Science.gov

Sample records for 3d electron diffraction

  1. 3D printed diffractive terahertz lenses.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Walter D; Ferrando, Vicente; Monsoriu, Juan A; Zagrajek, Przemysław; Czerwińska, Elżbieta; Szustakowski, Mieczysław

    2016-04-15

    A 3D printer was used to realize custom-made diffractive THz lenses. After testing several materials, phase binary lenses with periodic and aperiodic radial profiles were designed and constructed in polyamide material to work at 0.625 THz. The nonconventional focusing properties of such lenses were assessed by computing and measuring their axial point spread function (PSF). Our results demonstrate that inexpensive 3D printed THz diffractive lenses can be reliably used in focusing and imaging THz systems. Diffractive THz lenses with unprecedented features, such as extended depth of focus or bifocalization, have been demonstrated. PMID:27082335

  2. Diffractive optical element for creating visual 3D images.

    PubMed

    Goncharsky, Alexander; Goncharsky, Anton; Durlevich, Svyatoslav

    2016-05-01

    A method is proposed to compute and synthesize the microrelief of a diffractive optical element to produce a new visual security feature - the vertical 3D/3D switch effect. The security feature consists in the alternation of two 3D color images when the diffractive element is tilted up/down. Optical security elements that produce the new security feature are synthesized using electron-beam technology. Sample optical security elements are manufactured that produce 3D to 3D visual switch effect when illuminated by white light. Photos and video records of the vertical 3D/3D switch effect of real optical elements are presented. The optical elements developed can be replicated using standard equipment employed for manufacturing security holograms. The new optical security feature is easy to control visually, safely protected against counterfeit, and designed to protect banknotes, documents, ID cards, etc. PMID:27137530

  3. Layered nano-gratings by electron beam writing to form 3-level diffractive optical elements for 3D phase-offset holographic lithography.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Liang Leon; Herman, Peter R

    2015-12-21

    A multi-level nanophotonic structure is a major goal in providing advanced optical functionalities as found in photonic crystals and metamaterials. A three-level nano-grating phase mask has been fabricated in an electron-beam resist (ma-N) to meet the requirement of holographic generation of a diamond-like 3D nanostructure in photoresist by a single exposure step. A 2D mask with 600 nm periodicity is presented for generating first order diffracted beams with a preferred π/2 phase shift on the X- and Y-axes and with sufficient 1(st) order diffraction efficiency of 3.5% at 800 nm wavelength for creating a 3D periodic nanostructure in SU-8 photoresist. The resulting 3D structure is anticipated to provide an 8% complete photonic band gap (PBG) upon silicon inversion. A thin SiO2 layer was used to isolate the grating layers and multiple spin-coating steps served to planarize the final resist layer. A reversible soft coating (aquaSAVE) was introduced to enable SEM inspection and verification of each insulating grating layer. This e-beam lithographic method is extensible to assembling multiple layers of a nanophotonic structure.

  4. A pseudo-3D approach based on electron backscatter diffraction and backscatter electron imaging to study the character of phase boundaries between Mg and long period stacking ordered phase in a Mg–2Y–Zn alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Afshar, Mehran Zaefferer, Stefan

    2015-03-15

    In Mg–2 at.% Y–1 at.% Zn alloys, the LPSO (Long Period Stacking Ordered) phase is important to improve mechanical properties of the material. The aim of this paper is to present a study on the phase boundary character in these two-phase alloys. Using EBSD pattern analysis it was found that the 24R structure is the dominant LPSO phase structure in the current alloy. The phase boundary character between the Mg matrix and the LPSO phase was investigated using an improved pseudo-3D EBSD (electron backscatter diffraction) technique in combination with BSE or SE (backscatter or secondary electron) imaging. A large amount of very low-angle phase boundaries was detected. The (0 0 0 2) plane in the Mg matrix which is parallel to the (0 0 0 24) plane in the LPSO phase was found to be the most frequent plane for these phase boundaries. This plane is supposed to be the habit plane of the eutectic co-solidification of the Mg matrix and the LPSO phase. - Highlights: • It is shown that for the investigated alloy the LPSO phase has mainly 24R crystal structure. • A new method is presented which allows accurate determination of the 5-parameter grain or phase boundary character. • It is found that the low-angle phase boundaries appearing in the alloy all have basal phase boundary planes.

  5. Ultrafast electron diffraction from aligned molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Centurion, Martin

    2015-08-17

    The aim of this project was to record time-resolved electron diffraction patterns of aligned molecules and to reconstruct the 3D molecular structure. The molecules are aligned non-adiabatically using a femtosecond laser pulse. A femtosecond electron pulse then records a diffraction pattern while the molecules are aligned. The diffraction patterns are then be processed to obtain the molecular structure.

  6. 3D Printed Terahertz Diffraction Gratings And Lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, A. D.; Constable, E.; Lewis, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    3D printing opens up an inexpensive, rapid, and versatile path to the fabrication of optical elements suited to the terahertz regime. The transmission of the plastics used in 3D printers, while generally decreasing with frequency, is usable over the range 0.1-2 THz. We have designed, fabricated, and tested regular and blazed gratings and aspherical lenses for operation at terahertz frequencies. We find that the measured performance matches our theoretical predictions.

  7. Lensfree diffractive tomography for the imaging of 3D cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Momey, F.; Berdeu, A.; Bordy, T.; Dinten, J.-M.; Marcel, F. Kermarrec; Picollet-D’hahan, N.; Gidrol, X.; Allier, C.

    2016-01-01

    New microscopes are needed to help realize the full potential of 3D organoid culture studies. In order to image large volumes of 3D organoid cultures while preserving the ability to catch every single cell, we propose a new imaging platform based on lensfree microscopy. We have built a lensfree diffractive tomography setup performing multi-angle acquisitions of 3D organoid culture embedded in Matrigel and developed a dedicated 3D holographic reconstruction algorithm based on the Fourier diffraction theorem. With this new imaging platform, we have been able to reconstruct a 3D volume as large as 21.5 mm3 of a 3D organoid culture of prostatic RWPE1 cells showing the ability of these cells to assemble in 3D intricate cellular network at the mesoscopic scale. Importantly, comparisons with 2D images show that it is possible to resolve single cells isolated from the main cellular structure with our lensfree diffractive tomography setup. PMID:27231600

  8. Lensfree diffractive tomography for the imaging of 3D cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Momey, F; Berdeu, A; Bordy, T; Dinten, J-M; Marcel, F Kermarrec; Picollet-D'hahan, N; Gidrol, X; Allier, C

    2016-03-01

    New microscopes are needed to help realize the full potential of 3D organoid culture studies. In order to image large volumes of 3D organoid cultures while preserving the ability to catch every single cell, we propose a new imaging platform based on lensfree microscopy. We have built a lensfree diffractive tomography setup performing multi-angle acquisitions of 3D organoid culture embedded in Matrigel and developed a dedicated 3D holographic reconstruction algorithm based on the Fourier diffraction theorem. With this new imaging platform, we have been able to reconstruct a 3D volume as large as 21.5 mm (3) of a 3D organoid culture of prostatic RWPE1 cells showing the ability of these cells to assemble in 3D intricate cellular network at the mesoscopic scale. Importantly, comparisons with 2D images show that it is possible to resolve single cells isolated from the main cellular structure with our lensfree diffractive tomography setup. PMID:27231600

  9. Evolution in boron-based GEM detectors for diffraction measurements: from planar to 3D converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, Giorgia; Perelli Cippo, Enrico; Croci, Gabriele; Muraro, Andrea; Schooneveld, Erik; Scherillo, Antonella; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Höglund, Carina; Hultman, Lars; Birch, Jens; Claps, Gerardo; Murtas, Fabrizio; Rebai, Marica; Tardocchi, Marco; Gorini, Giuseppe

    2016-11-01

    The so-called ‘3He-crisis’ has motivated the neutron detector community to undertake an intense R&D programme in order to develop technologies alternative to standard 3He tubes and suitable for neutron detection systems in future spallation sources such as the European spallation source (ESS). Boron-based GEM (gas electron multiplier) detectors are a promising ‘3He-free’ technology for thermal neutron detection in neutron scattering experiments. In this paper the evolution of boron-based GEM detectors from planar to 3D converters with an application in diffraction measurements is presented. The use of 3D converters coupled with GEMs allows for an optimization of the detector performances. Three different detectors were used for diffraction measurements on the INES instrument at the ISIS spallation source. The performances of the GEM-detectors are compared with those of conventional 3He tubes installed on the INES instrument. The conceptual detector with the 3D converter used in this paper reached a count rate per unit area of about 25% relative to the currently installed 3He tube. Its timing resolution is similar and the signal-to-background ratio (S/B) is 2 times lower.

  10. 3D electron microscopy of biological nanomachines: principles and applications.

    PubMed

    Sorzano, C O S; Jonic, S; Cottevieille, M; Larquet, E; Boisset, N; Marco, S

    2007-11-01

    Transmission electron microscopy is a powerful technique for studying the three-dimensional (3D) structure of a wide range of biological specimens. Knowledge of this structure is crucial for fully understanding complex relationships among macromolecular complexes and organelles in living cells. In this paper, we present the principles and main application domains of 3D transmission electron microscopy in structural biology. Moreover, we survey current developments needed in this field, and discuss the close relationship of 3D transmission electron microscopy with other experimental techniques aimed at obtaining structural and dynamical information from the scale of whole living cells to atomic structure of macromolecular complexes.

  11. Design and verification of diffractive optical elements for speckle generation of 3-D range sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Pei-Qin; Shih, Hsi-Fu; Chen, Jenq-Shyong; Wang, Yi-Shiang

    2016-09-01

    The optical projection using speckles is one of the structured light methods that have been applied to three-dimensional (3-D) range sensors. This paper investigates the design and fabrication of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) for generating the light field with uniformly distributed speckles. Based on the principles of computer generated holograms, the iterative Fourier transform algorithm was adopted for the DOE design. It was used to calculate the phase map for diffracting the incident laser beam into a goal pattern with distributed speckles. Four patterns were designed in the study. Their phase maps were first examined by a spatial light modulator and then fabricated on glass substrates by microfabrication processes. Finally, the diffraction characteristics of the fabricated devices were verified. The experimental results show that the proposed methods are applicable to the DOE design of 3-D range sensors. Furthermore, any expected diffraction area and speckle density could be possibly achieved according to the relations presented in the paper.

  12. Electron Diffraction Using Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bendersky, Leonid A.; Gayle, Frank W.

    2001-01-01

    Electron diffraction via the transmission electron microscope is a powerful method for characterizing the structure of materials, including perfect crystals and defect structures. The advantages of electron diffraction over other methods, e.g., x-ray or neutron, arise from the extremely short wavelength (≈2 pm), the strong atomic scattering, and the ability to examine tiny volumes of matter (≈10 nm3). The NIST Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory has a history of discovery and characterization of new structures through electron diffraction, alone or in combination with other diffraction methods. This paper provides a survey of some of this work enabled through electron microscopy. PMID:27500060

  13. Electron Diffraction Experiments using Laser Plasma Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Fill, E E; Trushin, S; Tommasini, R; Bruch, R

    2005-09-07

    We demonstrate that electrons emitted from a laser plasma can be used to generate diffraction patterns in reflection and transmission. The electrons are emitted in the direction of laser polarization with energies up to 100 keV. The broad electron energy spectrum makes possible the generation of a ''streaked'' diffraction pattern which allows recording fast processes in a single run.

  14. Femtosecond single-electron diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Lahme, S.; Kealhofer, C.; Krausz, F.; Baum, P.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction allows the tracking of atomic motion in real time, but space charge effects within dense electron packets are a problem for temporal resolution. Here, we report on time-resolved pump-probe diffraction using femtosecond single-electron pulses that are free from intra-pulse Coulomb interactions over the entire trajectory from the source to the detector. Sufficient average electron current is achieved at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz. Thermal load on the sample is avoided by minimizing the pump-probe area and by maximizing heat diffusion. Time-resolved diffraction from fibrous graphite polycrystals reveals coherent acoustic phonons in a nanometer-thick grain ensemble with a signal-to-noise level comparable to conventional multi-electron experiments. These results demonstrate the feasibility of pump-probe diffraction in the single-electron regime, where simulations indicate compressibility of the pulses down to few-femtosecond and attosecond duration. PMID:26798778

  15. Real-time visualization of 3-D dynamic microscopic objects using optical diffraction tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Kyung Sang; Park, Hyunjoo; Ye, Jong Chul; Park, Yongkeun

    2013-12-30

    3-D refractive index (RI) distribution is an intrinsic bio-marker for the chemical and structural information about biological cells. Here we develop an optical diffraction tomography technique for the real-time reconstruction of 3-D RI distribution, employing sparse angle illumination and a graphic processing unit (GPU) implementation. The execution time for the tomographic reconstruction is 0.21 s for 96(3) voxels, which is 17 times faster than that of a conventional approach. We demonstrated the real-time visualization capability with imaging the dynamics of Brownian motion of an anisotropic colloidal dimer and the dynamic shape change in a red blood cell upon shear flow.

  16. Correlated electron pseudopotentials for 3d-transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Trail, J. R. Needs, R. J.

    2015-02-14

    A recently published correlated electron pseudopotentials (CEPPs) method has been adapted for application to the 3d-transition metals, and to include relativistic effects. New CEPPs are reported for the atoms Sc − Fe, constructed from atomic quantum chemical calculations that include an accurate description of correlated electrons. Dissociation energies, molecular geometries, and zero-point vibrational energies of small molecules are compared with all electron results, with all quantities evaluated using coupled cluster singles doubles and triples calculations. The CEPPs give better results in the correlated-electron calculations than Hartree-Fock-based pseudopotentials available in the literature.

  17. Cryptotomography: reconstructing 3D Fourier intensities from randomly oriented single-shot diffraction patterns.

    PubMed

    Loh, N D; Bogan, M J; Elser, V; Barty, A; Boutet, S; Bajt, S; Hajdu, J; Ekeberg, T; Maia, F R N C; Schulz, J; Seibert, M M; Iwan, B; Timneanu, N; Marchesini, S; Schlichting, I; Shoeman, R L; Lomb, L; Frank, M; Liang, M; Chapman, H N

    2010-06-01

    We reconstructed the 3D Fourier intensity distribution of monodisperse prolate nanoparticles using single-shot 2D coherent diffraction patterns collected at DESY's FLASH facility when a bright, coherent, ultrafast x-ray pulse intercepted individual particles of random, unmeasured orientations. This first experimental demonstration of cryptotomography extended the expansion-maximization-compression framework to accommodate unmeasured fluctuations in photon fluence and loss of data due to saturation or background scatter. This work is an important step towards realizing single-shot diffraction imaging of single biomolecules.

  18. Cryptotomography: Reconstructing 3D Fourier Intensities from Randomly Oriented Single-Shot Diffraction Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, N. D.; Bogan, M. J.; Elser, V.; Barty, A.; Boutet, S.; Bajt, S.; Hajdu, J.; Ekeberg, T.; Maia, F. R. N. C.; Schulz, J.; Seibert, M. M.; Iwan, B.; Timneanu, N.; Marchesini, S.; Schlichting, I.; Shoeman, R. L.; Lomb, L.; Frank, M.; Liang, M.; Chapman, H. N.

    2010-06-01

    We reconstructed the 3D Fourier intensity distribution of monodisperse prolate nanoparticles using single-shot 2D coherent diffraction patterns collected at DESY’s FLASH facility when a bright, coherent, ultrafast x-ray pulse intercepted individual particles of random, unmeasured orientations. This first experimental demonstration of cryptotomography extended the expansion-maximization-compression framework to accommodate unmeasured fluctuations in photon fluence and loss of data due to saturation or background scatter. This work is an important step towards realizing single-shot diffraction imaging of single biomolecules.

  19. Cryptotomography: reconstructing 3D Fourier intensities from randomly oriented single-shot diffraction patterns.

    PubMed

    Loh, N D; Bogan, M J; Elser, V; Barty, A; Boutet, S; Bajt, S; Hajdu, J; Ekeberg, T; Maia, F R N C; Schulz, J; Seibert, M M; Iwan, B; Timneanu, N; Marchesini, S; Schlichting, I; Shoeman, R L; Lomb, L; Frank, M; Liang, M; Chapman, H N

    2010-06-01

    We reconstructed the 3D Fourier intensity distribution of monodisperse prolate nanoparticles using single-shot 2D coherent diffraction patterns collected at DESY's FLASH facility when a bright, coherent, ultrafast x-ray pulse intercepted individual particles of random, unmeasured orientations. This first experimental demonstration of cryptotomography extended the expansion-maximization-compression framework to accommodate unmeasured fluctuations in photon fluence and loss of data due to saturation or background scatter. This work is an important step towards realizing single-shot diffraction imaging of single biomolecules. PMID:20867179

  20. Analytical description of 3D optical pulse diffraction by a phase-shifted Bragg grating.

    PubMed

    Golovastikov, Nikita V; Bykov, Dmitry A; Doskolovich, Leonid L; Soifer, Victor A

    2016-08-22

    Diffraction of a three-dimensional (3D) spatiotemporal optical pulse by a phase-shifted Bragg grating (PSBG) is considered. The pulse diffraction is described in terms of signal transmission through a linear system with a transfer function determined by the reflection or transmission coefficient of the PSBG. Resonant approximations of the reflection and transmission coefficients of the PSBG as functions of the angular frequency and the in-plane component of the wave vector are obtained. Using these approximations, a hyperbolic partial differential equation (Klein-Gordon equation) describing a general class of transformations of the incident 3D pulse envelope is derived. A solution to this equation is found in the form of a convolution integral. The presented rigorous simulation results fully confirm the proposed theoretical description. The obtained results may find application in the design of new devices for spatiotemporal pulse shaping and for optical information processing and analog optical computing. PMID:27557167

  1. Electron diffraction by plasmon waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García de Abajo, F. J.; Barwick, B.; Carbone, F.

    2016-07-01

    An electron beam traversing a structured plasmonic field is shown to undergo diffraction with characteristic angular patterns of both elastic and inelastic outgoing electron components. In particular, a plasmonic grating (e.g., a standing wave formed by two counterpropagating plasmons in a thin film) produces diffraction orders of the same parity as the net number of exchanged plasmons. Large diffracted beam fractions are predicted to occur for realistic plasmon intensities in attainable geometries due to a combination of phase and amplitude changes locally imprinted on the passing electron wave. Our study opens vistas in the study of multiphoton exchanges between electron beams and evanescent optical fields with unexplored effects related to the transversal component of the electron wave function.

  2. High resolution diameter estimation of microthin wires by a novel 3D diffraction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Khushi; Lolla, Kameswara Rao

    2011-08-01

    Micro-thin wires are of significant importance to academia, research laboratories as well as industries engaged in micro-fabrication of products related to diverse fields like micromechanics, bio-instrumentation, optoelectronics etc. Critical dimension metrology of such wires often demands diameter estimation with tight tolerances. Amongst other measurement techniques, Optical Diffractometry under Fraunhofer approximation has emerged over years as a nondestructive, robust and precise technique for on-line diameter estimation of thin wires. However, it is observed that existing Fraunhofer models invariably result in experimental overestimation of wire diameter, leading to unacceptable error performances particularly for diameters below 50 μm. In this paper, a novel diffraction model based on Geometric theory is proposed and demonstrated to theoretically quantify this diameter overestimation. The proposed model utilizes hitherto unused paths-ways for the two lateral rays that contribute to the first diffraction minimum. Based the 3-D geometry of the suggested model, a new 'diffraction formulation' is proposed. The theoretical analysis reveals the following. For diffraction experiment, the Actual diameter of the diffracting wire is a function of four parameters: source wavelength 'λ', axial distance 'z', diffraction angle corresponding to first diffraction minimum 'θd' and a newly defined characteristic parameter 'm'. The analysis reveals further that the proposed characteristic parameter 'm' varies non-linearly with diameter and presents a dependence only on the experimentally measured diffraction angle 'θd'. Based on the proposed model, the communication reports for the first time, a novel diameter-inversion procedure which, not only corrects for the overestimated but also facilitates wire diameter-inversion with high resolution. Micro-thin metallic wires having diameters spanning the range 1-50 μm are examined. Experimental results are obtained that

  3. Recent progress in printed 2/3D electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, Andreas; Patter, Paul; Popovic, Karl; Blümel, Alexander; Sax, Stefan; Lenz, Martin; Glushko, Oleksandr; Cordill, Megan J.; List-Kratochvil, Emil J. W.

    2015-09-01

    New, energy-saving, efficient and cost-effective processing technologies such as 2D and 3D inkjet printing (IJP) for the production and integration of intelligent components will be opening up very interesting possibilities for industrial applications of molecular materials in the near future. Beyond the use of home and office based printers, "inkjet printing technology" allows for the additive structured deposition of photonic and electronic materials on a wide variety of substrates such as textiles, plastics, wood, stone, tiles or cardboard. Great interest also exists in applying IJP in industrial manufacturing such as the manufacturing of PCBs, of solar cells, printed organic electronics and medical products. In all these cases inkjet printing is a flexible (digital), additive, selective and cost-efficient material deposition method. Due to these advantages, there is the prospect that currently used standard patterning processes can be replaced through this innovative material deposition technique. A main issue in this research area is the formulation of novel functional inks or the adaptation of commercially available inks for specific industrial applications and/or processes. In this contribution we report on the design, realization and characterization of novel active and passive inkjet printed electronic devices including circuitry and sensors based on metal nanoparticle ink formulations and the heterogeneous integration into 2/3D printed demonstrators. The main emphasis of this paper will be on how to convert scientific inkjet knowledge into industrially relevant processes and applications.

  4. Computational-optical microscopy for 3D biological imaging beyond the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, Ginni

    In recent years, super-resolution imaging has become an important fluorescent microscopy tool. It has enabled imaging of structures smaller than the optical diffraction limit with resolution less than 50 nm. Extension to high-resolution volume imaging has been achieved by integration with various optical techniques. In this thesis, development of a fluorescent microscope to enable high resolution, extended depth, three dimensional (3D) imaging is discussed; which is achieved by integration of computational methods with optical systems. In the first part of the thesis, point spread function (PSF) engineering for volume imaging is discussed. A class of PSFs, referred to as double-helix (DH) PSFs, is generated. The PSFs exhibit two focused spots in the image plane which rotate about the optical axis, encoding depth in rotation of the image. These PSFs extend the depth-of-field up to a factor of ˜5. Precision performance of the DH-PSFs, based on an information theoretical analysis, is compared with other 3D methods with conclusion that the DH-PSFs provide the best precision and the longest depth-of-field. Out of various possible DH-PSFs, a suitable PSF is obtained for super-resolution microscopy. The DH-PSFs are implemented in imaging systems, such as a microscope, with a special phase modulation at the pupil plane. Surface-relief elements which are polarization-insensitive and ˜90% light efficient are developed for phase modulation. The photon-efficient DH-PSF microscopes thus developed are used, along with optimal position estimation algorithms, for tracking and super-resolution imaging in 3D. Imaging at depths-of-field of up to 2.5 microm is achieved without focus scanning. Microtubules were imaged with 3D resolution of (6, 9, 39) nm, which is in close agreement with the theoretical limit. A quantitative study of co-localization of two proteins in volume was conducted in live bacteria. In the last part of the thesis practical aspects of the DH-PSF microscope are

  5. Hybrid additive manufacturing of 3D electronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Wasley, T.; Nguyen, T. T.; Ta, V. D.; Shephard, J. D.; Stringer, J.; Smith, P.; Esenturk, E.; Connaughton, C.; Kay, R.

    2016-10-01

    A novel hybrid additive manufacturing (AM) technology combining digital light projection (DLP) stereolithography (SL) with 3D micro-dispensing alongside conventional surface mount packaging is presented in this work. This technology overcomes the inherent limitations of individual AM processes and integrates seamlessly with conventional packaging processes to enable the deposition of multiple materials. This facilitates the creation of bespoke end-use products with complex 3D geometry and multi-layer embedded electronic systems. Through a combination of four-point probe measurement and non-contact focus variation microscopy, it was identified that there was no obvious adverse effect of DLP SL embedding process on the electrical conductivity of printed conductors. The resistivity maintained to be less than 4  ×  10-4 Ω · cm before and after DLP SL embedding when cured at 100 °C for 1 h. The mechanical strength of SL specimens with thick polymerized layers was also identified through tensile testing. It was found that the polymerization thickness should be minimised (less than 2 mm) to maximise the bonding strength. As a demonstrator a polymer pyramid with embedded triple-layer 555 LED blinking circuitry was successfully fabricated to prove the technical viability.

  6. Rigorous 3-D coupled wave diffraction analysis of multiple superposed gratings in anisotropic media.

    PubMed

    Glytsis, E N; Gaylord, T K

    1989-06-15

    The diffraction by two planar slanted fringe gratings superposed in the same volume of an anisotropic medium is treated using rigorous 3-D vector coupled wave analysis. Arbitrary angle of incidence and polarization are included. Both phase and/or amplitude slanted gratings in anisotropic media are treated in the analysis. The external boundary regions can be either isotropic (for bulk applications) or uniaxial anisotropic (for integrated applications). Both forward- and backward-diffracted orders are characterized by a number pair (i(l),i(2)), where i(l) and i(2) are integers. The Floquet condition is discussed for the case of two superposed gratings. When the external regions are anisotropic, each diffracted order has an ordinary (O), and an extraordinary (E) component. The analysis is also generalized for an arbitrary number of superposed gratings. The numerical complexity is discussed. In the case of equal grating periodicities along the boundaries, the diffracted orders become degenerate in the external regions. In this case, an alternative analysis that utilizes a cascaded stack of unslanted gratings can be used. Limiting cases are also presented. The various Bragg conditions are identified and quantified. Sample calculations presented include the quantification of the crosstalk between two superposed gratings, the evaluation of the effects of coupled Bragg conditions in beam combining applications, design and analysis of a beam splitter and a beam combiner, demonstration of the use of a cascaded stack of unslanted gratings of constant modulation to represent two superposed gratings that have the same periodicity along the boundaries, and finally evaluation of the effect of the phase difference between two gratings. The same analysis applies in the limiting cases of isotropic materials, single slanted gratings, etc. Applications of this analysis include optical storage, optical digital truth table look-up processing, neural nets, optical interconnects, beam

  7. Perturbation theory in electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakken, L. N.; Marthinsen, K.; Hoeier, R.

    1992-12-01

    The Bloch-wave approach is used for discussing multiple inelastic electron scattering and higher-order perturbation theory in inelastic high-energy electron diffraction. In contrast to previous work, the present work describes three-dimensional diffraction so that higher-order Laue zone (HOLZ) effects are incorporated. Absorption is included and eigenvalues and eigenvectors are calculated from a structure matrix with the inclusion of an absorptive potential. Centrosymmetric as well as non-centrosymmetric crystal structures are allowed. An iteration method with a defined generalized propagation function for solving the inelastic coupling equations is described. It is shown that a similar iteration method with the same propagation function can be used for obtaining higher-order perturbation terms for the wave-function when a perturbation is added to the crystal potential. Finally, perturbation theory by matrix calculations when a general perturbation is added to the structure matrix is considered.

  8. Diffractive 3D XUV optics at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzhezinskaya, Maria; Firsov, Alexander; Erko, Alexei

    2014-09-01

    The 2-Dimensional and 3-Dimensional variable line spacing (VLS) gratings based on total external reflection give the unique possibility for spectroscopy and focusing in application to 4th and 5th generation synchrotron sources. We focus on the elaboration of novel approaches for design and fabrication of 3D VLS working in the entire energy range, from THz to hard X-rays. These optical elements have unique combination of properties and can operate at all XUV sources including Free Electron Lasers (FELs), Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) and High Harmonic Generators (HHGs). Such 3D DOEs are able to cover the energy range of up to 20 keV with energy resolution λ/Δλ ≥ 1000 for soft x-ray and λ/Δλ ≥ 10000 for hard x-ray. We fabricate 3D VLS for time-resolved spectroscopy (energy range 100 - 2000 eV, 7500-9500 eV), FELs and ERLs (energy range up to 3 keV), and HHGs (energy range 10 - 200 eV).

  9. Terahertz 3D printed diffractive lens matrices for field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays.

    PubMed

    Szkudlarek, Krzesimir; Sypek, Maciej; Cywiński, Grzegorz; Suszek, Jarosław; Zagrajek, Przemysław; Feduniewicz-Żmuda, Anna; Yahniuk, Ivan; Yatsunenko, Sergey; Nowakowska-Siwińska, Anna; Coquillat, Dominique; But, Dmytro B; Rachoń, Martyna; Węgrzyńska, Karolina; Skierbiszewski, Czesław; Knap, Wojciech

    2016-09-01

    We present the concept, the fabrication processes and the experimental results for materials and optics that can be used for terahertz field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays. More specifically, we propose 3D printed arrays of a new type - diffractive multi-zone lenses of which the performance is superior to that of previously used mono-zone diffractive or refractive elements and evaluate them with GaN/AlGaN field-effect transistor terahertz detectors. Experiments performed in the 300-GHz atmospheric window show that the lens arrays offer both a good efficiency and good uniformity, and may improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the terahertz field-effect transistor detectors by more than one order of magnitude. In practice, we tested 3 × 12 lens linear arrays with printed circuit board THz detector arrays used in postal security scanners and observed significant signal-to-noise improvements. Our results clearly show that the proposed technology provides a way to produce cost-effective, reproducible, flat optics for large-size field-effect transistor THz-detector focal plane arrays.

  10. Terahertz 3D printed diffractive lens matrices for field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays.

    PubMed

    Szkudlarek, Krzesimir; Sypek, Maciej; Cywiński, Grzegorz; Suszek, Jarosław; Zagrajek, Przemysław; Feduniewicz-Żmuda, Anna; Yahniuk, Ivan; Yatsunenko, Sergey; Nowakowska-Siwińska, Anna; Coquillat, Dominique; But, Dmytro B; Rachoń, Martyna; Węgrzyńska, Karolina; Skierbiszewski, Czesław; Knap, Wojciech

    2016-09-01

    We present the concept, the fabrication processes and the experimental results for materials and optics that can be used for terahertz field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays. More specifically, we propose 3D printed arrays of a new type - diffractive multi-zone lenses of which the performance is superior to that of previously used mono-zone diffractive or refractive elements and evaluate them with GaN/AlGaN field-effect transistor terahertz detectors. Experiments performed in the 300-GHz atmospheric window show that the lens arrays offer both a good efficiency and good uniformity, and may improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the terahertz field-effect transistor detectors by more than one order of magnitude. In practice, we tested 3 × 12 lens linear arrays with printed circuit board THz detector arrays used in postal security scanners and observed significant signal-to-noise improvements. Our results clearly show that the proposed technology provides a way to produce cost-effective, reproducible, flat optics for large-size field-effect transistor THz-detector focal plane arrays. PMID:27607620

  11. Advanced prior modeling for 3D bright field electron tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreehari, Suhas; Venkatakrishnan, S. V.; Drummy, Lawrence F.; Simmons, Jeffrey P.; Bouman, Charles A.

    2015-03-01

    Many important imaging problems in material science involve reconstruction of images containing repetitive non-local structures. Model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) could in principle exploit such redundancies through the selection of a log prior probability term. However, in practice, determining such a log prior term that accounts for the similarity between distant structures in the image is quite challenging. Much progress has been made in the development of denoising algorithms like non-local means and BM3D, and these are known to successfully capture non-local redundancies in images. But the fact that these denoising operations are not explicitly formulated as cost functions makes it unclear as to how to incorporate them in the MBIR framework. In this paper, we formulate a solution to bright field electron tomography by augmenting the existing bright field MBIR method to incorporate any non-local denoising operator as a prior model. We accomplish this using a framework we call plug-and-play priors that decouples the log likelihood and the log prior probability terms in the MBIR cost function. We specifically use 3D non-local means (NLM) as the prior model in the plug-and-play framework, and showcase high quality tomographic reconstructions of a simulated aluminum spheres dataset, and two real datasets of aluminum spheres and ferritin structures. We observe that streak and smear artifacts are visibly suppressed, and that edges are preserved. Also, we report lower RMSE values compared to the conventional MBIR reconstruction using qGGMRF as the prior model.

  12. Cryptotomography: reconstructing 3D Fourier intensities from randomly oriented single-shot diffraction patterns (CXIDB ID 9)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Loh, Ne-Te Duane

    2011-08-01

    These 2000 single-shot diffraction patterns include were either background-scattering only or hits (background-scattering plus diffraction signal from sub-micron ellipsoidal particles at random, undetermined orientations). Candidate hits were identified by eye, and the remainder were presumed as background. 54 usable, background-subtracted hits in this set (procedure in referenced article) were used to reconstruct the 3D diffraction intensities of the average ellipsoidal particle.

  13. 3-D wave propagation solution of a stable resonator, free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, A.; Cover, R. A.; Labbe, R. H.

    1983-11-01

    Rigorous numerical solutions of a stable resonator, free-electron laser are obtained using 3-D wave propagation algorithms in the presence of a radially and azimuthally varying gain. Assumptions of this time-independent formulation of the loaded-resonator cavity are discussed. Wave propagation in the cavity is performed by computing numerically the Fresnel-Kirchoff diffraction integral by the Gardner-Fresnel-Kirchoff algorithm. Results of steady-state numerical iterative solutions, in which both the gain and the optical fields achieve self-consistency throughout the resonator, are presented. These consist of: (1) mode pattern and (2) variations in gain with variations in the resonator parameters.

  14. A femtosecond electron diffraction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Baosheng; Zhang, Jie; Tian, Jinshou; Wang, Junfeng; Wu, Jianjun; Liu, Yunquan; Liu, Hulin

    2007-01-01

    The femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) is a unique method for the study of the changes of complex molecular structures, and has been specifically applied in the investigations of transient-optics, opto-physics, crystallography, and other fields. The FED system designed by the present group, consists of a 35nm Ag photocathode evaporated on an ultraviolet glass, an anode with a 0.1mm aperture, two pairs of deflection plate for the deflection of electron beams in X and Y directions, and the Y deflection plate can be used as a scanning plate while measuring the pulse width of electron beams, the double MCPs detector for the enhancing and detecting of electron image. The magnetic lens was used for the focusing of the electron beams, and the focal length is 125mm. The distance between the object(the photocathode) and the image(the sample) is 503mm, and the size of electron beams is smaller than 17microns after focusing, the convergence angle is of -0.075~0.075°, and the temporal resolution is better than 350fs.

  15. 3D Observation of GEMS by Electron Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuno, Junya; Miyake, Akira; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Messenger, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Amorphous silicates in chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) coming from comets are dominated by glass with embedded metal and sulfides (GEMS). GEMS grains are submicron-sized rounded objects (typically 100-500) nm in diameter) with anaometer-sized (10-50 nm) Fe-Ni metal and sulfide grains embedded in an amorphous silicate matrix. Several formation processes for GEMS grains have been proposed so far, but these models are still being debated [2-5]. Bradley et al. proposed that GEMS grains are interstellar silicate dust that survived various metamorphism or alteration processes in the protoplanetary disk and that they are amorphiation products of crystalline silicates in the interstellar medium by sputter-deposition of cosmic ray irradiation, similar to space weathering [2,4]. This consideration is based on the observation of nano-sized crystals (approximately 10 nm) called relict grains in GEMS grains and their shapes are pseudomorphs to the host GEMS grains. On the other hand, Keller and Messenger proposed that most GEMS formed in the protoplanetary disk as condensates from high temperature gas [3,5]. This model is based on the fact that most GEMS grains have solar isotopic compositions and have extremely heterogeneous and non-solar elemental compositions. Keller and Messenger (2011) also reported that amorphous silicates in GEMS grains are surrounded by sulfide grains, which formed as sulfidization of metallic iron grains located on the GEMS surface. The previous studies were performed with 2D observation by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or scanning TEM (STEM). In order to understand the structure of GEMS grains described above more clearly, we observed 3D structure of GEMS grains by electron tomography using a TEM/STEM (JEM-2100F, JEOL) at Kyoto University. Electron tomography gives not only 3D structures but also gives higher spatial resolution (approximately a few nm) than that in conventional 2D image, which is restricted by

  16. 3D Printing: 3D Printing of Shape Memory Polymers for Flexible Electronic Devices (Adv. Mater. 22/2016).

    PubMed

    Zarek, Matt; Layani, Michael; Cooperstein, Ido; Sachyani, Ela; Cohn, Daniel; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2016-06-01

    On page 4449, D. Cohn, S. Magdassi, and co-workers describe a general and facile method based on 3D printing of methacrylated macromonomers to fabricate shape-memory objects that can be used in flexible and responsive electrical circuits. Such responsive objects can be used in the fabrication of soft robotics, minimal invasive medical devices, sensors, and wearable electronics. The use of 3D printing overcomes the poor processing characteristics of thermosets and enables complex geometries that are not easily accessible by other techniques. PMID:27273436

  17. 3D Printing: 3D Printing of Shape Memory Polymers for Flexible Electronic Devices (Adv. Mater. 22/2016).

    PubMed

    Zarek, Matt; Layani, Michael; Cooperstein, Ido; Sachyani, Ela; Cohn, Daniel; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2016-06-01

    On page 4449, D. Cohn, S. Magdassi, and co-workers describe a general and facile method based on 3D printing of methacrylated macromonomers to fabricate shape-memory objects that can be used in flexible and responsive electrical circuits. Such responsive objects can be used in the fabrication of soft robotics, minimal invasive medical devices, sensors, and wearable electronics. The use of 3D printing overcomes the poor processing characteristics of thermosets and enables complex geometries that are not easily accessible by other techniques.

  18. Note: An improved 3D imaging system for electron-electron coincidence measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yun Fei; Lee, Suk Kyoung; Adhikari, Pradip; Herath, Thushani; Lingenfelter, Steven; Winney, Alexander H.; Li, Wen

    2015-09-15

    We demonstrate an improved imaging system that can achieve highly efficient 3D detection of two electrons in coincidence. The imaging system is based on a fast frame complementary metal-oxide semiconductor camera and a high-speed waveform digitizer. We have shown previously that this detection system is capable of 3D detection of ions and electrons with good temporal and spatial resolution. Here, we show that with a new timing analysis algorithm, this system can achieve an unprecedented dead-time (<0.7 ns) and dead-space (<1 mm) when detecting two electrons. A true zero dead-time detection is also demonstrated.

  19. Note: An improved 3D imaging system for electron-electron coincidence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yun Fei; Lee, Suk Kyoung; Adhikari, Pradip; Herath, Thushani; Lingenfelter, Steven; Winney, Alexander H.; Li, Wen

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate an improved imaging system that can achieve highly efficient 3D detection of two electrons in coincidence. The imaging system is based on a fast frame complementary metal-oxide semiconductor camera and a high-speed waveform digitizer. We have shown previously that this detection system is capable of 3D detection of ions and electrons with good temporal and spatial resolution. Here, we show that with a new timing analysis algorithm, this system can achieve an unprecedented dead-time (<0.7 ns) and dead-space (<1 mm) when detecting two electrons. A true zero dead-time detection is also demonstrated.

  20. An Electronic Analog of the Diffraction Grating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLeod, A. M.

    1978-01-01

    Gives an outline description of electronic circuitry which is analogous to the optical diffraction grating or to crystals used in the Bragg reflection of X-rays or electron waves, and explains how to use it. (Author/GA)

  1. Electron crystallography of ultrathin 3D protein crystals: atomic model with charges.

    PubMed

    Yonekura, Koji; Kato, Kazuyuki; Ogasawara, Mitsuo; Tomita, Masahiro; Toyoshima, Chikashi

    2015-03-17

    Membrane proteins and macromolecular complexes often yield crystals too small or too thin for even the modern synchrotron X-ray beam. Electron crystallography could provide a powerful means for structure determination with such undersized crystals, as protein atoms diffract electrons four to five orders of magnitude more strongly than they do X-rays. Furthermore, as electron crystallography yields Coulomb potential maps rather than electron density maps, it could provide a unique method to visualize the charged states of amino acid residues and metals. Here we describe an attempt to develop a methodology for electron crystallography of ultrathin (only a few layers thick) 3D protein crystals and present the Coulomb potential maps at 3.4-Å and 3.2-Å resolution, respectively, obtained from Ca(2+)-ATPase and catalase crystals. These maps demonstrate that it is indeed possible to build atomic models from such crystals and even to determine the charged states of amino acid residues in the Ca(2+)-binding sites of Ca(2+)-ATPase and that of the iron atom in the heme in catalase.

  2. Electron crystallography of ultrathin 3D protein crystals: Atomic model with charges

    PubMed Central

    Yonekura, Koji; Kato, Kazuyuki; Ogasawara, Mitsuo; Tomita, Masahiro; Toyoshima, Chikashi

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins and macromolecular complexes often yield crystals too small or too thin for even the modern synchrotron X-ray beam. Electron crystallography could provide a powerful means for structure determination with such undersized crystals, as protein atoms diffract electrons four to five orders of magnitude more strongly than they do X-rays. Furthermore, as electron crystallography yields Coulomb potential maps rather than electron density maps, it could provide a unique method to visualize the charged states of amino acid residues and metals. Here we describe an attempt to develop a methodology for electron crystallography of ultrathin (only a few layers thick) 3D protein crystals and present the Coulomb potential maps at 3.4-Å and 3.2-Å resolution, respectively, obtained from Ca2+-ATPase and catalase crystals. These maps demonstrate that it is indeed possible to build atomic models from such crystals and even to determine the charged states of amino acid residues in the Ca2+-binding sites of Ca2+-ATPase and that of the iron atom in the heme in catalase. PMID:25730881

  3. Computational 3D reconstructions by optimization for cryo-electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhye; Zheng, Yili; Doerschuk, Peter C.; Johnson, John E.

    2003-06-01

    An algorithm for the simultaneous 3-D reconstruction of several types of object, where each type of object may possibly have a rotational symmetry, from 2-D projection images, where for each image the type of object imaged, the projection orientation used to create the image, and the location of the object in the image are unknown, is described. The motivating application is the determination of the 3-D structure of small spherical viruses from cryo electron microscopy images. The algorithm is a maximum likelihood estimator which is computed by expectation maximization (EM). Due to the structure of the statistical model, the maximization step of EM can be easily computed but the expectation step requires 5-D numerical quadrature. The computational burden of the quadratures necessitates parallel computation and three different implementations of two different types of parallelism have been developed using pthreads (for shared memory processors) and MPI (for distributed memory processors). An example applying one of the MPI implementations, running on a 32 node PC cluster, to experimental images of Flock House Virus with comparison to the x-ray crystal diffraction structure of the virus is described.

  4. Crystal structure refinement from electron diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Dudka, A. P. Avilov, A. S.; Lepeshov, G. G.

    2008-05-15

    A procedure of crystal structure refinement from electron diffraction data is described. The electron diffraction data on polycrystalline films are processed taking into account possible overlap of reflections and two-beam interaction. The diffraction from individual single crystals in an electron microscope equipped with a precession attachment is described using the Bloch-wave method, which takes into account multibeam scattering, and a special approach taking into consideration the specific features of the diffraction geometry in the precession technique. Investigations were performed on LiF, NaF, CaF{sub 2}, and Si crystals. A method for reducing experimental data, which allows joint electron and X-ray diffraction study, is proposed.

  5. The 3d International Workshop on Computational Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodnick, Stephen M.

    1994-09-01

    The Third International Workshop on Computational Electronics (IWCE) was held at the Benson Hotel in downtown Portland, Oregon, on May 18, 19, and 20, 1994. The workshop was devoted to a broad range of topics in computational electronics related to the simulation of electronic transport in semiconductors and semiconductor devices, particularly those which use large computational resources. The workshop was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Office of Naval Research and the Army Research Office, as well as local support from the Oregon Joint Graduate Schools of Engineering and the Oregon Center for Advanced Technology Education. There were over 100 participants in the Portland workshop, of which more than one quarter represented research groups outside of the United States from Austria, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. There were a total 81 papers presented at the workshop, 9 invited talks, 26 oral presentations and 46 poster presentations. The emphasis of the contributions reflected the interdisciplinary nature of computational electronics with researchers from the Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Physics communities participating in the workshop.

  6. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Electron Diffraction with Megavolt Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, J.B.; Rudakov, F.M.; Dowell, D.H.; Schmerge, J.F.; Cardoza, J.D.; Castro, J.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Loos, H.; Weber, P.M.; /Brown U.

    2006-10-24

    An rf photocathode electron gun is used as an electron source for ultrafast time-resolved pump-probe electron diffraction. We observed single-shot diffraction patterns from a 160 nm Al foil using the 5.4 MeV electron beam from the Gun Test Facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Excellent agreement with simulations suggests that single-shot diffraction experiments with a time resolution approaching 100 fs are possible.

  7. High performance computing for a 3-D optical diffraction tomographic application in fluid velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Lobera, Julia; Ortega, Gloria; García, Inmaculada; Arroyo, María del Pilar; Garzón, Ester M

    2015-02-23

    Optical Diffraction Tomography has been recently introduced in fluid velocimetry to provide three dimensional information of seeding particle locations. In general, image reconstruction methods at visible wavelengths have to account for diffraction. Linear approximation has been used for three-dimensional image reconstruction, but a non-linear and iterative reconstruction method is required when multiple scattering is not negligible. Non-linear methods require the solution of the Helmholtz equation, computationally highly demanding due to the size of the problem. The present work shows the results of a non-linear method customized for spherical particle location using GPU computing and a made-to-measure storing format.

  8. 3D imaging of sea quarks and gluons at an electron-ion collider

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim Guzey

    2011-11-01

    We outline key objectives and capabilities of an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) — a high-energy and high-luminosity electron-proton/nucleus collider with polarized electron and proton beams. One of goals of a future EIC is to map the 3D (in configuration and momentum spaces) structure of sea quarks and gluons in the nucleon and nuclei. We briefly present and discuss key observables and measurements pertaining to the program of 3D imaging at an EIC.

  9. Imaging Coherent Electronic Motion in Atoms by Ultrafast Electron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hua-Chieh; Starace, Anthony F.

    2014-05-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction from time-varying coherent electronic states of the H atom is investigated. Electron diffraction from coherent electronic states exhibiting breathing and wiggling modes of electronic motion are simulated in order to demonstrate the capability of attosecond electron pulses to image electron dynamics. A theoretical analysis identifies the conditions necessary to obtain time-resolved measurements. The scattering patterns and their temporal behaviors are shown to differentiate the two kinds of target electronic motion. Moreover, our simulations show that inelastic processes contribute significantly to the diffraction patterns. Thus although the diffraction patterns clearly distinguish different modes of target electronic motion, they cannot be easily related to the time-dependent target charge density. Finally, we note that detection of the scattered electron energy can provide more information on time-dependent target electronic motion. This work is supported in part by AFOSR Award No. FA9550-12-1-0149.

  10. A new 3D shape precision measurement system calibration method based on non-diffraction grating structured light projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ya; Zhou, Liping; Li, Wenlong; Gan, Jianghong; Xu, Long

    2016-03-01

    Phase calculation-based fringe projection techniques are widely used in three-dimensional shape measurement fields to obtain the 3D shape data of the object's surface. One important step of the phase calculation is calibration, which determines the relationship between the image phase and depth information. The traditional calibration methods are too complex and require many parameters. In this paper, model of 3D shape precision calibration method based on non-diffraction grating structured light fringes projection is proposed, which is consist of camera model, fringe phase obtaining, height-phase relationship model. This method is simple, convenient and there is no approximation in it, which can satisfy the precision measurement.

  11. Imaging coherent electronic motion in atoms by ultrafast electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hua-Chieh; Starace, Anthony F.

    2013-12-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction from time-varying coherent electronic states of the H atom is analyzed theoretically. This theoretical analysis identifies the conditions necessary to obtain time-resolved measurements. Electron diffraction from coherent electronic states exhibiting breathing and wiggling modes of electronic motion are simulated numerically in order to demonstrate the capability of attosecond electron pulses to image electron dynamics. The scattering patterns and their temporal behaviors are shown to differentiate the two kinds of target electronic motion. Moreover, our simulations show that inelastic processes contribute significantly to the diffraction patterns. Thus, although the diffraction patterns clearly distinguish different modes of target electronic motion, they cannot be easily related to the time-dependent target charge density.

  12. Fast spatial beam shaping by acousto-optic diffraction for 3D non-linear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Akemann, Walther; Léger, Jean-François; Ventalon, Cathie; Mathieu, Benjamin; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Acousto-optic deflection (AOD) devices offer unprecedented fast control of the entire spatial structure of light beams, most notably their phase. AOD light modulation of ultra-short laser pulses, however, is not straightforward to implement because of intrinsic chromatic dispersion and non-stationarity of acousto-optic diffraction. While schemes exist to compensate chromatic dispersion, non-stationarity remains an obstacle. In this work we demonstrate an efficient AOD light modulator for stable phase modulation using time-locked generation of frequency-modulated acoustic waves at the full repetition rate of a high power laser pulse amplifier of 80 kHz. We establish the non-local relationship between the optical phase and the generating acoustic frequency function and verify the system for temporal stability, phase accuracy and generation of non-linear two-dimensional phase functions. PMID:26561090

  13. Diffractive control of 3D multifilamentation in fused silica with micrometric resolution.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Yero, Omel; Carbonell-Leal, Miguel; Doñate-Buendía, Carlos; Mínguez-Vega, Gladys; Lancis, Jesús

    2016-07-11

    We show that a simple diffractive phase element (DPE) can be used to manipulate at will the positions and energy of multiple filaments generated in fused silica under femtosecond pulsed illumination. The method allows obtaining three-dimensional distributions of controlled filaments whose separations can be in the order of few micrometers. With such small distances we are able to study the mutual coherence among filaments from the resulted interference pattern, without needing a two-arm interferometer. The encoding of the DPE into a phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM) provides an extra degree of freedom to the optical set-up, giving more versatility for implementing different DPEs in real time. Our proposal might be particularly suited for applications at which an accurate manipulation of multiple filaments is required. PMID:27410807

  14. Fast spatial beam shaping by acousto-optic diffraction for 3D non-linear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Akemann, Walther; Léger, Jean-François; Ventalon, Cathie; Mathieu, Benjamin; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Acousto-optic deflection (AOD) devices offer unprecedented fast control of the entire spatial structure of light beams, most notably their phase. AOD light modulation of ultra-short laser pulses, however, is not straightforward to implement because of intrinsic chromatic dispersion and non-stationarity of acousto-optic diffraction. While schemes exist to compensate chromatic dispersion, non-stationarity remains an obstacle. In this work we demonstrate an efficient AOD light modulator for stable phase modulation using time-locked generation of frequency-modulated acoustic waves at the full repetition rate of a high power laser pulse amplifier of 80 kHz. We establish the non-local relationship between the optical phase and the generating acoustic frequency function and verify the system for temporal stability, phase accuracy and generation of non-linear two-dimensional phase functions.

  15. High Energy Electron Diffraction from Transverse Stacking Faults.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesson, David Edward

    1987-12-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The principal aim of this work is to study electron diffraction phenomena associated with high symmetry zone axes of crystals which contain transverse stacking faults. A theory is developed to describe diffraction effects visible in convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) patterns obtained from faulted crystals. In particular, it is shown that the idea of Bloch wave excitation transfers is of importance in understanding the origin of the diffraction phenomena. Three-dimensional (3D) diffraction is treated under pseudo-kinematic assumptions and an expression is derived for the higher order Laue zone (HOLZ) intensity profile associated with a single fault. As a basis for studying the faulted crystal, CBED patterns are obtained from perfect samples of the layered structure 2Hb MoS_2. Wide angle CBED (WACBED) results are simulated computationally and understood in terms of the dispersion surface construction. In particular, the relationship between HOLZ intensities and kinematic structure factors is investigated for the 2Hb polytype. In the case of faulted crystals, it is shown how the projected displacement vector can be determined from the symmetry of zone axis patterns (ZAP's). The sensitivity of pattern features to fault depth is examined by computer simulation and in some cases it is found useful to describe the excitation transfers in terms of tight binding functions. The phenomenon of HOLZ line splitting is clarified and it is shown how 3D diffraction can be used to provide information on the full displacement vector, including the non-zero layer component. Finally, absorption effects are shown to be important in simulating HOLZ intensity profiles from faulted crystals.

  16. Angular distribution of Auger electrons due to 3d-shell impact ionization of krypton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1977-01-01

    Cross sections for electron impact ionization of krypton due to ejection of a 3d-shell electron have been calculated using screened hydrogenic and Hartree-Slater wavefunctions for the target atom. While the total ionization cross sections in the two approximations are within 10% of each other, the Auger electron angular distribution, related to cross sections for specific magnetic quantum numbers of the 3d electrons, are widely different in the two approximations. The angular distribution due to the Hartree-Slater approximation is in excellent agreement with measurement. The physical reason for the discrepancies in the two approximations is explained.

  17. Application of Electron Diffraction to Biological Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Glaeser, Robert M.; Thomas, Gareth

    1969-01-01

    Three methods by which electron diffraction may be applied to problems in electron microscopy are discussed from a fundamental point of view, and experimental applications with biological specimens are demonstrated for each case. It is shown that wide-angle electron diffraction provides valuable information for evaluating specimen damage that can occur either during specimen preparation or while in the electron beam. Dark-field electron microscopy can be used both to enhance the image contrast and to provide highly restricted and therefore highly specific information about the object. Low-angle electron diffraction provides quantitative information about the object structure in the range from 20 A to ∼ 1000 A. Lowangle electron diffraction also demonstrates the important role of Fourier contrast with biological specimens, which are usually characterized by structural features with dimensions of 20 A or larger. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 13 PMID:4896898

  18. Femtosecond Electron Diffraction and Shadow Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherson, David

    2009-10-01

    Using femtosecond electron pulses as an imaging tool, we can probe ultrafast dynamics by taking snapshots at different time delays. By using femtosecond electron diffraction (FED), we can examine structural dynamics at the atomic level in real time, and study the structure-function correlation. Additionally, femtosecond electron shadow imaging (FESI) can explore the dynamics of laser induced plasmas off the surfaces of conductors, semiconductors, and insulators.

  19. Effect of 3d doping on the electronic structure of BaFe2As2

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, John A.; Buling, A.; Green, R.J.; Boyko, T.D.; Skorikov, N.A.; Kurmaev, E.Z.; Neumann, M.; Finkelstein, L.D.; Ni, Ni; Thaler, Alexander; Budko, Serguei L.; Canfield, Paul; Moewes, A.

    2012-04-25

    The electronic structure of BaFe2As2 doped with Co, Ni and Cu has been studied by a variety of experimental and theoretical methods, but a clear picture of the dopant 3d states has not yet emerged. Herein we provide experimental evidence of the distribution of Co, Ni and Cu 3d states in the valence band. We conclude that the Co and Ni 3d states provide additional free carriers to the Fermi level, while the Cu 3d states are found at the bottom of the valence band in a localized 3d10 shell. These findings help shed light on why superconductivity can occur in BaFe2As2 doped with Co and Ni but not Cu.

  20. Three-dimensional electronic unpacking of packed bags using 3-D CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Samuel M.; Crawford, Carl R.; Boyd, Douglas P.

    2009-02-01

    We present a 3-D electronic unpacking technique for airport security images based on volume rendering techniques developed for medical applications. Two electronic unpacking techniques are presented: (1) object-based unpacking and (2) unpacking by bag-slicing. Both techniques provide photo-realistic 3-D views of contents inside a packed bag with clearly marked threats. For the object-based unpacking, the 3-D objects within packed bags are unpacked (or isolated) though object selection tools that cut away undesired regions to isolates the 3-D object from the background clutter. With this selection tool, the operator is able to electronically unpack various 3-D objects and manipulate (rotate and zoom) the 3-D photo-realistic views for the immediate classification of the suspect object. The unpacking by bag-slicing technique places arbitrary cut planes to show the content beyond the cut plane that can be stepped forward or backward electronically. The methods may be used to reduce the need for manual unpacking of suitcases.

  1. Nanoparticle imaging. 3D structure of individual nanocrystals in solution by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungwon; Elmlund, Hans; Ercius, Peter; Yuk, Jong Min; Limmer, David T; Chen, Qian; Kim, Kwanpyo; Han, Sang Hoon; Weitz, David A; Zettl, A; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2015-07-17

    Knowledge about the synthesis, growth mechanisms, and physical properties of colloidal nanoparticles has been limited by technical impediments. We introduce a method for determining three-dimensional (3D) structures of individual nanoparticles in solution. We combine a graphene liquid cell, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, a direct electron detector, and an algorithm for single-particle 3D reconstruction originally developed for analysis of biological molecules. This method yielded two 3D structures of individual platinum nanocrystals at near-atomic resolution. Because our method derives the 3D structure from images of individual nanoparticles rotating freely in solution, it enables the analysis of heterogeneous populations of potentially unordered nanoparticles that are synthesized in solution, thereby providing a means to understand the structure and stability of defects at the nanoscale. PMID:26185247

  2. 3D structure of individual nanocrystals in solution by electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jungwon; Elmlund, Hans; Ercius, Peter; Yuk, Jong Min; Limmer, David T.; Chen, Qian; Kim, Kwanpyo; Han, Sang Hoon; Weitz, David A.; Zettl, A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge about the synthesis, growth mechanisms, and physical properties of colloidal nanoparticles has been limited by technical impediments. We introduce a method for determining three-dimensional (3D) structures of individual nanoparticles in solution. We combine a graphene liquid cell, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, a direct electron detector, and an algorithm for single-particle 3D reconstruction originally developed for analysis of biological molecules. This method yielded two 3D structures of individual platinum nanocrystals at near-atomic resolution. Because our method derives the 3D structure from images of individual nanoparticles rotating freely in solution, it enables the analysis of heterogeneous populations of potentially unordered nanoparticles that are synthesized in solution, thereby providing a means to understand the structure and stability of defects at the nanoscale.

  3. 3D Modeling Activity for Novel High Power Electron Guns at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, Anatoly

    2003-07-29

    The next generation of powerful electronic devices requires new approaches to overcome the known limitations of existing tube technology. Multi-beam and sheet beam approaches are novel concepts for the high power microwave devices. Direct and indirect modeling methods are being developed at SLAC to meet the new requirements in the 3D modeling. The direct method of solving of Poisson's equations for the multi-beam and sheet beam guns is employed in the TOPAZ 3D tool. The combination of TOPAZ 2D and EGUN (in the beginning) with MAFIA 3D and MAGIC 3D (at the end) is used in an indirect method to model the high power electron guns. Both methods complement each other to get reliable representation of the beam trajectories. Several gun ideas are under consideration at the present time. The collected results of these simulations are discussed.

  4. Analysis of the 3D distribution of stacked self-assembled quantum dots by electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The 3D distribution of self-assembled stacked quantum dots (QDs) is a key parameter to obtain the highest performance in a variety of optoelectronic devices. In this work, we have measured this distribution in 3D using a combined procedure of needle-shaped specimen preparation and electron tomography. We show that conventional 2D measurements of the distribution of QDs are not reliable, and only 3D analysis allows an accurate correlation between the growth design and the structural characteristics. PMID:23249477

  5. A simple, low-cost conductive composite material for 3D printing of electronic sensors.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Simon J; Bradley, Robert J; Purssell, Christopher P; Billson, Duncan R; Hutchins, David A

    2012-01-01

    3D printing technology can produce complex objects directly from computer aided digital designs. The technology has traditionally been used by large companies to produce fit and form concept prototypes ('rapid prototyping') before production. In recent years however there has been a move to adopt the technology as full-scale manufacturing solution. The advent of low-cost, desktop 3D printers such as the RepRap and Fab@Home has meant a wider user base are now able to have access to desktop manufacturing platforms enabling them to produce highly customised products for personal use and sale. This uptake in usage has been coupled with a demand for printing technology and materials able to print functional elements such as electronic sensors. Here we present formulation of a simple conductive thermoplastic composite we term 'carbomorph' and demonstrate how it can be used in an unmodified low-cost 3D printer to print electronic sensors able to sense mechanical flexing and capacitance changes. We show how this capability can be used to produce custom sensing devices and user interface devices along with printed objects with embedded sensing capability. This advance in low-cost 3D printing with offer a new paradigm in the 3D printing field with printed sensors and electronics embedded inside 3D printed objects in a single build process without requiring complex or expensive materials incorporating additives such as carbon nanotubes. PMID:23185319

  6. A simple, low-cost conductive composite material for 3D printing of electronic sensors.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Simon J; Bradley, Robert J; Purssell, Christopher P; Billson, Duncan R; Hutchins, David A

    2012-01-01

    3D printing technology can produce complex objects directly from computer aided digital designs. The technology has traditionally been used by large companies to produce fit and form concept prototypes ('rapid prototyping') before production. In recent years however there has been a move to adopt the technology as full-scale manufacturing solution. The advent of low-cost, desktop 3D printers such as the RepRap and Fab@Home has meant a wider user base are now able to have access to desktop manufacturing platforms enabling them to produce highly customised products for personal use and sale. This uptake in usage has been coupled with a demand for printing technology and materials able to print functional elements such as electronic sensors. Here we present formulation of a simple conductive thermoplastic composite we term 'carbomorph' and demonstrate how it can be used in an unmodified low-cost 3D printer to print electronic sensors able to sense mechanical flexing and capacitance changes. We show how this capability can be used to produce custom sensing devices and user interface devices along with printed objects with embedded sensing capability. This advance in low-cost 3D printing with offer a new paradigm in the 3D printing field with printed sensors and electronics embedded inside 3D printed objects in a single build process without requiring complex or expensive materials incorporating additives such as carbon nanotubes.

  7. A Simple, Low-Cost Conductive Composite Material for 3D Printing of Electronic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, Simon J.; Bradley, Robert J.; Purssell, Christopher P.; Billson, Duncan R.; Hutchins, David A.

    2012-01-01

    3D printing technology can produce complex objects directly from computer aided digital designs. The technology has traditionally been used by large companies to produce fit and form concept prototypes (‘rapid prototyping’) before production. In recent years however there has been a move to adopt the technology as full-scale manufacturing solution. The advent of low-cost, desktop 3D printers such as the RepRap and Fab@Home has meant a wider user base are now able to have access to desktop manufacturing platforms enabling them to produce highly customised products for personal use and sale. This uptake in usage has been coupled with a demand for printing technology and materials able to print functional elements such as electronic sensors. Here we present formulation of a simple conductive thermoplastic composite we term ‘carbomorph’ and demonstrate how it can be used in an unmodified low-cost 3D printer to print electronic sensors able to sense mechanical flexing and capacitance changes. We show how this capability can be used to produce custom sensing devices and user interface devices along with printed objects with embedded sensing capability. This advance in low-cost 3D printing with offer a new paradigm in the 3D printing field with printed sensors and electronics embedded inside 3D printed objects in a single build process without requiring complex or expensive materials incorporating additives such as carbon nanotubes. PMID:23185319

  8. Electron energy loss and diffraction of backscattered electrons from silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, Aimo; Aizel, Koceila; Vos, Maarten

    2010-05-01

    Electrons backscattered from crystals can show Kikuchi patterns: variations in intensity for different outgoing directions due to diffraction by the lattice. Here, we measure these effects as a function of their energy loss for 30 keV electrons backscattered from silicon. The change in diffraction contrast with energy loss depends strongly on the scattering geometry. At steep incidence on the sample, diffraction contrast in the observed Kikuchi bands decreases rapidly with energy loss. For an energy loss larger than about 150 eV the contrast is more than 5 times less than the contrast due to electrons near zero energy loss. However, for grazing incidence angles, maximum Kikuchi band contrast is observed for electrons with an energy loss near 60 eV, where the contrast is more than 2.5× larger than near zero energy loss. In addition, in this grazing incidence geometry, the Kikuchi diffraction effects stay significant even for electrons that have lost hundreds of electron volts. For the maximum measured energy loss of 440 eV, the electrons still show a contrast that is 1.5 × larger than that of the electrons near zero energy loss. These geometry-dependent observations of Kikuchi band diffraction contrast are interpreted based on the elastic and inelastic scattering properties of electrons and dynamical diffraction simulations.

  9. High-purity 3D nano-objects grown by focused-electron-beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdoba, Rosa; Sharma, Nidhi; Kölling, Sebastian; Koenraad, Paul M.; Koopmans, Bert

    2016-09-01

    To increase the efficiency of current electronics, a specific challenge for the next generation of memory, sensing and logic devices is to find suitable strategies to move from two- to three-dimensional (3D) architectures. However, the creation of real 3D nano-objects is not trivial. Emerging non-conventional nanofabrication tools are required for this purpose. One attractive method is focused-electron-beam induced deposition (FEBID), a direct-write process of 3D nano-objects. Here, we grow 3D iron and cobalt nanopillars by FEBID using diiron nonacarbonyl Fe2(CO)9, and dicobalt octacarbonyl Co2(CO)8, respectively, as starting materials. In addition, we systematically study the composition of these nanopillars at the sub-nanometer scale by atom probe tomography, explicitly mapping the homogeneity of the radial and longitudinal composition distributions. We show a way of fabricating high-purity 3D vertical nanostructures of ∼50 nm in diameter and a few micrometers in length. Our results suggest that the purity of such 3D nanoelements (above 90 at% Fe and above 95 at% Co) is directly linked to their growth regime, in which the selected deposition conditions are crucial for the final quality of the nanostructure. Moreover, we demonstrate that FEBID and the proposed characterization technique not only allow for growth and chemical analysis of single-element structures, but also offers a new way to directly study 3D core–shell architectures. This straightforward concept could establish a promising route to the design of 3D elements for future nano-electronic devices.

  10. High-purity 3D nano-objects grown by focused-electron-beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdoba, Rosa; Sharma, Nidhi; Kölling, Sebastian; Koenraad, Paul M.; Koopmans, Bert

    2016-09-01

    To increase the efficiency of current electronics, a specific challenge for the next generation of memory, sensing and logic devices is to find suitable strategies to move from two- to three-dimensional (3D) architectures. However, the creation of real 3D nano-objects is not trivial. Emerging non-conventional nanofabrication tools are required for this purpose. One attractive method is focused-electron-beam induced deposition (FEBID), a direct-write process of 3D nano-objects. Here, we grow 3D iron and cobalt nanopillars by FEBID using diiron nonacarbonyl Fe2(CO)9, and dicobalt octacarbonyl Co2(CO)8, respectively, as starting materials. In addition, we systematically study the composition of these nanopillars at the sub-nanometer scale by atom probe tomography, explicitly mapping the homogeneity of the radial and longitudinal composition distributions. We show a way of fabricating high-purity 3D vertical nanostructures of ˜50 nm in diameter and a few micrometers in length. Our results suggest that the purity of such 3D nanoelements (above 90 at% Fe and above 95 at% Co) is directly linked to their growth regime, in which the selected deposition conditions are crucial for the final quality of the nanostructure. Moreover, we demonstrate that FEBID and the proposed characterization technique not only allow for growth and chemical analysis of single-element structures, but also offers a new way to directly study 3D core-shell architectures. This straightforward concept could establish a promising route to the design of 3D elements for future nano-electronic devices.

  11. PF2fit: Polar Fast Fourier Matched Alignment of Atomistic Structures with 3D Electron Microscopy Maps.

    PubMed

    Bettadapura, Radhakrishna; Rasheed, Muhibur; Vollrath, Antje; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2015-10-01

    There continue to be increasing occurrences of both atomistic structure models in the PDB (possibly reconstructed from X-ray diffraction or NMR data), and 3D reconstructed cryo-electron microscopy (3D EM) maps (albeit at coarser resolution) of the same or homologous molecule or molecular assembly, deposited in the EMDB. To obtain the best possible structural model of the molecule at the best achievable resolution, and without any missing gaps, one typically aligns (match and fits) the atomistic structure model with the 3D EM map. We discuss a new algorithm and generalized framework, named PF(2) fit (Polar Fast Fourier Fitting) for the best possible structural alignment of atomistic structures with 3D EM. While PF(2) fit enables only a rigid, six dimensional (6D) alignment method, it augments prior work on 6D X-ray structure and 3D EM alignment in multiple ways: Scoring. PF(2) fit includes a new scoring scheme that, in addition to rewarding overlaps between the volumes occupied by the atomistic structure and 3D EM map, rewards overlaps between the volumes complementary to them. We quantitatively demonstrate how this new complementary scoring scheme improves upon existing approaches. PF(2) fit also includes two scoring functions, the non-uniform exterior penalty and the skeleton-secondary structure score, and implements the scattering potential score as an alternative to traditional Gaussian blurring. Search. PF(2) fit utilizes a fast polar Fourier search scheme, whose main advantage is the ability to search over uniformly and adaptively sampled subsets of the space of rigid-body motions. PF(2) fit also implements a new reranking search and scoring methodology that considerably improves alignment metrics in results obtained from the initial search.

  12. PF2 fit: Polar Fast Fourier Matched Alignment of Atomistic Structures with 3D Electron Microscopy Maps

    PubMed Central

    Bettadapura, Radhakrishna; Rasheed, Muhibur; Vollrath, Antje; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2015-01-01

    There continue to be increasing occurrences of both atomistic structure models in the PDB (possibly reconstructed from X-ray diffraction or NMR data), and 3D reconstructed cryo-electron microscopy (3D EM) maps (albeit at coarser resolution) of the same or homologous molecule or molecular assembly, deposited in the EMDB. To obtain the best possible structural model of the molecule at the best achievable resolution, and without any missing gaps, one typically aligns (match and fits) the atomistic structure model with the 3D EM map. We discuss a new algorithm and generalized framework, named PF2 fit (Polar Fast Fourier Fitting) for the best possible structural alignment of atomistic structures with 3D EM. While PF2 fit enables only a rigid, six dimensional (6D) alignment method, it augments prior work on 6D X-ray structure and 3D EM alignment in multiple ways: Scoring. PF2 fit includes a new scoring scheme that, in addition to rewarding overlaps between the volumes occupied by the atomistic structure and 3D EM map, rewards overlaps between the volumes complementary to them. We quantitatively demonstrate how this new complementary scoring scheme improves upon existing approaches. PF2 fit also includes two scoring functions, the non-uniform exterior penalty and the skeleton-secondary structure score, and implements the scattering potential score as an alternative to traditional Gaussian blurring. Search. PF2 fit utilizes a fast polar Fourier search scheme, whose main advantage is the ability to search over uniformly and adaptively sampled subsets of the space of rigid-body motions. PF2 fit also implements a new reranking search and scoring methodology that considerably improves alignment metrics in results obtained from the initial search. PMID:26469938

  13. PF2fit: Polar Fast Fourier Matched Alignment of Atomistic Structures with 3D Electron Microscopy Maps.

    PubMed

    Bettadapura, Radhakrishna; Rasheed, Muhibur; Vollrath, Antje; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2015-10-01

    There continue to be increasing occurrences of both atomistic structure models in the PDB (possibly reconstructed from X-ray diffraction or NMR data), and 3D reconstructed cryo-electron microscopy (3D EM) maps (albeit at coarser resolution) of the same or homologous molecule or molecular assembly, deposited in the EMDB. To obtain the best possible structural model of the molecule at the best achievable resolution, and without any missing gaps, one typically aligns (match and fits) the atomistic structure model with the 3D EM map. We discuss a new algorithm and generalized framework, named PF(2) fit (Polar Fast Fourier Fitting) for the best possible structural alignment of atomistic structures with 3D EM. While PF(2) fit enables only a rigid, six dimensional (6D) alignment method, it augments prior work on 6D X-ray structure and 3D EM alignment in multiple ways: Scoring. PF(2) fit includes a new scoring scheme that, in addition to rewarding overlaps between the volumes occupied by the atomistic structure and 3D EM map, rewards overlaps between the volumes complementary to them. We quantitatively demonstrate how this new complementary scoring scheme improves upon existing approaches. PF(2) fit also includes two scoring functions, the non-uniform exterior penalty and the skeleton-secondary structure score, and implements the scattering potential score as an alternative to traditional Gaussian blurring. Search. PF(2) fit utilizes a fast polar Fourier search scheme, whose main advantage is the ability to search over uniformly and adaptively sampled subsets of the space of rigid-body motions. PF(2) fit also implements a new reranking search and scoring methodology that considerably improves alignment metrics in results obtained from the initial search. PMID:26469938

  14. Dual array 3D electron cyclotron emission imaging at ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Classen, I. G. J. Bogomolov, A. V.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Suttrop, W.; Boom, J. E.; Tobias, B. J.; Donné, A. J. H.

    2014-11-15

    In a major upgrade, the (2D) electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic (ECEI) at ASDEX Upgrade has been equipped with a second detector array, observing a different toroidal position in the plasma, to enable quasi-3D measurements of the electron temperature. The new system will measure a total of 288 channels, in two 2D arrays, toroidally separated by 40 cm. The two detector arrays observe the plasma through the same vacuum window, both under a slight toroidal angle. The majority of the field lines are observed by both arrays simultaneously, thereby enabling a direct measurement of the 3D properties of plasma instabilities like edge localized mode filaments.

  15. Dual array 3D electron cyclotron emission imaging at ASDEX Upgrade.

    PubMed

    Classen, I G J; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C; Bogomolov, A V; Suttrop, W; Boom, J E; Tobias, B J; Donné, A J H

    2014-11-01

    In a major upgrade, the (2D) electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic (ECEI) at ASDEX Upgrade has been equipped with a second detector array, observing a different toroidal position in the plasma, to enable quasi-3D measurements of the electron temperature. The new system will measure a total of 288 channels, in two 2D arrays, toroidally separated by 40 cm. The two detector arrays observe the plasma through the same vacuum window, both under a slight toroidal angle. The majority of the field lines are observed by both arrays simultaneously, thereby enabling a direct measurement of the 3D properties of plasma instabilities like edge localized mode filaments. PMID:25430246

  16. Colorful holographic display of 3D object based on scaled diffraction by using non-uniform fast Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chenliang; Xia, Jun; Lei, Wei

    2015-03-01

    We proposed a new method to calculate the color computer generated hologram of three-dimensional object in holographic display. The three-dimensional object is composed of several tilted planes which are tilted from the hologram. The diffraction from each tilted plane to the hologram plane is calculated based on the coordinate rotation in Fourier spectrum domains. We used the nonuniform fast Fourier transformation (NUFFT) to calculate the nonuniform sampled Fourier spectrum on the tilted plane after coordinate rotation. By using the NUFFT, the diffraction calculation from tilted plane to the hologram plane with variable sampling rates can be achieved, which overcomes the sampling restriction of FFT in the conventional angular spectrum based method. The holograms of red, green and blue component of the polygon-based object are calculated separately by using our NUFFT based method. Then the color hologram is synthesized by placing the red, green and blue component hologram in sequence. The chromatic aberration caused by the wavelength difference can be solved effectively by restricting the sampling rate of the object in the calculation of each wavelength component. The computer simulation shows the feasibility of our method in calculating the color hologram of polygon-based object. The 3D object can be displayed in color with adjustable size and no chromatic aberration in holographic display system, which can be considered as an important application in the colorful holographic three-dimensional display.

  17. Femtosecond Electron Diffraction and Shadow Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherson, David

    2010-03-01

    Using femtosecond electron pulses as an imaging tool, we can probe ultrafast dynamics by taking snapshots at different time delays. By using femtosecond electron diffraction (FED), we can examine structural dynamics at the atomic level in real time, and study the structure-function correlation. Additionally, femtosecond electron shadow imaging (FESI) can explore the dynamics of laser induced plasmas off the surfaces of conductors, semiconductors, and insulators. Project as part of a Research Experience for Undergraduates program funded by the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University and the National Science Foundation under supervision of Jianming Cao, PhD., Florida State University.

  18. The degree of π electron delocalization and the formation of 3D-extensible sandwich structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Wang, Qiang; Yuan, Caixia; Zhao, Xue-Feng; Li, Jia-Jia; Li, Debao; Wu, Yan-Bo; Wang, Xiaotai

    2016-04-28

    DFT B3LYP/6-31G(d) calculations were performed to examine the feasibility of graphene-like C42H18 and starbenzene C6(BeH)6 (SBz) polymers as ligands of 3D-extensible sandwich compounds (3D-ESCs) with uninterrupted sandwich arrays. The results revealed that sandwich compounds with three or more C42H18 ligands were not feasible. The possible reason may be the localization of π electrons on certain C6 hexagons due to π-metal interactions, which makes the whole ligand lose its electronic structure basis (higher degree of π electron delocalization) to maintain the planar structure. For comparison, with the aid of benzene (Bz) molecules, the SBz polymers can be feasible ligands for designing 3D-ESCs because the C-Be interactions in individual SBz are largely ionic, which will deter the π electrons on one C6 ring from connecting to those on neighbouring C6 rings. This means that high degree of π electron delocalization is not necessary for maintaining the planarity of SBz polymers. Such a locally delocalized π electron structure is desirable for the ligands of 3D-ESCs. Remarkably, the formation of a sandwich compound with SBz is thermodynamically more favourable than that found for bis(Bz)chromium. The assembly of 3D-ESCs is largely exothermic, which will facilitate future experimental synthesis. The different variation trends on the HOMO-LUMO gaps in different directions (relative to the sandwich axes) suggest that they can be developed to form directional conductors or semiconductors, which may be useful in the production of electronic devices. PMID:27004750

  19. A compact electron gun for time-resolved electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Matthew S.; Lane, Paul D.; Wann, Derek A.

    2015-01-15

    A novel compact time-resolved electron diffractometer has been built with the primary goal of studying the ultrafast molecular dynamics of photoexcited gas-phase molecules. Here, we discuss the design of the electron gun, which is triggered by a Ti:Sapphire laser, before detailing a series of calibration experiments relating to the electron-beam properties. As a further test of the apparatus, initial diffraction patterns have been collected for thin, polycrystalline platinum samples, which have been shown to match theoretical patterns. The data collected demonstrate the focusing effects of the magnetic lens on the electron beam, and how this relates to the spatial resolution of the diffraction pattern.

  20. 3D structure of eukaryotic flagella/cilia by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Flagella/cilia are motile organelles with more than 400 proteins. To understand the mechanism of such complex systems, we need methods to describe molecular arrange-ments and conformations three-dimensionally in vivo. Cryo-electron tomography enabled us such a 3D structural analysis. Our group has been working on 3D structure of flagella/cilia using this method and revealed highly ordered and beautifully organized molecular arrangement. 3D structure gave us insights into the mechanism to gener-ate bending motion with well defined waveforms. In this review, I summarize our recent structural studies on fla-gella/cilia by cryo-electron tomography, mainly focusing on dynein microtubule-based ATPase motor proteins and the radial spoke, a regulatory protein complex. PMID:27493552

  1. 3D structure of eukaryotic flagella/cilia by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Flagella/cilia are motile organelles with more than 400 proteins. To understand the mechanism of such complex systems, we need methods to describe molecular arrange-ments and conformations three-dimensionally in vivo. Cryo-electron tomography enabled us such a 3D structural analysis. Our group has been working on 3D structure of flagella/cilia using this method and revealed highly ordered and beautifully organized molecular arrangement. 3D structure gave us insights into the mechanism to gener-ate bending motion with well defined waveforms. In this review, I summarize our recent structural studies on fla-gella/cilia by cryo-electron tomography, mainly focusing on dynein microtubule-based ATPase motor proteins and the radial spoke, a regulatory protein complex.

  2. Electrochemical fields within 3D reconstructed microstructures of mixed ionic and electronic conducting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanxiang; Chen, Yu; Lin, Ye; Yan, Mufu; Harris, William M.; Chiu, Wilson K. S.; Ni, Meng; Chen, Fanglin

    2016-11-01

    The performance and stability of the mixed ionic and electronic conducting (MIEC) membrane devices, such as solid oxide cells (SOCs) and oxygen separation membranes (OSMs) interplay tightly with the transport properties and the three-dimensional (3D) microstructure of the membrane. However, development of the MIEC devices is hindered by the limited knowledge about the distribution of electrochemical fields within the 3D local microstructures, especially at surface and interface. In this work, a generic model conforming to local thermodynamic equilibrium is developed to calculate the electrochemical fields, such as electric potential and oxygen chemical potential, within the 3D microstructure of the MIEC membrane. Stability of the MIEC membrane is evaluated by the distribution of oxygen partial pressure. The cell-level performance such as polarization resistance and voltage vs. current curve can be further calculated. Case studies are performed to demonstrate the capability of the framework by using X-ray computed tomography reconstructed 3D microstructures of a SOC and an OSM. The calculation method demonstrates high computational efficiency for large size 3D tomographic microstructures, and permits parallel calculation. The framework can serve as a powerful tool for correlating the transport properties and the 3D microstructure to the performance and the stability of MIEC devices.

  3. 3D image reconstruction algorithms for cryo-electron-microscopy images of virus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerschuk, Peter C.; Johnson, John E.

    2000-11-01

    A statistical model for the object and the complete image formation process in cryo electron microscopy of viruses is presented. Using this model, maximum likelihood reconstructions of the 3D structure of viruses are computed using the expectation maximization algorithm and an example based on Cowpea mosaic virus is provided.

  4. A Review on Energy Harvesting Using 3D Printed Fabrics for Wearable Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowthaman, Swaminathan; Chidambaram, Gowri Shankar; Rao, Dilli Babu Govardhana; Subramya, Hemakumar Vyudhayagiri; Chandrasekhar, Udhayagiri

    2016-06-01

    Embedding of energy harvesting systems into wearable health and environment monitoring systems, like integration of smart piezoelectric fibers into soldier fabric structures opens up avenues in generating electricity from natural mechanical movements for self-powering of wearable electronics. Emergence of multitudinous of materials and manufacturing technologies has enabled realization of various energy harvesting systems from mechanical movements. The materials and manufacturing related to 3D printing of energy harvesting fabrics are reviewed in this paper. State-of-the-art energy harvesting sources are briefly described following which an in-depth analysis on the materials and 3D printing techniques for energy harvesting fabrics are presented. While tremendous motivation and opportunity exists for wider-scale adoption of 3D printing for this niche area, the success depends on efficient design of three critical factors namely materials, process and structure. The present review discusses on the complex issues of materials selection, modelling and processing of 3D printed fabrics. The paper culminates by presenting a discussion on how future advancements in 3D printing technology might be useful for development of wearable electronics.

  5. Computer-aided microtomography with true 3-D display in electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, A C

    1986-01-01

    A novel research system has been designed to permit three-dimensional (3-D) viewing of high resolution image data from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The system consists of front-end primary data acquisition devices, such as TEM and SEM machines, which are equipped with computer-controlled specimen tilt stages. The output from these machines is in analogue form, where a video camera attached to the TEM provides the sequential analogue image output while the SEM direct video output is utilized. A 10 MHz digitizer transforms the video image to a digital array of 512 X 512 pixel units of 8 bits deep-stored in a frame buffer. Digital images from multiple projections are reconstructed into 3-D image boxes in a dedicated computer. Attached to the computer is a powerful true 3-D display device which has hardware for graphic manipulations including tilt and rotate on any axis and for probing the image with a 3-D cursor. Data editing and automatic contouring functions are used to enhance areas of interest, and specialized software is available for measurement of numbers, distances, areas, and volumes. With proper archiving of reconstructed image sequences, a dynamic 3-D presentation is possible. The microtomography system is highly versatile and can process image data on-line or from remote sites from which data records would typically be transported on computer tape, video tape, or floppy disk. PMID:3753610

  6. On 3D world perception: towards a definition of a cognitive map based electronic travel aid.

    PubMed

    Pissaloux, E E; Velazquez, R; Maingreaud, F

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses a 3D world perception principle and their usage for cognitive map building by visually impaired people. These bases are applied to define a new electronic travel aid named intelligent glasses system (IGS), a wearable system. IGS provides to blind people an information on their nearest 3D environment structure, and especially a tactile stimulating cognitive map of the obstacles located in user's peri-personal space. This paper outlines briefly the IG system, and presents first results on the validation of the proposed representation via psycho-physiological experiments.

  7. Prediction of spin-dependent electronic structure in 3d-transition-metal doped antimonene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L. F.; Song, Y.; Mi, W. B.; Wang, X. C.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the geometric structure and electronic and magnetic properties of 3d-transition-metal atom doped antimonene using spin-polarized first-principles calculations. Strong orbital hybridization exhibits between 3d-transition-metal and Sb atoms, where covalent bonds form in antimonene. A spin-polarized semiconducting state appears in Cr-doped antimonene, while half-metallic states appear by doping Ti, V, and Mn. These findings indicate that once combined with doping states, the bands of antimonene systems offer a variety of features. Specific dopants lead to half-metallic characters with high spin polarization that has potential application in spintronics.

  8. 3D imaging of the early embryonic chicken heart with focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rennie, Monique Y; Gahan, Curran G; López, Claudia S; Thornburg, Kent L; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2014-08-01

    Early embryonic heart development is a period of dynamic growth and remodeling, with rapid changes occurring at the tissue, cell, and subcellular levels. A detailed understanding of the events that establish the components of the heart wall has been hampered by a lack of methodologies for three-dimensional (3D), high-resolution imaging. Focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) is a novel technology for imaging 3D tissue volumes at the subcellular level. FIB-SEM alternates between imaging the block face with a scanning electron beam and milling away thin sections of tissue with a FIB, allowing for collection and analysis of 3D data. FIB-SEM was used to image the three layers of the day 4 chicken embryo heart: myocardium, cardiac jelly, and endocardium. Individual images obtained with FIB-SEM were comparable in quality and resolution to those obtained with transmission electron microscopy. Up to 1,100 serial images were obtained in 4 nm increments at 4.88 nm resolution, and image stacks were aligned to create volumes 800-1,500 μm3 in size. Segmentation of organelles revealed their organization and distinct volume fractions between cardiac wall layers. We conclude that FIB-SEM is a powerful modality for 3D subcellular imaging of the embryonic heart wall.

  9. Dynamics of electron emission in double photoionization processes near the krypton 3d threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penent, F.; Sheinerman, S.; Andric, L.; Lablanquie, P.; Palaudoux, J.; Becker, U.; Braune, M.; Viefhaus, J.; Eland, J. H. D.

    2008-02-01

    Two-electron emission following photoabsorption near the Kr 3d threshold is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. On the experimental side, electron/electron coincidences using a magnetic bottle time-of-flight spectrometer allow us to observe the complete double photo ionization (DPI) continua of selected Kr2+ final states, and to see how these continua are affected by resonant processes in the vicinity of the Kr 3d threshold. The analysis is based on a quantum mechanical approach that takes into account the contribution of three different processes: (A) Auger decay of the inner 3d vacancy with the associated post-collision interaction (PCI) effects, (B) capture of slow photoelectrons into discrete states followed by valence multiplet decay (VMD) of the excited ionic states and (C) valence shell DPI. The dominant process for each Kr2+(4p-2) final state is the photoionization of the inner shell followed by Auger decay of the 3d vacancies. Moreover, for the 4p-2(3P) and 4p-2(1D) final ionic states an important contribution comes from the processes of slow photoelectron capture followed by VMD as well as from double ionization of the outer shell involving also VMD.

  10. Resonant structure of the 3d electron`s angular distribution in a free Mn{sup +}Ion

    SciTech Connect

    Amusia, M.Y.; Dolmatov, V.K.

    1995-08-01

    The 3d-electron angular anisotropy parameter of the free Mn{sup +} ion is calculated using the {open_quotes}spin-polarized{close_quotes} random-phase approximation with exchange. Strong resonance structure is discovered, which is due to interference with the powerful 3p {yields} 3d discrete excitation. The effect of the 3p {yields} 4s transition is also noticeable. The ordering of these respective resonances with phonon energy increase proved to be opposite in angular anisotropy parameter to that in 3d-photoionization cross section. A paper describing these results was published.

  11. Precession electron diffraction – a topical review

    PubMed Central

    Midgley, Paul A.; Eggeman, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    In the 20 years since precession electron diffraction (PED) was introduced, it has grown from a little-known niche technique to one that is seen as a cornerstone of electron crystallography. It is now used primarily in two ways. The first is to determine crystal structures, to identify lattice parameters and symmetry, and ultimately to solve the atomic structure ab initio. The second is, through connection with the microscope scanning system, to map the local orientation of the specimen to investigate crystal texture, rotation and strain at the nanometre scale. This topical review brings the reader up to date, highlighting recent successes using PED and providing some pointers to the future in terms of method development and how the technique can meet some of the needs of the X-ray crystallography community. Complementary electron techniques are also discussed, together with how a synergy of methods may provide the best approach to electron-based structure analysis. PMID:25610633

  12. 3D Atomic Arrangement at Functional Interfaces Inside Nanoparticles by Resonant High-Energy X-ray Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Petkov, Valeri; Prasai, Binay; Shastri, Sarvjit; Chen, Tsan-Yao

    2015-10-21

    With current science and technology moving rapidly into smaller scales, nanometer-sized materials, often referred to as NPs, are produced in increasing numbers and explored for numerous useful applications. Evidence is mounting, however, that useful properties of NPs can be improved further and even new NP functionality achieved by not only controlling the NP size and shape but also interfacing chemically or structurally distinct entities into single, so-called "composite" NPs. A typical example is core-shell NPs wherein the synergy of distinct atoms at the core\\shell interface endows the NPs with otherwise unachievable functionality. However, though advantageous, the concept of functional interfaces inside NPs is still pursued largely by trial-and-error. That is because it is difficut to assess the interfaces precisely at the atomic level using traditional experimental techniques and, hence, difficult to take control of. Using the core\\shell interface in less than 10 nm in size Ru core-Pt shells NPs as an example, we demonstrate that precise knowledge of the 3D atomic arrangement at functional interfaces inside NPs can be obtained by resonant high-energy X-ray diffraction (XRD) coupled to element-specific atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. On the basis of the unique structure knowledge obtained, we scrutinize the still-debatable influence of core\\shell interface on the catalytic functionality of Ru core-Pt shell NPs, thus evidencing the usefulness of this nontraditional technique for practical applications.

  13. Injectable 3-D Fabrication of Medical Electronics at the Target Biological Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chao; Zhang, Jie; Li, Xiaokang; Yang, Xueyao; Li, Jingjing; Liu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Conventional transplantable biomedical devices generally request sophisticated surgery which however often causes big trauma and serious pain to the patients. Here, we show an alternative way of directly making three-dimensional (3-D) medical electronics inside the biological body through sequential injections of biocompatible packaging material and liquid metal ink. As the most typical electronics, a variety of medical electrodes with different embedded structures were demonstrated to be easily formed at the target tissues. Conceptual in vitro experiments provide strong evidences for the excellent performances of the injectable electrodes. Further in vivo animal experiments disclosed that the formed electrode could serve as both highly efficient ECG (Electrocardiograph) electrode and stimulator electrode. These findings clarified the unique features and practicability of the liquid metal based injectable 3-D fabrication of medical electronics. The present strategy opens the way for directly manufacturing electrophysiological sensors or therapeutic devices in situ via a truly minimally invasive approach. PMID:24309385

  14. Hollow Cone Electron Imaging for Single Particle 3D Reconstruction of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chun-Ying; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Lobato, Ivan; Van Dyck, Dirk; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The main bottlenecks for high-resolution biological imaging in electron microscopy are radiation sensitivity and low contrast. The phase contrast at low spatial frequencies can be enhanced by using a large defocus but this strongly reduces the resolution. Recently, phase plates have been developed to enhance the contrast at small defocus but electrical charging remains a problem. Single particle cryo-electron microscopy is mostly used to minimize the radiation damage and to enhance the resolution of the 3D reconstructions but it requires averaging images of a massive number of individual particles. Here we present a new route to achieve the same goals by hollow cone dark field imaging using thermal diffuse scattered electrons giving about a 4 times contrast increase as compared to bright field imaging. We demonstrate the 3D reconstruction of a stained GroEL particle can yield about 13.5 Å resolution but using a strongly reduced number of images. PMID:27292544

  15. Hollow Cone Electron Imaging for Single Particle 3D Reconstruction of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chun-Ying; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Lobato, Ivan; Van Dyck, Dirk; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The main bottlenecks for high-resolution biological imaging in electron microscopy are radiation sensitivity and low contrast. The phase contrast at low spatial frequencies can be enhanced by using a large defocus but this strongly reduces the resolution. Recently, phase plates have been developed to enhance the contrast at small defocus but electrical charging remains a problem. Single particle cryo-electron microscopy is mostly used to minimize the radiation damage and to enhance the resolution of the 3D reconstructions but it requires averaging images of a massive number of individual particles. Here we present a new route to achieve the same goals by hollow cone dark field imaging using thermal diffuse scattered electrons giving about a 4 times contrast increase as compared to bright field imaging. We demonstrate the 3D reconstruction of a stained GroEL particle can yield about 13.5 Å resolution but using a strongly reduced number of images. PMID:27292544

  16. Injectable 3-D Fabrication of Medical Electronics at the Target Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chao; Zhang, Jie; Li, Xiaokang; Yang, Xueyao; Li, Jingjing; Liu, Jing

    2013-12-01

    Conventional transplantable biomedical devices generally request sophisticated surgery which however often causes big trauma and serious pain to the patients. Here, we show an alternative way of directly making three-dimensional (3-D) medical electronics inside the biological body through sequential injections of biocompatible packaging material and liquid metal ink. As the most typical electronics, a variety of medical electrodes with different embedded structures were demonstrated to be easily formed at the target tissues. Conceptual in vitro experiments provide strong evidences for the excellent performances of the injectable electrodes. Further in vivo animal experiments disclosed that the formed electrode could serve as both highly efficient ECG (Electrocardiograph) electrode and stimulator electrode. These findings clarified the unique features and practicability of the liquid metal based injectable 3-D fabrication of medical electronics. The present strategy opens the way for directly manufacturing electrophysiological sensors or therapeutic devices in situ via a truly minimally invasive approach.

  17. Hollow Cone Electron Imaging for Single Particle 3D Reconstruction of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chun-Ying; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Lobato, Ivan; van Dyck, Dirk; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2016-06-01

    The main bottlenecks for high-resolution biological imaging in electron microscopy are radiation sensitivity and low contrast. The phase contrast at low spatial frequencies can be enhanced by using a large defocus but this strongly reduces the resolution. Recently, phase plates have been developed to enhance the contrast at small defocus but electrical charging remains a problem. Single particle cryo-electron microscopy is mostly used to minimize the radiation damage and to enhance the resolution of the 3D reconstructions but it requires averaging images of a massive number of individual particles. Here we present a new route to achieve the same goals by hollow cone dark field imaging using thermal diffuse scattered electrons giving about a 4 times contrast increase as compared to bright field imaging. We demonstrate the 3D reconstruction of a stained GroEL particle can yield about 13.5 Å resolution but using a strongly reduced number of images.

  18. Electronic spectroscopy and electronic structure of the smallest metal clusters: the diatomic 3D transition metal aluminides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, Jane M.; Morse, Michael D.

    1994-06-01

    A systematic study of the electronic spectroscopy, electronic structure, and chemical bonding has been initiated for the 3d series of diatomic transition metal aluminides. This report provides a review of the progress to date, with specific emphasis on AlCa, AlV, AlCr, AlMn, AlCo, AlNi, AlCu, and AlZn.

  19. Correlative Confocal and 3D Electron Microscopy of a Specific Sensory Cell

    PubMed Central

    Bohórquez, Diego; Haque, Fariha; Medicetty, Satish; Liddle, Rodger A.

    2015-01-01

    Delineation of a cell’s ultrastructure is important for understanding its function. This can be a daunting project for rare cell types diffused throughout tissues made of diverse cell types, such as enteroendocrine cells of the intestinal epithelium. These gastrointestinal sensors of food and bacteria have been difficult to study because they are dispersed among other epithelial cells at a ratio of 1:1,000. Recently, transgenic reporter mice have been generated to identify enteroendocrine cells by means of fluorescence. One of those is the peptide YY-GFP mouse. Using this mouse, we developed a method to correlate confocal and serial block-face scanning electron microscopy. We named the method cocem3D and applied it to identify a specific enteroendocrine cell in tissue and unveil the cell’s ultrastructure in 3D. The resolution of cocem3D is sufficient to identify organelles as small as secretory vesicles and to distinguish cell membranes for volume rendering. Cocem3D can be easily adapted to study the 3D ultrastructure of other specific cell types in their native tissue. PMID:26273796

  20. 3D Magnetic Induction Maps of Nanoscale Materials Revealed by Electron Holographic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of three-dimensional (3D) ferromagnetic nanoscale materials constitutes one of the key research areas of the current magnetism roadmap and carries great potential to impact areas such as data storage, sensing, and biomagnetism. The properties of such nanostructures are closely connected with their 3D magnetic nanostructure, making their determination highly valuable. Up to now, quantitative 3D maps providing both the internal magnetic and electric configuration of the same specimen with high spatial resolution are missing. Here, we demonstrate the quantitative 3D reconstruction of the dominant axial component of the magnetic induction and electrostatic potential within a cobalt nanowire (NW) of 100 nm in diameter with spatial resolution below 10 nm by applying electron holographic tomography. The tomogram was obtained using a dedicated TEM sample holder for acquisition, in combination with advanced alignment and tomographic reconstruction routines. The powerful approach presented here is widely applicable to a broad range of 3D magnetic nanostructures and may trigger the progress of novel spintronic nonplanar nanodevices. PMID:27182110

  1. Simulation-Guided 3D Nanomanufacturing via Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Fowlkes, Jason D.; Winkler, Robert; Lewis, Brett B.; Stanford, Michael G.; Plank, Harald; Rack, Philip D.

    2016-06-10

    Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is one of the few techniques that enables direct-write synthesis of free-standing 3D nanostructures. While the fabrication of simple architectures such as vertical or curving nanowires has been achieved by simple trial and error, processing complex 3D structures is not tractable with this approach. This is due, inpart, to the dynamic interplay between electron–solid interactions and the transient spatial distribution of absorbed precursor molecules on the solid surface. Here, we demonstrate the ability to controllably deposit 3D lattice structures at the micro/nanoscale, which have received recent interest owing to superior mechanical and optical properties.more » Moreover, a hybrid Monte Carlo–continuum simulation is briefly overviewed, and subsequently FEBID experiments and simulations are directly compared. Finally, a 3D computer-aided design (CAD) program is introduced, which generates the beam parameters necessary for FEBID by both simulation and experiment. In using this approach, we demonstrate the fabrication of various 3D lattice structures using Pt-, Au-, and W-based precursors.« less

  2. Virtual rough samples to test 3D nanometer-scale scanning electron microscopy stereo photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarrubia, J. S.; Tondare, V. N.; Vladár, A. E.

    2016-03-01

    The combination of scanning electron microscopy for high spatial resolution, images from multiple angles to provide 3D information, and commercially available stereo photogrammetry software for 3D reconstruction offers promise for nanometer-scale dimensional metrology in 3D. A method is described to test 3D photogrammetry software by the use of virtual samples—mathematical samples from which simulated images are made for use as inputs to the software under test. The virtual sample is constructed by wrapping a rough skin with any desired power spectral density around a smooth near-trapezoidal line with rounded top corners. Reconstruction is performed with images simulated from different angular viewpoints. The software's reconstructed 3D model is then compared to the known geometry of the virtual sample. Three commercial photogrammetry software packages were tested. Two of them produced results for line height and width that were within close to 1 nm of the correct values. All of the packages exhibited some difficulty in reconstructing details of the surface roughness.

  3. 3D structural fluctuation of IgG1 antibody revealed by individual particle electron tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Huimin; Peng, Bo; Rames, Matthew J.; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2015-05-05

    Commonly used methods for determining protein structure, including X-ray crystallography and single-particle reconstruction, often provide a single and unique three-dimensional (3D) structure. However, in these methods, the protein dynamics and flexibility/fluctuation remain mostly unknown. Here, we utilized advances in electron tomography (ET) to study the antibody flexibility and fluctuation through structural determination of individual antibody particles rather than averaging multiple antibody particles together. Through individual-particle electron tomography (IPET) 3D reconstruction from negatively-stained ET images, we obtained 120 ab-initio 3D density maps at an intermediate resolution (~1–3 nm) from 120 individual IgG1 antibody particles. Using these maps as a constraint, wemore » derived 120 conformations of the antibody via structural flexible docking of the crystal structure to these maps by targeted molecular dynamics simulations. Statistical analysis of the various conformations disclosed the antibody 3D conformational flexibility through the distribution of its domain distances and orientations. This blueprint approach, if extended to other flexible proteins, may serve as a useful methodology towards understanding protein dynamics and functions.« less

  4. 3D structural fluctuation of IgG1 antibody revealed by individual particle electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Huimin; Peng, Bo; Rames, Matthew J.; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2015-05-05

    Commonly used methods for determining protein structure, including X-ray crystallography and single-particle reconstruction, often provide a single and unique three-dimensional (3D) structure. However, in these methods, the protein dynamics and flexibility/fluctuation remain mostly unknown. Here, we utilized advances in electron tomography (ET) to study the antibody flexibility and fluctuation through structural determination of individual antibody particles rather than averaging multiple antibody particles together. Through individual-particle electron tomography (IPET) 3D reconstruction from negatively-stained ET images, we obtained 120 ab-initio 3D density maps at an intermediate resolution (~1–3 nm) from 120 individual IgG1 antibody particles. Using these maps as a constraint, we derived 120 conformations of the antibody via structural flexible docking of the crystal structure to these maps by targeted molecular dynamics simulations. Statistical analysis of the various conformations disclosed the antibody 3D conformational flexibility through the distribution of its domain distances and orientations. This blueprint approach, if extended to other flexible proteins, may serve as a useful methodology towards understanding protein dynamics and functions.

  5. Simulation of 3-D Magnetic Reconnection by Gyrokinetic Electron and Fully Kinetic Ion Particle Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Lin, Y.; Chen, L.

    2015-12-01

    3-D collisionless magnetic reconnection is investigated using the gyrokinetic electron and fully-kinetic ion (GeFi) particle simulation model. The simulation is carried out for cases with various finite guide field BG in a current sheet as occurring in space and laboratory plasmas. Turbulence power spectrum of magenetic field is found in the reconnection current sheet, with a clear k-5/3 dependence. The wave properties are analyzed. The anomalous resistivity in the electron diffusion region is estimated. The Dependence of the reconnection physics on the ion-to-electron mass ratio mi/me, beta values, and the half-width of the current sheet are also investigated.

  6. Potential of 3D printing technologies for fabrication of electron bolus and proton compensators.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Fisher, Ted; Zhang, Miao; Kim, Leonard; Chen, Ting; Narra, Venkat; Swann, Beth; Singh, Rachana; Siderit, Richard; Yin, Lingshu; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin; McKenna, Michael; McDonough, James; Ning, Yue J

    2015-05-08

    In electron and proton radiotherapy, applications of patient-specific electron bolus or proton compensators during radiation treatments are often necessary to accommodate patient body surface irregularities, tissue inhomogeneity, and variations in PTV depths to achieve desired dose distributions. Emerging 3D printing technologies provide alternative fabrication methods for these bolus and compensators. This study investigated the potential of utilizing 3D printing technologies for the fabrication of the electron bolus and proton compensators. Two printing technologies, fused deposition modeling (FDM) and selective laser sintering (SLS), and two printing materials, PLA and polyamide, were investigated. Samples were printed and characterized with CT scan and under electron and proton beams. In addition, a software package was developed to convert electron bolus and proton compensator designs to printable Standard Tessellation Language file format. A phantom scalp electron bolus was printed with FDM technology with PLA material. The HU of the printed electron bolus was 106.5 ± 15.2. A prostate patient proton compensator was printed with SLS technology and polyamide material with -70.1 ± 8.1 HU. The profiles of the electron bolus and proton compensator were compared with the original designs. The average over all the CT slices of the largest Euclidean distance between the design and the fabricated bolus on each CT slice was found to be 0.84 ± 0.45 mm and for the compensator to be 0.40 ± 0.42 mm. It is recommended that the properties of specific 3D printed objects are understood before being applied to radiotherapy treatments.

  7. Crystallographic orientation assessment by electron backscattered diffraction.

    PubMed

    Cléton, F; Jouneau, P H; Henry, S; Gäumann, M; Buffat, P A

    1999-01-01

    With an angular orientation accuracy of at least 1 , the ability of electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) to determine and emphasise crystallographic orientation is illustrated. Using the abilities of specially developed software for computing Euler angles derived from the scanned specimen, misorientations are pointed out with acceptable flexibility and graphic output through crystallographic orientation maps or pole figures. This ability is displayed in the particular case of laser cladding of nickel-based superalloy, a process that combines the advantages of a near net-shape manufacturing and a close control of the solidification microstructure (E-LMF: epitaxial laser metal forming). PMID:10483877

  8. Crystallographic orientation assessment by electron backscattered diffraction.

    PubMed

    Cléton, F; Jouneau, P H; Henry, S; Gäumann, M; Buffat, P A

    1999-01-01

    With an angular orientation accuracy of at least 1 , the ability of electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) to determine and emphasise crystallographic orientation is illustrated. Using the abilities of specially developed software for computing Euler angles derived from the scanned specimen, misorientations are pointed out with acceptable flexibility and graphic output through crystallographic orientation maps or pole figures. This ability is displayed in the particular case of laser cladding of nickel-based superalloy, a process that combines the advantages of a near net-shape manufacturing and a close control of the solidification microstructure (E-LMF: epitaxial laser metal forming).

  9. 3D scanning electron microscopy applied to surface characterization of fluorosed dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Limandri, Silvina; Galván Josa, Víctor; Valentinuzzi, María Cecilia; Chena, María Emilia; Castellano, Gustavo

    2016-05-01

    The enamel surfaces of fluorotic teeth were studied by scanning electron stereomicroscopy. Different whitening treatments were applied to 25 pieces to remove stains caused by fluorosis and their surfaces were characterized by stereomicroscopy in order to obtain functional and amplitude parameters. The topographic features resulting for each treatment were determined through these parameters. The results obtained show that the 3D reconstruction achieved from the SEM stereo pairs is a valuable potential alternative for the surface characterization of this kind of samples.

  10. SU-C-213-06: Dosimetric Verification of 3D Printed Electron Bolus

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, K; Corbett, M; Pelletier, C; Huang, Z; Feng, Y; Jung, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the dosimetric effect of 3D printed bolus in an anthropomorphic phantom. Methods: Conformable bolus material was generated for an anthropomorphic phantom from a DICOM volume. The bolus generated was a uniform expansion of 5mm applied to the nose region of the phantom, as this is a difficult area to uniformly apply bolus clinically. A Printrbot metal 3D Printer using PLA plastic generated the bolus. A 9MeV anterior beam with a 5cm cone was used to deliver dose to the nose of the phantom. TLD measurements were compared to predicted values at the phantom surface. Film planes were analyzed for the printed bolus, a standard 5mm bolus sheet placed on the phantom, and the phantom with no bolus applied to determine depth and dose distributions. Results: TLDs measured within 2.5% of predicted value for the 3D bolus. Film demonstrated a more uniform dose distribution in the nostril region for the 3d printed bolus than the standard bolus. This difference is caused by the air gap created around the nostrils by the standard bolus, creating a secondary build-up region. Both demonstrated a 50% central axis dose shift of 5mm relative to the no bolus film. HU for the bolus calculated the PLA electron density to be ∼1.1g/cc. Physical density was measured to be 1.3g/cc overall. Conclusion: 3D printed PLA bolus demonstrates improved dosimetric performance to standard bolus for electron beams with complex phantom geometry.

  11. Tensor decomposition in electronic structure calculations on 3D Cartesian grids

    SciTech Connect

    Khoromskij, B.N. Khoromskaia, V.; Chinnamsetty, S.R.; Flad, H.-J.

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate a novel approach based on the combination of Tucker-type and canonical tensor decomposition techniques for the efficient numerical approximation of functions and operators in electronic structure calculations. In particular, we study applicability of tensor approximations for the numerical solution of Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham equations on 3D Cartesian grids. We show that the orthogonal Tucker-type tensor approximation of electron density and Hartree potential of simple molecules leads to low tensor rank representations. This enables an efficient tensor-product convolution scheme for the computation of the Hartree potential using a collocation-type approximation via piecewise constant basis functions on a uniform nxnxn grid. Combined with the Richardson extrapolation, our approach exhibits O(h{sup 3}) convergence in the grid-size h=O(n{sup -1}). Moreover, this requires O(3rn+r{sup 3}) storage, where r denotes the Tucker rank of the electron density with r=O(logn), almost uniformly in n. For example, calculations of the Coulomb matrix and the Hartree-Fock energy for the CH{sub 4} molecule, with a pseudopotential on the C atom, achieved accuracies of the order of 10{sup -6} hartree with a grid-size n of several hundreds. Since the tensor-product convolution in 3D is performed via 1D convolution transforms, our scheme markedly outperforms the 3D-FFT in both the computing time and storage requirements.

  12. Bridging microscopes: 3D correlative light and scanning electron microscopy of complex biological structures.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Miriam S; Günthert, Maja; Gasser, Philippe; Lucas, Falk; Wepf, Roger

    2012-01-01

    The rationale of correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is to collect data on different information levels--ideally from an identical area on the same sample--with the aim of combining datasets at different levels of resolution to achieve a more holistic view of the hierarchical structural organization of cells and tissues. Modern three-dimensional (3D) imaging techniques in light and electron microscopy opened up new possibilities to expand morphological studies into the third dimension at the nanometer scale and over various volume dimensions. Here, we present two alternative approaches to correlate 3D light microscopy (LM) data with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) volume data. An adapted sample preparation method based on high-pressure freezing for structure preservation, followed by freeze-substitution for multimodal en-bloc imaging or serial-section imaging is described. The advantages and potential applications are exemplarily shown on various biological samples, such as cells, individual organisms, human tissue, as well as plant tissue. The two CLEM approaches presented here are per se not mutually exclusive, but have their distinct advantages. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and focused ion beam-SEM (FIB-SEM) is most suitable for targeted 3D correlation of small volumes, whereas serial-section LM and SEM imaging has its strength in large-area or -volume screening and correlation. The second method can be combined with immunocytochemical methods. Both methods, however, have the potential to extract statistically relevant data of structural details for systems biology.

  13. Future of Electron Scattering and Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Ernest; Stemmer, Susanne; Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei; Maracas, George

    2014-02-25

    The ability to correlate the atomic- and nanoscale-structure of condensed matter with physical properties (e.g., mechanical, electrical, catalytic, and optical) and functionality forms the core of many disciplines. Directing and controlling materials at the quantum-, atomic-, and molecular-levels creates enormous challenges and opportunities across a wide spectrum of critical technologies, including those involving the generation and use of energy. The workshop identified next generation electron scattering and diffraction instruments that are uniquely positioned to address these grand challenges. The workshop participants identified four key areas where the next generation of such instrumentation would have major impact: A – Multidimensional Visualization of Real Materials B – Atomic-scale Molecular Processes C – Photonic Control of Emergence in Quantum Materials D – Evolving Interfaces, Nucleation, and Mass Transport Real materials are comprised of complex three-dimensional arrangements of atoms and defects that directly determine their potential for energy applications. Understanding real materials requires new capabilities for three-dimensional atomic scale tomography and spectroscopy of atomic and electronic structures with unprecedented sensitivity, and with simultaneous spatial and energy resolution. Many molecules are able to selectively and efficiently convert sunlight into other forms of energy, like heat and electric current, or store it in altered chemical bonds. Understanding and controlling such process at the atomic scale require unprecedented time resolution. One of the grand challenges in condensed matter physics is to understand, and ultimately control, emergent phenomena in novel quantum materials that necessitate developing a new generation of instruments that probe the interplay among spin, charge, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom with intrinsic time- and length-scale resolutions. Molecules and soft matter require imaging and

  14. Chirality determination of quartz crystals using electron backscatter diffraction.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Aimo; Nolze, Gert

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the determination of crystal chirality using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in the scanning electron microscope. The chirality of α-quartz as a space-group-dependent property is verified via direct comparison of experimental diffraction features to simulations using the dynamical theory of electron diffraction.

  15. Comparisons of Runaway Electron Production in DIII--D with the CQL3D Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, R. W.; Chan, V. S.; Chiu, S. C.; Evans, T. E.; Whyte, D. G.; Rosenbluth, M. N.

    1997-11-01

    The time-dependent CQL3D relativistic, bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck code is well suited to modeling the electron runaway generation by ``tail slideaway'' and ``knockon'' processes associated with rapid plasma temperature drop as occurs during plasma disruption and pellet injection. ``Rapid temperure drop'' means in a time short compared to the resistive time thus leading to large inductive electric field; and also short compared to tail electron slowing down time thereby providing a significant number of high velocity electrons. The tail electrons find themselves beyond the critical velocity for runaway. During DIII--D pellet injection experiments, in the plasma interior we calculate nearly 100 percent of the plasma current is transferred to runaway electrons by tail slideaway. This effect diminishes towards the plasma edge, where the knockon process can become dominant on a longer time scale. These computational results will be benchmarked against the experimental results.

  16. Front-end receiver electronics for a matrix transducer for 3-D transesophageal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zili; Blaak, Sandra; Chang, Zu-yao; Yao, Jiajian; Bosch, Johan G; Prins, Christian; Lancée, Charles T; de Jong, Nico; Pertijs, Michiel A P; Meijer, Gerard C M

    2012-07-01

    There is a clear clinical need for creating 3-D images of the heart. One promising technique is the use of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). To enable 3-D TEE, we are developing a miniature ultrasound probe containing a matrix piezoelectric transducer with more than 2000 elements. Because a gastroscopic tube cannot accommodate the cables needed to connect all transducer elements directly to an imaging system, a major challenge is to locally reduce the number of channels, while maintaining a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. This can be achieved by using front-end receiver electronics bonded to the transducers to provide appropriate signal conditioning in the tip of the probe. This paper presents the design of such electronics, realizing time-gain compensation (TGC) and micro-beamforming using simple, low-power circuits. Prototypes of TGC amplifiers and micro-beamforming cells have been fabricated in 0.35-μm CMOS technology. These prototype chips have been combined on a printed circuit board (PCB) to form an ultrasound-receiver system capable of reading and combining the signals of three transducer elements. Experimental results show that this design is a suitable candidate for 3-D TEE.

  17. Effect of Single-Electron Interface Trapping in Decanano MOSFETs: A 3D Atomistic Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asenov, Asen; Balasubramaniam, R.; Brown, A. R.; Davies, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    We study the effect of trapping/detrapping of a single-electron in interface states in the channel of n-type MOSFETs with decanano dimensions using 3D atomistic simulation techniques. In order to highlight the basic dependencies, the simulations are carried out initially assuming continuous doping charge, and discrete localized charge only for the trapped electron. The dependence of the random telegraph signal (RTS) amplitudes on the device dimensions and on the position of the trapped charge in the channel are studied in detail. Later, in full-scale, atomistic simulations assuming discrete charge for both randomly placed dopants and the trapped electron, we highlight the importance of current percolation and of traps with strategic position where the trapped electron blocks a dominant current path.

  18. Synthesizing a 3D auditory scene for use in an electronic travel aid for the blind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujacz, Michał; Strumiłło, Paweł

    2008-01-01

    A system for auditory presentation of 3D scenes to the blind is presented, with the focus of the paper on the synthesis of sound codes suitable to carry important scene information. First, a short review of existing electronic travel aids for the blind (ETAs) is provided. Second, the project of the wearable ETA device, currently under development at the Technical University of Lodz, is outlined, along with the system modules: 3D scene reconstruction, object (obstacle) selection, synthesis of the sound code and the application of head related transfer functions (HRTFs) for generating spatialized sound. The importance of psychoacoustics, especially Bregman's theory of sound streams, is analyzed and proposed methods of sound code synthesis are presented, along with the software used for their verification.

  19. 3D motion of DNA-Au nanoconjugates in graphene liquid cell electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Smith, Jessica M; Park, Jungwon; Kim, Kwanpyo; Ho, Davy; Rasool, Haider I; Zettl, Alex; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2013-09-11

    Liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can probe and visualize dynamic events with structural or functional details at the nanoscale in a liquid medium. Earlier efforts have focused on the growth and transformation kinetics of hard material systems, relying on their stability under electron beam. Our recently developed graphene liquid cell technique pushed the spatial resolution of such imaging to the atomic scale but still focused on growth trajectories of metallic nanocrystals. Here, we adopt this technique to imaging three-dimensional (3D) dynamics of soft materials instead, double strand (dsDNA) connecting Au nanocrystals as one example, at nanometer resolution. We demonstrate first that a graphene liquid cell can seal an aqueous sample solution of a lower vapor pressure than previously investigated well against the high vacuum in TEM. Then, from quantitative analysis of real time nanocrystal trajectories, we show that the status and configuration of dsDNA dictate the motions of linked nanocrystals throughout the imaging time of minutes. This sustained connecting ability of dsDNA enables this unprecedented continuous imaging of its dynamics via TEM. Furthermore, the inert graphene surface minimizes sample-substrate interaction and allows the whole nanostructure to rotate freely in the liquid environment; we thus develop and implement the reconstruction of 3D configuration and motions of the nanostructure from the series of 2D projected TEM images captured while it rotates. In addition to further proving the nanoconjugate structural stability, this reconstruction demonstrates 3D dynamic imaging by TEM beyond its conventional use in seeing a flattened and dry sample. Altogether, we foresee the new and exciting use of graphene liquid cell TEM in imaging 3D biomolecular transformations or interaction dynamics at nanometer resolution. PMID:23944844

  20. A nanofiber based artificial electronic skin with high pressure sensitivity and 3D conformability.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Weibin; Liu, Qiongzhen; Wu, Yongzhi; Wang, Yuedan; Qing, Xing; Li, Mufang; Liu, Ke; Wang, Wenwen; Wang, Dong

    2016-06-16

    Pressure sensors with 3D conformability are highly desirable components for artificial electronic skin or e-textiles that can mimic natural skin, especially for application in real-time monitoring of human physiological signals. Here, a nanofiber based electronic skin with ultra-high pressure sensitivity and 3D conformability is designed and built by interlocking two elastic patterned nanofibrous membranes. The patterned membrane is facilely prepared by casting conductive nanofiber ink into a silicon mould to form an array of semi-spheroid-like protuberances. The protuberances composed of intertwined elastic POE nanofibers and PPy@PVA-co-PE nanofibers afford a tunable effective elastic modulus that is capable of capturing varied strains and stresses, thereby contributing to a high sensitivity for pressure sensing. This electronic skin-like sensor demonstrates an ultra-high sensitivity (1.24 kPa(-1)) below 150 Pa with a detection limit as low as about 1.3 Pa. The pixelated sensor array and a RGB-LED light are then assembled into a circuit and show a feasibility for visual detection of spatial pressure. Furthermore, a nanofiber based proof-of-concept wireless pressure sensor with a bluetooth module as a signal transmitter is proposed and has demonstrated great promise for wireless monitoring of human physiological signals, indicating a potential for large scale wearable electronic devices or e-skin. PMID:27250529

  1. Characterization of 3D interconnected microstructural network in mixed ionic and electronic conducting ceramic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, William M.; Brinkman, Kyle S.; Lin, Ye; Su, Dong; Cocco, Alex P.; Nakajo, Arata; Degostin, Matthew B.; Chen-Wiegart, Yu-Chen Karen; Wang, Jun; Chen, Fanglin; Chu, Yong S.; Chiu, Wilson K. S.

    2014-04-01

    The microstructure and connectivity of the ionic and electronic conductive phases in composite ceramic membranes are directly related to device performance. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) including chemical mapping combined with X-ray nanotomography (XNT) have been used to characterize the composition and 3-D microstructure of a MIEC composite model system consisting of a Ce0.8Gd0.2O2 (GDC) oxygen ion conductive phase and a CoFe2O4 (CFO) electronic conductive phase. The microstructural data is discussed, including the composition and distribution of an emergent phase which takes the form of isolated and distinct regions. Performance implications are considered with regards to the design of new material systems which evolve under non-equilibrium operating conditions.The microstructure and connectivity of the ionic and electronic conductive phases in composite ceramic membranes are directly related to device performance. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) including chemical mapping combined with X-ray nanotomography (XNT) have been used to characterize the composition and 3-D microstructure of a MIEC composite model system consisting of a Ce0.8Gd0.2O2 (GDC) oxygen ion conductive phase and a CoFe2O4 (CFO) electronic conductive phase. The microstructural data is discussed, including the composition and distribution of an emergent phase which takes the form of isolated and distinct regions. Performance implications are considered with regards to the design of new material systems which evolve under non-equilibrium operating conditions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06684c

  2. Dipole approximation in the L2,3 electron excited spectra in 3d transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuroh, K.

    2008-12-01

    A theoretical model based on the autoionization and characteristic decay processes following electron impact ionization of a core electron in solids that has previously been used in calculating electron-energy-loss spectra of transition metals near the 3p -excitation edge has been extended to the 2p -excitation edge for S21c through N27i as well. In the first set of calculations, magnetic effects were ignored and the relative scattering intensity was formulated in terms of the electrostatic interaction U(p,d) between the 3p and 3d electrons of the intermediate resonant configuration state p5dn+1 , using many-body perturbation theory that led to a generalized Fano-type formula for the intensity profiles. In the second set of calculations in which magnetic effects were included as well, an analysis based on the Bethe-Born formalism of inelastic scattering of electrons on atoms was used. The nature of the relative magnitudes of U(p,d) and the spin-orbit parameters ς3p and ς3d and the localized nature of the 3p state necessitated the diagonalization of the intermediate configuration state p5dn+1 to determine the multiplet splitting and their corresponding intensities in the LS -coupling limit using fractional parentage scheme. The nonrelativistic multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock (MCHF) code was used in determining the ground and continuum state wave functions, and the itinerant 3d states in the solid were approximated with an atomic MCHF-wave function. The outline above is applied to the 2p -excitation edge, except that because of the relative magnitudes of U(p,d) , ς2p , and ς3d , it is found that LK coupling is suitable for Sc, Ti, and V, while jK coupling is appropriate for Cr to Ni when it comes to the diagonalization of the configuration p5dn+1 to determine the multiplet splitting and their associated scattering intensities. In the dipole approximation, the scattering intensities separate into two distinct manifolds that arise from the p3/2 and p1/2 states. The

  3. Electron enrichment in 3d transition metal oxide hetero-nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kronawitter, Coleman X; Bakke, Jonathan R; Wheeler, Damon A; Wang, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Chinglin; Antoun, Bonnie R; Zhang, Jin Z; Guo, Jinghua; Bent, Stacey F; Mao, Samuel S; Vayssieres, Lionel

    2011-09-14

    Direct experimental observation of spontaneous electron enrichment of metal d orbitals in a new transition metal oxide heterostructure with nanoscale dimensionality is reported. Aqueous chemical synthesis and vapor phase deposition are combined to fabricate oriented arrays of high-interfacial-area hetero-nanostructures comprised of titanium oxide and iron oxide nanomaterials. Synchrotron-based soft X-ray spectroscopy techniques with high spectral resolution are utilized to directly probe the titanium and oxygen orbital character of the interfacial region's occupied and unoccupied densities of states. These data demonstrate the interface to possess electrons in Ti 3d bands and an emergent degree of orbital hybridization that is absent in parent oxide reference crystals. The carrier dynamics of the hetero-nanostructures are studied by ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy, which reveals the presence of a dense manifold of states, the relaxations from which exhibit multiple exponential decays whose magnitudes depend on their energetic positions within the electronic structure.

  4. Electron Microscopy: From 2D to 3D Images with Special Reference to Muscle

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This is a brief and necessarily very sketchy presentation of the evolution in electron microscopy (EM) imaging that was driven by the necessity of extracting 3-D views from the essentially 2-D images produced by the electron beam. The lens design of standard transmission electron microscope has not been greatly altered since its inception. However, technical advances in specimen preparation, image collection and analysis gradually induced an astounding progression over a period of about 50 years. From the early images that redefined tissues, cell and cell organelles at the sub-micron level, to the current nano-resolution reconstructions of organelles and proteins the step is very large. The review is written by an investigator who has followed the field for many years, but often from the sidelines, and with great wonder. Her interest in muscle ultrastructure colors the writing. More specific detailed reviews are presented in this issue. PMID:26913146

  5. Electron Microscopy: From 2D to 3D Images with Special Reference to Muscle.

    PubMed

    Franzini-Armstrong, Clara

    2015-01-01

    This is a brief and necessarily very sketchy presentation of the evolution in electron microscopy (EM) imaging that was driven by the necessity of extracting 3-D views from the essentially 2-D images produced by the electron beam. The lens design of standard transmission electron microscope has not been greatly altered since its inception. However, technical advances in specimen preparation, image collection and analysis gradually induced an astounding progression over a period of about 50 years. From the early images that redefined tissues, cell and cell organelles at the sub-micron level, to the current nano-resolution reconstructions of organelles and proteins the step is very large. The review is written by an investigator who has followed the field for many years, but often from the sidelines, and with great wonder. Her interest in muscle ultrastructure colors the writing. More specific detailed reviews are presented in this issue. PMID:26913146

  6. 3-D readout-electronics packaging for high-bandwidth massively paralleled imager

    DOEpatents

    Kwiatkowski, Kris; Lyke, James

    2007-12-18

    Dense, massively parallel signal processing electronics are co-packaged behind associated sensor pixels. Microchips containing a linear or bilinear arrangement of photo-sensors, together with associated complex electronics, are integrated into a simple 3-D structure (a "mirror cube"). An array of photo-sensitive cells are disposed on a stacked CMOS chip's surface at a 45.degree. angle from light reflecting mirror surfaces formed on a neighboring CMOS chip surface. Image processing electronics are held within the stacked CMOS chip layers. Electrical connections couple each of said stacked CMOS chip layers and a distribution grid, the connections for distributing power and signals to components associated with each stacked CSMO chip layer.

  7. Self-Consistent 3D Modeling of Electron Cloud Dynamics and Beam Response

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, Miguel; Furman, M.A.; Celata, C.M.; Kireeff-Covo, M.; Sonnad, K.G.; Vay, J.-L.; Venturini, M.; Cohen, R.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.; Molvik, A.; Stoltz, P.

    2007-04-02

    We present recent advances in the modeling of beam electron-cloud dynamics, including surface effects such as secondary electron emission, gas desorption, etc, and volumetric effects such as ionization of residual gas and charge-exchange reactions. Simulations for the HCX facility with the code WARP/POSINST will be described and their validity demonstrated by benchmarks against measurements. The code models a wide range of physical processes and uses a number of novel techniques, including a large-timestep electron mover that smoothly interpolates between direct orbit calculation and guiding-center drift equations, and a new computational technique, based on a Lorentz transformation to a moving frame, that allows the cost of a fully 3D simulation to be reduced to that of a quasi-static approximation.

  8. 3D Imaging of Diatoms with Ion-abrasion Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Mark; Kim, Sang; Shi, Dan; Scott, Keana; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2009-01-01

    Ion-abrasion scanning electron microscopy (IASEM) takes advantage of focused ion beams to abrade thin sections from the surface of bulk specimens, coupled with SEM to image the surface of each section, enabling 3D reconstructions of subcellular architecture at ~ 30 nm resolution. Here, we report the first application of IASEM for imaging a biomineralizing organism, the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Diatoms have highly patterned silica-based cell wall structures that are unique models for the study and application of directed nanomaterials synthesis by biological systems. Our study provides new insights into the architecture and assembly principles of both the “hard” (siliceous) and “soft” (organic) components of the cell. From 3D reconstructions of developmentally synchronized diatoms captured at different stages, we show that both micro- and nanoscale siliceous structures can be visualized at specific stages in their formation. We show that not only are structures visualized in a whole-cell context, but demonstrate that fragile, early-stage structures are visible, and that this can be combined with elemental mapping in the exposed slice. We demonstrate that the 3D architectures of silica structures, and the cellular components that mediate their creation and positioning can be visualized simultaneously, providing new opportunities to study and manipulate mineral nanostructures in a genetically tractable system. PMID:19269330

  9. An accurate dynamical electron diffraction algorithm for reflection high-energy electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Cai, C. Y.; Lv, C. L.; Zhou, G. W.; Wang, Y. G.

    2015-12-01

    The conventional multislice method (CMS) method, one of the most popular dynamical electron diffraction calculation procedures in transmission electron microscopy, was introduced to calculate reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) as it is well adapted to deal with the deviations from the periodicity in the direction parallel to the surface. However, in the present work, we show that the CMS method is no longer sufficiently accurate for simulating RHEED with the accelerating voltage 3-100 kV because of the high-energy approximation. An accurate multislice (AMS) method can be an alternative for more accurate RHEED calculations with reasonable computing time. A detailed comparison of the numerical calculation of the AMS method and the CMS method is carried out with respect to different accelerating voltages, surface structure models, Debye-Waller factors and glancing angles.

  10. Robust evaluation of 3D electron cryomicroscopy data using tilt-pairs

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Christopher J.; Passmore, Lori A.

    2014-01-01

    Determining the structure of a protein complex using electron microscopy requires the calculation of a 3D density map from 2D images of single particles. Since the individual images are taken at low electron dose to avoid radiation damage, they are noisy and difficult to align with each other. This can result in incorrect maps, making validation essential. Pairs of electron micrographs taken at known angles to each other (tilt-pairs) can be used to measure the accuracy of assigned projection orientations and verify the soundness of calculated maps. Here we establish a statistical framework for evaluating images and density maps using tilt-pairs. The directional distribution of such angular data is modelled using a Fisher distribution on the unit sphere. This provides a simple, quantitative and easily comparable metric, the concentration parameter κ, for evaluating the quality of datasets and density maps that is independent of the data collection and analysis methods. A large κ is indicative of good agreement between the particle images and the 3D density map. For structure validation, we recommend κ>10 and a p-value <0.01. The statistical framework herein allows one to objectively answer the question: Is a reconstructed density map correct within a particular confidence interval? PMID:25016098

  11. Scipion: A software framework toward integration, reproducibility and validation in 3D electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa-Trevín, J M; Quintana, A; Del Cano, L; Zaldívar, A; Foche, I; Gutiérrez, J; Gómez-Blanco, J; Burguet-Castell, J; Cuenca-Alba, J; Abrishami, V; Vargas, J; Otón, J; Sharov, G; Vilas, J L; Navas, J; Conesa, P; Kazemi, M; Marabini, R; Sorzano, C O S; Carazo, J M

    2016-07-01

    In the past few years, 3D electron microscopy (3DEM) has undergone a revolution in instrumentation and methodology. One of the central players in this wide-reaching change is the continuous development of image processing software. Here we present Scipion, a software framework for integrating several 3DEM software packages through a workflow-based approach. Scipion allows the execution of reusable, standardized, traceable and reproducible image-processing protocols. These protocols incorporate tools from different programs while providing full interoperability among them. Scipion is an open-source project that can be downloaded from http://scipion.cnb.csic.es. PMID:27108186

  12. Scipion: A software framework toward integration, reproducibility and validation in 3D electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa-Trevín, J M; Quintana, A; Del Cano, L; Zaldívar, A; Foche, I; Gutiérrez, J; Gómez-Blanco, J; Burguet-Castell, J; Cuenca-Alba, J; Abrishami, V; Vargas, J; Otón, J; Sharov, G; Vilas, J L; Navas, J; Conesa, P; Kazemi, M; Marabini, R; Sorzano, C O S; Carazo, J M

    2016-07-01

    In the past few years, 3D electron microscopy (3DEM) has undergone a revolution in instrumentation and methodology. One of the central players in this wide-reaching change is the continuous development of image processing software. Here we present Scipion, a software framework for integrating several 3DEM software packages through a workflow-based approach. Scipion allows the execution of reusable, standardized, traceable and reproducible image-processing protocols. These protocols incorporate tools from different programs while providing full interoperability among them. Scipion is an open-source project that can be downloaded from http://scipion.cnb.csic.es.

  13. 3D Distribution of the Coronal Electron Density and its Evolution with Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tongjiang; Reginald, Nelson Leslie; Davila, Joseph M.; St. Cyr, Orville Chris

    2016-05-01

    The variability of the solar white-light corona and its connection to the solar activity has been studied for more than a half century. It is widely accepted that the temporal variation of the total radiance of the K-corona follows the solar cycle pattern (e.g., correlated with sunspot number). However, the origin of this variation and its relationships with regard to coronal mass ejections and the solar wind are yet to be clearly understood. We know that the COR1-A and –B instruments onboard the STEREO spacecraft have continued to perform high-cadence (5 min) polarized brightness measurements from two different vantage points over a long period of time that encompasses the solar minimum of Solar Cycle 23 to the solar maximum of Solar Cycle 24. This extended period of polarized brightness measurements can now be used to reconstruct 3D electron density distributions of the corona between the heliocentric heights of 1.5-4.0 solar radii. In this study we have constructed the 3D coronal density models for 100 Carrington rotations (CRs) from 2007 to 2014 using the spherically symmetric inversion (SSI) method. The validity of these 3D density models is verified by comparing with similar 3D density models created by other means such as tomography, MHD modeling, and 2D density distributions inverted from the polarized brightness images from LASCO/C2 instrument onboard the SOHO spacecraft. When examining the causes for the temporal variation of the global electron content we find that its increase from the solar minimum to maximum depends on changes to both the total area and mean density of coronal streamers. We also find that the global and hemispheric electron contents show quasi-periodic variations with a period of 8-9 CRs during the ascending and maximum phases of Solar Cycle 24 through wavelet analysis. In addition, we also explore any obvious relationships between temporal variation of the global electron content with the photospheric magnetic flux, total mass of

  14. 3D scanning electron microscopy applied to surface characterization of fluorosed dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Limandri, Silvina; Galván Josa, Víctor; Valentinuzzi, María Cecilia; Chena, María Emilia; Castellano, Gustavo

    2016-05-01

    The enamel surfaces of fluorotic teeth were studied by scanning electron stereomicroscopy. Different whitening treatments were applied to 25 pieces to remove stains caused by fluorosis and their surfaces were characterized by stereomicroscopy in order to obtain functional and amplitude parameters. The topographic features resulting for each treatment were determined through these parameters. The results obtained show that the 3D reconstruction achieved from the SEM stereo pairs is a valuable potential alternative for the surface characterization of this kind of samples. PMID:26930005

  15. Electron microscopic evidence for nucleation and growth of 3D acetylcholine receptor microcrystals in structured lipid-detergent matrices.

    PubMed

    Paas, Yoav; Cartaud, Jean; Recouvreur, Michel; Grailhe, Regis; Dufresne, Virginie; Pebay-Peyroula, Eva; Landau, Ehud M; Changeux, Jean-Pierre

    2003-09-30

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) belong to a superfamily of oligomeric proteins that transduce electric signals across the cell membrane on binding of neurotransmitters. These receptors harbor a large extracellular ligand-binding domain directly linked to an ion-conducting channel-forming domain that spans the cell membrane 20 times and considerably extends into the cytoplasm. Thus far, none of these receptor channels has been crystallized in three dimensions. The crystallization of the AChR from Torpedo marmorata electric organs is challenged here in lipidic-detergent matrices. Detergent-soluble AChR complexed with alpha-bungarotoxin (alphaBTx), a polypeptidic competitive antagonist, was purified. The AChR-alphaBTx complex was reconstituted in a lipidic matrix composed of monoolein bilayers that are structured in three dimensions. The alphaBTx was conjugated to a photo-stable fluorophore, enabling us to monitor the physical behavior of the receptor-toxin complex in the lipidic matrix under light stereomicroscope, and to freeze fracture regions containing the receptor-toxin complex for visualization under a transmission electron microscope. Conditions were established for forming 2D receptor-toxin lattices that are stacked in the third dimension. 3D AChR nanocrystals were thereby grown inside the highly viscous lipidic 3D matrix. Slow emulsification of the lipidic matrix converted these nanocrystals into 3D elongated thin crystal plates of micrometer size. The latter are stable in detergent-containing aqueous solutions and can currently be used for seeding and epitaxial growth, en route to crystals of appropriate dimensions for x-ray diffraction studies.

  16. Scanning transmission and computer-aided volumic electron microscopy: 3-D modeling of entire cells by electronic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bron, Christophe; Gremillet, Philip; Launay, D.; Jourlin, Michel; Gautschi, H. P.; Baechi, Thomas; Schuepbach, Joerg

    1990-05-01

    The digital processing of electron microscopic images from serial sections containing laser-induced topographical references allows a 3-D reconstruction at a depth resolution of 30 to 40 nm of entire cells by the use of image analysis methods, as already demonstrated for Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) coupled with a video camera. We decided to use a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (STEM) to get higher contrast and better resolution at medium magnification. The scanning of our specimens at video frequencies is an attractive and easy way to link a STEM with an image processing system but the hysteresis of the electronic spools responsible for the magnetic deviation of the scanning electron beam induces deformations of images which have to be modelized and corrected before registration. Computer algorithms developed for image analysis and treatment correct the artifacts caused by the use of STEM and by serial sectioning to automatically reconstruct the third dimension of the cells. They permit the normalization of the images through logarithmic processing of the original grey level infonnation. The automatic extraction of cell limits allows to link the image analysis and treatments with image synthesis methods by minimal human intervention. The surface representation and the registered images provide an ultrastructural data base from which quantitative 3-D morphological parameters, as well as otherwise impossible visualizations, can be computed. This 3-D image processing named C.A.V.U.M. for Computer Aided Volumic Ultra-Microscopy offers a new tool for the documentation and analysis of cell ultrastructure and for 3-D morphometric studies at EM magnifications. Further, a virtual observer can be computed in such a way as to simulate a visit of the reconstructed object.

  17. A nanofiber based artificial electronic skin with high pressure sensitivity and 3D conformability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Weibin; Liu, Qiongzhen; Wu, Yongzhi; Wang, Yuedan; Qing, Xing; Li, Mufang; Liu, Ke; Wang, Wenwen; Wang, Dong

    2016-06-01

    Pressure sensors with 3D conformability are highly desirable components for artificial electronic skin or e-textiles that can mimic natural skin, especially for application in real-time monitoring of human physiological signals. Here, a nanofiber based electronic skin with ultra-high pressure sensitivity and 3D conformability is designed and built by interlocking two elastic patterned nanofibrous membranes. The patterned membrane is facilely prepared by casting conductive nanofiber ink into a silicon mould to form an array of semi-spheroid-like protuberances. The protuberances composed of intertwined elastic POE nanofibers and PPy@PVA-co-PE nanofibers afford a tunable effective elastic modulus that is capable of capturing varied strains and stresses, thereby contributing to a high sensitivity for pressure sensing. This electronic skin-like sensor demonstrates an ultra-high sensitivity (1.24 kPa-1) below 150 Pa with a detection limit as low as about 1.3 Pa. The pixelated sensor array and a RGB-LED light are then assembled into a circuit and show a feasibility for visual detection of spatial pressure. Furthermore, a nanofiber based proof-of-concept wireless pressure sensor with a bluetooth module as a signal transmitter is proposed and has demonstrated great promise for wireless monitoring of human physiological signals, indicating a potential for large scale wearable electronic devices or e-skin.Pressure sensors with 3D conformability are highly desirable components for artificial electronic skin or e-textiles that can mimic natural skin, especially for application in real-time monitoring of human physiological signals. Here, a nanofiber based electronic skin with ultra-high pressure sensitivity and 3D conformability is designed and built by interlocking two elastic patterned nanofibrous membranes. The patterned membrane is facilely prepared by casting conductive nanofiber ink into a silicon mould to form an array of semi-spheroid-like protuberances. The

  18. Mapping atomic arrays in crystals by interpreting electron diffraction patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Bryan; Lanning, Nick; Ware, William; Wigginton, Spencer; Lee, Chris; Bahrim, Cristian

    2012-03-01

    Analyzing diffraction of light and electrons allows one to map the geometric structure of nettings and crystals. There is a strong analogy between light and electron diffraction because in both cases the diffraction angles are small and the patterns may be described as images of a Fourier transform. Light diffraction patterns may be interpreted as the optical transforms of 2D-nettings and therefore are simpler to understand. The interpretation of electron diffraction patterns is more sophisticated and requires the visualization of the crystal's reciprocal lattice using vector algebra. With light we can analyze the redistribution of energy in diffraction patterns. Our studies indicate a deviation of about 1% from the exact conservation of energy when the ratio between slit width and slit separation approaches 1. Such a deviation is expected to show up in electron diffraction patterns produced by super dense materials. We focused our studies on electron diffraction by graphite for understanding the mechanism of electron transmission through Carbon atoms. From measuring diffraction patterns and applying the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, we are able to estimate the atomic transmission time of the projectile electron and the group velocity of the electron passing through the crystal. Finally, our analysis leads to the estimation of the C-C bond in a hexagonal closed-packed (hcp) graphite crystal and the volume of the Carbon atom which diffracts the projectile electron. Sponsored by the STAIRSTEP-NSF-DUE grant# 0757057.

  19. 3D structure of eukaryotic flagella in a quiescent state revealed by cryo-electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nicastro, Daniela; McIntosh, J. Richard; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    We have used cryo-electron tomography to investigate the 3D structure and macromolecular organization of intact, frozen-hydrated sea urchin sperm flagella in a quiescent state. The tomographic reconstructions provide information at a resolution better than 6 nm about the in situ arrangements of macromolecules that are key for flagellar motility. We have visualized the heptameric rings of the motor domains in the outer dynein arm complex and determined that they lie parallel to the plane that contains the axes of neighboring flagellar microtubules. Both the material associated with the central pair of microtubules and the radial spokes display a plane of symmetry that helps to explain the planar beat pattern of these flagella. Cryo-electron tomography has proven to be a powerful technique for helping us understand the relationships between flagellar structure and function and the design of macromolecular machines in situ. PMID:16246999

  20. 3D structure of eukaryotic flagella in a quiescent state revealed by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Nicastro, Daniela; McIntosh, J Richard; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2005-11-01

    We have used cryo-electron tomography to investigate the 3D structure and macromolecular organization of intact, frozen-hydrated sea urchin sperm flagella in a quiescent state. The tomographic reconstructions provide information at a resolution better than 6 nm about the in situ arrangements of macromolecules that are key for flagellar motility. We have visualized the heptameric rings of the motor domains in the outer dynein arm complex and determined that they lie parallel to the plane that contains the axes of neighboring flagellar microtubules. Both the material associated with the central pair of microtubules and the radial spokes display a plane of symmetry that helps to explain the planar beat pattern of these flagella. Cryo-electron tomography has proven to be a powerful technique for helping us understand the relationships between flagellar structure and function and the design of macromolecular machines in situ. PMID:16246999

  1. 3D mapping of nanoscale electric potentials in semiconductor structures using electron-holographic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Daniel; Lubk, Axel; Prete, Paola; Lovergine, Nico; Lichte, Hannes

    2016-09-01

    Off-axis electron holography (EH) is a powerful method for mapping projected electric potentials, such as built-in potentials in semiconductor devices, in two dimensions (2D) at nanometer resolution. However, not well-defined thickness profiles, surface effects, and composition changes of the sample under investigation complicate the interpretation of the projected potentials. Here, we demonstrate how these problems can be overcome by combining EH with tomographic techniques, that is, electron holographic tomography (EHT), reconstructing electric potentials in 3D. We present EHT reconstructions of an n-type MOSFET including its dopant-related built-in potentials inside the device, as well as of a GaAs/AlGaAs core-multishell nanowire containing a 5 nm thick quantum well tube.

  2. 3D structure of eukaryotic flagella in a quiescent state revealed by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Nicastro, Daniela; McIntosh, J Richard; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2005-11-01

    We have used cryo-electron tomography to investigate the 3D structure and macromolecular organization of intact, frozen-hydrated sea urchin sperm flagella in a quiescent state. The tomographic reconstructions provide information at a resolution better than 6 nm about the in situ arrangements of macromolecules that are key for flagellar motility. We have visualized the heptameric rings of the motor domains in the outer dynein arm complex and determined that they lie parallel to the plane that contains the axes of neighboring flagellar microtubules. Both the material associated with the central pair of microtubules and the radial spokes display a plane of symmetry that helps to explain the planar beat pattern of these flagella. Cryo-electron tomography has proven to be a powerful technique for helping us understand the relationships between flagellar structure and function and the design of macromolecular machines in situ.

  3. Cellulose Nanocrystals as Chiral Inducers: Enantioselective Catalysis and Transmission Electron Microscopy 3D Characterization.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Madhu; Basu, Kaustuv; Benoit, Charles; Cirtiu, Ciprian M; Vali, Hojatollah; Moores, Audrey

    2015-05-20

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), derived from cellulose, provide us with an opportunity to devise more sustainable solutions to current technological challenges. Enantioselective catalysis, especially heterogeneous, is the preferred method for the synthesis of pure chiral molecules in the fine chemical industries. Cellulose has been long sought as a chiral inducer in enantioselective catalysis. We report herein an unprecedentedly high enantiomeric excess (ee) for Pd patches deposited onto CNCs used as catalysts for the hydrogenation of prochiral ketones in water at room temperature and 4 bar H2. Our system, where CNCs acted as support and sole chiral source, achieved an ee of 65% with 100% conversions. Cryo-electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and tomography were used for the first time to study the 3D structure of a metal functionalized CNC hybrid. It established the presence of sub-nanometer-thick Pd patches at the surface of CNCs and provided insight into the chiral induction mechanism.

  4. Predicting the Electronic Properties of 3D, Million-atom Semiconductor nanostructure Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Jack Dongarra; Stanimire Tomov

    2012-03-15

    This final report describes the work done by Jack Dongarra (University Distinguished Professor) and Stanimire Tomov (Research Scientist) related to the DOE project entitled Predicting the Electronic Properties of 3D, Million-Atom Semiconductor Nanostructure Architectures. In this project we addressed the mathematical methodology required to calculate the electronic and transport properties of large nanostructures with comparable accuracy and reliability to that of current ab initio methods. This capability is critical for further developing the field, yet it is missing in all the existing computational methods. Additionally, quantitative comparisons with experiments are often needed for a qualitative understanding of the physics, and for guiding the design of new nanostructures. We focused on the mathematical challenges of the project, in particular on solvers and preconditioners for large scale eigenvalue problems that occur in the computation of electronic states of large nanosystems. Usually, the states of interest lie in the interior of the spectrum and their computation poses great difficulties for existing algorithms. The electronic properties of a semiconductor nanostructure architecture can be predicted/determined by computing its band structure. Of particular importance are the 'band edge states' (electronic states near the energy gap) which can be computed from a properly defined interior eigenvalue problem. Our primary mathematics and computational challenge here has been to develop an efficient solution methodology for finding these interior states for very large systems. Our work has produced excellent results in terms of developing both new and extending current state-of-the-art techniques.

  5. BioMEA: a versatile high-density 3D microelectrode array system using integrated electronics.

    PubMed

    Charvet, Guillaume; Rousseau, Lionel; Billoint, Olivier; Gharbi, Sadok; Rostaing, Jean-Pierre; Joucla, Sébastien; Trevisiol, Michel; Bourgerette, Alain; Chauvet, Philippe; Moulin, Céline; Goy, François; Mercier, Bruno; Colin, Mikael; Spirkovitch, Serge; Fanet, Hervé; Meyrand, Pierre; Guillemaud, Régis; Yvert, Blaise

    2010-04-15

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) offer a powerful tool to both record activity and deliver electrical microstimulations to neural networks either in vitro or in vivo. Microelectronics microfabrication technologies now allow building high-density MEAs containing several hundreds of microelectrodes. However, dense arrays of 3D micro-needle electrodes, providing closer contact with the neural tissue than planar electrodes, are not achievable using conventional isotropic etching processes. Moreover, increasing the number of electrodes using conventional electronics is difficult to achieve into compact devices addressing all channels independently for simultaneous recording and stimulation. Here, we present a full modular and versatile 256-channel MEA system based on integrated electronics. First, transparent high-density arrays of 3D-shaped microelectrodes were realized by deep reactive ion etching techniques of a silicon substrate reported on glass. This approach allowed achieving high electrode aspect ratios, and different shapes of tip electrodes. Next, we developed a dedicated analog 64-channel Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) including one amplification stage and one current generator per channel, and analog output multiplexing. A full modular system, called BIOMEA, has been designed, allowing connecting different types of MEAs (64, 128, or 256 electrodes) to different numbers of ASICs for simultaneous recording and/or stimulation on all channels. Finally, this system has been validated experimentally by recording and electrically eliciting low-amplitude spontaneous rhythmic activity (both LFPs and spikes) in the developing mouse CNS. The availability of high-density MEA systems with integrated electronics will offer new possibilities for both in vitro and in vivo studies of large neural networks.

  6. 3D electromagnetic simulation of spatial autoresonance acceleration of electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugar-Zhabon, V. D.; González, J. D.; Orozco, E. A.

    2016-02-01

    The results of full electromagnetic simulations of the electron beam acceleration by a TE 112 linear polarized electromagnetic field through Space Autoresonance Acceleration mechanism are presented. In the simulations, both the self-sustaned electric field and selfsustained magnetic field produced by the beam electrons are included into the elaborated 3D Particle in Cell code. In this system, the space profile of the magnetostatic field maintains the electron beams in the acceleration regime along their trajectories. The beam current density evolution is calculated applying the charge conservation method. The full magnetic field in the superparticle positions is found by employing the trilinear interpolation of the mesh node data. The relativistic Newton-Lorentz equation presented in the centered finite difference form is solved using the Boris algorithm that provides visualization of the beam electrons pathway and energy evolution. A comparison between the data obtained from the full electromagnetic simulations and the results derived from the motion equation depicted in an electrostatic approximation is carried out. It is found that the self-sustained magnetic field is a factor which improves the resonance phase conditions and reduces the beam energy spread.

  7. Microdefects and 3 d electrons in ordered B2-FeAl alloys investigated by positron annihilation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuyang, Huang; Yanqiong, Lu; Yanyan, Zhu; Yuxia, Li; Wen, Deng

    2009-09-01

    Microdefects and 3d electrons in B2-FeAl alloys with different chemical composition, single crystal of Fe and cold-rolled Fe has been studied by positron lifetime and coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopy. The coincidence Doppler broadening spectrum of the single crystal of Fe shows the highest 3d electron signal in the spectra of all tested samples. The 3d electron signal in the spectrum of Fe50Al50 alloy is much lower than that of the cold-rolled Fe. This indicates that some of the 3d electrons of Fe atoms and 3p electrons of Al atoms in B2-FeAl alloy are localized to form strong covalent bonds, thus decreasing the probability of positron annihilation with 3d electrons of Fe atoms. With the increase of Al content in B2-FeAl alloys, the 3d electron signal in the spectrum of the alloy decreases, while the open volume of defect increases.

  8. 3D hybrid simulations with gyrokinetic particle ions and fluid electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Belova, E.V.; Park, W.; Fu, G.Y.; Strauss, H.R.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    1998-12-31

    The previous hybrid MHD/particle model (MH3D-K code) represented energetic ions as gyrokinetic (or drift-kinetic) particles coupled to MHD equations using the pressure or current coupling scheme. A small energetic to bulk ion density ratio was assumed, n{sub h}/n{sub b} {much_lt} 1, allowing the neglect of the energetic ion perpendicular inertia in the momentum equation and the use of MHD Ohm`s law E = {minus}v{sub b} {times} B. A generalization of this model in which all ions are treated as gyrokinetic/drift-kinetic particles and fluid description is used for the electron dynamics is considered in this paper.

  9. Local electronic structure and magnetic properties of 3d transition metal doped GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, He; Duan, Haiming

    2008-05-01

    The local electronic structure and magnetic properties of GaAs doped with 3d transition metal (Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) were studied by using discrete variational method (DVM) based on density functional theory. The calculated result indicated that the magnetic moment of transition metal increases first and then decreases, and reaches the maximum value when Mn is doped into GaAs. In the case of Mn concentration of 1.4%, the magnetic moment of Mn is in good agreement with the experimental result. The coupling between impure atoms in the system with two impure atoms was found to have obvious variation. For different transition metal, the coupling between the impure atom and the nearest neighbor As also has different variation.

  10. Investigation of resins suitable for the preparation of biological sample for 3-D electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kizilyaprak, Caroline; Longo, Giovanni; Daraspe, Jean; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-02-01

    In the last two decades, the third-dimension has become a focus of attention in electron microscopy to better understand the interactions within subcellular compartments. Initially, transmission electron tomography (TEM tomography) was introduced to image the cell volume in semi-thin sections (∼ 500 nm). With the introduction of the focused ion beam scanning electron microscope, a new tool, FIB-SEM tomography, became available to image much larger volumes. During TEM tomography and FIB-SEM tomography, the resin section is exposed to a high electron/ion dose such that the stability of the resin embedded biological sample becomes an important issue. The shrinkage of a resin section in each dimension, especially in depth, is a well-known phenomenon. To ensure the dimensional integrity of the final volume of the cell, it is important to assess the properties of the different resins and determine the formulation which has the best stability in the electron/ion beam. Here, eight different resin formulations were examined. The effects of radiation damage were evaluated after different times of TEM irradiation. To get additional information on mass-loss and the physical properties of the resins (stiffness and adhesion), the topography of the irradiated areas was analysed with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Further, the behaviour of the resins was analysed after ion milling of the surface of the sample with different ion currents. In conclusion, two resin formulations, Hard Plus and the mixture of Durcupan/Epon, emerged that were considerably less affected and reasonably stable in the electron/ion beam and thus suitable for the 3-D investigation of biological samples. PMID:25433274

  11. FERM3D: A finite element R-matrix electron molecule scattering code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonzani, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    FERM3D is a three-dimensional finite element program, for the elastic scattering of a low energy electron from a general polyatomic molecule, which is converted to a potential scattering problem. The code is based on tricubic polynomials in spherical coordinates. The electron-molecule interaction is treated as a sum of three terms: electrostatic, exchange, and polarization. The electrostatic term can be extracted directly from ab initio codes ( GAUSSIAN 98 in the work described here), while the exchange term is approximated using a local density functional. A local polarization potential based on density functional theory [C. Lee, W. Yang, R.G. Parr, Phys. Rev. B 37 (1988) 785] describes the long range attraction to the molecular target induced by the scattering electron. Photoionization calculations are also possible and illustrated in the present work. The generality and simplicity of the approach is important in extending electron-scattering calculations to more complex targets than it is possible with other methods. Program summaryTitle of program:FERM3D Catalogue identifier:ADYL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYL_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested:Intel Xeon, AMD Opteron 64 bit, Compaq Alpha Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested:HP Tru64 Unix v5.1, Red Hat Linux Enterprise 3 Programming language used:Fortran 90 Memory required to execute with typical data:900 MB (neutral CO 2), 2.3 GB (ionic CO 2), 1.4 GB (benzene) No. of bits in a word:32 No. of processors used:1 Has the code been vectorized?:No No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:58 383 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:561 653 Distribution format:tar.gzip file CPC Program library subprograms used:ADDA, ACDP Nature of physical problem:Scattering of an

  12. Single-Particle Cryo-EM and 3D Reconstruction of Hybrid Nanoparticles with Electron-Dense Components.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guimei; Yan, Rui; Zhang, Chuan; Mao, Chengde; Jiang, Wen

    2015-10-01

    Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), accompanied with 3D reconstruction, is a broadly applicable tool for the structural characterization of macromolecules and nanoparticles. Recently, the cryo-EM field has pushed the limits of this technique to higher resolutions and samples of smaller molecular mass, however, some samples still present hurdles to this technique. Hybrid particles with electron-dense components, which have been studied using single-particle cryo-EM yet with limited success in 3D reconstruction due to the interference caused by electron-dense elements, constitute one group of such challenging samples. To process such hybrid particles, a masking method is developed in this work to adaptively remove pixels arising from electron-dense portions in individual projection images while maintaining maximal biomass signals for subsequent 2D alignment, 3D reconstruction, and iterative refinements. As demonstrated by the success in 3D reconstruction of an octahedron DNA/gold hybrid particle, which has been previously published without a 3D reconstruction, the devised strategy that combines adaptive masking and standard single-particle 3D reconstruction approach has overcome the hurdle of electron-dense elements interference, and is generally applicable to cryo-EM structural characterization of most, if not all, hybrid nanomaterials with electron-dense components.

  13. 3D Reconstruction of the Glycocalyx Structure in Mammalian Capillaries using Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Arkill, KP; Neal, CR; Mantell, JM; Michel, CC; Qvortrup, K; Bates, DO; Knupp, C; Squire, JM

    2013-01-01

    Visualising the molecular strands making up the glycocalyx in the lumen of small blood vessels has proved to be difficult using conventional transmission electron microscopy techniques. Images obtained from tissue stained in a variety of ways have revealed a regularity in the organisation of the proteoglycan components of the glycocalyx layer (fundamental spacing about 20 nm), but require a large sample number. Attempts to visualise the glycocalyx face-on (i.e. in a direction perpendicular to the endothelial cell layer in the lumen and directly applicable for permeability modelling) has had limited success (e.g. freeze fracture). A new approach is therefore needed. Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of using the relatively novel electron microscopy technique of 3D electron tomography on two differently stained preparations to reveal details of the architecture of the glycocalyx just above the endothelial cell layer. One preparation uses the novel staining technique using Lanthanum Dysprosium Glycosamino Glycan adhesion (the LaDy GAGa method). PMID:22324320

  14. Interaction of 3d transition metal atoms with charged ion projectiles from Electron Nuclear Dynamics computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelberg, Frank

    2003-03-01

    Computational results on atomic scattering between charged projectiles and transition metal target atoms are presented. This work aims at obtaining detailed information about charge, spin and energy transfer processes that occur between the interacting particles. An in-depth understanding of these phenomena is expected to provide a theoretical basis for the interpretation of various types of ion beam experiments, ranging from gas phase chromatography to spectroscopic observations of fast ions in ferromagnetic media. This contribution focuses on the scattering of light projectiles ranging from He to O, that are prepared in various initial charge states, by 3d transition metal atoms. The presented computations are performed in the framework of Electron Nuclear Dynamics (END)^1 theory which incorporates the coupling between electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom without reliance on the computationally cumbersome and frequently intractable determination of potential energy surfaces. In the present application of END theory to ion - transition metal atom scattering, a supermolecule approach is utilized in conjunction with a spin-unrestricted single determinantal wave function describing the electronic system. Integral scattering, charge and spin exchange cross sections are discussed as functions of the elementary parameters of the problem, such as projectile and target atomic numbers as well as projectile charge and initial kinetic energy. ^1 E.Deumens, A.Diz, R.Longo, Y.Oehrn, Rev.Mod.Phys. 66, 917 (1994)

  15. The Collection of High-Resolution Electron Diffraction Data

    PubMed Central

    Gonen, Tamir

    2013-01-01

    A number of atomic-resolution structures of membrane proteins (better than 3Å resolution) have been determined recently by electron crystallography. While this technique was established more than 40 years ago, it is still in its infancy with regard to the two-dimensional (2D) crystallization, data collection, data analysis, and protein structure determination. In terms of data collection, electron crystallography encompasses both image acquisition and electron diffraction data collection. Other chapters in this volume outline protocols for image collection and analysis. This chapter, however, outlines detailed protocols for data collection by electron diffraction. These include microscope setup, electron diffraction data collection, and troubleshooting. PMID:23132060

  16. FEMTO SECOND ELECTRON BEAM DIFFRACTION USING A PHOTOCATHODE RF GUN.

    SciTech Connect

    WANG,X.J.WU,Z.IHEE,H.

    2003-05-12

    One of the 21st century scientific frontiers is to explore the molecule structure transition on the femtosecond time scale. X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) is one of the tools now under development for investigating femto-second structure transition. We are proposing an alternative technique--femto-second electron diffraction based on a photocathode RF gun. We will present a design of a kHz femto-seconds electron diffraction system based on a photocathode RF gun. Our simulation shows that, the photocathode RF gun can produce 100 fs (FWHM) electron bunch with millions electrons at about 2 MeV. This is at least one order of magnitude reduction in bunch length, and two orders of magnitude increase in number of electrons comparing to present time-resolved electron diffraction system. We will also discuss various issues and limitations related to MeV electron diffraction.

  17. The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle Demonstrated with An Electron Diffraction Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matteucci, Giorgio; Ferrari, Loris; Migliori, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    An experiment analogous to the classical diffraction of light from a circular aperture has been realized with electrons. The results are used to introduce undergraduate students to the wave behaviour of electrons. The diffraction fringes produced by the circular aperture are compared to those predicted by quantum mechanics and are exploited to…

  18. Electronic structure and local magnetism of 3d-5d impurity substituted CeFe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Rakesh; Das, G. P.; Srivastava, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    We present here a systematic first-principles study of electronic structure and local magnetic properties of Ce[Fe0.75M0.25]2 compounds, where M is a 3d, 4d or 5d transition or post-transition element, using the generalized gradient approximation of the density functional theory. The d-f band hybridizations existing in CeFe2 get modified by the impurity M in an orderly manner across a period for each impurity series: the hybridization is strongest for the Mn group impurity in the period and gets diminished on either side of it. The weakening of the d-f hybridization strength is also associated with a relative localization of the Ce 4f states with respect to the delocalized 4f states in CeFe2. The above effects are most prominent for 3d impurity series, while for 4d and 5d impurities, the hybridizations and relocalizations are relatively weak due primarily to the relatively extended nature of 4d and 5d wavefunctions. The Ce local moment is found to decrease from the CeFe2 value in proportion to the strength of relocalization, thus following almost the same orderly trend as obeyed by the d-f hybridization. Further, depending on the way the spin-up and spin-down densities of states of an impurity shift relative to the Fermi energy, the impurity local moments are highest for Mn or Fe group, reduce on either side, become zero for Ni to Ga, and are small but negative for V and Ti. The Ce hyperfine field is found to follow the M local moment in a linear fashion, and vice-versa.

  19. Cellular uptake mechanisms of functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes by 3D electron tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jamal, Khuloud T.; Nerl, Hannah; Müller, Karin H.; Ali-Boucetta, Hanene; Li, Shouping; Haynes, Peter D.; Jinschek, Joerg R.; Prato, Maurizio; Bianco, Alberto; Kostarelos, Kostas; Porter, Alexandra E.

    2011-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being investigated for a variety of biomedical applications. Despite numerous studies, the pathways by which carbon nanotubes enter cells and their subsequent intracellular trafficking and distribution remain poorly determined. Here, we use 3-D electron tomography techniques that offer optimum enhancement of contrast between carbon nanotubes and the plasma membrane to investigate the mechanisms involved in the cellular uptake of shortened, functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT-NH3+). Both human lung epithelial (A549) cells, that are almost incapable of phagocytosis and primary macrophages, capable of extremely efficient phagocytosis, were used. We observed that MWNT-NH3+ were internalised in both phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells by any one of three mechanisms: (a) individually via membrane wrapping; (b) individually by direct membrane translocation; and (c) in clusters within vesicular compartments. At early time points following intracellular translocation, we noticed accumulation of nanotube material within various intracellular compartments, while a long-term (14-day) study using primary human macrophages revealed that MWNT-NH3+ were able to escape vesicular (phagosome) entrapment by translocating directly into the cytoplasm.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being investigated for a variety of biomedical applications. Despite numerous studies, the pathways by which carbon nanotubes enter cells and their subsequent intracellular trafficking and distribution remain poorly determined. Here, we use 3-D electron tomography techniques that offer optimum enhancement of contrast between carbon nanotubes and the plasma membrane to investigate the mechanisms involved in the cellular uptake of shortened, functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT-NH3+). Both human lung epithelial (A549) cells, that are almost incapable of phagocytosis and primary macrophages, capable of extremely efficient phagocytosis, were used. We observed

  20. Correcting for 3D distortion when using backscattered electron detectors in a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Jacob M

    2009-01-01

    A variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VPSEM) can produce a topographic surface relief of a physical object under examination, in addition to its two-dimensional (2D) image. This topographic surface relief is especially helpful when dealing with porous rock because it may elucidate the pore-space structure as well as grain shape and size. Whether the image accurately reproduces the physical object depends on the management of the hardware, acquisition, and postprocessing. Two problems become apparent during testing: (a) a topographic surface relief of a precision ball bearing is distorted and does not correspond to the physical dimensions of the actual sphere and (b) an image of a topographic surface relief of a Berea sandstone is geometrically tilted and topographically distorted even after standard corrections are applied. The procedure presented here is to ensure the veracity of the image, and includes: (a) adjusting the brightness and contrast levels originally provided by the manufacturer and (b) tuning the amplifiers of the backscatter detector plates to be equal to each other, and producing zero voltage when VPSEM is idle. This procedure is tested and verified on the said two physical samples. SCANNING 31: 59-64, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Digital electron diffraction – seeing the whole picture

    SciTech Connect

    Beanland, Richard; Thomas, Paul J.; Woodward, David I.; Thomas, Pamela A.; Roemer, Rudolf A.

    2013-07-01

    Computer control of beam tilt and image capture allows the collection of electron diffraction patterns over a large angular range, without any overlap in diffraction data and from a region limited only by the size of the electron beam. This results in a significant improvement in data volumes and ease of interpretation. The advantages of convergent-beam electron diffraction for symmetry determination at the scale of a few nm are well known. In practice, the approach is often limited due to the restriction on the angular range of the electron beam imposed by the small Bragg angle for high-energy electron diffraction, i.e. a large convergence angle of the incident beam results in overlapping information in the diffraction pattern. Techniques have been generally available since the 1980s which overcome this restriction for individual diffracted beams, by making a compromise between illuminated area and beam convergence. Here a simple technique is described which overcomes all of these problems using computer control, giving electron diffraction data over a large angular range for many diffracted beams from the volume given by a focused electron beam (typically a few nm or less). The increase in the amount of information significantly improves the ease of interpretation and widens the applicability of the technique, particularly for thin materials or those with larger lattice parameters.

  2. MO-H-19A-03: Patient Specific Bolus with 3D Printing Technology for Electron Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, W; Swann, B; Siderits, R; McKenna, M; Khan, A; Yue, N; Zhang, M; Fisher, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Bolus is widely used in electron radiotherapy to achieve desired dose distribution. 3D printing technologies provide clinicians with easy access to fabricate patient specific bolus accommodating patient body surface irregularities and tissue inhomogeneity. This study presents the design and the clinical workflow of 3D printed bolus for patient electron therapy in our clinic. Methods: Patient simulation CT images free of bolus were exported from treatment planning system (TPS) to an in-house developed software package. Bolus with known material properties was designed in the software package and then exported back to the TPS as a structure. Dose calculation was carried out to examine the coverage of the target. After satisfying dose distribution was achieved, the bolus structure was transferred in Standard Tessellation Language (STL) file format for the 3D printer to generate the machine codes for printing. Upon receiving printed bolus, a quick quality assurance was performed with patient resimulated with bolus in place to verify the bolus dosimetric property before treatment started. Results: A patient specific bolus for electron radiotherapy was designed and fabricated in Form 1 3D printer with methacrylate photopolymer resin. Satisfying dose distribution was achieved in patient with bolus setup. Treatment was successfully finished for one patient with the 3D printed bolus. Conclusion: The electron bolus fabrication with 3D printing technology was successfully implemented in clinic practice.

  3. Potential energy curves and electronic structure of 3d transition metal hydrides and their cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Satyender; Masunov, Artëm E.

    2008-12-01

    We investigate gas-phase neutral and cationic hydrides formed by 3d transition metals from Sc to Cu with density functional theory (DFT) methods. The performance of two exchange-correlation functionals, Boese-Martin for kinetics (BMK) and Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS), in predicting bond lengths and energetics, electronic structures, dipole moments, and ionization potentials is evaluated in comparison with available experimental data. To ensure a unique self-consistent field (SCF) solution, we use stability analysis, Fermi smearing, and continuity analysis of the potential energy curves. Broken-symmetry approach was adapted in order to get the qualitatively correct description of the bond dissociation. We found that on average BMK predicted values of dissociation energies and ionization potentials are closer to experiment than those obtained with high level wave function theory methods. This agreement deteriorates quickly when the fraction of the Hartree-Fock exchange in DFT functional is decreased. Natural bond orbital (NBO) population analysis was used to describe the details of chemical bonding in the systems studied. The multireference character in the wave function description of the hydrides is reproduced in broken-symmetry DFT description, as evidenced by NBO analysis. We also propose a new scheme to correct for spin contamination arising in broken-symmetry DFT approach. Unlike conventional schemes, our spin correction is introduced for each spin-polarized electron pair individually and therefore is expected to yield more accurate energy values. We derive an expression to extract the energy of the pure singlet state from the energy of the broken-symmetry DFT description of the low spin state and the energies of the high spin states (pentuplet and two spin-contaminated triplets in the case of two spin-polarized electron pairs). The high spin states are build with canonical natural orbitals and do not require SCF convergence.

  4. Compression of Electron Pulses for Femtosecond Electron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandi, Omid; Yang, Jie; Centurion, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Our goal is to improve the temporal resolution in electron diffraction experiments to 100 fs by compressing the electron pulses using a time-varying electric field. The compressed pulse can be used for a better understanding of the dynamics of molecules under study. A bunch of 3 million electrons is generated at a photocathode by femtosecond UV laser pulses and accelerated to 100 keV in a static electric field. Then, the longitudinal component of the electric field of a microwave cavity is employed to compress the bunch. The cavity's frequency and phase are accurately tuned in such a way that the electric field is parallel to the bunch motion at its arrival and antiparallel to it at its exit. Compression in the transverse directions is done by magnetic lenses. Simulations have been done to predict the bunch profile at different positions and times by General Particle Tracer code. A streak camera has been built to measure the duration of the pulses. It uses the electric field of a discharging parallel plate capacitor to rotate the bunch so that angular spreading of the bunch is proportional to its duration. The capacitor is discharged by a laser pulse incident on a photo switch.

  5. Acoustic backing in 3-D integration of CMUT with front-end electronics.

    PubMed

    Berg, Sigrid; Rønnekleiv, Arne

    2012-07-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) have shown promising qualities for medical imaging. However, there are still some problems to be investigated, and some challenges to overcome. Acoustic backing is necessary to prevent SAWs excited in the surface of the silicon substrate from affecting the transmit pattern from the array. In addition, echoes resulting from bulk waves in the substrate must be removed. There is growing interest in integrating electronic circuits to do some of the beamforming directly below the transducer array. This may be easier to achieve for CMUTs than for traditional piezoelectric transducers. We will present simulations showing that the thickness of the silicon substrate and thicknesses and acoustic properties of the bonding material must be considered, especially when designing highfrequency transducers. Through simulations, we compare the acoustic properties of 3-D stacks bonded with three different bonding techniques; solid-liquid interdiffusion (SLID) bonding, direct fusion bonding, and anisotropic conductive adhesives (ACA). We look at a CMUT array with a center frequency of 30 MHz and three silicon wafers underneath, having a total silicon thickness of 100 μm. We find that fusion bonding is most beneficial if we want to prevent surface waves from damaging the array response, but SLID and ACA are also promising if bonding layer thicknesses can be reduced.

  6. Single particle cryo-electron microscopy and 3-D reconstruction of viruses.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fei; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    With fast progresses in instrumentation, image processing algorithms, and computational resources, single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) 3-D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses has now reached near-atomic resolutions (3-4 Å). With comparable resolutions and more predictable outcomes, cryo-EM is now considered a preferred method over X-ray crystallography for determination of atomic structure of icosahedral viruses. At near-atomic resolutions, all-atom models or backbone models can be reliably built that allow residue level understanding of viral assembly and conformational changes among different stages of viral life cycle. With the developments of asymmetric reconstruction, it is now possible to visualize the complete structure of a complex virus with not only its icosahedral shell but also its multiple non-icosahedral structural features. In this chapter, we will describe single particle cryo-EM experimental and computational procedures for both near-atomic resolution reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and asymmetric reconstruction of viruses with both icosahedral and non-icosahedral structure components. Procedures for rigorous validation of the reconstructions and resolution evaluations using truly independent de novo initial models and refinements are also introduced.

  7. A resource from 3D electron microscopy of hippocampal neuropil for user training and tool development

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Kristen M.; Spacek, Josef; Bell, Maria Elizabeth; Parker, Patrick H.; Lindsey, Laurence F.; Baden, Alexander D.; Vogelstein, Joshua T.; Burns, Randal

    2015-01-01

    Resurgent interest in synaptic circuitry and plasticity has emphasized the importance of 3D reconstruction from serial section electron microscopy (3DEM). Three volumes of hippocampal CA1 neuropil from adult rat were imaged at X-Y resolution of ~2 nm on serial sections of ~50–60 nm thickness. These are the first densely reconstructed hippocampal volumes. All axons, dendrites, glia, and synapses were reconstructed in a cube (~10 μm3) surrounding a large dendritic spine, a cylinder (~43 μm3) surrounding an oblique dendritic segment (3.4 μm long), and a parallelepiped (~178 μm3) surrounding an apical dendritic segment (4.9 μm long). The data provide standards for identifying ultrastructural objects in 3DEM, realistic reconstructions for modeling biophysical properties of synaptic transmission, and a test bed for enhancing reconstruction tools. Representative synapses are quantified from varying section planes, and microtubules, polyribosomes, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, and endosomes are identified and reconstructed in a subset of dendrites. The original images, traces, and Reconstruct software and files are freely available and visualized at the Open Connectome Project (Data Citation 1). PMID:26347348

  8. Single Particle Cryo-electron Microscopy and 3-D Reconstruction of Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fei; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    With fast progresses in instrumentation, image processing algorithms, and computational resources, single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) 3-D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses has now reached near-atomic resolutions (3–4 Å). With comparable resolutions and more predictable outcomes, cryo-EM is now considered a preferred method over X-ray crystallography for determination of atomic structure of icosahedral viruses. At near-atomic resolutions, all-atom models or backbone models can be reliably built that allow residue level understanding of viral assembly and conformational changes among different stages of viral life cycle. With the developments of asymmetric reconstruction, it is now possible to visualize the complete structure of a complex virus with not only its icosahedral shell but also its multiple non-icosahedral structural features. In this chapter, we will describe single particle cryo-EM experimental and computational procedures for both near-atomic resolution reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and asymmetric reconstruction of viruses with both icosahedral and non-icosahedral structure components. Procedures for rigorous validation of the reconstructions and resolution evaluations using truly independent de novo initial models and refinements are also introduced. PMID:24357374

  9. Microstructural characterization of the cycling behavior of electrodeposited manganese oxide supercapacitors using 3D electron tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalili, N.; Clark, M. P.; Davari, E.; Ivey, D. G.

    2016-10-01

    Manganese oxide has been investigated extensively as an electrochemical capacitor or supercapacitor electrode material. Manganese oxide is inexpensive to fabricate and exhibits relatively high capacitance values, i.e., in excess of 200 F g-1 in many cases; the actual value depends very much on the fabrication method and test conditions. The cycling behavior of Mn oxide, fabricated using anodic electrodeposition, is investigated using slice and view techniques, via a dual scanning electron microscope (SEM) and focused ion beam (FIB) instrument to generate three-dimensional (3D) images, coupled with electrochemical characterization. The initial as-fabricated electrode has a rod-like appearance, with a fine-scale, sheet-like morphology within the rods. The rod-like structure remains after cycling, but there are significant morphological changes. These include partial dissolution of Mn oxide followed by redeposition of Mn oxide in regions close to the substrate. The redeposited material has a finer morphology than the original as-fabricated Mn oxide. The Mn oxide coverage is also better near the substrate. These effects result in an increase in the specific capacitance.

  10. Portable high-intensity focused ultrasound system with 3D electronic steering, real-time cavitation monitoring, and 3D image reconstruction algorithms: a preclinical study in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and accuracy of a new portable ultrasonography-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (USg-HIFU) system with a 3-dimensional (3D) electronic steering transducer, a simultaneous ablation and imaging module, real-time cavitation monitoring, and 3D image reconstruction algorithms. Methods: To address the accuracy of the transducer, hydrophones in a water chamber were used to assess the generation of sonic fields. An animal study was also performed in five pigs by ablating in vivo thighs by single-point sonication (n=10) or volume sonication (n=10) and ex vivo kidneys by single-point sonication (n=10). Histological and statistical analyses were performed. Results: In the hydrophone study, peak voltages were detected within 1.0 mm from the targets on the y- and z-axes and within 2.0-mm intervals along the x-axis (z-axis, direction of ultrasound propagation; y- and x-axes, perpendicular to the direction of ultrasound propagation). Twenty-nine of 30 HIFU sessions successfully created ablations at the target. The in vivo porcine thigh study showed only a small discrepancy (width, 0.5-1.1 mm; length, 3.0 mm) between the planning ultrasonograms and the pathological specimens. Inordinate thermal damage was not observed in the adjacent tissues or sonic pathways in the in vivo thigh and ex vivo kidney studies. Conclusion: Our study suggests that this new USg-HIFU system may be a safe and accurate technique for ablating soft tissues and encapsulated organs. PMID:25038809

  11. 3D printed electromagnetic transmission and electronic structures fabricated on a single platform using advanced process integration techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deffenbaugh, Paul Issac

    3D printing has garnered immense attention from many fields including in-office rapid prototyping of mechanical parts, outer-space satellite replication, garage functional firearm manufacture, and NASA rocket engine component fabrication. 3D printing allows increased design flexibility in the fabrication of electronics, microwave circuits and wireless antennas and has reached a level of maturity which allows functional parts to be printed. Much more work is necessary in order to perfect the processes of 3D printed electronics especially in the area of automation. Chapter 1 shows several finished prototypes of 3D printed electronics as well as newly developed techniques in fabrication. Little is known about the RF and microwave properties and applications of the standard materials which have been developed for 3D printing. Measurement of a wide variety of materials over a broad spectrum of frequencies up to 10 GHz using a variety of well-established measurement methods is performed throughout chapter 2. Several types of high frequency RF transmission lines are fabricated and valuable model-matched data is gathered and provided in chapter 3 for future designers' use. Of particular note is a fully 3D printed stripline which was automatically fabricated in one process on one machine. Some core advantages of 3D printing RF/microwave components include rapid manufacturing of complex, dimensionally sensitive circuits (such as antennas and filters which are often iteratively tuned) and the ability to create new devices that cannot be made using standard fabrication techniques. Chapter 4 describes an exemplary fully 3D printed curved inverted-F antenna.

  12. Diffractive centrosymmetric 3D-transmission phase gratings positioned at the image plane of optical systems transform lightlike 4D-WORLD as tunable resonators into spectral metrics...

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauinger, Norbert

    1999-08-01

    Diffractive 3D phase gratings of spherical scatterers dense in hexagonal packing geometry represent adaptively tunable 4D-spatiotemporal filters with trichromatic resonance in visible spectrum. They are described in the (lambda) - chromatic and the reciprocal (nu) -aspects by reciprocal geometric translations of the lightlike Pythagoras theorem, and by the direction cosine for double cones. The most elementary resonance condition in the lightlike Pythagoras theorem is given by the transformation of the grating constants gx, gy, gz of the hexagonal 3D grating to (lambda) h1h2h3 equals (lambda) 111 with cos (alpha) equals 0.5. Through normalization of the chromaticity in the von Laue-interferences to (lambda) 111, the (nu) (lambda) equals (lambda) h1h2h3/(lambda) 111-factor of phase velocity becomes the crucial resonance factor, the 'regulating device' of the spatiotemporal interaction between 3D grating and light, space and time. In the reciprocal space equal/unequal weights and times in spectral metrics result at positions of interference maxima defined by hyperbolas and circles. A database becomes built up by optical interference for trichromatic image preprocessing, motion detection in vector space, multiple range data analysis, patchwide multiple correlations in the spatial frequency spectrum, etc.

  13. Ultrafast electron diffraction from laser-aligned molecules in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie

    Ultrafast electron diffraction has emerged since the end of last century, and has become an increasingly important tool for revealing great details of molecular dynamics. In comparison to spectroscopic techniques, ultrafast electron diffraction directly probes time-resolved structure of target molecules, and therefore can potentially provide "molecular movies" of the reactions being studied. These molecular movies are critical for understanding and ultimately controlling the energy conversion pathways and efficiencies of photochemical processes. In this dissertation, I have focused on ultrafast electron diffraction from gas-phase molecules, and have investigated several long-standing challenges that have been preventing researchers from being able to achieve 3-D molecular movies of photochemical reactions. The first challenge is to resolve the full 3-D structure for molecules in the gas phase. The random orientation of molecules in the gas phase smears out the diffraction signal, which results in only 1-D structural information being accessible. The second challenge lies in temporal resolution. In order to resolve coherent nuclear motions on their natural time scale, a temporal resolution of ˜200 femtosecond or better is required. However, due to experimental limitations the shortest temporal resolution that had been achieved was only a few picoseconds in early 2000, by Zewail group from Caltech. The first challenge is tackled by laser-alignment. In the first half of the dissertation, I approach this method both theoretically and experimentally, and demonstrate that by using a short laser pulse to transiently align target molecules in space, 3-D molecular structure can be reconstructed ab-initio from diffraction patterns. The second half of the dissertation presents two experiments, both of which are important steps toward imaging coherent nuclear motions in real time during photochemical reactions. The first experiment simultaneously resolves molecular alignment

  14. Calibrating MMS Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux Measurements and Characterizing 3D Electric Field Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuster, J. R.; Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Argall, M. R.; Li, G.; Chen, L. J.; Ergun, R. E.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Marklund, G. T.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Russell, C. T.; Magnes, W.; Le Contel, O.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    The electron drift instruments (EDIs) onboard each MMS spacecraft are designed with large geometric factors (~0.01cm2 str) to facilitate detection of weak (~100 nA) electron beams fired and received by the two gun-detector units (GDUs) when EDI is in its "electric field mode" to determine the local electric and magnetic fields. A consequence of the large geometric factor is that "ambient mode" electron flux measurements (500 eV electrons having 0°, 90°, or 180° pitch angle) can vary depending on the orientation of the EDI instrument with respect to the magnetic field, a nonphysical effect that requires a correction. Here, we present determinations of the θ- and ø-dependent correction factors for the eight EDI GDUs, where θ (ø) is the polar (azimuthal) angle between the GDU symmetry axis and the local magnetic field direction, and compare the corrected fluxes with those measured by the fast plasma instrument (FPI). Using these corrected, high time resolution (~1,000 samples per second) ambient electron fluxes, combined with the unprecedentedly high resolution 3D electric field measurements taken by the spin-plane and axial double probes (SDP and ADP), we are equipped to accurately detect electron-scale current layers and electric field waves associated with the non-Maxwellian (anisotropic and agyrotropic) particle distribution functions predicted to exist in the reconnection diffusion region. We compare initial observations of the diffusion region with distributions and wave analysis from PIC simulations of asymmetric reconnection applicable for modeling reconnection at the Earth's magnetopause, where MMS will begin Science Phase 1 as of September 1, 2015.

  15. Pattern matching approach to pseudosymmetry problems in electron backscatter diffraction.

    PubMed

    Nolze, Gert; Winkelmann, Aimo; Boyle, Alan P

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate an approach to overcome Kikuchi pattern misindexing problems caused by crystallographic pseudosymmetry in electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Based on the quantitative comparison of experimentally measured Kikuchi patterns with dynamical electron diffraction simulations, the algorithm identifies the best-fit orientation from a set of pseudosymmetric candidates. Using measurements on framboidal pyrite (FeS2) as an example, we also show the improvement of the orientation precision using this approach.

  16. Sizable electron/neutron electric dipole moment in D 3 /D 7 μ -split supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhuria, Mansi; Misra, Aalok

    2014-10-01

    0-32) cm from a one-loop diagram involving a heavy chargino and a light Higgs as propagators in the loop. The neutron EDM gets a dominant contribution of the order dn/e ≡O (1 0-33) cm from the one-loop diagram involving SM-like quarks and Higgs. To justify the possibility of obtaining a large EDM value in the case of a Barr-Zee diagram which involves W± and the Higgs (responsible to generate the nontrivial C P -violating phase) in the two-loop diagrams as discussed by Leigh et al. [Nucl. Phys. B267, 509 (1986)], we provide an analysis of the same in the context of our D 3 /D 7 μ -split SUSY model at the EW scale. By conjecturing that the C P -violating phase can appear from the diagonalization of the Higgs mass matrix obtained in the context of μ -split SUSY, we also get an EDM of the electron/neutron around O (1 0-27) e cm in the case of the two-loop diagram involving W± bosons.

  17. Ultrafast Electron Diffraction: How It Works

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-05

    A new technology at SLAC uses high-energy electrons to unravel motions in materials that are faster than a tenth of a trillionth of a second, opening up new research opportunities in ultrafast science.

  18. Femtosecond time-resolved MeV electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Pengfei; Zhu, Y.; Hidaka, Y.; Wu, L.; Cao, J.; Berger, H.; Geck, J.; Kraus, R.; Pjerov, S.; Shen, Y.; Tobey, R. I.; Hill, J. P.; Wang, X. J.

    2015-06-02

    We report the experimental demonstration of femtosecond electron diffraction using high-brightness MeV electron beams. High-quality, single-shot electron diffraction patterns for both polycrystalline aluminum and single-crystal 1T-TaS2 are obtained utilizing a 5 fC (~3 × 104 electrons) pulse of electrons at 2.8 MeV. The high quality of the electron diffraction patterns confirms that electron beam has a normalized emittance of ~50 nm rad. The transverse and longitudinal coherence length is ~11 and ~2.5 nm, respectively. The timing jitter between the pump laser and probe electron beam was found to be ~100 fs (rms). The temporal resolution is demonstrated by observing the evolution of Bragg and superlattice peaks of 1T-TaS2 following an 800 nm optical pump and was found to be 130 fs. Lastly, our results demonstrate the advantages of MeV electrons, including large elastic differential scattering cross-section and access to high-order reflections, and the feasibility of ultimately realizing below 10 fs time-resolved electron diffraction.

  19. Femtosecond time-resolved MeV electron diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Pengfei; Zhu, Y.; Hidaka, Y.; Wu, L.; Cao, J.; Berger, H.; Geck, J.; Kraus, R.; Pjerov, S.; Shen, Y.; et al

    2015-06-02

    We report the experimental demonstration of femtosecond electron diffraction using high-brightness MeV electron beams. High-quality, single-shot electron diffraction patterns for both polycrystalline aluminum and single-crystal 1T-TaS2 are obtained utilizing a 5 fC (~3 × 104 electrons) pulse of electrons at 2.8 MeV. The high quality of the electron diffraction patterns confirms that electron beam has a normalized emittance of ~50 nm rad. The transverse and longitudinal coherence length is ~11 and ~2.5 nm, respectively. The timing jitter between the pump laser and probe electron beam was found to be ~100 fs (rms). The temporal resolution is demonstrated by observing themore » evolution of Bragg and superlattice peaks of 1T-TaS2 following an 800 nm optical pump and was found to be 130 fs. Lastly, our results demonstrate the advantages of MeV electrons, including large elastic differential scattering cross-section and access to high-order reflections, and the feasibility of ultimately realizing below 10 fs time-resolved electron diffraction.« less

  20. Imaging electronic motions in atoms by energy-resolved ultrafast electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hua-Chieh; Starace, Anthony F.

    2014-09-01

    We propose energy-resolved ultrafast electron diffraction as a means of directly imaging target electronic motions whose space, time, and energy information can be simultaneously retrieved from time-resolved diffraction measurements. The energy-resolved diffraction images are simulated for breathing, wiggling, and hybrid modes of electronic motion in the H atom. The simulations demonstrate the capabilities of ultrafast electron diffraction to image and distinguish different kinds of electronic motion. The theoretical analysis of the scattering process identifies the requirements for time- and state-resolved imaging of electronic motion and provides interpretations of the results.

  1. A Bioactive Carbon Nanotube-Based Ink for Printing 2D and 3D Flexible Electronics.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Ryon; Farzad, Raziyeh; Tamayol, Ali; Manoharan, Vijayan; Mostafalu, Pooria; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Akbari, Mohsen; Jung, Sung Mi; Kim, Duckjin; Comotto, Mattia; Annabi, Nasim; Al-Hazmi, Faten Ebrahim; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-05-01

    The development of electrically conductive carbon nanotube-based inks is reported. Using these inks, 2D and 3D structures are printed on various flexible substrates such as paper, hydrogels, and elastomers. The printed patterns have mechanical and electrical properties that make them beneficial for various biological applications. PMID:26915715

  2. A Bioactive Carbon Nanotube-Based Ink for Printing 2D and 3D Flexible Electronics.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Ryon; Farzad, Raziyeh; Tamayol, Ali; Manoharan, Vijayan; Mostafalu, Pooria; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Akbari, Mohsen; Jung, Sung Mi; Kim, Duckjin; Comotto, Mattia; Annabi, Nasim; Al-Hazmi, Faten Ebrahim; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-05-01

    The development of electrically conductive carbon nanotube-based inks is reported. Using these inks, 2D and 3D structures are printed on various flexible substrates such as paper, hydrogels, and elastomers. The printed patterns have mechanical and electrical properties that make them beneficial for various biological applications.

  3. 3D image analysis of plants using electron tomography and micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Mineyuki, Yoshinobu

    2014-11-01

    help to promote MT bundling. Cell plate attachment to the parental wall leads to the fusion of the newly formed middle lamellae in the cell plate to the middle lamella of parental cell wall, and a three-way junction is created. Air space develops from the three-way junction. To determine 3D arrangement of cells and air spaces, we used X-ray micro-CT at the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. Using micro-CT available in BL20XU (8 keV, 0.2 µm/pixel), we were able to elucidate ∼90% of the cortical cell outlines in the hypocotyl-radicle axis of arabidopsis seeds [4] and to analyze cell geometrical properties. As the strength of the system X-ray is too strong for seed survival, we used another beam line BL20B2 (10-15 keV, 2.4-2.7 µm/pixel) to examine air space development during seed imbibition [4,5]. Using this system, we were able to detect air space development at the early imbibition stages of seeds without causing damage during seed germination. AcknowledgmentThe author would like to thank Dr. Ichirou Karahara (Univ. Toyama), Dr. L. Andrew Staehelin (Univ. Colorado), Ms. Naoko Kajimura, Dr. Akio Takaoka (Osaka Univ.), Dr. Kazuyo Misaki, Dr. Shigenobu Yonemura (RIKEN CDB), Dr. Kazuyoshi Murata (NIP), Dr. Kentaro Uesugi, Dr. Akihisa Takeuchi, Dr. Yoshio Suzuki (JASRI), Dr. Miyuki Takeuchi, Dr. Daisuke Tamaoki, Dr. Daisuke Yamauchi, and Ms. Aki Fukuda (Univ. Hyogo) for their collaborations in the work presented here. PMID:25359847

  4. Feasibility study of a single-shot 3D electron bunch shape monitor with an electro-optic sampling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okayasu, Yuichi; Tomizawa, Hiromitsu; Matsubara, Shinichi; Kumagai, Noritaka; Maekawa, Akira; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2013-05-01

    We developed a three-dimensional electron bunch charge distribution (3D-BCD) monitor with single-shot detection, and a spectral decoding based electro-optic (EO) sampling technique for a nondestructive monitor enables real-time reconstruction of the three-dimensional distribution of a bunch charge. We realized three goals by simultaneously probing a number of Pockels EO crystals that surround the electron beam axis with hollow and radial polarized laser pulses. First, we performed a feasibility test as a simple case of a 3D-BCD monitor probing two ZnTe crystals as EO detectors installed on the opposite angle to the electron beam axis and confirmed that we simultaneously obtained both EO signals. Since the adopted hollow probe laser pulse is not only radially polarized but also temporally shifted azimuthally, some disorders in the radial polarization distribution of such a laser pulse were numerically analyzed with a plane-wave expansion method. Based on the above investigations, the 3D-BCD monitor is feasible both in experimental and numerical estimations. Furthermore, we previously developed a femtosecond response organic crystal as a Pockels EO detector and a broadband probe laser (≥350nm in FWHM); the 3D-BCD monitor realizes 30- to 40-fs (FWHM) temporal resolution. Eventually, the monitor is expected to be equipped in such advanced accelerators as XFEL to measure and adjust the electron bunch charge distribution in real time. The 3D-BCD measurement works as a critical tool to provide feedback to seeded FELs.

  5. The technique of RDF of nanovolumes using electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockayne, D. J. H.; Chen, Y.; Li, G.; Borisenko, K. B.

    2010-07-01

    Amorphous materials are not, as the Greek etymology suggests, "without form". Indeed, as with crystalline materials, their structure determines their properties. The overwhelming number of structural studies of amorphous materials use the diffracted intensity to give the radial distribution function, which can be used as data against which to test, or refine, structural models. Neutron and X-ray diffraction examples abound. However, neutrons and X-rays are of no use when small volumes are involved. This paper reports the current state of RDF analysis of nanovolumes using electron diffraction.

  6. Polyhedral 3D structure of human plasma very low density lipoproteins by individual particle cryo-electron tomography1[S

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yadong; Kuang, Yu-Lin; Lei, Dongsheng; Zhai, Xiaobo; Zhang, Meng; Krauss, Ronald M.; Ren, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Human VLDLs assembled in the liver and secreted into the circulation supply energy to peripheral tissues. VLDL lipolysis yields atherogenic LDLs and VLDL remnants that strongly correlate with CVD. Although the composition of VLDL particles has been well-characterized, their 3D structure is elusive because of their variations in size, heterogeneity in composition, structural flexibility, and mobility in solution. Here, we employed cryo-electron microscopy and individual-particle electron tomography to study the 3D structure of individual VLDL particles (without averaging) at both below and above their lipid phase transition temperatures. The 3D reconstructions of VLDL and VLDL bound to antibodies revealed an unexpected polyhedral shape, in contrast to the generally accepted model of a spherical emulsion-like particle. The smaller curvature of surface lipids compared with HDL may also reduce surface hydrophobicity, resulting in lower binding affinity to the hydrophobic distal end of the N-terminal β-barrel domain of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) compared with HDL. The directional binding of CETP to HDL and VLDL may explain the function of CETP in transferring TGs and cholesteryl esters between these particles. This first visualization of the 3D structure of VLDL could improve our understanding of the role of VLDL in atherogenesis. PMID:27538822

  7. 3D imaging and quantitative analysis of small solubilized membrane proteins and their complexes by transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Jastrzebska, Beata; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Engel, Andreas

    2013-02-01

    Inherently unstable, detergent-solubilized membrane protein complexes can often not be crystallized. For complexes that have a mass of >300 kDa, cryo-electron microscopy (EM) allows their three-dimensional (3D) structure to be assessed to a resolution that makes secondary structure elements visible in the best case. However, many interesting complexes exist whose mass is below 300 kDa and thus need alternative approaches. Two methods are reviewed: (i) Mass measurement in a scanning transmission electron microscope, which has provided important information on the stoichiometry of membrane protein complexes. This technique is applicable to particulate, filamentous and sheet-like structures. (ii) 3D-EM of negatively stained samples, which determines the molecular envelope of small membrane protein complexes. Staining and dehydration artifacts may corrupt the quality of the 3D map. Staining conditions thus need to be optimized. 3D maps of plant aquaporin SoPIP2;1 tetramers solubilized in different detergents illustrate that the flattening artifact can be partially prevented and that the detergent itself contributes significantly. Another example discussed is the complex of G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin with its cognate G protein transducin.

  8. Processing of electron diffraction patterns with the XDP program.

    PubMed

    Mitsuoka, Kaoru

    2013-01-01

    Electron crystallography using two-dimensional crystals of membrane protein can provide high-resolution structure of a membrane protein within a lipid bilayer. With this technique, it is advantageous to use electron diffraction patterns to collect accurate intensities of the structure factors at high resolution. Here we describe how to process diffraction patterns using the XDP program and show what parameters are used and how they are determined in the process. Finally, the procedures for merging the intensity data will be described briefly.

  9. Web-based visualisation and analysis of 3D electron-microscopy data from EMDB and PDB☆

    PubMed Central

    Lagerstedt, Ingvar; Moore, William J.; Patwardhan, Ardan; Sanz-García, Eduardo; Best, Christoph; Swedlow, Jason R.; Kleywegt, Gerard J.

    2013-01-01

    The Protein Data Bank in Europe (PDBe) has developed web-based tools for the visualisation and analysis of 3D electron microscopy (3DEM) structures in the Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) and Protein Data Bank (PDB). The tools include: (1) a volume viewer for 3D visualisation of maps, tomograms and models, (2) a slice viewer for inspecting 2D slices of tomographic reconstructions, and (3) visual analysis pages to facilitate analysis and validation of maps, tomograms and models. These tools were designed to help non-experts and experts alike to get some insight into the content and assess the quality of 3DEM structures in EMDB and PDB without the need to install specialised software or to download large amounts of data from these archives. The technical challenges encountered in developing these tools, as well as the more general considerations when making archived data available to the user community through a web interface, are discussed. PMID:24113529

  10. Web-based visualisation and analysis of 3D electron-microscopy data from EMDB and PDB.

    PubMed

    Lagerstedt, Ingvar; Moore, William J; Patwardhan, Ardan; Sanz-García, Eduardo; Best, Christoph; Swedlow, Jason R; Kleywegt, Gerard J

    2013-11-01

    The Protein Data Bank in Europe (PDBe) has developed web-based tools for the visualisation and analysis of 3D electron microscopy (3DEM) structures in the Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) and Protein Data Bank (PDB). The tools include: (1) a volume viewer for 3D visualisation of maps, tomograms and models, (2) a slice viewer for inspecting 2D slices of tomographic reconstructions, and (3) visual analysis pages to facilitate analysis and validation of maps, tomograms and models. These tools were designed to help non-experts and experts alike to get some insight into the content and assess the quality of 3DEM structures in EMDB and PDB without the need to install specialised software or to download large amounts of data from these archives. The technical challenges encountered in developing these tools, as well as the more general considerations when making archived data available to the user community through a web interface, are discussed.

  11. Study of materials and machines for 3D printed large-scale, flexible electronic structures using fused deposition modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seyeon

    The 3 dimensional printing (3DP), called to additive manufacturing (AM) or rapid prototyping (RP), is emerged to revolutionize manufacturing and completely transform how products are designed and fabricated. A great deal of research activities have been carried out to apply this new technology to a variety of fields. In spite of many endeavors, much more research is still required to perfect the processes of the 3D printing techniques especially in the area of the large-scale additive manufacturing and flexible printed electronics. The principles of various 3D printing processes are briefly outlined in the Introduction Section. New types of thermoplastic polymer composites aiming to specified functional applications are also introduced in this section. Chapter 2 shows studies about the metal/polymer composite filaments for fused deposition modeling (FDM) process. Various metal particles, copper and iron particles, are added into thermoplastics polymer matrices as the reinforcement filler. The thermo-mechanical properties, such as thermal conductivity, hardness, tensile strength, and fracture mechanism, of composites are tested to figure out the effects of metal fillers on 3D printed composite structures for the large-scale printing process. In Chapter 3, carbon/polymer composite filaments are developed by a simple mechanical blending process with an aim of fabricating the flexible 3D printed electronics as a single structure. Various types of carbon particles consisting of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT), conductive carbon black (CCB), and graphite are used as the conductive fillers to provide the thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) with improved electrical conductivity. The mechanical behavior and conduction mechanisms of the developed composite materials are observed in terms of the loading amount of carbon fillers in this section. Finally, the prototype flexible electronics are modeled and manufactured by the FDM process using Carbon/TPU composite filaments and

  12. Nanoscale 3D cellular imaging by axial scanning transmission electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hohmann-Marriott, Martin F.; Sousa, Alioscka A.; Azari, Afrouz A.; Glushakova, Svetlana; Zhang, Guofeng; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Leapman, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Electron tomography provides three-dimensional structural information about supramolecular assemblies and organelles in a cellular context but image degradation, caused by scattering of transmitted electrons, limits applicability in specimens thicker than 300 nm. We show that scanning transmission electron tomography of 1000 nm thick samples using axial detection provides resolution comparable to conventional electron tomography. The method is demonstrated by reconstructing a human erythrocyte infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. PMID:19718033

  13. Formation of wave packets in electron diffraction on crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanning, Robert; Bahrim, Cristian

    2012-02-01

    Measurements of electron diffraction typically reveal the atomic structure of crystals and allow finding the length of chemical bonds. The effective electronic charge of each atom in the crystal acts upon the incident electron beam as a netting of narrow pinholes, and Fourier transforms the unique deBroglie wavelength of the projectile electron accelerated at fixed voltage into a wave packet. Using the uncertainty principle one can understand the mechanism that makes an incident electron to become a wave packet travelling inside the crystal at a group velocity identical with the initial speed of the projectile electron. Furthermore, the Pauli Exclusion Principle allows us to understand the fast passage of the projectile electron through the crystal and also, it allows the evaluation of the characteristic time for electron transmission. The project was sponsored by the STAIRSTEP program under the NSF-DUE grant# 0757057.

  14. Simulation of the 3-D Evolution of Electron Scale Magnetic Reconnection - Motivated by Laboratory Experiments Predictions for MMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buechner, J.; Jain, N.; Sharma, A.

    2013-12-01

    The four s/c of the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, to be launched in 2014, will use the Earth's magnetosphere as a laboratory to study the microphysics of three fundamental plasma processes. One of them is magnetic reconnection, an essentially multi-scale process. While laboratory experiments and past theoretical investigations have shown that important processes necessary to understand magnetic reconnection take place at electron scales the MMS mission for the first time will be able to resolve these scales by in space observations. For the measurement strategy of MMS it is important to make specific predictions of the behavior of current sheets with a thickness of the order of the electron skin depth which play an important role in the evolution of collisionless magnetic reconnection. Since these processes are highly nonlinear and non-local numerical simulation is needed to specify the current sheet evolution. Here we present new results about the nonlinear evolution of electron-scale current sheets starting from the linear stage and using 3-D electron-magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) simulations. The growth rates of the simulated instabilities compared well with the growth rates obtained from linear theory. Mechanisms and conditions of the formation of flux ropes and of current filamentation will be discussed in comparison with the results of fully kinetic simulations. In 3D the X- and O-point configurations of the magnetic field formed in reconnection planes alternate along the out-of-reconnection-plane direction with the wavelength of the unstable mode. In the presence of multiple reconnection sites, the out-of-plane magnetic field can develop nested structure of quadrupoles in reconnection planes, similar to the 2-D case, but now with variations in the out-of-plane direction. The structures of the electron flow and magnetic field in 3-D simulations will be compared with those in 2-D simulations to discriminate the essentially 3D features. We also discuss

  15. Color 3D electronic imaging of the surface of the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioux, Marc

    1994-10-01

    The NRC laboratories have developed a laser scanning technique to digitize shapes and colors in registration. The technique, known as synchronized scanning, is capable of digitizing topography as small as the relief of a bare finger tip, showing a clear picture of the skin structure (essentially a clean fingerprint without distortion), as well as the shape and size of body components such as hands, face, and feet, and the full body of one or more subjects simultaneously. The laser scanner uses a RGB laser, coupled to an optical fiber, which is projected in the field of view. The 3D color measurements are made by optical triangulation to a resolution of 10 micrometers for finger tip scans and a resolution of 1 mm for whole body scans. Experimental results are presented and discussed. Potential applications of this technology in the field of identification and inspection of humans include face recognition, finger, foot and teeth print identification, and 3D mugshots that can be rapidly broadcast through satellite communication. One of the unique properties of this technology is that absolute measurements, not only appearance and relative position of features, can be used for identification purposes.

  16. Collimation and splitting of valley electron diffraction in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mou; Bai, Yan-Kui; Zhang, Wen-Lian; Wang, Rui-Qiang

    2016-08-01

    We reported the collimation and splitting effects of the diffraction of valley electrons in graphene. When the incident energy increases from the neutral point, the diffraction tends to be collimated for one valley and split for the other valley. The difference in the diffraction between valleys results in valley-dependent transport. We investigated the left-right conductance of a four-terminal graphene device. The conductance ratio between the two valleys was derived to be 1 -(8 /3 )E , where E is the incident energy in units of the atom-atom hopping. The ratio is independent of the device dimensions and reflects the intrinsic properties of the electronic structure of graphene.

  17. Application of Electron Backscatter Diffraction to Phase Identification

    SciTech Connect

    El-Dasher, B S; Deal, A

    2008-07-16

    The identification of crystalline phases in solids requires knowledge of two microstructural properties: crystallographic structure and chemical composition. Traditionally, this has been accomplished using X-ray diffraction techniques where the measured crystallographic information, in combination with separate chemical composition measurements for specimens of unknown pedigrees, is used to deduce the unknown phases. With the latest microstructural analysis tools for scanning electron microscopes, both the crystallography and composition can be determined in a single analysis utilizing electron backscatter diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy, respectively. In this chapter, we discuss the approach required to perform these experiments, elucidate the benefits and limitations of this technique, and detail via case studies how composition, crystallography, and diffraction contrast can be used as phase discriminators.

  18. Orientation mapping of semicrystalline polymers using scanning electron nanobeam diffraction.

    PubMed

    Panova, Ouliana; Chen, X Chelsea; Bustillo, Karen C; Ophus, Colin; Bhatt, Mahesh P; Balsara, Nitash; Minor, Andrew M

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate a scanning electron nanobeam diffraction technique that can be used for mapping the size and distribution of nanoscale crystalline regions in a polymer blend. In addition, it can map the relative orientation of crystallites and the degree of crystallinity of the material. The model polymer blend is a 50:50w/w mixture of semicrystalline poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) and amorphous polystyrene (PS). The technique uses a scanning electron beam to raster across the sample and acquires a diffraction image at each probe position. Through image alignment and filtering, the diffraction image dataset enables mapping of the crystalline regions within the scanned area and construction of an orientation map. PMID:27323282

  19. Femtosecond free-electron laser x-ray diffraction data sets for algorithm development.

    PubMed

    Kassemeyer, Stephan; Steinbrener, Jan; Lomb, Lukas; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Aquila, Andrew; Barty, Anton; Martin, Andrew V; Hampton, Christina Y; Bajt, Saša; Barthelmess, Miriam; Barends, Thomas R M; Bostedt, Christoph; Bott, Mario; Bozek, John D; Coppola, Nicola; Cryle, Max; DePonte, Daniel P; Doak, R Bruce; Epp, Sascha W; Erk, Benjamin; Fleckenstein, Holger; Foucar, Lutz; Graafsma, Heinz; Gumprecht, Lars; Hartmann, Andreas; Hartmann, Robert; Hauser, Günter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Hömke, André; Holl, Peter; Jönsson, Olof; Kimmel, Nils; Krasniqi, Faton; Liang, Mengning; Maia, Filipe R N C; Marchesini, Stefano; Nass, Karol; Reich, Christian; Rolles, Daniel; Rudek, Benedikt; Rudenko, Artem; Schmidt, Carlo; Schulz, Joachim; Shoeman, Robert L; Sierra, Raymond G; Soltau, Heike; Spence, John C H; Starodub, Dmitri; Stellato, Francesco; Stern, Stephan; Stier, Gunter; Svenda, Martin; Weidenspointner, Georg; Weierstall, Uwe; White, Thomas A; Wunderer, Cornelia; Frank, Matthias; Chapman, Henry N; Ullrich, Joachim; Strüder, Lothar; Bogan, Michael J; Schlichting, Ilme

    2012-02-13

    We describe femtosecond X-ray diffraction data sets of viruses and nanoparticles collected at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The data establish the first large benchmark data sets for coherent diffraction methods freely available to the public, to bolster the development of algorithms that are essential for developing this novel approach as a useful imaging technique. Applications are 2D reconstructions, orientation classification and finally 3D imaging by assembling 2D patterns into a 3D diffraction volume.

  20. Femtosecond free-electron laser x-ray diffraction data sets for algorithm development.

    PubMed

    Kassemeyer, Stephan; Steinbrener, Jan; Lomb, Lukas; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Aquila, Andrew; Barty, Anton; Martin, Andrew V; Hampton, Christina Y; Bajt, Saša; Barthelmess, Miriam; Barends, Thomas R M; Bostedt, Christoph; Bott, Mario; Bozek, John D; Coppola, Nicola; Cryle, Max; DePonte, Daniel P; Doak, R Bruce; Epp, Sascha W; Erk, Benjamin; Fleckenstein, Holger; Foucar, Lutz; Graafsma, Heinz; Gumprecht, Lars; Hartmann, Andreas; Hartmann, Robert; Hauser, Günter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Hömke, André; Holl, Peter; Jönsson, Olof; Kimmel, Nils; Krasniqi, Faton; Liang, Mengning; Maia, Filipe R N C; Marchesini, Stefano; Nass, Karol; Reich, Christian; Rolles, Daniel; Rudek, Benedikt; Rudenko, Artem; Schmidt, Carlo; Schulz, Joachim; Shoeman, Robert L; Sierra, Raymond G; Soltau, Heike; Spence, John C H; Starodub, Dmitri; Stellato, Francesco; Stern, Stephan; Stier, Gunter; Svenda, Martin; Weidenspointner, Georg; Weierstall, Uwe; White, Thomas A; Wunderer, Cornelia; Frank, Matthias; Chapman, Henry N; Ullrich, Joachim; Strüder, Lothar; Bogan, Michael J; Schlichting, Ilme

    2012-02-13

    We describe femtosecond X-ray diffraction data sets of viruses and nanoparticles collected at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The data establish the first large benchmark data sets for coherent diffraction methods freely available to the public, to bolster the development of algorithms that are essential for developing this novel approach as a useful imaging technique. Applications are 2D reconstructions, orientation classification and finally 3D imaging by assembling 2D patterns into a 3D diffraction volume. PMID:22418172

  1. Electronic structure of the chiral helimagnet and 3 d -intercalated transition metal dichalcogenide C r1 /3Nb S2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirica, N.; Mo, S.-K.; Bondino, F.; Pis, I.; Nappini, S.; Vilmercati, P.; Yi, J.; Gai, Z.; Snijders, P. C.; Das, P. K.; Vobornik, I.; Ghimire, N.; Koehler, M. R.; Li, L.; Sapkota, D.; Parker, D. S.; Mandrus, D. G.; Mannella, N.

    2016-08-01

    The electronic structure of the chiral helimagnet C r1 /3Nb S2 has been studied with core level and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Intercalated Cr atoms are found to be effective in donating electrons to the Nb S2 layers but also cause significant modifications of the electronic structure of the host Nb S2 material. In particular, the data provide evidence that a description of the electronic structure of C r1 /3Nb S2 on the basis of a simple rigid band picture is untenable. The data also reveal substantial inconsistencies with the predictions of standard density functional theory. The relevance of these results to the attainment of a correct description of the electronic structure of chiral helimagnets, magnetic thin films/multilayers, and transition metal dichalcogenides intercalated with 3 d magnetic elements is discussed.

  2. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast.

  3. Status report on the 'Merging' of the Electron-Cloud Code POSINST with the 3-D Accelerator PIC CODE WARP

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J.-L.; Furman, M.A.; Azevedo, A.W.; Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Stoltz, P.H.

    2004-04-19

    We have integrated the electron-cloud code POSINST [1] with WARP [2]--a 3-D parallel Particle-In-Cell accelerator code developed for Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion--so that the two can interoperate. Both codes are run in the same process, communicate through a Python interpreter (already used in WARP), and share certain key arrays (so far, particle positions and velocities). Currently, POSINST provides primary and secondary sources of electrons, beam bunch kicks, a particle mover, and diagnostics. WARP provides the field solvers and diagnostics. Secondary emission routines are provided by the Tech-X package CMEE.

  4. From Voxels to Knowledge: A Practical Guide to the Segmentation of Complex Electron Microscopy 3D-Data

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wen-Ting; Hassan, Ahmed; Sarkar, Purbasha; Correa, Joaquin; Metlagel, Zoltan; Jorgens, Danielle M.; Auer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Modern 3D electron microscopy approaches have recently allowed unprecedented insight into the 3D ultrastructural organization of cells and tissues, enabling the visualization of large macromolecular machines, such as adhesion complexes, as well as higher-order structures, such as the cytoskeleton and cellular organelles in their respective cell and tissue context. Given the inherent complexity of cellular volumes, it is essential to first extract the features of interest in order to allow visualization, quantification, and therefore comprehension of their 3D organization. Each data set is defined by distinct characteristics, e.g., signal-to-noise ratio, crispness (sharpness) of the data, heterogeneity of its features, crowdedness of features, presence or absence of characteristic shapes that allow for easy identification, and the percentage of the entire volume that a specific region of interest occupies. All these characteristics need to be considered when deciding on which approach to take for segmentation. The six different 3D ultrastructural data sets presented were obtained by three different imaging approaches: resin embedded stained electron tomography, focused ion beam- and serial block face- scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM, SBF-SEM) of mildly stained and heavily stained samples, respectively. For these data sets, four different segmentation approaches have been applied: (1) fully manual model building followed solely by visualization of the model, (2) manual tracing segmentation of the data followed by surface rendering, (3) semi-automated approaches followed by surface rendering, or (4) automated custom-designed segmentation algorithms followed by surface rendering and quantitative analysis. Depending on the combination of data set characteristics, it was found that typically one of these four categorical approaches outperforms the others, but depending on the exact sequence of criteria, more than one approach may be successful. Based on these data

  5. Electron diffraction of CBr4 in superfluid helium droplets: A step towards single molecule diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Kong, Wei

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate the practicality of electron diffraction of single molecules inside superfluid helium droplets using CBr4 as a testing case. By reducing the background from pure undoped droplets via multiple doping, with small corrections for dimers and trimers, clearly resolved diffraction rings of CBr4 similar to those of gas phase molecules can be observed. The experimental data from CBr4 doped droplets are in agreement with both theoretical calculations and with experimental results of gaseous species. The abundance of monomers and clusters in the droplet beam also qualitatively agrees with the Poisson statistics. Possible extensions of this approach to macromolecular ions will also be discussed. This result marks the first step in building a molecular goniometer using superfluid helium droplet cooling and field induced orientation. The superior cooling effect of helium droplets is ideal for field induced orientation, but the diffraction background from helium is a concern. This work addresses this background issue and identifies a possible solution. Accumulation of diffraction images only becomes meaningful when all images are produced from molecules oriented in the same direction, and hence a molecular goniometer is a crucial technology for serial diffraction of single molecules.

  6. Electron diffraction of CBr4 in superfluid helium droplets: A step towards single molecule diffraction.

    PubMed

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Kong, Wei

    2016-07-21

    We demonstrate the practicality of electron diffraction of single molecules inside superfluid helium droplets using CBr4 as a testing case. By reducing the background from pure undoped droplets via multiple doping, with small corrections for dimers and trimers, clearly resolved diffraction rings of CBr4 similar to those of gas phase molecules can be observed. The experimental data from CBr4 doped droplets are in agreement with both theoretical calculations and with experimental results of gaseous species. The abundance of monomers and clusters in the droplet beam also qualitatively agrees with the Poisson statistics. Possible extensions of this approach to macromolecular ions will also be discussed. This result marks the first step in building a molecular goniometer using superfluid helium droplet cooling and field induced orientation. The superior cooling effect of helium droplets is ideal for field induced orientation, but the diffraction background from helium is a concern. This work addresses this background issue and identifies a possible solution. Accumulation of diffraction images only becomes meaningful when all images are produced from molecules oriented in the same direction, and hence a molecular goniometer is a crucial technology for serial diffraction of single molecules. PMID:27448887

  7. Web-based volume slicer for 3D electron-microscopy data from EMDB.

    PubMed

    Salavert-Torres, José; Iudin, Andrii; Lagerstedt, Ingvar; Sanz-García, Eduardo; Kleywegt, Gerard J; Patwardhan, Ardan

    2016-05-01

    We describe the functionality and design of the Volume slicer - a web-based slice viewer for EMDB entries. This tool uniquely provides the facility to view slices from 3D EM reconstructions along the three orthogonal axes and to rapidly switch between them and navigate through the volume. We have employed multiple rounds of user-experience testing with members of the EM community to ensure that the interface is easy and intuitive to use and the information provided is relevant. The impetus to develop the Volume slicer has been calls from the EM community to provide web-based interactive visualisation of 2D slice data. This would be useful for quick initial checks of the quality of a reconstruction. Again in response to calls from the community, we plan to further develop the Volume slicer into a fully-fledged Volume browser that provides integrated visualisation of EMDB and PDB entries from the molecular to the cellular scale.

  8. Web-based volume slicer for 3D electron-microscopy data from EMDB.

    PubMed

    Salavert-Torres, José; Iudin, Andrii; Lagerstedt, Ingvar; Sanz-García, Eduardo; Kleywegt, Gerard J; Patwardhan, Ardan

    2016-05-01

    We describe the functionality and design of the Volume slicer - a web-based slice viewer for EMDB entries. This tool uniquely provides the facility to view slices from 3D EM reconstructions along the three orthogonal axes and to rapidly switch between them and navigate through the volume. We have employed multiple rounds of user-experience testing with members of the EM community to ensure that the interface is easy and intuitive to use and the information provided is relevant. The impetus to develop the Volume slicer has been calls from the EM community to provide web-based interactive visualisation of 2D slice data. This would be useful for quick initial checks of the quality of a reconstruction. Again in response to calls from the community, we plan to further develop the Volume slicer into a fully-fledged Volume browser that provides integrated visualisation of EMDB and PDB entries from the molecular to the cellular scale. PMID:26876163

  9. Parallel 3D Finite Element Numerical Modelling of DC Electron Guns

    SciTech Connect

    Prudencio, E.; Candel, A.; Ge, L.; Kabel, A.; Ko, K.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; /SLAC

    2008-02-04

    In this paper we present Gun3P, a parallel 3D finite element application that the Advanced Computations Department at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is developing for the analysis of beam formation in DC guns and beam transport in klystrons. Gun3P is targeted specially to complex geometries that cannot be described by 2D models and cannot be easily handled by finite difference discretizations. Its parallel capability allows simulations with more accuracy and less processing time than packages currently available. We present simulation results for the L-band Sheet Beam Klystron DC gun, in which case Gun3P is able to reduce simulation time from days to some hours.

  10. Uncertainty studies of topographical measurements on steel surface corrosion by 3D scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kang, K W; Pereda, M D; Canafoglia, M E; Bilmes, P; Llorente, C; Bonetto, R

    2012-02-01

    Pitting corrosion is a damage mechanism quite serious and dangerous in both carbon steel boiler tubes for power plants which are vital to most industries and stainless steels for orthopedic human implants whose demand, due to the increase of life expectation and rate of traffic accidents, has sharply increased. Reliable methods to characterize this kind of damage are becoming increasingly necessary, when trying to evaluate the advance of damage and to establish the best procedures for component inspection in order to determine remaining lives and failure mitigation. A study about the uncertainties on the topographies of corrosion pits from 3D SEM images, obtained at low magnifications (where errors are greater) and different stage tilt angles were carried out using an in-house software previously developed. Additionally, measurements of pit depths on biomaterial surfaces, subjected to two different surface treatments on stainless steels, were carried out. The different depth distributions observed were in agreement with electrochemical measurements.

  11. Angular distribution of Auger electrons due to 3d-shell ionization of krypton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1977-01-01

    Cross sections for electron impact ionization of krypton due to ejection of a 3rd shell electron have been calculated using screened hydrogenic and Hartree-Slater wave functions for target atom. While the total ionization cross sections in the two approximations are within 10% of each other, the Auger electron angular distribution, related to cross sections for specific magnetic quantum numbers of the 3rd electrons, is widely different in the two approximations. The angular distribution due to Hartree-Slater approximation is in excellent agreement with measurement. The physical reason for the discrepancies in the two approximations is explained.

  12. Observations of the 3-D distribution of interplanetary electrons and ions from solar wind plasma to low energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Anderson, K. A.; Ashford, S.; Carlson, C.; Curtis, D.; Ergun, R.; Larson, D.; McFadden, J.; McCarthy, M.; Parks, G. K.

    1995-01-01

    The 3-D Plasma and Energetic Particle instrument on the GGS Wind spacecraft (launched November 1, 1994) is designed to make measurements of the full three-dimensional distribution of suprathermal electrons and ions from solar wind plasma to low energy cosmic rays, with high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, good energy and angular resolution, and high time resolution. Three pairs of double-ended telescopes, each with two or three closely sandwiched passivated ion implanted silicon detectors measure electrons and ions from approximately 20 keV to greater than or equal to 300 keV. Four top-hat symmetrical spherical section electrostatic analyzers with microchannel plate detectors, a large and a small geometric factor analyzer for electrons and a similar pair for ions, cover from approximately 3 eV to 30 keV. We present preliminary observations of the electron and ion distributions in the absence of obvious solar impulsive events and upstream particles. The quiet time electron energy spectrum shows a smooth approximately power law fall-off extending from the halo population at a few hundred eV to well above approximately 100 keV The quiet time ion energy spectrum also shows significant fluxes over this energy range. Detailed 3-D distributions and their temporal variations will be presented.

  13. 3D Plant cell architecture of Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae) using focused ion beam–scanning electron microscopy1

    PubMed Central

    Bhawana; Miller, Joyce L.; Cahoon, A. Bruce

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Focused ion beam–scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) combines the ability to sequentially mill the sample surface and obtain SEM images that can be used to create 3D renderings with micron-level resolution. We have applied FIB-SEM to study Arabidopsis cell architecture. The goal was to determine the efficacy of this technique in plant tissue and cellular studies and to demonstrate its usefulness in studying cell and organelle architecture and distribution. • Methods: Seed aleurone, leaf mesophyll, stem cortex, root cortex, and petal lamina from Arabidopsis were fixed and embedded for electron microscopy using protocols developed for animal tissues and modified for use with plant cells. Each sample was sectioned using the FIB and imaged with SEM. These serial images were assembled to produce 3D renderings of each cell type. • Results: Organelles such as nuclei and chloroplasts were easily identifiable, and other structures such as endoplasmic reticula, lipid bodies, and starch grains were distinguishable in each tissue. • Discussion: The application of FIB-SEM produced 3D renderings of five plant cell types and offered unique views of their shapes and internal content. These results demonstrate the usefulness of FIB-SEM for organelle distribution and cell architecture studies. PMID:25202629

  14. Neutron diffraction and the electronic properties of BaFe2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovesey, S. W.; Khalyavin, D. D.; van der Laan, G.

    2016-01-01

    It is argued on the basis of previously published experimental data that, the magnetic space-group Cac (#9.41) is the correct description of magnetically ordered BaFe2Se3. The corresponding crystal class m1‧ allows axial and polar dipoles and forbids bulk ferromagnetism. Magneto-electric multipoles that are both time-odd and parity-odd are allowed, e.g., a magnetic charge (monopole) and an anapole (magnetic toroidal dipole). The experimental observation of magneto-electric multipoles must shed light on valence electrons involved in bonding, including charge transfer using 3d(Fe) and p-states of ligand ions. We provide the appropriate structure factors for the Bragg diffraction neutrons, together with estimates of atomic form factors. Structure factors for resonant x-ray Bragg diffraction are also considered, because the analysis of successful experiments will yield complementary information about electronic properties. Magneto-electric multipoles, over and above those that contribute to magnetic neutron diffraction, include the magnetic monopole. A time-odd, parity-even monopole created from the magnetic dipole and an electric toroidal dipole, which is a manifestation of a structural rotation, is allowed in BaFe2Se3 but it is not visible in diffraction, nor is the corresponding dipole.

  15. Structural study of new hydrocarbon nano-crystals by energy-filtered electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Wu, J S; Melcer, N; Sharp, W P; O'Keeffe, M; Spence, J C H; Yaghi, O M

    2004-01-01

    A new brittle hydrocarbon has been successfully synthesized in polycrystalline form, and its crystal structure solved by quantitative electron diffraction. By 3D tilting of the nano-crystals, the lattice type and unit cell parameters were determined. (Triclinic, [Formula: see text] A, [Formula: see text] A, [Formula: see text] A, [Formula: see text] degrees, [Formula: see text] degrees, and [Formula: see text] degrees.) Spot diffraction patterns were obtained at -165 degrees C using the Koehler selected-area mode on a LEO 912 TEM fitted with an omega in-column elastic energy filter. The direct methods algorithm was then applied to merged intensities and a trial structure obtained assuming single scattering. This was further refined to obtain good agreement with a small residual of about 10% using multiple scattering calculations. A diagram of the proposed structure is given.

  16. 3D tracking of single nanoparticles and quantum dots in living cells by out-of-focus imaging with diffraction pattern recognition

    PubMed Central

    Gardini, Lucia; Capitanio, Marco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2015-01-01

    Live cells are three-dimensional environments where biological molecules move to find their targets and accomplish their functions. However, up to now, most single molecule investigations have been limited to bi-dimensional studies owing to the complexity of 3d-tracking techniques. Here, we present a novel method for three-dimensional localization of single nano-emitters based on automatic recognition of out-of-focus diffraction patterns. Our technique can be applied to track the movements of single molecules in living cells using a conventional epifluorescence microscope. We first demonstrate three-dimensional localization of fluorescent nanobeads over 4 microns depth with accuracy below 2 nm in vitro. Remarkably, we also establish three-dimensional tracking of Quantum Dots, overcoming their anisotropic emission, by adopting a ligation strategy that allows rotational freedom of the emitter combined with proper pattern recognition. We localize commercially available Quantum Dots in living cells with accuracy better than 7 nm over 2 microns depth. We validate our technique by tracking the three-dimensional movements of single protein-conjugated Quantum Dots in living cell. Moreover, we find that important localization errors can occur in off-focus imaging when improperly calibrated and we give indications to avoid them. Finally, we share a Matlab script that allows readily application of our technique by other laboratories. PMID:26526410

  17. 3D tracking of single nanoparticles and quantum dots in living cells by out-of-focus imaging with diffraction pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Gardini, Lucia; Capitanio, Marco; Pavone, Francesco S

    2015-01-01

    Live cells are three-dimensional environments where biological molecules move to find their targets and accomplish their functions. However, up to now, most single molecule investigations have been limited to bi-dimensional studies owing to the complexity of 3d-tracking techniques. Here, we present a novel method for three-dimensional localization of single nano-emitters based on automatic recognition of out-of-focus diffraction patterns. Our technique can be applied to track the movements of single molecules in living cells using a conventional epifluorescence microscope. We first demonstrate three-dimensional localization of fluorescent nanobeads over 4 microns depth with accuracy below 2 nm in vitro. Remarkably, we also establish three-dimensional tracking of Quantum Dots, overcoming their anisotropic emission, by adopting a ligation strategy that allows rotational freedom of the emitter combined with proper pattern recognition. We localize commercially available Quantum Dots in living cells with accuracy better than 7 nm over 2 microns depth. We validate our technique by tracking the three-dimensional movements of single protein-conjugated Quantum Dots in living cell. Moreover, we find that important localization errors can occur in off-focus imaging when improperly calibrated and we give indications to avoid them. Finally, we share a Matlab script that allows readily application of our technique by other laboratories.

  18. New aspects of whistler waves driven by an electron beam studied by a 3-D electromagnetic code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Buneman, Oscar; Neubert, Torsten

    1994-01-01

    We have restudied electron beam driven whistler waves with a 3-D electromagnetic particle code. The simulation results show electromagnetic whistler wave emissions and electrostatic beam modes like those observed in the Spacelab 2 electron beam experiment. It has been suggested in the past that the spatial bunching of beam electrons associated with the beam mode may directly generate whistler waves. However, the simulation results indicate several inconsistencies with this picture: (1) whistler waves continue to be generated even after the beam mode space charge modulation looses its coherence, (2) the parallel (to the background magnetic field) wavelength of the whistler wave is longer than that of the beam instability, and (3) the parallel phase velocity of the whistler wave is smaller than that of the beam mode. The complex structure of the whistler waves in the vicinity of the beam suggest that the transverse motion (gyration) of the beam and background electrons is also involved in the generation of whistler waves.

  19. Viral Infection at High Magnification: 3D Electron Microscopy Methods to Analyze the Architecture of Infected Cells.

    PubMed

    Romero-Brey, Inés; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2015-12-03

    As obligate intracellular parasites, viruses need to hijack their cellular hosts and reprogram their machineries in order to replicate their genomes and produce new virions. For the direct visualization of the different steps of a viral life cycle (attachment, entry, replication, assembly and egress) electron microscopy (EM) methods are extremely helpful. While conventional EM has given important information about virus-host cell interactions, the development of three-dimensional EM (3D-EM) approaches provides unprecedented insights into how viruses remodel the intracellular architecture of the host cell. During the last years several 3D-EM methods have been developed. Here we will provide a description of the main approaches and examples of innovative applications.

  20. Viral Infection at High Magnification: 3D Electron Microscopy Methods to Analyze the Architecture of Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Brey, Inés; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    As obligate intracellular parasites, viruses need to hijack their cellular hosts and reprogram their machineries in order to replicate their genomes and produce new virions. For the direct visualization of the different steps of a viral life cycle (attachment, entry, replication, assembly and egress) electron microscopy (EM) methods are extremely helpful. While conventional EM has given important information about virus-host cell interactions, the development of three-dimensional EM (3D-EM) approaches provides unprecedented insights into how viruses remodel the intracellular architecture of the host cell. During the last years several 3D-EM methods have been developed. Here we will provide a description of the main approaches and examples of innovative applications. PMID:26633469

  1. Observation of the Quantum-Classical Transition via Electron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beierle, Peter; Batelaan, Herman

    2016-05-01

    A collimated electron beam with an energy ranging from .5 keV- 5 keV is passed over a 1 cm long conducting surface. The electrons are diffracted from a 100 nm periodic SiN free-standing grating. The surface is place within the electron near-field diffraction distance. The loss of visibility of the far-field diffraction pattern is measured, which indicates the amount of decoherence that the electrons experienced as they passed over the surface. It has been determined through the visibility as a function of the height with respect to the surface that a) one can observe the transition of the electron's behavior between classical and quantum mechanics, b) that our experiment can be used to rule out a classical theoretical model of the surface decohering mechanism (consistent with Hasselbach's work), and c) this experimental setup is simpler than the use of an interferometer. Comparing a silicon to a gold surface, we are in the process of testing a wider array of theoretical models for the mechanism of decoherence. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under award number 1306565.

  2. Communication: Electron diffraction of ferrocene in superfluid helium droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; He, Yunteng; Kong, Wei

    2016-06-01

    We report electron diffraction of ferrocene doped in superfluid helium droplets. By taking advantage of the velocity slip in our pulsed droplet beam using a pulsed electron gun, and by doping with a high concentration of ferrocene delivered via a pulsed valve, we can obtain high quality diffraction images from singly doped droplets. Under the optimal doping conditions, 80% of the droplets sampled in the electron beam are doped with just one ferrocene molecule. Extension of this size selection method to dopant clusters has also been demonstrated. However, incomplete separation of dopant clusters might require deconvolution and modeling of the doping process. This method can be used for studies of nucleation processes in superfluid helium droplets.

  3. Communication: Electron diffraction of ferrocene in superfluid helium droplets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report electron diffraction of ferrocene doped in superfluid helium droplets. By taking advantage of the velocity slip in our pulsed droplet beam using a pulsed electron gun, and by doping with a high concentration of ferrocene delivered via a pulsed valve, we can obtain high quality diffraction images from singly doped droplets. Under the optimal doping conditions, 80% of the droplets sampled in the electron beam are doped with just one ferrocene molecule. Extension of this size selection method to dopant clusters has also been demonstrated. However, incomplete separation of dopant clusters might require deconvolution and modeling of the doping process. This method can be used for studies of nucleation processes in superfluid helium droplets. PMID:27305988

  4. Electron backscatter diffraction of a plutonium-gallium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehlert, C. J.; Zocco, T. G.; Schulze, R. K.; Mitchell, J. N.; Pereyra, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    An experimental technique has recently been developed to characterize reactive metals, including plutonium (Pu) and cerium, using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Microstructural characterization of Pu and its alloys by EBSD had been previously elusive primarily because of the extreme toxicity and rapid surface oxidation rate associated with Pu metal. The experimental technique, which included ion-sputtering the metal surface using a scanning Auger microprobe (SAM) followed by vacuum transfer of the sample from the SAM to the scanning electron microscope (SEM), used to obtain electron backscatter diffraction Kikuchi patterns and orientation maps for a Pu-gallium alloy is described and the initial microstructural observations based on the analysis are discussed. The phase transformation behavior between the δ (face-centered cubic) and ɛ (body-centered-cubic) structures is explained by combining the SEM and EBSD observations.

  5. Dynamical electron compressibility in the 3D topological insulator Bi2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inhofer, Andreas; Assaf, Badih; Wilmart, Quentin; Veyrat, Louis; Nowka, Christian; Dufouleur, Joseph; Giraud, Romain; Hampel, Silke; Buechner, Bernd; Fève, Gwendal; Berroir, Jean-Marc; Placais, Bernard

    Measurements of the quantum capacitance cq, related to the electron compressibility χ =cq /e2 is a sensitive tool to probe the density of states. In a topological insulator (TI) the situation is enriched by the coexistence and the interplay of topologically protected surface states and massive bulk carriers. We investigate top-gate metal-oxyde-TI capacitors using Bi2Se3 thin crystals at GHz frequencies. These measurements provide insight into the compressibillity of such a two electron-fluid system. Furthermore, the dynamical response yields information about electron scattering properties in TIs. More specifically, in our measurements we track simultaneously the conductivity σ and the compressibility as a function of a DC-gate voltage. Using the Einstein relation σ =cq D , we have access to the gate dependence of the electron diffusion constant D (Vg) , a signature of the peculiar scattering mechanisms in TIs.

  6. Coincidence studies of diffraction structures in binary encounter electron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.; Hagmann, S.; Richard, P.

    1994-12-31

    The authors have measured binary encounter electron (BEe) production in collisions of 0.3 MeV/u Cu{sup q+} (q=4,12) projectiles on H{sub 2} targets from 0 to 70 degrees with respect to the beam direction. Prominent features are the appearance of the BEe peak splitting and a very strong forward peaked angular distribution which are attributed to the diffractive scattering of the quasifree target electrons in the short range potential of the projectile. Using electron-projectile final charge state coincidence techniques, different collision reaction channels can be separated. Measurements of this type are being pursued.

  7. Web-based volume slicer for 3D electron-microscopy data from EMDB

    PubMed Central

    Salavert-Torres, José; Iudin, Andrii; Lagerstedt, Ingvar; Sanz-García, Eduardo; Kleywegt, Gerard J.; Patwardhan, Ardan

    2016-01-01

    We describe the functionality and design of the Volume slicer – a web-based slice viewer for EMDB entries. This tool uniquely provides the facility to view slices from 3D EM reconstructions along the three orthogonal axes and to rapidly switch between them and navigate through the volume. We have employed multiple rounds of user-experience testing with members of the EM community to ensure that the interface is easy and intuitive to use and the information provided is relevant. The impetus to develop the Volume slicer has been calls from the EM community to provide web-based interactive visualisation of 2D slice data. This would be useful for quick initial checks of the quality of a reconstruction. Again in response to calls from the community, we plan to further develop the Volume slicer into a fully-fledged Volume browser that provides integrated visualisation of EMDB and PDB entries from the molecular to the cellular scale. PMID:26876163

  8. Study of titanate nanotubes by X-ray and electron diffraction and electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brunatova, Tereza; Popelkova, Daniela; Wan, Wei; Oleynikov, Peter; Danis, Stanislav; Zou, Xiaodong; Kuzel, Radomir

    2014-01-15

    The structure of titanate nanotubes (Ti-NTs) was studied by a combination of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), electron diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Ti-NTs are prepared by hydrothermal treatment of TiO{sub 2} powder. The structure is identified by powder X-ray diffraction as the one based on the structure of H{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5}·H{sub 2}O phase. The same structure is obtained by projected potential from HRTEM through-focus image series. The structure is verified by simulated PXRD pattern with the aid of the Debye formula. The validity of the model is tested by computing Fourier transformation of a single nanotube which is proportional to measured electron diffraction intensities. A good agreement of this calculation with measured precession electron diffraction data is achieved. - Highlights: • Titanate nanotubes were prepared by hydrothermal method. • X-ray powder diffraction indicated their structure based on that of H{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5}·H{sub 2}O. • Structural model was created with the aid of high-resolution electron microscopy. • The model was verified with electron diffraction data. • X-ray powder diffraction pattern was calculated with the aid of the Debye formula.

  9. Photons, Electrons and Positrons Transport in 3D by Monte Carlo Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-01

    Version 04 FOTELP-2014 is a new compact general purpose version of the previous FOTELP-2K6 code designed to simulate the transport of photons, electrons and positrons through three-dimensional material and sources geometry by Monte Carlo techniques, using subroutine package PENGEOM from the PENELOPE code under Linux-based and Windows OS. This new version includes routine ELMAG for electron and positron transport simulation in electric and magnetic fields, RESUME option and routine TIMER for obtaining starting random number and for measuring the time of simulation.

  10. Photons, Electrons and Positrons Transport in 3D by Monte Carlo Techniques

    2014-12-01

    Version 04 FOTELP-2014 is a new compact general purpose version of the previous FOTELP-2K6 code designed to simulate the transport of photons, electrons and positrons through three-dimensional material and sources geometry by Monte Carlo techniques, using subroutine package PENGEOM from the PENELOPE code under Linux-based and Windows OS. This new version includes routine ELMAG for electron and positron transport simulation in electric and magnetic fields, RESUME option and routine TIMER for obtaining starting random numbermore » and for measuring the time of simulation.« less

  11. [The reconstruction of welding arc 3D electron density distribution based on Stark broadening].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wang; Hua, Xue-Ming; Pan, Cheng-Gang; Li, Fang; Wang, Min

    2012-10-01

    The three-dimensional electron density is very important for welding arc quality control. In the present paper, Side-on characteristic line profile was collected by a spectrometer, and the lateral experimental data were approximated by a polynomial fitting. By applying an Abel inversion technique, the authors obtained the radial intensity distribution at each wavelength and thus constructed a profile for the radial positions. The Fourier transform was used to separate the Lorentz linear from the spectrum reconstructed, thus got the accurate Stark width. And we calculated the electronic density three-dimensional distribution of the TIG welding are plasma. PMID:23285847

  12. Efficient Semi-Automatic 3D Segmentation for Neuron Tracing in Electron Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Cory; Liu, Ting; Cohan, Nathaniel Wood; Ellisman, Mark; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2015-01-01

    0.1. Background In the area of connectomics, there is a significant gap between the time required for data acquisition and dense reconstruction of the neural processes contained in the same dataset. Automatic methods are able to eliminate this timing gap, but the state-of-the-art accuracy so far is insufficient for use without user corrections. If completed naively, this process of correction can be tedious and time consuming. 0.2. New Method We present a new semi-automatic method that can be used to perform 3D segmentation of neurites in EM image stacks. It utilizes an automatic method that creates a hierarchical structure for recommended merges of superpixels. The user is then guided through each predicted region to quickly identify errors and establish correct links. 0.3. Results We tested our method on three datasets with both novice and expert users. Accuracy and timing were compared with published automatic, semi-automatic, and manual results. 0.4. Comparison with Existing Methods Post-automatic correction methods have also been used in [1] and [2]. These methods do not provide navigation or suggestions in the manner we present. Other semi-automatic methods require user input prior to the automatic segmentation such as [3] and [4] and are inherently different than our method. 0.5. Conclusion Using this method on the three datasets, novice users achieved accuracy exceeding state-of-the-art automatic results, and expert users achieved accuracy on par with full manual labeling but with a 70% time improvement when compared with other examples in publication. PMID:25769273

  13. Measuring surface topography with scanning electron microscopy. I. EZEImage: a program to obtain 3D surface data.

    PubMed

    Ponz, Ezequiel; Ladaga, Juan Luis; Bonetto, Rita Dominga

    2006-04-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is widely used in the science of materials and different parameters were developed to characterize the surface roughness. In a previous work, we studied the surface topography with fractal dimension at low scale and two parameters at high scale by using the variogram, that is, variance vs. step log-log graph, of a SEM image. Those studies were carried out with the FERImage program, previously developed by us. To verify the previously accepted hypothesis by working with only an image, it is indispensable to have reliable three-dimensional (3D) surface data. In this work, a new program (EZEImage) to characterize 3D surface topography in SEM has been developed. It uses fast cross correlation and dynamic programming to obtain reliable dense height maps in a few seconds which can be displayed as an image where each gray level represents a height value. This image can be used for the FERImage program or any other software to obtain surface topography characteristics. EZEImage also generates anaglyph images as well as characterizes 3D surface topography by means of a parameter set to describe amplitude properties and three functional indices for characterizing bearing and fluid properties. PMID:17481354

  14. Ripple-modulated electronic structure of a 3D topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yoshinori; Zhou, Wenwen; Walkup, D; Dhital, Chetan; Wilson, Stephen D; Madhavan, V

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional topological insulators host linearly dispersing states with unique properties and a strong potential for applications. An important ingredient in realizing some of the more exotic states in topological insulators is the ability to manipulate local electronic properties. Direct analogy to the Dirac material graphene suggests that a possible avenue for controlling local properties is via a controlled structural deformation such as the formation of ripples. However, the influence of such ripples on topological insulators is yet to be explored. Here we use scanning tunnelling microscopy to determine the effects of one-dimensional buckling on the electronic properties of Bi(2)Te(3.) By tracking spatial variations of the interference patterns generated by the Dirac electrons we show that buckling imposes a periodic potential, which locally modulates the surface-state dispersion. This suggests that forming one- and two-dimensional ripples is a viable method for creating nanoscale potential landscapes that can be used to control the properties of Dirac electrons in topological insulators.

  15. An LS-MARS method for modeling regional 3D ionospheric electron density based on GPS data and IRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Szu-Pyng; Chen, Yao-Chung; Ning, Fang-Shii; Tu, Yuh-Min

    2015-05-01

    The methods of developing an accurate and effective ionospheric electron density (IED) model have greatly interested ionosphere researchers. Numerous scholars have proposed many effective and reliable models and methods of global positioning system (GPS)-based computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) in the past decades. This study introduced a new function-based CIT method, namely the LS-MARS (Least Squares method-Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines), combining MARS with IEDs calculated by International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) to automatically choose the best representing basis functions for the three-dimensional (3D) electron density inside that modeling area. This selected basis functions was substituted into the observation equation of the GPS total electron content (TEC) to calculate the design matrix. Finally, the weighted damped least squares (WDLS) were adopted to reestimate the IED model coefficients. In contrast to common function-based CIT methods, the LS-MARS can be used to attain optimal 3D model automatically, flexibly, adaptively based on the IRI without a priori knowledge of the IED distribution mathematical function. The findings indicated that the LS-MARS model had a smaller recovery TEC error than did the MARS_IRI2012 model, and the VTEC calculated using the LS-MARS model was closer to the VTEC obtained from International GNSS Service (IGS) final IONEX files than was the VTEC calculated using the MARS_IRI2012 and IRI2012. Therefore, this method exhibits strong modeling effectiveness and reliability, and can be an efficient alternative method for estimating regional 3D IED models.

  16. Space charge effects in ultrafast electron diffraction and imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Zhensheng; Zhang He; Duxbury, P. M.; Berz, Martin; Ruan, Chong-Yu

    2012-02-15

    Understanding space charge effects is central for the development of high-brightness ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy techniques for imaging material transformation with atomic scale detail at the fs to ps timescales. We present methods and results for direct ultrafast photoelectron beam characterization employing a shadow projection imaging technique to investigate the generation of ultrafast, non-uniform, intense photoelectron pulses in a dc photo-gun geometry. Combined with N-particle simulations and an analytical Gaussian model, we elucidate three essential space-charge-led features: the pulse lengthening following a power-law scaling, the broadening of the initial energy distribution, and the virtual cathode threshold. The impacts of these space charge effects on the performance of the next generation high-brightness ultrafast electron diffraction and imaging systems are evaluated.

  17. The diffracted distribution of classical trajectories and interference between electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guo-Peng; Zhang, Yan-Hui; Cai, Xiang-Ji; Xu, Xiu-Lan; Kang, Li-Sha

    2016-10-01

    We use a semiclassical approximation to study the escape of electrons through a circular mesostructure with the diffractive effect at the entrance lead taken into consideration. We find that the fluctuating shapes of the escape probability manifests a good agreement with the diffracted distributions of the incident angles for different transverse modes, and show that several classical trajectories with certain lengths have prominent contributions on the escape probability. In addition, we define the coherence factor to investigate the interference between electrons for different transverse modes and we find that it is the coherent backscattering that is responsible for the prominent interference. Moreover, we find there is a good correspondence between the distribution of classical trajectories and the time-reversed path.

  18. Structure refinement using precession electron diffraction tomography and dynamical diffraction: tests on experimental data.

    PubMed

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Corrêa, Cinthia Antunes; Steciuk, Gwladys; Jacob, Damien; Roussel, Pascal; Boullay, Philippe; Klementová, Mariana; Gemmi, Mauro; Kopeček, Jaromír; Domeneghetti, M Chiara; Cámara, Fernando; Petříček, Václav

    2015-12-01

    The recently published method for the structure refinement from three-dimensional precession electron diffraction data using dynamical diffraction theory [Palatinus et al. (2015). Acta Cryst. A71, 235-244] has been applied to a set of experimental data sets from five different samples - Ni2Si, PrVO3, kaolinite, orthopyroxene and mayenite. The data were measured on different instruments and with variable precession angles. For each sample a reliable reference structure was available. A large series of tests revealed that the method provides structure models with an average error in atomic positions typically between 0.01 and 0.02 Å. The obtained structure models are significantly more accurate than models obtained by refinement using kinematical approximation for the calculation of model intensities. The method also allows a reliable determination of site occupancies and determination of absolute structure. Based on the extensive tests, an optimal set of the parameters for the method is proposed.

  19. Electron-density comparisons between radar observations and 3-D ionospheric model calculations. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.W.

    1990-01-01

    A comparison of electron densities calculated from the Utah State University First-Principals Ionospheric Model with simultaneous observations taken at Sondrestrom, Millstone, and Arecibo incoherent-scatter radars was undertaken to better understanding the response of the ionosphere at these longitudinally similar yet latitudinally separated locations. The comparison included over 50 days distributed over 3 1/2 years roughly symmetrical about the last solar-minimum in 1986. The overall trend of the comparison was that to first-order the model reproduces electron densities responding to diurnal, seasonal, geomagnetic, and solar-cycle variations for all three radars. However, some model-observation discrepancies were found. These include, failure of the model to correctly produce an evening peak at Millstone, fall-spring equinox differences at Sondrestrom, tidal structure at Arecibo, and daytime NmF2 values at Arecibo.

  20. Isolation, Electron Microscopy and 3D Reconstruction of Invertebrate Muscle Myofilaments

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanism of muscle contraction and its regulation has been greatly influenced and aided by studies of myofilament structure in invertebrate muscles. Invertebrates are easily obtained and cover a broad spectrum of species and functional specializations. The thick (myosin-containing) filaments from some invertebrates are especially stable and simple in structure and thus much more amenable to structural analysis than those of vertebrates. Comparative studies of invertebrate filaments by electron microscopy and image processing have provided important generalizations of muscle molecular structure and function. This article reviews methods for preparing thick and thin filaments from invertebrate muscle, for imaging filaments by electron microscopy, and for determining their three dimensional structure by image processing. It also highlights some of the key insights into filament function that have come from these studies. PMID:22155190

  1. Direct observation of multistep energy transfer in LHCII with fifth-order 3D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengyang; Lambrev, Petar H.; Wells, Kym L.; Garab, Győző; Tan, Howe-Siang

    2015-07-01

    During photosynthesis, sunlight is efficiently captured by light-harvesting complexes, and the excitation energy is then funneled towards the reaction centre. These photosynthetic excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways are complex and proceed in a multistep fashion. Ultrafast two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) is an important tool to study EET processes in photosynthetic complexes. However, the multistep EET processes can only be indirectly inferred by correlating different cross peaks from a series of 2DES spectra. Here we directly observe multistep EET processes in LHCII using ultrafast fifth-order three-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (3DES). We measure cross peaks in 3DES spectra of LHCII that directly indicate energy transfer from excitons in the chlorophyll b (Chl b) manifold to the low-energy level chlorophyll a (Chl a) via mid-level Chl a energy states. This new spectroscopic technique allows scientists to move a step towards mapping the complete complex EET processes in photosynthetic systems.

  2. 3D modeling of the electron energy distribution function in negative hydrogen ion sources.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, R; Fujino, I; Hatayama, A; Mizuno, T; Inoue, T

    2010-02-01

    For optimization and accurate prediction of the amount of H-ion production in negative ion sources, analysis of electron energy distribution function (EEDF) is necessary. We are developing a numerical code which analyzes EEDF in the tandem-type arc-discharge source. It is a three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation code with realistic geometry and magnetic configuration. Coulomb collision between electrons is treated with the "binary collision" model and collisions with hydrogen species are treated with the "null-collision" method. We applied this code to the analysis of the JAEA 10 A negative ion source. The numerical result shows that the obtained EEDF is in good agreement with experimental results.

  3. Mapping electronic ordering in chromium in 3D with x-ray microdiffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ruqing

    2015-03-01

    In the antiferromagnetic state of chromium, electrons form spin-density waves and charge-density waves with wave vector along one of the lattice cubic axes; the spontaneous ordering of the electrons breaks the lattice symmetry and creates domains within a single crystal. We report the first 3-dimentional mapping of charge-density wave domains in bulk polycrystalline chromium samples using differential-aperture x-ray microdiffraction at the Advanced Photon Source. This research used resources of the Advanced Photon Source, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility operated for the DOE Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357

  4. 3s- and 3p-core level excitations in 3d-transition metal oxides from electron-energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, P.; Zimmermann, R.; Reinert, F.; Engel, Th.; Hüfner, S.

    1995-03-01

    3s- and 3p-core level excitations for a large number of 3d-transition metal oxides, with a formal 3d occupation from 3d0 to 3d10, have been measured by electron energy loss spectroscopy in reflection geometry (REELS) with primary energies 200 eV≤ E 0≤1600 eV. Their intensities decrease systematically with the formal 3d-count, classifying them as transitions to empty 3d-states. The structure of the 3s excitations is analysed in detail and is compared to the 3s-XPS photoemission spectra of the samples. This 3s-REELS structure and its change with the 3d occupation can be explained by the assumption that the excitation arises mainly from a 3s23dn→3s13dn+1 quadrupole transition.

  5. Weissenberg reflection high-energy electron diffraction for surface crystallography.

    PubMed

    Abukawa, Tadashi; Yamazaki, Tomoyuki; Yajima, Kentaro; Yoshimura, Koji

    2006-12-15

    The principle of a Weissenberg camera is applied to surface crystallographic analysis by reflection high-energy electron diffraction. By removing inelastic electrons and measuring hundreds of patterns as a function of sample rotation angle phi, kinematical analysis can be performed over a large volume of reciprocal space. The data set is equivalent to a three-dimensional stack of Weissenberg photographs. The method is applied to analysis of an Si(111)-square root of 3 x square root of 3-Ag surface, and the structural data obtained are in excellent agreement with the known atomic structure.

  6. EMRinger: side chain–directed model and map validation for 3D cryo-electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Barad, Benjamin A.; Echols, Nathaniel; Wang, Ray Yu-Ruei; Cheng, Yifan; DiMaio, Frank; Adams, Paul D.; Fraser, James S.

    2015-08-17

    Advances in high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) require the development of validation metrics to independently assess map quality and model geometry. We report that EMRinger is a tool that assesses the precise fitting of an atomic model into the map during refinement and shows how radiation damage alters scattering from negatively charged amino acids. EMRinger (https://github.com/fraser-lab/EMRinger) will be useful for monitoring progress in resolving and modeling high-resolution features in cryo-EM.

  7. The linearly scaling 3D fragment method for large scale electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan; Lee, Byounghak; Shan, Hongzhang; Strohmaier, Erich; Bailey, David; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2009-07-28

    The Linearly Scaling three-dimensional fragment (LS3DF) method is an O(N) ab initio electronic structure method for large-scale nano material simulations. It is a divide-and-conquer approach with a novel patching scheme that effectively cancels out the artificial boundary effects, which exist in all divide-and-conquer schemes. This method has made ab initio simulations of thousand-atom nanosystems feasible in a couple of hours, while retaining essentially the same accuracy as the direct calculation methods. The LS3DF method won the 2008 ACM Gordon Bell Prize for algorithm innovation. Our code has reached 442 Tflop/s running on 147,456 processors on the Cray XT5 (Jaguar) at OLCF, and has been run on 163,840 processors on the Blue Gene/P (Intrepid) at ALCF, and has been applied to a system containing 36,000 atoms. In this paper, we will present the recent parallel performance results of this code, and will apply the method to asymmetric CdSe/CdS core/shell nanorods, which have potential applications in electronic devices and solar cells.

  8. The Linearly Scaling 3D Fragment Method for Large Scale Electronic Structure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan; Lee, Byounghak; Shan, Hongzhang; Strohmaier, Erich; Bailey, David; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2009-06-26

    The Linearly Scaling three-dimensional fragment (LS3DF) method is an O(N) ab initio electronic structure method for large-scale nano material simulations. It is a divide-and-conquer approach with a novel patching scheme that effectively cancels out the artificial boundary effects, which exist in all divide-and-conquer schemes. This method has made ab initio simulations of thousand-atom nanosystems feasible in a couple of hours, while retaining essentially the same accuracy as the direct calculation methods. The LS3DF method won the 2008 ACM Gordon Bell Prize for algorithm innovation. Our code has reached 442 Tflop/s running on 147,456 processors on the Cray XT5 (Jaguar) at OLCF, and has been run on 163,840 processors on the Blue Gene/P (Intrepid) at ALCF, and has been applied to a system containing 36,000 atoms. In this paper, we will present the recent parallel performance results of this code, and will apply the method to asymmetric CdSe/CdS core/shell nanorods, which have potential applications in electronic devices and solar cells.

  9. The linearly scaling 3D fragment method for large scale electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan; Lee, Byounghak; Shan, Hongzhang; Strohmaier, Erich; Bailey, David; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2009-07-01

    The linearly scaling three-dimensional fragment (LS3DF) method is an O(N) ab initio electronic structure method for large-scale nano material simulations. It is a divide-and-conquer approach with a novel patching scheme that effectively cancels out the artificial boundary effects, which exist in all divide-and-conquer schemes. This method has made ab initio simulations of thousand-atom nanosystems feasible in a couple of hours, while retaining essentially the same accuracy as the direct calculation methods. The LS3DF method won the 2008 ACM Gordon Bell Prize for algorithm innovation. Our code has reached 442 Tflop/s running on 147,456 processors on the Cray XT5 (Jaguar) at OLCF, and has been run on 163,840 processors on the Blue Gene/P (Intrepid) at ALCF, and has been applied to a system containing 36,000 atoms. In this paper, we will present the recent parallel performance results of this code, and will apply the method to asymmetric CdSe/CdS core/shell nanorods, which have potential applications in electronic devices and solar cells.

  10. A Detailed Study of FDIRC Prototype with Waveform Digitizing Electronics in Cosmic Ray Telescope Using 3D Tracks.

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, K

    2012-07-01

    We present a detailed study of a novel Cherenkov imaging detector called the Focusing DIRC (FDIRC) with waveform digitizing electronics. In this test study, the FDIRC prototype has been instrumented with seven Hamamatsu H-8500 MaPMTs. Waveforms from ~450 pixels are digitized with waveform sampling electronics based on the BLAB2 ASIC, operating at a sampling speed of ~2.5 GSa/s. The FDIRC prototype was tested in a large cosmic ray telescope (CRT) providing 3D muon tracks with ~1.5 mrad angular resolution and muon energy of Emuon greater than 1.6 GeV. In this study we provide a detailed analysis of the tails in the Cherenkov angle distribution as a function of various variables, compare experimental results with simulation, and identify the major contributions to the tails. We demonstrate that to see the full impact of these tails on the Cherenkov angle resolution, it is crucial to use 3D tracks, and have a full understanding of the role of ambiguities. These issues could not be fully explored in previous FDIRC studies where the beam was perpendicular to the quartz radiator bars. This work is relevant for the final FDIRC prototype of the PID detector at SuperB, which will be tested this year in the CRT setup.

  11. A Detailed Study of FDIRC Prototype with Waveform Digitizing Electronics in Cosmic Ray Telescope Using 3D Tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, K.; Dey, B.; Aston, D.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Ratcliff, B.; Roberts, D.; Ruckman, L.; Shtol, D.; Varner, G.S.; Va'vra, J.; Vavra, Jerry; /SLAC

    2012-07-30

    We present a detailed study of a novel Cherenkov imaging detector called the Focusing DIRC (FDIRC) with waveform digitizing electronics. In this test study, the FDIRC prototype has been instrumented with seven Hamamatsu H-8500 MaPMTs. Waveforms from {approx}450 pixels are digitized with waveform sampling electronics based on the BLAB2 ASIC, operating at a sampling speed of {approx}2.5 GSa/s. The FDIRC prototype was tested in a large cosmic ray telescope (CRT) providing 3D muon tracks with {approx}1.5 mrad angular resolution and muon energy of E{sub muon} > 1.6 GeV. In this study we provide a detailed analysis of the tails in the Cherenkov angle distribution as a function of various variables, compare experimental results with simulation, and identify the major contributions to the tails. We demonstrate that to see the full impact of these tails on the Cherenkov angle resolution, it is crucial to use 3D tracks, and have a full understanding of the role of ambiguities. These issues could not be fully explored in previous FDIRC studies where the beam was perpendicular to the quartz radiator bars. This work is relevant for the final FDIRC prototype of the PID detector at SuperB, which will be tested this year in the CRT setup.

  12. Runaway electron production in DIII-D killer pellet experiments, calculated with the CQL3D/KPRAD model

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R. W.; Chan, V. S.; Chiu, S. C.; Evans, T. E.; Rosenbluth, M. N.; Whyte, D. G.

    2000-11-01

    Runaway electrons are calculated to be produced during the rapid plasma cooling resulting from ''killer pellet'' injection experiments, in general agreement with observations in the DIII-D [J. L. Luxon , Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1986 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. I, p. 159] tokamak. The time-dependent dynamics of the kinetic runaway distributions are obtained with the CQL3D [R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, ''The CQL3D Code,'' in Proceedings of the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Numerical Modeling, Montreal, 1992 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1992), p. 489] collisional Fokker--Planck code, including the effect of small and large angle collisions and stochastic magnetic field transport losses. The background density, temperature, and Z{sub eff} are evolved according to the KPRAD [D. G. Whyte and T. E. Evans , in Proceedings of the 24th European Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics, Berchtesgaden, Germany (European Physical Society, Petit-Lancy, 1997), Vol. 21A, p. 1137] deposition and radiation model of pellet--plasma interactions. Three distinct runway mechanisms are apparent: (1) prompt ''hot-tail runaways'' due to the residual hot electron tail remaining from the pre-cooling phase, (2) ''knock-on'' runaways produced by large-angle Coulomb collisions on existing high energy electrons, and (3) Dreicer ''drizzle'' runaway electrons due to diffusion of electrons up to the critical velocity for electron runaway. For electron densities below {approx}1x10{sup 15}cm{sup -3}, the hot-tail runaways dominate the early time evolution, and provide the seed population for late time knock-on runaway avalanche. For small enough stochastic magnetic field transport losses, the knock-on production of electrons balances the losses at late times. For losses due to radial magnetic field perturbations in excess of {approx}0.1% of the background field, i.e., {delta}B{sub r}/B{>=}0.001, the losses

  13. 3D electron tomography of pretreated biomass informs atomic modeling of cellulose microfibrils.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Peter N; Matthews, James F; Tucker, Melvin P; Beckham, Gregg T; Crowley, Michael F; Himmel, Michael E; Donohoe, Bryon S

    2013-09-24

    Fundamental insights into the macromolecular architecture of plant cell walls will elucidate new structure-property relationships and facilitate optimization of catalytic processes that produce fuels and chemicals from biomass. Here we introduce computational methodology to extract nanoscale geometry of cellulose microfibrils within thermochemically treated biomass directly from electron tomographic data sets. We quantitatively compare the cell wall nanostructure in corn stover following two leading pretreatment strategies: dilute acid with iron sulfate co-catalyst and ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX). Computational analysis of the tomographic data is used to extract mathematical descriptions for longitudinal axes of cellulose microfibrils from which we calculate their nanoscale curvature. These nanostructural measurements are used to inform the construction of atomistic models that exhibit features of cellulose within real, process-relevant biomass. By computational evaluation of these atomic models, we propose relationships between the crystal structure of cellulose Iβ and the nanoscale geometry of cellulose microfibrils. PMID:23988022

  14. Electron transfer through ordered metallic chains in LiNbO 3 : (Mg, Zn) : Me(3d)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakitina, L. G.; Shanina, B. D.; Corradi, G.; Polgar, K.

    1998-04-01

    In crystal and ceramic LiNbO 3 double doped with Mg or Zn above the threshold concentration ( CMg,Zn⩾4-6 mol%) and with transition metals of the 3d group (Cr, Fe, Mn) non-resonant microwave absorption (NRMA) dependent on the magnetic field was studied. Peak-like dependencies of the NRMA signal intensity on the concentration of dopants and stoichiometry of lithium niobate were found. The EPR line of mobile electrons (Δ B=30 mT) with g=2.0023 was detected. The interaction energy between the substitutional impurities of Mg and Cr was calculated. It was concluded, that in LiNbO 3 : (Mg, Zn) : (Cr, Fe, Mn) ordered metallic chains exist with electron conductivity.

  15. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 07: Design and production of 3D printed bolus for electron radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Shiqin; Moran, Kathryn; Robar, James L.

    2014-08-15

    This is a proof-of-concept study demonstrating the capacity for modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT) using 3D printed bolus. Previous reports have involved bolus design using an electron pencil beam model and fabrication using a milling machine. In this study, an in-house algorithm is presented that optimizes the dose distribution with regard to dose coverage, conformity and homogeneity within planning target volume (PTV). The algorithm uses calculated result of a commercial electron Monte Carlo dose calculation as input. Distances along ray lines from distal side of 90% isodose to distal surface of PTV are used to estimate the bolus thickness. Inhomogeneities within the calculation volume are accounted for using coefficient of equivalent thickness method. Several regional modulation operators are applied to improve dose coverage and uniformity. The process is iterated (usually twice) until an acceptable MERT plan is realized, and the final bolus is printed using solid polylactic acid. The method is evaluated with regular geometric phantoms, anthropomorphic phantoms and a clinical rhabdomyosarcoma pediatric case. In all cases the dose conformity is improved compared to that with uniform bolus. The printed boluses conform well to the surface of complex anthropomorphic phantoms. For the rhabdomyosarcoma patient, the MERT plan yields a reduction of mean dose by 38.2% in left kidney relative to uniform bolus. MERT using 3D printed bolus appears to be a practical, low cost approach to generating optimized bolus for electron therapy. The method is effective in improving conformity of prescription isodose surface and in sparing immediately adjacent normal tissues.

  16. Relativistic radiation belt electron responses to GEM magnetic storms: Comparison of CRRES observations with 3-D VERB simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung-Chan; Shprits, Yuri; Subbotin, Dmitriy; Ni, Binbin

    2012-08-01

    Understanding the dynamics of relativistic electron acceleration, loss, and transport in the Earth's radiation belt during magnetic storms is a challenging task. The U.S. National Science Foundation's Geospace Environment Modeling (GEM) has identified five magnetic storms for in-depth study that occurred during the second half of the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) mission in the year 1991. In this study, we show the responses of relativistic radiation belt electrons to the magnetic storms by comparing the time-dependent 3-D Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) simulations with the CRRES MEA 1 MeV electron observations in order to investigate the relative roles of the competing effects of previously proposed scattering mechanisms at different storm phases, as well as to examine the extent to which the simulations can reproduce observations. The major scattering processes in our model are radial transport due to Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) electromagnetic fluctuations, pitch angle and energy diffusion including mixed diffusion by whistler mode chorus waves outside the plasmasphere, and pitch angle scattering by plasmaspheric hiss inside the plasmasphere. The 3-D VERB simulations show that during the storm main phase and early recovery phase the estimated plasmapause is located deep in the inner region, indicating that pitch angle scattering by chorus waves can be a dominant loss process in the outer belt. We have also confirmed the important role played by mixed energy-pitch angle diffusion by chorus waves, which tends to reduce the fluxes enhanced by local acceleration, resulting in comparable levels of computed and measured fluxes. However, we cannot reproduce the more pronounced flux dropout near the boundary of our simulations during the main phase, which indicates that non-adiabatic losses may extend toL-shells lower than our simulation boundary. We also provide a detailed description of simulations for each of the GEM storm events.

  17. Linearly Scaling 3D Fragment Method for Large-Scale Electronic Structure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Lee, Byounghak; Shan, Hongzhang; Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan; Strohmaier, Erich; Bailey, David H.

    2008-07-01

    We present a new linearly scaling three-dimensional fragment (LS3DF) method for large scale ab initio electronic structure calculations. LS3DF is based on a divide-and-conquer approach, which incorporates a novel patching scheme that effectively cancels out the artificial boundary effects due to the subdivision of the system. As a consequence, the LS3DF program yields essentially the same results as direct density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The fragments of the LS3DF algorithm can be calculated separately with different groups of processors. This leads to almost perfect parallelization on tens of thousands of processors. After code optimization, we were able to achieve 35.1 Tflop/s, which is 39percent of the theoretical speed on 17,280 Cray XT4 processor cores. Our 13,824-atom ZnTeO alloy calculation runs 400 times faster than a direct DFTcalculation, even presuming that the direct DFT calculation can scale well up to 17,280 processor cores. These results demonstrate the applicability of the LS3DF method to material simulations, the advantage of using linearly scaling algorithms over conventional O(N3) methods, and the potential for petascale computation using the LS3DF method.

  18. An enteroendocrine cell-enteric glia connection revealed by 3D electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bohórquez, Diego V; Samsa, Leigh A; Roholt, Andrew; Medicetty, Satish; Chandra, Rashmi; Liddle, Rodger A

    2014-01-01

    The enteroendocrine cell is the cornerstone of gastrointestinal chemosensation. In the intestine and colon, this cell is stimulated by nutrients, tastants that elicit the perception of flavor, and bacterial by-products; and in response, the cell secretes hormones like cholecystokinin and peptide YY--both potent regulators of appetite. The development of transgenic mice with enteroendocrine cells expressing green fluorescent protein has allowed for the elucidation of the apical nutrient sensing mechanisms of the cell. However, the basal secretory aspects of the enteroendocrine cell remain largely unexplored, particularly because a complete account of the enteroendocrine cell ultrastructure does not exist. Today, the fine ultrastructure of a specific cell can be revealed in the third dimension thanks to the invention of serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBEM). Here, we bridged confocal microscopy with SBEM to identify the enteroendocrine cell of the mouse and study its ultrastructure in the third dimension. The results demonstrated that 73.5% of the peptide-secreting vesicles in the enteroendocrine cell are contained within an axon-like basal process. We called this process a neuropod. This neuropod contains neurofilaments, which are typical structural proteins of axons. Surprisingly, the SBEM data also demonstrated that the enteroendocrine cell neuropod is escorted by enteric glia--the cells that nurture enteric neurons. We extended these structural findings into an in vitro intestinal organoid system, in which the addition of glial derived neurotrophic factors enhanced the development of neuropods in enteroendocrine cells. These findings open a new avenue of exploration in gastrointestinal chemosensation by unveiling an unforeseen physical relationship between enteric glia and enteroendocrine cells. PMID:24587096

  19. An Enteroendocrine Cell – Enteric Glia Connection Revealed by 3D Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bohórquez, Diego V.; Samsa, Leigh A.; Roholt, Andrew; Medicetty, Satish; Chandra, Rashmi; Liddle, Rodger A.

    2014-01-01

    The enteroendocrine cell is the cornerstone of gastrointestinal chemosensation. In the intestine and colon, this cell is stimulated by nutrients, tastants that elicit the perception of flavor, and bacterial by-products; and in response, the cell secretes hormones like cholecystokinin and peptide YY – both potent regulators of appetite. The development of transgenic mice with enteroendocrine cells expressing green fluorescent protein has allowed for the elucidation of the apical nutrient sensing mechanisms of the cell. However, the basal secretory aspects of the enteroendocrine cell remain largely unexplored, particularly because a complete account of the enteroendocrine cell ultrastructure does not exist. Today, the fine ultrastructure of a specific cell can be revealed in the third dimension thanks to the invention of serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBEM). Here, we bridged confocal microscopy with SBEM to identify the enteroendocrine cell of the mouse and study its ultrastructure in the third dimension. The results demonstrated that 73.5% of the peptide-secreting vesicles in the enteroendocrine cell are contained within an axon-like basal process. We called this process a neuropod. This neuropod contains neurofilaments, which are typical structural proteins of axons. Surprisingly, the SBEM data also demonstrated that the enteroendocrine cell neuropod is escorted by enteric glia – the cells that nurture enteric neurons. We extended these structural findings into an in vitro intestinal organoid system, in which the addition of glial derived neurotrophic factors enhanced the development of neuropods in enteroendocrine cells. These findings open a new avenue of exploration in gastrointestinal chemosensation by unveiling an unforeseen physical relationship between enteric glia and enteroendocrine cells. PMID:24587096

  20. Basis set limit electronic excitation energies, ionization potentials, and electron affinities for the 3d transition metal atoms: Coupled cluster and multireference methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabanov, Nikolai B.; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2006-08-01

    Recently developed correlation consistent basis sets for the first row transition metal elements Sc-Zn have been utilized to determine complete basis set (CBS) scalar relativistic electron affinities, ionization potentials, and 4s23dn -2-4s1dn -1 electronic excitation energies with single reference coupled cluster methods [CCSD(T), CCSDT, and CCSDTQ] and multireference configuration interaction with three reference spaces: 3d4s, 3d4s4p, and 3d4s4p3d'. The theoretical values calculated with the highest order coupled cluster techniques at the CBS limit, including extrapolations to full configuration interaction, are well within 1kcal/mol of the corresponding experimental data. For the early transition metal elements (Sc-Mn) the internally contracted multireference averaged coupled pair functional method yielded excellent agreement with experiment; however, the atomic properties for the late transition metals (Mn-Zn) proved to be much more difficult to describe with this level of theory, even with the largest reference function of the present work.

  1. Dual nature of 3 d electrons in YbT 2 Zn 20 (T = Co; Fe) evidenced by electron spin resonance

    DOE PAGES

    Ivanshin, V. A.; Litvinova, T. O.; Gimranova, K.; Sukhanov, A. A.; Jia, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2015-03-18

    The electron spin resonance experiments were carried out in the single crystals YbFe2Zn20. The observed spin dynamics is compared with that in YbCo2Zn20 and Yb2Co12P7 as well as with the data of inelastic neutron scattering and electronic band structure calculations. Our results provide direct evidence that 3d electrons are itinerant in YbFe2Zn20 and localized in YbCo2Zn20. Possible connection between spin paramagnetism of dense heavy fermion systems, quantum criticality effects, and ESR spectra is discussed.

  2. Ab initio structure determination of nanocrystals of organic pharmaceutical compounds by electron diffraction at room temperature using a Timepix quantum area direct electron detector

    PubMed Central

    van Genderen, E.; Clabbers, M. T. B.; Das, P. P.; Stewart, A.; Nederlof, I.; Barentsen, K. C.; Portillo, Q.; Pannu, N. S.; Nicolopoulos, S.; Gruene, T.; Abrahams, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, structure determination by transmission electron microscopy of beam-sensitive three-dimensional nanocrystals required electron diffraction tomography data collection at liquid-nitrogen temperature, in order to reduce radiation damage. Here it is shown that the novel Timepix detector combines a high dynamic range with a very high signal-to-noise ratio and single-electron sensitivity, enabling ab initio phasing of beam-sensitive organic compounds. Low-dose electron diffraction data (∼0.013 e− Å−2 s−1) were collected at room temperature with the rotation method. It was ascertained that the data were of sufficient quality for structure solution using direct methods using software developed for X-ray crystallography (XDS, SHELX) and for electron crystallography (ADT3D/PETS, SIR2014). PMID:26919375

  3. Ab initio structure determination of nanocrystals of organic pharmaceutical compounds by electron diffraction at room temperature using a Timepix quantum area direct electron detector.

    PubMed

    van Genderen, E; Clabbers, M T B; Das, P P; Stewart, A; Nederlof, I; Barentsen, K C; Portillo, Q; Pannu, N S; Nicolopoulos, S; Gruene, T; Abrahams, J P

    2016-03-01

    Until recently, structure determination by transmission electron microscopy of beam-sensitive three-dimensional nanocrystals required electron diffraction tomography data collection at liquid-nitrogen temperature, in order to reduce radiation damage. Here it is shown that the novel Timepix detector combines a high dynamic range with a very high signal-to-noise ratio and single-electron sensitivity, enabling ab initio phasing of beam-sensitive organic compounds. Low-dose electron diffraction data (∼ 0.013 e(-) Å(-2) s(-1)) were collected at room temperature with the rotation method. It was ascertained that the data were of sufficient quality for structure solution using direct methods using software developed for X-ray crystallography (XDS, SHELX) and for electron crystallography (ADT3D/PETS, SIR2014). PMID:26919375

  4. Present State of Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Prospective Developments

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarzer, R A; Field, D P; Adams, B L; Kumar, M; Schwartz, A J

    2008-10-24

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), when employed as an additional characterization technique to a scanning electron microscope (SEM), enables individual grain orientations, local texture, point-to-point orientation correlations, and phase identification and distributions to be determined routinely on the surfaces of bulk polycrystals. The application has experienced rapid acceptance in metallurgical, materials, and geophysical laboratories within the past decade (Schwartz et al. 2000) due to the wide availability of SEMs, the ease of sample preparation from the bulk, the high speed of data acquisition, and the access to complementary information about the microstructure on a submicron scale. From the same specimen area, surface structure and morphology of the microstructure are characterized in great detail by the relief and orientation contrast in secondary and backscatter electron images, element distributions are accessed by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS), or cathodoluminescence analysis, and the orientations of single grains and phases can now be determined, as a complement, by EBSD.

  5. Carbon Nanofibers Synthesized on Selective Substrates for Nonvolatile Memory and 3D Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Khan, Abdur R.

    2011-01-01

    A plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) growth technique has been developed where the choice of starting substrate was found to influence the electrical characteristics of the resulting carbon nanofiber (CNF) tubes. It has been determined that, if the tubes are grown on refractory metallic nitride substrates, then the resulting tubes formed with dc PECVD are also electrically conducting. Individual CNFs were formed by first patterning Ni catalyst islands using ebeam evaporation and liftoff. The CNFs were then synthesized using dc PECVD with C2H2:NH3 = [1:4] at 5 Torr and 700 C, and approximately equal to 200-W plasma power. Tubes were grown directly on degenerately doped silicon <100> substrates with resistivity rho approximately equal to 1-5 meterohm-centimeter, as well as NbTiN. The approximately equal to 200-nanometer thick refractory NbTiN deposited using magnetron sputtering had rho approximately equal to 113 microohm-centimeter and was also chemically compatible with CNF synthesis. The sample was then mounted on a 45 beveled Al holder, and placed inside a SEM (scanning electron microscope). A nanomanipulator probe stage was placed inside the SEM equipped with an electrical feed-through, where tungsten probes were used to make two-terminal electrical measurements with an HP 4156C parameter analyzer. The positive terminal nanoprobe was mechanically manipulated to physically contact an individual CNF grown directly on NbTiN as shown by the SEM image in the inset of figure (a), while the negative terminal was grounded to the substrate. This revealed the tube was electrically conductive, although measureable currents could not be detected until approximately equal to 6 V, after which point current increased sharply until compliance (approximately equal to 50 nA) was reached at approximately equal to 9.5 V. A native oxide on the tungsten probe tips may contribute to a tunnel barrier, which could be the reason for the suppressed transport at low biases

  6. All oxide semiconductor-based bidirectional vertical p-n-p selectors for 3D stackable crossbar-array electronics

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Yoon Cheol; Lee, Ah Rahm; Baek, Gwang Ho; Chung, Je Bock; Kim, Tae Yoon; Park, Jea Gun; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) stackable memory devices including nano-scaled crossbar array are central for the realization of high-density non-volatile memory electronics. However, an essential sneak path issue affecting device performance in crossbar array remains a bottleneck and a grand challenge. Therefore, a suitable bidirectional selector as a two-way switch is required to facilitate a major breakthrough in the 3D crossbar array memory devices. Here, we show the excellent selectivity of all oxide p-/n-type semiconductor-based p-n-p open-based bipolar junction transistors as selectors in crossbar memory array. We report that bidirectional nonlinear characteristics of oxide p-n-p junctions can be highly enhanced by manipulating p-/n-type oxide semiconductor characteristics. We also propose an associated Zener tunneling mechanism that explains the unique features of our p-n-p selector. Our experimental findings are further extended to confirm the profound functionality of oxide p-n-p selectors integrated with several bipolar resistive switching memory elements working as storage nodes. PMID:26289565

  7. Diffractive electron imaging of nanoparticles on a substrate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinsong; Weierstall, U; Spence, John C H

    2005-12-01

    The observation of the detailed atomic arrangement within nanostructures has previously required the use of an electron microscope for imaging. The development of diffractive (lensless) imaging in X-ray science and electron microscopy using ab initio phase retrieval provides a promising tool for nanostructural characterization. We show that it is possible experimentally to reconstruct the atomic-resolution complex image (exit-face wavefunction) of a small particle lying on a thin carbon substrate from its electron microdiffraction pattern alone. We use a modified iterative charge-flipping algorithm and an estimate of the complex substrate image is subtracted at each iteration. The diffraction pattern is recorded using a parallel beam with a diameter of approximately 50 nm, illuminating a gold nanoparticle of approximately 13.6 nm diameter. Prior knowledge of the boundary of the object is not required. The method has the advantage that the reconstructed exit-face wavefunction is free of the aberrations of the objective lens normally used in the microscope, whereas resolution is limited only by thermal vibration and noise. PMID:16299507

  8. Femtosecond electron diffraction: heralding the era of atomically resolved dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciaini, Germán; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2011-09-01

    One of the great dream experiments in Science is to directly observe atomic motions as they occur. Femtosecond electron diffraction provided the first 'light' of sufficient intensity to achieve this goal by attaining atomic resolution to structural changes on the relevant timescales. This review covers the technical progress that made this new level of acuity possible and gives a survey of the new insights gained from an atomic level perspective of structural dynamics. Atomic level views of the simplest possible structural transition, melting, are discussed for a number of systems in which both thermal and purely electronically driven atomic displacements can be correlated with the degree of directional bonding. Optical manipulation of charge distributions and effects on interatomic forces/bonding can be directly observed through the ensuing atomic motions. New phenomena involving strongly correlated electron-lattice systems are also discussed in which optically induced changes in the potential energy landscape lead to ballistic structural changes. Concepts such as the structural order parameters are now directly observable at the atomic level of inspection to give a remarkable view of the extraordinary degree of cooperativity involved in strongly correlated electron-lattice systems. These recent examples, in combination with time-resolved real space imaging now possible with electron probes, are truly defining an emerging field that holds great promise to make a significant impact in how we understand structural dynamics. This article is dedicated to the memory of Professor David John Hugh Cockayne, a world leader in electron microscopy, who sadly passed away in December.

  9. Diffraction and electron energy loss to plasmons in silicon slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Zachary H.

    2008-03-01

    Dynamical diffraction patterns were calculated for 25nm slabs of silicon with [001], [111], and [110] faces for a 120keV electron beam. The calculation used the mixed dynamical form factor in the dielectric formulation. Dielectric matrices with wave vector and frequency dependence were calculated within the local density approximation using the random phase approximation. The energy losses, 10-25eV , span the plasmon peak. Near the zone axes, the results show the preservation of elastic contrast and both excess and deficit Kikuchi lines.

  10. An electron diffraction study of alkali chloride vapors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mawhorter, R. J.; Fink, M.; Hartley, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    A study of monomers and dimers of the four alkali chlorides NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl in the vapor phase using the counting method of high energy electron diffraction is reported. Nozzle temperatures from 850-960 K were required to achieve the necessary vapor pressures of approximately 0.01 torr. Using harmonic calculations for the monomer and dimer 1 values, a consistent set of structures for all four molecules was obained. The corrected monomer distances reproduce the microwave values very well. The experiment yields information on the amount of dimer present in the vapor, and these results are compared with thermodynamic values.

  11. FT3D: three-dimensional Fourier analysis on small Unix workstations for electron microscopy and tomographic studies.

    PubMed

    Lanzavecchia, S; Bellon, P L; Tosoni, L

    1993-12-01

    FT3D is a self-contained package of tools for three-dimensional Fourier analysis, written in the C language for Unix workstations. It can evaluate direct transforms of three-dimensional real functions, inverse transforms, auto- and cross-correlations and spectra. The library has been developed to support three-dimensional reconstructions of biological structures from projections obtained in the electron microscope. This paper discusses some features of the library, which has been implemented in such a way as to profit from the resources of modern workstations. A table of elapsed times for jobs of different dimensions with different RAM buffers is reported for the particular hardware used in the authors' laboratory.

  12. Structure-function studies of blood and air capillaries in chicken lung using 3D electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    West, John B; Fu, Zhenxing; Deerinck, Thomas J; Mackey, Mason R; Obayashi, James T; Ellisman, Mark H

    2010-02-28

    Avian pulmonary capillaries differ from those of mammals in three important ways. The blood-gas barrier is much thinner, it is more uniform in thickness, and the capillaries are far more rigid when their transmural pressure is altered. The thinness of the barrier is surprising because it predisposes the capillaries to stress failure. A possible mechanism for these differences is that avian pulmonary capillaries, unlike mammalian, are supported from the outside by air capillaries, but the details of the support are poorly understood. To clarify this we studied the blood and air capillaries in chicken lung using transmission electron microscopy (EM) and two relatively new techniques that allow 3D visualization: electron tomography and serial block-face scanning EM. These studies show that the pulmonary capillaries are flanked by epithelial bridges composed of two extremely thin epithelial cells with large surface areas. The junctions of the bridges with the capillary walls show thickening of the epithelial cells and an accumulation of extracellular matrix. Collapse of the pulmonary capillaries when the pressure outside them is increased is apparently prevented by the guy wire-like action of the epithelial bridges. The enlarged junctions between the bridges and the walls could provide a mechanism that limits the hoop stress in the capillary walls when the pressure inside them is increased. The support of the pulmonary capillaries may also be explained by an interdependence mechanism whereby the capillaries are linked to a rigid assemblage of air capillaries. These EM studies show the supporting structures in greater detail than has previously been possible, particularly in 3D, and they allow a more complete analysis of the mechanical forces affecting avian pulmonary capillaries. PMID:20038456

  13. Kondo effect at low electron density and high particle-hole asymmetry in 1D, 2D, and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žitko, Rok; Horvat, Alen

    2016-09-01

    Using the perturbative scaling equations and the numerical renormalization group, we study the characteristic energy scales in the Kondo impurity problem as a function of the exchange coupling constant J and the conduction-band electron density. We discuss the relation between the energy gain (impurity binding energy) Δ E and the Kondo temperature TK. We find that the two are proportional only for large values of J , whereas in the weak-coupling limit the energy gain is quadratic in J , while the Kondo temperature is exponentially small. The exact relation between the two quantities depends on the detailed form of the density of states of the band. In the limit of low electron density the Kondo screening is affected by the strong particle-hole asymmetry due to the presence of the band-edge van Hove singularities. We consider the cases of one- (1D), two- (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) tight-binding lattices (linear chain, square lattice, cubic lattice) with inverse-square-root, step-function, and square-root onsets of the density of states that are characteristic of the respective dimensionalities. We always find two different regimes depending on whether TK is higher or lower than μ , the chemical potential measured from the bottom of the band. For 2D and 3D, we find a sigmoidal crossover between the large-J and small-J asymptotics in Δ E and a clear separation between Δ E and TK for TK<μ . For 1D, there is, in addition, a sizable intermediate-J regime where the Kondo temperature is quadratic in J due to the diverging density of states at the band edge. Furthermore, we find that in 1D the particle-hole asymmetry leads to a large decrease of TK compared to the standard result obtained by approximating the density of states to be constant (flat-band approximation), while in 3D the opposite is the case; this is due to the nontrivial interplay of the exchange and potential scattering renormalization in the presence of particle-hole asymmetry. The 2D square

  14. Hybrid approach for structural modeling of biological systems from X-ray free electron laser diffraction patterns.

    PubMed

    Tokuhisa, Atsushi; Jonic, Slavica; Tama, Florence; Miyashita, Osamu

    2016-06-01

    We present a new hybrid approach for structural modeling using X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) diffraction patterns from non-crystalline biological samples. Reconstruction of a 3D structure requires a large number of diffraction patterns; however, in the current XFEL experiments with biological systems, the analysis often relies on a small number of 2D diffraction patterns. In this study, we explore the strategies to identify plausible 3D structural models by combining the 2D analysis of such diffraction patterns with computational modeling (normal mode analysis or molecular dynamics simulations). As the first step toward such hybrid modeling, we established a protocol to assess the agreement between the model structure and the target XFEL diffraction pattern and showed that XFEL data can be used to study the conformational transitions of biological molecules. We tested the proposed algorithms using data of three biomolecular complexes of different sizes (elongation factor 2, CCM virus, and ribosome) and examined the experimental conditions that are required to perform such studies, in particular the XFEL beam intensity requirements. The results indicate that the current beam intensity is close to a strength that enables us to study conformational transitions of macromolecules, such as ribosomes. The proposed algorithm can be combined with molecular mechanics approaches, such as molecular dynamics simulations and normal mode analysis, to generate a large number of candidate structures to perform hybrid structural modeling. PMID:26972893

  15. Hybrid approach for structural modeling of biological systems from X-ray free electron laser diffraction patterns.

    PubMed

    Tokuhisa, Atsushi; Jonic, Slavica; Tama, Florence; Miyashita, Osamu

    2016-06-01

    We present a new hybrid approach for structural modeling using X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) diffraction patterns from non-crystalline biological samples. Reconstruction of a 3D structure requires a large number of diffraction patterns; however, in the current XFEL experiments with biological systems, the analysis often relies on a small number of 2D diffraction patterns. In this study, we explore the strategies to identify plausible 3D structural models by combining the 2D analysis of such diffraction patterns with computational modeling (normal mode analysis or molecular dynamics simulations). As the first step toward such hybrid modeling, we established a protocol to assess the agreement between the model structure and the target XFEL diffraction pattern and showed that XFEL data can be used to study the conformational transitions of biological molecules. We tested the proposed algorithms using data of three biomolecular complexes of different sizes (elongation factor 2, CCM virus, and ribosome) and examined the experimental conditions that are required to perform such studies, in particular the XFEL beam intensity requirements. The results indicate that the current beam intensity is close to a strength that enables us to study conformational transitions of macromolecules, such as ribosomes. The proposed algorithm can be combined with molecular mechanics approaches, such as molecular dynamics simulations and normal mode analysis, to generate a large number of candidate structures to perform hybrid structural modeling.

  16. Electron diffraction from oriented molecules: e—CH3Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böwering, N.; Volkmer, M.; Meier, C.; Lieschke, J.; Fink, M.

    1994-06-01

    The additional molecular interference contributions to the differential elastic electron scattering cross sections for spatially oriented and partially state-selected CH3Cl molecules have been measured at an incident energy of 1 keV. Using the electrostatic hexapole technique, the molecules were oriented with their axes preferentially parallel or antiparallel to the electron beam. Deviations from the diffraction pattern of unoriented molecules of up to 4% were observed as a function of momentum transfer. A change of the orientational distribution in the state ensemble gave rise to a significantly altered interference pattern with alignment contributions dominating in both cases. For comparison with the data the fractional population of the various states present in the molecular beam was calculated and the independent atom model was applied to obtain the scattering pattern using the formalism of Kohl and Shipsey.

  17. Applications of the electron backscatter diffraction technique to ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koblischka, M. R.; Koblischka-Veneva, A.

    2013-07-01

    A technique with a relatively high spatial resolution is required for an effective analysis of the microstructure of ceramic materials. The recently developed electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique, which works within a scanning electron microscope, enables a spatially highly resolved study of crystallographic orientations while recording Kikuchi patterns on a user-defined grid. However, such an EBSD texture analysis was until now not often performed on ceramic materials - in contrary, the technique is widely employed in the analysis of metallic materials, including the investigation of various types of steels. The use of ceramics possesses a variety of problems for EBSD investigations like: (i) complicated crystal structure, (ii) difficult surface preparation, and (iii) problems arising from a low conductivity of the ceramic materials. Here, we discuss these problems and present solutions in order to obtain high-quality Kikuchi patterns from such ceramics.

  18. Precession electron diffraction and its utility for structural fingerprinting in the transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeck, Peter; Rouvimov, Sergei; Nicolopoulos, Stavros

    2009-09-01

    Precession electron diffraction (PED) in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) is discussed in order to illustrate its utility for structural fingerprinting of nanocrystals. While individual nanocrystals may be fingerprinted structurally from PED spot patterns, ensembles of nanocrystals may be fingerprinted from powder PED ring patterns.

  19. 3D Reconstruction of VZV Infected Cell Nuclei and PML Nuclear Cages by Serial Section Array Scanning Electron Microscopy and Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Reichelt, Mike; Joubert, Lydia; Perrino, John; Koh, Ai Leen; Phanwar, Ibanri; Arvin, Ann M.

    2012-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella (chickenpox) and herpes zoster (shingles). Like all herpesviruses, the VZV DNA genome is replicated in the nucleus and packaged into nucleocapsids that must egress across the nuclear membrane for incorporation into virus particles in the cytoplasm. Our recent work showed that VZV nucleocapsids are sequestered in nuclear cages formed from promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) in vitro and in human dorsal root ganglia and skin xenografts in vivo. We sought a method to determine the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of nucleocapsids in the nuclei of herpesvirus-infected cells as well as the 3D shape, volume and ultrastructure of these unique PML subnuclear domains. Here we report the development of a novel 3D imaging and reconstruction strategy that we term Serial Section Array-Scanning Electron Microscopy (SSA-SEM) and its application to the analysis of VZV-infected cells and these nuclear PML cages. We show that SSA-SEM permits large volume imaging and 3D reconstruction at a resolution sufficient to localize, count and distinguish different types of VZV nucleocapsids and to visualize complete PML cages. This method allowed a quantitative determination of how many nucleocapsids can be sequestered within individual PML cages (sequestration capacity), what proportion of nucleocapsids are entrapped in single nuclei (sequestration efficiency) and revealed the ultrastructural detail of the PML cages. More than 98% of all nucleocapsids in reconstructed nuclear volumes were contained in PML cages and single PML cages sequestered up to 2,780 nucleocapsids, which were shown by electron tomography to be embedded and cross-linked by an filamentous electron-dense meshwork within these unique subnuclear domains. This SSA-SEM analysis extends our recent characterization of PML cages and provides a proof of concept for this new strategy to investigate events during virion assembly at the single cell

  20. The GaOH-HGaO potential energy hypersurface and the necessity of correlating the 3d electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Claude A., Jr.; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Kim, Seung-Joon; Schaefer, Henry F., III

    1996-06-01

    The ground state potential energy hypersurface of the GaOH-HGaO system has been investigated using high level ab initio molecular electronic structure theory. The geometries and physical properties of two equilibrium structures, one isomerization transition state and one inversion transition state were determined at the self-consistent field (SCF), configuration interaction with single and double excitations (CISD), coupled cluster with single and double excitations (CCSD), and CCSD with perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)] levels of theory with four sets of basis functions. It has been found that freezing the 3d electrons of the Ga atom in the correlation procedures is not appropriate for this system. For the energy difference ΔE (GaOH-HGaO) the freezing of the 3d electrons results in an error of 25 kcal/mol! The dipole moments, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and infrared (IR) intensities are predicted for the four stationary points. At the highest level of theory employed in this study, CCSD(T) using triple zeta plus double polarization with higher angular momentum and diffuse functions [TZ2P(f,d)+diff] basis set, the bent GaOH was found to be 41.9 kcal/mol more stable than the linear HGaO species; with the zero-point vibrational energy (ZPVE) correction, the energy separation becomes 40.4 kcal/mol. The classical barrier height for the exothermic isomerization (1,2 hydrogen shift) reaction HGaO→GaOH is determined to be 44.5 kcal/mol and the barrier height with the ZPVE correction 42.3 kcal/mol. The classical barrier to linearity for the bent GaOH molecule is determined to be 1.7 kcal/mol and the barrier height with the ZPVE correction to be 1.2 kcal/mol. The predicted dipole moments of GaOH and HGaO are 1.41 and 4.45 Debye, respectively. The effects of electron correlation reduce the dipole moment of HGaO by the sizable amount of 1.2 Debye. The two equilibrium species may be suitable for microwave spectroscopic investigation. Furthermore, they may also

  1. Investigations on interfacial dynamics with ultrafast electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdick, Ryan A.

    An ultrafast electron diffractive voltammetry (UEDV) technique is introduced, extended from ultrafast electron diffraction, to investigate the ultrafast charge transport dynamics at interfaces and in nanostructures. Rooted in Coulomb-induced refraction, formalisms are presented to quantitatively deduce the transient surface voltages (TSVs), caused by photoinduced charge redistributions at interfaces, and are applied to examine a prototypical Si/SiO2 interface, known to be susceptible to photoinduced interfacial charging The ultrafast time resolution and high sensitivity to surface charges of this electron diffractive approach allows direct elucidation of the transient effects of photoinduced hot electron transport at nanometer (˜2 nm) interfaces. Two distinctive regimes are uncovered, characterized by the time scales associated with charge separation. At the low fluence regime, the charge transfer is described by a thermally-mediated process with linear dependence on the excitation fluence. Theoretical analysis of the transient thermal properties of the carriers show that it is well-described by a direct tunneling of the laser heated electrons through the dielectric oxide layer to surface states. At higher fluences, a coherent multiphoton absorption process is invoked to directly inject electrons into the conduction band of SiO2, leading to a more efficient surface charge accumulation. A quadratic fluence dependence on this coherent, 3-photon lead electron injection is characterized by the rapid dephasing of the intermediately generated hot electrons from 2-photon absorption, limiting the yield of the consecutive 1-photon absorption by free carriers. The TSV formalism is extended beyond the simple slab geometry associated with planar surfaces (Si/SiO2), to interfaces with arbitrary geometrical features, by imposing a corrective scheme to the slab model. The validity of this treatment is demonstrated in an investigation of the charge transfer dynamics at a metal

  2. Imaging electronic motions in atoms by energy-resolved ultrafast electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hua-Chieh; Starace, Anthony F.

    2015-05-01

    We present a general analysis of energy-resolved ultrafast electron diffraction for imaging target electronic motion and numerical simulations of time-resolved spectra of ultrafast electrons scattered from the breathing, wiggling, and hybrid modes of electronic motion in the H atom. We consider pump-probe processes in which a laser pulse creates a coherent superposition of target states that are probed by the electron pulses. Varying the pump-probe delay time, the delay-dependent scattering intensities record the ensuing electronic motions. The kinematics of the scattered electrons is fully resolved; both the scattering angles and the kinetic energies are measured. Therefore, besides the spatial and temporal information, the energy content of the electronic motions can be retrieved from the energy-resolved diffraction patterns, which provide unequivocal interpretations of the electronic motions. Because of this, we are able to explain the counterintuitive temporal behavior of the diffraction images, which show a quite different temporal behavior and little connection to the electron densities. This work has been supported in part by AFOSR Award No. FA9550-12-1-0149.

  3. Electronic structures in coupled two quantum dots by 3D-mesh Hartree-Fock-Kohn-Sham calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuse, T.; Hama, T.; Kaihatsu, H.; Toyoda, N.; Takizawa, T.

    To study the electronic structures of quantum dots in the framework of self-interaction-free including three dimensional effects, we adopt the theory of nonlocal effective potential introduced by Kohn and Sham [#!ks65!#]. For utilizing the advantageous point of the real space (3D) mesh method to solve the original nonlinear and nonlocal Hartree-Fock-Kohn-Sham (HFKS)-equation, we introduce a linearization of the equation in the local form by introducing the local Coulomb potentials which depend on explicitly the two single particle states. In practice, for solving the local form HFKS-equation, we use the Car-Parrinello-like relaxation method and the Coulomb potentials are obtained by solving the Poisson equation under proper boundary conditions. Firstly the observed energy gap between triplet- and singlet-states of N = 4 in DBS [#!tarucha96!#] is discussed to reproduce the addition energies and chemical potentials depending the magnetic field. Next the coupling between two-quantum dots in TBS [#!aht97!#] is studied by adding the square barrier between two dots. The spin-degeneracy [#!aht97!#] measured in gate-voltage depending on magnetic field is well reproduced in the limit of small mismatch. Finally, the electronic states in the ring structure are calculated and discussed how the ring size and magnetic field affect to the structures.

  4. 3D nanostructured inkjet printed graphene via UV-pulsed laser irradiation enables paper-based electronics and electrochemical devices.

    PubMed

    Das, Suprem R; Nian, Qiong; Cargill, Allison A; Hondred, John A; Ding, Shaowei; Saei, Mojib; Cheng, Gary J; Claussen, Jonathan C

    2016-09-21

    Emerging research on printed and flexible graphene-based electronics is beginning to show tremendous promise for a wide variety of fields including wearable sensors and thin film transistors. However, post-print annealing/reduction processes that are necessary to increase the electrical conductivity of the printed graphene degrade sensitive substrates (e.g., paper) and are whole substrate processes that are unable to selectively anneal/reduce only the printed graphene-leaving sensitive device components exposed to damaging heat or chemicals. Herein a pulsed laser process is introduced that can selectively irradiate inkjet printed reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and subsequently improve the electrical conductivity (Rsheet∼0.7 kΩ□(-1)) of printed graphene above previously published reports. Furthermore, the laser process is capable of developing 3D petal-like graphene nanostructures from 2D planar printed graphene. These visible morphological changes display favorable electrochemical sensing characteristics-ferricyanide cyclic voltammetry with a redox peak separation (ΔEp) ≈ 0.7 V as well as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) amperometry with a sensitivity of 3.32 μA mM(-1) and a response time of <5 s. Thus this work paves the way for not only paper-based electronics with graphene circuits, it enables the creation of low-cost and disposable graphene-based electrochemical electrodes for myriad applications including sensors, biosensors, fuel cells, and theranostic devices.

  5. 2D/3D electron temperature fluctuations near explosive MHD instabilities accompanied by minor and major disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. J.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Lee, K. D.; Ko, W.-H.; Park, Y.-S.; Park, B. H.; In, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Minor and major disruptions by explosive MHD instabilities were observed with the novel quasi 3D electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system in the KSTAR plasma. The fine electron temperature (T e) fluctuation images revealed two types of minor disruptions: a small minor disruption is a q∼ 2 localized fast transport event due to a single m/n  =  2/1 magnetic island growth, while a large minor disruption is partial collapse of the q≤slant 2 region with two successive fast heat transport events by the correlated m/n  =  2/1 and m/n  =  1/1 instabilities. The m/n  =  2/1 magnetic island growth during the minor disruption is normally limited below the saturation width. However, as the additional interchange-like perturbation grows near the inner separatrix of the 2/1 island, the 2/1 island can expand beyond the limit through coupling with the cold bubble formed by the interchange-like perturbation.

  6. 3D nanostructured inkjet printed graphene via UV-pulsed laser irradiation enables paper-based electronics and electrochemical devices.

    PubMed

    Das, Suprem R; Nian, Qiong; Cargill, Allison A; Hondred, John A; Ding, Shaowei; Saei, Mojib; Cheng, Gary J; Claussen, Jonathan C

    2016-09-21

    Emerging research on printed and flexible graphene-based electronics is beginning to show tremendous promise for a wide variety of fields including wearable sensors and thin film transistors. However, post-print annealing/reduction processes that are necessary to increase the electrical conductivity of the printed graphene degrade sensitive substrates (e.g., paper) and are whole substrate processes that are unable to selectively anneal/reduce only the printed graphene-leaving sensitive device components exposed to damaging heat or chemicals. Herein a pulsed laser process is introduced that can selectively irradiate inkjet printed reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and subsequently improve the electrical conductivity (Rsheet∼0.7 kΩ□(-1)) of printed graphene above previously published reports. Furthermore, the laser process is capable of developing 3D petal-like graphene nanostructures from 2D planar printed graphene. These visible morphological changes display favorable electrochemical sensing characteristics-ferricyanide cyclic voltammetry with a redox peak separation (ΔEp) ≈ 0.7 V as well as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) amperometry with a sensitivity of 3.32 μA mM(-1) and a response time of <5 s. Thus this work paves the way for not only paper-based electronics with graphene circuits, it enables the creation of low-cost and disposable graphene-based electrochemical electrodes for myriad applications including sensors, biosensors, fuel cells, and theranostic devices. PMID:27510913

  7. First-principle study of the electronic structure and magnetism of lithium-adsorbed 3d transition-metal phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Hu, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Li, Y.; Zhou, T.; Ren, J.

    2016-02-01

    Based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the electronic structures and magnetic properties of 3d transition-metal phthalocyanine (TMPc, TM = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu), as well as Li-adsorbed phthalocyanines have been studied. The results show that the pristine TMPcs all have a good D4h symmetry. When there is one Li atom adsorbed on TMPcs directly over (LiTMPc-α) or slantly above (LiTMPc-β) the TM atoms, the geometries and electronic structures will be changed. For LiTMPc-α systems, the central TM atoms will deviate from the molecular plane and the molecules exhibit good C4v symmetry. LiTMPc-β systems are more stable than LiTMPc-α systems but it do not possess D4h and C4v symmetries. The total and local magnetic moments and the charge transfer are also presented. Finally, by using the orbit mixing and splitting theory under D4h and C4v symmetry, we get the ordering of the energy levels of the central TM atoms.

  8. Electronic and magnetic properties of monolayer SiC sheet doped with 3d-transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezi Javan, Masoud

    2016-03-01

    We theoretically studied the electronic and magnetic properties of the monolayer SiC sheet doped by 3d transition-metal (TM) atoms. The structural properties, induced strain, electronic and magnetic properties were studied for cases that a carbon or silicon of the SiC sheet replaced with TM atoms. We found that the mount of induced strain to the lattice structure of the SiC sheet with substituting TM atoms is different for Si (TMSi) and C (TMC) sites as the TMSi structures have lower value of the strain. Also the TM atoms can be substituted in the lattice of the SiC sheet with different binding energy values for TMSi and TMC structures as the TMSi structures have higher value of the binding energies. Dependent to the structural properties, the TM doped SiC sheets show magnetic or nonmagnetic properties. We found that some structures such as MnSi, CuSi and CoC configurations have significant total magnetic moment about 3 μB.

  9. Correlation Energy of 3D Spin-Polarized Electron Gas: A Single Interpolation Between High- and Low-Density Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianwei; Perdew, John; Seidl, Michael

    2008-03-01

    We present an analytic model for the correlation energy per electron ec(rs,ζ) in the three-dimensional (3D) uniform electron gas, covering the full range 0<=rs<∞ and 0<=ζ<=1 of the density parameter rs and the relative spin polarization ζ. An interpolation is made between the exactly known high-density (rs->0) and low-density (rs->∞) limits, using a formula which (unlike previous ones) has the right analytic structures in both limits. We find that there is almost enough information available from these limits to determine the correlation energy over the full range. By minimal fitting to numerical quantum Monte Carlo data, we predict the value of b1(ζ) at ζ=0 close to the theoretical value [1], where b1(ζ) is the coefficient of the rsterm in the high-density expansion. The model finds correlation energies for the unpolarized (ζ=0) and fully polarized (ζ=1) cases in excellent agreement with Monte Carlo data. [1] T. Endo, M. Horiuchi, Y. Takada and H. Yasuhara, Phys. Rev. B 59, 7367 (1999)

  10. Principles of depth-resolved Kikuchi pattern simulation for electron backscatter diffraction.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, A

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents a tutorial discussion of the principles underlying the depth-dependent Kikuchi pattern formation of backscattered electrons in the scanning electron microscope. To illustrate the connections between various electron diffraction methods, the formation of Kikuchi bands in electron backscatter diffraction in the scanning electron microscope and in transmission electron microscopy are compared with the help of simulations employing the dynamical theory of electron diffraction. The close relationship between backscattered electron diffraction and convergent beam electron diffraction is illuminated by showing how both effects can be calculated within the same theoretical framework. The influence of the depth-dependence of diffuse electron scattering on the formation of the experimentally observed electron backscatter diffraction contrast and intensity is visualized by calculations of depth-resolved Kikuchi patterns. Comparison of an experimental electron backscatter diffraction pattern with simulations assuming several different depth distributions shows that the depth-distribution of backscattered electrons needs to be taken into account in quantitative descriptions. This should make it possible to obtain more quantitative depth-dependent information from experimental electron backscatter diffraction patterns via correlation with dynamical diffraction simulations and Monte Carlo models of electron scattering.

  11. A correlative approach for combining microCT, light and transmission electron microscopy in a single 3D scenario

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In biomedical research, a huge variety of different techniques is currently available for the structural examination of small specimens, including conventional light microscopy (LM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), microscopic X-ray computed tomography (microCT), and many others. Since every imaging method is physically limited by certain parameters, a correlative use of complementary methods often yields a significant broader range of information. Here we demonstrate the advantages of the correlative use of microCT, light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy for the analysis of small biological samples. Results We used a small juvenile bivalve mollusc (Mytilus galloprovincialis, approximately 0.8 mm length) to demonstrate the workflow of a correlative examination by microCT, LM serial section analysis, and TEM-re-sectioning. Initially these three datasets were analyzed separately, and subsequently they were fused in one 3D scene. This workflow is very straightforward. The specimen was processed as usual for transmission electron microscopy including post-fixation in osmium tetroxide and embedding in epoxy resin. Subsequently it was imaged with microCT. Post-fixation in osmium tetroxide yielded sufficient X-ray contrast for microCT imaging, since the X-ray absorption of epoxy resin is low. Thereafter, the same specimen was serially sectioned for LM investigation. The serial section images were aligned and specific organ systems were reconstructed based on manual segmentation and surface rendering. According to the region of interest (ROI), specific LM sections were detached from the slides, re-mounted on resin blocks and re-sectioned (ultrathin) for TEM. For analysis, image data from the three different modalities was co-registered into a single 3D scene using the software AMIRA®. We were able to register both the LM section series volume and TEM slices neatly to the microCT dataset, with

  12. Measuring Strain in Semiconductor Nanostructures by Convergent Beam Electron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clément, L.; Rouviere, J.-L.; Cacho, F.; Pantel, R.

    Convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) experiments and simulations, and finite element calculations are used to measure the strain and stress in a complex device such as a series of periodic MOS transistors. When approaching the transistor active regions, the HOLZ lines in the CBED patterns acquired in the silicon substrate, become increasingly broad. This HOLZ line broadening, which is due to the relaxation of stress in the lamella, is used to determine quantitatively the strain and stress in the thin lamella and then in the bulk device. Two parameters, the intrinsic material stresses in the NiSi and Si3N4 layers of the transistors, are successfully fitted by trial and error. These fitted values are, respectively, equal to 1.2 and 0.95GPa.

  13. Enantiomorph identification in organic crystals by electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K.; Fujio, S.; Inui, H.; Ueji, R.; Sumida, N.

    2009-05-01

    The convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) method we proposed recently for enantiomorph identification has successfully been applied to some amino acid crystals such as glutamic acid and threonin. Enantiomorph identification (either left-handed or right-handed form) can readily be made within the framework of the proposed method by noting the asymmetric intensity distribution of Bijvoet pairs of reflections in the CBED pattern taken along an appropriate zone-axis orientation. Although the proposed method usually requires only a single CBED pattern, some effort to eliminate the ambiguity of 180°-rotation of the CBED pattern about the incident beam is needed for enantiomorph identification for these organic crystals because of the lack of HOLZ (higher-order Laue zone) reflection disks.

  14. Symmetry quantification and mapping using convergent beam electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyou-Hyun; Zuo, Jian-Min

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new algorithm to quantify symmetry recorded in convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) patterns and use it for symmetry mapping in materials applications. We evaluate the effectiveness of the profile R-factor (R(p)) and the normalized cross-correlation coefficient (γ) for quantifying the amount of symmetry in a CBED pattern. The symmetry quantification procedures are automated and the algorithm is implemented as a DM (Digital Micrograph(©)) script. Experimental and simulated CBED patterns recorded from a Si single crystal are used to calibrate the proposed algorithm for the symmetry quantification. The proposed algorithm is then applied to a Si sample with defects to test the sensitivity of symmetry quantification to defects. Using the mirror symmetry as an example, we demonstrate that the normalized cross-correlation coefficient provides an effective and robust measurement of the symmetry recorded in experimental CBED patterns. PMID:23142747

  15. A study of 3D structure of nighttime electron density enhancement in the mid-latitude ionosphere by GPS tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Saito, A.

    2011-12-01

    The mid-latitude summer nighttime anomaly (MSNA) is a feature that the nighttime electron density larger than that in the daytime mid-latitude ionosphere. This anomaly was first detected in the southern hemisphere five decades ago and observed in the northern hemisphere recently by ionosondes and satellites. Previous studies presented the electron density structure of MSNA by using COSMIC occultation data and found that MSNA is clearly seen around 300 km altitude during local summer. However, due to lack of observation, the day-to-day variation of MSNA was not investigated. A GPS tomography method by SPEL of Kyoto University using the total electron content (TEC) data measured by the ground-based GPS receiver network is employed in this study. The wide coverage and continuous observation of GPS receivers are suitable for investigating the spatial and day-to-day variations of ionospheric electron densities. The algorithm of the GPS tomography developed by SPEL of Kyoto University use a constraint condition that the gradient of election density tends to be smooth in the horizontal direction and steep in the vicinity of the F2 peak, instead of inputting the initial conditions. Therefore, the algorithm is independent of any ionospheric and plasmaspheric electron density distribution models. The dense ground-based GPS receiver network around European region is used to study the three dimensional (3D) structure of MSNA with GPS tomography. Results show that the MSNA usually appear around the geomagnetic mid-latitude region during local summer nighttime. The feature of MSNA is most obvious at the ionospheric F2-peak altitudes. The result also shows a day-to-day variation in the formation of MSNA, in terms of the occurrence time, intensity, and spatial extent. The tomographic results are compared with the ionosondes, satellites, and radar measurements. A theoretical model simulation, SAMI2, is also used to further discuss the mechanism of MSNA. The comparison with other

  16. Nanometres-resolution Kikuchi patterns from materials science specimens with transmission electron forward scatter diffraction in the scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Brodusch, N; Demers, H; Gauvin, R

    2013-04-01

    A charge-coupled device camera of an electron backscattered diffraction system in a scanning electron microscope was positioned below a thin specimen and transmission Kikuchi patterns were collected. Contrary to electron backscattered diffraction, transmission electron forward scatter diffraction provides phase identification and orientation mapping at the nanoscale. The minimum Pd particle size for which a Kikuchi diffraction pattern was detected and indexed reliably was 5.6 nm. An orientation mapping resolution of 5 nm was measured at 30 kV. The resolution obtained with transmission electron forward scatter diffraction was of the same order of magnitude than that reported in electron nanodiffraction in the transmission electron microscope. An energy dispersive spectrometer X-ray map and a transmission electron forward scatter diffraction orientation map were acquired simultaneously. The high-resolution chemical, phase and orientation maps provided at once information on the chemical form, orientation and coherency of precipitates in an aluminium-lithium 2099 alloy.

  17. Plasma response measurements of external magnetic perturbations using electron cyclotron emission and comparisons to 3D ideal MHD equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willensdorfer, M.; Denk, S. S.; Strumberger, E.; Suttrop, W.; Vanovac, B.; Brida, D.; Cavedon, M.; Classen, I.; Dunne, M.; Fietz, S.; Fischer, R.; Kirk, A.; Laggner, F. M.; Liu, Y. Q.; Odstrčil, T.; Ryan, D. A.; Viezzer, E.; Zohm, H.; Luhmann, I. C.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team; The EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-11-01

    The plasma response from an external n  =  2 magnetic perturbation field in ASDEX Upgrade has been measured using mainly electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics and a rigid rotating field. To interpret ECE and ECE-imaging (ECE-I) measurements accurately, forward modeling of the radiation transport has been combined with ray tracing. The measured data is compared to synthetic ECE data generated from a 3D ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibrium calculated by VMEC. The measured amplitudes of the helical displacement around the outboard midplane are in reasonable agreement with the one from the synthetic VMEC diagnostics. Both exceed the predictions from the vacuum field calculations and indicate the presence of a kink response at the edge, which amplifies the perturbation. VMEC and MARS-F have been used to calculate the properties of this kink mode. The poloidal mode structure of the magnetic perturbation of this kink mode at the edge peaks at poloidal mode numbers larger than the resonant components |m|>|nq| , whereas the poloidal mode structure of its displacement is almost resonant |m|≈ |nq| . This is expected from ideal MHD in the proximity of rational surfaces. The displacement measured by ECE-I confirms this resonant response.

  18. Optical sectioning and 3D reconstructions as an alternative to scanning electron microscopy for analysis of cell shape1

    PubMed Central

    Landis, Jacob B.; Ventura, Kayla L.; Soltis, Douglas E.; Soltis, Pamela S.; Oppenheimer, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Visualizing flower epidermal cells is often desirable for investigating the interaction between flowers and their pollinators, in addition to the broader range of ecological interactions in which flowers are involved. We developed a protocol for visualizing petal epidermal cells without the limitations of the commonly used method of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Methods: Flower material was collected and fixed in glutaraldehyde, followed by dehydration in an ethanol series. Flowers were dissected to collect petals, and subjected to a Histo-Clear series to remove the cuticle. Material was then stained with aniline blue, mounted on microscope slides, and imaged using a compound fluorescence microscope to obtain optical sections that were reconstructed into a 3D image. Results: This optical sectioning method yielded high-quality images of the petal epidermal cells with virtually no damage to cells. Flowers were processed in larger batches than are possible using common SEM methods. Also, flower size was not a limiting factor as often observed in SEM studies. Flowers up to 5 cm in length were processed and mounted for visualization. Conclusions: This method requires no special equipment for sample preparation prior to imaging and should be seen as an alternative method to SEM. PMID:25909040

  19. First-Principles Study of Electronic Structure and Hydrogen Adsorption of 3d Transition Metal Exposed Paddle Wheel Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Bak, J. H.; Le, V. D.; Kang, J.; Wei, S. H.; Kim, Y. H.

    2012-04-05

    Open-site paddle wheels, comprised of two transition metals bridged with four carboxylate ions, have been widely used for constructing metal-organic frameworks with large surface area and high binding energy sites. Using first-principles density functional theory calculations, we have investigated atomic and electronic structures of various 3d transition metal paddle wheels before and after metal exposure and their hydrogen adsorption properties at open metal sites. Notably, the hydrogen adsorption is impeded by covalent metal-metal bonds in early transition metal paddle wheels from Sc to Cr and by the strong ferromagnetic coupling of diatomic Mn and Fe in the paddle wheel configurations. A significantly enhanced H{sub 2} adsorption is predicted in the nonmagnetic Co{sub 2} and Zn{sub 2} paddle wheel with the binding energy of {approx}0.2 eV per H{sub 2}. We also propose the use of two-dimensional Co{sub 2} and Zn{sub 2} paddle wheel frameworks that could have strongly adsorbed dihydrogen up to 1.35 wt % for noncryogenic hydrogen storage applications.

  20. Electronic structure of trioxide, oxoperoxide, oxosuperoxide, and ozonide clusters of the 3d elements: density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Uzunova, Ellie L

    2011-03-01

    The trioxide clusters with stoichiometry MO3, and the structural isomers with side-on and end-on bonded oxygen atoms, are studied by DFT with the B1LYP functional. For the first half of the 3d elements row (Sc to Cr), pyramidal or distorted pyramidal structures dominate among the trioxide and oxoperoxide ground states, while the remaining elements form planar trioxides, oxoperoxides, oxosuperoxides, and ozonides. Low-lying trioxide clusters are formed by Ti, V, Cr, and Mn, among which the distorted pyramidal VO3 in the (2)A'' state, the pyramidal CrO3 in the (1)A1 state, and the planar MnO3 in the (2)A1' state are global minima. With the exception of the middle-row elements Mn, Fe, and Co, the magnetic moment of the ground-state clusters is formed with a major contribution from unpaired electrons located at the oxygen atoms. The stability of trioxides and oxoperoxides toward release of molecular oxygen is significantly higher for Sc, Ti, and V than for the remaining elements of the row. A trend of increasing the capability to dissociate one oxygen molecule is observed from Cr to Cu, with the exception of OFe(O2) being more reactive than OCo(O2). A gradual increase of reactivity from Ti to Cu is observed for the complete fragmentation reaction M + O + O2.

  1. Ultrafast electron diffraction with megahertz MeV electron pulses from a superconducting radio-frequency photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, L. W.; Lin, L.; Huang, S. L.; Quan, S. W.; Hao, J. K.; Zhu, F.; Wang, F.; Liu, K. X.; Jiang, T.; Zhu, P. F.; Fu, F.; Wang, R.; Zhao, L.; Xiang, D.

    2015-11-30

    We report ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction operating at the megahertz repetition rate where the electron beam is produced in a superconducting radio-frequency (rf) photoinjector. We show that the beam quality is sufficiently high to provide clear diffraction patterns from gold and aluminium samples. With the number of electrons, several orders of magnitude higher than that from a normal conducting photocathode rf gun, such high repetition rate ultrafast MeV electron diffraction may open up many new opportunities in ultrafast science.

  2. 3D visualization of TiO2 nanocrystals in mesoporous nanocomposite using energy filtered transmission electron microscopy tomography.

    PubMed

    Gondo, Takashi; Kasama, Takeshi; Kaneko, Kenji

    2014-11-01

    IntroductionMesoporous silica, SBA-15, is one of the best candidate for the supporting material of catalytic nanoparticles because of its relative large and controllable pore size and large specific surface area [1]. So far, various nanoparticles, such as Au, Pt and Pd, have been introduced into the pore for catalytic application [2]. The size of nanoparticles supported inside SBA-15 is restricted by that of the pore, and they are usually ranging from 2 nm and 50 nm in space.It is necessary to anchor the nanoparticles within pores to avoid segregation / sintering of them. However, it is difficult to anchor them within pores in the case of use of deposition-precipitation method due to extreme low iso-electric point (IEP) of silica (∼2). Therefore, TiO2 nanocrystals (IEP 6-8) were then introduced to anchor AuNPs [3].In this study, EFTEM tomography was applied to examine the effectiveness of TiO2 for AuNPs. Materials and methodAu/TiO2-SBA-15 was embedded into epoxy resin for electron microscopy and microtomed to about 30 nm thickness. EFTEM-tomography was operated at 120 kV and using Ti-L ionization edge via three-window method. Prior to EFTEM, STEM-HAADF tomography was also carried out for visualizing AuNPs and for comparison. Result and discussionFigure 1 shows 3D-volume of AuNPs and TiO2 nanocrystals from EFTEM-tomography. TiO2 nanocrystals in the porous material were successfully visualized using EFTEM -tomography, and local relationship between AuNPs and TiO2 nanocrystals were revealed. A large number of TiO2 nanocrystals were randomly distributed in the SBA-15. It was found that most AuNPs were directly on the exposed TiO2 nanocrystals. It implies that TiO2 nanocrystals were exposed on the surface of the pore and anchored AuNPs inside the pores.jmicro;63/suppl_1/i27/DFU081F1F1DFU081F1Fig. 1.3D volume of AuNPs and TiO2 nanocrystals.

  3. A New Approach to Sap Flow Measurement Using 3D Printed Gauges and Open-source Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, J. M.; Miner, G. L.; Kluitenberg, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    A new type of sap flow gauge was developed to measure transpiration from herbaceous plants using a modified heat pulse technique. Gauges were fabricated using 3D-printing technology and low-cost electronics to keep the materials cost under $20 (U.S.) per sensor. Each gauge consisted of small-diameter needle probes fastened to a 3D-printed frame. One needle contained a resistance heater to provide a 6 to 8 second heat pulse while the other probes measured the resultant temperature increase at two distances from the heat source. The data acquisition system for the gauges was built from a low-cost Arduino microcontroller. The system read the gauges every 10 minutes and stored the results on a SD card. Different numerical techniques were evaluated for estimating sap velocity from the heat pulse data - including analytical solutions and parameter estimation approaches . Prototype gauges were tested in the greenhouse on containerized corn and sunflower. Sap velocities measured by the gauges were compared to independent gravimetric measurements of whole plant transpiration. Results showed the system could measure daily transpiration to within 3% of the gravimetric measurements. Excellent agreement was observed when two gauges were attached the same stem. Accuracy was not affected by rapidly changing transpiration rates observed under partly cloudy conditions. The gauge-based estimates of stem thermal properties suggested the system may also detect the onset of water stress. A field study showed the gauges could run for 1 to 2 weeks on a small battery pack. Sap flow measurements on multiple corn stems were scaled up by population to estimate field-scale transpiration. During full canopy cover, excellent agreement was observed between the scaled-up sap flow measurements and reference crop evapotranspiration calculated from weather data. Data also showed promise as a way to estimate real-time canopy resistance required for model verification and development. Given the low

  4. Advanced characterization of twins using automated electron backscatter diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, S. I.; Bingert, J. F.; Mason, T. A.; Larson, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes results obtained using an automated, crystallographically-based technique for twin identification. The technique is based on the automated collection of spatially specific orientation measurements by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The key features of the analysis are identification of potential twin boundaries by their misorientation character, identification of the distinct boundary planes among the symmetrically equivalent candidates, and validation of these boundaries through comparison with the boundary and twin plane traces in the sample cross section. Results on the application of this technique to deformation twins in zirconium are analyzed for the effect of twin type and amount and sense of uniaxial deformation. The accumulation of strain tends to increase the misorientation deviation at least to the degree of the trace deviation compared with recrystallization twins in nickel. In addition to the results on characterizing the twin character, results on extending the twin analysis to automated identification of parent and daughter material for structures exhibiting twin deformation are reported as well.

  5. Electron density distribution in vanadium and niobium from γ-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauch, W.; Reehuis, M.

    2011-03-01

    The electron density distribution in paramagnetic vanadium and niobium is derived via multipole refinement of high-quality single-crystal diffraction data, complete up to sinθ/λ = 1.9 Å-1, collected at room temperature with 316.5 keV γ radiation. Four γ lines in the energy range 200-600 keV have been used to extrapolate extinction-free low-order structure factors. Both metals display charge asphericity due to preferential occupancy of the t2g orbital. The asphericity in V is in quantitative agreement with ab initio calculations, but not with earlier experimental results, laying at rest a long-standing debate. In both metals, the d-electron density is strongly contracted relative to the free atoms. The high-precision thermal parameters are in good agreement with some of the older results. No support is found in the data for anharmonic contributions to the thermal parameters, contrary to claims in previous reports on V. Attention is paid to the 3d-4s occupation problem in V, indicating no change in electronic configuration between atom and metal. Relativistic form factor issues are also discussed. It is pointed out that for the analysis of crystallographic data nonrelativistic form factors are to be preferred over their relativistic counterparts.

  6. Visualizing the 3D Architecture of Multiple Erythrocytes Infected with Plasmodium at Nanoscale by Focused Ion Beam-Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Soares Medeiros, Lia Carolina; De Souza, Wanderley; Jiao, Chengge; Barrabin, Hector; Miranda, Kildare

    2012-01-01

    Different methods for three-dimensional visualization of biological structures have been developed and extensively applied by different research groups. In the field of electron microscopy, a new technique that has emerged is the use of a focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopy for 3D reconstruction at nanoscale resolution. The higher extent of volume that can be reconstructed with this instrument represent one of the main benefits of this technique, which can provide statistically relevant 3D morphometrical data. As the life cycle of Plasmodium species is a process that involves several structurally complex developmental stages that are responsible for a series of modifications in the erythrocyte surface and cytoplasm, a high number of features within the parasites and the host cells has to be sampled for the correct interpretation of their 3D organization. Here, we used FIB-SEM to visualize the 3D architecture of multiple erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium chabaudi and analyzed their morphometrical parameters in a 3D space. We analyzed and quantified alterations on the host cells, such as the variety of shapes and sizes of their membrane profiles and parasite internal structures such as a polymorphic organization of hemoglobin-filled tubules. The results show the complex 3D organization of Plasmodium and infected erythrocyte, and demonstrate the contribution of FIB-SEM for the obtainment of statistical data for an accurate interpretation of complex biological structures. PMID:22432024

  7. Mega-electron-volt ultrafast electron diffraction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, S. P.; Brown, G.; Centurion, M.; Chase, T. F.; Coffee, R.; Corbett, J.; Eichner, J. P.; Frisch, J. C.; Fry, A. R.; Gühr, M.; Hartmann, N.; Hast, C.; Hettel, R.; Jobe, R. K.; Jongewaard, E. N.; Lewandowski, J. R.; Li, R. K.; Lindenberg, A. M.; Makasyuk, I.; May, J. E.; McCormick, D.; Nguyen, M. N.; Reid, A. H.; Shen, X.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Vecchione, T.; Vetter, S. L.; Wu, J.; Yang, J.; Dürr, H. A.; Wang, X. J.

    2015-07-01

    Ultrafast electron probes are powerful tools, complementary to x-ray free-electron lasers, used to study structural dynamics in material, chemical, and biological sciences. High brightness, relativistic electron beams with femtosecond pulse duration can resolve details of the dynamic processes on atomic time and length scales. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory recently launched the Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) and microscopy Initiative aiming at developing the next generation ultrafast electron scattering instruments. As the first stage of the Initiative, a mega-electron-volt (MeV) UED system has been constructed and commissioned to serve ultrafast science experiments and instrumentation development. The system operates at 120-Hz repetition rate with outstanding performance. In this paper, we report on the SLAC MeV UED system and its performance, including the reciprocal space resolution, temporal resolution, and machine stability.

  8. Mega-electron-volt ultrafast electron diffraction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, S. P.; Brown, G.; Chase, T. F.; Coffee, R.; Corbett, J.; Eichner, J. P.; Frisch, J. C.; Fry, A. R.; Gühr, M.; Hartmann, N.; Hast, C.; Hettel, R.; Jobe, R. K.; Jongewaard, E. N.; Lewandowski, J. R.; Li, R. K. Lindenberg, A. M.; Makasyuk, I.; May, J. E.; McCormick, D.; and others

    2015-07-15

    Ultrafast electron probes are powerful tools, complementary to x-ray free-electron lasers, used to study structural dynamics in material, chemical, and biological sciences. High brightness, relativistic electron beams with femtosecond pulse duration can resolve details of the dynamic processes on atomic time and length scales. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory recently launched the Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) and microscopy Initiative aiming at developing the next generation ultrafast electron scattering instruments. As the first stage of the Initiative, a mega-electron-volt (MeV) UED system has been constructed and commissioned to serve ultrafast science experiments and instrumentation development. The system operates at 120-Hz repetition rate with outstanding performance. In this paper, we report on the SLAC MeV UED system and its performance, including the reciprocal space resolution, temporal resolution, and machine stability.

  9. Task reports on developing techniques for scattering by 3D composite structures and to generate new solutions in diffraction theory using higher order boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volakis, John L.

    1991-01-01

    There are two tasks described in this report. First, an extension of a two dimensional formulation is presented for a three dimensional body of revolution. A Fourier series expansion of the vector electric and magnetic fields is employed to reduce the dimensionality of the system, and an exact boundary condition is employed to terminate the mesh. The mesh termination boundary is chosen such that it leads to convolutional boundary operators for low O(n) memory demand. Second, rigorous uniform geometrical theory of diffraction (UTD) diffraction coefficients are presented for a coated convex cylinder simulated with generalized impedance boundary conditions. Ray solutions are obtained which remain valid in the transition region and reduce uniformly those in the deep lit and shadow regions. A uniform asymptotic solution is also presented for observations in the close vicinity of the cylinder.

  10. A Dictionary Approach to Electron Backscatter Diffraction Indexing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu H; Park, Se Un; Wei, Dennis; Newstadt, Greg; Jackson, Michael A; Simmons, Jeff P; De Graef, Marc; Hero, Alfred O

    2015-06-01

    We propose a framework for indexing of grain and subgrain structures in electron backscatter diffraction patterns of polycrystalline materials. We discretize the domain of a dynamical forward model onto a dense grid of orientations, producing a dictionary of patterns. For each measured pattern, we identify the most similar patterns in the dictionary, and identify boundaries, detect anomalies, and index crystal orientations. The statistical distribution of these closest matches is used in an unsupervised binary decision tree (DT) classifier to identify grain boundaries and anomalous regions. The DT classifies a pattern as an anomaly if it has an abnormally low similarity to any pattern in the dictionary. It classifies a pixel as being near a grain boundary if the highly ranked patterns in the dictionary differ significantly over the pixel's neighborhood. Indexing is accomplished by computing the mean orientation of the closest matches to each pattern. The mean orientation is estimated using a maximum likelihood approach that models the orientation distribution as a mixture of Von Mises-Fisher distributions over the quaternionic three sphere. The proposed dictionary matching approach permits segmentation, anomaly detection, and indexing to be performed in a unified manner with the additional benefit of uncertainty quantification. PMID:26055190

  11. A Dictionary Approach to Electron Backscatter Diffraction Indexing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu H; Park, Se Un; Wei, Dennis; Newstadt, Greg; Jackson, Michael A; Simmons, Jeff P; De Graef, Marc; Hero, Alfred O

    2015-06-01

    We propose a framework for indexing of grain and subgrain structures in electron backscatter diffraction patterns of polycrystalline materials. We discretize the domain of a dynamical forward model onto a dense grid of orientations, producing a dictionary of patterns. For each measured pattern, we identify the most similar patterns in the dictionary, and identify boundaries, detect anomalies, and index crystal orientations. The statistical distribution of these closest matches is used in an unsupervised binary decision tree (DT) classifier to identify grain boundaries and anomalous regions. The DT classifies a pattern as an anomaly if it has an abnormally low similarity to any pattern in the dictionary. It classifies a pixel as being near a grain boundary if the highly ranked patterns in the dictionary differ significantly over the pixel's neighborhood. Indexing is accomplished by computing the mean orientation of the closest matches to each pattern. The mean orientation is estimated using a maximum likelihood approach that models the orientation distribution as a mixture of Von Mises-Fisher distributions over the quaternionic three sphere. The proposed dictionary matching approach permits segmentation, anomaly detection, and indexing to be performed in a unified manner with the additional benefit of uncertainty quantification.

  12. Crystallographic Orientation of Cuttlebone Shield Determined by Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusack, Maggie; Chung, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In common with many cephalopod mollusks, cuttlefish produce an internal biomineral buoyancy device. This cuttlebone is analogous to a surf board in shape and structure, providing rigidity and a means of controlling buoyancy. The cuttlebone is composed of calcium carbonate in the form of aragonite and comprises an upper dorsal shield and a lower lamellar matrix. The lamellar matrix comprises layers of chambers with highly corrugated walls. The dorsal shield comprises bundles of aragonite needles stacked on top of each other. Electron backscatter diffraction analyses of the dorsal shield reveal that the c-axis of aragonite is parallel with the long axis of the needles in the bundles such that any spread in crystallographic orientation is consistent with the spread in orientation of the fibers as they radiate to form the overall structure of the dorsal shield. This arrangement of c-axis coincident with the long axis of the biomineral structure is similar to the arrangement in corals and in contrast to the situation in the molluskan aragonite nacre of brachiopod calcite where the c-axis is perpendicular to the aragonite tablet or calcite fiber, respectively.

  13. A method for 3D-reconstruction of a muscle thick filament using the tilt series images of a single filament electron tomogram.

    PubMed

    Márquez, G; Pinto, A; Alamo, L; Baumann, B; Ye, F; Winkler, H; Taylor, K; Padrón, R

    2014-05-01

    Myosin interacting-heads (MIH) motifs are visualized in 3D-reconstructions of thick filaments from striated muscle. These reconstructions are calculated by averaging methods using images from electron micrographs of grids prepared using numerous filament preparations. Here we propose an alternative method to calculate the 3D-reconstruction of a single thick filament using only a tilt series images recorded by electron tomography. Relaxed thick filaments, prepared from tarantula leg muscle homogenates, were negatively stained. Single-axis tilt series of single isolated thick filaments were obtained with the electron microscope at a low electron dose, and recorded on a CCD camera by electron tomography. An IHRSR 3D-recontruction was calculated from the tilt series images of a single thick filament. The reconstruction was enhanced by including in the search stage dual tilt image segments while only single tilt along the filament axis is usually used, as well as applying a band pass filter just before the back projection. The reconstruction from a single filament has a 40 Å resolution and clearly shows the presence of MIH motifs. In contrast, the electron tomogram 3D-reconstruction of the same thick filament - calculated without any image averaging and/or imposition of helical symmetry - only reveals MIH motifs infrequently. This is - to our knowledge - the first application of the IHRSR method to calculate a 3D reconstruction from tilt series images. This single filament IHRSR reconstruction method (SF-IHRSR) should provide a new tool to assess structural differences between well-ordered thick (or thin) filaments in a grid by recording separately their electron tomograms.

  14. A method for 3D-reconstruction of a muscle thick filament using the tilt series images of a single filament electron tomogram.

    PubMed

    Márquez, G; Pinto, A; Alamo, L; Baumann, B; Ye, F; Winkler, H; Taylor, K; Padrón, R

    2014-05-01

    Myosin interacting-heads (MIH) motifs are visualized in 3D-reconstructions of thick filaments from striated muscle. These reconstructions are calculated by averaging methods using images from electron micrographs of grids prepared using numerous filament preparations. Here we propose an alternative method to calculate the 3D-reconstruction of a single thick filament using only a tilt series images recorded by electron tomography. Relaxed thick filaments, prepared from tarantula leg muscle homogenates, were negatively stained. Single-axis tilt series of single isolated thick filaments were obtained with the electron microscope at a low electron dose, and recorded on a CCD camera by electron tomography. An IHRSR 3D-recontruction was calculated from the tilt series images of a single thick filament. The reconstruction was enhanced by including in the search stage dual tilt image segments while only single tilt along the filament axis is usually used, as well as applying a band pass filter just before the back projection. The reconstruction from a single filament has a 40 Å resolution and clearly shows the presence of MIH motifs. In contrast, the electron tomogram 3D-reconstruction of the same thick filament - calculated without any image averaging and/or imposition of helical symmetry - only reveals MIH motifs infrequently. This is - to our knowledge - the first application of the IHRSR method to calculate a 3D reconstruction from tilt series images. This single filament IHRSR reconstruction method (SF-IHRSR) should provide a new tool to assess structural differences between well-ordered thick (or thin) filaments in a grid by recording separately their electron tomograms. PMID:24727133

  15. Design of a high-flux instrument for ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippetto, D.; Qian, H.

    2016-05-01

    We present the design and optimization of a new instrument for ultrafast electron diffraction and imaging. The proposed instrument merges the high peak current and relativistic electron energies of radio-frequency guns, with the high average electron flux of static electron microscopes, extending the beam parameter space achievable with relativistic electrons by many orders of magnitude. An immediate consequence of this work is a broader range of accessible science by using electron probes, enabling techniques as femtosecond nano-diffraction and coherent diffraction imaging, and paving the way to direct observation of ultrafast dynamics in complex and isolated samples, from nanocrystals, to nano/micro droplets and organic molecules.

  16. A new type of 3-D peripheral ultrastructure in Glaucocystis (Glaucocystales, Glaucophyta) as revealed by ultra-high voltage electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Nishida, Tomoki; Saito, Chieko; Yasuda, Hidehiro; Nozaki, Hisayoshi

    2016-06-01

    The coccoid glaucophyte genus Glaucocystis is characterized by having a thick cell wall, which has to date prohibited examination of the native ultrastructural features of the protoplast periphery. Recently, however, the three-dimensional (3-D) ultrastructure of the protoplast periphery was revealed in two divergent Glaucocystis species, with the world's most powerful ultra-high voltage electron microscope (UHVEM). The two species exhibit morphological diversity in terms of their 3-D ultrastructural features. However, these two types do not seem to encompass actual ultrastructural diversity in the genetically diverse genus Glaucocystis. Here, we report a new type of peripheral 3-D ultrastructure resolved in "G. incrassata" SAG 229-2 cells by 3-D modeling based on UHVEM tomography using high-pressure freezing and freeze-substitution fixation. The plasma membrane and underlying flattened vesicles in "G. incrassata" SAG 229-2 exhibited grooves at intervals of 200-600 nm, and the flattened vesicles often overlapped one another at the protoplast periphery. This 3-D ultrastructure differs from those of the two types previously reported in other species of Glaucocystis. The possibility of classification of Glaucocystis species based on the 3-D ultrastructure of the protoplast periphery is discussed. PMID:27273537

  17. Comparison of radiotherapy dosimetry for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and SBRT based on electron density calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartutik, K.; Wibowo, W. E.; Pawiro, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate calculation of dose distribution affected by inhomogeneity tissue is required in radiotherapy planning. This study was performed to determine the ratio between radiotherapy planning using 3D-CRT, IMRT, and SBRT based on a calibrated curve of CT-number in the lung for different target's shape in 3D-CRT, IMRT, and spinal cord for SBRT. Calibration curves of CT-number were generated under measurement basis and introduced into TPS, then planning was performed for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and SBRT with 7, and 15 radiation fields. Afterwards, planning evaluation was performed by comparing the DVH curve, HI, and CI. 3D-CRT and IMRT produced the lowest HI at calibration curve of CIRS 002LFC with the value 0.24 and 10. Whereas SBRT produced the lowest HI on a linear calibration curve with a value of 0.361. The highest CI in IMRT and SBRT technique achieved using a linear calibration curve was 0.97 and 1.77 respectively. For 3D-CRT, the highest CI was obtained by using calibration curve of CIRS 062M with the value of 0.45. From the results of CI and HI, it is concluded that the calibration curve of CT-number does not significantly differ with Schneider's calibrated curve, and inverse planning gives a better result than forward planning.

  18. Imagerie 2D et 3D de matériaux monocristallins : topographie et tomographie en diffraction rayons X de très haute énergie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamelin, B.; Bastie, P.; Richard, D.; Eiaazzouzi, A.

    2004-11-01

    La caractérisation en volume de matériaux cristallins de forte épaisseur (plusieurs cm) n'est possible que par l'utilisation de sources de rayonnement X de forte énergie (diffractomètres gamma, lignes haute énergie du rayonnement synchrotron) ou encore par l'utilisation de faisceau de neutrons. L'Institut Laue Langevin a développé et construit, en coopération avec le Laboratoire de Spectrométrie Physique, un nouveau type d'instrument utilisant le spectre continu rayons X à très haute énergie (typiquement 100 à 400 keV) émis par un générateur rayons X à foyer fin utilisé pour des radiographies. Ce diffractomètre permet la caractérisation rapide, précise et en volume d'échantillons de forte épaisseur. Outre des applications variées dans différents domaines (structure cristalline, mesure de paramètre de maille, contraintes, textures,ldots), il est possible de caractériser complètement des échantillons cristallins à partir d'une série de mesures en diffraction. Il est en particulier possible de visualiser (localiser) les désorientations du réseau cristallin au sein d'un échantillon (topographie en transmission). Il est également possible de visualiser les volumes diffractants dans une section de l'échantillon en utilisant une reconstruction de type tomographique à partir d'une série d'acquisitions en diffraction. Ces nouvelles possibilités s'avèrent être particulièrement utiles pour le contrôle non destructif de matériaux cristallins.

  19. Method for dose-reduced 3D catheter tracking on a scanning-beam digital x-ray system using dynamic electronic collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkerley, David A. P.; Funk, Tobias; Speidel, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    Scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy system capable of tomosynthesis-based 3D catheter tracking. This work proposes a method of dose-reduced 3D tracking using dynamic electronic collimation (DEC) of the SBDX scanning x-ray tube. Positions in the 2D focal spot array are selectively activated to create a regionof- interest (ROI) x-ray field around the tracked catheter. The ROI position is updated for each frame based on a motion vector calculated from the two most recent 3D tracking results. The technique was evaluated with SBDX data acquired as a catheter tip inside a chest phantom was pulled along a 3D trajectory. DEC scans were retrospectively generated from the detector images stored for each focal spot position. DEC imaging of a catheter tip in a volume measuring 11.4 cm across at isocenter required 340 active focal spots per frame, versus 4473 spots in full-FOV mode. The dose-area-product (DAP) and peak skin dose (PSD) for DEC versus full field-of-view (FOV) scanning were calculated using an SBDX Monte Carlo simulation code. DAP was reduced to 7.4% to 8.4% of the full-FOV value, consistent with the relative number of active focal spots (7.6%). For image sequences with a moving catheter, PSD was 33.6% to 34.8% of the full-FOV value. The root-mean-squared-deviation between DEC-based 3D tracking coordinates and full-FOV 3D tracking coordinates was less than 0.1 mm. The 3D distance between the tracked tip and the sheath centerline averaged 0.75 mm. Dynamic electronic collimation can reduce dose with minimal change in tracking performance.

  20. Electronic and magnetic structure of 3d-transition-metal point defects in silicon calculated from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeler, F.; Andersen, O. K.; Scheffler, M.

    1990-01-01

    We describe spin-unrestricted self-consistent linear muffin-tin-orbital (LMTO) Green-function calculations for Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu transition-metal impurities in crystalline silicon. Both defect sites of tetrahedral symmetry are considered. All possible charge states with their spin multiplicities, magnetization densities, and energy levels are discussed and explained with a simple physical picture. The early transition-metal interstitial and late transition-metal substitutional 3d ions are found to have low spin. This is in conflict with the generally accepted crystal-field model of Ludwig and Woodbury, but not with available experimental data. For the interstitial 3d ions, the calculated deep donor and acceptor levels reproduce all experimentally observed transitions. For substitutional 3d ions, a large number of predictions is offered to be tested by future experimental studies.

  1. Electronic structure of oxide, peroxide, and superoxide clusters of the 3d elements: A comparative density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunova, Ellie L.; Mikosch, Hans; Nikolov, Georgi St.

    2008-03-01

    The 3d-element transition metal dioxide MO2, peroxide M(O2), and superoxide MOO clusters (M=Sc-Zn), are studied by density functional theory with the B1LYP functional. The reliability of the methods and basis sets employed was tested by a reinvestigation of the monoxides, for which a database of experimental data is available. The global minima on the M+O2 potential energy surfaces correspond to dioxide structure, the only exception being CuOO, with a superoxide structure. All Zn dioxygen clusters are thermodynamically unstable-their ground states lie higher than the dissociation limit to Zn+O2. Our calculations are in favor of the high-spin configurations for the FeO2, CoO2, and NiO2 ground states, which are still a subject of extensive theoretical and experimental studies. These assignments are confirmed by the coupled-cluster method, CCSD(T), except for NiO2. Based on the existence of a stable NiO2 monoanion in a 4B1 state, however, it can be concluded that NiO2 in its 5A1 state should also be stable. The vibrational frequencies are calculated for clusters entrapped in the cubic cell of solid Ar matrix and compared with those obtained for gas-phase clusters. The matrix has no influence on the vibrations of the monoxides and most of the dioxides; however, Co and Ni-dioxoclusters interact strongly with the atoms from the noble gas matrix. The most intense frequencies in the IR spectra are shifted to lower energies and the ordering of the low-lying electronic states by stability is also reversed. According to the electrostatic potential maps, the oxygen atoms in the peroxides are more nucleophilic than those in the dioxides and superoxides. The terminal oxygen atom in superoxides is more nucleophilic than its M-bonded oxygen atom, though charge distribution analysis predicts a smaller negative charge on the terminal oxygen. TiO2 is the only dioxide in which nucleophilic character in the vicinity of the metal cation is induced.

  2. Total-scattering pair-distribution function of organic material from powder electron diffraction data.

    PubMed

    Gorelik, Tatiana E; Schmidt, Martin U; Kolb, Ute; Billinge, Simon J L

    2015-04-01

    This paper shows that pair-distribution function (PDF) analyses can be carried out on organic and organometallic compounds from powder electron diffraction data. Different experimental setups are demonstrated, including selected area electron diffraction and nanodiffraction in transmission electron microscopy or nanodiffraction in scanning transmission electron microscopy modes. The methods were demonstrated on organometallic complexes (chlorinated and unchlorinated copper phthalocyanine) and on purely organic compounds (quinacridone). The PDF curves from powder electron diffraction data, called ePDF, are in good agreement with PDF curves determined from X-ray powder data demonstrating that the problems of obtaining kinematical scattering data and avoiding beam damage of the sample are possible to resolve.

  3. Task reports on developing techniques for scattering by 3D composite structures and to generate new solutions in diffraction theory using higher order boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volakis, John L.

    1990-01-01

    There are two tasks described in this report. First, an extension of a two dimensional formulation is presented for a three dimensional body of revolution. With the introduction of a Fourier expansion of the vector electric and magnetic fields, a coupled two dimensional system is generated and solved via the finite element method. An exact boundary condition is employed to terminate the mesh and the fast fourier transformation is used to evaluate the boundary integrals for low O(n) memory demand when an iterative solution algorithm is used. Second, the diffraction by a material discontinuity in a thick dielectric/ferrite layer is considered by modeling the layer as a distributed current sheet obeying generalized sheet transition conditions (GSTC's).

  4. Determination of the electrostatic potential and electron density of silicon using convergent-beam electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yoichiro; Tsuda, Kenji; Tanaka, Michiyoshi

    2008-09-01

    A structure-analysis method using convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) developed by Tsuda et al. [Tsuda & Tanaka (1999), Acta Cryst. A55, 939-954; Tsuda, Ogata, Takagi, Hashimoto & Tanaka (2002), Acta Cryst. A58, 514-525] has been applied to the determination of the electrostatic potential and electron density of crystalline silicon. CBED patterns recorded at nine different incidences are simultaneously used to improve the accuracy of the refinement. The Debye-Waller factor and low-order structure factors of silicon have been successfully refined only using CBED data. The electrostatic potential and electron-density distribution have been reconstructed from the refined parameters. The latter clearly shows the bonding electrons between the nearest neighbor atoms. The obtained results are compared with the results of other CBED and recent X-ray diffraction experiments. The influence of the number of refined low-order structure factors on the electron density is discussed. The effect of the reduction of experimental data points on the accuracy of the refined parameters is also examined.

  5. Multivariate analysis of X-ray, ion and electron spectral images: from surface to 3D materials characterization.

    SciTech Connect

    Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Keenan, Michael Robert

    2005-02-01

    Spectral imaging where a complete spectrum is collected from each of a series of spatial locations (1D lines, 2D images or 3D volumes) is now available on a wide range of analytical tools - from electron and x-ray to ion beam instruments. With this capability to collect extremely large spectral images comes the need for automated data analysis tools that can rapidly and without bias reduce a large number of raw spectra to a compact, chemically relevant, and easily interpreted representation. It is clear that manual interrogation of individual spectra is impractical even for very small spectral images (< 5000 spectra). More typical spectral images can contain tens of thousands to millions of spectra, which given the constraint of acquisition time may contain between 5 and 300 counts per 1000-channel spectrum. Conventional manual approaches to spectral image analysis such as summing spectra from regions or constructing x-ray maps are prone to bias and possibly error. One way to comprehensively analyze spectral image data, which has been automated, is to utilize an unsupervised self-modeling multivariate statistical analysis method such as multivariate curve resolution (MCR). This approach has proven capable of solving a wide range of analytical problems based upon the counting of x-rays (SEM/STEM-EDX, XRF, PIXE), electrons (EELS, XPS) and ions (TOF-SIMS). As an example of the MCR approach, a STEM x-ray spectral image from a ZrB2-SiC composite was acquired and analyzed. The data were generated in a FEI Tecnai F30-ST TEM/STEM operated at 300kV, equipped with an EDAX SUTW x-ray detector. The spectral image was acquired with the TIA software on the STEM at 128 by 128 pixels (12nm/pixel) for 100msec dwell per pixel (total acquisition time was 30 minutes) with a probe of approximately the same size as each pixel. Each spectrum in the image had, on average, 500 counts. The calculation took 5 seconds on a PC workstation with dual 2.4GHz PentiumIV Xeon processors and 2Gbytes

  6. Mapping of reciprocal space of La{sub 0.30}CoO{sub 2} in 3D: Analysis of superstructure diffractions and intergrowths with Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Brázda, Petr; Knížek, Karel

    2015-07-15

    We have used electron diffraction tomography and powder X-ray diffraction to elucidate the structural properties of layered cobaltate γ-La{sub 0.30}CoO{sub 2}. The structure consists of hexagonal sheets of edge-sharing CoO{sub 6} octahedra interleaved by lanthanum monolayers. The La{sup 3+} cations occupy only one third of available P2 sites, forming a 2-dimensional a√3×a√3 superstructure in a–b plane. The results show that there exists no order in the mutual relative shift between the neighbouring La interlayers within the a–b plane. This is manifested in the observed monotonous decrease of the diffracted intensity of the superstructure diffractions along c{sup ⁎} in both X-ray and electron diffraction data. The observed lack of stacking order differentiates the La{sub x}CoO{sub 2} from its Ca and Sr analogues where at least a partial stacking order of the cationic interlayers is manifested in experimental data published in literature. - Highlights: • We use electron diffraction tomography for reciprocal space mapping of La{sub 0.30}CoO{sub 2}. • We observed a complete disorder of the stacking of Lanthanum interlayers. • Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} intergrown with La{sub 0.30}CoO{sub 2} crystals brings about fake superstructure diffractions. • Twinning of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} enhances the problem of fake superstructure diffractions.

  7. Electron diffraction patterns with thermal diffuse scattering maxima around Kikuchi lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakhanyan, R. K.; Karakhanyan, K. R.

    2011-01-01

    Transmission electron diffraction patterns of silicon with thermal diffuse maxima around Kikuchi lines, which are analogs of the maxima of thermal diffuse electron scattering around point reflections, have been recorded. Diffuse maxima are observed only around Kikuchi lines with indices that are forbidden for the silicon structure. The diffraction conditions for forming these maxima are discussed.

  8. Equation of state and phase transition of deuterated ammonia monohydrate (ND3.D2O) measured by high-resolution neutron powder diffraction up to 500 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, A. Dominic; Suard, Emmanuelle; Lemée-Cailleau, Marie-Hélène; Pickard, Christopher J.; Needs, Richard J.

    2009-10-01

    We describe the results of a neutron powder diffraction study of perdeuterated ammonia monohydrate (AMH, ND3ṡD2O) carried out in the range 102

  9. Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) Characterization of Uranium and Uranium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, Rodney J.; Kelly, Ann Marie; Clarke, Amy J.; Field, Robert D.; Wenk, H. R.

    2012-07-25

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to examine the microstructures of unalloyed uranium, U-6Nb, U-10Mo, and U-0.75Ti. For unalloyed uranium, we used EBSD to examine the effects of various processes on microstructures including casting, rolling and forming, recrystallization, welding, and quasi-static and shock deformation. For U-6Nb we used EBSD to examine the microstructural evolution during shape memory loading. EBSD was used to study chemical homogenization in U-10Mo, and for U-0.75Ti, we used EBSD to study the microstructure and texture evolution during thermal cycling and deformation. The studied uranium alloys have significant microstructural and chemical differences and each of these alloys presents unique preparation challenges. Each of the alloys is prepared by a sequence of mechanical grinding and polishing followed by electropolishing with subtle differences between the alloys. U-6Nb and U-0.75Ti both have martensitic microstructures and both require special care in order to avoid mechanical polishing artifacts. Unalloyed uranium has a tendency to rapidly oxidize when exposed to air and a two-step electropolish is employed, the first step to remove the damaged surface layer resulting from the mechanical preparation and the second step to passivate the surface. All of the alloying additions provide a level of surface passivation and different one and two step electropolishes are employed to create good EBSD surfaces. Because of its low symmetry crystal structure, uranium exhibits complex deformation behavior including operation of multiple deformation twinning modes. EBSD was used to observe and quantify twinning contributions to deformation and to examine the fracture behavior. Figure 1 shows a cross section of two mating fracture surfaces in cast uranium showing the propensity of deformation twinning and intergranular fracture largely between dissimilarly oriented grains. Deformation of U-6Nb in the shape memory regime occurs by the motion

  10. High resolution electron diffraction analysis of structural changes associated with the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. -G.

    1994-04-01

    Changes in protein structure that occur during the formation of the M photointermediate of bacteriorhodopsin can be directly visualized by electron diffraction techniques. Samples containing a high percentage of the M intermediate were trapped by rapidly cooling the crystals with liquid nitrogen following illumination with filtered green light at 240K and 260K respectively. Difference Fourier projection maps for M minus bR at two temperatures and for M{sub 260K} minus M{sub 240K} are presented. While it is likely that a unique M-substate is trapped when illuminated at 260K produces a mixture of the M{sub 240K} substate and a second M-substate which may have a protein structure similar to the N-intermediate. The diffraction data clearly show that statistically significant structural changes occur upon formation of the M{sub 240K} specimen and then further upon formation of the second substate which is present in the mixture that is produced at 260K. A preliminary 3-D difference map, based on data collected with samples tilted up to 30{degree}, has been constructed at a resolution of 3.5{angstrom} parallel to the membrane plane and a resolution of 8.5{angstrom} perpendicular to the membrane. The data have been analyzed by a number of different criteria to ensure that the differences seen reflect real conformation changes at a level which is significantly above the noise in the map. Furthermore, a comparison of the positions of specific backbone and side-chain groups relative to significant difference peaks suggests that it will be necessary to further refine the atomic resolution model before it will be possible to interpret the changes in chemical structure that occur in the protein at this stage of the photocycle.

  11. Bulk crystal growth and electronic characterization of the 3D Dirac semimetal Na{sub 3}Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Kushwaha, Satya K.; Krizan, Jason W.; Cava, R. J.; Feldman, Benjamin E.; Gyenis, András; Randeria, Mallika T.; Xiong, Jun; Xu, Su-Yang; Alidoust, Nasser; Belopolski, Ilya; Liang, Tian; Zahid Hasan, M.; Ong, N. P.; Yazdani, A.

    2015-04-01

    High quality hexagon plate-like Na{sub 3}Bi crystals with large (001) plane surfaces were grown from a molten Na flux. The freshly cleaved crystals were analyzed by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, allowing for the characterization of the three-dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetal (TDS) behavior and the observation of the topological surface states. Landau levels were observed, and the energy-momentum relations exhibited a linear dispersion relationship, characteristic of the 3D TDS nature of Na{sub 3}Bi. In transport measurements on Na{sub 3}Bi crystals, the linear magnetoresistance and Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillations are observed for the first time.

  12. Nuclear contribution into single-event upset in 3D on-board electronics at moderate energy cosmic proton impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chechenin, N. G.; Chuvilskaya, T. V.; Shirokova, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    In continuation and development of our previous works where nuclear reactions of moderate energy (10 - 400 MeV) protons with Si, Al and W have been investigated, the results of reactions with Cu are reported in this paper. Cu is a most important component in composition of materials in contact pads and pathways of modern and perspective ultra large-scale integration circuitry, especially in 3D topology.

  13. Theoretical study of H2/+/ spectroscopic properties. II, III. [2p and 3d excited electronic states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckel, C. L.; Shafi, M.; Peek, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the theoretical spectroscopic properties of the 2p pi/sub u/ and 3d sigma/sub g/ excited states of the H2/+/ hydrogen molecular ion. Numerical integration of the Schrodinger equation is used to determine vibration-rotation eigenvalues. Dunham power series expansions are used to determine the equilibrium separation, potential coefficients, and spectroscopic constants. The eigenvalues are used to determine delta-G, Bv, Dv, and Hv.

  14. Low energy electron diffraction using an electronic delay-line detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Human, D.; Hu, X. F.; Hirschmugl, C. J.; Ociepa, J.; Hall, G.; Jagutzki, O.; Ullmann-Pfleger, K.

    2006-02-01

    A low energy electron diffraction (LEED) instrument incorporating a delay line detector has been constructed to rapidly collect high-quality digital LEED images with low total electron exposures. The system uses a position-sensitive pulse-counting detector with high bias current microchannel plates. This delay-line detector combined with a femtoampere electron gun offers a wide range of flexibility, with electron dosing currents ranging from 0.15pAto0.3fA. Using the highest current setting and collecting 1×106 counts per image, individual LEED images can be completed in 4s with an acquisition rate of 250kHz and a total electron exposure of 5×106 electrons. Under the latter conditions, images can be collected in 20min with an acquisition rate of 1kHz with a total electron exposure of 2×106 electrons. An angular width of 0.13° at 108eV is demonstrated, which means that domain sizes as large as 600Å can be resolved, depending on the surface quality of the crystal. The system electronics collect 2048×2048pixel images with a spatial resolution of about 75μm. The dynamic range of this system is 32bits/pixel (limited only by physical memory). The construction of the detector results in a "plus"-shaped artifact, which requires that, for a given sample orientation, two images be taken at a relative angle of 45°. Identical current-voltage curves from an MgO(111)1×1H terminated sample, taken during several hours of exposure to the low current electron beam, demonstrate minimal electron induced H desorption.

  15. Experimental electronic structure and Fermi-surface instability of the correlated 3d sulphide BaVS3 : High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrovic, S.; Fazekas, P.; Søndergaard, C.; Ariosa, D.; Barišić, N.; Berger, H.; Cloëtta, D.; Forró, L.; Höchst, H.; Kupčić, I.; Pavuna, D.; Margaritondo, G.

    2007-04-01

    The correlated 3d sulphide BaVS3 exhibits an interesting coexistence of one-dimensional and three-dimensional properties. Our experiments determine the electronic band structure and shed light on this puzzle. High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements in a 4-eV -wide range below the Fermi energy level uncover and investigate the coexistence of a1g wide-band and eg narrow-band d electrons, which lead to the complicated electronic properties of this material. We explore the effects of strong correlations and the Fermi surface instability associated with the metal-insulator transition.

  16. Ultrafast electron diffraction optimized for studying structural dynamics in thin films and monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Badali, D. S.; Gengler, R. Y. N.; Miller, R. J. D.

    2016-01-01

    A compact electron source specifically designed for time-resolved diffraction studies of free-standing thin films and monolayers is presented here. The sensitivity to thin samples is achieved by extending the established technique of ultrafast electron diffraction to the “medium” energy regime (1–10 kV). An extremely compact design, in combination with low bunch charges, allows for high quality diffraction in a lensless geometry. The measured and simulated characteristics of the experimental system reveal sub-picosecond temporal resolution, while demonstrating the ability to produce high quality diffraction patterns from atomically thin samples. PMID:27226978

  17. The role of 3d electrons in the appearance of ferromagnetism in the antiferromagnetic Ru2MnGe Heusler compound: a magnetic Compton scattering study.

    PubMed

    Mizusaki, S; Ohnishi, T; Douzono, A; Hirose, M; Nagata, Y; Itou, M; Sakurai, Y; Ozawa, T C; Samata, H; Noro, Y

    2012-06-27

    The antiferromagnetism in Ru(2)MnGe can be suppressed by the substitution of V by Mn and ferromagnetism appears. Synchrotron-based magnetic Compton scattering experiments are used in order to investigates the role of 3d electrons in the indirect/direct exchange interactions for the appearance of ferromagnetism. A small spin moment for the itinerant electron part on the magnetic Compton profile indicates that the metallic ferromagnet Ru(2)Mn(0.5)V(0.5)Ge has a weak indirect exchange interaction between the d-like and sp-like (itinerant) electrons. This suggests that the appearance of ferromagnetism is caused by the enhancement of the direct exchange interactions between d-d electrons in the Ru(2)MnGe Heusler compound. These findings indicate that the indirect exchange interaction between itinerant electrons and localized electrons is a significant key point for the appearance of ferromagnetism in this system.

  18. High-Throughput Processes and Structural Characterization of Single-Nanotube Based Devices for 3D Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, A. B.; Megerian, K. G.; Baron, R. L.; Jennings, A. T.; Jang, D.; Greer, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed manufacturable approaches to form single, vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, where the tubes are centered precisely, and placed within a few hundred nm of 1-1.5 micron deep trenches. These wafer-scale approaches were enabled by chemically amplified resists and inductively coupled Cryo-etchers to form the 3D nanoscale architectures. The tube growth was performed using dc plasmaenhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and the materials used for the pre-fabricated 3D architectures were chemically and structurally compatible with the high temperature (700 C) PECVD synthesis of our tubes, in an ammonia and acetylene ambient. The TEM analysis of our tubes revealed graphitic basal planes inclined to the central or fiber axis, with cone angles up to 30 deg. for the particular growth conditions used. In addition, bending tests performed using a custom nanoindentor, suggest that the tubes are well adhered to the Si substrate. Tube characteristics were also engineered to some extent, by adjusting growth parameters, such as Ni catalyst thickness, pressure and plasma power during growth.

  19. High-throughput processes and structural characterization of single-nanotube based devices for 3D electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaul, A. B.; Megerian, K. G.; Baron, R. L.; Jennings, A. T.; Jang, D.; Greer, J. R.

    2009-05-01

    We have developed manufacturable approaches to form single, vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, where the tubes are centered precisely, and placed within a few hundred nm of 1-1.5 μm deep trenches. These wafer-scale approaches were enabled by chemically amplified resists and inductively coupled Cryo-etchers to form the 3D nanoscale architectures. The tube growth was performed using dc plasmaenhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and the materials used for the pre-fabricated 3D architectures were chemically and structurally compatible with the high temperature (700 °C) PECVD synthesis of our tubes, in an ammonia and acetylene ambient. The TEM analysis of our tubes revealed graphitic basal planes inclined to the central or fiber axis, with cone angles up to 30° for the particular growth conditions used. In addition, bending tests performed using a custom nanoindentor, suggest that the tubes are well adhered to the Si substrate. Tube characteristics were also engineered to some extent, by adjusting growth parameters, such as Ni catalyst thickness, pressure and plasma power during growth.

  20. Coherent forward and backward diffraction radiation of relativistic electrons in a dielectric targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumenko, G. A.; Shevelev, M. V.; Popov, Yu A.

    2016-08-01

    During the interaction of the relativistic electrons field with a dielectric target various types of electromagnetic radiation, such as Cerenkov radiation, diffraction radiation, transition radiation can be generated. In this report we present the results of experimental studies of the diffraction radiation generated by relativistic electrons in a dielectric target at the interface vacuum-insulator and insulator-conductor in the millimeter wavelength range. The experimental results show that the component of the diffraction radiation of relativistic electrons at the interface insulator-conductor, for any significant refractive index of insulator, is suppressed. The analysis of the results from different points of view was done.

  1. Electronic structure of the chiral helimagnet and 3d-intercalated transition metal dichalcogenide Cr1/3NbS2

    DOE PAGES

    Sirca, N.; Mo, S. -K.; Bondino, F.; Pis, I.; Nappini, S.; Vilmercati, P.; Yi, Jieyu; Gai, Zheng; Snijders, Paul C.; Das, P. K.; et al

    2016-08-18

    The electronic structure of the chiral helimagnet Cr1/3NbS2 has been studied with core level and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Intercalated Cr atoms are found to be effective in donating electrons to the NbS2 layers but also cause significant modifications of the electronic structure of the host NbS2 material. Specifically, the data provide evidence that a description of the electronic structure of Cr1/3NbS2 on the basis of a simple rigid band picture is untenable. The data also reveal substantial inconsistencies with the predictions of standard density functional theory. In conclusion, the relevance of these results to the attainment of a correctmore » description of the electronic structure of chiral helimagnets, magnetic thin films/multilayers, and transition metal dichalcogenides intercalated with 3d magnetic elements is discussed.« less

  2. Nanoscale diffraction gratings and electron vortex beams in a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schachtner, Alexander; Wright, Carly; McMorran, Benjamin; Harvey, Tyler; Yahn, Tyler; Pierce, Jordan

    2012-10-01

    We use focused ion beam nanofabrication to manufacture forked diffraction gratings capable of producing electron beams with helical wavefronts and orbital angular momentum (OAM). A vast number of unique beam modes carrying OAM can be produced through manipulation of grating fork number or position. Generally these gratings are milled such that they produce a phase shift in the beam and are used with high energy electrons (300keV) in a TEM to investigate the quantum or magnetic properties of the electron or image magnetic materials. Our latest work focuses on manufacturing sub-100-nm pitch binary transmission gratings that produce only an amplitude modulation, which opens up imaging capability to lower energy electrons (5-30 keV) and thus expands their use to a wider range of commercially available SEMs. We use these amplitude gratings to show the relationship between the number/position of forks and OAM inherited by the beam. This work could lead to advances in imaging capability, and also creates a widely accessible and scalable demonstration of the quantum properties of the electron which can be leveraged by any science program with SEM access.

  3. Improved strain precision with high spatial resolution using nanobeam precession electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Rouviere, Jean-Luc Martin, Yannick; Denneulin, Thibaud; Cooper, David

    2013-12-09

    NanoBeam Electron Diffraction is a simple and efficient technique to measure strain in nanostructures. Here, we show that improved results can be obtained by precessing the electron beam while maintaining a few nanometer probe size, i.e., by doing Nanobeam Precession Electron Diffraction (N-PED). The precession of the beam makes the diffraction spots more uniform and numerous, making N-PED more robust and precise. In N-PED, smaller probe size and better precision are achieved by having diffraction disks instead of diffraction dots. Precision in the strain measurement better than 2 × 10{sup −4} is obtained with a probe size approaching 1 nm in diameter.

  4. The hybridizations of cobalt 3 d bands with the electron band structure of the graphene/cobalt interface on a tungsten substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jinwoong; Hwang, Choongyu; Chung, Nak-Kwan; N'Diaye, A. D.; Schmid, A. K.; Denlinger, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    The interface between graphene and a ferromagnetic substrate has attracted recent research interests due to its potential for spintronic applications. We report an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study on the interface between graphene and cobalt epitaxially grown on a tungsten substrate. We find that the electron band structure of the interface exhibits clear discontinuities at the crossing points with cobalt 3 d bands. These observations indicate strong hybridizations between the electronic states in the interface and provide an important clue to understand the intriguing electromagnetic properties of the graphene/ferromagnet interface.

  5. Spectroscopic Evidence for a 3d(10) Ground State Electronic Configuration and Ligand Field Inversion in [Cu(CF3)4](1-).

    PubMed

    Walroth, Richard C; Lukens, James T; MacMillan, Samantha N; Finkelstein, Kenneth D; Lancaster, Kyle M

    2016-02-17

    The contested electronic structure of [Cu(CF3)4](1-) is investigated with UV/visible/near IR spectroscopy, Cu K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and 1s2p resonant inelastic X-ray scattering. These data, supported by density functional theory, multiplet theory, and multireference calculations, support a ground state electronic configuration in which the lowest unoccupied orbital is of predominantly trifluoromethyl character. The consensus 3d(10) configuration features an inverted ligand field in which all five metal-localized molecular orbitals are located at lower energy relative to the trifluoromethyl-centered σ orbitals.

  6. Do's and Don'ts of Cryo-electron Microscopy: A Primer on Sample Preparation and High Quality Data Collection for Macromolecular 3D Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Cabra, Vanessa; Samsó, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) entails flash-freezing a thin layer of sample on a support, and then visualizing the sample in its frozen hydrated state by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This can be achieved with very low quantity of protein and in the buffer of choice, without the use of any stain, which is very useful to determine structure-function correlations of macromolecules. When combined with single-particle image processing, the technique has found widespread usefulness for 3D structural determination of purified macromolecules. The protocol presented here explains how to perform cryoEM and examines the causes of most commonly encountered problems for rational troubleshooting; following all these steps should lead to acquisition of high quality cryoEM images. The technique requires access to the electron microscope instrument and to a vitrification device. Knowledge of the 3D reconstruction concepts and software is also needed for computerized image processing. Importantly, high quality results depend on finding the right purification conditions leading to a uniform population of structurally intact macromolecules. The ability of cryoEM to visualize macromolecules combined with the versatility of single particle image processing has proven very successful for structural determination of large proteins and macromolecular machines in their near-native state, identification of their multiple components by 3D difference mapping, and creation of pseudo-atomic structures by docking of x-ray structures. The relentless development of cryoEM instrumentation and image processing techniques for the last 30 years has resulted in the possibility to generate de novo 3D reconstructions at atomic resolution level. PMID:25651412

  7. Time-resolved measurements with streaked diffraction patterns from electrons generated in laser plasma wakefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alec; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond bunches of electrons with relativistic to ultra-relativistic energies can be robustly produced in laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA). Scaling the electron energy down to sub-relativistic and MeV level using a millijoule laser system will make such electron source a promising candidate for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications due to the intrinsic short bunch duration and perfect synchronization with the optical pump. Recent results of electron diffraction from a single crystal gold foil, using LWFA electrons driven by 8-mJ, 35-fs laser pulses at 500 Hz, will be presented. The accelerated electrons were collimated with a solenoid magnetic lens. By applying a small-angle tilt to the magnetic lens, the diffraction pattern can be streaked such that the temporal evolution is separated spatially on the detector screen after propagation. The observable time window and achievable temporal resolution are studied in pump-probe measurements of photo-induced heating on the gold foil.

  8. A 3D computer simulation of negative ion extraction influenced by electron diffusion and weak magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Turek, M.; Sielanko, J.

    2008-03-19

    The numerical model of negative ion beam extraction from the RF ion source by different kinds of large extraction grid systems is considered. The model takes into account the influence of the transversal magnetic field and the electron diffusion. The magnetic filter field increases H{sup -} yields significantly. The random-walk electron diffusion model enables electrons to travel through magnetic field. The H{sup -} currents obtained from simulations with or without the diffusion are compared.

  9. Detecting VMAT delivery errors: A study on the sensitivity of the ArcCHECK-3D electronic dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumugam, S.; Xing, A.; Goozee, G.; Holloway, L.

    2013-06-01

    The sensitivity of the ArcCHECK 3D dosimeter in detecting VMAT delivery errors has been investigated. Dose and leaf positional errors of different magnitudes were introduced to whole arc and individual control points (CPs) of a simple open arc VMAT plan. The error introduced and error free plans were delivered and measured using the ArcCHECK device. The measured doses were compared against the treatment planning system calculated doses using gamma (γ) criteria with 2%/2mm and 3%/3mm tolerance levels. ArcCHECK effectively detected the dose errors resulting from MLC leaf positioning errors in limited CPs and Whole arc. For errors introduced to MU, ArcCHECK effectively detected the MU delivery errors in whole arc but not the MU errors introduced to CPs in integrated dose comparison.

  10. Teaching Diffraction of Light and Electrons: Classroom Analogies to Classic Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velentzas, Athanasios

    2014-01-01

    Diffraction and interference are phenomena that demonstrate the wave nature of light and of particles. Experiments relating to the diffraction/interference of light can easily be carried out in an educational lab, but it may be impossible to perform experiments involving electrons because of the lack of specialized equipment needed for such…

  11. Electron diffraction studies of molecular ordering and orientation in phospholipid monolayer domains.

    PubMed

    Hui, S W; Yu, H

    1993-01-01

    The molecular order and orientation of phase separated domains in monolayers of DP(Me)PE and DP(Me)2PE were determined by electron diffraction. Dark and bright fluorescent domains at the air-water interface were observed by fluorescence microscopy. The monolayers were transferred to Formvar coated electron microscope grids for electron diffraction studies. The positions of domains on the marker grids were recorded in fluorescence micrographs, which were used as guide maps to locate these domains in the electron microscope. Selected area electron diffraction patterns were obtained from predetermined areas within and outside the dark domains. Sharp hexagonal diffraction patterns were recorded from dark domains, and diffuse diffraction rings from bright areas in between dark domains. The diffraction results indicated that the dark domains and bright areas were comprised of lipid molecules in solid and fluid states, respectively. The orientation of diffraction patterns from adjacent locations within a dark domains changed gradually, indicating a continuous bending of the molecular packing lattice vector within these domains. Orientation directors in U-shaped DP(Me)2PE domains followed the turn of the arm; no vortex nor branching was indicated by electron diffraction. Directors branching from the "stem" of highly invaginated DP(Me)PE domains usually occurred at twinning angles of n pi/3 from the stem director, which would minimize packing defects in the development of thinner branches. Electron diffraction from local areas of individual domains proved that dark fluorescent domains were solid ones, and that pseudo-long range order existed in these solid domains.

  12. Extracellular vesicles of calcifying turkey leg tendon characterized by immunocytochemistry and high voltage electron microscopic tomography and 3-D graphic image reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, W. J.; Hodgens, K. J.; McKee, M. D.; Nanci, A.; Song, M. J.; Kiyonaga, S.; Arena, J.; McEwen, B.

    1992-01-01

    To gain insight into the structure and possible function of extracellular vesicles in certain calcifying vertebrate tissues, normally mineralizing leg tendons from the domestic turkey, Meleagris gallopavo, have been studied in two separate investigations, one concerning the electron microscopic immunolocalization of the 66 kDa phosphoprotein, osteopontin, and the other detailing the organization and distribution of mineral crystals associated with the vesicles as determined by high voltage microscopic tomography and 3-D graphic image reconstruction. Immunolabeling shows that osteopontin is related to extracellular vesicles of the tendon in the sense that its initial presence appears coincident with the development of mineral associated with the vesicle loci. By high voltage electron microscopy and 3-D imaging techniques, mineral crystals are found to consist of small irregularly shaped particles somewhat randomly oriented throughout individual vesicles sites. Their appearance is different from that found for the mineral observed within calcifying tendon collagen, and their 3-D disposition is not regularly ordered. Possible spatial and temporal relationships of vesicles, osteopontin, mineral, and collagen are being examined further by these approaches.

  13. Preparation of cultured cells using high-pressure freezing and freeze substitution for subsequent 2D or 3D visualization in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Philippa C

    2015-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is an invaluable technique used for imaging the ultrastructure of samples and it is particularly useful when determining virus-host interactions at a cellular level. The environment inside a TEM is not favorable for biological material (high vacuum and high energy electrons). Also biological samples have little or no intrinsic electron contrast, and rarely do they naturally exist in very thin sheets, as is required for optimum resolution in the TEM. To prepare these samples for imaging in the TEM therefore requires extensive processing which can alter the ultrastructure of the material. Here we describe a method which aims to minimize preparation artifacts by freezing the samples at high pressure to instantaneously preserve ultrastructural detail, then rapidly substituting the ice and infiltrating with resin to provide a firm matrix which can be cut into thin sections for imaging. Thicker sections of this material can also be imaged and reconstructed into 3D volumes using electron tomography.

  14. Differential and integrated cross sections for excitation to the 3s, 3p, and 3d states of atomic hydrogen by electron impact below the n=4 threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, Philip L.; Bray, Igor; Stelbovics, Andris T.; Williams, J. F.; Mikosza, A. G.

    2006-08-15

    Integrated cross sections for the electron-impact excitation of ground-state hydrogen to the 3s, 3p, and 3d final states have been calculated using propagating exterior complex scaling and convergent close-coupling methods at energies between the n=3 and 4 excitation thresholds. The calculations are in excellent agreement and demonstrate that exterior complex scaling methods can accurately reproduce the resonance structure and magnitude of the excitation cross sections below the ionization threshold. Measurements of the separate 3s, 3p, and 3d differential cross sections were made at 12.24 eV, and are consistent with both calculations within a total experimental uncertainty of about 35%.

  15. Analysis of Kikuchi band contrast reversal in electron backscatter diffraction patterns of silicon.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Aimo; Nolze, Gert

    2010-02-01

    We analyze the contrast reversal of Kikuchi bands that can be seen in electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns under specific experimental conditions. The observed effect can be reproduced using dynamical electron diffraction calculations. Two crucial contributions are identified to be at work: First, the incident beam creates a depth distribution of incoherently backscattered electrons which depends on the incidence angle of the beam. Second, the localized inelastic scattering in the outgoing path leads to pronounced anomalous absorption effects for electrons at grazing emission angles, as these electrons have to go through the largest amount of material. We use simple model depth distributions to account for the incident beam effect, and we assume an exit angle dependent effective crystal thickness in the dynamical electron diffraction calculations. Very good agreement is obtained with experimental observations for silicon at 20keV primary beam energy.

  16. Atomic-scale diffractive imaging of sub-cycle electron dynamics in condensed matter

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, Vladislav S.; Stockman, Mark I.; Krausz, Ferenc; Baum, Peter

    2015-09-28

    For interaction of light with condensed-matter systems, we show with simulations that ultrafast electron and X-ray diffraction can provide a time-dependent record of charge-density maps with sub-cycle and atomic-scale resolutions. Using graphene as an example material, we predict that diffraction can reveal localised atomic-scale origins of optical and electronic phenomena. Here, we point out nontrivial relations between microscopic electric current and density in undoped graphene.

  17. Atomic-scale diffractive imaging of sub-cycle electron dynamics in condensed matter

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Vladislav S.; Stockman, Mark I.; Krausz, Ferenc; Baum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    For interaction of light with condensed-matter systems, we show with simulations that ultrafast electron and X-ray diffraction can provide a time-dependent record of charge-density maps with sub-cycle and atomic-scale resolutions. Using graphene as an example material, we predict that diffraction can reveal localised atomic-scale origins of optical and electronic phenomena. In particular, we point out nontrivial relations between microscopic electric current and density in undoped graphene. PMID:26412407

  18. Hydrogen in polar intermetallics: Syntheses and structures of the ternary Ca5Bi3D0.93, Yb5Bi3Hx, and Sm5Bi3H~1 by powder neutron or single crystal X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Leon-Escamilla, E. Alejandro; Dervenagas, Panagiotis; Stasis, Constantine; Corbett, John D.

    2010-01-01

    The syntheses of the title compounds are described in detail. Structural characterizations from refinements of single crystal X-ray diffraction data for Yb{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}H{sub x} and Sm{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}H{sub 1} and of powder neutron diffraction data for Ca{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}D{sub 0.93(3)} are reported. These confirm that all three crystallize with the heavy atom structure type of {beta}-Yb{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}, and the third gives the first proof that the deuterium lies in the center of nominal calcium tetrahedra, isostructural with the Ca{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}F-type structure. These Ca and Yb phases are particularly stable with respect to dissociation to Mn{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-type product plus H{sub 2}. Some contradictions in the literature regarding Yb{sub 5}Sb{sub 3} and Yb{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}H{sub x} phases are considered in terms of adventitious hydrogen impurities that are generated during reactions in fused silica containers at elevated temperatures.

  19. Interpretation of electron diffraction from carbon nanotube bundles presenting precise helicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomer, J.-F.; Henrard, L.; Launois, P.; van Tendeloo, G.; Lucas, A. A.; Lambin, Ph.

    2004-08-01

    The structure of bundles of carbon nanotubes produced by catalytic chemical vapor deposition has been studied by electron diffraction. The experimental results were analyzed with the kinematical theory of diffraction. An interpretation of the diffraction patterns demonstrates unambiguously that some bundles are made of double-walled carbon nanotubes, and not single-walled nanotubes as previously reported in Phys. Rev. B 64, 125425 (2001). In this previous work, we have focused our attention on bundles presenting one or two helicities. The interpretation of our diffraction data based on the assumption of double-walled nanotubes is shown to fit remarkably with experiment. In the present paper, the detailed analysis of an electron diffraction pattern from a small bundle exhibiting two helicities is made and we deduced the most probable wrapping indices of the two tubes constituting the double-walled nanotubes.

  20. Accurate measurement of relative tilt and azimuth angles in electron tomography: A comparison of fiducial marker method with electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, Misa; Malac, Marek; Bergen, Michael; Egerton, Ray F.; Li, Peng

    2014-08-01

    Electron tomography is a method whereby a three-dimensional reconstruction of a nanoscale object is obtained from a series of projected images measured in a transmission electron microscope. We developed an electron-diffraction method to measure the tilt and azimuth angles, with Kikuchi lines used to align a series of diffraction patterns obtained with each image of the tilt series. Since it is based on electron diffraction, the method is not affected by sample drift and is not sensitive to sample thickness, whereas tilt angle measurement and alignment using fiducial-marker methods are affected by both sample drift and thickness. The accuracy of the diffraction method benefits reconstructions with a large number of voxels, where both high spatial resolution and a large field of view are desired. The diffraction method allows both the tilt and azimuth angle to be measured, while fiducial marker methods typically treat the tilt and azimuth angle as an unknown parameter. The diffraction method can be also used to estimate the accuracy of the fiducial marker method, and the sample-stage accuracy. A nano-dot fiducial marker measurement differs from a diffraction measurement by no more than ±1°.

  1. Accurate measurement of relative tilt and azimuth angles in electron tomography: A comparison of fiducial marker method with electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashida, Misa; Malac, Marek; Egerton, Ray F.; Bergen, Michael; Li, Peng

    2014-08-15

    Electron tomography is a method whereby a three-dimensional reconstruction of a nanoscale object is obtained from a series of projected images measured in a transmission electron microscope. We developed an electron-diffraction method to measure the tilt and azimuth angles, with Kikuchi lines used to align a series of diffraction patterns obtained with each image of the tilt series. Since it is based on electron diffraction, the method is not affected by sample drift and is not sensitive to sample thickness, whereas tilt angle measurement and alignment using fiducial-marker methods are affected by both sample drift and thickness. The accuracy of the diffraction method benefits reconstructions with a large number of voxels, where both high spatial resolution and a large field of view are desired. The diffraction method allows both the tilt and azimuth angle to be measured, while fiducial marker methods typically treat the tilt and azimuth angle as an unknown parameter. The diffraction method can be also used to estimate the accuracy of the fiducial marker method, and the sample-stage accuracy. A nano-dot fiducial marker measurement differs from a diffraction measurement by no more than ±1°.

  2. The backscatter electron signal as an additional tool for phase segmentation in electron backscatter diffraction.

    PubMed

    Payton, E J; Nolze, G

    2013-08-01

    The advent of simultaneous energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) data collection has vastly improved the phase separation capabilities for electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) mapping. A major problem remains, however, in distinguishing between multiple cubic phases in a specimen, especially when the compositions of the phases are similar or their particle sizes are small, because the EDS interaction volume is much larger than that of EBSD and the EDS spectra collected during spatial mapping are generally noisy due to time limitations and the need to minimize sample drift. The backscatter electron (BSE) signal is very sensitive to the local composition due to its atomic number (Z) dependence. BSE imaging is investigated as a complimentary tool to EDS to assist phase segmentation and identification in EBSD through examination of specimens of meteorite, Cu dross, and steel oxidation layers. The results demonstrate that the simultaneous acquisition of EBSD patterns, EDS spectra, and the BSE signal can provide new potential for advancing multiphase material characterization in the scanning electron microscope. PMID:23575349

  3. Initial Self-Consistent 3D Electron-Cloud Simulations of the LHC Beam with the Code WARP+POSINST

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J; Furman, M A; Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Grote, D P

    2005-10-11

    We present initial results for the self-consistent beam-cloud dynamics simulations for a sample LHC beam, using a newly developed set of modeling capability based on a merge [1] of the three-dimensional parallel Particle-In-Cell (PIC) accelerator code WARP [2] and the electron-cloud code POSINST [3]. Although the storage ring model we use as a test bed to contain the beam is much simpler and shorter than the LHC, its lattice elements are realistically modeled, as is the beam and the electron cloud dynamics. The simulated mechanisms for generation and absorption of the electrons at the walls are based on previously validated models available in POSINST [3, 4].

  4. Visualising the 3D Structure of Fine-Grained Estuarine Sediments; Preliminary Interpretations of a Novel Dataset Obtained via Volume Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatland, Jonathan; Bushby, Andy; Spencer, Kate; Carr, Simon

    2014-05-01

    Accurate measurement of the physical characteristics of sediment are critical to determining sediment transport behaviour and the stability of settled deposits. The properties (e.g. particle size, density, and settling velocity) of coarse-grained sediments (> 63 μm φ) can be easily characterised, hence their behaviour is relatively simple to predict and model. However, due to their small size and tendency to interact with their surrounding medium, the characteristics of fine sediments (< 63 μm φ) and their behaviour during transportation, deposition and consolidation is poorly understood. Recent studies have used correlative microscopy, a multi-method technique combining scanning confocal laser microscopy (SCLM), conventional optical microscopy (COM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), to characterise fine sediments at both the gross (> 1 μm) and sub-micron scale (Droppo et al., 1996). Whilst this technique has proven insightful, the measurement of geometric properties (e.g. the shape of primary particles and their spatial arrangement) can only be achieved by three-dimensional (3D) analysis and the scale of observation for e.g. TEM does not overlap with those techniques used to characterise sediments at larger scales (100s to 1000s microns) (e.g. video analysis). Volume electron microscopy [or focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM)] provides 3D analysis at scales of 10s to 1000s microns and though widely used in cell biology, has not been used to observe sediment. FIB-SEM requires samples that are vacuum stable and a key challenge will be to capture fragile, hydrated sediment samples whilst preserving their structural integrity. The aims of this work are therefore: 1) to modify preparation techniques currently used in cell biology for the stabilization of sedimentary materials; 2) to acquire 3D datasets for both fragile suspended sediments (flocs) and consolidated bed sediments and 3) to interpret the 3D structure of these samples. In

  5. An electron microscopic and optical diffraction analysis of the structure of Limulus telson muscle thick filaments

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Long, thick filaments (greater than 4.0 micrometer) rapidly and gently isolated from fresh, unstimulated Limulus muscle by an improved procedure have been examined by electron microscopy and optical diffraction. Images of negatively stained filaments appear highly periodic with a well-preserved myosin cross-bridge array. Optical diffraction patterns of the electron micrographs show a wealth of detail and are consistent with a myosin helical repeat of 43.8 nm, similar to that observed by x-ray diffraction. Analysis of the optical diffraction patterns, in conjunction with the appearance in electron micrographs of the filaments, supports a model for the filament in which the myosin cross-bridges are arranged on a four-stranded helix, with 12 cross-bridges per turn or each helix, thus giving an axial repeat every third level of cross-bridges (43.8 nm). PMID:7199531

  6. Total-scattering pair-distribution function of organic material from powder electron diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, Tatiana E.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Schmidt, Martin U.; Kolb, Ute

    2015-04-01

    This paper shows for the first time that pair-distribution function analyses can be carried out on organic and organo-metallic compounds from powder electron diffraction data. Different experimental setups are demonstrated, including selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and nanodiffraction in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or nanodiffraction in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) modes. The methods were demonstrated on organo-metallic complexes (chlorinated and unchlorinated copper-phthalocyanine) and on purely organic compounds (quinacridone). The PDF curves from powder electron diffraction data, called ePDF, are in good agreement with PDF curves determined from X-ray powder data demonstrating that the problems of obtaining kinematical scattering data and avoiding beam-damage of the sample are possible to resolve.

  7. Total-scattering pair-distribution function of organic material from powder electron diffraction data.

    PubMed

    Gorelik, Tatiana E; Schmidt, Martin U; Kolb, Ute; Billinge, Simon J L

    2015-04-01

    This paper shows that pair-distribution function (PDF) analyses can be carried out on organic and organometallic compounds from powder electron diffraction data. Different experimental setups are demonstrated, including selected area electron diffraction and nanodiffraction in transmission electron microscopy or nanodiffraction in scanning transmission electron microscopy modes. The methods were demonstrated on organometallic complexes (chlorinated and unchlorinated copper phthalocyanine) and on purely organic compounds (quinacridone). The PDF curves from powder electron diffraction data, called ePDF, are in good agreement with PDF curves determined from X-ray powder data demonstrating that the problems of obtaining kinematical scattering data and avoiding beam damage of the sample are possible to resolve. PMID:25510245

  8. Total-scattering pair-distribution function of organic material from powder electron diffraction data

    DOE PAGES

    Gorelik, Tatiana E.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Schmidt, Martin U.; Kolb, Ute

    2015-04-01

    This paper shows for the first time that pair-distribution function analyses can be carried out on organic and organo-metallic compounds from powder electron diffraction data. Different experimental setups are demonstrated, including selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and nanodiffraction in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or nanodiffraction in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) modes. The methods were demonstrated on organo-metallic complexes (chlorinated and unchlorinated copper-phthalocyanine) and on purely organic compounds (quinacridone). The PDF curves from powder electron diffraction data, called ePDF, are in good agreement with PDF curves determined from X-ray powder data demonstrating that the problems of obtaining kinematical scattering datamore » and avoiding beam-damage of the sample are possible to resolve.« less

  9. Evolution of chemical bonding and electron density rearrangements during D(3h) → D(3d) reaction in monolayered TiS2: a QTAIM and ELF study.

    PubMed

    Ryzhikov, Maxim R; Slepkov, Vladimir A; Kozlova, Svetlana G; Gabuda, Svyatoslav P

    2014-08-15

    Monolayered titanium disulfide TiS2, a prospective nanoelectronic material, was previously shown to be subject to an exothermic solid-state D3h -D3d reaction that proceeds via a newly discovered transition state. Here, we study the reaction in detail using topological methods of quantum chemistry (quantum theory of atoms in molecules and electron localization function analysis) and show how electron density and chemical bonding between the atoms change in the course of the reaction. The reaction is shown to undergo a series of topological catastrophes, associated with elementary chemical events such as break and formation of bonds (including the unexpected formation of S-S bonding between sulfur layers), and rearrangement of electron density of outer valence and core shells.

  10. High-Throughput Top-Down and Bottom-Up Processes for Forming Single-Nanotube Based Architectures for 3D Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Megerian, Krikor G.; von Allmen, Paul; Kowalczyk, Robert; Baron, Richard

    2009-01-01

    We have developed manufacturable approaches to form single, vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, where the tubes are centered precisely, and placed within a few hundred nm of 1-1.5 micron deep trenches. These wafer-scale approaches were enabled by chemically amplified resists and inductively coupled Cryo-etchers for forming the 3D nanoscale architectures. The tube growth was performed using dc plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and the materials used for the pre-fabricated 3D architectures were chemically and structurally compatible with the high temperature (700 C) PECVD synthesis of our tubes, in an ammonia and acetylene ambient. Tube characteristics were also engineered to some extent, by adjusting growth parameters, such as Ni catalyst thickness, pressure and plasma power during growth. Such scalable, high throughput top-down fabrication techniques, combined with bottom-up tube synthesis, should accelerate the development of PECVD tubes for applications such as interconnects, nano-electromechanical (NEMS), sensors or 3D electronics in general.

  11. Spectroscopy of jet-cooled AlMn and trends in the electronic structure of the 3d transition metal aluminides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, Jane M.; Morse, Michael D.

    1994-10-01

    Jet-cooled diatomic AlMn has been spectroscopically investigated and is shown to possess a 5Πi ground state deriving from the Al (3s23p1,2P0)+Mn (3d54s2,6S) separated atom limit. This implies that the aluminum atom favors a 3pπ approach to the manganese atom, a result that is in agreement with previous studies on the related AlCa and AlZn molecules. The ground state bond length has been measured as 2.6384±0.0010 Å, a value which includes corrections due to spin-uncoupling effects in the X 5Πi state. It is suggested that the 5Πi state emerges as the ground state due to a particularly favorable configuration interaction with a low-lying 5Πi state that derives from the interaction of Al (3s23p1,2P0)+Mn [3d6(5D)4s1,6D]. Combination of the atoms in this excited state leads to a strong σ2 covalent bond via a 3pσAl-4sσMn interaction, which causes this excited electronic state to drop in energy so that it is expected to lie within a few thousand cm-1 of the ground electronic state. Following a discussion of the spectroscopic results on AlMn, an overall summary of the spectroscopic results on the 3d series of transition metal aluminides is presented, along with predictions of the ground electronic states of the as yet unobserved AlSc, AlTi, and AlFe molecules.

  12. Control of Attosecond Electron Diffraction by Elliptical Long-Wavelength Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranitovic, Predrag; Tong, Xiao-Min; Hickstein, Daniel; Murnane, Margaret; Kapteyn, Henry

    2015-05-01

    Generation of intense laser pulses in the mid-IR regime, has opened door for several novel applications in the ultrafast AMO physics. Attosecond electron diffraction and holography, driven by the mid-IR radiation is one example of these new developments. In this work we utilize a broad range of laser wavelengths (267 to 2000 nm) in a strong-field regime, to obtain holographic 2D images of electrons diffracting off small atoms and molecules. By comparing 2D electron momenta taken with different laser wavelengths, using a VMI geometry, we found that for the long-wavelength laser pulses (1.3 and 2 μm), the main features in the electron momenta come from the interference of the plane, and spherical electron wave packets diffracting off the parent ion. By controlling the ellipticity of the driving laser fields, we were able to tune the returning electron direction, and in turn the amplitudes of the diffracting spherical electron wave packets that carry the information of the electron-ion differential cross sections. In this combined theoretical and experimental work we showed how to control the amplitudes and the phases of these rescattering electron wave packets, and how to use this method to image matter with attosecond temporal and Angstrom spatial resolution.

  13. MICROINCINERATION, ELECTRON MICROSCOPY, AND ELECTRON DIFFRACTION OF CALCIUM PHOSPHATE-LOADED MITOCHONDRIA

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Richard S.; Greenawalt, John W.

    1968-01-01

    Isolated rat liver mitochondria were incubated in vitro under conditions supporting the massive accumulation of calcium and phosphate. Samples were embedded, thin sectioned, and examined in the electron microscope. The intramitochondrial distribution of insoluble or structure-bound mineral substances was studied by electron microscopy coupled with recently developed techniques of high resolution microincineration. As shown previously, the ion-loaded mitochondria acquire large, internal granules which have inherent electron opacity indicative of high mineral content. Study of ash patterns in preselected areas of sections directly confirmed the high mineral content of the granules, and the appearance of the residues was consistent with the copresence in the granules of some organic material. Other mitochondrial structures were almost devoid of mineral. Thin sections of unincubated control mitochondria also were incinerated. They were found to contain appreciable amounts of intrinsic mineral, seemingly associated with membranes. The normal, dense matrix granules commonly seen in unaltered mitochondria could be seen in intact sections of these control preparations, but after burning no definite correspondence of any ash to the granules could be demonstrated. The normal granules perhaps do not contain mineral. Heating experiments on ash patterns of all the preparations demonstrated the thermal stability and crystallizability of the ash. The crystallized ash of the in vitro-produced dense granules was tentatively shown by electron diffraction to be β-tricalcium phosphate (whitlockite). This, together with evidence from the literature, suggests that the original, noncrystalline mineral may be a colloidal, subcrystalline precursor of calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite. Experiments were performed on synthetic calcium phosphates for comparison. Other possible applications of the microincineration techniques are briefly discussed. PMID:4878171

  14. Front-end electronics and data acquisition system for a multi-wire 3D gas tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łojek, K.; Rozpȩdzik, D.; Bodek, K.; Perkowski, M.; Severijns, N.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of the front-end electronics and the data acquisition (DAQ) system for readout of multi-wire drift chambers (MWDC). Apart of the conventional drift time measurement the system delivers the hit position along the wire utilizing the charge division technique. The system consists of preamplifiers, and analog and digital boards sending data to a back-end computer via an Ethernet interface. The data logging software formats the received data and enables an easy access to the data analysis software. The use of specially designed preamplifiers and peak detectors allows the charge-division readout of the low resistance signal wire. The implication of the charge-division circuitry onto the drift time measurement was studied and the overall performance of the electronic system was evaluated in dedicated off-line tests.

  15. Preconditioning techniques for constrained vector potential integral equations, with application to 3-D magnetoquasistatic analysis of electronic packages

    SciTech Connect

    Kamon, M.; Phillips, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper techniques are presented for preconditioning equations generated by discretizing constrained vector integral equations associated with magnetoquasistatic analysis. Standard preconditioning approaches often fail on these problems. The authors present a specialized preconditioning technique and prove convergence bounds independent of the constraint equations and electromagnetic excitation frequency. Computational results from analyzing several electronic packaging examples are given to demonstrate that the new preconditioning approach can sometimes reduce the number of GMRES iterations by more than an order of magnitude.

  16. Stacked-Bloch-wave electron diffraction simulations using GPU acceleration.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Robert S; Wang, Feng; Koch, Christoph T

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we discuss the advantages for Bloch-wave simulations performed using graphics processing units (GPUs), based on approximating the matrix exponential directly instead of performing a matrix diagonalization. Our direct matrix-exponential algorithm yields a functionally identical electron scattering matrix to that generated with matrix diagonalization. Using the matrix-exponential scaling-and-squaring method with a Padé approximation, direct GPU-based matrix-exponential double-precision calculations are up to 20× faster than CPU-based calculations and up to approximately 70× faster than matrix diagonalization. We compare precision and runtime of scaling and squaring methods with either the Padé approximation or a Taylor expansion. We also discuss the stacked-Bloch-wave method, and show that our stacked-Bloch-wave implementation yields the same electron scattering matrix as traditional Bloch-wave matrix diagonalization.

  17. 3D electrostatic gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion simulation of lower-hybrid drift instability of Harris current sheet

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Zhenyu; Lin, Yu; Wang, Xueyi; Tummel, Kurt; Chen, Liu

    2016-07-07

    The eigenmode stability properties of three-dimensional lower-hybrid-drift-instabilities (LHDI) in a Harris current sheet with a small but finite guide magnetic field have been systematically studied by employing the gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion (GeFi) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation model with a realistic ion-to-electron mass ratio mi/me. In contrast to the fully kinetic PIC simulation scheme, the fast electron cyclotron motion and plasma oscillations are systematically removed in the GeFi model, and hence one can employ the realistic mi/me. The GeFi simulations are benchmarked against and show excellent agreement with both the fully kinetic PIC simulation and the analytical eigenmode theory. Our studies indicate that, for small wavenumbers, ky, along the current direction, the most unstable eigenmodes are peaked at the location wheremore » $$\\vec{k}$$• $$\\vec{B}$$ =0, consistent with previous analytical and simulation studies. Here, $$\\vec{B}$$ is the equilibrium magnetic field and $$\\vec{k}$$ is the wavevector perpendicular to the nonuniformity direction. As ky increases, however, the most unstable eigenmodes are found to be peaked at $$\\vec{k}$$ •$$\\vec{B}$$ ≠0. Additionally, the simulation results indicate that varying mi/me, the current sheet width, and the guide magnetic field can affect the stability of LHDI. Simulations with the varying mass ratio confirm the lower hybrid frequency and wave number scalings.« less

  18. 3D electrostatic gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion simulation of lower-hybrid drift instability of Harris current sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Lin, Yu; Wang, Xueyi; Tummel, Kurt; Chen, Liu

    2016-07-01

    The eigenmode stability properties of three-dimensional lower-hybrid-drift-instabilities (LHDI) in a Harris current sheet with a small but finite guide magnetic field have been systematically studied by employing the gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion (GeFi) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation model with a realistic ion-to-electron mass ratio mi/me . In contrast to the fully kinetic PIC simulation scheme, the fast electron cyclotron motion and plasma oscillations are systematically removed in the GeFi model, and hence one can employ the realistic mi/me . The GeFi simulations are benchmarked against and show excellent agreement with both the fully kinetic PIC simulation and the analytical eigenmode theory. Our studies indicate that, for small wavenumbers, ky, along the current direction, the most unstable eigenmodes are peaked at the location where k →.B → =0 , consistent with previous analytical and simulation studies. Here, B → is the equilibrium magnetic field and k → is the wavevector perpendicular to the nonuniformity direction. As ky increases, however, the most unstable eigenmodes are found to be peaked at k →.B → ≠0 . In addition, the simulation results indicate that varying mi/me , the current sheet width, and the guide magnetic field can affect the stability of LHDI. Simulations with the varying mass ratio confirm the lower hybrid frequency and wave number scalings.

  19. Synergy between transmission electron microscopy and powder diffraction: application to modulated structures.

    PubMed

    Batuk, Dmitry; Batuk, Maria; Abakumov, Artem M; Hadermann, Joke

    2015-04-01

    The crystal structure solution of modulated compounds is often very challenging, even using the well established methodology of single-crystal X-ray crystallography. This task becomes even more difficult for materials that cannot be prepared in a single-crystal form, so that only polycrystalline powders are available. This paper illustrates that the combined application of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and powder diffraction is a possible solution to the problem. Using examples of anion-deficient perovskites modulated by periodic crystallographic shear planes, it is demonstrated what kind of local structural information can be obtained using various TEM techniques and how this information can be implemented in the crystal structure refinement against the powder diffraction data. The following TEM methods are discussed: electron diffraction (selected area electron diffraction, precession electron diffraction), imaging (conventional high-resolution TEM imaging, high-angle annular dark-field and annular bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy) and state-of-the-art spectroscopic techniques (atomic resolution mapping using energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and electron energy loss spectroscopy).

  20. Generation of High-Density Electrons Based on Plasma Grating Induced Bragg Diffraction in Air

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Liping; Li Wenxue; Wang Yongdong; Lu Xin; Ding Liang'en; Zeng Heping

    2011-08-26

    Efficient nonlinear Bragg diffraction was observed as an intense infrared femtosecond pulse was focused on a plasma grating induced by interference between two ultraviolet femtosecond laser pulses in air. The preformed electrons inside the plasma grating were accelerated by subsequent intense infrared laser pulses, inducing further collisional ionization and significantly enhancing the local electron density.

  1. Feynman Path Integral Approach to Electron Diffraction for One and Two Slits: Analytical Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beau, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present an analytic solution of the famous problem of diffraction and interference of electrons through one and two slits (for simplicity, only the one-dimensional case is considered). In addition to exact formulae, various approximations of the electron distribution are shown which facilitate the interpretation of the results.…

  2. 3D electron density distributions in the solar corona during solar minima: assessment for more realistic solar wind modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Patoul, J.; Foullon, C.; Riley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the electron density distribution in the solar corona put constraints on the magnetic field configurations for coronal modeling, and on initial conditions for solar wind modeling. We work with polarized SOHO/LASCO-C2 images from the last two recent minima of solar activity (1996-1997 and 2008-2010), devoid of coronal mass ejections. We derive the 4D electron density distributions in the corona by applying a newly developed time-dependent tomographic reconstruction method. First we compare the density distributions obtained from tomography with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solutions. The tomography provides more accurate distributions of electron densities in the polar regions, and we find that the observed density varies with the solar cycle in both polar and equatorial regions. Second, we find that the highest-density structures do not always correspond to the predicted large-scale heliospheric current sheet or its helmet streamer but can follow the locations of pseudo-streamers. We conclude that tomography offers reliable density distribution in the corona, reproducing the slow time evolution of coronal structures, without prior knowledge of the coronal magnetic field over a full rotation. Finally, we suggest that the highest-density structures show a differential rotation well above the surface depending on how it is magnetically connected to the surface. Such valuable information on the rotation of large-scale structures could help to connect the sources of the solar wind to their in-situ counterparts in future missions such as Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus. This research combined with the MHD coronal modeling efforts has the potential to increase the reliability for future space weather forecasting.

  3. Toroidal mode number estimation of the edge-localized modes using the KSTAR 3-D electron cyclotron emission imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Yun, G. S. Lee, J. E.; Kim, M.; Choi, M. J.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Park, Y. S.; Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G.

    2014-06-15

    A new and more accurate technique is presented for determining the toroidal mode number n of edge-localized modes (ELMs) using two independent electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. The technique involves the measurement of the poloidal spacing between adjacent ELM filaments, and of the pitch angle α{sub *} of filaments at the plasma outboard midplane. Equilibrium reconstruction verifies that α{sub *} is nearly constant and thus well-defined at the midplane edge. Estimates of n obtained using two ECEI systems agree well with n measured by the conventional technique employing an array of Mirnov coils.

  4. Ultrafast electron microscopy and diffraction with laser-driven field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ropers, Claus

    2015-03-01

    Ultrafast structural dynamics in solids and nanostructures can be investigated by an increasing number of sophisticated electron and x-ray diffraction techniques. Electrons are particularly suited for this purpose, exhibiting high scattering cross-sections and allowing for beam control by versatile electrostatic or magnetic lens systems. The capabilities of time-resolved electron imaging techniques critically depend on the employed source of laser-driven ultrashort electron pulses. Nanoscopic sources offer exceptional possibilities for the generation of electron probe pulses with very short durations and high spatial beam coherence. In this talk, I will discuss recent progress in the development of ultrafast electron microscopy and diffraction based on nanoscopic photocathodes. In particular, we implemented ultrafast low-energy electron diffraction (ULEED) and ultrafast transmission electron microscopy (UTEM) driven by nonlinear photoemission from field emission tips. ULEED enables the study of structural changes with high temporal resolution and ultimate surface sensitivity, at sub-keV electron energies. As a first application of this technique, we studied the structural phase transition in a stripe-like polymer superstructure on freestanding monolayer graphene. An advanced UTEM instrument was realized by custom modifications of a standard transmission electron microscope, leading to electron focal spot sizes in the microscope's sample plane of about 10 nm and electron pulse durations of less than 700 fs. Utilizing these features, we investigate the quantum-coherent interaction between the ultrashort electron pulse and the optical near-field of an illuminated nanostructure. Finally, further applications and prospects of ultrafast electron imaging, diffraction and spectroscopy using nanoscale field emitters will be discussed.

  5. EBSD characterization and modeling of columnar dendritic grains growing in the presence of fluid flow[Electron Backscattered Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Takatani, H.; Gandin, C.A.; Rappaz, M.

    2000-02-09

    Columnar dendritic grains of steel growth in the presence of fluid flow (e.g., solidified on turning rolls) have been characterized by Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) technique. It is shown that grains have a random crystallographic orientation at the surfaces of the sheet in contact with the mould. In the middle of the sheet, the grains which have survived the growth selection mechanisms exhibit a (100) texture in which the average dendrite trunk direction is not exactly aligned with the thermal gradient (i.e., the normal to the surfaces of the sheet). It is tilted by about 15{degree} toward the upstream direction. This deviation is examined by simulations of grain structure formation based on a three-dimensional Cellular Automation (CA)-Finite Element (FE) (3D CAFE) model, which has been modified in order to account for fluid flow effects. The modified Ca algorithm includes a growth kinetics of the dendrites which is a function of both the undercooling and fluid flow direction. It is validated by comparing the predicted shape of an individual grain growing under given thermal and fluid flow conditions with an analytical solution. The 3D CAFE predictions of the columnar grains grown in the presence of fluid flow are in good agreement with the experimental EBSB results.

  6. 3D imaging of cells and tissues by focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM).

    PubMed

    Drobne, Damjana

    2013-01-01

    Integration of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and focused ion beam (FIB) technology into a single FIB/SEM system permits use of the FIB as a nano-scalpel to reveal site-specific subsurface microstructures which can be examined in great detail by SEM. The FIB/SEM technology is widely used in the semiconductor industry and material sciences, and recently its use in the life sciences has been initiated. Samples for FIB/SEM investigation can be either embedded in a plastic matrix, the traditional means of preparation of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimens, or simply dried as in samples prepared for SEM imaging. Currently, FIB/SEM is used in the life sciences for (a) preparation by the lift-out technique of lamella for TEM analysis, (b) tomography of samples embedded in a matrix, and (c) in situ site-specific FIB milling and SEM imaging using a wide range of magnifications. Site-specific milling and imaging has attracted wide interest as a technique in structural research of single eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, small animals, and different animal tissue, but it still remains to be explored more thoroughly. In the past, preparation of samples for site-specific milling and imaging by FIB/SEM has typically adopted the embedding techniques used for TEM samples, and which have been very well described in the literature. Sample preparation protocols for the use of dried samples in FIB/SEM have been less well investigated. The aim of this chapter is to encourage application of FIB/SEM on dried biological samples. A detailed description of conventional dried sample preparation and FIB/SEM investigation of dried biological samples is presented. The important steps are described and illustrated, and direct comparison between embedded and dried samples of same tissues is provided. The ability to discover links between gross morphology of the tissue or organ, surface characteristics of any selected region, and intracellular structural details on the nanometer

  7. Numerical simulations - Some results for the 2- and 3-D Hubbard models and a 2-D electron phonon model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scalapino, D. J.; Sugar, R. L.; White, S. R.; Bickers, N. E.; Scalettar, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical simulations on the half-filled three-dimensional Hubbard model clearly show the onset of Neel order. Simulations of the two-dimensional electron-phonon Holstein model show the competition between the formation of a Peierls-CDW state and a superconducting state. However, the behavior of the partly filled two-dimensional Hubbard model is more difficult to determine. At half-filling, the antiferromagnetic correlations grow as T is reduced. Doping away from half-filling suppresses these correlations, and it is found that there is a weak attractive pairing interaction in the d-wave channel. However, the strength of the pair field susceptibility is weak at the temperatures and lattice sizes that have been simulated, and the nature of the low-temperature state of the nearly half-filled Hubbard model remains open.

  8. mr-PosEBR: a novel positive tone resist for high resolution electron beam lithography and 3D surface patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfirrmann, Stefan; Kirchner, Robert; Lohse, Olga; Guzenko, Vitaliy A.; Voigt, Anja; Harder, Irina; Kolander, Anett; Schift, Helmut; Grützner, Gabi

    2016-03-01

    In this contribution, we present the results of a systematic material variation for the development of a resist material for high resolution positive tone electron beam lithography (EBL). Several acrylic copolymer materials with different compositions, that is varying mass fractions of the comonomers and different molecular weights, were synthesized and - as resist solutions - evaluated in terms of EBL performance at acceleration voltages of 30 kV and 100 kV. The resist material exhibiting the best combination of the desired properties, named mr-PosEBR, is two times more sensitive than PMMA 495k and performs comparably to the known high resolution resist ZEP520A at 30 kV. For example, a grating pattern with 29 nm wide lines with a period of 100 nm could be lithographically generated in films of mr-PosEBR with an area dose of 100 μC/cm2. In terms of resolution, single lines of only 35 nm width could be fabricated via metal liftoff. Furthermore, the dry etch stability of mr-PosEBR in a CF4/SF6 process is similar to the one of ZEP520A. Consequently, via dry etching nano patterns in mr-PosEBR could be smoothly transferred into the underlying Si substrate with high fidelity. Moreover, mr-PosEBR was evaluated as electron beam grayscale patterning and reflow resist. It was shown that the resist exhibits a good grayscale and reflow performance very similar to PMMA 120k and ZEP520A. Via these well controllable processes the generation of a wide variety of features and applications is possible.

  9. 3D ELECTRON DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE SOLAR CORONA DURING SOLAR MINIMA: ASSESSMENT FOR MORE REALISTIC SOLAR WIND MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Patoul, Judith de; Foullon, Claire; Riley, Pete E-mail: c.foullon@exeter.ac.uk

    2015-11-20

    Knowledge of the electron density distribution in the solar corona put constraints on the magnetic field configurations for coronal modeling and on initial conditions for solar wind modeling. We work with polarized SOHO/LASCO-C2 images from the last two recent minima of solar activity (1996–1997 and 2008–2010), devoid of coronal mass ejections. The goals are to derive the 4D electron density distributions in the corona by applying a newly developed time-dependent tomographic reconstruction method and to compare the results between the two solar minima and with two magnetohydrodynamic models. First, we confirm that the values of the density distribution in thermodynamic models are more realistic than in polytropic ones. The tomography provides more accurate distributions in the polar regions, and we find that the density in tomographic and thermodynamic solutions varies with the solar cycle in both polar and equatorial regions. Second, we find that the highest-density structures do not always correspond to the predicted large-scale heliospheric current sheet or its helmet streamer but can follow the locations of pseudo-streamers. We deduce that tomography offers reliable density distributions in the corona, reproducing the slow time evolution of coronal structures, without prior knowledge of the coronal magnetic field over a full rotation. Finally, we suggest that the highest-density structures show a differential rotation well above the surface depending on how they are magnetically connected to the surface. Such valuable information on the rotation of large-scale structures could help to connect the sources of the solar wind to their in situ counterparts in future missions such as Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus.

  10. Electronic structure evolution of single bilayer Bi(1 1 1) film on 3D topological insulator Bi2Se x Te3-x surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Tao; Jin, Kyung-Hwan; Zhang, Nian; Zhao, Jia-Li; Liu, Chen; Li, Wen-Jie; Wang, Jia-Ou; Wu, Rui; Qian, Hai-Jie; Liu, Feng; Ibrahim, Kurash

    2016-06-01

    The electronic state evolution of single bilayer (1BL) Bi(1 1 1) deposited on three-dimensional (3D) Bi2Se x Te3-x topological insulators at x  =  0, 1.26, 2, 2.46, 3 is systematically investigated by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Our results indicate that the electronic structures of epitaxial Bi films are strongly influenced by the substrate especially the topmost sublayer near the Bi films, manifesting in two main aspects. First, the Se atoms cause a stronger charge transfer effect, which induces a giant Rashba-spin splitting, while the low electronegativity of Te atoms induces a strong hybridization at the interface. Second, the lattice strain notably modifies the band dispersion of the surface bands. Furthermore, our experimental results are elucidated by first-principles band structure calculations.

  11. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  12. Quantitative measurements of Kikuchi bands in diffraction patterns of backscattered electrons using an electrostatic analyzer.

    PubMed

    Went, M R; Winkelmann, A; Vos, M

    2009-09-01

    Diffraction patterns of backscattered electrons can provide important crystallographic information with high spatial resolution. Recently, the dynamical theory of electron diffraction was applied to reproduce in great detail backscattering patterns observed in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). However, a fully quantitative comparison of theory and experiment requires angle-resolved measurements of the intensity and the energy of the backscattered electrons, which is difficult to realize in an SEM. This paper determines diffraction patterns of backscattered electrons using an electrostatic analyzer, operating at energies up to 40 keV with sub-eV energy resolution. Measurements are done for different measurement geometries and incoming energies. Generally a good agreement is found between theory and experiment. This spectrometer also allows us to test the influence of the energy loss of the detected electron on the backscattered electron diffraction pattern. It is found that the amplitude of the intensity variation decreases only slowly with increasing energy loss from 0 to 60 eV.

  13. Detection of electron magnetic circular dichroism signals under zone axial diffraction geometry.

    PubMed

    Song, Dongsheng; Rusz, Jan; Cai, Jianwang; Zhu, Jing

    2016-10-01

    EMCD (electron magnetic circular dichroism) technique provides us a new opportunity to explore magnetic properties in the transmission electron microscope. However, specific diffraction geometry is the major limitation. Only the two-beam and three-beam case are demonstrated in the experiments until now. Here, we present the more general case of zone axial (ZA) diffraction geometry through which the EMCD signals can be detected even with the very strong sensitivity to dynamical diffraction conditions. Our detailed calculations and well-controlled diffraction conditions lead to experiments in agreement with theory. The effect of dynamical diffraction conditions on EMCD signals are discussed both in theory and experiments. Moreover, with the detailed analysis of dynamical diffraction effects, we experimentally obtain the separate EMCD signals for each crystallographic site in Y3Fe5O12, which is also applicable for other materials and cannot be achieved by site-specific EMCD and XMCD technique directly. Our work extends application of more general diffraction geometries and will further promote the development of EMCD technique. PMID:27448200

  14. Electron energy-loss near-edge structures of 3d transition metal oxides recorded at high-energy resolution.

    PubMed

    Mitterbauer, C; Kothleitner, G; Grogger, W; Zandbergen, H; Freitag, B; Tiemeijer, P; Hofer, F

    2003-09-01

    Near-edge fine structures of the metal L(2,3) and O K-edges in transition metal-oxides have been studied with a transmission electron microscope equipped with a monochromator and a high-resolution imaging filter. This system enables the recording of EELS spectra with an energy resolution of 0.1eV thus providing new near-edge fine structure details which could not be observed previously by EELS in conventional TEM instruments. EELS-spectra from well-defined oxides like titanium oxide (TiO(2)), vanadium oxide (V(2)O(5)), chromium oxide (Cr(2)O(3)), iron oxide (Fe(2)O(3)), cobalt oxide (CoO) and nickel oxide (NiO) have been measured with the new system. These spectra are compared with EELS data obtained from a conventional microscope and the main spectral features are interpreted. Additionally, the use of monochromised TEMs is discussed in view of the natural line widths of K and L(2,3) edges. PMID:12871809

  15. 3d electron transitions in Co- and Ni-doped MgSO3·6H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, P.; Bunzarov, Zh; Iliev, I.; Dimov, T.; Tzoukrovsky, Y.

    2012-05-01

    Absorption spectra of magnesium sulfite hexahydrate (MgSO3·6H2O), doped with Co and Ni, have been studied in the spectral region 1.46-3.1 eV. Investigations have been carried out with linear polarized light E||c, E⊥c (c is the optical axis of MgSO3·6H2O) that propagates in the (1210) direction. The Co structure manifests in the spectral region 2.06-3.1 eV and the Ni structures manifest in the spectral region 1.46-2.26 eV. The peculiarities of the Jahn-Teller effect and spin-orbit interaction with respect to the impurity ions in the crystal lattice of MgSO3·6H2O are analyzed and discussed. The electron transitions in Co2+ and Ni2+ ions are determined for E||c, E⊥c. The crystal field parameter Dq and Racah parameters B and C are also calculated.

  16. Space Electron Density Gradient Studies using a 3D Embedded Reconfigurable Sounder and ESA/NASA CLUSTER Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekoulis, George

    2016-07-01

    This paper provides a direct comparison between data captured by a new embedded reconfigurable digital sounder, different ground-based ionospheric sounders spread around Europe and the ESA/NASA CLUSTER mission. The CLUSTER mission consists of four identical space probes flying in a formation that allows measurements of the electron density gradient in the local magnetic field. Both the ground-based and the spacecraft instrumentations assist in studying the motion, geometry and boundaries of the plasmasphere. The comparison results are in accordance to each other. Some slight deviations among the captured data were expected from the beginning of this investigation. These small discrepancies are reasonable and seriatim analyzed. The results of this research are significant, since the level of the plasma's ionization, which is related to the solar activity, dominates the propagation of electromagnetic waves through it. Similarly, unusually high solar activity presents serious hazards to orbiting satellites, spaceborne instrumentation, satellite communications and infrastructure located on the Earth's surface. Long-term collaborative study of the data is required to continue, in order to identify and determine the enhanced risk in advance. This would allow scientists to propose an immediate cure.

  17. Novel freestanding nanotube devices for combining TEM and electron diffraction with Raman and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Jannik C.; Obergfell, Dirk; Roth, Siegmar; Paillet, Matthieu; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis; Neumann, Anita; Duesberg, Georg

    2005-09-27

    A versatile procedure for combining high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction with Raman spectroscopy and transport measurements on the very same nanotube is presented. For this we prepare free-standing structures on the corner of a substrate by electron beam lithography and an etching process. Further, this procedure makes possible a TEM quality control of nanotubes grown directly on the substrate.

  18. Electron Diffraction Study of α-AlMnSi Crystals Along Non-Crystallographic Zone Axes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, G. L.; Bursill, L. A.

    The structure of crystalline α-AlMnSi is examined by electron diffraction. Six distinct zone axes are examined, including both normal crystallographic and non-crystallographic zone axes, allowing the space group symmetry of α-AlMnSi to be studied. A method for indexing the non-crystallographic zone axis diffraction patterns, which involve reflections from several nearby crystallographic zone axes, is described and applied to electron diffraction patterns of the quasi-5-fold, 3-fold and 2-fold axes of the icosahedral building units of cubic α-AlMnSi. These are compared with electron diffraction patterns from the corresponding 5-fold, 3-fold and 2-fold axes of the quasicrystalline phase i-AlMnSi, from which we may make some conclusions concerning the occupancies of the icosahedral units in i-AlMnSi. Electron diffraction patterns characteristic of Pmbar {3} were obtained for thicker specimens. However, for thin specimens, as used for HRTEM imaging, the electron diffraction patterns were characteristic of Imbar {3} space group symmetry. This unusual behaviour arises because the structural basis for the Pmbar {3} to Imbar {3} phase transition is a weak effect, involving changes in occupancy of the icosahedral structural elements located at the corners (double-MacKay icosahedra) and body-centers (MacKay icosahedra) of the cubic unit cell. The effects of changing the occupancies of the outer shells of the MI and DMI structural units on the diffraction intensities of the weak reflections were examined. Thus, calculation of the dynamical diffraction amplitudes shows that in fact the weak reflections characteristic of Pmbar {3} only develop sufficient intensity if two conditions are satisfied: namely (1) the crystal thickness exceeds approx. 50 nm and (2) if a significant proportion of Imbar {3} occupancies are included in the structural model. By fitting the observed thickness variation of the diffraction intensities we propose a new set of occupancies for

  19. New schemes for recording electron diffraction patterns of hexagonal and monoclinic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyazumov, M. G.

    2014-07-01

    Some new schemes for recording electron diffraction patterns of hexagonal crystals rotating around the axes lying in the ( hk0) plane of the reciprocal lattice and monoclinic crystals rotating around the a and b axes of the direct lattice and the a* axis of the reciprocal lattice have been developed. Formulas for interpreting electron diffraction patterns are reported. The electron diffraction patterns obtained based on these schemes were used to solve the 2H and 3R polytypes of CdInGaS4 crystals and the 3R polytype of Zn1.5In3Se6 crystal with the parameters a = 4.046 and c = 59.292 Å, sp. gr. R3 m.

  20. Transmission Kikuchi diffraction and transmission electron forescatter imaging of electropolished and FIB manufactured TEM specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Zieliński, W. Płociński, T.; Kurzydłowski, K.J.

    2015-06-15

    We present a study of the efficiency of the utility of scanning electron microscope (SEM)-based transmission methods for characterizing grain structure in thinned bulk metals. Foils of type 316 stainless steel were prepared by two methods commonly used for transmission electron microscopy — double-jet electropolishing and focused ion beam milling. A customized holder allowed positioning of the foils in a configuration appropriate for both transmission electron forward scatter diffraction, and for transmission imaging by the use of a forescatter detector with two diodes. We found that both crystallographic orientation maps and dark-field transmitted images could be obtained for specimens prepared by either method. However, for both methods, preparation-induced artifacts may affect the quality or accuracy of transmission SEM data, especially those acquired by the use of transmission Kikuchi diffraction. Generally, the quality of orientation data was better for specimens prepared by electropolishing, due to the absence of ion-induced damage. - Highlights: • The transmission imaging and diffraction techniques are emerging in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as promising new field of materials characterization. • The manuscript titled: “Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction and Transmission Electron Forescatter Imaging of Electropolished and FIB Manufactured TEM Specimens” documents how different specimen thinning procedures can effect efficiency of transmission Kikuchi diffraction and transmission electron forescatter imaging. • The abilities to make precision crystallographic orientation maps and dark-field images in transmission was studied on electropolished versus focus ion beam manufactured TEM specimens. • Depending on the need, electropolished and focused ion beam technique may produce suitable specimens for transmission imaging and diffraction in SEM.

  1. Complete analysis of a transmission electron diffraction pattern of a MoS2-graphite heterostructure.

    PubMed

    Adrian, Marlene; Senftleben, Arne; Morgenstern, Silvio; Baumert, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The combination of various 2D layered materials in multilayer heterostructures arises great interest in the current science. Due to the large variety of electronic properties of the group of 2D layered materials the combination opens a new pathway towards ultrasmall electronic devices. In this contribution we present a full mathematical description of multilayer heterostructure samples and their diffraction patterns including a proposal of a consistent assignment of the superstructure diffraction spots. A 27nm thick MoS2-graphite heterostructure was produced and fully analysed with the methods presented in this paper.

  2. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    Apollo's 3-dimensional graphics hardware, but does not take advantage of the shading and hidden line/surface removal capabilities of the Apollo DN10000. Although this implementation does not offer a capability for putting text on plots, it does support the use of a mouse to translate, rotate, or zoom in on views. The version 3.6b+ Apollo implementations of PLOT3D (ARC-12789) and PLOT3D/TURB3D (ARC-12785) were developed for use on Apollo computers running UNIX System V with BSD 4.3 extensions and the graphics library GMR3D Version 2.0. The standard distribution media for each of these programs is a 9-track, 6250 bpi magnetic tape in TAR format. Customers purchasing one implementation version of PLOT3D or PLOT3D/TURB3D will be given a $200 discount on each additional implementation version ordered at the same time. Version 3.6b+ of PLOT3D and PLOT3D/TURB3D are also supported for the following computers and graphics libraries: 1) generic UNIX Supercomputer and IRIS, suitable for CRAY 2/UNICOS, CONVEX, and Alliant with remote IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D (ARC-12779, ARC-12784); 2) VAX computers running VMS Version 5.0 and DISSPLA Version 11.0 (ARC-12777, ARC-12781); 3) generic UNIX and DISSPLA Version 11.0 (ARC-12788, ARC-12778); and (4) Silicon Graphics IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D workstations (ARC-12783, ARC-12782). Silicon Graphics Iris, IRIS 4D, and IRIS 2xxx/3xxx are trademarks of Silicon Graphics Incorporated. VAX and VMS are trademarks of Digital Electronics Corporation. DISSPLA is a trademark of Computer Associates. CRAY 2 and UNICOS are trademarks of CRAY Research, Incorporated. CONVEX is a trademark of Convex Computer Corporation. Alliant is a trademark of Alliant. Apollo and GMR3D are trademarks of Hewlett-Packard, Incorporated. UNIX is a registered trademark of AT&T.

  3. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    Apollo's 3-dimensional graphics hardware, but does not take advantage of the shading and hidden line/surface removal capabilities of the Apollo DN10000. Although this implementation does not offer a capability for putting text on plots, it does support the use of a mouse to translate, rotate, or zoom in on views. The version 3.6b+ Apollo implementations of PLOT3D (ARC-12789) and PLOT3D/TURB3D (ARC-12785) were developed for use on Apollo computers running UNIX System V with BSD 4.3 extensions and the graphics library GMR3D Version 2.0. The standard distribution media for each of these programs is a 9-track, 6250 bpi magnetic tape in TAR format. Customers purchasing one implementation version of PLOT3D or PLOT3D/TURB3D will be given a $200 discount on each additional implementation version ordered at the same time. Version 3.6b+ of PLOT3D and PLOT3D/TURB3D are also supported for the following computers and graphics libraries: 1) generic UNIX Supercomputer and IRIS, suitable for CRAY 2/UNICOS, CONVEX, and Alliant with remote IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D (ARC-12779, ARC-12784); 2) VAX computers running VMS Version 5.0 and DISSPLA Version 11.0 (ARC-12777, ARC-12781); 3) generic UNIX and DISSPLA Version 11.0 (ARC-12788, ARC-12778); and (4) Silicon Graphics IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D workstations (ARC-12783, ARC-12782). Silicon Graphics Iris, IRIS 4D, and IRIS 2xxx/3xxx are trademarks of Silicon Graphics Incorporated. VAX and VMS are trademarks of Digital Electronics Corporation. DISSPLA is a trademark of Computer Associates. CRAY 2 and UNICOS are trademarks of CRAY Research, Incorporated. CONVEX is a trademark of Convex Computer Corporation. Alliant is a trademark of Alliant. Apollo and GMR3D are trademarks of Hewlett-Packard, Incorporated. UNIX is a registered trademark of AT&T.

  4. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  5. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  6. Structural characterization of titania by X-ray diffraction, photoacoustic, Raman spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kadam, R M; Rajeswari, B; Sengupta, Arijit; Achary, S N; Kshirsagar, R J; Natarajan, V

    2015-02-25

    A titania mineral (obtained from East coast, Orissa, India) was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), Raman and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) studies. XRD studies indicated the presence of rutile (91%) and anatase (9%) phases in the mineral. Raman investigation supported this information. Both rutile and anatase phases have tetragonal structure (rutile: space group P4(2)/mnm, a=4.5946(1) Å, c=2.9597(1) Å, V=62.48(1) (Å)(3), Z=2; anatase: space group I4(1)/amd, 3.7848(2) Å, 9.5098(11) Å, V=136.22(2) (Å)(3), Z=4). The deconvoluted PAS spectrum showed nine peaks around 335, 370, 415,485, 555, 605, 659, 690,730 and 785 nm and according to the ligand field theory, these peaks were attributed to the presence of V(4+), Cr(3+), Mn(4+) and Fe(3+) species. EPR studies revealed the presence of transition metal ions V(4+)(d(1)), Cr(3+)(d(3)), Mn(4+)(d(3)) and Fe(3+)(d(5)) at Ti(4+) sites. The EPR spectra are characterized by very large crystal filed splitting (D term) and orthorhombic distortion term (E term) for multiple electron system (s>1) suggesting that the transition metal ions substitute the Ti(4+) in the lattice which is situated in distorted octahedral coordination of oxygen. The possible reasons for observation of unusually large D and E term in the EPR spectra of transition metal ions (S=3/2 and 5/2) are discussed. PMID:25233027

  7. Structural characterization of titania by X-ray diffraction, photoacoustic, Raman spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kadam, R M; Rajeswari, B; Sengupta, Arijit; Achary, S N; Kshirsagar, R J; Natarajan, V

    2015-02-25

    A titania mineral (obtained from East coast, Orissa, India) was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), Raman and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) studies. XRD studies indicated the presence of rutile (91%) and anatase (9%) phases in the mineral. Raman investigation supported this information. Both rutile and anatase phases have tetragonal structure (rutile: space group P4(2)/mnm, a=4.5946(1) Å, c=2.9597(1) Å, V=62.48(1) (Å)(3), Z=2; anatase: space group I4(1)/amd, 3.7848(2) Å, 9.5098(11) Å, V=136.22(2) (Å)(3), Z=4). The deconvoluted PAS spectrum showed nine peaks around 335, 370, 415,485, 555, 605, 659, 690,730 and 785 nm and according to the ligand field theory, these peaks were attributed to the presence of V(4+), Cr(3+), Mn(4+) and Fe(3+) species. EPR studies revealed the presence of transition metal ions V(4+)(d(1)), Cr(3+)(d(3)), Mn(4+)(d(3)) and Fe(3+)(d(5)) at Ti(4+) sites. The EPR spectra are characterized by very large crystal filed splitting (D term) and orthorhombic distortion term (E term) for multiple electron system (s>1) suggesting that the transition metal ions substitute the Ti(4+) in the lattice which is situated in distorted octahedral coordination of oxygen. The possible reasons for observation of unusually large D and E term in the EPR spectra of transition metal ions (S=3/2 and 5/2) are discussed.

  8. Unit-cell determination from randomly oriented electron-diffraction patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Linhua Georgieva, Dilyana; Zandbergen, Henny W.; Abrahams, Jan Pieter

    2009-07-01

    An algorithm is described that calculates the most likely primitive unit cell given a set of randomly oriented electron-diffraction patterns with unknown angular relationships. Unit-cell determination is the first step towards the structure solution of an unknown crystal form. Standard procedures for unit-cell determination cannot cope with data collections that consist of single diffraction patterns of multiple crystals, each with an unknown orientation. However, for beam-sensitive nanocrystals these are often the only data that can be obtained. An algorithm for unit-cell determination that uses randomly oriented electron-diffraction patterns with unknown angular relationships is presented here. The algorithm determined the unit cells of mineral, pharmaceutical and protein nanocrystals in orthorhombic high- and low-symmetry space groups, allowing (well oriented) patterns to be indexed.

  9. Precession electron diffraction assisted orientation mapping of gradient nanostructure in a Ni-based superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Z. Q.; Chen, Y. X.; Wu, G. L.; Yang, Y. Q.

    2015-08-01

    Surface mechanical grinding of a Ni-based superalloy can introduce a gradient microstructure in the surface layer with a grain size from nanoscale to microscale. In-depth investigation of the crystal orientation distribution of the surface nanostructured layer is more often, however, not an easy work by using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) based electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) method due to its sensitivity to lattice distortions and spatial resolution limitation. Here we use a newly developed precession electron diffraction (PED) technique coupled with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate the microstructural and crystallographic characteristics of the surface gradient nanostructure, with particular emphasis on the topmost nanocrystalline layer. A strong shear texture and a minor Copper texture were identified according to orientation analyses of the 1.6 pm thick near-surface nanocrystalline layer. The PED technique is proved to be practical for two dimensional orientation mapping of severely deformed microstructures at the nanoscale.

  10. Curious matrix effects: a computational, electron diffraction, and vibrational spectroscopic study of dysprosium triiodide.

    PubMed

    Varga, Zoltán; Groen, Cornelis Petrus; Kolonits, Mária; Hargittai, Magdolna

    2010-07-21

    The molecular and electronic structure of dysprosium triiodide, DyI(3), and its dimer, Dy(2)I(6), was determined by high level computations, gas-phase electron diffraction, and gas-phase infrared and matrix-isolation infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The free monomeric molecule is planar from all methods with an equilibrium bond length of 2.808(9) A; the thermal average bond length from electron diffraction is 2.828(6) A. The molecule forms complexes in the matrix-isolation experiments causing pyramidalisation of planar monomeric molecules. The likelihood of having both pyramidal and planar DyI(3) molecules in the matrix is discussed in order to explain certain features of the spectra. Our computations suggest that the dimer geometry depends on the occupation of the partially filled 4f orbitals. As this is the third molecule in the dysprosium trihalide series studied, trends in their electronic and molecular structures are presented and discussed.

  11. Focused ion beam (FIB) combined with high resolution scanning electron microscopy: a promising tool for 3D analysis of chromosome architecture.

    PubMed

    Schroeder-Reiter, Elizabeth; Pérez-Willard, Fabián; Zeile, Ulrike; Wanner, Gerhard

    2009-02-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) milling in combination with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) was applied to investigations of metaphase barley chromosomes, providing new insight into the chromatin packaging in the chromosome interior and 3D distribution of histone variants in the centromeric region. Whole mount chromosomes were sectioned with FIB with thicknesses in the range of 7-20nm, resulting in up to 2000 sections, which allow high resolution three-dimensional reconstruction. For the first time, it could be shown that the chromosome interior is characterized by a network of interconnected cavities, with openings to the chromosome surface. In combination with immunogold labeling, the centromere-correlated distribution of histone variants (phosphorylated histone H3, CENH3) could be investigated with FIB in three dimensions. Limitations of classical SEM analysis of whole mount chromosomes with back-scattered electrons requiring higher accelerating voltages, e.g. faint and blurred interior signals, could be overcome with FIB milling: from within the chromosome even very small labels in the range of 10nm could be precisely visualized. This allowed direct quantification of marker molecules in a three-dimensional context. Distribution of DNA in the chromosome interior could be directly analyzed after staining with a DNA-specific platinorganic compound Platinum Blue. Higher resolution visualization of DNA distribution could be performed by preparation of FIB lamellae with the in situ lift-out technique followed by investigation in dark field with a scanning transmission electron detector (STEM) at 30kV. PMID:19059341

  12. Electro-optic sampling for time resolving relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Scoby, C. M.; Musumeci, P.; Moody, J.; Gutierrez, M.; Tran, T.

    2009-01-22

    The Pegasus laboratory at UCLA features a state-of-the-art electron photoinjector capable of producing ultrashort (<100 fs) high-brightness electron bunches at energies of 3.75 MeV. These beams recently have been used to produce static diffraction patterns from scattering off thin metal foils, and it is foreseen to take advantage of the ultrashort nature of these bunches in future pump-probe time-resolved diffraction studies. In this paper, single shot 2-d electro-optic sampling is presented as a potential technique for time of arrival stamping of electron bunches used for diffraction. Effects of relatively low bunch charge (a few 10's of pC) and modestly relativistic beams are discussed and background compensation techniques to obtain high signal-to-noise ratio are explored. From these preliminary tests, electro-optic sampling is suitable to be a reliable nondestructive time stamping method for relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction at the Pegasus lab.

  13. A pipeline for comprehensive and automated processing of electron diffraction data in IPLT

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Andreas D.; Philippsen, Ansgar; Engel, Andreas; Walz, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Electron crystallography of two-dimensional crystals allows the structural study of membrane proteins in their native environment, the lipid bilayer. Determining the structure of a membrane protein at near-atomic resolution by electron crystallography remains, however, a very labor-intense and time-consuming task. To simplify and accelerate the data processing aspect of electron crystallography, we implemented a pipeline for the processing of electron diffraction data using the Image Processing Library & Toolbox (IPLT), which provides a modular, flexible, integrated, and extendable cross-platform, open-source framework for image processing. The diffraction data processing pipeline is organized as several independent modules implemented in Python. The modules can be accessed either from a graphical user interface or through a command line interface, thus meeting the needs of both novice and expert users. The low-level image processing algorithms are implemented in C++ to achieve optimal processing performance, and their interface is exported to Python using a wrapper. For enhanced performance, the Python processing modules are complemented with a central data managing facility that provides a caching infrastructure. The validity of our data processing algorithms was verified by processing a set of aquaporin-0 diffraction patterns with the IPLT pipeline and comparing the resulting merged data set with that obtained by processing the same diffraction patterns with the classical set of MRC programs. PMID:23500887

  14. Characterization of calcium crystals in Abelia using x-ray diffraction and electron microscopes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Localization, chemical composition, and morphology of calcium crystals in leaves and stems of Abelia mosanensis and A. ×grandiflora were analyzed with a variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VP-SEM) equipped with an X-ray diffraction system, low temperature SEM (LT-SEM) and a transmission ...

  15. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  16. Molecular organization in phospholipid monolayer domains by correlative fluorescence microscopy and electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Hui, S W; Yu, H

    1994-04-01

    Lipid monolayer is a half leaflet model for lipid bilayer, which forms the basis of biological membranes. Within a certain range of surface area per molecular of phospholipid monolayers at the air-water interface, where the compressibility was nearly infinite, two phases with different molecular packings were observable by fluorescence microscopy. Mixed-phase monolayers of L-1,2-dipalmitoyl-N-monomethyl-3-phosphatidylethanolamine [DP(Me)PE] or L-1,2-dipalmitoyl-N-dimethyl-3-phosphatidyl-ethanolamine [DP(Me)2PE] were deposited on marker grids coated with Formvar films. The molecular organization in the dark and bright fluorescent areas on the grids was investigated by low dose, selected area electron diffraction. Sharp reflection arcs, at a spacing of 4.2A and arranged in a hexagon pattern, were detected from dark domains of both lipids. A diffuse reflection ring at a spacing of 4.6A was derived from the bright background areas. Diffraction patterns were obtained from neighboring areas along selected dark domains of both lipids. The orientations of diffraction patterns from areas along smooth and curving boundaries of DP(Me)2PE domains were found to turn with the boundaries. In the branching domains of DP(Me)PE, the orientations of diffraction patterns indicated that the branches were formed by twinning. Electron diffraction thus provides an unique way to sample the local molecular packing order and orientation within individual domains in phospholipid monolayers.

  17. On the Use of Dynamical Diffraction Theory To Refine Crystal Structure from Electron Diffraction Data: Application to KLa5O5(VO4)2, a Material with Promising Luminescent Properties.

    PubMed

    Colmont, Marie; Palatinus, Lukas; Huvé, Marielle; Kabbour, Houria; Saitzek, Sébastien; Djelal, Nora; Roussel, Pascal

    2016-03-01

    A new lanthanum oxide, KLa5O5(VO4)2, was synthesized using a flux growth technique that involved solid-state reaction under an air atmosphere at 900 °C. The crystal structure was solved and refined using an innovative approach recently established and based on three-dimensional (3D) electron diffraction data, using precession of the electron beam and then validated against Rietveld refinement and denisty functional theory (DFT) calculations. It crystallizes in a monoclinic unit cell with space group C2/m and has unit cell parameters of a = 20.2282(14) Å, b = 5.8639(4) Å, c = 12.6060(9) Å, and β = 117.64(1)°. Its structure is built on Cresnel-like two-dimensional (2D) units (La5O5) of 4*3 (OLa4) tetrahedra, which run parallel to (001) plane, being surrounded by isolated VO4 tetrahedra. Four isolated vanadate groups create channels that host K(+) ions. Substitution of K(+) cations by another alkali metal is possible, going from lithium to rubidium. Li substitution led to a similar phase with a primitive monoclinic unit cell. A complementary selected area electron diffraction (SAED) study highlighted diffuse streaks associated with stacking faults observed on high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) images of the lithium compound. Finally, preliminary catalytic tests for ethanol oxidation are reported, as well as luminescence evidence. This paper also describes how solid-state chemists can take advantages of recent progresses in electron crystallography, assisted by DFT calculations and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) refinements, to propose new structural types with potential applications to the physicist community. PMID:26901292

  18. Electron Tomography of Cryo-Immobilized Plant Tissue: A Novel Approach to Studying 3D Macromolecular Architecture of Mature Plant Cell Walls In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Purbasha; Bosneaga, Elena; Yap, Edgar G.; Das, Jyotirmoy; Tsai, Wen-Ting; Cabal, Angelo; Neuhaus, Erica; Maji, Dolonchampa; Kumar, Shailabh; Joo, Michael; Yakovlev, Sergey; Csencsits, Roseann; Yu, Zeyun; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Downing, Kenneth H.; Auer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Cost-effective production of lignocellulosic biofuel requires efficient breakdown of cell walls present in plant biomass to retrieve the wall polysaccharides for fermentation. In-depth knowledge of plant cell wall composition is therefore essential for improving the fuel production process. The precise spatial three-dimensional (3D) organization of cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin and lignin within plant cell walls remains unclear to date since the microscopy techniques used so far have been limited to two-dimensional, topographic or low-resolution imaging, or required isolation or chemical extraction of the cell walls. In this paper we demonstrate that by cryo-immobilizing fresh tissue, then either cryo-sectioning or freeze-substituting and resin embedding, followed by cryo- or room temperature (RT) electron tomography, respectively, we can visualize previously unseen details of plant cell wall architecture in 3D, at macromolecular resolution (∼2 nm), and in near-native state. Qualitative and quantitative analyses showed that wall organization of cryo-immobilized samples were preserved remarkably better than conventionally prepared samples that suffer substantial extraction. Lignin-less primary cell walls were well preserved in both self-pressurized rapidly frozen (SPRF), cryo-sectioned samples as well as high-pressure frozen, freeze-substituted and resin embedded (HPF-FS-resin) samples. Lignin-rich secondary cell walls appeared featureless in HPF-FS-resin sections presumably due to poor stain penetration, but their macromolecular features could be visualized in unprecedented details in our cryo-sections. While cryo-tomography of vitreous tissue sections is currently proving to be instrumental in developing 3D models of lignin-rich secondary cell walls, here we confirm that the technically easier method of RT-tomography of HPF-FS-resin sections could be used immediately for routine study of low-lignin cell walls. As a proof of principle, we characterized the

  19. Electron tomography of cryo-immobilized plant tissue: a novel approach to studying 3D macromolecular architecture of mature plant cell walls in situ.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Purbasha; Bosneaga, Elena; Yap, Edgar G; Das, Jyotirmoy; Tsai, Wen-Ting; Cabal, Angelo; Neuhaus, Erica; Maji, Dolonchampa; Kumar, Shailabh; Joo, Michael; Yakovlev, Sergey; Csencsits, Roseann; Yu, Zeyun; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Downing, Kenneth H; Auer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Cost-effective production of lignocellulosic biofuel requires efficient breakdown of cell walls present in plant biomass to retrieve the wall polysaccharides for fermentation. In-depth knowledge of plant cell wall composition is therefore essential for improving the fuel production process. The precise spatial three-dimensional (3D) organization of cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin and lignin within plant cell walls remains unclear to date since the microscopy techniques used so far have been limited to two-dimensional, topographic or low-resolution imaging, or required isolation or chemical extraction of the cell walls. In this paper we demonstrate that by cryo-immobilizing fresh tissue, then either cryo-sectioning or freeze-substituting and resin embedding, followed by cryo- or room temperature (RT) electron tomography, respectively, we can visualize previously unseen details of plant cell wall architecture in 3D, at macromolecular resolution (∼ 2 nm), and in near-native state. Qualitative and quantitative analyses showed that wall organization of cryo-immobilized samples were preserved remarkably better than conventionally prepared samples that suffer substantial extraction. Lignin-less primary cell walls were well preserved in both self-pressurized rapidly frozen (SPRF), cryo-sectioned samples as well as high-pressure frozen, freeze-substituted and resin embedded (HPF-FS-resin) samples. Lignin-rich secondary cell walls appeared featureless in HPF-FS-resin sections presumably due to poor stain penetration, but their macromolecular features could be visualized in unprecedented details in our cryo-sections. While cryo-tomography of vitreous tissue sections is currently proving to be instrumental in developing 3D models of lignin-rich secondary cell walls, here we confirm that the technically easier method of RT-tomography of HPF-FS-resin sections could be used immediately for routine study of low-lignin cell walls. As a proof of principle, we characterized the

  20. A Low-Dose Electron Diffraction Assay for Protection of Protein Structure against Damage from Drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massover, William H.

    2004-04-01

    A new assay using low-dose electron diffraction to measure the protection of protein structure against damage from drying is described. When thin single crystals of catalase are dried within water alone, low-dose electron diffraction yields no Bragg spots. Drying within an experimental aqueous solution that permits detection of diffraction spots thereby indicates a positive result, and the extent of these Bragg reflections into the high angle range gives a quantitative measure of the degree of protection. Bragg spots out to 3.7 3.9 [Angstrom capital A, ring] are recorded for drying within 100 mM solutions of the known structure-preserving sugars, sucrose, tannin, and trehalose. The ability of trehalose to maintain native protein structure during drying starts between 10 and 25 mM, and changes only slightly at concentrations above this threshold; with drying in 150-mM trehalose, catalase crystals yield diffraction spots out to 3.7 [Angstrom capital A, ring]. Drying within the organic nonsugar polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone gives Bragg spots to 4.0 [Angstrom capital A, ring]. This new assay should be useful to measure the unexamined structure-preserving capabilities of modified sugars, other nonsugars, and mixtures to identify which protective matrix maintains native protein structure to the greatest extent during drying; electron crystallography using that optimal matrix should yield protein structure at improved levels of high resolution.

  1. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) as a tool for detection of coral diagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusack, M.; England, J.; Dalbeck, P.; Tudhope, A. W.; Fallick, A. E.; Allison, N.

    2008-12-01

    Fine-scale structures of intact modern and fossil coralline skeletons were analysed to determine alteration to secondary cements and phases using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). EBSD analysis revealed secondary aragonite cements in endolithic borings in the modern skeleton and whole dissepiments of the fossil skeleton replaced by calcite, despite X-ray diffraction (XRD) bulk analysis of the general area suggesting only aragonite was present. Non-destructive, in situ screening of coral samples by EBSD analysis provides a valuable tool for assessing the extent of alteration and can determine which areas may produce more reliable climate proxy data.

  2. Low energy electron diffraction study of high index copper surfaces underneath graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chenfang; Tong, Nai; Yang, Weisheng; Zhao, Ruguang; Hu, Zonghai

    2015-08-01

    After growth of graphene by chemical vapour deposition on copper foil, Cu(4 1 0) facets were distinguished from Cu(1 0 0) facets using the low energy electron diffraction technique. Evolution of the diffraction patterns was studied after oxidation of the Cu substrate and subsequent annealing in ultrahigh vacuum. An ordered Cu(4 1 0)-O phase was then identified. The distinction between Cu(4 1 0) and Cu(4 1 0)-O is relevant in determination of the coupling between graphene and the substrate.

  3. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Stern, S; Holmegaard, L; Filsinger, F; Rouzée, A; Rudenko, A; Johnsson, P; Martin, A V; Barty, A; Bostedt, C; Bozek, J; Coffee, R; Epp, S; Erk, B; Foucar, L; Hartmann, R; Kimmel, N; Kühnel, K-U; Maurer, J; Messerschmidt, M; Rudek, B; Starodub, D; Thøgersen, J; Weidenspointner, G; White, T A; Stapelfeldt, H; Rolles, D; Chapman, H N; Küpper, J

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an X-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source [Phys. Rev. Lett.112, 083002 (2014)]. This experiment is the first step toward coherent diffractive imaging of structures and structural dynamics of isolated molecules at atomic resolution, i.e., picometers and femtoseconds, using X-ray free-electron lasers.

  4. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Stern, S; Holmegaard, L; Filsinger, F; Rouzée, A; Rudenko, A; Johnsson, P; Martin, A V; Barty, A; Bostedt, C; Bozek, J; Coffee, R; Epp, S; Erk, B; Foucar, L; Hartmann, R; Kimmel, N; Kühnel, K-U; Maurer, J; Messerschmidt, M; Rudek, B; Starodub, D; Thøgersen, J; Weidenspointner, G; White, T A; Stapelfeldt, H; Rolles, D; Chapman, H N; Küpper, J

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an X-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source [Phys. Rev. Lett.112, 083002 (2014)]. This experiment is the first step toward coherent diffractive imaging of structures and structural dynamics of isolated molecules at atomic resolution, i.e., picometers and femtoseconds, using X-ray free-electron lasers. PMID:25415561

  5. Odd electron diffraction patterns in silicon nanowires and silicon thin films explained by microtwins and nanotwins

    PubMed Central

    Cayron, Cyril; Den Hertog, Martien; Latu-Romain, Laurence; Mouchet, Céline; Secouard, Christopher; Rouviere, Jean-Luc; Rouviere, Emmanuelle; Simonato, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Odd electron diffraction patterns (EDPs) have been obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on silicon nanowires grown via the vapour–liquid–solid method and on silicon thin films deposited by electron beam evaporation. Many explanations have been given in the past, without consensus among the scientific community: size artifacts, twinning artifacts or, more widely accepted, the existence of new hexagonal Si phases. In order to resolve this issue, the microstructures of Si nanowires and Si thin films have been characterized by TEM, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. Despite the differences in the geometries and elaboration processes, the EDPs of the materials show great similarities. The different hypotheses reported in the literature have been investigated. It was found that the positions of the diffraction spots in the EDPs could be reproduced by simulating a hexagonal structure with c/a = 12(2/3)1/2, but the intensities in many EDPs remained unexplained. Finally, it was established that all the experimental data, i.e. EDPs and HRTEM images, agree with a classical cubic silicon structure containing two microstructural defects: (i) overlapping Σ3 microtwins which induce extra spots by double diffraction, and (ii) nanotwins which induce extra spots as a result of streaking effects. It is concluded that there is no hexagonal phase in the Si nanowires and the Si thin films presented in this work. PMID:22477767

  6. Dynamical electron diffraction simulation for non-orthogonal crystal system by a revised real space method.

    PubMed

    Lv, C L; Liu, Q B; Cai, C Y; Huang, J; Zhou, G W; Wang, Y G

    2015-01-01

    In the transmission electron microscopy, a revised real space (RRS) method has been confirmed to be a more accurate dynamical electron diffraction simulation method for low-energy electron diffraction than the conventional multislice method (CMS). However, the RRS method can be only used to calculate the dynamical electron diffraction of orthogonal crystal system. In this work, the expression of the RRS method for non-orthogonal crystal system is derived. By taking Na2 Ti3 O7 and Si as examples, the correctness of the derived RRS formula for non-orthogonal crystal system is confirmed by testing the coincidence of numerical results of both sides of Schrödinger equation; moreover, the difference between the RRS method and the CMS for non-orthogonal crystal system is compared at the accelerating voltage range from 40 to 10 kV. Our results show that the CMS method is almost the same as the RRS method for the accelerating voltage above 40 kV. However, when the accelerating voltage is further lowered to 20 kV or below, the CMS method introduces significant errors, not only for the higher-order Laue zone diffractions, but also for zero-order Laue zone. These indicate that the RRS method for non-orthogonal crystal system is necessary to be used for more accurate dynamical simulation when the accelerating voltage is low. Furthermore, the reason for the increase of differences between those diffraction patterns calculated by the RRS method and the CMS method with the decrease of the accelerating voltage is discussed. PMID:26461207

  7. Project EDoLMI: Instrumentation for electron diffraction of trapped, massive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcelle Buford, C.; Whetten, R. L.

    2000-11-01

    Project EDoLMI (``Electron Diffraction of Levitated Massive Ions") is a large ($1.4M) NSF-funded instrumentation development project which should result in the first application of the trapped-ion electron diffraction method in an academic institution. The instrument will be developed collaboratively by research teams at the Rowland Institute of Science (Cambridge, MA) and at the Georgia Institute of Technology, and once operational will be located entirely at the Atlanta campus. This contributed paper will describe the theory and practice of the trapped-ion electron diffraction method, as implemented in the Cambridge instrument by Parks etal.,(2-4) as well as descrbing progress toward the Atlanta instrument. The method will also be illustrated by recent results obtained using the Cambridge instrument,(2-4) as well as by theoretical calculations of diffraction results using hypothetical structural models and temperature-ranges of interest. Acknowledgement: We are grateful for the cooperation of EDoLMI team partners at the Rowland Institute of Science, including Dr. Joel H. Parks and Dr. Joseph T. Khoury in particular. 1. ``Collaborative development of a heavy-ion trap electron diffractometer for structure determination of selected nanoparticles, aerosol particles, and biomolecular assemblies," NSF CHE-0079678, by R. L. Whetten, J. H. Parks et al., funding period August 2000 to January 2003. 2. M. Maier-Borst, D. B. Cameron, M. Rokni, J. H. Parks, Phys. Rev. A59, R3162 (1999). 3. J. H. Parks, presented at the Third International Symposium on Theory of Atomic and Molecular Clusters," Berlin (1999), unpublished document. 4. S. Krückeberg, D. Schooss, M. Maier-Borst, J. H. Parks, ``Diffraction of trapped CsI clusters: The appearance of the bulk structure," submitted.

  8. 5-Femtosecond Laser-Electron Synchronization for Pump-Probe Crystallography and Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walbran, Matthew; Gliserin, Alexander; Jung, Kwangyun; Kim, Jungwon; Baum, Peter

    2015-10-01

    For improving the temporal resolution in ultrafast pump-probe electron or x-ray diffraction, we report a laser-electron synchronization concept via direct microwave extraction from the laser frequency comb combined with phase detection by fiber-loop interferometry, in situ drift correction via electron-energy analysis, and laser-electron streaking for final timing metrology. We achieve a laser-electron jitter below 5 fs (rms) integrated between 8 min and Nyquist period (400 ns). Slower drifts are also below 5 fs (rms) after active compensation. This result helps advance femtosecond crystallography with electrons or x rays to the regime of fundamental atomic-scale dynamics and light-matter interaction.

  9. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  10. Effects of focused ion beam milling on electron backscatter diffraction patterns in strontium titanate and stabilized zirconia.

    PubMed

    Saowadee, N; Agersted, K; Bowen, J R

    2012-06-01

    This study investigates the effect of focused ion beam (FIB) current and accelerating voltage on electron backscatter diffraction pattern quality of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and Nb-doped strontium titanate (STN) to optimize data quality and acquisition time for 3D-EBSD experiments by FIB serial sectioning. Band contrast and band slope were used to describe the pattern quality. The FIB probe currents investigated ranged from 100 to 5000 pA and the accelerating voltage was either 30 or 5 kV. The results show that 30 kV FIB milling induced a significant reduction of the pattern quality of STN samples compared to a mechanically polished surface but yielded a high pattern quality on YSZ. The difference between STN and YSZ pattern quality is thought to be caused by difference in the degree of ion damage as their backscatter coefficients and ion penetration depths are virtually identical. Reducing the FIB probe current from 5000 to 100 pA improved the pattern quality by 20% for STN but only showed a marginal improvement for YSZ. On STN, a conductive coating can help to improve the pattern quality and 5 kV polishing can lead to a 100% improvement of the pattern quality relatively to 30 kV FIB milling. For 3D-EBSD experiments of a material such as STN, it is recommended to combine a high kV FIB milling and low kV polishing for each slice in order to optimize the data quality and acquisition time. PMID:22582798

  11. Investigation on Deformation Behavior of Nickel Aluminum Bronze by Neutron Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Hong; Lv, Yuting; Lu, Weijie; Sun, Guangai

    2016-05-01

    The deformation behavior, deformation microstructures, and generated inter-phase stresses of nickel aluminum bronze were investigated by in situ neutron diffraction instrument and transmission electron microscopy in this paper. Lattice strains calculated by both peak shifting and broadening by Gaussian fitting of α and κ phase neutron diffraction peak profiles at both holding stress conditions and unloaded stress conditions were compared. Twining and stacking faults in α matrix were observed after deformed by different tensile stresses. Compressive internal/residual stress in α matrix and tensile internal stress in κ phase in elasto-plastic region were calculated based on neutron diffraction analysis. The piled-up dislocations around hard κ phases increase with increasing the deformation degree, which raise the stress concentration near α/ κ interface and increase the internal stresses.

  12. Three-dimensional nanostructure determination from a large diffraction data set recorded using scanning electron nanodiffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Meng, Yifei; Zuo, Jian-Min

    2016-07-04

    A diffraction-based technique is developed for the determination of three-dimensional nanostructures. The technique employs high-resolution and low-dose scanning electron nanodiffraction (SEND) to acquire three-dimensional diffraction patterns, with the help of a special sample holder for large-angle rotation. Grains are identified in three-dimensional space based on crystal orientation and on reconstructed dark-field images from the recorded diffraction patterns. Application to a nanocrystalline TiN thin film shows that the three-dimensional morphology of columnar TiN grains of tens of nanometres in diameter can be reconstructed using an algebraic iterative algorithm under specified prior conditions, together with their crystallographic orientations. The principles can bemore » extended to multiphase nanocrystalline materials as well. Thus, the tomographic SEND technique provides an effective and adaptive way of determining three-dimensional nanostructures.« less

  13. Optimizing electron backscatter diffraction of carbonate biominerals-resin type and carbon coating.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Cusack, Maggie

    2009-06-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is becoming a widely used technique to determine crystallographic orientation in biogenic carbonates. Despite this use, there is little information available on preparation for the analysis of biogenic carbonates. EBSD data are compared for biogenic aragonite and calcite in the common blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, using different types of resin and thicknesses of carbon coating. Results indicate that carbonate biomineral samples provide better EBSD results if they are embedded in resin, particularly epoxy resin. A uniform layer of carbon of 2.5 nm thickness provides sufficient conductivity for EBSD analyses of such insulators to avoid charging without masking the diffracted signal. Diffraction intensity decreases with carbon coating thickness of 5 nm or more. This study demonstrates the importance of optimizing sample preparation for EBSD analyses of insulators such as carbonate biominerals.

  14. Identification of crystals deposited in brain and kidney after xylitol administration by biochemical, histochemical, and electron diffraction methods

    PubMed Central

    Evans, G. W.; Phillips, Gael; Mukherjee, T. M.; Snow, M. R.; Lawrence, J. R.; Thomas, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    The positive identification of crystals of calcium oxalate occurring in brain and kidney after xylitol administration is described. Biochemical, histochemical, conventional light and electron microscopical methods, including selected area electron diffraction, were used to characterize the crystals. Images PMID:4693896

  15. Tilted femtosecond pulses for velocity matching in gas-phase ultrafast electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping; Yang, Jie; Centurion, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Recent advances in pulsed electron gun technology have resulted in femtosecond electron pulses becoming available for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments. For experiments investigating chemical dynamics in the gas phase, the resolution is still limited to picosecond time scales due to the velocity mismatch between laser and electron pulses. Tilted laser pulses can be used for velocity matching, but thus far this has not been demonstrated over an extended target in a diffraction setting. We demonstrate an optical configuration to deliver high-intensity laser pulses with a tilted pulse front for velocity matching over the typical length of a gas jet. A laser pulse is diffracted from a grating to introduce angular dispersion, and the grating surface is imaged on the target using large demagnification. The laser pulse duration and tilt angle were measured at and near the image plane using two different techniques: second harmonic cross correlation and an interferometric method. We found that a temporal resolution on the order of 100 fs can be achieved over a range of approximately 1 mm around the image plane.

  16. Electromagnetic diffraction radiation of a subwavelength-hole array excited by an electron beam.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shenggang; Hu, Min; Zhang, Yaxin; Li, Yuebao; Zhong, Renbin

    2009-09-01

    This paper explores the physics of the electromagnetic diffraction radiation of a subwavelength holes array excited by a set of evanescent waves generated by a line charge of electron beam moving parallel to the array. Activated by a uniformly moving line charge, numerous physical phenomena occur such as the diffraction radiation on both sides of the array as well as the electromagnetic penetration or transmission below or above the cut-off through the holes. As a result the subwavelength holes array becomes a radiation array. Making use of the integral equation with relevant Green's functions, an analytical theory for such a radiation system is built up. The results of the numerical calculations based on the theory agree well with that obtained by the computer simulation. The relation among the effective surface plasmon wave, the electromagnetic penetration or transmission of the holes and the diffraction radiation is revealed. The energy dependence of and the influence of the hole thickness on the diffraction radiation and the electromagnetic penetration or transmission are investigated in detail. Therefore, a distinct diffraction radiation phenomenon is discovered.

  17. Diffraction efficiency of plasmonic gratings fabricated by electron beam lithography using a silver halide film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheer, Porwal, S.; Bhartiya, S.; Rao, B. T.; Tiwari, P.; Srivastava, Himanshu; Sharma, T. K.; Rai, V. N.; Srivastava, A. K.; Naik, P. A.

    2016-07-01

    The silver nanoparticle surface relief gratings of ˜10 μm period are fabricated using electron beam lithography on the silver halide film substrate. Morphological characterization of the gratings shows that the period, the shape, and the relief depth in the gratings are mainly dependent on the number of lines per frame, the spot size, and the accelerating voltage of electron beam raster in the SEM. Optical absorption of the silver nanoparticle gratings provides a broad localized surface plasmon resonance peak in the visible region, whereas the intensity of the peaks depends on the number density of silver nanoparticles in the gratings. The maximum efficiency of ˜7.2% for first order diffraction is observed for the grating fabricated at 15 keV. The efficiency is peaking at 560 nm with ˜380 nm bandwidth. The measured profiles of the diffraction efficiency for the gratings are found in close agreement with the Raman-Nath diffraction theory. This technique provides a simple and efficient method for the fabrication of plasmonic nanoparticle grating structures with high diffraction efficiency having broad wavelength tuning.

  18. Guide for 3D WARP simulations of hollow electron beam lenses. Practical explanation on basis of Tevatron electron lens test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Moens, Vince

    2014-06-08

    The purpose of this guide is to help successive students handle WARP. It outlines the installation of WARP on personal computers as well as super-computers and clusters. It furthermore teaches the reader how to handle the WARP environment and run basic scripts. Lastly it outlines how to execute the current Hollow Electron Beam Lens scripts.

  19. Microstrain distribution mapping on CuInSe2 thin films by means of electron backscatter diffraction, X-ray diffraction, and Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Norbert; Wilkinson, Angus J; Schmid, Thomas; Winkelmann, Aimo; Chahine, Gilbert A; Schülli, Tobias U; Rissom, Thorsten; Marquardt, Julien; Schorr, Susan; Abou-Ras, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    The investigation of the microstructure in functional, polycrystalline thin films is an important contribution to the enhanced understanding of structure-property relationships in corresponding devices. Linear and planar defects within individual grains may affect substantially the performance of the device. These defects are closely related to strain distributions. The present work compares electron and X-ray diffraction as well as Raman microspectroscopy, which provide access to microstrain distributions within individual grains. CuInSe2 thin films for solar cells are used as a model system. High-resolution electron backscatter diffraction and X-ray microdiffraction as well as Raman microspectroscopy were applied for this comparison. Consistently, microstrain values were determined of the order of 10(-4) by these three techniques. However, only electron backscatter diffraction, X-ray microdiffraction exhibit sensitivities appropriate for mapping local strain changes at the submicrometer level within individual grains in polycrystalline materials. PMID:27459269

  20. Multiobjective optimizations of a novel cryocooled dc gun based ultrafast electron diffraction beam line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliford, Colwyn; Bartnik, Adam; Bazarov, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of multiobjective genetic algorithm optimizations of a single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction beam line utilizing a 225 kV dc gun with a novel cryocooled photocathode system and buncher cavity. Optimizations of the transverse projected emittance as a function of bunch charge are presented and discussed in terms of the scaling laws derived in the charge saturation limit. Additionally, optimization of the transverse coherence length as a function of final rms bunch length at the sample location have been performed for three different sample radii: 50, 100, and 200 μ m , for two final bunch charges: 1 05 electrons (16 fC) and 1 06 electrons (160 fC). Example optimal solutions are analyzed, and the effects of disordered induced heating estimated. In particular, a relative coherence length of Lc ,x/σx=0.27 nm /μ m was obtained for a final bunch charge of 1 05 electrons and final bunch length of σt≈100 fs . For a final charge of 1 06 electrons the cryogun produces Lc ,x/σx≈0.1 nm /μ m for σt≈100 - 200 fs and σx≥50 μ m . These results demonstrate the viability of using genetic algorithms in the design and operation of ultrafast electron diffraction beam lines.

  1. Strain Distribution Measurement in Stainless Steels by Convergent-Beam Electron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Masakazu; Aoyama, Takashi; Nakata, Kiyotomo; Suzuki, Takaya

    1995-01-01

    A convergent-beam electron diffraction technique was utilized to measure local strain distributions in stainless steels. Electron beams were focused into {210} crystal planes and the higher order Laue zone (HOLZ) lines diffracted from {375} and {119} planes were characterized by measuring the distances between the intersections of these HOLZ lines. Four parameters, including strains in three directions and one magnification factor, were calculated based on the least squares method. Strain distributions near a chromium carbide precipitate were measured in sensitized SUS 304 and it was confirmed that parallel tensile strain and vertical compressive strain to the edge of the precipitate existed and that they decreased with the distance from the edge of precipitate.

  2. Synchrotron powder diffraction of silicon: high-quality structure factors and electron density.

    PubMed

    Wahlberg, Nanna; Bindzus, Niels; Bjerg, Lasse; Becker, Jacob; Dippel, Ann Christin; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt

    2016-01-01

    Crystalline silicon is an ideal compound to test the current state of experimental structure factors and corresponding electron densities. High-quality structure factors have been measured on crystalline silicon with synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction. They are in excellent agreement with benchmark Pendellösung data having comparable accuracy and precision, but acquired in far less time and to a much higher resolution (sin θ/λ < 1.7 Å(-1)). The extended data range permits an experimental modelling of not only the valence electron density but also the core deformation in silicon, establishing an increase of the core density upon bond formation in crystalline silicon. Furthermore, a physically sound procedure for evaluating the standard deviation of powder-derived structure factors has been applied. Sampling statistics inherently account for contributions from photon counts as well as the limited number of diffracting particles, where especially the latter are particularly difficult to handle. PMID:26697864

  3. Microstructural evolution in adiabatic shear bands of copper at high strain rates: Electron backscatter diffraction characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Lin; Chen Zhiyong; Zhan Congkun; Yang Xuyue; Liu Chuming; Cai Hongnian

    2012-02-15

    The microstructural evolution of adiabatic shear bands in annealed copper with different large strains at high strain rates has been investigated by electron backscatter diffraction. The results show that mechanical twinning can occur with minimal contribution to shear localization under dynamic loading. Elongated ultrafine grains with widths of 100-300 nm are observed during the evolution of the adiabatic shear bands. A rotational dynamic recrystallization mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of the elongated ultrafine grains. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The microstructural evolution of ASB is studied by electron backscatter diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Twinning can occur in ASB while the contribution to shear localization is slight. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elongated ultrafine grains are observed during the evolution process of ASB. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A possible mechanism is proposed to explain the microstructure evolution of ASB.

  4. Diffractive imaging of a rotational wavepacket in nitrogen molecules with femtosecond megaelectronvolt electron pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Guehr, Markus; Vecchione, Theodore; Robinson, Matthew S.; Li, Renkai; Hartmann, Nick; Shen, Xiaozhe; Coffee, Ryan; Corbett, Jeff; Fry, Alan; Gaffney, Kelly; Gorkhover, Tais; Hast, Carsten; Jobe, Keith; Makasyuk, Igor; Reid, Alexander; Robinson, Joseph; Vetter, Sharon; Wang, Fenglin; Weathersby, Stephen; Yoneda, Charles; Centurion, Martin; Wang, Xijie

    2016-04-01

    Imaging changes in molecular geometries on their natural femtosecond timescale with sub-Angström spatial precision is one of the critical challenges in the chemical sciences, as the nuclear geometry changes determine the molecular reactivity. For photoexcited molecules, the nuclear dynamics determine the photoenergy conversion path and efficiency. Here we report a gas-phase electron diffraction experiment using megaelectronvolt (MeV) electrons, where we captured the rotational wavepacket dynamics of nonadiabatically laser-aligned nitrogen molecules. We achieved a combination of 100 fs root-mean-squared temporal resolution and sub-Angstrom (0.76 Å) spatial resolution that makes it possible to resolve the position of the nuclei within the molecule. In addition, the diffraction patterns reveal the angular distribution of the molecules, which changes from prolate (aligned) to oblate (anti-aligned) in 300 fs. Our results demonstrate a significant and promising step towards making atomically resolved movies of molecular reactions.

  5. Practical aspects of diffractive imaging using an atomic-scale coherent electron probe.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Weyland, M; Ercius, P; Ciston, J; Zheng, C; Fuhrer, M S; D'Alfonso, A J; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2016-10-01

    Four-dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy (4D-STEM) is a technique where a full two-dimensional convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) pattern is acquired at every STEM pixel scanned. Capturing the full diffraction pattern provides a rich dataset that potentially contains more information about the specimen than is contained in conventional imaging modes using conventional integrating detectors. Using 4D datasets in STEM from two specimens, monolayer MoS2 and bulk SrTiO3, we demonstrate multiple STEM imaging modes on a quantitative absolute intensity scale, including phase reconstruction of the transmission function via differential phase contrast imaging. Practical issues about sampling (i.e. number of detector pixels), signal-to-noise enhancement and data reduction of large 4D-STEM datasets are emphasized. PMID:27517162

  6. Electron backscattering diffraction analysis of an ancient wootz steel blade from central India

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, M.R. Sullivan, A.; Balasubramaniam, R.

    2009-04-15

    The electron backscattering diffraction technique was used to analyse the nature of carbides present in an ancient wootz steel blade. Bulky carbides, pro-eutectoid carbide along the prior austenite grain boundaries and fine spheroidized carbides were detected. Electron backscattering diffraction was employed to understand the texture of these carbides. The orientations of the cementite frequently occur in clusters, which points to a common origin of the members of the cluster. For the bands of coarse cementite, the origin is probably large coarse particles formed during the original cooling of the wootz cake. Pearlite formed earlier in the forging process has led to groups of similarly oriented fine cementite particles. The crystallographic texture of the cementite is sharp whereas that of the ferrite is weak. The sharp cementite textures point to the longevity of the coarse cementite throughout the repeated forging steps and to the influence of existing textured cementite on the nucleation of new cementite during cooling.

  7. X-ray fluorescence (conventional and 3D) and scanning electron microscopy for the investigation of Portuguese polychrome glazed ceramics: Advances in the knowledge of the manufacturing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilherme, A.; Coroado, J.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Lühl, L.; Wolff, T.; Kanngießer, B.; Carvalho, M. L.

    2011-05-01

    This work shows the first analytical results obtained by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) (conventional and 3D) and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive System (SEM-EDS) on original Portuguese ceramic pieces produced between the 16th and 18th centuries in Coimbra and Lisbon. Experts distinguished these productions based only on the color, texture and brightness, which originates mislabeling in some cases. Thanks to lateral and spatial resolution in the micrometer regime, the results obtained with μ-XRF were essential in determining the glaze and pigment thicknesses by monitoring the profile of the most abundant element in each "layer". Furthermore, the dissemination of these elements throughout the glaze is different depending on the glaze composition, firing temperature and on the pigment itself. Hence, the crucial point of this investigation was to analyze and understand the interfaces color/glaze and glaze/ceramic support. Together with the XRF results, images captured by SEM and the corresponding semi-quantitative EDS data revealed different manufacturing processes used by the two production centers. Different capture modes were suitable to distinguish different crystals from the minerals that confer the color of the pigments used and to enhance the fact that some of them are very well spread through the glassy matrix, sustaining the theory of an evolved and careful procedure in the manufacturing process of the glaze.

  8. Integration of 3D scale-based pseudo-enhancement correction and partial volume image segmentation for improving electronic colon cleansing in CT colonograpy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Lihong; Zhu, Hongbin; Han, Hao; Song, Bowen; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-01-01

    Orally administered tagging agents are usually used in CT colonography (CTC) to differentiate residual bowel content from native colonic structures. However, the high-density contrast agents tend to introduce pseudo-enhancement (PE) effect on neighboring soft tissues and elevate their observed CT attenuation value toward that of the tagged materials (TMs), which may result in an excessive electronic colon cleansing (ECC) since the pseudo-enhanced soft tissues are incorrectly identified as TMs. To address this issue, we integrated a 3D scale-based PE correction into our previous ECC pipeline based on the maximum a posteriori expectation-maximization partial volume (PV) segmentation. The newly proposed ECC scheme takes into account both the PE and PV effects that commonly appear in CTC images. We evaluated the new scheme on 40 patient CTC scans, both qualitatively through display of segmentation results, and quantitatively through radiologists' blind scoring (human observer) and computer-aided detection (CAD) of colon polyps (computer observer). Performance of the presented algorithm has shown consistent improvements over our previous ECC pipeline, especially for the detection of small polyps submerged in the contrast agents. The CAD results of polyp detection showed that 4 more submerged polyps were detected for our new ECC scheme over the previous one.

  9. Accurate electronic and chemical properties of 3d transition metal oxides using a calculated linear response U and a DFT + U(V) method

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhongnan; Kitchin, John R.; Joshi, Yogesh V.; Raman, Sumathy

    2015-04-14

    We validate the usage of the calculated, linear response Hubbard U for evaluating accurate electronic and chemical properties of bulk 3d transition metal oxides. We find calculated values of U lead to improved band gaps. For the evaluation of accurate reaction energies, we first identify and eliminate contributions to the reaction energies of bulk systems due only to changes in U and construct a thermodynamic cycle that references the total energies of unique U systems to a common point using a DFT + U(V ) method, which we recast from a recently introduced DFT + U(R) method for molecular systems. We then introduce a semi-empirical method based on weighted DFT/DFT + U cohesive energies to calculate bulk oxidation energies of transition metal oxides using density functional theory and linear response calculated U values. We validate this method by calculating 14 reactions energies involving V, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co oxides. We find up to an 85% reduction of the mean average error (MAE) compared to energies calculated with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional. When our method is compared with DFT + U with empirically derived U values and the HSE06 hybrid functional, we find up to 65% and 39% reductions in the MAE, respectively.

  10. Characterization of a sub-assembly of 3D position sensitive cadmium zinc telluride detectors and electronics from a sub-millimeter resolution PET system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Gu, Yi; Reynolds, Paul D.; Levin, Craig S.

    2016-09-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) offers key advantages for small animal positron emission tomography (PET), including high spatial and energy resolution and simple metal deposition for fabrication of very small pixel arrays. Previous studies have investigated the intrinsic spatial, energy, and timing resolution of an individual sub-millimeter resolution CZT detector. In this work we present the first characterization results of a system of these detectors. The 3D position sensitive dual-CZT detector module and readout electronics developed in our lab was scaled up to complete a significant portion of the final PET system. This sub-system was configured as two opposing detection panels containing a total of twelve 40~\\text{mm}× 40~\\text{mm}× 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals for proof of concept. System-level characterization studies, including optimizing the trigger threshold of each channel’s comparators, were performed. 68Ge and 137Cs radioactive isotopes were used to characterize the energy resolution of all 468 anode channels in the sub-system. The mean measured global 511 keV photopeak energy resolution over all anodes was found to be 7.35+/- 1.75 % FWHM after correction for photon interaction depth-dependent signal variation. The measured global time resolution was 37 ns FWHM, a parameter to be further optimized, and the intrinsic spatial resolution was 0.76 mm FWHM.

  11. Numerical Solution of 3D Poisson-Nernst-Planck Equations Coupled with Classical Density Functional Theory for Modeling Ion and Electron Transport in a Confined Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Da; Zheng, Bin; Lin, Guang; Sushko, Maria L.

    2014-08-29

    We have developed efficient numerical algorithms for the solution of 3D steady-state Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations (PNP) with excess chemical potentials described by the classical density functional theory (cDFT). The coupled PNP equations are discretized by finite difference scheme and solved iteratively by Gummel method with relaxation. The Nernst-Planck equations are transformed into Laplace equations through the Slotboom transformation. Algebraic multigrid method is then applied to efficiently solve the Poisson equation and the transformed Nernst-Planck equations. A novel strategy for calculating excess chemical potentials through fast Fourier transforms is proposed which reduces computational complexity from O(N2) to O(NlogN) where N is the number of grid points. Integrals involving Dirac delta function are evaluated directly by coordinate transformation which yields more accurate result compared to applying numerical quadrature to an approximated delta function. Numerical results for ion and electron transport in solid electrolyte for Li ion batteries are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental data and the results from previous studies.

  12. High-Index Facets in Gold Nanocrystals Elucidated by Coherent Electron Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amish B.; Sivapalan, Sean T.; DeVetter, Brent M.; Yang, Timothy K.; Wen, Jianguo; Bhargava, Rohit; Murphy, Catherine J.; Zuo, Jian-Min

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of high index facets in noble metal nanocrystals for plasmonics and catalysis has been a challenge due to their small sizes and complex shapes. Here, we present an approach to determine the high index facets of nanocrystals using streaked Bragg reflections in coherent electron diffraction patterns, and provide a comparison of high index facets on unusual nanostructures such as trisoctahedra. We report new high index facets in trisoctahedra and previous unappreciated diversity in facet sharpness. PMID:23484620

  13. Calculation of diffraction patterns associated with electron irradiation induced amorphization of CuTi

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, R.; Meshii, M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P. ); Sabochik, M.J. . Dept. of Engineering Physics)

    1990-11-01

    A new approach that uses the multislice method in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations to study electron irradiation induced amorphisation is presented. Diffraction patterns were calculated for CuTi and found to be more sensitive than the pair correlation function to the structural changes preceding amorphisation. The results from this approach and from a study of long range order are presented. 16 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Accurate determination of atomic structure of multiwalled carbon nanotubes by nondestructive nanobeam electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zejian; Zhang Qi; Qin Luchang

    2005-05-09

    We report a method that allows direct, systematic, and accurate determination of the atomic structure of multiwalled carbon nanotubes by analyzing the scattering intensities on the nonequatorial layer lines in the electron diffraction pattern. Complete structure determination of a quadruple-walled carbon nanotube is described as an example, and it was found that the intertubular distance varied from 0.36 nm to 0.5 nm with a mean value of 0.42 nm.

  15. Strain mapping at the nanoscale using precession electron diffraction in transmission electron microscope with off axis camera

    SciTech Connect

    Vigouroux, M. P.; Delaye, V.; Bernier, N.; Lafond, D.; Audoit, G.; Bertin, F.; Cipro, R.; Baron, T.; Martin, M.; Rouvière, J. L.; Chenevier, B.

    2014-11-10

    Precession electron diffraction is an efficient technique to measure strain in nanostructures by precessing the electron beam, while maintaining a few nanometre probe size. Here, we show that an advanced diffraction pattern treatment allows reproducible and precise strain measurements to be obtained using a default 512 × 512 DigiSTAR off-axis camera both in advanced or non-corrected transmission electron microscopes. This treatment consists in both projective geometry correction of diffraction pattern distortions and strain Delaunay triangulation based analysis. Precision in the strain measurement is improved and reached 2.7 × 10{sup −4} with a probe size approaching 4.2 nm in diameter. This method is applied to the study of the strain state in InGaAs quantum-well (QW) devices elaborated on Si substrate. Results show that the GaAs/Si mismatch does not induce in-plane strain fluctuations in the InGaAs QW region.

  16. X-ray laser-induced electron dynamics observed by femtosecond diffraction from nanocrystals of Buckminsterfullerene.

    PubMed

    Abbey, Brian; Dilanian, Ruben A; Darmanin, Connie; Ryan, Rebecca A; Putkunz, Corey T; Martin, Andrew V; Wood, David; Streltsov, Victor; Jones, Michael W M; Gaffney, Naylyn; Hofmann, Felix; Williams, Garth J; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M Marvin; Williams, Sophie; Curwood, Evan; Balaur, Eugeniu; Peele, Andrew G; Nugent, Keith A; Quiney, Harry M

    2016-09-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) deliver x-ray pulses with a coherent flux that is approximately eight orders of magnitude greater than that available from a modern third-generation synchrotron source. The power density of an XFEL pulse may be so high that it can modify the electronic properties of a sample on a femtosecond time scale. Exploration of the interaction of intense coherent x-ray pulses and matter is both of intrinsic scientific interest and of critical importance to the interpretation of experiments that probe the structures of materials using high-brightness femtosecond XFEL pulses. We report observations of the diffraction of extremely intense 32-fs nanofocused x-ray pulses by a powder sample of crystalline C60. We find that the diffraction pattern at the highest available incident power significantly differs from the one obtained using either third-generation synchrotron sources or XFEL sources operating at low output power and does not correspond to the diffraction pattern expected from any known phase of crystalline C60. We interpret these data as evidence of a long-range, coherent dynamic electronic distortion that is driven by the interaction of the periodic array of C60 molecular targets with intense x-ray pulses of femtosecond duration.

  17. X-ray laser-induced electron dynamics observed by femtosecond diffraction from nanocrystals of Buckminsterfullerene.

    PubMed

    Abbey, Brian; Dilanian, Ruben A; Darmanin, Connie; Ryan, Rebecca A; Putkunz, Corey T; Martin, Andrew V; Wood, David; Streltsov, Victor; Jones, Michael W M; Gaffney, Naylyn; Hofmann, Felix; Williams, Garth J; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M Marvin; Williams, Sophie; Curwood, Evan; Balaur, Eugeniu; Peele, Andrew G; Nugent, Keith A; Quiney, Harry M

    2016-09-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) deliver x-ray pulses with a coherent flux that is approximately eight orders of magnitude greater than that available from a modern third-generation synchrotron source. The power density of an XFEL pulse may be so high that it can modify the electronic properties of a sample on a femtosecond time scale. Exploration of the interaction of intense coherent x-ray pulses and matter is both of intrinsic scientific interest and of critical importance to the interpretation of experiments that probe the structures of materials using high-brightness femtosecond XFEL pulses. We report observations of the diffraction of extremely intense 32-fs nanofocused x-ray pulses by a powder sample of crystalline C60. We find that the diffraction pattern at the highest available incident power significantly differs from the one obtained using either third-generation synchrotron sources or XFEL sources operating at low output power and does not correspond to the diffraction pattern expected from any known phase of crystalline C60. We interpret these data as evidence of a long-range, coherent dynamic electronic distortion that is driven by the interaction of the periodic array of C60 molecular targets with intense x-ray pulses of femtosecond duration. PMID:27626076

  18. X-ray laser–induced electron dynamics observed by femtosecond diffraction from nanocrystals of Buckminsterfullerene

    PubMed Central

    Abbey, Brian; Dilanian, Ruben A.; Darmanin, Connie; Ryan, Rebecca A.; Putkunz, Corey T.; Martin, Andrew V.; Wood, David; Streltsov, Victor; Jones, Michael W. M.; Gaffney, Naylyn; Hofmann, Felix; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Williams, Sophie; Curwood, Evan; Balaur, Eugeniu; Peele, Andrew G.; Nugent, Keith A.; Quiney, Harry M.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) deliver x-ray pulses with a coherent flux that is approximately eight orders of magnitude greater than that available from a modern third-generation synchrotron source. The power density of an XFEL pulse may be so high that it can modify the electronic properties of a sample on a femtosecond time scale. Exploration of the interaction of intense coherent x-ray pulses and matter is both of intrinsic scientific interest and of critical importance to the interpretation of experiments that probe the structures of materials using high-brightness femtosecond XFEL pulses. We report observations of the diffraction of extremely intense 32-fs nanofocused x-ray pulses by a powder sample of crystalline C60. We find that the diffraction pattern at the highest available incident power significantly differs from the one obtained using either third-generation synchrotron sources or XFEL sources operating at low output power and does not correspond to the diffraction pattern expected from any known phase of crystalline C60. We interpret these data as evidence of a long-range, coherent dynamic electronic distortion that is driven by the interaction of the periodic array of C60 molecular targets with intense x-ray pulses of femtosecond duration. PMID:27626076

  19. Sub-phonon-period compression of electron pulses for atomic diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Gliserin, A.; Walbran, M.; Krausz, F.; Baum, P.

    2015-01-01

    Visualizing the rearrangement of atoms in a wide range of molecular and condensed-matter systems requires resolving picometre displacements on a 10-fs timescale, which is achievable using pump–probe diffraction, given short enough pulses. Here we demonstrate the compression of single-electron pulses with a de Broglie wavelength of 0.08 ångström to a full-width at half-maximum duration of 28 fs or equivalently 12-fs root-mean square, substantially shorter than most phonon periods and molecular normal modes. Atomic resolution diffraction from a complex organic molecule is obtained with good signal-to-noise ratio within a data acquisition period of minutes. The electron-laser timing is found to be stable within 5 fs (s.d.) over several hours, allowing pump–probe diffraction at repetitive excitation. These measurements show the feasibility of laser-pump/electron-probe scans that can resolve the fastest atomic motions relevant in reversible condensed-matter transformations and organic chemistry. PMID:26502750

  20. A structural study of cyanotrichite from Dachang by conventional and automated electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventruti, Gennaro; Mugnaioli, Enrico; Capitani, Giancarlo; Scordari, Fernando; Pinto, Daniela; Lausi, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    The crystal structure of cyanotrichite, having general formula Cu4Al2(SO4)(OH)12·2H2O, from the Dachang deposit (China) was studied by means of conventional transmission electron microscopy, automated electron diffraction tomography (ADT) and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). ADT revealed the presence of two different cyanotrichite-like phases. The same phases were also recognized in the XRPD pattern, allowing the perfect indexing of all peaks leading, after refinement to the following cell parameters: (1) a = 12.417(2) Å, b = 2.907(1) Å, c = 10.157(1) Å and β = 98.12(1); (2) a = 12.660(2) Å, b = 2.897(1) Å, c = 10.162(1) Å and β = 92.42(1)°. Only for the former phase, labeled cyanotrichite-98, a partial structure, corresponding to the [Cu4Al2(OH){12/2+}] cluster, was obtained ab initio by direct methods in space group C2/ m on the basis of electron diffraction data. Geometric and charge-balance considerations allowed to reach the whole structure model for the cyanotrichite-98 phase. The sulfate group and water molecule result to be statistically disordered over two possible positions, but keeping the average structure consistent with the C-centering symmetry, in agreement with ADT results.

  1. X-ray laser–induced electron dynamics observed by femtosecond diffraction from nanocrystals of Buckminsterfullerene

    PubMed Central

    Abbey, Brian; Dilanian, Ruben A.; Darmanin, Connie; Ryan, Rebecca A.; Putkunz, Corey T.; Martin, Andrew V.; Wood, David; Streltsov, Victor; Jones, Michael W. M.; Gaffney, Naylyn; Hofmann, Felix; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Williams, Sophie; Curwood, Evan; Balaur, Eugeniu; Peele, Andrew G.; Nugent, Keith A.; Quiney, Harry M.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) deliver x-ray pulses with a coherent flux that is approximately eight orders of magnitude greater than that available from a modern third-generation synchrotron source. The power density of an XFEL pulse may be so high that it can modify the electronic properties of a sample on a femtosecond time scale. Exploration of the interaction of intense coherent x-ray pulses and matter is both of intrinsic scientific interest and of critical importance to the interpretation of experiments that probe the structures of materials using high-brightness femtosecond XFEL pulses. We report observations of the diffraction of extremely intense 32-fs nanofocused x-ray pulses by a powder sample of crystalline C60. We find that the diffraction pattern at the highest available incident power significantly differs from the one obtained using either third-generation synchrotron sources or XFEL sources operating at low output power and does not correspond to the diffraction pattern expected from any known phase of crystalline C60. We interpret these data as evidence of a long-range, coherent dynamic electronic distortion that is driven by the interaction of the periodic array of C60 molecular targets with intense x-ray pulses of femtosecond duration.

  2. 3D Micro-topography of Transferred Laboratory and Natural Ice Crystal Surfaces Imaged by Cryo and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, N. B.; Boaggio, K.; Bancroft, L.; Bandamede, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent work has highlighted micro-scale roughness on the surfaces of ice crystals grown and imaged in-situ within the chambers of environmental scanning electron microscopes (ESEM). These observations appear to align with theoretical and satellite observations that suggest a prevalence of rough ice in cirrus clouds. However, the atmospheric application of the lab observations are indeterminate because the observations have been based only on crystals grown on substrates and in pure-water vapor environments. In this work, we present details and results from the development of a transfer technique which allows natural and lab-grown ice and snow crystals to be captured, preserved, and transferred into the ESEM for 3D imaging. Ice crystals were gathered from 1) natural snow, 2) a balloon-borne cirrus particle capture device, and 3) lab-grown ice crystals from a diffusion chamber. Ice crystals were captured in a pre-conditioned small-volume (~1 cm3) cryo-containment cell. The cell was then sealed closed and transferred to a specially-designed cryogenic dewer (filled with liquid nitrogen or crushed dry ice) for transport to a new Hitachi Field Emission, Variable Pressure SEM (SU-5000). The cryo-cell was then removed from the dewer and quickly placed onto the pre-conditioned cryo transfer stage attached to the ESEM (Quorum 3010T). Quantitative 3D topographical digital elevation models of ice surfaces are reported from SEM for the first time, including a variety of objective measures of statistical surface roughness. The surfaces of the transported crystals clearly exhibit signatures of mesoscopic roughening that are similar to examples of roughness seen in ESEM-grown crystals. For most transported crystals, the habits and crystal edges are more intricate that those observed for ice grown directly on substrates within the ESEM chamber. Portions of some crystals do appear smooth even at magnification greater than 1000x, a rare observation in our ESEM-grown crystals. The

  3. Use of electron diffraction for determination of strain distribution in synthetic diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balovsyak, S.; Borcha, M.; Garabazhiv, Ya.; Fodchuk, I.; Tkach, V.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate possibilities of electron backscattering diffraction technique (Kikuchi method) for determination of strain distribution in local areas of synthetic diamond samples. To increase the precision of lattice parameter determination a correlation method and corresponding software were used for accurate identification of coordinates of Kikuchi lines intersections on the Kikuchi patterns. Consequently, subjective factors influencing on accuracy at determination of displacements of image details were minimized. Samples have been investigated by scanning electron microscope "Zeiss" EVO-50 using CCD detector. The complex analysis of location changes of Kikuchi lines intersections and Kikuchi line intensity profiles permits to specify peculiarities of strain distribution for diamonds grown by various methods.

  4. Use of electron diffraction for determination of strain distribution in synthetic diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balovsyak, S.; Borcha, M.; Garabazhiv, Ya.; Fodchuk, I.; Tkach, V.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we demonstrate possibilities of electron backscattering diffraction technique (Kikuchi method) for determination of strain distribution in local areas of synthetic diamond samples. To increase the precision of lattice parameter determination a correlation method and corresponding software were used for accurate identification of coordinates of Kikuchi lines intersections on the Kikuchi patterns. Consequently, subjective factors influencing on accuracy at determination of displacements of image details were minimized. Samples have been investigated by scanning electron microscope "Zeiss" EVO-50 using CCD detector. The complex analysis of location changes of Kikuchi lines intersections and Kikuchi line intensity profiles permits to specify peculiarities of strain distribution for diamonds grown by various methods.

  5. Diffractive optical elements on non-flat substrates using electron beam lithography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maker, Paul D. (Inventor); Muller, Richard E. (Inventor); Wilson, Daniel W. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present disclosure describes a technique for creating diffraction gratings on curved surfaces with electron beam lithography. The curved surface can act as an optical element to produce flat and aberration-free images in imaging spectrometers. In addition, the fabrication technique can modify the power structure of the grating orders so that there is more energy in the first order than for a typical grating. The inventors noticed that by using electron-beam lithography techniques, a variety of convex gratings that are well-suited to the requirements of imaging spectrometers can be manufactured.

  6. High-Resolution Infrared and Electron-Diffraction Studies of Trimethylenecyclopropane ([3]-Radialene)

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Corey; Holmes, Joshua; Nibler, Joseph W.; Hedberg, Kenneth; White, James D.; Hedberg, Lise; Weber, Alfons; Blake, Thomas A.

    2013-05-16

    Combined high-resolution spectroscopic, electron-diffraction, and quantum theoretical methods are particularly advantageous for small molecules of high symmetry and can yield accurate structures that reveal subtle effects of electron delocalization on molecular bonds. The smallest of the radialene compounds, trimethylenecyclopropane, [3]-radialene, has been synthesized and examined in the gas phase by these methods. The first high-resolution infrared spectra have been obtained for this molecule of D3h symmetry, leading to an accurate B0 rotational constant value of 0.1378629(8) cm-1, within 0.5% of the value obtained from electronic structure calculations (density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP/cc-pVTZ). This result is employed in an analysis of electron-diffraction data to obtain the rz bond lengths (in Å): C-H = 1.072 (17), C-C = 1.437 (4), and C=C = 1.330 (4). The analysis does not lead to an accurate value of the HCH angle; however, from comparisons of theoretical and experimental angles for similar compounds, the theoretical prediction of 117.5° is believed to be reliable to within 2°. The effect of electron delocalization in radialene is to reduce the single C-C bond length by 0.07 Å compared to that in cyclopropane.

  7. Do-It-Yourself: 3D Models of Hydrogenic Orbitals through 3D Printing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Kaitlyn M.; de Cataldo, Riccardo; Fogarty, Keir H.

    2016-01-01

    Introductory chemistry students often have difficulty visualizing the 3-dimensional shapes of the hydrogenic electron orbitals without the aid of physical 3D models. Unfortunately, commercially available models can be quite expensive. 3D printing offers a solution for producing models of hydrogenic orbitals. 3D printing technology is widely…

  8. FPGA architectures for electronically scanned wide-band RF beams using 3-D FIR/IIR digital filters for rectangular array aperture receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijayaratna, Sewwandi; Madanayake, Arjuna; Beall, Brandon D.; Bruton, Len T.

    2014-05-01

    Real-time digital implementation of three-dimensional (3-D) infinite impulse response (IIR) beam filters are discussed. The 3-D IIR filter building blocks have filter coefficients, which are defined using algebraic closed-form expressions that are functions of desired beam personalities, such as the look-direction of the aperture, the bandwidth and sampling frequency of interest, inter antenna spacing, and 3dB beam size. Real-time steering of such 3-D beam filters are obtained by proposed calculation of filter coefficients. Application specific computing units for rapidly calculating the 3-D IIR filter coefficients at nanosecond speed potentially allows fast real-time tracking of low radar cross section (RCS) objects at close range. Proposed design consists of 3-D IIR beam filter with 4 4 antenna grid and the filter coefficient generation block in separate FPGAs. The hardware is designed and co-simulated using a Xilinx Virtex-6 XC6VLX240T FPGA. The 3-D filter operates over 90 MHz and filter coefficient computing structure can operate at up to 145 MHz.

  9. Conventional transmission electron microscopy imaging beyond the diffraction and information limits.

    PubMed

    Rosenauer, Andreas; Krause, Florian F; Müller, Knut; Schowalter, Marco; Mehrtens, Thorsten

    2014-08-29

    There are mainly two complementary imaging modes in transmission electron microscopy (TEM): Conventional TEM (CTEM) and scanning TEM (STEM). In the CTEM mode the specimen is illuminated with a plane electron wave, and the direct image formed by the objective lens is recorded in the image plane. STEM is based on scanning the specimen surface with a focused electron beam and collecting scattered electrons with an extended disk or ring-shaped detector. Here we show that combination of CTEM imaging with STEM illumination generally allows extending the point resolution of CTEM imaging beyond the diffraction limit. This new imaging mode improves imaging characteristics, is more robust against chromatic aberration, exhibits direct structural imaging with superior precision, visualizes light elements with excellent contrast, and even allows us to overcome the conventional information limit of a microscope. PMID:25215995

  10. Conventional Transmission Electron Microscopy Imaging beyond the Diffraction and Information Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenauer, Andreas; Krause, Florian F.; Müller, Knut; Schowalter, Marco; Mehrtens, Thorsten

    2014-08-01

    There are mainly two complementary imaging modes in transmission electron microscopy (TEM): Conventional TEM (CTEM) and scanning TEM (STEM). In the CTEM mode the specimen is illuminated with a plane electron wave, and the direct image formed by the objective lens is recorded in the image plane. STEM is based on scanning the specimen surface with a focused electron beam and collecting scattered electrons with an extended disk or ring-shaped detector. Here we show that combination of CTEM imaging with STEM illumination generally allows extending the point resolution of CTEM imaging beyond the diffraction limit. This new imaging mode improves imaging characteristics, is more robust against chromatic aberration, exhibits direct structural imaging with superior precision, visualizes light elements with excellent contrast, and even allows us to overcome the conventional information limit of a microscope.

  11. DNA Damage Induced by Low-Energy Electrons: Electron Transfer and Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Wagner, J. Richard; Sanche, Léon

    2006-05-01

    Thin films of the short single strand of DNA, GCAT, in which guanine (G) or adenine (A) have been removed, were bombarded under vacuum by 4 to 15 eV electrons. The fragments corresponding to base release and strand breaks (SB) were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography and their yields compared with those obtained from unmodified GCAT. From such a comparison, it is shown that, using GCAT as a model system, (1) most SB result from electron capture by DNA bases followed by electron transfer to the phosphate group and (2) the initial capture probability depends on the coherence of the electron wave within the tetramer.

  12. The first 3D malonate bridged copper [Cu(O{sub 2}C-CH{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}H){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O]: Structure, properties and electronic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Seguatni, A.; Fakhfakh, M.; Smiri, L.S.; Gressier, P.; Boucher, F.; Jouini, N.

    2012-03-15

    A new inorganic-organic compound [Cu(O{sub 2}C-CH{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}H){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O] ([Cumal]) was hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by IR spectroscopy, thermal analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction. [Cumal] is the first three-dimensional compound existing in the system Cu(II)-malonic acid-H{sub 2}O. Its framework is built up through carboxyl bridged copper where CuO{sub 6} octahedra are elongated with an almost D{sub 4h} symmetry (4+2) due to the Jahn-Teller effect. The magnetic properties were studied by measuring its magnetic susceptibility in the temperature range of 2-300 K indicating the existence of weak ferromagnetic interactions. The electronic structure of [Cumal] was calculated within the density functional theory (DFT) framework. Structural features are well reproduced using DFT structural optimizations and the optical spectra, calculated within the dielectric formalism, explain very well the light blue colour of the compound. It is shown that a GGA+U approach with a U{sub eff} value of about 6 eV is necessary for a better correlation with the experiment. - Graphical abstract: [Cu(O{sub 2}C-CH{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}H){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O]: the first 3D hybrid organic-inorganic compound built up carboxyl groups. The network presents a diamond-like structure achieved via carboxyl. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new organic-inorganic material with an unprecedented topology is synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystallographic structure is determined using single crystal X-ray diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electronic structure is obtained from DFT, GGA+U calculation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Framework can be described as formed from CuC{sub 4} tetrahedron sharing four corners. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This structure can be classified as an extended diamond structure.

  13. Teaching Diffraction of Light and Electrons: Classroom Analogies to Classic Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velentzas, Athanasios

    2014-11-01

    Diffraction and interference are phenomena that demonstrate the wave nature of light and of particles. Experiments relating to the diffraction/interference of light can easily be carried out in an educational lab, but it may be impossible to perform experiments involving electrons because of the lack of specialized equipment needed for such experiments. It would, however, be possible for students to analyze data from scientific experiments by analogy to experiments they themselves had performed. Based on this rationale, this paper describes two pairs of experiments that may be of interest to teachers aiming to teach the wave nature of light and of particles to upper secondary school (or to college) students. Specifically, students are asked to (i) carry out a double-slit experiment by using monochromatic light, thus repeating in a way the historical experiment of Young,1 and then analyze real data from Jönsson's2-3 scientific double-slit experiment with electrons, and (ii) perform an experiment involving diffraction of monochromatic light using a compact disc (CD) as a reflection grating, and then by analogy analyze data from the experiment of Davisson and Germer.4 The proposed real experiments are not original, and different versions of them have been wi dely described in the literature.5,6 The educational value of the present work lies in the use of the analogy between experiments carried out in the school lab and experiments performed in the scientific lab.

  14. Morphological analyses of minute crystals by using stereo-photogrammetric scanning electron microscopy and electron back-scattered diffraction.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Jun; Inoguchi, Ryoichi; Prior, David J; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2007-12-01

    We present a new method for the morphological analyses of minute faceted crystals by combining stereo-photogrammetric analysis of scanning electron microscope images and electron back-scattered diffraction. Two scanning electron microscope images of the same crystal, recorded at different tilt angles of the specimen stage, are used to determine the orientations of crystal edges in a specimen-fixed coordinate system. The edge orientations are converted to the indices [uvw] in the crystal system using the crystal orientation determined by electron back-scattered diffraction analysis. The Miller indices of crystal facets are derived from the indices of the edges surrounding the facets. The method is applicable to very small crystal facets. The angular error, as derived from tests using a calcite crystal of known morphology, is a few degrees. To demonstrate the applicability of the method, the morphology of boehmite (gamma-AlOOH) precipitated from solution during the dissolution of anorthite was analyzed. The micrometre-sized boehmite crystals are surrounded by two {010} basal facets and eight equivalent side facets that can be indexed equally well as {323}, {434} or {545}. We suggest that these side facets are in fact {111}, the morphology having been modified slightly (by a few degrees) by a small extension associated with opening along (010) microcleavage planes. Tiny {140} facets are also commonly observed.

  15. Extracting conformational structure information of benzene molecules via laser-induced electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yuta; Wang, Chuncheng; Le, Anh-Thu; Okunishi, Misaki; Ding, Dajun; Lin, C D; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2016-05-01

    We have measured the angular distributions of high energy photoelectrons of benzene molecules generated by intense infrared femtosecond laser pulses. These electrons arise from the elastic collisions between the benzene ions with the previously tunnel-ionized electrons that have been driven back by the laser field. Theory shows that laser-free elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) can be extracted from these photoelectrons, and the DCS can be used to retrieve the bond lengths of gas-phase molecules similar to the conventional electron diffraction method. From our experimental results, we have obtained the C-C and C-H bond lengths of benzene with a spatial resolution of about 10 pm. Our results demonstrate that laser induced electron diffraction (LIED) experiments can be carried out with the present-day ultrafast intense lasers already. Looking ahead, with aligned or oriented molecules, more complete spatial information of the molecule can be obtained from LIED, and applying LIED to probe photo-excited molecules, a "molecular movie" of the dynamic system may be created with sub-Ångström spatial and few-ten femtosecond temporal resolutions. PMID:27462650

  16. Extracting conformational structure information of benzene molecules via laser-induced electron diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yuta; Wang, Chuncheng; Le, Anh-Thu; Okunishi, Misaki; Ding, Dajun; Lin, C. D.; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    We have measured the angular distributions of high energy photoelectrons of benzene molecules generated by intense infrared femtosecond laser pulses. These electrons arise from the elastic collisions between the benzene ions with the previously tunnel-ionized electrons that have been driven back by the laser field. Theory shows that laser-free elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) can be extracted from these photoelectrons, and the DCS can be used to retrieve the bond lengths of gas-phase molecules similar to the conventional electron diffraction method. From our experimental results, we have obtained the C-C and C-H bond lengths of benzene with a spatial resolution of about 10 pm. Our results demonstrate that laser induced electron diffraction (LIED) experiments can be carried out with the present-day ultrafast intense lasers already. Looking ahead, with aligned or oriented molecules, more complete spatial information of the molecule can be obtained from LIED, and applying LIED to probe photo-excited molecules, a “molecular movie” of the dynamic system may be created with sub-Ångström spatial and few-ten femtosecond temporal resolutions. PMID:27462650

  17. Extracting conformational structure information of benzene molecules via laser-induced electron diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Ito, Yuta; Wang, Chuncheng; Le, Anh-Thu; Okunishi, Misaki; Ding, Dajun; Lin, C. D.; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Here, we have measured the angular distributions of high energy photoelectrons of benzene molecules generated by intense infrared femtosecond laser pulses. These electrons arise from the elastic collisions between the benzene ions with the previously tunnel-ionized electrons that have been driven back by the laser field. Theory shows that laser-free elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) can be extracted from these photoelectrons, and the DCS can be used to retrieve the bond lengths of gas-phase molecules similar to the conventional electron diffraction method. From our experimental results, we have obtained the C-C and C-H bond lengths of benzene with a spatialmore » resolution of about 10 pm. Our results demonstrate that laser induced electron diffraction (LIED) experiments can be carried out with the present-day ultrafast intense lasers already. Looking ahead, with aligned or oriented molecules, more complete spatial information of the molecule can be obtained from LIED, and applying LIED to probe photo-excited molecules, a “molecular movie” of the dynamic system may be created with sub-A°ngstrom spatial and few-ten femtosecond temporal resolutions.« less

  18. Structural, mechanical and electronic properties of 3d transition metal nitrides in cubic zincblende, rocksalt and cesium chloride structures: a first-principles investigation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z T Y; Zhou, X; Khare, S V; Gall, D

    2014-01-15

    We report systematic results from ab initio calculations with density functional theory on three cubic structures, zincblende (zb), rocksalt (rs) and cesium chloride (cc), of the ten 3d transition metal nitrides. We computed lattice constants, elastic constants, their derived moduli and ratios that characterize mechanical properties. Experimental measurements exist in the literature of lattice constants for rs-ScN, rs-TiN and rs-VN and of elastic constants for rs-TiN and rs-VN, all of which are in good agreement with our computational results. Similarly, computed Vickers hardness (HV) values for rs-TiN and rs-VN are consistent with earlier experimental results. Several trends were observed in our rich data set of 30 compounds. All nitrides, except for zb-CrN, rs-MnN, rs-FeN, cc-ScN, cc-CrN, cc-NiN and cc-ZnN, were found to be mechanically stable. A clear correlation in the atomic density with the bulk modulus (B) was observed with maximum values of B around FeN, MnN and CrN. The shear modulus, Young's modulus, HV and indicators of brittleness showed similar trends and all showed maxima for cc-VN. The calculated value of HV for cc-VN was about 30 GPa, while the next highest values were for rs-ScN and rs-TiN, about 24 GPa. A relation (H(V) is proportional to θ(D)(2)) between HV and Debye temperature (θD) was investigated and verified for each structure type. A tendency for anti-correlation of the elastic constant C44, which strongly influences stability and hardness, with the number of electronic states around the Fermi energy was observed.

  19. High resolution electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data from calcite biominerals in recent gastropod shells.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Dauphin, Yannicke; Cuif, Jean Pierre; Cusack, Maggie

    2011-04-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is a microscopy technique that reveals in situ crystallographic information. Currently, it is widely used for the characterization of geological materials and in studies of biomineralization. Here, we analyze high resolution EBSD data from biogenic calcite in two mollusk taxa, Concholepas and Haliotis, previously used in the understanding of complex biomineralization and paleoenvironmental studies. Results indicate that Concholepas has less ordered prisms than in Haliotis, and that in Concholepas the level of order is not homogenous in different areas of the shell. Overall, the usefulness of data integration obtained from diffraction intensity and crystallographic orientation maps, and corresponding pole figures, is discussed as well as its application to similar studies.

  20. Application of schwinger perturbation theory in electron diffraction analysis. Part I. Linear XY 2 type molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, K. V.; Butayev, B. S.; Spiridonov, V. P.

    1989-06-01

    The analysis of molecules by electron diffraction in terms of the intramolecular potential function is presented. The method is based on the coordinate distribution function obtained using Schwinger operator perturbation theory wit the effective harmonic oscillator as an initial approximation. The primary advantage of the approach is that it circumvents problems involving resonance denominators. Analytical formulae for the coordinate distribution function are developed for linear XY 2 molecules with due account being taken for vibration-rotation coupling. A test of the performance of the theory devised is given by calculating various moments and comparing the results with those of the variational treatment of Hilderbrandt and Kohl. The scheme of diffraction analysis, which provides suitable facility for incorporating spectroscopic frequences, is proposed and checked by treatment of the intensity data for CO 2.

  1. Reconstruction of two-dimensional molecular structure with laser-induced electron diffraction from laser-aligned polyatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chao; Wei, Hui; Wang, Xu; Le, Anh -Thu; Lu, Ruifeng; Lin, C. D.

    2015-10-27

    Imaging the transient process of molecules has been a basic way to investigate photochemical reactions and dynamics. Based on laser-induced electron diffraction and partial one-dimensional molecular alignment, here we provide two effective methods for reconstructing two-dimensional structure of polyatomic molecules. We demonstrate that electron diffraction images in both scattering angles and broadband energy can be utilized to retrieve complementary structure information, including positions of light atoms. Lastly, with picometre spatial resolution and the inherent femtosecond temporal resolution of lasers, laser-induced electron diffraction method offers significant opportunities for probing atomic motion in a large molecule in a typical pump-probe measurement.

  2. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  3. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  4. A Medipix quantum area detector allows rotation electron diffraction data collection from submicrometre three-dimensional protein crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Nederlof, Igor; Genderen, Eric van; Li, Yao-Wang; Abrahams, Jan Pieter

    2013-07-01

    An ultrasensitive Medipix2 detector allowed the collection of rotation electron-diffraction data from single three-dimensional protein nanocrystals for the first time. The data could be analysed using the standard X-ray crystallography programs MOSFLM and SCALA. When protein crystals are submicrometre-sized, X-ray radiation damage precludes conventional diffraction data collection. For crystals that are of the order of 100 nm in size, at best only single-shot diffraction patterns can be collected and rotation data collection has not been possible, irrespective of the diffraction technique used. Here, it is shown that at a very low electron dose (at most 0.1 e{sup −} Å{sup −2}), a Medipix2 quantum area detector is sufficiently sensitive to allow the collection of a 30-frame rotation series of 200 keV electron-diffraction data from a single ∼100 nm thick protein crystal. A highly parallel 200 keV electron beam (λ = 0.025 Å) allowed observation of the curvature of the Ewald sphere at low resolution, indicating a combined mosaic spread/beam divergence of at most 0.4°. This result shows that volumes of crystal with low mosaicity can be pinpointed in electron diffraction. It is also shown that strategies and data-analysis software (MOSFLM and SCALA) from X-ray protein crystallography can be used in principle for analysing electron-diffraction data from three-dimensional nanocrystals of proteins.

  5. Strain mapping at nanometer resolution using advanced nano-beam electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdol, V. B.; Gammer, C.; Jin, X. G.; Ercius, P.; Ophus, C.; Ciston, J.; Minor, A. M.

    2015-06-01

    We report on the development of a nanometer scale strain mapping technique by means of scanning nano-beam electron diffraction. Only recently possible due to fast acquisition with a direct electron detector, this technique allows for strain mapping with a high precision of 0.1% at a lateral resolution of 1 nm for a large field of view reaching up to 1 μm. We demonstrate its application to a technologically relevant strain-engineered GaAs/GaAsP hetero-structure and show that the method can even be applied to highly defected regions with substantial changes in local crystal orientation. Strain maps derived from atomically resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy images were used to validate the accuracy, precision and resolution of this versatile technique.

  6. Strain mapping at nanometer resolution using advanced nano-beam electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ozdol, V. B.; Ercius, P.; Ophus, C.; Ciston, J.; Gammer, C. E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov; Jin, X. G.; Minor, A. M. E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov

    2015-06-22

    We report on the development of a nanometer scale strain mapping technique by means of scanning nano-beam electron diffraction. Only recently possible due to fast acquisition with a direct electron detector, this technique allows for strain mapping with a high precision of 0.1% at a lateral resolution of 1 nm for a large field of view reaching up to 1 μm. We demonstrate its application to a technologically relevant strain-engineered GaAs/GaAsP hetero-structure and show that the method can even be applied to highly defected regions with substantial changes in local crystal orientation. Strain maps derived from atomically resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy images were used to validate the accuracy, precision and resolution of this versatile technique.

  7. Improving spatial resolution of convergent beam electron diffraction strain mapping in silicon microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Armigliato, A.; Balboni, R.; Frabboni, S.

    2005-02-07

    Despite the use of nanometer-sized probes in field emission transmission electron microscopes, the spatial resolution in strain analysis performed by convergent beam electron diffraction is limited in one direction by the need for tilting the cross-sectional sample in the electron microscope off the vertical <110> direction. We demonstrate that it is possible to improve this resolution by using the <340> zone axis, instead of the <230> one, which has recently become of common use in the analysis of silicon microdevices. Quantitative strain information with good sensitivity and accuracy can be obtained in the new axis. An example of application to the two-dimensional strain mapping in shallow trench isolation structures, obtained with a scanning attachment and a high-angle annular dark-field detector, is reported.

  8. Carrier-envelope phase mapping in laser-induced electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiseler, Henning; Ishii, Nobuhisa; Kaneshima, Keisuke; Geier, Florian; Kanai, Teruto; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Morishita, Toru; Itatani, Jiro

    2016-09-01

    We present laser-induced electron diffraction measurements of elastic differential scattering cross sections (DCSs) of a photoelectron on the parent ion for argon, krypton, and xenon, using waveform-controlled few-cycle pulses. Considering only cutoff electrons and employing the adiabatic theory for the analysis enables us to eliminate ambiguities in extracting the DCSs from experimental spectra. Contrary to previous works, which mainly focused on the angular dependence of the DCS, our method allows us to extract also its dependence on the scattering momentum. In the case of xenon, we demonstrate how this method can be used to obtain the complete angular and momentum dependence of the DCS in a range of these variables determined by the pulse. The obtained results are compared to theoretical calculations based on the single-active-electron approximation, which shows a high level of agreement. Further investigations may provide opportunities to study multielectron effects when more advanced theoretical models become available.

  9. Three-dimensional electron diffraction as a complementary technique to powder X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution of powders.

    PubMed

    Yun, Yifeng; Zou, Xiaodong; Hovmöller, Sven; Wan, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Phase identification and structure determination are important and widely used techniques in chemistry, physics and materials science. Recently, two methods for automated three-dimensional electron diffraction (ED) data collection, namely automated diffraction tomography (ADT) and rotation electron diffraction (RED), have been developed. Compared with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and two-dimensional zonal ED, three-dimensional ED methods have many advantages in identifying phases and determining unknown structures. Almost complete three-dimensional ED data can be collected using the ADT and RED methods. Since each ED pattern is usually measured off the zone axes by three-dimensional ED methods, dynamic effects are much reduced compared with zonal ED patterns. Data collection is easy and fast, and can start at any arbitrary orientation of the crystal, which facilitates automation. Three-dimensional ED is a powerful technique for structure identification and structure solution from individual nano- or micron-sized particles, while powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) provides information from all phases present in a sample. ED suffers from dynamic scattering, while PXRD data are kinematic. Three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD are complementary and their combinations are promising for studying multiphase samples and complicated crystal structures. Here, two three-dimensional ED methods, ADT and RED, are described. Examples are given of combinations of three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD for phase identification and structure determination over a large number of different materials, from Ni-Se-O-Cl crystals, zeolites, germanates, metal-organic frameworks and organic compounds to intermetallics with modulated structures. It is shown that three-dimensional ED is now as feasible as X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution, but still needs further development in order to be as accurate as X-ray diffraction. It is expected that three-dimensional ED methods

  10. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  11. Surface structure of Bi2Se3(111) determined by low-energy electron diffraction and surface x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Reis, Diogo Duarte; Barreto, Lucas; Bianchi, Marco; Ribeiro, Guilherme Almeida Silva; Soares, Edmar Avellar; Silva, Wendell Simões e.; de Carvalho, Vagner Eustáquio; Rawle, Jonathan; Hoesch, Moritz; Nicklin, Chris; Fernandes, Willians Principe; Mi, Jianli; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt; Hofmann, Philip

    2013-07-01

    The surface structure of the prototypical topological insulator Bi2Se3 is determined by low-energy electron diffraction and surface x-ray diffraction at room temperature. Both approaches show that the crystal is terminated by an intact quintuple layer. Specifically, an alternative termination by a bismuth bilayer is ruled out. Surface relaxations obtained by both techniques are in good agreement with each other and found to be small. This includes the relaxation of the van der Waals gap between the first two quintuple layers.

  12. Femtosecond electron diffraction: Preparation and characterization of (110)-oriented bismuth films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriena, Gustavo; Hada, Masaki; Sciaini, Germán; Matsuo, Jiro; Dwayne Miller, R. J.

    2012-02-01

    Here, we present a new approach to synthesize (110)-oriented ultrathin membranes of bismuth (Bi). This rather exotic orientation was achieved by directing the growth through rationale control of lattice matching. Bi films were hetero-epitaxially grown on the (100)-surface of freshly cleaved potassium chloride crystals. The sample orientation was characterized by x-ray and electron diffraction. In addition, high quality free-standing films were obtained after dissolution of the substrate in water and controlled evaporation. Femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) was, therefore, used to monitor the coherent shear acoustic phonons in (110)-oriented free-standing Bi films produced by impulsive femtosecond optical excitation. The small de Broglie wavelength (flat Ewald sphere) of keV-electrons combined with an off-Bragg detection scheme provided a magnified view of shear atomic motions, i.e., lattice distortions in the transverse direction. All-optical pump-probe experiments are usually insensitive to shear displacements, a fact that makes FED a unique non-contact method to achieve the complete characterization of elastic properties of nanoscale materials.

  13. Structure and bonding in alpha-copper phthalocyanine by electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Wu, J S; Spence, J C H

    2003-09-01

    Energy-filtered quantitative electron diffraction at liquid nitrogen temperature has been used to examine the atomic structure and bonding of metastable alpha-Cu phthalocyanine crystals. Three theoretical methods (kinematic, kinematic with excitation errors and Bloch wave) were employed for the intensity calculations. The Bloch-wave method was found to account for dynamical effects by greatly reducing the residual factor between experimental and simulated results. A new method for calculating electron scattering factors for partially charged ions is proposed and the sensitivity of electron diffraction to charge transfer is discussed. The atomic charge states were analyzed for alpha-Cu phthalocyanine using a charge cloud model in which the Gaussian bond charge is positioned along the bonds. Spot patterns were collected in the Kohler mode at two beam energies to reduce error. Using the best-fitting model, a deformation charge-density map is produced and compared to the neutral-atom model. From this, the main features of atomic charge transfer in the alpha-Cu phthalocyanine structure can be seen in the (010) plane.

  14. Diffraction and holography with photoelectrons and Auger electrons: Some new directions

    SciTech Connect

    Fadley, C.S. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1992-06-01

    The current status of photoelectron and Auger-electron diffraction is reviewed, with emphasis on new directions of activity. The use of forward scattering in the study of adsorbed molecules, epitaxial overlayers, and clean surfaces is one of the most developed applications, and one that will become more powerful as higher energy resolution and perhaps spin analysis are used to resolve emitters on the basis of chemical state, position at a surface, or magnetic state. The use of larger data sets spanning a considerable fraction of the solid angle above a surface will also much enhance the structural information available, for example, in the growth of epitaxial layers or nanostructures on surfaces. Detailed fitting of experimental data to theoretical calculations based upon either single scattering or multiple scattering should also provide more rich structural information, including such parameters as substrate interlayer relaxation. Surface phase transitions in which near-surface layers become highly disordered can also be studied, with results that are complementary to those from such techniques as low energy electron diffraction and medium energy ion scattering. Short-range magnetic order also can be probed by somehow resolving the spin of the outgoing electrons, e.g. by using multiplet-split core levels.

  15. The effects of slipage and diffraction in long wavelength operation of a free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhulin, V.I.; Haselhoff, E.H.; Amersfoort, P.W. van

    1995-01-01

    The Free-Electron Laser user facility FELIX produces picosecond optical pulses in the wavelength range of 5-110 {mu}m. The proposed installation of a new undulator with a larger magnetic period would allow extension towards considerably larger wavelengths. This would result in the production of extremely short, far-infrared pulses, with a duration of a single optical period or even less. In order to investigate the pulse propagation for free-electron lasers operating in the long wavelength limit, a three-dimensional simulation code was developed. Using the FELIX parameters, with the addition of a long-period undulator, the effects of slippage, diffraction losses, changes in the filling factor, as well as the effects of the optical cavity geometry were studied for wavelengths up to 300 {mu}m, with electron pulses in the ps regime. It is shown that slippage effects are less restrictive for long wavelength operation than the increasing losses due to optical beam diffraction.

  16. Orbital angular momentum in electron diffraction and its use to determine chiral crystal symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juchtmans, Roeland; Verbeeck, Jo

    2015-10-01

    In this work we present an alternative way to look at electron diffraction in a transmission electron microscope. Instead of writing the scattering amplitude in Fourier space as a set of plane waves, we use the cylindrical Fourier transform to describe the scattering amplitude in a basis of orbital angular momentum (OAM) eigenstates. We show how working in this framework can be very convenient when investigating, e.g., rotation and screw-axis symmetries. For the latter we find selection rules on the OAM coefficients that unambiguously reveal the handedness of the screw axis. Detecting the OAM coefficients of the scattering amplitude thus offers the possibility to detect the handedness of crystals without the need for dynamical simulations, the thickness of the sample, nor the exact crystal structure. We propose an experimental setup to measure the OAM components where an image of the crystal is taken after inserting a spiral phase plate in the diffraction plane and perform multislice simulations on α quartz to demonstrate how the method indeed reveals the chirality. The experimental feasibility of the technique is discussed together with its main advantages with respect to chirality determination of screw axes. The method shows how the use of a spiral phase plate can be extended from a simple phase imaging technique to a tool to measure the local OAM decomposition of an electron wave, widening the field of interest well beyond chiral space group determination.

  17. Venus in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, J. J.

    1993-08-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  18. 3D reservoir visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Van, B.T.; Pajon, J.L.; Joseph, P. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper shows how some simple 3D computer graphics tools can be combined to provide efficient software for visualizing and analyzing data obtained from reservoir simulators and geological simulations. The animation and interactive capabilities of the software quickly provide a deep understanding of the fluid-flow behavior and an accurate idea of the internal architecture of a reservoir.

  19. Analysis of local strain in aluminum interconnects by convergent beam electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, Stephan; Mayer, Joachim

    1999-11-01

    Energy filtered convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) was used to investigate localized strain in aluminum interconnects. An analysis of the higher order Laue zone (HOLZ) line positions in CBED patterns makes it possible to measure the lattice strain with high accuracy (˜104) and high spatial resolution (10 to 100 nm). The strain development in a single grain was measured during thermal cycling between -170 °C and +100 °C. The grain showed reversible, elastic behavior over the whole temperature range building up large strains at low temperatures. By comparing with finite element simulations, a detailed understanding of the tri-axial strain state could be achieved.

  20. Phase analysis on dual-phase steel using band slope of electron backscatter diffraction pattern.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jun-Yun; Park, Seong-Jun; Moon, Man-Been

    2013-08-01

    A quantitative and automated phase analysis of dual-phase (DP) steel using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was attempted. A ferrite-martensite DP microstructure was produced by intercritical annealing and quenching. An EBSD map of the microstructure was obtained and post-processed for phase discrimination. Band slope (BS), which was a measure of pattern quality, exhibited much stronger phase contrast than another conventional one, band contrast. Owing to high sensitivity to lattice defect and little orientation dependence, BS provided handiness in finding a threshold for phase discrimination. Its grain average gave a superior result on the discrimination and volume fraction measurement of the constituent phases in the DP steel.