms prior to application in patients.

  20. SU-E-T-346: Effect of Jaw Position On Dose to Critical Structures in 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Paudel, N; Han, E; Liang, X; Morrill, S; Zhang, X; Hardee, M; Penagaricano, J; Ratanatharathorn, V

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Three-dimensional conformal therapy remains a valid and widely used modality for pancreatic radiotherapy treatment. It usually meets dose constraints on critical structures. However, careful positioning of collimation jaws can reduce dose to the critical structures. Here we investigate the dosimetric effect of jaw position in MLC-based 3-D conformal treatment planning on critical structures. Methods: We retrospectively selected seven pancreatic cancer patients treated with 3-D conformal radiotherapy. We started with treatment plans (Varian Truebeam LINAC, Eclipse TPS, AAA, 18MV) having both x and y jaws aligned with the farthest extent of the block outline (8mm around PTV). Then we subsequently moved either both x-jaws or all x and y jaws outwards upto 3 cm in 1 cm increments and investigated their effect on average and maximum dose to neighboring critical structures keeping the same coverage to treatment volume. Results: Lateral displacement of both x-jaws by 1cm each increased kidney and spleen mean dose by as much as 1.7% and 1.3% respectively and superior inferior displacement increased liver, right kidney, stomach and spleen dose by as much as 2.1%, 2%, 5.2% and 1.6% respectively. Displacement of all x and y-jaws away by 1cm increased the mean dose to liver, right kidney, left kidney, bowels, cord, stomach and spleen by as much as 4.9%, 5.9%, 2.1%, 2.8%, 7.4%, 10.4% and 4.2% respectively. Percentage increase in mean dose due to 2 and 3cm jaw displacement increased almost linearly with the displaced distance. Changes in maximum dose were much smaller (mostly negligible) than the changes in mean dose. Conclusion: Collimation jaw position affects dose mostly to critical structures adjacent to it. Though treatment plans with MLCs conforming the block margin usually meet dose constraints to critical structures, keeping jaws all the way in, to the edge of the block reduces dose to the critical structures during radiation treatment.

  1. [A new 2D and 3D imaging approach to musculoskeletal physiology and pathology with low-dose radiation and the standing position: the EOS system].

    PubMed

    Dubousset, Jean; Charpak, Georges; Dorion, Irène; Skalli, Wafa; Lavaste, François; Deguise, Jacques; Kalifa, Gabriel; Ferey, Solène

    2005-02-01

    Close collaboration between multidisciplinary specialists (physicists, biomecanical engineers, medical radiologists and pediatric orthopedic surgeons) has led to the development of a new low-dose radiation device named EOS. EOS has three main advantages: The use of a gaseous X-ray detector, invented by Georges Charpak (Nobel Prizewinner 1992), the dose necessary to obtain a 2D image of the skeletal system has been reduced by 8 to 10 times, while that required to obtain a 3D reconstruction from CT slices has fallen by a factor of 800 to 1000. The accuracy of the 3D reconstruction obtained with EOS is as good as that obtained with CT. The patient is examined in the standing (or seated) position, and is scanned simultaneously from head to feet, both frontally and laterally. This is a major advantage over conventional CT which requires the patient to be placed horizontally. -The 3D reconstructions of each element of the osteo-articular system are as precise as those obtained by conventional CT. EOS is also rapid, taking only 15 to 30 minutes to image the entire spine.

  2. Impact of injected dose and acquisition time on a normal database by use of 3D-SSP in SPECT images: quantitative simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Hideo; Hatazawa, Jun; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Ito, Kengo; Ha-Kawa, Sang Kil; Masuda, Yasuhiko; Sugibayashi, Keiichi; Takahashi, Masaaki; Kikuchi, Kei; Katsuta, Noboru

    2015-07-01

    The present study aimed to validate the accuracy of normal databases (NDBs) with respect to variable injected doses and acquisition times by use of three-dimensional stereotactic surface projections (3D-SSP) in N-isopropyl-p-[123I]-iodoamphetamine (I-123-IMP) brain perfusion images. We constructed NDBs based on brain SPECT images obtained from 29 healthy volunteers. Each NDB was rebuilt under simulated unique conditions by use of dynamic acquisition datasets and comprised injected doses (222, 167, and 111 MBq) and acquisition times (30, 20, and 15 min). We selected seven of 29 datasets derived from the volunteers to simulate patients' data (PD). The simulated PD were designed to include regions of hypoperfusion. The study comprised protocol A (same conditions for PD and NDB) and protocol B (mismatched conditions for PD and NDB). We used 3D-SSP to compare with the Z score and detection error. The average Z scores were decreased significantly in protocol A [PD (High)-NDB (High) vs. PD (Low)-NDB (Low); PD (30 m)-NDB (30 m) vs. PD (15 m)-NDB (15 m) and PD (20 m)-NDB (20 m)].The average Z scores of PD (High) and PD (Medium) with NDB (High) did not differ significantly in protocol B, whereas all others were decreased significantly. The error of detection increased 6.65 % (protocol A) and 32.05 % (protocol B). The Z scores were specific to the injected dose and acquisition time used in 3D-SSP studies, and the calculated Z scores were affected by mismatched injected doses and acquisition times between PD and selected NDBs.

  3. Long term dose monitoring onboard the European Columbus module of the international space station (ISS) in the frame of DOSIS and DOSIS 3D project - results from the active instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmeister, Soenke; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Guenther; Boehme, Matthias; Haumann, Lutz; Labrenz, Johannes

    Besides the effects of the microgravity environment, and the psychological and psychosocial problems encountered in confined spaces, radiation is the main health detriment for long duration human space missions. The radiation environment encountered in space differs in nature from that on earth, consisting mostly of high energetic ions from protons up to iron, resulting in radiation levels far exceeding the ones encountered on earth for occupational radiation workers. Accurate knowledge of the physical characteristics of the space radiation field in dependence on the solar activity, the orbital parameters and the different shielding configurations of the International Space Station ISS is therefore needed. For the investigation of the spatial and temporal distribution of the radiation field inside the European COLUMBUS module the experiment DOSIS (Dose Distribution Inside the ISS) under the lead of DLR has been launched on July 15 (th) 2009 with STS-127 to the ISS. The experimental package was transferred from the Space Shuttle into COLUMBUS on July 18 (th) . It consists of a combination of passive detector packages (PDP) distributed at 11 locations inside the European Columbus Laboratory and two active radiation detectors (Dosimetry Telescopes = DOSTELs) with a DDPU (DOSTEL Data and Power Unit) in a Nomex pouch (DOSIS MAIN BOX) mounted at a fixed location beneath the European Physiology Module rack (EPM) inside COLUMBUS. The active components of the DOSIS experiment were operational from July 18 (th) 2009 to June 16 (th) 2011. After refurbishment the hardware has been reactivated on May 15 (th) 2012 as active part of the DOSIS 3D experiment and provides continuous data since this activation. The presentation will focus on the latest results from the two DOSTEL instruments as absorbed dose, dose equivalent and the related LET spectra gathered within the DOSIS (2009 - 2011) and DOSIS 3D (2012 - 2014) experiment. The CAU contributions to DOSIS and DOSIS 3D are

  4. Tumor control probability and the utility of 4D vs 3D dose calculations for stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Valdes, Gilmer; Robinson, Clifford; Lee, Percy; Morel, Delphine; Low, Daniel; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Lamb, James M

    2015-01-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) dose calculations for lung cancer radiotherapy have been technically feasible for a number of years but have not become standard clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to determine if clinically significant differences in tumor control probability (TCP) exist between 3D and 4D dose calculations so as to inform the decision whether 4D dose calculations should be used routinely for treatment planning. Radiotherapy plans for Stage I-II lung cancer were created for 8 patients. Clinically acceptable treatment plans were created with dose calculated on the end-exhale 4D computed tomography (CT) phase using a Monte Carlo algorithm. Dose was then projected onto the remaining 9 phases of 4D-CT using the Monte Carlo algorithm and accumulated onto the end-exhale phase using commercially available deformable registration software. The resulting dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the gross tumor volume (GTV), planning tumor volume (PTV), and PTVsetup were compared according to target coverage and dose. The PTVsetup was defined as a volume including the GTV and a margin for setup uncertainties but not for respiratory motion. TCPs resulting from these DVHs were estimated using a wide range of alphas, betas, and tumor cell densities. Differences of up to 5Gy were observed between 3D and 4D calculations for a PTV with highly irregular shape. When the TCP was calculated using the resulting DVHs for fractionation schedules typically used in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), the TCP differed at most by 5% between 4D and 3D cases, and in most cases, it was by less than 1%. We conclude that 4D dose calculations are not necessary for most cases treated with SBRT, but they might be valuable for irregularly shaped target volumes. If 4D calculations are used, 4D DVHs should be evaluated on volumes that include margin for setup uncertainty but not respiratory motion. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier

  5. The Radial Distribution of Star Formation in Galaxies at Z approximately 1 from the 3D-HST Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Erica June; vanDokkum, Pieter G.; Momcheva, Ivelina; Brammer, Gabriel; Lundgren, Britt; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; DaCunha, Elisabete; Schreiber, Natascha Foerster; Franx, Marijn; hide

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of galaxies can be described by the distribution of their star formation as a function of cosmic time. Thanks to the WFC3 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) it is now possible to measure this beyond the local Universe. Here we present the spatial distribution of H emission for a sample of 54 strongly star-forming galaxies at z 1 in the 3D-HST Treasury survey. By stacking the H emission, we find that star formation occurred in approximately exponential distributions at z approximately 1, with a median Sersic index of n = 1.0 +/- 0.2. The stacks are elongated with median axis ratios of b/a = 0.58 +/- 0.09 in H consistent with (possibly thick) disks at random orientation angles. Keck spectra obtained for a subset of eight of the galaxies show clear evidence for rotation, with inclination corrected velocities of 90.330 km s(exp 1-). The most straightforward interpretation of our results is that star formation in strongly star-forming galaxies at z approximately 1 generally occurred in disks. The disks appear to be scaled-up versions of nearby spiral galaxies: they have EW(H alpha) at approximately 100 A out to the solar orbit and they have star formation surface densities above the threshold for driving galactic scale winds.

  6. The Radial Distribution of Star Formation in Galaxies at z1 From The 3D-HST Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Erica June; Dokkum, Pieter G. Van; Momcheva, Ivelina; Brammer, Gabriel; Lundgren, Britt; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Tease, Katherine Whitaker; Cunha, Elisabete Da; Schreiber, Natascha Forster; Franx, Marijn; hide

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of galaxies can be described by the distribution of their star formation as a function of cosmic time.Thanks to the WFC3 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) it is now possible to measure this beyond thelocal Universe. Here we present the spatial distribution of H emission for a sample of 54 strongly star-forming-galaxies at z1 in the 3D-HST Treasury survey. By stacking the Halpha emission, we find that star formation occurredin approximately exponential distributions at z1, with a median Sersic index of n=1.0 plus or minus 0.2. The stacks areelongated with median axis ratios of b/a 0.58 plus or minus 0.09 in Halpha consistent with (possibly thick) disks at randomorientation angles. Keck spectra obtained for a subset of eight of the galaxies show clear evidence for rotation, withinclination corrected velocities of 90-330 km per second. The most straightforward interpretation of our results is that starformation in strongly star-forming galaxies at z1 generally occurred in disks. The disks appear to be scaled-upversions of nearby spiral galaxies: they have EW(Halpha)100 Angstroms out to the solar orbit and they have star formation surface densities above the threshold for driving galactic scale winds.

  7. THE RADIAL DISTRIBUTION OF STAR FORMATION IN GALAXIES AT z {approx} 1 FROM THE 3D-HST SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Erica June; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Momcheva, Ivelina; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Leja, Joel; Brammer, Gabriel; Lundgren, Britt; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Rix, Hans-Walter; Van der Wel, Arjen; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha; Wuyts, Stijn; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Labbe, Ivo; Patel, Shannon; Kriek, Mariska; Schmidt, Kasper B.

    2013-01-20

    The assembly of galaxies can be described by the distribution of their star formation as a function of cosmic time. Thanks to the WFC3 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) it is now possible to measure this beyond the local Universe. Here we present the spatial distribution of H{alpha} emission for a sample of 54 strongly star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 1 in the 3D-HST Treasury survey. By stacking the H{alpha} emission, we find that star formation occurred in approximately exponential distributions at z {approx} 1, with a median Sersic index of n = 1.0 {+-} 0.2. The stacks are elongated with median axis ratios of b/a = 0.58 {+-} 0.09 in H{alpha} consistent with (possibly thick) disks at random orientation angles. Keck spectra obtained for a subset of eight of the galaxies show clear evidence for rotation, with inclination corrected velocities of 90-330 km s{sup -1}. The most straightforward interpretation of our results is that star formation in strongly star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 1 generally occurred in disks. The disks appear to be 'scaled-up' versions of nearby spiral galaxies: they have EW(H{alpha}) {approx} 100 A out to the solar orbit and they have star formation surface densities above the threshold for driving galactic scale winds.

  8. Low Dose Computed Tomography for 3D Planning of Total Hip Arthroplasty: Evaluation of Radiation Exposure and Image Quality.

    PubMed

    Huppertz, Alexander; Lembcke, Alexander; Sariali, El-Hadi; Durmus, Tahir; Schwenke, Carsten; Hamm, Bernd; Sparmann, Martin; Baur, Alexander D J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare radiation exposure and image quality between dedicated computed tomography (CT) protocols for preoperative total hip arthroplasty (THA) planning. Three protocols with automated tube current modulation using 64-slice (n = 177) and 128-slice CT scanners without (n = 129) and with automated tube voltage preselection (n = 84) were compared. All 390 CTs were of sufficient quality for THA planning. Mean DLP was 235.0 mGy*cm (effective dose 2.8 mSv). Lowest radiation exposure (2.5 mSv) was seen with automated voltage preselection and the algorithm's selection was 100 kV (90.5% of patients) and 120 kV. Lowest image noise was seen in the highest dose group (3.1 mSv, 128-slice CT fixed tube voltage). A significant difference in cortical bone radiodensity was seen between 100 kV and 120 kV (P < 0.0001). Preoperative pelvic CT for THA planning is possible with very low radiation dose and reliable quality. Automated voltage preselection further decreases the effective dose by 18.2%.

  9. 3-D treatment planning and dose delivery verification integrating a variety of state-of-the-art techniques: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kuchnir, F T; Watson-Bullock, S; Reft, C S; Hallahan, D

    1991-12-01

    A patient previously treated with radiation for base-of-tongue cancer presented with recurrent disease seven years later. The spinal cord had received tolerance dose. Using state-of-the-art treatment planning techniques, including beam's-eye-view and volumetrics, dose-volume histograms, split field technique, mixed energies, and beam intensity modulation (with a compensator), we achieved uniform dose coverage of the target in 3-D. This was verified in vivo with thermoluminescence dosimeters positioned in the esophagus by means of a nasogastric tube that ran centrally through the target volume. The various techniques applied will be presented with a discussion of the rationale used in each step of plan optimization and verification.

  10. 3D CT to 2D low dose single-plane fluoroscopy registration algorithm for in-vivo knee motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Akter, Masuma; Lambert, Andrew J; Pickering, Mark R; Scarvell, Jennie M; Smith, Paul N

    2014-01-01

    A limitation to accurate automatic tracking of knee motion is the noise and blurring present in low dose X-ray fluoroscopy images. For more accurate tracking, this noise should be reduced while preserving anatomical structures such as bone. Noise in low dose X-ray images is generated from different sources, however quantum noise is by far the most dominant. In this paper we present an accurate multi-modal image registration algorithm which successfully registers 3D CT to 2D single plane low dose noisy and blurred fluoroscopy images that are captured for healthy knees. The proposed algorithm uses a new registration framework including a filtering method to reduce the noise and blurring effect in fluoroscopy images. Our experimental results show that the extra pre-filtering step included in the proposed approach maintains higher accuracy and repeatability for in vivo knee joint motion analysis.

  11. Reconstructing the 3D fracture distribution model from core (10 cm) to outcrop (10 m) and lineament (10 km) scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcel, C.; Davy, P.; Bour, O.; de Dreuzy, J.

    2006-12-01

    Considering the role of fractures in hydraulic flow, the knowledge of the 3D spatial distribution of fractures is a basic concern for any hydrogeology-related study (potential leakages in waste repository, aquifer management, ?). Unfortunately geophysical imagery is quite blind with regard to fractures, and only the largest ones are generally detected, if they are. Actually most of the information has to be derived from statistical models whose parameters are defined from a few sparse sampling areas, such as wells, outcrops, or lineament maps. How these observations obtained at different scales can be linked to each other is a critical point, which directly addresses the issue of fracture scaling. In this study, we use one of the most important datasets that have ever been collected for characterizing fracture networks. It was collected by the Swedish company SKB for their research program on deep repository for radioactive waste, and consists of large-scale lineament maps covering about 100 km2, several outcrops of several hundreds of m2 mapped with a fracture trace length resolution down to 0.50 m, and a series of 1000m-deep cored boreholes where both fracture orientations and fracture intensities were carefully recorded. Boreholes are an essential complement to surface outcrops as they allow the sampling of horizontal fracture planes that, generally, are severely undersampled in subhorizontal outcrops. Outcrops, on the other hand, provide information on fracture sizes which is not possible to address from core information alone. However linking outcrops and boreholes is not straightforward: the sampling scale is obviously different and some scaling rules have to be applied to relate both fracture distributions; outcrops are 2D planes while boreholes are mostly 1D records; outcrops can be affected by superficial fracturing processes that are not representative of the fracturing at depth. We present here the stereology methods for calculating the 3D distribution

  12. Effects of energy spectrum on dose distribution calculations for high energy electron beams.

    PubMed

    Toutaoui, Abdelkader; Khelassi-Toutaoui, Nadia; Brahimi, Zakia; Chami, Ahmed Chafik

    2009-01-01

    In an early work we have demonstrated the possibility of using Monte Carlo generated pencil beams for 3D electron beam dose calculations. However, in this model the electron beam was considered as monoenergetic and the effects of the energy spectrum were taken into account by correction factors, derived from measuring central-axis depth dose curves. In the present model, the electron beam is considered as polyenergetic and the pencil beam distribution of a clinical electron beam, of a given nominal energy, is represented as a linear combination of Monte Carlo monoenergetic pencil beams. The coefficients of the linear combination describe the energy spectrum of the clinical electron beam, and are chosen to provide the best-fit between the calculated and measured central axis depth dose, in water. The energy spectrum is determined by the constrained least square method. The angular distribution of the clinical electron beam is determined by in-air penumbra measurements. The predictions of this algorithm agree very well with the measurements in the region near the surface, and the discrepancies between the measured and calculated dose distributions, behind 3D heterogeneities, are reduced to less than 10%. We have demonstrated a new algorithm for 3D electron beam dose calculations, which takes into account the energy spectra. Results indicate that the use of this algorithm leads to a better modeling of dose distributions downstream, from complex heterogeneities.

  13. Effects of energy spectrum on dose distribution calculations for high energy electron beams

    PubMed Central

    Toutaoui, Abdelkader; Khelassi-Toutaoui, Nadia; Brahimi, Zakia; Chami, Ahmed Chafik

    2009-01-01

    In an early work we have demonstrated the possibility of using Monte Carlo generated pencil beams for 3D electron beam dose calculations. However, in this model the electron beam was considered as monoenergetic and the effects of the energy spectrum were taken into account by correction factors, derived from measuring central-axis depth dose curves. In the present model, the electron beam is considered as polyenergetic and the pencil beam distribution of a clinical electron beam, of a given nominal energy, is represented as a linear combination of Monte Carlo monoenergetic pencil beams. The coefficients of the linear combination describe the energy spectrum of the clinical electron beam, and are chosen to provide the best-fit between the calculated and measured central axis depth dose, in water. The energy spectrum is determined by the constrained least square method. The angular distribution of the clinical electron beam is determined by in-air penumbra measurements. The predictions of this algorithm agree very well with the measurements in the region near the surface, and the discrepancies between the measured and calculated dose distributions, behind 3D heterogeneities, are reduced to less than 10%. We have demonstrated a new algorithm for 3D electron beam dose calculations, which takes into account the energy spectra. Results indicate that the use of this algorithm leads to a better modeling of dose distributions downstream, from complex heterogeneities. PMID:20126560

  14. A comparison of needle tip localization accuracy using 2D and 3D trans-rectal ultrasound for high-dose-rate prostate cancer brachytherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Hoover, Douglas A.; Surry, Kathleen; Edirisinghe, Chandima; Montreuil, Jacques; D'Souza, David; Fenster, Aaron; Wong, Eugene

    2016-03-01

    Background: High-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) is a prostate cancer treatment option involving the insertion of hollow needles into the gland through the perineum to deliver a radioactive source. Conventional needle imaging involves indexing a trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe in the superior/inferior (S/I) direction, using the axial transducer to produce an image set for organ segmentation. These images have limited resolution in the needle insertion direction (S/I), so the sagittal transducer is used to identify needle tips, requiring a manual registration with the axial view. This registration introduces a source of uncertainty in the final segmentations and subsequent treatment plan. Our lab has developed a device enabling 3D-TRUS guided insertions with high S/I spatial resolution, eliminating the need to align axial and sagittal views. Purpose: To compare HDR-BT needle tip localization accuracy between 2D and 3D-TRUS. Methods: 5 prostate cancer patients underwent conventional 2D TRUS guided HDR-BT, during which 3D images were also acquired for post-operative registration and segmentation. Needle end-length measurements were taken, providing a gold standard for insertion depths. Results: 73 needles were analyzed from all 5 patients. Needle tip position differences between imaging techniques was found to be largest in the S/I direction with mean+/-SD of -2.5+/-4.0 mm. End-length measurements indicated that 3D TRUS provided statistically significantly lower mean+/-SD insertion depth error of -0.2+/-3.4 mm versus 2.3+/-3.7 mm with 2D guidance (p < .001). Conclusions: 3D TRUS may provide more accurate HDR-BT needle localization than conventional 2D TRUS guidance for the majority of HDR-BT needles.

  15. 3D printing of five-in-one dose combination polypill with defined immediate and sustained release profiles.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Shaban A; Burley, Jonathan C; Alexander, Morgan R; Yang, Jing; Roberts, Clive J

    2015-11-10

    We have used three dimensional (3D) extrusion printing to manufacture a multi-active solid dosage form or so called polypill. This contains five compartmentalised drugs with two independently controlled and well-defined release profiles. This polypill demonstrates that complex medication regimes can be combined in a single personalised tablet. This could potentially improve adherence for those patients currently taking many separate tablets and also allow ready tailoring of a particular drug combination/drug release for the needs of an individual. The polypill here represents a cardiovascular treatment regime with the incorporation of an immediate release compartment with aspirin and hydrochlorothiazide and three sustained release compartments containing pravastatin, atenolol, and ramipril. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) were used to assess drug-excipient interaction. The printed polypills were evaluated for drug release using USP dissolution testing. We found that the polypill showed the intended immediate and sustained release profiles based upon the active/excipient ratio used.

  16. 3D CT-based high-dose-rate breast brachytherapy implants: treatment planning and quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Das, Rupak K; Patel, Rakesh; Shah, Hiral; Odau, Heath; Kuske, Robert R

    2004-07-15

    Although accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as the sole radiation modality after lumpectomy has shown promising results for select breast cancer patients, published experiences thus far have provided limited information on treatment planning methodology and quality assurance measures. A novel three-dimensional computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning method for accurate delineation and geometric coverage of the target volume is presented. A correlation between treatment volume and irradiation time has also been studied for quality assurance purposes. Between May 2002 and January 2003, 50 consecutive patients underwent an image-guided interstitial implant followed by CT-based treatment planning and were subsequently treated with APBI with a high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy remote afterloader. Target volume was defined as the lumpectomy cavity +2 cm margin modified to >/=5 mm to the skin surface. Catheter reconstruction, geometric optimization, and manual adjustment of irradiation time were done to optimally cover the target volume while minimizing hot spots. Dose homogeneity index (DHI) and percent of target volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose (32 Gy in 8 fractions or 34 Gy in 10 fractions) was determined. Additionally, the correlation between the treatment volume and irradiation time, source strength, and dose was then analyzed for manual verification of the HDR computer calculation. In all cases, the lumpectomy cavity was covered 100%. Target volume coverage was excellent with a median of 96%, and DHI had a median value of 0.7. For each plan, source strength times the treatment time for every unit of prescribed dose had an excellent agreement of +/-7% to the Manchester volume implant table corrected for modern units. CT-based treatment planning allowed excellent visualization of the lumpectomy cavity and normal structures, thereby improving target volume delineation and optimal coverage, relative to conventional orthogonal film

  17. 3D finite element analysis of nutrient distributions and cell viability in the intervertebral disc: effects of deformation and degeneration.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alicia R; Huang, Chun-Yuh C; Brown, Mark D; Gu, Wei Yong

    2011-09-01

    The intervertebral disc (IVD) receives important nutrients, such as glucose, from surrounding blood vessels. Poor nutritional supply is believed to play a key role in disc degeneration. Several investigators have presented finite element models of the IVD to investigate disc nutrition; however, none has predicted nutrient levels and cell viability in the disc with a realistic 3D geometry and tissue properties coupled to mechanical deformation. Understanding how degeneration and loading affect nutrition and cell viability is necessary for elucidating the mechanisms of disc degeneration and low back pain. The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of disc degeneration and static deformation on glucose distributions and cell viability in the IVD using finite element analysis. A realistic 3D finite element model of the IVD was developed based on mechano-electrochemical mixture theory. In the model, the cellular metabolic activities and viability were related to nutrient concentrations, and transport properties of nutrients were dependent on tissue deformation. The effects of disc degeneration and mechanical compression on glucose concentrations and cell density distributions in the IVD were investigated. To examine effects of disc degeneration, tissue properties were altered to reflect those of degenerated tissue, including reduced water content, fixed charge density, height, and endplate permeability. Two mechanical loading conditions were also investigated: a reference (undeformed) case and a 10% static deformation case. In general, nutrient levels decreased moving away from the nutritional supply at the disc periphery. Minimum glucose levels were at the interface between the nucleus and annulus regions of the disc. Deformation caused a 6.2% decrease in the minimum glucose concentration in the normal IVD, while degeneration resulted in an 80% decrease. Although cell density was not affected in the undeformed normal disc, there was a decrease in cell

  18. Advanced morphological 3D magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) scoring using a new isotropic 3D proton-density, turbo spin echo sequence with variable flip angle distribution (PD-SPACE) compared to an isotropic 3D steady-state free precession sequence (True-FISP) and standard 2D sequences.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Goetz H; Zak, Lukas; Mamisch, Tallal C; Paul, Dominik; Lauer, Lars; Mauerer, Andreas; Marlovits, Stefan; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate a new isotropic 3D proton-density, turbo-spin-echo sequence with variable flip-angle distribution (PD-SPACE) sequence compared to an isotropic 3D true-fast-imaging with steady-state-precession (True-FISP) sequence and 2D standard MR sequences with regard to the new 3D magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score. Sixty consecutive MR scans on 37 patients (age: 32.8 ± 7.9 years) after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) of the knee were prospectively included. The 3D MOCART score was assessed using the standard 2D sequences and the multiplanar-reconstruction (MPR) of both isotropic sequences. Statistical, Bonferroni-corrected correlation as well as subjective quality analysis were performed. The correlation of the different sequences was significant for the variables defect fill, cartilage interface, bone interface, surface, subchondral lamina, chondral osteophytes, and effusion (Pearson coefficients 0.514-0.865). Especially between the standard sequences and the 3D True-FISP sequence, the variables structure, signal intensity, subchondral bone, and bone marrow edema revealed lower, not significant, correlation values (0.242-0.383). Subjective quality was good for all sequences (P ≥ 0.05). Artifacts were most often visible on the 3D True-FISP sequence (P < 0.05). Different isotropic sequences can be used for the 3D evaluation of cartilage repair with the benefits of isotropic 3D MRI, MPR, and a significantly reduced scan time, where the 3D PD-SPACE sequence reveals the best results. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Solar Wind Heating as Revealed from the Variation of 3D Ion Velocity Distributions across the Magnetic Reconnection Exhaust Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection within current sheet has been regarded as one of the crucial dissipation and heating processes of coherent structures in the solar wind turbulence. Counter-streaming of ions is an important phenomenon in the reconnection exhaust region ranged from the ion diffusion region to the extended outflow region. It has been suggested by theoretical and numerical models that the ions are going to be picked up by the ejecting magnetic field and show larger T_perpendicular than T_parallel, if the guide field is strong enough (in other word, the shear angle is relatively low). The pick-up behavior seems to favor the heating of heavy ions with high mass-to-charge ratio, since the high M/Q ions have larger gyro-period/transit-time and tend to be non-adiabatic more easily. The above statements from theoretical models have not been thoroughly testified in the solar wind observations, though the changes in total temperature and 1D reduced velocity distribution function had been studied. Until now, it remains unclear about the difference of full 3D velocity distribution for the proton and helium ions between the upstream and the exhaust regions. Here, we will analyze the plasma measurement data from WIND/3DP to explore and compare the parallel and perpendicular heating effect of different species of ions. As a preliminary result, the proton is found to show bi-directional streams in its velocity distribution in some reconnection exhaust regions. The thermalization of the counter-streaming protons will be presented. The relation between proton T_parallel/T_perpendicular and guide field strength (or shear angle) will be studied. The velocity distributions of helium ions will be illustrated, which shows the difference of heating effect between different M/Q ratios.

  20. 3D modeling of gas/water distribution in water-bearing carbonate gas reservoirs: the Longwangmiao gas field, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Chenghua; Li, ChaoChun; Ma, Zhonggao

    2016-10-01

    A water-bearing carbonate gas reservoir is an important natural gas resource being developed worldwide. Due to the long-term water/rock/gas interaction during geological evolution, complex gas/water distribution has formed under the superposed effect of sedimentary facies, reservoir space facies and gravity difference of fluid facies. In view of these challenges, on the basis of the conventional three-stage modeling method, this paper presents a modelling method controlled by four-stage facies to develop 3D model of a water-bearing carbonate gas reservoir. Key to this method is the reservoir property modelling controlled by two-stage facies, and the fluid property modelling controlled by another two-stage facies. The prerequisite of this method is a reliable database obtained from solid geological investigation. On the basis of illustrating the principles of the modelling method controlled by four-stage facies, this paper further implements systematically modeling of the heterogeneous gas/water distribution of the Longwangmiao carbonate formation in the Moxi-Gaoshiti area, Sichuan basin, China.

  1. 3D Ion and Electron Distribution Function Measurements from the Fast Plasma Investigation on the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C. J.; Avanov, L. A.; Barrie, A. C.; Burch, J. L.; Chandler, M. O.; Clark, G. B.; Coffey, V. N.; Dickson, C.; Dorelli, J.; Ergun, R. E.; Fuselier, S. A.; Gershman, D. J.; Gliese, U.; Holland, M. P.; Jacques, A. D.; Kreisler, S.; Lavraud, B.; MacDonald, E.; Mauk, B.; Moore, T. E.; Mukai, T.; Nakamura, R.; Paterson, W. R.; Rager, A. C.; Saito, Y.; Salo, C.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Torbert, R. B.; Vinas, A. F.; Yokota, S.

    2015-12-01

    The primary focus of the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, launched in March 2015, is magnetic reconnection and associated processes. Understanding hinges critically on the kinetic physics that allows reconnection to take place. The Fast Plasma Investigation (FPI) provides electron